WorldWideScience

Sample records for intermolecular beta-sheet formation

  1. The Promiscuity of [beta]-Strand Pairing Allows for Rational Design of [beta]-Sheet Face Inversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei (UC)

    2009-06-17

    Recent studies suggest the dominant role of main-chain H-bond formation in specifying {beta}-sheet topology. Its essentially sequence-independent nature implies a large degree of freedom in designing {beta}-sheet-based nanomaterials. Here we show rational design of {beta}-sheet face inversions by incremental deletions of {beta}-strands from the single-layer {beta}-sheet of Borrelia outer surface protein A. We show that a {beta}-sheet structure can be maintained when a large number of native contacts are removed and that one can design large-scale conformational transitions of a {beta}-sheet such as face inversion by exploiting the promiscuity of strand-strand interactions. High-resolution X-ray crystal structures confirmed the success of the design and supported the importance of main-chain H-bonds in determining {beta}-sheet topology. This work suggests a simple but effective strategy for designing and controlling nanomaterials based on {beta}-rich peptide self-assemblies.

  2. Effects of Intermolecular Coupling on Excimer Formation and Singlet Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauck, Catherine McKay

    compelling strategy for improving organic photovoltaic device efficiencies. The formation of triplet states through singlet fission can be characterized using femtosecond visible transient absorption spectroscopy (fsTA). However, in PDI, the triplet-triplet absorption spectrum is strongly overlapped with the ground state bleach absorption. Here, a dyad molecule where PDI is covalently attached to an apocarotene triplet acceptor is synthesized, and studied in solution aggregates and thin films with fsTA, to demonstrate that apocarotene can be used as a sensitive spectral tag for triplet formation in PDI due to triplet-triplet energy transfer from PDI to the carotenoid. The efficiency of singlet fission in DPP can be tuned by modulating the crystal packing in the solid state. By synthesizing 3,6-bis(thiophene) derivatives of DPP with a series of different sidechains, thin film DPP singlet fission is related to the crystal structure intermolecular geometries, to more precisely determine the relationship between interchromophore coupling and singlet fission rate, which will inform the design of more robust chromophores for singlet fission. Finally, the role of the dielectric environment and stabilization of charge transfer configurations and charge transfer states is explored in DPP singlet fission, through aqueous nanoparticles of 3,6-bis(phenylthiophene) with different surface area-to-volume ratios, and a covalently linked dimer of DPP in solvents of varying polarity which can undergo symmetry-breaking charge separation.

  3. Formation of an intermolecular charge-transfer compound in UHV codeposited tetramethoxypyrene and tetracyanoquinodimethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medjanik, K.; Perkert, S.; Naghavi, S.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV)-deposited films of the mixed phase of tetramethoxypyrene and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TMP -TCNQ ) on gold have been studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS......). The formation of an intermolecular charge-transfer (CT) compound is evident from the appearance of new reflexes in XRD (d =0.894nm and d =0.677nm). A softening of the CN stretching vibration (redshift by 7 cm⊃-1) of TCNQ is visible in the IR spectra, being indicative of a CT on the order of 0.3e from TMP...

  4. Exploring the propensities of helices in PrP(C) to form beta sheet using NMR structures and sequence alignments.

    OpenAIRE

    Dima, R I; Thirumalai, D

    2002-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases induced by transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are associated with prions. The most spectacular event in the formation of the infectious scrapie form, referred to as PrP(Sc), is the conformational change from the predominantly alpha-helical conformation of PrP(C) to the PrP(Sc) state that is rich in beta-sheet content. Using sequence alignments and structural analysis of the available nuclear magnetic resonance structures of PrP(C), we explore the propensities...

  5. Flanking Polyproline Sequences Inhibit [beta]-Sheet Structure in Polyglutamine Segments by Inducing PPII-like Helix Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darnell, Gregory; Orgel, Joseph P.R.O.; Pahl, Reinhard; Meredith, Stephen C. (IIT); (UC)

    2008-06-24

    Polyglutamine (poly(Q)) expansion is associated with protein aggregation into {beta}-sheet amyloid fibrils and neuronal cytotoxicity. In the mutant poly(Q) protein huntingtin, associated with Huntington's disease, both aggregation and cytotoxicity may be abrogated by a polyproline (poly(P)) domain flanking the C terminus of the poly(Q) region. To understand structural changes that may occur with the addition of the poly(P) sequence, we synthesized poly(Q) peptides with 3-15 glutamine residues and a corresponding set of poly(Q) peptides flanked on the C terminus by 11 proline residues (poly(Q)-poly(P)), as occurs in the huntingtin sequence. The shorter soluble poly(Q) peptides (three or six glutamine residues) showed polyproline type II-like (PPII)-like helix conformation when examined by circular dichroism spectroscopy and were monomers as judged by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), while the longer poly(Q) peptides (nine or 15 glutamine residues) showed a {beta}-sheet conformation by CD and defined oligomers by SEC. Soluble poly(Q)-poly(P) peptides showed PPII-like content but SEC showed poorly defined, overlapping oligomeric peaks, and as judged by CD these peptides retained significant PPII-like structure with increasing poly(Q) length. More importantly, addition of the poly(P) domain increased the threshold for fibril formation to {approx} 15 glutamine residues. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and film CD showed that, while poly(Q) peptides with {ge} 6 glutamine residues formed {beta}-sheet-rich fibrils, only the longest poly(Q)-poly(P) peptide (15 glutamine residues) did so. From these and other observations, we propose that poly(Q) domains exist in a 'tug-of-war' between two conformations, a PPII-like helix and a {beta}-sheet, while the poly(P) domain is conformationally constrained into a proline type II helix (PPII). Addition of poly(P) to the C terminus of a poly(Q) domain induces a PPII-like structure, which opposes the

  6. Ideally amphipathic beta-sheeted peptides at interfaces: structure, orientation, affinities for lipids and hemolytic activity of (KL)(m)K peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, S; Desbat, B; Dufourcq, J

    2000-01-15

    Designed to model ideally amphipathic beta-sheets, the minimalist linear (KL)(m)K peptides (m=4-7) were synthesized and proved to form stable films at the air/water interface, they insert into compressed dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers and interact with egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles. Whatever the interface or the lateral pressure applied to the films, FT-IR and polarization-modulated IRRAS spectroscopy developed in situ on the films indicated that all the peptides totally fold into intermolecular antiparallel beta-sheets. Calculated spectra of the amide region allowed us to define the orientation of the beta-strands compared to the interface. It is concluded that such beta-sheets remain flat-oriented without deep perturbation of zwitterionic phospholipids. Dansyl labelling at the N-terminus indicates that all the peptides are monomeric at a low concentration in aqueous buffer and bind to lipids with similar Dns burying. The affinities for zwitterionic lecithin mono- and bilayers, quantitatively estimated from buffer to lipid partition constants, monotonically increased with peptide length, indicating that hydrophobicity is a limiting parameter for lipid and membrane affinities. Peptides induced permeability increases on zwitterionic liposomes, they are strongly hemolytic towards human erythrocytes and their activity increases concurrently with length. Taking into account the lipid affinity, a hemolytic efficiency can be defined: at the same amount of peptide bound, this efficiency strongly increases with the peptide length. It is proposed that the first determinant step of membrane disturbance is the invasion of the outer membrane leaflet by these ideally amphipathic beta-sheeted structures lying flat at the interface, like large rafts depending on the number of beta-strands.

  7. Folding dynamics of a family of beta-sheet proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2008-03-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) consist of ten anti-parallel beta strands and two small alpha helices. The beta strands are arranged into two nearly orthogonal five-strand beta sheets that surround the interior cavity, which binds unsaturated long-chain fatty acids. In the brain isoform (BFABP), these are very important for the development of the central nervous system and neuron differentiation. Furthermore, BFABP is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer and neuronal degenerative disorders. In this work, site-directed spin labeling combined with EPR techniques have been used to study the folding mechanism of BFABP. In the first series of studies, we labeled the two Cys residues at position 5 and 80 in the wild type protein with an EPR spin marker; in addition, two singly labeled mutants at positions 5 and 80 in the C80A and C5A mutants, respectively, were also produced and used as controls. The changes in the distances between the two residues were examined by a pulsed EPR method, DEER (Double Electron Electron Resonance), as a function of guanidinium hydrochloride concentration. The results were compared with those from CW EPR, circular dichroism and fluorescence measurements, which provide the information regarding sidechain mobility, secondary structure and tertiary structure, respectively. The results will be discussed in the context of the folding mechanism of the family of fatty acid binding proteins.

  8. Structure and intermolecular dynamics of aggregates populated during amyloid fibril formation studied by hydrogen/deuterium exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carulla, Natàlia; Zhou, Min; Giralt, Ernest; Robinson, Carol V; Dobson, Christopher M

    2010-08-17

    The aggregation of proteins into amyloid fibrils is a complex and fascinating process associated with debilitating clinical disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The process of aggregation involves a series of steps during which many intermediate aggregation states are populated. Recent evidence points to these intermediate states as the toxic moieties primarily responsible for cell damage or cell death, which are critical steps in the origin and progression of these disorders. To understand the molecular basis of these diseases, it is crucial to investigate and define the details of the aggregation process, and to achieve this objective, researchers need the tools to characterize the structure and kinetics of interconversion of the various species present during amyloid fibril formation. Hydrogen-deuterium (HD) exchange experiments are based on solvent accessibilities and provide one means by which this kind of information may be acquired. In this Account, we describe research based on HD exchange processes that is directed toward better understanding the dynamics and structural reorganizations involved in the formation of amyloid fibrils. Amide hydrogens that normally undergo rapid exchange with solvent hydrogens experience much slower exchange when involved in H-bonded structures or when sterically inaccessible to the solvent. The rates of exchange can be monitored by replacing some hydrogens with deuterons. When peptide and protein molecules assemble into amyloid fibrils, the fibrils contain a core region based on repetitive arrays of beta-sheets oriented parallel to the fibril axis. HD experiments have been applied extensively to map such structures in different amyloid fibril systems. By an extension of this approach, we have observed that HD exchange can be governed by a mechanism through which molecules making up the fibrils are continuously dissolving and reforming, revealing that amyloid fibrils are not static but dynamic structures

  9. Reversion of prion protein conformational changes by synthetic beta-sheet breaker peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, C; Kascsak, R J; Saborío, G P; Aucouturier, P; Wisniewski, T; Prelli, F; Kascsak, R; Mendez, E; Harris, D A; Ironside, J; Tagliavini, F; Carp, R I; Frangione, B

    2000-01-15

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are associated with a structural transition in the prion protein that results in the conversion of the physiological PrPc to pathological PrP(Sc). We investigated whether this conformational transition can be inhibited and reversed by peptides homologous to the PrP fragments implicated in the abnormal folding, which contain specific residues acting as beta-sheet blockers (beta-sheet breaker peptides). We studied the effect of a 13-residue beta-sheet breaker peptide (iPrP13) on the reversion of the abnormal structure and properties of PrP(Sc) purified from the brains of mice with experimental scrapie and from human beings affected by sporadic and variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. In a cellular model of familial prion disease, we studied the effect of the peptide in the production of the abnormal form of PrP in intact cells. The influence of the peptide on prion infectivity was studied in vivo by incubation time assays in mice with experimental scrapie. The beta-sheet breaker peptide partly reversed in-vitro PrP(Sc) to a biochemical and structural state similar to that of PrPc. The effect of the peptide was also detected in intact cells. Treatment of prion infectious material with iPrP13 delayed the appearance of clinical symptoms and decreased infectivity by 90-95% in mice with experimental scrapie. Beta-sheet breaker peptides reverse PrP conformational changes implicated in the pathogenesis of spongiform encephalopathies. These peptides or their derivatives provide a useful tool to study the role of PrP conformation and might represent a novel therapeutic approach for prion-related disorders.

  10. A new perspective on beta-sheet structures using vibrational Raman optical activity: From poly(L-lysine) to the prion protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McColl, L.H.; Blanch, E.W.; Gill, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    -sheet poly(L-lysine) contains up-and-down antiparallel beta-sheets based on the hairpin motif. The ROA spectrum of beta-sheet poly(L-lysine) was compared with ROA data on a number of native proteins containing different types of beta-sheet. Amide I and amide II ROA band patterns observed in beta-sheet poly(L-ly...

  11. Structural analysis of alanine tripeptide with antiparallel and parallel beta-sheet structures in relation to the analysis of mixed beta-sheet structures in Samia cynthia ricini silk protein fiber using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Okonogi, Michi; Nakazawa, Yasumoto; Yamauchi, Kazuo

    2006-05-10

    The structural analysis of natural protein fibers with mixed parallel and antiparallel beta-sheet structures by solid-state NMR is reported. To obtain NMR parameters that can characterize these beta-sheet structures, (13)C solid-state NMR experiments were performed on two alanine tripeptide samples: one with 100% parallel beta-sheet structure and the other with 100% antiparallel beta-sheet structure. All (13)C resonances of the tripeptides could be assigned by a comparison of the methyl (13)C resonances of Ala(3) with different [3-(13)C]Ala labeling schemes and also by a series of RFDR (radio frequency driven recoupling) spectra observed by changing mixing times. Two (13)C resonances observed for each Ala residue could be assigned to two nonequivalent molecules per unit cell. Differences in the (13)C chemical shifts and (13)C spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) were observed between the two beta-sheet structures. Especially, about 3 times longer T(1) values were obtained for parallel beta-sheet structure as compared to those of antiparallel beta-sheet structure, which could be explicable by the difference in the hydrogen-bond networks of both structures. This very large difference in T(1) becomes a good measure to differentiate between parallel or antiparallel beta-sheet structures. These differences in the NMR parameters found for the tripeptides may be applied to assign the parallel and antiparallel beta-sheet (13)C resonances in the asymmetric and broad methyl spectra of [3-(13)C]Ala silk protein fiber of a wild silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini.

  12. Laminated Morphology of Nontwisting beta-Sheet Fibrilis Constructed via Peptide Self-Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamm,M.; Rajagopal, K.; Schneider, J.; Pochan, D.

    2005-01-01

    A synthetic peptide has been de novo designed that self-assembles into {beta}-sheet fibrils exhibiting a nontwisted, stacked morphology. The stacked morphology is constituted by 2.5 nm wide filaments that laterally associate to form flat fibril laminates exceeding 50 nm in width and micrometers in length. The height of each fibril is limited to the length of exactly one peptide monomer in an extended {beta}-strand conformation, approximately 7 nm. Once assembled, these highly ordered, 2-D structures are stable over a wide range of pH and temperature and exhibit characteristics similar to those of amyloid fibrils. Furthermore, the rate of assembly and degree of fibril lamination can be controlled with kinetic parameters of pH and temperature. Finally, the presence of a diproline peptide between two {beta}-sheet-forming strands in the peptide sequence is demonstrated to be an important factor in promoting the nontwisting, laminated fibril morphology.

  13. PB1-F2 influenza A virus protein adopts a beta-sheet conformation and forms amyloid fibers in membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Christophe; Al Bazzal, Ali; Vidic, Jasmina; Février, Vincent; Bourdieu, Christiane; Bouguyon, Edwige; Le Goffic, Ronan; Vautherot, Jean-François; Bernard, Julie; Moudjou, Mohammed; Noinville, Sylvie; Chich, Jean-François; Da Costa, Bruno; Rezaei, Human; Delmas, Bernard

    2010-04-23

    The influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein, encoded by an alternative reading frame in the PB1 polymerase gene, displays a high sequence polymorphism and is reported to contribute to viral pathogenesis in a sequence-specific manner. To gain insights into the functions of PB1-F2, the molecular structure of several PB1-F2 variants produced in Escherichia coli was investigated in different environments. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that all variants have a random coil secondary structure in aqueous solution. When incubated in trifluoroethanol polar solvent, all PB1-F2 variants adopt an alpha-helix-rich structure, whereas incubated in acetonitrile, a solvent of medium polarity mimicking the membrane environment, they display beta-sheet secondary structures. Incubated with asolectin liposomes and SDS micelles, PB1-F2 variants also acquire a beta-sheet structure. Dynamic light scattering revealed that the presence of beta-sheets is correlated with an oligomerization/aggregation of PB1-F2. Electron microscopy showed that PB1-F2 forms amorphous aggregates in acetonitrile. In contrast, at low concentrations of SDS, PB1-F2 variants exhibited various abilities to form fibers that were evidenced as amyloid fibers in a thioflavin T assay. Using a recombinant virus and its PB1-F2 knock-out mutant, we show that PB1-F2 also forms amyloid structures in infected cells. Functional membrane permeabilization assays revealed that the PB1-F2 variants can perforate membranes at nanomolar concentrations but with activities found to be sequence-dependent and not obviously correlated with their differential ability to form amyloid fibers. All of these observations suggest that PB1-F2 could be involved in physiological processes through different pathways, permeabilization of cellular membranes, and amyloid fiber formation.

  14. The KIM-family protein-tyrosine phosphatases use distinct reversible oxidation intermediates: Intramolecular or intermolecular disulfide bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Luciana E S F; Shen, Tun-Li; Page, Rebecca; Peti, Wolfgang

    2017-05-26

    The kinase interaction motif (KIM) family of protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) includes hematopoietic protein-tyrosine phosphatase (HePTP), striatal-enriched protein-tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), and protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor type R (PTPRR). KIM-PTPs bind and dephosphorylate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and thereby critically modulate cell proliferation and differentiation. PTP activity can readily be diminished by reactive oxygen species (ROS), e.g. H 2 O 2 , which oxidize the catalytically indispensable active-site cysteine. This initial oxidation generates an unstable sulfenic acid intermediate that is quickly converted into either a sulfinic/sulfonic acid (catalytically dead and irreversible inactivation) or a stable sulfenamide or disulfide bond intermediate (reversible inactivation). Critically, our understanding of ROS-mediated PTP oxidation is not yet sufficient to predict the molecular responses of PTPs to oxidative stress. However, identifying distinct responses will enable novel routes for PTP-selective drug design, important for managing diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we performed a detailed biochemical and molecular study of all KIM-PTP family members to determine their H 2 O 2 oxidation profiles and identify their reversible inactivation mechanism(s). We show that despite having nearly identical 3D structures and sequences, each KIM-PTP family member has a unique oxidation profile. Furthermore, we also show that whereas STEP and PTPRR stabilize their reversibly oxidized state by forming an intramolecular disulfide bond, HePTP uses an unexpected mechanism, namely, formation of a reversible intermolecular disulfide bond. In summary, despite being closely related, KIM-PTPs significantly differ in oxidation profiles. These findings highlight that oxidation protection is critical when analyzing PTPs, for example, in drug screening. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  15. A new perspective on beta-sheet structures using vibrational Raman optical activity: From poly(L-lysine) to the prion protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McColl, L.H.; Blanch, E.W.; Gill, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    (L-lySine) are different from those observed in typical beta-sheet proteins and may be characteristic of an extended flat multistranded beta-sheet, which is unlike the more irregular and twisted beta-sheet found in most proteins. However, a reduced isoform of the truncated ovine prion protein PrP94-233 that is rich...... in beta-sheet shows amide I and amide II ROA bands similar to those of beta-sheet poly(L-lysine), which suggests that the C-terminal domain of the prion protein is able to support unusually flat beta-sheets. A principal component analysis (PCA) that identifies protein structural types from ROA band...

  16. Crossover from layering to island formation in Langmuir-Blodgett growth: role of long-range intermolecular forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Smita; Datta, Alokmay

    2011-04-01

    Combined studies by atomic force microscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy on transition-metal stearate (M-St, M = Mn, Co, Zn, and Cd) Langmuir-Blodgett films clearly indicate association of bidentate coordination of the metal-carboxylate head group to layer-by-layer growth as observed in MnSt and CoSt and partially in ZnSt. Crossover to islandlike growth, as observed in CdSt and ZnSt, is associated with the presence of unidentate coordination in the head group. Morphological evolutions as obtained from one, three, and nine monolayers (MLs) of M-St films are consistent with Frank van der Merwe, Stranski-Krastanov, and Volmer Weber growth modes for M=Mn/Co, Zn, and Cd, respectively, as previously assigned, and are found to vary with number (n) of metal atoms per head group, viz. n=1 (Mn/Co), n=0.75 (Zn), and n=0.5 (Cd). The parameter n is found to decide head-group coordination such that n=1.0 corresponds to bidentate and n=0.5 corresponds to unidentate coordination; the intermediate value in Zn corresponds to a mixture of both. The dependence of the growth mode on head-group structure is explained by the fact that in bidentate head groups, with the in-plane dipole moment being zero, intermolecular forces between adjacent molecules are absent and hence growth proceeds via layering. On the other hand, in unidentate head groups, the existence of a nonzero in-plane dipole moment results in the development of weak in-plane intermolecular forces between adjacent molecules causing in-plane clustering leading to islandlike growth. ©2011 American Physical Society

  17. Mechanistic insight of photo-induced aggregation of chicken egg white lysozyme: the interplay between hydrophobic interactions and formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jinbing; Qin, Meng; Cao, Yi; Wang, Wei

    2011-08-01

    Recently, it was reported that ultraviolet (UV) illumination could trigger the unfolding of proteins by disrupting the buried disulfide bonds. However, the consequence of such unfolding has not been adequately evaluated. Here, we report that unfolded chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) triggered by UV illumination can form uniform globular aggregates as confirmed by dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The assembling process of such aggregates was also monitored by several other methods, such as circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, mass spectrometry based on chymotrypsin digestion, ANS-binding assay, Ellman essay, and SDS-PAGE. Our finding is that due to the dissociation of the native disulfide bonds by UV illumination, CEWL undergoes drastic conformational changes resulting in the exposure of some hydrophobic residues and free thiols. Subsequently, these partially unfolded molecules self-assemble into small granules driven by intermolecular hydrophobic interaction. With longer UV illumination or longer incubation time, these granules can further self-assemble into larger globular aggregates. The combined effects from both the hydrophobic interaction and the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds dominate this process. Additionally, similar aggregation behavior can also be found in other three typical disulfide-bonded proteins, that is, α-lactalbumin, RNase A, and bovine serum albumin. Thus, we propose that such aggregation behavior might be a general mechanism for some disulfide-bonded proteins under UV irradiation. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. A METHOD TO PREDICT EDGE STRANDS IN BETA-SHEETS FROM PROTEIN SEQUENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonin Guilloux

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for rules allowing three-dimensional structure information to be derived from protein sequences. In this work, consideration of an elementary protein folding step allows protein sub-sequences which optimize folding to be derived for any given protein sequence. Classical mechanics applied to this system and the energy conservation law during the elementary folding step yields an equation whose solutions are taken over the field of rational numbers. This formalism is applied to beta-sheets containing two edge strands and at least two central strands. The number of protein sub-sequences optimized for folding per amino acid in beta-strands is shown in particular to predict edge strands from protein sequences. Topological information on beta-strands and loops connecting them is derived for protein sequences with a prediction accuracy of 75%. The statistical significance of the finding is given. Applications in protein structure prediction are envisioned such as for the quality assessment of protein structure models.

  19. A method to predict edge strands in beta-sheets from protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonin Guilloux

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for rules allowing three-dimensional structure information to be derived from protein sequences. In this work, consideration of an elementary protein folding step allows protein sub-sequences which optimize folding to be derived for any given protein sequence. Classical mechanics applied to this system and the energy conservation law during the elementary folding step yields an equation whose solutions are taken over the field of rational numbers. This formalism is applied to beta-sheets containing two edge strands and at least two central strands. The number of protein sub-sequences optimized for folding per amino acid in beta-strands is shown in particular to predict edge strands from protein sequences. Topological information on beta-strands and loops connecting them is derived for protein sequences with a prediction accuracy of 75%. The statistical significance of the finding is given. Applications in protein structure prediction are envisioned such as for the quality assessment of protein structure models.

  20. A general approach to intermolecular carbonylation of arene C-H bonds to ketones through catalytic aroyl triflate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison Kinney, R.; Tjutrins, Jevgenijs; Torres, Gerardo M.; Liu, Nina Jiabao; Kulkarni, Omkar; Arndtsen, Bruce A.

    2018-02-01

    The development of metal-catalysed methods to functionalize inert C-H bonds has become a dominant research theme in the past decade as an approach to efficient synthesis. However, the incorporation of carbon monoxide into such reactions to form valuable ketones has to date proved a challenge, despite its potential as a straightforward and green alternative to Friedel-Crafts reactions. Here we describe a new approach to palladium-catalysed C-H bond functionalization in which carbon monoxide is used to drive the generation of high-energy electrophiles. This offers a method to couple the useful features of metal-catalysed C-H functionalization (stable and available reagents) and electrophilic acylations (broad scope and selectivity), and synthesize ketones simply from aryl iodides, CO and arenes. Notably, the reaction proceeds in an intermolecular fashion, without directing groups and at very low palladium-catalyst loadings. Mechanistic studies show that the reaction proceeds through the catalytic build-up of potent aroyl triflate electrophiles.

  1. Intermolecular Formation of Two C−C Bonds across Olefins Enabled by Boron-Based Relay Strategies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hidasová, Denisa; Jahn, Ullrich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 33 (2017), s. 9656-9658 ISSN 1433-7851 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 1,2-metalate rearrangement * C−C bond formation * radical reactions * transition metal catalysis * vinyl boronates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  2. A quantum-chemical validation about the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions in intermolecular heterocyclic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Galdino Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a detailed theoretical study in order to understand the charge density topology of the C2H4O···C2H2 and C2H4S···C2H2 heterocyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes. Through the calculations derived from Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM, it was observed the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions. Such analysis was performed through the determination of optimized geometries at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory, by which is that QTAIM topological operators were computed, such as the electronic density ρ(r, Laplacian Ñ2ρ(r, and ellipticity ε. The examination of the hydrogen bonds has been performed through the measurement of ρ(r, Ñ2ρ(r and ε between (O···H—C and (S···H—C, whereas the secondary interaction between axial hydrogen atoms Hα and carbon of acetylene. In this insight, it was verified the existence of secondary interaction only in C2H4S···C2H2 complex because its structure is propitious to form multiple interactions.

  3. NMR studies of Borrelia burgdorferi OspA, a 28 kDa protein containing a single-layer {beta}-sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, Thuy-Nga; Koide, Shohei

    1998-05-15

    The crystal structure of outer surface protein A (OspA) from Borrelia burgdorferi contains a single-layer {beta}-sheet connecting the N- and C-terminal globular domains. The central {beta}-sheet consists largely of polar amino acids and it is solvent-exposed on both faces, which so far appears to be unique among known protein structures. We have accomplished nearly complete backbone H, C and N and C{sup ;}/H{sup {beta}} assignments of OspA (28 kDa) using standard triple resonance techniques without perdeuteration. This was made possible by recording spectra at a high temperature (45 {sup o}C ). The chemical shift index and {sup 15}N T{sub 1}/T{sub 2} ratios show that both the secondary structure and the global conformation of OspA in solution are similar to the crystal structure, suggesting that the unique central {beta}-sheet is fairly rigid.

  4. Intermolecular and surface forces

    CERN Document Server

    Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-01-01

    This reference describes the role of various intermolecular and interparticle forces in determining the properties of simple systems such as gases, liquids and solids, with a special focus on more complex colloidal, polymeric and biological systems. The book provides a thorough foundation in theories and concepts of intermolecular forces, allowing researchers and students to recognize which forces are important in any particular system, as well as how to control these forces. This third edition is expanded into three sections and contains five new chapters over the previous edition.· starts fr

  5. Effect of secondary structure on the potential of mean force for poly-L-lysine in the alpha-Helix and beta-sheet conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigsby, J.J.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    2001-10-30

    Because poly-L-lysine (PLL) can exist in the {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet conformation depending on solution preparation and solution conditions, PLL is a suitable candidate to probe the dependence of protein interactions on secondary structure. The osmotic second virial coefficient and weight-average molecular weight are reported from low-angle laser-light scattering measurements for PLL as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet content. Interactions between PLL molecules become more attractive as salt concentration increases due to screening of PLL charge by salt ions and at low salt concentration become more attractive as pH increases due to decreased net charge on PLL. The experimental results show that interactions are stronger for the {beta}-sheet conformation than for the {alpha}-helix conformation. A spherically-symmetric model for the potential of mean force is used to account for specific interactions not described by DLVO theory and to show how differences in secondary structure affect PLL interactions.

  6. Microphase Separation Controlled beta-Sheet Crystallization Kinetics in Fibrous Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, X.; Lu, Q.; Kaplan, D.; Cebe, P.

    2009-01-01

    Silk is a naturally occurring fibrous protein with a multiblock chain architecture. As such, it has many similarities with synthetic block copolymers, including the possibility for e-sheet crystallization restricted within the crystallizable blocks. The mechanism of isothermal crystallization kinetics of e-sheet crystals in silk multiblock fibrous proteins is reported in this study. Kinetics theories, such as Avrami analysis which was established for studies of synthetic polymer crystal growth, are for the first time extended to investigate protein self-assembly in e-sheet rich Bombyx mori silk fibroin samples, using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and synchrotron real-time wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The Avrami exponent, n, was close to 2 for all methods and crystallization temperatures, indicating formation of e-sheet crystals in silk proteins is different from the 3-D spherulitic crystal growth found in synthetic polymers. Observations by scanning electron microscopy support the view that the protein structures vary during the different stages of crystal growth, and show a microphase separation pattern after chymotrypsin enzyme biodegradation. We present a model to explain the crystallization of the multiblock silk fibroin protein, by analogy to block copolymers: crystallization of e-sheets occurs under conditions of geometrical restriction caused by phase separation of the crystallizable and uncrystallizable blocks. This crystallization model could be widely applicable in other proteins with multiblock (i.e., crystallizable and noncrystallizable) domains.

  7. Dynamic covalent side-chain cross-links via intermolecular oxime or hydrazone formation from bifunctional peptides and simple organic linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Conor M; Horne, W Seth

    2014-02-01

    Peptide cyclization via chemoselective reactions between side chains has proven a useful strategy to control folded structure. We report here a method for the synthesis of side-chain to side-chain cyclic peptides based on the intermolecular reaction between a linear peptide functionalized with two aminooxy or hydrazide side chains and an organic dialdehyde linker. A family of oxime-based and hydrazone-based cyclic products is prepared in a modular and convergent fashion by combination of unprotected linear peptide precursors and various small molecule linkers in neutral aqueous buffer. The side-chain to side-chain linkages that result can alter peptide folding behavior. The dynamic covalent nature of the Schiff bases in the cyclic products can be utilized to create mixtures where product composition changes in response to experimental conditions. Thus, a linear peptide precursor can select one organic linker from a mixture, and a cyclic product can dynamically exchange the small molecule component of the macrocycle. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Protein Secondary Structures (alpha-helix and beta-sheet) at a Cellular Levle and Protein Fractions in Relation to Rumen Degradation Behaviours of Protein: A New Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Studying the secondary structure of proteins leads to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein, and such an understanding of the structure of the whole protein is often vital to understanding its digestive behaviour and nutritive value in animals. The main protein secondary structures are the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet. The percentage of these two structures in protein secondary structures influences protein nutritive value, quality and digestive behaviour. A high percentage of {beta}-sheet structure may partly cause a low access to gastrointestinal digestive enzymes, which results in a low protein value. The objectives of the present study were to use advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform IR (S-FTIR) microspectroscopy as a new approach to reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein secondary structures of feed tissues affected by heat-processing within intact tissue at a cellular level, and to quantify protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modelling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods, in relation to protein digestive behaviours and nutritive value in the rumen, which was determined using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System. The synchrotron-based molecular chemistry research experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy. The results showed that, with S-FTIR microspectroscopy, the molecular chemistry, ultrastructural chemical make-up and nutritive characteristics could be revealed at a high ultraspatial resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m). S-FTIR microspectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of protein differed between raw and roasted golden flaxseeds in terms of the percentages and ratio of {alpha}-helixes and {beta}-sheets in the mid-IR range at the cellular level. By using multicomponent peak modelling, the results show that the roasting reduced (P <0.05) the percentage of {alpha}-helixes (from 47.1% to 36.1%: S

  9. Rational design of amyloid beta peptide-binding proteins: pseudo-Abeta beta-sheet surface presented in green fluorescent protein binds tightly and preferentially to structured Abeta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Ohta, Kenichi; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2010-02-01

    Some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease are caused by protein misfolding. In AD, amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) is thought to be a toxic agent by self-assembling into a variety of aggregates involving soluble oligomeric intermediates and amyloid fibrils. Here, we have designed several green fluorescent protein (GFP) variants that contain pseudo-Abeta beta-sheet surfaces and evaluated their abilities to bind to Abeta and inhibit Abeta oligomerization. Two GFP variants P13H and AP93Q bound tightly to Abeta, K(d) = 260 nM and K(d) = 420 nM, respectively. Moreover, P13H and AP93Q were capable of efficiently suppressing the generation of toxic Abeta oligomers as shown by a cell viability assay. By combining the P13H and AP93Q mutations, a super variant SFAB4 comprising four strands of Abeta-derived sequences was designed and bound more tightly to Abeta (K(d) = 100 nM) than those having only two pseudo-Abeta strands. The SFAB4 protein preferentially recognized the soluble oligomeric intermediates of Abeta more than both unstructured monomer and mature amyloid fibrils. Thus, the design strategy for embedding pseudo-Abeta beta-sheet structures onto a protein surface arranged in the beta-barrel structure is useful to construct molecules capable of binding tightly to Abeta and inhibiting its aggregation. This strategy may provide implication for the diagnostic and therapeutic development in the treatment of AD. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. High-Resolution Structure of a Self-Assembly-Competent Form of a Hydrophobic Peptide Captured in a Soluble [beta]-Sheet Scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makabe, Koki; Biancalana, Matthew; Yan, Shude; Tereshko, Valentina; Gawlak, Grzegorz; Miller-Auer, Hélène; Meredith, Stephen C.; Koide, Shohei (UC)

    2010-02-08

    {beta}-Rich self-assembly is a major structural class of polypeptides, but still little is known about its atomic structures and biophysical properties. Major impediments for structural and biophysical studies of peptide self-assemblies include their insolubility and heterogeneous composition. We have developed a model system, termed peptide self-assembly mimic (PSAM), based on the single-layer {beta}-sheet of Borrelia outer surface protein A. PSAM allows for the capture of a defined number of self-assembly-like peptide repeats within a water-soluble protein, making structural and energetic studies possible. In this work, we extend our PSAM approach to a highly hydrophobic peptide sequence. We show that a penta-Ile peptide (Ile{sub 5}), which is insoluble and forms {beta}-rich self-assemblies in aqueous solution, can be captured within the PSAM scaffold in a form capable of self-assembly. The 1.1-{angstrom} crystal structure revealed that the Ile{sub 5} stretch forms a highly regular {beta}-strand within this flat {beta}-sheet. Self-assembly models built with multiple copies of the crystal structure of the Ile5 peptide segment showed no steric conflict, indicating that this conformation represents an assembly-competent form. The PSAM retained high conformational stability, suggesting that the flat {beta}-strand of the Ile{sub 5} stretch primed for self-assembly is a low-energy conformation of the Ile{sub 5} stretch and rationalizing its high propensity for self-assembly. The ability of the PSAM to 'solubilize' an otherwise insoluble peptide stretch suggests the potential of the PSAM approach to the characterization of self-assembling peptides.

  11. Electronic transitions and intermolecular forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemert, M.C. van.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis describes two different subjects - electronic transitions and intermolecular forces - that are related mainly by the following observation: The wavenumber at which an electronic transition in an atom or molecule occurs, depends on the environment of that atom or molecule. This implies, for instance, that when a molecule becomes solvated its absorption spectrum may be shifted either to the blue or to the red side of the original gasphase spectrum. In part I attention is paid to the experimental aspects of VUV spectroscopy, both in the gasphase and in the condensed phase. In part II a series of papers are presented, dealing with the calculation of intermolecular forces (and some related topics) both for the ground state and for the excited state interactions, using different non-empirical methods. The calculations provide, among other results, a semiquantitative interpretation of the spectral blue shifts encountered in our experiments. (Auth.)

  12. Intermolecular Interactions at high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikeland, Espen Zink

    2016-01-01

    transmitting medium. Through careful structural analysis combined with theoretical calculations, the structures of all the new high-pressure phases identified herein were determined. In the hydroquinone - methanol and hydroquinone - acetonitrile clathrate structures the phase transitions break the host...... illustrates how important it is to quantify all intermolecular interactions in structures. This enables researchers to see a more complete picture and not focus only on a few interactions deemed particularly important....

  13. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Richard P.; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F.; Maki, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO’s single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO’s unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO. PMID:26890638

  14. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P Laura

    Full Text Available Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO's single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO's unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO.

  15. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Richard P; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F; Maki, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO's single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO's unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO.

  16. The nonadditive intermolecular potential for water revised

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang, L.X.

    1992-01-01

    The results of an improved version of a nonadditive intermolecular model for water that explicitly includes the nonadditive polarization energy are reported. The original polarizable water potential model (POL1), upon which the improved version is based, was developed by Caldwell, Dang, and Kollman [J. Am. Soc. Chem. 112, 9144 (1990)]. To improve the POL1 model, we developed a new set of atomic polarizabilities that reproduce the experimental molecular polarizability for water using the atom--dipole interaction model (Applequist, Carl, and Fung [J. Am. Soc. Chem. 94, 2952 (1972)]). Using the new atomic polarizabilities, we optimized the Lennard-Jones parameters for O--O interactions to improve the model. As expected, the new model has improved the radial distribution functions and the average potential energy for liquid water as well as the density and the average total dipole moment. The model is then used to compute the binding energies of Cs + --water clusters. Without the need for three-body forces (ion--water--water interaction), the agreement between the results of molecular-dynamics simulations and experimental energies of cluster formation is very good

  17. Intermolecular interaction studies of glyphosate with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manon, Priti; Juglan, K. C.; Kaur, Kirandeep; Sethi, Nidhi; Kaur, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    The density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (U) of glyphosate with water have been measured on different ultrasonic frequency ranges from 1MHz, 2MHz, 3MHz & 5MHz by varying concentrations (0.05%, 0.10%, 0.15%, 0.20%, 0.25%, 0.30%, 0.35%, & 0.40%) at 30°C. The specific gravity bottle, Ostwald's viscometer and quartz crystal interferometer were used to determine density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (U). These three factors contribute in evaluating the other parameters as acoustic impedance (Z), adiabatic compressibility (β), relaxation time (τ), intermolecular free length (Lf), free volume (Vf), ultrasonic attenuation (α/f2), Rao's constant (R), Wada's constant (W) and relative strength (R). Solute-solvent interaction is confirmed by ultrasonic velocity and viscosity values, which increases with increase in concentration indicates stronger association between solute and solvent molecules. With rise in ultrasonic frequency the interaction between the solute and solvent particles decreases. The linear variations in Rao's constant and Wada's constant suggest the absence of complex formation.

  18. Characterizing the Polymer:Fullerene Intermolecular Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Sweetnam, Sean

    2016-02-02

    Polymer:fullerene solar cells depend heavily on the electronic coupling of the polymer and fullerene molecular species from which they are composed. The intermolecular interaction between the polymer and fullerene tends to be strong in efficient photovoltaic systems, as evidenced by efficient charge transfer processes and by large changes in the energetics of the polymer and fullerene when they are molecularly mixed. Despite the clear presence of these strong intermolecular interactions between the polymer and fullerene, there is not a consensus on the nature of these interactions. In this work, we use a combination of Raman spectroscopy, charge transfer state absorption, and density functional theory calculations to show that the intermolecular interactions do not appear to be caused by ground state charge transfer between the polymer and fullerene. We conclude that these intermolecular interactions are primarily van der Waals in nature. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  19. Pentacoordinated carbon in intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baev, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain nonconformity of properties of organoelemental compounds (B, In, Te, etc.) with models of sp 3 -hybridization. Conventional notions of hybridization can be maintained only at coordination number ≤4 solely for the sp m -type hybridization involving non-transition elements. The concept of reciprocal dative bond and participation of pentacoordinated carbon in molecular interactions permits understanding the specific features of solvation processes in solutions of alkyl compounds and formation of molecular complexes, pronouncement of competing effect of the reciprocal dative bond and steric strain on stability of the latter. 15 refs., 1 tab

  20. Cohesion: a scientific history of intermolecular forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rowlinson, J. S

    2002-01-01

    .... The final section gives an account of the successful use in the 20th century of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics to resolve most of the remaining problems. Throughout the last 300 years there have been periods of tremendous growth in our understanding of intermolecular forces but such interest proved to be unsustainable, and long periods of...

  1. Quantitative investigation of intermolecular interactions in dimorphs ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    RAHUL SHUKLA

    2018-03-23

    Mar 23, 2018 ... molecular interactions in derivatives of 1,2,4-triazoles. CrystEngComm 16 1702. 48. Shukla R, Mohan T P, Vishalakshi B and Chopra D. 2017 Synthesis, crystal structure and theoretical analysis of intermolecular interactions in two biologically active derivatives of 1,2,4-triazoles J. Mol. Struct. 1134 426. 49.

  2. Modeling Adsorption-Desorption Processes at the Intermolecular Interactions Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeeva, Vera V.; Terentev, Alexey V.

    2018-01-01

    Modeling of the surface adsorption and desorption processes, as well as the diffusion, are of considerable interest for the physical phenomenon under study in ground tests conditions. When imitating physical processes and phenomena, it is important to choose the correct parameters to describe the adsorption of gases and the formation of films on the structural materials surface. In the present research the adsorption-desorption processes on the gas-solid interface are modeled with allowance for diffusion. Approaches are proposed to describe the adsorbate distribution on the solid body surface at the intermolecular interactions level. The potentials of the intermolecular interaction of water-water, water-methane and methane-methane were used to adequately modeling the real physical and chemical processes. The energies calculated by the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ method. Computational algorithms for determining the average molecule area in a dense monolayer, are considered here. Differences in modeling approaches are also given: that of the proposed in this work and the previously approved probabilistic cellular automaton (PCA) method. It has been shown that the main difference is due to certain limitations of the PCA method. The importance of accounting the intermolecular interactions via hydrogen bonding has been indicated. Further development of the adsorption-desorption processes modeling will allow to find the conditions for of surface processes regulation by means of quantity adsorbed molecules control. The proposed approach to representing the molecular system significantly shortens the calculation time in comparison with the use of atom-atom potentials. In the future, this will allow to modeling the multilayer adsorption at a reasonable computational cost.

  3. Transetherification on Polyols by Intra- and Intermolecular Nucleophilic Substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Takahiro; Adachi, Kota; Chowdhury, Rainy; Kinbara, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    Transetherification on polyols involving intra- and intermolecular nucleophilic substitutions is reported. Di- or trialkoxide formation of propane-1,3-diol or 2-(hydroxymethyl)propane-1,3-diol derivatives by NaH triggers the reaction via oxetanes formation, where the order to add NaH and a polyol significantly influences the yields of products. It was demonstrated that the protective group on the pentaerythritol skeleton is apparently transferred to the hydrophilic and hydrophobic chain molecules bearing a leaving group in one-step, and a protective group conversion from tosyl to benzyl was successful using a benzyl-appending triol to afford a desired product in 67% yield. PMID:24663293

  4. Ru(II)-catalyzed intermolecular ortho-C-H amidation of aromatic ketones with sulfonyl azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhanuchandra, M; Yadav, M Ramu; Rit, Raja K; Rao Kuram, Malleswara; Sahoo, Akhila K

    2013-06-07

    Ru(II)-catalyzed intermolecular ortho-C-H amidation of weakly coordinating aromatic ketones with sulfonyl azides is reported. The developed reaction protocol can be extended to various substituted aromatic ketones to afford a wide range of desired C-N bond formation products in good yields.

  5. Conformation and intermolecular interactions of SA2 peptides self-assembled into vesicles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hell, A.J.; Klymchenko, A.; Burgers, P.P.; Moret, E.E.; Jiskoot, W.; Hennink, W.E.; Crommelin, D.J.A.; Mastrobattista, E.

    2010-01-01

    Previously we have shown that the recombinantly produced SA2 amphiphilic oligopeptide (Ac-Ala-Ala-Val-Val-Leu-Leu-Leu-Trp-Glu-Glu-COOH) self-assembles into nanovesicles (van Hell et al. 2007). In this study, the intermolecular interactions that contribute to the formation of such peptide vesicles

  6. Ultrasonic and IR study of intermolecular association through hydrogen bonding in ternary liquid mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Aashees; Shukla, J P

    2003-08-01

    Complex formation in ternary liquid mixtures of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) with phenol and o-cresol in carbontetrachloride has been studied by measuring ultrasonic velocity at 2 MHz, in the concentration range of 0.019-0.162 (in mole fraction of DMSO) at varying temperatures of 20, 30 and 40 degrees C. Using measured values of ultrasonic velocity, other parameters such as adiabatic compressibility, intermolecular free length, molar sound velocity, molar compressibility, specific acoustic impedance and molar volume have been evaluated. These parameters have been utilized to study the solute-solute interactions in these systems. The ultrasonic velocity shows a maxima and adiabatic compressibility a corresponding minima as a function of concentration for these mixtures. The results indicate the occurrence of complex formation between unlike molecules through intermolecular hydrogen bonding between oxygen atom of DMSO molecule and hydrogen atom of phenol and o-cresol molecules. The excess values of adiabatic compressibility and intermolecular free length have also been evaluated. The variation of both these parameters with concentration also indicates the possibility of the complex formation in these systems. Further, to investigate the presence of O-HO bond complexes and the strength of molecular association with concentrations, the infrared spectra of both the systems, DMSO-phenol and DMSO-o-cresol, have been recorded for various concentrations at room temperature (20 degrees C). The results obtained using infrared spectroscopy for both the systems also support the occurrence of complex formation through intermolecular hydrogen bonding in these ternary liquid mixtures.

  7. A theoretical investigation into the strength of N-NO2 bonds, ring strain and electrostatic potential upon formation of intermolecular H-bonds between HF and the nitro group in nitrogen heterocyclic rings C n H2n N-NO2 (n = 2-5), RDX and HMX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Guo; Ren, Fu-de; Shi, Wen-Jing

    2015-11-01

    Changes in N-NO2 bond strength, ring strain energy and electrostatic potential upon formation of intermolecular H-bonds between HF and the nitro group in nitrogen heterocyclic rings C n H2n N-NO2 (n = 2-5), RDX and HMX were investigated using DFT-B3LYP and MP2(full) methods with the 6-311++G(2df,2p) and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets. Analysis of electron density shifts was also carried out. The results indicate that H-bonding energy correlates well with the increment of ring strain energy. Upon complex formation, the strength of the N-NO2 trigger-bond is enhanced, suggesting reduced sensitivity, while judged by the increased ring strain energy, sensitivity is increased. However, some features of the molecular surface electrostatic potential, such as a local maximum above the N-NO2 bond and ring, σ + (2) and electrostatic balance parameter ν, remain essentially unchanged upon complex formation, and only a small change in the impact sensitivity h 50 is suggested. It is not sufficient to determine sensitivity solely on the basis of trigger bond or ring strain; as a global feature of a molecule, the molecular surface electrostatic potential is available to help judge the change of sensitivity in H-bonded complexes. Graphical Abstract The strengthened N-NO2 bond suggests reduced sensitivity, while it is reverse by theincreased ring strain energy upon the complex formation. However, the molecular surfaceelectrostatic potential (V S) shows the little change of h 50. The V S should be taken into accountin the analysis of explosive sensitivity in the H-bonded complex.

  8. Single-molecule magnets ``without'' intermolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Vergnani, L.; Rodriguez-Douton, M. J.; Cornia, A.; Neugebauer, P.; Barra, A. L.; Sorace, L.; Sessoli, R.

    2012-02-01

    Intermolecular magnetic interactions (dipole-dipole and exchange) affect strongly the magnetic relaxation of crystals of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), especially at low temperature, where quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) dominates. This leads to complex many-body problems [l]. Measurements on magnetically diluted samples are desirable to clearly sort out the behaviour of magnetically-isolated SMMs and to reveal, by comparison, the effect of intermolecular interactions. Here, we diluted a Fe4 SMM into a diamagnetic crystal lattice, affording arrays of independent and iso-oriented magnetic units. We found that the resonant tunnel transitions are much sharper, the tunneling efficiency changes significantly, and two-body QTM transitions disappear. These changes have been rationalized on the basis of a dipolar shuffling mechanism and of transverse dipolar fields, whose effect has been analyzed using a multispin model. Our findings directly prove the impact of intermolecular magnetic couplings on the SMM behaviour and disclose the magnetic response of truly-isolated giant spins in a diamagnetic crystalline environment.[4pt] [1] W. Wernsdorfer, at al, PRL 82, 3903 (1999); PRL 89, 197201 (2002); Nature 416, 406 (2002); IS Tupitsyn, PCE Stamp, NV Prokof'ev, PRB 69, 132406 (2004).

  9. Conformational change from antiparallel beta-sheet to alpha-helix in a series of depsipeptide, -(Leu-Leu-Lac)(n)-: syntheses, spectroscopic studies, and crystal structures of Boc-Leu-Lac-OEt and Boc-(Leu-Leu-Lac)(n)-OEt (n = 1, 2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Keiichi; Katakai, Ryoichi

    2008-04-01

    The depsipeptides Boc-Leu-Lac-OEt (1) and Boc-(Leu-Leu-Lac)(n)-OEt (n = 1, 2) (2 and 3, respectively) (Boc = tert-butyloxycarbonyl, Lac = L-lactic acid residue) has been synthesized and studied by crystallographic, CD spectroscopic, and ESI-MS analyses. In the packing cells, those three compounds adopt beta-strand conformations. Each molecule is linked into a dimer (1) or an infinite assembly (2 and 3) by tight hydrogen bonds of the type NH...O==C. Interestingly, the hexamer, 3 shows the first example of antiparallel pleated beta-sheet crystal structure for a depsipeptide molecule. In the packing cells, especially for 3, the ester groups O--C==O are perpendicularly oriented to the amide groups NH--C==O and beta-sheet planes to avoid the interaction between --O--(ester) and O==C. Therefore, when the chain length become longer, the O...O==C repulsion interaction works as a beta-sheet breaker and hence promotes an alpha-helical structure as observed for Boc-(Leu-Leu-Lac)(3)-Leu-Leu-OEt (4) (Oku et al. Biopolymers 2004, 75, 242-254) and Boc-(Leu-Leu-Lac)(n)-OEt (n = 4-6) (5-7) (Katakai et al., Biopolymers 1996, 38, 285-290), in which the O...O==C repulsion does not cause significant structural changes in alpha-helical main chains. Therefore from the structural and spectroscopic analyses, we have found governing factors for the specificity in the beta-sheet and alpha-helix decision in this series of depsipeptides, -(Leu-Leu-Lac)(n)-.

  10. Probing acid-amide intermolecular hydrogen bonding by NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Sachin Rama; Suryaprakash, N.

    2012-05-01

    Benzene carboxylic acids and benzamide act as their self-complement in molecular recognition to form inter-molecular hydrogen bonded dimers between amide and carboxylic acid groups, which have been investigated by 1H, 13C and 15N NMR spectroscopy. Extensive NMR studies using diffusion ordered spectroscopy (DOSY), variable temperature 1D, 2D NMR, established the formation of heterodimers of benzamide with benzoic acid, salicylic acid and phenyl acetic acid in deuterated chloroform solution. Association constants for the complex formation in the solution state have been determined. The results are ascertained by X-ray diffraction in the solid state. Intermolecular interactions in solution and in solid state were found to be similar. The structural parameters obtained by X-ray diffraction studies are compared with those obtained by DFT calculations.

  11. Isotopic effects on non-linearity, molecular radius and intermolecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    study the isotopic effects on the non-linearity parameter and the physicochemical proper- ties of the liquids, which in turn has been used to study their effect on the intermolecular interactions produced thereof. Keywords. Non-linearity parameter; molecular radius; free length; intermolecular inter- actions. PACS Nos 43.25.

  12. 1H NMR study on the intermolecular interactions of macrocyclic and single α-amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Rodolfo; Pabón, Laura; Quevedo-Acosta, Yovanny

    2013-06-01

    Through analysis of 1H NMR spectra, evidence was found for intermolecular interactions between macrocyclic amino acid derivatives from L-tyrosine and their importance in the formation of aggregates in solution. It was also shown that both macrocyclic and simple amino acids are capable of retaining alcohol molecules through hydrogen bonding, where the alcohol molecule acts as a proton donor and the amino group acts as an acceptor.

  13. Interpolation of intermolecular potentials using Gaussian processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uteva, Elena; Graham, Richard S.; Wilkinson, Richard D.; Wheatley, Richard J.

    2017-10-01

    A procedure is proposed to produce intermolecular potential energy surfaces from limited data. The procedure involves generation of geometrical configurations using a Latin hypercube design, with a maximin criterion, based on inverse internuclear distances. Gaussian processes are used to interpolate the data, using over-specified inverse molecular distances as covariates, greatly improving the interpolation. Symmetric covariance functions are specified so that the interpolation surface obeys all relevant symmetries, reducing prediction errors. The interpolation scheme can be applied to many important molecular interactions with trivial modifications. Results are presented for three systems involving CO2, a system with a deep energy minimum (HF-HF), and a system with 48 symmetries (CH4-N2). In each case, the procedure accurately predicts an independent test set. Training this method with high-precision ab initio evaluations of the CO2-CO interaction enables a parameter-free, first-principles prediction of the CO2-CO cross virial coefficient that agrees very well with experiments.

  14. Intermolecular Structural Change for Thermoswitchable Polymeric Photosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Wooram; Park, Sin-Jung [Center; Cho, Soojeong; Shin, Heejun [Center; Jung, Young-Seok [Center; Lee, Byeongdu [X-ray; Na, Kun [Center; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2016-08-17

    A switchable photosensitizer (PS), which can be activated at a spe-cific condition beside light, has tremendous advantages for photo-dynamic therapy (PDT). Herein, we developed a thermo-switchable polymeric photosensitizer (T-PPS) by conjugating PS (Pheophor-bide-a, PPb-a) to a temperature-responsive polymer backbone of biocompatible hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC). Self-quenched PS molecules linked in close proximity by pi-pi stacking in T-PPS were easily transited to an active monomeric state by the tempera-ture induced phase transition of polymer backbones. The tempera-ture responsive inter-molecular interaction changes of PS molecules in T-PPS were demonstrated in synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and UV-Vis spectrophotometer analysis. The T-PPS allowed switchable activation and synergistically enhanced cancer cell killing effect at the hyperthermia temperature (45 °C). Our developed T-PPS has the considerable potential not only as a new class of photomedicine in clinics but also as a biosensor based on temperature responsiveness.

  15. beta-sheet preferences from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Bækgaard, Iben Sig Buur; Gregersen, Misha Marie

    2003-01-01

    The natural amino acids have different preferences of occurring in specific types of secondary protein structure. Simulations are performed on periodic model â-sheets of 14 different amino acids, at the level of density functional theory, employing the generalized gradient approximation. We find ...

  16. Ranking beta sheet topologies of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Helles, Glennie; Winter, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of protein structure prediction is to identify long-range interactions between amino acids. To reliably predict such interactions, we enumerate, score and rank all beta-topologies (partitions of beta-strands into sheets, orderings of strands within sheets and orientations...... of paired strands) of a given protein. We show that the beta-topology corresponding to the native structure is, with high probability, among the top-ranked. Since full enumeration is very time-consuming, we also suggest a method to deal with proteins with many beta-strands. The results reported...... in this paper are highly relevant for ab initio protein structure prediction methods based on decoy generation. The top-ranked beta-topologies can be used to find initial conformations from which conformational searches can be started. They can also be used to filter decoys by removing those with poorly...

  17. Ranking beta sheet topologies of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Helles, Glennie; Winter, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of protein structure prediction is to identify long-range interactions between amino acids. To reliably predict such interactions, we enumerate, score and rank all beta-topologies (partitions of beta-strands into sheets, orderings of strands within sheets and orientations of...

  18. Synthesis and intermolecular interactions of N-benzylidenetyramines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Mauricio; Pérez-Redondo, Adrián; Quevedo, Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the synthesis and intermolecular interactions between N-benzylidenetyramine molecules were investigated. The crystal structure of N-(4-nitrobenzylidene)tyramine shows a molecular organization in zigzag chains with intermolecular O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds between the azomethine and phenolic hydroxyl groups. Those chains are held together by C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds to generate layers, which are connected by C-H⋯O, π⋯π and NO2⋯π interactions.

  19. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  20. Quantifying intermolecular interactions of ionic liquids using cohesive energy densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    For ionic liquids (ILs), both the large number of possible cation + anion combinations and their ionic nature provide a unique challenge for understanding intermolecular interactions. Cohesive energy density, ced, is used to quantify the strength of intermolecular interactions for molecular liquids, and is determined using the enthalpy of vaporization. A critical analysis of the experimental challenges and data to obtain ced for ILs is provided. For ILs there are two methods to judge the strength of intermolecular interactions, due to the presence of multiple constituents in the vapour phase of ILs. Firstly, cedIP, where the ionic vapour constituent is neutral ion pairs, the major constituent of the IL vapour. Secondly, cedC+A, where the ionic vapour constituents are isolated ions. A cedIP dataset is presented for 64 ILs. For the first time an experimental cedC+A, a measure of the strength of the total intermolecular interaction for an IL, is presented. cedC+A is significantly larger for ILs than ced for most molecular liquids, reflecting the need to break all of the relatively strong electrostatic interactions present in ILs. However, the van der Waals interactions contribute significantly to IL volatility due to the very strong electrostatic interaction in the neutral ion pair ionic vapour. An excellent linear correlation is found between cedIP and the inverse of the molecular volume. A good linear correlation is found between IL cedIP and IL Gordon parameter (which are dependent primarily on surface tension). ced values obtained through indirect methods gave similar magnitude values to cedIP. These findings show that cedIP is very important for understanding IL intermolecular interactions, in spite of cedIP not being a measure of the total intermolecular interactions of an IL. In the outlook section, remaining challenges for understanding IL intermolecular interactions are outlined. PMID:29308254

  1. Quantifying intermolecular interactions of ionic liquids using cohesive energy densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Kevin R J

    2017-12-01

    For ionic liquids (ILs), both the large number of possible cation + anion combinations and their ionic nature provide a unique challenge for understanding intermolecular interactions. Cohesive energy density, ced , is used to quantify the strength of intermolecular interactions for molecular liquids, and is determined using the enthalpy of vaporization. A critical analysis of the experimental challenges and data to obtain ced for ILs is provided. For ILs there are two methods to judge the strength of intermolecular interactions, due to the presence of multiple constituents in the vapour phase of ILs. Firstly, ced IP , where the ionic vapour constituent is neutral ion pairs, the major constituent of the IL vapour. Secondly, ced C+A , where the ionic vapour constituents are isolated ions. A ced IP dataset is presented for 64 ILs. For the first time an experimental ced C+A , a measure of the strength of the total intermolecular interaction for an IL, is presented. ced C+A is significantly larger for ILs than ced for most molecular liquids, reflecting the need to break all of the relatively strong electrostatic interactions present in ILs. However, the van der Waals interactions contribute significantly to IL volatility due to the very strong electrostatic interaction in the neutral ion pair ionic vapour. An excellent linear correlation is found between ced IP and the inverse of the molecular volume. A good linear correlation is found between IL ced IP and IL Gordon parameter (which are dependent primarily on surface tension). ced values obtained through indirect methods gave similar magnitude values to ced IP . These findings show that ced IP is very important for understanding IL intermolecular interactions, in spite of ced IP not being a measure of the total intermolecular interactions of an IL. In the outlook section, remaining challenges for understanding IL intermolecular interactions are outlined.

  2. A disulfide-linked amyloid-beta peptide dimer forms a protofibril-like oligomer through a distinct pathway from amyloid fibril formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Yagi, Hisashi; Goto, Yuji; Matsuzaki, Katsumi; Hoshino, Masaru

    2010-08-24

    The conversion of the soluble, nontoxic amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide into an aggregated, toxic form rich in beta-sheets is considered a key step in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Whereas growing evidence indicates that the Abeta amyloid fibrils consist of in-register parallel beta-sheets, little is known about the structure of soluble oligomeric intermediates because of their transient nature. To understand the mechanism by which amyloid fibrils form, especially the initial development of the "nucleus" oligomeric intermediates, we prepared covalently linked dimeric Abeta peptides and analyzed the kinetics of the fibril-forming process. A covalent bond introduced between two Abeta molecules dramatically facilitated the spontaneous formation of aggregates with a beta-sheet structure and affinity for thioflavin T. Transmission electron microscopy revealed, however, that these aggregates differed in morphology from amyloid fibrils, more closely resembling protofibrils. The protofibril-like aggregates were not the most thermodynamically stable state but were a kinetically trapped state. The results emphasize the importance of the conformational flexibility of the Abeta molecule and a balance in the association and dissociation rate for the formation of rigid amyloid fibrils.

  3. Intermolecular interactions in binary system of 1-methylimidazole with methanol: A volumetric and theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang; Fang, Hui; Huang, Rong-Yi; Xu, Heng; Wu, Gen-Hua; Ye, Shi-Yong

    2013-11-01

    The Letter demonstrates an experimental and computational investigation of intermolecular interactions in binary system of 1-methylimidazole (MeIm) with methanol. The densities of binary system were measured at T = 288.15-323.15 K, and the values of excess molar volumes were obtained as a function of composition at each temperature. The experimental results indicate the formation of strong cross-associated complex in the binary system. Meanwhile, the nature of hydrogen bond of the associated complexes was explored based on theoretical calculations. In addition, the changes of thermodynamic properties from the monomers to cross-associated complex were also investigated.

  4. He-, Ne-, and Ar-phosgene intermolecular potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munteanu, Cristian R.; Henriksen, Christian; Felker, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Using the CCSD(T) model, we evaluated the intermolecular potential energy surfaces of the He-, Ne-, and Ar-phosgene complexes. We considered a representative number of intermolecular geometries for which we calculated the corresponding interaction energies with the augmented (He complex) and double......-phosgene surfaces were found to have absolute minima of -72.1, -140.4, and -326.6 cm -1 at distances between the rare-gas atom and the phosgene center of mass of 3.184, 3.254, and 3.516 Å, respectively. The potentials were further used in the evaluation of rovibrational states and the rotational constants...

  5. Intermolecular interactions and aggregation of fac-tris(2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N)iridium(III) in nonpolar solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayasu, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Shinozaki, Kazuteru

    2013-08-15

    The intermolecular interaction and aggregation of the neutral complex fac-tris(2-phenylpyridinato-C(2),N)iridium(III) (fac-Ir(ppy)3) in solution was investigated. Intermolecular interactions were found to effectively decrease the luminescence lifetime via self-quenching with increasing fac-Ir(ppy)3 concentrations. A Stern-Volmer plot for quenching in acetonitrile was linear, due to bimolecular self-quenching, but curved in toluene as the result of excimer formation. (1)H NMR spectra demonstrated a monomer-aggregate equilibrium which resulted in spectral shifts depending on solvent polarity. X-ray crystallography provided structural information concerning the aggregate, which is based on a tetramer consisting of two Δ-fac-Ir(ppy)3-Λ-fac-Ir(ppy)3 pairs. Offset π-π stacking of ppy ligands and electrostatic dipole-dipole interactions between complex molecules play an important role in the formation of these molecular pairs.

  6. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in 2,2'-((4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUBBIAH THAMOTHARAN

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... REGULAR ARTICLE. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in ... The quantitative molecular electrostatic potential surface diagram depicts the potential binding sites which are in good agreement with the crystal ..... root mean squared deviation (rmsd: 0.19 Å) is observed for the compound I and ...

  7. Dancing Crystals: A Dramatic Illustration of Intermolecular Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Donald W.

    2007-01-01

    Crystals of naphthalene form on the surface of an acetone solution and dance about in an animated fashion illustrating surface tension, crystallization, and intermolecular forces. Additional experiments reveal the properties of the solution. Flows within the solutions can be visualized by various means. Previous demonstrations of surface motion…

  8. Phase transitions in liquids with directed intermolecular bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Son, L.; Ryltcev, R.

    2005-01-01

    Liquids with quasi - chemical bonding between molecules are described in terms of vertex model. It is shown that this bonding results in liquid - liquid phase transition, which occurs between phases with different mean density of intermolecular bonds. The transition may be suggested to be a universal phenomena for those liquids.

  9. All rights reserved Intermolecular Model Potentials and Virial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Key words: Equation of state, virial coefficients, speed of sound, intermolecular potentials. The virial equation of state (EOS) is based on ... general equation of state method that can predict volumetric and caloric thermodynamic ... standard cubic foot of gas per day and at the current price of $ 3.3 per 1000 cubic foot set by ...

  10. Intermolecular Interactions in Ternary Glycerol–Sample–H2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Peter; Rasmussen, Erik Lumby; Koga, Yoshikata

    2011-01-01

    We studied the intermolecular interactions in ternary glycerol (Gly)–sample (S)–H2O systems at 25 °C. By measuring the excess partial molar enthalpy of Gly, HGlyEHEGly, we evaluated the Gly–Gly enthalpic interaction, HGly-GlyEHEGly--Gly, in the presence of various samples (S). For S, tert...

  11. Gold-catalyzed intermolecular hydroamination of allenes with sulfonamides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A co-catalyst of (PPh3AuCl/AgOTf for the intermolecular hydroamination of allenes with sulfonamides is shown. The reaction proceeded smoothly under mild conditions for differently substituted allenes giving N-allylic sulfonamides in good yields with high regioselectivity and E-selectivity.

  12. Connecting Protein Structure to Intermolecular Interactions: A Computer Modeling Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualia, Mohammed; Schroeder, Lianne; Garcia, Megan; Daubenmire, Patrick L.; Wink, Donald J.; Clark, Ginevra A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of protein folding relies on a solid foundation of a number of critical chemical concepts, such as molecular structure, intra-/intermolecular interactions, and relating structure to function. Recent reports show that students struggle on all levels to achieve these understandings and use them in meaningful ways. Further, several…

  13. The role of weak intermolecular CH… F interactions in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 4. The role of weak intermolecular C-H…F interactions in supramolecular assembly: Structural investigations on 3,5- dibenzylidene-piperidin-4-one and database analysis. R S Rathore N S Karthikeyan Y Alekhya K Sathiyanarayanan P G Aravindan.

  14. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in 2, 2'-((4 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The relative contributions of various intermolecular contacts in the title compound and its closely related analogs are evaluated using Hirshfeld surface analysis and the decomposed fingerprint plots. The common packing features exist between the title compound and its related analogs are identified.The quantitative ...

  15. Learning about Intermolecular Interactions from the Cambridge Structural Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Gary M.; Allen, Frank H.

    2012-01-01

    A clear understanding and appreciation of noncovalent interactions, especially hydrogen bonding, are vitally important to students of chemistry and the life sciences, including biochemistry, molecular biology, pharmacology, and medicine. The opportunities afforded by the IsoStar knowledge base of intermolecular interactions to enhance the…

  16. A structural study of the intermolecular interactions of tyramine in the solid state and in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Rodolfo; Nuñez-Dallos, Nelson; Wurst, Klaus; Duarte-Ruiz, Álvaro

    2012-12-01

    The nature of the interactions between tyramine units was investigated in the solid state and in solution. Crystals of tyramine in its free base form were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). The crystal structure shows a linear molecular organization held together by "head-to-tail" intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the amino groups and the phenolic hydroxyl groups. These chains are arranged in double layers that can geometrically favor the formation of templates in solution, which may facilitate macrocyclization reactions to form azacyclophane-type compounds. Computational calculations using the PM6-DH+ method and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) reveal that the formation of a hydrogen-bonded tyramine dimer is favored in solution.

  17. Role of dbnd NOH intermolecular interactions in oxime derivatives via Crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface, PIXELC and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushothaman, Gayathri; Thiruvenkatam, Vijay

    2017-11-01

    Oximes are building block of organic synthesis and they have wide range applications in laboratories, industries, and pharmaceutical as antidotes. Herein we report the crystal structures of oxime derivative Beta-p-Dimethylaminodeoxybenzionoxime (I) and o-Chloro-p-dimethylaminodeoxybenzion (II) the precursor molecule of o-Chloro-p-dimethylaminodeoxybenzionoxime and their intermolecular interactions studies through Hirshfeld surface & 2D-fingerprint plot analysis along with PIXELC and DFT calculations. The packing arrangements in I and II are driven by Osbnd H⋯N and Osbnd H⋯C interactions respectively. The Osbnd H⋯N hydrogen bonding in I facilitates the formation of the dimer with the motif of R (22(6)), whereas in II absence of oxime moiety (dbnd NOH) restricts the dimer formation. The 2D-fingerprint plot shows the close contacts for the intermolecular interactions in I & II. The PIXELC calculation of II suggests Osbnd H⋯C contributes for intermolecular interaction that stabilizes the crystal packing with the total energy value of 60.4 kcal/mol. The DFT calculation using B3LYP with 6-311G (d, p) functional set for both the derivatives shows a small deviation in the benzene ring (I) and chlorobenzene ring (II) with the RMSD value of 0.5095 Å and 0.8472 Å respectively.

  18. Intermolecular vs molecule–substrate interactions: A combined STM and theoretical study of supramolecular phases on graphene/Ru(0001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Roos

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The competition between intermolecular interactions and long-range lateral variations in the substrate–adsorbate interaction was studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM and force field based calculations, by comparing the phase formation of (sub- monolayers of the organic molecules (i 2-phenyl-4,6-bis(6-(pyridin-3-yl-4-(pyridin-3-ylpyridin-2-ylpyrimidine (3,3'-BTP and (ii 3,4,9,10-perylene tetracarboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA on graphene/Ru(0001. For PTCDA adsorption, a 2D adlayer phase was formed, which extended over large areas, while for 3,3'-BTP adsorption linear or ring like structures were formed, which exclusively populated the areas between the maxima of the moiré structure of the buckled graphene layer. The consequences for the competing intermolecular interactions and corrugation in the adsorption potential are discussed and compared with the theoretical results.

  19. The Effect of Intermolecular Halogen Bond on 19F DNP Enhancement in 1, 4-Diiodotetrafluorobenzene/4-OH-TEMPO Supramolecular Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Shan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Halogen bond, as hydrogen bond, is a non-covalent bond. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP technique has been used previously to study hydrogen bonds-mediated intermolecular interactions. However, no study has been carried out so far to study the halogen bond-mediated intermolecular interactions with DNP. In this work, 19F DNP polarization efficiency of the halogen bonds existing in supramolecular assembling by 4-OH-TEMPO and 1,4-diiodotetrafluorobenzene (DITFB was studied on a home-made DNP system. The formation of intermolecular halogen bonds appeared to increase 19F DNP polarization efficiency, suggesting that the spin-spin interactions among electrons were weakened by the halogen bonds, resulting in an increased T2e and a larger saturation factor.

  20. Intermolecular interactions of decamethoxinum and acetylsalicylic acid in systems of various complexity levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Vashchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular interactions between decamethoxinum (DEC and acetylsalicylic acid (ASА have been studied in the phospholipid-containing systems of escalating complexity levels. The host media for these substances were solvents, L-α-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC membranes, and samples of human erythrocytes. Peculiar effects caused by DEC-ASА interaction have been observed in each system using appropriate techniques: (a DEC-ASА non-covalent complexes formation in DPPC-containing systems were revealed by mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization; (b joint DEC-ASА action on DPPC model membranes led to increasing of membrane melting temperature Tm, whereas individual drugs caused pronounced Tm decreasing, which was demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry; (c deceleration of DEC-induced haemolysis of erythrocytes under joint DEC-ASА application was observed by optical microscopy.

  1. Combination Bands of the Nonpolar OCS Dimer Involving Intermolecular Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M.; Oliaee, J. Norooz; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2012-06-01

    Spectra of the nonpolar carbonyl sulfide in the region of the OCS ν_1 fundamental band were observed in a supersonic slit-jet apparatus. The expansion gas was probed using radiation from a tunable diode laser employed in a rapid-scan signal averaging mode. Three bands centered at 2085.906, 2103.504, and 2114.979 cm-1 were observed and anlysed. The rotational assignment and fitting of the bands were made by fixing the lower state parameters to those for the ground state of nonpolar (OCS)_2, thus confirming that they were indeed combination bands of the of the most stable isomer of OCS dimer. The band centered at 2085.906 cm-1 is a combination of the forbidden A_g intramolecular mode plus the geared bend intermolecular mode and that centered at 2114.979 cm-1 is a combination of the allowed B_u intramolecular mode plus the intermolecular van der Waals stretch. The combination at 2103.504 cm-1 can be assigned as a band whose upper state involves four quanta of the intramolecular bend or the B_u intramolecular mode plus two quanta of the intermolecular torsional mode. Isotopic work is needed to conclusively identify the vibrational assignment of this band. Our experimental frequencies for the geared bend and van der Waals modes are in good agreement with a recent high level ab initio calculation by Brown et al. J. Brown, Xiao-Gang Wang, T. Carrington Jr. and Richard Dawes, Journal of Chemical Physics, submitted.

  2. An approach to the intermolecular energy in pure liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAbriel Hernández de la Torre

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Se propone un método para: estimar la energía potencial de repulsión de cualquier molécula central como una función de las densidades ortobáricas en líquidos puros no auto asociados; estimar los parámetros necesarios para calcular la energía de dispersión de London; calcular los números de coordinación promedio, distancias intermoleculares de interacción, diámetros moleculares y de grupos; en moléculas globulares, moléculas planas y parafinas normales.

  3. Intermolecular interactions and the thermodynamic properties of supercritical fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigzawe, Tesfaye M; Sadus, Richard J

    2013-05-21

    The role of different contributions to intermolecular interactions on the thermodynamic properties of supercritical fluids is investigated. Molecular dynamics simulation results are reported for the energy, pressure, thermal pressure coefficient, thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal and adiabatic compressibilities, isobaric and isochoric heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and speed of sound of fluids interacting via both the Lennard-Jones and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen potentials. These properties were obtained for a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and densities. For each thermodynamic property, an excess value is determined to distinguish between attraction and repulsion. It is found that the contributions of intermolecular interactions have varying effects depending on the thermodynamic property. The maxima exhibited by the isochoric and isobaric heat capacities, isothermal compressibilities, and thermal expansion coefficient are attributed to interactions in the Lennard-Jones well. Repulsion is required to obtain physically realistic speeds of sound and both repulsion and attraction are necessary to observe a Joule-Thomson inversion curve. Significantly, both maxima and minima are observed for the isobaric and isochoric heat capacities of the supercritical Lennard-Jones fluid. It is postulated that the loci of these maxima and minima converge to a common point via the same power law relationship as the phase coexistence curve with an exponent of β = 0.32. This provides an explanation for the terminal isobaric heat capacity maximum in supercritical fluids.

  4. Intra-/Intermolecular Bifurcated Chalcogen Bonding in Crystal Structure of Thiazole/Thiadiazole Derived Binuclear (DiaminocarbenePdII Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Mikherdov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of cis-[PdCl2(CNXyl2] (Xyl = 2,6-Me2C6H3 with 4-phenylthiazol-2-amine in molar ratio 2:3 at RT in CH2Cl2 leads to binuclear (diaminocarbenePdII complex 3c. The complex was characterized by HRESI+-MS, 1H NMR spectroscopy, and its structure was elucidated by single-crystal XRD. Inspection of the XRD data for 3c and for three relevant earlier obtained thiazole/thiadiazole derived binuclear diaminocarbene complexes (3a EYOVIZ; 3b: EYOWAS; 3d: EYOVOF suggests that the structures of all these species exhibit intra-/intermolecular bifurcated chalcogen bonding (BCB. The obtained data indicate the presence of intramolecular S•••Cl chalcogen bonds in all of the structures, whereas varying of substituent in the 4th and 5th positions of the thiazaheterocyclic fragment leads to changes of the intermolecular chalcogen bonding type, viz. S•••π in 3a,b, S•••S in 3c, and S•••O in 3d. At the same time, the change of heterocyclic system (from 1,3-thiazole to 1,3,4-thiadiazole does not affect the pattern of non-covalent interactions. Presence of such intermolecular chalcogen bonding leads to the formation of one-dimensional (1D polymeric chains (for 3a,b, dimeric associates (for 3c, or the fixation of an acetone molecule in the hollow between two diaminocarbene complexes (for 3d in the solid state. The Hirshfeld surface analysis for the studied X-ray structures estimated the contributions of intermolecular chalcogen bonds in crystal packing of 3a–d: S•••π (3a: 2.4%; 3b: 2.4%, S•••S (3c: less 1%, S•••O (3d: less 1%. The additionally performed DFT calculations, followed by the topological analysis of the electron density distribution within the framework of Bader’s theory (AIM method, confirm the presence of intra-/intermolecular BCB S•••Cl/S•••S in dimer of 3c taken as a model system (solid state geometry. The AIM analysis demonstrates the presence of appropriate bond critical points for these

  5. Direct measurements of intermolecular forces by chemical force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezenov, Dmitri Vitalievich

    1999-12-01

    Detailed description of intermolecular forces is key to understanding a wide range of phenomena from molecular recognition to materials failure. The unique features of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to make point contact force measurements with ultra high sensitivity and to generate spatial maps of surface topography and forces have been extended to include measurements between well-defined organic molecular groups. Chemical modification of AFM probes with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was used to make them sensitive to specific molecular interactions. This novel chemical force microscopy (CFM) technique was used to probe forces between different molecular groups in a range of environments (vacuum, organic liquids and aqueous solutions); measure surface energetics on a nanometer scale; determine pK values of the surface acid and base groups; measure forces to stretch and unbind a short synthetic DNA duplex and map the spatial distribution of specific functional groups and their ionization state. Studies of adhesion forces demonstrated the important contribution of hydrogen bonding to interactions between simple organic functionalities. The chemical identity of the tip and substrate surfaces as well as the medium had a dramatic effect on adhesion between model monolayers. A direct correlation between surface free energy and adhesion forces was established. The adhesion between epoxy polymer and model mixed SAMs varied with the amount of hydrogen bonding component in the monolayers. A consistent interpretation of CFM measurements in polar solvents was provided by contact mechanics models and intermolecular force components theory. Forces between tips and surfaces functionalized with SAMs terminating in acid or base groups depended on their ionization state. A novel method of force titration was introduced for highly local characterization of the pK's of surface functional groups. The pH-dependent changes in friction forces were exploited to map spatially the

  6. Structural modeling and intermolecular correlation of liquid chlorine dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Norio; Hironori, Shimakura; Kawakita, Yukinobu; Ohara, Yukoji; Kohara, Shinji; Takeda, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 ) is water-soluble yellow gas at room temperature. It has long been used as a disinfectant of tap water and various commodities owing to its strong oxidizing activity against various microbial proteins. The oxidizing activity is believed to be due to the presence of unpaired electron in its molecular orbital. Despite wealth of physicochemical studies of gaseous ClO 2 , little is known about liquid ClO 2 , especially about fine molecular structure and intermolecular interactions of liquid ClO 2 . The purpose of this study is to elucidate the fine structure and intermolecular orientations of ClO 2 molecules in its liquid state using a high-energy X-ray diffraction technique. The measurements of liquid ClO 2 were carried out at -50 to 0 degree Celsius using a two-axis diffractometer installed at the BL04B2 beamline in the third-generation synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8 (Hyogo, Japan). The incident X-ray beamline was 113.4 keV in energy and 0.1093 Armstrong in wavelength from a Si(111) monochromator with the third harmonic reflection. Liquid ClO 2 held in a quartz capillary tube was placed in a temperature-controlled vacuum chamber. We obtained a structure factor S(Q) to a range of Q = 0.3-30 Amstrong -1 and a pair distribution function g(r) upon Fourier transform of the S(Q). The total g(r) showed peaks at 1.46, 2.08, 2.48, 3.16 and 4.24 Armstrong. From intramolecular bond lengths of 1.46 Armstrong for Cl-O and 2.48 Armstrong for O-O, O-Cl-O bond angle was estimated to be 116.1 degrees. Peaks at 3.16 and 4.24 Armstrong in the total g(r) strongly indicate presence of specific intermolecular orientations of ClO 2 molecules that are distinct from those observed as a dimer in the solid phase ClO 2 . This view was further supported by molecular simulation using a reverse Monte Carlo method (RMC). (author)

  7. Modulation of intermolecular interactions in single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroux, Katie Jeanne

    Polynuclear manganese clusters exhibiting interesting magnetic and quantum properties have been an area of intense research since the discovery of the first single-molecule magnet (SMM) in 1993. These molecules, below their blocking temperature, function as single-domain magnetic particles which exhibit classical macroscale magnetic properties as well as quantum mechanical phenomena such as quantum tunnelling of magnetization (QTM) and quantum phase interference. The union of classical and quantum behavior in these nanomaterials makes SMMs ideal candidates for high-density information storage and quantum computing. However, environmental coupling factors (nuclear spins, phonons, neighboring molecules) must be minimized if such applications are ever to be fully realized. The focus of this work is making small structural changes in well-known manganese SMMs in order to drastically enhance the overall magnetic and quantum properties of the system. Well-isolated molecules of high crystalline quality should lead to well-defined energetic and spectral properties as well. An advantage of SMMs over bulk magnetic materials is that they can be chemically altered from a "bottom-up" approach providing a synthetic tool for tuning magnetic properties. This systematic approach is utilized in the work presented herein by incorporating bulky ligands and/or counterions to "isolate" the magnetic core of [Mn4] dicubane SMMs. Reducing intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattice (neighboring molecules, solvate molecules, dipolar interactions) is an important step toward developing viable quantum computing devices. Detailed bulk magnetic studies as well as single crystal magnetization hysteresis and high-frequency EPR studies on these sterically-isolated complexes show enhanced, and sometimes even unexpected, quantum dynamics. The importance of intra- and intermolecular interactions remains a common theme throughout this work, extending to other SMMs of various topology including

  8. Intermolecular potential energy surface for CS2 dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhpour, Hossein; Mombeini, Zainab; Namazian, Mansoor; Coote, Michelle L

    2011-04-15

    A new four-dimensional intermolecular potential energy surface for CS(2) dimer is obtained by ab initio calculation of the interaction energies for a range of configurations and center-of-mass separation distances for the first time. The calculations were performed using the supermolecular approach at the Møller-Plesset second-order perturbation (MP2) level of theory with the augmented correlation consistent basis sets (aug-cc-pVxZ, x = D, T) and corrected for the basis-set superposition error using the full counterpoise correction method. A two-point extrapolation method was used to extrapolate the calculated energy points to the complete basis set limit. The effect of using the higher levels of theory, quadratic configuration interaction containing single, double, and perturbative triple excitations QCISD(T) and coupled cluster singles, doubles and perturbative triples excitations CCSD(T), on the shape of potential energy surface was investigated. It is shown that the MP2 level of theory apparently performs extremely poorly for describing the intermolecular potential energy surface, overestimating the total energy by a factor of nearly 1.73 in comparison with the QCISD(T) and CCSD(T) values. The value of isotropic dipole-dipole dispersion coefficient (C(6) ) of CS(2) fluid was obtained from the extrapolated MP2 potential energy surface. The MP2 extrapolated energy points were fitted to well-known analytical potential functions using two different methods to represent the potential energy surface analytically. The most stable configuration of the dimer was determined at R = 6.23 au, α = 90°, β = 90°, and γ = 90°, with a well depth of 3.980 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2 level of theory. Finally, the calculated second virial coefficients were compared with experimental values to test the quality of the presented potential energy surface. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Ab initio ground state phenylacetylene-argon intermolecular potential energy surface and rovibrational spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cybulski, Hubert; Fernandez, Berta; Henriksen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We evaluate the phenylacetylene-argon intermolecular potential energy surface by fitting a representative number of ab initio interaction energies to an analytic function. These energies are calculated at a grid of intermolecular geometries, using the CCSD(T) method and the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set ...... Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4742153]...

  10. Polymorphism, Intermolecular Interactions, and Spectroscopic Properties in Crystal Structures of Sulfonamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Francisco-Márquez, Misaela; Soriano-Correa, Catalina

    2018-01-01

    The antibiotics family of sulfonamides has been used worldwide intensively in human therapeutics and farm livestock during decades. Intermolecular interactions of these sulfamides are important to understand their bioactivity and biodegradation. These interactions are also responsible for their supramolecular structures. The intermolecular interactions in the crystal polymorphs of the sulfonamides, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfamethoxydiazine, as models of sulfonamides, have been studied by using quantum mechanical calculations. Different conformations in the sulphonamide molecules have been detected in the crystal polymorphs. Several intermolecular patterns have been studied to understand the molecular packing behavior in these antibiotics. Strong intermolecular hydrogen bonds and π-π interactions are the main driving forces for crystal packing in these sulfonamides. Different stability between polymorphs can explain the experimental behavior of these crystal forms. The calculated infrared spectroscopy frequencies explain the main intermolecular interactions in these crystals. Copyright © 2018 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The origins of the directionality of noncovalent intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changwei; Guan, Liangyu; Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason; Mo, Yirong

    2016-01-05

    The recent σ-hole concept emphasizes the contribution of electrostatic attraction to noncovalent bonds, and implies that the electrostatic force has an angular dependency. Here a set of clusters, which includes hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding, chalcogen bonding, and pnicogen bonding systems, is investigated to probe the magnitude of covalency and its contribution to the directionality in noncovalent bonding. The study is based on the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method that decomposes the binding energy into the steric and the charge transfer (CT) (hyperconjugation) contributions. One unique feature of the BLW method is its capability to derive optimal geometries with only steric effect taken into account, while excluding the CT interaction. The results reveal that the overall steric energy exhibits angular dependency notably in halogen bonding, chalcogen bonding, and pnicogen bonding systems. Turning on the CT interactions further shortens the intermolecular distances. This bond shortening enhances the Pauli repulsion, which in turn offsets the electrostatic attraction, such that in the final sum, the contribution of the steric effect to bonding is diminished, leaving the CT to dominate the binding energy. In several other systems particularly hydrogen bonding systems, the steric effect nevertheless still plays the major role whereas the CT interaction is minor. However, in all cases, the CT exhibits strong directionality, suggesting that the linearity or near linearity of noncovalent bonds is largely governed by the charge-transfer interaction whose magnitude determines the covalency in noncovalent bonds. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Polyelectrolyte brushes in mixed ionic medium studied via intermolecular forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Robert; Laugel, Nicolas; Pincus, Philip; Tirrell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    The vast uses and applications of polyelectrolyte brushes make them an attractive field of research especially with the growing interest in responsive materials. Polymers which respond via changes in temperature, pH, and ionic strength are increasingly being used for applications in drug delivery, chemical gating, etc. When polyelectrolyte brushes are found in either nature (e.g., surfaces of cartilage and mammalian lung interiors) or commercially (e.g., skin care products, shampoo, and surfaces of medical devices) they are always surrounded by mixed ionic medium. This makes the study of these brushes in varying ionic environments extremely relevant for both current and future potential applications. The polyelectrolyte brushes in this work are diblock co-polymers of poly-styrene sulfonate (N=420) and poly-t-butyl styrene (N=20) which tethers to a hydrophobic surface allowing for a purely thermodynamic study of the polyelectrolyte chains. Intermolecular forces between two brushes are measured using the SFA. As multi-valent concentrations are increased, the brushes collapse internally and form strong adhesion between one another after contact (properties not seen in a purely mono-valent environment).

  13. Intermolecular Interactions in Crystalline Theobromine as Reflected in Electron Deformation Density and (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzková, Kateřina; Babinský, Martin; Novosadová, Lucie; Marek, Radek

    2013-06-11

    An understanding of the role of intermolecular interactions in crystal formation is essential to control the generation of diverse crystalline forms which is an important concern for pharmaceutical industry. Very recently, we reported a new approach to interpret the relationships between intermolecular hydrogen bonding, redistribution of electron density in the system, and NMR chemical shifts (Babinský et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 497). Here, we employ this approach to characterize a full set of crystal interactions in a sample of anhydrous theobromine as reflected in (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs). The important intermolecular contacts are identified by comparing the DFT-calculated NMR CSTs for an isolated theobromine molecule and for clusters composed of several molecules as selected from the available X-ray diffraction data. Furthermore, electron deformation density (EDD) and shielding deformation density (SDD) in the proximity of the nuclei involved in the proposed interactions are calculated and visualized. In addition to the recently reported observations for hydrogen bonding, we focus here particularly on the stacking interactions. Although the principal relations between the EDD and CST for hydrogen bonding (HB) and stacking interactions are similar, the real-space consequences are rather different. Whereas the C-H···X hydrogen bonding influences predominantly and significantly the in-plane principal component of the (13)C CST perpendicular to the HB path and the C═O···H hydrogen bonding modulates both in-plane components of the carbonyl (13)C CST, the stacking modulates the out-of-plane electron density resulting in weak deshielding (2-8 ppm) of both in-plane principal components of the CST and weak shielding (∼ 5 ppm) of the out-of-plane component. The hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions may add to or subtract from one another to produce total values observed experimentally. On the example of theobromine, we demonstrate

  14. Amyloid formation via supramolecular peptide assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Roger A; Hayes, Stanley F; Fischer, Elizabeth R; Priola, Suzette A

    2007-06-19

    Amyloid fibrils have been classically defined as linear, nonbranched polymeric proteins with a cross beta-sheet structure and the ability to alter the optical properties of the amyloid-specific dye Congo Red. Mounting evidence suggests that soluble oligomeric peptide assemblies approximately 2-20 nm in diameter are critical intermediates in amyloid formation. Using a pathogenic prion protein peptide comprised of residues 23-144, we demonstrate that, under quiescent but not agitated conditions, much larger globular assemblies up to 1 mum in diameter are made. These globules precede fibril formation and directly interact with growing fibril bundles. Fibrils made via these large spherical peptide assemblies displayed a remarkable diversity of ultrastructural features. Fibrillization of the Abeta1-40 peptide under similar conditions yielded similar results, suggesting a mechanism of general amyloid formation that can proceed through intermediates much larger than those previously described. Our data suggest that simply changing the physical microenvironment can profoundly influence the mechanism of amyloid formation and yield fibrils with novel ultrastructural properties.

  15. Determination of stepsize parameters for intermolecular vibrational energy transfer: Progress report, May 1, 1987-April 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tardy, D.C.

    1988-05-01

    Intermolecular vibrational energy transfer for highly excited polyatomic molecules is involved in any mechanism in which excitation energy is required (pyrolysis) or in which energy must be removed from a hot source (cooling). The average energy removed per collision, , is a useful quantity to compare efficiency for energy transfer. The objectives of this work are: to determine the dependence of on excitation energy and on the molecular complexity (number of vibrational modes) of substrate and deactivator; to assess the importance of intermolecular attractions (complex formation) on vibrational energy transfer; to obtain detailed information on the energy distribution after collision and to evaluate the importance of on high-temperature unimolecular reactions. This information will be obtained by monitoring the time dependence of the infrared emission, ultraviolet absorption, refractive index and pressure. The results from these complementary techniques will be benchmarked with values from previous studies on the relaxation of chemically activated alkyl and fluoroalkyl radicals. Trajectory calculations simulating energy transfer are being performed for ''generic'' substrate/deactivator pairs to provide additional details and insight on the important parameters. Model calculations are also being performed to determine the feasibility of obtaining information from experimental data for high-temperature unimolecular reactions

  16. Arginine-phosphate salt bridges between histones and DNA: Intermolecular actuators that control nucleosome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Li, Yun; Singh, Gautam; Olson, Wilma K.

    2014-10-01

    Structural bioinformatics and van der Waals density functional theory are combined to investigate the mechanochemical impact of a major class of histone-DNA interactions, namely, the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. Principal component analysis reveals that the configurational fluctuations of the sugar-phosphate backbone display sequence-specific directionality and variability, and clustering of nucleosome crystal structures identifies two major salt-bridge configurations: a monodentate form in which the arginine end-group guanidinium only forms one hydrogen bond with the phosphate, and a bidentate form in which it forms two. Density functional theory calculations highlight that the combination of sequence, denticity, and salt-bridge positioning enables the histones to apply a tunable mechanochemical stress to the DNA via precise and specific activation of backbone deformations. The results suggest that selection for specific placements of van der Waals contacts, with high-precision control of the spatial distribution of intermolecular forces, may serve as an underlying evolutionary design principle for the structure and function of nucleosomes, a conjecture that is corroborated by previous experimental studies.

  17. Anti-plasticizing effect of amorphous indomethacin induced by specific intermolecular interactions with PVA copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Aikawa, Shohei; Kashima, Yousuke; Kikuchi, Junko; Ida, Yasuo; Tanino, Tadatsugu; Kadota, Kazunori; Tozuka, Yuichi

    2014-09-01

    The mechanism of how poly(vinyl alcohol-co-acrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate) (PVA copolymer) stabilizes an amorphous drug was investigated. Solid dispersions of PVA copolymer, poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP), and poly(vinyl pyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) (PVPVA) with indomethacin (IMC) were prepared. The glass transition temperature (Tg)-proportion profiles were evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). General Tg profiles decreasing with the IMC ratio were observed for IMC-PVP and IMC-PVPVA samples. An interesting antiplasticizing effect of IMC on PVA copolymer was observed; Tg increased up to 20% IMC ratio. Further addition of IMC caused moderate reduction with positive deviation from theoretical values. Specific hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions between IMC and PVA copolymer were revealed by infrared spectra. The indole amide of IMC played an important role in hydrogen bonding with PVA copolymer, but not with PVP and PVPVA. X-ray diffraction findings and the endotherm on DSC profiles suggested that PVA copolymer could form a semicrystalline structure and a possibility of correlation of the crystallographic nature with its low hygroscopicity was suggested. PVA copolymer was able to prevent crystallization of amorphous IMC through both low hygroscopicity and the formation of a specific intermolecular interaction compared with that with PVP and PVPVA. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Competition between intermolecular interaction and configuration entropy as the structure-determining factor for inclusion compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbotin, O.; Belosludov, V.; Adamova, T. [Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Nikolaev Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Belosludov, R.; Kawazoe, Y. [Tohoku Univ., Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research; Kudoh, J.I. [Tohoku Univ., Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan). Center for Northeast Asia Studies

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented a newly developed method to accurately predict the thermodynamic properties of clathrate hydrates, particularly their structural phase transitions under pressure. The method is based on the theory of Van-der-Waals and Platteeuw with some modifications that include the influence of guest molecules on the host lattice. The model was used to explain the exception from the established rule that small guest molecules form structure s1 and large molecules form structure s2 hydrates. In this study, the thermodynamic properties of argon (Ar) hydrate and methane hydrate, each in both cubic structure s1 and s2 were modelled. The model showed that two competing factors play a role in the formation of inclusions, notably the intermolecular interaction of guest molecules with water molecules, and the configuration entropy. Competition of these 2 factors determines the structure of hydrate formed at different pressures. The model provides an accurate description of the thermodynamic properties of gas hydrates and how they behave under pressure. For the argon hydrates, the structural phase transition from structure s2 to s1 at high pressure was predicted, while methane hydrates were predicted to be metastable in the s2 structure. The model can be used for other inclusion compounds with the same type of composition such as clathrate silicon, zeolites, and inclusion compounds of semiconductor elements. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Analysis of intermolecular RNA-RNA recombination by rubella virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Sandra D.; Tzeng, W.-P.; Chen, M.-H.; Frey, Teryl K.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate whether rubella virus (RUB) undergoes intermolecular RNA-RNA recombination, cells were cotransfected with pairs of in vitro transcripts from genomic cDNA plasmid vectors engineered to contain nonoverlapping deletions: the replicative transcript maintained the 5'-proximal nonstructural (NS) ORF (which contained the replicase, making it RNA replication competent), had a deletion in the 3'-proximal structural protein (SP) ORF, and maintained the 3' end of the genome, including the putative 3' cis-acting elements (CSE), while the nonreplicative transcript consisted of the 3' half of the genome including the SP-ORF and 3' CSE. Cotransfection yielded plaque-forming virus that synthesized the standard genomic and subgenomic RNAs and thus was generated by RNA-RNA recombination. Using transcripts tagged with a 3'-terminal deletion, it was found that recombinants contained the 3' end derived from the replicative strand, indicating a cis-preference for initiation of negative-strand synthesis. In cotransfections in which the replicative transcript lacked the 3' CSE, recombination occurred, albeit at lower efficiency, indicating that initiation in trans from the NS-ORF can occur. The 3' CSE was sufficient as a nonreplicative transcript, showing that it can serve as a promoter for negative-strand RNA synthesis. While deletion mutagenesis showed that the presence of the junction untranslated region (J-UTR) between the ORFs appeared to be necessary on both transcripts for recombination in this region of the genome, analysis with transcripts tagged with restriction sites showed that the J-UTR was not a hot spot for recombination compared to neighboring regions in both ORFs. Sequence analysis of recombinants revealed that both precise (homologous) and imprecise recombination (aberrant, homologous resulting in duplications) occurred; however, imprecise recombination only involved the J-UTR or the 3' end of the NS-ORF and the J-UTR (maintaining the NS-ORF), indicating

  20. Measuring "Impossible" Intermolecular Cross-Peaks to Improve Selectivity and Specificity in Breast MRI

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Warren, Warren

    2000-01-01

    Work in my laboratory at the time of grant submission had shown that intermolecular cross-peaks could be generated in vivo, and that these peaks gave enhanced contrast in rat brain images, including tumor enhancement...

  1. Intermolecular Forces in Introductory Chemistry Studied by Gas Chromatography, Computer Models, and Viscometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedvik, Jonathan C.; McManaman, Charity; Anderson, Janet S.; Carroll, Mary K.

    1998-07-01

    An experiment on intermolecular forces for first-term introductory college chemistry is presented. The experiment integrates traditional viscometry-based measurements with modern chromatographic analysis and use of computer-based molecular models. Students performing gas chromatographic (GC) analyses of mixtures of n-alkanes and samples that simulate crime scene evidence discover that liquid mixtures can be separated rapidly into their components based upon intermolecular forces. Each group of students is given a liquid sample that simulates one collected at an arson scene, and the group is required to determine the identity of the accelerant. Students also examine computer models to better visualize how molecular structure affects intermolecular forces: London forces, dipole-dipole interactions, and hydrogen bonding. The relative viscosities of organic liquids are also measured to relate physical properties to intermolecular forces.

  2. The Raman and vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-containing complexes and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxton, P.M.; Schaeffer, M.W.; Ohline, S.M.; Kim, W.; Venturo, V.A.; Felker, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results pertaining to the excitation of intermolecular vibrations in the Raman and vibronic spectra of aromatic-containing, weakly bound complexes and clusters are reported. The theoretical analysis of intermolecular Raman activity is based on the assumption that the polarizability tensor of a weakly bound species is given by the sum of the polarizability tensors of its constituent monomers. The analysis shows that the van der Waals bending fundamentals in aromatic--rare gas complexes may be expected to be strongly Raman active. More generally, it predicts strong Raman activity for intermolecular vibrations that involve the libration or internal rotation of monomer moieties having appreciable permanent polarizability anisotropies. The vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-rare gas complexes is analyzed under the assumption that every vibronic band gains its strength from an aromatic-localized transition. It is found that intermolecular vibrational excitations can accompany aromatic-localized vibronic excitations by the usual Franck--Condon mechanism or by a mechanism dependent on the librational amplitude of the aromatic moiety during the course of the pertinent intermolecular vibration. The latter mechanism can impart appreciable intensity to bands that are forbidden by rigid-molecule symmetry selection rules. The applicability of such rules is therefore called into question. Finally, experimental spectra of intermolecular transitions, obtained by mass-selective, ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies, are reported for benzene--X (X=Ar, --Ar 2 , N 2 , HCl, CO 2 , and --fluorene), fluorobenzene--Ar and --Kr, aniline--Ar, and fluorene--Ar and --Ar 2 . The results support the conclusions of the theoretical analyses and provide further evidence for the value of Raman methods in characterizing intermolecular vibrational level structures

  3. Intermolecular failure of L-type Ca2+ channel and ryanodine receptor signaling in hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure overload-induced hypertrophy is a key step leading to heart failure. The Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release (CICR process that governs cardiac contractility is defective in hypertrophy/heart failure, but the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. To examine the intermolecular aspects of CICR during hypertrophy, we utilized loose-patch confocal imaging to visualize the signaling between a single L-type Ca(2+ channel (LCC and ryanodine receptors (RyRs in aortic stenosis rat models of compensated (CHT and decompensated (DHT hypertrophy. We found that the LCC-RyR intermolecular coupling showed a 49% prolongation in coupling latency, a 47% decrease in chance of hit, and a 72% increase in chance of miss in DHT, demonstrating a state of "intermolecular failure." Unexpectedly, these modifications also occurred robustly in CHT due at least partially to decreased expression of junctophilin, indicating that intermolecular failure occurs prior to cellular manifestations. As a result, cell-wide Ca(2+ release, visualized as "Ca(2+ spikes," became desynchronized, which contrasted sharply with unaltered spike integrals and whole-cell Ca(2+ transients in CHT. These data suggested that, within a certain limit, termed the "stability margin," mild intermolecular failure does not damage the cellular integrity of excitation-contraction coupling. Only when the modification steps beyond the stability margin does global failure occur. The discovery of "hidden" intermolecular failure in CHT has important clinical implications.

  4. Observation of aggregation triggered by Resonance Energy Transfer (RET) induced intermolecular pairing force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Wang, Weizhi; Ke, Lin; Zhang, Nan

    2017-07-20

    In this report, we showed the existence of RET induced intermolecular pairing force by comparing their fluorescence behaviors under room illumination vs standing in dark area for either PFluAnt solution or PFluAnt&PFOBT mixture. Their prominent emission attenuation under room illumination brought out the critical role of photo, i.e. RET induced intermolecular pairing force in induction of polymer aggregation. Constant UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectra in terms of both peak shapes and maximum wavelengths implied no chemical decomposition was involved. Recoverable fluorescence intensity, fluorescence lifetime as well as NMR spectra further exclude photo induced decomposition. The controllable on/off state of RET induced intermolecular pairing force was verified by the masking effect of outside PFluAnt solution which function as filter to block the excitation of inside PFluAnt and thus off the RET induced intermolecular pairing force. Theoretical calculation suggest that magnitude of RET induced intermolecular pairing force is on the same scale as that of van der Waals interaction. Although the absolute magnitude of RET induced intermolecular pairing force was not tunable, its effect can be magnified by intentionally turn it "on", which was achieved by irradiance with 5 W desk lamp in this report.

  5. Intermolecular proton transfer in anionic complexes of uracil with alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Rak, Janusz; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Radisic, Dunja; Stokes, Sarah T.; Bowen, Kit H.

    2005-01-01

    A series of eighteen alcohols (ROH) has been designed with an enthalpy of deprotonation (H DP ) in a range of 13.8-16.3 eV. The effects of excess electron attachment to the binary alcohol-uracil (ROH...U) complexes have been studied at the density functional level with a B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and at the second order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory level. The photoelectron spectra of anionic complexes of uracil with three alcohols (ethanol, 2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoroethanol and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol) have been measured with 2.54 eV photons. For ROHs with deprotonation enthalpies larger than 14.8 eV only the ROH...U - minimum exists on the potential energy surface of the anionic complex. For alcohols with deprotonation enthalpies in a range of 14.3-14.8 eV two minima might exist on the anionic potential energy surface, which correspond to the RO - ...HU . and ROH...U - structures. For ROHs with deprotonation enthalpies smaller than 14.3 eV, the excess electron attachment to the ROH...U complex always induces a barrier-free proton transfer from the hydroxyl group of ROH to the O8 atom of U, with the product being RO - ...HU . . A driving force for the intermolecular proton transfer is to stabilize the excess negative charge localized on a orbital of uracil. Therefore, these complexes with proton transferred to the anionic uracil are characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy (VDE). The values of VDE for anionic complexes span a range from 1.0 to 2.3 eV and roughly correlate with the acidity of alcohols. However, there is a gap of ∼0.5 eV in the values of VDE, which separates the two families, ROH...U - and RO - ...HU . , of anionic complexes. The energy of stabilization for the anionic complexes spans a range from 0.6 to 1.7 eV and roughly correlates with the acidity of alcohols. The measured photoelectron spectra are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions

  6. Ranking beta sheet topologies with applications to protein structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Helles, Glennie; Winter, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    One reason why ab initio protein structure predictors do not perform very well is their inability to reliably identify long-range interactions between amino acids. To achieve reliable long-range interactions, all potential pairings of ß-strands (ß-topologies) of a given protein are enumerated, in...

  7. pH- and thermal-dependent conformational transition of PGAIPG, a repeated hexapeptide sequence from tropoelastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Hsieh, Tzu-Feng; Wei, Yen-Shan

    2005-04-01

    The secondary structure of PGAIPG (Pro-Gly-Ala-IIe-Pro-Gly), a repeated hexapeptide of tropoelastin, in buffer solution of different pH was determined by using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The thermal-dependent structural change of PGAIPG in aqueous solution or in solid state was also examined by thermal FTIR microspectroscopy. The conformation of PGAIPG in aqueous solution exhibited a pH-dependent structural characterization. A predominant peak at 1614 cm(-1) (aggregated beta-sheet) with a shoulder near 1560 cm(-1) (beta-sheet) appeared in pH 5.5-8.5 buffer solutions. A new broad shoulder at 1651 cm(-1) (random coil and/or alpha-helix) with 1614 cm(-1) was observed in the pH 4.5 buffer solution. However, the broad shoulder at 1651 cm(-1) was converted to a maximum peak at 1679 cm(-1) (beta-turn/antiparallel beta-sheet) when the pH shifted from 4.5 to 3.5, but the original pronounced peak at 1614 cm(-1) became a shoulder. Once the pH was lowered to 2.5, the IR spectrum of PGAIPG was dominated by major absorption at 1679 cm(-1) with a minor peak at 1552 cm(-1) (alpha-helix/random coil). The result indicates that the pH was a predominant factor to transform PGAIPG structure from aggregated beta-sheet (pH 8.5) to beta-turn/intermolecular antiparallel beta-sheet (pH 2.5). Moreover, a partial conformation of PGAIPG with minor alpha-helix/random coil structures was also explored in the lower pH buffer solution. There was no thermal-dependent structural change for solid-state PGAIPG. The thermal-induced formation of aggregated beta-sheet for PGAIPG in aqueous solution was found from 28 to 30 degrees C, however, which might be correlated with the formation of an opaque gel that turned from clear solution. The formation of aggregated beta-sheet structure for PGAIPG beyond 30 degrees C might be due to the intermolecular hydrogen bonded interaction between the hydrophobic PGAIPG fragments induced by coacervation.

  8. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  9. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  10. Impact of proline and aspartic acid residues on the dissociation of intermolecularly crosslinked peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Myles W; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2008-03-01

    The dissociation of intermolecularly crosslinked peptides was evaluated for a series of peptides with proline or aspartic acid residues positioned adjacent to the crosslinking sites (lysine residues). The peptides were crosslinked with either disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS) or disuccinimidyl L-tartrate (DST), and the influence of proline and aspartic acid residues on the fragmentation patterns were investigated for precursor ions with and without a mobile proton. Collisionally activated dissociation (CAD) spectra of aspartic acid-containing crosslinked peptide ions, doubly-charged with both protons sequestered, were dominated by cleavage C-terminal to the Asp residue, similar to that of unmodified peptides. The proline-containing crosslinked peptides exhibited a high degree of internal ion formation, with the resulting product ions having an N-terminal proline residue. Upon dissociation of the doubly-charged crosslinked peptides, twenty to fifty percent of the fragment ion abundance was accounted for by multiple cleavage products. Crosslinked peptides possessing a mobile proton yielded almost a full series of b- and y-type fragment ions, with only proline-directed fragments still observed at high abundances. Interestingly, the crosslinked peptides exhibited a tendency to dissociate at the amide bond C-terminal to the crosslinked lysine residue, relative to the N-terminal side. One could envision updating computer algorithms to include these crosslinker specific product ions--particularly for precursor ions with localized protons--that provide complementary and confirmatory information, to offer more confident identification of both the crosslinked peptides and the location of the crosslink, as well as affording predictive guidelines for interpretation of the product-ion spectra of crosslinked peptides.

  11. The iodine molecule insights into intra- and intermolecular perturbation in diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lukashov, Sergey; Pravilov, Anatoly

    2018-01-01

    This book presents experimental and theoretical spectroscopic studies performed over the last 25 years on the iodine molecule’s excited states and their perturbations. It is going to be of interest to researchers who study intra- and intermolecular perturbations in diatomic molecules and more complex systems. The book offers a detailed treatment of the nonadiabatic perturbations of valence, ion pair and Rydberg states induced by intramolecular as well as intermolecular interactions in collisions or in weakly-bound complexes. It also provides an overview of current instrumentation and techniques as well as theoretical approaches describing intra- and intermolecular perturbations. The authors are experts in the use of spectroscopy for the study of intrinsic and collision-induced perturbations in diatomic iodine. They introduced new methods of two- and three-step optical population of the iodine ion-pair states. The iodine molecule has 23 valence states correlating with three dissociation limits, 20 so-called ...

  12. Moment Analysis Theory for Size Exclusion Capillary Electrochromatography with Chemical Reaction of Intermolecular Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Kanji; Suzuki, Nozomu

    2017-01-01

    New moment equations were developed for size exclusion capillary electrochromatography (SECEC), in which intermolecular chemical reactions simultaneously took place. They explain how the first absolute and second central moments of elution peaks are correlated with some fundamental equilibrium and kinetic parameters of mass transfer and chemical reaction in SECEC column. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the moment equations, they were used to predict chromatographic behavior under hypothetical SECEC conditions. It was quantitatively studied how the association and dissociation rate constants of intermolecular interaction affected the position and spreading of elution peaks. It was indicated that both the intermolecular reaction kinetics and axial dispersion of solute molecules in a capillary column had a predominant contribution to the band broadening.

  13. Evidence of low intermolecular coupling in rubrene single crystals by Raman scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg-Wolf, J R; McNeil, L E; Liu Shubin; Kloc, Christian

    2007-01-01

    The observed Raman spectra for single crystals of rubrene and tetracene are compared with the calculated spectra for the isolated molecules. The Raman measurements presented are of the bulk properties of the material, and they confirmed that the vapour growth process yields very pure, unstrained rubrene crystals. Finally, Raman measurements indicate that rubrene, unlike many other oligoacenes, has very weak intermolecular coupling and no observable intermolecular Raman vibrational modes. We discuss the apparent conflict between the high mobility and the weak π-electron overlap in this material

  14. Influence of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the fluorescence decay time of indigo derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, S.; Lill, E.; Hefferle, P.; Doerr, F.

    1981-01-01

    It is well known that both intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding can lead to drastic changes in the lifetime of the first excited singlet state. By employing a synchronously pumped, mode-locked dye-laser for excitation in connection with a continuously operated streak camera for detection, the solvent-dependent fluorescence decay times of several indigo derivatives were determined with high temporal resolution (approx. 5 ps with deconvolution). It is found that in indigo dyes intramolecular hydrogen bonding gives rise to a strong fluorescence quenching; intermolecular hydrogen bonding can also provide a channel for fast radiationless deactivation in those derivatives in which the former are not present. (author)

  15. Ab initio and Gordon--Kim intermolecular potentials for two nitrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ree, F.H.; Winter, N.W.

    1980-01-01

    Both ab initio MO--LCAO--SCF and the electron-gas (or Gordon--Kim) methods have been used to compute the intermolecular potential (Phi) of N 2 molecules for seven different N 2 --N 2 orientations. The ab initio calculations were carried out using a [4s3p] contracted Gaussian basis set with and without 3d polarization functions. The larger basis set provides adequate results for Phi>0.002 hartree or intermolecular separations less than 6.5--7 bohr. We use a convenient analytic expression to represent the ab initio data in terms of the intermolecular distance and three angles defining the orientations of the two N 2 molecules. The Gordon--Kim method with Rae's self-exchange correction yields Phi, which agrees reasonably well over a large repulsive range. However, a detailed comparison of the electron kinetic energy contributions shows a large difference between the ab initio and the Gordon--Kim calculations. Using the ab initio data we derive an atom--atom potential of the two N 2 molecules. Although this expression does not accurately fit the data at some orientations, its spherical average agrees with the corresponding average of the ab initio Phi remarkably well. The spherically averaged ab initio Phi is also compared with the corresponding quantities derived from experimental considerations. The approach of the ab initio Phi to the classical quadrupole--quadrupole interaction at large intermolecular separation is also discussed

  16. Catalytic Intermolecular Cross-Couplings of Azides and LUMO-Activated Unsaturated Acyl Azoliums

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wenjun

    2017-02-15

    An example for the catalytic synthesis of densely functionalized 1,2,3-triazoles through a LUMO activation mode has been developed. The protocol is enabled by intermolecular cross coupling reactions of azides with in situ-generated alpha,beta-unsaturated acyl azoliums. High yields and broad scope as well as the investigation of reaction mechanism are reported.

  17. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming

    2013-11-01

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  18. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming

    2013-11-28

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  19. Transient process spectroscopy for the direct observation of inter-molecular photo-dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Hashimoto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Transient process spectroscopy has previously been thought to be applicable only to the analysis of intra-molecular processes. Two metal ion bridges used in the present work have allowed us to visualize real-time variations of the molecular vibration frequencies during photo-disproportionation inside bimolecule aggregates, which directly shows transient inter-molecular reactions.

  20. Studying Intermolecular Forces with a Dual Gas Chromatography and Boiling Point Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, William Patrick; Xia, Ian; Wickline, Kaitlyn; Huitron, Eric Ivan Garcia; Heo, Jun

    2018-01-01

    A procedure for the study of structural differences and intermolecular attraction between ethanol and 1-butanol based in laboratory work is described. This study provides comparisons of data retrieved from both a determination of boiling point and gas chromatography traces for the mixture. The methodology reported here should provide instructors…

  1. Supramolecular salts of 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine and acids through classical H-Bonds and other intermolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lingfeng; Jin, Shouwen; Jin, Shide; Gao, Xingjun; Xie, Xinxin; Lin, Zhihao; Wang, Yining; Xu, Weiqiang; Wang, Daqi

    2018-02-01

    This article demonstrates 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine based organic salts formation of crystalline solids 1-9, in which the acidic units have been integrated via a variety of non-covalent bonds. Addition of equivalents of the acidic units to the solution of 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine generates the single protonated species which direct the anions. The nine compounds crystallize as their salts with the acidic H transferred to the aromatic N of the 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine. In 2, 3, 4, and 7 the methyl substituted N-rings were protonated, while others were protonated at the NH2 substituted N-ring. All salts have been characterized via IR, mp, EA and XRD technique. The major driving force for the salt formation is attributed to the classical H-bonds from 5,7-dimethyl-1,8-naphthyridine-2-amine and the acids. Other extensive intermolecular interactions also play great functions in space association of the molecular assemblies in the relevant crystals. The common R22(8) graph set has been observed in all salts due to the H-bonds and other intermolecular interactions, except 2, 4, and 6. For the synergistic interactions of the various non-covalent bonds, all salts displayed 3D structures.

  2. Atom depth analysis delineates mechanisms of protein intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alocci, Davide; Bernini, Andrea; Niccolai, Neri

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •3D atom depth analysis is proposed to identify different layers in protein structures. •Amino acid contents for each layers have been analyzed for a large protein dataset. •Charged amino acids in the most external layer are present at very different extents. •Atom depth indexes of K residues reflect their side chains flexibility. •Mobile surface charges can be responsible for long range protein–protein recognition. -- Abstract: The systematic analysis of amino acid distribution, performed inside a large set of resolved protein structures, sheds light on possible mechanisms driving non random protein–protein approaches. Protein Data Bank entries have been selected using as filters a series of restrictions ensuring that the shape of protein surface is not modified by interactions with large or small ligands. 3D atom depth has been evaluated for all the atoms of the 2,410 selected structures. The amino acid relative population in each of the structural layers formed by grouping atoms on the basis of their calculated depths, has been evaluated. We have identified seven structural layers, the inner ones reproducing the core of proteins and the outer one incorporating their most protruding moieties. Quantitative analysis of amino acid contents of structural layers identified, as expected, different behaviors. Atoms of Q, R, K, N, D residues are increasingly more abundant in going from core to surfaces. An opposite trend is observed for V, I, L, A, C, and G. An intermediate behavior is exhibited by P, S, T, M, W, H, F and Y. The outer structural layer hosts predominantly E and K residues whose charged moieties, protruding from outer regions of the protein surface, reorient free from steric hindrances, determining specific electrodynamics maps. This feature may represent a protein signature for long distance effects, driving the formation of encounter complexes and the eventual short distance approaches that are required for protein

  3. Catalyst-Controlled and Tunable, Chemoselective Silver-Catalyzed Intermolecular Nitrene Transfer: Experimental and Computational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Nicholas S; Scamp, Ryan J; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Berry, John F; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2016-11-09

    The development of new catalysts for selective nitrene transfer is a continuing area of interest. In particular, the ability to control the chemoselectivity of intermolecular reactions in the presence of multiple reactive sites has been a long-standing challenge in the field. In this paper, we demonstrate examples of silver-catalyzed, nondirected, intermolecular nitrene transfer reactions that are both chemoselective and flexible for aziridination or C-H insertion, depending on the choice of ligand. Experimental probes present a puzzling picture of the mechanistic details of the pathways mediated by [( t Bu 3 tpy)AgOTf] 2 and (tpa)AgOTf. Computational studies elucidate these subtleties and provide guidance for the future development of new catalysts exhibiting improved tunability in group transfer reactions.

  4. A quantitative analysis of weak intermolecular interactions & quantum chemical calculations (DFT) of novel chalcone derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavda, Bhavin R.; Gandhi, Sahaj A.; Dubey, Rahul P.; Patel, Urmila H.; Barot, Vijay M.

    2016-05-01

    The novel chalcone derivatives have widespread applications in material science and medicinal industries. The density functional theory (DFT) is used to optimized the molecular structure of the three chalcone derivatives (M-I, II, III). The observed discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental (X-ray data) results attributed to different environments of the molecules, the experimental values are of the molecule in solid state there by subjected to the intermolecular forces, like non-bonded hydrogen bond interactions, where as isolated state in gas phase for theoretical studies. The lattice energy of all the molecules have been calculated using PIXELC module in Coulomb -London -Pauli (CLP) package and is partitioned into corresponding coulombic, polarization, dispersion and repulsion contributions. Lattice energy data confirm and strengthen the finding of the X-ray results that the weak but significant intermolecular interactions like C-H…O, Π- Π and C-H… Π plays an important role in the stabilization of crystal packing.

  5. Changes of microstructure characteristics and intermolecular interactions of preserved egg white gel during pickling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yan; Chen, Zhangyi; Li, Jianke; Xu, Mingsheng; Shao, Yaoyao; Tu, Yonggang

    2016-07-15

    Changes in gel microstructure characteristics and in intermolecular interactions of preserved egg whites during pickling were investigated. Spin-spin relaxation times of preserved egg whites significantly decreased in the first 8 days and remained unchanged after the 16th day. SEM images revealed a three-dimensional gel network, interwoven with a loose linear fibrous mesh structure. The protein gel mesh structure became more regular, smaller, and compacted with pickling time. Free sulfhydryl contents in the egg whites increased significantly, while total sulfhydryl contents dramatically decreased during pickling. The primary intermolecular forces in the preserved egg white gels were ionic and disulfide bonds. Secondary forces included hydrophobic interaction and relatively few hydrogen bonds. During the first 8 days, the proportion of ionic bonds sharply decreased, and that of disulfide bonds increased over the first 24 days. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Organic narrowband near-infrared photodetectors based on intermolecular charge-transfer absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Bernhard; Mischok, Andreas; Benduhn, Johannes; Zeika, Olaf; Ullbrich, Sascha; Nehm, Frederik; Böhm, Matthias; Spoltore, Donato; Fröb, Hartmut; Körner, Christian; Leo, Karl; Vandewal, Koen

    2017-06-01

    Blending organic electron donors and acceptors yields intermolecular charge-transfer states with additional optical transitions below their optical gaps. In organic photovoltaic devices, such states play a crucial role and limit the operating voltage. Due to its extremely weak nature, direct intermolecular charge-transfer absorption often remains undetected and unused for photocurrent generation. Here, we use an optical microcavity to increase the typically negligible external quantum efficiency in the spectral region of charge-transfer absorption by more than 40 times, yielding values over 20%. We demonstrate narrowband detection with spectral widths down to 36 nm and resonance wavelengths between 810 and 1,550 nm, far below the optical gap of both donor and acceptor. The broad spectral tunability via a simple variation of the cavity thickness makes this innovative, flexible and potentially visibly transparent device principle highly suitable for integrated low-cost spectroscopic near-infrared photodetection.

  7. Greenhouse effect in planetary atmospheres caused by molecular symmetry breaking in intermolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigasin, A. A.; Mokhov, I. I.

    2017-03-01

    It is believed that the greenhouse effect is related to the parameters of absorption spectra of polyatomic molecules, usually trace gases, in planetary atmospheres. The main components of all known atmospheres of celestial bodies are symmetrical molecules that do not possess the dipole-allowed purely rotational (and in the case of diatomic molecules, vibrational-rotational) absorption spectrum. Upon increased pressure, a weak absorption appears, induced by intermolecular interaction, which can lead to a greenhouse effect. The contribution of the induced absorption in radiative forcing of a dense atmosphere may amount to a few or even tens of W/m2. In conditions typical for the atmospheres of terrestrial planets (including paleoatmospheres), the collision-induced absorption and associated greenhouse effect may lead to an increase in surface temperature above the freezing point of water. There is a correlation between the temperature of an atmosphere and the intermolecular bonding energy of gases that dominate in planetary atmospheres of the Solar System.

  8. Copper-catalyzed intermolecular trifluoromethylazidation of alkenes: convenient access to CF3 -containing alkyl azides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Qi, Xiaoxu; Liang, Zhaoli; Chen, Pinhong; Liu, Guosheng

    2014-02-10

    A novel copper-catalyzed intermolecular trifluoromethylazidation of alkenes has been developed under mild reaction conditions. A variety of CF3 -containing organoazides were directly synthesized from a wide range of olefins, including activated and unactivated alkenes, and the resulting products can be easily transformed into the corresponding CF3 -containing amine derivatives. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Branched-Selective Intermolecular Ketone α-Alkylation with Unactivated Alkenes via an Enamide Directing Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Dong; Dong, Guangbin

    2017-10-04

    We describe a strategy for intermolecular branched-selective α-alkylation of ketones using simple alkenes as the alkylating agents. Enamides derived from isoindolin-1-one provide an excellent directing template for catalytic activation of ketone α-positions. High branched selectivity is obtained for both aliphatic and aromatic alkenes using a cationic iridium catalyst. Preliminary mechanistic study favors an Ir-C migratory insertion pathway.

  10. Weak Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds with Fluorine: Detection and Implications for Enzymatic/Chemical Reactions, Chemical Properties, and Ligand/Protein Fluorine NMR Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvit, Claudio; Vulpetti, Anna

    2016-05-23

    It is known that strong hydrogen-bonding interactions play an important role in many chemical and biological systems. However, weak or very weak hydrogen bonds, which are often difficult to detect and characterize, may also be relevant in many recognition and reaction processes. Fluorine serving as a hydrogen-bond acceptor has been the subject of many controversial discussions and there are different opinions about it. It now appears that there is compelling experimental evidence for the involvement of fluorine in weak intramolecular or intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Using established NMR methods, we have previously characterized and measured the strengths of intermolecular hydrogen-bond complexes involving the fluorine moieties CH2 F, CHF2 , and CF3 , and have compared them with the well-known hydrogen-bond complex formed between acetophenone and the strong hydrogen-bond donor p-fluorophenol. We now report evidence for the formation of hydrogen bonds involving fluorine with significantly weaker donors, namely 5-fluoroindole and water. A simple NMR method is proposed for the simultaneous measurement of the strengths of hydrogen bonds between an acceptor and a donor or water. Important implications of these results for enzymatic/chemical reactions involving fluorine, for chemical and physical properties, and for ligand/protein (19) F NMR screening are analyzed through experiments and theoretical simulations. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. VSCF calculations for the intra- and intermolecular vibrational modes of the water dimer and its isotopologs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, João G.S.; Barbosa, André G.H., E-mail: andre@vm.uff.br

    2016-11-10

    In this work we show how the VSCF method may be successfully used to describe all fundamental vibrational transitions of several isotopologs of water dimer. By expressing the normal mode displacements in terms of appropriate delocalized internal coordinates we are able to minimize the mode-mode coupling in the PES and thus yield PT2-VSCF frequencies in good agreement with the experiment. The use of curvilinear normal modes is of paramount importance to describe vibrational transitions of the very soft intermolecular modes. Within our approach the maximum calculated error for the (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} intermolecular frequencies are reduced from 311 cm{sup −1} (Cartesian normal modes) to just 56 cm{sup −1} (curvilinear normal modes). Plots of the diagonal intermolecular potential and of the vibrational wave function illustrate the remarkable effect of different coordinate systems. In conclusion, our PT2-VSCF calculations provide a fair anharmonic description of the fundamental transitions of water dimers.

  12. Behavior of intermolecular interactions in α-glycine under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Ayako; Komatsu, Kazuki; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Chikako; Machida, Shinichi; Sano-Furukawa, Asami; Hattori, Takanori

    2018-01-01

    Pressure-response on the crystal structure of deuterated α-glycine was investigated at room temperature, using powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and powder neutron diffraction measurements under high pressure. No phase change was observed up to 8.7 GPa, although anisotropy of the lattice compressibility was found. No significant changes in the compressibility and the intramolecular distance between non-deuterated α-glycine and deuterated α-glycine were observed. Neutron diffraction measurements indicated the distance of the intermolecular D⋯O bond along with the c-axis increased with compression up to 6.4 GPa. The distance of another D⋯O bond along with the a-axis decreased with increasing pressure and became the shortest intermolecular hydrogen bond above 3 GPa. In contrast, the lengths of the bifurcated N-D⋯O and C-D⋯O hydrogen bonds, which are formed between the layers of the α-glycine molecules along the b-axis, decreased significantly with increasing pressure. The decrease of the intermolecular distances resulted in the largest compressibility of the b-axis, compared to the other two axes. The Hirshfeld analysis suggested that the reduction of the void region size, rather than shrinkage of the strong N-D⋯O hydrogen bonds, occurred with compression.

  13. Quantified Binding Scale of Competing Ligands at the Surface of Gold Nanoparticles: The Role of Entropy and Intermolecular Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Claire; Ribot, François; Peiretti, Leonardo F; Quaino, Paola; Tielens, Frederik; Sanchez, Clément; Chanéac, Corinne; Portehault, David

    2017-05-01

    A basic understanding of the driving forces for the formation of multiligand coronas or self-assembled monolayers over metal nanoparticles is mandatory to control and predict the properties of ligand-protected nanoparticles. Herein, 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and advanced density functional theory (DFT) modeling are combined to highlight the key parameters defining the efficiency of ligand exchange on dispersed gold nanoparticles. The compositions of the surface and of the liquid reaction medium are quantitatively correlated for bifunctional gold nanoparticles protected by a range of competing thiols, including an alkylthiol, arylthiols of varying chain length, thiols functionalized by ethyleneglycol units, and amide groups. These partitions are used to build scales that quantify the ability of a ligand to exchange dodecanethiol. Such scales can be used to target a specific surface composition by choosing the right exchange conditions (ligand ratio, concentrations, and particle size). In the specific case of arylthiols, the exchange ability scale is exploited with the help of DFT modeling to unveil the roles of intermolecular forces and entropic effects in driving ligand exchange. It is finally suggested that similar considerations may apply to other ligands and to direct biligand synthesis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Mechanism and Regioselectivity of Rh(III)-Catalyzed Intermolecular Annulation of Aryl-Substituted Diazenecarboxylates and Alkenes: DFT Insights

    KAUST Repository

    Ajitha, Manjaly John

    2016-02-05

    The mechanism of Rh-catalyzed intermolecular annulation of aryl-substituted diazenecarboxylates and alkenes was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) (PCM-M062X/6-311+G(d,p)//M062X/6-31G(d)). The acetate ligand (OAc)-assisted C-H activation via the formation of a five-membered rhodacycle (I-TS1; ΔG‡ = 19.4 kcal/mol) is more favorable compared to that via a four-membered intermediate (II-TS1; ΔG‡ = 27.8 kcal/mol). Our results also revealed that the seven-membered intermediate (I-3, ΔGrel = -6.8 kcal/mol) formed after the alkene insertion could undergo a coordination switch with the adjacent nitrogen atom (via TScs; ΔG‡ = 16.5 kcal/mol) to produce a thermodynamically stable six-membered intermediate (II-3, ΔGrel = -10.4 kcal/mol), eventually leading to a cyclization process followed by a barrierless ligand-assisted protonation to yield the final product. The β-hydride elimination product was found to be kinetically and thermodynamically undesirable. The rate-determining step is identified as the initial C-H activation, consistent with the previous kinetic studies. Notably, DFT studies offered important insights on the ability of the substrate (diazene carboxylate) to promote the switchable coordination site selectivity during the reaction to achieve a lower energy pathway. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  15. Altering intra- to inter-molecular hydrogen bonding by dimethylsulfoxide: A TDDFT study of charge transfer for coumarin 343

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Yin, Hang; Li, Hui; Shi, Ying

    2017-04-01

    DFT and TDDFT methods were carried out to investigate the influences of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding on excited state charge transfer for coumarin 343 (C343). Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is formed between carboxylic acid group and carbonyl group in C343 monomer. However, in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution, DMSO 'opens up' the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and forms solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonded C343-DMSO complex. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals reveals that intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) occurs in the first excited state both for C343 monomer and complex. The results of optimized geometric structures indicate that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction is strengthened while the intermolecular hydrogen bonding is weakened in excited state, which is confirmed again by monitoring the shifts of characteristic peaks of infrared spectra. We demonstrated that DMSO solvent can not only break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding to form intermolecular hydrogen bonding with C343 but also alter the mechanism of excited state hydrogen bonding strengthening.

  16. Structure-based design of non-natural amino-acid inhibitors of amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Karanicolas, John; Chang, Howard W.; Zhao, Anni; Jiang, Lin; Zirafi, Onofrio; Stevens, Jason T.; Münch, Jan; Baker, David; Eisenberg, David (UCLA); (UWASH); (UL); (Kansas); (Ulm)

    2011-09-20

    Many globular and natively disordered proteins can convert into amyloid fibrils. These fibrils are associated with numerous pathologies as well as with normal cellular functions, and frequently form during protein denaturation. Inhibitors of pathological amyloid fibril formation could be useful in the development of therapeutics, provided that the inhibitors were specific enough to avoid interfering with normal processes. Here we show that computer-aided, structure-based design can yield highly specific peptide inhibitors of amyloid formation. Using known atomic structures of segments of amyloid fibrils as templates, we have designed and characterized an all-D-amino-acid inhibitor of the fibril formation of the tau protein associated with Alzheimer's disease, and a non-natural L-amino-acid inhibitor of an amyloid fibril that enhances sexual transmission of human immunodeficiency virus. Our results indicate that peptides from structure-based designs can disrupt the fibril formation of full-length proteins, including those, such as tau protein, that lack fully ordered native structures. Because the inhibiting peptides have been designed on structures of dual-{beta}-sheet 'steric zippers', the successful inhibition of amyloid fibril formation strengthens the hypothesis that amyloid spines contain steric zippers.

  17. Using corresponding state theory to obtain intermolecular potentials to calculate pure liquid shock Hugoniots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1997-12-01

    Determination of product species, equations-of-state (EOS) and thermochemical properties of high explosives and pyrotechnics remains a major unsolved problem. Although, empirical EOS models may be calibrated to replicate detonation conditions within experimental variability (5--10%), different states, e.g. expansion, may produce significant discrepancy with data if the basic form of the EOS model is incorrect. A more physically realistic EOS model based on intermolecular potentials, such as the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler (JCZ3) EOS, is needed to predict detonation states as well as expanded states. Predictive capability for any EOS requires a large species data base composed of a wide variety of elements. Unfortunately, only 20 species have known JCZ3 molecular force constants. Of these 20 species, only 10 have been adequately compared to experimental data such as molecular scattering or shock Hugoniot data. Since data in the strongly repulsive region of the molecular potential is limited, alternative methods must be found to deduce force constants for a larger number of species. The objective of the present study is to determine JCZ3 product species force constants by using a corresponding states theory. Intermolecular potential parameters were obtained for a variety of gas species using a simple corresponding states technique with critical volume and critical temperature. A more complex, four parameter corresponding state method with shape and polarity corrections was also used to obtain intermolecular potential parameters. Both corresponding state methods were used to predict shock Hugoniot data obtained from pure liquids. The simple corresponding state method is shown to give adequate agreement with shock Hugoniot data.

  18. Intermolecular interactions between imidazole derivatives intercalated in layered solids. Substituent group effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, M.; Lemus-Santana, A.A. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Rodríguez-Hernández, J. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Materiales, Universidad de La Habana, Havana (Cuba); Aguirre-Velez, C.I. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico); Knobel, M. [Institute of Physics “Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México, DF (Mexico)

    2013-08-15

    This study sheds light on the intermolecular interactions between imidazole derive molecules (2-methyl-imidazole, 2-ethyl-imidazole and benzimidazole) intercalated in T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layers to form a solid of formula unit T(ImD){sub 2}[Ni(CN){sub 4}]. These hybrid inorganic–organic solids were prepared by soft chemical routes and their crystal structures solved and refined from X-ray powder diffraction data. The involved imidazole derivative molecules were found coordinated through the pyridinic N atom to the axial positions for the metal T in the T[Ni(CN){sub 4}] layer. In the interlayers region ligand molecules from neighboring layers remain stacked in a face-to-face configuration through dipole–dipole and quadrupole–quadrupole interactions. These intermolecular interactions show a pronounced dependence on the substituent group and are responsible for an ImD-pillaring concatenation of adjacent layers. This is supported by the structural information and the recorded magnetic data in the 2–300 K temperature range. The samples containing Co and Ni are characterized by presence of spin–orbit coupling and pronounced temperature dependence for the effective magnetic moment except for 2-ethyl-imidazole related to the local distortion for the metal coordination environment. For this last one ligand a weak ferromagnetic ordering ascribed to a super-exchange interaction between T metals from neighboring layers through the ligands π–π interaction was detected. - Graphical abstract: In the interlayers region imidazole derivative molecules are oriented according to their dipolar and quadrupolar interactions and minimizing the steric impediment. Highlights: • Imidazole derivatives intercalation compounds. • Intermolecular interaction between intercalated imidazole derivatives. • Hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Pi–pi interactions and ferromagnetic coupling. • Dipolar and quadrupolar interactions between intercalated imidazole derivatives.

  19. Catalytic Asymmetric Synthesis of 8-Oxabicyclooctanes by Intermolecular [5+2] Pyrylium Cycloadditions**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witten, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Highly enantioselective intermolecular [5+2] cycloadditions of pyrylium ion intermediates with electron-rich alkenes are promoted by a dual catalyst system composed of an achiral thiourea and a chiral primary aminothiourea. The observed enantioselectivity is highly dependent on the substitution pattern of the 5π component, and the basis for this effect is analyzed using experimental and computational evidence. The resultant 8-oxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane derivatives possess a scaffold common in natural products and medicinally active compounds and are also versatile chiral building blocks for further manipulations. Several stereoselective complexity-generating transformations of the 8-oxabicyclooctane products are presented. PMID:24782332

  20. The same number of optimized parameters scheme for determining intermolecular interaction energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Eriksen, Janus Juul

    2015-01-01

    We propose the Same Number Of Optimized Parameters (SNOOP) scheme as an alternative to the counterpoise method for treating basis set superposition errors in calculations of intermolecular interaction energies. The key point of the SNOOP scheme is to enforce that the number of optimized wave...... as numerically. Numerical results for second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and coupled-cluster with single, double, and approximate triple excitations (CCSD(T)) show that the SNOOP scheme in general outperforms the uncorrected and counterpoise approaches. Furthermore, we show that SNOOP...

  1. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic effects on the 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and 131Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe2 system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular...... in Xe gas. Our best results, obtained with the piecewise approximation for the binary chemical shift combined with the previously published state of the art theoretical potential energy curve for Xe2, are in excellent agreement with the experiment for the first time. © 2007 American Institute of Physics...

  2. A general intermolecular force field based on tight-binding quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph; Caldeweyher, Eike; Pisarek, Jana; Hansen, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    A black-box type procedure is presented for the generation of a molecule-specific, intermolecular potential energy function. The method uses quantum chemical (QC) information from our recently published extended tight-binding semi-empirical scheme (GFN-xTB) and can treat non-covalently bound complexes and aggregates with almost arbitrary chemical structure. The necessary QC information consists of the equilibrium structure, Mulliken atomic charges, charge centers of localized molecular orbitals, and also of frontier orbitals and orbital energies. The molecular pair potential includes model density dependent Pauli repulsion, penetration, as well as point charge electrostatics, the newly developed D4 dispersion energy model, Drude oscillators for polarization, and a charge-transfer term. Only one element-specific and about 20 global empirical parameters are needed to cover systems with nuclear charges up to radon (Z = 86). The method is tested for standard small molecule interaction energy benchmark sets where it provides accurate intermolecular energies and equilibrium distances. Examples for structures with a few hundred atoms including charged systems demonstrate the versatility of the approach. The method is implemented in a stand-alone computer code which enables rigid-body, global minimum energy searches for molecular aggregation or alignment.

  3. Binding Cellulose and Chitosan via Intermolecular Inclusion Interaction: Synthesis and Characterisation of Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiufang Duan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel cellulose-chitosan gel was successfully prepared in three steps: (1 ferrocene- (Fc- cellulose with degrees of substitution (DS of 0.5 wt% was synthesised by ferrocenecarboxylic acid and cellulose within dimethylacetamide/lithium chloride (DMAc/LiCl; (2 the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD groups were introduced onto the chitosan chains by reacting chitosan with epichlorohydrin in dimethyl sulphoxide and a DS of 0.35 wt%; (3 thus, the cellulose-chitosan gel was obtained via an intermolecular inclusion interaction of Fc-cellulose and β-CD-chitosan in DMA/LiCl, that is, by an intermolecular inclusion interaction, between the Fc groups of cellulose and the β-CD groups on the chitosan backbone at room temperature. The successful synthesis of Fc-cellulose and β-CD-chitosan was characterised by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. The gel based on β-CD-chitosan and Fc-cellulose was formed under mild conditions which can engender autonomous healing between cut surfaces after 24 hours: the gel cannot self-heal while the cut surfaces were coated with a solution of a competitive guest (adamantane acid. The cellulose-chitosan complex made by this method underwent self-healing. Therefore, this study provided a novel method of expanding the application of chitosan by binding it with another polymer.

  4. A quantitative analysis of weak intermolecular interactions & quantum chemical calculations (DFT) of novel chalcone derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavda, Bhavin R., E-mail: chavdabhavin9@gmail.com; Dubey, Rahul P.; Patel, Urmila H. [Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar-388120, Gujarat (India); Gandhi, Sahaj A. [Bhavan’s Shri I.L. Pandya Arts-Science and Smt. J.M. shah Commerce College, Dakar, Anand -388001, Gujarat, Indian (India); Barot, Vijay M. [P. G. Center in Chemistry, Smt. S. M. Panchal Science College, Talod, Gujarat 383 215 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The novel chalcone derivatives have widespread applications in material science and medicinal industries. The density functional theory (DFT) is used to optimized the molecular structure of the three chalcone derivatives (M-I, II, III). The observed discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental (X-ray data) results attributed to different environments of the molecules, the experimental values are of the molecule in solid state there by subjected to the intermolecular forces, like non-bonded hydrogen bond interactions, where as isolated state in gas phase for theoretical studies. The lattice energy of all the molecules have been calculated using PIXELC module in Coulomb –London –Pauli (CLP) package and is partitioned into corresponding coulombic, polarization, dispersion and repulsion contributions. Lattice energy data confirm and strengthen the finding of the X-ray results that the weak but significant intermolecular interactions like C-H…O, Π- Π and C-H… Π plays an important role in the stabilization of crystal packing.

  5. Intermolecular Singlet and Triplet Exciton Transfer Integrals from Many-Body Green's Functions Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Jens; Baumeier, Björn

    2017-04-11

    A general approach to determine orientation and distance-dependent effective intermolecular exciton transfer integrals from many-body Green's functions theory is presented. On the basis of the GW approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation (BSE), a projection technique is employed to obtain the excitonic coupling by forming the expectation value of a supramolecular BSE Hamiltonian with electron-hole wave functions for excitations localized on two separated chromophores. Within this approach, accounting for the effects of coupling mediated by intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitations is possible via perturbation theory or a reduction technique. Application to model configurations of pyrene dimers shows an accurate description of short-range exchange and long-range Coulomb interactions for the coupling of singlet and triplet excitons. Computational parameters, such as the choice of the exchange-correlation functional in the density-functional theory (DFT) calculations that underly the GW-BSE steps and the convergence with the number of included CT excitations, are scrutinized. Finally, an optimal strategy is derived for simulations of full large-scale morphologies by benchmarking various approximations using pairs of dicyanovinyl end-capped oligothiophenes (DCV5T), which are used as donor material in state-of-the-art organic solar cells.

  6. Empirical intermolecular potential from depolarized interaction-induced light scattering spectra for tetrafluoromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Mohamed Sayed Abdel

    2002-07-01

    Depolarized interaction-induced light scattering spectra of tetrafluoromethane in the frequency range 2-150 cm-1 at 294.5 K and 0.91 mol/l with the interaction pressure virial coefficient and viscosity have been used for deriving the empirical multiparameter Morse-Morse-Morse-Spline-van der Waals (M3SV), Lennard-Jones, Kihara, and exp-6 intermolecular potentials. The line shape at relatively low frequencies is determined largely by the effect of bound and free transitions. At intermediate frequencies it is sensitive to both the attractive part of the potential and the short-range part of the polarizability anisotropy. The high frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision-induced rotational Raman effect and estimates for the dipole-quadrupole and dipole-octopole polarizabilities A and E, respectively, are obtained. Absolute zeroth and second moments have been measured and compared with theoretical calculations using these models of the intermolecular potentials. The results show that M3SV is the most accurate potential yet reported for this system.

  7. DFT-SAPT intermolecular interaction energies employing exact-exchange Kohn-Sham response methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselmann, Andreas

    2018-03-22

    Intermolecular interaction energies have been calculated by symmetry-adapted perturbation theory based on density-functional theory monomer properties (DFT-SAPT) employing response functions from time-dependent exact-exchange (TDEXX) kernels. Combined with a new asymptotic correction scheme for the xc potentials of the monomers, it is shown that this DFT-SAPT[TDEXX] method delivers highly accurate intermolecular interaction energies for the S22, S66 and IonHB benchmark data bases by Hobza et al.. A corresponding DFT-SAPT approach employing the adiabatic TDEXX kernel in the response calculations has also been tested. While exhibiting a similar performance than DFT-SAPT[TDEXX] for dispersion-dominated dimer systems, it was found found that the accuracies of the interaction energies for hydrogen-bonded dimers deteriorate with this DFT-SAPT[ATDEXX] method. Compared to this, the DFT-SAPT[TDEXX] yields a balanced description of the interaction energies for various interaction-type motifs, similar to the standard DFT-SAPT method that utilises the ALDA xc kernel to compute the response functions.

  8. Potential mesogens based on pyridine derivatives: The geometric structure, conformational properties and characteristics of intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorov, Mikhail S.; Giricheva, Nina I.; Shpilevaya, Kseniya E.; Lapykina, Elena A.; Syrbu, Svetlana A.

    2017-03-01

    Conformational properties of the main part (excluding sbnd OC3H7 radicals) of the p-n-propyloxybenzoic (A1) and p-n-propyloxycinnamic (A2) acids molecules (relating to mesomorphic compounds) as well as p-n-propyloxybenzoic acid pyridine ester (B1) and p-n-propyloxyphenylazopyridine (B2) molecules (relating to non-mesomorphic compounds) were studied by DFT(B3LYP)/cc-pVTZ method. It was shown that the main parts of A1 and A2 acids are rigid. The barrier to internal rotation of pyridine fragment in the B1 and B2 molecules depends on the nature of the bridging group. It was determined that all studied A1⋯B1, A2⋯B1 and A2⋯B2 complexes are characterized by a strong hydrogen bond. The binding energy of complexes (≈14 kcal/mol, with BSSE corrections, DFT(B97D)/6-311++G**) exceeds the energy per hydrogen bond in the corresponding acid dimers (≈10 kcal/mol). The structural non-rigidity of A⋯B complexes is mainly caused by possibility of sbnd OC3H7 radicals internal rotation and A and B molecules rotation about the (H)O⋯N line. The characteristics of intermolecular hydrogen bonds were determined by NBO-analysis. The obtained results indicate that examined complexes correspond to the basic requirements to mesogen molecular forms. The thermodynamic functions of the gas-phase complexation reactions (idealized model of the complexes formation in the condensed state) were calculated. Preliminary studies of mesogen-non-mesogen A1⋯B2 system by differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy, showed that it has mesomorphic properties.

  9. Luminescence of tartrate bridged dinuclear 2,2'-bipyridine platinum(ii) complexes: emission color controlled by intra- and inter-molecular interactions in the solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Keiji; Tanuma, Honami; Kusano, Yukiko; Kaizaki, Sumio; Nagasawa, Akira; Fujihara, Takashi

    2017-06-13

    Novel dinuclear Pt II complexes with a chiral (l-) and an achiral (meso-) tartrate [{Pt II (bpy)} 2 (μ-x-tart)] (bpy: 2,2'-bipyridine; tartH 2 2- : tartrate; x = l (1), meso (2)) and with a racemic (dl-) tartrate [{Pt II (bpy)} 2 (μ-d-tart)][{Pt II (bpy)} 2 (μ-l-tart)] (3) were synthesized, and the influence of their stereochemistry on their molecular and crystal structures affecting their luminescence was discussed. Effects of the dinuclearity on the structures and luminescence were revealed by comparison with those of a novel racemic mononuclear complex [Pt II (bpy)(d-tartH 2 )][Pt II (bpy)(l-tartH 2 )] (4). The X-ray crystallography showed the crystallization of 1 in two polymorphs, namely monoclinic 3[1·6H 2 O] (1α) and triclinic 2[1·6H 2 O] (1β), and those of other complexes in monoclinic hydrate crystals 2·12.5H 2 O, 3·4H 2 O, and 4·H 2 O. The chiral complexes in 1α, 1β, and 3·4H 2 O showed clamshell-like structures with Pt-Pt and π-π interactions, while the achiral complex in 2·12.5H 2 O displayed a twisted form without intramolecular interactions. The complexes in 1α were assembled in a right-handed helical arrangement through significant Pt-Pt interactions, and those in 1β and 3·4H 2 O were stacked in one-dimensional columns through significant and slight π-π interactions, respectively. The complex in 2·12.5H 2 O constructed an intermolecular dimer through Pt-Pt interactions with its adjacent complex. The crystal structure of 4·H 2 O displayed a three-dimensional network architecture through π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding. These crystals exhibited luminescence depending on their molecular and crystal structures (λ max nm = 535 (4·H 2 O), 569 (3·4H 2 O), 621 (2·12.5H 2 O), 649 (1β), and 656 (1α)). The formations of intermolecular dimers and clamshell-like structures through Pt-Pt interactions in 2·12.5H 2 O and in 3·4H 2 O, respectively, lead to red-shifts in emissions compared to 4·H 2 O, and further low

  10. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  11. Plane-Wave Density Functional Theory Meets Molecular Crystals: Thermal Ellipsoids and Intermolecular Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deringer, Volker L; George, Janine; Dronskowski, Richard; Englert, Ulli

    2017-05-16

    Molecular compounds, organic and inorganic, crystallize in diverse and complex structures. They continue to inspire synthetic efforts and "crystal engineering", with implications ranging from fundamental questions to pharmaceutical research. The structural complexity of molecular solids is linked with diverse intermolecular interactions: hydrogen bonding with all its facets, halogen bonding, and other secondary bonding mechanisms of recent interest (and debate). Today, high-resolution diffraction experiments allow unprecedented insight into the structures of molecular crystals. Despite their usefulness, however, these experiments also face problems: hydrogen atoms are challenging to locate, and thermal effects may complicate matters. Moreover, even if the structure of a crystal is precisely known, this does not yet reveal the nature and strength of the intermolecular forces that hold it together. In this Account, we show that periodic plane-wave-based density functional theory (DFT) can be a useful, and sometimes unexpected, complement to molecular crystallography. Initially developed in the solid-state physics communities to treat inorganic solids, periodic DFT can be applied to molecular crystals just as well: theoretical structural optimizations "help out" by accurately localizing the elusive hydrogen atoms, reaching neutron-diffraction quality with much less expensive measurement equipment. In addition, phonon computations, again developed by physicists, can quantify the thermal motion of atoms and thus predict anisotropic displacement parameters and ORTEP ellipsoids "from scratch". But the synergy between experiment and theory goes much further than that. Once a structure has been accurately determined, computations give new and detailed insights into the aforementioned intermolecular interactions. For example, it has been debated whether short hydrogen bonds in solids have covalent character, and we have added a new twist to this discussion using an orbital

  12. Identification of intra- and intermolecular disulfide bridges in the multidrug resistance transporter ABCG2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ulla Birk; Fog, Jacob U; Litman, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    cysteines predicted to be on the extracellular face of ABCG2. Upon mutation of Cys-592 or Cys-608 to alanine (C592A and C608A), ABCG2 migrated as a dimer in SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions; however, mutation of Cys-603 to Ala (C603A) caused the transporter to migrate as a single monomeric band....... Despite this change, C603A displayed efficient membrane targeting and preserved transport function. Because the transporter migrated as a dimer in SDS-PAGE, when only Cys-603 was present (C592A-C608A), the data suggest that Cys-603 forms a symmetrical intermolecular disulfide bridge in the ABCG2 homodimer...

  13. INS study of intermolecular interaction at the silicone-fumed silica interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheka, E.F.; Natkaniec, I.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The paper presents results related to the interface formed between finned silica particles and polydimethylsiloxane polymers, presented in the study by a five-member cyclic oligomer SiS. The substrate surface is terminated by either hydroxyl units or by trimethylsiloxy ones. When the interface is formed, methyl units are the main constituents providing neutron scattering. Protium/deuterium exchange has been used to distinguish the latter belonging to either adsorbate or substrate. A detailed analysis of the intermolecular interaction impact on both adsorbed molecule and substrate has been performed. The observed features are supported by the vibrational spectra calculations performed on the basis of a modem quantum-chemical approach and supplemented by the solution of the inverse spectral problem. (author)

  14. Chain-length-dependent intermolecular packing in polyphenylenes: a high pressure study

    CERN Document Server

    Heimel, G; Oehzelt, M; Hummer, K; Koppelhuber-Bitschnau, B; Porsch, F; Ambrosch-Draxl, C; Resel, R

    2003-01-01

    We report on pressure-induced structural changes in crystalline oligo(para-phenylenes) containing two to six phenyl rings. The results are discussed with particular emphasis put on the implications these changes in intermolecular distances and molecular arrangement have on important bulk properties of this class of materials, such as optical response and charge transport. We performed energy dispersive x-ray diffraction in a systematic study on polycrystalline powders of biphenyl, para-terphenyl, p-quaterphenyl, p-quinquephenyl and p-sexiphenyl under hydrostatic pressure up to 60 kbar. Revisiting the crystal structures at ambient conditions reveals details in the packing principle. A linear relationship between the density at ambient conditions and the number of phenyl rings is found. High pressure data not only yields pressure-dependent lattice parameters and hints towards pressure-induced changes in the molecular arrangement but also allows for an analysis of the equations of state of these substances as a ...

  15. Asymmetric silver-catalysed intermolecular bromotrifluoromethoxylation of alkenes with a new trifluoromethoxylation reagent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shuo; Cong, Fei; Guo, Rui; Wang, Liang; Tang, Pingping

    2017-06-01

    Fluorinated organic compounds are becoming increasingly important in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and materials science. The introduction of trifluoromethoxy groups into new drugs and agrochemicals has attracted much attention due to their strongly electron-withdrawing nature and high lipophilicity. However, synthesis of trifluoromethoxylated organic molecules is difficult owing to the decomposition of trifluoromethoxide anion and β-fluoride elimination from transition-metal-trifluoromethoxide complexes, and no catalytic enantioselective trifluoromethoxylation reaction has been reported until now. Here, we present an example of an asymmetric silver-catalysed intermolecular bromotrifluoromethoxylation of alkenes with trifluoromethyl arylsulfonate (TFMS) as a new trifluoromethoxylation reagent. Compared to other trifluoromethoxylation reagents, TFMS is easily prepared and thermally stable with good reactivity. In addition, this reaction is operationally simple, scalable and proceeds under mild reaction conditions. Furthermore, broad scope and good functional group compatibility has been demonstrated by application of the method to the bromotrifluoromethoxylation of double bonds in natural products and natural product derivatives.

  16. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Mei Mei Jaslyn Elizabeth; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira

    2015-01-01

    LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multi......LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement...... solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers...

  17. Crystal structures and intermolecular interactions of two novel antioxidant triazolyl-benzimidazole compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karayel, A., E-mail: matchlessjimmy@163.com, E-mail: yccaoh@hotmail.com; Özbey, S. [Hacettepe University, Physics Engineering Department (Turkey); Ayhan-Kılcıgil, G.; Kuş, C. [Ankara University, Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy (Turkey)

    2015-12-15

    The crystal structures of 5-(2-(p-chlorophenylbenzimidazol-1-yl-methyl)-4-(3-fluorophenyl)-2, 4-dihydro-[1,2,4]-triazole-3-thione (G6C) and 5-(2-(p-chlorophenylbenzimidazol-1-yl-methyl)-4-(2-methylphenyl)-2, 4-dihydro-[1,2,4]-triazole-3-thione (G4C) have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Benzimidazole ring systems in both molecules are planar. The triazole part is almost perpendicular to the phenyl and the benzimidazole parts of the molecules in order to avoid steric interactions between the rings. The crystal structures are stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the amino group of the triazole and the nitrogen atom of benzimidazole of a neighboring molecule.

  18. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Anders S., E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang, E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Elstner, Marcus [Theoretische Chemische Biologie, Universität Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  19. Local Intermolecular Order Controls Photoinduced Charge Separation at Donor/Acceptor Interfaces in Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feier, Hilary M.; Reid, Obadiah G.; Pace, Natalie A.; Park, Jaehong; Bergkamp, Jesse J.; Sellinger, Alan; Gust, Devens; Rumbles, Garry

    2016-03-23

    How free charge is generated at organic donor-acceptor interfaces is an important question, as the binding energy of the lowest energy (localized) charge transfer states should be too high for the electron and hole to escape each other. Recently, it has been proposed that delocalization of the electronic states participating in charge transfer is crucial, and aggregated or otherwise locally ordered structures of the donor or the acceptor are the precondition for this electronic characteristic. The effect of intermolecular aggregation of both the polymer donor and fullerene acceptor on charge separation is studied. In the first case, the dilute electron acceptor triethylsilylhydroxy-1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octabutoxyphthalocyaninatosilicon(IV) (SiPc) is used to eliminate the influence of acceptor aggregation, and control polymer order through side-chain regioregularity, comparing charge generation in 96% regioregular (RR-) poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) with its regiorandom (RRa-) counterpart. In the second case, ordered phases in the polymer are eliminated by using RRa-P3HT, and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) is used as the acceptor, varying its concentration to control aggregation. Time-resolved microwave conductivity, time-resolved photoluminescence, and transient absorption spectroscopy measurements show that while ultrafast charge transfer occurs in all samples, long-lived charge carriers are only produced in films with intermolecular aggregates of either RR-P3HT or PC61BM, and that polymer aggregates are just as effective in this regard as those of fullerenes.

  20. Importance of the Donor:Fullerene intermolecular arrangement for high-efficiency organic photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Graham, Kenneth

    2014-07-09

    The performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) material systems are hypothesized to depend strongly on the intermolecular arrangements at the donor:fullerene interfaces. A review of some of the most efficient polymers utilized in polymer:fullerene PV devices, combined with an analysis of reported polymer donor materials wherein the same conjugated backbone was used with varying alkyl substituents, supports this hypothesis. Specifically, the literature shows that higher-performing donor-acceptor type polymers generally have acceptor moieties that are sterically accessible for interactions with the fullerene derivative, whereas the corresponding donor moieties tend to have branched alkyl substituents that sterically hinder interactions with the fullerene. To further explore the idea that the most beneficial polymer:fullerene arrangement involves the fullerene docking with the acceptor moiety, a family of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b]dithiophene-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione polymers (PBDTTPD derivatives) was synthesized and tested in a variety of PV device types with vastly different aggregation states of the polymer. In agreement with our hypothesis, the PBDTTPD derivative with a more sterically accessible acceptor moiety and a more sterically hindered donor moiety shows the highest performance in bulk-heterojunction, bilayer, and low-polymer concentration PV devices where fullerene derivatives serve as the electron-accepting materials. Furthermore, external quantum efficiency measurements of the charge-transfer state and solid-state two-dimensional (2D) 13C{1H} heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR analyses support that a specific polymer:fullerene arrangement is present for the highest performing PBDTTPD derivative, in which the fullerene is in closer proximity to the acceptor moiety of the polymer. This work demonstrates that the polymer:fullerene arrangement and resulting intermolecular interactions may be key factors in determining the performance of OPV material systems

  1. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P

    2002-01-01

    -induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  2. Intermolecular Interactions and Cooperative Effects from Electronic Structure Calculations: An Effective Means for Developing Interaction Potentials for Condensed Phase Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2004-05-01

    The modeling of the macroscopic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems via atomistic simulations such as molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) techniques is based on the accurate description of the relevant solvent-solute and solvent-solvent intermolecular interactions. The total energy (U) of an n-body molecular system can be formally written as [1,2,3

  3. Intermolecular covalent pi-pi bonding interaction indicated by bond distances, energy bands, and magnetism in biphenalenyl biradicaloid molecular crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingsong; Kertesz, Miklos

    2007-02-14

    Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed for energy band structure and geometry optimizations on the stepped pi-chain, the isolated molecule and (di)cations of the chain, and various related molecules of a neutral biphenalenyl biradicaloid (BPBR) organic semiconductor 2. The dependence of the geometries on crystal packing provides indirect evidence for the intermolecular covalent pi-pi bonding interaction through space between neighboring pi-stacked phenalenyl units along the chain. The two phenalenyl electrons on each molecule, occupying the singly occupied molecular orbitals (SOMOs), are participating in the intermolecular covalent pi-pi bonding making them partially localized on the phenalenyl units and less available for intramolecular delocalization. The band structure shows a relatively large bandwidth and small band gap indicative of good pi-pi overlap and delocalization between neighboring pi-stacked phenalenyl units. A new interpretation is presented for the magnetism of the stepped pi-chain of 2 using an alternating Heisenberg chain model, which is consistent with DFT total energy calculations for 2 and prevails against the previous interpretation using a Bleaney-Bowers dimer model. The obtained transfer integrals and the magnetic exchange parameters fit well into the framework of a Hubbard model. All presented analyses on molecular geometries, energy bands, and magnetism provide a coherent picture for 2 pointing toward an alternating chain with significant intermolecular through-space covalent pi-pi bonding interactions in the molecular crystal. Surprisingly, both the intermolecular transfer integrals and exchange parameters are larger than the intramolecular through-bond values indicating the effectiveness of the intermolecular overlap of the phenalenyl SOMO electrons.

  4. Liquid Crystal Enabled Early Stage Detection of Beta Amyloid Formation on Lipid Monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadati, Monirosadat [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Apik, Aslin Izmitli [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; Armas-Perez, Julio C. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Departamento de Materiales y Minerales, Facultad de Minas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín, Calle 75 # 79A-51, Bloque M17 Medellín Colombia; Abbott, Nicholas L. [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; de Pablo, Juan J. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2015-09-09

    Liquid crystals (LCs) can serve as sensitive reporters of interfacial events, and this property has been used for sensing of synthetic or biological toxins. Here it is demonstrated that LCs can distinguish distinct molecular motifs and exhibit a specific response to beta-sheet structures. That property is used to detect the formation of highly toxic protofibrils involved in neurodegenerative diseases, where it is crucial to develop methods that probe the early-stage aggregation of amyloidogenic peptides in the vicinity of biological membranes. In the proposed method, the amyloid fibrils formed at the lipid-decorated LC interface can change the orientation of LCs and form elongated and branched structures that are amplified by the mesogenic medium; however, nonamyloidogenic peptides form ellipsoidal domains of tilted LCs. Moreover, a theoretical and computational analysis is used to reveal the underlying structure of the LC, thereby providing a detailed molecular-level view of the interactions and mechanisms responsible for such motifs. The corresponding signatures can be detected at nanomolar concentrations of peptide by polarized light microscopy and much earlier than the ones that can be identified by fluorescence-based techniques. As such, it offers the potential for early diagnoses of neurodegenerative diseases and for facile testing of inhibitors of amyloid formation.

  5. EPR studies of intermolecular interactions and competitive binding of drugs in a drug-BSA binding model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdogan, Y; Emrullahoglu, M; Tatlidil, D; Ucuncu, M; Cakan-Akdogan, G

    2016-08-10

    Understanding intermolecular interactions between drugs and proteins is very important in drug delivery studies. Here, we studied different binding interactions between salicylic acid and bovine serum albumin (BSA) using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Salicylic acid was labeled with a stable radical (spin label) in order to monitor its mobilized (free) or immobilized (bound to BSA) states. In addition to spin labeled salicylic acid (SL-salicylic acid), its derivatives including SL-benzoic acid, SL-phenol, SL-benzene, SL-cyclohexane and SL-hexane were synthesized to reveal the effects of various drug binding interactions. EPR results of these SL-molecules showed that hydrophobic interaction is the main driving force. Whereas each of the two functional groups (-COOH and -OH) on the benzene ring has a minute but detectable effect on the drug-protein complex formation. In order to investigate the effect of electrostatic interaction on drug binding, cationic BSA (cBSA) was synthesized, altering the negative net charge of BSA to positive. The salicylic acid loading capacity of cBSA is significantly higher compared to that of BSA, indicating the importance of electrostatic interaction in drug binding. Moreover, the competitive binding properties of salicylic acid, ibuprofen and aspirin to BSA were studied. The combined EPR results of SL-salicylic acid/ibuprofen and SL-ibuprofen/salicylic acid showed that ibuprofen is able to replace up to ∼83% of bound SL-salicylic acid, and salicylic acid can replace only ∼14% of the bound SL-ibuprofen. This indicates that ∼97% of all salicylic acid and ibuprofen binding sites are shared. On the other hand, aspirin replaces only ∼23% of bound SL-salicylic acid, and salicylic acid replaces ∼50% of bound SL-aspirin, indicating that ∼73% of all salicylic acid and aspirin binding sites are shared. These results show that EPR spectroscopy in combination with the spin labeling technique is a very powerful

  6. Formation of silk fibroin nanoparticles in water-miscible organic solvent and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuqing, E-mail: yqzhang@public1.sz.js.cn; Shen Weide; Xiang Ruli [Soochow University, Silk Biotechnol. Lab., School of Life Science (China); Zhuge Lanjian; Gao Weijian; Wang Wenbao [Soochow University, Analytical Center (China)

    2007-10-15

    When Silk fibre derived from Bombyx mori, a native biopolymer, was dissolved in highly concentrated neutral salts such as CaCl{sub 2}, the regenerated liquid silk, a gradually degraded peptide mixture of silk fibroin, could be obtained. The silk fibroin nanoparticles were prepared rapidly from the liquid silk by using water-miscible protonic and polar aprotonic organic solvents. The nanoparticles are insoluble but well dispersed and stable in aqueous solution and are globular particles with a range of 35-125 nm in diameter by means of TEM, SEM, AFM and laser sizer. Over one half of the {epsilon}-amino groups exist around the protein nanoparticles by using a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) method. Raman spectra shows the tyrosine residues on the surface of the globules are more exposed than those on native silk fibers. The crystalline polymorph and conformation transition of the silk nanoparticles from random-coil and {alpha}-helix form (Silk I) into anti-parallel {beta}-sheet form (Silk II) are investigated in detail by using infrared, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy, DSC, {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR and electron diffraction. X-ray diffraction of the silk nanoparticles shows that the nanoparticles crystallinity is about four fifths of the native fiber. Our results indicate that the degraded peptide chains of the regenerated silk is gathered homogeneously or heterogeneously to form a looser globular structure in aqueous solution. When introduced into excessive organic solvent, the looser globules of the liquid silk are rapidly dispersed and simultaneously dehydrated internally and externally, resulting in the further chain-chain contact, arrangement of those hydrophobic domains inside the globules and final formation of crystalline silk nanoparticles with {beta}-sheet configuration. The morphology and size of the nanoparticles are relative to the kinds, properties and even molecular structures of organic solvents, and more significantly to the looser globular

  7. Intermolecular nuclear relaxation in paramagnetic solutions: from free radicals to rare earths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belorizky, E. [Universite Joseph-Fourier, Lab. de Spectrometrie Physique, CNRS-UMR 5588, 38 - Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Fries, P.H.; Rast, S. [CEA Grenoble, Laboratoire de Reconnaissance ionique, Service de Chimie Inorganique et Biologique UMR 5046, Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, 38 (France)

    2001-11-01

    The principles of the intermolecular relaxation of a nuclear spin by its fluctuating magnetic dipolar interactions with the electronic spins of the paramagnetic surrounding species in solution are briefly recalled. It is shown that a very high dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) of solvent protons is obtained by saturating allowed transitions of free radicals with a hyperfine structure, and that this effect can be used in efficient Earth field magnetometers. Recent work on trivalent lanthanide Ln{sup 3+} aqua complexes in heavy water solutions is discussed, including paramagnetic shift and relaxation rate measurements of the {sup 1}H NMR lines of probe solutes. This allows a determination of the effective electronic magnetic moments of the various Ln{sup 3+} ions in these complexes, and an estimation of their longitudinal and transverse electronic relaxation times T{sub 1e} and T{sub 2e}. Particular attention is given to Gd(III) hydrated chelates which can serve as contrast agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The full experimental electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of these complexes can be interpreted within the Redfield relaxation theory. Monte-Carlo simulations are used to explore situations beyond the validity of the Redfield approximation. For each Gd(III) complex, the EPR study leads to an accurate prediction of T{sub 1e}, which can be also derived from an independent relaxation dispersion study of the protons of the probe solutes. (authors)

  8. Intermolecular dissociation energies of dispersively bound 1-naphtholṡcycloalkane complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Surajit; Ottiger, Philipp; Balmer, Franziska A.; Knochenmuss, Richard; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    Intermolecular dissociation energies D0(S0) of the supersonic jet-cooled complexes of 1-naphthol (1NpOH) with cyclopentane, cyclohexane, and cycloheptane were determined to within theory (DFT) methods predict that the cycloalkane moieties are dispersively bound to the naphthol face via London-type interactions, similar to the "face" isomer of the 1-naphtholṡcyclopropane complex [S. Maity et al., J. Chem. Phys. 145, 164304 (2016)]. The experimental and calculated D0(S0) values of the cyclohexane and cyclopentane complexes are practically identical, although the polarizability of cyclohexane is ˜20 % larger than that of cyclopentane. Investigation of the calculated pairwise atomic contributions to the D2 dispersion energy reveals that this is due to subtle details of the binding geometries of the cycloalkanes relative to the 1-naphthol ring. The B97-D3 DFT method predicts dissociation energies within about ±1 % of experiment, including the cyclopropane face complex. The B3LYP-D3 and ωB97X-D calculated dissociation energies are 7-9 and 13-20% higher than the experimental D0(S0) values. Without dispersion correction, all the complexes are calculated to be unbound.

  9. Characterization of the glass transition of water predicted by molecular dynamics simulations using nonpolarizable intermolecular potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreck, Cara A; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2014-02-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations allow detailed study of the experimentally inaccessible liquid state of supercooled water below its homogeneous nucleation temperature and the characterization of the glass transition. Simple, nonpolarizable intermolecular potentials are commonly used in classical molecular dynamics simulations of water and aqueous systems due to their lower computational cost and their ability to reproduce a wide range of properties. Because the quality of these predictions varies between the potentials, the predicted glass transition of water is likely to be influenced by the choice of potential. We have thus conducted an extensive comparative investigation of various three-, four-, five-, and six-point water potentials in both the NPT and NVT ensembles. The T(g) predicted from NPT simulations is strongly correlated with the temperature of minimum density, whereas the maximum in the heat capacity plot corresponds to the minimum in the thermal expansion coefficient. In the NVT ensemble, these points are instead related to the maximum in the internal pressure and the minimum of its derivative, respectively. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen-bonding properties at the glass transition reveals that the extent of hydrogen-bonds lost upon the melting of the glassy state is related to the height of the heat capacity peak and varies between water potentials.

  10. A heuristic approach to evaluate peri interactions versus intermolecular interactions in an overcrowded naphthalene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Row, Tayur N. Guru

    2017-01-01

    Octachloronaphthalene (OCN), a serious environmental pollutant, has been investigated by charge density analysis to unravel several unexplored factors responsible for steric overcrowding. The topological features of the enigmatic peri interactions contributing to steric overcrowding are qualified and quantified from experimental and theoretical charge-density studies. A new facet in the fundamental understanding of peri interactions is revealed by NCI (non-covalent interaction) analysis. The potential role of these interactions in deforming the molecular geometry and subsequent effect on aromaticity are substantiated from NICS (Nuclear Independent Chemical Shift) and QTAIM (Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules) calculations. The eye-catching dissimilarity in the out-of-plane twisting of OCN renders the molecule in an asymmetric geometry in the crystalline phase compared with symmetric geometry in the optimized solvated phase. This is uniquely characterized by their molecular electrostatic potential (MESP), respectively, and is explained in terms of conflict between two opposing forces – peri interactions, and symbiotic intermolecular Cl⋯Cl and Cl⋯π contacts. PMID:28250940

  11. Intercalation of organic molecules in 2D copper (II) nitroprusside: Intermolecular interactions and magnetic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osiry, H.; Cano, A.; Lemus-Santana, A.A.; Rodríguez, A. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico); Carbonio, R.E. [INFIQC-CONICET, Departamento de Físico Química, Facultad de Ciencias Químicas, Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, X5000HUA Córdoba (Argentina); Reguera, E., E-mail: edilso.reguera@gmail.com [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    This contribution discusses the intercalation of imidazole and its 2-ethyl derivative, and pyridine in 2D copper nitroprusside. In the interlayer region, neighboring molecules remain interacting throu gh their dipole and quadrupole moments, which supports the solid 3D crystal structure. The crystal structure of this series of intercalation compounds was solved and refined from powder X-ray diffraction patterns complemented with spectroscopic information. The intermolecular interactions were studied from the refined crystal structures and low temperature magnetic measurements. Due to strong attractive forces between neighboring molecules, the resulting π–π cloud overlapping enables the ferromagnetic coupling between metal centers on neighboring layers, which was actually observed for the solids containing imidazole and pyridine as intercalated molecules. For these two solids, the magnetic data were properly described with a model of six neighbors. For the solid containing 2-ethylimidazole and for 2D copper nitroprusside, a model of four neighbors in a plane is sufficient to obtain a reliable data fitting. - Highlights: • Intercalation of organic molecules in 2D copper (II) nitroprusside. • Molecular properties of intercalation compounds of 2D copper (II) nitroprusside. • Magnetic properties of hybrid inorganic–organic solids. • Hybrid inorganic–organic 3D framework.

  12. Argon intermolecular potential from a measurement of the total scattering cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Y.W.

    1975-01-01

    An inversion method to obtain accurate intermolecular potentials from experimental total cross section measurements is presented. This method is based on the high energy Massey--Smith approximation. The attractive portion of the potential is represented by a multi-parameter spline function and the repulsive part by a Morse function. The best fit potential is obtained by a least squares minimization based on comparison of experimental cross sections with those obtained by a Fourier transform of the reduced Massey--Smith phase shift curve. An experimental method was developed to obtain the total cross sections needed for the above inversion procedure. In this technique, integral cross sections are measured at various resolutions and the total cross section is obtained by extrapolating to infinite resolution. Experimental results obtained for the Ar--Ar system are in excellent agreement with total cross sections calculated using the Barker-Fisher-Watts potential. Inversion of the data to obtain a potential distinguishable from the BFW-potential requires an extension of the method based on the Massey--Smith approximation to permit use of JWKB phase shifts and was not attempted

  13. Chemical Dynamics Simulations of Intermolecular Energy Transfer: Azulene + N2 Collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsik; Paul, Amit K; Pratihar, Subha; Hase, William L

    2016-07-14

    Chemical dynamics simulations were performed to investigate collisional energy transfer from highly vibrationally excited azulene (Az*) in a N2 bath. The intermolecular potential between Az and N2, used for the simulations, was determined from MP2/6-31+G* ab initio calculations. Az* is prepared with an 87.5 kcal/mol excitation energy by using quantum microcanonical sampling, including its 95.7 kcal/mol zero-point energy. The average energy of Az* versus time, obtained from the simulations, shows different rates of Az* deactivation depending on the N2 bath density. Using the N2 bath density and Lennard-Jones collision number, the average energy transfer per collision ⟨ΔEc⟩ was obtained for Az* as it is collisionally relaxed. By comparing ⟨ΔEc⟩ versus the bath density, the single collision limiting density was found for energy transfer. The resulting ⟨ΔEc⟩, for an 87.5 kcal/mol excitation energy, is 0.30 ± 0.01 and 0.32 ± 0.01 kcal/mol for harmonic and anharmonic Az potentials, respectively. For comparison, the experimental value is 0.57 ± 0.11 kcal/mol. During Az* relaxation there is no appreciable energy transfer to Az translation and rotation, and the energy transfer is to the N2 bath.

  14. Range-separated density-functional theory with random phase approximation applied to noncovalent intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wuming; Toulouse, Julien; Savin, Andreas; Angyán, János G

    2010-06-28

    Range-separated methods combining a short-range density functional with long-range random phase approximations (RPAs) with or without exchange response kernel are tested on rare-gas dimers and the S22 benchmark set of weakly interacting complexes of Jurecka et al. [Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 8, 1985 (2006)]. The methods are also compared to full-range RPA approaches. Both range separation and inclusion of the Hartree-Fock exchange kernel largely improve the accuracy of intermolecular interaction energies. The best results are obtained with the method called RSH+RPAx, which yields interaction energies for the S22 set with an estimated mean absolute error of about 0.5-0.6 kcal/mol, corresponding to a mean absolute percentage error of about 7%-9% depending on the reference interaction energies used. In particular, the RSH+RPAx method is found to be overall more accurate than the range-separated method based on long-range second-order Moller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory (RSH+MP2).

  15. MAu2GeS4-Chalcogel (M = Co, Ni): Heterogeneous Intra- and Intermolecular Hydroamination Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Davaasuren, Bambar

    2017-08-08

    High surface area macroporous chalcogenide aerogels (chalcogels) MAu2GeS4 (M = Co, Ni) were prepared from K2Au2GeS4 precursor and Co(OAc)2 or NiCl2 by one-pot sol-gel metathesis reactions in aqueous media. The MAu2GeS4-chalcogels were screened for catalytic intramolecular hydroamination of 4-pentyn-1-amine substrate at different temperatures. 87% and 58% conversion was achieved at 100 °C, using CoAu2GeS4- and NiAu2GeS4-chalcogels respectively, and the reaction kinetics follows the first order. It was established that the catalytic performance of the aerogels is associated with the M(2+) centers present in the structure. Intermolecular hydroamination of aniline with 1-R-4-ethynylbenzene (R = -H, -OCH3, -Br, -F) was carried out at 100 °C using CoAu2GeS4-chalcogel catalyst, due to its promising catalytic performance. The CoAu2GeS4-chalcogel regioselectively converted the pair of substrates to respective Markovnikov products, (E)-1-(4-R-phenyl)-N-phenylethan-1-imine, with 38% to 60% conversion.

  16. Keto-enol tautomerization and intermolecular proton transfer in photoionized cyclopentanone dimer in the gas phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Arup K.; Chatterjee, Piyali; Chakraborty, Tapas, E-mail: pctc@iacs.res.in [Department of Physical Chemistry, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, 2A Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-07-28

    Time-of-flight mass spectra of cyclopentanone and its clusters cooled in a supersonic jet expansion have been measured following 4-, 3-, and 2-photon ionizations by the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th harmonic wavelengths, respectively, of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The mass spectra reveal signatures of energetically favored keto to enol tautomerization of the molecular ion leading to intermolecular proton transfer, and this observation is found sharply dependent on the ionization wavelengths used. Electronic structure calculation predicts that in spite of the energetic preference, keto-enol conversion barrier of isolated molecular ion is high. However, the barrier is significantly reduced in a CH⋯O hydrogen-bonded dimer of the molecule. The transition states associated with tautomeric conversion of both cyclopentanone monomer and dimer cations have been identified by means of intrinsic reaction co-ordinate calculation. In a supersonic jet expansion, although a weakly bound dimer is readily generated, the corresponding cation and also the protonated counterpart are observed only for ionization by 532 nm. For other two ionization wavelengths, these species do not register in the mass spectra, where the competing reaction channels via α-cleavage of the ring become dominant. In contrast to the report of a recent study, we notice that the intact molecular ion largely survives fragmentations when ionized from the 2-photon resonant 3p Rydberg state as intermediate using nanosecond laser pulses, and the corresponding resonant 3-photon ionization spectrum has been recorded probing the intact molecular ion.

  17. Intermolecular and very strong intramolecular C-SeO/N chalcogen bonds in nitrophenyl selenocyanate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Ju; Wang, Weizhou

    2018-02-14

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that polymorphic ortho-nitrophenyl selenocyanate (o-NSC, crystals 1a and 1b) and monomorphic para-nitrophenyl selenocyanate (p-NSC, crystal 2) crystals are all stabilized mainly by intermolecular and very strong intramolecular C-SeO/N chalcogen bonds, as well as by other different interactions. Thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry thermogram (DSC) analyses show that the starting decomposition temperatures and melting points of the three crystals are different, following the order 1b > 1a > 2, which is consistent with the structural characteristics of the crystals. In addition, atoms in molecules (AIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses indicate that the total strengths of the C-SeO and C-SeN chalcogen bonds decrease in the order 1b > 1a > 2. This study could be significant for engineering functional crystals based on robust C-SeO and C-SeN chalcogen bonds, and for designing drugs containing selenium as well as understanding their interaction in biosystems.

  18. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M. [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Midtgaard, Søren Roi [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Gysel, Kira [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J. [University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël, E-mail: mickael.blaise@cpbs.cnrs.fr [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  19. Inter-molecular β-sheet structure facilitates lung-targeting siRNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jihan; Li, Dong; Wen, Hao; Zheng, Shuquan; Su, Cuicui; Yi, Fan; Wang, Jue; Liang, Zicai; Tang, Tao; Zhou, Demin; Zhang, Li-He; Liang, Dehai; Du, Quan

    2016-03-01

    Size-dependent passive targeting based on the characteristics of tissues is a basic mechanism of drug delivery. While the nanometer-sized particles are efficiently captured by the liver and spleen, the micron-sized particles are most likely entrapped within the lung owing to its unique capillary structure and physiological features. To exploit this property in lung-targeting siRNA delivery, we designed and studied a multi-domain peptide named K-β, which was able to form inter-molecular β-sheet structures. Results showed that K-β peptides and siRNAs formed stable complex particles of 60 nm when mixed together. A critical property of such particles was that, after being intravenously injected into mice, they further associated into loose and micron-sized aggregates, and thus effectively entrapped within the capillaries of the lung, leading to a passive accumulation and gene-silencing. The large size aggregates can dissociate or break down by the shear stress generated by blood flow, alleviating the pulmonary embolism. Besides the lung, siRNA enrichment and targeted gene silencing were also observed in the liver. This drug delivery strategy, together with the low toxicity, biodegradability, and programmability of peptide carriers, show great potentials in vivo applications.

  20. Exciton dynamics reveal aggregates with intermolecular order at hidden interfaces in solution-cast organic semiconducting films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cathy Y; Cotts, Benjamin L; Wu, Hao; Ginsberg, Naomi S

    2015-01-12

    Large-scale organic electronics manufacturing requires solution processing. For small-molecule organic semiconductors, solution processing results in crystalline domains with high charge mobility, but the interfaces between these domains impede charge transport, degrading device performance. Although understanding these interfaces is essential to improve device performance, their intermolecular and electronic structure is unknown: they are smaller than the diffraction limit, are hidden from surface probe techniques, and their nanoscale heterogeneity is not typically resolved using X-ray methods. Here we use transient absorption microscopy to isolate a unique signature of a hidden interface in a TIPS-pentacene thin film, exposing its exciton dynamics and intermolecular structure. Surprisingly, instead of finding an abrupt grain boundary, we reveal that the interface can be composed of nanoscale crystallites interleaved by a web of interfaces that compound decreases in charge mobility. Our novel approach provides critical missing information on interface morphology necessary to correlate solution-processing methods to optimal device performance.

  1. Intermolecular vibrations of the CO2-CS2 complex: Experiment and theory agree, but understanding remains challenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghany, M.; Rezaei, Mojtaba; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.; Brown, James; Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2016-12-01

    The infrared spectrum of the cross-shaped van der Waals complex CO2-CS2 is observed in the region of the CO2 ν3 fundamental band (≈2350 cm-1) using a tuneable diode laser to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion. Two combination bands are assigned, corresponding to the intermolecular torsion and CO2 bend modes, and their positions and rotational structure agree extremely well (torsional band is well-behaved, but the a-type CO2 bending band is highly unusual, with large shifts between the subband origins for Ka = 0, 2, and 4. The shifts may be rationalized as due to tunnelling effects and Ka-dependent perturbations from other intermolecular modes. But even though they are well predicted by our calculations, there is no simple qualitative explanation. The predicted low-lying planar slipped parallel isomer of CO2-CS2 is not observed.

  2. Communication: Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory with intermolecular induction and dispersion energies from the Bethe-Salpeter equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Christof; Klopper, Wim

    2017-11-01

    A method for calculating intermolecular induction and dispersion energies based on a GW description of the monomers and employing response functions from the Bethe-Salpeter equation is proposed. Calculations on a test set of 10 weakly bound complexes with GW-based symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (GW-SAPT) show an improved performance in comparison with symmetry-adapted perturbation theory based on density-functional theory (DFT-SAPT).

  3. Highly Convergent Total Synthesis of (+)-Lithospermic Acid via a Late-Stage Intermolecular C–H Olefination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Hui; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2011-01-01

    The total synthesis of (+)-lithospermic acid is reported, which exploits two successive C–H activation reactions as the key steps. Rh-catalyzed carbene C–H insertion reaction using Davies’ catalyst built the dihydrobenzofuran core, and a late-stage intermolecular C–H olefination coupled the olefin unit with the dihydrobenzofuran core to construct the molecule in a highly convergent manner. PMID:21443224

  4. Intermolecular sulfenoamination of alkenes with sulfonamides and N-sulfanylsuccinimides to access β-sulfonylamino sulfides and dihydrobenzothiazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Tian, Jun; Gao, Wen-Chao; Chang, Hong-Hong; Liu, Qiang; Li, Xing; Wei, Wen-Long

    2017-07-19

    An acid-catalyzed intermolecular sulfenoamination reaction of alkenes is developed with sulfonamides as the nitrogen source and N-sulfanylsuccinimides as the sulfur source. This methodology provides a straightforward and general way to synthesize various β-sulfonylamino sulfides with high regio- and diastereoselectivity. The developed method was coupled with intramolecular C-N coupling in a one-pot procedure to afford a series of dihydrobenzothiazine derivatives, a kind of important heterocycle used as biologically active compounds in medicinal chemistry.

  5. Rubrene: The interplay between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions determines the planarization of its tetracene core in the solid state

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-06-15

    Rubrene is one of the most studied molecular semiconductors; its chemical structure consists of a tetracene backbone with four phenyl rings appended to the two central fused rings. Derivatization of these phenyl rings can lead to two very different solid-state molecular conformations and packings: One in which the tetracene core is planar and there exists substantive overlap among neighboring π-conjugated backbones; and another where the tetracene core is twisted and the overlap of neighboring π-conjugated backbones is completely disrupted. State-of-the-art electronic-structure calculations show for all isolated rubrene derivatives that the twisted conformation is more favorable (by -1.7 to -4.1 kcal mol-1), which is a consequence of energetically unfavorable exchange-repulsion interactions among the phenyl side groups. Calculations based on available crystallographic structures reveal that planar conformations of the tetracene core in the solid state result from intermolecular interactions that can be tuned through well-chosen functionalization of the phenyl side groups, and lead to improved intermolecular electronic couplings. Understanding the interplay of these intramolecular and intermolecular interactions provides insight into how to chemically modify rubrene and similar molecular semiconductors to improve the intrinsic materials electronic properties.

  6. Programmable display of DNA-protein chimeras for controlling cell-hydrogel interactions via reversible intermolecular hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2013-04-08

    Extensive studies have been recently carried out to achieve dynamic control of cell-material interactions primarily through physicochemical stimulation. The purpose of this study was to apply reversible intermolecular hybridization to program cell-hydrogel interactions in physiological conditions based on DNA-antibody chimeras and complementary oligonucleotides. The results showed that DNA oligonucleotides could be captured to and released from the immobilizing DNA-functionalized hydrogels with high specificity via DNA hybridization. Accordingly, DNA-antibody chimeras were captured to the hydrogels, successfully inducing specific cell attachment. The cell attachment to the hydrogels reached the plateau at approximately half an hour after the functionalized hydrogels and the cells were incubated together. The attached cells were rapidly released from the bound hydrogels when triggering complementary oligonucleotides were introduced to the system. However, the capability of the triggering complementary oligonucleotides in releasing cells was affected by the length of intermolecular hybridization. The length needed to be at least more than 20 base pairs in the current experimental setting. Notably, because the procedure of intermolecular hybridization did not involve any harsh condition, the released cells maintained the same viability as that of the cultured cells. The functionalized hydrogels also exhibited the potential to catch and release cells repeatedly. Therefore, this study demonstrates that it is promising to regulate cell-material interactions dynamically through the DNA-programmed display of DNA-protein chimeras.

  7. Intermolecular detergent-membrane protein noes for the characterization of the dynamics of membrane protein-detergent complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Cédric; Orts, Julien; Tzitzilonis, Christos; Vögeli, Beat; Smrt, Sean; Lorieau, Justin; Riek, Roland

    2014-12-11

    The interaction between membrane proteins and lipids or lipid mimetics such as detergents is key for the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of membrane proteins. In NMR-based structural studies of membrane proteins, qualitative analysis of intermolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) or paramagnetic resonance enhancement are used in general to identify the transmembrane segments of a membrane protein. Here, we employed a quantitative characterization of intermolecular NOEs between (1)H of the detergent and (1)H(N) of (2)H-perdeuterated, (15)N-labeled α-helical membrane protein-detergent complexes following the exact NOE (eNOE) approach. Structural considerations suggest that these intermolecular NOEs should show a helical-wheel-type behavior along a transmembrane helix or a membrane-attached helix within a membrane protein as experimentally demonstrated for the complete influenza hemagglutinin fusion domain HAfp23. The partial absence of such a NOE pattern along the amino acid sequence as shown for a truncated variant of HAfp23 and for the Escherichia coli inner membrane protein YidH indicates the presence of large tertiary structure fluctuations such as an opening between helices or the presence of large rotational dynamics of the helices. Detergent-protein NOEs thus appear to be a straightforward probe for a qualitative characterization of structural and dynamical properties of membrane proteins embedded in detergent micelles.

  8. Intermolecular RNA Recombination Occurs at Different Frequencies in Alternate Forms of Brome Mosaic Virus RNA Replication Compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan Garcia-Ruiz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in membrane-bound replication compartments. Brome mosaic virus (BMV replicates in vesicular invaginations of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. BMV has served as a productive model system to study processes like virus-host interactions, RNA replication and recombination. Here we present multiple lines of evidence showing that the structure of the viral RNA replication compartments plays a fundamental role and that recruitment of parental RNAs to a common replication compartment is a limiting step in intermolecular RNA recombination. We show that a previously defined requirement for an RNA recruitment element on both parental RNAs is not to function as a preferred crossover site, but in order for individual RNAs to be recruited into the replication compartments. Moreover, modulating the form of the replication compartments from spherular vesicles (spherules to more expansive membrane layers increased intermolecular RNA recombination frequency by 200- to 1000-fold. We propose that intermolecular RNA recombination requires parental RNAs to be recruited into replication compartments as monomers, and that recruitment of multiple RNAs into a contiguous space is much more common for layers than for spherules. These results could explain differences in recombination frequencies between viruses that replicate in association with smaller spherules versus larger double-membrane vesicles and convoluted membranes.

  9. Synthesis, crystal structure and theoretical analysis of intermolecular interactions in two biologically active derivatives of 1,2,4-triazoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Rahul; Mohan, T. P.; Vishalakshi, B.; Chopra, Deepak

    2017-04-01

    In the present study, we have synthesized and structurally characterized two biologically active derivatives of 1,2,4 triazoles, namely 3-(4-fluoro-3-phenoxyphenyl)-1-(piperidin-1-ylmethyl)-1H-1,2,4-triazole-5(4H)-thione (TR) and 1-((3-(4-fluoro-3-phenoxyphenyl)-5-(methylthio)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)methyl)piperidine (TR1) via single crystal X-ray diffraction. Both the structures show the presence of various intermolecular interactions in the crystalline solid such as Csbnd H…F, Csbnd H…S, Csbnd H…N, Csbnd H…O, Csbnd H … π, and π … π intermolecular interactions. The role of these interactions in molecular packing was analyzed, and the nature of these interactions was evaluated through computational procedures using PIXEL. Hirshfeld analysis further reveals that the contribution of H…F interactions was more prominent towards packing as compared to H…N/O intermolecular interactions.

  10. Formation of hydrogen connections in the dandelion medicinal in dependences of the place of growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukurov, T.; Khaitova, Z.M.; Djuraev, An.A.; Marupov, R.

    2007-01-01

    In this article results of spectroscopic researches of formation of hydrogen connections in roots of a dandelion growing in different ecological conditions and heights above sea level are presented. On shift of frequency of a maximum OH-groups in the field of frequencies 3800-3000sm - 1 a t cation-exchange, are certain of intermolecular interaction

  11. New insight into the formation of structural defects in poly(vinyl chloride)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purmova, J; Pauwels, KFD; van Zoelen, W; Vorenkamp, EJ; Schouten, AJ; Coote, ML; Pauwels, Kim F.D.; Coote, Michelle L.

    2005-01-01

    The monomer conversion dependence of the formation of the various types of defect structures in radical suspension polymerization of vinyl chloride was examined via both H-1 and C-13 NMR spectrometry. The rate coefficients for model propagation and intra- and intermolecular hydrogen abstraction

  12. Intermolecular potential and rovibrational states of the H2O–D2 complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avoird, Ad van der; Scribano, Yohann; Faure, Alexandre; Weida, Miles J.; Fair, Joanna R.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: H 2 O–D 2 potential surface and pH 2 O–oD 2 ground state wave function, for planar geometries. Highlights: ► The interaction between H 2 O and H 2 is of great astrophysical interest. ► The rovibrational states of H 2 O–D 2 were computed on an ab initio potential surface. ► Results are compared with the rovibrational states of H 2 O–H 2 computed recently. ► We measured the high-resolution infrared spectrum of H 2 O–D 2 in the H 2 O bend region. ► Comparison with the calculations provides information on H 2 O–H 2 potential surface. - Abstract: A five-dimensional intermolecular potential for H 2 O–D 2 was obtained from the full nine-dimensional ab initio potential surface of Valiron et al. [P. Valiron, M. Wernli, A. Faure, L. Wiesenfeld, C. Rist, S. Kedžuch, J. Noga, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 134306] by averaging over the ground state vibrational wave functions of H 2 O and D 2 . On this five-dimensional potential with a well depth D e of 232.12 cm −1 we calculated the bound rovibrational levels of H 2 O–D 2 for total angular momentum J = 0–3. The method used to compute the rovibrational levels is similar to a scattering approach—it involves a basis of coupled free rotor wave functions for the hindered internal rotations and the overall rotation of the dimer—while it uses a discrete variable representation of the intermolecular distance coordinate R. The basis was adapted to the permutation symmetry associated with the para/ortho (p/o) nature of both H 2 O and D 2 , as well as to inversion symmetry. As expected, the H 2 O–D 2 dimer is more strongly bound than its H 2 O–H 2 isotopologue [cf. A. van der Avoird, D.J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 134 (2011) 044314], with dissociation energies D 0 of 46.10, 50.59, 67.43, and 73.53 cm −1 for pH 2 O–oD 2 , oH 2 O–oD 2 , pH 2 O–pD 2 , and oH 2 O–pD 2 . A rotationally resolved infrared spectrum of H 2 O–D 2 was measured in the frequency region of the H 2 O bend

  13. Towards interpretation of intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement outside the fast exchange limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceccon, Alberto; Marius Clore, G., E-mail: mariusc@mail.nih.gov; Tugarinov, Vitali, E-mail: vitali.tugarinov@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2016-09-15

    In an exchanging system between major and minor species, the transverse paramagnetic relaxation enhancement rate observed on the resonances of the major species (Γ{sub 2}{sup app}) is dependent upon the exchange regime between the species. Quantitative analysis of PRE data in such systems typically assumes that the overall exchange rate k{sub ex} between the species is fast on the PRE time scale (k{sub ex} ≫ Γ{sub 2}). Recently, we have characterized the kinetics of binding of the model protein ubiquitin to large (LUV) and small (SUV) unilamellar lipid-based nanoparticles or liposomes (Ceccon A, Tugarinov V, Bax A, Clore GM (2016). J Am Chem Soc 138:5789–5792). Building upon these results and taking advantage of a strong paramagnetic agent with an isotropic g-tensor, Gd{sup 3+}, we were able to measure intermolecular methyl carbon and proton PREs between paramagnetically-tagged liposomes and ubiquitin. In the limit of fast exchange (k{sub ex} ≫ Γ{sub 2}) the ratio of the apparent proton to carbon methyl PREs, ({sup 1}H{sub m}–Γ{sub 2}{sup app})/({sup 13}C{sub m}–Γ{sub 2}{sup app}), is equal to the square of the ratio of the gyromagnetic ratios of the two nuclei, (γ{sub Η}/γ{sub C}){sup 2}. However, outside the fast exchange regime, under intermediate exchange conditions (e.g. when Γ{sub 2} is comparable in magnitude to k{sub ex}) the ({sup 1}H{sub m}–Γ{sub 2}{sup app})/({sup 13}C{sub m}–Γ{sub 2}{sup app}) ratio provides a reliable measure of the ‘true’ methyl PREs.

  14. A trans-Complementing Recombination Trap Demonstrates a Low Propensity of Flaviviruses for Intermolecular Recombination▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taucher, Christian; Berger, Angelika; Mandl, Christian W.

    2010-01-01

    Intermolecular recombination between the genomes of closely related RNA viruses can result in the emergence of novel strains with altered pathogenic potential and antigenicity. Although recombination between flavivirus genomes has never been demonstrated experimentally, the potential risk of generating undesirable recombinants has nevertheless been a matter of concern and controversy with respect to the development of live flavivirus vaccines. As an experimental system for investigating the ability of flavivirus genomes to recombine, we developed a “recombination trap,” which was designed to allow the products of rare recombination events to be selected and amplified. To do this, we established reciprocal packaging systems consisting of pairs of self-replicating subgenomic RNAs (replicons) derived from tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), West Nile virus (WNV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) that could complement each other in trans and thus be propagated together in cell culture over multiple passages. Any infectious viruses with intact, full-length genomes that were generated by recombination of the two replicons would be selected and enriched by end point dilution passage, as was demonstrated in a spiking experiment in which a small amount of wild-type virus was mixed with the packaged replicons. Using the recombination trap and the JEV system, we detected two aberrant recombination events, both of which yielded unnatural genomes containing duplications. Infectious clones of both of these genomes yielded viruses with impaired growth properties. Despite the fact that the replicon pairs shared approximately 600 nucleotides of identical sequence where a precise homologous crossover event would have yielded a wild-type genome, this was not observed in any of these systems, and the TBEV and WNV systems did not yield any viable recombinant genomes at all. Our results show that intergenomic recombination can occur in the structural region of flaviviruses

  15. Intermolecular Interactions and Electrostatic Properties of the [beta]-Hydroquinone Apohost: Implications for Supramolecular Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausen, Henrik F.; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Jayatilaka, Dylan; Overgaard, Jacob; Koutsantonis, George A.; Spackman, Mark A.; Iversen, Bo B. (Aarhus); (UWA); (UC)

    2012-02-07

    The crystal structure of the {beta}-polymorph of hydroquinone ({beta}-HQ), the apohost of a large family of clathrates, is reported with a specific focus on intermolecular interactions and the electrostatic nature of its cavity. Hirshfeld surface analysis reveals subtle close contacts between two interconnecting HQ networks, and the local packing and related close contacts were examined by breakdown of the fingerprint plot. An experimental multipole model containing anisotropic thermal parameters for hydrogen atoms has been successfully refined against 15(2) K single microcrystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data. The experimental electron density model has been compared with a theoretical electron density calculated with the molecule embedded in its own crystal field. Hirshfeld charges, interaction energies and the electrostatic potential calculated for both models are qualitatively in good agreement, but small differences in the electrostatic potential persist due to charge transfer from all hydrogen atoms to the oxygen atoms in the theoretical model. The electrostatic potential in the center of the cavity is positive, very shallow and highly symmetric, suggesting that the inclusion of polar molecules in the void will involve a balance between opposing effects. The electric field is by symmetry zero in the center of the cavity, increasing to a value of 0.0185 e/{angstrom}{sup 2} (0.27 V/{angstrom}) 1 {angstrom} along the 3-fold axis and 0.0105 e/{angstrom}{sup 2} (0.15 V/{angstrom}) 1 {angstrom} along the perpendicular direction. While these values are substantial in a macroscopic context, they are quite small for a molecular cavity and are not expected to strongly polarize a guest molecule.

  16. Effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of carbon nanotube–gold nanoparticle conjugates in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konczak L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lukasz Konczak,1 Jolanta Narkiewicz-Michalek,2 Giorgia Pastorin,3 Tomasz Panczyk1 1Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow, 2Department of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland; 3Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, Singapore Abstract: This work deals with the role of intermolecular interactions in the stability of a carbon nanotube (CNT capped by functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. The importance of such a system is due to its potential application as a pH-controlled drug carrier. Our preliminary experimental studies showed that fabrication of such a nanobottle/nanocontainer is feasible and it is possible to encapsulate the anticancer drug cisplatin inside the inner space of a CNT and seal its ends by functionalized AuNPs. The expected behavior, that is, detachment of AuNPs at acidic pH and the release of cisplatin, was, however, not observed. On the other hand, our theoretical studies of chemically identical system led to the conclusion that the release of cisplatin at acidic pH should be observed. Therefore, in this work, a deeper theoretical analysis of various factors that could be responsible for the disagreement between experimental and theoretical results were performed. The study found that the major factor is a large dispersion interaction component acting between CNT and AuNP in solution in the case of the experimental system. This factor can be controlled to some extent by tuning the system size or the ratio between AuNP diameter and CNT diameter. Thus, such kind of a pH-sensitive drug carrier is still of great interest, but its structural parameters need to be properly adjusted. Keywords: hydrazone bond, drug delivery, dispersion interactions, cisplatin, acidic pH

  17. Intermolecular hydrogen transfer catalyzed by a flavodehydrogenase, bakers' yeast flavocytochrome b2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, P.; Lederer, F.

    1985-01-01

    Bakers yeast flavocytochrome b2 is a flavin-dependent L-2-hydroxy acid dehydrogenase which also exhibits transhydrogenase activity. When a reaction takes place between [2- 3 H]lactate and a halogenopyruvate, tritium is found in water and at the halogenolactate C2 position. When the halogenopyruvate undergoes halide ion elimination, tritium is also found at the C3 position of the resulting pyruvate. The amount tau of this intermolecular tritium transfer depends on the initial keto acid-acceptor concentration. At infinite acceptor concentration, extrapolation yields a maximal transfer of 97 +/- 11%. This indicates that the hydroxy acid-derived hydrogen resides transiently on enzyme monoprotic heteroatoms and that exchange with bulk solvent occurs only at the level of free reduced enzyme. Using a minimal kinetic scheme, the rate constant for hydrogen exchange between Ered and solvent is calculated to be on the order of 10(2) M-1 S-1, which leads to an estimated pK approximately equal to 15 for the ionization of the substrate-derived proton while on the enzyme. It is suggested that this hydrogen could be shared between the active site base and Flred N5 anion. It is furthermore shown that some tritium is incorporated into the products when the transhydrogenation is carried out in tritiated water. Finally, with [2-2H]lactate-reduced enzyme, a deuterium isotope effect is observed on the rate of bromopyruvate disappearance. Extrapolation to infinite bromopyruvate concentration yields DV = 4.4. An apparent inverse isotope effect is determined for bromide ion elimination. These results strengthen the idea that oxidoreduction and elimination pathways involve a common carbanionic intermediate

  18. A programmable optimization environment using the GAMESS-US and MERLIN/MCL packages. Applications on intermolecular interaction energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalatzis, Fanis G.; Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G.; Demetropoulos, Ioannis N.

    2006-09-01

    systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: UNIX Programming language used: ANSI C, ANSI Fortran-77 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:11 282 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 49 458 Distribution format: tar.gz Memory required to execute with typical data: Memory requirements mainly depend on the selection of a GAMESS-US basis set and the number of atoms No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of processors used: 1 Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: no Nature of physical problem: Multidimensional geometry optimization is of great importance in any ab initio calculation since it usually is one of the most CPU-intensive tasks, especially on large molecular systems. For example, the geometric and energetic description of van der Waals and weakly bound H-bonded complexes requires the construction of related important portions of the multidimensional intermolecular potential energy surface (IPES). So the various held views about the nature of these bonds can be quantitatively tested. Method of solution: The Merlin/MCL optimization environment was interconnected with the GAMESS-US package to facilitate geometry optimization in quantum chemistry problems. The important portions of the IPES require the capability to program optimization strategies. The Merlin/MCL environment was used for the implementation of such strategies. In this work, a CP-corrected geometry optimization was performed on the HF-H 2O complex and an MCL program was developed to study portions of the potential energy surface of the C 6H 6-H 2O complex. Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The Merlin optimization environment and the GAMESS-US package must be installed. The MERGAM interface requires GAMESS-US input files that have been constructed in Cartesian coordinates. This restriction occurs from a design-time requirement to not allow reorientation of atomic coordinates; this rule holds always true when applying the COORD

  19. Pressure effects on the structure, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of heat-induced aggregation of protein studied by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Y [Applied Chemistry Department, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Okuno, A [Research Department 3, Central Research, Bridgestone Co. Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8531 (Japan); Kato, M, E-mail: taniguti@sk.ritsumei.ac.j [Pharmaceutical Sciences Department, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Pressure can retrain the heat-induced aggregation and dissociate the heat-induced aggregates. We observed the aggregation-preventing pressure effect and the aggregates-dissociating pressure effect to characterize the heat-induced aggregation of equine serum albumin (ESA) by FT-IR spectroscopy. The results suggest the {alpha}-helical structure collapses at the beginning of heat-induced aggregation through the swollen structure, and then the rearrangement of structure to the intermolecular {beta}-sheet takes place through partially unfolded structure. We determined the activation volume for the heat-induced aggregation ({Delta}V'' = +93 ml/mol) and the partial molar volume difference between native state and heat-induced aggregates ({Delta}V=+32 ml/mol). This positive partial molar volume difference suggests that the heat-induced aggregates have larger internal voids than the native structure. Moreover, the positive volume change implies that the formation of the intermolecular {beta}-sheet is unfavorable under high pressure.

  20. Manipulation of Intermolecular Interactions for Active Layer Morphology Optimization in Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreda, Leonel

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are an attractive solar energy technology for low-current applications. Herein is described the supramolecular design and methodology to manipulate intermolecular interactions in order to create an active layer in OPVs devices composed of crystalline and amorphous donor-acceptor domains, which has been proposed as the ideal morphology for high performance. To this end, a series of symmetric and asymmetric diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) derivatives containing either an amide (capable of hydrogen-bonding) or ester endgroups were synthesized. The symmetric designs faced problems with solubility, strong segregation and low performance, so asymmetric donors having one amide/ester were used. Upon addressing initial stability problems, analysis of the ester films with X-ray diffraction displayed greater crystallinity and pi-pi stacking. The amide formed short aggregates with smaller, less ordered domains, resulting from competition between hydrogen bonding and pi-pi stacking, which interestingly endowed devices with higher current and 50% increase in device efficiency over the ester. To better match solar emission, the DPP core was substituted by benzodithiophene (BDT). Amides again outperformed esters, but introduction of a benzothiadiazole ?-spacer between the amide/ester endgroups led to electron traps and lowered performance; replacing it with phenyldithiophene reduced stacking ability. A recurring issue was the competition between noncovalent interactions, which motivated the use of barbituric acid endgroups, but solubility was compromised. After addressing each problem, a design having a BDT core with planar ?-spacers, connected by an alkyl linker to the hydrogen-bonding endgroups is predicted to display optimized optoelectronic properties and cooperative noncovalent interaction. Next, a series of BDT-core molecules with DPP endgroups and alkyl tails resembling solvent additives (which improve donor-acceptor interaction but increase

  1. Studies on the stability and intermolecular interactions of cellulose and polylactide systems using molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, David T.

    The stability and intermolecular interactions of cellulose and polylactide (PLA) systems were studied using molecular modeling. This work explains how grafting various groups onto cellulose increases hydrolysis of the glycosidic linkages of cellulose. A substituent increases hydrolysis of cellulose by serving as an anchor to the end of the cleaved cellulose to which it is bonded, making it less mobile, and allowing it to have stronger interactions than those in pure hydrolyzed cellulose. Hydrolysis increases with the size of the substituent. Molecules sorbed but not grafted to cellulose do not increase hydrolysis. Hydrolysis mainly occurs at glucoses bonded to the substituent. A substituent on the sixth carbon position of cellulose increases hydrolysis to a greater extent than does one on the second or third carbon position. The effect of blending poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(D-lactide) (PDLA) and the effect of various arrangements of L-lactide and D-lactide in poly(L-lactide-co-D-lactide) on the resistance of polylactide (PLA) to hydrolysis has been explained. Among the homopolymer blends, the 50/50 PLLA/PDLA blend has the greatest resistance to hydrolysis due to its having stronger hydrogen-bonding and van der Waals forces than pure PLLA or PDLA. The change in potential energy for hydrolysis decreases linearly with increasing % PLLA or % PDLA from 0 to 50%. Among the copolymers containing a given percentage of L-lactide and D-lactide, those containing longer blocks of L-lactide and D-lactide have greater resistance to hydrolysis compared to those with shorter blocks or random copolymers because copolymers with longer blocks are more stable before hydrolysis compared to the other copolymers. Among the copolymers with long blocks of L- and D-lactide, those containing 50% L-lactide have a greater resistance to hydrolysis compared to the copolymers with 26% or 74% L-lactide. Blends or copolymers that are mirror images of each other have the same resistance to

  2. New models for intermolecular repulsion and their application to Van Der Waals complexes and crystals of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, H.H.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Model intermolecular potentials are required for simulations of molecules in the gas, liquid, or solid phase. The widely used isotropic atom-atom model potentials are empirically fitted and based on the assumptions of transferability, combining rules and that atoms in molecules are spherical. This thesis develops a non-empirical method of modelling repulsion by applying the overlap model, which we show as a general non-empirical method of deriving repulsion potentials for a specific molecule. In this thesis, the repulsion parameters for an exponential atom-atom model potential are obtained from the ab initio charge density of a small organic molecule by making the assumption that the repulsion is proportional to the overlap of a pair of molecules. The proportionality constant is fixed by a limited number of intermolecular perturbation theory (IMPT) calculations. To complete the model potential, the electrostatic interaction is represented by a distributed multipole analysis, and the Slater-Kirkwood formula is used for the dispersion. These non-empirical potentials can reproduce experimental crystal structure when applied to crystal structure prediction of an oxyboryl derivative. A detailed study on further improving the overlap model was carried out for phenol-water, by including other minor intermolecular contributions of charge-transfer and penetration. High quality ab initio calculations on the complex were performed for use in comparison. To compare with experimental data, diffusion Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the potential, so that the effects of anharmonic zero-point motion on structure and energy of the system are included. When the system is too large for an IMPT calculation, the proportionality constant can be determined empirically by fitting the cell volume as shown in our study of crystal structures of chlorothalonil. This is used with an anisotropic repulsion model that has been derived for Cl and N atoms in chlorothalonil. This model

  3. Intra- and intermolecular effects on the Compton profile of the ionic liquid 1,3-dimethylimidazolium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koskelo, J., E-mail: jaakko.koskelo@helsinki.fi; Juurinen, I.; Ruotsalainen, K. O.; Lehtola, S.; Galambosi, S.; Hämäläinen, K.; Huotari, S.; Hakala, M., E-mail: mikko.o.hakala@helsinki.fi [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); McGrath, M. J. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l’Environnement, CEA-Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette CEDEX (France); Kuo, I-F. [Physical and Life Sciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-12-28

    We present a comprehensive simulation study on the solid-liquid phase transition of the ionic liquid 1,3-dimethylimidazolium chloride in terms of the changes in the atomic structure and their effect on the Compton profile. The structures were obtained by using ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Chosen radial distribution functions of the liquid structure are presented and found generally to be in good agreement with previous ab initio molecular dynamics and neutron scattering studies. The main contributions to the predicted difference Compton profile are found to arise from intermolecular changes in the phase transition. This prediction can be used for interpreting future experiments.

  4. Intermolecular Anti-Markovnikov Hydroamination of Unactivated Alkenes with Sulfonamides Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qilei; Graff, David E; Knowles, Robert R

    2018-01-17

    Here we report a catalytic method for the intermolecular anti-Markovnikov hydroamination of unactivated alkenes using primary and secondary sulfonamides. These reactions occur at room temperature under visible light irradiation and are jointly catalyzed by an iridium(III) photocatalyst, a dialkyl phosphate base, and a thiol hydrogen atom donor. Reaction outcomes are consistent with the intermediacy of an N-centered sulfonamidyl radical generated via proton-coupled electron transfer activation of the sulfonamide N-H bond. Studies outlining the synthetic scope (>60 examples) and mechanistic features of the reaction are presented.

  5. Intra- und intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical and molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simperler, A.

    1999-03-01

    Intra- and intermolecular H-bonds have been investigated with spectroscopic, quantum chemical, and molecular dynamics methods. The work is divided into the following three parts: 1. Intramolecular interactions in ortho-substituted phenols. Theoretical and experimental data that characterizes the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in 48 different o-substituted phenols are discussed. The study covers various kinds of O-H ... Y -type interactions (Y= N, O, S, F, Cl, Br, I, C=C, C=-C, and C-=N). The bond strength sequences for several series of systematically related compounds as obtained from IR spectroscopy data (i.e., v(OH) stretching frequencies) are discussed and reproduced with several theoretical methods (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), B3LYP/DZVP, MP2/6-31G(d,p), and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory). The experimentally determined sequences are interpreted in terms of the intrinsic properties of the molecules: hydrogen bond distances, Mulliken partial charges, van der Waals radii, and electron densities of the Y-proton acceptors. 2. Competitive hydrogen bonds and conformational equilibria in 2,6-disubstituted phenols containing two different carbonyl substituents. The rotational isomers of ten unsymmetrical 2,6-disubstituted phenols as obtained by combinations of five different carbonyl substituents (COOH, COOCH 3 , CHO, COCH 3 , and CONH 2 ) have been theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The relative stability of four to five conformers of each compound were determined by full geometry optimization for free molecules as well as for molecules in reaction fields with dielectric constants up to ε=37.5. A comparison with IR spectroscopic data of available compounds revealed excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted stability sequences and conformational equilibria. The stability of a conformer could be interpreted to be governed by the following two contributions: (i) an attractive hydrogen bond

  6. Lack of evidence for intermolecular epistatic interactions between adiponectin and resistin gene polymorphisms in Malaysian male subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cia-Hin Lau

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epistasis (gene-gene interaction is a ubiquitous component of the genetic architecture of complex traits such as susceptibility to common human diseases. Given the strong negative correlation between circulating adiponectin and resistin levels, the potential intermolecular epistatic interactions between ADIPOQ (SNP+45T > G, SNP+276G > T, SNP+639T > C and SNP+1212A > G and RETN (SNP-420C > G and SNP+299G > A gene polymorphisms in the genetic risk underlying type 2 diabetes (T2DM and metabolic syndrome (MS were assessed. The potential mutual influence of the ADIPOQ and RETN genes on their adipokine levels was also examined. The rare homozygous genotype (risk alleles of SNP-420C > G at the RETN locus tended to be co-inherited together with the common homozygous genotypes (protective alleles of SNP+639T > C and SNP+1212A > G at the ADIPOQ locus. Despite the close structural relationship between the ADIPOQ and RETN genes, there was no evidence of an intermolecular epistatic interaction between these genes. There was also no reciprocal effect of the ADIPOQ and RETN genes on their adipokine levels, i.e., ADIPOQ did not affect resistin levels nor did RETN affect adiponectin levels. The possible influence of the ADIPOQ gene on RETN expression warrants further investigation.

  7. Quantum electrodynamics with nonrelativistic sources. V. Electromagnetic field correlations and intermolecular interactions between molecules in either ground or excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, E.A.; Thirunamachandran, T.

    1993-01-01

    Spatial correlations between electromagnetic fields arising from neutral sources with electric-dipole transition moments are calculated using nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics in the multipolar formalism. Expressions for electric-electric, magnetic-magnetic, and electric-magnetic correlation functions at two points r and r' are given for a source molecule in either a ground or an excited state. In contrast to the electric-electric and magnetic-magnetic cases there are no electric-magnetic correlations for a ground-state molecule. For an excited molecule the downward transitions contribute additional terms which have modulating factors depending on (r-r')/λ. From these correlation functions electric and magnetic energy densities are found by setting r=r'. These energy densities are then used in a response formalism to calculate intermolecular energy shifts. In the case of two ground-state molecules this leads to the Casimir-Polder potential. However, for a pair of molecules, one or both excited, there are additional terms arising from downward transitions. An important feature of these energies is that they exhibit an R -2 dependence for large intermolecular separations R. This dependence is interpreted in terms of the Poynting vector, which itself can be obtained by setting r=r' in the electric-magnetic correlation function

  8. Influence of intermolecular interactions on solid state luminescence of imidazopyridines: theoretical interpretations using FMO-TDDFT and ONIOM approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemitsu, Yasuhiro; Mutai, Toshiki; Houjou, Hirohiko; Araki, Koji

    2014-07-28

    6-Cyano-2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)imidazo[1,2-a]-pyridine (6CN-HPIP) shows polymorph-dependent luminescence with the three different crystal forms exhibiting the packing-controlled tuning of bright colors, orange, yellow, and red. The distinctive emission in aggregated states was treated with finite cluster models and analyzed by means of quantum chemistry calculations. The influence of structural displacements and intermolecular interactions in the crystalline state on solid state luminescence was examined in detail using the Fragment Molecular Orbital (FMO) scheme, suitable for studies of aggregated molecular systems. The FMO pair interaction analysis of the S1-S0 emission maxima indicated that the intermolecular side-to-side interactions cause hypsochromic shifts; facial interactions induce bathochromic shifts; and crystal packing effects in total induce hypsochromic shifts. The FMO predictions of the emission maxima offered qualitatively satisfactory agreements with the experiments. However, the small cluster models including up to 17 molecules did not reach quantitative convergence, i.e., the emission colour order among them was not well reproduced.

  9. A quantum chemical study of H2S2: Intramolecular torsional mode and intermolecular interactions with rare gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Glauciete S; Barreto, Patricia R P; Palazzetti, Federico; Lombardi, Andrea; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2008-10-28

    The structural and energetic properties of the H(2)S(2) molecule have been studied using density functional theory, second-order Moller-Plesset method, and coupled cluster theory with several basis sets. In order to extend previous work on intra- and intermolecular dynamics of the chirality changing modes for H(2)O(2) and its derivatives, our focus has been on the torsion around the S-S bond, along with an extensive characterization of the intermolecular potentials of H(2)S(2) with the rare gases (He, Ne, Ar, and Kr). Use is made of previously defined coordinates and expansion formulas for the potentials which allow for a faithful representation of geometrical and symmetry properties of these systems that involve the interaction of an atom with a floppy molecule. The potential energy surfaces obtained in this work are useful for classical and quantum mechanical simulations of molecular collisions responsible for chirality changing processes of possible interest in the modeling of prebiotic phenomena.

  10. Structural analysis of intermolecular interactions in the kinesin adaptor complex fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1/ short coiled-coil protein (FEZ1/SCOCO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Rodrigo Alborghetti

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton and protein trafficking processes, including vesicle transport to synapses, are key processes in neuronal differentiation and axon outgrowth. The human protein FEZ1 (fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 / UNC-76, in C. elegans, SCOCO (short coiled-coil protein / UNC-69 and kinesins (e.g. kinesin heavy chain / UNC116 are involved in these processes. Exploiting the feature of FEZ1 protein as a bivalent adapter of transport mediated by kinesins and FEZ1 protein interaction with SCOCO (proteins involved in the same path of axonal growth, we investigated the structural aspects of intermolecular interactions involved in this complex formation by NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (MS, SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering and molecular modelling. The topology of homodimerization was accessed through NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance studies of the region involved in this process, corresponding to FEZ1 (92-194. Through studies involving the protein in its monomeric configuration (reduced and dimeric state, we propose that homodimerization occurs with FEZ1 chains oriented in an anti-parallel topology. We demonstrate that the interaction interface of FEZ1 and SCOCO defined by MS and computational modelling is in accordance with that previously demonstrated for UNC-76 and UNC-69. SAXS and literature data support a heterotetrameric complex model. These data provide details about the interaction interfaces probably involved in the transport machinery assembly and open perspectives to understand and interfere in this assembly and its involvement in neuronal differentiation and axon outgrowth.

  11. Protein topology determines cysteine oxidation fate: the case of sulfenyl amide formation among protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelipe, Lucas A; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A; Turjanski, Adrián G

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function.

  12. Nanostructure characterization of beta-sheet crystals in silk under various temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the nanostructure characterizations of β-sheet in silk fiber with different reaction temperatures. A molecular dynamic model is developed and simulated by Gromacs software packages. The results reveal the change rules of the number of hydrogen bonds in β-sheet under different temperatures. The best reaction temperature for the β-sheet crystals is also found. This work provides theoretical basis for the designing of materials based on silk.

  13. Beta-Sheet-Forming, Self-Assembled Peptide Nanomaterials towards Optical, Energy, and Healthcare Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungjin; Kim, Jae Hong; Lee, Joon Seok; Park, Chan Beum

    2015-08-12

    Peptide self-assembly is an attractive route for the synthesis of intricate organic nanostructures that possess remarkable structural variety and biocompatibility. Recent studies on peptide-based, self-assembled materials have expanded beyond the construction of high-order architectures; they are now reporting new functional materials that have application in the emerging fields such as artificial photosynthesis and rechargeable batteries. Nevertheless, there have been few reviews particularly concentrating on such versatile, emerging applications. Herein, recent advances in the synthesis of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials (e.g., cross β-sheet-based amyloid nanostructures, peptide amphiphiles) are selectively reviewed and their new applications in diverse, interdisciplinary fields are described, ranging from optics and energy storage/conversion to healthcare. The applications of peptide-based self-assembled materials in unconventional fields are also highlighted, such as photoluminescent peptide nanostructures, artificial photosynthetic peptide nanomaterials, and lithium-ion battery components. The relation of such functional materials to the rapidly progressing biomedical applications of peptide self-assembly, which include biosensors/chips and regenerative medicine, are discussed. The combination of strategies shown in these applications would further promote the discovery of novel, functional, small materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. An adaptive bin framework search method for a beta-sheet protein homopolymer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoos Holger H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The problem of protein structure prediction consists of predicting the functional or native structure of a protein given its linear sequence of amino acids. This problem has played a prominent role in the fields of biomolecular physics and algorithm design for over 50 years. Additionally, its importance increases continually as a result of an exponential growth over time in the number of known protein sequences in contrast to a linear increase in the number of determined structures. Our work focuses on the problem of searching an exponentially large space of possible conformations as efficiently as possible, with the goal of finding a global optimum with respect to a given energy function. This problem plays an important role in the analysis of systems with complex search landscapes, and particularly in the context of ab initio protein structure prediction. Results In this work, we introduce a novel approach for solving this conformation search problem based on the use of a bin framework for adaptively storing and retrieving promising locally optimal solutions. Our approach provides a rich and general framework within which a broad range of adaptive or reactive search strategies can be realized. Here, we introduce adaptive mechanisms for choosing which conformations should be stored, based on the set of conformations already stored in memory, and for biasing choices when retrieving conformations from memory in order to overcome search stagnation. Conclusion We show that our bin framework combined with a widely used optimization method, Monte Carlo search, achieves significantly better performance than state-of-the-art generalized ensemble methods for a well-known protein-like homopolymer model on the face-centered cubic lattice.

  15. beta-Sheet Aggregation of Kisspeptin-10 is Stimulated by Heparin but Inhibited by Amphiphiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bang; Franzmann, Magnus; Basaiawmoit, Rajiv Vaid

    2010-01-01

    The murine 10-residue neurohormone kisspeptin (YNWNSFGLRY) is an important regulator of reproductive behavior and gonadotrophin secretion. It is known to form a random coil in solution, but undergoes a structural change in the presence of membranes although the nature of this change is not fully ...

  16. Tuning Aryl−CH···O Intermolecular Interactions on Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demers-Carpentier, Vincent; Laliberte, Marc-André; Pan, Yunxiang

    2010-01-01

    −CH···O bonding as the driving force for dimer formation. In contrast to TFAP, chemisorbed TFVB and OFAP do not form such self-assembled structures as they lack carbonyl and aryl−CH groups, respectively. The self-assembly of MB on Pt(111) differs from that of TFAP, in that it can form structures stabilized by one...

  17. Tuning Aryl−CH···O Intermolecular Interactions on Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demers-Carpentier, Vincent; Laliberte, Marc-André; Pan, Yunxiang

    2011-01-01

    −CH···O bonding in forming self-assembled low-nuclearity structures at room temperature and to compare aryl−CH···O bonding by ester and ketone carbonyl functions. The STM images clearly evidence the formation of homochiral dimers and trimers of TFAP, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal aryl...

  18. Refined ab initio intermolecular ground-state potential energy surface for the He-C2H2 van der Waals complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, Berta; Henriksen, Christian; Farrelly, David

    2013-01-01

    A refined CCSD(T) intermolecular potential energy surface is developed for the He-C2H2 van der Waals complex. For this, 206 points on the intermolecular potential energy surface, evaluated using the CCSD(T) method and the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set extended with a set of 3s3p2d1f1g midbond functions...... previously by Munteanu and Fernández (J. Chem. Phys., 123, 014309, 2005) but differs notably at short range. The improved potential energy surface should, therefore, be particularly useful for computations of collision line broadening. Dynamical calculations of a number of rovibrational bound state energies...

  19. Fast Microwave-Enhanced Intra-, Pseudo-intra- and Intermolecular Heck Reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Svennebring, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The Heck reaction is one of the most appreciated methods for carbon-carbon bond formation. Due to its mildness and ability to be tuned by additives, it often leaves few alternative competitive reactions. It has also proven easy to develop the reaction conditions in an environmentally benign direction. Through the introduction of palladium chelating groups in olefinic precursors for the Heck reaction, it has been possible to direct the substitution in the following Heck arylation in favor of t...

  20. Propagator formalism and computer simulation of restricted diffusion behaviors of inter-molecular multiple-quantum coherences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Congbo; Chen Zhong; Cai Shuhui; Zhong Jianhui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, behaviors of single-quantum coherences and inter-molecular multiple-quantum coherences under restricted diffusion in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments were investigated. The propagator formalism based on the loss of spin phase memory during random motion was applied to describe the diffusion-induced signal attenuation. The exact expression of the signal attenuation under the short gradient pulse approximation for restricted diffusion between two parallel plates was obtained using this propagator method. For long gradient pulses, a modified formalism was proposed. The simulated signal attenuation under the effects of gradient pulses of different width based on the Monte Carlo method agrees with the theoretical predictions. The propagator formalism and computer simulation can provide convenient, intuitive and precise methods for the study of the diffusion behaviors

  1. Central-field intermolecular potentials from the differential elastic scattering of H2(D2) by other molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppermann, Aron; Gordon, R.J.; Coggiola, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    Differential elastic scattering cross sections for the systems H 2 +O 2 , SF 6 , NH 3 , CO, and CH 4 and for D 2 +O 2 , SF 6 , and NH 3 have been obtained from crossed beam studies. In all cases, rapid quantum oscillations have been resolved which permit the determination of intermolecular potentiel parameters if a central-field assumption is adopted. These potentials were found to be independent of both the isotopic form of the hydrogen molecule, and the relative collision energy. As a result of this, and the ability of these spherical potentials to quantitatively describe the measured scattering, it is concluded that anisotropy effects do not seem important in these H 2 (D 2 ) systems

  2. Investigation on intermolecular interaction between berberine and β-cyclodextrin by 2D UV-Vis asynchronous spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Anqi; Kang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yizhuang; Noda, Isao; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Wu, Jinguang

    2017-10-01

    The interaction between berberine chloride and β-cyclodextrin (β-CyD) is investigated via 2D asynchronous UV-Vis spectrum. The occurrence of cross peaks around (420 nm, 420 nm) in 2D asynchronous spectrum reveals that specific intermolecular interaction indeed exists between berberine chloride and β-CyD. In spite of the difficulty caused by overlapping of cross peaks, we manage to confirm that the 420 nm band of berberine undergoes a red-shift, and its bandwidth decreases under the interaction with β-CyD. The red-shift of the 420 nm band that can be assigned to n-π* transition indicates the environment of berberine becomes more hydrophobic. The above spectral behavior is helpful in understanding why the solubility of berberine is enhanced by β-CyD.

  3. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P

    2002-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) belongs to family C of the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. The receptor is believed to exist as a homodimer due to covalent and non-covalent interactions between the two amino terminal domains (ATDs). It is well established that agonist binding to family C...... receptors takes place at the ATD and that this causes the ATD dimer to twist. However, very little is known about the translation of the ATD dimer twist into G-protein coupling to the 7 transmembrane moieties (7TMs) of these receptor dimers. In this study we have attempted to delineate the agonist......-induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  4. Rational design of viscosity reducing mutants of a monoclonal antibody: hydrophobic versus electrostatic inter-molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Pilarin; Li, Li; Kumar, Sandeep; Buck, Patrick M; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Balthazor, Bryan; Conley, Tami R; Sek, David; Allen, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    High viscosity of monoclonal antibody formulations at concentrations ≥100 mg/mL can impede their development as products suitable for subcutaneous delivery. The effects of hydrophobic and electrostatic intermolecular interactions on the solution behavior of MAB 1, which becomes unacceptably viscous at high concentrations, was studied by testing 5 single point mutants. The mutations were designed to reduce viscosity by disrupting either an aggregation prone region (APR), which also participates in 2 hydrophobic surface patches, or a negatively charged surface patch in the variable region. The disruption of an APR that lies at the interface of light and heavy chain variable domains, VH and VL, via L45K mutation destabilized MAB 1 and abolished antigen binding. However, mutation at the preceding residue (V44K), which also lies in the same APR, increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1 without sacrificing antigen binding or thermal stability. Neutralizing the negatively charged surface patch (E59Y) also increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1, but charge reversal at the same position (E59K/R) caused destabilization, decreased solubility and led to difficulties in sample manipulation that precluded their viscosity measurements at high concentrations. Both V44K and E59Y mutations showed similar increase in apparent solubility. However, the viscosity profile of E59Y was considerably better than that of the V44K, providing evidence that inter-molecular interactions in MAB 1 are electrostatically driven. In conclusion, neutralizing negatively charged surface patches may be more beneficial toward reducing viscosity of highly concentrated antibody solutions than charge reversal or aggregation prone motif disruption.

  5. Modelling decomposition, intermolecular protection and physical aggregation based on organic matter quality assessed by 13C-CPMAS-NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incerti, Guido; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Sarker, Tushar Chandra; Giannino, Francesco; Cartenì, Fabrizio; Peressotti, Alessandro; Spaccini, Riccardo; Piccolo, Alessandro; Mazzoleni, Stefano

    2017-04-01

    Modelling organic matter decomposition is fundamental to predict biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Current models use C/N or Lignin/N ratios to describe susceptibility to decomposition, or implement separate C pools decaying with different rates, disregarding biomolecular transformations and interactions and their effect on decomposition dynamics. We present a new process-based model of decomposition that includes a description of biomolecular dynamics obtained by 13C-CPMAS NMR spectroscopy. Baseline decay rates for relevant molecular classes and intermolecular protection were calibrated by best fitting of experimental data from leaves of 20 plant species decomposing for 180 days in controlled optimal conditions. The model was validated against field data from leaves of 32 plant species decomposing for 1-year at four sites in Mediterranean ecosystems. Our innovative approach accurately predicted decomposition of a wide range of litters across different climates. Simulations correctly reproduced mass loss data and variations of selected molecular classes both in controlled conditions and in the field, across different plant molecular compositions and environmental conditions. Prediction accuracy emerged from the species-specific partitioning of molecular types and from the representation of intermolecular interactions. The ongoing model implementation and calibration are oriented at representing organic matter dynamics in soil, including processes of interaction between mineral and organic soil fractions as a function of soil texture, physical aggregation of soil organic particles, and physical protection of soil organic matter as a function of aggregate size and abundance. Prospectively, our model shall satisfactorily reproduce C sequestration as resulting from experimental data of soil amended with a range of organic materials with different biomolecular quality, ranging from biochar to crop residues. Further application is also planned based on

  6. A Closer Look at Trends in Boiling Points of Hydrides: Using an Inquiry-Based Approach to Teach Intermolecular Forces of Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Samantha; Marano, Nadia; Eisen, Laura

    2010-01-01

    We describe how we use boiling-point trends of group IV-VII hydrides to introduce intermolecular forces in our first-year general chemistry classes. Starting with the idea that molecules in the liquid state are held together by some kind of force that must be overcome for boiling to take place, students use data analysis and critical reasoning to…

  7. A functional fragment of Tau forms fibers without the need for an intermolecular cysteine bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huvent, Isabelle; Kamah, Amina; Cantrelle, François-Xavier [CNRS UMR 8576, University of Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Barois, Nicolas [Plate-forme BICeL-IFR142, Institut Pasteur de Lille, Lille (France); Slomianny, Christian [Inserm U1003, Laboratoire de physiologie cellulaire, Université Lille 1, 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Smet-Nocca, Caroline; Landrieu, Isabelle [CNRS UMR 8576, University of Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Lippens, Guy, E-mail: Guy.Lippens@univ-lille1.fr [CNRS UMR 8576, University of Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • A functional fragment of Tau forms bundled ribbon-like fibrils. • Nucleation of its fibril formation is faster than for full-length Tau. • In contrast to full-length Tau, without cysteines, the fragment still forms fibers. - Abstract: We study the aggregation of a fragment of the neuronal protein Tau that contains part of the proline rich domain and of the microtubule binding repeats. When incubated at 37 °C with heparin, the fragment readily forms fibers as witnessed by Thioflavin T fluorescence. Electron microscopy and NMR spectroscopy show bundled ribbon like structures with most residues rigidly incorporated in the fibril. Without its cysteines, this fragment still forms fibers of a similar morphology, but with lesser Thioflavin T binding sites and more mobility for the C-terminal residues.

  8. The formation of right-handed and left-handed chiral nanopores within a single domain during amino acid self-assembly on Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sena; Jeon, Aram; Driver, Russell W; Kim, Yeonwoo; Jeon, Eun Hee; Kim, Sehun; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hangil

    2016-05-25

    We report the formation of both right- and left-handed chiral nanopores within a single domain during the self-assembly of an amino acid derivative on an inert Au(111) surface using STM. DFT calculations employed to rationalize this unusual result identified that intermolecular interactions between chiral, windmill-shaped tetramers are crucial for self-assembly.

  9. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  10. Spectroscopic Characterization of Intermolecular Interaction of Amyloid β Promoted on GM1 Micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maho Yagi-Utsumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of GM1 gangliosides act as platforms for conformational transition of monomeric, unstructured amyloid β (Aβ to its toxic β-structured aggregates. We have previously shown that Aβ(1–40 accommodated on the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of lyso-GM1 or GM1 micelles assumes α-helical structures under ganglioside-excess conditions. For better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the α-to-β conformational transition of Aβ on GM1 clusters, we performed spectroscopic characterization of Aβ(1–40 titrated with GM1. It was revealed that the thioflavin T- (ThT- reactive β-structure is more populated in Aβ(1–40 under conditions where the Aβ(1–40 density on GM1 micelles is high. Under this circumstance, the C-terminal hydrophobic anchor Val39-Val40 shows two distinct conformational states that are reactive with ThT, while such Aβ species were not generated by smaller lyso-GM1 micelles. These findings suggest that GM1 clusters promote specific Aβ-Aβ interactions through their C-termini coupled with formation of the ThT-reactive β-structure depending on sizes and curvatures of the clusters.

  11. Observation of Cysteine Thiolate and -S...H-O Intermolecular Hydrogen Bond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Hin-koon; Lau, Kai Chung; Wang, Xue B.; Wang, Lai S.

    2006-11-23

    The cysteine anion was produced in the gas phase by electrospray ionization and investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy at low-temperature (70K). The cysteine anion was found to exhibit the thiolate form [-SCH2CH(NH2)CO2H], rather than the expected carboxylate form [HSCH2CH(NH2)CO2 -]. This observation was confirmed by two control experiments i.e. methyl cysteine [CH3SCH2CH(NH2)CO2-] and cysteine methyl ester [-SCH2CH(NH2)CO2CH3]. The electron binding energy of [-CH2CH(NH2)CO2H] was measured to be about 0.7 eV blue-shifted relative to [-SCH2CH(NH2)CO2CH3] due to the formation of an intramolecular –S-…HO2C– hydrogen bond in the cysteine hiolate. Theoretical calculations at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(2df,p) and B3LYP/6-311++G(2df,p) levels were carried out to estimate the strength of this intramolecular –S-…HO2C– hydrogen bond. Combining experimental measurements and theoretical calculations yielded an estimated value of 16.4 ± 2.0 kcal/mol for the –S-…HO2C– intramolecular hydrogen bond strength.

  12. Genetic plasticity of the Shigella virulence plasmid is mediated by intra- and inter-molecular events between insertion sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Giulia; McVicker, Gareth; Tang, Christoph M

    2017-09-01

    Acquisition of a single copy, large virulence plasmid, pINV, led to the emergence of Shigella spp. from Escherichia coli. The plasmid encodes a Type III secretion system (T3SS) on a 30 kb pathogenicity island (PAI), and is maintained in a bacterial population through a series of toxin:antitoxin (TA) systems which mediate post-segregational killing (PSK). The T3SS imposes a significant cost on the bacterium, and strains which have lost the plasmid and/or genes encoding the T3SS grow faster than wild-type strains in the laboratory, and fail to bind the indicator dye Congo Red (CR). Our aim was to define the molecular events in Shigella flexneri that cause loss of Type III secretion (T3S), and to examine whether TA systems exert positional effects on pINV. During growth at 37°C, we found that deletions of regions of the plasmid including the PAI lead to the emergence of CR-negative colonies; deletions occur through intra-molecular recombination events between insertion sequences (ISs) flanking the PAI. Furthermore, by repositioning MvpAT (which belongs to the VapBC family of TA systems) near the PAI, we demonstrate that the location of this TA system alters the rearrangements that lead to loss of T3S, indicating that MvpAT acts both globally (by reducing loss of pINV through PSK) as well as locally (by preventing loss of adjacent sequences). During growth at environmental temperatures, we show for the first time that pINV spontaneously integrates into different sites in the chromosome, and this is mediated by inter-molecular events involving IS1294. Integration leads to reduced PAI gene expression and impaired secretion through the T3SS, while excision of pINV from the chromosome restores T3SS function. Therefore, pINV integration provides a reversible mechanism for Shigella to circumvent the metabolic burden imposed by pINV. Intra- and inter-molecular events between ISs, which are abundant in Shigella spp., mediate plasticity of S. flexneri pINV.

  13. Biophysical analyses of human resistin: oligomer formation suggests novel biological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruna, Battu; Islam, Asimul; Ghosh, Sudip; Singh, Anil K; Vijayalakshmi, Malladi; Ahmad, Faizan; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z

    2008-11-25

    Resistin, a small secreted peptide initially identified as a link between obesity and diabetes in mice, was shown to be involved in mediating inflammation in humans. We had shown earlier that recombinant human resistin has a tendency to form aggregates by formation of inter/intramolecular disulfide linkages and that it undergoes a concentration-dependent conformational change in secondary structure from alpha-helical to beta-sheet form. Here we report that this change in secondary structural conformation is due to the increase in the oligomeric form of human resistin as a function of protein concentration. Gel filtration analysis under different conditions further demonstrated that recombinant human resistin exists as a mixture of oligomer and trimer but is converted to a mixture of monomer and oligomer in the presence of 100 mM NaCl. We show that while the trimeric form of human resistin is stable to urea-induced denaturation, it is highly susceptible to NaCl and NaF, indicating the importance of ionic interactions in stabilization of trimer. In addition, urea was able to destabilize the oligomers indicating the involvement of hydrophobic interactions in oligomerization. Ionic as well as hydrophobic interactions stabilize the monomeric human resistin. Our data suggest that human resistin exists predominantly as oligomer and trimer in vitro. The oligomeric form of human resistin shows more potent effect on stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Therefore, it is very tempting to propose that the structural conformation of resistin may be involved in maintaining the very fine balance in regulation of macrophage function for successful response to a variety of pathological conditions.

  14. Soil formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Buurman, P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil Formation deals with qualitative and quantitative aspects of soil formation (or pedogenesis) and the underlying chemical, biological, and physical processes. The starting point of the text is the process - and not soil classification. Effects of weathering and new formation of minerals,

  15. Analysis and Ranking of Protein-Protein Docking Models Using Inter-Residue Contacts and Inter-Molecular Contact Maps

    KAUST Repository

    Oliva, Romina

    2015-07-01

    In view of the increasing interest both in inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and in protein drugs themselves, analysis of the three-dimensional structure of protein-protein complexes is assuming greater relevance in drug design. In the many cases where an experimental structure is not available, protein-protein docking becomes the method of choice for predicting the arrangement of the complex. However, reliably scoring protein-protein docking poses is still an unsolved problem. As a consequence, the screening of many docking models is usually required in the analysis step, to possibly single out the correct ones. Here, making use of exemplary cases, we review our recently introduced methods for the analysis of protein complex structures and for the scoring of protein docking poses, based on the use of inter-residue contacts and their visualization in inter-molecular contact maps. We also show that the ensemble of tools we developed can be used in the context of rational drug design targeting protein-protein interactions.

  16. Dispersion-corrected energy decomposition analysis for intermolecular interactions based on the BLW and dDXDM methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmann, Stephan N; Corminboeuf, Clemence; Wu, Wei; Mo, Yirong

    2011-06-02

    As the simplest variant of the valence bond (VB) theory, the block-localized wave function (BLW) method defines the intermediate electron-localized state self-consistently at the DFT level and can be used to explore the nature of intermolecular interactions in terms of several physically intuitive energy components. Yet, it is unclear how the dispersion interaction affects such a kind of energy decomposition analysis (EDA) as standard density functional approximations neglect the long-range dispersion attractive interactions. Three electron densities corresponding to the initial electron-localized state, optimal electron-localized state, and final electron-delocalized state are involved in the BLW-ED approach; a density-dependent dispersion correction, such as the recently proposed dDXDM approach, can thus uniquely probe the impact of the long-range dispersion effect on EDA results computed at the DFT level. In this paper, we incorporate the dDXDM dispersion corrections into the BLW-ED approach and investigate a range of representative systems such as hydrogen-bonding systems, acid-base pairs, and van der Waals complexes. Results show that both the polarization and charge-transfer energies are little affected by the inclusion of the long-range dispersion effect, which thus can be regarded as an independent energy component in EDA. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  17. CORCEMA evaluation of the potential role of intermolecular transferred NOESY in the characterization of ligand-receptor complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto, Ernest V.; Moseley, Hunter N. B.; Krishna, N. Rama

    1996-10-01

    We report a theoretical characterization of the intermolecular transferred NOESY (inter-TrNOESY) between ligands and receptor macromolecules that bind reversibly, using a COmplete Relaxation and Conformational Exchange MAtrix (CORCEMA) theory developed in our laboratory. We examine the dependence of inter-TrNOESY on the dissociation constant, off-rate, ligand-to-receptor ratio, and distance variations between protons of interacting species within the complex. These factors are analyzed from simulations on two model systems: (i) neuraminidase complexed to a transition-state analogue; and (ii) thermolysin complexed to a leucine-based inhibitor. The latter case utilizes a three-state model of interaction to simulate the effect of hinge-bending motions on the inter-TrNOESY. Our calculations suggest a potential role for inter-TrNOESY (when observable) and CORCEMA analysis in properly docking the ligand within the active site, and in refining the conformation of the ligand-receptor (active-site) complex. These findings have implications on the structure-based design of ligands (e.g., inhibitors) reversibly binding to receptors (e.g., enzymes).

  18. A Raman spectroscopy study on the effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on water molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Shenghan; Wang, Xiaojun; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-05-01

    The structural forms of water/deuterated water molecules located on the surface of borosilicate capillaries have been first investigated in this study on the basis of the Raman spectral data obtained at different temperatures and under atmospheric pressure for molecules in bulk and also for molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface. The strongest two fundamental bands locating at 3063 cm-1 (2438 cm-1) in the recorded Raman spectra are assigned here to the Osbnd H (Osbnd D) bond stretching vibrations and they are compared with the corresponding bands observed at 3124 cm-1 (2325 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum of ice Ih. Our spectroscopic observations have indicated that the structure of water and deuterated water molecules on borosilicate surface is similar to that of ice Ih (hexagonal phase of ice). These observations have also indicated that water molecules locate on the borosilicate surface so as to construct a bilayer structure and that strong and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between water/deuterated molecules and silanol groups on borosilicate surface. In accordance with these findings, water and deuterated water molecules at the interface of capillary have a higher melting temperature.

  19. Correlation distance dependence of the resonance frequency of intermolecular zero quantum coherences and its implication for MR thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Le; McCallister, Andrew; Koshlap, Karl M; Branca, Rosa Tamara

    2018-03-01

    Because the resonance frequency of water-fat intermolecular zero-quantum coherences (iZQCs) reflects the water-fat frequency separation at the microscopic scale, these frequencies have been proposed and used as a mean to obtain more accurate temperature information. The purpose of this work was to investigate the dependence of the water-fat iZQC resonance frequency on sample microstructure and on the specific choice of the correlation distance. The effect of water-fat susceptibility gradients on the water-methylene iZQC resonance frequency was first computed and then measured for different water-fat emulsions and for a mixture of porcine muscle and fat. Similar measurements were also performed for mixed heteronuclear spin systems. A strong dependence of the iZQC resonance frequency on the sample microstructure and on the specific choice of the correlation distance was found for spin systems like water and fat that do not mix, but not for spin systems that mix at the molecular level. Because water and fat spins do not mix at the molecular level, the water-fat iZQC resonance frequency and its temperature coefficient are not only affected by sample microstructure but also by the specific choice of the correlation distance. Magn Reson Med 79:1429-1438, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  20. A Raman spectroscopy study on the effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on water molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Shenghan; Wang, Xiaojun; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-05-05

    The structural forms of water/deuterated water molecules located on the surface of borosilicate capillaries have been first investigated in this study on the basis of the Raman spectral data obtained at different temperatures and under atmospheric pressure for molecules in bulk and also for molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface. The strongest two fundamental bands locating at 3063cm -1 (2438cm -1 ) in the recorded Raman spectra are assigned here to the OH (OD) bond stretching vibrations and they are compared with the corresponding bands observed at 3124cm -1 (2325cm -1 ) in the Raman spectrum of ice Ih. Our spectroscopic observations have indicated that the structure of water and deuterated water molecules on borosilicate surface is similar to that of ice Ih (hexagonal phase of ice). These observations have also indicated that water molecules locate on the borosilicate surface so as to construct a bilayer structure and that strong and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between water/deuterated molecules and silanol groups on borosilicate surface. In accordance with these findings, water and deuterated water molecules at the interface of capillary have a higher melting temperature. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Intermolecular π-electron perturbations generate extrinsic visible contributions to eumelanin black chromophore in model polymers with interrupted interring conjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascione, Laura; Pezzella, Alessandro; Ambrogi, Veronica; Carfagna, Cosimo; d'Ischia, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The key structural factors underlying the unique black chromophore of eumelanin biopolymers have so far defied elucidation. Capitalizing on the ability of 1% polyvinylalcohol (PVA) to prevent pigment precipitation during melanogenesis in vitro, we have investigated the visible chromophore properties of soluble eumelanin-like polymers produced by biomimetic oxidation of 5,6-dihydroxyindole (DHI) and 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) in 1% PVA-containing buffer at pH 7. Upon dilution DHI-eumelanin solutions exhibited almost linear visible absorbance changes, whereas DHICA-eumelanin displayed a remarkable deviation from linearity in simple buffer, but not in PVA-containing buffer. It is suggested that in DHICA polymers, exhibiting repeated interruptions of interring conjugation due to lack of planar conformations, the black chromophore is not due to an overlap of static entities defined intrinsically by the conjugation length across the carbon frame, but results largely from aggregation-related intermolecular perturbations of the π-electron systems which are extrinsic in character. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology © 2012 The American Society of Photobiology.

  2. Chemical cross-linking with thiol-cleavable reagents combined with differential mass spectrometric peptide mapping--a novel approach to assess intermolecular protein contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, K L; Kussmann, M; Björk, P

    2000-01-01

    The intermolecular contact regions between monomers of the homodimeric DNA binding protein ParR and the interaction between the glycoproteins CD28 and CD80 were investigated using a strategy that combined chemical cross-linking with differential MALDI-MS analyses. ParR dimers were modified in vitro...... a "head-to-tail" arrangement of the monomers in the dimeric complex. Glycoprotein fusion constructs CD28-IgG and CD80-Fab were cross-linked in vitro by DTSSP, characterized by nonreducing SDS-PAGE, digested in situ with trypsin and analyzed by MALDI-MS peptide mapping (+/- thiol reagent). The data...... revealed the presence of an intermolecular cross-link between the receptor regions of the glycoprotein constructs, as well as a number of unexpected but nonetheless specific interactions between the fusion domains of CD28-IgG and the receptor domain of CD80-Fab. The strategy of chemical cross...

  3. Decomposition of Intermolecular Interactions in the Crystal Structure of Some Diacetyl Platinum(II Complexes: Combined Hirshfeld, AIM, and NBO Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied M. Soliman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular interactions play a vital role in crystal structures. Therefore, we conducted a topological study, using Hirshfeld surfaces and atom in molecules (AIM analysis, to decompose and analyze, respectively, the different intermolecular interactions in six hydrazone-diacetyl platinum(II complexes. Using AIM and natural bond orbital (NBO analyses, we determined the type, nature, and strength of the interactions. All the studied complexes contain C-H⋯O interactions, and the presence of bond critical points along the intermolecular paths underlines their significance. The electron densities (ρ(r at the bond critical points (0.0031–0.0156 e/a03 fall within the typical range for H-bonding interactions. Also, the positive values of the Laplacian of the electron density (∇2ρ(r revealed the depletion of electronic charge on the interatomic path, another characteristic feature of closed-shell interactions. The ratios of the absolute potential energy density to the kinetic energy density (|V(r|/G(r and ρ(r are highest for the O2⋯H15-N3 interaction in [Pt(COMe2(2-pyCMe=NNH2] (1; hence, this interaction has the highest covalent character of all the O⋯H intermolecular interactions. Interestingly, in [Pt(COMe2(H2NN=CMe-CMe=NNH2] (3, there are significant N-H⋯Pt interactions. Using the NBO method, the second-order interaction energies, E(2, of these interactions range from 3.894 to 4.061 kJ/mol. Furthermore, the hybrid Pt orbitals involved in these interactions are comprised of dxy, dxz, and s atomic orbitals.

  4. Architecture based on the integration of intermolecular G-quadruplex structure with sticky-end pairing and colorimetric detection of DNA hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbo; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Zhifa; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2014-02-21

    An interesting discovery is reported in that G-rich hairpin-based recognition probes can self-assemble into a nano-architecture based on the integration of an intermolecular G-quadruplex structure with the sticky-end pairing effect in the presence of target DNAs. Moreover, GNPs modified with partly complementary DNAs can intensively aggregate by hybridization-based intercalation between intermolecular G-quadruplexes, indicating an inspiring assembly mechanism and a powerful colorimetric DNA detection. The proposed intermolecular G-quadruplex-integrated sticky-end pairing assembly (called GISA)-based colorimetric system allows a specific and quantitative assay of p53 DNA with a linear range of more than two orders of magnitude and a detection limit of 0.2 nM, suggesting a considerably improved analytical performance. And more to the point, the discrimination of single-base mismatched target DNAs can be easily conducted via visual observation. The successful development of the present colorimetric system, especially the GISA-based aggregation mechanism of GNPs is different from traditional approaches, and offers a critical insight into the dependence of the GNP aggregation on the structural properties of oligonucleotides, opening a good way to design colorimetric sensing probes and DNA nanostructure.

  5. The effect of the intermolecular potential formulation on the state-selected energy exchange rate coefficients in N2-N2 collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnosov, Alexander; Cacciatore, Mario; Laganà, Antonio; Pirani, Fernando; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Garcia, Ernesto

    2014-04-05

    The rate coefficients for N2-N2 collision-induced vibrational energy exchange (important for the enhancement of several modern innovative technologies) have been computed over a wide range of temperature. Potential energy surfaces based on different formulations of the intramolecular and intermolecular components of the interaction have been used to compute quasiclassically and semiclassically some vibrational to vibrational energy transfer rate coefficients. Related outcomes have been rationalized in terms of state-to-state probabilities and cross sections for quasi-resonant transitions and deexcitations from the first excited vibrational level (for which experimental information are available). On this ground, it has been possible to spot critical differences on the vibrational energy exchange mechanisms supported by the different surfaces (mainly by their intermolecular components) in the low collision energy regime, though still effective for temperatures as high as 10,000 K. It was found, in particular, that the most recently proposed intermolecular potential becomes the most effective in promoting vibrational energy exchange near threshold temperatures and has a behavior opposite to the previously proposed one when varying the coupling of vibration with the other degrees of freedom. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Intermolecular potential and rovibrational states of the H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avoird, Ad van der, E-mail: A.vanderAvoird@theochem.ru.nl [Theoretical Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Scribano, Yohann [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne-UMR 5209, CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. Alain Savary, B.P. 47870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Faure, Alexandre [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble F-38041 (France); Weida, Miles J. [Daylight Solutions, 15378 Avenue of Science, San Diego, CA 92128 (United States); Fair, Joanna R. [Department of Radiology, MSC10 5530, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Nesbitt, David J. [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2012-05-03

    Graphical abstract: H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} potential surface and pH{sub 2}O-oD{sub 2} ground state wave function, for planar geometries. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction between H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} is of great astrophysical interest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The rovibrational states of H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} were computed on an ab initio potential surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results are compared with the rovibrational states of H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2} computed recently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured the high-resolution infrared spectrum of H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} in the H{sub 2}O bend region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with the calculations provides information on H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2} potential surface. - Abstract: A five-dimensional intermolecular potential for H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} was obtained from the full nine-dimensional ab initio potential surface of Valiron et al. [P. Valiron, M. Wernli, A. Faure, L. Wiesenfeld, C. Rist, S. Kedzuch, J. Noga, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 134306] by averaging over the ground state vibrational wave functions of H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}. On this five-dimensional potential with a well depth D{sub e} of 232.12 cm{sup -1} we calculated the bound rovibrational levels of H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} for total angular momentum J = 0-3. The method used to compute the rovibrational levels is similar to a scattering approach-it involves a basis of coupled free rotor wave functions for the hindered internal rotations and the overall rotation of the dimer-while it uses a discrete variable representation of the intermolecular distance coordinate R. The basis was adapted to the permutation symmetry associated with the para/ortho (p/o) nature of both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}, as well as to inversion symmetry. As expected, the H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} dimer is more strongly bound than its H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2} isotopologue [cf. A. van der Avoird, D.J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 134 (2011) 044314], with dissociation energies D

  7. SpaGrOW—A Derivative-Free Optimization Scheme for Intermolecular Force Field Parameters Based on Sparse Grid Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Reith

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Molecular modeling is an important subdomain in the field of computational modeling, regarding both scientific and industrial applications. This is because computer simulations on a molecular level are a virtuous instrument to study the impact of microscopic on macroscopic phenomena. Accurate molecular models are indispensable for such simulations in order to predict physical target observables, like density, pressure, diffusion coefficients or energetic properties, quantitatively over a wide range of temperatures. Thereby, molecular interactions are described mathematically by force fields. The mathematical description includes parameters for both intramolecular and intermolecular interactions. While intramolecular force field parameters can be determined by quantum mechanics, the parameterization of the intermolecular part is often tedious. Recently, an empirical procedure, based on the minimization of a loss function between simulated and experimental physical properties, was published by the authors. Thereby, efficient gradient-based numerical optimization algorithms were used. However, empirical force field optimization is inhibited by the two following central issues appearing in molecular simulations: firstly, they are extremely time-consuming, even on modern and high-performance computer clusters, and secondly, simulation data is affected by statistical noise. The latter provokes the fact that an accurate computation of gradients or Hessians is nearly impossible close to a local or global minimum, mainly because the loss function is flat. Therefore, the question arises of whether to apply a derivative-free method approximating the loss function by an appropriate model function. In this paper, a new Sparse Grid-based Optimization Workflow (SpaGrOW is presented, which accomplishes this task robustly and, at the same time, keeps the number of time-consuming simulations relatively small. This is achieved by an efficient sampling procedure

  8. Nickel complexes with "click"-derived pyridyl-triazole ligands: weak intermolecular interactions and catalytic ethylene oligomerisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweinfurth, David; Su, Cheng-Yong; Wei, Shi-Chao; Braunstein, Pierre; Sarkar, Biprajit

    2012-11-07

    The ligands 1-(cyclohexyl)-4-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazole (1), 1-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-4-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazole (2), 1-(4-butoxyphenyl)-4-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazole (3) and 1-(methyl)-4-(2-pyridyl)-1,2,3-triazole (4) were synthesized by the Cu(I) catalyzed "Click" reaction between 2-pyridylacetylene and the corresponding azides. The ligands were then reacted with NiBr(2)·3H(2)O to generate the complexes (1)(2)NiBr(2) (1a), (2)(2)NiBr(2) (2a), (3)(2)NiBr(2) (3a) and (4)(2)NiBr(2) (4a). Structural characterization of 1a confirmed the mononuclear and distorted octahedral environment around the Ni(II) center, with the pyridyl-triazole ligands coordinating in a bis-chelating fashion. Bond length analysis inside the 1,2,3-triazole ring shows a short N=N double bond that is flanked by two longer C-N and N-N bonds pointing to the existence of "azo" character in the ring. The highly polar five-membered 1,2,3-triazole ring makes its C-H bond acidic, and these bonds participate in an extended weak intermolecular C-H···Br interactions with the Br-groups of neighboring molecules, resulting in a 3-D network. The nickel complexes with these "Click" ligands were tested as pre-catalysts for ethylene oligomerization, and the complexes showed moderate activity in that reaction with good selectivity towards C4 oligomers.

  9. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH₃⁺ groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein-nucleic acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kurtis M; Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani; Gorenstein, David G; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-05-01

    Protein-nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein-DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH3 (+) groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their (1)H and (15)N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain (15)N and DNA phosphorodithiaote (31)P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein-RNA complexes as well.

  10. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH3+ groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Kurtis M.; Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani; Gorenstein, David G.; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH 3 + groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their 1 H and 15 N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain 15 N and DNA phosphorodithiaote 31 P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well

  11. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Kurtis M. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States); Gorenstein, David G. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Iwahara, Junji, E-mail: juiwahar@utmb.edu, E-mail: j.iwahara@utmb.edu [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain {sup 15}N and DNA phosphorodithiaote {sup 31}P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well.

  12. Microassembly by intermolecular forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, S.J.; White, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The value of neutron and X-ray small-angle scattering for studying self assembly of molecular-sized units into interesting chemical and electrical structures is illustrated with three different types of system. The amphiphilic nature of a polyacetylene-polyisoprene [(CH) x PI] AB block copolymer and some of the structure arising from this are seen in neutron scattering from (CD) x PI solids and solutions. The action of template molecules in zeolite synthesis is discussed and template action of the tetrapropylammonium ion at room temperature in soluble silicate gels demonstrated. Finally, very large interplatelet spacings in clay sols are recorded using small-angle X-ray scattering and the swelling behaviour of these systems is characterized. Their usefulness for pillared clay synthesis is discussed. (orig.)

  13. Ribonucleocapsid Formation of SARS-COV Through Molecular Action of the N-Terminal Domain of N Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, K.S.; Joseph, J.S.; Subramanian, V.; Neuman, B.W.; Buchmeier, M.J.; Stevens, R.C.; Kuhn, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-12

    Conserved amongst all coronaviruses are four structural proteins, the matrix (M), small envelope (E) and spike (S) that are embedded in the viral membrane and the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), which exists in a ribonucleoprotein complex in their lumen. The N terminal domain of coronaviral N proteins (N-NTD) provides a scaffold for RNA binding while the C-terminal domain (N-CTD) mainly acts as oligomerization modules during assembly. The C-terminus of N protein anchors it to the viral membrane by associating with M protein. We characterized the structures of N-NTD from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in two crystal forms, at 1.17A (monoclinic) and 1.85 A (cubic) respectively, solved by molecular replacement using the homologous avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) structure. Flexible loops in the solution structure of SARS-CoV N-NTD are now shown to be well ordered around the beta-sheet core. The functionally important positively charged beta-hairpin protrudes out of the core and is oriented similar to that in the IBV N-NTD and is involved in crystal packing in the monoclinic form. In the cubic form, the monomers form trimeric units that stack in a helical array. Comparison of crystal packing of SARS-CoV and IBV N-NTDs suggest a common mode of RNA recognition, but probably associate differently in vivo during the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex. Electrostatic potential distribution on the surface of homology models of related coronaviral N-NTDs hints that they employ different modes of both RNA recognition as well as oligomeric assembly, perhaps explaining why their nucleocapsids have different morphologies.

  14. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  15. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof...... is important, since it helps constraining chemical evolution models at high redshift. A new project studying how the population of galaxies hosting GRBs relate to other galaxy population is outlined in the conclusion of this thesis. The core of this project will be to quantify how the stellar mass function...

  16. Star formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-09-27

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references.

  17. Bottom-Up Enhancement of g-C3N4 Photocatalytic H2 Evolution Utilising Disordering Intermolecular Interactions of Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Lu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Disordered intermolecular interaction carbon nitride precursor prepared by water-assisted grinding of dicyandiamide was used for synthesis of g-C3N4. The final sample possesses much looser structure and provides a broadening optical window for effective light harvesting and charge separation efficiency, which exhibits significantly improved H2 evolution by photocatalytic water splitting. The bottom-up mechanochemistry method opens new vistas towards the potential applications of weak interactions in the photocatalysis field and may also stimulate novel ideas completely different from traditional ones for the design and optimization of photocatalysts.

  18. The role of London dispersion interactions in strong and moderate intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the crystal and in the gas phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsyuba, Sergey A.; Vener, Mikhail V.; Zvereva, Elena E.; Brandenburg, J. Gerit

    2017-03-01

    Two variants of density functional theory computations have been applied to characterization of hydrogen bonds of the 1-(2-hydroxylethyl)-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2OHmim][OAc]), i.e. with and without inclusion of dispersion interactions. A comparison of the results demonstrates that London dispersion interactions have very little impact on the energetical, geometrical, infrared spectroscopic and electron density parameters of charge-assisted intermolecular hydrogen bonds functioning both in the crystal of the [C2OHmim][OAc] and in the isolated [C2OHmim]+ [OAc]- ion pairs.

  19. The influence of polymer concentration on the radiation-chemical yield of intermolecular crosslinking of poly(vinyl alcohol) by γ-rays in deoxygenated aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Benlian; Mukataka, Sukekuni; Kokufuta, Etsuo; Kodama, Makoto

    2000-07-01

    The effect of polymer concentration on G value of intermolecular crosslinking of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) during γ-ray irradiation is reported here. The G value, determined by the measurement of weight average molecular weight ( Mw) from static light scattering, increased initially due to the polymer concentration and approached a maximum value of 0.5 × 10 -7 mol J -1. It then markedly decreased for the more concentrated water-swollen PVA film (polymer concentration Cp>300 g dm -3). Our results suggest that polymer concentration plays an important role in the crosslinking and degradation reactions of PVA during γ-ray irradiation.

  20. Concepções alternativas sobre forças intermoleculares : um estudo a partir das publicações da área de ensino

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes Miranda, Ana Carolina

    2017-01-01

    O objetivo desta pesquisa foi detectar as concepções alternativas mais recorrentes sobre o conteúdo de forças intermoleculares, por meio da análise de artigos publicados em periódicos nacionais e internacionais da área de Ensino. Serão apresentados os resultados relativos à produção bibliográfica referentes ao período de 1998-2015. Os resultados revelaram que conhecer os equívocos apresentados pelos estudantes constitui o ponto de partida para que professores possam elaborar estratégias que c...

  1. Purification and multimer formation of allurin, a sperm chemoattractant from Xenopus laevis egg jelly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Hitoshi; Burnett, Lindsey; Xiang, Xueyu; Olson, John; Willis, Shaun; Miao, Amy; Akema, Tatsuo; Bieber, Allan L; Chandler, Douglas E

    2009-06-01

    Allurin, a sperm chemoattractant isolated from Xenopus laevis egg jelly, can be purified in one step from an extract of diffusible jelly proteins ("egg water") using a FPLC or HPLC anion exchange column and a multi-step NaCl gradient. Allurin homomultimers were detected by Western blotting with antibodies prepared against the purified protein or peptides within the protein. Allurin multimers were stable and resisted dissociation by SDS and beta-mercaptoethanol. Alkylation of allurin provided evidence for two free sulfhydryl groups but did not eliminate multimer formation, suggesting that intermolecular disulfide bond formation is not required for allurin aggregation. Concentration of egg water was accompanied by a reduction of chemoattractant activity that could not be fully accounted for by homomultimer formation. Rather, the presence of a multiphasic dose-activity curve upon partial purification and formation of hetero-allurin complexes during concentration suggested that egg water may contain allurin-binding proteins that reduce multimer formation and activity.

  2. A detailed study of intermolecular interactions, electronic and vibrational properties of the metal complex bis(uracilato)diammine copper(ii) dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramajo Feijoo, M.; Fernández-Liencres, M. P.; Gil, D. M.; Gómez, M. I.; Ben Altabef, A.; Navarro, A.; Tuttolomondo, M. E.

    2018-03-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations were performed with the aim of investigating the vibrational, electronic and structural properties of [Cu(uracilato-N1)2 (NH3)2]ṡ2H2O complex. The IR and Raman spectra were recorded leading to a complete analysis of the normal modes of vibration of the metal complex. A careful study of the intermolecular interactions observed in solid state was performed by using the Hirshfeld surface analysis and their associated 2D fingerprint plots. The results indicated that the crystal packing is stabilized by Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds and π-stacking interactions. In addition, Csbnd H···π interactions were also observed. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations revealed that all the low-lying electronic states correspond to a mixture of intraligand charge transfer (ILCT) and ligand-to-metal charge transfer (LMCT) transitions. Finally, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Atoms in Molecules (AIM) analysis were performed to shed light on the intermolecular interactions in the coordination sphere.

  3. 16α-Hydroxyfriedelin and 3-Oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene as Building Blocks: Crystal Structure and Hirshfeld Surfaces Decoding Intermolecular Contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo S. Corrêa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the importance of C–H⋯O intermolecular hydrogen bonds and van der Waals forces in crystal packing stabilization of 16α-hydroxyfriedelin (1 and 3-oxo-16-methylfriedel-16-ene (2 is described. Compound 1 is a natural product isolated from the hexane extract of Salacia elliptica branches, whereas compound 2 is obtained from compound 1 after dehydration accompanied by methyl migration of C-17 to C-16. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction experiments for 1 and 2 were carried out at 150 K, and the crystallographic study demonstrated that these compounds crystallize in noncentrosymmetric space groups, with 1 showing an orthorhombic P212121 space group and 2 a monoclinic P21 one. Compounds 1 and 2 are composed of five fused six-membered rings presenting a chair conformation, except for the central ring of 2, which adopts a half-chair conformation. In addition, the intra- and intermolecular parameters were studied using CCDC MOGUL analyses and Hirshfeld surfaces.

  4. Vibrational Spectra of β″-Type BEDT-TTF Salts: Relationship between Conducting Property, Time-Averaged Site Charge and Inter-Molecular Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamamoto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the conducting behavior and the degree of charge fluctuation in the β″-type BEDT-TTF salts is reviewed from the standpoints of vibrational spectroscopy and crystal structure. A group of β″-type ET salts demonstrates the best model compounds for achieving the above relationship because the two-dimensional structure is simple and great diversity in conducting behavior is realized under ambient pressure. After describing the requirement for the model compound, the methodology for analyzing the results of the vibrational spectra is presented. Vibrational spectroscopy provides the time-averaged molecular charge, the charge distribution in the two-dimensional layer, and the inter-molecular interactions, etc. The experimental results applied to 2/3-filled and 3/4-filled β″-type ET salts are reported. These experimental results suggest that the conducting property, the difference in the time-averaged molecular charges between the ionic and neutral-like sites, the alternation in the inter-molecular distances and the energy levels in the charge distributions are relevant to one another. The difference in the time-averaged molecular charges, ∆ρ, is a useful criterion for indicating conducting behavior. All superconductors presented in this review are characterized as small but finite ∆ρ.

  5. Determination of the primary structure of intermolecular cross-linking sites on the Ca2(+)-ATPase of sarcoplasmic reticulum using 14C-labeled N,N'-(1,4-phenylene)bismaleimide or N-ethylmaleimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, K; Sano, N; Ohe, M; Yamamoto, T

    1990-12-01

    To determine the intermolecular cross-linking site on the primary structure sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca-ATPase, the conditions for the specific binding of 14C-labeled 1,4-phenylene bis maleimide (PBM) or 14C-labeled N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) to the ATPase were explored. SR vesicles were preincubated with nonradioactive PBM in the presence of 1 mM vanadate for 1 h, then washed by centrifugation to remove free PBM and vanadate. When the pretreated SR vesicles were allowed to react with 1 mM [14C]PBM in the presence of 1 mM AMPPNP, the amount of [14C]PBM incorporated into the ATPase increased with time in parallel with the formation of dimeric ATPase and reached the maximum labeling density of 1 mol of [14C]PBM per mol of dimeric ATPase at 40 min after the start of the reaction. When the pretreated SR vesicles were allowed to react with 2 mM [14C]NEM in the absence of AMPPNP, a maximum of about 2 mol of NEM was bound per mol of the ATPase monomer. The labeling density of [14C]NEM decreased from 2 to 1 mol per mol of the ATPase when the SR vesicles were allowed to react with [14C]NEM in the presence of AMPPNP. From the analysis of the amino acid composition of the two major [14C]NEM-labeled peptides isolated from the thermolytic digest of the enzyme after the reaction of SR with [14C]NEM in the absence of AMPPNP, we deduced that [14C]NEM was incorporated into Cys377 and Cys614. On the other hand, the labeling of SR in the presence of AMPPNP resulted in inhibition of the [14C]NEM binding to Cys614, leaving Cys377 unaltered.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Effects of adenyl-5'-imidodiphosphate and vanadate Ion on the intermolecular cross-linking of Ca2(+)-ATPase in the sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane with N,N'-(1,4-phenylene)bismaleimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, K; Yamamoto, T

    1989-12-01

    The functional significance of the molecular interaction of Ca2(+)-ATPase in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane was examined using intermolecular cross-linking of Ca2(+)-ATPase with N,N'-(1,4-phenylene)bismaleimide (PBM). When SR vesicles were allowed to react with 1 mM PBM at pH 7 and 23 degrees C for various intervals and subjected to SDS-PAGE, the amount of the major band of monomeric ATPase decreased with a half life of about 20 min. Higher orders of oligomers were concurrently formed without accumulation of any particular species of oligomer. When SR vesicles were allowed to react with 1 mM PBM in the presence of 1 mM adenyl-5'-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP), the rate of oligomerization was markedly reduced and the amount of dimeric Ca2(+)-ATPase increased with time. After 1 h, more than 40% of the Ca2(+)-ATPase had accumulated in the dimeric form. When 1 mol of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was bound per mol of ATPase, the effects of AMP-PNP on the cross-linking with PBM were completely abolished. When SR vesicles were treated with PBM in the presence of 0.1 mM vanadate in Ca2+ free medium, the oligomerization of the Ca2(+)-ATPase by PBM was strongly inhibited. The vanadate effect on the cross-link formation was completely removed by the presence of Ca2+ and AMP-PNP in the reaction medium. When SR vesicles were pretreated with PBM in the presence of AMP-PNP and digested with trypsin for a short time, the dimeric ATPase was degraded to a peptide with an apparent molecular mass of about 170 kDa.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Effect of intermolecular cohesion on coal liquefaction. 3. Reactivity of oxygen methylated coal; Sekitan teibunshika hanno ni okeru bunshikan gyoshuryoku no koka. 3. O-methyl ka tan no hanno tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, M.; Nagaishi, H.; Yoshida, T. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    The reactivity of oxygen methylated coal was studied to control hydrogen bond in bituminous coal liquefaction and intermolecular cohesion such as van der Waals force. In experiment, crushed and dried Illinois coal of 100mesh or less was used as specimen, and oxygen methylated coal was prepared by Liotta`s method using tetrabutylammonium halide. Coal liquefaction was conducted in an electromagnetic agitation autoclave using tetralin solvent under initial hydrogen pressure of 100kg/cm{sup 2} while heating. The molecular weight distribution of the products obtained was measured by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) analysis. The experimental results are as follows. The effect of intermolecular cohesion in bituminous coal on the reactivity is mainly derived from decomposing reaction from preasphaltene to oil. Yields of oil fraction by methylation increase corresponding to release of intermolecular cohesion. Since the thermal release is promoted with temperature rise, the difference in yield due to different treatments decreases. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Nanomechanics of single keratin fibres: A Raman study of the alpha helix -> beta sheet transition and water effect

    OpenAIRE

    Colomban, Philippe; Paquin, Raphaël

    2007-01-01

    International audience; The use of micro-Raman spectroscopy, through chemical bond nano-scale probes, allows the changes in conformations (α helix -> β sheet), chain orientation, disconnection of disulfide bonds (-20%) and the increase of intra and inter-chain distances during the strain to be distinguished. The combination of micro-Raman spectroscopy and a allows a quantitative measure of the extension of chemical bonds in the peptidic chain during loading. The nano-structural transformation...

  9. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid...

  10. Digtets formater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Kallesøe; Rasmussen, Krista Stinne Greve; Skriver, Svend

    2017-01-01

    definition of text and work can be supplemented by a hermeneutical dimension, thus taking various versions of works and the influence of their respective media (blog, book etc.) on the percipient into account. In connection with the theoretical considerations, a handful of recent works by Lea Marie...... Løppenthin, Olga Ravn, Mikkel Thykier, Caspar Eric, and Simon Grotrian are discussed. By using the format as a point of departure rather than applying a more conventional practice of close reading, the authors argue for a broad-spectred approach to literary analysis which focuses on aspects of the conception...

  11. Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longair, Malcolm S

    2008-01-01

    This second edition of Galaxy Formation is an up-to-date text on astrophysical cosmology, expounding the structure of the classical cosmological models from a contemporary viewpoint. This forms the background to a detailed study of the origin of structure and galaxies in the Universe. The derivations of many of the most important results are derived by simple physical arguments which illuminate the results of more advanced treatments. A very wide range of observational data is brought to bear upon these problems, including the most recent results from WMAP, the Hubble Space Telescope, galaxy surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, studies of Type 1a supernovae, and many other observations.

  12. Modeling intra- and intermolecular correlations for linear and branched polymers using a modified test-chain self-consistent field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Renfeng; Wu, David T; Wang, Dapeng

    2017-04-01

    A modified test-chain self-consistent field theory (SCFT) is presented to study the intra- and intermolecular correlations of linear and branched polymers in various solutions and melts. The key to the test-chain SCFT is to break the the translational symmetry by fixing a monomer at the origin of a coordinate. This theory successfully describes the crossover from self-avoiding walk at short distances to screened random walk at long distances in a semidilute solution or melt. The calculations indicated that branching enhances the swelling of polymers in melts and influences stretching at short distances. The test-chain SCFT calculations show good agreement with experiments and classic polymer theories. We highlight that the theory presented here provides a solution to interpret the polymer conformation and behavior under various conditions within the framework of one theory.

  13. Improved Formulas for the Calculation of the Electrostatic Contribution to the Intermolecular Interaction Energy from Multipolar Expansion of the Electronic Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Gresh, Nohad; Giessner-Prettre, Claude

    2003-12-04

    We have, within the framework of the molecular mechanics method SIBFA, improved the formulation of the Coulomb (electrostatic) energy contribution to the intermolecular interaction energy. This was done by integrating "overlap-like" terms into two components of the multipolar development used to calculate this contribution in SIBFA. The calibration of the new component is done on five water dimers by fitting this augmented electrostatic contribution to the corresponding Ec term. Several tests are done on (i) representative neutral and ionic hydrogen-bonded complexes; (ii) the complexes of metal cations (Cu(I) and Cu(II)) with a neutral or an anionic ligand; and (iii) a representative stacked complex. The improvement brought by the new formulation reduces the difference between the ab initio (Ec) and molecular mechanics (EMTP*) values by almost an order of magnitude when compared to the values of EMTP calculated using the standard method.

  14. Character of intermolecular interaction in pyridine-argon complex: Ab initio potential energy surface, internal dynamics, and interrelations between SAPT energy components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarewicz, Jan, E-mail: jama@amu.edu.pl; Shirkov, Leonid [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89b, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2016-05-28

    The pyridine-Ar (PAr) van der Waals (vdW) complex is studied using a high level ab initio method. Its structure, binding energy, and intermolecular vibrational states are determined from the analytical potential energy surface constructed from interaction energy (IE) values computed at the coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbatively included triple excitations with the augmented correlation consistent polarized valence double-ζ (aug-cc-pVDZ) basis set complemented by midbond functions. The structure of the complex at its global minimum with Ar at a distance of 3.509 Å from the pyridine plane and shifted by 0.218 Å from the center of mass towards nitrogen agrees well with the corresponding equilibrium structure derived previously from the rotational spectrum of PAr. The PAr binding energy D{sub e} of 392 cm{sup −1} is close to that of 387 cm{sup −1} calculated earlier at the same ab initio level for the prototypical benzene-Ar (BAr) complex. However, under an extension of the basis set, D{sub e} for PAr becomes slightly lower than D{sub e} for BAr. The ab initio vdW vibrational energy levels allow us to estimate the reliability of the methods for the determination of the vdW fundamentals from the rotational spectra. To disclose the character of the intermolecular interaction in PAr, the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) is employed for the analysis of different physical contributions to IE. It is found that SAPT components of IE can be approximately expressed in the binding region by only two of them: the exchange repulsion and dispersion energy. The total induction effect is negligible. The interrelations between various SAPT components found for PAr are fulfilled for a few other complexes involving aromatic molecules and Ar or Ne, which indicates that they are valid for all rare gas (Rg) atoms and aromatics.

  15. Characterization of Intermolecular Interactions at Play in the 2,2,2-TRIFLUOROETHANOL Trimers Using Cavity and Chirped-Pulse Microwave Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Thomas, Javix; Jäger, Wolfgang; Xu, Yunjie

    2017-06-01

    2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) is a common aqueous co-solvent in biological chemistry which may induce or destabilize secondary structures of proteins and polypeptides, thanks to its diverse intermolecular linkages originating from the hydrogen bonding potential of both the hydroxyl and perfluoro groups. Theoretically, the TFE monomer is predicted to have two stable gauche (gauche^{+}/gauche^{-}) conformations whereas the trans form is unstable or is supported only by a very shallow potential. Only the gauche conformers have been identified in the gas phase, whereas liquid phase studies suggest a trans:gauche ratio of 2:3. The question at which sample (cluster) size the trans form of TFE would appear was one major motivation for our study. Here, we report the detection of three trimers of TFE using Balle-Flygare cavity and chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy (CP-FTMW) techniques. The most stable observed trimer features one trans- and two gauche-TFE subunits. The other two trimers, observed using a newly constructed 2-6 GHz CP-FTMW spectrometer, consist of only the two gauche conformers of TFE. Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and non-covalent interactions (NCI) analyses give detailed insights into which intermolecular interactions are at play to stabilize the trans form of TFE in the most stable trimer. M. Buck, Q. Rev. Biophys. 1998, 31, 297-335. I. Bakó, T. Radnai, M. Claire, B. Funel, J. Chem. Phys. 2004, 121, 12472-12480. R. F. W. Bader, Chem. Rev. 1991, 91, 893-928. E. R. Johnson, S. Keinan, P. Mori-Sánchez, J. Contreras-Garcia, A. J. Cohen, W. Yang, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2010, 132, 6498-6506.

  16. Character of intermolecular interaction in pyridine-argon complex: Ab initio potential energy surface, internal dynamics, and interrelations between SAPT energy components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarewicz, Jan; Shirkov, Leonid

    2016-05-28

    The pyridine-Ar (PAr) van der Waals (vdW) complex is studied using a high level ab initio method. Its structure, binding energy, and intermolecular vibrational states are determined from the analytical potential energy surface constructed from interaction energy (IE) values computed at the coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbatively included triple excitations with the augmented correlation consistent polarized valence double-ζ (aug-cc-pVDZ) basis set complemented by midbond functions. The structure of the complex at its global minimum with Ar at a distance of 3.509 Å from the pyridine plane and shifted by 0.218 Å from the center of mass towards nitrogen agrees well with the corresponding equilibrium structure derived previously from the rotational spectrum of PAr. The PAr binding energy De of 392 cm(-1) is close to that of 387 cm(-1) calculated earlier at the same ab initio level for the prototypical benzene-Ar (BAr) complex. However, under an extension of the basis set, De for PAr becomes slightly lower than De for BAr. The ab initio vdW vibrational energy levels allow us to estimate the reliability of the methods for the determination of the vdW fundamentals from the rotational spectra. To disclose the character of the intermolecular interaction in PAr, the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) is employed for the analysis of different physical contributions to IE. It is found that SAPT components of IE can be approximately expressed in the binding region by only two of them: the exchange repulsion and dispersion energy. The total induction effect is negligible. The interrelations between various SAPT components found for PAr are fulfilled for a few other complexes involving aromatic molecules and Ar or Ne, which indicates that they are valid for all rare gas (Rg) atoms and aromatics.

  17. Effect of secondary structure on the interactions of peptide T4 LYS (11-36) in mixtures of aqueous sodium chloride and 2,2,2,-Trifluoroethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Camille O.; Spiegelberg, Susanne; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2001-10-01

    The potential of mean force for protein-protein interactions is key to the development of a statistical-mechanical model for salt-induced protein precipitation and crystallization, and for understanding certain disease states, including cataract formation and {beta}-amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence anisotropy provides a method for quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions due to reversible association. Monomer-dimer equilibria for the peptide T4 LYS(11-36) were studied by fluorescence anisotropy. This peptide, derived from the {beta}-sheet region of the T4 lysozyme molecule, has the potential to form amyloid fibrils. 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces a change in peptide secondary structure, and was used in aqueous solutions at concentrations from 0 to 50% (v/v) at 25 and 37 C to examine the role of peptide conformation on peptide-peptide interactions. The association constant for dimerization increased with rising TFE concentration and with falling temperature. The peptide-peptide potential of mean force was computed from these association constants. Circular-dichroism measurements showed that the secondary structure of the peptide plays an important role in these strong attractive interactions due to intermolecular hydrogen-bond formation and hydrophobic interactions.

  18. Satellite hole formation during dewetting: experiment and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, C; Seemann, R; Blossey, R; Becker, J; Grün, G

    2003-01-01

    The dewetting of thin polymer films on solid substrates has been studied extensively in recent years. These films can decay either by nucleation events or by spinodal dewetting, essentially only depending on the interface potential describing the short- and long-range intermolecular interactions between the interfaces and the initial film thickness. Here, we describe experiments and simulations concerned with the decay of polystyrene thin films. The rupture of the film occurs by the formation of a correlated pattern of holes ('satellite holes') along the liquid rims accumulating at the channel borders. The development of this complex film rupture process, which is neither simply spinodal nor nucleation dewetting, can be mimicked precisely by making use of a novel simulation code based on a rigorous mathematical treatment of the thin film equation and on the knowledge of the effective interface potential of the system. The conditions that determine the appearance and the position of the satellite holes around ...

  19. Controlling intermolecular aurophilicity in emissive dinuclear Au(I) materials and their luminescent response to ammonia vapour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ryan J; Le, Debbie; Leznoff, Daniel B

    2015-10-01

    The concept that hydrogen bonding cations can reduce the coulombic repulsion inherent to anionic gold species and thereby trigger aurophilicity is realized with three new photoluminescent compounds of the form [Q]2[Au2(i-mnt)2] (i-mnt = (CN)2C[double bond, length as m-dash]CS2(2-), Q = 3,5-dimethylpyrazolium, piperidinium). These compounds illustrate unprecedented supramolecular aurophilicity between the anions, the emission of which is significantly red-shifted compared to zero-dimensional analogues, a direct result of the aurophilic network. The piperidinium salt exhibits a vapochromic/luminescent response to ammonia, inducing a change in colour of the reflectance and emission from red to yellow. These results demonstrate the ability to rationally control the formation of supramolecular metallophilic networks via the incorporation of hydrogen bonding cations.

  20. Mixed layers of β-lactoglobulin and SDS at air-water interfaces with tunable intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Kathrin; Weichsel, Ulrike; Kraft, Elena; Segets, Doris; Peukert, Wolfgang; Braunschweig, Björn

    2014-04-17

    Mixtures of β-lactoglobulin (BLG) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were studied at pH 3.8 and 6.7 under equilibrium conditions. At these pH conditions, BLG carries either a positive or a negative net charge, respectively, which enables tunable electrostatic interactions between anionic SDS surfactants and BLG proteins. For pH 3.8, vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG) and ellipsometry indicate strong BLG-SDS complex formation at air-water interfaces that is caused by attractive electrostatic interactions. The latter complexes are already formed in the bulk solution which was confirmed by a thermodynamic study of BLG-SDS mixtures using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). For acidic conditions we determine from our ITC data an exothermal binding enthalpy of -40 kJ mol(-1). Increasing SDS/BLG molar ratios above 10 leads to a surface excess of SDS and thus to a charge reversal from a positive net charge with BLG as the dominating surface adsorbed species to a negatively charged layer with SDS as the dominating surface species. The latter is evidenced by a pronounced minimum in SFG intensities that is also accompanied by a phase change of O-H stretching bands due to a reorientation of H2O within the local electric field. This phase change which occurs at SDS/BLG molar ratio between 1 and 10 causes a polarity change in SFG intensities from BLG aromatic C-H stretching vibrations. Conclusions from SFG spectra are corroborated by ellipsometry which shows a dramatic increase in layer thicknesses at molar ratios where a charge reversal occurs. The formation of interfacial multilayers comprising SDS-BLG complexes is, thus, caused by cancellation of electrostatic interactions which leads to agglomeration at the interface. In contrast to pH 3.8, behavior of BLG-SDS mixtures at pH 6.7 is different due to repulsive electrostatic interactions between SDS and BLG which lead to a significantly reduced binding enthalpy of -17 kJ mol(-1). Finally, it has to be mentioned that

  1. Theoretical study of the possibility of glycin with thiotriazoline complexes formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Kucherenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain strokes are widely spread all over the world and are among the most dangerous for the population. Often it leads to death, complete or partial loss of ability to work. The correction of imbalance of Excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems by activation of natural inhibitory processes is a promising direction of primary neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia. Particular attention is drawn to the natural inhibitory neurotransmitter – glycine and its role in the mechanisms of acute cerebral ischemia. There are data on the ability of the thiotriazoline antioxidant to potentiate the therapeutic effect of neurometabolic cerebroprotectors. Therefore, the creation of new combined preparation based on glycine with thiotriazoline is important today. Objective: to study the structure, and estimate the energy of formation and geometric characteristics of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds for complexes which are formed with glycine, 3-methyl-1,2,4-triazolyl-5-thioacetate (MTTA and morpholine. Method of calculation. The initial approximation to the structure of the complexes was obtained with the help of molecular docking procedure using the AutoDock Vina program. The resulting three-component complexes were preliminarily optimized by the semiempirical PM7 method, taking into account the outward influences, which was simulated by the COSMO method. The calculations were carried out using the MOPAC2012 program. The complexes were optimized using the density functional method with the empirical dispersion correction B97-D3/SVP+COSMO (Water using geometric correction for the incompleteness of the gCP basic set. A more accurate calculation of the solvation energy was carried out by SMD method. Calculations by the density functional method were carried out using the ORCA 3.0.3 program. The energy of formation of complexes in solution was calculated as the difference between the free Gibbs energies of the solvated complex and its individual solvated

  2. Enhancement in Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation in the Presence of Preexisting Organic Particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianhuai; Gordon, Catherine A; Chan, Arthur W H

    2016-04-05

    Atmospheric models of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) typically assume organic species form a well-mixed phase. As a result, partitioning of semivolatile oxidation products into the particle phase to form SOA is thought to be enhanced by preexisting organic particles. In this work, the physicochemical properties that govern such enhancement in SOA yield were examined. SOA yields from α-pinene ozonolysis were measured in the presence of a variety of organic seeds which were chosen based on polarity and phase state at room temperature. Yield enhancement was only observed with seeds of medium polarities (tetraethylene glycol and citric acid). Solid hexadecanol seed was observed to enhance SOA yields only in chamber experiments with longer mixing time scales, suggesting that the mixing process for SOA and hexadecanol may be kinetically limited at shorter time scales. Our observations indicate that, in addition to kinetic limitations, intermolecular interactions also play a significant role in determining SOA yields. Here we propose for the first time to use the Hansen solubility framework to determine aerosol miscibility and predict SOA yield enhancement. These results highlight that current models may overestimate SOA formation, and parametrization of intermolecular forces is needed for accurate predictions of SOA formation.

  3. Intermolecular polarizabilities in H{sub 2}-rare-gas mixtures (H{sub 2}–He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe): Insight from collisional isotropic spectral properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Głaz, Waldemar, E-mail: glaz@kielich.amu.edu.pl; Bancewicz, Tadeusz [Nonlinear Optics Division, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Godet, Jean-Luc [Laboratoire de photonique d’Angers, Université d’Angers, 2 boulevard Lavoisier, 49045 Angers (France); Gustafsson, Magnus [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, SE 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Maroulis, George; Haskopoulos, Anastasios [Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece)

    2014-08-21

    The report presents results of theoretical and numerical analysis of the electrical properties related to the isotropic part of the polarizability induced by interactions within compounds built up of a hydrogen H{sub 2} molecule and a set of noble gas atoms, Rg, ranging from the least massive helium up to the heaviest xenon perturber. The Cartesian components of the collisional polarizabilities of the H{sub 2}–Rg systems are found by means of the quantum chemistry methods and their dependence on the intermolecular distance is determined. On the basis of these data, the spherical, symmetry adapted components of the trace polarizability are derived in order to provide data sets that are convenient for evaluating collisional spectral profiles of the isotropic polarized part of light scattered by the H{sub 2}–Rg mixtures. Three independent methods of numerical computing of the spectral intensities are applied at room temperature (295 K). The properties of the roto-translational profiles obtained are discussed in order to determine the role played by contributions corresponding to each of the symmetry adapted parts of the trace polarizability. By spreading the analysis over the collection of the H{sub 2}–Rg systems, evolution of the spectral properties with the growing masses of the supermolecular compounds can be observed.

  4. Induced Smectic X Phase Through Intermolecular Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid Crystals Formed Between Citric Acid and p- n-(Octyloxy)Benzoic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, S.; Subhasri, P.; Rajasekaran, T. R.; Jayaprakasam, R.; Senthil, T. S.; Vijayakumar, V. N.

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (HBLC) is synthesized from citric acid (CA) and 4-(octyloxy)benzoic acid (8OBA) with different mole ratios. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirms the presence of hydrogen bond between CA and 8OBA. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies validate the intermolecular complementary, cyclic type of hydrogen bond, and molecular environment in the designed HBLC complex. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the monoclinic nature of liquid crystal complex in solid phase. Liquid crystal parameters such as phase transition temperature and enthalpy values for the corresponding mesogenic phases are investigated using a polarizing optical microscope (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It is observed that the change in chain length and steric hindrance while increasing the mole ratio in HBLC complex induces a new smectic X (Sm X) along with higher-order smectic G (Sm G) phases by quenching of smectic C (Sm C). From the experimental observations, induced Sm X phase has been identified as a finger print texture. Also, Sm G is a multi-colored mosaic texture in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 mol ratios. The optical tilt angle, thermal stability factor, and enhanced thermal span width of CA + 8OBA complex are discussed.

  5. Collision-induced spectroscopy with long-range intermolecular interactions: A diagrammatic representation and the invariant form of the induced properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzov, A. P.; Chrysos, M.; Rachet, F.; Egorova, N. I.

    2006-01-01

    Collision-induced properties of two interacting molecules a and b are derived by means of a general diagrammatic method involving M molecule-molecule and N photon-molecule couplings. The method is an extension of previous graphical treatments of nonlinear optics because it exhaustively determines interaction-induced polarization mechanisms in a trustworthy and handy fashion. Here we focus on long-range intermolecular interactions. Retardation effects are neglected. A fully quantum-mechanical treatment of the molecules is made whereas second quantization for the electromagnetic field, in the nonrelativistic approximation, is implicitly applied. The collision-induced absorption, Raman, and hyper-Raman processes are viewed and studied, through guiding examples, as specific cases N=1, 2, and 3, respectively. In Raman (N=2), the standard first-order (M=1) dipole-induced dipole term of the incremental polarizability, Δα, is the result of a coupling of the two photons with distinct molecules, a and b, which perturb each other via a dipole-dipole mechanism. Rather, when the two photons interact with the same molecule, a or b, the (N=2, M=1) graphs predict the occurrence of a nonlinear polarization mechanism. The latter is expected to contribute substantially to the collision-induced Raman bands by certain molecular gases

  6. A surface plasmon resonance study of the intermolecular interaction between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Narula, Gagandeep; Wang, Xuewen; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; He, Jin; Darici, Yesim

    2014-01-01

    To date, the bacterial DNA topoisomerases are one of the major target biomolecules for the discovery of new antibacterial drugs. DNA topoisomerase regulates the topological state of DNA, which is very important for replication, transcription and recombination. The relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA is catalyzed by bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) and this reaction requires Mg2+. In this report, we first quantitatively studied the intermolecular interactions between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EctopoI) and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions is determined to be about 8 nM. We then studied the effect of Mg2+ on the catalysis of EctopoI-pBAD/Thio reaction. A slightly higher equilibrium dissociation constant (~15 nM) was obtained for Mg2+ coordinated EctopoI (Mg2+EctopoI)-pBAD/Thio interactions. In addition, we observed a larger dissociation rate constant (kd) for Mg2+EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.043 s−1), compared to EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.017 s−1). These results suggest that enzyme turnover during plasmid DNA relaxation is enhanced due to the presence of Mg2+ and furthers the understanding of importance of the Mg2+ ion for bacterial topoisomerase I catalytic activity. PMID:24530905

  7. Influence of specific intermolecular interactions on the thermal and dielectric properties of bulk polymers: atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of Nylon 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasheva, N V; Tolmachev, D A; Nazarychev, V M; Kenny, J M; Lyulin, S V

    2017-01-04

    Specific intermolecular interactions, in particular H-bonding, have a strong influence on the structural, thermal and relaxation characteristics of polymers. We report here the results of molecular dynamics simulations of Nylon 6 which provides an excellent example for the investigation of such an influence. To demonstrate the effect of proper accounting for H-bonding on bulk polymer properties, the AMBER99sb force field is used with two different parametrization approaches leading to two different sets of partial atomic charges. The simulations allowed the study of the thermal and dielectric properties in a wide range of temperatures and cooling rates. The feasibility of the use of the three methods for the estimation of the glass transition temperature not only from the temperature dependence of structural characteristics such as density, but also by using the electrostatic energy and dielectric constant is demonstrated. The values of glass transition temperatures obtained at different cooling rates are practically the same for the three methods. By proper accounting for partial charges in the simulations, a reasonable agreement between the results of our simulations and experimental data for the density, thermal expansion coefficient, static dielectric constant and activation energy of γ and β relaxations is obtained demonstrating the validity of the modeling approach reported.

  8. Solid-State [2+2] Photodimerization and Photopolymerization of α,ω-Diarylpolyene Monomers: Effective Utilization of Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoriko Sonoda

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available [2+2] Photocycloaddition of olefins is a very useful reaction in synthetic organic chemistry to obtain cyclobutane-containing molecules, which are almost inaccessible by other methods. The reaction, when performed in the crystalline state, occurs more efficiently and selectively than in homogeneous solution due to tight and regular molecular arrangement in the crystal state. Despite numerous examples for the solid-state [2+2] photodimerization of monoenes, however, it is still a challenge to prepare not only dimers but also higher oligomers and polymers from conjugated polyenes, which have multiple reactive double bonds in a molecule. In our recent studies of the solid-state photoreactions of α,ω-diarylpolyenes, noncovalent intermolecular interactions in crystals were effectively utilized to prealign molecules in stacking arrangements, suitable for the [2+2] reaction. With appropriate ring-substituents, [2+2] photodimerization and photopolymerization of the polyenes took place, although the degree of polymerization was relatively low. This review will describe the details of these reactions.

  9. Density functional theory study of Rh(III)-catalyzed C-H activations and intermolecular annulations between benzamide derivatives and allenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Zhong; Huang, Fang; Sun, Chuanzhi; Zhao, Xue; Liu, Jianbiao; Chen, Dezhan

    2015-04-20

    Density functional theory has been applied to gain insight into the Cp*Rh(OAc)2-catalyzed C-H activation and intermolecular annulation of benzamide derivatives with allenes. The study shows that the reactions proceed in three steps: (1) C-H activation induced by Rh catalyst reacting with benzamide derivatives, (2) carborhodation of allene, and (3) regeneration of Rh catalyst. The results indicate that the N-H deprotonation makes the following C-H activation much easier. The regio- and stereoselectivities of 1a (N-pivaloyloxy benzamide)/2a (cyclohexylallene) and 1b (N-pivaloyloxy-4-methyl-benzamide)/2b (1,1-dimethyl allene) depend on the allene carborhodation step. The steric hindrance effect is the dominant factor. We also discuss the reaction mechanism of 1c (N-methoxy benzamide)/2a. The chemoselectivity between 1c/2a is determined by the N-O cleavage step. Replacement of OPiv by OMe leads to loss of the stabilization effect provided by C=O in OPiv. Additionally, Cp*Rh(OAc)(OPiv) is produced in the Cp*Rh(OAc)2 regeneration step, which can work as catalyst as well.

  10. Intermolecular polarizabilities in H2-rare-gas mixtures (H2-He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe): insight from collisional isotropic spectral properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głaz, Waldemar; Bancewicz, Tadeusz; Godet, Jean-Luc; Gustafsson, Magnus; Maroulis, George; Haskopoulos, Anastasios

    2014-08-21

    The report presents results of theoretical and numerical analysis of the electrical properties related to the isotropic part of the polarizability induced by interactions within compounds built up of a hydrogen H2 molecule and a set of noble gas atoms, Rg, ranging from the least massive helium up to the heaviest xenon perturber. The Cartesian components of the collisional polarizabilities of the H2-Rg systems are found by means of the quantum chemistry methods and their dependence on the intermolecular distance is determined. On the basis of these data, the spherical, symmetry adapted components of the trace polarizability are derived in order to provide data sets that are convenient for evaluating collisional spectral profiles of the isotropic polarized part of light scattered by the H2-Rg mixtures. Three independent methods of numerical computing of the spectral intensities are applied at room temperature (295 K). The properties of the roto-translational profiles obtained are discussed in order to determine the role played by contributions corresponding to each of the symmetry adapted parts of the trace polarizability. By spreading the analysis over the collection of the H2-Rg systems, evolution of the spectral properties with the growing masses of the supermolecular compounds can be observed.

  11. Stereodynamics in the Collisional Autoionization of Water, Ammonia, and Hydrogen Sulfide with Metastable Rare Gas Atoms: Competition Between Intermolecular Halogen and Hydrogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcinelli, Stefano; Bartocci, Alessio; Cavalli, Simonetta; Pirani, Fernando; Vecchiocattivi, Franco

    2016-01-11

    Recent experiments on the title subject, performed with a high-resolution crossed-beam apparatus, have provided the total ionization cross sections as a function of the collision energy between noble gas atoms, electronically excited in their metastable states (Ng*), and H2 O, H2 S, and NH3 reagents, as well as the emitted electron energy spectra. This paper presents a rationalization of all the experimental findings in a unifying picture to cast light on the basic chemical properties of Ng* under conditions of great relevance both from a fundamental and from an applied point of view. The importance of this investigation is that it isolates the selective role of the intermolecular halogen and hydrogen bonds, to assess their anisotropic effects on the stereodynamics of the promoted ionization reactions, and to model energy transfer and reactivity in systems of applied interest, such as planetary atmospheres, plasmas, lasers, and flames. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. A surface plasmon resonance study of the intermolecular interaction between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Purushottam Babu; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Narula, Gagandeep; Wang, Xuewen; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; He, Jin; Darici, Yesim

    2014-03-07

    To date, the bacterial DNA topoisomerases are one of the major target biomolecules for the discovery of new antibacterial drugs. DNA topoisomerase regulates the topological state of DNA, which is very important for replication, transcription and recombination. The relaxation of negatively supercoiled DNA is catalyzed by bacterial DNA topoisomerase I (topoI) and this reaction requires Mg(2+). In this report, we first quantitatively studied the intermolecular interactions between Escherichia coli topoisomerase I (EctopoI) and pBAD/Thio supercoiled plasmid DNA using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique. The equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions was determined to be about 8 nM. We then studied the effect of Mg(2+) on the catalysis of EctopoI-pBAD/Thio reaction. A slightly higher equilibrium dissociation constant (~15 nM) was obtained for Mg(2+) coordinated EctopoI (Mg(2+)EctopoI)-pBAD/Thio interactions. In addition, we observed a larger dissociation rate constant (kd) for Mg(2+)EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.043 s(-1)), compared to EctopoI-pBAD/Thio interactions (~0.017 s(-1)). These results suggest that enzyme turnover during plasmid DNA relaxation is enhanced due to the presence of Mg(2+) and furthers the understanding of importance of the Mg(2+) ion for bacterial topoisomerase I catalytic activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Green synthesis, characterization and some physico-chemical studies on a novel intermolecular compound; 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine-N, N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, U. S.; Singh, Manjeet; Rai, R. N.

    2017-09-01

    An inter-molecular compound (IMC) L1 was synthesized by taking 1:1 molar ratio of p-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOPDA) and N, N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (DMAB) via thermally initiated solid state reaction. It was characterized by X-ray diffraction, spectral and optical studies. The single crystal of the (L1) was grown from saturated solution of ethanol using slow evaporation technique at 29 °C. From the single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, it can be inferred that it crystallizes in triclinic unit cell with P-1 space group (CCDC No 1422765). Absorption spectrum of IMC (L1) shows a band at 318 nm attributed to the intra-molecular charge-transfer (ICT) excited state absorption and the other band at 376 nm is due to n→π* transition. The IMC (L1) shows a strong fluorescence at 418 nm with a Stokes shift (≈100 nm) and quantum efficiency (0.22) upon excitation in methyl alcohol at 318 nm.

  14. On the intermolecular vibrational coupling, hydrogen bonding, and librational freedom of water in the hydration shell of mono- and bivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Namboodiri, V; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A

    2014-10-28

    The hydration energy of an ion largely resides within the first few layers of water molecules in its hydration shell. Hence, it is important to understand the transformation of water properties, such as hydrogen-bonding, intermolecular vibrational coupling, and librational freedom in the hydration shell of ions. We investigated these properties in the hydration shell of mono- (Cl(-) and I(-)) and bivalent (SO4(2-) and CO3(2-)) anions by using Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopy in the OH stretch, HOH bend, and [bend+librational] combination bands of water. Raman-MCR of aqueous Na-salt (NaCl, NaI, Na2SO4, and Na2CO3) solutions provides ion-correlated spectra (IC-spectrum) which predominantly bear the vibrational characteristics of water in the hydration shell of respective anions. Comparison of these IC-spectra with the Raman spectrum of bulk water in different spectral regions reveals that the water is vibrationally decoupled with its neighbors in the hydration shell. Hydrogen-bond strength and librational freedom also vary with the nature of anion: hydrogen-bond strength, for example, decreases as CO3(2-) > SO4(2-) > bulk water ≈ Cl(-) > I(-); and the librational freedom increases as CO3(2-) ≈ SO4(2-) water water in the hydration shell of anions.

  15. Landau-Zener tunneling in the presence of weak intermolecular interactions in a crystal of Mn4 single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Bhaduri, S.; Vinslava, A.; Christou, G.

    2005-12-01

    A Mn4 single-molecule magnet (SMM), with a well-isolated spin ground state of S=9/2 , is used as a model system to study Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling in the presence of weak intermolecular dipolar and exchange interactions. The anisotropy constants D and B are measured with minor hysteresis loops. A transverse field is used to tune the tunnel splitting over a large range. Using the LZ and inverse LZ method, it is shown that these interactions play an important role in the tunnel rates. Three regions are identified: (i) at small transverse fields, tunneling is dominated by single tunnel transitions, (ii) at intermediate transverse fields, the measured tunnel rates are governed by reshuffling of internal fields, and (iii) at larger transverse fields, the magnetization reversal starts to be influenced by the direct relaxation process, and many-body tunnel events may occur. The hole digging method is used to study the next-nearest-neighbor interactions. At small external fields, it is shown that magnetic ordering occurs which does not quench tunneling. An applied transverse field can increase the ordering rate. Spin-spin cross-relaxations, mediated by dipolar and weak exchange interactions, are proposed to explain additional quantum steps.

  16. Site-specific intermolecular valence-band dispersion in α-phase crystalline films of cobalt phthalocyanine studied by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2014-12-14

    The valence band structure of α-phase crystalline films of cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) grown on Au(111) is investigated by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with synchrotron radiation. The photo-induced change in the ARPES peaks is noticed in shape and energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, C 2p) and HOMO-1 (Co 3d) of CoPc, and is misleading the interpretation of the electronic properties of CoPc films. From the damage-free normal-emission ARPES measurement, the clear valence-band dispersion has been first observed, showing that orbital-specific behaviors are attributable to the interplay of the intermolecular π-π and π-d interactions. The HOMO band dispersion of 0.1 eV gives the lower limit of the hole mobility for α-CoPc of 28.9 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at 15 K. The non-dispersive character of the split HOMO-1 bands indicates that the localization of the spin state is a possible origin of the antiferromagnetism.

  17. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashynska, Vlada; Stepanian, Stepan; Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms

  18. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashynska, Vlada, E-mail: vlada@vl.kharkov.ua [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Stepanian, Stepan [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly [Institute of Organic Chemistry of Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudosok korutja, 2, Budapest H-1117 (Hungary); Adamowicz, Ludwik [University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-07-09

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms.

  19. Close Formation Flight Control

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Proud, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    ... in the formation's drag is achieved. A controller, i.e., a formation-hold autopilot for the wing aircraft, is designed such that the formation's geometry is maintained in the face of lead aircraft maneuvers...

  20. Intermolecular Dehydrative Coupling Reaction of Arylketones with Cyclic Alkenes Catalyzed by a Well-Defined Cationic Ruthenium-Hydride Complex: A Novel Ketone Olefination Method via Vinyl C–H Bond Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chae S.; Lee, Do W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The cationic ruthenium-hydride complex [(η6-C6H6)(PCy3)(CO)RuH]+BF4− was found to be a highly effective catalyst for the intermolecular olefination reaction of arylketones with cycloalkenes. The preliminary mechanistic analysis revealed that electrophilic ruthenium-vinyl complex is the key species for mediating both vinyl C–H bond activation and the dehydrative olefination steps of the coupling reaction. PMID:20567607

  1. Effects of intermolecular interactions on absorption intensities of the fundamental and the first, second, and third overtones of OH stretching vibrations of methanol and t-butanol‑d9in n-hexane studied by visible/near-infrared/infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisawa, Yusuke; Suga, Arisa

    2018-05-15

    Visible (Vis), near-infrared (NIR) and IR spectra in the 15,600-2500cm -1 region were measured for methanol, methanol-d 3 , and t-butanol-d 9 in n-hexane to investigate effects of intermolecular interaction on absorption intensities of the fundamental and the first, second, and third overtones of their OH stretching vibrations. The relative area intensities of OH stretching bands of free and hydrogen-bonded species were plotted versus the vibrational quantum number using logarithm plots (V=1-4) for 0.5M methanol, 0.5M methanol‑d 3 , and 0.5M t-butanol-d 9 in n-hexane. In the logarithm plots the relative intensities of free species yield a linear dependence irrespective of the solutes while those of hydrogen-bonded species deviate significantly from the linearity. The observed results suggest that the modifications in dipole moment functions of the OH bond induced by the formation of the hydrogen bondings change transient dipole moment, leading to the deviations of the dependences of relative absorption intensities on the vibrational quantum number from the linearity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. High-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy of fish muscle, eggs and small whole fish via Hadamard-encoded intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy has become an important technique for tissue studies. Since tissues are in semisolid-state, their high-resolution (HR spectra cannot be obtained by conventional NMR spectroscopy. Because of this restriction, extraction and high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR MAS are widely applied for HR NMR spectra of tissues. However, both of the methods are subject to limitations. In this study, the feasibility of HR (1H NMR spectroscopy based on intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence (iMQC technique is explored using fish muscle, fish eggs, and a whole fish as examples. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Intact salmon muscle tissues, intact eggs from shishamo smelt and a whole fish (Siamese algae eater are studied by using conventional 1D one-pulse sequence, Hadamard-encoded iMQC sequence, and HR MAS. RESULTS: When we use the conventional 1D one-pulse sequence, hardly any useful spectral information can be obtained due to the severe field inhomogeneity. By contrast, HR NMR spectra can be obtained in a short period of time by using the Hadamard-encoded iMQC method without shimming. Most signals from fatty acids and small metabolites can be observed. Compared to HR MAS, the iMQC method is non-invasive, but the resolution and the sensitivity of resulting spectra are not as high as those of HR MAS spectra. CONCLUSION: Due to the immunity to field inhomogeneity, the iMQC technique can be a proper supplement to HR MAS, and it provides an alternative for the investigation in cases with field distortions and with samples unsuitable for spinning. The acquisition time of the proposed method is greatly reduced by introduction of the Hadamard-encoded technique, in comparison with that of conventional iMQC method.

  3. Push it to the limit: Characterizing the convergence of common sequences of basis sets for intermolecular interactions as described by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, Jonathon [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neaton, Jeffrey B. [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    With the aim of systematically characterizing the convergence of common families of basis sets such that general recommendations for basis sets can be made, we have tested a wide variety of basis sets against complete-basis binding energies across the S22 set of intermolecular interactions—noncovalent interactions of small and medium-sized molecules consisting of first- and second-row atoms—with three distinct density functional approximations: SPW92, a form of local-density approximation; B3LYP, a global hybrid generalized gradient approximation; and B97M-V, a meta-generalized gradient approximation with nonlocal correlation. We have found that it is remarkably difficult to reach the basis set limit; for the methods and systems examined, the most complete basis is Jensen’s pc-4. The Dunning correlation-consistent sequence of basis sets converges slowly relative to the Jensen sequence. The Karlsruhe basis sets are quite cost effective, particularly when a correction for basis set superposition error is applied: counterpoise-corrected def2-SVPD binding energies are better than corresponding energies computed in comparably sized Dunning and Jensen bases, and on par with uncorrected results in basis sets 3-4 times larger. These trends are exhibited regardless of the level of density functional approximation employed. A sense of the magnitude of the intrinsic incompleteness error of each basis set not only provides a foundation for guiding basis set choice in future studies but also facilitates quantitative comparison of existing studies on similar types of systems.

  4. Z/E-Isomerism of 3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-2-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)acrylonitrile: crystal structures and secondary intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammisetti, Renuka Devi; Kosilkin, Ilya V; Guzei, Ilia A; Khrustalev, Victor N; Dalton, Larry; Timofeeva, Tatiana V

    2018-01-01

    The Z and E isomers of 3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]-2-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)acrylonitrile, C 17 H 13 Br 3 N 2 , (1), were obtained simultaneously by a Knoevenagel condensation between 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde and 2-(2,4,6-tribromophenyl)acetonitrile, and were investigated by X-ray diffraction and density functional theory (DFT) quantum-chemical calculations. The (Z)-(1) isomer is monoclinic (space group P2 1 /n, Z' = 1), whereas the (E)-(1) isomer is triclinic (space group P-1, Z' = 2). The two crystallographically-independent molecules of (E)-(1) adopt similar geometries. The corresponding bond lengths and angles in the two isomers of (1) are very similar. The difference in the calculated total energies of isolated molecules of (Z)-(1) and (E)-(1) with DFT-optimized geometries is ∼4.47 kJ mol -1 , with the minimum value corresponding to the Z isomer. The crystal structure of (Z)-(1) reveals strong intermolecular nonvalent Br...N [3.100 (2) and 3.216 (3) Å] interactions which link the molecules into layers parallel to (10-1). In contrast, molecules of (E)-(1) in the crystal are bound to each other by strong nonvalent Br...Br [3.5556 (10) Å] and weak Br...N [3.433 (4) Å] interactions, forming chains propagating along [110]. The crystal packing of (Z)-(1) is denser than that of (E)-(1), implying that the crystal structure realized for (Z)-(1) is more stable than that for (E)-(1).

  5. Heteroleptic and Homoleptic Iron(III Spin-Crossover Complexes; Effects of Ligand Substituents and Intermolecular Interactions between Co-Cation/Anion and the Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasinee Phonsri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The structural and magnetic properties of a range of new iron(III bis-tridentate Schiff base complexes are described with emphasis on how intermolecular structural interactions influence spin states and spin crossover (SCO in these d5 materials. Three pairs of complexes were investigated. The first pair are the neutral, heteroleptic complexes [Fe(3-OMe-SalEen(thsa] 1 and [Fe(3-MeOSalEen(3-EtOthsa] 2, where 3-R-HSalEen = (E-2-(((2-(ethylaminoethyliminomethyl-6-R-phenol and 3-R-H2thsa = thiosemicarbazone-3-R-salicylaldimine. They display spin transitions above room temperature. However, 2 shows incomplete and gradual change, while SCO in 1 is complete and more abrupt. Lower cooperativity in 2 is ascribed to the lack of π–π interactions, compared to 1. The second pair, cationic species [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]NO3 3 and [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]Cl 4 differ only in the counter-anion. They show partial SCO above room temperature with 3 displaying a sharp transition at 343 K. Weak hydrogen bonds from cation to Cl− probably lead to weaker cooperativity in 4. The last pair, CsH2O[Fe(3-MeO-thsa2] 5 and Cs(H2O2[Fe(5-NO2-thsa2] 6, are anionic homoleptic chelates that have different substituents on the salicylaldiminate rings of thsa2−. The Cs cations bond to O atoms of water and the ligands, in unusual ways thus forming attractive 1D and 3D networks in 5 and 6, respectively, and 5 remains HS (high spin at all temperatures while 6 remains LS (low spin. Comparisons are made to other literature examples of Cs salts of [Fe(5-R-thsa2]− (R = H and Br.

  6. Physiological intermolecular modification spectroscopy for the prediction of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Pierre; Glaubitz, Lisa; Breidert, Matthias; Neurath, Markus Friedrich; Atreya, Raja

    2014-01-01

    Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) antibodies have clinical efficiency only in a subgroup of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Prediction of clinical response is a critical clinical problem. Physiological intermolecular modification spectroscopy (PIMS) is a label-free technology performed in physiological conditions. PIMS enables real-time monitoring of dynamic molecular resonance of entire proteins and macromolecules of an individual. The aim of this study was to explore the capacity of PIMS to discriminate IBD patients regarding response to anti-TNF treatment. Protein extracts of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 30 outpatients diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn's disease (CD) and treated with infliximab were subjected to PIMS analysis in a blinded transversal study. Total protein from each patient's PBMCs was challenged with infliximab. Dynamic changes in macromolecular interaction were registered while the temperature rose from -37 to 37°C. Individual macromolecular volume and molecular elasticity were determined for each patient. Clinical data revealed that 67% of UC and 79% of CD patients responded to infliximab therapy during the 3-month study period based on their respective clinical activity score. These results confirm that PIMS data predicted response to anti-TNF therapy with an accuracy of 96%. PIMS stratified IBD patients into two groups, responders and nonresponders, which correlated with the clinical efficacy of anti-TNF therapy. PIMS seems to be a powerful technology to adapt IBD treatment to the individual patient. Further studies with PIMS might enable to predict clinical response to biological treatment in IBD patients before the therapy is initiated. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Rates of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    It is illustrated that a theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies depends on an understanding of star formation, and especially of the factors influencing the rate of star formation. Some of the theoretical problems of star formation in galaxies, some approaches that have been considered in models of galaxy evolution, and some possible observational tests that may help to clarify which processes or models are most relevant are reviewed. The material is presented under the following headings: power-law models for star formation, star formation processes (conditions required, ways of achieving these conditions), observational indications and tests, and measures of star formation rates in galaxies. 49 references

  8. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Crable

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production.

  9. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    OpenAIRE

    Crable, Bryan R.; Plugge, Caroline M.; McInerney, Michael J.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is...

  10. Disorder and intermolecular interactions in a family of tetranuclear Ni(II) complexes probed by high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jon; Yang, En-Che; Edwards, Rachel; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Ramsey, Chris; Dalal, Naresh S; Gantzel, Peter K; Hill, Stephen; Hendrickson, David N

    2008-03-17

    structure splittings for complex 3. This behavior is thought to be due to the onset of short-range magnetic correlations/coherences between molecules caused by weak intermolecular magnetic exchange interactions.

  11. Dispersion-corrected first-principles calculation of terahertz vibration, and evidence for weak hydrogen bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2013-03-01

    A weak hydrogen bond (WHB) such as CH-O is very important for the structure, function, and dynamics in a chemical and biological system WHB stretching vibration is in a terahertz (THz) frequency region Very recently, the reasonable performance of dispersion-corrected first-principles to WHB has been proven. In this lecture, we report dispersion-corrected first-principles calculation of the vibrational absorption of some organic crystals, and low-temperature THz spectral measurement, in order to clarify WHB stretching vibration. The THz frequency calculation of a WHB crystal has extremely improved by dispersion correction. Moreover, the discrepancy in frequency between an experiment and calculation and is 10 1/cm or less. Dispersion correction is especially effective for intermolecular mode. The very sharp peak appearing at 4 K is assigned to the intermolecular translational mode that corresponds to WHB stretching vibration. It is difficult to detect and control the WHB formation in a crystal because the binding energy is very small. With the help of the latest intense development of experimental and theoretical technique and its careful use, we reveal solid-state WHB stretching vibration as evidence for the WHB formation that differs in respective WHB networks The research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (Grant No. 22550003).

  12. The Format Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oder, Norman

    2002-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of public libraries that investigated trends in audiovisual materials. Highlights include format issues; audiobooks; media budgets for various formats; video collections; DVDs; circulation; collection sizes; music CDs; and future possibilities. (LRW)

  13. Observation of Combination Bands Involving Intermolecular Vibrations of N_2O-N_2, N_2O-OCS and N_2O-CO_2 Complexes Using AN External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, M.; Sheybani-Deloui, S.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2013-06-01

    Spectra of the weakly-bound N_2O-CO_2, N_2O-OCS, and N_2O-N_2 complexes in the region of the N_2O ν_1 fundamental band (˜2224 cm^{-1}) are observed in a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion probed with a quantum cascade laser. One new band is observed for each complex: two combination bands involving the intermolecular in-plane bending for N_2O-CO_2 and N_2O-N_2 complexes, and the out-of-plane torsional vibration for N_2O-OCS. The resulting intermolecular frequencies are 34.17, 17.11 and 22.33 cm^{-1} for N_2O-CO_2, N_2O-OCS, and N_2O-N_2 complexes, respectively. The intermolecular vibrations provide clear spectroscopic data against which theory can be benchmarked. These results will be discussed, along with a brief introduction to our pulsed-jet supersonic apparatus which has been retrofitted by an infrared cw external-cavity quantum cascade laser (QCL) manufactured by Daylight Solutions. The QCL is used in the rapid-scan signal averaging mode. Although the repetition rate of the QCL is limited by its PZT scan rate, which is 100 Hz, we describe a simple technique to increase the effective repetition rate to 625 Hz. In addition, we have significantly reduced the long term frequency drift of the QCL by locking the laser frequency to the sides of a reference line. Limin Zheng, Soo-Ying Lee, Yunpeng Lu, and Minghui Yang, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 044302 (2013).

  14. Multi-property isotropic intermolecular potentials and predicted spectral lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA), collision-induced light scattering (CILS) and collision-induced hyper-Rayleigh scattering (CIHR) for H2sbnd Ne, -Kr and -Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kader, M. S. A.; Godet, J.-L.; Gustafsson, M.; Maroulis, G.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA), collision-induced light scattering (CILS) and collision-induced hyper-Rayleigh scattering (CIHR) at room temperature (295 K) are computed for gaseous mixtures of molecular hydrogen with neon, krypton and xenon. The induced spectra are detected using theoretical values for induced dipole moment, pair-polarizability trace and anisotropy, hyper-polarizability and updated intermolecular potentials. Good agreement is observed for all spectra when the literature and the present potentials which are constructed from the transport and thermo-physical properties are used.

  15. Mössbauer spectroscopic and powder X-ray diffraction studies on incorporation of gaseous organic molecules into intermolecular nano-voids of mixed-valence trinuclear iron pentafluorobenzoate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yoichi; Onaka, Satoru; Ogiso, Ryo; Takayama, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Masashi; Nakamoto, Tadahiro

    2013-01-01

    Incorporation of gaseous organic molecules into polycrystalline mixed-valence trinuclear iron (Fe 3+ ,Fe 3+ ,Fe 2+ ) pentafluorobenzoate complex Fe 3 O(C 6 F 5 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 with intermolecular nano-voids was studied by 57 Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopic and powder XRD measurements. Organic-molecule incorporation was mainly chased by using iron-valence fluctuation observed in a Mössbauer spectrum, and also researched supportively by a powder XRD technique. (author)

  16. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crable, B.R.; Plugge, C.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the

  17. Formation Flying Concept Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Palkin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term “formation flying” implies coordinated movement of at least two satellites on coplanar and non-coplanar orbits with a maximum distance between them being much less than the length of the orbit. Peculiarities of formation flying concept also include:- automatic coordination of satellites;- sub-group specialization of formation flying satellites;- equipment and data exchange technology unification in each specialized group or subgroup.Formation flying satellites can be classified according to the configuration stability level (order (array, cluster («swarm», intergroup specialization rules («central satellite», «leader», «slave», manoeuvrability («active» and «passive» satellites.Tasks of formation flying include:- experiments with payload, distributed in formation flying satellites;- various near-earth space and earth-surface research;- super-sized aperture antenna development;- land-based telescope calibration;- «space advertisement» (earth-surface observable satellite compositions of a logotype, word, etc.;- orbital satellite maintenance, etc.Main issues of formation flying satellite system design are:- development of an autonomous satellite group manoeuvring technology;- providing a sufficient characteristic velocity of formation flying satellites;- ballistic and navigation maintenance for satellite formation flying;- technical and economic assessment of formation flying orbital delivery and deployment;- standardization, unification, miniaturization and integration of equipment;- intergroup and intersatellite function redistribution.

  18. From Sermon Formation to Preacher Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaarden, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    today is less about exercising the authority of an office and more about embodying authenticity. I argue that traditional homiletic education can benefit from implementing a learner-centered approach to teaching moving from sermon formation towards preacher formation, in order to develop and train...... judged, evaluated, or critiqued. In this paper, I explain how a learner-centered approach to education works in practice and show how pastors experience the teaching method and the congregations’ positive response to their improvements. I shall present the results of a focus-group interview with pastors...

  19. Magnesium chloride concentration-dependent formation of tofu-like precipitates with different physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arii, Yasuhiro; Takenaka, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A wet precipitate is generated in the process of making tofu by adding a coagulant to the basic soymilk ingredient. We investigated the magnesium chloride concentration-dependent change in the precipitate weight. The wet precipitate weight dramatically increased following a short plateau phase at a low concentration of magnesium chloride. It is interesting that this weight slightly decreased following a long plateau phase at a high concentration. These low and high concentrations respectively induced precipitates with a smooth surface and rough surface. The precipitate with a smooth surface had a higher water content than that with a rough surface. These precipitates also had obviously different solubility in various chemical reagents. The different properties indicate that these precipitates were formed by different intermolecular interactions. These results can be utilized to more clearly understand the mechanisms involved in tofu formation.

  20. Quantitative determination of the lateral density and intermolecular correlation between proteins anchored on the membrane surfaces using grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuillan, Wasim; Vorobiev, Alexei; Hartel, Andreas; Jones, Nicola G; Engstler, Markus; Tanaka, Motomu

    2012-11-28

    As a physical model of the surface of cells coated with densely packed, non-crystalline proteins coupled to lipid anchors, we functionalized the surface of phospholipid membranes by coupling of neutravidin to biotinylated lipid anchors. After the characterization of fine structures perpendicular to the plane of membrane using specular X-ray reflectivity, the same membrane was characterized by grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). Within the framework of distorted wave Born approximation and two-dimensional Percus-Yevick function, we can analyze the form and structure factors of the non-crystalline, membrane-anchored proteins for the first time. As a new experimental technique to quantify the surface density of proteins on the membrane surface, we utilized grazing incidence X-ray fluorescence (GIXF). Here, the mean intermolecular distance between proteins from the sulfur peak intensities can be calculated by applying Abelé's matrix formalism. The characteristic correlation distance between non-crystalline neutravidin obtained by the GISAXS analysis agrees well with the intermolecular distance calculated by GIXF, suggesting a large potential of the combination of GISAXS and GIXF in probing the lateral density and correlation of non-crystalline proteins displayed on the membrane surface.

  1. The Organic Secondary Building Unit: Strong Intermolecular π Interactions Define Topology in MIT-25, a Mesoporous MOF with Proton-Replete Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sarah S; Hendon, Christopher H; Fielding, Alistair J; Walsh, Aron; O'Keeffe, Michael; Dincă, Mircea

    2017-03-15

    The structure-directing role of the inorganic secondary building unit (SBU) is key for determining the topology of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here we show that organic building units relying on strong π interactions that are energetically competitive with the formation of common inorganic SBUs can also play a role in defining the topology. We demonstrate the importance of the organic SBU in the formation of Mg 2 H 6 (H 3 O)(TTFTB) 3 (MIT-25), a mesoporous MOF with the new ssp topology. A delocalized electronic hole is critical in the stabilization of the TTF triad organic SBUs and exemplifies a design principle for future MOF synthesis.

  2. Stages of ores formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Deposit formation (especially endogenous) is the complicated, multi-stage and long process. Establishment of deposit formation succession, age-specific correlations of minerals and aggregates have a high importance at solving genetic questions. Studying of minerals correlations and mineral aggregates, succession of their crystallization and other observations let restore the history of deposit formation, pick up in it different on duration and physical and chemical conditions stages

  3. Understanding Alliance Formation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    might take a different trend in different eras, in which it is either positive, leading to a bigger chance of alliance formation , or negative, leading...of war and peace with regard to systemic analysis. Therefore, it is reasonable that there is a deviation in the trends of alliance formation during...ALLIANCE FORMATION PATTERNS by Wael Abbas Zoltan Schneider December 2015 Thesis Advisor: William P. Fox Second Reader: Heather S. Gregg

  4. Exploring Opponent Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Rasmussen, Majken; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2013-01-01

    of how the opponent format and relationships impact a game are almost absent in current research. Thus, this paper aims to elucidate how the perception of a competition differs, depending on the opponent format, by presenting a game mechanic framework. The paper furthermore presents an interactive...... football-training platform, as well as games designed to explore the different opponent formats. The games are qualitatively evaluated to illuminate the qualities of and distinctions between different types of opponent formats, proposed by the framework terminology....

  5. ENDF/B format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.A.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1986-09-01

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B. This format, originally designed for the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File, is recommended for international use. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-NCS-50496 (ENDF 102) should be consulted. An Appendix to the present document gives a summary of the format differences between ENDF/B-4 and ENDF/B-5. (author)

  6. Data format translation routines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base

  7. ENDF/B Format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B, the evaluated neutron nuclear data library of the US National Nuclear Data Center. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-50274 (ENDF-102) should be consulted. (author)

  8. Diminutive formations in Xitsonga

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kate H

    Introduction. In Xitsonga diminutive formation, the juncture between the root and the suffix undergoes various phonological processes: glide formation, velarisation and vowel deletion. We argue that these seemingly disjointed processes are results of repair strategies that apply in order to avoid a sequence of labial sounds.

  9. Divisions-ST Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Henny, L

    2001-01-01

    Au CERN la formation est une partie intégrante des activités de l'Organisation. Mentionnée dans le Statut du Personnel depuis l'origine, elle figure au Règlement depuis 1981 et est largement explicitée dans la Circulaire Administrative N° 16. L'organe réglementaire est constitué par la Commission Paritaire de Formation (Joint Training Board dont le sigle est JTB) qui a pour but de conseiller le Directeur Général en matière de formation, de définir la politique de formation et d'en faire l'évaluation. Des organes spécifiques ont été mis en place pour organiser les différents programmes : le Groupe Formation et Développement, le Comité exécutif de formation (sigle TEC), le Comité d'enseignement académique. Des délégués divisionnaires à la formation (sigle DTO) servent de courroie de transmission entre ces organes, le personnel et le Service de l'Enseignement (Div. HR). La Division ST dont les activités présentent une grande variété se doit de poursuivre une politique de formation s...

  10. Thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA tertiary structure formation in the junctionless hairpin ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Neil A; Hoogstraten, Charles G

    2017-09-01

    The hairpin ribozyme consists of two RNA internal loops that interact to form the catalytically active structure. This docking transition is a rare example of intermolecular formation of RNA tertiary structure without coupling to helix annealing. We have used temperature-dependent surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to characterize the thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA tertiary structure formation for the junctionless form of the ribozyme, in which loops A and B reside on separate molecules. We find docking to be strongly enthalpy-driven and to be accompanied by substantial activation barriers for association and dissociation, consistent with the structural reorganization of both internal loops upon complex formation. Comparisons with the parallel analysis of a ribozyme variant carrying a 2'-O-methyl modification at the self-cleavage site and with published data in other systems reveal a surprising diversity of thermodynamic signatures, emphasizing the delicate balance of contributions to the free energy of formation of RNA tertiary structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Structural Transitions Induced by a Recombinant Methionine-Trigger in Silk Spidroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna; Winkler, Stefan; Valluzzi, Regina; Kaplan, David

    2000-03-01

    Control of beta sheet formation is an important factor in the understanding and prediction of structural transitions and protein folding. In genetically engineered silk proteins this control has been achieved using oxidative triggers. A genetically engineered variant of a spider silk protein, and a peptide analog, based on the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk, were modified to include methionines flanking the beta sheet forming polyalanine regions. These methionines could be selectively reduced and oxidized, altering the bulkiness and charge of the sulfhydryl group to control beta sheet formation by steric hindrance. Biophysical characterization and monitoring of structural transitions and intermediates were accomplished through attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) for solution state structures in both oxidized and reduced forms. For solid state structural characterization, IR microscopy and reflectance IR experiments were performed. Electron diffraction data as well as circular dichroism studies provide structural corroboration for all experiments in which reproducible sample preparation was achieved.

  12. Intermolecular configurations dominated by quadrupole-quadrupole electrostatic interactions: explicit correlation treatment of the five-dimensional potential energy surface and infrared spectra for the CO-N2 complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing-Min; Zhai, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Li, Hui

    2018-01-17

    A thorough understanding of the intermolecular configurations of van der Waals complexes is a great challenge due to their weak interactions, floppiness and anharmonic nature. Although high-resolution microwave or infrared spectroscopy provides one of the most direct and precise pieces of experimental evidence, the origin and key role in determining such intermolecular configurations of a van der Waals system strongly depend on its highly accurate potential energy surface (PES) and a detailed analysis of its ro-vibrational wavefunctions. Here, a new five-dimensional potential energy surface for the van der Waals complex of CO-N 2 which explicitly incorporates the dependence on the stretch coordinate of the CO monomer is generated using the explicitly correlated couple cluster (CCSD(T)-F12) method in conjunction with a large basis set. Analytic four-dimensional PESs are obtained by the least-squares fitting of vibrationally averaged interaction energies for v = 0 and v = 1 to the Morse/Long-Range potential mode (V MLR ). These fits to 7966 points have root-mean-square deviations (RMSD) of 0.131 cm -1 and 0.129 cm -1 for v = 0 and v = 1, respectively, with only 315 parameters. Energy decomposition analysis is carried out, and it reveals that the dominant factor in controlling intermolecular configurations is quadrupole-quadrupole electrostatic interactions. Moreover, the rovibrational levels and wave functions are obtained for the first time. The predicted infrared transitions and intensities for the ortho-N 2 -CO complex as well as the calculated energy levels for para-N 2 -CO are in good agreement with the available experimental data with RMSD discrepancies smaller than 0.068 cm -1 . The calculated infrared band origin shift associated with the fundamental band frequency of CO is -0.721 cm -1 for ortho-N 2 -CO which is in excellent agreement with the experimental value of -0.739 cm -1 . The agreement with experimental values validates the high quality of the PESs

  13. Ab initio study of the intermolecular potential energy surface in the ion-induced-dipole hydrogen-bonded O2(-)(X2Πg)-H2(X1Σg(+)) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy, Wafaa M

    2012-01-26

    This work presents the first investigation on the intermolecular potential energy surface of the ground electronic state of the O2(-)(2Πg)-H2(1Σg(+)) complex. High level correlated ab initio calculations were carried out using the Hartree-Fock spin-unrestricted coupled cluster singles and doubles including perturbative triples correction [RHF-UCCSD(T)]/aug-cc-pVXZ levels of calculations, where XZ = DZ, TZ, QZ, and 5Z. Results of full geometry optimization and the intermolecular potential energy surface (IPES) calculations show four equivalent minimum energy structures of L-shaped geometry with Cs symmetry at equilibrium along the 2A″ surface of the complex. For these equilibrium minimum energy structures, the most accurate value for the dissociation energy (De) was calculated as 1407.7 cm(-1), which was obtained by extrapolating the counterpoise (CP) corrected De values to the complete basis set (CBS) limit. This global minimum energy structure is stabilized by an ion-induced-dipole hydrogen bond. Detailed investigations of the IPES show that the collinear structure is unstable, while the C2v geometries present saddle points along the 2A″ surface. The barrier height between the two equivalent structures that differs in whether the hydrogen-bonded hydrogen atom is above or below the axis that connects centers of masses of the H2 and O2(-) moieties within the complex was calculated as 70 cm(-1). This suggests that the complex exhibits large amplitude motion. The barrier height to rotation of the H2 moiety by 180° within the complex is 1020 cm(-1). Anharmonic oscillator calculations predicted a strong H-H stretch fundamental transition at 3807 cm(-1). Results of the current work are expected to stimulate further theoretical and experimental investigations on the nature of intermolecular interactions in complexes that contain the superoxide radical and various closed-shell molecules that model atmospheric and biological molecules. These studies are fundamental

  14. Manuel UNIMARC format bibliographique

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This manual is the French translation of the second edition of UNIMARC Manual: bibliographic format published in English in 1994 and completed by 5 updates published from 1996 to 2005. This 5th French edition is composite. It reproduces identically a part of the 4th edition published in 2002 and, for the fields of the format modified in the Update 5, it offers a new more structured presentation. This is a handbook dedicated to French-speaking users of the UNIMARC format for bibliographic descriptions.

  15. How can a beta-sheet peptide be both a potent antimicrobial and harmfully toxic? Molecular dynamics simulations of protegrin-1 in micelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langham, Allison A; Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the naturally occurring beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1 (PG-1) is studied by molecular dynamics simulation in all-atom sodium dodecylsulfate and dodecylphosphocholine micelles. These simulations provide a high-resolution picture of the interactions between the peptide...

  16. Evidence for Intramolecular Antiparallel Beta-Sheet Structure in Alpha-Synuclein Fibrils from a Combination of Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeters, Steven J; Iyer, Aditya; Pletikapić, Galja; Kogan, Vladimir; Subramaniam, Vinod; Woutersen, Sander

    2017-01-01

    The aggregation of the intrinsically disordered protein alpha-synuclein (αS) into amyloid fibrils is thought to play a central role in the pathology of Parkinson's disease. Using a combination of techniques (AFM, UV-CD, XRD, and amide-I 1D- and 2D-IR spectroscopy) we show that the structure of αS

  17. Cosmology and galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Implications of the massive halos and ''missing mass'' for galaxy formation are addressed; it is suggested that this mass consists of ''Population III'' stars that formed before the galaxies did. 19 references

  18. PCF File Format.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoreson, Gregory G [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    PCF files are binary files designed to contain gamma spectra and neutron count rates from radiation sensors. It is the native format for the GAmma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) package [1]. It can contain multiple spectra and information about each spectrum such as energy calibration. This document outlines the format of the file that would allow one to write a computer program to parse and write such files.

  19. Autonomous Formation Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schkolnik, Gerard S.; Cobleigh, Brent

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Strategic Plan for the Aerospace Technology Enterprise includes ambitious objectives focused on affordable air travel, reduced emissions, and expanded aviation-system capacity. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, in cooperation with NASA Ames Research Center, the Boeing Company, and the University of California, Los Angeles, has embarked on an autonomous-formation-flight project that promises to make significant strides towards these goals. For millions of years, birds have taken advantage of the aerodynamic benefit of flying in formation. The traditional "V" formation flown by many species of birds (including gulls, pelicans, and geese) enables each of the trailing birds to fly in the upwash flow field that exists just outboard of the bird immediately ahead in the formation. The result for each trailing bird is a decrease in induced drag and thus a reduction in the energy needed to maintain a given speed. Hence, for migratory birds, formation flight extends the range of the system of birds over the range of birds flying solo. The Autonomous Formation Flight (AFF) Project is seeking to extend this symbiotic relationship to aircraft.

  20. Protein-ligand interfaces are polarized: discovery of a strong trend for intermolecular hydrogen bonds to favor donors on the protein side with implications for predicting and designing ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschka, Sebastian; Wolf, Alex J.; Bemister-Buffington, Joseph; Kuhn, Leslie A.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding how proteins encode ligand specificity is fascinating and similar in importance to deciphering the genetic code. For protein-ligand recognition, the combination of an almost infinite variety of interfacial shapes and patterns of chemical groups makes the problem especially challenging. Here we analyze data across non-homologous proteins in complex with small biological ligands to address observations made in our inhibitor discovery projects: that proteins favor donating H-bonds to ligands and avoid using groups with both H-bond donor and acceptor capacity. The resulting clear and significant chemical group matching preferences elucidate the code for protein-native ligand binding, similar to the dominant patterns found in nucleic acid base-pairing. On average, 90% of the keto and carboxylate oxygens occurring in the biological ligands formed direct H-bonds to the protein. A two-fold preference was found for protein atoms to act as H-bond donors and ligand atoms to act as acceptors, and 76% of all intermolecular H-bonds involved an amine donor. Together, the tight chemical and geometric constraints associated with satisfying donor groups generate a hydrogen-bonding lock that can be matched only by ligands bearing the right acceptor-rich key. Measuring an index of H-bond preference based on the observed chemical trends proved sufficient to predict other protein-ligand complexes and can be used to guide molecular design. The resulting Hbind and Protein Recognition Index software packages are being made available for rigorously defining intermolecular H-bonds and measuring the extent to which H-bonding patterns in a given complex match the preference key.

  1. Cooperativity effect involving drug-DNA/RNA intermolecular interaction: A B3LYP-D3 and MP2 theoretical investigation on ketoprofen⋯cytosine⋯H2O system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jun-Ping; Wei, Xiao-Chun; Shi, Wen-Jing; Huang, Zhu-Yuan; Jin, Bo; Zhou, Yu-Kun

    2017-11-14

    In order to examine the origin of the drug action and design new DNA/RNA-targeted drugs, the cooperativity effect involving drug-DNA/RNA intermolecular interaction in ketoprofen⋯cytosine⋯H 2 O ternary system were investigated by the B3LYP, B3LYP-D3, and MP2 methods with the 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set. The thermodynamic cooperativity was also evaluated at 310.15 K. The N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N, C-H⋯N, and C-H⋯O H bonds coexist in ternary complexes. The intermolecular interactions obtained by B3LYP-D3 are close to those calculated by MP2. The steric effects and van der Waals interactions have little influence on the cooperativity effects. The anti-cooperativity effect in ket⋯cyt⋯H 2 O is far more notable than the cooperativity effect, and the stability of the cyclic structure with anti-cooperativity effect is higher than that of the linear structure with cooperativity effect, as is confirmed by the AIM (atoms in molecules) and RDG (reduced density gradient) analysis. Thus, it can be inferred that, in the presence of H 2 O, the anti-cooperativity effect plays a dominant role in the drug-DNA/RNA interaction, and the nature of the hydration in the binding of drugs to DNA/RNA bases is the H-bonding anti-cooperativity effect. Furthermore, the drug always links simultaneously with DNA/RNA base and H 2 O, and only in this way can the biological activity of drugs play a role. In most cases, the enthalpy change is the major factor driving the cooperativity, as is different from most of biomacromolecule complexes.

  2. Competing intramolecular N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bonds and extended intermolecular network in 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(2-methyl-4-oxopentan-2-yl) thiourea analyzed by experimental and theoretical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, Aamer, E-mail: aamersaeed@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Khurshid, Asma [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Jasinski, Jerry P. [Department of Chemistry, Keene State College, 229 Main Street Keene, NH 03435-2001 (United States); Pozzi, C. Gustavo; Fantoni, Adolfo C. [Instituto de Física La Plata, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 49 y 115, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Erben, Mauricio F., E-mail: erben@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CEQUINOR (UNLP, CONICET-CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 962, (1900) La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-03-18

    Highlights: • Two distinct N-H⋯O=C intramolecular competing hydrogen bonds are feasible in the title molecule. • Crystal structures and vibrational properties were determined. • The C=O and C=S double bonds of the acyl-thiourea group are mutually oriented in opposite directions. • A strong hyperconjugative lpO1 → σ{sup ∗}(N2-H) remote interaction was detected. • Topological analysis reveals a Cl⋯N interaction playing a relevant role in crystal packing. - Abstract: The synthesis of a novel 1-acyl-thiourea species (C{sub 14}H{sub 17}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}SCl), has been tailored in such a way that two distinct N-H⋯O=C intramolecular competing hydrogen bonds are feasible. The X-ray structure analysis as well as the vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) data reveal that the S conformation is preferred, with the C=O and C=S bonds of the acyl-thiourea group pointing in opposite directions. The preference for the intramolecular N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bond within the -C(O)NHC(S)NH- core is confirmed. The Natural Bond Orbital and the Atom in Molecule approaches demonstrate that a strong hyperconjugative lpO → σ{sup ∗}(N-H) remote interaction between the acyl and the thioamide N-H groups is responsible for the stabilization of the S conformation. Intermolecular interactions have been characterized in the periodic system electron density and the topological analysis reveals the presence of an extended intermolecular network in the crystal, including a Cl⋯N interaction playing a relevant role in crystal packing.

  3. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of the HIV gp41 membrane fusion protein supports intermolecular antiparallel β sheet fusion peptide structure in the final six-helix bundle state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Kelly; Nethercott, Matthew J; Zheng, Zhaoxiong; Weliky, David P

    2014-03-06

    The HIV gp41 protein catalyzes fusion between viral and target cell membranes. Although the ~20-residue N-terminal fusion peptide (FP) region is critical for fusion, the structure of this region is not well characterized in large gp41 constructs that model the gp41 state at different times during fusion. This paper describes solid-state NMR (SSNMR) studies of FP structure in a membrane-associated construct (FP-Hairpin), which likely models the final fusion state thought to be thermostable trimers with six-helix bundle structure in the region C-terminal of the FP. The SSNMR data show that there are populations of FP-Hairpin with either α helical or β sheet FP conformation. For the β sheet population, measurements of intermolecular (13)C-(13)C proximities in the FP are consistent with a significant fraction of intermolecular antiparallel β sheet FP structure with adjacent strand crossing near L7 and F8. There appears to be negligible in-register parallel structure. These findings support assembly of membrane-associated gp41 trimers through interleaving of N-terminal FPs from different trimers. Similar SSNMR data are obtained for FP-Hairpin and a construct containing the 70 N-terminal residues of gp41 (N70), which is a model for part of the putative pre-hairpin intermediate state of gp41. FP assembly may therefore occur at an early fusion stage. On a more fundamental level, similar SSNMR data are obtained for FP-Hairpin and a construct containing the 34 N-terminal gp41 residues (FP34) and support the hypothesis that the FP is an autonomous folding domain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Application of Near-Infrared and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy in the Characterization of Ligand-Induced Conformation Changes in Folate Binding Protein Purified from Bovine Milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Susanne Wrang; Holm, Jan; Hansen, Steen Ingemann

    2006-01-01

    and explained by side-chain contributions to the NIR, which could reflect the tertiary and quaternary structure differences. NIR spectra of FBP at pH 7.4 and 5.0 revealed contradictory effects on the side chains, reflecting different polymerization events at the two pH values, whereas the amide I region...... and phosphate buffers, and the formation of intermolecular beta-sheet was indicated at pH 5.0, in agreement with a dimerization of FBP taking place at this pH. The ligand-induced changes in the 2100-2300 nm NIR region were significant for FBP in acetate and phosphate buffers of pH 5.0, and the variations were...... indicated similar changes at the two pH values. Therefore, we suggest that FT-IR and NIR spectroscopy may complement each other, such that the two techniques in combination may give information on all three types of protein conformational changes. While the secondary structure changes are revealed by FT...

  5. Peptide insertion, positioning, and stabilization in a membrane: insight from an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakhani, Arneh; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Gullingsrud, Justin; Kim, Judy E; Andrew McCammon, J

    Peptide insertion, positioning, and stabilization in a model membrane are probed via an all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. One peptide (WL5) is simulated in each leaflet of a solvated dimyristoylglycero-3-phosphate (DMPC) membrane. Within the first 5 ns, the peptides spontaneously insert into the membrane and then stabilize during the remaining 70 ns of simulation time. In both leaflets, the peptides localize to the membrane interface, and this localization is attributed to the formation of peptide-lipid hydrogen bonds. We show that the single tryptophan residue in each peptide contributes significantly to these hydrogen bonds; specifically, the nitrogen heteroatom of the indole ring plays a critical role. The tilt angles of the indole rings relative to the membrane normal in the upper and lower leaflets are approximately 26 degrees and 54 degrees , respectively. The tilt angles of the entire peptide chain are 62 degrees and 74 degrees . The membrane induces conformations of the peptide that are characteristic of beta-sheets, and the peptide enhances the lipid ordering in the membrane. Finally, the diffusion rate of the peptides in the membrane plane is calculated (based on experimental peptide concentrations) to be approximately 6 A(2)/ns, thus suggesting a 500 ns time scale for intermolecular interactions.

  6. Densities and Kinematic Viscosities for the Systems Benzene + Methyl Formate, Benzene + Ethyl Formate, Benzene + Propyl Formate, and Benzene + Butyl Formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmerling, Uwe; Rasmussen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Densities and kinematic viscosities have been measured for the system benzene + methyl formate at 20°C and for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate from 20°C to 50°C. The results for the system benzene + methyl formate have been correlated usi...

  7. Dynamic covalent chemistry enables formation of antimicrobial peptide quaternary assemblies in a completely abiotic manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, James F.; Dees, Justine L.; Kolesnichenko, Igor V.; Hernandez, Erik T.; Ukraintsev, Dmitri V.; Guduru, Rusheel; Whiteley, Marvin; Anslyn, Eric V.

    2018-01-01

    Naturally occurring peptides and proteins often use dynamic disulfide bonds to impart defined tertiary/quaternary structures for the formation of binding pockets with uniform size and function. Although peptide synthesis and modification are well established, controlling quaternary structure formation remains a significant challenge. Here, we report the facile incorporation of aryl aldehyde and acyl hydrazide functionalities into peptide oligomers via solid-phase copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SP-CuAAC) click reactions. When mixed, these complementary functional groups rapidly react in aqueous media at neutral pH to form peptide-peptide intermolecular macrocycles with highly tunable ring sizes. Moreover, sequence-specific figure-of-eight, dumbbell-shaped, zipper-like and multi-loop quaternary structures were formed selectively. Controlling the proportions of reacting peptides with mismatched numbers of complementary reactive groups results in the formation of higher-molecular-weight sequence-defined ladder polymers. This also amplified antimicrobial effectiveness in select cases. This strategy represents a general approach to the creation of complex abiotic peptide quaternary structures.

  8. Trifluoroethanol modulates amyloid formation by the all α-helical URN1 FF domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinelli, Patrizia; Castillo, Virginia; Ventura, Salvador

    2013-08-30

    Amyloid fibril formation is implicated in different human diseases. The transition between native α-helices and nonnative intermolecular β-sheets has been suggested to be a trigger of fibrillation in different conformational diseases. The FF domain of the URN1 splicing factor (URN1-FF) is a small all-α protein that populates a molten globule (MG) at low pH. Despite the fact that this conformation maintains most of the domain native secondary structure, it progressively converts into β-sheet enriched and highly ordered amyloid fibrils. In this study, we investigated if 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) induced conformational changes that affect URN1-FF amyloid formation. Despite TFE having been shown to induce or increase the aggregation of both globular and disordered proteins at moderate concentrations, we demonstrate here that in the case of URN1-FF it reinforces its intrinsic α-helical structure, which competes the formation of aggregated assemblies. In addition, we show that TFE induces conformational diversity in URN1-FF fibrils, in such a way that the fibrils formed in the presence and absence of the cosolvent represent different polymorphs. It is suggested that the effect of TFE on both the soluble and aggregated states of URN1-FF depends on its ability to facilitate hydrogen bonding.

  9. Photoinduced fibrils formation of chicken egg white lysozyme under native conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jin-Bing; Cao, Yi; Pan, Hai; Qin, Meng; Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Xiong, Xiang; Wang, Wei

    2012-11-01

    Recent findings showed that transiently accessing structurally native-like yet energetically higher conformational states is sufficient to trigger the formation of protein fibrils. Typically, these conformational states are made available through changing solvent conditions or introducing mutations. Here we show a novel way to initialize fibril formation for Chicken egg white lysozyme (CEWL) under native conditions via controlled UV illumination. Through a cassette of tryptophan-based photochemistry, the two terminal disulfide bonds in CEWL can be selectively reduced. The reduced CEWL is then converted to conformational states with the C-terminal fragment floppy upon thermal fluctuation. These states serve as precursors for the fibrillar aggregation. Intriguingly, the CEWL fibrils are stabilized by intermolecular disulfide bonds instead of noncovalent β-sheet structures, distinct from the amyloid-like lysozyme fibrils reported before. Based on the experimental evidences and all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, we proposed a "runaway domain-swapping" model for the structure of the CEWL fibrils, in which each CEWL molecule swaps the C-terminal fragment into the complementary position of the adjacent molecule along the fibrils. We anticipate that this fibrillation mechanism can be extended to many other disulfide-containing proteins. Our study stands for the first example of formation of protein fibrils under native conditions upon UV illumination and poses the potential danger of low UV dose to organisms at the protein level. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Adsorption of organic molecules may explain growth of newly nucleated clusters and new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2013-05-01

    New particle formation consists of formation of thermodynamically stable clusters from trace gas molecules (homogeneous nucleation) followed by growth of these clusters to a detectable size. Because of the large coagulation rate of clusters smaller than 3 nm with the preexisting aerosol population, for new particle formation to take place, these clusters need to grow sufficiently fast to escape removal by coagulation. Previous studies have indicated that condensation of low-volatility organic vapor may play an important role in the initial growth of the clusters. However, due to the relatively high vapor pressure and partial molar volume of even highly oxidized organic compounds, the strong Kelvin effect may prevent typical ambient organics from condensing on these small clusters. Earlier studies did not consider that adsorption of organic molecules on the cluster surface, due to the intermolecular forces between the organic molecule and cluster, may occur and substantially alter the growth process under sub-saturated conditions. Using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) isotherm, we show that the adsorption of organic molecules onto the surface of clusters may significantly reduce the saturation ratio required for condensation of organics to occur, and therefore may provide a physico-chemical explanation for the enhanced initial growth by condensation of organics despite the strong Kelvin effect.

  11. Tribromobenzene on Cu(111): Temperature-dependent formation of halogen-bonded, organometallic, and covalent nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qitang; Wang, Tao; Liu, Liming; Zhao, Jin; Zhu, Junfa; Gottfried, J Michael

    2015-03-14

    The temperature-controlled surface-assisted synthesis of halogen bonded, organometallic, and covalent nanostructures based on 1,3,5-tribromo-benzene (TriBB) was studied with scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy in ultrahigh vacuum. Vapor deposition of TriBB onto a Cu(111) surface held at 90 K leads to the formation of large domains of a honeycomb-like organic monolayer structure stabilized by triangular nodes with Br⋯Br intermolecular bonds. Upon annealing the organic monolayer to ∼140 K, a new hexagonal close-packed structure with intact TriBB molecules connected by Cu adatoms is formed. Further warming up the sample to 300 K gives rise to the scission of C-Br bonds and formation of C-Cu-C bonds between phenyl fragments such that stable dendritic organometallic networks are formed. Larger islands of organometallic networks are obtained by maintaining the temperature of Cu(111) at 420 K during deposition of TriBB. Simultaneously, large islands of Br atoms are formed around the organometallic networks. Annealing the more extended organometallic network (prepared at 420 K) to 520 K leads to the formation of a branched covalent organic framework (COF) which comprises structural elements of porous graphene and is surrounded by Br islands. These organometallic networks and COFs appear as small dendritic and branched domains, most likely due to the steric influence exerted by the Br islands.

  12. Flow interactions lead to orderly formations of flapping wings in forward flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramananarivo, Sophie; Fang, Fang; Oza, Anand; Zhang, Jun; Ristroph, Leif

    2016-11-01

    Classic models of fish schools and flying formations of birds are built on the hypothesis that the preferred locations of an individual are determined by the flow left by its upstream neighbor. Lighthill posited that arrangements may in fact emerge passively from hydro- or aerodynamic interactions, drawing an analogy to the formation of crystals by intermolecular forces. Here, we carry out physical experiments aimed at testing the Lighthill conjecture and find that self-propelled flapping wings spontaneously assume one of multiple arrangements due to flow interactions. Wings in a tandem pair select the same forward speed, which tends to be faster than a single wing, while maintaining a separation distance that is an integer multiple of the wavelength traced out by each body. When perturbed, these locomotors robustly return to the same arrangement, and direct hydrodynamic force measurements reveal springlike restoring forces that maintain group cohesion. We also use these data to construct an interaction potential, showing how the observed positions of the follower correspond to stable wells in an energy landscape. Flow visualization and vortex-based theoretical models reveal coherent interactions in which the follower surfs on the periodic wake left by the leader. These results indicate that, for the high-Reynolds-number flows characteristic of schools and flocks, collective locomotion at enhanced speed and in orderly formations can emerge from flow interactions alone. If true for larger groups, then the view of collectives as ordered states of matter may prove to be a useful analogy.

  13. Adsorption geometry of tetracene on SiO 2/Si (1 1 1) substrate with the balance of molecule-substrate and intermolecular interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hongying; Guan, Dandan; Chen, Meiliang; Dou, Weidong; Song, Fei; Zhang, Hanjie; Li, Haiyang; He, Pimo; Bao, Shining

    2010-02-01

    The growth of tetracene on SiO 2/Si(1 1 1) substrate has been studied by ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy measurements. Seven emission features of the organic material are located at 2.26, 3.56, 4.77, 5.88, 6.98, 8.18 and 9.90 eV, respectively, below the Fermi level. The changes in binding energy and work function during the deposition of tetracene molecules on SiO 2 substrate indicate an interaction between tetracene molecule and substrate. The interaction between tetracene molecule and substrate is weaker than that between the organic and silicon substrate. The reduction in work function is due to the formation of interface dipole. Based on the density functional theory (DFT) calculation, tetracene molecules are arranged in an upright standing manner with the optimal growth of a small cluster consisting four molecules.

  14. Galaxy formation and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, Houjun; White, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of galaxy formation lies at the interface between astronomy, particle physics, and cosmology. Covering diverse topics from these disciplines, all of which are needed to understand how galaxies form and evolve, this book is ideal for researchers entering the field. Individual chapters explore the evolution of the Universe as a whole and its particle and radiation content; linear and nonlinear growth of cosmic structure; processes affecting the gaseous and dark matter components of galaxies and their stellar populations; the formation of spiral and elliptical galaxies; central supermassive black holes and the activity associated with them; galaxy interactions; and the intergalactic medium. Emphasizing both observational and theoretical aspects, this book provides a coherent introduction for astronomers, cosmologists, and astroparticle physicists to the broad range of science underlying the formation and evolution of galaxies.

  15. Forces in strategy formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensen, Elmer Fly; Sanchez, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This chapter proposes that organizational strategy formation should be characterized theoretically as a process that is subject to several interacting forces, rather than represented by separate discrete decisionmodels or theoretic perspectives, as is commonly done in the strategic management...... literature. Based on an extensive review of relevant theory and empirical work in strategic decision-making, organizational change theory, cognitive and social psychology, and strategy processes, seven kinds of ''forces'' - rational, imposed, teleological, learning, political, heuristic, and social...... - are identified as interacting in and having significant influence on the strategy formation process. It is further argued that by applying a holistic ''forces-view'' of the significant and interacting influences on strategy formation, we can better understand the dynamics and challenges in managing the process...

  16. Formation of ball lightning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silberg, P.A. (2833 Lawton Drive, Amarillo, Texas (USA))

    A plasma continuum model for the formation of ball lightning is developed based on a substantial number of reports that the ball is often in the discharge column of a previous lightning stroke. The usual method of setting up the plasma equation for a one-component electron plasma is used. An approximate equation for the plasma is derived from the describing equation which is then solved exactly in terms of the Jacobi elliptic functions. The formation of the ball is based on a nonlinearity of the plasma equation which under certain circumstances permits the field to collapse into a small region. This collapse is interpreted to be ball lightning. The approximate equation derived for the plasma has the same form as a previous equation used to describe the formation of the fireball plasma.

  17. Tritiated ammonia formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    When nitrogen was selected as the glovebox atmosphere for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a concern was raised as to the possibility of tritiated ammonia formation in the gloveboxes. Experimental data were produced to study the tritiated ammonia formation rate in a tritium and nitrogen mixture. A rate equation that closely simulates the experimental data was developed. This rate equation can be used to calculate the formation of tritiated ammonia from different concentrations of tritium and nitrogen. The reaction of T 2 and N 2 to form NT 3 is a slow process, particularly when the tritium concentration is low. The reaction requires weeks or months to reach radiochemical equilibrium dependent on the concentrations of the reactants. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  18. Principles of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Bodenheimer, Peter H

    2011-01-01

    Understanding star formation is one of the key fields in present-day astrophysics. This book treats a wide variety of the physical processes involved, as well as the main observational discoveries, with key points being discussed in detail. The current star formation in our galaxy is emphasized, because the most detailed observations are available for this case. The book presents a comparison of the various scenarios for star formation, discusses the basic physics underlying each one, and follows in detail the history of a star from its initial state in the interstellar gas to its becoming a condensed object in equilibrium. Both theoretical and observational evidence to support the validity of the general evolutionary path are presented, and methods for comparing the two are emphasized. The author is a recognized expert in calculations of the evolution of protostars, the structure and evolution of disks, and stellar evolution in general. This book will be of value to graduate students in astronomy and astroph...

  19. Double layer formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.

    1982-01-01

    Results from several numerical simulations of the formation of double layers in plasmas with a constant potential drop across them are presented. Here the emphasis is mainly on plasma processes during the formation of double layers. The recurring formation of double layers, their propagation and associated current interruptions are observed when the electron current injected into the simulation region from the low potential side exceeds the electron thermal current. This recurring process is stopped (or delayed) when the electron current recuperation is inhibited by a small magnetic force on the electrons. The motion of double layers is examined and it is found that the motion is caused by the interruption of the ion current from the high potential side. The subsequent recovery of this current renders the double layer stationary. (author)

  20. Planetesimals and Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, John

    The first step in the standard model for planet formation is the growth of gravitationally bound bodies called ``planetesimals'' from dust grains in a protoplanetary disk. Currently, we do not know how planetesimals form, how long they take to form, or what their sizes and mechanical properties are. The goal of this proposal is to assess how these uncertainties affect subsequent stages of planetary growth and the kind of planetary systems that form. The work will address three particular questions: (i) Can the properties of small body populations in the modern Solar System constrain the properties of planetesimals? (ii) How do the properties of planetesimals affect the formation of giant planets? (iii) How does the presence of a water ice condensation front (the ``snow line'') in a disk affect planetesimal formation and the later stages of planetary growth? These questions will be examined with computer simulations of planet formation using new computer codes to be developed as part of the proposal. The first question will be addressed using a statistical model for planetesimal coagulation and fragmentation. This code will be merged with the proposer's Mercury N-body integrator code to model the dynamics of large protoplanets in order to address the second question. Finally, a self- consistent model of disk evolution and the radial transport of water ice and vapour will be added to examine the third question. A theoretical understanding of how planets form is one of the key goals of NASA and the Origins of Solar Systems programme. Researchers have carried out many studies designed to address this goal, but the questions of how planetesimals form and how their properties affect planet formation have received relatively little attention. The proposed work will help address these unsolved questions, and place other research in context by assessing the importance of planetesimal origins and properties for planet formation.

  1. Densities and Kinematic Viscosities for the Systems Benzene + Methyl Formate, Benzene + Ethyl Formate, Benzene + Propyl Formate, and Benzene + Butyl Formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmerling, Uwe; Rasmussen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Densities and kinematic viscosities have been measured for the system benzene + methyl formate at 20°C and for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate from 20°C to 50°C. The results for the system benzene + methyl formate have been correlated using...... a Redlich-Kister type of expression with temperature-independent parameters and the data for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate with temperature-dependent parameters. The viscosities have furthermore been compared to values predicted by means of the GC...

  2. The formation of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stahler, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of star formation, one of the most active fields of modern astronomy. The reader is guided through the subject in a logically compelling manner. Starting from a general description of stars and interstellar clouds, the authors delineate the earliest phases of stellar evolution. They discuss formation activity not only in the Milky Way, but also in other galaxies, both now and in the remote past. Theory and observation are thoroughly integrated, with the aid of numerous figures and images. In summary, this volume is an invaluable resource, both as a text f

  3. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students with good quality feedback to enhance student learning in an online community of practice (COP). The aim of the study is to identify feedback mechanisms in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and to create a full formative...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...

  4. Tea aroma formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Tang Ho

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Besides water, tea is one of the most popular beverages around the world. The chemical ingredients and biological activities of tea have been summarized recently. The current review summarizes tea aroma compounds and their formation in green, black, and oolong tea. The flavor of tea can be divided into two categories: taste (non-volatile compounds and aroma (volatile compounds. All of these aroma molecules are generated from carotenoids, lipids, glycosides, etc. precursors, and also from Maillard reaction. In the current review, we focus on the formation mechanism of main aromas during the tea manufacturing process.

  5. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Fabiana A.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Tam, Joshua H. K.; Cavanagh, P. Craig; Goiko, Maria; Ferguson, Stephen S. G.; Pasternak, Stephen H.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; de Bruyn, John R.; Heit, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR) software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell. PMID:26657340

  6. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana A Caetano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell.

  7. Temperature controlled 'void' formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, P.; Sharma, B.D.

    1975-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of voids in structural materials during high temperature deformation or irradiation is essentially dependent upon the existence of 'vacancy supersaturation'. The role of temperature dependent diffusion processes in 'void' formation under varying conditions, and the mechanical property changes associated with this microstructure are briefly reviewed. (author)

  8. Formatting Design Dialogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Eva; Binder, Thomas; Messeter, Jörn

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses design games as a particular genre for formatting design dialogues. In the first part of the article we review the participatory design literature for game-oriented framings of co-design. We look at what constitutes game and play, we discuss other authors’ use of games...

  9. Triggered star formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palouš, Jan; Ehlerová, Soňa

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2002), s. 35-36 ISSN 1405-2059 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003705; GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : interstellar medium * star formation * HI shells Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  10. PAHs and star formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, AGGM; Peeters, E; Bakes, ELO; Spoon, HWW; Hony, S; Johnstone, D; Adams, FC; Lin, DNC; Neufeld, DA; Ostriker, EC

    2004-01-01

    Strong IR emission features at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.2 mum are a common characteristic of regions of massive star formation. These features are carried by large (similar to 50 C-atom) Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon molecules which are pumped by the strong FUV photon flux from these stars.

  11. FORMATION CONSTANTS AND THERMODYNAMIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions has been ... A good deal of work has been reported on the preparation and structural investigation of. Schiff base ... Formation constants and thermodynamic parameters of Co, Ni, Cu and Zn complexes. Bull. Chem.

  12. COMPETENCYTHE FORMATION FOR LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Mederos-Piñeiro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation of life competences is the result of a quality education that prepares students to meet the challenges of a fast moving world where equality and equal opportunities should constitute premises of education; training them is a challenge teachers to assume new generations contribute actively to a better world. In Cuba are important research on the formation of communication competences and self-regulated learning in primary school. The paper shows the result of an investigation that provides a methodology for the formation of life competences in primary school education, used as an essential pathway research activity. The methodological approach of research has a quantitative approach and an explanatory scope to establish and make sense of understanding the causal relationship between the direction of research activity and training of life competences. Theoretical, empirical and mathematical-statistical, for characterizing the initial state, processing of results and analysis: research methods are used. The application of the methodology for the formation of life competences makes teachers lead the teaching-learning process with a research and transforming teaching concept, where the school is the protagonist of their learning and causes changes in their performances, which are evident in the formed competences related to effective and affective communication; the solution of problems related to life; the use of means in obtaining the knowledge and the expression of a behavior consistent with school and social demands. The effectiveness of the methodology confirms that there is a causal relationship between the direction of research activity by teachers and the formation of life competences in school.

  13. Effect of homogenisation in formation of thermally induced aggregates in a non- and low- fat milk model system with microparticulated whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Isabel Celigueta; Nieto, Gema; Nylander, Tommy; Simonsen, Adam Cohen; Tolkach, Alexander; Ipsen, Richard

    2017-05-01

    The objective of the research presented in this paper was to investigate how different characteristics of whey protein microparticles (MWP) added to milk as fat replacers influence intermolecular interactions occurring with other milk proteins during homogenisation and heating. These interactions are responsible for the formation of heat-induced aggregates that influence the texture and sensory characteristics of the final product. The formation of heat-induced complexes was studied in non- and low-fat milk model systems, where microparticulated whey protein (MWP) was used as fat replacer. Five MWP types with different particle characteristics were utilised and three heat treatments used: 85 °C for 15 min, 90 °C for 5 min and 95 °C for 2 min. Surface characteristics of the protein aggregates were expressed as the number of available thiol groups and the surface net charge. Intermolecular interactions involved in the formation of protein aggregates were studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the final complexes visualised by darkfield microscopy. Homogenisation of non-fat milk systems led to partial adsorption of caseins onto microparticles, independently of the type of microparticle. On the contrary, homogenisation of low-fat milk resulted in preferential adsorption of caseins onto fat globules, rather than onto microparticles. Further heating of the milk, led to the formation of heat induced complexes with different sizes and characteristics depending on the type of MWP and the presence or not of fat. The results highlight the importance of controlling homogenisation and heat processing in yoghurt manufacture in order to induce desired changes in the surface reactivity of the microparticles and thereby promote effective protein interactions.

  14. Matrix-isolation studies on the radiation-induced chemistry in H₂O/CO₂ systems: reactions of oxygen atoms and formation of HOCO radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2015-03-19

    The radiation-induced transformations occurring upon X-ray irradiation of solid CO2/H2O/Ng systems (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe) at 8-10 K and subsequent annealing up to 45 K were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared (IR) spectra of deposited matrices revealed the presence of isolated monomers, dimers, and intermolecular H2O···CO2 complexes. Irradiation resulted in effective decomposition of matrix-isolated carbon dioxide and water yielding CO molecules and OH radicals, respectively. Annealing of the irradiated samples led to formation of O3, HO2, and a number of xenon hydrides of HXeY type (in the case of xenon matrices). The formation of these species was used for monitoring of the postirradiation thermally induced chemical reactions involving O and H atoms generated by radiolysis. It was shown that the radiolysis of CO2 in noble-gas matrices produced high yields of stabilized oxygen atoms. In all cases, the temperatures at which O atoms become mobile and react are lower than those of H atoms. Dynamics and reactivity of oxygen atoms was found to be independent of the precursor nature. In addition, the formation of HOCO radicals was observed in all the noble-gas matrices at remarkably low temperatures. The IR spectra of HOCO and DOCO were first characterized in krypton and xenon matrices. It was concluded that the formation of HOCO was mainly due to the radiation-induced evolution of the weakly bound H2O···CO2 complexes. This result indicates the significance of weak intermolecular interactions in the radiation-induced chemical processes in inert low-temperature media.

  15. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants DJ or ΔJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Dror M.; Walker, Nicholas R.; Legon, Anthony C.

    2016-02-01

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ e or ΔJ e , the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ e or ΔJ e for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ 0 or ΔJ 0 for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ˜ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  16. A two force-constant model for complexes B⋯M-X (B is a Lewis base and MX is any diatomic molecule): Intermolecular stretching force constants from centrifugal distortion constants D(J) or Δ(J).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittner, Dror M; Walker, Nicholas R; Legon, Anthony C

    2016-02-21

    A two force-constant model is proposed for complexes of the type B⋯MX, in which B is a simple Lewis base of at least C2v symmetry and MX is any diatomic molecule lying along a Cn axis (n ≥ 2) of B. The model assumes a rigid subunit B and that force constants beyond quadratic are negligible. It leads to expressions that allow, in principle, the determination of three quadratic force constants F11, F12, and F22 associated with the r(B⋯M) = r2 and r(M-X) = r1 internal coordinates from the equilibrium centrifugal distortion constants DJ (e) or ΔJ (e), the equilibrium principal axis coordinates a1 and a2, and equilibrium principal moments of inertia. The model can be applied generally to complexes containing different types of intermolecular bond. For example, the intermolecular bond of B⋯MX can be a hydrogen bond if MX is a hydrogen halide, a halogen-bond if MX is a dihalogen molecule, or a stronger, coinage-metal bond if MX is a coinage metal halide. The equations were tested for BrCN, for which accurate equilibrium spectroscopic constants and a complete force field are available. In practice, equilibrium values of DJ (e) or ΔJ (e) for B⋯MX are not available and zero-point quantities must be used instead. The effect of doing so has been tested for BrCN. The zero-point centrifugal distortion constants DJ (0) or ΔJ (0) for all B⋯MX investigated so far are of insufficient accuracy to allow F11 and F22 to be determined simultaneously, even under the assumption F12 = 0 which is shown to be reasonable for BrCN. The calculation of F22 at a series of fixed values of F11 reveals, however, that in cases for which F11 is sufficiently larger than F22, a good approximation to F22 is obtained. Plots of F22 versus F11 have been provided for Kr⋯CuCl, Xe⋯CuCl, OC⋯CuCl, and C2H2⋯AgCl as examples. Even in cases where F22 ∼ F11 (e.g., OC⋯CuCl), such plots will yield either F22 or F11 if the other becomes available.

  17. Cocrystals of kaempferol, quercetin and myricetin with 4,4‧-bipyridine: Crystal structures, analyses of intermolecular interactions and antibacterial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Nan; Yin, He-Mei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Da-Jun; Su, Xin; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2017-02-01

    With an aim to explore the interactions of Osbnd H⋯N between hydroxyl moiety of the flavonoids and the pyridyl ring of N-containing aromatic amines, three flavonols with varying B-ring-hydroxyl groups (kaempferol, quercetin, and myricetin) were selected to combine with 4,4‧-bipyridine. As a result, three new cocrystals of flavonols were obtained with a solution evaporation approach. These three cocrystals were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, XPRD, IR and NMR methods. The resulting cocrystals were kaempferol: 4,4‧-bipyridine (2:1) (KAE·BPY·2H2O), quercetin: 4,4‧-bipyridine (1:1.5) (QUE·BPY), and myricetin: 4,4‧-bipyridine (1:2) (MYR·BPY·H2O). Structural analyses show that an array of hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking interactions interconnect the molecules to form a two-dimensional (2D) supramolecular layer in KAE·BPY·2H2O, QUE·BPY, and MYR·BPY·H2O. In the three cocrystals, they present as three different synthons-ⅠR88(58), Ⅳ R44(42) and, Ⅶ R66(29) with 4,4‧-bipyridine, respectively-which may yield a strategy for constructing the supramolecule. Cocrystals of flavonols combined with N-containing aromatic amines, 7-OH, B-ring-hydroxyl number and/or the location of the flavonols to play a significant part in extending the dimensionality of the cocrystals. The resulting motif formation and crystal packing in these flavonols cocrystals has combined with N-containing aromatic amines. Additionally, the antibacterial properties of the three cocrystals against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) have been investigated.

  18. Insight into the intermolecular interactions in [Bmim]BF4/[Amim]Cl-ethanol-water mixtures by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bo; Zhang, Yumei; Wang, Huaping

    2009-09-10

    In this contribution, we examined the effect of ethanol on the structural organization of aqueous solution of ionic liquids (ILs) using the near-infrared (NIR) technique and two-dimensional (2D) correlation spectra. The ILs used here are 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim]BF(4)) and 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl). It was easily found, from the distinct change tendency of NIR spectra for their aqueous solution, that the added ethanol exerted a different effect on the solution structure of [Bmim]BF(4) and [Amim]Cl. For [Amim]Cl/H(2)O, it was deduced that ethanol molecules prefer to compete with water by interacting with imidazolium C(2)-H rather than C(4,5)-H groups, accompanied by the formation of C(2)-H...O interactions with ethanol molecules, while ethanol molecules do not interact specifically with any imidazolium C-H groups for [Bmim]BF(4). Furthermore, it was shown that the nonpolar tail of [Amim]Cl is more sensitive to the decrease of polarity or dielectric constant of solvents than its polar head, whereas the converse is true for [Bmim]BF(4). However, for both ILs, ethanol molecules were capable of changing the interaction between cations and water, anions and water by introduction of C-H...O interactions with cations, as well as the strong hydrogen-bond interactions between the anions and the hydroxyls of the ethanol. This information is suggestive for recycling the hydrophilic ILs by distillation from their aqueous diluted solutions, as well as for purifying hygroscopic ILs.

  19. Plasma formation in TBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Bosco, E.

    1981-01-01

    In this work are presented and discussed results of the formation and equilibrium of the plasma current in TBR, a small tokamak, designed and contructed at the Instituto de Fisica of Universidade de Sao Paulo. The measured breakdown curves for H 2 , A and He are compared with the predictions of a simple model with reasonable agreement. The influence of stray magnetic fields in the plasma formation is investigated and conditions are chosen to facilitate the breakdown. The time profile of loop voltage and plasma current for shots with plasma equilibrium are shown. A comparison is made between experimental results and analytical-numerical model for tokamaks discharges with ohmic heating. Reasonable agreement is obtained when Z, effective atomic number, is assumed as a parameter. (Author) [pt

  20. Mars’ peculiar formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Man Yin; Brasser, Ramon; Mojzsis, Stephen; Matsumura, Soko; Ida, Shigeru

    2017-10-01

    The formation of the terrestrial planets is a long standing problem. Mars probably holds the key to solving this mystery because of the substantial amount of data gathered from space missions, martian meteorites and its obvious differences when compared to Earth. Recent elemental and isotopic abundances suggest that Mars’ composition is significantly different from that of Earth. Therefore, Mars should have accreted most of its mass in a region different from Earth’s, most likely further from the Sun. These compositional differences should be explained with planet formation models. We tested the probability of producing a Mars analogue that is compositionally different from Earth in two popular planet formation models: the Grand Tack model with tack locations of 1.5 or 2 AU for Jupiter; and the Classical model in which all the terrestrial planets formed near their current locations. We performed a high number of N-body simulations with initial conditions that are either equal-mass planetary embryos or a semi-analytical approach to oligarch growth. Our results show that the probability of producing a Mars analogue which matches the current mass and orbit of Mars is at most 9% but reduces to mostly about 1% when it mainly accretes its mass further than Mars’ current position of 1.5 AU. Strangely enough, in the Grand Tack model the number of Mars analogues produced is independent of the initial number of planet embryos. Hence, we conclude that both planet formation models have difficulties to explain the observed compositional differences between Earth and Mars.

  1. Alkali metal hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of producing alkali metal hydrides by absorbing hydrogen gas under pressure into a mixture of lower alkyl mono amines and alkali metal alkyl amides selected from sodium and potassium amides formed from said amines. The present invention also includes purification of a mixture of the amines and amides which contain impurities, such as is used as a catalytic exchange liquid in the enrichment of deuterium, involving the formation of the alkali metal hydride

  2. Isothermal Martensite Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo

    are chosen to investigate time dependent martensite formation. Among them, a Fe-11wt%Ni-0.6wt%C model alloy and Fe-1.6wt%Cr-1wt%C (AISI 52100), Fe-17wt%Cr-7wt%Ni (AISI 631) and Fe-16wt%Cr-5wt%Ni (AISI 630) commercial steels. The investigation was performed with in situ magnetometry, dilatometry, synchrotron...

  3. Symbol Formation Reconsidered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2013-01-01

    begins with a brief outline and contextualization of the book as well as of the articles that this special issue comprises. The first two articles were written by contributors who were part of the Werner era at Clark University. They explore the key concepts of the organismic and development, and situate...... the organismic-developmental approach to fields only touched in Symbol formation, such as magical practices, social structures, pictures and gesture....

  4. Formation of TRAPPIST-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormel, C. W.; Liu, B.; Schoonenberg, D.

    2017-09-01

    We present a model for the formation of the recently-discovered TRAPPIST-1 planetary system. In our scenario planets form in the interior regions, by accretion of mm to cm-size particles (pebbles) that drifted from the outer disk. This scenario has several advantages: it connects to the observation that disks are made up of pebbles, it is efficient, it explains why the TRAPPIST-1 planets are ˜Earth mass, and it provides a rationale for the system's architecture.

  5. Methemoglobin formation by paraquat.

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Shinsaku; Ogata, Masana

    1982-01-01

    Paraquat is a broad spectrum herbicide known to be highly lethal to man and animals. Its toxicity is characterized by acute lung injury. Paraquat produces such toxic effects through the generation of the superoxide anion according to one proposed mechanism. The present experiment, methemoglobin formation was demonstrated after incubation of oxyhemoglobin with paraquat. The generation of the superoxide anion through the interaction of oxyhemoglobin with paraquat was suggested by chemiluminesce...

  6. Formate-assisted pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSisto, William Joseph; Wheeler, Marshall Clayton; van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2015-03-17

    The present invention provides, among other thing, methods for creating significantly deoxygenated bio-oils form biomass including the steps of providing a feedstock, associating the feedstock with an alkali formate to form a treated feedstock, dewatering the treated feedstock, heating the dewatered treated feedstock to form a vapor product, and condensing the vapor product to form a pyrolysis oil, wherein the pyrolysis oil contains less than 30% oxygen by weight.

  7. THE ALLIANCE FORMATION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Whipple, Judith M.; Frankel, Robert

    1998-01-01

    While interest in developing strategic alliances within the food system continues to increase, there remains considerable risk when firms adopt such a cooperative strategy. The risk is due in part to the lack of concrete guidelines that illustrate the steps or stages of alliance development and the important strategic and operational decisions required at each stage. The existence of such guidelines would facilitate alliance formation and enable managers and researchers to better understand a...

  8. Complexity and formative experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque Strieder

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The contemporaneity is characterized by instability and diversity calling into question certainties and truths proposed in modernity. We recognize that the reality of things and phenomena become effective as a set of events, interactions, retroactions and chances. This different frame extends the need for revision of the epistemological foundations that sustain educational practices and give them sense. The complex thinking is an alternative option for acting as a counterpoint to classical science and its reductionist logic and knowledge compartmentalization, as well as to answer to contemporary epistemological and educational challenges. It aims to associate different areas and forms of knowledge, without, however merge them, distinguishing without separating the several disciplines and instances of the realities. This study, in theoretical references, highlights the relevance of complex approaches to support formative experiences because also able to produce complexities in reflections about educational issues. We conclude that formative possibilities from complexity potentialize the resignification of human’s conception and the understanding of its singularity in interdependence; The understanding that pedagogical and educational activities is a constant interrogation about the possibilities of knowing the knowledge and reframe learning, far beyond knowing its functions and utilitarian purposes; and, as a formative possibility, places us on the trail of responsibility, not as something eventual, but present and indicative of freedom to choose to stay or go beyond.

  9. Terrestrial planet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids.

  10. Anti-parallel dimer and tetramer formation of propylene carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayana Tagawa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Raman scattering and infrared (IR absorption spectra of enantiopure (R-propylene carbonate ((RPC and racemic propylene carbonate (PC were recorded at room temperature, 25 °C, in benzene (Bz solution and in the pure liquid state to investigate the presence of dimers and other higher order intermolecular associations. (RPC and PC both demonstrated a strong C=O stretching vibrational band. The band exhibited changes in its shape and resonance wavenumber highly dependent on the concentrations of PCs, whereas a difference between the chirality of (RPC and PC had little influence. In an extremely dilute condition, doubly split bands were observed at 1807 and 1820 cm-1 in both Raman and IR spectra, which are assigned to the characteristic bands of isolated monomeric PCs. An additional band appeared at 1795 cm-1 in a dilute to concentrated regime, and its magnitude strengthened with increasing concentrations accompanied with slight increasing in the magnitude of 1807 cm-1 band in Raman spectra, while an increase in the magnitude of 1807 cm-1 band was clearly greater than that of 1795 cm-1 band in IR spectra. The spectrum changes at 1795 and 1807 cm-1 were attributed to characteristics of anti-parallel dimer formation of PCs caused by strong dipole-dipole interactions between C=O groups. Moreover, another additional signal was clearly observed at 1780-1790 cm-1 in a concentrated regime, and became the primary signal in the pure liquid state with slight increasing in the intensity of 1795 cm-1 band in Raman spectra. On the other hand, in IR spectra the observed increasing of 1780-1790 cm-1 band was much less than that of 1795 cm-1 band. These newly found spectrum changes in the concentrated regime are attributed to the formation of anti-parallel tetramers of PCs based on the characteristics of band selection rule found in Raman and IR spectra. Equilibrium constants for the anti-parallel dimer (KD and tetramer formation (KT of PCs in Bz solution and in

  11. Anti-parallel dimer and tetramer formation of propylene carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Ayana; Numata, Tomoko; Shikata, Toshiyuki

    2017-09-01

    Raman scattering and infrared (IR) absorption spectra of enantiopure (R)-propylene carbonate ((R)PC) and racemic propylene carbonate (PC) were recorded at room temperature, 25 °C, in benzene (Bz) solution and in the pure liquid state to investigate the presence of dimers and other higher order intermolecular associations. (R)PC and PC both demonstrated a strong C=O stretching vibrational band. The band exhibited changes in its shape and resonance wavenumber highly dependent on the concentrations of PCs, whereas a difference between the chirality of (R)PC and PC had little influence. In an extremely dilute condition, doubly split bands were observed at 1807 and 1820 cm-1 in both Raman and IR spectra, which are assigned to the characteristic bands of isolated monomeric PCs. An additional band appeared at 1795 cm-1 in a dilute to concentrated regime, and its magnitude strengthened with increasing concentrations accompanied with slight increasing in the magnitude of 1807 cm-1 band in Raman spectra, while an increase in the magnitude of 1807 cm-1 band was clearly greater than that of 1795 cm-1 band in IR spectra. The spectrum changes at 1795 and 1807 cm-1 were attributed to characteristics of anti-parallel dimer formation of PCs caused by strong dipole-dipole interactions between C=O groups. Moreover, another additional signal was clearly observed at 1780-1790 cm-1 in a concentrated regime, and became the primary signal in the pure liquid state with slight increasing in the intensity of 1795 cm-1 band in Raman spectra. On the other hand, in IR spectra the observed increasing of 1780-1790 cm-1 band was much less than that of 1795 cm-1 band. These newly found spectrum changes in the concentrated regime are attributed to the formation of anti-parallel tetramers of PCs based on the characteristics of band selection rule found in Raman and IR spectra. Equilibrium constants for the anti-parallel dimer (KD) and tetramer formation (KT) of PCs in Bz solution and in the pure

  12. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide inhibits amyloid formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Bound Aβ(1–40) features a β-hairpin comprising residues 17–36, providing the first high-resolution structure of Aβ in β conformation. The positions of the secondary structure elements strongly resemble those observed for fibrillar Aβ. ZAβ3 stabilizes the β-sheet by extending it intermolecularly and by burying both of the mostly nonpolar faces of the Aβ hairpin within a large hydrophobic tunnel-like cavity. Consequently, ZAβ3 acts as a stoichiometric inhibitor of Aβ fibrillation. The selected Aβ conformation allows us to suggest a structural mechanism for amyloid formation based on soluble oligomeric hairpin intermediates. PMID:18375754

  13. Surface self-assembly of fluorosurfactants during film formation of MMA/nBA colloidal dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, W R; Urban, M W

    2004-11-23

    These studies focus on the behavior of fluorosurfactants (FS) containing hydrophobic and ionic entities in the presence of methyl methacrylate/n-butyl acrylate (MMA/nBA) colloidal dispersions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The presence of FS significantly not only alters the mobility of SDS in MMA/nBA films, but their hydrophobic and ionic nature results in self-assembly near the film-air (F-A) interface leading to different surface morphologies. Spherical islands and rodlike morphologies are formed which diminish the kinetic coefficient of friction of films by at least 3 orders of magnitude, and the presence of dual hydrophobic tails and an anionic head appears to have the largest effect on the surface friction. Using internal reflection IR imaging, these studies show that structural and chemical features of FS are directly related to their ability to migrate to the F-A interface and self-assemble to form specific morphological features. While the anionic nature of FS allows for SDS migration to the F-A interface and the formation of stable domains across the surface, intermolecular cohesion of nonionic FS allows for the formation of rodlike structures due to inability to form mixed micelles with SDS. These studies also establish the relationship between surface morphologies, kinetic coefficient of friction, and structural features of surfactants in the complex environments.

  14. Liposome formation in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, D. E.; Spooner, B. S.

    Liposomes are artificial vesicles with a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The formation of liposomes is a self-assembly process that is driven by the amphipathic nature of phospholipid molecules and can be observed during the removal of detergent from phospholipids dissolved in detergent micelles. As detergent concentration in the mixed micelles decreases, the non-polar tail regions of phospholipids produce a hydrophobic effect that drives the micelles to fuse and form planar bilayers in which phospholipids orient with tail regions to the center of the bilayer and polar head regions to the external surface. Remaining detergent molecules shield exposed edges of the bilayer sheet from the aqueous environment. Further removal of detergent leads to intramembrane folding and membrane vesiculation, forming liposomes. We have observed that the formation of liposomes is altered in microgravity. Liposomes that were formed at 1-g did not exceed 150 nm in diameter, whereas liposomes that were formed during spaceflight exhibited diameters up to 2000 nm. Using detergent-stabilized planar bilayers, we determined that the stage of liposome formation most influenced by gravity is membrane vesiculation. In addition, we found that small, equipment-induced fluid disturbances increased vesiculation and negated the size-enhancing effects of microgravity. However, these small disturbances had no effect on liposome size at 1-g, likely due to the presence of gravity-induced buoyancy-driven fluid flows (e.g., convection currents). Our results indicate that fluid disturbances, induced by gravity, influence the vesiculation of membranes and limit the diameter of forming liposomes.

  15. Formation control of AAUSHIP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nick; Dam, Jeppe; Larsen, Jesper Abildgaard

    2015-01-01

    Many maritime mapping tasks are today carried out by large research ships, which are very costly to operate. As a way to overcome this, a number of small surveying vessels have been developed called AAUSHIP. In order to efficiently map the an area with such smaller vessels, it is important that s...... that several vessels are able to corporate on the task at hand. In this paper, the developed formation control strategy for the AAUSHIP series of vessels is presented, along with simulation results, which confirms, that the algorithm works as intended....

  16. Bouyei word formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attasith Boonsawasd

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Bouyei language is divided into three vernaculars, the southern vernacular, the central vernacular and the southwestern vernacular. This paper aims to describe the lexicology of the southern vernacular of the Bouyei language focusing on word formation process. Bouyei words are formed by affixing, compounding and reduplicating. First, the affixation consists of prefixing and suffixing. Infixing is not found in this language. Second, the compound is divided into the semantic and syntactic compound. Finally, the reduplication is divided into the simple and complex reduplication. The simple reduplication is normally used to emphasize the meaning of the root or to indicate plurality.

  17. Democracy and formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huggler, Jørgen

    to nature, Schlegel appeals to culture and political experience and political formation, in order to make the world more peaceful. He opposes with heavy arguments the Kantian distinction between republicanism and democracy. Instead he gives quite good reasons for a more important distinction between...... of the structure of political autonomy in a political social contract (Ingeborg Mauss). Against Kant, the thinker of political continuity, Schlegel presents historically well informed reflections on the beginning and the end of political legitimacy. Dictatorship can be legitimate, states of emergency are found...

  18. Modeling Chondrule Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhour, D. D.; Buseck, P. R.

    1995-09-01

    Over the last several decades considerable data on chondrule sizes, compositions, and textures has been collected [1]; experimental studies have greatly improved our understanding of the conditions required to produce chondrule compositions and textures [2]; and models of energetic nebular processes have provided insight into mechanisms by which chondrules may have formed [3]. While much work remains in each of these areas, the information presently available is sufficient to allow the construction of simple numerical models of chondrule formation. We have constructed a computer algorithm to investigate the consequences of forming chondrules under a variety of conditions. Variables that are considered include: 1) the mechanism of heating (e.g., EM radiation, aerodynamic drag, collisions with energetic particles), 2) peak chondrule temperature, 3) heat-source geometry, 4) pre-chondrule dust aggregate size distributions, 5) dust aggregate compositional distributions, 6) chondrule solidus and liquidus temperatures, 7) kinetic barriers to melting, and 8) the duration of heating. Output includes the size distributions and relative abundances of PO, PP, POP, BO, and NP chondrules. Given the uncertainties in the input variables, the primary purpose of the code is not to construct a single (and necessarily somewhat arbitrary) model of chondrule formation, but rather to elucidate the differences in chondrule properties associated with various sets of formation conditions. Results from a number of simulations using a variety of input parameters illustrate the importance of both composition and peak temperature on the proportion of porphyritic to non-porphyritic chondrules produced. Also apparent is the influence of the mechanism of heating on the relative size distributions of chondrule textural types. Results indicate that specific heating mechanisms require unique sets of associated conditions to account for the observed properties of chondrules. These unique sets of

  19. Loss of metal ions, disulfide reduction and mutations related to familial ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates from superoxide dismutase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep A Oztug Durer

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 are one of the causes of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS. Fibrillar inclusions containing SOD1 and SOD1 inclusions that bind the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin S have been found in neurons of transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1. Therefore, the formation of amyloid fibrils from human SOD1 was investigated. When agitated at acidic pH in the presence of low concentrations of guanidine or acetonitrile, metalated SOD1 formed fibrillar material which bound both thioflavin T and Congo red and had circular dichroism and infrared spectra characteristic of amyloid. While metalated SOD1 did not form amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH, either removing metals from SOD1 with its intramolecular disulfide bond intact or reducing the intramolecular disulfide bond of metalated SOD1 was sufficient to promote formation of these aggregates. SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates both with and without intermolecular disulfide bonds, depending on the incubation conditions, and a mutant SOD1 lacking free sulfhydryl groups (AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH under reducing conditions. ALS mutations enhanced the ability of disulfide-reduced SOD1 to form amyloid-like aggregates, and apo-AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at pH 7 only when an ALS mutation was also present. These results indicate that some mutations related to ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates by facilitating the loss of metals and/or by making the intramolecular disulfide bond more susceptible to reduction, thus allowing the conversion of SOD1 to a form that aggregates to form resembling amyloid. Furthermore, the occurrence of amyloid-like aggregates per se does not depend on forming intermolecular disulfide bonds, and multiple forms of such aggregates can be produced from SOD1.

  20. Loss of metal ions, disulfide reduction and mutations related to familial ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates from superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztug Durer, Zeynep A; Cohlberg, Jeffrey A; Dinh, Phong; Padua, Shelby; Ehrenclou, Krista; Downes, Sean; Tan, James K; Nakano, Yoko; Bowman, Christopher J; Hoskins, Jessica L; Kwon, Chuhee; Mason, Andrew Z; Rodriguez, Jorge A; Doucette, Peter A; Shaw, Bryan F; Valentine, Joan Selverstone

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) are one of the causes of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS). Fibrillar inclusions containing SOD1 and SOD1 inclusions that bind the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin S have been found in neurons of transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1. Therefore, the formation of amyloid fibrils from human SOD1 was investigated. When agitated at acidic pH in the presence of low concentrations of guanidine or acetonitrile, metalated SOD1 formed fibrillar material which bound both thioflavin T and Congo red and had circular dichroism and infrared spectra characteristic of amyloid. While metalated SOD1 did not form amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH, either removing metals from SOD1 with its intramolecular disulfide bond intact or reducing the intramolecular disulfide bond of metalated SOD1 was sufficient to promote formation of these aggregates. SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates both with and without intermolecular disulfide bonds, depending on the incubation conditions, and a mutant SOD1 lacking free sulfhydryl groups (AS-SOD1) formed amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH under reducing conditions. ALS mutations enhanced the ability of disulfide-reduced SOD1 to form amyloid-like aggregates, and apo-AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at pH 7 only when an ALS mutation was also present. These results indicate that some mutations related to ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates by facilitating the loss of metals and/or by making the intramolecular disulfide bond more susceptible to reduction, thus allowing the conversion of SOD1 to a form that aggregates to form resembling amyloid. Furthermore, the occurrence of amyloid-like aggregates per se does not depend on forming intermolecular disulfide bonds, and multiple forms of such aggregates can be produced from SOD1.

  1. The Planet Formation Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, S.; Buscher, D. F.; Monnier, J. D.; PFI Science, the; Technical Working Group

    2014-04-01

    Among the most fascinating and hotly-debated areas in contemporary astrophysics are the means by which planetary systems are assembled from the large rotating disks of gas and dust which attend a stellar birth. Although important work is being done both in theory and observation, a full understanding of the physics of planet formation can only be achieved by opening observational windows able to directly witness the process in action. The key requirement is then to probe planet-forming systems at the natural spatial scales over which material is being assembled. By definition, this is the so-called Hill Sphere which delineates the region of influence of a gravitating body within its surrounding environment. The Planet Formation Imager project has crystallized around this challenging goal: to deliver resolved images of Hill-Sphere-sized structures within candidate planet-hosting disks in the nearest star-forming regions. In this contribution we outline the primary science case of PFI and discuss how PFI could significantly advance our understanding of the architecture and potential habitability of planetary systems. We present radiation-hydrodynamics simulations from which we derive preliminary specifications that guide the design of the facility. Finally, we give an overview about the interferometric and non-interferometric technologies that we are investigating in order to meet the specifications.

  2. Urbanization and slum formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Giok Ling; Phua, Kai Hong

    2007-05-01

    The formation of slums need not be inevitable with rapid urbanization. Such an argument appears to be contradicted by evidence of large slum populations in a large number of developing countries and particularly in rapidly urbanizing regions like Asia. The evidence discussed suggests that city authorities faced with rapid urban development lack the capacity to cope with the diverse demands for infrastructural provision to meet economic and social needs. Not only are strategic planning and intervention major issues in agenda to manage rapid urbanization, but city governments are not effectively linking the economic development trajectory to implications for urban growth and, hence, housing needs. In the following discussion, a case study is presented in support of the argument that city governments have to first recognize and then act to establish the link that is crucial between economic development, urban growth, and housing. This is the agendum that has been largely neglected by city and national governments that have been narrowly focused on economic growth with the consequent proliferation of slum formation as a housing solution.

  3. Real time monitoring of sickle cell hemoglobin fiber formation by UV resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, Kelly M; Mukerji, Ishita

    2009-10-20

    In sickle cell hemoglobin, individual tetramers associate into long fibers as a consequence of the mutation at the beta6 position. In this study UV resonance Raman spectroscopy is used to monitor the formation of Hb S fibers in real time through aromatic amino acid vibrational modes. The intermolecular contact formed by the mutation site ((1)beta(1)6 Glu-->Val) of one tetramer and the (2)beta(2)85 Phe-(2)beta(2)88 Leu hydrophobic pocket on a different tetramer is observed by monitoring the increase in signal intensity of Phe vibrational modes as a function of time, yielding kinetic progress curves similar to those obtained by turbidity measurements. Comparison of individual spectra collected at early time points (<1000 s) show small Phe intensity changes, which are attributed to weak transient associations of Hb S tetramers during the initial stages of the polymerization process. At later times (1000-2000 s) Phe signal intensity steadily increases because of increasing hydrophobicity of local Phe environment, a consequence of forming more stable (1)beta(1)-(2)beta(2) contacts. Tyr and Trp vibrational modes monitor H-bond strength between critical residues at the alpha(1)beta(2) interface of individual tetramers. Kinetic progress curves generated from these signals exhibit two distinct transitions at 2040 and 7340 s. These transitions, which occur later in time than those detected either by turbidity (1560 s) or by Phe signal intensity (1680 s), are attributed to initial fiber formation and subsequent formation of larger assemblies, such as macrofibers or gels. These results provide molecular insight into the interactions governing Hb S fiber formation.

  4. The multifaceted planetesimal formation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Blum, Jürgen; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2013-01-01

    -Neptunian objects and comets provide a unique record of the physical conditions in the solar nebula. Debris from planetesimal collisions around other stars signposts that the planetesimal formation process, and hence planet formation, is ubiquitous in the Galaxy. The planetesimal formation stage extends from...

  5. Designing for informed group formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Juel Jacobsen, Alice; Riis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    A new design ―project preparation‖ preparing for the group formation in problem based project work is proposed and investigated. The main problem is to overcome group formation based on existing relations. The hypothesis is that theme development and group formation are somewhat counterproductive...

  6. Restoring formation after leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    A method of restoring a formation which had uranium and other mineral values extracted by an alkaline lixiviant comprises introducing a source of phosphate in an amount sufficient to lower the level of soluble uranium compounds below that previously existing in the formation by the formation of insoluble uranium phosphate compounds

  7. Recipes for planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael R.

    2009-11-01

    Anyone who has ever used baking soda instead of baking powder when trying to make a cake knows a simple truth: ingredients matter. The same is true for planet formation. Planets are made from the materials that coalesce in a rotating disk around young stars - essentially the "leftovers" from when the stars themselves formed through the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds of gas and dust. The planet-making disk should therefore initially have the same gas-to-dust ratio as the interstellar medium: about 100 to 1, by mass. Similarly, it seems logical that the elemental composition of the disk should match that of the star, reflecting the initial conditions at that particular spot in the galaxy.

  8. Determinants for gallstone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Monsted; Sorensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    associations were found for blood pressure, smoking, alcohol consumption, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides in meta-analyses. Conclusions: Age, female sex, BMI, non-HDL cholesterol, and polyps are independent determinants for gallstone formation. Incident gallstones and the metabolic syndrome share common risk...... on a prospective protocol, a systematic review of the literature was performed identifying all articles dealing with determinants of incident gallstones. Meta-analyses of comparable determinants were performed through fixed effect models. Results: Participants with no gallstones at baseline and with at least one...... re-examination were followed-up completely (mean 11.6 years, N = 2848). The overall cumulative incidence of gallstones was 0.60% per year. Independent positive determinants for incident gallstones were age, female sex, non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol, and gallbladder polyps...

  9. Formation fracturing with foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blauer, R.E.; Kohlhaas, C.A.

    1974-01-01

    Over 60 wells have been treated with hydraulic fracturing techniques, with foam as the fracturing fluid. These foams contained as much as 95% gaseous phase; most treatments used foams with gas contents in the 65% to 85% range. Foam has several desirable properties for use as a fracturing fluid: high sand-carrying and sand-suspending capability, low fluid loss, low hydrostatic head, low pressure drops due to friction, quick fluid recovery, low formation damage, and no reduction of fracture conductivity due to fluid ingredients. Most applications of foam as a fracturing fluid have been in low permeability gas reservoirs. However, several oil reservoirs also have been successfully treated. Cost of the treatment is approx. the same or slightly less than a treatment with conventional fluids of comparable volume and rate. (25 refs.)

  10. Standardizing exchange formats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.; Schmidt, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    An international network of co-operating data centres is described who maintain identical data bases which are simultaneously updated by an agreed data exchange procedure. The agreement covers ''data exchange formats'' which are compatible to the centres' internal data storage and retrieval systems which remain different, optimized at each centre to the available computer facilities and to the needs of the data users. Essential condition for the data exchange is an agreement on common procedures for the data exchange is an agreement on common procedures for the data compilation, including critical data analysis and validation. The systems described (''EXFOR'', ''ENDF'', ''CINDA'') are used for ''nuclear reaction data'', but the principles used for data compilation and exchange should be valid also for other data types. (author). 24 refs, 4 figs

  11. Molecular near-field antenna effect in resonance hyper-Raman scattering: Intermolecular vibronic intensity borrowing of solvent from solute through dipole-dipole and dipole-quadrupole interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Rintaro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o

    2014-01-01

    We quantitatively interpret the recently discovered intriguing phenomenon related to resonance Hyper-Raman (HR) scattering. In resonance HR spectra of all-trans-β-carotene (β-carotene) in solution, vibrations of proximate solvent molecules are observed concomitantly with the solute β-carotene HR bands. It has been shown that these solvent bands are subject to marked intensity enhancements by more than 5 orders of magnitude under the presence of β-carotene. We have called this phenomenon the molecular-near field effect. Resonance HR spectra of β-carotene in benzene, deuterated benzene, cyclohexane, and deuterated cyclohexane have been measured precisely for a quantitative analysis of this effect. The assignments of the observed peaks are made by referring to the infrared, Raman, and HR spectra of neat solvents. It has been revealed that infrared active and some Raman active vibrations are active in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed spectra in the form of difference spectra (between benzene/deuterated benzene and cyclohexane/deuterated cyclohexane) are quantitatively analyzed on the basis of the extended vibronic theory of resonance HR scattering. The theory incorporates the coupling of excited electronic states of β-carotene with the vibrations of a proximate solvent molecule through solute–solvent dipole–dipole and dipole–quadrupole interactions. It is shown that the infrared active modes arise from the dipole–dipole interaction, whereas Raman active modes from the dipole–quadrupole interaction. It is also shown that vibrations that give strongly polarized Raman bands are weak in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed solvent HR spectra are simulated with the help of quantum chemical calculations for various orientations and distances of a solvent molecule with respect to the solute. The observed spectra are best simulated with random orientations of the solvent molecule at an intermolecular distance of 10 Å

  12. Conformational analysis of a Chlamydia-specific disaccharide {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl in aqueous solution and bound to a monoclonal antibody: Observation of intermolecular transfer NOEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowski, Tobias; Haselhorst, Thomas; Scheffler, Karoline [Medizinische Universitaet, Institut fuer Chemie (Germany); Weisemann, Ruediger [Bruker Analytik GmbH, Silberstreifen (Germany); Kosma, Paul [Institut fuer Chemie der Universitaet fuer Bodenkultur Wien (Austria); Brade, Helmut; Brade, Lore [Forschungszentrum Borstel, Zentrum fuer Medizin und Biowissenschaften Parkallee 22 (Germany); Peters, Thomas [Medizinische Universitaet, Institut fuer Chemie (Germany)

    1998-07-15

    The disaccharide {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo (Kdo: 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) represents a genus-specific epitope of the lipopolysaccharide of the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia. The conformation of the synthetically derived disaccharide {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl was studied in aqueous solution, and complexed to a monoclonal antibody S25-2. Various NMR experiments based on the detection of NOEs (or transfer NOEs) and ROEs (or transfer ROEs) were performed. A major problem was the extensive overlap of almost all {sup 1}H NMR signals of {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl. To overcome this difficulty, HMQC-NOESY and HMQC-trNOESY experiments were employed. Spin diffusion effects were identified using trROESY experiments, QUIET-trNOESY experiments and MINSY experiments. It was found that protein protons contribute to the observed spin diffusion effects. At 800 MHz, intermolecular trNOEs were observed between ligand protons and aromatic protons in the antibody binding site. From NMR experiments and Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, it was concluded that {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl in aqueous solution exists as a complex conformational mixture. Upon binding to the monoclonal antibody S25-2, only a limited range of conformations is available to {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl. These possible bound conformations were derived from a distance geometry analysis using transfer NOEs as experimental constraints. It is clear that a conformation is selected which lies within a part of the conformational space that is highly populated in solution. This conformational space also includes the conformation found in the crystal structure. Our results provide a basis for modeling studies of the antibody-disaccharide complex.

  13. Influence of an intermolecular charge-transfer state on excited-state relaxation dynamics: solvent effect on the methylnaphthalene-oxygen system and its significance for singlet oxygen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Poul-Gudmund; Arnbjerg, Jacob; Tolbod, Lars Poulsen; Toftegaard, Rasmus; Ogilby, Peter R

    2009-09-17

    The extent to which an intermolecular charge-transfer (CT) state can influence excited-state relaxation dynamics is examined for the system wherein 1-methylnaphthalene (MN) interacts with molecular oxygen. The MN-O2 system is ideally suited for such a study because excited states can be independently accessed by (i) irradiation into the discrete MN-O2 CT absorption band, (ii) direct irradiation of MN, and (iii) the photosensitized production of triplet state MN. Changing the solvent in which the MN-O2 system is dissolved influences the MN-dependent photoinduced production of singlet oxygen, O2(a1Delta(g)), which, in turn, yields information about fundamental concepts of state mixing. Results of experiments conducted in the polar solvent acetonitrile differ substantially from those obtained from the nonpolar solvent cyclohexane. The data reflect differences in the energy and behavior of the solvent-equilibrated MN-O2 CT state, CT(SE), and the extent to which this state couples to other states of the MN-O2 system. In particular, the data are consistent with a model where both the MN triplet state and the MN-O2 CT(SE) state are immediate precursors of O2(a1Delta(g)). Although the work reported herein is of direct and practical significance for the wide variety of systems in which O2(a1Delta(g)) can be produced upon irradiation, it also serves as an accessible model for a study of general issues pertinent to state mixing and the solvent-dependent dynamics of CT-mediated excited-state relaxation.

  14. Molecular near-field antenna effect in resonance hyper-Raman scattering: Intermolecular vibronic intensity borrowing of solvent from solute through dipole-dipole and dipole-quadrupole interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Rintaro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o, E-mail: hhama@nctu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-28

    We quantitatively interpret the recently discovered intriguing phenomenon related to resonance Hyper-Raman (HR) scattering. In resonance HR spectra of all-trans-β-carotene (β-carotene) in solution, vibrations of proximate solvent molecules are observed concomitantly with the solute β-carotene HR bands. It has been shown that these solvent bands are subject to marked intensity enhancements by more than 5 orders of magnitude under the presence of β-carotene. We have called this phenomenon the molecular-near field effect. Resonance HR spectra of β-carotene in benzene, deuterated benzene, cyclohexane, and deuterated cyclohexane have been measured precisely for a quantitative analysis of this effect. The assignments of the observed peaks are made by referring to the infrared, Raman, and HR spectra of neat solvents. It has been revealed that infrared active and some Raman active vibrations are active in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed spectra in the form of difference spectra (between benzene/deuterated benzene and cyclohexane/deuterated cyclohexane) are quantitatively analyzed on the basis of the extended vibronic theory of resonance HR scattering. The theory incorporates the coupling of excited electronic states of β-carotene with the vibrations of a proximate solvent molecule through solute–solvent dipole–dipole and dipole–quadrupole interactions. It is shown that the infrared active modes arise from the dipole–dipole interaction, whereas Raman active modes from the dipole–quadrupole interaction. It is also shown that vibrations that give strongly polarized Raman bands are weak in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed solvent HR spectra are simulated with the help of quantum chemical calculations for various orientations and distances of a solvent molecule with respect to the solute. The observed spectra are best simulated with random orientations of the solvent molecule at an intermolecular distance of 10 Å.

  15. Formation feedback control of UAV flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegall, Stephen

    This thesis is a study of formation control with autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles using the formation as feedback. There is also an investigation of formation methods presenting insight into different algorithms for formations. A rigid formation is achieved using a proportional-derivative virtual structure with a formation feedback controller. There is an emphasis on stick controlled aerodynamics. The rigid formation is verified by a simulation of a longitudinal model. Formation control ideas are presented for rigid formations.

  16. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, J. S.; Stewart, Lacey; Wilke, M. D.; King, N. S.; Baker A, S.; Lewis, Wilfred

    1999-01-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics

  17. Continuing galactic formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCanney, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    A new theory for galactic arm formation shows the arms to be continually eminating from the galactic nucleus due to a continual influx of cosmic dust. In the neighborhood of the nucleus the problem is treated as a fluid flow and a simple solution is given using conservation of momentum. When rotational dynamics are included the spinning arm system is the result. This solution resolves the problem of the missing mass, accounts for warped disk galaxies and gives a probable source for the gravity waves measured by Weber which eminate from our galactic center. Reversal of arm direction is demonstrated and examples of such reversals are cited. An approximate theoretical estimate of the age of our Sun is found to be in good agreement with radio isotope dating. A general result shows why twin star systems are in such great abundance in a galaxy. It gives a model of galactic evolution which begins with only a single massive nucleus with the collapsing gas clouds forming the arms. (orig.)

  18. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  19. Perturbation theory for intermolecular forces including exchange

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Laidlaw, W.G.

    1970-01-01

    Generalized solutions to the Kisenschitz and London perturbation equations are derived. It is pointed out that the results obtained in the formalisms proposed by Hirschfelder (HAV), by Hirschfelder and Silbey, by Murrell and Shaw, and by Musher and Amos are special cases of the generalized

  20. Theoretical study on the molecular structure, intermolecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It was revealed that S1 is formed by the edge(2-AP)-to-face(DDQ) linkage, which is stabilized by a moderate σ–π interaction and hydrogen binding interaction. ... the 2-AP(π)→DDQ(π*) charge transfer transitions in conformers S2 and S3 contribute to the two new charge transfer absorption bands which were experimentally ...

  1. Ultrafast intermolecular energy transfer in heavy water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piatkowski, L.; Eisenthal, K.B.; Bakker, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a study of the vibrational energy relaxation and resonant vibrational (Forster) energy transfer of the OD vibrations of D2O and mixtures of D2O and H2O using femtosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy. We observe the lifetime of the OD vibrations of bulk D2O to be 400 +/- 30 fs. The rate of

  2. Enhanced intermolecular forces in supramolecular polymer nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ureido-pyrimidone (Upy can dimerize in a self-complementary array of quadruple hydrogen bonds. In this paper, supramolecular polymer composites were prepared by blending Upy functionalized nanosilica with Upy end-capped polycarbonatediol. Surface characteristics of Upy functionalized nanosilica and influences of supramolecular forces on interfacial binding were researched. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and Gel permeation chromatography (GPC were used to characterize the synthesized molecules. Grafting ratio of Upy segments on the surface of nanosilica was analysed by Thermogravimetic analysis (TGA. Hydrophobicity and morphology of Upy modified nanosilica were analysed by Contact angle tester and Scanning electron microscope (SEM. Furthermore, dynamic thermo mechanical properties, mechanical properties and distribution of nanosilica in supramolecular polymer composites were also researched. Compared with the matrix resin, tensile stress and young's modulus of supramolecular polymer composites containing 5 wt% modified nanosilica were increased by 292 and 198% respectively.

  3. Theoretical study on the molecular structure, intermolecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hailong Wang

    N17–C18. → BD*(π)C3–O8 and BD(π)C19–C20. →. BD*(π)C1–C2 for S3, respectively. As indicated in. Table 2, the main interactions of S4 turn out to be halo- gen bonding and hydrogen bonding interactions, which are characterized by LP(σ)N17 → BD*(σ)C4–Cl10 and. LP(π)Cl10/LP(π)O8 → BD*(σ)N21–H26, and the cor ...

  4. Proton tunnelling in intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewill, A.J. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Johnson, M.R. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Trommsdorff, H.P. [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    The wavefunctions of particles extend beyond the classically accessible regions of potential energy-surfaces (PES). A manifestation of this partial delocalization is the quantum-mechanical tunneling effect which enables a particle to escape from a metastable potential-well. Tunnelling is most important for the lightest atoms, so that the determination of its contribution to proton transfer, one of the most fundamental chemical reactions, is an important issue. QENS and NMR techniques have been employed to study the motion of protons in the hydrogen bond of benzoic-acid crystals, a system which has emerged as a particularly suitable model since proton transfer occurs in a near symmetric double-well potential. The influence of quantum tunnelling was revealed and investigated in these experiments. This work provides an experimental benchmark for theoretical descriptions of translational proton-tunnelling. (author). 7 refs.

  5. Habit Formation: Deep and Uncertain

    OpenAIRE

    Ali Choudhary; Young-Bae Kim

    2007-01-01

    We extend the Ravn, Schmitt-Grohe and Uribe (Review of Economic Studies, 2006) model of external deep-habits with the idea that some product varieties are more prone to habit formation than others. This s uncertainty in habit formation which affects firm's pricing. Provided that uncertainty is strong, a profound implication is that role of market frictions, such as habit formation, and its consequences for the dynamic variations in the markups can be reversed.

  6. Treatment of an underground formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, P.E.; Braden, W.B. Jr.

    1974-03-12

    A method is described for treating underground formations, especially those containing clays or clay-like materials which are sensitive to fresh water. The treatment densensitizes the clays so they will not swell or disperse on contact with fresh water. The procedure consists of contacting the clay-containing formation with solutions which accomplish the electroless deposition of metal on the clay particles. Optionally, the formation can be resin coated prior to electroless plating. (9 claims)

  7. Complexity in Acid-Base Titrations: Multimer Formation Between Phosphoric Acids and Imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christian; Kim, Heejae; Wagner, Manfred; Hunger, Johannes

    2017-08-10

    Solutions of Brønsted acids with bases in aprotic solvents are not only common model systems to study the fundamentals of proton transfer pathways but are also highly relevant to Brønsted acid catalysis. Despite their importance the light nature of the proton makes characterization of acid-base aggregates challenging. Here, we track such acid-base interactions over a broad range of relative compositions between diphenyl phosphoric acid and the base quinaldine in dichloromethane, by using a combination of dielectric relaxation and NMR spectroscopy. In contrast to what one would expect for an acid-base titration, we find strong deviations from quantitative proton transfer from the acid to the base. Even for an excess of the base, multimers consisting of one base and at least two acid molecules are formed, in addition to the occurrence of proton transfer from the acid to the base and simultaneous formation of ion pairs. For equimolar mixtures such multimers constitute about one third of all intermolecular aggregates. Quantitative analysis of our results shows that the acid-base association constant is only around six times larger than that for the acid binding to an acid-base dimer, that is, to an already protonated base. Our findings have implications for the interpretation of previous studies of reactive intermediates in organocatalysis and provide a rationale for previously observed nonlinear effects in phosphoric acid catalysis. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  8. Electrocatalytic Oxidation of Formate with Nickel Diphosphane Dipeptide Complexes. Effect of Ligands Modified with Amino Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, Brandon R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Reback, Matthew L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jain, Avijita [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Appel, Aaron M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shaw, Wendy J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-03

    A series of nickel bis-diphosphine complexes with dipeptides appended to the ligands were investigated for the catalytic oxidation of formate. Typical rates of ~7 s-1 were found, similar to the parent complex (~8 s-1), with amino acid size and positioning contributing very little to rate or operating potential. Hydroxyl functionalities did result in lower rates, which were recovered by protecting the hydroxyl group. The results suggest that the overall dielectric introduced by the dipeptides does not play an important role in catalysis, but free hydroxyl groups do influence activity suggesting contributions from intra- or intermolecular interactions. These observations are important in developing a fundamental understanding of the affect that an enzyme-like outer coordination sphere can have upon molecular catalysts. This work was funded by the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geoscience and Biosciences Division (BRG, AJ, AMA, WJS), the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences, Physical Bioscience program (MLR). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. Complexity in Acid–Base Titrations: Multimer Formation Between Phosphoric Acids and Imines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christian; Kim, Heejae; Wagner, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Solutions of Brønsted acids with bases in aprotic solvents are not only common model systems to study the fundamentals of proton transfer pathways but are also highly relevant to Brønsted acid catalysis. Despite their importance the light nature of the proton makes characterization of acid–base aggregates challenging. Here, we track such acid–base interactions over a broad range of relative compositions between diphenyl phosphoric acid and the base quinaldine in dichloromethane, by using a combination of dielectric relaxation and NMR spectroscopy. In contrast to what one would expect for an acid–base titration, we find strong deviations from quantitative proton transfer from the acid to the base. Even for an excess of the base, multimers consisting of one base and at least two acid molecules are formed, in addition to the occurrence of proton transfer from the acid to the base and simultaneous formation of ion pairs. For equimolar mixtures such multimers constitute about one third of all intermolecular aggregates. Quantitative analysis of our results shows that the acid‐base association constant is only around six times larger than that for the acid binding to an acid‐base dimer, that is, to an already protonated base. Our findings have implications for the interpretation of previous studies of reactive intermediates in organocatalysis and provide a rationale for previously observed nonlinear effects in phosphoric acid catalysis. PMID:28597513

  10. Satellite formation flying relative dynamics, formation design, fuel optimal maneuvers and formation maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Danwei; Poh, Eng Kee

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically describes the concepts and principles for multi-satellite relative motion, passive and near passive formation designs, trajectory planning and control for fuel optimal formation maneuvers, and formation flying maintenance control design. As such, it provides a sound foundation for researchers and engineers in this field to develop further theories and pursue their implementations. Though satellite formation flying is widely considered to be a major advance in space technology, there are few systematic treatments of the topic in the literature. Addressing that gap, the book offers a valuable resource for academics, researchers, postgraduate students and practitioners in the field of satellite science and engineering.

  11. Uranium logging in earth formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Givens, W.W.

    1979-01-01

    A technique is provided for assaying the formations surrounding a borehole for uranium. A borehole logging tool cyclically irradiates the formations with neutrons and responds to neutron fluxes produced during the period of time that prompt neutrons are being produced by the neutron fission of uranium in the formations. A borehole calibration tool employs a steady-state (continuous output) neutron source, firstly, to produce a response to neutron fluxes in models having known concentrations of uranium and, secondly, to to produce a response to neutron fluxes in the formations surrounding the borehole. The neutron flux responses of the borehole calibration tool in both the model and the formations surrounding the borehole are utilized to correct the neutron flux response of the borehole logging tool for the effects of epithermal/thermal neutron moderation, scattering, and absorption within the borehole itself

  12. Um estudo químico-quântico da covalência intermolecular em sistemas π∙∙∙H através da análise topológica QTAIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Rego

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho foram estudados os sistemas trimoleculares C2H4∙∙∙HCN∙∙∙HF e C2H2∙∙∙HCN∙∙∙HF com o objetivo de examinar variações no espectro vibracional decorrente da força das ligações de hidrogênio π∙∙∙H e H∙∙∙N. As geometrias otimizadas destes sistemas foram obtidas através de cálculos realizados pelo software Gaussian versão 03W com o nível de teoria formado pelo funcional híbrido BHandHLYP e o conjunto de base 6-311++G(d,p. Os parâmetros QTAIM foram obtidos pelo software AIMAll versão 11.12.19. Para caracterizar as ligações de hidrogênio π∙∙∙H e H∙∙∙N, os baixos valores de densidade eletrônica na ordem de 0,0087 e 0,0310 e.ao-3 juntamente com os resultados positivos do Laplaciano indicam que estes sistemas são fracamente ligados sem nenhum caráter de covalência intermolecular. Nos complexos C2H2∙∙∙HCN∙∙∙HF e C2H4∙∙∙HCN∙∙∙HF, as ligações H–C e H–F dos doadores de prótons HCN e HF apresentam variações compreendidas entre 0,0055-0,0132 Å acompanhadas por red shifts nas frequências de estiramento compreendidos entre -73,85 e -306,91cm-1. Para justificar estes deslocamentos de frequências, a análise NBO foi utilizada, cujos resultados revelaram que as contribuições do orbital p dos átomos de carbono (H–C e flúor (H–F, em geral, sofrem uma diminuição, indicando uma menor polaridade nas ligações H–C e H–F.

  13. Substituted perylene diimides as electron acceptors in organic solar cells: Suppressing aggregate formation to increase device efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamm, Valentin; Battagliarin, Glauco; Howard, Ian A.; Hansen, Michael; Spiess, Hans W.; Mavrinskiy, Alexey; Pisula, Wojciech; Li, Chen; Muellen, Klaus; Laquai, Frederic [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Mainz (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Perylene diimide (PDI) is a promising electron acceptor material for high open circuit voltage bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. However, many PDI molecules have the drawback of strong aggregation leading to intermolecular excited state formation that results in exciton trapping. These traps can effectively limit the diffusion of excitons to the interface where charge separation occurs and thus strongly reduce the charge generation efficiency. In this contribution we study the influence of substitution of PDI molecules with side groups attached to the terminal and to the perylene core positions on the formation of aggregates. In particular transient photoluminescence and absorption spectroscopy are used to probe the impact of aggregation on the dynamics of charge generation and recombination in bulk heterojunction solar cells. Besides, AFM, x-ray and solid state NMR techniques are used to get further insight into the solid state morphology of polymer: PDI blends on different length scales. Finally, we correlate the photophysical properties of the PDI derivatives with the efficiency of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells and present unprecedented efficiencies from polymer: PDI solar cells.

  14. Spectroscopic investigation on structure and pH dependent Cocrystal formation between gamma-aminobutyric acid and benzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Xue, Jiadan; Cai, Qiang; Zhang, Qi

    2018-02-01

    Vibrational spectroscopic methods, including terahertz absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopy, were utilized for the characterization and analysis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), benzoic acid (BA), and the corresponding GABA-BA cocrystal formation under various pH values of aqueous solution. Vibrational spectroscopic results demonstrated that the solvent GABA-BA cocrystal, similar as grinding counterpart, possessed unique characteristic features compared with that of starting parent compounds. The change of vibrational modes for GABA-BA cocrystal comparing with starting components indicates there is strong inter-molecular interaction between GABA and BA molecules during its cocrystallization process. Formation of GABA-BA cocrystal under slow solvent evaporation is impacted by the pH value of aqueous solution. Vibrational spectra indicate that the GABA-BA cocrystal could be stably formed with the solvent condition of 2.00 ≤ pH ≤ 7.00. In contrast, such cocrystallization did not occur and the cocrystal would dissociate into its parent components when the pH value of solvent is lower than 2.00. This study provides experimental benchmark to discriminate and identify the structure of cocrystal and also pH-dependent cocrystallization effect with vibrational spectroscopic techniques in solid-state pharmaceutical fields.

  15. Dicarbonyl Induced Structural Perturbations Make Histone H1 Highly Immunogenic and Generate an Auto-Immune Response in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Mir

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions, through the interaction of AGEs with RAGE receptors and via activation of interleukin mediated transcription signalling, has been reported in cancer. Proteins modifications are being explored for their roles in the development and progression of cancer and autoantibody response against them is gaining interest as a probe for early detection of the disease. This study has analysed the changes in histone H1 upon modification by methylglyoxal (MG and its implications in auto-immunopathogenesis of cancer. Modified histone showed modifications in the aromatic residues, changed tyrosine microenvironment, intermolecular cross linking and generation of AGEs. It showed masking of hydrophobic patches and a hypsochromic shift in the in ANS specific fluorescence. MG aggressively oxidized histone H1 leading to the accumulation of reactive carbonyls. Far UV CD measurements showed di-carbonyl induced enhancement of the alpha structure and the induction of beta sheet conformation; and thermal denaturation (Tm studies confirmed the thermal stability of the modified histone. FTIR analysis showed amide I band shift, generation of a carboxyethyl group and N-Cα vibrations in the modified histone. LCMS analysis confirmed the formation of Nε-(carboxyethyllysine and electron microscopic studies revealed the amorphous aggregate formation. The modified histone showed altered cooperative binding with DNA. Modified H1 induced high titre antibodies in rabbits and the IgG isolated form sera of rabbits immunized with modified H1 exhibited specific binding with its immunogen in Western Blot analysis. IgG isolated from the sera of patients with lung cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer and cancer of head and neck region showed better recognition for neo-epitopes on the modified histone, reflecting the presence of circulating autoantibodies in cancer. Since reports suggest a link between AGE-RAGE axis and

  16. Age differences in concept formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Marilyn; Stratton-Salib, Brea C

    2007-02-01

    In order to identify the source of age-related deficits in concept formation, older and younger adults completed a new Concept Matching Test, tests of selective attention, and the Sorting Test, a standardized test of concept formation (Delis, Kaplan, & Kramer, 2001). Older adults showed intact concept identification, the ability to generate abstract concepts from stimulus features, but age differences were observed when irrelevant features were present. In addition, selective attention, but not concept identification ability, predicted age-related declines on the Sorting Test. Thus, reduced concept formation in older adults may stem from declines in abilities other than the capacity for abstraction.

  17. AGN feedback in galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Antonuccio-Delogu, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, convincing evidence has been accumulated concerning the effect of active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity on the internal and external environment of their host galaxies. Featuring contributions from well-respected researchers in the field, and bringing together work by specialists in both galaxy formation and AGN, this volume addresses a number of key questions about AGN feedback in the context of galaxy formation. The topics covered include downsizing and star-formation time scales in massive elliptical galaxies, the connection between the epochs of supermassive black h

  18. Dynamics of rock varnish formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Reneau, S.L.; Guthrie, G.D. Jr.; Bish, D.L.; Harrington, C.D.

    1991-01-01

    Our studies of rock varnish from the southwestern United States suggest that the Mn-phase in rock varnish has neither the chemistry nor the crystal structure of birnessite. Rather, the Mn-rich phase is non-crystalline and contains Ba, Ca, Fe, Al, and P. Unknowns concerning the formation of this non-crystalline Mn phase must be resolved before researchers are able to define chemical parameters of rock varnish formation based upon conditions of formation of the Mn phase. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  19. Free-format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide offers a concise and thorough introduction to the increased productivity, better readability, and easier program maintenance that comes with the free-format style of programming in RPG IV. Although free-format information is available in IBM manuals, it is not separated from everything else, thereby requiring hours of tedious research to track down the information needed. This book provides everything one needs to know to write RPG IV in the free-format style, and author Jim Martin not only teaches rules and syntax but also explains how this new style of coding has the pot

  20. Modularity in New Market Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Ron; Hang, Chang Chieh

    2017-01-01

    the formation of an industrial base of assemblers and component suppliers, assisting new firms in building customer relationships, enabling more geographically diffused economic development within countries, and facilitating development of export markets. We also suggest directions for further research......In this paper we appraise the ways in which use of closed-system proprietary product architectures versus open-system modular product architectures is likely to influence the dynamics and trajectory of new product market formation. We compare the evolutions of new markets in China for gas...... as the basis for new kinds of products may result in very different patterns and speeds of new market formation. We then suggest some key implications of the different dynamics of market formation associated with open-system modular architectures for both the competence-based strategic management (CBSM...

  1. Robust Decentralized Formation Flight Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Weihua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the idea of multiplexed model predictive control (MMPC, this paper introduces a new framework for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs formation flight and coordination. Formulated using MMPC approach, the whole centralized formation flight system is considered as a linear periodic system with control inputs of each UAV subsystem as its periodic inputs. Divided into decentralized subsystems, the whole formation flight system is guaranteed stable if proper terminal cost and terminal constraints are added to each decentralized MPC formulation of the UAV subsystem. The decentralized robust MPC formulation for each UAV subsystem with bounded input disturbances and model uncertainties is also presented. Furthermore, an obstacle avoidance control scheme for any shape and size of obstacles, including the nonapriorily known ones, is integrated under the unified MPC framework. The results from simulations demonstrate that the proposed framework can successfully achieve robust collision-free formation flights.

  2. The formate bio-economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yishai, Oren; Lindner, Steffen N; Gonzalez de la Cruz, Jorge; Tenenboim, Hezi; Bar-Even, Arren

    2016-12-01

    In this review we discuss the concept of the formate bio-economy: formate can be produced efficiently from various available resources and can be consumed by microbes as the sole carbon source for the production of value-added chemicals, directly addressing major challenges in energy storage and chemical production. We show that the formate assimilation pathways utilized by natural formatotrophs are either inefficient or are constrained to organisms that are difficult to cultivate and engineer. Instead, adapting model industrial organisms to formatotrophic growth using synthetic, specially tailored formate-assimilation routes could prove an advantageous strategy. Several studies have started to tackle this challenge, but a fully active synthetic pathway has yet to be established, leaving room for future undertakings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Hydroxyl radical formation by dithranol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K; Kappus, H

    1988-11-15

    Ethene formation from 2-keto-thiomethyl-butyric acid (KMBA) was used to measure hydroxyl radical generation from the antipsoriatic drug dithranol in phosphate buffer pH 7.8. Because the singlet oxygen (1O2) sensitizer, rose bengale, showed enlarged production of ethene when irradiated in the presence of KMBA, experiments were performed in the dark in order to avoid 1O2 production by dithranol. KMBA was converted to ethene by dithranol under aerobic conditions, whereas ethene formation was negligible in the absence of oxygen. Addition of catalytic amounts of FeCl3 resulted in increased ethene formation, indicating the catalysis of a superoxide-driven Fenton-reaction. O2- - and .OH-scavengers such as rutin, catechin, dimethyl sulfoxide, mannitol, ethanol, sodium salicylate and propyl gallate as well as catalase and superoxide dismutase inhibited ethene formation.

  4. Problem of professional personality formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pryazhnikova E.Yu.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the current approaches to the problem of professional personality formation. It ana-lyzes the impact of professional identity of students on the choice of the specialist field they make. The article highlights certain aspects of the educational environment which promote to formation of compe-tences in students, relating to their choice of professional occupations. The article presents the analysis of students’ internal and external strivings after graduation from the university and their fulfillment.

  5. Well stability in shale formations

    OpenAIRE

    Tariq, Abdullah

    2014-01-01

    Master's thesis in Petroleum engineering Well instability in shale formations has been a very major problem due to physiochemical interactions between drilling fluid and formation. In this thesis, chemical, thermal and diffusion effects on the well collapse strength are evaluated in order to investigate the dominating driving forces. A case study on the designed Heidrun well program was also performed in order to study the dynamics of the collapse pressure during drilling phase due to vari...

  6. Chain formation of metal atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahn, Sune Rastad; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of formation of single-atomic chains by manipulation of nanocontacts is studied for a selection of metals (Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au). Molecular dynamics simulations show that the tendency for chain formation is strongest for Au and Pt. Density functional theory calculations indicate...... that the metals which form chains exhibit pronounced many-atom interactions with strong bonding in low coordinated systems....

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of nonpolarizable inorganic salt solution interfaces: NaCl, NaBr, and NaI in transferable intermolecular potential 4-point with charge dependent polarizability (TIP4P-QDP) water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brad A.; Patel, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of the liquid-vapor interface of 1M salt solutions of nonpolarizable NaCl, NaBr, and NaI in polarizable transferable intermolecular potential 4-point with charge dependent polarizability water [B. A. Bauer et al., J. Chem. Theory Comput. 5, 359 (2009)]; this water model accommodates increased solvent polarizability (relative to the condensed phase) in the interfacial and vapor regions. We employ fixed-charge ion models developed in conjunction with the TIP4P-QDP water model to reproduce ab initio ion-water binding energies and ion-water distances for isolated ion-water pairs. The transferability of these ion models to the condensed phase was validated with hydration free energies computed using thermodynamic integration (TI) and appropriate energy corrections. Density profiles of Cl-, Br-, and I- exhibit charge layering in the interfacial region; anions and cation interfacial probabilities show marked localization, with the anions penetrating further toward the vapor than the cations. Importantly, in none of the cases studied do anions favor the outermost regions of the interface; there is always an aqueous region between the anions and vapor phase. Observed interfacial charge layering is independent of the strength of anion-cation interactions as manifest in anion-cation contact ion pair peaks and solvent separated ion pair peaks; by artificially modulating the strength of anion-cation interactions (independent of their interactions with solvent), we find little dependence on charge layering particularly for the larger iodide anion. The present results reiterate the widely held view of the importance of solvent and ion polarizability in mediating specific anion surface segregation effects. Moreover, due to the higher parametrized polarizability of the TIP4P-QDP condensed phase {1.31 Å3 for TIP4P-QDP versus 1.1 Å3 (TIP4P-FQ) and 0.87 Å3 (POL3) [Ponder and Case, Adv. Protein Chem. 66, 27 (2003)]} based on ab initio

  8. An Adaptable Seismic Data Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, Lion; Smith, James; Lei, Wenjie; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Ruan, Youyi; de Andrade, Elliott Sales; Podhorszki, Norbert; Bozdağ, Ebru; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-11-01

    We present ASDF, the Adaptable Seismic Data Format, a modern and practical data format for all branches of seismology and beyond. The growing volume of freely available data coupled with ever expanding computational power opens avenues to tackle larger and more complex problems. Current bottlenecks include inefficient resource usage and insufficient data organization. Properly scaling a problem requires the resolution of both these challenges, and existing data formats are no longer up to the task. ASDF stores any number of synthetic, processed or unaltered waveforms in a single file. A key improvement compared to existing formats is the inclusion of comprehensive meta information, such as event or station information, in the same file. Additionally, it is also usable for any non-waveform data, for example, cross-correlations, adjoint sources or receiver functions. Last but not least, full provenance information can be stored alongside each item of data, thereby enhancing reproducibility and accountability. Any data set in our proposed format is self-describing and can be readily exchanged with others, facilitating collaboration. The utilization of the HDF5 container format grants efficient and parallel I/O operations, integrated compression algorithms and check sums to guard against data corruption. To not reinvent the wheel and to build upon past developments, we use existing standards like QuakeML, StationXML, W3C PROV and HDF5 wherever feasible. Usability and tool support are crucial for any new format to gain acceptance. We developed mature C/Fortran and Python based APIs coupling ASDF to the widely used SPECFEM3D_GLOBE and ObsPy toolkits.

  9. Formation of (HCOO )(H 2 SO 4 ) Anion Clusters: Violation of Gas-Phase Acidity Predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Gao-Lei; Wang, Xue-Bin; Valiev, Marat

    2017-08-10

    Sulfuric acid is commonly known to be a strong acid and, by all counts, should readily donate its proton to formate, which has much higher proton affinity. This conventional wisdom is challenged in this work, where temperature-dependent negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy (NIPES) and theoretical studies demonstrate the existence of (HCOO?)(H2SO4) pair at the energy slightly below the conventional (HCOOH)(HSO4?) structure. Analysis of quantum-mechanical calculations indicates that large proton affinity barrier (~36 kcal/mol), favoring proton transfer to formate, is offset by the gain in inter-molecular interaction energy between HCOO? and H2SO4 through the formation of two strong hydrogen bonds. However, this stabilization comes with severe entropic penalty, requiring the two species in the precise align-ment. As a result, the population of (HCOO?)(H2SO4) drops significantly at higher temperatures, rendering (HCOOH)(HSO4?) to be the dominant species. This phe-nomenon is consistent with the NIPES data, which shows depletion in the spectra assigned to (HCOO?)(H2SO4), and has also been verified by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. The Physics of Planetesimal Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jacob; Armitage, Philip; Youdin, Andrew; Li, Rixin

    2015-12-01

    Planetesimals are the precursors to planets, and understanding their formation is an essential step towards developing a complete theory of planet formation. For small solid particles (e.g., dust grains) to coagulate into planetesimals, however, requires that these particles grow beyond centimeter sizes; with traditional coagulation physics, this is very difficult. The streaming instability, which is a clumping process akin to the pile-up of cars in a traffic jam, generates sufficiently high solid densities that the mutual gravity between the clumped particles eventually causes their collapse towards planetesimal mass and size scales. Exploring this transition from dust grains to planetesimals is still in its infancy but is extremely important if we want to understand the basics of planet formation. Here, I present a series of high resolution, first principles numerical simulations of potoplanetary disk gas and dust to study the clumping of particles via the streaming instability and the subsequent collapse towards planetesimals. These simulations have been employed to characterize the planetesimal population as a function of radius in protoplanetary disks. The results of these simulations will be crucial for planet formation models to correctly explain the formation and configuration of solar systems.

  11. The formation of cluster galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancone, Conor L.

    2012-06-01

    In this work I sought to understand the formation and evolution of galaxies. Specifically, I studied three key aspects of galaxy formation: star formation, mass assembly, and structural evolution. Past research has shown that the formation of a galaxy is strongly coupled to its local environment (i.e. the local galaxy density). Therefore, I studied the evolution of cluster galaxies because clusters are the highest density environments that exist in the universe. In turn, the observational results found herein form a foundation upon which to test theories of galaxy formation in the densest environments. I used the latest sample of galaxy clusters from the Bootes region to measure the near-infrared luminosity function (NIR LF) of cluster galaxies from 0 1.3. I used deeper IRAC imaging to study the NIR LF of high redshift cluster galaxies (1 pulsating AGB stars, which are poorly understood observationally but contribute substantially to the NIR light of a stellar population. I also created the Python Galaxy Fitter (PyGFit), a program which measures PSF matched photometry from crowded imaging with disparate PSFs and resolutions. This enabled accurate measurement of spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in crowded cluster fields.

  12. Black holes and galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Propst, Raphael J

    2010-01-01

    Galaxies are the basic unit of cosmology. The study of galaxy formation is concerned with the processes that formed a heterogeneous universe from a homogeneous beginning. The physics of galaxy formation is complicated because it deals with the dynamics of stars, thermodynamics of gas and energy production of stars. A black hole is a massive object whose gravitational field is so intense that it prevents any form of matter or radiation to escape. It is hypothesized that the most massive galaxies in the universe- "elliptical galaxies"- grow simultaneously with the supermassive black holes at their centers, giving us much stronger evidence that black holes control galaxy formation. This book reviews new evidence in the field.

  13. Exoplanets Detection, Formation, Properties, Habitability

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, John W

    2008-01-01

    This edited, multi-author volume will be an invaluable introduction and reference to all key aspects in the field of exoplanet research. The reviews cover: Detection methods and properties of known exoplanets, Detection of extrasolar planets by gravitational microlensing. The formation and evolution of terrestrial planets in protoplanetary and debris disks. The brown dwarf-exoplanet connection. Formation, migration mechanisms and properties of hot Jupiters. Dynamics of multiple exoplanet systems. Doppler exoplanet surveys. Searching for exoplanets in the stellar graveyard. Formation and habitability of extra solar planets in multiple star systems. Exoplanet habitats and the possibilities for life. Moons of exoplanets: habitats for life. Contributing authors: •Rory Barnes •David P. Bennett •Jian Ge •Nader Haghighipour •Patrick Irwin •Hugh Jones •Victoria Meadows •Stanimir Metchev •I. Neill Reid •George Rieke •Caleb Scharf •Steinn Sigurdsson

  14. Cosmic Star-Formation History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madau, Piero; Dickinson, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Over the past two decades, an avalanche of new data from multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic surveys has revolutionized our view of galaxy formation and evolution. Here we review the range of complementary techniques and theoretical tools that allow astronomers to map the cosmic history of star formation, heavy element production, and reionization of the Universe from the cosmic “dark ages” to the present epoch. A consistent picture is emerging, whereby the star-formation rate density peaked approximately 3.5 Gyr after the Big Bang, at z≈1.9, and declined exponentially at later times, with an e-folding timescale of 3.9 Gyr. Half of the stellar mass observed today was formed before a redshift z = 1.3. About 25% formed before the peak of the cosmic star-formation rate density, and another 25% formed after z = 0.7. Less than ˜1% of today's stars formed during the epoch of reionization. Under the assumption of a universal initial mass function, the global stellar mass density inferred at any epoch matches reasonably well the time integral of all the preceding star-formation activity. The comoving rates of star formation and central black hole accretion follow a similar rise and fall, offering evidence for coevolution of black holes and their host galaxies. The rise of the mean metallicity of the Universe to about 0.001 solar by z = 6, one Gyr after the Big Bang, appears to have been accompanied by the production of fewer than ten hydrogen Lyman-continuum photons per baryon, a rather tight budget for cosmological reionization.

  15. Cementing of low pressure formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brownlie, D. [Trican Well Service Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada); Coupland, M. [Baytex Energy Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This paper proposed a solution to the notorious problem of squeeze cementing low pressure formations. It is a well known fact within the petroleum industry that it is difficult to squeeze cement low pressure formations in certain areas. Short of fracturing, most geological formations will not allow cement to penetrate the actual rock. In standard cement squeezing, cement slurries are placed across perforations and then pressure is applied to force the cement into perforation tunnels against the formation causing partial dehydration of the slurry. The cement left in the perforation tunnels makes a seal between the formation and the wellbore that has high compressive strength and low permeability. However, experience has shown that some wells are not capable of holding the hydrostatic pressure of a water column. This paper presented case studies that examined formations with modified geology, a highly unconsolidated sandstone where large volumes of sand were extracted during the production process. In particular, the paper refers to a low pressure field in Western Canada, the remedial cementing in Lloydminster. Within a 3 year period 18 zones were cement squeezed and drilled out. Nine of the zones were cement squeezed using a retainer with thixotropic cement followed by a 0:1:0 Class G cement. Only 11 per cent of the 9 zones was successful on the first attempt. The other 9 zones were cement squeezed using the bullhead technique in which a fluid is shot into the well casing before the downhole equipment. This latter technique proved to be more successful on the first attempt. 2 refs.

  16. Prediction of tar ball formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khelifa, A.; Gamble, L.

    2006-01-01

    The presence of small tar balls ranging in size from less than a millimetre to 60 centimetres have been observed during cleanup assessment operations following accidental oil spills on water. The tar balls are composed of heavy oil residues and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from the water column. They can be found on shorelines, settled on the seafloor and floating at or near the water surface. Their abundance on the shorelines varies from site to site and depends on the conditions of the spill and mixing conditions. Aggregation between SPM and micro-sized oil droplets occurs naturally in coastal waters and enhances the dispersion of spilled oil. Although tar balls are among the important end states of spilled oil in the marine environment, no model exists to estimate the percentage of the spilled oil that becomes tar balls. This paper offered some insight into the modeling of tar ball formation. Current modeling understanding of oil-SPM aggregate formation was used to predict tar ball formation. The formation of oil droplets was examined with respect to a range of conditions under which the formation of large droplets is expected. The role of aggregation was then presented to demonstrate the effects of concentration and type of SPM on the buoyancy of tar balls. Good agreement was found between modeling results and field data reported in the literature regarding the size and density of tar balls. Oil viscosity and mixing energy were found to be the main factors controlling the formation of tar balls. The aggregation of tar balls with SPM and shoreline material results in significant increases or decreases in density, depending on the type and concentration of SPM. 42 refs., 2 tabs., 6 figs

  17. Pattern formations and oscillatory phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    Patterns and their formations appear throughout nature, and are studied to analyze different problems in science and make predictions across a wide range of disciplines including biology, physics, mathematics, chemistry, material science, and nanoscience. With the emergence of nanoscience and the ability for researchers and scientists to study living systems at the biological level, pattern formation research has become even more essential. This book is an accessible first of its kind guide for scientists, researchers, engineers, and students who require a general introduction to thi

  18. Star formation and gas supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catinella, B.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed knowledge of how gas cycles in and around galaxies, and how it depends on galaxy properties such as stellar mass and star formation rate, is crucial to understand galaxy formation and evolution. We take advantage of the most sensitive surveys of cold gas in massive galaxies, GASS and COLD GASS, as well as of the state-of-the-art HI blind survey ALFALFA to investigate how molecular and atomic hydrogen reservoirs vary along and across the main sequence of star-forming galaxies.

  19. Fruiting Body Formation in Basidiomycetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelkmans, J.F.; Lugones, L.G.; Wosten, H.A.B.

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of the dikaryotic mycelium and formation of fruiting bodies are highly complex developmental programmes that are activated by a combination of environmental cues. A wide variety of proteins are expected to regulate and coordinate these programmes or to fulfil enzymatic conversions or

  20. Analysis of Disulfide Bond Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, Ineke; Lamriben, Lydia; van Zadelhoff, Guus; Hebert, Daniel N.

    2017-01-01

    In this unit, protocols are provided for detection of disulfide bond formation in cultures of intact cells and in an in vitro translation system containing isolated microsomes or semi-permeabilized cells. First, the newly synthesized protein of interest is biosynthetically labeled with radioactive

  1. Shell formation and nuclear masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuker, A. P. [IPHC, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Louis Pasteur, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)]. e-mail: Andres.Zuker@IReS.in2p3.fr

    2008-12-15

    We describe the basic mechanisms responsible for nuclear bulk properties and shell formation incorporated in the Duflo Zuker models. The emphasis is put on explaining why functionals of the occupancies can be so efficient in accounting for data with minimal computational effort. (Author)

  2. Auditory and phonetic category formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudbeek, Martijn; Cutler, A.; Smits, R.; Swingley, D.; Cohen, Henri; Lefebvre, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Among infants' first steps in language acquisition is learning the relevant contrasts of the language-specific phonemic repertoire. This learning is viewed as the formation of categories in a multidimensional psychophysical space. Research in the visual modality has shown that for adults, some kinds

  3. Exciton Formation in Disordered Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klochikhin, A.; Reznitsky, A.; Permogorov, S.

    1999-01-01

    Stationary luminescence spectra of disordered solid solutions can be accounted by the model of localized excitons. Detailed analysis of the long time decay kinetics of luminescence shows that exciton formation in these systems is in great extent due to the bimolecular reaction of separated carrie...

  4. Market formation and market selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raalte, C.L.J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The organization of markets is an important field of inquiry in modern economic theory. This monograph analyzes models which consider the formation and selection of markets. In these models, markets are organized by middlemen and used by traders. In Part I of the monograph, coalitions of middlemen

  5. Playing Games with Formative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassie, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Games can be great tools to engage reluctant learners and provide ongoing feedback to educators about how their lessons are "sticking." Cassie discusses how to use gamified formative assessments to measure different kinds of skills and looks at the different ways teachers can use games in the classroom--from out-of-the-box board games to…

  6. The Road to Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Keel, William C

    2007-01-01

    The formation of galaxies is one of the greatest puzzles in astronomy, the solution is shrouded in the depths of space and time, but has profound implications for the universe we observe today. The book discusses the beginnings of the process from cosmological observations and calculations, considers the broad features of galaxies that we need to explain and what we know of their later history. The author compares the competing theories for galaxy formation and considers the progress expected from new generations of powerful telescopes both on earth and in space. In this second edition the author has retained the observationally-based approach of the first edition, a feature which was particularly well-reviewed: Writing in Nature, Carlton Baugh noted in February 2003 that “It is refreshing, in a market dominated by theorists, to come across a book on galaxy formation written from an observational perspective. The Road to Galaxy Formation should prove to be a handy primer on observations for graduate student...

  7. Amyloid Beta Mediates Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Osta, Ana; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2009-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) undergoes sequential cleavages to generate various polypeptides, including the amyloid [beta] (1-42) peptide (A[beta][1-42]), which is believed to play a major role in amyloid plaque formation in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we provide evidence that, in contrast with its pathological role when accumulated,…

  8. DAC tries a new format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Karlberg, Bo; Emons, Hendrik

    2008-01-01

    The European Analytical Column has a somewhat different format this time. From now and on it is our ambition to invite a guest columnist to give her/his view on various matters related to Analytical Chemistry in Europe. This year we have invited Prof. Hendrik Emons at the Institute for Reference ...

  9. Genetic analysis of symbiosome formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovchinnikova, E.

    2012-01-01

    Endosymbiotic interactions form a fundament of life as we know it and are characterized by the formation of new specialized membrane compartments, in which the microbes are hosted inside living plant cells. A striking example is the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing Rhizobium

  10. Evolutionary dynamics of group formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javarone, Marco Alberto; Marinazzo, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Group formation is a quite ubiquitous phenomenon across different animal species, whose individuals cluster together forming communities of diverse size. Previous investigations suggest that, in general, this phenomenon might have similar underlying reasons across the interested species, despite genetic and behavioral differences. For instance improving the individual safety (e.g. from predators), and increasing the probability to get food resources. Remarkably, the group size might strongly vary from species to species, e.g. shoals of fishes and herds of lions, and sometimes even within the same species, e.g. tribes and families in human societies. Here we build on previous theories stating that the dynamics of group formation may have evolutionary roots, and we explore this fascinating hypothesis from a purely theoretical perspective, with a model using the framework of Evolutionary Game Theory. In our model we hypothesize that homogeneity constitutes a fundamental ingredient in these dynamics. Accordingly, we study a population that tries to form homogeneous groups, i.e. composed of similar agents. The formation of a group can be interpreted as a strategy. Notably, agents can form a group (receiving a 'group payoff'), or can act individually (receiving an 'individual payoff'). The phase diagram of the modeled population shows a sharp transition between the 'group phase' and the 'individual phase', characterized by a critical 'individual payoff'. Our results then support the hypothesis that the phenomenon of group formation has evolutionary roots.

  11. A Model of Partnership Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talman, A.J.J.; Yang, Z.F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model of partnership formation. A set of agents wants to conduct some business or other activities. Agents may act alone or seek a partner for cooperation and need in the latter case to consider with whom to cooperate and how to share the profit in a collaborative and

  12. A model of partnership formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talman, A.J.J.; Yang, Z.F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of partnership formation. A number of agents want to conduct some business or other activities. Agents may act alone or seek a partner for cooperation and need in the latter case to consider with whom to cooperate and how to share the profit in a collaborative and

  13. Facial Prototype Formation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inn, Donald; And Others

    This study examined memory representation as it is exhibited in young children's formation of facial prototypes. In the first part of the study, researchers constructed images of faces using an Identikit that provided the features of hair, eyes, mouth, nose, and chin. Images were varied systematically. A series of these images, called exemplar…

  14. The EPRDATA Format: A Dialogue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Henry Grady III [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-08-18

    Recently the Los Alamos Nuclear Data Team has communicated certain issues of concern in relation to the new electron/photon/relaxation ACE data format as released in the eprdata12 library. In this document those issues are parsed, analyzed, and answered.

  15. Mantle dynamics following supercontinent formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heron, Philip J.

    This thesis presents mantle convection numerical simulations of supercontinent formation. Approximately 300 million years ago, through the large-scale subduction of oceanic sea floor, continental material amalgamated to form the supercontinent Pangea. For 100 million years after its formation, Pangea remained relatively stationary, and subduction of oceanic material featured on its margins. The present-day location of the continents is due to the rifting apart of Pangea, with supercontinent dispersal being characterized by increased volcanic activity linked to the generation of deep mantle plumes. The work presented here investigates the thermal evolution of mantle dynamics (e.g., mantle temperatures and sub-continental plumes) following the formation of a supercontinent. Specifically, continental insulation and continental margin subduction are analyzed. Continental material, as compared to oceanic material, inhibits heat flow from the mantle. Previous numerical simulations have shown that the formation of a stationary supercontinent would elevate sub-continental mantle temperatures due to the effect of continental insulation, leading to the break-up of the continent. By modelling a vigorously convecting mantle that features thermally and mechanically distinct continental and oceanic plates, this study shows the effect of continental insulation on the mantle to be minimal. However, the formation of a supercontinent results in sub-continental plume formation due to the re-positioning of subduction zones to the margins of the continent. Accordingly, it is demonstrated that continental insulation is not a significant factor in producing sub-supercontinent plumes but that subduction patterns control the location and timing of upwelling formation. A theme throughout the thesis is an inquiry into why geodynamic studies would produce different results. Mantle viscosity, Rayleigh number, continental size, continental insulation, and oceanic plate boundary evolution are

  16. Inside-out planet formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, Sourav; Tan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    The compact multi-transiting planet systems discovered by Kepler challenge planet formation theories. Formation in situ from disks with radial mass surface density, Σ, profiles similar to the minimum mass solar nebula but boosted in normalization by factors ≳ 10 has been suggested. We propose that a more natural way to create these planets in the inner disk is formation sequentially from the inside-out via creation of successive gravitationally unstable rings fed from a continuous stream of small (∼cm-m size) 'pebbles', drifting inward via gas drag. Pebbles collect at the pressure maximum associated with the transition from a magnetorotational instability (MRI)-inactive ('dead zone') region to an inner MRI-active zone. A pebble ring builds up until it either becomes gravitationally unstable to form an ∼1 M ⊕ planet directly or induces gradual planet formation via core accretion. The planet may undergo Type I migration into the active region, allowing a new pebble ring and planet to form behind it. Alternatively, if migration is inefficient, the planet may continue to accrete from the disk until it becomes massive enough to isolate itself from the accretion flow. A variety of densities may result depending on the relative importance of residual gas accretion as the planet approaches its isolation mass. The process can repeat with a new pebble ring gathering at the new pressure maximum associated with the retreating dead-zone boundary. Our simple analytical model for this scenario of inside-out planet formation yields planetary masses, relative mass scalings with orbital radius, and minimum orbital separations consistent with those seen by Kepler. It provides an explanation of how massive planets can form with tightly packed and well-aligned system architectures, starting from typical protoplanetary disk properties.

  17. Consensus formation on coevolving networks: groups' formation and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozma, Balazs; Barrat, Alain

    2008-01-01

    We study the effect of adaptivity on a social model of opinion dynamics and consensus formation. We analyse how the adaptivity of the network of contacts between agents to the underlying social dynamics affects the size and topological properties of groups and the convergence time to the stable final state. We find that, while on static networks these properties are determined by percolation phenomena, on adaptive networks the rewiring process leads to different behaviors: adaptive rewiring fosters group formation by enhancing communication between agents of similar opinion, though it also makes possible the division of clusters. We show how the convergence time is determined by the characteristic time of link rearrangement. We finally investigate how the adaptivity yields nontrivial correlations between the internal topology and the size of the groups of agreeing agents

  18. Stratigraphy and dissolution of the Rustler Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachman, G.O.

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the physical stratigraphy of the Rustler Formation, because the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant will be constructed in salt beds that underlie this formation. Described are subdivisions of the formations, the major karst features, and a proposed method for the formation of Nash Draw. 2 refs., 2 figs

  19. At the crossroad of photochemistry and radiation chemistry: formation of hydroxyl radicals in diluted aqueous solutions exposed to ultraviolet radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomanová, Kateřina; Precek, Martin; Múčka, Viliam; Vyšín, Luděk; Juha, Libor; Čuba, Václav

    2017-11-08

    Formation yields of ˙OH radicals were precisely determined in aqueous solutions of coumarin-3-carboxylic acid and ferrous sulfate (i.e., Fricke dosimeter) exposed to 253.7 nm radiation delivered from a continuous source. Quantum yield of ˙OH radicals was determined as ∼0.08, i.e., roughly one out of twelve photons, efficiently absorbed in UV-illuminated solutions, produced one ˙OH radical. Energetically, a water molecule should undergo a correlated action of at least two 4.9 eV photons delivering enough energy for direct H-OH dissociation (5.0-5.4 eV). We suggest a mechanism based on an interaction of two water molecules, both in long-living triplet states. An intermolecular transfer of excitation energy provided a sufficient amount of energy for the dissociation of one water molecule into ˙OH and H˙ radicals. In an aqueous solution of phospholipids, quantum yields of hydroperoxides formed under these irradiation conditions decreased with total effectively absorbed energy (i.e. a dose), similar to the radiation chemical yields obtained during an exposure to ionizing radiation, such as gamma rays from radionuclide sources. Under 253.7 nm irradiation, one ˙OH radical causes a peroxidation of 34 phospholipid molecules. This implicates chain mechanism of the reaction.

  20. Film Thickness Formation in Nanoscale due to Effects of Elastohydrodynamic, Electrostatic and Surface force of Solvation and Van der Waals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Abd Al-Samieh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of oil film with a thickness in the nanoscale is discussed in this paper. A polar lubricant of propylene carbonate is used as the intervening liquid between contiguous bodies in concentrated contacts. A pressure caused by the hydrodynamic viscous action in addition to double layer electrostatic force, Van der Waals inter-molecular forces, and solvation pressure due to inter-surface forces is considered in calculating the ultrathin lubricating films. The numerical solution has been carried out, using the Newton-Raphson iteration technique, applied for the convergence of the hydrodynamic pressure. The results show that, at separations beyond about five molecular diameters of the intervening liquid, the formation of a lubricant film thickness is governed by combined effects of viscous action and surface force of an attractive Van der Waals force and a repulsive double layer force. At smaller separations below about five molecular diameters of the intervening liquid, the effect of solvation force is dominant in determining the oil film thickness

  1. Using terahertz time-domain spectroscopical technique to monitor cocrystal formation between piracetam and 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Xia, Yi; Zhang, Huili; Hong, Zhi

    2013-07-01

    Far-infrared vibrational absorption of cocrystal formation between 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHBA) and piracetam compounds under solvent evaporation and grinding methods have been investigated using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) at room temperature. The experimental results show large difference among absorption spectra of the formed cocrystals and the involved individual parent molecules in 0.20-1.50 THz region, which probably originated from the intra-molecular and inter-molecular hydrogen bonds due to the presence of two hydroxyl groups in 2,5-DHBA and amide moieties in piracetam compound. The THz absorption spectra of two formed cocrystals with different methods are almost identical. With grinding method, the reaction process can be monitored directly from both time-domain and frequency-domain spectra using THz-TDS technique. The results indicate that THz-TDS technology can absolutely offer us a high potential method to identify and characterize the formed cocrystals, and also provide the rich information about their reaction dynamic process involving two or more molecular crystals in situ to better know the corresponding reaction mechanism in pharmaceutical fields.

  2. ASDF: A new data format for astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, P.; Droettboom, M.; Bray, E.

    2015-09-01

    We present the case for developing a successor format for the immensely successful FITS format. We first review existing alternative formats and discuss why we do not believe they provide an adequate solution. The proposed format is called the Advanced Scientific Data Format (ASDF) and is based on an existing text format, YAML, that we believe removes most of the current problems with the FITS format. An overview of the capabilities of the new format is given along with specific examples. This format has the advantage that it does not limit the size of attribute names (akin to FITS keyword names) nor place restrictions on the size or type of values attributes have. Hierarchical relationships are explicit in the syntax and require no special conventions. Finally, it is capable of storing binary data within the file in its binary form. At its basic level, the format proposed has much greater applicability than for just astronomical data.

  3. Track formation. Principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monnin, M.

    1978-01-01

    The principles and technical aspects of track formation in insulating solids are first described. The characteristics of dialectic track detection are discussed from the technical point of view: the nature of the detectors, the chemical treatment, the sensitivity and the environmental conditions of use. The applications are reviewed. The principle of each type of applied research is described and then the applications are listed. When used as a detector, nuclear tracks can provide valuable information in a number of fields: element content determination and wrapping, imaging, radiation dosimetry, environmental studies, technological uses and miscellaneous other applications. The track-formation process can also be used for making well-defined holes; this method allows other applications which are also described. Finally, some possible future applications are mentioned. (author)

  4. Singularities formation, structure, and propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Eggers, J

    2015-01-01

    Many key phenomena in physics and engineering are described as singularities in the solutions to the differential equations describing them. Examples covered thoroughly in this book include the formation of drops and bubbles, the propagation of a crack and the formation of a shock in a gas. Aimed at a broad audience, this book provides the mathematical tools for understanding singularities and explains the many common features in their mathematical structure. Part I introduces the main concepts and techniques, using the most elementary mathematics possible so that it can be followed by readers with only a general background in differential equations. Parts II and III require more specialised methods of partial differential equations, complex analysis and asymptotic techniques. The book may be used for advanced fluid mechanics courses and as a complement to a general course on applied partial differential equations.

  5. Othering, identity formation and agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sune Qvotrup Jensen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the potentials of the concept of othering to describe identity formation among ethnic minorities. First, it outlines the history of the concept, its contemporary use, as well as some criticisms. Then it is argued that young ethnic minority men in Denmark are subject to intersectional othering, which contains elements of exoticist fascination of the other. On the basis of ethnographic material, it is analysed how young marginalized ethnic minority men react to othering. Two types of reactions are illustrated: 1 capitalization on being positioned as the other, and 2 refusing to occupy the position of the other by disidentification and claims to normality. Finally, it is argued that the concept of othering is well suited for understanding the power structures as well as the historic symbolic meanings conditioning such identity formation, but problematic in terms of agency.

  6. Nuclear processing during star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, M.J.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary survey was conducted of the thermonuclear energy release expected during star formation. The destruction of primordial deuterium provides substantial amounts of energy at surprisingly low temperatures, and must be considered in any meaningful treatment of star formation carried to stages in which the internal temperature exceeds a few hundred thousand degrees. Significant energy generation from consumption of initial lithium requires higher temperatures, of the order of a few million degrees. Depletion of primordial beryllium and boron may never provide an important energy source. The approach to equilibrium of the carbon--nitrogen cycle is dominant at temperatures approaching those characteristic of the central regions of main sequence stars. The present calculation should serve as a useful guide in choosing those nuclear processes to be included in a more detailed study. 8 figures, 2 tables

  7. Biofilm formation on abiotic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Lone

    2011-01-01

    antibiotics, disinfectants and cleaning agents. Biofilms are therefore very difficult to eradicate, and an attractive approach to limit biofilm formation is to reduce bacterial adhesion. In this thesis it was shown that lowering the surface roughness had a greater effect on bacterial retention compared....... The ability to form biofilms, the amount of eDNA produced, and the importance of eDNA for biofilm formation or stability did not correlate and varied from strain to strain. Finally, a method was developed for immobilization of living bacteria for analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM is used...... for nanoscale visualisation and measurement of interaction forces of living cells under physiological conditions. The new immobilisation technique provides the practical platform needed to apply AFM for analysis of living bacteria....

  8. Coevolutionary modeling in network formation

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shyoukh, Ibrahim

    2014-12-03

    Network coevolution, the process of network topology evolution in feedback with dynamical processes over the network nodes, is a common feature of many engineered and natural networks. In such settings, the change in network topology occurs at a comparable time scale to nodal dynamics. Coevolutionary modeling offers the possibility to better understand how and why network structures emerge. For example, social networks can exhibit a variety of structures, ranging from almost uniform to scale-free degree distributions. While current models of network formation can reproduce these structures, coevolutionary modeling can offer a better understanding of the underlying dynamics. This paper presents an overview of recent work on coevolutionary models of network formation, with an emphasis on the following three settings: (i) dynamic flow of benefits and costs, (ii) transient link establishment costs, and (iii) latent preferential attachment.

  9. Rapid gas hydrate formation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas D.; Taylor, Charles E.; Unione, Alfred J.

    2013-01-15

    The disclosure provides a method and apparatus for forming gas hydrates from a two-phase mixture of water and a hydrate forming gas. The two-phase mixture is created in a mixing zone which may be wholly included within the body of a spray nozzle. The two-phase mixture is subsequently sprayed into a reaction zone, where the reaction zone is under pressure and temperature conditions suitable for formation of the gas hydrate. The reaction zone pressure is less than the mixing zone pressure so that expansion of the hydrate-forming gas in the mixture provides a degree of cooling by the Joule-Thompson effect and provides more intimate mixing between the water and the hydrate-forming gas. The result of the process is the formation of gas hydrates continuously and with a greatly reduced induction time. An apparatus for conduct of the method is further provided.

  10. The dynamics of city formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, J Vernon; Venables, Anthony J

    2009-04-01

    This paper examines city formation in a country whose urban population is growing steadily over time, with new cities required to accommodate this growth. In contrast to most of the literature there is immobility of housing and urban infrastructure, and investment in these assets is taken on the basis of forward-looking behavior. In the presence of these fixed assets cities form sequentially, without the population swings in existing cities that arise in current models, but with swings in house rents. Equilibrium city size, absent government, may be larger or smaller than is efficient, depending on how urban externalities vary with population. Efficient formation of cities with internalization of externalities involves local government intervention and borrowing to finance development. The paper explores the institutions required for successful local government intervention.

  11. Bio-based Films from Linter Cellulose and Its Acetates: Formation and Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella L. Morgado

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results obtained on the preparation of films composed of linter cellulose and the corresponding acetates. The acetylation was carried out in the LiCl/DMAc solvent system. Films were prepared from a LiCl/DMAc solution of cellulose acetates (degree of substitution, DS 0.8–2.9 mixed with linter cellulose (5, 10 and 15 wt %. Detailed characterization of the films revealed the following: (i they exhibited fibrous structures on their surfaces. The strong tendency of the linter cellulose chains to aggregate in LiCl/DMAc suggests that these fibrous elements consist of cellulose chains, as can be deduced from SEM images of the film of cellulose proper; (ii the cellulose acetate films obtained from samples with DS 2.1 and 2.9 exhibited microspheres on the surface, whose formation seems to be favored for acetates with higher DS; (iii AFM analysis showed that, in general, the presence of cellulose increased both the asperity thickness and the surface roughness of the analyzed films, indicating that cellulose chains are at least partially organized in domains and not molecularly dispersed between acetate chains; and (iv the films prepared from cellulose and acetates exhibited lower hygroscopicity than the acetate films, also suggesting that the cellulose chains are organized into domains, probably due to strong intermolecular interactions. The linter and sisal acetates (the latter from a prior study, and their respective films, were prepared using the same processes; however, the two sets of films presented more differences (as in humidity absorption, optical, and tensile properties than similarities (as in some morphological aspects, most likely due to the different properties of the starting materials. Potential applications of the films prepared in tissue engineering scaffold coatings and/or drug delivery are mentioned.

  12. Bio-based Films from Linter Cellulose and Its Acetates: Formation and Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Daniella L; Rodrigues, Bruno V M; Almeida, Erika V R; Seoud, Omar A El; Frollini, Elisabete

    2013-06-14

    This paper describes the results obtained on the preparation of films composed of linter cellulose and the corresponding acetates. The acetylation was carried out in the LiCl/DMAc solvent system. Films were prepared from a LiCl/DMAc solution of cellulose acetates (degree of substitution, DS 0.8-2.9) mixed with linter cellulose (5, 10 and 15 wt %). Detailed characterization of the films revealed the following: (i) they exhibited fibrous structures on their surfaces. The strong tendency of the linter cellulose chains to aggregate in LiCl/DMAc suggests that these fibrous elements consist of cellulose chains, as can be deduced from SEM images of the film of cellulose proper; (ii) the cellulose acetate films obtained from samples with DS 2.1 and 2.9 exhibited microspheres on the surface, whose formation seems to be favored for acetates with higher DS; (iii) AFM analysis showed that, in general, the presence of cellulose increased both the asperity thickness and the surface roughness of the analyzed films, indicating that cellulose chains are at least partially organized in domains and not molecularly dispersed between acetate chains; and (iv) the films prepared from cellulose and acetates exhibited lower hygroscopicity than the acetate films, also suggesting that the cellulose chains are organized into domains, probably due to strong intermolecular interactions. The linter and sisal acetates (the latter from a prior study), and their respective films, were prepared using the same processes; however, the two sets of films presented more differences (as in humidity absorption, optical, and tensile properties) than similarities (as in some morphological aspects), most likely due to the different properties of the starting materials. Potential applications of the films prepared in tissue engineering scaffold coatings and/or drug delivery are mentioned.

  13. Real-time Monitoring of Intermediates Reveals the Reaction Pathway in the Thiol-Disulfide Exchange between Disulfide Bond Formation Protein A (DsbA) and B (DsbB) on a Membrane-immobilized Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) System*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Kenjiro; Furusawa, Hiroyuki; Okahata, Yoshio

    2013-01-01

    Disulfide bond formation protein B (DsbBS-S,S-S) is an inner membrane protein in Escherichia coli that has two disulfide bonds (S-S, S-S) that play a role in oxidization of a pair of cysteine residues (SH, SH) in disulfide bond formation protein A (DsbASH,SH). The oxidized DsbAS-S, with one disulfide bond (S-S), can oxidize proteins with SH groups for maturation of a folding preprotein. Here, we have described the transient kinetics of the oxidation reaction between DsbASH,SH and DsbBS-S,S-S. We immobilized DsbBS-S,S-S embedded in lipid bilayers on the surface of a 27-MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) device to detect both formation and degradation of the reaction intermediate (DsbA-DsbB), formed via intermolecular disulfide bonds, as a mass change in real time. The obtained kinetic parameters (intermediate formation, reverse, and oxidation rate constants (kf, kr, and kcat, respectively) indicated that the two pairs of cysteine residues in DsbBS-S,S-S were more important for the stability of the DsbA-DsbB intermediate than ubiquinone, an electron acceptor for DsbBS-S,S-S. Our data suggested that the reaction pathway of almost all DsbASH,SH oxidation processes would proceed through this stable intermediate, avoiding the requirement for ubiquinone. PMID:24145032

  14. Ion Formation from Organic Solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-04

    contributed papers. The first of FAB. She described the was by K. Busch (Purdue Univ.) on characteristics of a good matrix, the internal energy effects...addi- by G. Cooks and Busch to describe tion, the likely role of the all "soft" ionization techniques. liquid matrix was to replenish Busch discussed...workshop dealt with ion formation ionization, and a localized, processes. The first paper was nonequilibrium thermal process. by H. Block ( Fritz Haber Insti

  15. Pattern Formation in Vertebrate Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-05-08

    with several modifications. Dreisch separated the firs t two cel l s of sea urchins by agi t ation, and the development of the s urviving cell s...the fate of a cell is a function of the position of the cell in the embryo has emerged as one of the main components of c urrent pattern formation...the relevance of s pecific divisions of the cyt oplasm during development. Driesch found that the single factor, calcium was necessary for deve

  16. The Black Hole Formation Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-02-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P BH(M ZAMS). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P BH(M ZAMS) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P BH(M ZAMS) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P BH(M ZAMS) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment.

  17. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kibble, T.W.B.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of a system of strings created at a phase transition early in the history of the universe is reviewed. The two possible end points are a string-dominated universe, which behaves much like a matter-dominated one, and a scaling solution, in which the persistence length of the system of strings scales with the horizon distance. The latter is the basis for a very attractive theory of galaxy formation. (Auth.)

  18. THE BLACK HOLE FORMATION PROBABILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clausen, Drew; Piro, Anthony L.; Ott, Christian D.

    2015-01-01

    A longstanding question in stellar evolution is which massive stars produce black holes (BHs) rather than neutron stars (NSs) upon death. It has been common practice to assume that a given zero-age main sequence (ZAMS) mass star (and perhaps a given metallicity) simply produces either an NS or a BH, but this fails to account for a myriad of other variables that may effect this outcome, such as spin, binarity, or even stochastic differences in the stellar structure near core collapse. We argue that instead a probabilistic description of NS versus BH formation may be better suited to account for the current uncertainties in understanding how massive stars die. We present an initial exploration of the probability that a star will make a BH as a function of its ZAMS mass, P BH (M ZAMS ). Although we find that it is difficult to derive a unique P BH (M ZAMS ) using current measurements of both the BH mass distribution and the degree of chemical enrichment by massive stars, we demonstrate how P BH (M ZAMS ) changes with these various observational and theoretical uncertainties. We anticipate that future studies of Galactic BHs and theoretical studies of core collapse will refine P BH (M ZAMS ) and argue that this framework is an important new step toward better understanding BH formation. A probabilistic description of BH formation will be useful as input for future population synthesis studies that are interested in the formation of X-ray binaries, the nature and event rate of gravitational wave sources, and answering questions about chemical enrichment

  19. Pattern formation in optical resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, C O; Larionova, Ye

    2007-01-01

    We review pattern formation in optical resonators. The emphasis is on 'particle-like' structures such as vortices or spatial solitons. On the one hand, similarities impose themselves with other fields of physics (condensed matter, phase transitions, particle physics, fluds/super fluids). On the other hand the feedback is led by the resonator mirrors to bi- and multi-stability of the spatial field structure, which is the basic ingredient for optical information processing. The spatial dimension or the 'parallelism' is the strength of optics compared to electronics (and will have to be employed to fully use the advantages optics offers in information processing). But even in the 'serial' processing tasks of telecoms (e.g. information buffering) spatial resonator solitons can do better than the schemes proposed so far-including 'slow light'. Pattern formation in optical resonators will likely be the key to brain-like information processing like cognition, learning and association; to complement the precise but limited algorithmic capabilities of electronic processing. But even in the short term it will be useful for solving serial optical processing problems. The prospects for technical uses of pattern formation in resonators are one motivation for this research. The fundamental similarities with other fields of physics, on the other hand, inspire transfer of concepts between fields; something that has always proven fruitful for gaining deeper insights or for solving technical problems

  20. The formation of star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Bradley C.

    The ability of HST to resolve objects ten times smaller than possible from the ground has re-juvenated the study of young star clusters. A recurrent morphological theme found in nearby resolved systems is the observation of young (typically 1-10 Myr), massive (103 - 104 Msolar), compact (ρ≍105 Msolar pc-3) clusters which have evacuated the gas and dust from a spherical region around themselves. New stars are being triggered into formation along the edges of the envelopes, with pillars (similar to the Eagle Nebula) of molecular gas streaming away from the regions of star formation. The prototype for these objects is 30 Doradus. Another major theme has been the discovery of large numbers of young (typically 1-500 Myr), massive (103 - 108 Msolar), compact star clusters in merging, starbursting, and even some barred and spiral galaxies. The brightest of these clusters have all the attributes expected of protoglobular clusters, hence allowing us to study the formation of globular clusters in the local universe rather than trying to ascertain how they formed ≍14 Gyr ago. The prototype is the Antennae Galaxy.