WorldWideScience

Sample records for intermolecular beta-sheet formation

  1. Effects of Intermolecular Coupling on Excimer Formation and Singlet Fission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauck, Catherine McKay

    compelling strategy for improving organic photovoltaic device efficiencies. The formation of triplet states through singlet fission can be characterized using femtosecond visible transient absorption spectroscopy (fsTA). However, in PDI, the triplet-triplet absorption spectrum is strongly overlapped with the ground state bleach absorption. Here, a dyad molecule where PDI is covalently attached to an apocarotene triplet acceptor is synthesized, and studied in solution aggregates and thin films with fsTA, to demonstrate that apocarotene can be used as a sensitive spectral tag for triplet formation in PDI due to triplet-triplet energy transfer from PDI to the carotenoid. The efficiency of singlet fission in DPP can be tuned by modulating the crystal packing in the solid state. By synthesizing 3,6-bis(thiophene) derivatives of DPP with a series of different sidechains, thin film DPP singlet fission is related to the crystal structure intermolecular geometries, to more precisely determine the relationship between interchromophore coupling and singlet fission rate, which will inform the design of more robust chromophores for singlet fission. Finally, the role of the dielectric environment and stabilization of charge transfer configurations and charge transfer states is explored in DPP singlet fission, through aqueous nanoparticles of 3,6-bis(phenylthiophene) with different surface area-to-volume ratios, and a covalently linked dimer of DPP in solvents of varying polarity which can undergo symmetry-breaking charge separation.

  2. Folding control in cyclic peptides through N-methylation pattern selection: formation of antiparallel beta-sheet dimers, double reverse turns and supramolecular helices by 3alpha,gamma cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amorín, Manuel; Castedo, Luis; Granja, Juan R

    2008-01-01

    Peptide foldamers constitute a growing class of nanomaterials with potential applications in a wide variety of chemical, medical and technological fields. Here we describe the preparation and structural characteristics of a new class of cyclic peptide foldamers (3alpha,gamma-CPs) that, depending on their backbone N-methylation patterns and the medium, can either remain as flat rings that dimerize through arrays of hydrogen bonds of antiparallel beta-sheet type, or can fold into twisted double reverse turns that, in the case of double gamma-turns, associate in nonpolar solvents to form helical supramolecular structures. A 3alpha,gamma-CP consists of a number of multiples of a repeat unit made up of four amino acid residues of alternating chirality: three corresponding to alpha-amino acids and one to a gamma-amino acid (a cis-3-aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acid).

  3. Orientation determination of interfacial beta-sheet structures in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khoi Tan; King, John Thomas; Chen, Zhan

    2010-07-01

    Structural information such as orientations of interfacial proteins and peptides is important for understanding properties and functions of such biological molecules, which play crucial roles in biological applications and processes such as antimicrobial selectivity, membrane protein activity, biocompatibility, and biosensing performance. The alpha-helical and beta-sheet structures are the most widely encountered secondary structures in peptides and proteins. In this paper, for the first time, a method to quantify the orientation of the interfacial beta-sheet structure using a combined attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopic (ATR-FTIR) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopic study was developed. As an illustration of the methodology, the orientation of tachyplesin I, a 17 amino acid peptide with an antiparallel beta-sheet, adsorbed to polymer surfaces as well as associated with a lipid bilayer was determined using the regular and chiral SFG spectra, together with polarized ATR-FTIR amide I signals. Both the tilt angle (theta) and the twist angle (psi) of the beta-sheet at interfaces are determined. The developed method in this paper can be used to obtain in situ structural information of beta-sheet components in complex molecules. The combination of this method and the existing methodology that is currently used to investigate alpha-helical structures will greatly broaden the application of optical spectroscopy in physical chemistry, biochemistry, biophysics, and structural biology.

  4. Evidence for novel beta-sheet structures in Iowa mutant beta-amyloid fibrils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert; Sciarretta, Kimberly L; Orgel, Joseph P R O; Meredith, Stephen C

    2009-07-07

    Asp23-to-Asn mutation within the coding sequence of beta-amyloid, called the Iowa mutation, is associated with early onset, familial Alzheimer's disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, in which patients develop neuritic plaques and massive vascular deposition predominantly of the mutant peptide. We examined the mutant peptide, D23N-Abeta40, by electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils considerably faster than the wild-type peptide (k = 3.77 x 10(-3) min(-1) and 1.07 x 10(-4) min(-1) for D23N-Abeta40 and the wild-type peptide WT-Abeta40, respectively) and without a lag phase. Electron microscopy shows that D23N-Abeta40 forms fibrils with multiple morphologies. X-ray fiber diffraction shows a cross-beta pattern, with a sharp reflection at 4.7 A and a broad reflection at 9.4 A, which is notably smaller than the value for WT-Abeta40 fibrils (10.4 A). Solid-state NMR measurements indicate molecular level polymorphism of the fibrils, with only a minority of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils containing the in-register, parallel beta-sheet structure commonly found in WT-Abeta40 fibrils and most other amyloid fibrils. Antiparallel beta-sheet structures in the majority of fibrils are indicated by measurements of intermolecular distances through (13)C-(13)C and (15)N-(13)C dipole-dipole couplings. An intriguing possibility exists that there is a relationship between the aberrant structure of D23N-Abeta40 fibrils and the unusual vasculotropic clinical picture in these patients.

  5. Formation of an intermolecular charge-transfer compound in UHV codeposited tetramethoxypyrene and tetracyanoquinodimethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medjanik, K.; Perkert, S.; Naghavi, S.

    2010-01-01

    Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV)-deposited films of the mixed phase of tetramethoxypyrene and tetracyanoquinodimethane (TMP -TCNQ ) on gold have been studied using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS......). The formation of an intermolecular charge-transfer (CT) compound is evident from the appearance of new reflexes in XRD (d =0.894nm and d =0.677nm). A softening of the CN stretching vibration (redshift by 7 cm⊃-1) of TCNQ is visible in the IR spectra, being indicative of a CT on the order of 0.3e from TMP...

  6. Interactions between two beta-sheets. Energetics of beta/beta packing in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K C; Némethy, G; Rumsey, S; Tuttle, R W; Scheraga, H A

    1986-04-20

    The analysis of the interactions between regularly folded segments of the polypeptide chain contributes to an understanding of the energetics of protein folding. Conformational energy-minimization calculations have been carried out to determine the favorable ways of packing two right-twisted beta-sheets. The packing of two five-stranded beta-sheets was investigated, with the strands having the composition CH3CO-(L-Ile)6-NHCH3 in one beta-sheet and CH3CO-(L-Val)6-NHCH3 in the other. Two distinct classes of low-energy packing arrangements were found. In the class with lowest energies, the strands of the two beta-sheets are aligned nearly parallel (or antiparallel) with each other, with a preference for a negative orientation angle, because this arrangement corresponds to the best complementary packing of the two twisted saddle-shaped beta-sheets. In the second class, with higher interaction energies, the strands of the two beta-sheets are oriented nearly perpendicular to each other. While the surfaces of the two beta-sheets are not complementary in this arrangement, there is good packing between the corner of one beta-sheet and the interior part of the surface of the other, resulting in a favorable energy of packing. Both classes correspond to frequently observed orientations of beta-sheets in proteins. In proteins, the second class of packing is usually observed when the two beta-sheets are covalently linked, i.e. when a polypeptide strand passes from one beta-sheet to the other, but we have shown here that a large contribution to the stabilization of this packing arrangement arises from noncovalent interactions.

  7. Modeling the Alzheimer Abeta17-42 fibril architecture: tight intermolecular sheet-sheet association and intramolecular hydrated cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie; Jang, Hyunbum; Ma, Buyong; Tsai, Chung-Jun; Nussinov, Ruth

    2007-11-01

    We investigate Abeta(17-42) protofibril structures in solution using molecular dynamics simulations. Recently, NMR and computations modeled the Abeta protofibril as a longitudinal stack of U-shaped molecules, creating an in-parallel beta-sheet and loop spine. Here we study the molecular architecture of the fibril formed by spine-spine association. We model in-register intermolecular beta-sheet-beta-sheet associations and study the consequences of Alzheimer's mutations (E22G, E22Q, E22K, and M35A) on the organization. We assess the structural stability and association force of Abeta oligomers with different sheet-sheet interfaces. Double-layered oligomers associating through the C-terminal-C-terminal interface are energetically more favorable than those with the N-terminal-N-terminal interface, although both interfaces exhibit high structural stability. The C-terminal-C-terminal interface is essentially stabilized by hydrophobic and van der Waals (shape complementarity via M35-M35 contacts) intermolecular interactions, whereas the N-terminal-N-terminal interface is stabilized by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Hence, shape complementarity, or the "steric zipper" motif plays an important role in amyloid formation. On the other hand, the intramolecular Abeta beta-strand-loop-beta-strand U-shaped motif creates a hydrophobic cavity with a diameter of 6-7 A, allowing water molecules and ions to conduct through. The hydrated hydrophobic cavities may allow optimization of the sheet association and constitute a typical feature of fibrils, in addition to the tight sheet-sheet association. Thus, we propose that Abeta fiber architecture consists of alternating layers of tight packing and hydrated cavities running along the fibrillar axis, which might be possibly detected by high-resolution imaging.

  8. Rapid model building of beta-sheets in electron-density maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C

    2010-03-01

    A method for rapidly building beta-sheets into electron-density maps is presented. beta-Strands are identified as tubes of high density adjacent to and nearly parallel to other tubes of density. The alignment and direction of each strand are identified from the pattern of high density corresponding to carbonyl and C(beta) atoms along the strand averaged over all repeats present in the strand. The beta-strands obtained are then assembled into a single atomic model of the beta-sheet regions. The method was tested on a set of 42 experimental electron-density maps at resolutions ranging from 1.5 to 3.8 A. The beta-sheet regions were nearly completely built in all but two cases, the exceptions being one structure at 2.5 A resolution in which a third of the residues in beta-sheets were built and a structure at 3.8 A in which under 10% were built. The overall average r.m.s.d. of main-chain atoms in the residues built using this method compared with refined models of the structures was 1.5 A.

  9. A new perspective on beta-sheet structures using vibrational Raman optical activity: From poly(L-lysine) to the prion protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McColl, L.H.; Blanch, E.W.; Gill, A.C.

    2003-01-01

    -sheet poly(L-lysine) contains up-and-down antiparallel beta-sheets based on the hairpin motif. The ROA spectrum of beta-sheet poly(L-lysine) was compared with ROA data on a number of native proteins containing different types of beta-sheet. Amide I and amide II ROA band patterns observed in beta-sheet poly(L-ly...

  10. Structural analysis of alanine tripeptide with antiparallel and parallel beta-sheet structures in relation to the analysis of mixed beta-sheet structures in Samia cynthia ricini silk protein fiber using solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Tetsuo; Okonogi, Michi; Nakazawa, Yasumoto; Yamauchi, Kazuo

    2006-05-10

    The structural analysis of natural protein fibers with mixed parallel and antiparallel beta-sheet structures by solid-state NMR is reported. To obtain NMR parameters that can characterize these beta-sheet structures, (13)C solid-state NMR experiments were performed on two alanine tripeptide samples: one with 100% parallel beta-sheet structure and the other with 100% antiparallel beta-sheet structure. All (13)C resonances of the tripeptides could be assigned by a comparison of the methyl (13)C resonances of Ala(3) with different [3-(13)C]Ala labeling schemes and also by a series of RFDR (radio frequency driven recoupling) spectra observed by changing mixing times. Two (13)C resonances observed for each Ala residue could be assigned to two nonequivalent molecules per unit cell. Differences in the (13)C chemical shifts and (13)C spin-lattice relaxation times (T(1)) were observed between the two beta-sheet structures. Especially, about 3 times longer T(1) values were obtained for parallel beta-sheet structure as compared to those of antiparallel beta-sheet structure, which could be explicable by the difference in the hydrogen-bond networks of both structures. This very large difference in T(1) becomes a good measure to differentiate between parallel or antiparallel beta-sheet structures. These differences in the NMR parameters found for the tripeptides may be applied to assign the parallel and antiparallel beta-sheet (13)C resonances in the asymmetric and broad methyl spectra of [3-(13)C]Ala silk protein fiber of a wild silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini.

  11. Interactions between an alpha-helix and a beta-sheet. Energetics of alpha/beta packing in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K C; Némethy, G; Rumsey, S; Tuttle, R W; Scheraga, H A

    1985-12-05

    Conformational energy computations have been carried out to determine the favorable ways of packing a right-handed alpha-helix on a right-twisted antiparallel or parallel beta-sheet. Co-ordinate transformations have been developed to relate the position and orientation of the alpha-helix to the beta-sheet. The packing was investigated for a CH3CO-(L-Ala)16-NHCH3 alpha-helix interacting with five-stranded beta-sheets composed of CH3CO-(L-Val)6-NHCH3 chains. All internal and external variables for both the alpha-helix and the beta-sheet were allowed to change during energy minimization. Four distinct classes of low-energy packing arrangements were found for the alpha-helix interacting with both the parallel and the anti-parallel beta-sheet. The classes differ in the orientation of the axis of the alpha-helix relative to the direction of the strands of the right-twisted beta-sheet. In the class with the most favorable arrangement, the alpha-helix is oriented along the strands of the beta-sheet, as a result of attractive non-bonded side-chain-side-chain interactions along the entire length of the alpha-helix. A class with nearly perpendicular orientation of the helix axis to the strands is also of low energy, because it allows similarly extensive attractive interactions. In the other two classes, the helix is oriented diagonally relative to the strands of the beta-sheet. In one of them, it interacts with the convex surface near the middle of the saddle-shaped twisted beta-sheet. In the other, it is oriented along the concave diagonal of the beta-sheet and, therefore, it interacts only with the corner regions of the sheet, so that this packing is energetically less favorable. The packing arrangements involving an antiparallel and a parallel beta-sheet are generally similar, although the antiparallel beta-sheet has been found to be more flexible. The major features of 163 observed alpha/beta packing arrangements in 37 proteins are accounted for in terms of the computed

  12. Thermally Induced Alpha-Helix to Beta-Sheet Transition in Regenerated Silk Fibers and Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummy,L.; Phillips, D.; Stone, M.; Farmer, B.; Naik, R.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of thin films cast from regenerated solutions of Bombyx mori cocoon silk in hexafluoroisopropyl alcohol (HFIP) was studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction during heating. A solid-state conformational transition from an alpha-helical structure to the well-known beta-sheet silk II structure occurred at a temperature of approximately 140 degrees C. The transition appeared to be homogeneous, as both phases do not coexist within the resolution of the current study. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of the films showed an endothermic melting peak followed by an exothermic crystallization peak, both occurring near 140 degrees C. Oriented fibers were also produced that displayed this helical molecular conformation. Subsequent heating above the structural transition temperature produced oriented beta-sheet fibers very similar in structure to B. mori cocoon fibers. Heat treatment of silk films at temperatures well below their degradation temperature offers a controllable route to materials with well-defined structures and mechanical behavior.

  13. PB1-F2 influenza A virus protein adopts a beta-sheet conformation and forms amyloid fibers in membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Christophe; Al Bazzal, Ali; Vidic, Jasmina; Février, Vincent; Bourdieu, Christiane; Bouguyon, Edwige; Le Goffic, Ronan; Vautherot, Jean-François; Bernard, Julie; Moudjou, Mohammed; Noinville, Sylvie; Chich, Jean-François; Da Costa, Bruno; Rezaei, Human; Delmas, Bernard

    2010-04-23

    The influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein, encoded by an alternative reading frame in the PB1 polymerase gene, displays a high sequence polymorphism and is reported to contribute to viral pathogenesis in a sequence-specific manner. To gain insights into the functions of PB1-F2, the molecular structure of several PB1-F2 variants produced in Escherichia coli was investigated in different environments. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that all variants have a random coil secondary structure in aqueous solution. When incubated in trifluoroethanol polar solvent, all PB1-F2 variants adopt an alpha-helix-rich structure, whereas incubated in acetonitrile, a solvent of medium polarity mimicking the membrane environment, they display beta-sheet secondary structures. Incubated with asolectin liposomes and SDS micelles, PB1-F2 variants also acquire a beta-sheet structure. Dynamic light scattering revealed that the presence of beta-sheets is correlated with an oligomerization/aggregation of PB1-F2. Electron microscopy showed that PB1-F2 forms amorphous aggregates in acetonitrile. In contrast, at low concentrations of SDS, PB1-F2 variants exhibited various abilities to form fibers that were evidenced as amyloid fibers in a thioflavin T assay. Using a recombinant virus and its PB1-F2 knock-out mutant, we show that PB1-F2 also forms amyloid structures in infected cells. Functional membrane permeabilization assays revealed that the PB1-F2 variants can perforate membranes at nanomolar concentrations but with activities found to be sequence-dependent and not obviously correlated with their differential ability to form amyloid fibers. All of these observations suggest that PB1-F2 could be involved in physiological processes through different pathways, permeabilization of cellular membranes, and amyloid fiber formation.

  14. Intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, I.G.; Rodimova, O.B.; AN SSSR, Tomsk. Inst. Optiki Atmosfery)

    1978-01-01

    The present state of the intermolecular interaction theory is described. The general physical picture of the molecular interactions is given, the relative contributions of interactions of different types are analyzed (electrostatic, resonance, induction, dispersion, relativistic, magnetostatic and exchange), and the main ones in each range of separations are picked out. The methods of the potential curve calculations are considered, specific for definite separations between the interacting systems. The special attention is paid to the analysis of approximations used in different theoretical calculation methods

  15. Probing alpha-helical and beta-sheet structures of peptides at solid/liquid interfaces with SFG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyun; Wang, Jie; Sniadecki, Jason J; Even, Mark A; Chen, Zhan

    2005-03-29

    We demonstrated that sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy can distinguish different secondary structures of proteins or peptides adsorbed at solid/liquid interfaces. The SFG spectrum for tachyplesin I at the polystyrene (PS)/solution interface has a fingerprint peak corresponding to the B1/B3 mode of the antiparallel beta-sheet. This peak disappeared upon the addition of dithiothreitol, which can disrupt the beta-sheet structure. The SFG spectrum indicative of the MSI594 alpha-helical structure was observed at the PS/MSI594 solution interface. This research validates SFG as a powerful technique for revealing detailed secondary structures of interfacial proteins and peptides.

  16. Intermolecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelbart, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    In this article some of the theoretical background is presented for the following papers on 'Intermolecular Spectroscopy and Dynamical Properties of Dense Systems'. In Section 1 we outline a simple semi-classical description of the interaction between optical radiation and matter. The motion of a many-body polarizability is introduced; limiting forms of this complicated quantity lead to the familiar cases of light scattering spectra. In Section 2 we consider the linear response approximation, and the equation of motion for the many-body density matrix is solved to first order in the matter-radiation interaction. The often quoted fluctuation-dissipation theorem and the time-dependent, equilibrium correlation functions are discussed. Section 3 treats the problem of the local field. In Section 4 we consider the special case of collision-induced light scattering by atomic fluids in the low-density limit. This allows us to focus on determining the interaction polarizability for simple gases. Finally, in Section 5 we distinguish between collision-induced and multiple light scattering, and discuss the double-light-scattering analyses which provide new information about critical and thermodynamically unstable fluids. (KBE)

  17. Markov analysis of alpha-helical, beta-sheet and random coil regions of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macchiato, M.; Tramontano, A.

    1983-01-01

    The rules up to now used to predict the spatial configuration of proteins from their primary structure are mostly based on the recurrence analysis of some doublets, triplets and so on of contiguous amino acids, but they do not take into account the correlation characteristics of the whole amino acid sequence. A statistical analysis of amino acid sequences for the alpha-helical, beta-sheet and random coil regions of about twenty proteins with known secondary structure by considering correlations effects has been carried out. The obtained results demonstrate that these sequences are at least a second-order Markov chain, i.e. they appear as if they were generated by a source that remembers at least the two aminoacids before the one being generated and that these two previous symbols influence the present choice

  18. Characterization of the conformational space of a triple-stranded beta-sheet forming peptide with molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soto, P; Colombo, G

    2004-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on a series of mutants of the 20 amino acid peptide Betanova in order to critically assess the ability of MD simulations to reproduce the folding and stability of small beta-sheet-forming peptides on currently accessible timescales. Simulations

  19. Density functional calculations of backbone 15N shielding tensors in beta-sheet and turn residues of protein G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Ling; Kosov, Daniel S.; Fushman, David

    2011-01-01

    We performed density functional calculations of backbone 15 N shielding tensors in the regions of beta-sheet and turns of protein G. The calculations were carried out for all twenty-four beta-sheet residues and eight beta-turn residues in the protein GB3 and the results were compared with the available experimental data from solid-state and solution NMR measurements. Together with the alpha-helix data, our calculations cover 39 out of the 55 residues (or 71%) in GB3. The applicability of several computational models developed previously (Cai et al. in J Biomol NMR 45:245–253, 2009) to compute 15 N shielding tensors of alpha-helical residues is assessed. We show that the proposed quantum chemical computational model is capable of predicting isotropic 15 N chemical shifts for an entire protein that are in good correlation with experimental data. However, the individual components of the predicted 15 N shielding tensor agree with experiment less well: the computed values show much larger spread than the experimental data, and there is a profound difference in the behavior of the tensor components for alpha-helix/turns and beta-sheet residues. We discuss possible reasons for this.

  20. A general approach to intermolecular carbonylation of arene C-H bonds to ketones through catalytic aroyl triflate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison Kinney, R.; Tjutrins, Jevgenijs; Torres, Gerardo M.; Liu, Nina Jiabao; Kulkarni, Omkar; Arndtsen, Bruce A.

    2018-02-01

    The development of metal-catalysed methods to functionalize inert C-H bonds has become a dominant research theme in the past decade as an approach to efficient synthesis. However, the incorporation of carbon monoxide into such reactions to form valuable ketones has to date proved a challenge, despite its potential as a straightforward and green alternative to Friedel-Crafts reactions. Here we describe a new approach to palladium-catalysed C-H bond functionalization in which carbon monoxide is used to drive the generation of high-energy electrophiles. This offers a method to couple the useful features of metal-catalysed C-H functionalization (stable and available reagents) and electrophilic acylations (broad scope and selectivity), and synthesize ketones simply from aryl iodides, CO and arenes. Notably, the reaction proceeds in an intermolecular fashion, without directing groups and at very low palladium-catalyst loadings. Mechanistic studies show that the reaction proceeds through the catalytic build-up of potent aroyl triflate electrophiles.

  1. Intermolecular effects on the radiogenic formation of electron-capture phosphorus-centered radicals. A single-crystal ESR study of diastereoisomeric precursors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagaard, O.M.; Janssen, R.A.J.; de Waal, B.F.M.; Buck, H.M. (Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands))

    1990-01-31

    ESR experiments on X-irradiated single crystals of the 2R,4S,5R and 2S,4S,5R diastereoisomers of 2-chloro-3,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1,3,2-oxazaphospholidine 2-sulfide reveal that the yield of radiogenic electron-capture reactions in the solid state strongly depends on intermolecular interactions in the crystal. In the present case a high yield of P-Cl three-electron-bond phosphoranyl radical anions is found in crystals of the 2R,4S,5R isomer, whereas no radical formation can be detected for the 2S,4S,5R isomer. An analysis of nonbonded interactions with neighboring molecules reveals that the geometry relaxation necessary for the radical stabilization is easily accommodated in crystals of the 2R,4S,SR isomer but not in the 2S,4S,5R isomer, explaining the observed difference in electron-capture efficiency. Experiments on radical formation in a MeTHF host matrix give further insight into the importance of the environment on radiogenic radical formation. The possible concurrent effect of the matrix on the electronic configuration and spin density distribution of the resulting phosphoranyl radical is discussed.

  2. Intermolecular effects on the radiogenic formation of electron-capture phosphorus-centered radicals. A single-crystal ESR study of diastereoisomeric precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aagaard, O.M.; Janssen, R.A.J.; de Waal, B.F.M.; Buck, H.M.

    1990-01-01

    ESR experiments on X-irradiated single crystals of the 2R,4S,5R and 2S,4S,5R diastereoisomers of 2-chloro-3,4-dimethyl-5-phenyl-1,3,2-oxazaphospholidine 2-sulfide reveal that the yield of radiogenic electron-capture reactions in the solid state strongly depends on intermolecular interactions in the crystal. In the present case a high yield of P-Cl three-electron-bond phosphoranyl radical anions is found in crystals of the 2R,4S,5R isomer, whereas no radical formation can be detected for the 2S,4S,5R isomer. An analysis of nonbonded interactions with neighboring molecules reveals that the geometry relaxation necessary for the radical stabilization is easily accommodated in crystals of the 2R,4S,SR isomer but not in the 2S,4S,5R isomer, explaining the observed difference in electron-capture efficiency. Experiments on radical formation in a MeTHF host matrix give further insight into the importance of the environment on radiogenic radical formation. The possible concurrent effect of the matrix on the electronic configuration and spin density distribution of the resulting phosphoranyl radical is discussed

  3. Intermolecular Formation of Two C−C Bonds across Olefins Enabled by Boron-Based Relay Strategies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hidasová, Denisa; Jahn, Ullrich

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 33 (2017), s. 9656-9658 ISSN 1433-7851 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : 1,2- metal ate rearrangement * C−C bond formation * radical reactions * transition metal catalysis * vinyl boronates Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Organic chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  4. A quantum-chemical validation about the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions in intermolecular heterocyclic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boaz Galdino Oliveira

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We have performed a detailed theoretical study in order to understand the charge density topology of the C2H4O···C2H2 and C2H4S···C2H2 heterocyclic hydrogen-bonded complexes. Through the calculations derived from Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM, it was observed the formation of hydrogen bonds and secondary interactions. Such analysis was performed through the determination of optimized geometries at B3LYP/6-31G(d,p level of theory, by which is that QTAIM topological operators were computed, such as the electronic density ρ(r, Laplacian Ñ2ρ(r, and ellipticity ε. The examination of the hydrogen bonds has been performed through the measurement of ρ(r, Ñ2ρ(r and ε between (O···H—C and (S···H—C, whereas the secondary interaction between axial hydrogen atoms Hα and carbon of acetylene. In this insight, it was verified the existence of secondary interaction only in C2H4S···C2H2 complex because its structure is propitious to form multiple interactions.

  5. Contrasting intermolecular and intramolecular exciplex formation of a 1,4-dicyano-2-methylnaphthalene-N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine dyad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, Mitsutaka; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Fujii, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Hisaji; Tamaki, Akihiro; Takeda, Motonori; Mizuno, Kazuhiko

    2010-05-07

    An intramolecular exciplex is formed upon excitation of the cyclohexane solution of the 1,4-dicyano-2-methylnaphthalene-N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine dyad, but little if any intramolecular CT complex exists in the ground state of this substance in solution. In contrast, in the crystalline state, the dyad forms an intermolecular mixed-stack CT complex in the ground state and an intermolecular exciplex when it is photoexcited.

  6. ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation of intermolecular structure formation in acetic acid-water mixtures at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengul, Mert Y.; Randall, Clive A.; van Duin, Adri C. T.

    2018-04-01

    The intermolecular structure formation in liquid and supercritical acetic acid-water mixtures was investigated using ReaxFF-based molecular dynamics simulations. The microscopic structures of acetic acid-water mixtures with different acetic acid mole fractions (1.0 ≥ xHAc ≥ 0.2) at ambient and critical conditions were examined. The potential energy surface associated with the dissociation of acetic acid molecules was calculated using a metadynamics procedure to optimize the dissociation energy of ReaxFF potential. At ambient conditions, depending on the acetic acid concentration, either acetic acid clusters or water clusters are dominant in the liquid mixture. When acetic acid is dominant (0.4 ≤ xHAc), cyclic dimers and chain structures between acetic acid molecules are present in the mixture. Both structures disappear at increased water content of the mixture. It was found by simulations that the acetic acid molecules released from these dimer and chain structures tend to stay in a dipole-dipole interaction. These structural changes are in agreement with the experimental results. When switched to critical conditions, the long-range interactions (e.g., second or fourth neighbor) disappear and the water-water and acetic acid-acetic acid structural formations become disordered. The simulated radial distribution function for water-water interactions is in agreement with experimental and computational studies. The first neighbor interactions between acetic acid and water molecules are preserved at relatively lower temperatures of the critical region. As higher temperatures are reached in the critical region, these interactions were observed to weaken. These simulations indicate that ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulations are an appropriate tool for studying supercritical water/organic acid mixtures.

  7. Multiple native-like conformations trapped via self-association-induced hydrophobic collapse of the 33-residue beta-sheet domain from platelet factor 4.

    OpenAIRE

    Ilyina, E; Mayo, K H

    1995-01-01

    Native platelet factor 4 (PF4) (70 residues) has a hydrophobic three-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet domain on to which is folded an amphipathic C-terminal alpha-helix and an aperiodic N-terminal domain. The 33-amino acid beta-sheet domain from PF4 (residues 23-55) has been synthesized and studied by c.d. and n.m.r. At 10 degrees C and low concentration, peptide 23-55 appears to exist in aqueous solution in a random-coil distribution of highly flexible conformational states. Some preferred ...

  8. Intermolecular and surface forces

    CERN Document Server

    Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2011-01-01

    This reference describes the role of various intermolecular and interparticle forces in determining the properties of simple systems such as gases, liquids and solids, with a special focus on more complex colloidal, polymeric and biological systems. The book provides a thorough foundation in theories and concepts of intermolecular forces, allowing researchers and students to recognize which forces are important in any particular system, as well as how to control these forces. This third edition is expanded into three sections and contains five new chapters over the previous edition.· starts fr

  9. Effect of secondary structure on the potential of mean force for poly-L-lysine in the alpha-Helix and beta-sheet conformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigsby, J.J.; Blanch, H.W.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    2001-10-30

    Because poly-L-lysine (PLL) can exist in the {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet conformation depending on solution preparation and solution conditions, PLL is a suitable candidate to probe the dependence of protein interactions on secondary structure. The osmotic second virial coefficient and weight-average molecular weight are reported from low-angle laser-light scattering measurements for PLL as a function of NaCl concentration, pH, and {alpha}-helix or {beta}-sheet content. Interactions between PLL molecules become more attractive as salt concentration increases due to screening of PLL charge by salt ions and at low salt concentration become more attractive as pH increases due to decreased net charge on PLL. The experimental results show that interactions are stronger for the {beta}-sheet conformation than for the {alpha}-helix conformation. A spherically-symmetric model for the potential of mean force is used to account for specific interactions not described by DLVO theory and to show how differences in secondary structure affect PLL interactions.

  10. Microphase Separation Controlled beta-Sheet Crystallization Kinetics in Fibrous Proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, X.; Lu, Q.; Kaplan, D.; Cebe, P.

    2009-01-01

    Silk is a naturally occurring fibrous protein with a multiblock chain architecture. As such, it has many similarities with synthetic block copolymers, including the possibility for e-sheet crystallization restricted within the crystallizable blocks. The mechanism of isothermal crystallization kinetics of e-sheet crystals in silk multiblock fibrous proteins is reported in this study. Kinetics theories, such as Avrami analysis which was established for studies of synthetic polymer crystal growth, are for the first time extended to investigate protein self-assembly in e-sheet rich Bombyx mori silk fibroin samples, using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and synchrotron real-time wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS). The Avrami exponent, n, was close to 2 for all methods and crystallization temperatures, indicating formation of e-sheet crystals in silk proteins is different from the 3-D spherulitic crystal growth found in synthetic polymers. Observations by scanning electron microscopy support the view that the protein structures vary during the different stages of crystal growth, and show a microphase separation pattern after chymotrypsin enzyme biodegradation. We present a model to explain the crystallization of the multiblock silk fibroin protein, by analogy to block copolymers: crystallization of e-sheets occurs under conditions of geometrical restriction caused by phase separation of the crystallizable and uncrystallizable blocks. This crystallization model could be widely applicable in other proteins with multiblock (i.e., crystallizable and noncrystallizable) domains.

  11. Simulations of molecular self-assembled monolayers on surfaces: packing structures, formation processes and functions tuned by intermolecular and interfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jin; Li, Wei; Chen, Shuang; Ma, Jing

    2016-08-17

    Surfaces modified with a functional molecular monolayer are essential for the fabrication of nano-scale electronics or machines with novel physical, chemical, and/or biological properties. Theoretical simulation based on advanced quantum chemical and classical models is at present a necessary tool in the development, design, and understanding of the interfacial nanostructure. The nanoscale surface morphology, growth processes, and functions are controlled by not only the electronic structures (molecular energy levels, dipole moments, polarizabilities, and optical properties) of building units but also the subtle balance between intermolecular and interfacial interactions. The switchable surfaces are also constructed by introducing stimuli-responsive units like azobenzene derivatives. To bridge the gap between experiments and theoretical models, opportunities and challenges for future development of modelling of ferroelectricity, entropy, and chemical reactions of surface-supported monolayers are also addressed. Theoretical simulations will allow us to obtain important and detailed information about the structure and dynamics of monolayer modified interfaces, which will guide the rational design and optimization of dynamic interfaces to meet challenges of controlling optical, electrical, and biological functions.

  12. Desensitization of metastable intermolecular composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, James R [South Fork, CO; Dye, Robert C [Los Alamos, NM; Foley, Timothy J [Los Alamos, NM; Higa, Kelvin T [Ridgecrest, CA; Jorgensen, Betty S [Jemez Springs, NM; Sanders, Victor E [White Rock, NM; Son, Steven F [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-04-26

    A method to substantially desensitize a metastable intermolecular composite material to electrostatic discharge and friction comprising mixing the composite material with an organic diluent and removing enough organic diluent from the mixture to form a mixture with a substantially putty-like consistency, as well as a concomitant method of recovering the metastable intermolecular composite material.

  13. A folding pathway for betapep-4 peptide 33mer: from unfolded monomers and beta-sheet sandwich dimers to well-structured tetramers.

    OpenAIRE

    Mayo, K. H.; Ilyina, E.

    1998-01-01

    It was recently reported that a de novo designed peptide 33mer, betapep-4, can form well-structured beta-sheet sandwich tetramers (Ilyina E, Roongta V, Mayo KH, 1997b, Biochemistry 36:5245-5250). For insight into the pathway of betapep-4 folding, the present study investigates the concentration dependence of betapep-4 self-association by using 1H-NMR pulsed-field gradient (PFG)-NMR diffusion measurements, and circular dichroism. Downfield chemically shifted alphaH resonances, found to arise o...

  14. Protein Secondary Structures (alpha-helix and beta-sheet) at a Cellular Levle and Protein Fractions in Relation to Rumen Degradation Behaviours of Protein: A New Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Studying the secondary structure of proteins leads to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein, and such an understanding of the structure of the whole protein is often vital to understanding its digestive behaviour and nutritive value in animals. The main protein secondary structures are the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet. The percentage of these two structures in protein secondary structures influences protein nutritive value, quality and digestive behaviour. A high percentage of {beta}-sheet structure may partly cause a low access to gastrointestinal digestive enzymes, which results in a low protein value. The objectives of the present study were to use advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform IR (S-FTIR) microspectroscopy as a new approach to reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein secondary structures of feed tissues affected by heat-processing within intact tissue at a cellular level, and to quantify protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modelling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods, in relation to protein digestive behaviours and nutritive value in the rumen, which was determined using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System. The synchrotron-based molecular chemistry research experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy. The results showed that, with S-FTIR microspectroscopy, the molecular chemistry, ultrastructural chemical make-up and nutritive characteristics could be revealed at a high ultraspatial resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m). S-FTIR microspectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of protein differed between raw and roasted golden flaxseeds in terms of the percentages and ratio of {alpha}-helixes and {beta}-sheets in the mid-IR range at the cellular level. By using multicomponent peak modelling, the results show that the roasting reduced (P <0.05) the percentage of {alpha}-helixes (from 47.1% to 36.1%: S

  15. Intermolecular-directed reactivity in solid media. Radiogenic formation of phosphorus-centered radicals in chiral diphosphine disulfides studied by ESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagaard, O.M.; Janssen, R.A.J.; de Waal, B.F.M.; Buck, H.M. (Eindhoven Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)); Kanters, J.A.; Schouten, A. (State Univ. of Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1990-07-04

    Single-crystal, powder, and frozen-matrix ESR experiments have been performed to study the radiogenic electron-capture properties of several diastereoisomeric and asymmetric diphosphine disulfides (R{sub 1}R{sub 2}P(S)P(S)R{sub 3}R{sub 4}). The principal values of the hyperfine couplings of several phosphorus-centered radical configurations are determined and related to the spin density distribution. Attention is focused on the strong differences in radiogenic properties, observed between the meso and racemic forms of phenyl- and tolyl-substituted diphosphine disulfides. The most striking result is that X irradiation of the crystalline meso compounds MePhP(S)P(S)MePh, Me(p-Tol)P(S)P(S)Me(p-Tol), and Ph(PhCH{sub 2})P(S)P(S)Ph(CH{sub 2}Ph) does not lead to the formation of a three-electron bond P-P {sigma}* radical but invariably results in configurations in which the unpaired electron is primarily localized on one half of the molecule. X irradiation of the corresponding racemic forms, on the other hand, gives rise to P-P {sigma}* configurations.

  16. Electronic transitions and intermolecular forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemert, M.C. van.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis describes two different subjects - electronic transitions and intermolecular forces - that are related mainly by the following observation: The wavenumber at which an electronic transition in an atom or molecule occurs, depends on the environment of that atom or molecule. This implies, for instance, that when a molecule becomes solvated its absorption spectrum may be shifted either to the blue or to the red side of the original gasphase spectrum. In part I attention is paid to the experimental aspects of VUV spectroscopy, both in the gasphase and in the condensed phase. In part II a series of papers are presented, dealing with the calculation of intermolecular forces (and some related topics) both for the ground state and for the excited state interactions, using different non-empirical methods. The calculations provide, among other results, a semiquantitative interpretation of the spectral blue shifts encountered in our experiments. (Auth.)

  17. Incorporating beta-turns and a turn mimetic out of context in loop 1 of the WW domain affords cooperatively folded beta-sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, R; Angeles, A R; Jäger, M; Powers, E T; Kelly, J W

    2001-06-06

    To probe the conformational requirements of loop 1 in the Pin1 WW domain, the residues at the i + 2 and i + 3 positions of a beta-turn within this loop were replaced by dPro-Gly and Asn-Gly, which are known to prefer the conformations required at the i + 1 and i + 2 positions of type II' and type I' beta-turns. Conformational specificity or lack thereof was further examined by incorporating into the i + 2 and i + 3 positions a non-alpha-amino acid-based beta-turn mimetic (4-(2'-aminoethyl)-6-dibenzofuran propionic acid residue, 1), which was designed to replace the i + 1 and i + 2 positions of beta-turns. All these Pin WW variants are monomeric and folded as discerned by analytical ultracentrifugation, NMR, and CD. They exhibit cooperative two-state transitions and display thermodynamic stability within 0.5 kcal/mol of the wild-type WW domain, demonstrating that the acquisition of native structure and stability does not require a specific sequence and, by extension, conformation within loop 1. However, it could be that these loop 1 mutations alter the kinetics of antiparallel beta-sheet folding, which will be addressed by subsequent kinetic studies.

  18. Origin of life. Primordial genetics: Information transfer in a pre-RNA world based on self-replicating beta-sheet amyloid conformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Carl Peter J

    2015-10-07

    The question of the origin of life on Earth can largely be reduced to the question of what was the first molecular replicator system that was able to replicate and evolve under the presumably very harsh conditions on the early Earth. It is unlikely that a functional RNA could have existed under such conditions and it is generally assumed that some other kind of information system preceded the RNA world. Here, I present an informational molecular system that is stable, self-replicative, environmentally responsive, and evolvable under conditions characterized by high temperatures, ultraviolet and cosmic radiation. This postulated pregenetic system is based on the amyloid fold, a functionally unique polypeptide fold characterized by a cross beta-sheet structure in which the beta strands are arranged perpendicular to the fiber axis. Beside an extraordinary structural robustness, the amyloid fold possesses a unique ability to transmit information by a three-dimensional templating mechanism. In amyloidogenesis short peptide monomers are added one by one to the growing end of the fiber. From the same monomeric subunits several structural variants of amyloid may be formed. Then, in a self-replicative mode, a specific amyloid conformer can act as a template and confer its spatially encoded information to daughter molecular entities in a repetitive way. In this process, the specific conformational information, the spatially changed organization, is transmitted; the coding element is the steric zipper structure, and recognition occurs by amino acid side chain complementarity. The amyloid information system fulfills several basic requirements of a primordial evolvable replicator system: (i) it is stable under the presumed primitive Earth conditions, (ii) the monomeric building blocks of the informational polymer can be formed from available prebiotic compounds, (iii) the system is self-assembling and self-replicative and (iv) it is adaptive to changes in the environment and

  19. Desensitization and recovery of metastable intermolecular composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, James R [South Fork, CO; Dye, Robert C [Los Alamos, NM; Foley, Timothy J [Los Alamos, NM; Higa, Kelvin T [Ridgecrest, CA; Jorgensen, Betty S [Jemez Springs, NM; Sanders, Victor E [White Rock, NM; Son, Steven F [Los Alamos, NM

    2010-09-07

    A method to substantially desensitize a metastable intermolecular composite material to electrostatic discharge and friction comprising mixing the composite material with an organic diluent and removing enough organic diluent from the mixture to form a mixture with a substantially putty-like consistency, as well as a concomitant method of recovering the metastable intermolecular composite material.

  20. Intermolecular interaction studies of glyphosate with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manon, Priti; Juglan, K. C.; Kaur, Kirandeep; Sethi, Nidhi; Kaur, J. P.

    2017-07-01

    The density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (U) of glyphosate with water have been measured on different ultrasonic frequency ranges from 1MHz, 2MHz, 3MHz & 5MHz by varying concentrations (0.05%, 0.10%, 0.15%, 0.20%, 0.25%, 0.30%, 0.35%, & 0.40%) at 30°C. The specific gravity bottle, Ostwald's viscometer and quartz crystal interferometer were used to determine density (ρ), viscosity (η) and ultrasonic velocity (U). These three factors contribute in evaluating the other parameters as acoustic impedance (Z), adiabatic compressibility (β), relaxation time (τ), intermolecular free length (Lf), free volume (Vf), ultrasonic attenuation (α/f2), Rao's constant (R), Wada's constant (W) and relative strength (R). Solute-solvent interaction is confirmed by ultrasonic velocity and viscosity values, which increases with increase in concentration indicates stronger association between solute and solvent molecules. With rise in ultrasonic frequency the interaction between the solute and solvent particles decreases. The linear variations in Rao's constant and Wada's constant suggest the absence of complex formation.

  1. Characterizing the Polymer:Fullerene Intermolecular Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Sweetnam, Sean; Vandewal, Koen; Cho, Eunkyung; Risko, Chad; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Salleo, Alberto; Bredas, Jean-Luc; McGehee, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    the polymer and fullerene, there is not a consensus on the nature of these interactions. In this work, we use a combination of Raman spectroscopy, charge transfer state absorption, and density functional theory calculations to show that the intermolecular

  2. Characterizing the Polymer:Fullerene Intermolecular Interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Sweetnam, Sean

    2016-02-02

    Polymer:fullerene solar cells depend heavily on the electronic coupling of the polymer and fullerene molecular species from which they are composed. The intermolecular interaction between the polymer and fullerene tends to be strong in efficient photovoltaic systems, as evidenced by efficient charge transfer processes and by large changes in the energetics of the polymer and fullerene when they are molecularly mixed. Despite the clear presence of these strong intermolecular interactions between the polymer and fullerene, there is not a consensus on the nature of these interactions. In this work, we use a combination of Raman spectroscopy, charge transfer state absorption, and density functional theory calculations to show that the intermolecular interactions do not appear to be caused by ground state charge transfer between the polymer and fullerene. We conclude that these intermolecular interactions are primarily van der Waals in nature. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  3. Evidence for Intramolecular Antiparallel Beta-Sheet Structure in Alpha-Synuclein Fibrils from a Combination of Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeters, Steven J.; Iyer, Aditya; Pletikapić, Galja; Kogan, Vladimir; Subramaniam, Vinod; Woutersen, Sander

    2017-01-01

    The aggregation of the intrinsically disordered protein alpha-synuclein (αS) into amyloid fibrils is thought to play a central role in the pathology of Parkinson’s disease. Using a combination of techniques (AFM, UV-CD, XRD, and amide-I 1D- and 2D-IR spectroscopy) we show that the structure of αS fibrils varies as a function of ionic strength: fibrils aggregated in low ionic-strength buffers ([NaCl] ≤ 25 mM) have a significantly different structure than fibrils grown in higher ionic-strength buffers. The observations for fibrils aggregated in low-salt buffers are consistent with an extended conformation of αS molecules, forming hydrogen-bonded intermolecular β-sheets that are loosely packed in a parallel fashion. For fibrils aggregated in high-salt buffers (including those prepared in buffers with a physiological salt concentration) the measurements are consistent with αS molecules in a more tightly-packed, antiparallel intramolecular conformation, and suggest a structure characterized by two twisting stacks of approximately five hydrogen-bonded intermolecular β-sheets each. We find evidence that the high-frequency peak in the amide-I spectrum of αS fibrils involves a normal mode that differs fundamentally from the canonical high-frequency antiparallel β-sheet mode. The high sensitivity of the fibril structure to the ionic strength might form the basis of differences in αS-related pathologies.

  4. Cohesion: a scientific history of intermolecular forces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rowlinson, J. S

    2002-01-01

    .... The final section gives an account of the successful use in the 20th century of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics to resolve most of the remaining problems. Throughout the last 300 years there have been periods of tremendous growth in our understanding of intermolecular forces but such interest proved to be unsustainable, and long periods of...

  5. Modeling Adsorption-Desorption Processes at the Intermolecular Interactions Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeeva, Vera V.; Terentev, Alexey V.

    2018-01-01

    Modeling of the surface adsorption and desorption processes, as well as the diffusion, are of considerable interest for the physical phenomenon under study in ground tests conditions. When imitating physical processes and phenomena, it is important to choose the correct parameters to describe the adsorption of gases and the formation of films on the structural materials surface. In the present research the adsorption-desorption processes on the gas-solid interface are modeled with allowance for diffusion. Approaches are proposed to describe the adsorbate distribution on the solid body surface at the intermolecular interactions level. The potentials of the intermolecular interaction of water-water, water-methane and methane-methane were used to adequately modeling the real physical and chemical processes. The energies calculated by the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ method. Computational algorithms for determining the average molecule area in a dense monolayer, are considered here. Differences in modeling approaches are also given: that of the proposed in this work and the previously approved probabilistic cellular automaton (PCA) method. It has been shown that the main difference is due to certain limitations of the PCA method. The importance of accounting the intermolecular interactions via hydrogen bonding has been indicated. Further development of the adsorption-desorption processes modeling will allow to find the conditions for of surface processes regulation by means of quantity adsorbed molecules control. The proposed approach to representing the molecular system significantly shortens the calculation time in comparison with the use of atom-atom potentials. In the future, this will allow to modeling the multilayer adsorption at a reasonable computational cost.

  6. Gold-catalyzed intermolecular coupling of sulfonylacetylene with allyl ethers: [3,3]- and [1,3]-rearrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungho Jun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Gold-catalyzed intermolecular couplings of sulfonylacetylenes with allyl ethers are reported. A cooperative polarization of alkynes both by a gold catalyst and a sulfonyl substituent resulted in an efficient intermolecular tandem carboalkoxylation. Reactions of linear allyl ethers are consistent with the [3,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement mechanism, while those of branched allyl ethers provided [3,3]- and [1,3]-rearrangement products through the formation of a tight ion–dipole pair.

  7. Digital communication through intermolecular fluorescence modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymo, F M; Giordani, S

    2001-06-14

    [see reaction]. Ultraminiaturized processors incorporating molecular components can be developed only after devising efficient strategies to communicate signals at the molecular level. We have demonstrated that a three-state molecular switch responds to ultraviolet light, visible light, and H+, attenuating the emission intensity of a fluorescent probe. Intermolecular communication is responsible for the transduction of three input signals into a single optical output. The behavior of the communicating ensemble of molecules corresponds to that of a logic circuit incorporating seven gates.

  8. Chemical origin of blue- and redshifted hydrogen bonds: intramolecular hyperconjugation and its coupling with intermolecular hyperconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An Yong

    2007-04-21

    Upon formation of a H bond Y...H-XZ, intramolecular hyperconjugation n(Z)-->sigma*(X-H) of the proton donor plays a key role in red- and blueshift characters of H bonds and must be introduced in the concepts of hyperconjugation and rehybridization. Intermolecular hyperconjugation transfers electron density from Y to sigma*(X-H) and causes elongation and stretch frequency redshift of the X-H bond; intramolecular hyperconjugation couples with intermolecular hyperconjugation and can adjust electron density in sigma*(X-H); rehybridization causes contraction and stretch frequency blueshift of the X-H bond on complexation. The three factors--intra- and intermolecular hyperconjugations and rehybridization--determine commonly red- or blueshift of the formed H bond. A proton donor that has strong intramolecular hyperconjugation often forms blueshifted H bonds.

  9. Single-molecule magnets ``without'' intermolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Vergnani, L.; Rodriguez-Douton, M. J.; Cornia, A.; Neugebauer, P.; Barra, A. L.; Sorace, L.; Sessoli, R.

    2012-02-01

    Intermolecular magnetic interactions (dipole-dipole and exchange) affect strongly the magnetic relaxation of crystals of single-molecule magnets (SMMs), especially at low temperature, where quantum tunneling of the magnetization (QTM) dominates. This leads to complex many-body problems [l]. Measurements on magnetically diluted samples are desirable to clearly sort out the behaviour of magnetically-isolated SMMs and to reveal, by comparison, the effect of intermolecular interactions. Here, we diluted a Fe4 SMM into a diamagnetic crystal lattice, affording arrays of independent and iso-oriented magnetic units. We found that the resonant tunnel transitions are much sharper, the tunneling efficiency changes significantly, and two-body QTM transitions disappear. These changes have been rationalized on the basis of a dipolar shuffling mechanism and of transverse dipolar fields, whose effect has been analyzed using a multispin model. Our findings directly prove the impact of intermolecular magnetic couplings on the SMM behaviour and disclose the magnetic response of truly-isolated giant spins in a diamagnetic crystalline environment.[4pt] [1] W. Wernsdorfer, at al, PRL 82, 3903 (1999); PRL 89, 197201 (2002); Nature 416, 406 (2002); IS Tupitsyn, PCE Stamp, NV Prokof'ev, PRB 69, 132406 (2004).

  10. Intermolecular interactions in the condensed phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders S.; Kromann, Jimmy Charnley; Jensen, Jan Halborg

    2017-01-01

    To facilitate further development of approximate quantum mechanical methods for condensed phase applications, we present a new benchmark dataset of intermolecular interaction energies in the solution phase for a set of 15 dimers, each containing one charged monomer. The reference interaction energy...... and solution phases. As most approximate QM methods are parametrized and evaluated using data measured or calculated in the gas phase, the dataset represents an important first step toward calibrating QM based methods for application in the condensed phase where polarization and exchange repulsion need...

  11. Ranking beta sheet topologies of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Helles, Glennie; Winter, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    One of the challenges of protein structure prediction is to identify long-range interactions between amino acids. To reliably predict such interactions, we enumerate, score and rank all beta-topologies (partitions of beta-strands into sheets, orderings of strands within sheets and orientations...... of paired strands) of a given protein. We show that the beta-topology corresponding to the native structure is, with high probability, among the top-ranked. Since full enumeration is very time-consuming, we also suggest a method to deal with proteins with many beta-strands. The results reported...... in this paper are highly relevant for ab initio protein structure prediction methods based on decoy generation. The top-ranked beta-topologies can be used to find initial conformations from which conformational searches can be started. They can also be used to filter decoys by removing those with poorly...

  12. beta-sheet preferences from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Bækgaard, Iben Sig Buur; Gregersen, Misha Marie

    2003-01-01

    The natural amino acids have different preferences of occurring in specific types of secondary protein structure. Simulations are performed on periodic model â-sheets of 14 different amino acids, at the level of density functional theory, employing the generalized gradient approximation. We find ...

  13. Mechanism of Intermolecular Electron Transfer in Bionanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruodis, A.; Galikova, N.; Šarka, K.; Saulė, R.; Batiuškaitė, D.; Saulis, G.

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide. Most patients are inoperable and hepatoma cells are resistant to conventional chemotherapies. Thus, the development of novel therapies for HCC treatment is of paramount importance. Amongst different alimentary factors, vitamin C and vitamin K3 In the present work, it has been shown that the treatment of mouse hepatoma MH-22A cells by vitamin C and vitamin K3 at the ratio of 100:1 greatly enhanced their cytotoxicity. When cells were subjected to vitamin C at 200 μM or to vitamin K3 at 2 μM separately, their viability reduced by only about 10%. However, when vitamins C and K3 were combined at the same concentrations, they killed more than 90% of cells. To elucidate the mechanism of the synergistic cytotoxicity of the C&K3 mixture, theoretical quantum-chemical analysis of the dynamics of intermolecular electron transfer (IET) processes within the complexes containing C (five forms) and K3 (one form) has been carried out. Optimization of the ground state complex geometry has been provided by means of GAUSSIAN03 package. Simulation of the IET has been carried out using NUVOLA package, in the framework of molecular orbitals (MO). The rate of IET has been calculated using Fermi Golden rule. The results of simulations allow us to create the preliminary model of the reaction pathway.

  14. The effect of strong intermolecular and chemical interactions on the compatibility of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Askadskii, Andrei A

    1999-01-01

    The data on compatibility and on the properties of polymer blends are generalised. The emphasis is placed on the formation of strong intermolecular interactions (dipole-dipole interaction and hydrogen bonding) between the components of blends, as well as on the chemical reactions between them. A criterion for the prediction of compatibility of polymers is described in detail. Different cases of compatibility are considered and the dependences of the glass transition temperatures on the composition of blends are analysed. The published data on the effect of strong intermolecular interactions between the blend components on the glass transition temperature are considered. The preparation of interpolymers is described whose macromolecules are composed of incompatible polymers, which leads to the so-called 'forced compatibility.' The bibliography includes 80 references.

  15. Measuring Intermolecular Binding Energies by Laser Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knochenmuss, Richard; Maity, Surajit; Féraud, Géraldine; Leutwyler, Samuel

    2017-02-22

    The ground-state dissociation energy, D0(S0), of isolated intermolecular complexes in the gas phase is a fundamental measure of the interaction strength between the molecules. We have developed a three-laser, triply resonant pump-dump-probe technique to measure dissociation energies of jet-cooled M•S complexes, where M is an aromatic chromophore and S is a closed-shell 'solvent' molecule. Stimulated emission pumping (SEP) via the S0→S1 electronic transition is used to precisely 'warm' the complex by populating high vibrational levels v" of the S0 state. If the deposited energy E(v") is less than D0(S0), the complex remains intact, and is then mass- and isomer-selectively detected by resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) with a third (probe) laser. If the pumped level is above D0(S0), the hot complex dissociates and the probe signal disappears. Combining the fluorescence or SEP spectrum of the cold complex with the SEP breakoff of the hot complex brackets D0(S0). The UV chromophores 1-naphthol and carbazole were employed; these bind either dispersively via the aromatic rings, or form a hydrogen bond via the -OH or -NH group. Dissociation energies have been measured for dispersively bound complexes with noble gases (Ne, Kr, Ar, Xe), diatomics (N2, CO), alkanes (methane to n-butane), cycloalkanes (cyclopropane to cycloheptane), and unsaturated compounds (ethene, benzene). Hydrogen-bond dissociation energies have been measured for H2O, D2O, methanol, ethanol, ethers (oxirane, oxetane), NH3 and ND3.

  16. All rights reserved Intermolecular Model Potentials and Virial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Intermolecular Model Potentials and Virial Coefficients from Acoustic Data. 1* ... method of cluster expansion. Its merit is that, ... their determination is by the analyses of isothermal p- ρ-y data ... Carlo simulation method to calculate volumetric.

  17. He-, Ne-, and Ar-phosgene intermolecular potential energy surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munteanu, Cristian R.; Henriksen, Christian; Felker, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Using the CCSD(T) model, we evaluated the intermolecular potential energy surfaces of the He-, Ne-, and Ar-phosgene complexes. We considered a representative number of intermolecular geometries for which we calculated the corresponding interaction energies with the augmented (He complex) and doub...... of the complexes, providing valuable results for future experimental investigations. Comparing our results to those previously available for other phosgene complexes, we suggest that the results for Cl2-phosgene should be revised....

  18. Crystal structure of the anti-(carcinoembryonic antigen) single-chain Fv antibody MFE-23 and a model for antigen binding based on intermolecular contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, M K; Corper, A L; Wan, T; Sohi, M K; Sutton, B J; Thornton, J D; Keep, P A; Chester, K A; Begent, R H; Perkins, S J

    2000-03-01

    MFE-23 is the first single-chain Fv antibody molecule to be used in patients and is used to target colorectal cancer through its high affinity for carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a cell-surface member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. MFE-23 contains an N-terminal variable heavy-chain domain joined by a (Gly(4)Ser)(3) linker to a variable light-chain (V(L)) domain (kappa chain) with an 11-residue C-terminal Myc-tag. Its crystal structure was determined at 2.4 A resolution by molecular replacement with an R(cryst) of 19.0%. Five of the six antigen-binding loops, L1, L2, L3, H1 and H2, conformed to known canonical structures. The sixth loop, H3, displayed a unique structure, with a beta-hairpin loop and a bifurcated apex characterized by a buried Thr residue. In the crystal lattice, two MFE-23 molecules were associated back-to-back in a manner not seen before. The antigen-binding site displayed a large acidic region located mainly within the H2 loop and a large hydrophobic region within the H3 loop. Even though this structure is unliganded within the crystal, there is an unusually large region of contact between the H1, H2 and H3 loops and the beta-sheet of the V(L) domain of an adjacent molecule (strands DEBA) as a result of intermolecular packing. These interactions exhibited remarkably high surface and electrostatic complementarity. Of seven MFE-23 residues predicted to make contact with antigen, five participated in these lattice contacts, and this model for antigen binding is consistent with previously reported site-specific mutagenesis of MFE-23 and its effect on CEA binding.

  19. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  20. Quantifying intermolecular interactions of ionic liquids using cohesive energy densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    For ionic liquids (ILs), both the large number of possible cation + anion combinations and their ionic nature provide a unique challenge for understanding intermolecular interactions. Cohesive energy density, ced, is used to quantify the strength of intermolecular interactions for molecular liquids, and is determined using the enthalpy of vaporization. A critical analysis of the experimental challenges and data to obtain ced for ILs is provided. For ILs there are two methods to judge the strength of intermolecular interactions, due to the presence of multiple constituents in the vapour phase of ILs. Firstly, cedIP, where the ionic vapour constituent is neutral ion pairs, the major constituent of the IL vapour. Secondly, cedC+A, where the ionic vapour constituents are isolated ions. A cedIP dataset is presented for 64 ILs. For the first time an experimental cedC+A, a measure of the strength of the total intermolecular interaction for an IL, is presented. cedC+A is significantly larger for ILs than ced for most molecular liquids, reflecting the need to break all of the relatively strong electrostatic interactions present in ILs. However, the van der Waals interactions contribute significantly to IL volatility due to the very strong electrostatic interaction in the neutral ion pair ionic vapour. An excellent linear correlation is found between cedIP and the inverse of the molecular volume. A good linear correlation is found between IL cedIP and IL Gordon parameter (which are dependent primarily on surface tension). ced values obtained through indirect methods gave similar magnitude values to cedIP. These findings show that cedIP is very important for understanding IL intermolecular interactions, in spite of cedIP not being a measure of the total intermolecular interactions of an IL. In the outlook section, remaining challenges for understanding IL intermolecular interactions are outlined. PMID:29308254

  1. Quantifying intermolecular interactions of ionic liquids using cohesive energy densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelock, Kevin R J

    2017-12-01

    For ionic liquids (ILs), both the large number of possible cation + anion combinations and their ionic nature provide a unique challenge for understanding intermolecular interactions. Cohesive energy density, ced , is used to quantify the strength of intermolecular interactions for molecular liquids, and is determined using the enthalpy of vaporization. A critical analysis of the experimental challenges and data to obtain ced for ILs is provided. For ILs there are two methods to judge the strength of intermolecular interactions, due to the presence of multiple constituents in the vapour phase of ILs. Firstly, ced IP , where the ionic vapour constituent is neutral ion pairs, the major constituent of the IL vapour. Secondly, ced C+A , where the ionic vapour constituents are isolated ions. A ced IP dataset is presented for 64 ILs. For the first time an experimental ced C+A , a measure of the strength of the total intermolecular interaction for an IL, is presented. ced C+A is significantly larger for ILs than ced for most molecular liquids, reflecting the need to break all of the relatively strong electrostatic interactions present in ILs. However, the van der Waals interactions contribute significantly to IL volatility due to the very strong electrostatic interaction in the neutral ion pair ionic vapour. An excellent linear correlation is found between ced IP and the inverse of the molecular volume. A good linear correlation is found between IL ced IP and IL Gordon parameter (which are dependent primarily on surface tension). ced values obtained through indirect methods gave similar magnitude values to ced IP . These findings show that ced IP is very important for understanding IL intermolecular interactions, in spite of ced IP not being a measure of the total intermolecular interactions of an IL. In the outlook section, remaining challenges for understanding IL intermolecular interactions are outlined.

  2. Connecting Protein Structure to Intermolecular Interactions: A Computer Modeling Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abualia, Mohammed; Schroeder, Lianne; Garcia, Megan; Daubenmire, Patrick L.; Wink, Donald J.; Clark, Ginevra A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of protein folding relies on a solid foundation of a number of critical chemical concepts, such as molecular structure, intra-/intermolecular interactions, and relating structure to function. Recent reports show that students struggle on all levels to achieve these understandings and use them in meaningful ways. Further, several…

  3. Phase transitions in liquids with directed intermolecular bonding

    OpenAIRE

    Son, L.; Ryltcev, R.

    2005-01-01

    Liquids with quasi - chemical bonding between molecules are described in terms of vertex model. It is shown that this bonding results in liquid - liquid phase transition, which occurs between phases with different mean density of intermolecular bonds. The transition may be suggested to be a universal phenomena for those liquids.

  4. Dancing Crystals: A Dramatic Illustration of Intermolecular Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Donald W.

    2007-01-01

    Crystals of naphthalene form on the surface of an acetone solution and dance about in an animated fashion illustrating surface tension, crystallization, and intermolecular forces. Additional experiments reveal the properties of the solution. Flows within the solutions can be visualized by various means. Previous demonstrations of surface motion…

  5. Intermolecular interactions between σ- and π-holes of bromopentafluorobenzene and pyridine: computational and experimental investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang-Ling; Yang, Xing; Wu, Rui-Zhi; Yan, Chao-Xian; Yang, Fan; Ye, Weichun; Zhang, Liang-Wei; Zhou, Pan-Pan

    2018-04-25

    The characters of σ- and π-holes of bromopentafluorobenzene (C6F5Br) enable it to interact with an electron-rich atom or group like pyridine which possesses an electron lone-pair N atom and a π ring. Theoretical studies of intermolecular interactions between C6F5Br and C5H5N have been carried out at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ level without and with the counterpoise method, together with single point calculations at M06-2X/TZVP, wB97-XD/aug-cc-pVDZ and CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ levels. The σ- and π-holes of C6F5Br exhibiting positive electrostatic potentials make these sites favorably interact with the N atom and the π ring of C5H5N with negative electrostatic potentials, leading to five different dimers connected by a σ-holen bond, a σ-holeπ bond or a π-holeπ bond. Their geometrical structures, characteristics, nature and spectroscopy behaviors were systematically investigated. EDA analyses reveal that the driving forces in these dimers are different. NCI, QTAIM and NBO analyses confirm the existence of intermolecular interactions formed via σ- and π-holes of C6F5Br and the N atom and the π ring of C5H5N. The experimental IR and Raman spectra gave us important information about the formation of molecular complexes between C6F5Br and C5H5N. We expect that the results could provide valuable insights into the investigation of intermolecular interactions involving σ- and π-holes.

  6. The study of intermolecular interactions in NLO crystal melaminium chloride hemihydrate using DFT simulation and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, K.; Kumar, V. R. Suresh; Marchewka, M. K.; Binoy, J.

    2018-05-01

    Since, the intermolecular interactions play a crucial role in the formation of crystalline network, its analysis throws light on structure dependent crystalline properties. In the present study, DFT based vibrational spectral investigation has been performed in the stretching region (3500 cm-1 - 2800 cm-1) of IR and Raman spectra of melaminium chloride hemihydrates. The intermolecular interaction has been investigated by analyzing the half width of the OH and NH stretching profile of the deconvoluted spectra. Correlation of vibrational spectra with Hirshfeld surface analysis and finger print plot has been contemplated and molecular docking studies has been performed on melaminium chloride hemihydrate to assess its role in the drug transport mechanism and toxicity to human body.

  7. Intermolecular cleavage by UmuD-like mutagenesis proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, John P.; Frank, Ekaterina G.; Levine, Arthur S.; Woodgate, Roger

    1998-01-01

    The activity of a number of proteins is regulated by self-processing reactions. Elegant examples are the cleavage of the prokaryotic LexA and λCI transcriptional repressors and the UmuD-like mutagenesis proteins. Various studies support the hypothesis that LexA and λCI cleavage reactions are predominantly intramolecular in nature. The recently described crystal structure of the Escherichia coli UmuD′ protein (the posttranslational cleavage product of the UmuD protein) suggests, however, that the region of the protein corresponding to the cleavage site is at least 50 Å away from the catalytic active site. We considered the possibility, therefore, that the UmuD-like proteins might undergo self-processing that, in contrast to LexA and λCI, occurs via an intermolecular rather than intramolecular reaction. To test this hypothesis, we introduced into E. coli compatible plasmids with mutations at either the cleavage or the catalytic site of three UmuD-like proteins. Cleavage of these proteins only occurs in the presence of both plasmids, indicating that the reaction is indeed intermolecular in nature. Furthermore, this intermolecular reaction is completely dependent upon the multifunctional RecA protein and leads to the restoration of cellular mutagenesis in nonmutable E. coli strains. Intermolecular cleavage of a biotinylated UmuD active site mutant was also observed in vitro in the presence of the wild-type UmuD′ protein, indicating that in addition to the intact UmuD protein, the normal cleavage product (UmuD′) can also act as a classical enzyme. PMID:9465040

  8. Highly Stereoselective Intermolecular Haloetherification and Haloesterification of Allyl Amides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanzadeh, Bardia; Jaganathan, Arvind; Staples, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    An organocatalytic and highly regio-, diastereo-, and enantioselective intermolecular haloetherification and haloesterification reaction of allyl amides is reported. A variety of alkene substituents and substitution patterns are compatible with this chemistry. Notably, electronically unbiased alkene substrates exhibit exquisite regio- and diastereoselectivity for the title transformation. We also demonstrate that the same catalytic system can be used in both chlorination and bromination reactions of allyl amides with a variety of nucleophiles with little or no modification. PMID:26110812

  9. The Effect of Intermolecular Halogen Bond on 19F DNP Enhancement in 1, 4-Diiodotetrafluorobenzene/4-OH-TEMPO Supramolecular Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Shan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Halogen bond, as hydrogen bond, is a non-covalent bond. Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP technique has been used previously to study hydrogen bonds-mediated intermolecular interactions. However, no study has been carried out so far to study the halogen bond-mediated intermolecular interactions with DNP. In this work, 19F DNP polarization efficiency of the halogen bonds existing in supramolecular assembling by 4-OH-TEMPO and 1,4-diiodotetrafluorobenzene (DITFB was studied on a home-made DNP system. The formation of intermolecular halogen bonds appeared to increase 19F DNP polarization efficiency, suggesting that the spin-spin interactions among electrons were weakened by the halogen bonds, resulting in an increased T2e and a larger saturation factor.

  10. Determination of intermolecular transfer integrals from DFT calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumeier, Bjoern; Andrienko, Denis [Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Theoretical studies of charge transport in organic conducting systems pose a unique challenge since they require multiscale schemes that combine quantum-chemical, molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte-Carlo calculations. The description of the mobility of electrons and holes in the hopping regime relies on the determination of intermolecular hopping rates in large scale morphologies. Using Marcus theory these rates can be calculated from intermolecular transfer integrals and on-site energies. Here we present a detailed computational study on the accuracy and efficiency of density-functional theory based approaches to the determination of intermolecular transfer integrals. First, it is demonstrated how these can be obtained from quantum-chemistry calculations by forming the expectation value of a dimer Fock operator with frontier orbitals of two neighboring monomers based on a projective approach. We then consider the prototypical example of one pair out of a larger morphology of Tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminium (Alq3) and study the influence of computational parameters, e.g. the choice of basis sets, exchange-correlation functional, and convergence criteria, on the calculated transfer integrals. The respective accuracies and efficiencies are compared in order to derive an optimal strategy for future simulations based on the full morphology.

  11. Competing Intramolecular vs. Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds in Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter I. Nagy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A hydrogen bond for a local-minimum-energy structure can be identified according to the definition of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC recommendation 2011 or by finding a special bond critical point on the density map of the structure in the framework of the atoms-in-molecules theory. Nonetheless, a given structural conformation may be simply favored by electrostatic interactions. The present review surveys the in-solution competition of the conformations with intramolecular vs. intermolecular hydrogen bonds for different types of small organic molecules. In their most stable gas-phase structure, an intramolecular hydrogen bond is possible. In a protic solution, the intramolecular hydrogen bond may disrupt in favor of two solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The balance of the increased internal energy and the stabilizing effect of the solute-solvent interactions regulates the new conformer composition in the liquid phase. The review additionally considers the solvent effects on the stability of simple dimeric systems as revealed from molecular dynamics simulations or on the basis of the calculated potential of mean force curves. Finally, studies of the solvent effects on the type of the intermolecular hydrogen bond (neutral or ionic in acid-base complexes have been surveyed.

  12. Intermolecular interactions of decamethoxinum and acetylsalicylic acid in systems of various complexity levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Vashchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular interactions between decamethoxinum (DEC and acetylsalicylic acid (ASА have been studied in the phospholipid-containing systems of escalating complexity levels. The host media for these substances were solvents, L-α-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC membranes, and samples of human erythrocytes. Peculiar effects caused by DEC-ASА interaction have been observed in each system using appropriate techniques: (a DEC-ASА non-covalent complexes formation in DPPC-containing systems were revealed by mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization; (b joint DEC-ASА action on DPPC model membranes led to increasing of membrane melting temperature Tm, whereas individual drugs caused pronounced Tm decreasing, which was demonstrated by differential scanning calorimetry; (c deceleration of DEC-induced haemolysis of erythrocytes under joint DEC-ASА application was observed by optical microscopy.

  13. An approach to the intermolecular energy in pure liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAbriel Hernández de la Torre

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Se propone un método para: estimar la energía potencial de repulsión de cualquier molécula central como una función de las densidades ortobáricas en líquidos puros no auto asociados; estimar los parámetros necesarios para calcular la energía de dispersión de London; calcular los números de coordinación promedio, distancias intermoleculares de interacción, diámetros moleculares y de grupos; en moléculas globulares, moléculas planas y parafinas normales.

  14. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesha R. Hathwar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically, the presence of Cπ...Cπ interactions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. The quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations.

  15. Intra-/Intermolecular Bifurcated Chalcogen Bonding in Crystal Structure of Thiazole/Thiadiazole Derived Binuclear (DiaminocarbenePdII Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Mikherdov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of cis-[PdCl2(CNXyl2] (Xyl = 2,6-Me2C6H3 with 4-phenylthiazol-2-amine in molar ratio 2:3 at RT in CH2Cl2 leads to binuclear (diaminocarbenePdII complex 3c. The complex was characterized by HRESI+-MS, 1H NMR spectroscopy, and its structure was elucidated by single-crystal XRD. Inspection of the XRD data for 3c and for three relevant earlier obtained thiazole/thiadiazole derived binuclear diaminocarbene complexes (3a EYOVIZ; 3b: EYOWAS; 3d: EYOVOF suggests that the structures of all these species exhibit intra-/intermolecular bifurcated chalcogen bonding (BCB. The obtained data indicate the presence of intramolecular S•••Cl chalcogen bonds in all of the structures, whereas varying of substituent in the 4th and 5th positions of the thiazaheterocyclic fragment leads to changes of the intermolecular chalcogen bonding type, viz. S•••π in 3a,b, S•••S in 3c, and S•••O in 3d. At the same time, the change of heterocyclic system (from 1,3-thiazole to 1,3,4-thiadiazole does not affect the pattern of non-covalent interactions. Presence of such intermolecular chalcogen bonding leads to the formation of one-dimensional (1D polymeric chains (for 3a,b, dimeric associates (for 3c, or the fixation of an acetone molecule in the hollow between two diaminocarbene complexes (for 3d in the solid state. The Hirshfeld surface analysis for the studied X-ray structures estimated the contributions of intermolecular chalcogen bonds in crystal packing of 3a–d: S•••π (3a: 2.4%; 3b: 2.4%, S•••S (3c: less 1%, S•••O (3d: less 1%. The additionally performed DFT calculations, followed by the topological analysis of the electron density distribution within the framework of Bader’s theory (AIM method, confirm the presence of intra-/intermolecular BCB S•••Cl/S•••S in dimer of 3c taken as a model system (solid state geometry. The AIM analysis demonstrates the presence of appropriate bond critical points for these

  16. Direct measurements of intermolecular forces by chemical force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezenov, Dmitri Vitalievich

    1999-12-01

    Detailed description of intermolecular forces is key to understanding a wide range of phenomena from molecular recognition to materials failure. The unique features of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to make point contact force measurements with ultra high sensitivity and to generate spatial maps of surface topography and forces have been extended to include measurements between well-defined organic molecular groups. Chemical modification of AFM probes with self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was used to make them sensitive to specific molecular interactions. This novel chemical force microscopy (CFM) technique was used to probe forces between different molecular groups in a range of environments (vacuum, organic liquids and aqueous solutions); measure surface energetics on a nanometer scale; determine pK values of the surface acid and base groups; measure forces to stretch and unbind a short synthetic DNA duplex and map the spatial distribution of specific functional groups and their ionization state. Studies of adhesion forces demonstrated the important contribution of hydrogen bonding to interactions between simple organic functionalities. The chemical identity of the tip and substrate surfaces as well as the medium had a dramatic effect on adhesion between model monolayers. A direct correlation between surface free energy and adhesion forces was established. The adhesion between epoxy polymer and model mixed SAMs varied with the amount of hydrogen bonding component in the monolayers. A consistent interpretation of CFM measurements in polar solvents was provided by contact mechanics models and intermolecular force components theory. Forces between tips and surfaces functionalized with SAMs terminating in acid or base groups depended on their ionization state. A novel method of force titration was introduced for highly local characterization of the pK's of surface functional groups. The pH-dependent changes in friction forces were exploited to map spatially the

  17. Structural modeling and intermolecular correlation of liquid chlorine dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Norio; Hironori, Shimakura; Kawakita, Yukinobu; Ohara, Yukoji; Kohara, Shinji; Takeda, Shinichi

    2009-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO 2 ) is water-soluble yellow gas at room temperature. It has long been used as a disinfectant of tap water and various commodities owing to its strong oxidizing activity against various microbial proteins. The oxidizing activity is believed to be due to the presence of unpaired electron in its molecular orbital. Despite wealth of physicochemical studies of gaseous ClO 2 , little is known about liquid ClO 2 , especially about fine molecular structure and intermolecular interactions of liquid ClO 2 . The purpose of this study is to elucidate the fine structure and intermolecular orientations of ClO 2 molecules in its liquid state using a high-energy X-ray diffraction technique. The measurements of liquid ClO 2 were carried out at -50 to 0 degree Celsius using a two-axis diffractometer installed at the BL04B2 beamline in the third-generation synchrotron radiation facility SPring-8 (Hyogo, Japan). The incident X-ray beamline was 113.4 keV in energy and 0.1093 Armstrong in wavelength from a Si(111) monochromator with the third harmonic reflection. Liquid ClO 2 held in a quartz capillary tube was placed in a temperature-controlled vacuum chamber. We obtained a structure factor S(Q) to a range of Q = 0.3-30 Amstrong -1 and a pair distribution function g(r) upon Fourier transform of the S(Q). The total g(r) showed peaks at 1.46, 2.08, 2.48, 3.16 and 4.24 Armstrong. From intramolecular bond lengths of 1.46 Armstrong for Cl-O and 2.48 Armstrong for O-O, O-Cl-O bond angle was estimated to be 116.1 degrees. Peaks at 3.16 and 4.24 Armstrong in the total g(r) strongly indicate presence of specific intermolecular orientations of ClO 2 molecules that are distinct from those observed as a dimer in the solid phase ClO 2 . This view was further supported by molecular simulation using a reverse Monte Carlo method (RMC). (author)

  18. Symmetry in the polarization expansion for intermolecular forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipman, D.M.; Hirschfelder, J.O.

    1980-01-01

    In the usual polarization expansion for intermolecular forces, exchange effects that determine the separations of energy levels within the manifold of interacting states are ignored. Previous low order calculations on simple physical systems have indicated that these exchange terms can be described reasonably well by an appropriate ad hoc symmetrization of the polarization wave function (the SYM-P method). But theoretical considerations suggest that the SYM-P method should be good for only one of the interacting states and not for the others in the manifold. Here this long standing apparent conflict between theoretical expectations and actual results is explained by consideration of a simple model system in which the relevant equations can be solved exactly. It is concluded that while the SYM-P method is potentially exact for only one of the interacting states, it may provide good approximations to the other states of the manifold in the case of large separations of the interacting subsystems

  19. Testing intermolecular potential functions using transport property data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifford, A.A.; Dickinson, E.; Gray, P.; Scott, A.C.

    1975-01-01

    The viscosity of hydrogen has been measured at eight temperatures from 273 to 1060K, using a capillary-flow viscometer. The results have been used to test the repulsive part of a recently formulated H 2 /H 2 intermolecular potential function, obtained from molecular-beam measurements. Agreement between the experimental and predicted values for viscosity is within 3.5%, which corresponds approximately to the combined quoted uncertainties in the two sets of data. However, if the value of the distance parameter of the potential is reduced by about 1.5%, the agreement obtained is within 0.75% over the whole temperature range. This modified potential function gives better agreement with the available higher temperature viscosities and second virial coefficients. (author)

  20. Modulation of intermolecular interactions in single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heroux, Katie Jeanne

    Polynuclear manganese clusters exhibiting interesting magnetic and quantum properties have been an area of intense research since the discovery of the first single-molecule magnet (SMM) in 1993. These molecules, below their blocking temperature, function as single-domain magnetic particles which exhibit classical macroscale magnetic properties as well as quantum mechanical phenomena such as quantum tunnelling of magnetization (QTM) and quantum phase interference. The union of classical and quantum behavior in these nanomaterials makes SMMs ideal candidates for high-density information storage and quantum computing. However, environmental coupling factors (nuclear spins, phonons, neighboring molecules) must be minimized if such applications are ever to be fully realized. The focus of this work is making small structural changes in well-known manganese SMMs in order to drastically enhance the overall magnetic and quantum properties of the system. Well-isolated molecules of high crystalline quality should lead to well-defined energetic and spectral properties as well. An advantage of SMMs over bulk magnetic materials is that they can be chemically altered from a "bottom-up" approach providing a synthetic tool for tuning magnetic properties. This systematic approach is utilized in the work presented herein by incorporating bulky ligands and/or counterions to "isolate" the magnetic core of [Mn4] dicubane SMMs. Reducing intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattice (neighboring molecules, solvate molecules, dipolar interactions) is an important step toward developing viable quantum computing devices. Detailed bulk magnetic studies as well as single crystal magnetization hysteresis and high-frequency EPR studies on these sterically-isolated complexes show enhanced, and sometimes even unexpected, quantum dynamics. The importance of intra- and intermolecular interactions remains a common theme throughout this work, extending to other SMMs of various topology including

  1. Systematic study on intermolecular valence-band dispersion in molecular crystalline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Intermolecular valence-band dispersion of crystalline films of phthalocyanines. • Intermolecular transfer integral versus lattice constant. • Site-specific intermolecular interaction and resultant valence-band dispersion. • Band narrowing effect induced by elevated temperature. - Abstract: Functionalities of organic semiconductors are governed not only by individual properties of constituent molecules but also by solid-state electronic states near the Fermi level such as frontier molecular orbitals, depending on weak intermolecular interactions in various conformations. The individual molecular property has been widely investigated in detail; on the other hand, the weak intermolecular interaction is difficult to investigate precisely due to the presence of the structural and thermal energy broadenings in organic solids. Here we show quite small but essential intermolecular valence band dispersions and their temperature dependence of sub-0.1-eV scale in crystalline films of metal phthalocyanines (H_2Pc, ZnPc, CoPc, MnPc, and F_1_6ZnPc) by using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) with synchrotron radiation. The observed bands show intermolecular and site dependent dispersion widths, phases, and periodicities, for different chemical substitution of terminal groups and central metals in the phthalocyanine molecule. The precise and systematic band-dispersion measurement would be a credible approach toward the comprehensive understanding of intermolecular interactions and resultant charge transport properties as well as their tuning by substituents in organic molecular systems.

  2. Polyelectrolyte brushes in mixed ionic medium studied via intermolecular forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Robert; Laugel, Nicolas; Pincus, Philip; Tirrell, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    The vast uses and applications of polyelectrolyte brushes make them an attractive field of research especially with the growing interest in responsive materials. Polymers which respond via changes in temperature, pH, and ionic strength are increasingly being used for applications in drug delivery, chemical gating, etc. When polyelectrolyte brushes are found in either nature (e.g., surfaces of cartilage and mammalian lung interiors) or commercially (e.g., skin care products, shampoo, and surfaces of medical devices) they are always surrounded by mixed ionic medium. This makes the study of these brushes in varying ionic environments extremely relevant for both current and future potential applications. The polyelectrolyte brushes in this work are diblock co-polymers of poly-styrene sulfonate (N=420) and poly-t-butyl styrene (N=20) which tethers to a hydrophobic surface allowing for a purely thermodynamic study of the polyelectrolyte chains. Intermolecular forces between two brushes are measured using the SFA. As multi-valent concentrations are increased, the brushes collapse internally and form strong adhesion between one another after contact (properties not seen in a purely mono-valent environment).

  3. Intermolecular Interactions in Ternary Glycerol–Sample–H2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Peter; Rasmussen, Erik Lumby; Koga, Yoshikata

    2011-01-01

    We studied the intermolecular interactions in ternary glycerol (Gly)–sample (S)–H2O systems at 25 °C. By measuring the excess partial molar enthalpy of Gly, HGlyEHEGly, we evaluated the Gly–Gly enthalpic interaction, HGly-GlyEHEGly--Gly, in the presence of various samples (S). For S, tert...... little effect on HGly-GlyEHEGly--Gly. This contrasts with our earlier studies on 1P–S–H2O in that Na+, F− and Cl− are found as hydration centers from the induced changes on HIP-IPEHEIP--IP in the presence of S, while Br−, I−, and SCN− are found to act as hydrophiles. In comparison with the Hofmeister...... ranking of these ions, the kosmotropes are hydration centers and the more kosmotropic the higher the hydration number, consistent with the original Hofmeister’s concept of “H2O withdrawing power.” Br−, I− and SCN−, on the other hand, acted as hydrophiles and the more chaotropic they are the more...

  4. Localized-overlap approach to calculations of intermolecular interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rob, Fazle

    Symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) based on the density functional theory (DFT) description of the monomers [SAPT(DFT)] is one of the most robust tools for computing intermolecular interaction energies. Currently, one can use the SAPT(DFT) method to calculate interaction energies of dimers consisting of about a hundred atoms. To remove the methodological and technical limits and extend the size of the systems that can be calculated with the method, a novel approach has been proposed that redefines the electron densities and polarizabilities in a localized way. In the new method, accurate but computationally expensive quantum-chemical calculations are only applied for the regions where it is necessary and for other regions, where overlap effects of the wave functions are negligible, inexpensive asymptotic techniques are used. Unlike other hybrid methods, this new approach is mathematically rigorous. The main benefit of this method is that with the increasing size of the system the calculation scales linearly and, therefore, this approach will be denoted as local-overlap SAPT(DFT) or LSAPT(DFT). As a byproduct of developing LSAPT(DFT), some important problems concerning distributed molecular response, in particular, the unphysical charge-flow terms were eliminated. Additionally, to illustrate the capabilities of SAPT(DFT), a potential energy function has been developed for an energetic molecular crystal of 1,1-diamino-2,2-dinitroethylene (FOX-7), where an excellent agreement with the experimental data has been found.

  5. The origins of the directionality of noncovalent intermolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changwei; Guan, Liangyu; Danovich, David; Shaik, Sason; Mo, Yirong

    2016-01-05

    The recent σ-hole concept emphasizes the contribution of electrostatic attraction to noncovalent bonds, and implies that the electrostatic force has an angular dependency. Here a set of clusters, which includes hydrogen bonding, halogen bonding, chalcogen bonding, and pnicogen bonding systems, is investigated to probe the magnitude of covalency and its contribution to the directionality in noncovalent bonding. The study is based on the block-localized wavefunction (BLW) method that decomposes the binding energy into the steric and the charge transfer (CT) (hyperconjugation) contributions. One unique feature of the BLW method is its capability to derive optimal geometries with only steric effect taken into account, while excluding the CT interaction. The results reveal that the overall steric energy exhibits angular dependency notably in halogen bonding, chalcogen bonding, and pnicogen bonding systems. Turning on the CT interactions further shortens the intermolecular distances. This bond shortening enhances the Pauli repulsion, which in turn offsets the electrostatic attraction, such that in the final sum, the contribution of the steric effect to bonding is diminished, leaving the CT to dominate the binding energy. In several other systems particularly hydrogen bonding systems, the steric effect nevertheless still plays the major role whereas the CT interaction is minor. However, in all cases, the CT exhibits strong directionality, suggesting that the linearity or near linearity of noncovalent bonds is largely governed by the charge-transfer interaction whose magnitude determines the covalency in noncovalent bonds. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Orientation correlation and intermolecular structure of GeCl4, VCl4 and other tetrachloride liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, P.P.; Sarkar, S.; Joarder, R.N.

    2007-01-01

    The intermolecular structure and correlation of GeCl 4 , VCl 4 and other tetrachloride liquids can be well described by Misawa's orientation correlation model originally applied to liquid CCl 4 . The model supports on average a specific 'corner' to 'face' correlation, but evidently very different from 'Apollo' type model. The Misawa model appears to work, in some respect, even better than reference interaction site model (RISM) used for long to describe intermolecular structure of such molecular systems. The test and comparison are made through the calculation of small asymmetric part of the intermolecular structure and evaluation of partial atom-atom distribution functions

  7. Intermolecular Interactions in Crystalline Theobromine as Reflected in Electron Deformation Density and (13)C NMR Chemical Shift Tensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzková, Kateřina; Babinský, Martin; Novosadová, Lucie; Marek, Radek

    2013-06-11

    An understanding of the role of intermolecular interactions in crystal formation is essential to control the generation of diverse crystalline forms which is an important concern for pharmaceutical industry. Very recently, we reported a new approach to interpret the relationships between intermolecular hydrogen bonding, redistribution of electron density in the system, and NMR chemical shifts (Babinský et al. J. Phys. Chem. A, 2013, 117, 497). Here, we employ this approach to characterize a full set of crystal interactions in a sample of anhydrous theobromine as reflected in (13)C NMR chemical shift tensors (CSTs). The important intermolecular contacts are identified by comparing the DFT-calculated NMR CSTs for an isolated theobromine molecule and for clusters composed of several molecules as selected from the available X-ray diffraction data. Furthermore, electron deformation density (EDD) and shielding deformation density (SDD) in the proximity of the nuclei involved in the proposed interactions are calculated and visualized. In addition to the recently reported observations for hydrogen bonding, we focus here particularly on the stacking interactions. Although the principal relations between the EDD and CST for hydrogen bonding (HB) and stacking interactions are similar, the real-space consequences are rather different. Whereas the C-H···X hydrogen bonding influences predominantly and significantly the in-plane principal component of the (13)C CST perpendicular to the HB path and the C═O···H hydrogen bonding modulates both in-plane components of the carbonyl (13)C CST, the stacking modulates the out-of-plane electron density resulting in weak deshielding (2-8 ppm) of both in-plane principal components of the CST and weak shielding (∼ 5 ppm) of the out-of-plane component. The hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions may add to or subtract from one another to produce total values observed experimentally. On the example of theobromine, we demonstrate

  8. "Precipitation on Nanoparticles": Attractive Intermolecular Interactions Stabilize Specific Ligand Ratios on the Surfaces of Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zonglin; Han, Yanxiao; Kral, Petr; Klajn, Rafal

    2018-04-19

    Confining organic molecules to the surfaces of inorganic nanoparticles can induce intermolecular interactions between them, which can affect the composition of the mixed self-assembled monolayers obtained by co-adsorption from solution of two different molecules. Here, we study co-adsorption of two thiolated ligands-a dialkylviologen and a zwitterionic sulfobetaine-that can interact with each other electrostatically, onto gold nanoparticles. Consequently, the nanoparticles favor a narrow range of ratios of these two molecules that is largely independent of the molar ratio in solution. We show that changing the solution molar ratio of two ligands by a factor of ~5,000 affects the on-nanoparticle ratio of these ligands by only 3 times. This behavior is reminiscent of the formation of insoluble inorganic salts (e.g., AgCl), which similarly compensate positive and negative charges upon crystallizing. Our results pave the way towards developing well-defined hybrid organic-inorganic nanostructures. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Arginine-phosphate salt bridges between histones and DNA: Intermolecular actuators that control nucleosome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Li, Yun; Singh, Gautam; Olson, Wilma K.

    2014-10-01

    Structural bioinformatics and van der Waals density functional theory are combined to investigate the mechanochemical impact of a major class of histone-DNA interactions, namely, the formation of salt bridges between arginine residues in histones and phosphate groups on the DNA backbone. Principal component analysis reveals that the configurational fluctuations of the sugar-phosphate backbone display sequence-specific directionality and variability, and clustering of nucleosome crystal structures identifies two major salt-bridge configurations: a monodentate form in which the arginine end-group guanidinium only forms one hydrogen bond with the phosphate, and a bidentate form in which it forms two. Density functional theory calculations highlight that the combination of sequence, denticity, and salt-bridge positioning enables the histones to apply a tunable mechanochemical stress to the DNA via precise and specific activation of backbone deformations. The results suggest that selection for specific placements of van der Waals contacts, with high-precision control of the spatial distribution of intermolecular forces, may serve as an underlying evolutionary design principle for the structure and function of nucleosomes, a conjecture that is corroborated by previous experimental studies.

  10. Competition between intermolecular interaction and configuration entropy as the structure-determining factor for inclusion compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbotin, O.; Belosludov, V.; Adamova, T. [Russian Academy of Science, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Nikolaev Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry; Belosludov, R.; Kawazoe, Y. [Tohoku Univ., Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research; Kudoh, J.I. [Tohoku Univ., Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan). Center for Northeast Asia Studies

    2008-07-01

    This paper presented a newly developed method to accurately predict the thermodynamic properties of clathrate hydrates, particularly their structural phase transitions under pressure. The method is based on the theory of Van-der-Waals and Platteeuw with some modifications that include the influence of guest molecules on the host lattice. The model was used to explain the exception from the established rule that small guest molecules form structure s1 and large molecules form structure s2 hydrates. In this study, the thermodynamic properties of argon (Ar) hydrate and methane hydrate, each in both cubic structure s1 and s2 were modelled. The model showed that two competing factors play a role in the formation of inclusions, notably the intermolecular interaction of guest molecules with water molecules, and the configuration entropy. Competition of these 2 factors determines the structure of hydrate formed at different pressures. The model provides an accurate description of the thermodynamic properties of gas hydrates and how they behave under pressure. For the argon hydrates, the structural phase transition from structure s2 to s1 at high pressure was predicted, while methane hydrates were predicted to be metastable in the s2 structure. The model can be used for other inclusion compounds with the same type of composition such as clathrate silicon, zeolites, and inclusion compounds of semiconductor elements. 17 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Analysis of intermolecular RNA-RNA recombination by rubella virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Sandra D.; Tzeng, W.-P.; Chen, M.-H.; Frey, Teryl K.

    2003-01-01

    To investigate whether rubella virus (RUB) undergoes intermolecular RNA-RNA recombination, cells were cotransfected with pairs of in vitro transcripts from genomic cDNA plasmid vectors engineered to contain nonoverlapping deletions: the replicative transcript maintained the 5'-proximal nonstructural (NS) ORF (which contained the replicase, making it RNA replication competent), had a deletion in the 3'-proximal structural protein (SP) ORF, and maintained the 3' end of the genome, including the putative 3' cis-acting elements (CSE), while the nonreplicative transcript consisted of the 3' half of the genome including the SP-ORF and 3' CSE. Cotransfection yielded plaque-forming virus that synthesized the standard genomic and subgenomic RNAs and thus was generated by RNA-RNA recombination. Using transcripts tagged with a 3'-terminal deletion, it was found that recombinants contained the 3' end derived from the replicative strand, indicating a cis-preference for initiation of negative-strand synthesis. In cotransfections in which the replicative transcript lacked the 3' CSE, recombination occurred, albeit at lower efficiency, indicating that initiation in trans from the NS-ORF can occur. The 3' CSE was sufficient as a nonreplicative transcript, showing that it can serve as a promoter for negative-strand RNA synthesis. While deletion mutagenesis showed that the presence of the junction untranslated region (J-UTR) between the ORFs appeared to be necessary on both transcripts for recombination in this region of the genome, analysis with transcripts tagged with restriction sites showed that the J-UTR was not a hot spot for recombination compared to neighboring regions in both ORFs. Sequence analysis of recombinants revealed that both precise (homologous) and imprecise recombination (aberrant, homologous resulting in duplications) occurred; however, imprecise recombination only involved the J-UTR or the 3' end of the NS-ORF and the J-UTR (maintaining the NS-ORF), indicating

  12. Exciplex: An Intermolecular Charge-Transfer Approach for TADF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Monima; Wong, Ken-Tsung

    2018-04-03

    Organic materials that display thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) are a striking class of functional materials that have witnessed a booming progress in recent years. In addition to pure TADF emitters achieved by the subtle manipulations of intramolecular charge transfer processes with sophisticated molecular structures, a new class of efficient TADF-based OLEDs with emitting layer formed by blending electron donor and acceptor molecules that involve intermolecular charge transfer have also been fabricated. In contrast to pure TADF materials, the exciplex-based systems can realize small ΔEST (0-0.05 eV) much more easily since the electron and hole are positioned on two different molecules, thereby giving small exchange energy. Consequently, exciplex-based OLEDs have the prospective to maximize the TADF contribution and achieve theoretical 100% internal quantum efficiency. Therefore, the challenging issue of achieving small ΔEST in organic systems could be solved. In this article, we summarize and discuss the latest and most significant developments regarding these rapidly evolving functional materials, wherein the majority of the reported exciplex forming systems are categorized into two sub-groups, viz. (a) exciplex as TADF emitters and (b) those as hosts for fluorescent, phosphorescent and TADF dopants according to their structural features and applications. The working mechanisms of the direct electroluminescence from the donor/acceptor interface and the exciplex-forming systems as co-host for the realization of high efficiency OLEDs are reviewed and discussed. This article delivers a summary of the current progresses and achievements of exciplex-based researches and points out the future challenges to trigger more research endeavors to this growing field.

  13. Catalytic Intermolecular Cross-Couplings of Azides and LUMO-Activated Unsaturated Acyl Azoliums

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wenjun; Ajitha, Manjaly John; Lang, Ming; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    An example for the catalytic synthesis of densely functionalized 1,2,3-triazoles through a LUMO activation mode has been developed. The protocol is enabled by intermolecular cross coupling reactions of azides with in situ-generated alpha

  14. The Raman and vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-containing complexes and clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maxton, P.M.; Schaeffer, M.W.; Ohline, S.M.; Kim, W.; Venturo, V.A.; Felker, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental results pertaining to the excitation of intermolecular vibrations in the Raman and vibronic spectra of aromatic-containing, weakly bound complexes and clusters are reported. The theoretical analysis of intermolecular Raman activity is based on the assumption that the polarizability tensor of a weakly bound species is given by the sum of the polarizability tensors of its constituent monomers. The analysis shows that the van der Waals bending fundamentals in aromatic--rare gas complexes may be expected to be strongly Raman active. More generally, it predicts strong Raman activity for intermolecular vibrations that involve the libration or internal rotation of monomer moieties having appreciable permanent polarizability anisotropies. The vibronic activity of intermolecular vibrations in aromatic-rare gas complexes is analyzed under the assumption that every vibronic band gains its strength from an aromatic-localized transition. It is found that intermolecular vibrational excitations can accompany aromatic-localized vibronic excitations by the usual Franck--Condon mechanism or by a mechanism dependent on the librational amplitude of the aromatic moiety during the course of the pertinent intermolecular vibration. The latter mechanism can impart appreciable intensity to bands that are forbidden by rigid-molecule symmetry selection rules. The applicability of such rules is therefore called into question. Finally, experimental spectra of intermolecular transitions, obtained by mass-selective, ionization-detected stimulated Raman spectroscopies, are reported for benzene--X (X=Ar, --Ar 2 , N 2 , HCl, CO 2 , and --fluorene), fluorobenzene--Ar and --Kr, aniline--Ar, and fluorene--Ar and --Ar 2 . The results support the conclusions of the theoretical analyses and provide further evidence for the value of Raman methods in characterizing intermolecular vibrational level structures

  15. Ranking beta sheet topologies with applications to protein structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Helles, Glennie; Winter, Pawel

    2011-01-01

    One reason why ab initio protein structure predictors do not perform very well is their inability to reliably identify long-range interactions between amino acids. To achieve reliable long-range interactions, all potential pairings of ß-strands (ß-topologies) of a given protein are enumerated......, including the native ß-topology. Two very different ß-topology scoring methods from the literature are then used to rank all potential ß-topologies. This has not previously been attempted for any scoring method. The main result of this paper is a justification that one of the scoring methods, in particular......, consistently top-ranks native ß-topologies. Since the number of potential ß-topologies grows exponentially with the number of ß-strands, it is unrealistic to expect that all potential ß-topologies can be enumerated for large proteins. The second result of this paper is an enumeration scheme of a subset of ß-topologies...

  16. Intermolecular failure of L-type Ca2+ channel and ryanodine receptor signaling in hypertrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xu

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Pressure overload-induced hypertrophy is a key step leading to heart failure. The Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release (CICR process that governs cardiac contractility is defective in hypertrophy/heart failure, but the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. To examine the intermolecular aspects of CICR during hypertrophy, we utilized loose-patch confocal imaging to visualize the signaling between a single L-type Ca(2+ channel (LCC and ryanodine receptors (RyRs in aortic stenosis rat models of compensated (CHT and decompensated (DHT hypertrophy. We found that the LCC-RyR intermolecular coupling showed a 49% prolongation in coupling latency, a 47% decrease in chance of hit, and a 72% increase in chance of miss in DHT, demonstrating a state of "intermolecular failure." Unexpectedly, these modifications also occurred robustly in CHT due at least partially to decreased expression of junctophilin, indicating that intermolecular failure occurs prior to cellular manifestations. As a result, cell-wide Ca(2+ release, visualized as "Ca(2+ spikes," became desynchronized, which contrasted sharply with unaltered spike integrals and whole-cell Ca(2+ transients in CHT. These data suggested that, within a certain limit, termed the "stability margin," mild intermolecular failure does not damage the cellular integrity of excitation-contraction coupling. Only when the modification steps beyond the stability margin does global failure occur. The discovery of "hidden" intermolecular failure in CHT has important clinical implications.

  17. Observation of aggregation triggered by Resonance Energy Transfer (RET) induced intermolecular pairing force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Wang, Weizhi; Ke, Lin; Zhang, Nan

    2017-07-20

    In this report, we showed the existence of RET induced intermolecular pairing force by comparing their fluorescence behaviors under room illumination vs standing in dark area for either PFluAnt solution or PFluAnt&PFOBT mixture. Their prominent emission attenuation under room illumination brought out the critical role of photo, i.e. RET induced intermolecular pairing force in induction of polymer aggregation. Constant UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectra in terms of both peak shapes and maximum wavelengths implied no chemical decomposition was involved. Recoverable fluorescence intensity, fluorescence lifetime as well as NMR spectra further exclude photo induced decomposition. The controllable on/off state of RET induced intermolecular pairing force was verified by the masking effect of outside PFluAnt solution which function as filter to block the excitation of inside PFluAnt and thus off the RET induced intermolecular pairing force. Theoretical calculation suggest that magnitude of RET induced intermolecular pairing force is on the same scale as that of van der Waals interaction. Although the absolute magnitude of RET induced intermolecular pairing force was not tunable, its effect can be magnified by intentionally turn it "on", which was achieved by irradiance with 5 W desk lamp in this report.

  18. Probing Intermolecular Electron Delocalization in Dimer Radical Anions by Vibrational Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Grills, David C.

    2017-01-01

    Delocalization of charges is one of the factors controlling charge transport in conjugated molecules. It is considered to play an important role in the performance of a wide range of molecular technologies, including organic solar cells and organic electronics. Dimerization reactions are well-suited as a model to investigate intermolecular spatial delocalization of charges. And while dimerization reactions of radical cations are well investigated, studies on radical anions are still scarce. Upon dimerization of radical anions with neutral counterparts, an electron is considered to delocalize over the two molecules. By using time-resolved infrared (TRIR) detection coupled with pulse radiolysis, we show that radical anions of 4-n-hexyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (6CB) undergo such dimerization reactions, with an electron equally delocalized over the two molecules. We have recently demonstrated that nitrile ν(C≡N) vibrations respond to the degree of electron localization of nitrile-substituted anions: we can quantify the changes in the electronic charges from the neutral to the anion states in the nitriles by monitoring the ν(C≡N) IR shifts. In the first part of this article, we show that the sensitivity of the ν(C≡N) IR shifts does not depend on solvent polarity. In the second part, we describe how probing the shifts of the nitrile IR vibrational band unambiguously confirms the formation of dimer radical anions, with K dim = 3 × 10 4 M –1 . IR findings are corroborated by electronic absorption spectroscopy and electronic structure calculations. We find that the presence of a hexyl chain and the formation of π–π interactions are both crucial for dimerization of radical anions of 6CB with neutral 6CB. Our study provides clear evidence of spatial delocalization of electrons over two molecular fragments.

  19. Intermolecular proton transfer in anionic complexes of uracil with alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haranczyk, Maciej; Rak, Janusz; Gutowski, Maciej S.; Radisic, Dunja; Stokes, Sarah T.; Bowen, Kit H.

    2005-01-01

    A series of eighteen alcohols (ROH) has been designed with an enthalpy of deprotonation (H DP ) in a range of 13.8-16.3 eV. The effects of excess electron attachment to the binary alcohol-uracil (ROH...U) complexes have been studied at the density functional level with a B3LYP exchange-correlation functional and at the second order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory level. The photoelectron spectra of anionic complexes of uracil with three alcohols (ethanol, 2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoroethanol and 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol) have been measured with 2.54 eV photons. For ROHs with deprotonation enthalpies larger than 14.8 eV only the ROH...U - minimum exists on the potential energy surface of the anionic complex. For alcohols with deprotonation enthalpies in a range of 14.3-14.8 eV two minima might exist on the anionic potential energy surface, which correspond to the RO - ...HU . and ROH...U - structures. For ROHs with deprotonation enthalpies smaller than 14.3 eV, the excess electron attachment to the ROH...U complex always induces a barrier-free proton transfer from the hydroxyl group of ROH to the O8 atom of U, with the product being RO - ...HU . . A driving force for the intermolecular proton transfer is to stabilize the excess negative charge localized on a orbital of uracil. Therefore, these complexes with proton transferred to the anionic uracil are characterized by larger values of electron vertical detachment energy (VDE). The values of VDE for anionic complexes span a range from 1.0 to 2.3 eV and roughly correlate with the acidity of alcohols. However, there is a gap of ∼0.5 eV in the values of VDE, which separates the two families, ROH...U - and RO - ...HU . , of anionic complexes. The energy of stabilization for the anionic complexes spans a range from 0.6 to 1.7 eV and roughly correlates with the acidity of alcohols. The measured photoelectron spectra are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions

  20. Functional Amyloid Formation within Mammalian Tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  1. Functional amyloid formation within mammalian tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M Fowler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amyloid is a generally insoluble, fibrous cross-beta sheet protein aggregate. The process of amyloidogenesis is associated with a variety of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington disease. We report the discovery of an unprecedented functional mammalian amyloid structure generated by the protein Pmel17. This discovery demonstrates that amyloid is a fundamental nonpathological protein fold utilized by organisms from bacteria to humans. We have found that Pmel17 amyloid templates and accelerates the covalent polymerization of reactive small molecules into melanin-a critically important biopolymer that protects against a broad range of cytotoxic insults including UV and oxidative damage. Pmel17 amyloid also appears to play a role in mitigating the toxicity associated with melanin formation by sequestering and minimizing diffusion of highly reactive, toxic melanin precursors out of the melanosome. Intracellular Pmel17 amyloidogenesis is carefully orchestrated by the secretory pathway, utilizing membrane sequestration and proteolytic steps to protect the cell from amyloid and amyloidogenic intermediates that can be toxic. While functional and pathological amyloid share similar structural features, critical differences in packaging and kinetics of assembly enable the usage of Pmel17 amyloid for normal function. The discovery of native Pmel17 amyloid in mammals provides key insight into the molecular basis of both melanin formation and amyloid pathology, and demonstrates that native amyloid (amyloidin may be an ancient, evolutionarily conserved protein quaternary structure underpinning diverse pathways contributing to normal cell and tissue physiology.

  2. Intermolecular interactions of trifluorohalomethanes with Lewis bases in the gas phase: an ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Siang; Yin, Chih-Chien; Chao, Sheng D

    2014-10-07

    We perform an ab initio computational study of molecular complexes with the general formula CF3X-B that involve one trifluorohalomethane CF3X (X = Cl or Br) and one of a series of Lewis bases B in the gas phase. The Lewis bases are so chosen that they provide a range of electron-donating abilities for comparison. Based on the characteristics of their electron pairs, we consider the Lewis bases with a single n-pair (NH3 and PH3), two n-pairs (H2O and H2S), two n-pairs with an unsaturated bond (H2CO and H2CS), and a single π-pair (C2H4) and two π-pairs (C2H2). The aim is to systematically investigate the influence of the electron pair characteristics and the central atom substitution effects on the geometries and energetics of the formed complexes. The counterpoise-corrected supermolecule MP2 and coupled-cluster single double with perturbative triple [CCSD(T)] levels of theory have been employed, together with a series of basis sets up to aug-cc-pVTZ. The angular and radial configurations, the binding energies, and the electrostatic potentials of the stable complexes have been compared and discussed as the Lewis base varies. For those complexes where halogen bonding plays a significant role, the calculated geometries and energetics are consistent with the σ-hole model. Upon formation of stable complexes, the C-X bond lengths shorten, while the C-X vibrational frequencies increase, thus rendering blueshifting halogen bonds. The central atom substitution usually enlarges the intermolecular bond distances while it reduces the net charge transfers, thus weakening the bond strengths. The analysis based on the σ-hole model is grossly reliable but requires suitable modifications incorporating the central atom substitution effects, in particular, when interaction components other than electrostatic contributions are involved.

  3. The iodine molecule insights into intra- and intermolecular perturbation in diatomic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lukashov, Sergey; Pravilov, Anatoly

    2018-01-01

    This book presents experimental and theoretical spectroscopic studies performed over the last 25 years on the iodine molecule’s excited states and their perturbations. It is going to be of interest to researchers who study intra- and intermolecular perturbations in diatomic molecules and more complex systems. The book offers a detailed treatment of the nonadiabatic perturbations of valence, ion pair and Rydberg states induced by intramolecular as well as intermolecular interactions in collisions or in weakly-bound complexes. It also provides an overview of current instrumentation and techniques as well as theoretical approaches describing intra- and intermolecular perturbations. The authors are experts in the use of spectroscopy for the study of intrinsic and collision-induced perturbations in diatomic iodine. They introduced new methods of two- and three-step optical population of the iodine ion-pair states. The iodine molecule has 23 valence states correlating with three dissociation limits, 20 so-called ...

  4. Intermolecular interaction potentials of the methane dimer from the local density approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiangrong; Bai Yulin; Zhu Jun; Yang Xiangdong

    2004-01-01

    The intermolecular interaction potentials of methane (CH 4 ) dimer are calculated within the density functional theory in the local density approximation (LDA). It is found that the calculated potentials have minima when the intermolecular distance of CH 4 dimer is about 7.0 a.u., which is in good agreement with the experiment. The depth of the potential is 0.017 eV. The results obtained by our LDA calculations seem to agree well with those obtained by MP2, MP3, and CCSD from the Moeller-Plesset and coupled cluster methods by Tsuzuki et al. and with the experimental data

  5. Catalytic Intermolecular Cross-Couplings of Azides and LUMO-Activated Unsaturated Acyl Azoliums

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Wenjun

    2017-02-15

    An example for the catalytic synthesis of densely functionalized 1,2,3-triazoles through a LUMO activation mode has been developed. The protocol is enabled by intermolecular cross coupling reactions of azides with in situ-generated alpha,beta-unsaturated acyl azoliums. High yields and broad scope as well as the investigation of reaction mechanism are reported.

  6. Ab initio and Gordon--Kim intermolecular potentials for two nitrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ree, F.H.; Winter, N.W.

    1980-01-01

    Both ab initio MO--LCAO--SCF and the electron-gas (or Gordon--Kim) methods have been used to compute the intermolecular potential (Phi) of N 2 molecules for seven different N 2 --N 2 orientations. The ab initio calculations were carried out using a [4s3p] contracted Gaussian basis set with and without 3d polarization functions. The larger basis set provides adequate results for Phi>0.002 hartree or intermolecular separations less than 6.5--7 bohr. We use a convenient analytic expression to represent the ab initio data in terms of the intermolecular distance and three angles defining the orientations of the two N 2 molecules. The Gordon--Kim method with Rae's self-exchange correction yields Phi, which agrees reasonably well over a large repulsive range. However, a detailed comparison of the electron kinetic energy contributions shows a large difference between the ab initio and the Gordon--Kim calculations. Using the ab initio data we derive an atom--atom potential of the two N 2 molecules. Although this expression does not accurately fit the data at some orientations, its spherical average agrees with the corresponding average of the ab initio Phi remarkably well. The spherically averaged ab initio Phi is also compared with the corresponding quantities derived from experimental considerations. The approach of the ab initio Phi to the classical quadrupole--quadrupole interaction at large intermolecular separation is also discussed

  7. Strong Intermolecular Exciton Couplings in Solid-State Circular Dichroism of Aryl Benzyl Sulfoxides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Padula, Daniele; Di Pietro, S.; Capozzi, M. A. M.; Cardellicchio, C.; Pescitelli, G.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 9 (2014), s. 462-470 ISSN 0899-0042 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : organic crystals * TDDFT CD calculations * pairwise additive approximation * two-body effects * intermolecular forces in crystal lattices Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.886, year: 2014

  8. Salting Effects as an Illustration of the Relative Strength of Intermolecular Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, Eric C.; Golden, Donnie R.; Royce, Brenda R.

    2010-01-01

    This quick and inexpensive demonstration of the salting of an alcohol out of an aqueous solution illustrates the impact of intermolecular forces on solubility using materials familiar to many students. Ammonium sulfate (fertilizer) is added to an aqueous 35% solution of isopropyl alcohol (rubbing alcohol and water) containing food coloring as a…

  9. Studying Intermolecular Forces with a Dual Gas Chromatography and Boiling Point Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, William Patrick; Xia, Ian; Wickline, Kaitlyn; Huitron, Eric Ivan Garcia; Heo, Jun

    2018-01-01

    A procedure for the study of structural differences and intermolecular attraction between ethanol and 1-butanol based in laboratory work is described. This study provides comparisons of data retrieved from both a determination of boiling point and gas chromatography traces for the mixture. The methodology reported here should provide instructors…

  10. Instantaneous normal mode analysis for intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from atomic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chun; Tang, Ping-Han; Wu, Ten-Ming

    2013-11-28

    By exploiting the instantaneous normal mode (INM) analysis for models of flexible molecules, we investigate intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations of water from the atomic point of view. With two flexible SPC/E models, our investigations include three aspects about their INM spectra, which are separated into the unstable, intermolecular, bending, and stretching bands. First, the O- and H-atom contributions in the four INM bands are calculated and their stable INM spectra are compared with the power spectra of the atomic velocity autocorrelation functions. The unstable and intermolecular bands of the flexible models are also compared with those of the SPC/E model of rigid molecules. Second, we formulate the inverse participation ratio (IPR) of the INMs, respectively, for the O- and H-atom and molecule. With the IPRs, the numbers of the three species participated in the INMs are estimated so that the localization characters of the INMs in each band are studied. Further, by the ratio of the IPR of the H atom to that of the O atom, we explore the number of involved OH bond per molecule participated in the INMs. Third, by classifying simulated molecules into subensembles according to the geometry of their local environments or their H-bond configurations, we examine the local-structure effects on the bending and stretching INM bands. All of our results are verified to be insensible to the definition of H-bond. Our conclusions about the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrations in water are given.

  11. Spectroscopic study on the intermolecular interaction of SO{sub 2} absorption in poly-ethylene glycol+H{sub 2}O systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jinrong; Zhang, Jianbin; Zhang, Na [Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Huhhot (China)

    2014-03-15

    Poly-Ethylene Glycol (PEG) 300+H{sub 2}O solutions (PEGWs) has been used as a promising medium for the absorption of SO{sub 2}. We investigated the UV, FTIR, {sup 1}H-NMR, and fluorescence spectra in the absorption processes of SO{sub 2} in PEGWs to present an important absorption mechanism. Based on the spectral results, the possibility of intermolecular hydrogen bond formation by hydroxyl oxygen atom in the PEG molecule with hydrogen atom in H{sub 2}O and S…O interaction formation by the oxygen atoms in PEG with the sulfur atom in SO{sub 2} are discussed. This shows that the spectral changes may be due to the formation of -CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O(H)…HOH… and -CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-O(CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-)…HOH… in PEGWs and the formation of -CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OH…OSO…, and intermolecular S…O interaction between PEG and SO{sub 2} as the formation of -CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}O(H)…(O)S(O)… and -CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-O(CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}-) …(O)S(O)…. The existence of these bonds benefits the absorption and desorption processes of SO{sub 2} in PEGWs.

  12. Atom depth analysis delineates mechanisms of protein intermolecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alocci, Davide; Bernini, Andrea; Niccolai, Neri

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •3D atom depth analysis is proposed to identify different layers in protein structures. •Amino acid contents for each layers have been analyzed for a large protein dataset. •Charged amino acids in the most external layer are present at very different extents. •Atom depth indexes of K residues reflect their side chains flexibility. •Mobile surface charges can be responsible for long range protein–protein recognition. -- Abstract: The systematic analysis of amino acid distribution, performed inside a large set of resolved protein structures, sheds light on possible mechanisms driving non random protein–protein approaches. Protein Data Bank entries have been selected using as filters a series of restrictions ensuring that the shape of protein surface is not modified by interactions with large or small ligands. 3D atom depth has been evaluated for all the atoms of the 2,410 selected structures. The amino acid relative population in each of the structural layers formed by grouping atoms on the basis of their calculated depths, has been evaluated. We have identified seven structural layers, the inner ones reproducing the core of proteins and the outer one incorporating their most protruding moieties. Quantitative analysis of amino acid contents of structural layers identified, as expected, different behaviors. Atoms of Q, R, K, N, D residues are increasingly more abundant in going from core to surfaces. An opposite trend is observed for V, I, L, A, C, and G. An intermediate behavior is exhibited by P, S, T, M, W, H, F and Y. The outer structural layer hosts predominantly E and K residues whose charged moieties, protruding from outer regions of the protein surface, reorient free from steric hindrances, determining specific electrodynamics maps. This feature may represent a protein signature for long distance effects, driving the formation of encounter complexes and the eventual short distance approaches that are required for protein

  13. Raman Spectra and Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonds of Quinoline in Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukhvatullin, F.H.; Jumabayev, A.; Hushvaktov, H.; Absanov, A.; Hudoyberdiev, B.

    2012-01-01

    The half-widths of the 1014- and 1033-cm -1 bands of the Raman spectrum of quinoline at its dilution in neutral solvents (benzene, CCl 4 ) are narrowed by 1.3-1.5 times at high dilutions. This effect is associated with the increased time of the vibrational relaxation. For the 520-cm -1 band in pure liquid quinoline, the parallel polarized component at 20 o C is asymmetric in the high-frequency region. The shape of the perpendicular polarized component is complicated. A non-coincidence of the peak frequencies of the parallel and perpendicular polarized components is observed (∼ 2 cm -1 ). Quantum-chemical calculations showed that, in the region of 520 cm -1 for a monomer molecule, we should really have two near located lines with the wavenumbers 530 and 527 cm -1 (scaling factor 0.97), and with the depolarization ratios 0.61 and 0.26. In the solutions with propan-2-ol, the 1033.8-cm -1 band becomes of a doublet character. The resolution of the doublet becomes better by the dilution of a binary quinoline-alcohol solution with a large amount of a neutral solvent (benzene). The wavenumbers of bands in the triple mixture are 1033 cm -1 and 1039 cm -1 . The doublet nature of the band in the binary and triple mixtures is associated with the presence of monomer molecules and quinoline-propan-2-ol aggregates (the high-frequency line) in the liquid mixture. Quantum-chemical calculations showed that the hydrogen bonds with a length of 1.958 A and an energy gain of 22.0 kJ/mole can be formed between molecules of quinoline and alcohol. The formation of aggregates can be also detected in the 820-cm -1 band of propan-2-ol. A similar picture is observed for the 667-cm -1 band of chloroform in its solution with quinoline.

  14. Ab initio ground state phenylacetylene-argon intermolecular potential energy surface and rovibrational spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cybulski, Hubert; Fernandez, Berta; Henriksen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    to the axis perpendicular to the phenylacetylene plane and containing the center of mass. The calculated interaction energy is -418.9 cm(-1). To check further the potential, we obtain the rovibrational spectrum of the complex and the results are compared to the available experimental data. (C) 2012 American......We evaluate the phenylacetylene-argon intermolecular potential energy surface by fitting a representative number of ab initio interaction energies to an analytic function. These energies are calculated at a grid of intermolecular geometries, using the CCSD(T) method and the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set...... extended with a series of 3s3p2d1flg midbond functions. The potential is characterized by two equivalent global minima where the Ar atom is located above and below the phenylacetylene plane at a distance of 3.5781 angstrom from the molecular center of mass and at an angle of 9.08 degrees with respect...

  15. Pharmaceutical cocrystals, salts and multicomponent systems; intermolecular interactions and property based design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, David J; Steed, Jonathan W

    2017-08-01

    As small molecule drugs become harder to develop and less cost effective for patient use, efficient strategies for their property improvement become increasingly important to global health initiatives. Improvements in the physical properties of Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs), without changes in the covalent chemistry, have long been possible through the application of binary component solids. This was first achieved through the use of pharmaceutical salts, within the last 10-15years with cocrystals and more recently coamorphous systems have also been consciously applied to this problem. In order to rationally discover the best multicomponent phase for drug development, intermolecular interactions need to be considered at all stages of the process. This review highlights the current thinking in this area and the state of the art in: pharmaceutical multicomponent phase design, the intermolecular interactions in these phases, the implications of these interactions on the material properties and the pharmacokinetics in a patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of intermolecular interactions in binary mixtures of ethanol in methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharolkar, Aruna P.; Khirade, P. W.; Murugkar, A. G.

    2016-05-01

    Present paper deals with study of physicochemical properties like viscosity, density and refractive index for the binary mixtures of ethanol and methanol over the entire concentration range were measured at 298.15 K. The experimental data further used to determine the excess properties viz. excess molar volume, excess viscosity, excess molar refraction. The values of excess properties further fitted with Redlich-Kister (R-K Fit) equation to calculate the binary coefficients and standard deviation. The resulting excess parameters are used to indicate the presence of intermolecular interactions and strength of intermolecular interactions between the molecules in the binary mixtures. Excess parameters indicate structure making factor in the mixture predominates in the system.

  17. Catalyst-Controlled and Tunable, Chemoselective Silver-Catalyzed Intermolecular Nitrene Transfer: Experimental and Computational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Nicholas S; Scamp, Ryan J; Yang, Tzuhsiung; Berry, John F; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2016-11-09

    The development of new catalysts for selective nitrene transfer is a continuing area of interest. In particular, the ability to control the chemoselectivity of intermolecular reactions in the presence of multiple reactive sites has been a long-standing challenge in the field. In this paper, we demonstrate examples of silver-catalyzed, nondirected, intermolecular nitrene transfer reactions that are both chemoselective and flexible for aziridination or C-H insertion, depending on the choice of ligand. Experimental probes present a puzzling picture of the mechanistic details of the pathways mediated by [( t Bu 3 tpy)AgOTf] 2 and (tpa)AgOTf. Computational studies elucidate these subtleties and provide guidance for the future development of new catalysts exhibiting improved tunability in group transfer reactions.

  18. INTERACTIONS: DESIGN, IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF A COMPUTATIONAL TOOL FOR TEACHING INTERMOLECULAR FORCES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Geraldo Barbosa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular forces are a useful concept that can explain the attraction between particulate matter as well as numerous phenomena in our lives such as viscosity, solubility, drug interactions, and dyeing of fibers. However, studies show that students have difficulty understanding this important concept, which has led us to develop a free educational software in English and Portuguese. The software can be used interactively by teachers and students, thus facilitating better understanding. Professors and students, both graduate and undergraduate, were questioned about the software quality and its intuitiveness of use, facility of navigation, and pedagogical application using a Likert scale. The results led to the conclusion that the developed computer application can be characterized as an auxiliary tool to assist teachers in their lectures and students in their learning process of intermolecular forces.

  19. Solid state synthesis, structural, physicochemical and optical properties of an inter-molecular compound: 2-hydroxy-1, 2-diphenylethanone-4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, U. S.; Singh, Manjeet; Rai, R. N.

    2017-09-01

    The phase diagram of 2-hydroxy-1, 2-diphenylethanone (HDPE)-4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOPDA) system, determined by the thaw-melt method, gives two eutectics E1 (m p = 66.0 °C) and E2 (m p = 155.0 °C) with 0.30 and 0.55 mol fractions of NOPDA, respectively, and an 1:1 inter-molecular compound (IMC) (m p 162.0 °C). This IMC was synthesized by adopting the green synthetic method of solid state reaction. While its formation and structure were confirmed by the X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic methods, the ORTEP view gives mode of crystal packing, C‒H…O, C‒H…N, π-π stacking and the inter-molecular hydrogen bonding in the compound. The single crystal of the IMC shows 53% transmission and emits significantly higher dual fluorescence, and the band gap was computed to be 3.04 eV. The values of solubility of the IMC, measured in the temperature range 304-322 K, satisfy the mole fraction (X) and temperature equation: Xeq= 5.1324 × 10-7 e 0.01356T.

  20. Boiling points of halogenated ethanes: an explanatory model implicating weak intermolecular hydrogen-halogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchamp, Guy

    2008-10-23

    This study explores via structural clues the influence of weak intermolecular hydrogen-halogen bonds on the boiling point of halogenated ethanes. The plot of boiling points of 86 halogenated ethanes versus the molar refraction (linked to polarizability) reveals a series of straight lines, each corresponding to one of nine possible arrangements of hydrogen and halogen atoms on the two-carbon skeleton. A multiple linear regression model of the boiling points could be designed based on molar refraction and subgroup structure as independent variables (R(2) = 0.995, standard error of boiling point 4.2 degrees C). The model is discussed in view of the fact that molar refraction can account for approximately 83.0% of the observed variation in boiling point, while 16.5% could be ascribed to weak C-X...H-C intermolecular interactions. The difference in the observed boiling point of molecules having similar molar refraction values but differing in hydrogen-halogen intermolecular bonds can reach as much as 90 degrees C.

  1. An optimized intermolecular force field for hydrogen-bonded organic molecular crystals using atomic multipole electrostatics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Thompson, Hugh P. G.; Day, Graeme M.

    2016-01-01

    An empirically parameterized intermolecular force field is developed for crystal structure modelling and prediction. The model is optimized for use with an atomic multipole description of electrostatic interactions. We present a re-parameterization of a popular intermolecular force field for describing intermolecular interactions in the organic solid state. Specifically we optimize the performance of the exp-6 force field when used in conjunction with atomic multipole electrostatics. We also parameterize force fields that are optimized for use with multipoles derived from polarized molecular electron densities, to account for induction effects in molecular crystals. Parameterization is performed against a set of 186 experimentally determined, low-temperature crystal structures and 53 measured sublimation enthalpies of hydrogen-bonding organic molecules. The resulting force fields are tested on a validation set of 129 crystal structures and show improved reproduction of the structures and lattice energies of a range of organic molecular crystals compared with the original force field with atomic partial charge electrostatics. Unit-cell dimensions of the validation set are typically reproduced to within 3% with the re-parameterized force fields. Lattice energies, which were all included during parameterization, are systematically underestimated when compared with measured sublimation enthalpies, with mean absolute errors of between 7.4 and 9.0%

  2. Mechanism and Regioselectivity of Rh(III)-Catalyzed Intermolecular Annulation of Aryl-Substituted Diazenecarboxylates and Alkenes: DFT Insights

    KAUST Repository

    Ajitha, Manjaly John

    2016-02-05

    The mechanism of Rh-catalyzed intermolecular annulation of aryl-substituted diazenecarboxylates and alkenes was investigated using density functional theory (DFT) (PCM-M062X/6-311+G(d,p)//M062X/6-31G(d)). The acetate ligand (OAc)-assisted C-H activation via the formation of a five-membered rhodacycle (I-TS1; ΔG‡ = 19.4 kcal/mol) is more favorable compared to that via a four-membered intermediate (II-TS1; ΔG‡ = 27.8 kcal/mol). Our results also revealed that the seven-membered intermediate (I-3, ΔGrel = -6.8 kcal/mol) formed after the alkene insertion could undergo a coordination switch with the adjacent nitrogen atom (via TScs; ΔG‡ = 16.5 kcal/mol) to produce a thermodynamically stable six-membered intermediate (II-3, ΔGrel = -10.4 kcal/mol), eventually leading to a cyclization process followed by a barrierless ligand-assisted protonation to yield the final product. The β-hydride elimination product was found to be kinetically and thermodynamically undesirable. The rate-determining step is identified as the initial C-H activation, consistent with the previous kinetic studies. Notably, DFT studies offered important insights on the ability of the substrate (diazene carboxylate) to promote the switchable coordination site selectivity during the reaction to achieve a lower energy pathway. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  3. Rubrene: The interplay between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions determines the planarization of its tetracene core in the solid state

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher; Marshall, Michael S.; Sherrill, C. David; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    exchange-repulsion interactions among the phenyl side groups. Calculations based on available crystallographic structures reveal that planar conformations of the tetracene core in the solid state result from intermolecular interactions that can be tuned

  4. Altering intra- to inter-molecular hydrogen bonding by dimethylsulfoxide: A TDDFT study of charge transfer for coumarin 343

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Yin, Hang; Li, Hui; Shi, Ying

    2017-04-01

    DFT and TDDFT methods were carried out to investigate the influences of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding on excited state charge transfer for coumarin 343 (C343). Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is formed between carboxylic acid group and carbonyl group in C343 monomer. However, in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution, DMSO 'opens up' the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and forms solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonded C343-DMSO complex. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals reveals that intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) occurs in the first excited state both for C343 monomer and complex. The results of optimized geometric structures indicate that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction is strengthened while the intermolecular hydrogen bonding is weakened in excited state, which is confirmed again by monitoring the shifts of characteristic peaks of infrared spectra. We demonstrated that DMSO solvent can not only break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding to form intermolecular hydrogen bonding with C343 but also alter the mechanism of excited state hydrogen bonding strengthening.

  5. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher; Risko, Chad; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π

  6. Morse-Morse-Spline-Van der Waals intermolecular potential suitable for hexafluoride gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coroiu, Ilioara

    2004-01-01

    Several effective isotopic pair potential functions have been proposed to characterize the bulk properties of quasispherical molecules, in particular the hexafluorides, but none got a success. Unfortunately, these potentials have repulsive walls steeper than those which describe the hexafluorides. That these intermolecular potentials are not quite adequate is shown by the lack of complete agreement between theory and experiment even for the rare gases. Not long ago, R. A. Aziz et al. have constructed a Morse-Morse-Spline-Van der Waals (MMSV) potential. The MMSV potential incorporates the determination of C 6 dispersion coefficient and it reasonably correlates second virial coefficients and viscosity data of sulphur hexafluoride at the same time. None of the potential functions previously proposed in literature could predict these properties simultaneously. We calculated the second virial coefficients and a large number of Chapman-Cowling collision integrals for this improved intermolecular potential, the MMSV potential. The results were tabulated for a large reduced temperature range, kT/ε from 0.1 to 100. The treatment was entirely classical and no corrections for quantum effects were made. The higher approximations to the transport coefficients and the isotopic thermal diffusion factor were also calculated and tabulated for the same range. In this paper we present the evaluation of the uranium hexafluoride potential parameters for the MMSV intermolecular potential. To find a single set of potential parameters which could predict all the transport properties (viscosity, thermal conductivity, self diffusion, etc.), as well as the second virial coefficients, simultaneously, the method suggested by Morizot and a large assortment of literature data were used. Our results emphasized that the Morse-Morse-Spline-Van der Waals potential have the best overall predictive ability for gaseous hexafluoride data, certain for uranium hexafluoride. (author)

  7. Using corresponding state theory to obtain intermolecular potentials to calculate pure liquid shock Hugoniots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1997-12-01

    Determination of product species, equations-of-state (EOS) and thermochemical properties of high explosives and pyrotechnics remains a major unsolved problem. Although, empirical EOS models may be calibrated to replicate detonation conditions within experimental variability (5--10%), different states, e.g. expansion, may produce significant discrepancy with data if the basic form of the EOS model is incorrect. A more physically realistic EOS model based on intermolecular potentials, such as the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler (JCZ3) EOS, is needed to predict detonation states as well as expanded states. Predictive capability for any EOS requires a large species data base composed of a wide variety of elements. Unfortunately, only 20 species have known JCZ3 molecular force constants. Of these 20 species, only 10 have been adequately compared to experimental data such as molecular scattering or shock Hugoniot data. Since data in the strongly repulsive region of the molecular potential is limited, alternative methods must be found to deduce force constants for a larger number of species. The objective of the present study is to determine JCZ3 product species force constants by using a corresponding states theory. Intermolecular potential parameters were obtained for a variety of gas species using a simple corresponding states technique with critical volume and critical temperature. A more complex, four parameter corresponding state method with shape and polarity corrections was also used to obtain intermolecular potential parameters. Both corresponding state methods were used to predict shock Hugoniot data obtained from pure liquids. The simple corresponding state method is shown to give adequate agreement with shock Hugoniot data.

  8. Intermolecular Interactions between Eosin Y and Caffeine Using 1H-NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macduff O. Okuom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DETECHIP has been used in testing analytes including caffeine, cocaine, and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC from marijuana, as well as date rape and club drugs such as flunitrazepam, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB, and methamphetamine. This study investigates the intermolecular interaction between DETECHIP sensor eosin Y (DC1 and the analyte (caffeine that is responsible for the fluorescence and color changes observed in the actual array. Using 1H-NMR, 1H-COSY, and 1H-DOSY NMR methods, a proton exchange from C-8 of caffeine to eosin Y is proposed.

  9. The same number of optimized parameters scheme for determining intermolecular interaction energies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Eriksen, Janus Juul

    2015-01-01

    We propose the Same Number Of Optimized Parameters (SNOOP) scheme as an alternative to the counterpoise method for treating basis set superposition errors in calculations of intermolecular interaction energies. The key point of the SNOOP scheme is to enforce that the number of optimized wave...... as numerically. Numerical results for second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) and coupled-cluster with single, double, and approximate triple excitations (CCSD(T)) show that the SNOOP scheme in general outperforms the uncorrected and counterpoise approaches. Furthermore, we show that SNOOP...

  10. Intermolecular Modes between LH2 Bacteriochlorophylls and Protein Residues: The Effect on the Excitation Energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, André; De Vico, Luca; Hansen, Thorsten

    2017-06-08

    Light-harvesting system 2 (LH2) executes the primary processes of photosynthesis in purple bacteria; photon absorption, and energy transportation to the reaction center. A detailed mechanistic insight into these operations is obscured by the complexity of the light-harvesting systems, particularly by the chromophore-environment interaction. In this work, we focus on the effects of the protein residues that are ligated to the bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) and construct potential energy surfaces of the ground and first optically excited state for the various BChl-residue systems where we in each case consider two degrees of freedom in the intermolecular region. We find that the excitation energies are only slightly affected by the considered modes. In addition, we see that axial ligands and hydrogen-bonded residues have opposite effects on both excitation energies and oscillator strengths by comparing to the isolated BChls. Our results indicate that only a small part of the chromophore-environment interaction can be associated with the intermolecular region between a BChl and an adjacent residue, but that it may be possible to selectively raise or lower the excitation energy at the axial and planar residue positions, respectively.

  11. Intermolecular cope-type hydroamination of alkenes and alkynes using hydroxylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Joseph; Gorelsky, Serge I; Dimitrijevic, Elena; Lebrun, Marie-Eve; Bédard, Anne-Catherine; Séguin, Catherine; Beauchemin, André M

    2008-12-31

    The development of the Cope-type hydroamination as a method for the metal- and acid-free intermolecular hydroamination of hydroxylamines with alkenes and alkynes is described. Aqueous hydroxylamine reacts efficiently with alkynes in a Markovnikov fashion to give oximes and with strained alkenes to give N-alkylhydroxylamines, while unstrained alkenes are more challenging. N-Alkylhydroxylamines also display similar reactivity with strained alkenes and give modest to good yields with vinylarenes. Electron-rich vinylarenes lead to branched products while electron-deficient vinylarenes give linear products. A beneficial additive effect is observed with sodium cyanoborohydride, the extent of which is dependent on the structure of the hydroxylamine. The reaction conditions are found to be compatible with common protecting groups, free OH and NH bonds, as well as bromoarenes. Both experimental and theoretical results suggest the proton transfer step of the N-oxide intermediate is of vital importance in the intermolecular reactions of alkenes. Details are disclosed concerning optimization, reaction scope, limitations, and theoretical analysis by DFT, which includes a detailed molecular orbital description for the concerted hydroamination process and an exhaustive set of calculated potential energy surfaces for the reactions of various alkenes, alkynes, and hydroxylamines.

  12. Effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, vibrational analysis and molecular structure of 4-chlorobenzothioamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çırak, Çağrı; Sert, Yusuf; Ucun, Fatih

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of 4-chlorobenzothioamide were investigated. The FT-IR (400-4000 cm-1) and μ-Raman spectra (100-4000 cm-1) of 4-chlorobenzothioamide in the solid phase were recorded. The geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational frequencies, Infrared and Raman intensities of the title molecule in the ground state were calculated using ab initio Hartree-Fock and density functional theory (B3LYP) methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the first time. The optimized geometric parameters and the theoretical vibrational frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data and with the results found in the literature. The vibrational frequencies were assigned based on the potential energy distribution using the VEDA 4 program. The dimeric form of 4-chlorobenzothioamide was also simulated to evaluate the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on the vibrational frequencies. It was observed that the Nsbnd H stretching modes shifted to lower frequencies, while the in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes shifted to higher frequencies due to the intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯S hydrogen bond. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and diagrams were presented.

  13. Effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, vibrational analysis and molecular structure of a biomolecule: 5-Hydroxymethyluracil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çırak, Çağrı; Sert, Yusuf; Ucun, Fatih

    2014-06-01

    In the present work, the experimental and theoretical vibrational spectra of 5-hydroxymethyluracil were investigated. The FT-IR (4000-400 cm-1) spectrum of the molecule in the solid phase was recorded. The geometric parameters (bond lengths and bond angles), vibrational frequencies, Infrared intensities of the title molecule in the ground state were calculated using density functional B3LYP and M06-2X methods with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set for the first time. The optimized geometric parameters and theoretical vibrational frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and with the results found in the literature. The vibrational frequencies were assigned based on the potential energy distribution using the VEDA 4 program. The dimeric form of 5-hydroxymethyluracil molecule was also simulated to evaluate the effect of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on its vibrational frequencies. It was observed that the Nsbnd H stretching modes shifted to lower frequencies, while its in-plane and out-of-plane bending modes shifted to higher frequencies due to the intermolecular Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond. Also, the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energies and diagrams were presented.

  14. Quantitative assessment of intermolecular interactions by atomic force microscopy imaging using copper oxide tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mönig, Harry; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Timmer, Alexander; Hu, Zhixin; Liu, Lacheng; Díaz Arado, Oscar; Cnudde, Marvin; Strassert, Cristian Alejandro; Ji, Wei; Rohlfing, Michael; Fuchs, Harald

    2018-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy is an impressive tool with which to directly resolve the bonding structure of organic compounds1-5. The methodology usually involves chemical passivation of the probe-tip termination by attaching single molecules or atoms such as CO or Xe (refs 1,6-9). However, these probe particles are only weakly connected to the metallic apex, which results in considerable dynamic deflection. This probe particle deflection leads to pronounced image distortions, systematic overestimation of bond lengths, and in some cases even spurious bond-like contrast features, thus inhibiting reliable data interpretation8-12. Recently, an alternative approach to tip passivation has been used in which slightly indenting a tip into oxidized copper substrates and subsequent contrast analysis allows for the verification of an oxygen-terminated Cu tip13-15. Here we show that, due to the covalently bound configuration of the terminal oxygen atom, this copper oxide tip (CuOx tip) has a high structural stability, allowing not only a quantitative determination of individual bond lengths and access to bond order effects, but also reliable intermolecular bond characterization. In particular, by removing the previous limitations of flexible probe particles, we are able to provide conclusive experimental evidence for an unusual intermolecular N-Au-N three-centre bond. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CuOx tips allow the characterization of the strength and configuration of individual hydrogen bonds within a molecular assembly.

  15. A general intermolecular force field based on tight-binding quantum chemical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimme, Stefan; Bannwarth, Christoph; Caldeweyher, Eike; Pisarek, Jana; Hansen, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    A black-box type procedure is presented for the generation of a molecule-specific, intermolecular potential energy function. The method uses quantum chemical (QC) information from our recently published extended tight-binding semi-empirical scheme (GFN-xTB) and can treat non-covalently bound complexes and aggregates with almost arbitrary chemical structure. The necessary QC information consists of the equilibrium structure, Mulliken atomic charges, charge centers of localized molecular orbitals, and also of frontier orbitals and orbital energies. The molecular pair potential includes model density dependent Pauli repulsion, penetration, as well as point charge electrostatics, the newly developed D4 dispersion energy model, Drude oscillators for polarization, and a charge-transfer term. Only one element-specific and about 20 global empirical parameters are needed to cover systems with nuclear charges up to radon (Z = 86). The method is tested for standard small molecule interaction energy benchmark sets where it provides accurate intermolecular energies and equilibrium distances. Examples for structures with a few hundred atoms including charged systems demonstrate the versatility of the approach. The method is implemented in a stand-alone computer code which enables rigid-body, global minimum energy searches for molecular aggregation or alignment.

  16. Thz Spectroscopy and DFT Modeling of Intermolecular Vibrations in Hydrophobic Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, michael R. C.; Aschaffenburg, Daniel J.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.

    2013-06-01

    Vibrations that involve intermolecular displacements occur in molecular crystals at frequencies in the 0.5-5 THz range (˜15-165 cm^{-1}), and these motions are direct indicators of the interaction potential between the molecules. The intermolecular potential energy surface of crystalline hydrophobic amino acids is inherently interesting simply because of the wide variety of forces (electrostatic, dipole-dipole, hydrogen-bonding, van der Waals) that are present. Furthermore, an understanding of these particular interactions is immediately relevant to important topics like protein conformation and pharmaceutical polymorphism. We measured the low-frequency absorption spectra of several polycrystalline hydrophobic amino acids using THz time-domain spectroscopy, and in addition we carried out DFT calculations using periodic boundary conditions and an exchange-correlation functional that accounts for van der Waals dispersion forces. We chose to investigate a series of similar amino acids with closely analogous unit cells (leucine, isoleucine, and allo-isoleucine, in racemic or pseudo-racemic mixtures). This allows us to consider trends in the vibrational spectra as a function of small changes in molecular arrangement and/or crystal geometry. In this way, we gain confidence that peak assignments are not based on serendipitous similarities between calculated and observed features.

  17. Photophysical and computational investigation of the intermolecular interactions of pyrene with phenothiazine and promazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Güloğlu, Pınar; Acar, Nursel, E-mail: nursel.acar@ege.edu.tr

    2016-10-20

    Highlights: • Intermolecular interactions of pyrene with phenothiazine/promazine were investigated. • All investigated systems were optimized at ωB97XD/6-31G(d,p) level in gas phase. • The electronic transitions were determined using frontier orbitals. • Both Py–Pheno and Py–Prom are potential candidates for charge transfer systems. - Abstract: The intermolecular interactions between the pyrene (Py) (as acceptor) and phenothiazine (Pheno), promazine (Prom) (as donors) were investigated using UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Fluorescence quenching rate constants for Py–Pheno and Py–Prom systems have been calculated approximately 10{sup 10} M{sup −1} s{sup −1}, indicating diffusion controlled processes. A computational investigation has also been carried out in gas phase at ωB97XD/6-31G(d,p) level. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) was used to calculate the electronic transitions of molecules at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level. Total electronic energies, complexation energies, free energy differences, excitation wavelengths, and HOMO–LUMO energy gaps are discussed in gas phase. Analyses of first excited singlet states have indicated charge transfers transitions between Py and Pheno, Prom through π–π stacking in gas phase at 433 nm and 466 nm, respectively. Due to its charge transfer character, Py–Pheno and Py–Prom systems seem to be appropriate models to investigate and design photosensitive materials.

  18. Binding Cellulose and Chitosan via Intermolecular Inclusion Interaction: Synthesis and Characterisation of Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiufang Duan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel cellulose-chitosan gel was successfully prepared in three steps: (1 ferrocene- (Fc- cellulose with degrees of substitution (DS of 0.5 wt% was synthesised by ferrocenecarboxylic acid and cellulose within dimethylacetamide/lithium chloride (DMAc/LiCl; (2 the β-cyclodextrin (β-CD groups were introduced onto the chitosan chains by reacting chitosan with epichlorohydrin in dimethyl sulphoxide and a DS of 0.35 wt%; (3 thus, the cellulose-chitosan gel was obtained via an intermolecular inclusion interaction of Fc-cellulose and β-CD-chitosan in DMA/LiCl, that is, by an intermolecular inclusion interaction, between the Fc groups of cellulose and the β-CD groups on the chitosan backbone at room temperature. The successful synthesis of Fc-cellulose and β-CD-chitosan was characterised by 13C-NMR spectroscopy. The gel based on β-CD-chitosan and Fc-cellulose was formed under mild conditions which can engender autonomous healing between cut surfaces after 24 hours: the gel cannot self-heal while the cut surfaces were coated with a solution of a competitive guest (adamantane acid. The cellulose-chitosan complex made by this method underwent self-healing. Therefore, this study provided a novel method of expanding the application of chitosan by binding it with another polymer.

  19. A quantitative analysis of weak intermolecular interactions & quantum chemical calculations (DFT) of novel chalcone derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavda, Bhavin R., E-mail: chavdabhavin9@gmail.com; Dubey, Rahul P.; Patel, Urmila H. [Department of Physics, Sardar Patel University, Vallabh Vidyanagar-388120, Gujarat (India); Gandhi, Sahaj A. [Bhavan’s Shri I.L. Pandya Arts-Science and Smt. J.M. shah Commerce College, Dakar, Anand -388001, Gujarat, Indian (India); Barot, Vijay M. [P. G. Center in Chemistry, Smt. S. M. Panchal Science College, Talod, Gujarat 383 215 (India)

    2016-05-06

    The novel chalcone derivatives have widespread applications in material science and medicinal industries. The density functional theory (DFT) is used to optimized the molecular structure of the three chalcone derivatives (M-I, II, III). The observed discrepancies between the theoretical and experimental (X-ray data) results attributed to different environments of the molecules, the experimental values are of the molecule in solid state there by subjected to the intermolecular forces, like non-bonded hydrogen bond interactions, where as isolated state in gas phase for theoretical studies. The lattice energy of all the molecules have been calculated using PIXELC module in Coulomb –London –Pauli (CLP) package and is partitioned into corresponding coulombic, polarization, dispersion and repulsion contributions. Lattice energy data confirm and strengthen the finding of the X-ray results that the weak but significant intermolecular interactions like C-H…O, Π- Π and C-H… Π plays an important role in the stabilization of crystal packing.

  20. Structural changes and intermolecular interactions of filled ice Ic structure for hydrogen hydrate under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, S; Hirai, H; Kawamura, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yagi, T

    2010-01-01

    High-pressure experiments of hydrogen hydrate were performed using a diamond anvil cell under conditions of 0.1-44.2 GPa and at room temperature. Also, high pressure Raman studies of solid hydrogen were performed in the pressure range of 0.1-43.7 GPa. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) for hydrogen hydrate revealed that a known high-pressure structure, filled ice Ic structure, of hydrogen hydrate transformed to a new high-pressure structure at approximately 35-40 GPa. A comparison of the Raman spectroscopy of a vibron for hydrogen molecules between hydrogen hydrate and solid hydrogen revealed that the extraction of hydrogen molecules from hydrogen hydrate occurred above 20 GPa. Also, the Raman spectra of a roton revealed that the rotation of hydrogen molecules in hydrogen hydrate was suppressed at around 20 GPa and that the rotation recovered under higher pressure. These results indicated that remarkable intermolecular interactions in hydrogen hydrate between neighboring hydrogen molecules and between guest hydrogen molecules and host water molecules might occur. These intermolecular interactions could produce the stability of hydrogen hydrate.

  1. Effects of pair correlation functions on intermolecular nuclear relaxation by translational and rotational diffusion in liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, P.

    1978-01-01

    In order to study the intermolecular relaxation due to magnetic dipolar interactions, we calculate the spectral densities resulting from random translational and rotational motions of spherical molecules carrying off-centre spins. The relative translational motion is treated in the frame-work of a general diffusion equation (the Smoluchowski equation) which takes into account the existence of effective forces between the molecules. This model implies a pair correlation function. i.e. a non unifom relative distribution of the molecules. The analytical calculations are carried out by taking correctly into account the hard sphere boundary conditions for the molecules. Explicit numerical calculations of the spectral densities are performed using finite difference methods and the pair correlation function of Verlet and Weiss obtained by computer experiments. The resulting calculations allow one to interpret the relaxation exhibited by benzene and some of its monohalogen derivatives which has been measured by Jonas et al. at various pressures. The effects of pair correlation and eccentricity contribute to a noticeable enhancement of the spectral densities, especially as the frequency increases. The translational correlation times calculated from the Stokes formula and those deduced from intermolecular relaxation studies are compared. It is shown that in order to distinguish which of the dynamical models is appropriate, measurements must be made as a function of frequency [fr

  2. Noncovalent Intermolecular Interactions in Organic Electronic Materials: Implications for the Molecular Packing vs Electronic Properties of Acenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-10-30

    Noncovalent intermolecular interactions, which can be tuned through the toolbox of synthetic chemistry, determine not only the molecular packing but also the resulting electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of materials derived from π-conjugated molecules, oligomers, and polymers. Here, we provide an overview of the theoretical underpinnings of noncovalent intermolecular interactions and briefly discuss the computational chemistry approaches used to understand the magnitude of these interactions. These methodologies are then exploited to illustrate how noncovalent intermolecular interactions impact important electronic properties-such as the electronic coupling between adjacent molecules, a key parameter for charge-carrier transport-through a comparison between the prototype organic semiconductor pentacene with a series of N-substituted heteropentacenes. Incorporating an understanding of these interactions into the design of organic semiconductors can assist in developing novel materials systems from this fascinating molecular class. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  3. Similarities between intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in RNA kissing complexes found by means of cross-correlated relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dittmer, Jens; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey

    2003-01-01

    The bond lengths and dynamics of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in an RNA kissing complex have been characterized by determining the NMR relaxation rates of various double- and triple-quantum coherences that involve an imino proton and two neighboring nitrogen-15 nuclei belonging to opposite bases. New experiments allow one to determine the chemical shift anisotropy of the imino protons. The bond lengths derived from dipolar relaxation and the lack of modulations of the nitrogen chemical shifts indicate that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds which hold the kissing complex together are very similar to the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the double-stranded stem of the RNA

  4. Intermolecular symmetry-adapted perturbation theory study of large organic complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heßelmann, Andreas; Korona, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    Binding energies for the complexes of the S12L database by Grimme [Chem. Eur. J. 18, 9955 (2012)] were calculated using intermolecular symmetry-adapted perturbation theory combined with a density-functional theory description of the interacting molecules. The individual interaction energy decompositions revealed no particular change in the stabilisation pattern as compared to smaller dimer systems at equilibrium structures. This demonstrates that, to some extent, the qualitative description of the interaction of small dimer systems may be extrapolated to larger systems, a method that is widely used in force-fields in which the total interaction energy is decomposed into atom-atom contributions. A comparison of the binding energies with accurate experimental reference values from Grimme, the latter including thermodynamic corrections from semiempirical calculations, has shown a fairly good agreement to within the error range of the reference binding energies

  5. Graphene-enhanced intermolecular interaction at interface between copper- and cobalt-phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, Wei-Dong [Department of Physics, Shaoxing University, Shaoxing 312000 (China); Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Huang, Shu-Ping [Department of Chemistry, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, South Dakota 57069 (United States); Lee, Chun-Sing, E-mail: apcslee@cityu.edu.hk [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Material Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-10-07

    Interfacial electronic structures of copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc), cobalt-phthalocyanine (CoPc), and graphene were investigated experimentally by using photoelectron spectroscopy. While the CuPc/graphene interface shows flat band structure and negligible interfacial dipole indicating quite weak molecule-substrate interaction, the CuPc/CoPc/graphene interface shows a large interfacial dipole and obvious energy level bending. Controlled experiments ruled out possible influences from the change in film structure of CuPc and pure π–π interaction between CoPc and CuPc. Analysis based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory reveals that the decrease in the work function for the CuPc/CoPc/graphene system is induced by the intermolecular interaction between CuPc and CoPc which is enhanced owning to the peculiar electronic properties at the CoPc-graphene interface.

  6. Identification of intra- and intermolecular disulfide bridges in the multidrug resistance transporter ABCG2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ulla Birk; Fog, Jacob U; Litman, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    cysteines predicted to be on the extracellular face of ABCG2. Upon mutation of Cys-592 or Cys-608 to alanine (C592A and C608A), ABCG2 migrated as a dimer in SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions; however, mutation of Cys-603 to Ala (C603A) caused the transporter to migrate as a single monomeric band....... Despite this change, C603A displayed efficient membrane targeting and preserved transport function. Because the transporter migrated as a dimer in SDS-PAGE, when only Cys-603 was present (C592A-C608A), the data suggest that Cys-603 forms a symmetrical intermolecular disulfide bridge in the ABCG2 homodimer...

  7. Influence of pressure on the crystallization of systems characterized by different intermolecular attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koperwas, K.; Affouard, F.; Gerges, J.; Valdes, L.-C.; Adrjanowicz, K.; Paluch, M.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we examine, in terms of the classical nucleation theory, how the strengthening of the attractive intermolecular interactions influences the crystallization process for systems like Lennard-Jones at different isobaric conditions. For this purpose, we modify the standard Lennard-Jones potential, and as a result, we obtain three different systems characterized by various strengths of attractive potentials occurring between molecules, which are in direct relationship to the physical quantities describing molecules, e.g., its polarizability or dipole moment. Based on performed analysis, we demonstrate that the molecular attraction primarily impacts the thermodynamics of the interface between liquid and crystal. This is reflected in the behavior of nucleation and overall crystallization rates during compression of the system.

  8. INS study of intermolecular interaction at the silicone-fumed silica interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheka, E.F.; Natkaniec, I.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The paper presents results related to the interface formed between finned silica particles and polydimethylsiloxane polymers, presented in the study by a five-member cyclic oligomer SiS. The substrate surface is terminated by either hydroxyl units or by trimethylsiloxy ones. When the interface is formed, methyl units are the main constituents providing neutron scattering. Protium/deuterium exchange has been used to distinguish the latter belonging to either adsorbate or substrate. A detailed analysis of the intermolecular interaction impact on both adsorbed molecule and substrate has been performed. The observed features are supported by the vibrational spectra calculations performed on the basis of a modem quantum-chemical approach and supplemented by the solution of the inverse spectral problem. (author)

  9. Intermolecular Force Field Parameters Optimization for Computer Simulations of CH4 in ZIF-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phannika Kanthima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The differential evolution (DE algorithm is applied for obtaining the optimized intermolecular interaction parameters between CH4 and 2-methylimidazolate ([C4N2H5]− using quantum binding energies of CH4-[C4N2H5]− complexes. The initial parameters and their upper/lower bounds are obtained from the general AMBER force field. The DE optimized and the AMBER parameters are then used in the molecular dynamics (MD simulations of CH4 molecules in the frameworks of ZIF-8. The results show that the DE parameters are better for representing the quantum interaction energies than the AMBER parameters. The dynamical and structural behaviors obtained from MD simulations with both sets of parameters are also of notable differences.

  10. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic effects on the 129Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and 131Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe2 system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular...... interaction-induced binary chemical shift d, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor ?s, and the NQC constant along the internuclear axis ?ll are calculated as a function of the internuclear distance. DHF shielding calculations are carried out using gauge-including atomic orbitals. For comparison, the full...... is obtained for d and ?s in Xe2. For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other...

  11. Crystal structures and intermolecular interactions of two novel antioxidant triazolyl-benzimidazole compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karayel, A.; Özbey, S.; Ayhan-Kılcıgil, G.; Kuş, C.

    2015-01-01

    The crystal structures of 5-(2-(p-chlorophenylbenzimidazol-1-yl-methyl)-4-(3-fluorophenyl)-2, 4-dihydro-[1,2,4]-triazole-3-thione (G6C) and 5-(2-(p-chlorophenylbenzimidazol-1-yl-methyl)-4-(2-methylphenyl)-2, 4-dihydro-[1,2,4]-triazole-3-thione (G4C) have been determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Benzimidazole ring systems in both molecules are planar. The triazole part is almost perpendicular to the phenyl and the benzimidazole parts of the molecules in order to avoid steric interactions between the rings. The crystal structures are stabilized by intermolecular hydrogen bonds between the amino group of the triazole and the nitrogen atom of benzimidazole of a neighboring molecule

  12. Chain-length-dependent intermolecular packing in polyphenylenes: a high pressure study

    CERN Document Server

    Heimel, G; Oehzelt, M; Hummer, K; Koppelhuber-Bitschnau, B; Porsch, F; Ambrosch-Draxl, C; Resel, R

    2003-01-01

    We report on pressure-induced structural changes in crystalline oligo(para-phenylenes) containing two to six phenyl rings. The results are discussed with particular emphasis put on the implications these changes in intermolecular distances and molecular arrangement have on important bulk properties of this class of materials, such as optical response and charge transport. We performed energy dispersive x-ray diffraction in a systematic study on polycrystalline powders of biphenyl, para-terphenyl, p-quaterphenyl, p-quinquephenyl and p-sexiphenyl under hydrostatic pressure up to 60 kbar. Revisiting the crystal structures at ambient conditions reveals details in the packing principle. A linear relationship between the density at ambient conditions and the number of phenyl rings is found. High pressure data not only yields pressure-dependent lattice parameters and hints towards pressure-induced changes in the molecular arrangement but also allows for an analysis of the equations of state of these substances as a ...

  13. Ab initio intermolecular potential energy surface and thermophysical properties of nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crusius, Johann-Philipp; Hellmann, Robert; Hassel, Egon; Bich, Eckard

    2015-06-28

    We present an analytical intermolecular potential energy surface (PES) for two rigid nitrous oxide (N2O) molecules derived from high-level quantum-chemical ab initio calculations. Interaction energies for 2018 N2O-N2O configurations were computed utilizing the counterpoise-corrected supermolecular approach at the CCSD(T) level of theory using basis sets up to aug-cc-pVQZ supplemented with bond functions. A site-site potential function with seven sites per N2O molecule was fitted to the pair interaction energies. We validated our PES by computing the second virial coefficient as well as shear viscosity and thermal conductivity in the dilute-gas limit. The values of these properties are substantiated by the best experimental data.

  14. Dielectric behaviour and intermolecular association between L(+) ascorbic acid and ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudyk, R.A.; Torres, M.C.; Acuna Molina, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to determine the dipole moment of L(+) ascorbic acid and the relation to its structure the experimental variations of permitivities, refractive indices and specific volumes of a series of dilute ethanolic solutions at 25 deg C were examined. The average moment (μ) using Buckingham equation was found to be 5,58 D considering the spherical approximation and 7,81 D if the ellipsoidal form factor was considered. The calculated μ value through vectorial addition was 4,98 D. The solute partial molal volume in the studied range was calculated to be 94,73 cm 3 instead of the theoretical value of 106,71 cm 3 . Both discrepancies are attributed to intermolecular solute-solvent interactions. A possible electronic displacement which favours hydrogen bonding with the solvent is postulated. (Author) [es

  15. Importance of the Donor:Fullerene intermolecular arrangement for high-efficiency organic photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Graham, Kenneth; Cabanetos, Clement; Jahnke, Justin P.; Idso, Matthew N.; El Labban, Abdulrahman; Ngongang Ndjawa, Guy Olivier; Heumueller, Thomas; Vandewal, Koen; Salleo, Alberto; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Amassian, Aram; Beaujuge, Pierre; McGehee, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) material systems are hypothesized to depend strongly on the intermolecular arrangements at the donor:fullerene interfaces. A review of some of the most efficient polymers utilized in polymer:fullerene PV devices, combined with an analysis of reported polymer donor materials wherein the same conjugated backbone was used with varying alkyl substituents, supports this hypothesis. Specifically, the literature shows that higher-performing donor-acceptor type polymers generally have acceptor moieties that are sterically accessible for interactions with the fullerene derivative, whereas the corresponding donor moieties tend to have branched alkyl substituents that sterically hinder interactions with the fullerene. To further explore the idea that the most beneficial polymer:fullerene arrangement involves the fullerene docking with the acceptor moiety, a family of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b]dithiophene-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione polymers (PBDTTPD derivatives) was synthesized and tested in a variety of PV device types with vastly different aggregation states of the polymer. In agreement with our hypothesis, the PBDTTPD derivative with a more sterically accessible acceptor moiety and a more sterically hindered donor moiety shows the highest performance in bulk-heterojunction, bilayer, and low-polymer concentration PV devices where fullerene derivatives serve as the electron-accepting materials. Furthermore, external quantum efficiency measurements of the charge-transfer state and solid-state two-dimensional (2D) 13C{1H} heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR analyses support that a specific polymer:fullerene arrangement is present for the highest performing PBDTTPD derivative, in which the fullerene is in closer proximity to the acceptor moiety of the polymer. This work demonstrates that the polymer:fullerene arrangement and resulting intermolecular interactions may be key factors in determining the performance of OPV material systems

  16. Importance of the Donor:Fullerene intermolecular arrangement for high-efficiency organic photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Graham, Kenneth

    2014-07-09

    The performance of organic photovoltaic (OPV) material systems are hypothesized to depend strongly on the intermolecular arrangements at the donor:fullerene interfaces. A review of some of the most efficient polymers utilized in polymer:fullerene PV devices, combined with an analysis of reported polymer donor materials wherein the same conjugated backbone was used with varying alkyl substituents, supports this hypothesis. Specifically, the literature shows that higher-performing donor-acceptor type polymers generally have acceptor moieties that are sterically accessible for interactions with the fullerene derivative, whereas the corresponding donor moieties tend to have branched alkyl substituents that sterically hinder interactions with the fullerene. To further explore the idea that the most beneficial polymer:fullerene arrangement involves the fullerene docking with the acceptor moiety, a family of benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b]dithiophene-thieno[3,4-c]pyrrole-4,6-dione polymers (PBDTTPD derivatives) was synthesized and tested in a variety of PV device types with vastly different aggregation states of the polymer. In agreement with our hypothesis, the PBDTTPD derivative with a more sterically accessible acceptor moiety and a more sterically hindered donor moiety shows the highest performance in bulk-heterojunction, bilayer, and low-polymer concentration PV devices where fullerene derivatives serve as the electron-accepting materials. Furthermore, external quantum efficiency measurements of the charge-transfer state and solid-state two-dimensional (2D) 13C{1H} heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR analyses support that a specific polymer:fullerene arrangement is present for the highest performing PBDTTPD derivative, in which the fullerene is in closer proximity to the acceptor moiety of the polymer. This work demonstrates that the polymer:fullerene arrangement and resulting intermolecular interactions may be key factors in determining the performance of OPV material systems

  17. Rewetting phenomena and their relation to intermolecular forces between a hot wall and the fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerweck, V.

    1989-12-01

    The rewetting phenomena and the different physical concepts which are used in their modelisation are reviewed. The present work studies the effect of the intermolecular forces between the hot wall and the fluid on this phase transition. Using suitable approximations, a local equation of state is obtained by the treatment of the fluid-fluid and fluid-wall intermolecular interactions. This local equation of state depends on the distance from the wall, and the critical pressure and temperature become a function of the distance from the wall, whereas the critical density is left constant throughout the fluid. At the wall, the critical pressure and temperature are half their bulk values and increase towards the bulk value as the distance from the wall increases. The penetration of a temperature profile in this fluid is studied by assuming that the liquid density is not strongly affected by this temperature profile as long as there is no phase transition. It is shown that the phase transition will occur extremely rapidly when the interfacial temperature upon contact is higher than the minimum of the local spinodal temperature, which varies with the distance from the wall. The result ist cast in the form of an interfacial rewetting temperature fT c above which rewetting of the surface by liquid-wall contacts is not expected because these contacts will be terminated in extremely short times. Comparing the theory with available data shows that in the usual rewetting situations the theory reduces to the use of the bulk spinodal temperature. For surfaces coated with poorly wetted materials the correction factor due to surface effects applies, reducing the rewetting temperature, in agreement with the experimental data. For liquid metals it appears that the theory is applied in a region where the basic theoretical approximations are very coarse; but even in that case the experimental trend is qualitatively predicted by the theory. (author) 43 figs., 11 tabs., 105 refs

  18. Improving intermolecular interactions in DFTB3 using extended polarization from chemical-potential equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Anders S., E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu; Cui, Qiang, E-mail: andersx@chem.wisc.edu, E-mail: cui@chem.wisc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1101 University Ave., Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Elstner, Marcus [Theoretische Chemische Biologie, Universität Karlsruhe, Kaiserstr. 12, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-08-28

    Semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods traditionally expand the electron density in a minimal, valence-only electron basis set. The minimal-basis approximation causes molecular polarization to be underestimated, and hence intermolecular interaction energies are also underestimated, especially for intermolecular interactions involving charged species. In this work, the third-order self-consistent charge density functional tight-binding method (DFTB3) is augmented with an auxiliary response density using the chemical-potential equalization (CPE) method and an empirical dispersion correction (D3). The parameters in the CPE and D3 models are fitted to high-level CCSD(T) reference interaction energies for a broad range of chemical species, as well as dipole moments calculated at the DFT level; the impact of including polarizabilities of molecules in the parameterization is also considered. Parameters for the elements H, C, N, O, and S are presented. The Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) interaction energy is improved from 6.07 kcal/mol to 1.49 kcal/mol for interactions with one charged species, whereas the RMSD is improved from 5.60 kcal/mol to 1.73 for a set of 9 salt bridges, compared to uncorrected DFTB3. For large water clusters and complexes that are dominated by dispersion interactions, the already satisfactory performance of the DFTB3-D3 model is retained; polarizabilities of neutral molecules are also notably improved. Overall, the CPE extension of DFTB3-D3 provides a more balanced description of different types of non-covalent interactions than Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap type of semi-empirical methods (e.g., PM6-D3H4) and PBE-D3 with modest basis sets.

  19. On the representation of the electric charge distribution in ethane for calculations of the molecular quadrupole moment and intermolecular electrostatic energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Alldredge, G. P.; Bruch, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    and gives a repulsive rather than an attractive electrostatic interaction at typical intermolecular distances. In the local multipole model, the atom-site dipoles give the largest contribution to both the molecular quadrupole moment and the intermolecular interaction. The Journal of Chemical Physics...

  20. Probing intermolecular protein-protein interactions in the calcium-sensing receptor homodimer using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders A.; Hansen, Jakob L; Sheikh, Søren P

    2002-01-01

    -induced intermolecular movements in the CaR homodimer using the new bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique, BRET2, which is based on the transference of energy from Renilla luciferase (Rluc) to the green fluorescent protein mutant GFP2. We tagged CaR with Rluc and GFP2 at different intracellular locations...

  1. Coiodação de alquenos com nucleófilos oxigenados: reações intermoleculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanseverino Antonio Manzolillo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A review on the electrophilic addition of iodine to alkenes in the presence of oxygen containing nucleophiles (cohalogenation reaction is presented. The intermolecular reactions are discussed with emphasis in methods of reaction and synthetic applications of the resulting vicinal iodo-functionalized products (iodohydrins, beta-iodoethers and beta-iodocarboxylates.

  2. Intermolecular rhodium-catalyzed [2 + 2 + 2] carbocyclization reactions of 1,6-enynes with symmetrical and unsymmetrical alkynes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Evans, P.; Sawyer, James R.; Lai, Kwong Wah; Huffman, John C.

    2006-01-01

    The crossed intermolecular rhodium-catalyzed [2 + 2 + 2] carbocyclization of carbon and heteroatom tethered 1,6-enynes can be accomplished with symmetrical and unsymmetrical alkynes, to afford the corresponding bicyclohexadienes in an efficient and highly selective manner. PMID:16075089

  3. Synthesis of benzimidazoles by potassium tert-butoxide-promoted intermolecular cyclization reaction of 2-iodoanilines with nitriles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Shi-Kai; Tan, Wen; Zhang, Dong-Xue; Tian, Xian-Li; Feng, Chun; Wang, Bi-Qin; Zhao, Ke-Qing; Hu, Ping; Yang, Hua

    2013-11-14

    The synthesis of benzimidazoles by intermolecular cyclization reaction of 2-iodoanilines with nitriles has been developed. These reactions proceeded without the aid of any transition metals or ligands and just using KOBu(t) as the base. A variety of substituted benzimidazole derivatives can be synthesized by the approach.

  4. Effects of sodium salt types on the intermolecular interaction of sodium alginate/antarctic krill protein composite fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Guo, Jing; Liu, Yuanfa; Chen, Shuang; Zhang, Sen; Yu, Yue

    2018-06-01

    Sodium alginate (SA) and antarctic krill protein (AKP) were blended to fabricate the SA/AKP composite fibers by the conventional wet spinning method using 5% CaCl 2 as coagulation solution. The sodium salt was added to the SA/AKP solution to adjust the ionization degree and intermolecular interaction of composite system. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the influences of sodium salt types (NaCl, CH 3 COONa, Na 2 SO 4 ) on the intermolecular interaction of SA/AKP composite fibers. The intermolecular interaction, morphology, crystallinity, thermal stability and mechanical properties of SA/AKP composite fibers were analyzed by fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results show that the types of sodium salt have obvious influences on the content of both β-sheet, intermolecular hydrogen bond, breaking strength and surface morphology in SA/AKP composite fibers, but have a negligible effect on the crystallinity and thermal stability. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Intermolecular Interactions and Cooperative Effects from Electronic Structure Calculations: An Effective Means for Developing Interaction Potentials for Condensed Phase Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2004-05-01

    The modeling of the macroscopic properties of homogeneous and inhomogeneous systems via atomistic simulations such as molecular dynamics (MD) or Monte Carlo (MC) techniques is based on the accurate description of the relevant solvent-solute and solvent-solvent intermolecular interactions. The total energy (U) of an n-body molecular system can be formally written as [1,2,3

  6. Evaluation of coupling terms between intra- and intermolecular vibrations in coarse-grained normal-mode analysis: Does a stronger acid make a stiffer hydrogen bond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houjou, Hirohiko

    2011-10-01

    Using theory of harmonic normal-mode vibration analysis, we developed a procedure for evaluating the anisotropic stiffness of intermolecular forces. Our scheme for coarse-graining of molecular motions is modified so as to account for intramolecular vibrations in addition to relative translational/rotational displacement. We applied this new analytical scheme to four carboxylic acid dimers, for which coupling between intra- and intermolecular vibrations is crucial for determining the apparent stiffness of the intermolecular double hydrogen bond. The apparent stiffness constant was analyzed on the basis of a conjunct spring model, which defines contributions from true intermolecular stiffness and molecular internal stiffness. Consequently, the true intermolecular stiffness was in the range of 43-48 N m-1 for all carboxylic acids studied, regardless of the molecules' acidity. We concluded that the difference in the apparent stiffness can be attributed to differences in the internal stiffness of the respective molecules.

  7. Liquid Crystal Enabled Early Stage Detection of Beta Amyloid Formation on Lipid Monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadati, Monirosadat [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Apik, Aslin Izmitli [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; Armas-Perez, Julio C. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jose [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Departamento de Materiales y Minerales, Facultad de Minas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Sede Medellín, Calle 75 # 79A-51, Bloque M17 Medellín Colombia; Abbott, Nicholas L. [Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 USA; de Pablo, Juan J. [Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago IL 60637 USA; Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA

    2015-09-09

    Liquid crystals (LCs) can serve as sensitive reporters of interfacial events, and this property has been used for sensing of synthetic or biological toxins. Here it is demonstrated that LCs can distinguish distinct molecular motifs and exhibit a specific response to beta-sheet structures. That property is used to detect the formation of highly toxic protofibrils involved in neurodegenerative diseases, where it is crucial to develop methods that probe the early-stage aggregation of amyloidogenic peptides in the vicinity of biological membranes. In the proposed method, the amyloid fibrils formed at the lipid-decorated LC interface can change the orientation of LCs and form elongated and branched structures that are amplified by the mesogenic medium; however, nonamyloidogenic peptides form ellipsoidal domains of tilted LCs. Moreover, a theoretical and computational analysis is used to reveal the underlying structure of the LC, thereby providing a detailed molecular-level view of the interactions and mechanisms responsible for such motifs. The corresponding signatures can be detected at nanomolar concentrations of peptide by polarized light microscopy and much earlier than the ones that can be identified by fluorescence-based techniques. As such, it offers the potential for early diagnoses of neurodegenerative diseases and for facile testing of inhibitors of amyloid formation.

  8. Glycation induces formation of amyloid cross-beta structure in albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouma, Barend; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M J; Wu, Ya-Ping; Brünjes, Bettina; Posthuma, George; Kranenburg, Onno; de Groot, Philip G; Voest, Emile E; Gebbink, Martijn F B G

    2003-10-24

    Amyloid fibrils are components of proteinaceous plaques that are associated with conformational diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and familial amyloidosis. Amyloid polypeptides share a specific quarternary structure element known as cross-beta structure. Commonly, fibrillar aggregates are modified by advanced glycation end products (AGE). In addition, AGE formation itself induces protein aggregation. Both amyloid proteins and protein-AGE adducts bind multiligand receptors, such as receptor for AGE, CD36, and scavenger receptors A and B type I, and the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). Based on these observations, we hypothesized that glycation induces refolding of globular proteins, accompanied by formation of cross-beta structure. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate here that glycated albumin condensates into fibrous or amorphous aggregates. These aggregates bind to amyloid-specific dyes Congo red and thioflavin T and to tPA. In contrast to globular albumin, glycated albumin contains amino acid residues in beta-sheet conformation, as measured with circular dichroism spectropolarimetry. Moreover, it displays cross-beta structure, as determined with x-ray fiber diffraction. We conclude that glycation induces refolding of initially globular albumin into amyloid fibrils comprising cross-beta structure. This would explain how glycated ligands and amyloid ligands can bind to the same multiligand "cross-beta structure" receptors and to tPA.

  9. Effect of donor orientation on ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer in coumarin-amine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P. K.; Nath, S.; Bhasikuttan, A. C.; Kumbhakar, M.; Mohanty, J.; Sarkar, S. K.; Mukherjee, T.; Pal, H.

    2008-01-01

    Effect of donor amine orientation on nondiffusive ultrafast intermolecular electron transfer (ET) reactions in coumarin-amine systems has been investigated using femtosecond fluorescence upconversion measurements. Intermolecular ET from different aromatic and aliphatic amines used as donor solvents to the excited coumarin-151 (C151) acceptor occurs with ultrafast rates such that the shortest fluorescence lifetime component (τ 1 ) is the measure of the fastest ET rate (τ 1 =τ ET fast =(k ET fast ) -1 ), assigned to the C151-amine contact pairs in which amine donors are properly oriented with respect to C151 to maximize the acceptor-donor electronic coupling (V el ). It is interestingly observed that as the amine solvents are diluted by suitable diluents (either keeping solvent dielectric constant similar or with increasing dielectric constant), the τ 1 remains almost in the similar range as long as the amine dilution does not cross a certain critical limit, which in terms of the amine mole fraction (x A ) is found to be ∼0.4 for aromatic amines and ∼0.8 for aliphatic amines. Beyond these dilutions in the two respective cases of the amine systems, the τ 1 values are seen to increase very sharply. The large difference in the critical x A values involving aromatic and aliphatic amine donors has been rationalized in terms of the largely different orientational restrictions for the ET reactions as imposed by the aliphatic (n-type) and aromatic (π-type) nature of the amine donors [A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008)]. Since the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the n-type aliphatic amines is mostly centralized at the amino nitrogen, only some specific orientations of these amines with respect to the close-contact acceptor dye [also of π-character; A. K. Satpati et al., J. Mol. Struct. 878, 84 (2008) and E. W. Castner et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 104, 2869 (2000)] can give suitable V el and thus ultrafast ET reaction. In contrary, the

  10. Effects of Weak Intermolecular Interactions on the Molecular Isomerism of Tricobalt Metal Chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, R.; Overgaard, J.; Schulman, A.; Stergaard, C.; Murillo, C.; Spackman, M.; Iversen, B.

    2009-01-01

    Depending on the number of interstitial solvent molecules, n, crystals of the linear chain compound Co3(dipyridylamide)4Cl2·nCH2Cl2 adopt either symmetrical or unsymmetrical metal chain structures. We explore here the possible reasons for such behavior using Hirshfeld surface analysis of intermolecular interactions as well as the charge density determined from 100(1) K X-ray diffraction data on the unsymmetrical complex Co3(dipyridylamide)4Cl2·2.11CH2Cl2, u-1, and crystal structures of u-1 determined from single crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data at 20, 150, and 300 K. The new crystal structures are compared with previous structural results on a crystal with slightly different solvent content. This change in solvent content only affects the bond distances to atom Co(3), which are also strongly affected by temperature changes due to a spin crossover transition. Large differences in intermolecular interactions are revealed by the Hirshfeld surface analysis between symmetrical (s-1) and unsymmetrical (u-1) crystal solvates, suggesting that the molecular isomerism is strongly influenced by crystal packing effects. Topological analysis of the static electron density of u-1 suggests that there is direct metal-metal bonding for both the shorter Co(1)-Co(2) and the longer Co(2)-Co(3) contact. The approximate description of the system as a (Co2)2+-dimer and an isolated Co2+-ion is reflected in the character of the metal-ligand interactions, which are more ionic for the isolated Co(3) atom, and the topological charges Co(1)+0.50, Co(2)+0.77, and Co(3)+1.36. The two termini of u-1 are found to be very different, both in terms of structural surroundings as well as topology. The central Co(2) atom is similar to a cobalt atom in a tetragonally distorted octahedral environment resulting in preferred occupancy in the t2g orbitals. The Co(1) atom has significant deformation in the xz and yz planes (z along the chain axis, x and y toward ligands) reflecting covalent

  11. Formation of silk fibroin nanoparticles in water-miscible organic solvent and their characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuqing, E-mail: yqzhang@public1.sz.js.cn; Shen Weide; Xiang Ruli [Soochow University, Silk Biotechnol. Lab., School of Life Science (China); Zhuge Lanjian; Gao Weijian; Wang Wenbao [Soochow University, Analytical Center (China)

    2007-10-15

    When Silk fibre derived from Bombyx mori, a native biopolymer, was dissolved in highly concentrated neutral salts such as CaCl{sub 2}, the regenerated liquid silk, a gradually degraded peptide mixture of silk fibroin, could be obtained. The silk fibroin nanoparticles were prepared rapidly from the liquid silk by using water-miscible protonic and polar aprotonic organic solvents. The nanoparticles are insoluble but well dispersed and stable in aqueous solution and are globular particles with a range of 35-125 nm in diameter by means of TEM, SEM, AFM and laser sizer. Over one half of the {epsilon}-amino groups exist around the protein nanoparticles by using a trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS) method. Raman spectra shows the tyrosine residues on the surface of the globules are more exposed than those on native silk fibers. The crystalline polymorph and conformation transition of the silk nanoparticles from random-coil and {alpha}-helix form (Silk I) into anti-parallel {beta}-sheet form (Silk II) are investigated in detail by using infrared, fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy, DSC, {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR and electron diffraction. X-ray diffraction of the silk nanoparticles shows that the nanoparticles crystallinity is about four fifths of the native fiber. Our results indicate that the degraded peptide chains of the regenerated silk is gathered homogeneously or heterogeneously to form a looser globular structure in aqueous solution. When introduced into excessive organic solvent, the looser globules of the liquid silk are rapidly dispersed and simultaneously dehydrated internally and externally, resulting in the further chain-chain contact, arrangement of those hydrophobic domains inside the globules and final formation of crystalline silk nanoparticles with {beta}-sheet configuration. The morphology and size of the nanoparticles are relative to the kinds, properties and even molecular structures of organic solvents, and more significantly to the looser globular

  12. On the influence of the intermolecular potential on the wetting properties of water on silica surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pafong, E.; Geske, J.; Drossel, B.

    2016-09-01

    We study the wetting properties of water on silica surfaces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. To describe the intermolecular interaction between water and silica atoms, two types of interaction potential models are used: the standard BródkA and Zerda (BZ) model and the Gulmen and Thompson (GT) model. We perform an in-depth analysis of the influence of the choice of the potential on the arrangement of the water molecules in partially filled pores and on top of silica slabs. We find that at moderate pore filling ratios, the GT silica surface is completely wetted by water molecules, which agrees well with experimental findings, while the commonly used BZ surface is less hydrophilic and is only partially wetted. We interpret our simulation results using an analytical calculation of the phase diagram of water in partially filled pores. Moreover, an evaluation of the contact angle of the water droplet on top of the silica slab reveals that the interaction becomes more hydrophilic with increasing slab thickness and saturates around 2.5-3 nm, in agreement with the experimentally found value. Our analysis also shows that the hydroaffinity of the surface is mainly determined by the electrostatic interaction, but the van der Waals interaction nevertheless is strong enough that it can turn a hydrophobic surface into a hydrophilic surface.

  13. Resolution enhancement in MR spectroscopy of red bone marrow fat via intermolecular double-quantum coherences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jianfeng; Cui, Xiaohong; Huang, Yuqing; Zhong, Jianhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-08-01

    High-resolution 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is generally inaccessible in red bone marrow (RBM) tissues using conventional MRS techniques. This is because signal from these tissues suffers from severe inhomogeneity in the main static B0 field originated from the intrinsic honeycomb structures in trabecular bone. One way to reduce effects of B0 field inhomogeneity is by using the intermolecular double quantum coherence (iDQC) technique, which has been shown in other systems to obtain signals insensitive to B0 field inhomogeneity. In the present study, we employed an iDQC approach to enhance the spectral resolution of RBM. The feasibility and performance of this method for achieving high resolution MRS was verified by experiments on phantoms and pig vertebral bone samples. Unsaturated fatty acid peaks which overlap in the conventional MRS were well resolved and identified in the iDQC spectrum. Quantitative comparison of fractions of three types of fatty acids was performed between iDQC spectra on the in situ RMB and conventional MRS on the extracted fat from the same RBM. Observations of unsaturated fatty acids with iDQC MRS may provide valuable information and may hold potential in diagnosis of diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and leukemia.

  14. Characterization of the glass transition of water predicted by molecular dynamics simulations using nonpolarizable intermolecular potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreck, Cara A; Mancera, Ricardo L

    2014-02-20

    Molecular dynamics simulations allow detailed study of the experimentally inaccessible liquid state of supercooled water below its homogeneous nucleation temperature and the characterization of the glass transition. Simple, nonpolarizable intermolecular potentials are commonly used in classical molecular dynamics simulations of water and aqueous systems due to their lower computational cost and their ability to reproduce a wide range of properties. Because the quality of these predictions varies between the potentials, the predicted glass transition of water is likely to be influenced by the choice of potential. We have thus conducted an extensive comparative investigation of various three-, four-, five-, and six-point water potentials in both the NPT and NVT ensembles. The T(g) predicted from NPT simulations is strongly correlated with the temperature of minimum density, whereas the maximum in the heat capacity plot corresponds to the minimum in the thermal expansion coefficient. In the NVT ensemble, these points are instead related to the maximum in the internal pressure and the minimum of its derivative, respectively. A detailed analysis of the hydrogen-bonding properties at the glass transition reveals that the extent of hydrogen-bonds lost upon the melting of the glassy state is related to the height of the heat capacity peak and varies between water potentials.

  15. Determination of a silane intermolecular force field potential model from an ab initio calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Arvin Huang-Te; Chao, Sheng D.; Chang, Chien-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Intermolecular interaction potentials of the silane dimer in 12 orientations have been calculated by using the Hartree-Fock (HF) self-consistent theory and the second-order Moeller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory. We employed basis sets from Pople's medium-size basis sets [up to 6-311++G(3df, 3pd)] and Dunning's correlation consistent basis sets (up to the triply augmented correlation-consistent polarized valence quadruple-zeta basis set). We found that the minimum energy orientations were the G and H conformers. We have suggested that the Si-H attractions, the central silicon atom size, and electronegativity play essential roles in weakly binding of a silane dimer. The calculated MP2 potential data were employed to parametrize a five-site force field for molecular simulations. The Si-Si, Si-H, and H-H interaction parameters in a pairwise-additive, site-site potential model for silane molecules were regressed from the ab initio energies.

  16. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M. [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Midtgaard, Søren Roi [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Gysel, Kira [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J. [University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël, E-mail: mickael.blaise@cpbs.cnrs.fr [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  17. Intermolecular G-quadruplex structure-based fluorescent DNA detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2013-03-15

    Adopting multi-donors to pair with one acceptor could improve the performance of fluorogenic detection probes. However, common dyes (e.g., fluorescein) in close proximity to each other would self-quench the fluorescence, and the fluorescence is difficult to restore. In this contribution, we constructed a novel "multi-donors-to-one acceptor" fluorescent DNA detection system by means of the intermolecular G-quadruplex (IGQ) structure-based fluorescence signal enhancement combined with the hairpin oligonucleotide. The novel IGQ-hairpin system was characterized using the p53 gene as the model target DNA. The proposed system showed an improved assay performance due to the introduction of IGQ-structure into fluorescent signaling probes, which could inhibit the background fluorescence and increase fluorescence restoration amplitude of fluoresceins upon target DNA hybridization. The proof-of-concept scheme is expected to provide new insight into the potential of G-quadruplex structure and promote the application of fluorescent oligonucleotide probes in fundamental research, diagnosis, and treatment of genetic diseases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Intermolecular crosslinks mediate aggregation of phospholipid vesicles by pulmonary surfactant-associated protein SAP-35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, G.R.; Sawyer, J.; Whitsett, J.

    1987-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant-associated protein, Mr=35,000 (SAP-35) is known to bind phospholipids and is hypothesized to function in the organization of surfactant lipid membranes. SAP-35 has been observed to accelerate the calcium-induced aggregation of phospholipid vesicles. In order to define the molecular domains of SAP-35 which function in phospholipid aggregation, they have measured the light scattering properties (400nm) of purified canine SAP-35-phospholipid vesicle suspensions. Accelerated aggregation of unilamellar vesicles, requires SAP-35 and at least 2mM free calcium. The initial rate of A 400 change is proportional to the amount of native SAP-35 added over lipid:protein molar ratios ranging from 100:1 to 5000:1. Removal of the SAP-35 collagen-like domain and a specific cysteine residue involved in intermolecular disulfide bonding by bacterial collagenase digestion destroys the protein's lipid aggregation activity. Pre-incubation of SAP-35 with dithiothreitol (DTT) under nondenaturing conditions also results in a time-dependent loss of aggregation activity. Sucrose density gradient floatation of SAP-35 with 14 C dipalmitoyl phosphatidycholine labelled vesicles in the absence or presence of DTT suggests retention of SAP-35 lipid binding capacity. These data demonstrate the importance of SAP-35 triple helix and disulfide crosslinking integrity for the aggregation of unilamellar phospholipid vesicles

  19. Ground state analytical ab initio intermolecular potential for the Cl2-water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormain, Laureline; Monnerville, Maurice; Toubin, Céline; Duflot, Denis; Pouilly, Brigitte; Briquez, Stéphane; Bernal-Uruchurtu, Margarita I.; Hernández-Lamoneda, Ramón

    2015-01-01

    The chlorine/water interface is of crucial importance in the context of atmospheric chemistry. Modeling the structure and dynamics at this interface requires an accurate description of the interaction potential energy surfaces. We propose here an analytical intermolecular potential that reproduces the interaction between the Cl 2 molecule and a water molecule. Our functional form is fitted to a set of high level ab initio data using the coupled-cluster single double (triple)/aug-cc-p-VTZ level of electronic structure theory for the Cl 2 − H 2 O complex. The potential fitted to reproduce the three minima structures of 1:1 complex is validated by the comparison of ab initio results of Cl 2 interacting with an increasing number of water molecules. Finally, the model potential is used to study the physisorption of Cl 2 on a perfectly ordered hexagonal ice slab. The calculated adsorption energy, in the range 0.27 eV, shows a good agreement with previous experimental results

  20. Intermolecular Interactions in the TMEM16A Dimer Controlling Channel Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudieri, Paolo; Musante, Ilaria; Gianotti, Ambra; Moran, Oscar; Galietta, Luis J V

    2016-12-08

    TMEM16A and TMEM16B are plasma membrane proteins with Ca 2+ -dependent Cl - channel function. By replacing the carboxy-terminus of TMEM16A with the equivalent region of TMEM16B, we obtained channels with potentiation of channel activity. Progressive shortening of the chimeric region restricted the "activating domain" to a short sequence close to the last transmembrane domain and led to TMEM16A channels with high activity at very low intracellular Ca 2+ concentrations. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this effect, we carried out experiments based on double chimeras, Forster resonance energy transfer, and intermolecular cross-linking. We also modeled TMEM16A structure using the Nectria haematococca TMEM16 protein as template. Our results indicate that the enhanced activity in chimeric channels is due to altered interaction between the carboxy-terminus and the first intracellular loop in the TMEM16A homo-dimer. Mimicking this perturbation with a small molecule could be the basis for a pharmacological stimulation of TMEM16A-dependent Cl - transport.

  1. Intermolecular interaction of fosinopril with bovine serum albumin (BSA): The multi-spectroscopic and computational investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai-Li; Pan, Dong-Qi; Lou, Yan-Yue; Shi, Jie-Hua

    2018-04-16

    The intermolecular interaction of fosinopril, an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor with bovine serum albumin (BSA), has been investigated in physiological buffer (pH 7.4) by multi-spectroscopic methods and molecular docking technique. The results obtained from fluorescence and UV absorption spectroscopy revealed that the fluorescence quenching mechanism of BSA induced by fosinopril was mediated by the combined dynamic and static quenching, and the static quenching was dominant in this system. The binding constant, K b , value was found to lie between 2.69 × 10 3 and 9.55 × 10 3  M -1 at experimental temperatures (293, 298, 303, and 308 K), implying the low or intermediate binding affinity between fosinopril and BSA. Competitive binding experiments with site markers (phenylbutazone and diazepam) suggested that fosinopril preferentially bound to the site I in sub-domain IIA on BSA, as evidenced by molecular docking analysis. The negative sign for enthalpy change (ΔH 0 ) and entropy change (ΔS 0 ) indicated that van der Waals force and hydrogen bonds played important roles in the fosinopril-BSA interaction, and 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonate binding assay experiments offered evidence of the involvements of hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, spectroscopic results (synchronous fluorescence, 3-dimensional fluorescence, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) indicated a slight conformational change in BSA upon fosinopril interaction. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Modeling the intermolecular interactions: molecular structure of N-3-hydroxyphenyl-4-methoxybenzamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Sedat; Namli, Hilmi; Kurtaran, Raif; Yildirim, Leyla Tatar; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2014-03-01

    The title compound, N-3-hydroxyphenyl-4-methoxybenzamide (3) was prepared by the acylation reaction of 3-aminophenol (1) and 4-metoxybenzoylchloride (2) in THF and characterized by ¹H NMR, ¹³C NMR and elemental analysis. Molecular structure of the crystal was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction and DFT calculations. 3 crystallizes in monoclinic P2₁/c space group. The influence of intermolecular interactions (dimerization and crystal packing) on molecular geometry has been evaluated by calculations performed for three different models; monomer (3), dimer (4) and dimer with added unit cell contacts (5). Molecular structure of 3, 4 and 5 was optimized by applying B3LYP method with 6-31G+(d,p) basis set in gas phase and compared with X-ray crystallographic data including bond lengths, bond angles and selected dihedral angles. It has been concluded that although the crystal packing and dimerization have a minor effect on bond lengths and angles, however, these interactions are important for the dihedral angles and the rotational conformation of aromatic rings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MAu2GeS4-Chalcogel (M = Co, Ni): Heterogeneous Intra- and Intermolecular Hydroamination Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Davaasuren, Bambar

    2017-08-08

    High surface area macroporous chalcogenide aerogels (chalcogels) MAu2GeS4 (M = Co, Ni) were prepared from K2Au2GeS4 precursor and Co(OAc)2 or NiCl2 by one-pot sol-gel metathesis reactions in aqueous media. The MAu2GeS4-chalcogels were screened for catalytic intramolecular hydroamination of 4-pentyn-1-amine substrate at different temperatures. 87% and 58% conversion was achieved at 100 °C, using CoAu2GeS4- and NiAu2GeS4-chalcogels respectively, and the reaction kinetics follows the first order. It was established that the catalytic performance of the aerogels is associated with the M(2+) centers present in the structure. Intermolecular hydroamination of aniline with 1-R-4-ethynylbenzene (R = -H, -OCH3, -Br, -F) was carried out at 100 °C using CoAu2GeS4-chalcogel catalyst, due to its promising catalytic performance. The CoAu2GeS4-chalcogel regioselectively converted the pair of substrates to respective Markovnikov products, (E)-1-(4-R-phenyl)-N-phenylethan-1-imine, with 38% to 60% conversion.

  4. Intermolecular and very strong intramolecular C-SeO/N chalcogen bonds in nitrophenyl selenocyanate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Ju; Wang, Weizhou

    2018-02-14

    Single-crystal X-ray diffraction reveals that polymorphic ortho-nitrophenyl selenocyanate (o-NSC, crystals 1a and 1b) and monomorphic para-nitrophenyl selenocyanate (p-NSC, crystal 2) crystals are all stabilized mainly by intermolecular and very strong intramolecular C-SeO/N chalcogen bonds, as well as by other different interactions. Thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry thermogram (DSC) analyses show that the starting decomposition temperatures and melting points of the three crystals are different, following the order 1b > 1a > 2, which is consistent with the structural characteristics of the crystals. In addition, atoms in molecules (AIM) and natural bond orbital (NBO) analyses indicate that the total strengths of the C-SeO and C-SeN chalcogen bonds decrease in the order 1b > 1a > 2. This study could be significant for engineering functional crystals based on robust C-SeO and C-SeN chalcogen bonds, and for designing drugs containing selenium as well as understanding their interaction in biosystems.

  5. Argon intermolecular potential from a measurement of the total scattering cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, Y.W.

    1975-01-01

    An inversion method to obtain accurate intermolecular potentials from experimental total cross section measurements is presented. This method is based on the high energy Massey--Smith approximation. The attractive portion of the potential is represented by a multi-parameter spline function and the repulsive part by a Morse function. The best fit potential is obtained by a least squares minimization based on comparison of experimental cross sections with those obtained by a Fourier transform of the reduced Massey--Smith phase shift curve. An experimental method was developed to obtain the total cross sections needed for the above inversion procedure. In this technique, integral cross sections are measured at various resolutions and the total cross section is obtained by extrapolating to infinite resolution. Experimental results obtained for the Ar--Ar system are in excellent agreement with total cross sections calculated using the Barker-Fisher-Watts potential. Inversion of the data to obtain a potential distinguishable from the BFW-potential requires an extension of the method based on the Massey--Smith approximation to permit use of JWKB phase shifts and was not attempted

  6. MAu2GeS4-Chalcogel (M = Co, Ni): Heterogeneous Intra- and Intermolecular Hydroamination Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Davaasuren, Bambar; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Rothenberger, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    High surface area macroporous chalcogenide aerogels (chalcogels) MAu2GeS4 (M = Co, Ni) were prepared from K2Au2GeS4 precursor and Co(OAc)2 or NiCl2 by one-pot sol-gel metathesis reactions in aqueous media. The MAu2GeS4-chalcogels were screened for catalytic intramolecular hydroamination of 4-pentyn-1-amine substrate at different temperatures. 87% and 58% conversion was achieved at 100 °C, using CoAu2GeS4- and NiAu2GeS4-chalcogels respectively, and the reaction kinetics follows the first order. It was established that the catalytic performance of the aerogels is associated with the M(2+) centers present in the structure. Intermolecular hydroamination of aniline with 1-R-4-ethynylbenzene (R = -H, -OCH3, -Br, -F) was carried out at 100 °C using CoAu2GeS4-chalcogel catalyst, due to its promising catalytic performance. The CoAu2GeS4-chalcogel regioselectively converted the pair of substrates to respective Markovnikov products, (E)-1-(4-R-phenyl)-N-phenylethan-1-imine, with 38% to 60% conversion.

  7. New insights into the dual fluorescence of methyl salicylate: effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding and solvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Panwang; Hoffmann, Mark R; Han, Keli; He, Guozhong

    2015-02-12

    In this paper, we propose a new and complete mechanism for dual fluorescence of methyl salicylate (MS) under different conditions using a combined experimental (i.e., steady-state absorption and emission spectra and time-resolved fluorescence spectra) and theoretical (i.e., time-dependent density function theory) study. First, our theoretical study indicates that the barrier height for excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction of ketoB depends on the solvent polarity. In nonpolar solvents, the ESIPT reaction of ketoB is barrierless; the barrier height will increase with increasing solvent polarity. Second, we found that, in alcoholic solvents, intermolecular hydrogen bonding plays a more important role. The ketoB form of MS can form two hydrogen bonds with alcoholic solvents; one will facilitate ESIPT and produce the emission band in the blue region; the other one precludes ESIPT and produces the emission band in the near-UV region. Our proposed new mechanism can well explain previous results as well as our new experimental results.

  8. Towards interpretation of intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement outside the fast exchange limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccon, Alberto; Marius Clore, G; Tugarinov, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    In an exchanging system between major and minor species, the transverse paramagnetic relaxation enhancement rate observed on the resonances of the major species (Γ 2 (app) ) is dependent upon the exchange regime between the species. Quantitative analysis of PRE data in such systems typically assumes that the overall exchange rate k ex between the species is fast on the PRE time scale (k ex ≫ Γ2). Recently, we have characterized the kinetics of binding of the model protein ubiquitin to large (LUV) and small (SUV) unilamellar lipid-based nanoparticles or liposomes (Ceccon A, Tugarinov V, Bax A, Clore GM (2016). J Am Chem Soc 138:5789-5792). Building upon these results and taking advantage of a strong paramagnetic agent with an isotropic g-tensor, Gd(3+), we were able to measure intermolecular methyl carbon and proton PREs between paramagnetically-tagged liposomes and ubiquitin. In the limit of fast exchange (k ex ≫ Γ2) the ratio of the apparent proton to carbon methyl PREs, ((1)Hm-Γ 2 (app) )/((13)Cm-Γ 2 (app) ), is equal to the square of the ratio of the gyromagnetic ratios of the two nuclei, (γΗ/γC)(2). However, outside the fast exchange regime, under intermediate exchange conditions (e.g. when Γ2 is comparable in magnitude to k ex) the ((1)Hm-Γ 2 (app) )/((13)Cm-Γ 2 (app) ) ratio provides a reliable measure of the 'true' methyl PREs.

  9. Similarity-transformed perturbation theory on top of truncated local coupled cluster solutions: Theory and applications to intermolecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azar, Richard Julian, E-mail: julianazar2323@berkeley.edu; Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-28

    Your correspondents develop and apply fully nonorthogonal, local-reference perturbation theories describing non-covalent interactions. Our formulations are based on a Löwdin partitioning of the similarity-transformed Hamiltonian into a zeroth-order intramonomer piece (taking local CCSD solutions as its zeroth-order eigenfunction) plus a first-order piece coupling the fragments. If considerations are limited to a single molecule, the proposed intermolecular similarity-transformed perturbation theory represents a frozen-orbital variant of the “(2)”-type theories shown to be competitive with CCSD(T) and of similar cost if all terms are retained. Different restrictions on the zeroth- and first-order amplitudes are explored in the context of large-computation tractability and elucidation of non-local effects in the space of singles and doubles. To accurately approximate CCSD intermolecular interaction energies, a quadratically growing number of variables must be included at zeroth-order.

  10. Mechanism of intermolecular hydroacylation of vinylsilanes catalyzed by a rhodium(I) olefin complex: a DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingxi; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming

    2012-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) was used to investigate the Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular hydroacylation of vinylsilane with benzaldehyde. All intermediates and transition states were optimized completely at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level (LANL2DZ(f) for Rh). Calculations indicated that Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular hydroacylation is exergonic, and the total free energy released is -110 kJ mol(-1). Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular hydroacylation mainly involves the active catalyst CA2, rhodium-alkene-benzaldehyde complex M1, rhodium-alkene-hydrogen-acyl complex M2, rhodium-alkyl-acyl complex M3, rhodium-alkyl-carbonyl-phenyl complex M4, rhodium-acyl-phenyl complex M5, and rhodium-ketone complex M6. The reaction pathway CA2 + R2 → M1b → T1b → M2b → T2b1 → M3b1 → T4b → M4b → T5b → M5b → T6b → M6b → P2 is the most favorable among all reaction channels of Rh(I)-catalyzed intermolecular hydroacylation. The reductive elimination reaction is the rate-determining step for this pathway, and the dominant product predicted theoretically is the linear ketone, which is consistent with Brookhart's experiments. Solvation has a significant effect, and it greatly decreases the free energies of all species. The use of the ligand Cp' (Cp' = C(5)Me(4)CF(3)) decreased the free energies in general, and in this case the rate-determining step was again the reductive elimination reaction.

  11. Highly Convergent Total Synthesis of (+)-Lithospermic Acid via a Late-Stage Intermolecular C–H Olefination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Hui; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2011-01-01

    The total synthesis of (+)-lithospermic acid is reported, which exploits two successive C–H activation reactions as the key steps. Rh-catalyzed carbene C–H insertion reaction using Davies’ catalyst built the dihydrobenzofuran core, and a late-stage intermolecular C–H olefination coupled the olefin unit with the dihydrobenzofuran core to construct the molecule in a highly convergent manner. PMID:21443224

  12. Intermolecular RNA Recombination Occurs at Different Frequencies in Alternate Forms of Brome Mosaic Virus RNA Replication Compartments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernan Garcia-Ruiz

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in membrane-bound replication compartments. Brome mosaic virus (BMV replicates in vesicular invaginations of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. BMV has served as a productive model system to study processes like virus-host interactions, RNA replication and recombination. Here we present multiple lines of evidence showing that the structure of the viral RNA replication compartments plays a fundamental role and that recruitment of parental RNAs to a common replication compartment is a limiting step in intermolecular RNA recombination. We show that a previously defined requirement for an RNA recruitment element on both parental RNAs is not to function as a preferred crossover site, but in order for individual RNAs to be recruited into the replication compartments. Moreover, modulating the form of the replication compartments from spherular vesicles (spherules to more expansive membrane layers increased intermolecular RNA recombination frequency by 200- to 1000-fold. We propose that intermolecular RNA recombination requires parental RNAs to be recruited into replication compartments as monomers, and that recruitment of multiple RNAs into a contiguous space is much more common for layers than for spherules. These results could explain differences in recombination frequencies between viruses that replicate in association with smaller spherules versus larger double-membrane vesicles and convoluted membranes.

  13. Resonance energy transfer (RET)-Induced intermolecular pairing force: a tunable weak interaction and its application in SWNT separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Chen, Hui; Wang, Wei Zhi; Ng, Siu Choon; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2011-07-21

    This paper explores evidence of an optically mediated interaction that is active in the separation mechanism of certain selective agents through consideration of the contrasting selective behaviors of two conjugated polymers with distinct optical properties. The involvement of a RET-induced intermolecular pairing force is implied by the different illumination response behaviors. The magnitude of this interaction scales with the external stimulus parameter, the illumination irradiance (I), and thus is tunable. This suggests a facile technique to modify the selectivity of polymers toward specific SWNT species by altering the polymer structure to adjust the corresponding intermolecular interaction. This is the first experimental verification and application of a RET-induced intermolecular pairing force to SWNT separation. With this kind of interaction taken into account, reasonable interpretation of some conflicting data, especially PLE maps, can be easily made. The above conclusion can be applied to other substances as long as they are electrically neutral and there is photon-induced RET between them. The significant magnitude of this interaction makes direct manipulation of molecules/particles possible and is expected to have applications in molecular engineering. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. Programmable display of DNA-protein chimeras for controlling cell-hydrogel interactions via reversible intermolecular hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaoyang; Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2013-04-08

    Extensive studies have been recently carried out to achieve dynamic control of cell-material interactions primarily through physicochemical stimulation. The purpose of this study was to apply reversible intermolecular hybridization to program cell-hydrogel interactions in physiological conditions based on DNA-antibody chimeras and complementary oligonucleotides. The results showed that DNA oligonucleotides could be captured to and released from the immobilizing DNA-functionalized hydrogels with high specificity via DNA hybridization. Accordingly, DNA-antibody chimeras were captured to the hydrogels, successfully inducing specific cell attachment. The cell attachment to the hydrogels reached the plateau at approximately half an hour after the functionalized hydrogels and the cells were incubated together. The attached cells were rapidly released from the bound hydrogels when triggering complementary oligonucleotides were introduced to the system. However, the capability of the triggering complementary oligonucleotides in releasing cells was affected by the length of intermolecular hybridization. The length needed to be at least more than 20 base pairs in the current experimental setting. Notably, because the procedure of intermolecular hybridization did not involve any harsh condition, the released cells maintained the same viability as that of the cultured cells. The functionalized hydrogels also exhibited the potential to catch and release cells repeatedly. Therefore, this study demonstrates that it is promising to regulate cell-material interactions dynamically through the DNA-programmed display of DNA-protein chimeras.

  15. Rubrene: The interplay between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions determines the planarization of its tetracene core in the solid state

    KAUST Repository

    Sutton, Christopher

    2015-06-15

    Rubrene is one of the most studied molecular semiconductors; its chemical structure consists of a tetracene backbone with four phenyl rings appended to the two central fused rings. Derivatization of these phenyl rings can lead to two very different solid-state molecular conformations and packings: One in which the tetracene core is planar and there exists substantive overlap among neighboring π-conjugated backbones; and another where the tetracene core is twisted and the overlap of neighboring π-conjugated backbones is completely disrupted. State-of-the-art electronic-structure calculations show for all isolated rubrene derivatives that the twisted conformation is more favorable (by -1.7 to -4.1 kcal mol-1), which is a consequence of energetically unfavorable exchange-repulsion interactions among the phenyl side groups. Calculations based on available crystallographic structures reveal that planar conformations of the tetracene core in the solid state result from intermolecular interactions that can be tuned through well-chosen functionalization of the phenyl side groups, and lead to improved intermolecular electronic couplings. Understanding the interplay of these intramolecular and intermolecular interactions provides insight into how to chemically modify rubrene and similar molecular semiconductors to improve the intrinsic materials electronic properties.

  16. Intermolecular detergent-membrane protein noes for the characterization of the dynamics of membrane protein-detergent complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Cédric; Orts, Julien; Tzitzilonis, Christos; Vögeli, Beat; Smrt, Sean; Lorieau, Justin; Riek, Roland

    2014-12-11

    The interaction between membrane proteins and lipids or lipid mimetics such as detergents is key for the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of membrane proteins. In NMR-based structural studies of membrane proteins, qualitative analysis of intermolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) or paramagnetic resonance enhancement are used in general to identify the transmembrane segments of a membrane protein. Here, we employed a quantitative characterization of intermolecular NOEs between (1)H of the detergent and (1)H(N) of (2)H-perdeuterated, (15)N-labeled α-helical membrane protein-detergent complexes following the exact NOE (eNOE) approach. Structural considerations suggest that these intermolecular NOEs should show a helical-wheel-type behavior along a transmembrane helix or a membrane-attached helix within a membrane protein as experimentally demonstrated for the complete influenza hemagglutinin fusion domain HAfp23. The partial absence of such a NOE pattern along the amino acid sequence as shown for a truncated variant of HAfp23 and for the Escherichia coli inner membrane protein YidH indicates the presence of large tertiary structure fluctuations such as an opening between helices or the presence of large rotational dynamics of the helices. Detergent-protein NOEs thus appear to be a straightforward probe for a qualitative characterization of structural and dynamical properties of membrane proteins embedded in detergent micelles.

  17. Intermolecular potential and rovibrational states of the H2O–D2 complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avoird, Ad van der; Scribano, Yohann; Faure, Alexandre; Weida, Miles J.; Fair, Joanna R.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: H 2 O–D 2 potential surface and pH 2 O–oD 2 ground state wave function, for planar geometries. Highlights: ► The interaction between H 2 O and H 2 is of great astrophysical interest. ► The rovibrational states of H 2 O–D 2 were computed on an ab initio potential surface. ► Results are compared with the rovibrational states of H 2 O–H 2 computed recently. ► We measured the high-resolution infrared spectrum of H 2 O–D 2 in the H 2 O bend region. ► Comparison with the calculations provides information on H 2 O–H 2 potential surface. - Abstract: A five-dimensional intermolecular potential for H 2 O–D 2 was obtained from the full nine-dimensional ab initio potential surface of Valiron et al. [P. Valiron, M. Wernli, A. Faure, L. Wiesenfeld, C. Rist, S. Kedžuch, J. Noga, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 134306] by averaging over the ground state vibrational wave functions of H 2 O and D 2 . On this five-dimensional potential with a well depth D e of 232.12 cm −1 we calculated the bound rovibrational levels of H 2 O–D 2 for total angular momentum J = 0–3. The method used to compute the rovibrational levels is similar to a scattering approach—it involves a basis of coupled free rotor wave functions for the hindered internal rotations and the overall rotation of the dimer—while it uses a discrete variable representation of the intermolecular distance coordinate R. The basis was adapted to the permutation symmetry associated with the para/ortho (p/o) nature of both H 2 O and D 2 , as well as to inversion symmetry. As expected, the H 2 O–D 2 dimer is more strongly bound than its H 2 O–H 2 isotopologue [cf. A. van der Avoird, D.J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 134 (2011) 044314], with dissociation energies D 0 of 46.10, 50.59, 67.43, and 73.53 cm −1 for pH 2 O–oD 2 , oH 2 O–oD 2 , pH 2 O–pD 2 , and oH 2 O–pD 2 . A rotationally resolved infrared spectrum of H 2 O–D 2 was measured in the frequency region of the H 2 O bend

  18. Formation of hydrogen connections in the dandelion medicinal in dependences of the place of growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukurov, T.; Khaitova, Z.M.; Djuraev, An.A.; Marupov, R.

    2007-01-01

    In this article results of spectroscopic researches of formation of hydrogen connections in roots of a dandelion growing in different ecological conditions and heights above sea level are presented. On shift of frequency of a maximum OH-groups in the field of frequencies 3800-3000sm - 1 a t cation-exchange, are certain of intermolecular interaction

  19. Effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of carbon nanotube–gold nanoparticle conjugates in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konczak L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lukasz Konczak,1 Jolanta Narkiewicz-Michalek,2 Giorgia Pastorin,3 Tomasz Panczyk1 1Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow, 2Department of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland; 3Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, Singapore Abstract: This work deals with the role of intermolecular interactions in the stability of a carbon nanotube (CNT capped by functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. The importance of such a system is due to its potential application as a pH-controlled drug carrier. Our preliminary experimental studies showed that fabrication of such a nanobottle/nanocontainer is feasible and it is possible to encapsulate the anticancer drug cisplatin inside the inner space of a CNT and seal its ends by functionalized AuNPs. The expected behavior, that is, detachment of AuNPs at acidic pH and the release of cisplatin, was, however, not observed. On the other hand, our theoretical studies of chemically identical system led to the conclusion that the release of cisplatin at acidic pH should be observed. Therefore, in this work, a deeper theoretical analysis of various factors that could be responsible for the disagreement between experimental and theoretical results were performed. The study found that the major factor is a large dispersion interaction component acting between CNT and AuNP in solution in the case of the experimental system. This factor can be controlled to some extent by tuning the system size or the ratio between AuNP diameter and CNT diameter. Thus, such kind of a pH-sensitive drug carrier is still of great interest, but its structural parameters need to be properly adjusted. Keywords: hydrazone bond, drug delivery, dispersion interactions, cisplatin, acidic pH

  20. A trans-Complementing Recombination Trap Demonstrates a Low Propensity of Flaviviruses for Intermolecular Recombination▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taucher, Christian; Berger, Angelika; Mandl, Christian W.

    2010-01-01

    Intermolecular recombination between the genomes of closely related RNA viruses can result in the emergence of novel strains with altered pathogenic potential and antigenicity. Although recombination between flavivirus genomes has never been demonstrated experimentally, the potential risk of generating undesirable recombinants has nevertheless been a matter of concern and controversy with respect to the development of live flavivirus vaccines. As an experimental system for investigating the ability of flavivirus genomes to recombine, we developed a “recombination trap,” which was designed to allow the products of rare recombination events to be selected and amplified. To do this, we established reciprocal packaging systems consisting of pairs of self-replicating subgenomic RNAs (replicons) derived from tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), West Nile virus (WNV), and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) that could complement each other in trans and thus be propagated together in cell culture over multiple passages. Any infectious viruses with intact, full-length genomes that were generated by recombination of the two replicons would be selected and enriched by end point dilution passage, as was demonstrated in a spiking experiment in which a small amount of wild-type virus was mixed with the packaged replicons. Using the recombination trap and the JEV system, we detected two aberrant recombination events, both of which yielded unnatural genomes containing duplications. Infectious clones of both of these genomes yielded viruses with impaired growth properties. Despite the fact that the replicon pairs shared approximately 600 nucleotides of identical sequence where a precise homologous crossover event would have yielded a wild-type genome, this was not observed in any of these systems, and the TBEV and WNV systems did not yield any viable recombinant genomes at all. Our results show that intergenomic recombination can occur in the structural region of flaviviruses

  1. Intermolecular hydrogen transfer catalyzed by a flavodehydrogenase, bakers' yeast flavocytochrome b2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, P.; Lederer, F.

    1985-01-01

    Bakers yeast flavocytochrome b2 is a flavin-dependent L-2-hydroxy acid dehydrogenase which also exhibits transhydrogenase activity. When a reaction takes place between [2- 3 H]lactate and a halogenopyruvate, tritium is found in water and at the halogenolactate C2 position. When the halogenopyruvate undergoes halide ion elimination, tritium is also found at the C3 position of the resulting pyruvate. The amount tau of this intermolecular tritium transfer depends on the initial keto acid-acceptor concentration. At infinite acceptor concentration, extrapolation yields a maximal transfer of 97 +/- 11%. This indicates that the hydroxy acid-derived hydrogen resides transiently on enzyme monoprotic heteroatoms and that exchange with bulk solvent occurs only at the level of free reduced enzyme. Using a minimal kinetic scheme, the rate constant for hydrogen exchange between Ered and solvent is calculated to be on the order of 10(2) M-1 S-1, which leads to an estimated pK approximately equal to 15 for the ionization of the substrate-derived proton while on the enzyme. It is suggested that this hydrogen could be shared between the active site base and Flred N5 anion. It is furthermore shown that some tritium is incorporated into the products when the transhydrogenation is carried out in tritiated water. Finally, with [2-2H]lactate-reduced enzyme, a deuterium isotope effect is observed on the rate of bromopyruvate disappearance. Extrapolation to infinite bromopyruvate concentration yields DV = 4.4. An apparent inverse isotope effect is determined for bromide ion elimination. These results strengthen the idea that oxidoreduction and elimination pathways involve a common carbanionic intermediate

  2. Towards interpretation of intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement outside the fast exchange limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceccon, Alberto; Marius Clore, G., E-mail: mariusc@mail.nih.gov; Tugarinov, Vitali, E-mail: vitali.tugarinov@nih.gov [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)

    2016-09-15

    In an exchanging system between major and minor species, the transverse paramagnetic relaxation enhancement rate observed on the resonances of the major species (Γ{sub 2}{sup app}) is dependent upon the exchange regime between the species. Quantitative analysis of PRE data in such systems typically assumes that the overall exchange rate k{sub ex} between the species is fast on the PRE time scale (k{sub ex} ≫ Γ{sub 2}). Recently, we have characterized the kinetics of binding of the model protein ubiquitin to large (LUV) and small (SUV) unilamellar lipid-based nanoparticles or liposomes (Ceccon A, Tugarinov V, Bax A, Clore GM (2016). J Am Chem Soc 138:5789–5792). Building upon these results and taking advantage of a strong paramagnetic agent with an isotropic g-tensor, Gd{sup 3+}, we were able to measure intermolecular methyl carbon and proton PREs between paramagnetically-tagged liposomes and ubiquitin. In the limit of fast exchange (k{sub ex} ≫ Γ{sub 2}) the ratio of the apparent proton to carbon methyl PREs, ({sup 1}H{sub m}–Γ{sub 2}{sup app})/({sup 13}C{sub m}–Γ{sub 2}{sup app}), is equal to the square of the ratio of the gyromagnetic ratios of the two nuclei, (γ{sub Η}/γ{sub C}){sup 2}. However, outside the fast exchange regime, under intermediate exchange conditions (e.g. when Γ{sub 2} is comparable in magnitude to k{sub ex}) the ({sup 1}H{sub m}–Γ{sub 2}{sup app})/({sup 13}C{sub m}–Γ{sub 2}{sup app}) ratio provides a reliable measure of the ‘true’ methyl PREs.

  3. Intermolecular interactions in the condensed phase: Evaluation of semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anders S; Kromann, Jimmy C; Jensen, Jan H; Cui, Qiang

    2017-10-28

    To facilitate further development of approximate quantum mechanical methods for condensed phase applications, we present a new benchmark dataset of intermolecular interaction energies in the solution phase for a set of 15 dimers, each containing one charged monomer. The reference interaction energy in solution is computed via a thermodynamic cycle that integrates dimer binding energy in the gas phase at the coupled cluster level and solute-solvent interaction with density functional theory; the estimated uncertainty of such calculated interaction energy is ±1.5 kcal/mol. The dataset is used to benchmark the performance of a set of semi-empirical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods that include DFTB3-D3, DFTB3/CPE-D3, OM2-D3, PM6-D3, PM6-D3H+, and PM7 as well as the HF-3c method. We find that while all tested SQM methods tend to underestimate binding energies in the gas phase with a root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of 2-5 kcal/mol, they overestimate binding energies in the solution phase with an RMSE of 3-4 kcal/mol, with the exception of DFTB3/CPE-D3 and OM2-D3, for which the systematic deviation is less pronounced. In addition, we find that HF-3c systematically overestimates binding energies in both gas and solution phases. As most approximate QM methods are parametrized and evaluated using data measured or calculated in the gas phase, the dataset represents an important first step toward calibrating QM based methods for application in the condensed phase where polarization and exchange repulsion need to be treated in a balanced fashion.

  4. Intermolecular interactions in the condensed phase: Evaluation of semi-empirical quantum mechanical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Anders S.; Kromann, Jimmy C.; Jensen, Jan H.; Cui, Qiang

    2017-10-01

    To facilitate further development of approximate quantum mechanical methods for condensed phase applications, we present a new benchmark dataset of intermolecular interaction energies in the solution phase for a set of 15 dimers, each containing one charged monomer. The reference interaction energy in solution is computed via a thermodynamic cycle that integrates dimer binding energy in the gas phase at the coupled cluster level and solute-solvent interaction with density functional theory; the estimated uncertainty of such calculated interaction energy is ±1.5 kcal/mol. The dataset is used to benchmark the performance of a set of semi-empirical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods that include DFTB3-D3, DFTB3/CPE-D3, OM2-D3, PM6-D3, PM6-D3H+, and PM7 as well as the HF-3c method. We find that while all tested SQM methods tend to underestimate binding energies in the gas phase with a root-mean-squared error (RMSE) of 2-5 kcal/mol, they overestimate binding energies in the solution phase with an RMSE of 3-4 kcal/mol, with the exception of DFTB3/CPE-D3 and OM2-D3, for which the systematic deviation is less pronounced. In addition, we find that HF-3c systematically overestimates binding energies in both gas and solution phases. As most approximate QM methods are parametrized and evaluated using data measured or calculated in the gas phase, the dataset represents an important first step toward calibrating QM based methods for application in the condensed phase where polarization and exchange repulsion need to be treated in a balanced fashion.

  5. Towards interpretation of intermolecular paramagnetic relaxation enhancement outside the fast exchange limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccon, Alberto; Marius Clore, G.; Tugarinov, Vitali

    2016-01-01

    In an exchanging system between major and minor species, the transverse paramagnetic relaxation enhancement rate observed on the resonances of the major species (Γ_2"a"p"p) is dependent upon the exchange regime between the species. Quantitative analysis of PRE data in such systems typically assumes that the overall exchange rate k_e_x between the species is fast on the PRE time scale (k_e_x ≫ Γ_2). Recently, we have characterized the kinetics of binding of the model protein ubiquitin to large (LUV) and small (SUV) unilamellar lipid-based nanoparticles or liposomes (Ceccon A, Tugarinov V, Bax A, Clore GM (2016). J Am Chem Soc 138:5789–5792). Building upon these results and taking advantage of a strong paramagnetic agent with an isotropic g-tensor, Gd"3"+, we were able to measure intermolecular methyl carbon and proton PREs between paramagnetically-tagged liposomes and ubiquitin. In the limit of fast exchange (k_e_x ≫ Γ_2) the ratio of the apparent proton to carbon methyl PREs, ("1H_m–Γ_2"a"p"p)/("1"3C_m–Γ_2"a"p"p), is equal to the square of the ratio of the gyromagnetic ratios of the two nuclei, (γ_Η/γ_C)"2. However, outside the fast exchange regime, under intermediate exchange conditions (e.g. when Γ_2 is comparable in magnitude to k_e_x) the ("1H_m–Γ_2"a"p"p)/("1"3C_m–Γ_2"a"p"p) ratio provides a reliable measure of the ‘true’ methyl PREs.

  6. Refined ab initio intermolecular ground-state potential energy surface for the He-C2H2 van der Waals complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, Berta; Henriksen, Christian; Farrelly, David

    2013-01-01

    A refined CCSD(T) intermolecular potential energy surface is developed for the He-C2H2 van der Waals complex. For this, 206 points on the intermolecular potential energy surface, evaluated using the CCSD(T) method and the aug-cc-pVQZ basis set extended with a set of 3s3p2d1f1g midbond functions...

  7. THz absorption spectrum of the CO2–H2O complex: Observation and assignment of intermolecular van der Waals vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Heimdal, J.; Wallin Mahler Andersen, Denise

    2014-01-01

    have been assigned and provide crucial observables for benchmark theoretical descriptions of this systems’ flat intermolecular potential energy surface. A (semi)-empirical value for the zero-point energy of 273 ± 15 cm−1 from the class of intermolecular van der Waals vibrations is proposed...... and the combination with high-level quantum chemical calculations provides a value of 726 ± 15 cm−1 for the dissociation energy D0...

  8. Pressure effects on the structure, kinetic, and thermodynamic properties of heat-induced aggregation of protein studied by FT-IR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniguchi, Y [Applied Chemistry Department, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Okuno, A [Research Department 3, Central Research, Bridgestone Co. Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8531 (Japan); Kato, M, E-mail: taniguti@sk.ritsumei.ac.j [Pharmaceutical Sciences Department, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    Pressure can retrain the heat-induced aggregation and dissociate the heat-induced aggregates. We observed the aggregation-preventing pressure effect and the aggregates-dissociating pressure effect to characterize the heat-induced aggregation of equine serum albumin (ESA) by FT-IR spectroscopy. The results suggest the {alpha}-helical structure collapses at the beginning of heat-induced aggregation through the swollen structure, and then the rearrangement of structure to the intermolecular {beta}-sheet takes place through partially unfolded structure. We determined the activation volume for the heat-induced aggregation ({Delta}V'' = +93 ml/mol) and the partial molar volume difference between native state and heat-induced aggregates ({Delta}V=+32 ml/mol). This positive partial molar volume difference suggests that the heat-induced aggregates have larger internal voids than the native structure. Moreover, the positive volume change implies that the formation of the intermolecular {beta}-sheet is unfavorable under high pressure.

  9. Molecular dynamics simulation of nonlinear spectroscopies of intermolecular motions in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Saito, Shinji

    2009-09-15

    Water is the most extensively studied of liquids because of both its ubiquity and its anomalous thermodynamic and dynamic properties. The properties of water are dominated by hydrogen bonds and hydrogen bond network rearrangements. Fundamental information on the dynamics of liquid water has been provided by linear infrared (IR), Raman, and neutron-scattering experiments; molecular dynamics simulations have also provided insights. Recently developed higher-order nonlinear spectroscopies open new windows into the study of the hydrogen bond dynamics of liquid water. For example, the vibrational lifetimes of stretches and a bend, intramolecular features of water dynamics, can be accurately measured and are found to be on the femtosecond time scale at room temperature. Higher-order nonlinear spectroscopy is expressed by a multitime correlation function, whereas traditional linear spectroscopy is given by a one-time correlation function. Thus, nonlinear spectroscopy yields more detailed information on the dynamics of condensed media than linear spectroscopy. In this Account, we describe the theoretical background and methods for calculating higher order nonlinear spectroscopy; equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, and a combination of both, are used. We also present the intermolecular dynamics of liquid water revealed by fifth-order two-dimensional (2D) Raman spectroscopy and third-order IR spectroscopy. 2D Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to couplings between modes; the calculated 2D Raman signal of liquid water shows large anharmonicity in the translational motion and strong coupling between the translational and librational motions. Third-order IR spectroscopy makes it possible to examine the time-dependent couplings. The 2D IR spectra and three-pulse photon echo peak shift show the fast frequency modulation of the librational motion. A significant effect of the translational motion on the fast frequency modulation of the librational motion is

  10. Relativistic effects in the intermolecular interaction-induced nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of xenon dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanni, Matti; Lantto, Perttu; Ilias, Miroslav; Jensen, Hans Jorgen Aagaard; Vaara, Juha

    2007-10-28

    Relativistic effects on the (129)Xe nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and (131)Xe nuclear quadrupole coupling (NQC) tensors are examined in the weakly bound Xe(2) system at different levels of theory including the relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) method. The intermolecular interaction-induced binary chemical shift delta, the anisotropy of the shielding tensor Deltasigma, and the NQC constant along the internuclear axis chi( parallel) are calculated as a function of the internuclear distance. DHF shielding calculations are carried out using gauge-including atomic orbitals. For comparison, the full leading-order one-electron Breit-Pauli perturbation theory (BPPT) is applied using a common gauge origin. Electron correlation effects are studied at the nonrelativistic (NR) coupled-cluster singles and doubles with perturbational triples [CCSD(T)] level of theory. The fully relativistic second-order Moller-Plesset many-body perturbation (DMP2) theory is used to examine the cross coupling between correlation and relativity on NQC. The same is investigated for delta and Deltasigma by BPPT with a density functional theory model. A semiquantitative agreement between the BPPT and DHF binary property curves is obtained for delta and Deltasigma in Xe(2). For these properties, the currently most complete theoretical description is obtained by a piecewise approximation where the uncorrelated relativistic DHF results obtained close to the basis-set limit are corrected, on the one hand, for NR correlation effects and, on the other hand, for the BPPT-based cross coupling of relativity and correlation. For chi( parallel), the fully relativistic DMP2 results obtain a correction for NR correlation effects beyond MP2. The computed temperature dependence of the second virial coefficient of the (129)Xe nuclear shielding is compared to experiment in Xe gas. Our best results, obtained with the piecewise approximation for the binary chemical shift combined with the

  11. Structural variability and the nature of intermolecular interactions in Watson-Crick B-DNA base pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyznikowska, Z; Góra, R W; Zaleśny, R; Lipkowski, P; Jarzembska, K N; Dominiak, P M; Leszczynski, J

    2010-07-29

    A set of nearly 100 crystallographic structures was analyzed using ab initio methods in order to verify the effect of the conformational variability of Watson-Crick guanine-cytosine and adenine-thymine base pairs on the intermolecular interaction energy and its components. Furthermore, for the representative structures, a potential energy scan of the structural parameters describing mutual orientation of the base pairs was carried out. The results were obtained using the hybrid variational-perturbational interaction energy decomposition scheme. The electron correlation effects were estimated by means of the second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory and coupled clusters with singles and doubles method adopting AUG-cc-pVDZ basis set. Moreover, the characteristics of hydrogen bonds in complexes, mimicking those appearing in B-DNA, were evaluated using topological analysis of the electron density. Although the first-order electrostatic energy is usually the largest stabilizing component, it is canceled out by the associated exchange repulsion in majority of the studied crystallographic structures. Therefore, the analyzed complexes of the nucleic acid bases appeared to be stabilized mainly by the delocalization component of the intermolecular interaction energy which, in terms of symmetry adapted perturbation theory, encompasses the second- and higher-order induction and exchange-induction terms. Furthermore, it was found that the dispersion contribution, albeit much smaller in terms of magnitude, is also a vital stabilizing factor. It was also revealed that the intermolecular interaction energy and its components are strongly influenced by four (out of six) structural parameters describing mutual orientation of bases in Watson-Crick pairs, namely shear, stagger, stretch, and opening. Finally, as a part of a model study, much of the effort was devoted to an extensive testing of the UBDB databank. It was shown that the databank quite successfully reproduces the

  12. New models for intermolecular repulsion and their application to Van Der Waals complexes and crystals of organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsui, H.H.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Model intermolecular potentials are required for simulations of molecules in the gas, liquid, or solid phase. The widely used isotropic atom-atom model potentials are empirically fitted and based on the assumptions of transferability, combining rules and that atoms in molecules are spherical. This thesis develops a non-empirical method of modelling repulsion by applying the overlap model, which we show as a general non-empirical method of deriving repulsion potentials for a specific molecule. In this thesis, the repulsion parameters for an exponential atom-atom model potential are obtained from the ab initio charge density of a small organic molecule by making the assumption that the repulsion is proportional to the overlap of a pair of molecules. The proportionality constant is fixed by a limited number of intermolecular perturbation theory (IMPT) calculations. To complete the model potential, the electrostatic interaction is represented by a distributed multipole analysis, and the Slater-Kirkwood formula is used for the dispersion. These non-empirical potentials can reproduce experimental crystal structure when applied to crystal structure prediction of an oxyboryl derivative. A detailed study on further improving the overlap model was carried out for phenol-water, by including other minor intermolecular contributions of charge-transfer and penetration. High quality ab initio calculations on the complex were performed for use in comparison. To compare with experimental data, diffusion Monte Carlo simulations were performed with the potential, so that the effects of anharmonic zero-point motion on structure and energy of the system are included. When the system is too large for an IMPT calculation, the proportionality constant can be determined empirically by fitting the cell volume as shown in our study of crystal structures of chlorothalonil. This is used with an anisotropic repulsion model that has been derived for Cl and N atoms in chlorothalonil. This model

  13. A simple and reliable approach to docking protein-protein complexes from very sparse NOE-derived intermolecular distance restraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Chun; Clore, G. Marius

    2006-01-01

    A simple and reliable approach for docking protein-protein complexes from very sparse NOE-derived intermolecular distance restraints (as few as three from a single point) in combination with a novel representation for an attractive potential between mapped interaction surfaces is described. Unambiguous assignments of very sparse intermolecular NOEs are obtained using a reverse labeling strategy in which one the components is fully deuterated with the exception of selective protonation of the δ-methyl groups of isoleucine, while the other component is uniformly 13 C-labeled. This labeling strategy can be readily extended to selective protonation of Ala, Leu, Val or Met. The attractive potential is described by a 'reduced' radius of gyration potential applied specifically to a subset of interfacial residues (those with an accessible surface area ≥ 50% in the free proteins) that have been delineated by chemical shift perturbation. Docking is achieved by rigid body minimization on the basis of a target function comprising the sparse NOE distance restraints, a van der Waals repulsion potential and the 'reduced' radius of gyration potential. The method is demonstrated for two protein-protein complexes (EIN-HPr and IIA Glc -HPr) from the bacterial phosphotransferase system. In both cases, starting from 100 different random orientations of the X-ray structures of the free proteins, 100% convergence is achieved to a single cluster (with near identical atomic positions) with an overall backbone accuracy of ∼2 A. The approach described is not limited to NMR, since interfaces can also be mapped by alanine scanning mutagenesis, and sparse intermolecular distance restraints can be derived from double cycle mutagenesis, cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry, or fluorescence energy transfer

  14. A simple and reliable approach to docking protein-protein complexes from very sparse NOE-derived intermolecular distance restraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chun; Clore, G. Marius [National Institutes of Health, Laboratory of Chemical Physics, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (United States)], E-mail: mariusc@intra.niddk.nih.gov

    2006-09-15

    A simple and reliable approach for docking protein-protein complexes from very sparse NOE-derived intermolecular distance restraints (as few as three from a single point) in combination with a novel representation for an attractive potential between mapped interaction surfaces is described. Unambiguous assignments of very sparse intermolecular NOEs are obtained using a reverse labeling strategy in which one the components is fully deuterated with the exception of selective protonation of the {delta}-methyl groups of isoleucine, while the other component is uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled. This labeling strategy can be readily extended to selective protonation of Ala, Leu, Val or Met. The attractive potential is described by a 'reduced' radius of gyration potential applied specifically to a subset of interfacial residues (those with an accessible surface area {>=} 50% in the free proteins) that have been delineated by chemical shift perturbation. Docking is achieved by rigid body minimization on the basis of a target function comprising the sparse NOE distance restraints, a van der Waals repulsion potential and the 'reduced' radius of gyration potential. The method is demonstrated for two protein-protein complexes (EIN-HPr and IIA{sup Glc}-HPr) from the bacterial phosphotransferase system. In both cases, starting from 100 different random orientations of the X-ray structures of the free proteins, 100% convergence is achieved to a single cluster (with near identical atomic positions) with an overall backbone accuracy of {approx}2 A. The approach described is not limited to NMR, since interfaces can also be mapped by alanine scanning mutagenesis, and sparse intermolecular distance restraints can be derived from double cycle mutagenesis, cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry, or fluorescence energy transfer.

  15. Intermolecular interactions in aqueous solutions of gallic acid at 296-306 K according to spectrofluorimetry and densimetry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, K. R.; Sargsyan, L. S.

    2015-12-01

    Features of intermolecular interactions in aqueous solutions of gallic acid (GA) are studied by means of densimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy (intrinsic fluorescence, 2D spectra, and excitation/ emission matrix fluorescence spectra, 3D) at 296.15, 301.15, and 306.15 K in the concentration range of 5.88 × 10-4-5.88 × 10-2 mol L-1. It is shown by analyzing the concentration and temperature dependences of the apparent molar volumes and fluorescence parameters of GA that the equilibrium between nonassociated and associated species in the solution and the hydration of these species undergo changes.

  16. Iron(II)-catalyzed intermolecular amino-oxygenation of olefins through the N-O bond cleavage of functionalized hydroxylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Deng-Fu; Zhu, Cheng-Liang; Jia, Zhen-Xin; Xu, Hao

    2014-09-24

    An iron-catalyzed diastereoselective intermolecular olefin amino-oxygenation reaction is reported, which proceeds via an iron-nitrenoid generated by the N-O bond cleavage of a functionalized hydroxylamine. In this reaction, a bench-stable hydroxylamine derivative is used as the amination reagent and oxidant. This method tolerates a range of synthetically valuable substrates that have been all incompatible with existing amino-oxygenation methods. It can also provide amino alcohol derivatives with regio- and stereochemical arrays complementary to known amino-oxygenation methods.

  17. Organophotocatalysis: Insights into the Mechanistic Aspects of Thiourea-Mediated Intermolecular [2+2] Photocycloadditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallavoju, Nandini; Selvakumar, Sermadurai; Pemberton, Barry C; Jockusch, Steffen; Sibi, Mukund P; Sivaguru, Jayaraman

    2016-04-25

    Mechanistic investigations of the intermolecular [2+2] photocycloaddition of coumarin with tetramethylethylene mediated by thiourea catalysts reveal that the reaction is enabled by a combination of minimized aggregation, enhanced intersystem crossing, and altered excited-state lifetime(s). These results clarify how the excited-state reactivity can be manipulated through catalyst-substrate interactions and reveal a third mechanistic pathway for thiourea-mediated organo-photocatalysis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. beta-Sheet aggregation of kisspeptin-10 is stimulated by heparin but inhibited by amphiphiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Bang; Franzmann, Magnus; Basaiawmoit, Rajiv V

    2010-01-01

    The murine 10-residue neurohormone kisspeptin (YNWNSFGLRY) is an important regulator of reproductive behavior and gonadotrophin secretion. It is known to form a random coil in solution, but undergoes a structural change in the presence of membranes although the nature of this change is not fully...

  19. Natural polypeptide scaffolds: beta-sheets, beta-turns, and beta-hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotondi, Kenneth S; Gierasch, Lila M

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to fundamental conformational states of polypeptides in the beta-region of phi,psi space, in which the backbone is extended near to its maximal length, and to more complex architectures in which extended segments are linked by turns and loops. There are several variants on these conformations, and they comprise versatile scaffolds for presentation of side chains and backbone amides for molecular recognition and designed catalysts. In addition, the geometry of these fundamental folds can be readily mimicked in peptidomimetics. Copyright 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. An adaptive bin framework search method for a beta-sheet protein homopolymer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoos Holger H

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The problem of protein structure prediction consists of predicting the functional or native structure of a protein given its linear sequence of amino acids. This problem has played a prominent role in the fields of biomolecular physics and algorithm design for over 50 years. Additionally, its importance increases continually as a result of an exponential growth over time in the number of known protein sequences in contrast to a linear increase in the number of determined structures. Our work focuses on the problem of searching an exponentially large space of possible conformations as efficiently as possible, with the goal of finding a global optimum with respect to a given energy function. This problem plays an important role in the analysis of systems with complex search landscapes, and particularly in the context of ab initio protein structure prediction. Results In this work, we introduce a novel approach for solving this conformation search problem based on the use of a bin framework for adaptively storing and retrieving promising locally optimal solutions. Our approach provides a rich and general framework within which a broad range of adaptive or reactive search strategies can be realized. Here, we introduce adaptive mechanisms for choosing which conformations should be stored, based on the set of conformations already stored in memory, and for biasing choices when retrieving conformations from memory in order to overcome search stagnation. Conclusion We show that our bin framework combined with a widely used optimization method, Monte Carlo search, achieves significantly better performance than state-of-the-art generalized ensemble methods for a well-known protein-like homopolymer model on the face-centered cubic lattice.

  1. Beta-Sheet-Forming, Self-Assembled Peptide Nanomaterials towards Optical, Energy, and Healthcare Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungjin; Kim, Jae Hong; Lee, Joon Seok; Park, Chan Beum

    2015-08-12

    Peptide self-assembly is an attractive route for the synthesis of intricate organic nanostructures that possess remarkable structural variety and biocompatibility. Recent studies on peptide-based, self-assembled materials have expanded beyond the construction of high-order architectures; they are now reporting new functional materials that have application in the emerging fields such as artificial photosynthesis and rechargeable batteries. Nevertheless, there have been few reviews particularly concentrating on such versatile, emerging applications. Herein, recent advances in the synthesis of self-assembled peptide nanomaterials (e.g., cross β-sheet-based amyloid nanostructures, peptide amphiphiles) are selectively reviewed and their new applications in diverse, interdisciplinary fields are described, ranging from optics and energy storage/conversion to healthcare. The applications of peptide-based self-assembled materials in unconventional fields are also highlighted, such as photoluminescent peptide nanostructures, artificial photosynthetic peptide nanomaterials, and lithium-ion battery components. The relation of such functional materials to the rapidly progressing biomedical applications of peptide self-assembly, which include biosensors/chips and regenerative medicine, are discussed. The combination of strategies shown in these applications would further promote the discovery of novel, functional, small materials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Nanostructure characterization of beta-sheet crystals in silk under various temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the nanostructure characterizations of β-sheet in silk fiber with different reaction temperatures. A molecular dynamic model is developed and simulated by Gromacs software packages. The results reveal the change rules of the number of hydrogen bonds in β-sheet under different temperatures. The best reaction temperature for the β-sheet crystals is also found. This work provides theoretical basis for the designing of materials based on silk.

  3. Intra- und intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Spectroscopic, quantum chemical and molecular dynamics studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simperler, A.

    1999-03-01

    Intra- and intermolecular H-bonds have been investigated with spectroscopic, quantum chemical, and molecular dynamics methods. The work is divided into the following three parts: 1. Intramolecular interactions in ortho-substituted phenols. Theoretical and experimental data that characterizes the intramolecular hydrogen bonds in 48 different o-substituted phenols are discussed. The study covers various kinds of O-H ... Y -type interactions (Y= N, O, S, F, Cl, Br, I, C=C, C=-C, and C-=N). The bond strength sequences for several series of systematically related compounds as obtained from IR spectroscopy data (i.e., v(OH) stretching frequencies) are discussed and reproduced with several theoretical methods (B3LYP/6-31G(d,p), B3LYP/6-311G(d,p), B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p), B3LYP/DZVP, MP2/6-31G(d,p), and MP2/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory). The experimentally determined sequences are interpreted in terms of the intrinsic properties of the molecules: hydrogen bond distances, Mulliken partial charges, van der Waals radii, and electron densities of the Y-proton acceptors. 2. Competitive hydrogen bonds and conformational equilibria in 2,6-disubstituted phenols containing two different carbonyl substituents. The rotational isomers of ten unsymmetrical 2,6-disubstituted phenols as obtained by combinations of five different carbonyl substituents (COOH, COOCH 3 , CHO, COCH 3 , and CONH 2 ) have been theoretically investigated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. The relative stability of four to five conformers of each compound were determined by full geometry optimization for free molecules as well as for molecules in reaction fields with dielectric constants up to ε=37.5. A comparison with IR spectroscopic data of available compounds revealed excellent agreement with the theoretically predicted stability sequences and conformational equilibria. The stability of a conformer could be interpreted to be governed by the following two contributions: (i) an attractive hydrogen bond

  4. Solvation study of the non-specific lipid transfer protein from wheat by intermolecular NOEs with water and small organic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liepinsh, Edvards; Sodano, Patrick; Tassin, Severine; Marion, Didier; Vovelle, Francoise; Otting, Gottfried

    1999-01-01

    Intermolecular nuclear Overhauser effects (NOEs) were measured between the protons of various small solvent or gas molecules and the non-specific lipid transfer protein (ns-LTP) from wheat. Intermolecular NOEs were observed with the hydrophobic pocket in the interior of wheat ns-LTP, which grew in intensity in the order cyclopropane (saturated solution) < methane (140 bar) < ethane (40 bar) < acetonitrile (5% in water) < cyclohexane (saturated solution) < benzene (saturated solution). No intermolecular NOEs were observed with dioxane (5% in water). The intermolecular NOEs were negative for all of the organic molecules tested. Intermolecular NOEs between wheat ns-LTP and water were weak or could not be distinguished from exchange-relayed NOEs. As illustrated by the NOEs with cyclohexane versus dioxane, the hydrophobic pocket in wheat ns-LTP preferably binds non-polar molecules. Yet, polar molecules like acetonitrile can also be accommodated. The pressure dependence of the NOEs between methane and wheat ns-LTP indicated incomplete occupancy, even at 190 bar methane pressure. In general, NOE intensities increased with the size of the ligand molecule and its vapor pressure. NMR of the vapor phase showed excellent resolution between the signals from the gas phase and those from the liquid phase. The vapor concentration of cyclohexane was fivefold higher than that of the dioxane solution, supporting the binding of cyclohexane versus uptake of dioxane

  5. Lack of evidence for intermolecular epistatic interactions between adiponectin and resistin gene polymorphisms in Malaysian male subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cia-Hin Lau

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epistasis (gene-gene interaction is a ubiquitous component of the genetic architecture of complex traits such as susceptibility to common human diseases. Given the strong negative correlation between circulating adiponectin and resistin levels, the potential intermolecular epistatic interactions between ADIPOQ (SNP+45T > G, SNP+276G > T, SNP+639T > C and SNP+1212A > G and RETN (SNP-420C > G and SNP+299G > A gene polymorphisms in the genetic risk underlying type 2 diabetes (T2DM and metabolic syndrome (MS were assessed. The potential mutual influence of the ADIPOQ and RETN genes on their adipokine levels was also examined. The rare homozygous genotype (risk alleles of SNP-420C > G at the RETN locus tended to be co-inherited together with the common homozygous genotypes (protective alleles of SNP+639T > C and SNP+1212A > G at the ADIPOQ locus. Despite the close structural relationship between the ADIPOQ and RETN genes, there was no evidence of an intermolecular epistatic interaction between these genes. There was also no reciprocal effect of the ADIPOQ and RETN genes on their adipokine levels, i.e., ADIPOQ did not affect resistin levels nor did RETN affect adiponectin levels. The possible influence of the ADIPOQ gene on RETN expression warrants further investigation.

  6. Photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer and off-resonance Raman characteristics of Rhodamine 101/N,N-diethylaniline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Li-lin; Liu, Wei-long; Song, Yun-fei; He, Xing; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chang; Wu, Hong-lin; Yang, Fang; Yang, Yan-qiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mechanism of PIET reaction process for the Rh101 + /DEA system is investigated. • The significant geometrical changes of the charge–transfer complex are explained. • Forward Electron transfer from DEA to Rh101 +∗ occurs with lifetime of 425–560 fs. • Backward electron transfer occurs with a time constant of 46.16–51.40 ps. • Intramolecular vibrational relaxation occurs with lifetime of 2.77–5.39 ps. - Abstract: The ultrafast photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer (PIET) reaction of Rhodamine 101 (Rh101 + ) in N,N-diethylaniline (DEA) was investigated using off-resonance Raman, femtosecond time-resolved multiplex transient grating (TG) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopies. The Raman spectra indicate that the C=C stretching vibration of the chromophore aromatic ring is more sensitive to ET compared with the C-C stretching mode. The ultrafast photoinduced intermolecular forward ET (FET) from DEA to Rh101 +∗ occurs on a time scale of τ FET = 425–560 fs. The backward ET (BET) occurs in the inverted region with a time constant of τ BET = 46.16–51.40 ps. The intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) process occurs on the excited state potential energy surface with the time constant of τ IVR = 2.77–5.39 ps

  7. Quantum electrodynamics with nonrelativistic sources. V. Electromagnetic field correlations and intermolecular interactions between molecules in either ground or excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, E.A.; Thirunamachandran, T.

    1993-01-01

    Spatial correlations between electromagnetic fields arising from neutral sources with electric-dipole transition moments are calculated using nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics in the multipolar formalism. Expressions for electric-electric, magnetic-magnetic, and electric-magnetic correlation functions at two points r and r' are given for a source molecule in either a ground or an excited state. In contrast to the electric-electric and magnetic-magnetic cases there are no electric-magnetic correlations for a ground-state molecule. For an excited molecule the downward transitions contribute additional terms which have modulating factors depending on (r-r')/λ. From these correlation functions electric and magnetic energy densities are found by setting r=r'. These energy densities are then used in a response formalism to calculate intermolecular energy shifts. In the case of two ground-state molecules this leads to the Casimir-Polder potential. However, for a pair of molecules, one or both excited, there are additional terms arising from downward transitions. An important feature of these energies is that they exhibit an R -2 dependence for large intermolecular separations R. This dependence is interpreted in terms of the Poynting vector, which itself can be obtained by setting r=r' in the electric-magnetic correlation function

  8. Photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer and off-resonance Raman characteristics of Rhodamine 101/N,N-diethylaniline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Li-lin [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Hezhou University, Hezhou 542800 (China); Liu, Wei-long; Song, Yun-fei; He, Xing; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chang; Wu, Hong-lin [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yang, Fang [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Tunable Laser, Department of Optoelectronics Information Science Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yang, Yan-qiang, E-mail: yqyang@hit.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900, Sichuan (China)

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • Mechanism of PIET reaction process for the Rh101{sup +}/DEA system is investigated. • The significant geometrical changes of the charge–transfer complex are explained. • Forward Electron transfer from DEA to Rh101{sup +∗} occurs with lifetime of 425–560 fs. • Backward electron transfer occurs with a time constant of 46.16–51.40 ps. • Intramolecular vibrational relaxation occurs with lifetime of 2.77–5.39 ps. - Abstract: The ultrafast photoinduced intermolecular electron transfer (PIET) reaction of Rhodamine 101 (Rh101{sup +}) in N,N-diethylaniline (DEA) was investigated using off-resonance Raman, femtosecond time-resolved multiplex transient grating (TG) and transient absorption (TA) spectroscopies. The Raman spectra indicate that the C=C stretching vibration of the chromophore aromatic ring is more sensitive to ET compared with the C-C stretching mode. The ultrafast photoinduced intermolecular forward ET (FET) from DEA to Rh101{sup +∗} occurs on a time scale of τ{sub FET} = 425–560 fs. The backward ET (BET) occurs in the inverted region with a time constant of τ{sub BET} = 46.16–51.40 ps. The intramolecular vibrational relaxation (IVR) process occurs on the excited state potential energy surface with the time constant of τ{sub IVR} = 2.77–5.39 ps.

  9. Metal-Catalyzed Intra- and Intermolecular Addition of Carboxylic Acids to Alkynes in Aqueous Media: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Francos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The metal-catalyzed addition of carboxylic acids to alkynes is a very effective tool for the synthesis of carboxylate-functionalized olefinic compounds in an atom-economical manner. Thus, a large variety of synthetically useful lactones and enol-esters can be accessed through the intra- or intermolecular versions of this process. In order to reduce the environmental impact of these reactions, considerable efforts have been devoted in recent years to the development of catalytic systems able to operate in aqueous media, which represent a real challenge taking into account the tendency of alkynes to undergo hydration in the presence of transition metals. Despite this, different Pd, Pt, Au, Cu and Ru catalysts capable of promoting the intra- and intermolecular addition of carboxylic acids to alkynes in a selective manner in aqueous environments have appeared in the literature. In this review article, an overview of this chemistry is provided. The synthesis of β-oxo esters by catalytic addition of carboxylic acids to terminal propargylic alcohols in water is also discussed.

  10. Effect of intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions on interfacial supramolecular structures of C3-symmetric hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Zhongcheng; Shao, Qi; Ye, Jun; Zeng, Zebing; Zhao, Yang; Hng, Huey Hoon; Boey, Freddy Yin Chiang; Wu, Jishan; Chen, Xiaodong

    2011-02-15

    Two-dimensional (2D) supramolecular assemblies of a series of novel C(3)-symmetric hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HBC) derivatives bearing different substituents adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite were studied by using scanning tunneling microscopy at a solid-liquid interface. It was found that the intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions play a critical role in controlling the interfacial supramolecular assembly of these C(3)-symmetric HBC derivatives at the solid-liquid interface. The HBC molecule bearing three -CF(3) groups could form 2D honeycomb structures because of antiparallel dipole-dipole interactions, whereas HBC molecules bearing three -CN or -NO(2) groups could form hexagonal superstructures because of a special trimeric arrangement induced by dipole-dipole interactions and weak hydrogen bonding interactions ([C-H···NC-] or [C-H···O(2)N-]). Molecular mechanics and dynamics simulations were performed to reveal the physics behind the 2D structures as well as detailed functional group interactions. This work provides an example of how intermolecular dipole-dipole interactions could enable fine control over the self-assembly of disklike π-conjugated molecules.

  11. Influence of intermolecular amide hydrogen bonding on the geometry, atomic charges, and spectral modes of acetanilide: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binoy, J.; Prathima, N. B.; Murali Krishna, C.; Santhosh, C.; Hubert Joe, I.; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2006-08-01

    Acetanilide, a compound of pharmaceutical importance possessing pain-relieving properties due to its blocking the pulse dissipating along the nerve fiber, is subjected to vibrational spectral investigation using NIR FT Raman, FT-IR, and SERS. The geometry, Mulliken charges, and vibrational spectrum of acetanilide have been computed using the Hartree-Fock theory and density functional theory employing the 6-31G (d) basis set. To investigate the influence of intermolecular amide hydrogen bonding, the geometry, charge distribution, and vibrational spectrum of the acetanilide dimer have been computed at the HF/6-31G (d) level. The computed geometries reveal that the acetanilide molecule is planar, while twisting of the secondary amide group with respect to the phenyl ring is found upon hydrogen bonding. The trans isomerism and “amido” form of the secondary amide, hyperconjugation of the C=O group with the adjacent C-C bond, and donor-acceptor interaction have been investigated using computed geometry. The carbonyl stretching band position is found to be influenced by the tendency of the phenyl ring to withdraw nitrogen lone pair, intermolecular hydrogen bonding, conjugation, and hyperconjugation. A decrease in the NH and C=O bond orders and increase in the C-N bond orders due to donor-acceptor interaction can be observed in the vibrational spectra. The SERS spectral analysis reveals that the flat orientation of the molecule on the adsorption plane is preferred.

  12. Structural analysis of intermolecular interactions in the kinesin adaptor complex fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1/ short coiled-coil protein (FEZ1/SCOCO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Rodrigo Alborghetti

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton and protein trafficking processes, including vesicle transport to synapses, are key processes in neuronal differentiation and axon outgrowth. The human protein FEZ1 (fasciculation and elongation protein zeta 1 / UNC-76, in C. elegans, SCOCO (short coiled-coil protein / UNC-69 and kinesins (e.g. kinesin heavy chain / UNC116 are involved in these processes. Exploiting the feature of FEZ1 protein as a bivalent adapter of transport mediated by kinesins and FEZ1 protein interaction with SCOCO (proteins involved in the same path of axonal growth, we investigated the structural aspects of intermolecular interactions involved in this complex formation by NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (MS, SAXS (Small Angle X-ray Scattering and molecular modelling. The topology of homodimerization was accessed through NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance studies of the region involved in this process, corresponding to FEZ1 (92-194. Through studies involving the protein in its monomeric configuration (reduced and dimeric state, we propose that homodimerization occurs with FEZ1 chains oriented in an anti-parallel topology. We demonstrate that the interaction interface of FEZ1 and SCOCO defined by MS and computational modelling is in accordance with that previously demonstrated for UNC-76 and UNC-69. SAXS and literature data support a heterotetrameric complex model. These data provide details about the interaction interfaces probably involved in the transport machinery assembly and open perspectives to understand and interfere in this assembly and its involvement in neuronal differentiation and axon outgrowth.

  13. Protein Topology Determines Cysteine Oxidation Fate: The Case of Sulfenyl Amide Formation among Protein Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defelipe, Lucas A.; Lanzarotti, Esteban; Gauto, Diego; Marti, Marcelo A.; Turjanski, Adrián G.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine residues have a rich chemistry and play a critical role in the catalytic activity of a plethora of enzymes. However, cysteines are susceptible to oxidation by Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species, leading to a loss of their catalytic function. Therefore, cysteine oxidation is emerging as a relevant physiological regulatory mechanism. Formation of a cyclic sulfenyl amide residue at the active site of redox-regulated proteins has been proposed as a protection mechanism against irreversible oxidation as the sulfenyl amide intermediate has been identified in several proteins. However, how and why only some specific cysteine residues in particular proteins react to form this intermediate is still unknown. In the present work using in-silico based tools, we have identified a constrained conformation that accelerates sulfenyl amide formation. By means of combined MD and QM/MM calculation we show that this conformation positions the NH backbone towards the sulfenic acid and promotes the reaction to yield the sulfenyl amide intermediate, in one step with the concomitant release of a water molecule. Moreover, in a large subset of the proteins we found a conserved beta sheet-loop-helix motif, which is present across different protein folds, that is key for sulfenyl amide production as it promotes the previous formation of sulfenic acid. For catalytic activity, in several cases, proteins need the Cysteine to be in the cysteinate form, i.e. a low pKa Cys. We found that the conserved motif stabilizes the cysteinate by hydrogen bonding to several NH backbone moieties. As cysteinate is also more reactive toward ROS we propose that the sheet-loop-helix motif and the constraint conformation have been selected by evolution for proteins that need a reactive Cys protected from irreversible oxidation. Our results also highlight how fold conservation can be correlated to redox chemistry regulation of protein function. PMID:25741692

  14. An Efficient Method to Evaluate Intermolecular Interaction Energies in Large Systems Using Overlapping Multicenter ONIOM and the Fragment Molecular Orbital Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Naoya; Fedorov, Dmitri G.; Kitaura, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Isao; Merz, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    We propose an approach based on the overlapping multicenter ONIOM to evaluate intermolecular interaction energies in large systems and demonstrate its accuracy on several representative systems in the complete basis set limit at the MP2 and CCSD(T) level of theory. In the application to the intermolecular interaction energy between insulin dimer and 4′-hydroxyacetanilide at the MP2/CBS level, we use the fragment molecular orbital method for the calculation of the entire complex assigned to the lowest layer in three-layer ONIOM. The developed method is shown to be efficient and accurate in the evaluation of the protein-ligand interaction energies. PMID:23050059

  15. Complete relaxation and conformational exchange matrix (CORCEMA) analysis of intermolecular saturation transfer effects in reversibly forming ligand-receptor complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayalakshmi, V; Krishna, N Rama

    2002-03-01

    A couple of recent applications of intermolecular NOE (INOE) experiments as applied to biomolecular systems involve the (i) saturation transfer difference NMR (STD-NMR) method and (ii) the intermolecular cross-saturation NMR (ICS-NMR) experiment. STD-NMR is a promising tool for rapid screening of a large library of compounds to identify bioactive ligands binding to a target protein. Additionally, it is also useful in mapping the binding epitopes presented by a bioactive ligand to its target protein. In this latter application, the STD-NMR technique is essentially similar to the ICS-NMR experiment, which is used to map protein-protein or protein-nucleic acid contact surfaces in complexes. In this work, we present a complete relaxation and conformational exchange matrix (CORCEMA) theory (H. N. B. Moseley et al., J. Magn. Reson. B 108, 243-261 (1995)) applicable for these two closely related experiments. As in our previous work, we show that when exchange is fast on the relaxation rate scale, a simplified CORCEMA theory can be formulated using a generalized average relaxation rate matrix. Its range of validity is established by comparing its predictions with those of the exact CORCEMA theory which is valid for all exchange rates. Using some ideal model systems we have analyzed the factors that influence the ligand proton intensity changes when the resonances from some protons on the receptor protein are saturated. The results show that the intensity changes in the ligand signals in an intermolecular NOE experiment are very much dependent upon: (1) the saturation time, (2) the location of the saturated receptor protons with respect to the ligand protons, (3) the conformation of the ligand-receptor interface, (4) the rotational correlation times for the molecular species, (5) the kinetics of the reversibly forming complex, and (6) the ligand/receptor ratio. As an example of a typical application of the STD-NMR experiment we have also simulated the STD effects for a

  16. Iron-catalyzed intermolecular cycloaddition of diazo surrogates with hexahydro-1,3,5-triazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei; Zhu, Chenghao; Xu, Guangyang; Sun, Jiangtao

    2017-09-26

    We report here an unprecedented iron-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction of diazo surrogates with hexahydro-1,3,5-triazines, providing five-membered heterocycles in moderate to high yields under mild reaction conditions. This cycloaddition features C-N and C-C bond formation using a cheap iron catalyst. Importantly, different to our former report on a gold-catalyzed system, both donor/donor and donor/acceptor diazo substrates are tolerated in this iron-catalyzed protocol.

  17. Central-field intermolecular potentials from the differential elastic scattering of H2(D2) by other molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppermann, Aron; Gordon, R.J.; Coggiola, M.J.

    1974-01-01

    Differential elastic scattering cross sections for the systems H 2 +O 2 , SF 6 , NH 3 , CO, and CH 4 and for D 2 +O 2 , SF 6 , and NH 3 have been obtained from crossed beam studies. In all cases, rapid quantum oscillations have been resolved which permit the determination of intermolecular potentiel parameters if a central-field assumption is adopted. These potentials were found to be independent of both the isotopic form of the hydrogen molecule, and the relative collision energy. As a result of this, and the ability of these spherical potentials to quantitatively describe the measured scattering, it is concluded that anisotropy effects do not seem important in these H 2 (D 2 ) systems

  18. Symmetric bi-pyridyl banana-shaped molecule and its intermolecular hydrogen bonding liquid-crystalline complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Dan; Hou, Qiufei; Chai, Jia; Ye, Ling; Zhao, Liyan; Li, Min; Jiang, Shimei

    2008-11-01

    A new symmetric bi-pyridyl banana-shaped molecule 1,3-phenylene diisonicotinate (PDI) was designed and synthesized. Its molecular structure was confirmed by FTIR, Elemental analysis and 1H NMR. X-ray crystallographic study reveals that there is an angle of approximate 118° among the centroids of the three rings (pyridyl-phenyl-pyridyl) in each PDI molecule indicating a desired banana shape. In addition, a series of liquid crystal complexes nBA:PDI:nBA induced by intermolecular hydrogen bonding between PDI (proton acceptor) and 4-alkoxybenzoic acids (nBA, proton donor) were synthesized and characterized. The mesomorphism properties and optical textures of the complex of nBA:PDI:nBA were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, polarizing optical microscope and X-ray diffraction.

  19. Investigation on intermolecular interaction between berberine and β-cyclodextrin by 2D UV-Vis asynchronous spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Anqi; Kang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yizhuang; Noda, Isao; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Wu, Jinguang

    2017-10-05

    The interaction between berberine chloride and β-cyclodextrin (β-CyD) is investigated via 2D asynchronous UV-Vis spectrum. The occurrence of cross peaks around (420nm, 420nm) in 2D asynchronous spectrum reveals that specific intermolecular interaction indeed exists between berberine chloride and β-CyD. In spite of the difficulty caused by overlapping of cross peaks, we manage to confirm that the 420nm band of berberine undergoes a red-shift, and its bandwidth decreases under the interaction with β-CyD. The red-shift of the 420nm band that can be assigned to n-π* transition indicates the environment of berberine becomes more hydrophobic. The above spectral behavior is helpful in understanding why the solubility of berberine is enhanced by β-CyD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Interplay between intramolecular and intermolecular structures of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira-Esteva, M.; Murugan, N. A.; Pardo, L. C.; Busch, S.; Tamarit, J. Ll.; Pothoczki, Sz.; Cuello, G. J.; Bermejo, F. J.

    2011-08-01

    We report on the interplay between the short-range order of molecules in the liquid phase of 1,1,2,2-tetrachloro-1,2-difluoroethane and the possible molecular conformations, trans and gauche. Two complementary approaches have been used to get a comprehensive picture: analysis of neutron-diffraction data by a Bayesian fit algorithm and a molecular dynamics simulation. The results of both show that the population of trans and gauche conformers in the liquid state can only correspond to the gauche conformer being more stable than the trans conformer. Distinct conformer geometries induce distinct molecular short-range orders around them, suggesting that a deep intra- and intermolecular interaction coupling is energetically favoring one of the conformers by reducing the total molecular free energy.

  1. Propagator formalism and computer simulation of restricted diffusion behaviors of inter-molecular multiple-quantum coherences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Congbo; Chen Zhong; Cai Shuhui; Zhong Jianhui

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, behaviors of single-quantum coherences and inter-molecular multiple-quantum coherences under restricted diffusion in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments were investigated. The propagator formalism based on the loss of spin phase memory during random motion was applied to describe the diffusion-induced signal attenuation. The exact expression of the signal attenuation under the short gradient pulse approximation for restricted diffusion between two parallel plates was obtained using this propagator method. For long gradient pulses, a modified formalism was proposed. The simulated signal attenuation under the effects of gradient pulses of different width based on the Monte Carlo method agrees with the theoretical predictions. The propagator formalism and computer simulation can provide convenient, intuitive and precise methods for the study of the diffusion behaviors

  2. Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed Activation of C(sp3)-H Bonds and Subsequent Intermolecular Amidation at Room Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolei; Wang, Yan; Lan, Jingbo; You, Jingsong

    2015-08-03

    Disclosed herein is a Rh(III)-catalyzed chelation-assisted activation of unreactive C(sp3)-H bonds, thus enabling an intermolecular amidation to provide a practical and step-economic route to 2-(pyridin-2-yl)ethanamine derivatives. Substrates with other N-donor groups are also compatible with the amidation. This protocol proceeds at room temperature, has a relatively broad functional-group tolerance and high selectivity, and demonstrates the potential of rhodium(III) in the promotive functionalization of unreactive C(sp3)-H bonds. A rhodacycle having a SbF6(-) counterion was identified as a plausible intermediate. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Intermolecular interactions between B. mori silk fibroin and poly(L-lactic acid) in electrospun composite nanofibrous scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taddei, Paola, E-mail: paola.taddei@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Neuromotorie, Università di Bologna, Via Belmeloro 8/2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Tozzi, Silvia [Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche e Neuromotorie, Università di Bologna, Via Belmeloro 8/2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Zuccheri, Giampaolo [Dipartimento di Farmacia e Biotecnologie e Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca Industriale Scienze della Vita e Tecnologie per la Salute, Università di Bologna, Via Irnerio 48, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Centro S3, Istituto Nanoscienze, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (Italy); Martinotti, Simona; Ranzato, Elia [Dipartimento di Scienze e Innovazione Tecnologica, DiSIT, Università del Piemonte Orientale, viale Teresa Michel 11, 15121 Alessandria (Italy); Chiono, Valeria; Carmagnola, Irene [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica e Aerospaziale, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Tsukada, Masuhiro [Division of Applied Biology, Faculty of Textile Science and Technology, Shinshu University, 3-15-1, Tokida, Ueda, Nagano 386-8567 (Japan)

    2017-01-01

    In this study, composite nanofibrous scaffolds were obtained by electrospinning a trifluoroacetic acid solution containing B. mori silk fibroin (SF) and poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) in a 1:1 weight ratio. SF, PLLA and SF/PLLA nanofibres were prepared with average diameter sizes of 360 ± 90 nm, 470 ± 240 nm and 580 ± 220 nm, respectively, as assessed by SEM analysis. Vibrational and thermal analyses showed that upon blending in the SF/PLLA nanofibres, the crystallisation of PLLA was hindered by the presence of SF, which crystallized preferentially and underwent conformational changes that did not significantly change its prevailing β-sheet structure. The two components were thermodynamically compatible and the intermolecular interactions between them were revealed for the first time. Human keratinocytes were cultured on nanofibres and their viability and proliferation were determined. Preliminary in vitro tests showed that the incorporation of SF into the PLLA component enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation with respect to the unfunctionalised material. SF has been successfully used to modify the biomaterial properties and confirmed to be an efficient bioactive protein to mediate cell-biomaterial interaction. - Highlights: • Composite silk fibroin-poly(L-lactic acid) scaffolds were obtained by electrospinning. • Intermolecular interactions between SF and PLLA were revealed for the first time. • Upon blending, the crystallisation of PLLA was hindered by the presence of SF. • SF crystallized preferentially and maintained its prevailing β-sheet structure. • The incorporation of SF into PLLA enhanced human keratinocytes adhesion and proliferation.

  4. Rational design of viscosity reducing mutants of a monoclonal antibody: hydrophobic versus electrostatic inter-molecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Pilarin; Li, Li; Kumar, Sandeep; Buck, Patrick M; Singh, Satish K; Goswami, Sumit; Balthazor, Bryan; Conley, Tami R; Sek, David; Allen, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    High viscosity of monoclonal antibody formulations at concentrations ≥100 mg/mL can impede their development as products suitable for subcutaneous delivery. The effects of hydrophobic and electrostatic intermolecular interactions on the solution behavior of MAB 1, which becomes unacceptably viscous at high concentrations, was studied by testing 5 single point mutants. The mutations were designed to reduce viscosity by disrupting either an aggregation prone region (APR), which also participates in 2 hydrophobic surface patches, or a negatively charged surface patch in the variable region. The disruption of an APR that lies at the interface of light and heavy chain variable domains, VH and VL, via L45K mutation destabilized MAB 1 and abolished antigen binding. However, mutation at the preceding residue (V44K), which also lies in the same APR, increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1 without sacrificing antigen binding or thermal stability. Neutralizing the negatively charged surface patch (E59Y) also increased apparent solubility and reduced viscosity of MAB 1, but charge reversal at the same position (E59K/R) caused destabilization, decreased solubility and led to difficulties in sample manipulation that precluded their viscosity measurements at high concentrations. Both V44K and E59Y mutations showed similar increase in apparent solubility. However, the viscosity profile of E59Y was considerably better than that of the V44K, providing evidence that inter-molecular interactions in MAB 1 are electrostatically driven. In conclusion, neutralizing negatively charged surface patches may be more beneficial toward reducing viscosity of highly concentrated antibody solutions than charge reversal or aggregation prone motif disruption.

  5. Molecular simulation of fluids with non-identical intermolecular potentials: Thermodynamic properties of 10-5 + 12-6 Mie potential binary mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiegler, Thomas; Sadus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    General methods for combining interactions between particles characterised by non-identical intermolecular potentials are investigated. The combination methods are tested by performing molecular dynamics simulations to determine the pressure, energy, isochoric and isobaric heat capacities, thermal expansion coefficient, isothermal compressibility, Joule-Thomson coefficient, and speed of sound of 10-5 + 12-6 Mie potential binary mixtures. In addition to the two non-identical Mie potentials, mixtures are also studied with non-identical intermolecular parameters. The combination methods are compared with results obtained by simply averaging the Mie exponents. When either the energy or size parameters are non-identical, very significant differences emerge in the thermodynamic properties predicted by the alternative combination methods. The isobaric heat capacity is the thermodynamic property that is most affected by the relative magnitude of the intermolecular potential parameters and the method for combining non-identical potentials. Either the arithmetic or geometric combination of potentials provides a simple and effective way of performing simulations involving mixtures of components characterised by non-identical intermolecular potentials, which is independent of their functional form

  6. Chemical cross-linking with thiol-cleavable reagents combined with differential mass spectrometric peptide mapping--a novel approach to assess intermolecular protein contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, K L; Kussmann, M; Björk, P

    2000-01-01

    The intermolecular contact regions between monomers of the homodimeric DNA binding protein ParR and the interaction between the glycoproteins CD28 and CD80 were investigated using a strategy that combined chemical cross-linking with differential MALDI-MS analyses. ParR dimers were modified in vit...

  7. A Closer Look at Trends in Boiling Points of Hydrides: Using an Inquiry-Based Approach to Teach Intermolecular Forces of Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Samantha; Marano, Nadia; Eisen, Laura

    2010-01-01

    We describe how we use boiling-point trends of group IV-VII hydrides to introduce intermolecular forces in our first-year general chemistry classes. Starting with the idea that molecules in the liquid state are held together by some kind of force that must be overcome for boiling to take place, students use data analysis and critical reasoning to…

  8. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  9. Spectroscopic Characterization of Intermolecular Interaction of Amyloid β Promoted on GM1 Micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maho Yagi-Utsumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of GM1 gangliosides act as platforms for conformational transition of monomeric, unstructured amyloid β (Aβ to its toxic β-structured aggregates. We have previously shown that Aβ(1–40 accommodated on the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of lyso-GM1 or GM1 micelles assumes α-helical structures under ganglioside-excess conditions. For better understanding of the mechanisms underlying the α-to-β conformational transition of Aβ on GM1 clusters, we performed spectroscopic characterization of Aβ(1–40 titrated with GM1. It was revealed that the thioflavin T- (ThT- reactive β-structure is more populated in Aβ(1–40 under conditions where the Aβ(1–40 density on GM1 micelles is high. Under this circumstance, the C-terminal hydrophobic anchor Val39-Val40 shows two distinct conformational states that are reactive with ThT, while such Aβ species were not generated by smaller lyso-GM1 micelles. These findings suggest that GM1 clusters promote specific Aβ-Aβ interactions through their C-termini coupled with formation of the ThT-reactive β-structure depending on sizes and curvatures of the clusters.

  10. Study of intermolecular interactions in binary mixtures of 2-(dimethylamino)ethanol with methanol and ethanol at various temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Puneet Kumar; Pandey, Vrijesh Kumar; Awasthi, Anjali; Nain, Anil Kumar; Awasthi, Aashees

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The densities and ultrasonic speeds of the binary mixtures over the entire composition range were measured at various temperatures at atmospheric pressure. The excess molar volumes, isentropic compressibilities, and molar isentropic compressions have been calculated. The variations of these parameters with composition and temperature are discussed. The IR spectra were recorded they further supported the conclusion drawn from excess parameters, which indicates the presence of intermolecular hydrogen bonding between the oxygen atom of DMAE molecules and hydrogen atom of methanol and ethanol molecules in these mixtures.. - Highlights: • The study reports density and ultrasonic velocity data of 2-(dimethylamino)ethanol + methanol/ethanol mixtures. • To elucidate the interactions in 2-(dimethylamino)ethanol + methanol/ethanol binary mixtures. • Provides information on nature and relative strength of interactions in these mixtures. • Correlates physicochemical properties with interactions in these mixtures. - Abstract: The densities, ρ and ultrasonic speeds, u of the binary mixtures of 2-(dimethylamino)ethanol (DMAE) with methanol/ethanol, including those of pure liquids, over the entire composition range were measured at 298.15, 308.15 and 318.15 K. From the experimental data, the excess molar volumes, V m E and excess isentropic compressibilities, κ s E have been calculated. The excess partial molar volumes, V ¯ m,1 E and V ¯ m,2 E and excess partial molar isentropic compressions, K ¯ s,m,1 E and K ¯ s,m,2 E over the whole composition range; and partial molar volumes, V ¯ m,1 ° and V ¯ m,2 ° , partial molar isentropic compressions, K ¯ s,m,1 ° and K ¯ s,m,2 ° , excess partial molar volumes, V ¯ m,1 °E and V ¯ m,2 °E , and excess partial molar isentropic compressions, K ¯ s,m,1 °E and K ¯ s,m,2 °E at infinite dilution have also been calculated. The variations of these parameters with composition and temperature are

  11. Genetic plasticity of the Shigella virulence plasmid is mediated by intra- and inter-molecular events between insertion sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Giulia; McVicker, Gareth; Tang, Christoph M

    2017-09-01

    Acquisition of a single copy, large virulence plasmid, pINV, led to the emergence of Shigella spp. from Escherichia coli. The plasmid encodes a Type III secretion system (T3SS) on a 30 kb pathogenicity island (PAI), and is maintained in a bacterial population through a series of toxin:antitoxin (TA) systems which mediate post-segregational killing (PSK). The T3SS imposes a significant cost on the bacterium, and strains which have lost the plasmid and/or genes encoding the T3SS grow faster than wild-type strains in the laboratory, and fail to bind the indicator dye Congo Red (CR). Our aim was to define the molecular events in Shigella flexneri that cause loss of Type III secretion (T3S), and to examine whether TA systems exert positional effects on pINV. During growth at 37°C, we found that deletions of regions of the plasmid including the PAI lead to the emergence of CR-negative colonies; deletions occur through intra-molecular recombination events between insertion sequences (ISs) flanking the PAI. Furthermore, by repositioning MvpAT (which belongs to the VapBC family of TA systems) near the PAI, we demonstrate that the location of this TA system alters the rearrangements that lead to loss of T3S, indicating that MvpAT acts both globally (by reducing loss of pINV through PSK) as well as locally (by preventing loss of adjacent sequences). During growth at environmental temperatures, we show for the first time that pINV spontaneously integrates into different sites in the chromosome, and this is mediated by inter-molecular events involving IS1294. Integration leads to reduced PAI gene expression and impaired secretion through the T3SS, while excision of pINV from the chromosome restores T3SS function. Therefore, pINV integration provides a reversible mechanism for Shigella to circumvent the metabolic burden imposed by pINV. Intra- and inter-molecular events between ISs, which are abundant in Shigella spp., mediate plasticity of S. flexneri pINV.

  12. Galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silk, J.; Di Cintio, A.; Dvorkin, I.

    2014-01-01

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  13. Analysis and Ranking of Protein-Protein Docking Models Using Inter-Residue Contacts and Inter-Molecular Contact Maps

    KAUST Repository

    Oliva, Romina; Chermak, Edrisse; Cavallo, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    In view of the increasing interest both in inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and in protein drugs themselves, analysis of the three-dimensional structure of protein-protein complexes is assuming greater relevance in drug design. In the many cases where an experimental structure is not available, protein-protein docking becomes the method of choice for predicting the arrangement of the complex. However, reliably scoring protein-protein docking poses is still an unsolved problem. As a consequence, the screening of many docking models is usually required in the analysis step, to possibly single out the correct ones. Here, making use of exemplary cases, we review our recently introduced methods for the analysis of protein complex structures and for the scoring of protein docking poses, based on the use of inter-residue contacts and their visualization in inter-molecular contact maps. We also show that the ensemble of tools we developed can be used in the context of rational drug design targeting protein-protein interactions.

  14. Ab initio calculation of intermolecular potentials for dimer Cl_2-Cl_2 and prediction of second virial coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thanh Duoc; Nguyen Thi Ai Nhung; Tran Duong; Pham Van Tat

    2015-01-01

    The results presented in this paper are the ab initio intermolecular potentials and the second virial coefficient, B_2 (T) of the dimer Cl_2-Cl_2. These ab initio potentials were proposed by the quantum chemical calculations at high level of theory CCSD(T) with basis sets of Dunning valence correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVmZ (m = 2, 3); these results were extrapolated to complete basis set limit aug-cc-pV23Z. The ab initio energies of complete basis set limit aug-cc-pV23Z resulted from the exponential extrapolation were used to construct the 5-site pair potential functions. The second virial coefficients for this dimer were predicted from those with four-dimensional integration. The second virial coefficients were also corrected to first-order quantum effects. The results turn out to be in good agreement with experimental data, if available, or with those from empirical correlation. The quality of ab initio 5-site potentials proved the reliability for prediction of molecular thermodynamic properties. (author)

  15. Room temperature ionic liquids: A simple model. Effect of chain length and size of intermolecular potential on critical temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapela, Gustavo A; Guzmán, Orlando; Díaz-Herrera, Enrique; del Río, Fernando

    2015-04-21

    A model of a room temperature ionic liquid can be represented as an ion attached to an aliphatic chain mixed with a counter ion. The simple model used in this work is based on a short rigid tangent square well chain with an ion, represented by a hard sphere interacting with a Yukawa potential at the head of the chain, mixed with a counter ion represented as well by a hard sphere interacting with a Yukawa potential of the opposite sign. The length of the chain and the depth of the intermolecular forces are investigated in order to understand which of these factors are responsible for the lowering of the critical temperature. It is the large difference between the ionic and the dispersion potentials which explains this lowering of the critical temperature. Calculation of liquid-vapor equilibrium orthobaric curves is used to estimate the critical points of the model. Vapor pressures are used to obtain an estimate of the triple point of the different models in order to calculate the span of temperatures where they remain a liquid. Surface tensions and interfacial thicknesses are also reported.

  16. A Raman spectroscopy study on the effects of intermolecular hydrogen bonding on water molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fabing; Li, Zhanlong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Shenghan; Wang, Xiaojun; Sun, Chenglin; Men, Zhiwei

    2018-05-01

    The structural forms of water/deuterated water molecules located on the surface of borosilicate capillaries have been first investigated in this study on the basis of the Raman spectral data obtained at different temperatures and under atmospheric pressure for molecules in bulk and also for molecules absorbed by borosilicate glass surface. The strongest two fundamental bands locating at 3063 cm-1 (2438 cm-1) in the recorded Raman spectra are assigned here to the Osbnd H (Osbnd D) bond stretching vibrations and they are compared with the corresponding bands observed at 3124 cm-1 (2325 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum of ice Ih. Our spectroscopic observations have indicated that the structure of water and deuterated water molecules on borosilicate surface is similar to that of ice Ih (hexagonal phase of ice). These observations have also indicated that water molecules locate on the borosilicate surface so as to construct a bilayer structure and that strong and weak intermolecular hydrogen bonds are formed between water/deuterated molecules and silanol groups on borosilicate surface. In accordance with these findings, water and deuterated water molecules at the interface of capillary have a higher melting temperature.

  17. Analysis and Ranking of Protein-Protein Docking Models Using Inter-Residue Contacts and Inter-Molecular Contact Maps

    KAUST Repository

    Oliva, Romina

    2015-07-01

    In view of the increasing interest both in inhibitors of protein-protein interactions and in protein drugs themselves, analysis of the three-dimensional structure of protein-protein complexes is assuming greater relevance in drug design. In the many cases where an experimental structure is not available, protein-protein docking becomes the method of choice for predicting the arrangement of the complex. However, reliably scoring protein-protein docking poses is still an unsolved problem. As a consequence, the screening of many docking models is usually required in the analysis step, to possibly single out the correct ones. Here, making use of exemplary cases, we review our recently introduced methods for the analysis of protein complex structures and for the scoring of protein docking poses, based on the use of inter-residue contacts and their visualization in inter-molecular contact maps. We also show that the ensemble of tools we developed can be used in the context of rational drug design targeting protein-protein interactions.

  18. Molecular self assembly and chiral recognition of copper octacyanophthalocyanine on Au(111): Interplay of intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sk, Rejaul; Dhara, Barun; Miller, Joel; Deshpande, Aparna

    Submolecular resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) of copper octacyanophthalocyanine, CuPc(CN)8, at 77 K demonstrates that these achiral molecules form a two dimensional (2D) tetramer-based self-assembly upon evaporation onto an atomically flat Au(111) substrate. They assemble in two different structurally chiral configurations upon adsorption on Au(111). Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS),acquired at 77 K, unveils the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of this self-assembly. Voltage dependent STM images show that each molecule in both the structurally chiral configurations individually becomes chiral by breaking the mirror symmetry due to the enhanced intermolecular dipolar coupling interaction at the LUMO energy while the individual molecules remain achiral at the HOMO energy and within the HOMO-LUMO gap. At the LUMO energy, the handedness of the each chiral molecule is decided by the direction of the dipolar coupling interaction in the tetramer unit cell. This preference for LUMO energy indicates that this chirality is purely electronic in nature and it manifests on top of the organizational chirality that is present in the self-assembly independent of the orbital energy. Supported by IISER Pune and DAE-BRNS, India (Project No. 2011/20/37C/17/BRNS).

  19. Synthesis and characterization of fluorinated magnetic core-shell nanoparticles for inhibition of insulin amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skaat, Hadas; Margel, Shlomo [Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Belfort, Georges [Howard P Isermann Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)], E-mail: ch348@mail.biu.ac.il, E-mail: belfog@rpi.edu, E-mail: Shlomo.margel@mail.biu.ac.il

    2009-06-03

    Maghemite ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) magnetic nanoparticles of 15.0 {+-} 2.1 nm are formed by nucleation followed by controlled growth of maghemite thin films on gelatin-iron oxide nuclei. Uniform magnetic {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/poly (2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate) ({gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA) core-shell nanoparticles are prepared by emulsion polymerization of the fluorinated monomer 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) in the presence of the maghemite nanoparticles. The kinetics of the insulin fibrillation process in the absence and in the presence of the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA core-shell nanoparticles are elucidated. A significant direct slow transition from {alpha}-helix to {beta}-sheets during insulin fibril formation is observed in the presence of the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/PHFBA nanoparticles. This is in contradiction to our previous manuscript, which illustrated that the {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} core nanoparticles do not affect the kinetics of the formation of the insulin fibrils, and to other previous publications that describe acceleration of the fibrillation process by using various types of nanoparticles. These core-shell nanoparticles may therefore be also useful for the inhibition of conformational changes of other amyloidogenic proteins that lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Huntington's, mad cow and prion diseases.

  20. Controlled Self-Assembly of Low-Dimensional Alq3 Nanostructures from 1D Nanowires to 2D Plates via Intermolecular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianmin; Yin, Baipeng; Fu, Shaoyan; Jin, Cuihong; Liu, Xin; Bian, Zhenpan; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Lu; Li, Xiaoyu

    2018-03-01

    Due to the intense influence of the shape and size of the photon building blocks on the limitation and guidance of optical waves, an important strategy is the fabrication of different structures. Herein, organic semiconductor tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium (Alq3) nanostructures with controllable morphology, ranging from one-dimensional nanowires to two-dimensional plates, have been prepared through altering intermolecular interactions with employing the anti-solvent diffusion cooperate with solvent-volatilization induced self-assembly method. The morphologies of the formed nanostructures, which are closely related to the stacking modes of the molecules, can be exactly controlled by altering the polarity of anti-solvents that can influence various intermolecular interactions. The synthesis strategy reported here can potentially be extended to other functional organic nanomaterials.

  1. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, ChuanXiang; Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT

  2. Decomposition of Intermolecular Interactions in the Crystal Structure of Some Diacetyl Platinum(II Complexes: Combined Hirshfeld, AIM, and NBO Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saied M. Soliman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular interactions play a vital role in crystal structures. Therefore, we conducted a topological study, using Hirshfeld surfaces and atom in molecules (AIM analysis, to decompose and analyze, respectively, the different intermolecular interactions in six hydrazone-diacetyl platinum(II complexes. Using AIM and natural bond orbital (NBO analyses, we determined the type, nature, and strength of the interactions. All the studied complexes contain C-H⋯O interactions, and the presence of bond critical points along the intermolecular paths underlines their significance. The electron densities (ρ(r at the bond critical points (0.0031–0.0156 e/a03 fall within the typical range for H-bonding interactions. Also, the positive values of the Laplacian of the electron density (∇2ρ(r revealed the depletion of electronic charge on the interatomic path, another characteristic feature of closed-shell interactions. The ratios of the absolute potential energy density to the kinetic energy density (|V(r|/G(r and ρ(r are highest for the O2⋯H15-N3 interaction in [Pt(COMe2(2-pyCMe=NNH2] (1; hence, this interaction has the highest covalent character of all the O⋯H intermolecular interactions. Interestingly, in [Pt(COMe2(H2NN=CMe-CMe=NNH2] (3, there are significant N-H⋯Pt interactions. Using the NBO method, the second-order interaction energies, E(2, of these interactions range from 3.894 to 4.061 kJ/mol. Furthermore, the hybrid Pt orbitals involved in these interactions are comprised of dxy, dxz, and s atomic orbitals.

  3. Theoretical studies for the N2–N2O van der Waals complex: The potential energy surface, intermolecular vibrations, and rotational transition frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Rui; Zheng, Limin; Yang, Minghui; Lu, Yunpeng

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface (PES) and bound states are performed for the N 2 –N 2 O van der Waals (vdW) complex. A four-dimensional intermolecular PES is constructed at the level of single and double excitation coupled-cluster method with a non-iterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set supplemented with bond functions. Two equivalent T-shaped global minima are located, in which the O atom of N 2 O monomer is near the N 2 monomer. The intermolecular fundamental vibrational states are assigned by inspecting the orientation of the nodal surface of the wavefunctions. The calculated frequency for intermolecular disrotation mode is 23.086 cm −1 , which is in good agreement with the available experimental data of 22.334 cm −1 . A negligible tunneling splitting with the value of 4.2 MHz is determined for the ground vibrational state and the tunneling splitting increases as the increment of the vibrational frequencies. Rotational levels and transition frequencies are calculated for both isotopomers 14 N 2 –N 2 O and 15 N 2 –N 2 O. The accuracy of the PES is validated by the good agreement between theoretical and experimental results for the transition frequencies and spectroscopic parameters

  4. Kinetics of isotope exchange reactions involving intra- and intermolecular reactions: 1. Rate law for a system with two chemical compounds and three exchangeable atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xuelei Chu; Ohmoto, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    For an isotopic exchange reaction between two compounds (X and AB) in a homogeneous system, such as a gaseous or aqueous system, where one (AB) of them possesses two exchangeable atoms in non-equivalent positions and where one intramolecular isotope exchange (A ↔ B) and two intermolecular isotope exchange reactions (X ↔ A and X ↔ B) may occur, its rate law no longer obeys a pseudo-first order rate equation described for simple two-component systems by many previous investigators. The change with time of the δ value of each of the three components (X, A, and B) in a closed and homogeneous system is a complicated function of the initial δ values of the three components, the chemical concentrations of the two compounds, and the overall rate constants of the forward and reverse reactions involving the two intermolecular and one intramolecular reactions of isotope exchanges. Also, for some one of the three components, the change of its δ value with time may not be monotonic, and the relationship of 1n (1 - F) with time may be non-linear in a plot of 1n (1 - F) vs. t. In addition, the rate law of the isotope exchange reaction in this system also provides a quantitative method to estimate the overall rate constants for the one-intra-and two intermolecular isotope exchanges and the equilibrium isotopic fractionation factors among the three components

  5. Vapour pressures of 1-methyl derivatives of benzimidazole, pyrazole and indole. The energy of the intermolecular hydrogen bond N-H⋯N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Ana R.R.P.; Monte, Manuel J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Vapour pressures of 1-methyl derivatives of benzimidazole, pyrazole and indole. • Enthalpies, entropies and Gibbs free energies of sublimation/vaporisation were derived. • Temperatures and enthalpies of fusion were determined. • Energy of the intermolecular hydrogen bond N-H⋯N was estimated. - Abstract: The vapour pressures of the liquid phase of 1-methylpyrazole, 1-methylbenzimidazole and 1-methylindole were measured over the temperature ranges (253.9 to 293.3) K, (303.2 to 372.5) K, and (268.6 to 341.9) K, respectively, using a static method. The vapour pressures of the crystalline phase of the two latter compounds were also measured at temperatures between (301.2 to 328.9) K and (267.6 to 275.5) K, respectively. The results obtained enabled the determination of the standard molar enthalpies and entropies of sublimation and of vaporisation at the mean temperatures of the measurements and at T = 298.15 K. The temperatures and molar enthalpies of fusion were determined using differential scanning calorimetry. The enthalpies of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds N-H⋯N in the crystalline phase of benzimidazole and pyrazole were determined and compared with the result previously determined for the energy of the intermolecular hydrogen bond in crystalline imidazole

  6. The effect of the intermolecular potential formulation on the state-selected energy exchange rate coefficients in N2-N2 collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnosov, Alexander; Cacciatore, Mario; Laganà, Antonio; Pirani, Fernando; Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Garcia, Ernesto

    2014-04-05

    The rate coefficients for N2-N2 collision-induced vibrational energy exchange (important for the enhancement of several modern innovative technologies) have been computed over a wide range of temperature. Potential energy surfaces based on different formulations of the intramolecular and intermolecular components of the interaction have been used to compute quasiclassically and semiclassically some vibrational to vibrational energy transfer rate coefficients. Related outcomes have been rationalized in terms of state-to-state probabilities and cross sections for quasi-resonant transitions and deexcitations from the first excited vibrational level (for which experimental information are available). On this ground, it has been possible to spot critical differences on the vibrational energy exchange mechanisms supported by the different surfaces (mainly by their intermolecular components) in the low collision energy regime, though still effective for temperatures as high as 10,000 K. It was found, in particular, that the most recently proposed intermolecular potential becomes the most effective in promoting vibrational energy exchange near threshold temperatures and has a behavior opposite to the previously proposed one when varying the coupling of vibration with the other degrees of freedom. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Intermolecular potential and rovibrational states of the H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avoird, Ad van der, E-mail: A.vanderAvoird@theochem.ru.nl [Theoretical Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Scribano, Yohann [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne-UMR 5209, CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Av. Alain Savary, B.P. 47870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Faure, Alexandre [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS, Institut de Planetologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble F-38041 (France); Weida, Miles J. [Daylight Solutions, 15378 Avenue of Science, San Diego, CA 92128 (United States); Fair, Joanna R. [Department of Radiology, MSC10 5530, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States); Nesbitt, David J. [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2012-05-03

    Graphical abstract: H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} potential surface and pH{sub 2}O-oD{sub 2} ground state wave function, for planar geometries. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The interaction between H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2} is of great astrophysical interest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The rovibrational states of H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} were computed on an ab initio potential surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results are compared with the rovibrational states of H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2} computed recently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured the high-resolution infrared spectrum of H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} in the H{sub 2}O bend region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Comparison with the calculations provides information on H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2} potential surface. - Abstract: A five-dimensional intermolecular potential for H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} was obtained from the full nine-dimensional ab initio potential surface of Valiron et al. [P. Valiron, M. Wernli, A. Faure, L. Wiesenfeld, C. Rist, S. Kedzuch, J. Noga, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008) 134306] by averaging over the ground state vibrational wave functions of H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}. On this five-dimensional potential with a well depth D{sub e} of 232.12 cm{sup -1} we calculated the bound rovibrational levels of H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} for total angular momentum J = 0-3. The method used to compute the rovibrational levels is similar to a scattering approach-it involves a basis of coupled free rotor wave functions for the hindered internal rotations and the overall rotation of the dimer-while it uses a discrete variable representation of the intermolecular distance coordinate R. The basis was adapted to the permutation symmetry associated with the para/ortho (p/o) nature of both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}, as well as to inversion symmetry. As expected, the H{sub 2}O-D{sub 2} dimer is more strongly bound than its H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2} isotopologue [cf. A. van der Avoird, D.J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 134 (2011) 044314], with dissociation energies D

  8. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Kurtis M. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States); Gorenstein, David G. [University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of NanoMedicine and Biomedical Engineering and Institute of Molecular Medicine (United States); Iwahara, Junji, E-mail: juiwahar@utmb.edu, E-mail: j.iwahara@utmb.edu [University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH{sub 3}{sup +} groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain {sup 15}N and DNA phosphorodithiaote {sup 31}P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well.

  9. A chemical approach for site-specific identification of NMR signals from protein side-chain NH3+ groups forming intermolecular ion pairs in protein–nucleic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Kurtis M.; Nguyen, Dan; Esadze, Alexandre; Zandrashvili, Levani; Gorenstein, David G.; Iwahara, Junji

    2015-01-01

    Protein–nucleic acid interactions involve intermolecular ion pairs of protein side-chain and DNA or RNA phosphate groups. Using three protein–DNA complexes, we demonstrate that site-specific oxygen-to-sulfur substitution in phosphate groups allows for identification of NMR signals from the protein side-chain NH 3 + groups forming the intermolecular ion pairs. A characteristic change in their 1 H and 15 N resonances upon this modification (i.e., substitution of phosphate to phosphorodithioate) can represent a signature of an intermolecular ion pair. Hydrogen-bond scalar coupling between protein side-chain 15 N and DNA phosphorodithiaote 31 P nuclei provides direct confirmation of the intermolecular ion pair. The same approach is likely applicable to protein–RNA complexes as well

  10. Microassembly by intermolecular forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, S.J.; White, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    The value of neutron and X-ray small-angle scattering for studying self assembly of molecular-sized units into interesting chemical and electrical structures is illustrated with three different types of system. The amphiphilic nature of a polyacetylene-polyisoprene [(CH) x PI] AB block copolymer and some of the structure arising from this are seen in neutron scattering from (CD) x PI solids and solutions. The action of template molecules in zeolite synthesis is discussed and template action of the tetrapropylammonium ion at room temperature in soluble silicate gels demonstrated. Finally, very large interplatelet spacings in clay sols are recorded using small-angle X-ray scattering and the swelling behaviour of these systems is characterized. Their usefulness for pillared clay synthesis is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Formative (measurement)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fassott, G.; Henseler, Jörg; Cooper, C.; Lee, N.; Farrell, A.

    2015-01-01

    When using measurement models with multiple indicators, researchers need to decide about the epistemic relationship between the latent variable and its indicators. In this article, we describe the nature, the estimation, the characteristics, and the validity assessment of formative measurement

  12. Ribonucleocapsid Formation of SARS-COV Through Molecular Action of the N-Terminal Domain of N Protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saikatendu, K.S.; Joseph, J.S.; Subramanian, V.; Neuman, B.W.; Buchmeier, M.J.; Stevens, R.C.; Kuhn, P.; /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-12

    Conserved amongst all coronaviruses are four structural proteins, the matrix (M), small envelope (E) and spike (S) that are embedded in the viral membrane and the nucleocapsid phosphoprotein (N), which exists in a ribonucleoprotein complex in their lumen. The N terminal domain of coronaviral N proteins (N-NTD) provides a scaffold for RNA binding while the C-terminal domain (N-CTD) mainly acts as oligomerization modules during assembly. The C-terminus of N protein anchors it to the viral membrane by associating with M protein. We characterized the structures of N-NTD from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in two crystal forms, at 1.17A (monoclinic) and 1.85 A (cubic) respectively, solved by molecular replacement using the homologous avian infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) structure. Flexible loops in the solution structure of SARS-CoV N-NTD are now shown to be well ordered around the beta-sheet core. The functionally important positively charged beta-hairpin protrudes out of the core and is oriented similar to that in the IBV N-NTD and is involved in crystal packing in the monoclinic form. In the cubic form, the monomers form trimeric units that stack in a helical array. Comparison of crystal packing of SARS-CoV and IBV N-NTDs suggest a common mode of RNA recognition, but probably associate differently in vivo during the formation of the ribonucleoprotein complex. Electrostatic potential distribution on the surface of homology models of related coronaviral N-NTDs hints that they employ different modes of both RNA recognition as well as oligomeric assembly, perhaps explaining why their nucleocapsids have different morphologies.

  13. Conformations and Intermolecular Interactions in Cellulose/Silk Fibroin Blend Films: A Solid-State NMR Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Donglin; Li, Tao; Zhang, Rongchun; Wu, Qiang; Chen, Tiehong; Sun, Pingchuan; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2017-06-29

    Fabricating materials with excellent mechanical performance from the natural renewable and degradable biopolymers has drawn significant attention in recent decades due to the environmental concerns and energy crisis. As two of the most promising substitutes of synthetic polymers, silk fibroin (SF), and cellulose, have been widely used in the field of textile, biomedicine, biotechnology, etc. Particularly, the cellulose/SF blend film exhibits better strength and toughness than that of regenerated cellulose film. Herein, this study is aimed to understand the molecular origin of the enhanced mechanical properties for the cellulose/SF blend film, using solid-state NMR as a main tool to investigate the conformational changes, intermolecular interactions between cellulose and SF and the water organization. It is found that the content of the β-sheet structure is increased in the cellulose/SF blend film with respect to the regenerated SF film, accompanied by the reduction of the content of random coil structures. In addition, the strong hydrogen bonding interaction between the SF and cellulose is clearly elucidated by the two-dimensional (2D) 1 H- 13 C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) NMR experiments, demonstrating that the SF and cellulose are miscible at the molecular level. Moreover, it is also found that the -NH groups of SF prefer to form hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl groups bonded to carbons C2 and C3 of cellulose, while the hydroxyl groups bonded to carbon C6 and the ether oxygen are less favorable for hydrogen bonding interactions with the -NH groups of SF. Interestingly, bound water is found to be present in the air-dried cellulose/SF blend film, which is predominantly associated with the cellulose backbones as determined by 2D 1 H- 13 C wide-line-separation (WISE) experiments with spin diffusion. This clearly reveals the presence of nanoheterogeneity in the cellulose/SF blend film, although cellulose and SF are miscible at a molecular level. Without doubt

  14. Calculation of intermolecular potentials for H2−H2 and H2−O2 dimers ab initio and prediction of second virial coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham Van, Tat; Deiters, Ulrich K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We construct the angular orientations of dimers H 2 −H 2 and H 2 −O 2 . • We calculate the ab initio intermolecular interaction energies for all built orientations. • Extrapolating the interaction energies to the complete basis set limit aug-cc-pV23Z. • We develop two 5-site ab initio intermolecular potentials of dimers H 2 −H 2 , H 2 −O 2 . • Calculating the virial coefficients of dimer H 2 −H 2 and H 2 −O 2 . - Abstract: The intermolecular interaction potentials of the dimers H 2 −H 2 and H 2 −O 2 were calculated from quantum mechanics, using coupled-cluster theory CCSD(T) and correlation-consistent basis sets aug-cc-pVmZ (m = 2, 3); the results were extrapolated to the basis set limit aug-cc-pV23Z. The interaction energies were corrected for the basis set superposition error with the counterpoise scheme. For comparison also Møller–Plesset perturbation theory (at levels 2–4) with the basis sets aug-cc-pVTZ were considered, but the results proved inferior. The quantum mechanical results were used to construct analytical pair potential functions. From these functions the second virial coefficients of hydrogen and the cross virial coefficients of the hydrogen–oxygen system were obtained by integration; in both cases corrections for quantum effects were included. The results agree well with experimental data, if available, or with empirical correlations

  15. Nitroxide stable radicals interacting as Lewis bases in hydrogen bonds: A search in the Cambridge structural data base for intermolecular contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Elguero, Eric

    2017-11-01

    1125 X-ray structures of nitroxide free radicals presenting intermolecular hydrogen bonds have been reported in the Cambridge Structural Database. We will report in this paper a qualitative and quantitative analysis of these bonds. The observation in some plots of an excluded region was statistically analyzed using convex hull and kernel smooting methodologies. A theoretical study at the MP2 level with different basis has been carried out indicating that the nitronyl nitroxide radicals (five electrons) lie just in between nitroso compounds (four electrons) and amine N-oxides (six electrons) as far as hydrogen-bond basicity is concerned.

  16. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including...... an overview of cement production, selected cement properties, and clinker phase relations. An extended summary of laboratory-scale investigations on clinkerization reactions, the most important reactions in cement production, is provided. Clinker formations by solid state reactions, solid−liquid and liquid......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  17. Star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Theoretical models of star formation are discussed beginning with the earliest stages and ending in the formation of rotating, self-gravitating disks or rings. First a model of the implosion of very diffuse gas clouds is presented which relies upon a shock at the edge of a galactic spiral arm to drive the implosion. Second, models are presented for the formation of a second generation of massive stars in such a cloud once a first generation has formed. These models rely on the ionizing radiation from massive stars or on the supernova shocks produced when these stars explode. Finally, calculations of the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds are discussed with special focus on the question of whether rotating disks or rings are the result of such a collapse. 65 references

  18. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof...... is important, since it helps constraining chemical evolution models at high redshift. A new project studying how the population of galaxies hosting GRBs relate to other galaxy population is outlined in the conclusion of this thesis. The core of this project will be to quantify how the stellar mass function...

  19. Comet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  20. Synthesis and studies on structural, optical and nonlinear optical properties of novel organic inter-molecular compounds: 4-chloro-3-nitroaniline-3-hydroxy benzaldehyde and urea-4-dimethylaminopyridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Priyanka; Rai, R. N.

    2018-05-01

    Two novel organic inter-molecular compounds (IMCs), (3-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenylimino) methyl) phenol) (CNMP) and urea ̶ 4-dimethylaminopyridine complex (UDMAP), have been synthesized by solid state reaction. These two IMCs were identified by phase diagram study of CNA-HB and U-DMAP systems. The single crystals of newly obtained IMCs were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique at room temperature. Both the IMCs were further studied for their thermal, spectral, single crystal XRD for their atomic packing in molecule, crystallinity, optical and nonlinear optical behaviour. In both the cases, melting point of inter-molecular compounds was found to be higher than that of their parent components, CNMP was found to be thermally stable up to 158 °C while UDMAP was stable up to 144 °C, which indicate their extra stability than their parents. The single crystal XRD studies confirmed that CNMP has crystallized in orthorhombic unit cell with non-centrosymmetric space group P212121 while UDMAP has crystallized in monoclinic unit cell with centrosymmetric space group C2/c. The absorption spectrum of CNMP was found to be in between the absorption of parents, while broadening of peak and red shift was observed in UDMAP as compared to the parents. Second order nonlinear optical property of CNMP and UDMAP was studied using Kurtz Perry powder technique and intense green light emission was observed with CNMP on excitation with 1064 nm of Nd:YAG laser while no emission was observed with UDMAP.

  1. Transport properties in mixtures involving carbon dioxide at low and moderate density: test of several intermolecular potential energies and comparison with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadasi, Jalil; Yousefi, Fakhri; Papari, Mohammad Mehdi; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Mohsenipour, Ali Asghar

    2009-09-01

    It is the purpose of this paper to extract unlike intermolecular potential energies of five carbon dioxide-based binary gas mixtures including CO2-He, CO2-Ne, CO2-Ar, CO2-Kr, and CO2-Xe from viscosity data and compare the calculated potentials with other models potential energy reported in literature. Then, dilute transport properties consisting of viscosity, diffusion coefficient, thermal diffusion factor, and thermal conductivity of aforementioned mixtures are calculated from the calculated potential energies and compared with literature data. Rather accurate correlations for the viscosity coefficient of afore-cited mixtures embracing the temperature range 200 K < T < 3273.15 K is reproduced from the present unlike intermolecular potentials energy. Our estimated accuracies for the viscosity are to within ±2%. In addition, the calculated potential energies are used to present smooth correlations for other transport properties. The accuracies of the binary diffusion coefficients are of the order of ±3%. Finally, the unlike interaction energy and the calculated low density viscosity have been employed to calculate high density viscosities using Vesovic-Wakeham method.

  2. Transport properties in mixtures involving carbon dioxide at low and moderate density: test of several intermolecular potential energies and comparison with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moghadasi, Jalil; Yousefi, Fakhri [Shiraz University, Department of Chemistry, Shiraz (Iran); Papari, Mohammad Mehdi; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali [Shiraz University of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Shiraz (Iran); Mohsenipour, Ali Asghar [University of Waterloo, Department of Chemical Engineering, Waterloo (Canada)

    2009-09-15

    It is the purpose of this paper to extract unlike intermolecular potential energies of five carbon dioxide-based binary gas mixtures including CO{sub 2}-He, CO{sub 2}-Ne, CO{sub 2}-Ar, CO{sub 2}-Kr, and CO{sub 2}-Xe from viscosity data and compare the calculated potentials with other models potential energy reported in literature. Then, dilute transport properties consisting of viscosity, diffusion coefficient, thermal diffusion factor, and thermal conductivity of aforementioned mixtures are calculated from the calculated potential energies and compared with literature data. Rather accurate correlations for the viscosity coefficient of afore-cited mixtures embracing the temperature range 200 Kintermolecular potentials energy. Our estimated accuracies for the viscosity are to within {+-}2%. In addition, the calculated potential energies are used to present smooth correlations for other transport properties. The accuracies of the binary diffusion coefficients are of the order of {+-}3%. Finally, the unlike interaction energy and the calculated low density viscosity have been employed to calculate high density viscosities using Vesovic-Wakeham method. (orig.)

  3. Vibrational Spectra of β″-Type BEDT-TTF Salts: Relationship between Conducting Property, Time-Averaged Site Charge and Inter-Molecular Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yamamoto

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the conducting behavior and the degree of charge fluctuation in the β″-type BEDT-TTF salts is reviewed from the standpoints of vibrational spectroscopy and crystal structure. A group of β″-type ET salts demonstrates the best model compounds for achieving the above relationship because the two-dimensional structure is simple and great diversity in conducting behavior is realized under ambient pressure. After describing the requirement for the model compound, the methodology for analyzing the results of the vibrational spectra is presented. Vibrational spectroscopy provides the time-averaged molecular charge, the charge distribution in the two-dimensional layer, and the inter-molecular interactions, etc. The experimental results applied to 2/3-filled and 3/4-filled β″-type ET salts are reported. These experimental results suggest that the conducting property, the difference in the time-averaged molecular charges between the ionic and neutral-like sites, the alternation in the inter-molecular distances and the energy levels in the charge distributions are relevant to one another. The difference in the time-averaged molecular charges, ∆ρ, is a useful criterion for indicating conducting behavior. All superconductors presented in this review are characterized as small but finite ∆ρ.

  4. Unambiguous Determination of Intermolecular Hydrogen Bond of NMR Structure by Molecular Dynamics Refinement Using All-Atom Force Field and Implicit Solvent Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jee, Jun Goo

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that AMD refinement is very useful for defining an intermolecular hydrogen bond in NMR structure calculation. The refined structure also provides a clue for explaining the pH dependence in Ub and UIM complexes. As reported by Choi et al., serine-mediated hydrogen bonds are the third most populated hydrogen bonds found in protein-protein intermolecular interactions, after the backbone-backbone and backbone-aspartate ones. The abundance imposes the requirement of an method to determine the interface of protein-protein complexes. The precise geometry is particularly important in the complex structures between Ub and UBDs. Ub recognizes various targets with the same surface, where both hydrophobic and hydrophobic interactions are involved. Hence, the details of the hydrophilic interactions are necessary to find the common binding modes. The structure determination of a biomolecule by NMR depends heavily on the distance restraints derived by the NOE cross peaks that are observed between two protons within 6 A through space. Therefore, the existence of the NOE peaks and their correct assignments to two corresponding protons are essential for an accurate and precise structure determination. Recent developments of NOE assignment and calculation algorithms have enabled the determination of protein 3D structures without any manual interpretation, provided chemical shifts are assigned in most atoms and sufficient NOE peaks exist. Along with these advances, the necessity of determining complicated structures such as complexes is increasing

  5. Intra- versus Intermolecular Hydrogen Bonding: Solvent-Dependent Conformational Preferences of a Common Supramolecular Binding Motif from 1 H NMR and Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarque, Daniel P; Merten, Christian

    2017-12-19

    When predicting binding properties of small molecules or larger supramolecular aggregates, intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonds are often considered the most important factor. Spectroscopic techniques such as 1 H NMR spectroscopy are typically utilized to characterize such binding events, but interpretation is often qualitative and follows chemical intuition. In this study, we compare the effects of intramolecular hydrogen bonding and solvation on two chiral 2,6-pyridinediyl-dialkylamides. In comparison with 1 H NMR spectroscopy, vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy proved to be more sensitive to conformational changes. In fact, the change of the solvent from CDCl 3 to [D 6 ]DMSO generates mirror-image VCD spectra for the same enantiomer. Here, the common sense that the sterically less hindered group is more prone to solvation proved to be wrong according predicted VCD spectra, which clearly show that both asymmetric amide hydrogens are equally likely to be solvated, but never simultaneously. The competition between intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding and their importance for a correct prediction of spectral properties are discussed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Gibb's energy and intermolecular free length of 'Borassus Flabellifier' (BF) and Adansonia digitata (AnD) aqueous binary mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phadke, Sushil; Shrivastava, Bhakt Darshan; Ujle, S K; Mishra, Ashutosh; Dagaonkar, N

    2014-01-01

    One of the potential driving forces behind a chemical reaction is favourable a new quantity known as the Gibbs free energy (G) of the system, which reflects the balance between these forces. Ultrasonic velocity and absorption measurements in liquids and liquid mixtures find extensive application to study the nature of intermolecular forces. Ultrasonic velocity measurements have been successfully employed to detect weak and strong molecular interactions present in binary and ternary liquid mixtures. After measuring the density and ultrasonic velocity of aqueous solution of 'Borassus Flabellifier' BF and Adansonia digitata And, we calculated Gibb's energy and intermolecular free length. The velocity of ultrasonic waves was measured, using a multi-frequency ultrasonic interferometer with a high degree of accuracy operating Model M-84 by M/s Mittal Enterprises, New Delhi, at a fixed frequency of 2 MHz. Natural sample 'Borassus Flabellifier' BF fruit pulp and Adansonia digitata AnD powder was collected from Dhar, District of MP, India for this study.

  7. Crystal structures of 4-chloropyridine-2-carbonitrile and 6-chloropyridine-2-carbonitrile exhibit different intermolecular π-stacking, C—H...Nnitrile and C—H...Npyridine interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Montgomery

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The two title compounds are isomers of C6H3ClN2 containing a pyridine ring, a nitrile group, and a chloro substituent. The molecules of each compound pack together in the solid state with offset face-to-face π-stacking, and intermolecular C—H...Nnitrile and C—H...Npyridine interactions. 4-Chloropyridine-2-carbonitrile, (I, exhibits pairwise centrosymmetric head-to-head C—H...Nnitrile and C—H...Npyridine interactions, forming one-dimensional chains, which are π-stacked in an offset face-to-face fashion. The intermolecular packing of the isomeric 6-chloropyridine-2-carbonitrile, (II, which differs only in the position of the chloro substituent on the pyridine ring, exhibits head-to-tail C—H...Nnitrile and C—H...Npyridine interactions, forming two-dimensional sheets which are π-stacked in an offset face-to-face fashion. In contrast to (I, the offset face-to-face π-stacking in (II is formed between molecules with alternating orientations of the chloro and nitrile substituents.

  8. Effect of intermolecular cohesion on coal liquefaction. 3. Reactivity of oxygen methylated coal; Sekitan teibunshika hanno ni okeru bunshikan gyoshuryoku no koka. 3. O-methyl ka tan no hanno tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, M.; Nagaishi, H.; Yoshida, T. [Hokkaido National Industrial Research Institute, Sapporo (Japan)

    1996-10-28

    The reactivity of oxygen methylated coal was studied to control hydrogen bond in bituminous coal liquefaction and intermolecular cohesion such as van der Waals force. In experiment, crushed and dried Illinois coal of 100mesh or less was used as specimen, and oxygen methylated coal was prepared by Liotta`s method using tetrabutylammonium halide. Coal liquefaction was conducted in an electromagnetic agitation autoclave using tetralin solvent under initial hydrogen pressure of 100kg/cm{sup 2} while heating. The molecular weight distribution of the products obtained was measured by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) analysis. The experimental results are as follows. The effect of intermolecular cohesion in bituminous coal on the reactivity is mainly derived from decomposing reaction from preasphaltene to oil. Yields of oil fraction by methylation increase corresponding to release of intermolecular cohesion. Since the thermal release is promoted with temperature rise, the difference in yield due to different treatments decreases. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, Morris

    2018-04-01

    Modern observational techniques are still not powerful enough to directly view planet formation, and so it is necessary to rely on theory. However, observations do give two important clues to the formation process. The first is that the most primitive form of material in interstellar space exists as a dilute gas. Some of this gas is unstable against gravitational collapse, and begins to contract. Because the angular momentum of the gas is not zero, it contracts along the spin axis, but remains extended in the plane perpendicular to that axis, so that a disk is formed. Viscous processes in the disk carry most of the mass into the center where a star eventually forms. In the process, almost as a by-product, a planetary system is formed as well. The second clue is the time required. Young stars are indeed observed to have gas disks, composed mostly of hydrogen and helium, surrounding them, and observations tell us that these disks dissipate after about 5 to 10 million years. If planets like Jupiter and Saturn, which are very rich in hydrogen and helium, are to form in such a disk, they must accrete their gas within 5 million years of the time of the formation of the disk. Any formation scenario one proposes must produce Jupiter in that time, although the terrestrial planets, which don't contain significant amounts of hydrogen and helium, could have taken longer to build. Modern estimates for the formation time of the Earth are of the order of 100 million years. To date there are two main candidate theories for producing Jupiter-like planets. The core accretion (CA) scenario supposes that any solid materials in the disk slowly coagulate into protoplanetary cores with progressively larger masses. If the core remains small enough it won't have a strong enough gravitational force to attract gas from the surrounding disk, and the result will be a terrestrial planet. If the core grows large enough (of the order of ten Earth masses), and the disk has not yet dissipated, then

  10. Influence of Philosamia ricini silk fibroin components on morphology, secondary structure and thermal properties of chitosan biopolymer film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasong, S; Nuanchai, K; Wilaiwan, S

    2009-09-15

    This study aimed to prepare Eri (Philosamia ricini) Silk Fibroin (SF)/chitosan (CS) blend films by a solvent evaporation method and to compare the blend films with both native SF and CS films. Influence of SF ratios on the morphology, secondary structure and thermal decomposition of the CS blend films were investigated. The native SF and CS films were uniform and homogeneous without phase separation. For the blend films, the uniform can be found less than 60% of SF composition. All of SF/CS blend films showed both SF and CS characteristics. FT-IR results showed that the blend films composed of both random coil and beta-sheet with predominant of beta-sheet form. Interaction of intermolecular between SF and CS have occurred which were measured by thermogravimetric thermograms. Increasing of SF contents was leading to the increase of beta-sheet structures which were enhanced the thermal stability of the CS blend films.

  11. Modeling the effect of intermolecular force on the size-dependent pull-in behavior of beam-type NEMS using modified couple stress theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beni, Yaghoub Tadi; Karimipour, Iman [Shahrekord University, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abadyan, Mohamadreza [Islamic Azad University, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    Experimental observations reveal that the physical response of nano structures is size-dependent. Herein, modified couple stress theory has been used to study the effect of intermolecular van der Waals force on the size dependent pull-in of nano bridges and nano cantilevers. Three approaches including using differential transformation method, applying numerical method and developing a simple lumped parameter model have been employed to solve the governing equation of the systems. The pull-in parameters i.e. critical tip deflection and instability voltage of the nano structures have been determined. Effect of the van der Waals attraction and the size dependency and the importance of coupling between them on the pull-in performance have been discussed.

  12. Electronic Mechanisms of Intra and Intermolecular J Couplings in Systems with C-H···O Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio N. Cavasotto

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Correlation effects on the change of 1J(CH couplings in model systems I:NCH...H2O and II:CH4...H2O as a function of the H...O distance are discussed. RPA and SOPPA results follow a similar trend in system II. In system I RPA values decrease monotonously as the H...O distance decreases, while SOPPA ones exhibit flat maximum near equilibrium. Such different behavior is ascribed to the π-transmitted component. Intermolecular couplings at the equilibrium geometry of I are analyzed by means of the CLOPPA approach. The larger absolute value of 2hJ(CO compared to 1hJ(HO is found to arise from contributions involving a vacant LMO localized in the C-H...O moiety.

  13. Data in support of intermolecular interactions at early stage of protein/detergent particle association induced by salt/polyethylene glycol mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Odahara

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The data provide information in support of the research article, “Intermolecular interactions at early stage of protein/detergent particle association induced by salt/polyethylene glycol mixtures” [1]. The data regarding variation of absorption spectra is used as an indicator of the duration of Rp. viridis PRU and RC, Rb. sphaeroides RC and LH2, and Rb. capsulatus LH2 in the native state in the presence of NaCl/polyethylene glycol (PEG mixture. The data about minimum concentrations of salt and PEG whose aqueous phases are mutually separated presents information on additional influence of Tris buffer and N-octyl-β-d-glucoside on the salt–PEG phase separation.

  14. Modeling the effect of intermolecular force on the size-dependent pull-in behavior of beam-type NEMS using modified couple stress theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beni, Yaghoub Tadi; Karimipour, Iman; Abadyan, Mohamadreza

    2014-01-01

    Experimental observations reveal that the physical response of nano structures is size-dependent. Herein, modified couple stress theory has been used to study the effect of intermolecular van der Waals force on the size dependent pull-in of nano bridges and nano cantilevers. Three approaches including using differential transformation method, applying numerical method and developing a simple lumped parameter model have been employed to solve the governing equation of the systems. The pull-in parameters i.e. critical tip deflection and instability voltage of the nano structures have been determined. Effect of the van der Waals attraction and the size dependency and the importance of coupling between them on the pull-in performance have been discussed.

  15. Ab initio study of the CO-N2 complex: a new highly accurate intermolecular potential energy surface and rovibrational spectrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cybulski, Hubert; Henriksen, Christian; Dawes, Richard

    2018-01-01

    A new, highly accurate ab initio ground-state intermolecular potential-energy surface (IPES) for the CO-N2 complex is presented. Thousands of interaction energies calculated with the CCSD(T) method and Dunning's aug-cc-pVQZ basis set extended with midbond functions were fitted to an analytical...... function. The global minimum of the potential is characterized by an almost T-shaped structure and has an energy of -118.2 cm-1. The symmetry-adapted Lanczos algorithm was used to compute rovibrational energies (up to J = 20) on the new IPES. The RMSE with respect to experiment was found to be on the order...... of 0.038 cm-1 which confirms the very high accuracy of the potential. This level of agreement is among the best reported in the literature for weakly bound systems and considerably improves on those of previously published potentials....

  16. Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Longair, Malcolm S

    2008-01-01

    This second edition of Galaxy Formation is an up-to-date text on astrophysical cosmology, expounding the structure of the classical cosmological models from a contemporary viewpoint. This forms the background to a detailed study of the origin of structure and galaxies in the Universe. The derivations of many of the most important results are derived by simple physical arguments which illuminate the results of more advanced treatments. A very wide range of observational data is brought to bear upon these problems, including the most recent results from WMAP, the Hubble Space Telescope, galaxy surveys like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, studies of Type 1a supernovae, and many other observations.

  17. Galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gribbin, J.

    1979-01-01

    The current debate on the origin and evolution of galaxies is reviewed and evidence to support the so-called 'isothermal' and 'adiabatic' fluctuation models considered. It is shown that new theories have to explain the formation of both spiral and elliptical galaxies and the reason for their differences. It is stated that of the most recent models the best indicates that rotating spiral galaxies are formed naturally when gas concentrates in the centre of a great halo and forms stars while ellipticals are explained by later interactions between spiral galaxies and merging, which can cancel out the rotation while producing an elliptical galaxy in which the stars, coming from two original galaxies, follow very elliptical, anisotropic orbits. (UK)

  18. Habit formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kyle S; Graybiel, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network.

  19. Habit formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kyle S.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  20. Radiation Induced Formation of Acrylated Palm Oil Nanoparticles using Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide Microemulsion System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rida Tajau; Rida Tajau; Wan Mohd Zin Wan Yunus

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report the preparation of Acrylated Palm Oil (APO) nanoparticles using aqueous Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) microemulsion system. This microemulsion system which contains the dispersed APO nano droplets was subjected to the gamma irradiation to induce the formation of the crosslinked APO nanoparticle. After irradiation at higher doses, the size of APO nanoparticles was transformed from a submicron-sized to a nano-sized of the particles. Size decreasing might be due to the intermolecular and the intramolecular crosslinking reactions of the APO nanoparticles during the irradiation process. (author)

  1. Ligand field and intermolecular interactions tuning the magnetic properties of spin-crossover Fe(II) polymer with 4,4′-bipyridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yang-Hui; Liu, Qing-Ling; Yang, Li-Jing; Ling, Yang; Wang, Wei; Sun, Bai-Wang, E-mail: chmsunbw@seu.edu.cn

    2015-02-15

    A new spin crossover coordination polymer (SCO-CPs) of Fe(II)-4,4′-bipyridine (4,4′-bipy) family: (Fe(4,4′-bipy){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2})·(4,4′-bipy)· 8(H{sub 2}O)·2(ClO{sub 4}) (3), which displays half spin transitions between 100 and 300 K, has been synthesized and structurally characterized. Compound 3 featured with two-dimensional (2-D) grids connected by hydrogen bonds and π…π packing between one-dimensional (1-D) chains, the 2-D grids expand to three-dimensional (3-D) architecture supported by a “S-shaped holder” involving lattice 4-4′-bipy, water molecules and perchlorate anion. We compared 3 with the other two analogous complexes: ((Fe(4,4′-bipy) (H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (NCS){sub 2})·4,4′-bipy, 1 and (Fe(4,4′-bipy){sub 2}(NCS){sub 2})·mSolv, 2) through Hirshfeld surfaces analysis, which revealed that the low ligand field strength (NCS{sup −}) and lone-pair…H contacts contribute to the stabilization of HS (high-spin) state of the Fe(II) ion, while the high ligand field strength (4,4′-bipy) and strong intermolecular contacts (hydrogen bonds and π…π packing interactions) make for the LS (low-spin) state. - Highlights: ●A new member of Fe(||)-4,4′-bipy family has been prepared. ●It displays half spin transitions tuned by ligand field and intermolecular interactions. ●We have made a detailed comparison of this new member with two other analogous complexes.

  2. Insight into the intermolecular recognition mechanism between Keap1 and IKKβ combining homology modelling, protein-protein docking, molecular dynamics simulations and virtual alanine mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Yu Jiang

    Full Text Available Degradation of certain proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is a common strategy taken by the key modulators responsible for stress responses. Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1(Keap1, a substrate adaptor component of the Cullin3 (Cul3-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complex, mediates the ubiquitination of two key modulators, NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 and IκB kinase β (IKKβ, which are involved in the redox control of gene transcription. However, compared to the Keap1-Nrf2 protein-protein interaction (PPI, the intermolecular recognition mechanism of Keap1 and IKKβ has been poorly investigated. In order to explore the binding pattern between Keap1 and IKKβ, the PPI model of Keap1 and IKKβ was investigated. The structure of human IKKβ was constructed by means of the homology modeling method and using reported crystal structure of Xenopus laevis IKKβ as the template. A protein-protein docking method was applied to develop the Keap1-IKKβ complex model. After the refinement and visual analysis of docked proteins, the chosen pose was further optimized through molecular dynamics simulations. The resulting structure was utilized to conduct the virtual alanine mutation for the exploration of hot-spots significant for the intermolecular interaction. Overall, our results provided structural insights into the PPI model of Keap1-IKKβ and suggest that the substrate specificity of Keap1 depend on the interaction with the key tyrosines, namely Tyr525, Tyr574 and Tyr334. The study presented in the current project may be useful to design molecules that selectively modulate Keap1. The selective recognition mechanism of Keap1 with IKKβ or Nrf2 will be helpful to further know the crosstalk between NF-κB and Nrf2 signaling.

  3. CP/MAS 13C NMR characterization of the isomeric states and intermolecular packing in tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum(III) (Alq3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Hironori; Kusaka, Yasunari; Onoyama, Goro; Horii, Fumitaka

    2006-04-05

    The isomeric states and intermolecular packing of tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum(III) (Alq(3)) in the alpha-, gamma-, and delta-crystalline forms and in the amorphous state, which are important for understanding the light-emitting and electron-transport properties, have been analyzed by CP/MAS (13)C NMR. This simple NMR experiment shows that the isomeric state of alpha- and amorphous Alq(3) is meridional, whereas that of gamma- and delta-Alq(3) is facial. In the amorphous Alq(3), the inclusion of facial isomers has been under debate. Our experiments show that meridional isomers are dominant in the amorphous Alq(3), although the existence of facial isomers cannot be completely denied. The local structure of amorphous Alq(3) is similar to that of alpha-Alq(3) and is significantly different from those of gamma- and delta-Alq(3). Among these Alq(3) samples, the effect of intermolecular interaction is not found only for gamma-Alq(3). This finding can explain the good solvent solubility of gamma-Alq(3), compared with the other crystalline forms. It is also shown that the structures are locally disordered not only for amorphous Alq(3) but also for alpha-Alq(3), although clear X-ray diffraction peaks are observed for alpha-Alq(3). In contrast, the local structures of gamma- and delta-Alq(3) are well defined. A clear relation is found between the spectral patterns of CP/MAS (13)C NMR and the fluorescence wavelengths; the samples, which consist of facial isomers, show blue-shifted fluorescence compared with those of meridionals.

  4. Infrared, diode laser spectroscopy of the Ar--N2O complex: Observation of the intermolecular bending mode in combination with the highest frequency intramolecular stretching mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, T.A.; Chappell, E.L.; Sharpe, S.W.

    1993-01-01

    Rotationally resolved vibrational spectra consisting of a-type transitions have been observed for the low-frequency, intermolecular bending mode in combination with the highest frequency, intramolecular stretching mode of Ar--N 2 O. Analysis of the spectral data places the origin of the combination band at 2256.1 cm -1 while the origin of the intramolecular stretching fundamental is at 2223.9 cm -1 . The difference between these two origins is approximately 32.2 cm -1 and agrees well with our calculated frequency of 31.5 cm -1 for the intermolecular bending mode, which was obtained by analysis of the centrifugal distortion constants. In addition, argon--nitrous oxide exhibits an anomalously large inertial defect of 10.96 amu A 2 in the combination state. This indicates a breakdown in the assumption of separation between vibration and rotation. While much of the inertial defect in the ground state can be accounted for by including Coriolis interactions, that occurring in the combination state is only partially accounted for by a similar analysis. Small, but significant changes, are observed in both the radial and angular parameters for Ar--N 2 O when going from the ground to the combination state, indicating large amplitude motion. The combination band is approximately 200 times less intense than the high-frequency, stretching fundamental of Ar--N 2 O. In addition, over 400 new rovibrational transitions are assigned to the previously observed 1 0 1 intramolecular stretching fundamental of the complex, and the subsequent rotational analysis is found to be in close agreement with earlier studies. Data were taken on a newly built, rapid-scan, diode laser spectrometer that incorporates a 12 cmx200 μm pulsed slit-expansion nozzle

  5. Character of intermolecular interaction in pyridine-argon complex: Ab initio potential energy surface, internal dynamics, and interrelations between SAPT energy components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarewicz, Jan, E-mail: jama@amu.edu.pl; Shirkov, Leonid [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89b, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2016-05-28

    The pyridine-Ar (PAr) van der Waals (vdW) complex is studied using a high level ab initio method. Its structure, binding energy, and intermolecular vibrational states are determined from the analytical potential energy surface constructed from interaction energy (IE) values computed at the coupled cluster level of theory with single, double, and perturbatively included triple excitations with the augmented correlation consistent polarized valence double-ζ (aug-cc-pVDZ) basis set complemented by midbond functions. The structure of the complex at its global minimum with Ar at a distance of 3.509 Å from the pyridine plane and shifted by 0.218 Å from the center of mass towards nitrogen agrees well with the corresponding equilibrium structure derived previously from the rotational spectrum of PAr. The PAr binding energy D{sub e} of 392 cm{sup −1} is close to that of 387 cm{sup −1} calculated earlier at the same ab initio level for the prototypical benzene-Ar (BAr) complex. However, under an extension of the basis set, D{sub e} for PAr becomes slightly lower than D{sub e} for BAr. The ab initio vdW vibrational energy levels allow us to estimate the reliability of the methods for the determination of the vdW fundamentals from the rotational spectra. To disclose the character of the intermolecular interaction in PAr, the symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT) is employed for the analysis of different physical contributions to IE. It is found that SAPT components of IE can be approximately expressed in the binding region by only two of them: the exchange repulsion and dispersion energy. The total induction effect is negligible. The interrelations between various SAPT components found for PAr are fulfilled for a few other complexes involving aromatic molecules and Ar or Ne, which indicates that they are valid for all rare gas (Rg) atoms and aromatics.

  6. Effect of secondary structure on the interactions of peptide T4 LYS (11-36) in mixtures of aqueous sodium chloride and 2,2,2,-Trifluoroethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Camille O.; Spiegelberg, Susanne; Prausnitz, John M.; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2001-10-01

    The potential of mean force for protein-protein interactions is key to the development of a statistical-mechanical model for salt-induced protein precipitation and crystallization, and for understanding certain disease states, including cataract formation and {beta}-amyloid pathology in Alzheimer's disease. Fluorescence anisotropy provides a method for quantitative characterization of intermolecular interactions due to reversible association. Monomer-dimer equilibria for the peptide T4 LYS(11-36) were studied by fluorescence anisotropy. This peptide, derived from the {beta}-sheet region of the T4 lysozyme molecule, has the potential to form amyloid fibrils. 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol (TFE) induces a change in peptide secondary structure, and was used in aqueous solutions at concentrations from 0 to 50% (v/v) at 25 and 37 C to examine the role of peptide conformation on peptide-peptide interactions. The association constant for dimerization increased with rising TFE concentration and with falling temperature. The peptide-peptide potential of mean force was computed from these association constants. Circular-dichroism measurements showed that the secondary structure of the peptide plays an important role in these strong attractive interactions due to intermolecular hydrogen-bond formation and hydrophobic interactions.

  7. Molecular characterization and intermolecular interaction of coat protein of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus: implications for virus assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshrestha, Saurabh; Hallan, Vipin; Sharma, Anshul; Seth, Chandrika Attri; Chauhan, Anjali; Zaidi, Aijaz Asghar

    2013-09-01

    Coat protein (CP) and RNA3 from Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV-rose), the most prevalent virus infecting rose in India, were characterized and regions in the coat protein important for self-interaction, during dimer formation were identified. The sequence analysis of CP and partial RNA 3 revealed that the rose isolate of PNRSV in India belongs to PV-32 group of PNRSV isolates. Apart from the already established group specific features of PV-32 group member's additional group-specific and host specific features were also identified. Presence of methionine at position 90 in the amino acid sequence alignment of PNRSV CP gene (belonging to PV-32 group) was identified as the specific conserved feature for the rose isolates of PNRSV. As protein-protein interaction plays a vital role in the infection process, an attempt was made to identify the portions of PNRSV CP responsible for self-interaction using yeast two-hybrid system. It was found (after analysis of the deletion clones) that the C-terminal region of PNRSV CP (amino acids 153-226) plays a vital role in this interaction during dimer formation. N-terminal of PNRSV CP is previously known to be involved in CP-RNA interactions, but our results also suggested that N-terminal of PNRSV CP represented by amino acids 1-77 also interacts with C-terminal (amino acids 153-226) in yeast two-hybrid system, suggesting its probable involvement in the CP-CP interaction.

  8. Satellite hole formation during dewetting: experiment and simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neto, Chiara; Jacobs, Karin; Seemann, Ralf; Blossey, Ralf; Becker, Juergen; Gruen, Guenther

    2003-01-01

    The dewetting of thin polymer films on solid substrates has been studied extensively in recent years. These films can decay either by nucleation events or by spinodal dewetting, essentially only depending on the interface potential describing the short- and long-range intermolecular interactions between the interfaces and the initial film thickness. Here, we describe experiments and simulations concerned with the decay of polystyrene thin films. The rupture of the film occurs by the formation of a correlated pattern of holes ('satellite holes') along the liquid rims accumulating at the channel borders. The development of this complex film rupture process, which is neither simply spinodal nor nucleation dewetting, can be mimicked precisely by making use of a novel simulation code based on a rigorous mathematical treatment of the thin film equation and on the knowledge of the effective interface potential of the system. The conditions that determine the appearance and the position of the satellite holes around pre-existing holes are discussed

  9. Satellite hole formation during dewetting: experiment and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, C; Seemann, R; Blossey, R; Becker, J; Grün, G

    2003-01-01

    The dewetting of thin polymer films on solid substrates has been studied extensively in recent years. These films can decay either by nucleation events or by spinodal dewetting, essentially only depending on the interface potential describing the short- and long-range intermolecular interactions between the interfaces and the initial film thickness. Here, we describe experiments and simulations concerned with the decay of polystyrene thin films. The rupture of the film occurs by the formation of a correlated pattern of holes ('satellite holes') along the liquid rims accumulating at the channel borders. The development of this complex film rupture process, which is neither simply spinodal nor nucleation dewetting, can be mimicked precisely by making use of a novel simulation code based on a rigorous mathematical treatment of the thin film equation and on the knowledge of the effective interface potential of the system. The conditions that determine the appearance and the position of the satellite holes around ...

  10. Defining the contributions of permanent electrostatics, Pauli repulsion, and dispersion in density functional theory calculations of intermolecular interaction energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, Paul R., E-mail: prhorn@berkeley.edu; Mao, Yuezhi; Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Kenneth S. Pitzer Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Chemical Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-03-21

    In energy decomposition analysis of Kohn-Sham density functional theory calculations, the so-called frozen (or pre-polarization) interaction energy contains contributions from permanent electrostatics, dispersion, and Pauli repulsion. The standard classical approach to separate them suffers from several well-known limitations. We introduce an alternative scheme that employs valid antisymmetric electronic wavefunctions throughout and is based on the identification of individual fragment contributions to the initial supersystem wavefunction as determined by an energetic optimality criterion. The density deformations identified with individual fragments upon formation of the initial supersystem wavefunction are analyzed along with the distance dependence of the new and classical terms for test cases that include the neon dimer, ammonia borane, water-Na{sup +}, water-Cl{sup −}, and the naphthalene dimer.

  11. Theoretical study of the possibility of glycin with thiotriazoline complexes formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Kucherenko

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain strokes are widely spread all over the world and are among the most dangerous for the population. Often it leads to death, complete or partial loss of ability to work. The correction of imbalance of Excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitter systems by activation of natural inhibitory processes is a promising direction of primary neuroprotection in cerebral ischemia. Particular attention is drawn to the natural inhibitory neurotransmitter – glycine and its role in the mechanisms of acute cerebral ischemia. There are data on the ability of the thiotriazoline antioxidant to potentiate the therapeutic effect of neurometabolic cerebroprotectors. Therefore, the creation of new combined preparation based on glycine with thiotriazoline is important today. Objective: to study the structure, and estimate the energy of formation and geometric characteristics of the intermolecular hydrogen bonds for complexes which are formed with glycine, 3-methyl-1,2,4-triazolyl-5-thioacetate (MTTA and morpholine. Method of calculation. The initial approximation to the structure of the complexes was obtained with the help of molecular docking procedure using the AutoDock Vina program. The resulting three-component complexes were preliminarily optimized by the semiempirical PM7 method, taking into account the outward influences, which was simulated by the COSMO method. The calculations were carried out using the MOPAC2012 program. The complexes were optimized using the density functional method with the empirical dispersion correction B97-D3/SVP+COSMO (Water using geometric correction for the incompleteness of the gCP basic set. A more accurate calculation of the solvation energy was carried out by SMD method. Calculations by the density functional method were carried out using the ORCA 3.0.3 program. The energy of formation of complexes in solution was calculated as the difference between the free Gibbs energies of the solvated complex and its individual solvated

  12. The role of the ion-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions in the formation of the two-ion average force interaction potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ajrian, E A; Sidorenko, S N

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the ion-molecule and intermolecular interactions on the formation of inter-ion average force potentials is investigated within the framework of a classical ion-dipole model of electrolyte solutions. These potentials are shown to possess the Coulomb asymptotics at large distances while in the region of mean distances they reveal creation and disintegration of solvent-shared ion pairs. The calculation results provide a qualitatively authentic physical picture which is experimentally observed in strong electrolytes solutions. In particular, an increased interaction between an ion and a molecule enhances formation of ion pairs in which the ions are separated by one solvent molecule

  13. On the intermolecular vibrational coupling, hydrogen bonding, and librational freedom of water in the hydration shell of mono- and bivalent anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Namboodiri, V; Singh, Ajay K; Mondal, Jahur A

    2014-10-28

    The hydration energy of an ion largely resides within the first few layers of water molecules in its hydration shell. Hence, it is important to understand the transformation of water properties, such as hydrogen-bonding, intermolecular vibrational coupling, and librational freedom in the hydration shell of ions. We investigated these properties in the hydration shell of mono- (Cl(-) and I(-)) and bivalent (SO4(2-) and CO3(2-)) anions by using Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopy in the OH stretch, HOH bend, and [bend+librational] combination bands of water. Raman-MCR of aqueous Na-salt (NaCl, NaI, Na2SO4, and Na2CO3) solutions provides ion-correlated spectra (IC-spectrum) which predominantly bear the vibrational characteristics of water in the hydration shell of respective anions. Comparison of these IC-spectra with the Raman spectrum of bulk water in different spectral regions reveals that the water is vibrationally decoupled with its neighbors in the hydration shell. Hydrogen-bond strength and librational freedom also vary with the nature of anion: hydrogen-bond strength, for example, decreases as CO3(2-) > SO4(2-) > bulk water ≈ Cl(-) > I(-); and the librational freedom increases as CO3(2-) ≈ SO4(2-) water water in the hydration shell of anions.

  14. Induced Smectic X Phase Through Intermolecular Hydrogen-Bonded Liquid Crystals Formed Between Citric Acid and p- n-(Octyloxy)Benzoic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaram, S.; Subhasri, P.; Rajasekaran, T. R.; Jayaprakasam, R.; Senthil, T. S.; Vijayakumar, V. N.

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogen-bonded liquid crystal (HBLC) is synthesized from citric acid (CA) and 4-(octyloxy)benzoic acid (8OBA) with different mole ratios. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirms the presence of hydrogen bond between CA and 8OBA. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies validate the intermolecular complementary, cyclic type of hydrogen bond, and molecular environment in the designed HBLC complex. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis reveals the monoclinic nature of liquid crystal complex in solid phase. Liquid crystal parameters such as phase transition temperature and enthalpy values for the corresponding mesogenic phases are investigated using a polarizing optical microscope (POM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It is observed that the change in chain length and steric hindrance while increasing the mole ratio in HBLC complex induces a new smectic X (Sm X) along with higher-order smectic G (Sm G) phases by quenching of smectic C (Sm C). From the experimental observations, induced Sm X phase has been identified as a finger print texture. Also, Sm G is a multi-colored mosaic texture in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 mol ratios. The optical tilt angle, thermal stability factor, and enhanced thermal span width of CA + 8OBA complex are discussed.

  15. Detailed intermolecular structure of molecular liquids containing slightly distorted tetrahedral molecules with C(3v) symmetry: chloroform, bromoform, and methyl-iodide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothoczki, Szilvia; Temleitner, László; Pusztai, László

    2011-01-28

    Analyses of the intermolecular structure of molecular liquids containing slightly distorted tetrahedral molecules of the CXY(3)-type are described. The process is composed of the determination of several different distance-dependent orientational correlation functions, including ones that are introduced here. As a result, a complete structure classification could be provided for CXY(3) molecular liquids, namely for liquid chloroform, bromoform, and methyl-iodide. In the present work, the calculations have been conducted on particle configurations resulting from reverse Monte Carlo computer modeling: these particle arrangements have the advantage that they are fully consistent with structure factors from neutron and x-ray diffraction measurements. It has been established that as the separation between neighboring molecules increases, the dominant mutual orientations change from face-to-face to edge-to-edge, via the edge-to-face arrangements. Depending on the actual liquid, these geometrical elements (edges and faces of the distorted tetrahedra) were found to contain different atoms. From the set of liquids studied here, the structure of methyl-iodide was found to be easiest to describe on the basis of pure steric effects (molecular shape, size, and density) and the structure of liquid chloroform seems to be the furthest away from the corresponding "flexible fused hard spheres" like reference system.

  16. Useful lower limits to polarization contributions to intermolecular interactions using a minimal basis of localized orthogonal orbitals: theory and analysis of the water dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, R Julian; Horn, Paul Richard; Sundstrom, Eric Jon; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2013-02-28

    The problem of describing the energy-lowering associated with polarization of interacting molecules is considered in the overlapping regime for self-consistent field wavefunctions. The existing approach of solving for absolutely localized molecular orbital (ALMO) coefficients that are block-diagonal in the fragments is shown based on formal grounds and practical calculations to often overestimate the strength of polarization effects. A new approach using a minimal basis of polarized orthogonal local MOs (polMOs) is developed as an alternative. The polMO basis is minimal in the sense that one polarization function is provided for each unpolarized orbital that is occupied; such an approach is exact in second-order perturbation theory. Based on formal grounds and practical calculations, the polMO approach is shown to underestimate the strength of polarization effects. In contrast to the ALMO method, however, the polMO approach yields results that are very stable to improvements in the underlying AO basis expansion. Combining the ALMO and polMO approaches allows an estimate of the range of energy-lowering due to polarization. Extensive numerical calculations on the water dimer using a large range of basis sets with Hartree-Fock theory and a variety of different density functionals illustrate the key considerations. Results are also presented for the polarization-dominated Na(+)CH4 complex. Implications for energy decomposition analysis of intermolecular interactions are discussed.

  17. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pashynska, Vlada, E-mail: vlada@vl.kharkov.ua [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Stepanian, Stepan [B.Verkin Institute for Low Temperature Physics and Engineering of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lenin Ave., 47, 61103 Kharkov (Ukraine); Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly [Institute of Organic Chemistry of Research Centre for Natural Sciences of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Magyar tudosok korutja, 2, Budapest H-1117 (Hungary); Adamowicz, Ludwik [University of Arizona, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2015-07-09

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms.

  18. Long-stem shaped multifunctional molecular beacon for highly sensitive nucleic acids determination via intramolecular and intermolecular interactions based strand displacement amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianguo; Zheng, Tingting; Le, Jingqing; Jia, Lee

    2017-11-20

    Occurrence and application of oligonucleotide probes have promoted great progress in the biochemical analysis field due to their unique biological and chemical properties. In this work, a long-stem shaped multifunctional molecular beacon (LS-MMB) that is responsive to a cancer-related gene, p53, is well-prepared. By designing the probe with long-paired bases at its two ends and short-paired bases between the middle region and the 3' end, the LS-MMB is intelligently endowed with the ability to recognize the target analyte, serve as the polymerization primer/template, and signal the hybridization event synchronously, which is distinctly advantageous over the traditional molecular beacons (MBs). Moreover, it is excitingly found that the LS-MMB can be employed to exert intramolecular and intermolecular interactions for strand displacement amplification (SDA) without the involvement of any assistant probes; this therapy results in a really easy and rapid sensing system that provides an extremely low background noise and high target output signal. In this case, an excellent sensitivity and specificity to detect target gene down to picomolar level and resolution to even one nucleotide variation are achieved, respectively. In addition, the application potential for real genomic DNA analysis is realized. We envision that the probe of LS-MMB can act as a universal platform for biosensing and biomedical research.

  19. Collision-induced spectroscopy with long-range intermolecular interactions: A diagrammatic representation and the invariant form of the induced properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouzov, A. P.; Chrysos, M.; Rachet, F.; Egorova, N. I.

    2006-01-01

    Collision-induced properties of two interacting molecules a and b are derived by means of a general diagrammatic method involving M molecule-molecule and N photon-molecule couplings. The method is an extension of previous graphical treatments of nonlinear optics because it exhaustively determines interaction-induced polarization mechanisms in a trustworthy and handy fashion. Here we focus on long-range intermolecular interactions. Retardation effects are neglected. A fully quantum-mechanical treatment of the molecules is made whereas second quantization for the electromagnetic field, in the nonrelativistic approximation, is implicitly applied. The collision-induced absorption, Raman, and hyper-Raman processes are viewed and studied, through guiding examples, as specific cases N=1, 2, and 3, respectively. In Raman (N=2), the standard first-order (M=1) dipole-induced dipole term of the incremental polarizability, Δα, is the result of a coupling of the two photons with distinct molecules, a and b, which perturb each other via a dipole-dipole mechanism. Rather, when the two photons interact with the same molecule, a or b, the (N=2, M=1) graphs predict the occurrence of a nonlinear polarization mechanism. The latter is expected to contribute substantially to the collision-induced Raman bands by certain molecular gases

  20. Enhanced fullerene–Au(111 coupling in (2√3 × 2√3R30° superstructures with intermolecular interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Paßens

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Disordered and uniform (2√3 × 2√3R30° superstructures of fullerenes on the Au(111 surface have been studied using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. It is shown that the deposition and growth process of a fullerene monolayer on the Au(111 surface determine the resulting superstructure. The supply of thermal energy is of importance for the activation of a Au vacancy forming process and thus, one criterion for the selection of the respective superstructure. However, here it is depicted that a vacancy–adatom pair can be formed even at room temperature. This latter process results in C60 molecules that appear slightly more bright in scanning tunnelling microscopy images and are identified in disordered (2√3 x 2√3R30° superstructures based on a detailed structure analysis. In addition, these slightly more bright C60 molecules form uniform (2√3 x 2√3R30° superstructures, which exhibit intermolecular interactions, likely mediated by Au adatoms. Thus, vacancy–adatom pairs forming at room temperature directly affect the resulting C60 superstructure. Differential conductivity spectra reveal a lifting of the degeneracy of the LUMO and LUMO+1 orbitals in the uniform (2√3 x 2√3R30° superstructure and in addition, hybrid fullerene–Au(111 surface states suggest partly covalent interactions.

  1. The experimental charge-density approach in the evaluation of intermolecular interactions. Application of a new module of the XD programming package to several solids including a pentapeptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, Y A; Volkov, A; Wu, G; Coppens, P

    2000-11-01

    A new module interfaced to the XD programming package has been used in the evaluation of intermolecular interactions and lattice energies of the crystals of p-nitroaniline, L-asparagine monohydrate and the pentapeptide Boc-Gln-D-Iva-Hyp-Ala-Phol (Boc = butoxycarbonyl, Iva = isovaline = ethylalanine, Phol = phenylalaninol). The electrostatic interactions are evaluated with the atom-centered distributed multipoles from KRMM (kappa'-restricted multipole model) refinements, using the Buckingham expression for non-overlapping charge densities. Results for p-nitroaniline are compared with Hartree-Fock (HF), density functional (DFT) and Moller-Plesset (MP2) supermolecular calculations and with HF and DFT periodic calculations. The HF and DFT methods fail to predict the stability of the p-nitroaniline crystal but the results of the experimental charge-density approach (ECDA) are in good agreement with both MP2 interaction energies and the experimental lattice energy. ECDA results for L-asparagine monohydrate compare well with those from DFT supermolecular and periodic HF calculations. The disorder of the terminal group in the pentapeptide, which persists at the experimental temperature of 20 K, corresponds to an energy difference of only 0.35 kJ mol(-1), which is too small to be reproduced with current methods.

  2. Competing intermolecular interactions of artemisinin-type agents and aspirin with membrane phospholipids: Combined model mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashynska, Vlada; Stepanian, Stepan; Gömöry, Agnes; Vekey, Karoly; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Competitive binding of artemisinin agents and aspirin with phospholipids is shown. • Complexation between the antimalarial drugs and aspirin molecules is also found. • Energetically favorable structures of the model complexes are identified by DFT. • Membranotropic activity of the studied drugs can be modified under joint usage. - Abstract: Study of intermolecular interactions of antimalarial artemisinin-type drugs and aspirin with membrane phospholipids is important in term of elucidation of the drugs activity modification under their joint usage. Combined experimental and computational study of the interaction of dihydroartemisinin, α-artemether, and artesunate with aspirin (ASP) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) is performed by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry and by DFT B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ methods. The results of the ESI investigation of systems containing artemisinin-type agent, ASP and DPPC, reveal a competition between the antimalarial agents and ASP for binding with DPPC molecules. The complexation between the antimalarial drugs and ASP is also found. Observed phenomena suggest that membranotropic activity of artemisin-type agents and aspirin is modified under their combined usage. To elucidate structure-energy characteristics of the non-covalent complexes studied the model DFT calculations are performed for dihydroartemisinin · ASP complex and complexes of the each drug with phosphatidylcholine head of DPPC in neutral and cationized forms

  3. Green synthesis, characterization and some physico-chemical studies on a novel intermolecular compound; 4-nitro-o-phenylenediamine-N, N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, U. S.; Singh, Manjeet; Rai, R. N.

    2017-09-01

    An inter-molecular compound (IMC) L1 was synthesized by taking 1:1 molar ratio of p-nitro-o-phenylenediamine (NOPDA) and N, N-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (DMAB) via thermally initiated solid state reaction. It was characterized by X-ray diffraction, spectral and optical studies. The single crystal of the (L1) was grown from saturated solution of ethanol using slow evaporation technique at 29 °C. From the single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, it can be inferred that it crystallizes in triclinic unit cell with P-1 space group (CCDC No 1422765). Absorption spectrum of IMC (L1) shows a band at 318 nm attributed to the intra-molecular charge-transfer (ICT) excited state absorption and the other band at 376 nm is due to n→π* transition. The IMC (L1) shows a strong fluorescence at 418 nm with a Stokes shift (≈100 nm) and quantum efficiency (0.22) upon excitation in methyl alcohol at 318 nm.

  4. Landau-Zener tunneling in the presence of weak intermolecular interactions in a crystal of Mn4 single-molecule magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernsdorfer, W.; Bhaduri, S.; Vinslava, A.; Christou, G.

    2005-12-01

    A Mn4 single-molecule magnet (SMM), with a well-isolated spin ground state of S=9/2 , is used as a model system to study Landau-Zener (LZ) tunneling in the presence of weak intermolecular dipolar and exchange interactions. The anisotropy constants D and B are measured with minor hysteresis loops. A transverse field is used to tune the tunnel splitting over a large range. Using the LZ and inverse LZ method, it is shown that these interactions play an important role in the tunnel rates. Three regions are identified: (i) at small transverse fields, tunneling is dominated by single tunnel transitions, (ii) at intermediate transverse fields, the measured tunnel rates are governed by reshuffling of internal fields, and (iii) at larger transverse fields, the magnetization reversal starts to be influenced by the direct relaxation process, and many-body tunnel events may occur. The hole digging method is used to study the next-nearest-neighbor interactions. At small external fields, it is shown that magnetic ordering occurs which does not quench tunneling. An applied transverse field can increase the ordering rate. Spin-spin cross-relaxations, mediated by dipolar and weak exchange interactions, are proposed to explain additional quantum steps.

  5. Studies of the structure of insulin fibrils by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L; Frokjaer, S; Carpenter, J F; Brange, J

    2001-01-01

    Fibril formation (aggregation) of insulin was investigated in acid media by visual inspection, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Insulin fibrillated faster in hydrochloric acid than in acetic acid at elevated temperatures, whereas the fibrillation tendencies were reversed at ambient temperatures. Electron micrographs showed that bovine insulin fibrils consisted of long fibers with a diameter of 5 to 10 nm and lengths of several microns. The fibrils appeared either as helical filaments (in hydrochloric acid) or arranged laterally in bundles (in acetic acid, NaCl). Freeze-thawing cycles broke the fibrils into shorter segments. FTIR spectroscopy showed that the native secondary structure of insulin was identical in hydrochloric acid and acetic acid, whereas the secondary structure of fibrils formed in hydrochloric acid was different from that formed in acetic acid. Fibrils of bovine insulin prepared by heating or agitating an acid solution of insulin showed an increased content of beta-sheet (mostly intermolecular) and a decrease in the intensity of the alpha-helix band. In hydrochloric acid, the frequencies of the beta-sheet bands depended on whether the fibrillation was induced by heating or agitation. This difference was not seen in acetic acid. Freeze-thawing cycles of the fibrils in hydrochloric acid caused an increase in the intensity of the band at 1635 cm(-1) concomitant with reduction of the band at 1622 cm(-1). The results showed that the structure of insulin fibrils is highly dependent on the composition of the acid media and on the treatment. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss Inc. and the American Pharmaceutical Association J Pharm Sci 90: 29-37, 2001

  6. Positronium formation studies in crystalline molecular complexes: Triphenylphosphine oxide - Acetanilide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, F. C.; Denadai, A. M. L.; Guerra, L. D. L.; Fulgêncio, F. H.; Windmöller, D.; Santos, G. C.; Fernandes, N. G.; Yoshida, M. I.; Donnici, C. L.; Magalhães, W. F.; Machado, J. C.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogen bond formation in the triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), acetanilide (ACN) supramolecular heterosynton system, named [TPPO0.5·ACN0.5], has been studied by Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and supported by several analytical techniques. In toluene solution, Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) presented a 1:1 stoichiometry and indicated that the complexation process is driven by entropy, with low enthalpy contribution. X-ray structure determination showed the existence of a three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds, allowing also the confirmation of the existence of a 1:1 crystalline molecular complex in solid state. The results of thermal analysis (TGA, DTA and DSC) and FTIR spectroscopy showed that the interactions in the complex are relatively weaker than those found in pure precursors, leading to a higher positronium formation probability at [TPPO0.5·ACN0.5]. These weak interactions in the complex enhance the possibility of the n- and π-electrons to interact with positrons and consequently, the probability of positronium formation is higher. Through the present work is shown that PALS is a sensible powerful tool to investigate intermolecular interactions in solid heterosynton supramolecular systems.

  7. Intermolecular Dehydrative Coupling Reaction of Arylketones with Cyclic Alkenes Catalyzed by a Well-Defined Cationic Ruthenium-Hydride Complex: A Novel Ketone Olefination Method via Vinyl C–H Bond Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chae S.; Lee, Do W.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The cationic ruthenium-hydride complex [(η6-C6H6)(PCy3)(CO)RuH]+BF4− was found to be a highly effective catalyst for the intermolecular olefination reaction of arylketones with cycloalkenes. The preliminary mechanistic analysis revealed that electrophilic ruthenium-vinyl complex is the key species for mediating both vinyl C–H bond activation and the dehydrative olefination steps of the coupling reaction. PMID:20567607

  8. Effects of intermolecular interactions on absorption intensities of the fundamental and the first, second, and third overtones of OH stretching vibrations of methanol and t-butanol‑d9 in n-hexane studied by visible/near-infrared/infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisawa, Yusuke; Suga, Arisa

    2018-05-01

    Visible (Vis), near-infrared (NIR) and IR spectra in the 15,600-2500 cm- 1 region were measured for methanol, methanol-d3, and t-butanol-d9 in n-hexane to investigate effects of intermolecular interaction on absorption intensities of the fundamental and the first, second, and third overtones of their OH stretching vibrations. The relative area intensities of OH stretching bands of free and hydrogen-bonded species were plotted versus the vibrational quantum number using logarithm plots (V = 1-4) for 0.5 M methanol, 0.5 M methanol‑d3, and 0.5 M t-butanol-d9 in n-hexane. In the logarithm plots the relative intensities of free species yield a linear dependence irrespective of the solutes while those of hydrogen-bonded species deviate significantly from the linearity. The observed results suggest that the modifications in dipole moment functions of the OH bond induced by the formation of the hydrogen bondings change transient dipole moment, leading to the deviations of the dependences of relative absorption intensities on the vibrational quantum number from the linearity.

  9. High-resolution 1H NMR spectroscopy of fish muscle, eggs and small whole fish via Hadamard-encoded intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghao Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy has become an important technique for tissue studies. Since tissues are in semisolid-state, their high-resolution (HR spectra cannot be obtained by conventional NMR spectroscopy. Because of this restriction, extraction and high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR MAS are widely applied for HR NMR spectra of tissues. However, both of the methods are subject to limitations. In this study, the feasibility of HR (1H NMR spectroscopy based on intermolecular multiple-quantum coherence (iMQC technique is explored using fish muscle, fish eggs, and a whole fish as examples. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Intact salmon muscle tissues, intact eggs from shishamo smelt and a whole fish (Siamese algae eater are studied by using conventional 1D one-pulse sequence, Hadamard-encoded iMQC sequence, and HR MAS. RESULTS: When we use the conventional 1D one-pulse sequence, hardly any useful spectral information can be obtained due to the severe field inhomogeneity. By contrast, HR NMR spectra can be obtained in a short period of time by using the Hadamard-encoded iMQC method without shimming. Most signals from fatty acids and small metabolites can be observed. Compared to HR MAS, the iMQC method is non-invasive, but the resolution and the sensitivity of resulting spectra are not as high as those of HR MAS spectra. CONCLUSION: Due to the immunity to field inhomogeneity, the iMQC technique can be a proper supplement to HR MAS, and it provides an alternative for the investigation in cases with field distortions and with samples unsuitable for spinning. The acquisition time of the proposed method is greatly reduced by introduction of the Hadamard-encoded technique, in comparison with that of conventional iMQC method.

  10. Push it to the limit: Characterizing the convergence of common sequences of basis sets for intermolecular interactions as described by density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, Jonathon [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Neaton, Jeffrey B. [Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kavli Energy Nanosciences Institute at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Head-Gordon, Martin, E-mail: mhg@cchem.berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-21

    With the aim of systematically characterizing the convergence of common families of basis sets such that general recommendations for basis sets can be made, we have tested a wide variety of basis sets against complete-basis binding energies across the S22 set of intermolecular interactions—noncovalent interactions of small and medium-sized molecules consisting of first- and second-row atoms—with three distinct density functional approximations: SPW92, a form of local-density approximation; B3LYP, a global hybrid generalized gradient approximation; and B97M-V, a meta-generalized gradient approximation with nonlocal correlation. We have found that it is remarkably difficult to reach the basis set limit; for the methods and systems examined, the most complete basis is Jensen’s pc-4. The Dunning correlation-consistent sequence of basis sets converges slowly relative to the Jensen sequence. The Karlsruhe basis sets are quite cost effective, particularly when a correction for basis set superposition error is applied: counterpoise-corrected def2-SVPD binding energies are better than corresponding energies computed in comparably sized Dunning and Jensen bases, and on par with uncorrected results in basis sets 3-4 times larger. These trends are exhibited regardless of the level of density functional approximation employed. A sense of the magnitude of the intrinsic incompleteness error of each basis set not only provides a foundation for guiding basis set choice in future studies but also facilitates quantitative comparison of existing studies on similar types of systems.

  11. Model for an RNA tertiary interaction from the structure of an intermolecular complex between a GAAA tetraloop and an RNA helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pley, H W; Flaherty, K M; McKay, D B

    1994-11-03

    In large structured RNAs, RNA hairpins in which the strands of the duplex stem are connected by a tetraloop of the consensus sequence 5'-GNRA (where N is any nucleotide, and R is either G or A) are unusually frequent. In group I introns there is a covariation in sequence between nucleotides in the third and fourth positions of the loop with specific distant base pairs in putative RNA duplex stems: GNAA loops correlate with successive 5'-C-C.G-C base pairs in stems, whereas GNGA loops correlate with 5'-C-U.G-A. This has led to the suggestion that GNRA tetraloops may be involved in specific long-range tertiary interactions, with each A in position 3 or 4 of the loop interacting with a C-G base pair in the duplex, and G in position 3 interacting with a U-A base pair. This idea is supported experimentally for the GAAA loop of the P5b extension of the group I intron of Tetrahymena thermophila and the L9 GUGA terminal loop of the td intron of bacteriophage T4 (ref. 4). NMR has revealed the overall structure of the tetraloop for 12-nucleotide hairpins with GCAA and GAAA loops and models have been proposed for the interaction of GNRA tetraloops with base pairs in the minor groove of A-form RNA. Here we describe the crystal structure of an intermolecular complex between a GAAA tetraloop and an RNA helix. The interactions we observe correlate with the specificity of GNRA tetraloops inferred from phylogenetic studies, suggesting that this complex is a legitimate model for intramolecular tertiary interactions mediated by GNRA tetraloops in large structured RNAs.

  12. Heteroleptic and Homoleptic Iron(III Spin-Crossover Complexes; Effects of Ligand Substituents and Intermolecular Interactions between Co-Cation/Anion and the Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasinee Phonsri

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The structural and magnetic properties of a range of new iron(III bis-tridentate Schiff base complexes are described with emphasis on how intermolecular structural interactions influence spin states and spin crossover (SCO in these d5 materials. Three pairs of complexes were investigated. The first pair are the neutral, heteroleptic complexes [Fe(3-OMe-SalEen(thsa] 1 and [Fe(3-MeOSalEen(3-EtOthsa] 2, where 3-R-HSalEen = (E-2-(((2-(ethylaminoethyliminomethyl-6-R-phenol and 3-R-H2thsa = thiosemicarbazone-3-R-salicylaldimine. They display spin transitions above room temperature. However, 2 shows incomplete and gradual change, while SCO in 1 is complete and more abrupt. Lower cooperativity in 2 is ascribed to the lack of π–π interactions, compared to 1. The second pair, cationic species [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]NO3 3 and [Fe(3-EtOSalEen2]Cl 4 differ only in the counter-anion. They show partial SCO above room temperature with 3 displaying a sharp transition at 343 K. Weak hydrogen bonds from cation to Cl− probably lead to weaker cooperativity in 4. The last pair, CsH2O[Fe(3-MeO-thsa2] 5 and Cs(H2O2[Fe(5-NO2-thsa2] 6, are anionic homoleptic chelates that have different substituents on the salicylaldiminate rings of thsa2−. The Cs cations bond to O atoms of water and the ligands, in unusual ways thus forming attractive 1D and 3D networks in 5 and 6, respectively, and 5 remains HS (high spin at all temperatures while 6 remains LS (low spin. Comparisons are made to other literature examples of Cs salts of [Fe(5-R-thsa2]− (R = H and Br.

  13. Rates of star formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    It is illustrated that a theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of galaxies depends on an understanding of star formation, and especially of the factors influencing the rate of star formation. Some of the theoretical problems of star formation in galaxies, some approaches that have been considered in models of galaxy evolution, and some possible observational tests that may help to clarify which processes or models are most relevant are reviewed. The material is presented under the following headings: power-law models for star formation, star formation processes (conditions required, ways of achieving these conditions), observational indications and tests, and measures of star formation rates in galaxies. 49 references

  14. Why adult formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Justinek

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The article argues that the primary aim of adult formation is comprehensive personality development which is supposed to ensure quality existence in modern world. The article also suggests that formarion is a permanent process. Justinek puts special emphasis on adult formation methodology and defines fundamental formation styles which encourage independent action in individuals. Justinek differentiates between formation and education. methods and concludes that formation methods are related to the emotional sphere of personality, and education methods mostly to the rational. Justinek believes that formation of adults is based primarily on appropriate formation methodology.

  15. Intermolecular Interactions at high pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eikeland, Espen Zink

    2016-01-01

    In this project high-pressure single crystal X-ray diffraction has been combined with quantitative energy calculations to probe the energy landscape of three hydroquinone clathrates enclosing different guest molecules. The simplicity of the hydroquinone clathrate structures together with their st...

  16. Formate Formation and Formate Conversion in Biological Fuels Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan R. Crable

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Biomethanation is a mature technology for fuel production. Fourth generation biofuels research will focus on sequestering CO2 and providing carbon-neutral or carbon-negative strategies to cope with dwindling fossil fuel supplies and environmental impact. Formate is an important intermediate in the methanogenic breakdown of complex organic material and serves as an important precursor for biological fuels production in the form of methane, hydrogen, and potentially methanol. Formate is produced by either CoA-dependent cleavage of pyruvate or enzymatic reduction of CO2 in an NADH- or ferredoxin-dependent manner. Formate is consumed through oxidation to CO2 and H2 or can be further reduced via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway for carbon fixation or industrially for the production of methanol. Here, we review the enzymes involved in the interconversion of formate and discuss potential applications for biofuels production.

  17. Disorder and intermolecular interactions in a family of tetranuclear Ni(II) complexes probed by high-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Jon; Yang, En-Che; Edwards, Rachel; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Ramsey, Chris; Dalal, Naresh S; Gantzel, Peter K; Hill, Stephen; Hendrickson, David N

    2008-03-17

    structure splittings for complex 3. This behavior is thought to be due to the onset of short-range magnetic correlations/coherences between molecules caused by weak intermolecular magnetic exchange interactions.

  18. Dispersion-corrected first-principles calculation of terahertz vibration, and evidence for weak hydrogen bond formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi; Ito, Hiromasa

    2013-03-01

    A weak hydrogen bond (WHB) such as CH-O is very important for the structure, function, and dynamics in a chemical and biological system WHB stretching vibration is in a terahertz (THz) frequency region Very recently, the reasonable performance of dispersion-corrected first-principles to WHB has been proven. In this lecture, we report dispersion-corrected first-principles calculation of the vibrational absorption of some organic crystals, and low-temperature THz spectral measurement, in order to clarify WHB stretching vibration. The THz frequency calculation of a WHB crystal has extremely improved by dispersion correction. Moreover, the discrepancy in frequency between an experiment and calculation and is 10 1/cm or less. Dispersion correction is especially effective for intermolecular mode. The very sharp peak appearing at 4 K is assigned to the intermolecular translational mode that corresponds to WHB stretching vibration. It is difficult to detect and control the WHB formation in a crystal because the binding energy is very small. With the help of the latest intense development of experimental and theoretical technique and its careful use, we reveal solid-state WHB stretching vibration as evidence for the WHB formation that differs in respective WHB networks The research was supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (Grant No. 22550003).

  19. Toward understanding insulin fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brange, J; Andersen, L; Laursen, E D; Meyn, G; Rasmussen, E

    1997-05-01

    Formation of insulin fibrils is a physical process by which partially unfolded insulin molecules interact with each other to form linear aggregates. Shielding of hydrophobic domains is the main driving force for this process, but formation of intermolecular beta-sheet may further stabilize the fibrillar structure. Conformational displacement of the B-chain C-terminal with exposure of nonpolar, aliphatic core residues, including A2, A3, B11, and B15, plays a crucial role in the fibrillation process. Recent crystal analyses and molecular modeling studies have suggested that when insulin fibrillates this exposed domain interacts with a hydrophobic surface domain formed by the aliphatic residues A13, B6, B14, B17, and B18, normally buried when three insulin dimers form a hexamer. In rabbit immunization experiments, insulin fibrils did not elicit an increased immune response with respect to formation of IgG insulin antibodies when compared with native insulin. In contrast, the IgE response increased with increasing content of insulin in fibrillar form. Strategies and practical approaches to prevent insulin from forming fibrils are reviewed. Stabilization of the insulin hexameric structure and blockage of hydrophobic interfaces by addition of surfactants are the most effective means of counteracting insulin fibrillation.

  20. FORMATION CONSTANTS AND THERMODYNAMIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KEY WORDS: Metal complexes, Schiff base ligand, Formation constant, DFT calculation ... best values for the formation constants of the proposed equilibrium model by .... to its positive charge distribution and the ligand deformation geometry.

  1. Theory of aurora formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira.

    1975-04-01

    A new theory of aurora formation is presented based on Alfven wave-electron interaction. The theory explains consistently 1) the electron acceleration process, 2) the formation of auroral layers and 3) the long wave formation in the longitudinal direction. (auth.)

  2. Multi-property isotropic intermolecular potentials and predicted spectral lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA), collision-induced light scattering (CILS) and collision-induced hyper-Rayleigh scattering (CIHR) for H2sbnd Ne, -Kr and -Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kader, M. S. A.; Godet, J.-L.; Gustafsson, M.; Maroulis, G.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA), collision-induced light scattering (CILS) and collision-induced hyper-Rayleigh scattering (CIHR) at room temperature (295 K) are computed for gaseous mixtures of molecular hydrogen with neon, krypton and xenon. The induced spectra are detected using theoretical values for induced dipole moment, pair-polarizability trace and anisotropy, hyper-polarizability and updated intermolecular potentials. Good agreement is observed for all spectra when the literature and the present potentials which are constructed from the transport and thermo-physical properties are used.

  3. Mössbauer spectroscopic and powder X-ray diffraction studies on incorporation of gaseous organic molecules into intermolecular nano-voids of mixed-valence trinuclear iron pentafluorobenzoate complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yoichi; Onaka, Satoru; Ogiso, Ryo; Takayama, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Masashi; Nakamoto, Tadahiro

    2013-01-01

    Incorporation of gaseous organic molecules into polycrystalline mixed-valence trinuclear iron (Fe 3+ ,Fe 3+ ,Fe 2+ ) pentafluorobenzoate complex Fe 3 O(C 6 F 5 COO) 6 (C 5 H 5 N) 3 with intermolecular nano-voids was studied by 57 Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopic and powder XRD measurements. Organic-molecule incorporation was mainly chased by using iron-valence fluctuation observed in a Mössbauer spectrum, and also researched supportively by a powder XRD technique. (author)

  4. The Organic Secondary Building Unit: Strong Intermolecular π Interactions Define Topology in MIT-25, a Mesoporous MOF with Proton-Replete Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sarah S; Hendon, Christopher H; Fielding, Alistair J; Walsh, Aron; O'Keeffe, Michael; Dincă, Mircea

    2017-03-15

    The structure-directing role of the inorganic secondary building unit (SBU) is key for determining the topology of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here we show that organic building units relying on strong π interactions that are energetically competitive with the formation of common inorganic SBUs can also play a role in defining the topology. We demonstrate the importance of the organic SBU in the formation of Mg 2 H 6 (H 3 O)(TTFTB) 3 (MIT-25), a mesoporous MOF with the new ssp topology. A delocalized electronic hole is critical in the stabilization of the TTF triad organic SBUs and exemplifies a design principle for future MOF synthesis.

  5. Stages of ores formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, A.Kh.

    1988-01-01

    Deposit formation (especially endogenous) is the complicated, multi-stage and long process. Establishment of deposit formation succession, age-specific correlations of minerals and aggregates have a high importance at solving genetic questions. Studying of minerals correlations and mineral aggregates, succession of their crystallization and other observations let restore the history of deposit formation, pick up in it different on duration and physical and chemical conditions stages

  6. Planet formation in Binaries

    OpenAIRE

    Thebault, Ph.; Haghighipour, N.

    2014-01-01

    Spurred by the discovery of numerous exoplanets in multiple systems, binaries have become in recent years one of the main topics in planet formation research. Numerous studies have investigated to what extent the presence of a stellar companion can affect the planet formation process. Such studies have implications that can reach beyond the sole context of binaries, as they allow to test certain aspects of the planet formation scenario by submitting them to extreme environments. We review her...

  7. Data format translation routines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, R.D.

    1981-02-01

    To enable the effective connection of several dissimilar computers into a network, modification of the data being passed from one computer to another may become necessary. This document describes a package of routines which permit the translation of data in PDP-8 formats to PDP-11 or DECsystem-10 formats or from PDP-11 format to DECsystem-10 format. Additional routines are described which permit the effective use of the translation routines in the environment of the Fusion Energy Division (FED) network and the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) data base

  8. ENDF/B format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.A.; Lemmel, H.D.

    1986-09-01

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B. This format, originally designed for the US Evaluated Nuclear Data File, is recommended for international use. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-NCS-50496 (ENDF 102) should be consulted. An Appendix to the present document gives a summary of the format differences between ENDF/B-4 and ENDF/B-5. (author)

  9. Exploring Opponent Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Rasmussen, Majken; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2013-01-01

    of how the opponent format and relationships impact a game are almost absent in current research. Thus, this paper aims to elucidate how the perception of a competition differs, depending on the opponent format, by presenting a game mechanic framework. The paper furthermore presents an interactive...... football-training platform, as well as games designed to explore the different opponent formats. The games are qualitatively evaluated to illuminate the qualities of and distinctions between different types of opponent formats, proposed by the framework terminology....

  10. Theoretical study about L-arginine complexes formation with thiotriazolin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Kucherenko

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Brain vascular diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity, mortality and disability of population in the industrialized countries of the world. An important element of this problem’s solution is the creation of new highly effective and safe drugs, which would lead to mortality reduction, to increase in life expectancy and quality of life. Therefore it is interesting to create a new combined drug based on L-arginine and thiotriazolin. Purpose of the study: to consider the possible structure and energy characteristics of complexes formed by L-arginine, 3-methyl-1,2,4-triazolyl-5-thioacetate (MTTA and morpholine. Calculation method. The initial approximation to the complex geometry was obtained using molecular docking with the help of AutoDock Vina program. The obtained ternary complexes were pre-optimized by semi-empirical PM7 method with modeling the impact of the environment by COSMO method. The calculations were carried out using MOPAC2012 program. Then they were optimized by B97-D3/SVP + COSMO (Water dispersion-corrected DFT-D with geometrical spreading correction on insufficiency of gCP basis set. A more accurate calculation of the solvation energy was conducted by SMD. The calculations by density functional method were carried out using the ORCA 3.0.3 software. Energy complex formation in solution was calculated as the difference of the Gibbs free energy of the solvated complex and its individual components. Results. Quantum chemical calculations show, that thiotriazolin and L-arginine are able to form ternary complexes, where molecules are linked by multiple hydrogen bonds. The calculation data suggest, that studied complexes are thermodynamically unstable in solution. The energies of them are positive, but rather low despite charge gain of a number of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Finding. Based on the results of the conducted quantum-chemical study of a three components system (MTTA, morpholine, and L-arginine it is possible

  11. ENDF/B Format

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    This document is a brief user's description of the format of ENDF/B, the evaluated neutron nuclear data library of the US National Nuclear Data Center. This summary is an aid to customers of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section when receiving data retrievals in ENDF/B format. For more detailed information the report BNL-50274 (ENDF-102) should be consulted. (author)

  12. Formation of multiple networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnani, Matteo; Rossi, Luca

    2013-01-01

    we introduce the first network formation model for multiple networks. Network formation models are among the most popular tools in traditional network studies, because of both their practical and theoretical impact. However, existing models are not sufficient to describe the generation of multiple...

  13. Thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA tertiary structure formation in the junctionless hairpin ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Neil A; Hoogstraten, Charles G

    2017-09-01

    The hairpin ribozyme consists of two RNA internal loops that interact to form the catalytically active structure. This docking transition is a rare example of intermolecular formation of RNA tertiary structure without coupling to helix annealing. We have used temperature-dependent surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to characterize the thermodynamics and kinetics of RNA tertiary structure formation for the junctionless form of the ribozyme, in which loops A and B reside on separate molecules. We find docking to be strongly enthalpy-driven and to be accompanied by substantial activation barriers for association and dissociation, consistent with the structural reorganization of both internal loops upon complex formation. Comparisons with the parallel analysis of a ribozyme variant carrying a 2'-O-methyl modification at the self-cleavage site and with published data in other systems reveal a surprising diversity of thermodynamic signatures, emphasizing the delicate balance of contributions to the free energy of formation of RNA tertiary structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. From Sermon Formation to Preacher Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaarden, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    today is less about exercising the authority of an office and more about embodying authenticity. I argue that traditional homiletic education can benefit from implementing a learner-centered approach to teaching moving from sermon formation towards preacher formation, in order to develop and train...... preachers. This involves a learning strategy to ministry where theological skills, pastoral competences, and own personality are interwoven. Teaching here means facilitating a room of learning where teacher’s power and control is reduced, allowing the preacher to reflect upon own practice without being...... judged, evaluated, or critiqued. In this paper, I explain how a learner-centered approach to education works in practice and show how pastors experience the teaching method and the congregations’ positive response to their improvements. I shall present the results of a focus-group interview with pastors...

  15. Usage Record Format Recommendation

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsen, J.K.; Muller-Pfeerkorn, R

    2013-01-01

    For resources to be shared, sites must be able to exchange basic accounting and usage data in a common format. This document describes a common format which enables the exchange of basic accounting and usage data from different resources. This record format is intended to facilitate the sharing of usage information, particularly in the area of the accounting of jobs, computing, memory, storage and cloud usage but with a structure that allows an easy extension to other resources. This document describes the Usage Record components both in natural language form and annotated XML. This document does not address how these records should be used, nor does it attempt to dictate the format in which the accounting records are stored. Instead, it denes a common exchange format. Furthermore, nothing is said regarding the communication mechanisms employed to exchange the records, i.e. transport layer, framing, authentication, integrity, etc.

  16. How can a beta-sheet peptide be both a potent antimicrobial and harmfully toxic? Molecular dynamics simulations of protegrin-1 in micelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langham, Allison A; Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2006-01-01

    In this work, the naturally occurring beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1 (PG-1) is studied by molecular dynamics simulation in all-atom sodium dodecylsulfate and dodecylphosphocholine micelles. These simulations provide a high-resolution picture of the interactions between the peptide...

  17. Structural Transitions Induced by a Recombinant Methionine-Trigger in Silk Spidroin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Donna; Winkler, Stefan; Valluzzi, Regina; Kaplan, David

    2000-03-01

    Control of beta sheet formation is an important factor in the understanding and prediction of structural transitions and protein folding. In genetically engineered silk proteins this control has been achieved using oxidative triggers. A genetically engineered variant of a spider silk protein, and a peptide analog, based on the consensus sequence of Nephila clavipes dragline silk, were modified to include methionines flanking the beta sheet forming polyalanine regions. These methionines could be selectively reduced and oxidized, altering the bulkiness and charge of the sulfhydryl group to control beta sheet formation by steric hindrance. Biophysical characterization and monitoring of structural transitions and intermediates were accomplished through attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) for solution state structures in both oxidized and reduced forms. For solid state structural characterization, IR microscopy and reflectance IR experiments were performed. Electron diffraction data as well as circular dichroism studies provide structural corroboration for all experiments in which reproducible sample preparation was achieved.

  18. Earth formation porosity log

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.; Smith, M.P.; Schultz, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    A method for determining the porosity of earth formations in the vicinity of a cased well borehole is described, comprising the steps of: irradiating the earth formations in the vicinity of the cased well borehole with fast neutrons from a source of fast neutrons passed into the borehole; and generating a signal representative of the fast neutron population present in the well borehole at a location in the borehole, the signal is functionally related to the porosity of the earth formations in the vicinity of the borehole

  19. Manuel UNIMARC format bibliographique

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    This manual is the French translation of the second edition of UNIMARC Manual: bibliographic format published in English in 1994 and completed by 5 updates published from 1996 to 2005. This 5th French edition is composite. It reproduces identically a part of the 4th edition published in 2002 and, for the fields of the format modified in the Update 5, it offers a new more structured presentation. This is a handbook dedicated to French-speaking users of the UNIMARC format for bibliographic descriptions.

  20. Electrochemistry of transition metal complex catalysts Part 10. Intra- and intermolecular electrochemically activated C-H addition to the central metal atom of a P-C-P-pincer iridium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, Filip; Speiser, Bernd; Mohammad, Hani A.Y.; Mayer, Hermann A.

    2004-01-01

    The electrochemical properties of a promising catalyst for C-H bond activation are investigated. This P-C-P-pincer complex of iridium exhibits an intramolecular C-H oxidative addition at room temperature, which becomes enhanced upon oxidation. The reaction product is detected by cyclic voltammetry. Mechanistic, kinetic, and thermodynamic information is extracted from experiments in combination with digital simulation. Multicycle voltammograms and voltammograms of mixtures consistently suggest an extended square scheme as the electrode reaction mechanism. The unsubstituted parent compound shows a more complex redox behavior including a coupled ECE sequence. Intermolecular C-H activation by reaction of the complex in the presence of cyclooctane is indicated by characteristic changes in the cyclic voltammograms

  1. Reconsidering formative measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Roy D; Breivik, Einar; Wilcox, James B

    2007-06-01

    The relationship between observable responses and the latent constructs they are purported to measure has received considerable attention recently, with particular focus on what has become known as formative measurement. This alternative to reflective measurement in the area of theory-testing research is examined in the context of the potential for interpretational confounding and a construct's ability to function as a point variable within a larger model. Although these issues have been addressed in the traditional reflective measurement context, the authors suggest that they are particularly relevant in evaluating formative measurement models. On the basis of this analysis, the authors conclude that formative measurement is not an equally attractive alternative to reflective measurement and that whenever possible, in developing new measures or choosing among alternative existing measures, researchers should opt for reflective measurement. In addition, the authors provide guidelines for researchers dealing with existing formative measures. Copyright 2007 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Isothermal Martensite Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo

    Isothermal (i.e. time dependent) martensite formation in steel was first observed in the 40ies of the XXth century and is still treated as an anomaly in the description of martensite formation which is considered as a-thermal (i.e. independent of time). Recently, the clarification of the mechanism...... of lattice strains provided fundamental information on the state of stress in the material and clarified the role of the strain energy on martensite formation. Electron backscatter diffraction revealed that the microstructure of the material and the morphology of martensite were independent on the cooling...... leading to isothermal kinetics acquired new practical relevance because of the identification of isothermal martensite formation as the most likely process responsible for enhanced performances of sub-zero Celsius treated high carbon steel products. In the present work, different iron based alloys...

  3. Cosmology and galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rees, M.J.

    1977-01-01

    Implications of the massive halos and ''missing mass'' for galaxy formation are addressed; it is suggested that this mass consists of ''Population III'' stars that formed before the galaxies did. 19 references

  4. Fracturing formations in wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daroza, R A

    1964-05-15

    This well stimulation method comprises introducing through the well bore a low-penetrating, dilatant fluid, and subjecting the fluid to sufficient pressure to produce fractures in the formation. The fluid is permitted to remain in contact with the formation so as to become diluted by the formation fluids, and thereby lose its properties of dilatancy. Also, a penetrating fluid, containing a propping agent suspended therein, in introduced into contact with the fractures at a pressure substantially reduced with respect to that pressure which would have been required, prior to the fracturing operation performed using the low-penetrating dilatant fluid. The propping agent is deposited within the fractures, and thereafter, fluid production is resumed from the fractured formation. (2 claims)

  5. Star formation: Cosmic feast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaringi, Simone

    2017-03-01

    Low-mass stars form through a process known as disk accretion, eating up material that orbits in a disk around them. It turns out that the same mechanism also describes the formation of more massive stars.

  6. Competing intramolecular N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bonds and extended intermolecular network in 1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-3-(2-methyl-4-oxopentan-2-yl) thiourea analyzed by experimental and theoretical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, Aamer, E-mail: aamersaeed@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Khurshid, Asma [Department of Chemistry, Quaid-I-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Jasinski, Jerry P. [Department of Chemistry, Keene State College, 229 Main Street Keene, NH 03435-2001 (United States); Pozzi, C. Gustavo; Fantoni, Adolfo C. [Instituto de Física La Plata, Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 49 y 115, La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Erben, Mauricio F., E-mail: erben@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [CEQUINOR (UNLP, CONICET-CCT La Plata), Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 962, (1900) La Plata, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-03-18

    Highlights: • Two distinct N-H⋯O=C intramolecular competing hydrogen bonds are feasible in the title molecule. • Crystal structures and vibrational properties were determined. • The C=O and C=S double bonds of the acyl-thiourea group are mutually oriented in opposite directions. • A strong hyperconjugative lpO1 → σ{sup ∗}(N2-H) remote interaction was detected. • Topological analysis reveals a Cl⋯N interaction playing a relevant role in crystal packing. - Abstract: The synthesis of a novel 1-acyl-thiourea species (C{sub 14}H{sub 17}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}SCl), has been tailored in such a way that two distinct N-H⋯O=C intramolecular competing hydrogen bonds are feasible. The X-ray structure analysis as well as the vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) data reveal that the S conformation is preferred, with the C=O and C=S bonds of the acyl-thiourea group pointing in opposite directions. The preference for the intramolecular N-H⋯O=C hydrogen bond within the -C(O)NHC(S)NH- core is confirmed. The Natural Bond Orbital and the Atom in Molecule approaches demonstrate that a strong hyperconjugative lpO → σ{sup ∗}(N-H) remote interaction between the acyl and the thioamide N-H groups is responsible for the stabilization of the S conformation. Intermolecular interactions have been characterized in the periodic system electron density and the topological analysis reveals the presence of an extended intermolecular network in the crystal, including a Cl⋯N interaction playing a relevant role in crystal packing.

  7. Cooperativity effect involving drug-DNA/RNA intermolecular interaction: A B3LYP-D3 and MP2 theoretical investigation on ketoprofen⋯cytosine⋯H2O system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Jun-Ping; Wei, Xiao-Chun; Shi, Wen-Jing; Huang, Zhu-Yuan; Jin, Bo; Zhou, Yu-Kun

    2017-11-14

    In order to examine the origin of the drug action and design new DNA/RNA-targeted drugs, the cooperativity effect involving drug-DNA/RNA intermolecular interaction in ketoprofen⋯cytosine⋯H 2 O ternary system were investigated by the B3LYP, B3LYP-D3, and MP2 methods with the 6-311++G(2d,p) basis set. The thermodynamic cooperativity was also evaluated at 310.15 K. The N-H⋯O, O-H⋯O, O-H⋯N, C-H⋯N, and C-H⋯O H bonds coexist in ternary complexes. The intermolecular interactions obtained by B3LYP-D3 are close to those calculated by MP2. The steric effects and van der Waals interactions have little influence on the cooperativity effects. The anti-cooperativity effect in ket⋯cyt⋯H 2 O is far more notable than the cooperativity effect, and the stability of the cyclic structure with anti-cooperativity effect is higher than that of the linear structure with cooperativity effect, as is confirmed by the AIM (atoms in molecules) and RDG (reduced density gradient) analysis. Thus, it can be inferred that, in the presence of H 2 O, the anti-cooperativity effect plays a dominant role in the drug-DNA/RNA interaction, and the nature of the hydration in the binding of drugs to DNA/RNA bases is the H-bonding anti-cooperativity effect. Furthermore, the drug always links simultaneously with DNA/RNA base and H 2 O, and only in this way can the biological activity of drugs play a role. In most cases, the enthalpy change is the major factor driving the cooperativity, as is different from most of biomacromolecule complexes.

  8. Protein-ligand interfaces are polarized: discovery of a strong trend for intermolecular hydrogen bonds to favor donors on the protein side with implications for predicting and designing ligand complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschka, Sebastian; Wolf, Alex J; Bemister-Buffington, Joseph; Kuhn, Leslie A

    2018-04-01

    Understanding how proteins encode ligand specificity is fascinating and similar in importance to deciphering the genetic code. For protein-ligand recognition, the combination of an almost infinite variety of interfacial shapes and patterns of chemical groups makes the problem especially challenging. Here we analyze data across non-homologous proteins in complex with small biological ligands to address observations made in our inhibitor discovery projects: that proteins favor donating H-bonds to ligands and avoid using groups with both H-bond donor and acceptor capacity. The resulting clear and significant chemical group matching preferences elucidate the code for protein-native ligand binding, similar to the dominant patterns found in nucleic acid base-pairing. On average, 90% of the keto and carboxylate oxygens occurring in the biological ligands formed direct H-bonds to the protein. A two-fold preference was found for protein atoms to act as H-bond donors and ligand atoms to act as acceptors, and 76% of all intermolecular H-bonds involved an amine donor. Together, the tight chemical and geometric constraints associated with satisfying donor groups generate a hydrogen-bonding lock that can be matched only by ligands bearing the right acceptor-rich key. Measuring an index of H-bond preference based on the observed chemical trends proved sufficient to predict other protein-ligand complexes and can be used to guide molecular design. The resulting Hbind and Protein Recognition Index software packages are being made available for rigorously defining intermolecular H-bonds and measuring the extent to which H-bonding patterns in a given complex match the preference key.

  9. Protein-ligand interfaces are polarized: discovery of a strong trend for intermolecular hydrogen bonds to favor donors on the protein side with implications for predicting and designing ligand complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raschka, Sebastian; Wolf, Alex J.; Bemister-Buffington, Joseph; Kuhn, Leslie A.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding how proteins encode ligand specificity is fascinating and similar in importance to deciphering the genetic code. For protein-ligand recognition, the combination of an almost infinite variety of interfacial shapes and patterns of chemical groups makes the problem especially challenging. Here we analyze data across non-homologous proteins in complex with small biological ligands to address observations made in our inhibitor discovery projects: that proteins favor donating H-bonds to ligands and avoid using groups with both H-bond donor and acceptor capacity. The resulting clear and significant chemical group matching preferences elucidate the code for protein-native ligand binding, similar to the dominant patterns found in nucleic acid base-pairing. On average, 90% of the keto and carboxylate oxygens occurring in the biological ligands formed direct H-bonds to the protein. A two-fold preference was found for protein atoms to act as H-bond donors and ligand atoms to act as acceptors, and 76% of all intermolecular H-bonds involved an amine donor. Together, the tight chemical and geometric constraints associated with satisfying donor groups generate a hydrogen-bonding lock that can be matched only by ligands bearing the right acceptor-rich key. Measuring an index of H-bond preference based on the observed chemical trends proved sufficient to predict other protein-ligand complexes and can be used to guide molecular design. The resulting Hbind and Protein Recognition Index software packages are being made available for rigorously defining intermolecular H-bonds and measuring the extent to which H-bonding patterns in a given complex match the preference key.

  10. PCF File Format.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoreson, Gregory G [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    PCF files are binary files designed to contain gamma spectra and neutron count rates from radiation sensors. It is the native format for the GAmma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS) package [1]. It can contain multiple spectra and information about each spectrum such as energy calibration. This document outlines the format of the file that would allow one to write a computer program to parse and write such files.

  11. Plant Formate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Markwell

    2005-01-10

    The research in this study identified formate dehydrogenase, an enzyme that plays a metabolic role on the periphery of one-carbon metabolism, has an unusual localization in Arabidopsis thaliana and that the enzyme has an unusual kinetic plasticity. These properties make it possible that this enzyme could be engineered to attempt to engineer plants with an improved photosynthetic efficiency. We have produced transgenic Arabidopsis and tobacco plants with increased expression of the formate dehydrogenase enzyme to initiate further studies.

  12. Peptide insertion, positioning, and stabilization in a membrane: insight from an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babakhani, Arneh; Gorfe, Alemayehu A; Gullingsrud, Justin; Kim, Judy E; Andrew McCammon, J

    Peptide insertion, positioning, and stabilization in a model membrane are probed via an all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. One peptide (WL5) is simulated in each leaflet of a solvated dimyristoylglycero-3-phosphate (DMPC) membrane. Within the first 5 ns, the peptides spontaneously insert into the membrane and then stabilize during the remaining 70 ns of simulation time. In both leaflets, the peptides localize to the membrane interface, and this localization is attributed to the formation of peptide-lipid hydrogen bonds. We show that the single tryptophan residue in each peptide contributes significantly to these hydrogen bonds; specifically, the nitrogen heteroatom of the indole ring plays a critical role. The tilt angles of the indole rings relative to the membrane normal in the upper and lower leaflets are approximately 26 degrees and 54 degrees , respectively. The tilt angles of the entire peptide chain are 62 degrees and 74 degrees . The membrane induces conformations of the peptide that are characteristic of beta-sheets, and the peptide enhances the lipid ordering in the membrane. Finally, the diffusion rate of the peptides in the membrane plane is calculated (based on experimental peptide concentrations) to be approximately 6 A(2)/ns, thus suggesting a 500 ns time scale for intermolecular interactions.

  13. Adsorption of organic molecules may explain growth of newly nucleated clusters and new particle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wexler, Anthony S.

    2013-05-01

    New particle formation consists of formation of thermodynamically stable clusters from trace gas molecules (homogeneous nucleation) followed by growth of these clusters to a detectable size. Because of the large coagulation rate of clusters smaller than 3 nm with the preexisting aerosol population, for new particle formation to take place, these clusters need to grow sufficiently fast to escape removal by coagulation. Previous studies have indicated that condensation of low-volatility organic vapor may play an important role in the initial growth of the clusters. However, due to the relatively high vapor pressure and partial molar volume of even highly oxidized organic compounds, the strong Kelvin effect may prevent typical ambient organics from condensing on these small clusters. Earlier studies did not consider that adsorption of organic molecules on the cluster surface, due to the intermolecular forces between the organic molecule and cluster, may occur and substantially alter the growth process under sub-saturated conditions. Using the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) isotherm, we show that the adsorption of organic molecules onto the surface of clusters may significantly reduce the saturation ratio required for condensation of organics to occur, and therefore may provide a physico-chemical explanation for the enhanced initial growth by condensation of organics despite the strong Kelvin effect.

  14. New polymers containing BF2-benzoylacetonate groups. Synthesis, luminescence, excimer and exciplex formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorenko, Elena V.; Mirochnik, Anatolii G.; Beloliptsev, Anton Yu.

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, a new synthetic method for the functionalization of polystyrene (PS) and (styrene-methyl methacrylate) copolymer has been developed. Using the new method, polymers containing BF 2 -benzoylacetonate groups have been obtained through double acylation by acetic anhydride with boron trifluoride. Luminescence of the produced polymers in solutions and films has been studied. Quantum yields of polymer solution luminescence are significantly higher than those of the low-molecular-weight analog – boron difluoride benzoylacetonate. For the polymer, in which styrene fragments are separated by methyl methacrylate groups, at low concentrations of the polymer in solution one observes the monomer luminescence of BF 2 -benzoylacetonate groups, while at high concentrations – the excimer luminescence. In case of PS-based polymers, in which BF 2 -benzoylacetonate groups and phenyl rings are not separated, in diluted solutions one observes the fluorescence of the intramolecular exciplexes, while at the concentration increase – the luminescence of intermolecular exciplexes. The ability of excimer formation is responsible for the increased photostability of the produced polymers. - Highlights: •Polymers containing BF 2 -benzoylacetonate groups have been synthesized. •Luminescence of the produced polymers in solutions and films has been studied. •Formation of excimers and exciplexes in solution has been revealed. •Formation of excimers in films increases their photostability.

  15. The standard enthalpies of formation of L-asparagine and L-{alpha}-glutamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contineanu, Iulia, E-mail: icontineanu@yahoo.com [Institute of Physical Chemistry ' I.G. Murgulescu' , Spl. Independentei 202, Bucharest (Romania); Neacsu, Ana, E-mail: anna_matache@yahoo.com [Institute of Physical Chemistry ' I.G. Murgulescu' , Spl. Independentei 202, Bucharest (Romania); Perisanu, Stefan T., E-mail: stefan.perisanu@upb.ro [Laboratory of General Chemistry, Polytechnic University of Bucharest, str. Polizu nr. 1, Bucuresti (Romania)

    2010-01-10

    The energies of combustion of L-asparagine and L-{alpha}-glutamine were measured in a static bomb adiabatic calorimeter. Corrections were made for the heats due to the ignition of sample and for the nitric acid formation. The derived enthalpies of formation in solid state of asparagine monohydrate, nonhydrated asparagine and glutamine are respectively -1084.1 {+-} 3.0, -788.1 {+-} 4.7 and -834.3 {+-} 4.6 kJ mol{sup -1}. The data of enthalpy of formation are compared with the literature values and with estimated values by means of group additivity, using parameters recommended by Domalski and Hearing. The discrepancies between experimental and calculated values are explained by considering the number and strength of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. The dehydration of asparagine monohydrate and the possible melting of the three amino acids were investigated by means of DSC. Glutamine melts without considerable decomposition at about 182 {sup o}C, while asparagines decompose during the fusion process (208 {sup o}C).

  16. New polymers containing BF{sub 2}-benzoylacetonate groups. Synthesis, luminescence, excimer and exciplex formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorenko, Elena V., E-mail: gev@ich.dvo.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 159, Prosp. 100 letiya Vladivostoka, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Mirochnik, Anatolii G.; Beloliptsev, Anton Yu. [Institute of Chemistry, Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 159, Prosp. 100 letiya Vladivostoka, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    In the present study, a new synthetic method for the functionalization of polystyrene (PS) and (styrene-methyl methacrylate) copolymer has been developed. Using the new method, polymers containing BF{sub 2}-benzoylacetonate groups have been obtained through double acylation by acetic anhydride with boron trifluoride. Luminescence of the produced polymers in solutions and films has been studied. Quantum yields of polymer solution luminescence are significantly higher than those of the low-molecular-weight analog – boron difluoride benzoylacetonate. For the polymer, in which styrene fragments are separated by methyl methacrylate groups, at low concentrations of the polymer in solution one observes the monomer luminescence of BF{sub 2}-benzoylacetonate groups, while at high concentrations – the excimer luminescence. In case of PS-based polymers, in which BF{sub 2}-benzoylacetonate groups and phenyl rings are not separated, in diluted solutions one observes the fluorescence of the intramolecular exciplexes, while at the concentration increase – the luminescence of intermolecular exciplexes. The ability of excimer formation is responsible for the increased photostability of the produced polymers. - Highlights: •Polymers containing BF{sub 2}-benzoylacetonate groups have been synthesized. •Luminescence of the produced polymers in solutions and films has been studied. •Formation of excimers and exciplexes in solution has been revealed. •Formation of excimers in films increases their photostability.

  17. Blistering and bubble formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.

    1976-01-01

    Blister formation in metals has been observed during bombardment with inert-gas ions in the energy range between 1 and 2000 keV at doses of about 10 17 to 10 19 cm -2 . The changes in surface topography and the erosion yields were mainly studied in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Additionally the release of the implanted gas during blister formation was observed. Recently measurements on single crystals were performed determining simultaneously the implantation profile, the total amount of trapped ions, the depth distribution of the induced lattice damage and the thickness of the covers of the blisters. In several stages of the formation process of blisters the implanted layer was observed in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) showing the formation of gas bubbles. Using the results of all these measurements in this review an attempt is made to develop a model of blister formation combining the effects of hydrostatic pressure in the gas bubbles and lateral stress due to volume swelling. (author)

  18. Vascular lumen formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammert, Eckhard; Axnick, Jennifer

    2012-04-01

    The vascular system developed early in evolution. It is required in large multicellular organisms for the transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products to and from tissues. The vascular system is composed of hollow tubes, which have a high level of complexity in vertebrates. Vasculogenesis describes the de novo formation of blood vessels, e.g., aorta formation in vertebrate embryogenesis. In contrast, angiogenesis is the formation of blood vessels from preexisting ones, e.g., sprouting of intersomitic blood vessels from the aorta. Importantly, the lumen of all blood vessels in vertebrates is lined and formed by endothelial cells. In both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, lumen formation takes place in a cord of endothelial cells. It involves a complex molecular mechanism composed of endothelial cell repulsion at the cell-cell contacts within the endothelial cell cords, junctional rearrangement, and endothelial cell shape change. As the vascular system also participates in the course of many diseases, such as cancer, stroke, and myocardial infarction, it is important to understand and make use of the molecular mechanisms of blood vessel formation to better understand and manipulate the pathomechanisms involved.

  19. Unified interpretation of exciplex formation and marcus electron transfer on the basis of two-dimensional free energy surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Shigeo; Tachiya, M

    2007-09-27

    The mechanism of exciplex formation proposed in a previous paper has been refined to show how exciplex formation and Marcus electron transfer (ET) in fluorescence quenching are related to each other. This was done by making simple calculations of the free energies of the initial (DA*) and final (D+A-) states of ET. First it was shown that the decrease in D-A distance can induce intermolecular ET even in nonpolar solvents where solvent orientational polarization is absent, and that it leads to exciplex formation. This is consistent with experimental results that exciplex is most often observed in nonpolar solvents. The calculation was then extended to ET in polar solvents where the free energies are functions of both D-A distance and solvent orientational polarization. This enabled us to discuss both exciplex formation and Marcus ET in the same D-A pair and solvent on the basis of 2-dimensional free energy surfaces. The surfaces contain more information about the rates of these reactions, the mechanism of fluorescence quenching by ET, etc., than simple reaction schemes. By changing the parameters such as the free energy change of reaction, solvent dielectric constants, etc., one can construct the free energy surfaces for various systems. The effects of free energy change of reaction and of solvent polarity on the mechanism and relative importance of exciplex formation and Marcus ET in fluorescence quenching can be well explained. The free energy surface will also be useful for discussion of other phenomena related to ET reactions.

  20. Meningococcal biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappann, M.; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Claus, H.

    2006-01-01

    We show that in a standardized in vitro flow system unencapsulated variants of genetically diverse lineages of Neisseria meningitidis formed biofilms, that could be maintained for more than 96 h. Biofilm cells were resistant to penicillin, but not to rifampin or ciprofloxacin. For some strains......, microcolony formation within biofilms was observed. Microcolony formation in strain MC58 depended on a functional copy of the pilE gene encoding the pilus subunit pilin, and was associated with twitching of cells. Nevertheless, unpiliated pilE mutants formed biofilms showing that attachment and accumulation......X alleles was identified among genetically diverse meningococcal strains. PilX alleles differed in their propensity to support autoaggregation of cells in suspension, but not in their ability to support microcolony formation within biofilms in the continuous flow system....

  1. Tritiated ammonia formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    When nitrogen was selected as the glovebox atmosphere for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a concern was raised as to the possibility of tritiated ammonia formation in the gloveboxes. Experimental data were produced to study the tritiated ammonia formation rate in a tritium and nitrogen mixture. A rate equation that closely simulates the experimental data was developed. This rate equation can be used to calculate the formation of tritiated ammonia from different concentrations of tritium and nitrogen. The reaction of T 2 and N 2 to form NT 3 is a slow process, particularly when the tritium concentration is low. The reaction requires weeks or months to reach radiochemical equilibrium dependent on the concentrations of the reactants. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  2. Galaxy formation and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, Houjun; White, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of galaxy formation lies at the interface between astronomy, particle physics, and cosmology. Covering diverse topics from these disciplines, all of which are needed to understand how galaxies form and evolve, this book is ideal for researchers entering the field. Individual chapters explore the evolution of the Universe as a whole and its particle and radiation content; linear and nonlinear growth of cosmic structure; processes affecting the gaseous and dark matter components of galaxies and their stellar populations; the formation of spiral and elliptical galaxies; central supermassive black holes and the activity associated with them; galaxy interactions; and the intergalactic medium. Emphasizing both observational and theoretical aspects, this book provides a coherent introduction for astronomers, cosmologists, and astroparticle physicists to the broad range of science underlying the formation and evolution of galaxies.

  3. Observsational Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruobing; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Fung, Jeffrey

    2017-06-01

    Planets form in gaseous protoplanetary disks surrounding newborn stars. As such, the most direct way to learn how they form from observations, is to directly watch them forming in disks. In the past, this was very difficult due to a lack of observational capabilities; as such, planet formation was largely a subject of pure theoretical astrophysics. Now, thanks to a fleet of new instruments with unprecedented resolving power that have come online recently, we have just started to unveil features in resolve images of protoplanetary disks, such as gaps and spiral arms, that are most likely associated with embedded (unseen) planets. By comparing observations with theoretical models of planet-disk interactions, the masses and orbits of these still forming planets may be constrained. Such planets may help us to directly test various planet formation models. This marks the onset of a new field — observational planet formation. I will introduce the current status of this field.

  4. Forces in strategy formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensen, Elmer Fly; Sanchez, Ron

    2008-01-01

    This chapter proposes that organizational strategy formation should be characterized theoretically as a process that is subject to several interacting forces, rather than represented by separate discrete decisionmodels or theoretic perspectives, as is commonly done in the strategic management...... literature. Based on an extensive review of relevant theory and empirical work in strategic decision-making, organizational change theory, cognitive and social psychology, and strategy processes, seven kinds of ''forces'' - rational, imposed, teleological, learning, political, heuristic, and social...... - are identified as interacting in and having significant influence on the strategy formation process. It is further argued that by applying a holistic ''forces-view'' of the significant and interacting influences on strategy formation, we can better understand the dynamics and challenges in managing the process...

  5. Planetesimals and Planet Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, John

    The first step in the standard model for planet formation is the growth of gravitationally bound bodies called ``planetesimals'' from dust grains in a protoplanetary disk. Currently, we do not know how planetesimals form, how long they take to form, or what their sizes and mechanical properties are. The goal of this proposal is to assess how these uncertainties affect subsequent stages of planetary growth and the kind of planetary systems that form. The work will address three particular questions: (i) Can the properties of small body populations in the modern Solar System constrain the properties of planetesimals? (ii) How do the properties of planetesimals affect the formation of giant planets? (iii) How does the presence of a water ice condensation front (the ``snow line'') in a disk affect planetesimal formation and the later stages of planetary growth? These questions will be examined with computer simulations of planet formation using new computer codes to be developed as part of the proposal. The first question will be addressed using a statistical model for planetesimal coagulation and fragmentation. This code will be merged with the proposer's Mercury N-body integrator code to model the dynamics of large protoplanets in order to address the second question. Finally, a self- consistent model of disk evolution and the radial transport of water ice and vapour will be added to examine the third question. A theoretical understanding of how planets form is one of the key goals of NASA and the Origins of Solar Systems programme. Researchers have carried out many studies designed to address this goal, but the questions of how planetesimals form and how their properties affect planet formation have received relatively little attention. The proposed work will help address these unsolved questions, and place other research in context by assessing the importance of planetesimal origins and properties for planet formation.

  6. Superclusters and galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einasto, J.; Joeveer, M.; Saar, E.

    1979-01-01

    The spatial distribution of Galaxies and Galaxy congestions in the southern galactic hemisphere is studied. The rich galaxy congestions, containing many elliptic Galaxies and radiogalaxies, are linked with each other by chains of scanty congestions with moderate content of elliptic Galaxies and radiogalaxies. The flat formation, linking the density pikes and the intermediate chains, can reasonably be called supercongestion. In the central region of supercongestions there is a thin layer of Galaxies consisting of only spiral Galaxies. The neighbouring supercongestions touch each other, while the intersupercongestion space contains no Galaxy congestions and almost no Galaxies. It is shown that such a structure was, apparently, formed before the formation of Galaxies

  7. Formation of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szalay, A.S.

    1984-12-01

    The present theories of galaxy formation are reviewed. The relation between peculiar velocities and the correlation function of galaxies points to the possibility that galaxies do not form uniformly everywhere. Scale invariant properties of the cluster-cluster correlations are discussed. Comparing the correlation functions in a dimensionless way, galaxies appear to be stronger clustered, in contrast with the comparison of the dimensional amplitudes of the correlation functions. Theoretical implications of several observations as Lyman-α clouds, correlations of faint galaxies are discussed. None of the present theories of galaxy formation can account for all facts in a natural way. 29 references

  8. The formation of stars

    CERN Document Server

    Stahler, Steven W

    2008-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive treatment of star formation, one of the most active fields of modern astronomy. The reader is guided through the subject in a logically compelling manner. Starting from a general description of stars and interstellar clouds, the authors delineate the earliest phases of stellar evolution. They discuss formation activity not only in the Milky Way, but also in other galaxies, both now and in the remote past. Theory and observation are thoroughly integrated, with the aid of numerous figures and images. In summary, this volume is an invaluable resource, both as a text f

  9. Densities and Kinematic Viscosities for the Systems Benzene + Methyl Formate, Benzene + Ethyl Formate, Benzene + Propyl Formate, and Benzene + Butyl Formate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emmerling, Uwe; Rasmussen, Peter

    1998-01-01

    a Redlich-Kister type of expression with temperature-independent parameters and the data for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate with temperature-dependent parameters. The viscosities have furthermore been compared to values predicted by means of the GC......Densities and kinematic viscosities have been measured for the system benzene + methyl formate at 20°C and for the systems benzene + ethyl formate, benzene + propyl formate, and benzene + butyl formate from 20°C to 50°C. The results for the system benzene + methyl formate have been correlated using...

  10. MIiSR: Molecular Interactions in Super-Resolution Imaging Enables the Analysis of Protein Interactions, Dynamics and Formation of Multi-protein Structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana A Caetano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms which regulate cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking has been enabled by conventional biochemical and microscopy techniques. However, these methods often obscure the heterogeneity of the cellular environment, thus precluding a quantitative assessment of the molecular interactions regulating these processes. Herein, we present Molecular Interactions in Super Resolution (MIiSR software which provides quantitative analysis tools for use with super-resolution images. MIiSR combines multiple tools for analyzing intermolecular interactions, molecular clustering and image segmentation. These tools enable quantification, in the native environment of the cell, of molecular interactions and the formation of higher-order molecular complexes. The capabilities and limitations of these analytical tools are demonstrated using both modeled data and examples derived from the vesicular trafficking system, thereby providing an established and validated experimental workflow capable of quantitatively assessing molecular interactions and molecular complex formation within the heterogeneous environment of the cell.

  11. Barrier cell sheath formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesner, J.

    1980-04-01

    The solution for electrostatic potential within a simply modeled tandem mirror thermal barrier is seen to exhibit a sheath at each edge of the cell. The formation of the sheath requires ion collisionality and the analysis assmes that the collisional trapping rate into the barrier is considerably slower than the barrier pump rate

  12. Formation of topological defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vachaspati, T.

    1991-01-01

    We consider the formation of point and line topological defects (monopoles and strings) from a general point of view by allowing the probability of formation of a defect to vary. To investigate the statistical properties of the defects at formation we give qualitative arguments that are independent of any particular model in which such defects occur. These arguments are substantiated by numerical results in the case of strings and for monopoles in two dimensions. We find that the network of strings at formation undergoes a transition at a certain critical density below which there are no infinite strings and the closed-string (loop) distribution is exponentially suppressed at large lengths. The results are contrasted with the results of statistical arguments applied to a box of strings in dynamical equilibrium. We argue that if point defects were to form with smaller probability, the distance between monopoles and antimonopoles would decrease while the monopole-to-monopole distance would increase. We find that monopoles are always paired with antimonopoles but the pairing becomes clean only when the number density of defects is small. A similar reasoning would also apply to other defects

  13. The formation of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, J.E.

    1983-01-01

    The presently fashionable ideas for galaxy formation are reviewed briefly, and it is concluded that the standard isothermal heirarchy fits the available data best. A simple infall picture is presented which explains many of the observed properties of disk galaxies. (orig.)

  14. Reconsidering Formative Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Roy D.; Breivik, Einar; Wilcox, James B.

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between observable responses and the latent constructs they are purported to measure has received considerable attention recently, with particular focus on what has become known as formative measurement. This alternative to reflective measurement in the area of theory-testing research is examined in the context of the potential…

  15. Chlorination and chloramines formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Lim Fang; Mohd Pauzi Abdullah; Sadia Ata; Abbas Abdullah; Basar IShak; Khairul Nidzham

    2008-01-01

    Chlorination is the most important method of disinfection in Malaysia which aims at ensuring an acceptable and safe drinking water quality. The dosing of chlorine to surface water containing ammonia and nitrogen compounds may form chloramines in the treated water. During this reaction, inorganic and organic chloramines are formed. The recommended maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for chloramines in drinking water is 3000 μg/L. The production of monochloramine, dichloramine and trichloramine is highly dependent upon pH, contact time and the chlorine to ammonia molar ratio. The purpose of this study is to examine the formation of chloramines that occur upon the chlorination during the treatment process. Chloramines were determined using the N,N-diethyl-p-phenylenediamine (DPD) colorimetric method. The influences of ammonia, pH and chlorine dosage on the chloramines formation were also studied. This paper presents a modeling approach based on regression analysis which is designed to estimate the formation of chloramines. The correlation between the concentration of chloramines and the ammonia, pH and chlorine dosage was examined. In all cases, the quantity of chloramines formed depended linearly upon the amount of chlorine dosage. On the basis of this study it reveals that the concentration of chloramines is a function of chlorine dosage and the ammonia concentration to the chlorination process. PH seems to not significantly affect the formation of chloramines. (author)

  16. Temperature controlled 'void' formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, P.; Sharma, B.D.

    1975-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of voids in structural materials during high temperature deformation or irradiation is essentially dependent upon the existence of 'vacancy supersaturation'. The role of temperature dependent diffusion processes in 'void' formation under varying conditions, and the mechanical property changes associated with this microstructure are briefly reviewed. (author)

  17. Triggered star formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palouš, Jan; Ehlerová, Soňa

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2002), s. 35-36 ISSN 1405-2059 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA3003705; GA AV ČR KSK1048102 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1003909 Keywords : interstellar medium * star formation * HI shells Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  18. Syntactic Formats for Free

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klin, Bartek; Sobocinski, Pawel

    2003-01-01

    A framework of Plotkin and Turi’s, originally aimed at providing an abstract notion of bi-simulation, is modified to cover other operational equivalences and preorders. Combined with bi-algebraic methods, it yields a technique for the derivation of syntactic formats for transition system specific...

  19. Formation of double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.; Wong, A.Y.; Quon, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on both stationary and propagating double layers and a related analytical model are described. Stationary double layers were produced in a multiple plasma device, in which an electron drift current was present. An investigation of the plasma parameters for the stable double layer condition is described. The particle distribution in the stable double layer establishes a potential profile, which creates electron and ion beams that excite plasma instabilities. The measured characteristics of the instabilities are consistent with the existence of the double layer. Propagating double layers are formed when the initial electron drift current is large. Ths slopes of the transition region increase as they propagate. A physical model for the formation of a double layer in the experimental device is described. This model explains the formation of the low potential region on the basis of the space charge. This space charge is created by the electron drift current. The model also accounts for the role of ions in double layer formation and explains the formation of moving double layers. (Auth.)

  20. The 'partial resonance' of the ring in the NLO crystal melaminium formate: study using vibrational spectra, DFT, HOMO-LUMO and MESP mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binoy, J; Marchewka, M K; Jayakumar, V S

    2013-03-01

    The molecular geometry and vibrational spectral investigations of melaminium formate, a potential material known for toxicity and NLO activity, has been performed. The FT IR and FT Raman spectral investigations of melaminium formate is performed aided by the computed spectra of melaminium formate, triazine, melamine, melaminium and formate ion, along with bond orders and PED, computed using the density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-31G(d) basis set and XRD data, to reveal intermolecular interactions of amino groups with neighbor formula units in the crystal, intramolecular H⋯H repulsion of amino group hydrogen with protonating hydrogen, consequent loss of resonance in the melaminium ring, restriction of resonance to N(3)C(1)N(1) moiety leading to special type resonance of the ring and the resonance structure of CO(2) group of formate ion. The 3D matrix of hyperpolarizability tensor components has been computed to quantify NLO activity of melamine, melaminium and melaminium formate and the hyperpolarizability enhancement is analyzed using computed plots of HOMO and LUMO orbitals. A new mechanism of proton transfer responsible for NLO activity has been suggested, based on anomalous IR spectral bands in the high wavenumber region. The computed MEP contour maps have been used to analyze the interaction of melaminium and formate ions in the crystal. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The `partial resonance' of the ring in the NLO crystal melaminium formate: Study using vibrational spectra, DFT, HOMO-LUMO and MESP mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binoy, J.; Marchewka, M. K.; Jayakumar, V. S.

    2013-03-01

    The molecular geometry and vibrational spectral investigations of melaminium formate, a potential material known for toxicity and NLO activity, has been performed. The FT IR and FT Raman spectral investigations of melaminium formate is performed aided by the computed spectra of melaminium formate, triazine, melamine, melaminium and formate ion, along with bond orders and PED, computed using the density functional method (B3LYP) with 6-31G(d) basis set and XRD data, to reveal intermolecular interactions of amino groups with neighbor formula units in the crystal, intramolecular H⋯H repulsion of amino group hydrogen with protonating hydrogen, consequent loss of resonance in the melaminium ring, restriction of resonance to N3C1N1 moiety leading to special type resonance of the ring and the resonance structure of CO2 group of formate ion. The 3D matrix of hyperpolarizability tensor components has been computed to quantify NLO activity of melamine, melaminium and melaminium formate and the hyperpolarizability enhancement is analyzed using computed plots of HOMO and LUMO orbitals. A new mechanism of proton transfer responsible for NLO activity has been suggested, based on anomalous IR spectral bands in the high wavenumber region. The computed MEP contour maps have been used to analyze the interaction of melaminium and formate ions in the crystal.

  2. COMPETENCYTHE FORMATION FOR LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Mederos-Piñeiro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation of life competences is the result of a quality education that prepares students to meet the challenges of a fast moving world where equality and equal opportunities should constitute premises of education; training them is a challenge teachers to assume new generations contribute actively to a better world. In Cuba are important research on the formation of communication competences and self-regulated learning in primary school. The paper shows the result of an investigation that provides a methodology for the formation of life competences in primary school education, used as an essential pathway research activity. The methodological approach of research has a quantitative approach and an explanatory scope to establish and make sense of understanding the causal relationship between the direction of research activity and training of life competences. Theoretical, empirical and mathematical-statistical, for characterizing the initial state, processing of results and analysis: research methods are used. The application of the methodology for the formation of life competences makes teachers lead the teaching-learning process with a research and transforming teaching concept, where the school is the protagonist of their learning and causes changes in their performances, which are evident in the formed competences related to effective and affective communication; the solution of problems related to life; the use of means in obtaining the knowledge and the expression of a behavior consistent with school and social demands. The effectiveness of the methodology confirms that there is a causal relationship between the direction of research activity by teachers and the formation of life competences in school.

  3. Matrix-isolation studies on the radiation-induced chemistry in H₂O/CO₂ systems: reactions of oxygen atoms and formation of HOCO radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazantsev, Sergey V; Feldman, Vladimir I

    2015-03-19

    The radiation-induced transformations occurring upon X-ray irradiation of solid CO2/H2O/Ng systems (Ng = Ar, Kr, Xe) at 8-10 K and subsequent annealing up to 45 K were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The infrared (IR) spectra of deposited matrices revealed the presence of isolated monomers, dimers, and intermolecular H2O···CO2 complexes. Irradiation resulted in effective decomposition of matrix-isolated carbon dioxide and water yielding CO molecules and OH radicals, respectively. Annealing of the irradiated samples led to formation of O3, HO2, and a number of xenon hydrides of HXeY type (in the case of xenon matrices). The formation of these species was used for monitoring of the postirradiation thermally induced chemical reactions involving O and H atoms generated by radiolysis. It was shown that the radiolysis of CO2 in noble-gas matrices produced high yields of stabilized oxygen atoms. In all cases, the temperatures at which O atoms become mobile and react are lower than those of H atoms. Dynamics and reactivity of oxygen atoms was found to be independent of the precursor nature. In addition, the formation of HOCO radicals was observed in all the noble-gas matrices at remarkably low temperatures. The IR spectra of HOCO and DOCO were first characterized in krypton and xenon matrices. It was concluded that the formation of HOCO was mainly due to the radiation-induced evolution of the weakly bound H2O···CO2 complexes. This result indicates the significance of weak intermolecular interactions in the radiation-induced chemical processes in inert low-temperature media.

  4. Effect of homogenisation in formation of thermally induced aggregates in a non- and low- fat milk model system with microparticulated whey proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Isabel Celigueta; Nieto, Gema; Nylander, Tommy; Simonsen, Adam Cohen; Tolkach, Alexander; Ipsen, Richard

    2017-05-01

    The objective of the research presented in this paper was to investigate how different characteristics of whey protein microparticles (MWP) added to milk as fat replacers influence intermolecular interactions occurring with other milk proteins during homogenisation and heating. These interactions are responsible for the formation of heat-induced aggregates that influence the texture and sensory characteristics of the final product. The formation of heat-induced complexes was studied in non- and low-fat milk model systems, where microparticulated whey protein (MWP) was used as fat replacer. Five MWP types with different particle characteristics were utilised and three heat treatments used: 85 °C for 15 min, 90 °C for 5 min and 95 °C for 2 min. Surface characteristics of the protein aggregates were expressed as the number of available thiol groups and the surface net charge. Intermolecular interactions involved in the formation of protein aggregates were studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the final complexes visualised by darkfield microscopy. Homogenisation of non-fat milk systems led to partial adsorption of caseins onto microparticles, independently of the type of microparticle. On the contrary, homogenisation of low-fat milk resulted in preferential adsorption of caseins onto fat globules, rather than onto microparticles. Further heating of the milk, led to the formation of heat induced complexes with different sizes and characteristics depending on the type of MWP and the presence or not of fat. The results highlight the importance of controlling homogenisation and heat processing in yoghurt manufacture in order to induce desired changes in the surface reactivity of the microparticles and thereby promote effective protein interactions.

  5. Medusae Fossae Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 10 April 2002) The Science This THEMIS visible image was acquired near 7o S, 172o W (188o E) and shows a remarkable martian geologic deposit known as the Medusae Fossae Formation. This Formation, seen here as the raised plateau in the upper two-thirds of the image, is a soft, easily eroded deposit that extends for nearly 1,000 km along the equator of Mars. In this region the deposit has been heavily eroded by the wind to produce a series of linear ridges called yardangs. These parallel ridges point in direction of the prevailing winds that carved them, and demonstrate the power of martian winds to sculpt the dry landscape of Mars. The Medusae Fossae Formation has been completely stripped from the surface in the lower third of the image, revealing a harder layer below that is more resistant to wind erosion. The easily eroded nature of the Medusae Fossae Formation suggests that it is composed of weakly cemented particles, and was most likely formed by the deposition of wind-blown dust or volcanic ash. Several ancient craters that were once completely buried by this deposit are being exposed, or exhumed, as the overlying Medusae Formation is removed. Very few impact craters are visible on this Formation, indicating that the surface seen today is relatively young, and that the processes of erosion are likely to be actively occurring. The Story Medusa of Greek mythology fame, the name-giver to this region, had snaky locks of hair that could turn a person to stone. Wild and unruly, this monster of the underworld could certainly wreak havoc on the world of the human imagination. As scary as she was, Medusa would have no advantage over the fierce, masterful winds blowing across Mars, which once carved the streaky, terrain at the top of this image. Wild and whipping, these winds have slowly eroded away the 'topsoil,' revealing ancient craters and other surface features they once covered. The loosely cemented particles of this 'topsoil' are likely made up of dust

  6. Efficiency of the intermolecular interaction of salicylic acid neutral form and monoanion with Cd2 + ion studied by methods of absorption and fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrik, N. L.; Mulloev, N. U.

    2018-02-01

    The methods of absorption and fluorescence were used to study the efficiency of the interaction between salicylic acid derivatives SAD (neutral SA form and SA monoanion) and Cd2 + ions (in CdBr2 salt) within the range pH = 1.5 ÷ 8. The efficiency was determined from the change in both the absorption band contour and the fluorescence intensity of various SAD forms. It has been established that depending on the SAD form, the addition of CdBr2 to a starting solution leads to the formation of additional absorption for both the shorter wave lengths in the absorption spectrum of the neutral form (at pH 4). In the fluorescence spectra, the intensity was observed to increase for the neutral SAD form (at pH 4) after addition of CdBr2. The spectral changes were interpreted in the framework of common notions about the effect of three physicochemical factors that determine the interaction between the SAD and the Cd2 + ion and affect the parameters of absorption and fluorescence spectra. These factors are: (1) the decrease in pH after addition of CdBr2 to the SAD solution, (2) the decrease in the efficiency of the H-bonding of SAD molecules to the water ones, and (3) the existence of electrostatic ion-ion interaction between the HSal- monoanion and the Cd2 + ion. The bimolecular fluorescence quenching constants Kq of HSal- monoanion fluorescence quenching by the Cd2 + ion appeared to be substantially less than those of the quenching which would follow either the dynamic (diffusion) or the concentration (static) mechanisms.

  7. Cocrystals of kaempferol, quercetin and myricetin with 4,4‧-bipyridine: Crystal structures, analyses of intermolecular interactions and antibacterial properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Nan; Yin, He-Mei; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Da-Jun; Su, Xin; Kuang, Hai-Xue

    2017-02-01

    With an aim to explore the interactions of Osbnd H⋯N between hydroxyl moiety of the flavonoids and the pyridyl ring of N-containing aromatic amines, three flavonols with varying B-ring-hydroxyl groups (kaempferol, quercetin, and myricetin) were selected to combine with 4,4‧-bipyridine. As a result, three new cocrystals of flavonols were obtained with a solution evaporation approach. These three cocrystals were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, XPRD, IR and NMR methods. The resulting cocrystals were kaempferol: 4,4‧-bipyridine (2:1) (KAE·BPY·2H2O), quercetin: 4,4‧-bipyridine (1:1.5) (QUE·BPY), and myricetin: 4,4‧-bipyridine (1:2) (MYR·BPY·H2O). Structural analyses show that an array of hydrogen bonds and π-π stacking interactions interconnect the molecules to form a two-dimensional (2D) supramolecular layer in KAE·BPY·2H2O, QUE·BPY, and MYR·BPY·H2O. In the three cocrystals, they present as three different synthons-ⅠR88(58), Ⅳ R44(42) and, Ⅶ R66(29) with 4,4‧-bipyridine, respectively-which may yield a strategy for constructing the supramolecule. Cocrystals of flavonols combined with N-containing aromatic amines, 7-OH, B-ring-hydroxyl number and/or the location of the flavonols to play a significant part in extending the dimensionality of the cocrystals. The resulting motif formation and crystal packing in these flavonols cocrystals has combined with N-containing aromatic amines. Additionally, the antibacterial properties of the three cocrystals against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli) have been investigated.

  8. The triplet excited state of Bodipy: formation, modulation and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianzhang; Xu, Kejing; Yang, Wenbo; Wang, Zhijia; Zhong, Fangfang

    2015-12-21

    Boron dipyrromethene (Bodipy) is one of the most extensively investigated organic chromophores. Most of the investigations are focused on the singlet excited state of Bodipy, such as fluorescence. In stark contrast, the study of the triplet excited state of Bodipy is limited, but it is an emerging area, since the triplet state of Bodipy is tremendously important for several areas, such as the fundamental photochemistry study, photodynamic therapy (PDT), photocatalysis and triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) upconversion. The recent developments in the study of the production, modulation and application of the triplet excited state of Bodipy are discussed in this review article. The formation of the triplet state of Bodipy upon photoexcitation, via the well known approach such as the heavy atom effect (including I, Br, Ru, Ir, etc.), and the new methods, such as using a spin converter (e.g. C60), charge recombination, exciton coupling and the doubly substituted excited state, are summarized. All the Bodipy-based triplet photosensitizers show strong absorption of visible or near IR light and the long-lived triplet excited state, which are important for the application of the triplet excited state in PDT or photocatalysis. Moreover, the methods for switching (or modulation) of the triplet excited state of Bodipy were discussed, such as those based on the photo-induced electron transfer (PET), by controlling the competing Förster-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET), or the intermolecular charge transfer (ICT). Controlling the triplet excited state will give functional molecules such as activatable PDT reagents or molecular devices. It is worth noting that switching of the singlet excited state and the triplet state of Bodipy may follow different principles. Application of the triplet excited state of Bodipy in PDT, hydrogen (H2) production, photoredox catalytic organic reactions and TTA upconversion were discussed. The challenges and the opportunities in these areas were

  9. The format of things

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørnø, Rasmus Leth

    this conception is identified as “the Format of Things.” The format is embedded in our everyday thinking. In relation to design,it is found in the name taken by the design community, that is human-computer interaction (HCI), and it is mirrored in the desktop metaphor, wherein information is conceived...... available. It consists of philosophical considerations on matters of relevance for the design of interfaces. It takes the position that the graphical user interfaces of computers (the Desktop Metaphor or Windows, Icons, Menus, Pointers [‘WIMP’]) that ordinarily come to mind for most people are cognates......The development of novel interfaces is one of the most important current design challenges for the intellectual, cultural and cognitive evolution of human imagination and knowledge work. Unfortunately, the thinking surrounding this design challenge is heavily mired in conceptions that harbor...

  10. Plasma formation in TBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Bosco, E.

    1981-01-01

    In this work are presented and discussed results of the formation and equilibrium of the plasma current in TBR, a small tokamak, designed and contructed at the Instituto de Fisica of Universidade de Sao Paulo. The measured breakdown curves for H 2 , A and He are compared with the predictions of a simple model with reasonable agreement. The influence of stray magnetic fields in the plasma formation is investigated and conditions are chosen to facilitate the breakdown. The time profile of loop voltage and plasma current for shots with plasma equilibrium are shown. A comparison is made between experimental results and analytical-numerical model for tokamaks discharges with ohmic heating. Reasonable agreement is obtained when Z, effective atomic number, is assumed as a parameter. (Author) [pt

  11. Formation of coronal cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, C.H.; Suess, S.T.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Steinolfson, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical study of the formation of a coronal cavity and its relation to a quiescent prominence is presented. It is argued that the formation of a cavity is initiated by the condensation of plasma which is trapped by the coronal magnetic field in a closed streamer and which then flows down to the chromosphere along the field lines due to lack of stable magnetic support against gravity. The existence of a coronal cavity depends on the coronal magnetic field strength; with low strength, the plasma density is not high enough for condensation to occur. Furthermore, we suggest that prominence and cavity material is supplied from the chromospheric level. Whether a coronal cavity and a prominence coexist depends on the magnetic field configuration; a prominence requires stable magnetic support

  12. Understanding Alliance Formation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    military, transportation, and communications technologies, which caused every place in the world to be politically significant. Second, “divisions of power...test a similar claim about the association between distance and dyadic alliance formation. In their first model, in which they use the complete data...1885 to 1990] are positively related to dyadic trade levels, and that their non- defense-pact counterparts are not significantly related to trade in

  13. Alkali metal hydride formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of producing alkali metal hydrides by absorbing hydrogen gas under pressure into a mixture of lower alkyl mono amines and alkali metal alkyl amides selected from sodium and potassium amides formed from said amines. The present invention also includes purification of a mixture of the amines and amides which contain impurities, such as is used as a catalytic exchange liquid in the enrichment of deuterium, involving the formation of the alkali metal hydride

  14. Formation of TRAPPIST-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormel, C. W.; Liu, B.; Schoonenberg, D.

    2017-09-01

    We present a model for the formation of the recently-discovered TRAPPIST-1 planetary system. In our scenario planets form in the interior regions, by accretion of mm to cm-size particles (pebbles) that drifted from the outer disk. This scenario has several advantages: it connects to the observation that disks are made up of pebbles, it is efficient, it explains why the TRAPPIST-1 planets are ˜Earth mass, and it provides a rationale for the system's architecture.

  15. THE ALLIANCE FORMATION PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Whipple, Judith M.; Frankel, Robert

    1998-01-01

    While interest in developing strategic alliances within the food system continues to increase, there remains considerable risk when firms adopt such a cooperative strategy. The risk is due in part to the lack of concrete guidelines that illustrate the steps or stages of alliance development and the important strategic and operational decisions required at each stage. The existence of such guidelines would facilitate alliance formation and enable managers and researchers to better understand a...

  16. Complexity and formative experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roque Strieder

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The contemporaneity is characterized by instability and diversity calling into question certainties and truths proposed in modernity. We recognize that the reality of things and phenomena become effective as a set of events, interactions, retroactions and chances. This different frame extends the need for revision of the epistemological foundations that sustain educational practices and give them sense. The complex thinking is an alternative option for acting as a counterpoint to classical science and its reductionist logic and knowledge compartmentalization, as well as to answer to contemporary epistemological and educational challenges. It aims to associate different areas and forms of knowledge, without, however merge them, distinguishing without separating the several disciplines and instances of the realities. This study, in theoretical references, highlights the relevance of complex approaches to support formative experiences because also able to produce complexities in reflections about educational issues. We conclude that formative possibilities from complexity potentialize the resignification of human’s conception and the understanding of its singularity in interdependence; The understanding that pedagogical and educational activities is a constant interrogation about the possibilities of knowing the knowledge and reframe learning, far beyond knowing its functions and utilitarian purposes; and, as a formative possibility, places us on the trail of responsibility, not as something eventual, but present and indicative of freedom to choose to stay or go beyond.

  17. Terrestrial planet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K; O'Brien, D P

    2011-11-29

    Advances in our understanding of terrestrial planet formation have come from a multidisciplinary approach. Studies of the ages and compositions of primitive meteorites with compositions similar to the Sun have helped to constrain the nature of the building blocks of planets. This information helps to guide numerical models for the three stages of planet formation from dust to planetesimals (~10(6) y), followed by planetesimals to embryos (lunar to Mars-sized objects; few 10(6) y), and finally embryos to planets (10(7)-10(8) y). Defining the role of turbulence in the early nebula is a key to understanding the growth of solids larger than meter size. The initiation of runaway growth of embryos from planetesimals ultimately leads to the growth of large terrestrial planets via large impacts. Dynamical models can produce inner Solar System configurations that closely resemble our Solar System, especially when the orbital effects of large planets (Jupiter and Saturn) and damping mechanisms, such as gas drag, are included. Experimental studies of terrestrial planet interiors provide additional constraints on the conditions of differentiation and, therefore, origin. A more complete understanding of terrestrial planet formation might be possible via a combination of chemical and physical modeling, as well as obtaining samples and new geophysical data from other planets (Venus, Mars, or Mercury) and asteroids.

  18. Anti-parallel dimer and tetramer formation of propylene carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayana Tagawa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Raman scattering and infrared (IR absorption spectra of enantiopure (R-propylene carbonate ((RPC and racemic propylene carbonate (PC were recorded at room temperature, 25 °C, in benzene (Bz solution and in the pure liquid state to investigate the presence of dimers and other higher order intermolecular associations. (RPC and PC both demonstrated a strong C=O stretching vibrational band. The band exhibited changes in its shape and resonance wavenumber highly dependent on the concentrations of PCs, whereas a difference between the chirality of (RPC and PC had little influence. In an extremely dilute condition, doubly split bands were observed at 1807 and 1820 cm-1 in both Raman and IR spectra, which are assigned to the characteristic bands of isolated monomeric PCs. An additional band appeared at 1795 cm-1 in a dilute to concentrated regime, and its magnitude strengthened with increasing concentrations accompanied with slight increasing in the magnitude of 1807 cm-1 band in Raman spectra, while an increase in the magnitude of 1807 cm-1 band was clearly greater than that of 1795 cm-1 band in IR spectra. The spectrum changes at 1795 and 1807 cm-1 were attributed to characteristics of anti-parallel dimer formation of PCs caused by strong dipole-dipole interactions between C=O groups. Moreover, another additional signal was clearly observed at 1780-1790 cm-1 in a concentrated regime, and became the primary signal in the pure liquid state with slight increasing in the intensity of 1795 cm-1 band in Raman spectra. On the other hand, in IR spectra the observed increasing of 1780-1790 cm-1 band was much less than that of 1795 cm-1 band. These newly found spectrum changes in the concentrated regime are attributed to the formation of anti-parallel tetramers of PCs based on the characteristics of band selection rule found in Raman and IR spectra. Equilibrium constants for the anti-parallel dimer (KD and tetramer formation (KT of PCs in Bz solution and in

  19. Surface self-assembly of fluorosurfactants during film formation of MMA/nBA colloidal dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, W R; Urban, M W

    2004-11-23

    These studies focus on the behavior of fluorosurfactants (FS) containing hydrophobic and ionic entities in the presence of methyl methacrylate/n-butyl acrylate (MMA/nBA) colloidal dispersions stabilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The presence of FS significantly not only alters the mobility of SDS in MMA/nBA films, but their hydrophobic and ionic nature results in self-assembly near the film-air (F-A) interface leading to different surface morphologies. Spherical islands and rodlike morphologies are formed which diminish the kinetic coefficient of friction of films by at least 3 orders of magnitude, and the presence of dual hydrophobic tails and an anionic head appears to have the largest effect on the surface friction. Using internal reflection IR imaging, these studies show that structural and chemical features of FS are directly related to their ability to migrate to the F-A interface and self-assemble to form specific morphological features. While the anionic nature of FS allows for SDS migration to the F-A interface and the formation of stable domains across the surface, intermolecular cohesion of nonionic FS allows for the formation of rodlike structures due to inability to form mixed micelles with SDS. These studies also establish the relationship between surface morphologies, kinetic coefficient of friction, and structural features of surfactants in the complex environments.

  20. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide inhibits amyloid formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Bound Aβ(1–40) features a β-hairpin comprising residues 17–36, providing the first high-resolution structure of Aβ in β conformation. The positions of the secondary structure elements strongly resemble those observed for fibrillar Aβ. ZAβ3 stabilizes the β-sheet by extending it intermolecularly and by burying both of the mostly nonpolar faces of the Aβ hairpin within a large hydrophobic tunnel-like cavity. Consequently, ZAβ3 acts as a stoichiometric inhibitor of Aβ fibrillation. The selected Aβ conformation allows us to suggest a structural mechanism for amyloid formation based on soluble oligomeric hairpin intermediates. PMID:18375754

  1. Intermolecular Interactions in Binary Liquid Mixtures of Styrene with m-, o-, or p-xylene%苯乙烯与邻、间、对-二甲苯二元混合液的分子间相互作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The densities (ρ), ultrasonic speeds (v), and refractive indices (n) of binary mixtures of styrene (STY)with m-, o-, or p-xylene, including those of their pure liquids, were measured over the entire composition range at the temperatures 298.15, 303.15, 308.15, and 313.15 K. The excess volumes (VE), deviations in isentropic compressibilities(△ks), acoustic impedances (△Z), and refractive indices (△n) were calculated from the experimental data. Partial molar volumes (V0φ,2) and partial molar isentropic compressibilities (K0φ,2) of xylenes in styrene have also been calculated. The derived functions, namely, VE, △ks, △Z, △n, V0φ,2, and K0φ,2 were used to have a better understanding of the intermolecular interactions occurring between the component molecules of the present liquid mixtures. The variations of these parameters suggest that the interactions between styrene and o-, m-, or p-xylene molecules follow the sequences: p-xylene>o-xylene>m-xylene. Apart from using density data for the calculation of VE, excess molar volumes were also estimated using refractive index data. Furthermore, several refractive index mixing rules have been used to estimate the refractive indices of the studied liquid mixtures theoretically. Overall, the computed and measured data were interpreted in terms of interactions between the mixing components.

  2. [Effect of stress actions on some hematologic and biochemical parameters of rat blood and on energetic intermolecular interactions in lipid extract under effect of light radiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabelinskiĭ, S A; Chebotareva, M A; Tavrovskaia, T V; Skverchinskaia, E A; Shukoliukova, E P; Maslov, M N; Krivchenko, A I

    2012-01-01

    electron transitions in the iron cation. By the change and disappearance of the Soret band, it is possible to judge about the processes occurring in the lipid extract. The disappearance of the Soret band in the lipid extract indicates formation in it of steady radicals as a result of the ferriheme disintegration due to accumulation of energy in porphyrin, which does not seem to occur in the blood cell membranes. The iron atom in the ferriheme molecule is known to accept electron and yields a part of energy probably to porphyrin. Then ferriheme yields electron and becomes ferriheme with excess of energy in porphyrin. Hence, at admission of the next electron to the iron atom the porphyrin molecule is to get rid of the energy obtained earlier to prevent its disintegration. The heme is possible to be an accumulator and distributor of energy in tissue.

  3. Fracturing of subterranean formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiel, O.M.; Kidwell, A.L.

    1968-03-19

    This method of propping fractured formations results in high conductivities. In the method, certain naturally occurring crystals are used as propping agents. Suitable crystals include garnet, corundum, zircon, rutile, high-temperature quartz, and other minerals which have Moh's hardness values of about 6 or greater and weather out as individual crystals of about 40 mesh or larger. These are said to result in permeabilities significantly higher than those obtained with ordinary quartz sand, metallic shot, glass beads, plastic particles, walnut hulls, or similar materials. (10 claims)

  4. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...... theoretical textual analysis method. Asynchronous written dialogue from an online master’s course at Aalborg University forms the empirical basis of the study. The findings suggests in general that students play an essential role in SFF and that students and educators are equal in the COP, but holds different...

  5. Superclusters and galaxy formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einasto, J; Joeveer, M; Saar, E [Tartu Astrophysical Observatory, Toravere, Estonia (USSR)

    1980-01-03

    A study of the structure of superclusters in the Southern galactic hemisphere using Zwicky clusters as principal tracers of the large-scale structure of the Universe is reported. The data presented suggest that the formation of galaxies was a two stage process involving larger spatial dimensions than earlier workers have postulated. In the first stage proto-superclusters and big holes had to form from the non-dissipative dark matter while in the second hot gas, by cooling and settling down into the potential wells caused by dark matter, will form galaxies and clusters of galaxies.

  6. Loss of metal ions, disulfide reduction and mutations related to familial ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates from superoxide dismutase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep A Oztug Durer

    Full Text Available Mutations in the gene encoding Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1 are one of the causes of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS. Fibrillar inclusions containing SOD1 and SOD1 inclusions that bind the amyloid-specific dye thioflavin S have been found in neurons of transgenic mice expressing mutant SOD1. Therefore, the formation of amyloid fibrils from human SOD1 was investigated. When agitated at acidic pH in the presence of low concentrations of guanidine or acetonitrile, metalated SOD1 formed fibrillar material which bound both thioflavin T and Congo red and had circular dichroism and infrared spectra characteristic of amyloid. While metalated SOD1 did not form amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH, either removing metals from SOD1 with its intramolecular disulfide bond intact or reducing the intramolecular disulfide bond of metalated SOD1 was sufficient to promote formation of these aggregates. SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates both with and without intermolecular disulfide bonds, depending on the incubation conditions, and a mutant SOD1 lacking free sulfhydryl groups (AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at neutral pH under reducing conditions. ALS mutations enhanced the ability of disulfide-reduced SOD1 to form amyloid-like aggregates, and apo-AS-SOD1 formed amyloid-like aggregates at pH 7 only when an ALS mutation was also present. These results indicate that some mutations related to ALS promote formation of amyloid-like aggregates by facilitating the loss of metals and/or by making the intramolecular disulfide bond more susceptible to reduction, thus allowing the conversion of SOD1 to a form that aggregates to form resembling amyloid. Furthermore, the occurrence of amyloid-like aggregates per se does not depend on forming intermolecular disulfide bonds, and multiple forms of such aggregates can be produced from SOD1.

  7. Urbanization and Slum Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Kai Hong

    2007-01-01

    The formation of slums need not be inevitable with rapid urbanization. Such an argument appears to be contradicted by evidence of large slum populations in a large number of developing countries and particularly in rapidly urbanizing regions like Asia. The evidence discussed suggests that city authorities faced with rapid urban development lack the capacity to cope with the diverse demands for infrastructural provision to meet economic and social needs. Not only are strategic planning and intervention major issues in agenda to manage rapid urbanization, but city governments are not effectively linking the economic development trajectory to implications for urban growth and, hence, housing needs. In the following discussion, a case study is presented in support of the argument that city governments have to first recognize and then act to establish the link that is crucial between economic development, urban growth, and housing. This is the agendum that has been largely neglected by city and national governments that have been narrowly focused on economic growth with the consequent proliferation of slum formation as a housing solution. PMID:17387618

  8. Formation of planetary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahic, A.

    1982-01-01

    It seemed appropriate to devote the 1980 School to the origin of the solar system and more particularly to the formation of planetary systems (dynamic accretion processes, small bodies, planetary rings, etc...) and to the physics and chemistry of planetary interiors, surface and atmospheres (physical and chemical constraints associated with their formation). This Summer School enabled both young researchers and hard-nosed scientists, gathered together in idyllic surroundings, to hold numerous discussions, to lay the foundations for future cooperation, to acquire an excellent basic understanding, and to make many useful contacts. This volume reflects the lectures and presentations that were delivered in this Summer School setting. It is aimed at both advanced students and research workers wishing to specialize in planetology. Every effort has been made to give an overview of the basic knowledge required in order to gain a better understanding of the origin of the solar system. Each article has been revised by one or two referees whom I would like to thank for their assistance. Between the end of the School in August 1980 and the publication of this volume in 1982, the Voyager probes have returned a wealth of useful information. Some preliminary results have been included for completeness

  9. A Mesoproterozoic iron formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Donald E.; Zhang, Shuichang; Wang, Huajian; Wang, Xiaomei; Zhao, Wenzhi; Su, Jin; Bjerrum, Christian J.; Haxen, Emma R.; Hammarlund, Emma U.

    2018-04-01

    We describe a 1,400 million-year old (Ma) iron formation (IF) from the Xiamaling Formation of the North China Craton. We estimate this IF to have contained at least 520 gigatons of authigenic Fe, comparable in size to many IFs of the Paleoproterozoic Era (2,500–1,600 Ma). Therefore, substantial IFs formed in the time window between 1,800 and 800 Ma, where they are generally believed to have been absent. The Xiamaling IF is of exceptionally low thermal maturity, allowing the preservation of organic biomarkers and an unprecedented view of iron-cycle dynamics during IF emplacement. We identify tetramethyl aryl isoprenoid (TMAI) biomarkers linked to anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria and thus phototrophic Fe oxidation. Although we cannot rule out other pathways of Fe oxidation, iron and organic matter likely deposited to the sediment in a ratio similar to that expected for anoxygenic photosynthesis. Fe reduction was likely a dominant and efficient pathway of organic matter mineralization, as indicated by organic matter maturation by Rock Eval pyrolysis combined with carbon isotope analyses: Indeed, Fe reduction was seemingly as efficient as oxic respiration. Overall, this Mesoproterozoic-aged IF shows many similarities to Archean-aged (>2,500 Ma) banded IFs (BIFs), but with an exceptional state of preservation, allowing an unprecedented exploration of Fe-cycle dynamics in IF deposition.

  10. Endocytosis and Enamel Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong-Dat Pham

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Enamel formation requires consecutive stages of development to achieve its characteristic extreme mineral hardness. Mineralization depends on the initial presence then removal of degraded enamel proteins from the matrix via endocytosis. The ameloblast membrane resides at the interface between matrix and cell. Enamel formation is controlled by ameloblasts that produce enamel in stages to build the enamel layer (secretory stage and to reach final mineralization (maturation stage. Each stage has specific functional requirements for the ameloblasts. Ameloblasts adopt different cell morphologies during each stage. Protein trafficking including the secretion and endocytosis of enamel proteins is a fundamental task in ameloblasts. The sites of internalization of enamel proteins on the ameloblast membrane are specific for every stage. In this review, an overview of endocytosis and trafficking of vesicles in ameloblasts is presented. The pathways for internalization and routing of vesicles are described. Endocytosis is proposed as a mechanism to remove debris of degraded enamel protein and to obtain feedback from the matrix on the status of the maturing enamel.

  11. Star Formation in Irregular Galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Deidre; Wolff, Sidney

    1985-01-01

    Examines mechanisms of how stars are formed in irregular galaxies. Formation in giant irregular galaxies, formation in dwarf irregular galaxies, and comparisons with larger star-forming regions found in spiral galaxies are considered separately. (JN)

  12. Standard exercise report format (SERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    This talk summarizes the reasons for the development of draft SERF the Standard Exercise Report Format used for reporting the results of emergency preparedness exercises, and gives a summary of the format and rational behind it

  13. Preventing disulfide bond formation weakens non-covalent forces among lysozyme aggregates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ravi

    Full Text Available Nonnative disulfide bonds have been observed among protein aggregates in several diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cataract and so on. The molecular mechanism by which formation of such bonds promotes protein aggregation is poorly understood. Here in this work we employ previously well characterized aggregation of hen eggwhite lysozyme (HEWL at alkaline pH to dissect the molecular role of nonnative disulfide bonds on growth of HEWL aggregates. We employed time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy, atomic force microscopy and single-molecule force spectroscopy to quantify the size, morphology and non-covalent interaction forces among the aggregates, respectively. These measurements were performed under conditions when disulfide bond formation was allowed (control and alternatively when it was prevented by alkylation of free thiols using iodoacetamide. Blocking disulfide bond formation affected growth but not growth kinetics of aggregates which were ∼50% reduced in volume, flatter in vertical dimension and non-fibrillar in comparison to control. Interestingly, single-molecule force spectroscopy data revealed that preventing disulfide bond formation weakened the non-covalent interaction forces among monomers in the aggregate by at least ten fold, thereby stalling their growth and yielding smaller aggregates in comparison to control. We conclude that while constrained protein chain dynamics in correctly disulfide bonded amyloidogenic proteins may protect them from venturing into partial folded conformations that can trigger entry into aggregation pathways, aberrant disulfide bonds in non-amyloidogenic proteins (like HEWL on the other hand, may strengthen non-covalent intermolecular forces among monomers and promote their aggregation.

  14. Restoring formation after leaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, R.B.

    1983-01-01

    A method of restoring a formation which had uranium and other mineral values extracted by an alkaline lixiviant comprises introducing a source of phosphate in an amount sufficient to lower the level of soluble uranium compounds below that previously existing in the formation by the formation of insoluble uranium phosphate compounds

  15. Formative Research in Educational Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodapp, Timothy

    This paper distinguishes between basic research, applied research, and evaluation. Evaluation is broken down into two types: summative and formative. The limitations of formative research are presented, followed by a discussion of the value of the formative researcher participating in the product planning process. The types of data which formative…

  16. Designing for informed group formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Juel Jacobsen, Alice; Riis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    A new design ―project preparation‖ preparing for the group formation in problem based project work is proposed and investigated. The main problem is to overcome group formation based on existing relations. The hypothesis is that theme development and group formation are somewhat counterproductive...

  17. Determinants for gallstone formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Monsted; Sorensen, Lars Tue; Jørgensen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    . Gallstone incidence was assessed through repeated ultrasound examinations. Body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, self-rated health, lifestyle variables, blood lipids, and use of female sex hormones were measured at the baseline examination. Statistical analyses included logistic regression. Based...... re-examination were followed-up completely (mean 11.6 years, N = 2848). The overall cumulative incidence of gallstones was 0.60% per year. Independent positive determinants for incident gallstones were age, female sex, non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL) cholesterol, and gallbladder polyps...... associations were found for blood pressure, smoking, alcohol consumption, HDL cholesterol, or triglycerides in meta-analyses. Conclusions: Age, female sex, BMI, non-HDL cholesterol, and polyps are independent determinants for gallstone formation. Incident gallstones and the metabolic syndrome share common risk...

  18. Standardizing exchange formats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.; Schmidt, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    An international network of co-operating data centres is described who maintain identical data bases which are simultaneously updated by an agreed data exchange procedure. The agreement covers ''data exchange formats'' which are compatible to the centres' internal data storage and retrieval systems which remain different, optimized at each centre to the available computer facilities and to the needs of the data users. Essential condition for the data exchange is an agreement on common procedures for the data exchange is an agreement on common procedures for the data compilation, including critical data analysis and validation. The systems described (''EXFOR'', ''ENDF'', ''CINDA'') are used for ''nuclear reaction data'', but the principles used for data compilation and exchange should be valid also for other data types. (author). 24 refs, 4 figs

  19. Recipes for planet formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael R.

    2009-11-01

    Anyone who has ever used baking soda instead of baking powder when trying to make a cake knows a simple truth: ingredients matter. The same is true for planet formation. Planets are made from the materials that coalesce in a rotating disk around young stars - essentially the "leftovers" from when the stars themselves formed through the gravitational collapse of rotating clouds of gas and dust. The planet-making disk should therefore initially have the same gas-to-dust ratio as the interstellar medium: about 100 to 1, by mass. Similarly, it seems logical that the elemental composition of the disk should match that of the star, reflecting the initial conditions at that particular spot in the galaxy.

  20. Formation of Service Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonas, Julia M.; Sörhammar, David; Satzger, Gerhard

    – i.e. the “birth phase” (Moore, 2009) of a service ecosystem. This paper, therefore, aims to explore how the somewhat “magic” processes of service ecosystem formation that are being taken for granted actually occur. Methodology/Approach: Building on a review of core elements in the definitions...... for Harvard students) or value proposition (share messages, photos, videos, etc. with friends). Processes of configuring actors, resources, and value propositions are influenced by the structural embeddedness of the service ecosystem (e.g., regional infrastructure, existing networks of actors, or resource...... availability) as well as guided by the actors’ own and shared institutions (e.g., rules, norms,and beliefs).We contextualize each starting point with illustrative cases and analyze the service ecosystem configuration process: “Axoon/Trumpf” (initiated by resources), “JOSEPHS – the service manufactory...

  1. Symbol Formation Reconsidered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagoner, Brady

    2013-01-01

    them vis-à-vis other research at Clark and in American psychology more generally. The second two articles analyse Werner and Kaplan’s notions of ‘distancing’ and ‘physiognomic metaphor’, showing their roots in naturphilosophie and comparing them with contemporary theories. The last four articles apply......Werner and Kaplan’s Symbol formation was published 50 years ago but its insights have yet to be adequately explored by psychology and other social sciences. This special issue aims to revisit this seminal work in search of concepts to work on key issues facing us today. This introductory article...... begins with a brief outline and contextualization of the book as well as of the articles that this special issue comprises. The first two articles were written by contributors who were part of the Werner era at Clark University. They explore the key concepts of the organismic and development, and situate...

  2. Conformational analysis of a Chlamydia-specific disaccharide {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl in aqueous solution and bound to a monoclonal antibody: Observation of intermolecular transfer NOEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolowski, Tobias; Haselhorst, Thomas; Scheffler, Karoline [Medizinische Universitaet, Institut fuer Chemie (Germany); Weisemann, Ruediger [Bruker Analytik GmbH, Silberstreifen (Germany); Kosma, Paul [Institut fuer Chemie der Universitaet fuer Bodenkultur Wien (Austria); Brade, Helmut; Brade, Lore [Forschungszentrum Borstel, Zentrum fuer Medizin und Biowissenschaften Parkallee 22 (Germany); Peters, Thomas [Medizinische Universitaet, Institut fuer Chemie (Germany)

    1998-07-15

    The disaccharide {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo (Kdo: 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) represents a genus-specific epitope of the lipopolysaccharide of the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia. The conformation of the synthetically derived disaccharide {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl was studied in aqueous solution, and complexed to a monoclonal antibody S25-2. Various NMR experiments based on the detection of NOEs (or transfer NOEs) and ROEs (or transfer ROEs) were performed. A major problem was the extensive overlap of almost all {sup 1}H NMR signals of {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl. To overcome this difficulty, HMQC-NOESY and HMQC-trNOESY experiments were employed. Spin diffusion effects were identified using trROESY experiments, QUIET-trNOESY experiments and MINSY experiments. It was found that protein protons contribute to the observed spin diffusion effects. At 800 MHz, intermolecular trNOEs were observed between ligand protons and aromatic protons in the antibody binding site. From NMR experiments and Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, it was concluded that {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl in aqueous solution exists as a complex conformational mixture. Upon binding to the monoclonal antibody S25-2, only a limited range of conformations is available to {alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}8)-{alpha}-Kdo-(2{sup {yields}}O)-allyl. These possible bound conformations were derived from a distance geometry analysis using transfer NOEs as experimental constraints. It is clear that a conformation is selected which lies within a part of the conformational space that is highly populated in solution. This conformational space also includes the conformation found in the crystal structure. Our results provide a basis for modeling studies of the antibody-disaccharide complex.

  3. A quantum mechanical study of water adsorption on the (110) surfaces of rutile SnO₂ and TiO₂: investigating the effects of intermolecular interactions using hybrid-exchange density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, M; Sanches, F F; Mallia, G; Harrison, N M

    2014-10-21

    Periodic hybrid-exchange density functional theory calculations are used to explore the first layer of water at model oxide surfaces, which is an important step for understanding the photocatalytic reactions involved in solar water splitting. By comparing the structure and properties of SnO2(110) and TiO2(110) surfaces in contact with water, the effects of structural and electronic differences on the water chemistry are examined. The dissociative adsorption mode at low coverage (1/7 ML) up to monolayer coverage (1 ML) on both SnO2 and TiO2(110) surfaces is analysed. To investigate further the intermolecular interactions between adjacent adsorbates, monolayer adsorption on each surface is explored in terms of binding energies and bond lengths. Analysis of the water adsorption geometry and energetics shows that the relative stability of water adsorption on SnO2(110) is governed largely by the strength of the chemisorption and hydrogen bonds at the surface of the adsorbate-substrate system. However on TiO2(110), a more complicated scenario of the first layer of water on its surface arises in which there is an interplay between chemisorption, hydrogen bonding and adsorbate-induced atomic displacements in the surface. Furthermore the projected density of states of each surface in contact with a mixture of adsorbed water molecules and adsorbed hydroxyls is presented and sheds some light on the nature of the crystalline chemical bonds as well as on why adsorbed water has often been reported to be unstable on rutile SnO2(110).

  4. Molecular near-field antenna effect in resonance hyper-Raman scattering: Intermolecular vibronic intensity borrowing of solvent from solute through dipole-dipole and dipole-quadrupole interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Rintaro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o, E-mail: hhama@nctu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-28

    We quantitatively interpret the recently discovered intriguing phenomenon related to resonance Hyper-Raman (HR) scattering. In resonance HR spectra of all-trans-β-carotene (β-carotene) in solution, vibrations of proximate solvent molecules are observed concomitantly with the solute β-carotene HR bands. It has been shown that these solvent bands are subject to marked intensity enhancements by more than 5 orders of magnitude under the presence of β-carotene. We have called this phenomenon the molecular-near field effect. Resonance HR spectra of β-carotene in benzene, deuterated benzene, cyclohexane, and deuterated cyclohexane have been measured precisely for a quantitative analysis of this effect. The assignments of the observed peaks are made by referring to the infrared, Raman, and HR spectra of neat solvents. It has been revealed that infrared active and some Raman active vibrations are active in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed spectra in the form of difference spectra (between benzene/deuterated benzene and cyclohexane/deuterated cyclohexane) are quantitatively analyzed on the basis of the extended vibronic theory of resonance HR scattering. The theory incorporates the coupling of excited electronic states of β-carotene with the vibrations of a proximate solvent molecule through solute–solvent dipole–dipole and dipole–quadrupole interactions. It is shown that the infrared active modes arise from the dipole–dipole interaction, whereas Raman active modes from the dipole–quadrupole interaction. It is also shown that vibrations that give strongly polarized Raman bands are weak in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed solvent HR spectra are simulated with the help of quantum chemical calculations for various orientations and distances of a solvent molecule with respect to the solute. The observed spectra are best simulated with random orientations of the solvent molecule at an intermolecular distance of 10 Å.

  5. Conformational analysis of a Chlamydia-specific disaccharide α-Kdo-(2→8)-α-Kdo-(2→O)-allyl in aqueous solution and bound to a monoclonal antibody: Observation of intermolecular transfer NOEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolowski, Tobias; Haselhorst, Thomas; Scheffler, Karoline; Weisemann, Ruediger; Kosma, Paul; Brade, Helmut; Brade, Lore; Peters, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    The disaccharide α-Kdo-(2 → 8)-α-Kdo (Kdo: 3-deoxy-d-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid) represents a genus-specific epitope of the lipopolysaccharide of the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia. The conformation of the synthetically derived disaccharide α-Kdo-(2 → 8)-α-Kdo-(2 → O)-allyl was studied in aqueous solution, and complexed to a monoclonal antibody S25-2. Various NMR experiments based on the detection of NOEs (or transfer NOEs) and ROEs (or transfer ROEs) were performed. A major problem was the extensive overlap of almost all 1 H NMR signals of α-Kdo-(2 → 8)-α-Kdo-(2 → O)-allyl. To overcome this difficulty, HMQC-NOESY and HMQC-trNOESY experiments were employed. Spin diffusion effects were identified using trROESY experiments, QUIET-trNOESY experiments and MINSY experiments. It was found that protein protons contribute to the observed spin diffusion effects. At 800 MHz, intermolecular trNOEs were observed between ligand protons and aromatic protons in the antibody binding site. From NMR experiments and Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations, it was concluded that α-Kdo-(2 → 8)-α-Kdo-(2 → O)-allyl in aqueous solution exists as a complex conformational mixture. Upon binding to the monoclonal antibody S25-2, only a limited range of conformations is available to α-Kdo-(2 → 8)-α-Kdo-(2 → O)-allyl. These possible bound conformations were derived from a distance geometry analysis using transfer NOEs as experimental constraints. It is clear that a conformation is selected which lies within a part of the conformational space that is highly populated in solution. This conformational space also includes the conformation found in the crystal structure. Our results provide a basis for modeling studies of the antibody-disaccharide complex

  6. Formation of small sparks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, E.; Jurenka, H.; Reynolds, S.I.

    1977-01-01

    The formation of a small incendiary spark at atmospheric pressure is identified with the transition from a weakly to a strongly ionized plasma. It is shown that initial gaseous ionization produced by avalanches and/or streamers always creates a high-temperature ideal electron gas that can shield the applied voltage difference and reduce ionization in the volume of the gas. The electron gas is collision dominated but able to maintain its high temperature, for times long compared to discharge events, through long-range Coulomb forces. In fact, electrons in the weakly ionized plasma constitute a collisionless independent fluid with a thermodynamic state that can be affected directly by field or density changes. Accordingly, with metal electrodes, cathode spot emission is always associated with the transition to a strongly ionized plasma. Neutral heating can be accomplished in two different ways. Effective dispersal of the electrons from the cathode leads to electron heating dominated by diffusion effects. Conversely, a fast rate of emission or rapid field changes can produce nonlinear wave propagation. It is shown that solitary waves are possible, and it is suggested that some spark transitions are associated with shock waves in the collisionless electron gas. In either the diffuse or nonlinear regime, neutral gas heating is controlled by collisions of ions with isotropic thermal electrons. This interaction is always subsequent to changes in state of the electron gas population. The basic results obtained should apply to all sparks

  7. Large Format Radiographic Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohrer, J. S.; Stewart, Lacey; Wilke, M. D.; King, N. S.; Baker A, S.; Lewis, Wilfred

    1999-01-01

    Radiographic imaging continues to be a key diagnostic in many areas at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Radiographic recording systems have taken on many form, from high repetition-rate, gated systems to film recording and storage phosphors. Some systems are designed for synchronization to an accelerator while others may be single shot or may record a frame sequence in a dynamic radiography experiment. While film recording remains a reliable standby in the radiographic community, there is growing interest in investigating electronic recording for many applications. The advantages of real time access to remote data acquisition are highly attractive. Cooled CCD camera systems are capable of providing greater sensitivity with improved signal-to-noise ratio. This paper begins with a review of performance characteristics of the Bechtel Nevada large format imaging system, a gated system capable of viewing scintillators up to 300 mm in diameter. We then examine configuration alternatives in lens coupled and fiber optically coupled electro-optical recording systems. Areas of investigation include tradeoffs between fiber optic and lens coupling, methods of image magnification, and spectral matching from scintillator to CCD camera. Key performance features discussed include field of view, resolution, sensitivity, dynamic range, and system noise characteristics

  8. Enhanced intermolecular forces in supramolecular polymer nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Lin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ureido-pyrimidone (Upy can dimerize in a self-complementary array of quadruple hydrogen bonds. In this paper, supramolecular polymer composites were prepared by blending Upy functionalized nanosilica with Upy end-capped polycarbonatediol. Surface characteristics of Upy functionalized nanosilica and influences of supramolecular forces on interfacial binding were researched. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and Gel permeation chromatography (GPC were used to characterize the synthesized molecules. Grafting ratio of Upy segments on the surface of nanosilica was analysed by Thermogravimetic analysis (TGA. Hydrophobicity and morphology of Upy modified nanosilica were analysed by Contact angle tester and Scanning electron microscope (SEM. Furthermore, dynamic thermo mechanical properties, mechanical properties and distribution of nanosilica in supramolecular polymer composites were also researched. Compared with the matrix resin, tensile stress and young's modulus of supramolecular polymer composites containing 5 wt% modified nanosilica were increased by 292 and 198% respectively.

  9. Proton tunnelling in intermolecular hydrogen bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewill, A J [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Johnson, M R [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Trommsdorff, H P [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)

    1997-04-01

    The wavefunctions of particles extend beyond the classically accessible regions of potential energy-surfaces (PES). A manifestation of this partial delocalization is the quantum-mechanical tunneling effect which enables a particle to escape from a metastable potential-well. Tunnelling is most important for the lightest atoms, so that the determination of its contribution to proton transfer, one of the most fundamental chemical reactions, is an important issue. QENS and NMR techniques have been employed to study the motion of protons in the hydrogen bond of benzoic-acid crystals, a system which has emerged as a particularly suitable model since proton transfer occurs in a near symmetric double-well potential. The influence of quantum tunnelling was revealed and investigated in these experiments. This work provides an experimental benchmark for theoretical descriptions of translational proton-tunnelling. (author). 7 refs.

  10. Intermolecular dynamics studied by paramagnetic tagging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Xingfu; Keizers, Peter H. J. [Leiden University, Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands); Reinle, Wolfgang; Hannemann, Frank; Bernhardt, Rita [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Naturwissenschaftlich-Technische Fakultaet III, Institut fuer Biochemie (Germany); Ubbink, Marcellus [Leiden University, Institute of Chemistry (Netherlands)], E-mail: m.ubbink@chem.leidenuniv.nl

    2009-04-15

    Yeast cytochrome c and bovine adrenodoxin form a dynamic electron transfer complex, which is a pure encounter complex. It is demonstrated that the dynamic nature of the interaction can readily be probed by using a rigid lanthanide tag attached to cytochrome c. The tag, Caged Lanthanide NMR Probe 5, induces pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings and does not perturb the binding interface. Due to the dynamics in the complex, residual dipolar couplings in adrenodoxin are very small. Simulation shows that cytochrome c needs to sample a large part of the surface of adrenodoxin to explain the small degree of alignment observed for adrenodoxin. The applied method provides a simple and straightforward way to observe dynamics in protein complexes or domain-domain mobility without the need for external alignment media.

  11. Intermolecular dynamics studied by paramagnetic tagging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xingfu; Keizers, Peter H. J.; Reinle, Wolfgang; Hannemann, Frank; Bernhardt, Rita; Ubbink, Marcellus

    2009-01-01

    Yeast cytochrome c and bovine adrenodoxin form a dynamic electron transfer complex, which is a pure encounter complex. It is demonstrated that the dynamic nature of the interaction can readily be probed by using a rigid lanthanide tag attached to cytochrome c. The tag, Caged Lanthanide NMR Probe 5, induces pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings and does not perturb the binding interface. Due to the dynamics in the complex, residual dipolar couplings in adrenodoxin are very small. Simulation shows that cytochrome c needs to sample a large part of the surface of adrenodoxin to explain the small degree of alignment observed for adrenodoxin. The applied method provides a simple and straightforward way to observe dynamics in protein complexes or domain-domain mobility without the need for external alignment media

  12. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  13. What Determines Star Formation Rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Neal John

    2017-06-01

    The relations between star formation and gas have received renewed attention. We combine studies on scales ranging from local (within 0.5 kpc) to distant galaxies to assess what factors contribute to star formation. These include studies of star forming regions in the Milky Way, the LMC, nearby galaxies with spatially resolved star formation, and integrated galaxy studies. We test whether total molecular gas or dense gas provides the best predictor of star formation rate. The star formation ``efficiency," defined as star formation rate divided by mass, spreads over a large range when the mass refers to molecular gas; the standard deviation of the log of the efficiency decreases by a factor of three when the mass of relatively dense molecular gas is used rather than the mass of all the molecular gas. We suggest ways to further develop the concept of "dense gas" to incorporate other factors, such as turbulence.

  14. Designing for informed group formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne Westh; Juel Jacobsen, Alice; Riis, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    A new design ―project preparation‖ preparing for the group formation in problem based project work is proposed and investigated. The main problem is to overcome group formation based on existing relations. The hypothesis is that theme development and group formation are somewhat counterproductive....... Following research based design methodology an experiment separating the two was initiated.This was to provide for more openness and creativity in contrast to a design in which existing relations seem predominant....

  15. Light meromyosin paracrystal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowrashi, P K; Pepe, F A

    1977-07-01

    STUDIES OF PARACRYSTAL FORMATION BY COLUMN PURIFIED LIGHT MEROMYOSIN (LMM) PREPARED IN A VARIETY OF WAYS LED TO THE FOLLOWING CONCLUSIONS: (a) different portions of the myosin rod may be coded for different stagger relationships. This was concluded from observations that paracrystals with different axial repeat periodicities could be obtained either with LMM framents of different lengths prepared with the same enzyme, or with LMM fragments of identical lengths but prepared with different enzymes. (b) Paracrystals with a 14-nm axial repeat periodicity are most likely formed by the aggregation of sheets with a 44-nm axial repeat within the sheets which are staggered by 14 nm. All of the axial repeat patterns expected from one sheet or aggregates of more than one sheet, on this basis, were observed in the same electron micrograph. (c) C-protein binding probably occurs preferentially to LMM molecules related in some specific way. This was concluded from the observation that the same axial repeat pattern was obtained in paracrystals formed from different LMM preparations in the presence of C-protein, regardless of differences in the axial repeat obtained in the absence of C-protein. (d) Nucleic acid is responsible for the 43-nm axial repeat patterns observed in paracrystals formed by the ethanol-resistant fraction of LMM. In the absence of nuclei acid, paracrystals with a 14nm axial repeat are obtained. (e) The 43-nm axial repeat pattern observed with the ethanol-resistant fraction of LMM is different for LMM preparations obtained by trypsin and papain digestions.

  16. Pattern formation during electropolishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuzhakov, V.V.; Chang, H.; Miller, A.E.

    1997-01-01

    Using atomic force microscopy, we find that the surface morphology of a dissolving aluminum anode in a commercial electropolishing electrolyte can exhibit both highly regular and randomly packed stripe and hexagonal patterns with amplitudes of about 5 nm and wavelengths of 100 nm. The driving instability of this pattern formation phenomenon is proposed to be the preferential adsorption of polar or polarizable organic molecules on surface ridges where the contorted double layer produces a higher electric potential gradient. The enhanced relative coverage shields the anode and induces a smaller dissolution rate at the ridges. The instability is balanced by surface diffusion of the adsorbate to yield a length scale of 4π(D s /k d ) 1/2 , where D s is the surface diffusivity and k d is the desorption coefficient of the adsorbate, which correlates well with the measured wavelength. A long-wavelength expansion of the double-layer field yields an interface evolution equation that reproduces all of the observed patterns. In particular, bifurcation analysis and numerical simulation yield a single voltage-dependent dimensionless parameter ξ that measures a balance between smoothing of adsorbate concentration by electric-field-dependent surface diffusion and fluctuation due to interfacial curvature and stretching. Randomly oriented stripes are favored at large ξ (low voltage), while random hills dominate at small ξ (high voltage) with perfectly periodic stripes and hexagonal hill patterns within a small window near ξ=1. These predictions are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with our measurements. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  17. Formative assessment : Enriching teaching and learning with formative assesment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diggelen, M.R.; Morgan, C.M.; Funk, M.; Bruns, M.

    2016-01-01

    Formative assessment is a valuable aspect in teaching and learning, and is proven to be an e ective learning method. There is evidence that adding formative assessment to your teaching increases students’ learning results (Black and William, 1998), but in practice many of the possibilities are left

  18. Complexity in Acid–Base Titrations: Multimer Formation Between Phosphoric Acids and Imines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christian; Kim, Heejae; Wagner, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Solutions of Brønsted acids with bases in aprotic solvents are not only common model systems to study the fundamentals of proton transfer pathways but are also highly relevant to Brønsted acid catalysis. Despite their importance the light nature of the proton makes characterization of acid–base aggregates challenging. Here, we track such acid–base interactions over a broad range of relative compositions between diphenyl phosphoric acid and the base quinaldine in dichloromethane, by using a combination of dielectric relaxation and NMR spectroscopy. In contrast to what one would expect for an acid–base titration, we find strong deviations from quantitative proton transfer from the acid to the base. Even for an excess of the base, multimers consisting of one base and at least two acid molecules are formed, in addition to the occurrence of proton transfer from the acid to the base and simultaneous formation of ion pairs. For equimolar mixtures such multimers constitute about one third of all intermolecular aggregates. Quantitative analysis of our results shows that the acid‐base association constant is only around six times larger than that for the acid binding to an acid‐base dimer, that is, to an already protonated base. Our findings have implications for the interpretation of previous studies of reactive intermediates in organocatalysis and provide a rationale for previously observed nonlinear effects in phosphoric acid catalysis. PMID:28597513

  19. Complexity in Acid-Base Titrations: Multimer Formation Between Phosphoric Acids and Imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Christian; Kim, Heejae; Wagner, Manfred; Hunger, Johannes

    2017-08-10

    Solutions of Brønsted acids with bases in aprotic solvents are not only common model systems to study the fundamentals of proton transfer pathways but are also highly relevant to Brønsted acid catalysis. Despite their importance the light nature of the proton makes characterization of acid-base aggregates challenging. Here, we track such acid-base interactions over a broad range of relative compositions between diphenyl phosphoric acid and the base quinaldine in dichloromethane, by using a combination of dielectric relaxation and NMR spectroscopy. In contrast to what one would expect for an acid-base titration, we find strong deviations from quantitative proton transfer from the acid to the base. Even for an excess of the base, multimers consisting of one base and at least two acid molecules are formed, in addition to the occurrence of proton transfer from the acid to the base and simultaneous formation of ion pairs. For equimolar mixtures such multimers constitute about one third of all intermolecular aggregates. Quantitative analysis of our results shows that the acid-base association constant is only around six times larger than that for the acid binding to an acid-base dimer, that is, to an already protonated base. Our findings have implications for the interpretation of previous studies of reactive intermediates in organocatalysis and provide a rationale for previously observed nonlinear effects in phosphoric acid catalysis. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  20. Formation of interstellar anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senent, Maria Luisa

    2012-05-01

    Formation of interstellar anions: M.L. Senent. The recent detection of negative charged species in the ISM1 has instigated enthusiasm for anions in the astrophysical community2. Many of these species are new and entail characterization. How they are formed in astrophysical sources is a question of major relevance. The anion presence in ISM was first predicted theoretically on the basis of electron affinities and on the negative linear chain molecular stabilities. Although very early, they were considered in astrochemical models3-4, their discovery is so recent because their abundances seem to be relatively low. These have to be understood in terms of molecular stabilities, reaction probabilities and radiative and collisional excitations. Then, we present our theoretical work on even carbon chains type Cn and CnH (n=2,4,6) focused to the understanding of anion abundances. We use highly correlated ab initio methods. We performed spectroscopic studies of various isomers that can play important roles as intermediates5-8. In previous papers9-10, we compared C2H and C2H- collisional rates responsible for observed line intensities. Actually, we study hydrogen attachment (Cn +H → CnH and Cn- +H → CnH-) and associative detachment processes (Cn- +H → CnH +e-) for 2, 4 and 6 carbon atom chains11. [1] M.C.McCarthy, C.A.Gottlieb, H.Gupta, P.Thaddeus, Astrophys.J, 652, L141 (2006) [2] V.M.Bierbaum, J.Cernicharo, R.Bachiller, eds., 2011, pp 383-389. [3] A. Dalgarno, R.A. Mc Cray, Astrophys.J,, 181, 95 (1973) [4] E. Herbst E., Nature, 289, 656 (1981); [5] H.Massó, M.L.Senent, P.Rosmus, M.Hochlaf, J.Chem.Phys., 124, 234304 (2006) [6] M.L.Senent, M.Hochlaf, Astrophys. J. , 708, 1452(2010) [7] H.Massó, M.L.Senent, J.Phys.Chem.A, 113, 12404 (2009) [8] D. Hammoutene, M.Hochlaf, M.L.Senent, submitted. [9] A. Spielfiedel, N. Feautrier, F. Najar, D. ben Abdallah, F. Dayou, M.L. Senent, F. Lique, Mon.Not.R.Astron.Soc., 421, 1891 (2012) [10] F.Dumouchel, A, Spielfieldel , M

  1. Satellite formation flying relative dynamics, formation design, fuel optimal maneuvers and formation maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Danwei; Poh, Eng Kee

    2017-01-01

    This book systematically describes the concepts and principles for multi-satellite relative motion, passive and near passive formation designs, trajectory planning and control for fuel optimal formation maneuvers, and formation flying maintenance control design. As such, it provides a sound foundation for researchers and engineers in this field to develop further theories and pursue their implementations. Though satellite formation flying is widely considered to be a major advance in space technology, there are few systematic treatments of the topic in the literature. Addressing that gap, the book offers a valuable resource for academics, researchers, postgraduate students and practitioners in the field of satellite science and engineering.

  2. Portable File Format (PFF) specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Daniel H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Created at Sandia National Laboratories, the Portable File Format (PFF) allows binary data transfer across computer platforms. Although this capability is supported by many other formats, PFF files are still in use at Sandia, particularly in pulsed power research. This report provides detailed PFF specifications for accessing data without relying on legacy code.

  3. Professional Development through Formative Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsibande, Rejoice; Garraway, James

    2011-01-01

    Formative evaluation and its associated methodology of reflection on practice are used extensively in academic staff development. In reflecting on formative evaluation processes in both more traditional and newer programmes conducted at a university of technology, a number of variables reported in the literature were observed to have influenced…

  4. Star formation in the multiverse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Leichenauer, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    We develop a simple semianalytic model of the star formation rate as a function of time. We estimate the star formation rate for a wide range of values of the cosmological constant, spatial curvature, and primordial density contrast. Our model can predict such parameters in the multiverse, if the underlying theory landscape and the cosmological measure are known.

  5. A format for phylogenetic placements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick A Matsen

    Full Text Available We have developed a unified format for phylogenetic placements, that is, mappings of environmental sequence data (e.g., short reads into a phylogenetic tree. We are motivated to do so by the growing number of tools for computing and post-processing phylogenetic placements, and the lack of an established standard for storing them. The format is lightweight, versatile, extensible, and is based on the JSON format, which can be parsed by most modern programming languages. Our format is already implemented in several tools for computing and post-processing parsimony- and likelihood-based phylogenetic placements and has worked well in practice. We believe that establishing a standard format for analyzing read placements at this early stage will lead to a more efficient development of powerful and portable post-analysis tools for the growing applications of phylogenetic placement.

  6. Uranium logging in earth formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Givens, W.W.

    1979-01-01

    A technique is provided for assaying the formations surrounding a borehole for uranium. A borehole logging tool cyclically irradiates the formations with neutrons and responds to neutron fluxes produced during the period of time that prompt neutrons are being produced by the neutron fission of uranium in the formations. A borehole calibration tool employs a steady-state (continuous output) neutron source, firstly, to produce a response to neutron fluxes in models having known concentrations of uranium and, secondly, to to produce a response to neutron fluxes in the formations surrounding the borehole. The neutron flux responses of the borehole calibration tool in both the model and the formations surrounding the borehole are utilized to correct the neutron flux response of the borehole logging tool for the effects of epithermal/thermal neutron moderation, scattering, and absorption within the borehole itself

  7. Geological factors of deposit formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grushevoj, G.V.

    1980-01-01

    Geologic factors of hydrogenic uranium deposit formation are considered. Structural, formation and lithological-facies factors of deposit formation, connected with zones of stratal oxidation, are characterized. Peculiarities of deposit localization, connected with orogenic structures of Mesozoic and lenozoic age, are described. It is noted that deposits of anagenous group are widely spread in Paleozoic formations, infiltration uranium deposits are localized mainly in Cenozoic sediments, while uranium mineralization both anagenous and infiltration groups are widely developed in Mesozoic sediments. Anagenous deposits were formed in non-oxygen situation, their age varies from 200 to 55 mln years. Infiltration deposit formation is determined by asymmetric oxidation zonation, their age varies from 10 - 40 mln years to dozens of thousand years [ru

  8. Binding Quantum Dots to Silk Biomaterials for Optical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disi Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs, have great potential for fabricating optical sensing devices and imaging biomaterial degradation in vivo. In the present study, 2-mercaptoethylamine- (MEA- and mercaptopropionic acid- (MPA- capped CdTe-QDs were physically incorporated in silk films that contained a high content (>30% of crystalline beta-sheet structure. The beta-sheets were induced by the addition of glycerol, water annealing, glycerol/annealing, or treatment with methanol. Incorporation of QDs did not influence the formation of beta-sheets. When the films were extracted with water, most QDs remained associated with the silk, based on the retention of photoluminescence in the silk films and negligible photoluminescence in the extracts. Compared to the solution state, photoluminescence intensity significantly decreased for MEA-QDs but not for MPA-QDs in the silk films, while the emission maximum blue shifted (≈4 nm slightly for both. Further film digestion using protease XIV, alpha-chymotrypsin, and the combination of the two proteases suggested that QDs may be bound to the silk beta-sheet regions but not the amorphous regions. QDs photoluminescence in silk films was quenched when the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 was above 0.2-0.3 mM, indicating the QDs-incorporated silk films can be used to report oxidation potential in solution.

  9. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair

  10. Dicarbonyl Induced Structural Perturbations Make Histone H1 Highly Immunogenic and Generate an Auto-Immune Response in Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Rouf Mir

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions, through the interaction of AGEs with RAGE receptors and via activation of interleukin mediated transcription signalling, has been reported in cancer. Proteins modifications are being explored for their roles in the development and progression of cancer and autoantibody response against them is gaining interest as a probe for early detection of the disease. This study has analysed the changes in histone H1 upon modification by methylglyoxal (MG and its implications in auto-immunopathogenesis of cancer. Modified histone showed modifications in the aromatic residues, changed tyrosine microenvironment, intermolecular cross linking and generation of AGEs. It showed masking of hydrophobic patches and a hypsochromic shift in the in ANS specific fluorescence. MG aggressively oxidized histone H1 leading to the accumulation of reactive carbonyls. Far UV CD measurements showed di-carbonyl induced enhancement of the alpha structure and the induction of beta sheet conformation; and thermal denaturation (Tm studies confirmed the thermal stability of the modified histone. FTIR analysis showed amide I band shift, generation of a carboxyethyl group and N-Cα vibrations in the modified histone. LCMS analysis confirmed the formation of Nε-(carboxyethyllysine and electron microscopic studies revealed the amorphous aggregate formation. The modified histone showed altered cooperative binding with DNA. Modified H1 induced high titre antibodies in rabbits and the IgG isolated form sera of rabbits immunized with modified H1 exhibited specific binding with its immunogen in Western Blot analysis. IgG isolated from the sera of patients with lung cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer and cancer of head and neck region showed better recognition for neo-epitopes on the modified histone, reflecting the presence of circulating autoantibodies in cancer. Since reports suggest a link between AGE-RAGE axis and

  11. Process for fracturing underground formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiel, O M

    1974-01-25

    This invention concerns a process for fracturing underground formations and has as one object the mixing of viscous compositions. Through a borehole, a fluid is injected into the formation. This fluid contains a complex prepared by the reaction of an aliphatic quaternary ammonium compound with a water-soluble compound chosen from monosaccharides, disaccharides, trisaccharides, polysaccharides, and synthetic hydroxylated polymers with long chains. These complexes are formed at temperatures between 20/sup 0/ and 205/sup 0/C. The process also includes production of formation fluid into the borehole.

  12. Free-format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide offers a concise and thorough introduction to the increased productivity, better readability, and easier program maintenance that comes with the free-format style of programming in RPG IV. Although free-format information is available in IBM manuals, it is not separated from everything else, thereby requiring hours of tedious research to track down the information needed. This book provides everything one needs to know to write RPG IV in the free-format style, and author Jim Martin not only teaches rules and syntax but also explains how this new style of coding has the pot

  13. AGN feedback in galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Antonuccio-Delogu, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, convincing evidence has been accumulated concerning the effect of active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity on the internal and external environment of their host galaxies. Featuring contributions from well-respected researchers in the field, and bringing together work by specialists in both galaxy formation and AGN, this volume addresses a number of key questions about AGN feedback in the context of galaxy formation. The topics covered include downsizing and star-formation time scales in massive elliptical galaxies, the connection between the epochs of supermassive black h

  14. Merging constitutional and motional covalent dynamics in reversible imine formation and exchange processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovaříček, Petr; Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-06-06

    The formation and exchange processes of imines of salicylaldehyde, pyridine-2-carboxaldehyde, and benzaldehyde have been studied, showing that the former has features of particular interest for dynamic covalent chemistry, displaying high efficiency and fast rates. The monoimines formed with aliphatic α,ω-diamines display an internal exchange process of self-transimination type, inducing a local motion of either "stepping-in-place" or "single-step" type by bond interchange, whose rate decreases rapidly with the distance of the terminal amino groups. Control of the speed of the process over a wide range may be achieved by substituents, solvent composition, and temperature. These monoimines also undergo intermolecular exchange, thus merging motional and constitutional covalent behavior within the same molecule. With polyamines, the monoimines formed execute internal motions that have been characterized by extensive one-dimensional, two-dimensional, and EXSY proton NMR studies. In particular, with linear polyamines, nondirectional displacement occurs by shifting of the aldehyde residue along the polyamine chain serving as molecular track. Imines thus behave as simple prototypes of systems displaying relative motions of molecular moieties, a subject of high current interest in the investigation of synthetic and biological molecular motors. The motional processes described are of dynamic covalent nature and take place without change in molecular constitution. They thus represent a category of dynamic covalent motions, resulting from reversible covalent bond formation and dissociation. They extend dynamic covalent chemistry into the area of molecular motions. A major further step will be to achieve control of directionality. The results reported here for imines open wide perspectives, together with other chemical groups, for the implementation of such features in multifunctional molecules toward the design of molecular devices presenting a complex combination of

  15. DNA methylation and memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Jeremy J; Sweatt, J David

    2010-11-01

    Memory formation and storage require long-lasting changes in memory-related neuronal circuits. Recent evidence indicates that DNA methylation may serve as a contributing mechanism in memory formation and storage. These emerging findings suggest a role for an epigenetic mechanism in learning and long-term memory maintenance and raise apparent conundrums and questions. For example, it is unclear how DNA methylation might be reversed during the formation of a memory, how changes in DNA methylation alter neuronal function to promote memory formation, and how DNA methylation patterns differ between neuronal structures to enable both consolidation and storage of memories. Here we evaluate the existing evidence supporting a role for DNA methylation in memory, discuss how DNA methylation may affect genetic and neuronal function to contribute to behavior, propose several future directions for the emerging subfield of neuroepigenetics, and begin to address some of the broader implications of this work.

  16. Robust Decentralized Formation Flight Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Weihua

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the idea of multiplexed model predictive control (MMPC, this paper introduces a new framework for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs formation flight and coordination. Formulated using MMPC approach, the whole centralized formation flight system is considered as a linear periodic system with control inputs of each UAV subsystem as its periodic inputs. Divided into decentralized subsystems, the whole formation flight system is guaranteed stable if proper terminal cost and terminal constraints are added to each decentralized MPC formulation of the UAV subsystem. The decentralized robust MPC formulation for each UAV subsystem with bounded input disturbances and model uncertainties is also presented. Furthermore, an obstacle avoidance control scheme for any shape and size of obstacles, including the nonapriorily known ones, is integrated under the unified MPC framework. The results from simulations demonstrate that the proposed framework can successfully achieve robust collision-free formation flights.

  17. The multifaceted planetesimal formation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Blum, Jürgen; Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of dust and ice particles into planetesimals is an important step in the planet formation process. Planetesimals are the seeds of both terrestrial planets and the solid cores of gas and ice giants forming by core accretion. Left-over planetesimals in the form of asteroids, trans...... for planetesimal formation where particle growth starts unaided by self-gravity but later proceeds inside gravitationally collapsing pebble clumps to form planetesimals with a wide range of sizes....

  18. Chain formation of metal atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahn, Sune Rastad; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2001-01-01

    The possibility of formation of single-atomic chains by manipulation of nanocontacts is studied for a selection of metals (Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au). Molecular dynamics simulations show that the tendency for chain formation is strongest for Au and Pt. Density functional theory calculations indicate...... that the metals which form chains exhibit pronounced many-atom interactions with strong bonding in low coordinated systems....

  19. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertschinger, Edmund

    1989-01-01

    The cosmogonical model proposed by Zel'dovich and Vilenkin (1981), in which superconducting cosmic strings act as seeds for the origin of structure in the universe, is discussed, summarizing the results of recent theoretical investigations. Consideration is given to the formation of cosmic strings, the microscopic structure of strings, gravitational effects, cosmic string evolution, and the formation of galaxies and large-scale structure. Simulation results are presented in graphs, and several outstanding issues are listed and briefly characterized.

  20. An Adaptable Seismic Data Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischer, Lion; Smith, James; Lei, Wenjie; Lefebvre, Matthieu; Ruan, Youyi; de Andrade, Elliott Sales; Podhorszki, Norbert; Bozdağ, Ebru; Tromp, Jeroen

    2016-11-01

    We present ASDF, the Adaptable Seismic Data Format, a modern and practical data format for all branches of seismology and beyond. The growing volume of freely available data coupled with ever expanding computational power opens avenues to tackle larger and more complex problems. Current bottlenecks include inefficient resource usage and insufficient data organization. Properly scaling a problem requires the resolution of both these challenges, and existing data formats are no longer up to the task. ASDF stores any number of synthetic, processed or unaltered waveforms in a single file. A key improvement compared to existing formats is the inclusion of comprehensive meta information, such as event or station information, in the same file. Additionally, it is also usable for any non-waveform data, for example, cross-correlations, adjoint sources or receiver functions. Last but not least, full provenance information can be stored alongside each item of data, thereby enhancing reproducibility and accountability. Any data set in our proposed format is self-describing and can be readily exchanged with others, facilitating collaboration. The utilization of the HDF5 container format grants efficient and parallel I/O operations, integrated compression algorithms and check sums to guard against data corruption. To not reinvent the wheel and to build upon past developments, we use existing standards like QuakeML, StationXML, W3C PROV and HDF5 wherever feasible. Usability and tool support are crucial for any new format to gain acceptance. We developed mature C/Fortran and Python based APIs coupling ASDF to the widely used SPECFEM3D_GLOBE and ObsPy toolkits.

  1. Computational study of the fibril organization of polyglutamine repeats reveals a common motif identified in beta-helices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanuy, David; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Lesk, Arthur M; Nussinov, Ruth

    2006-04-21

    The formation of fibril aggregates by long polyglutamine sequences is assumed to play a major role in neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington. Here, we model peptides rich in glutamine, through a series of molecular dynamics simulations. Starting from a rigid nanotube-like conformation, we have obtained a new conformational template that shares structural features of a tubular helix and of a beta-helix conformational organization. Our new model can be described as a super-helical arrangement of flat beta-sheet segments linked by planar turns or bends. Interestingly, our comprehensive analysis of the Protein Data Bank reveals that this is a common motif in beta-helices (termed beta-bend), although it has not been identified so far. The motif is based on the alternation of beta-sheet and helical conformation as the protein sequence is followed from the N to the C termini (beta-alpha(R)-beta-polyPro-beta). We further identify this motif in the ssNMR structure of the protofibril of the amyloidogenic peptide Abeta(1-40). The recurrence of the beta-bend suggests a general mode of connecting long parallel beta-sheet segments that would allow the growth of partially ordered fibril structures. The design allows the peptide backbone to change direction with a minimal loss of main chain hydrogen bonds. The identification of a coherent organization beyond that of the beta-sheet segments in different folds rich in parallel beta-sheets suggests a higher degree of ordered structure in protein fibrils, in agreement with their low solubility and dense molecular packing.

  2. Review of nutrition labeling formats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, C J; Wyse, B W; Parent, C R; Hansen, R G

    1991-07-01

    This article examines nutrition labeling history as well as the findings of nine research studies of nutrition labeling formats. Nutrition labeling regulations were announced in 1973 and have been periodically amended since then. In response to requests from consumers and health care professionals for revision of the labeling system, the Food and Drug Administration initiated a three-phase plan for reform of nutrition labeling in 1990. President Bush signed the Nutrition Labeling and Education Act in November 1990. Literature analysis revealed that only nine studies with an experimental design have focused on nutrition labeling since 1971. Four were conducted before 1975, which was the year that nutrition labeling was officially implemented, two were conducted in 1980, and three were conducted after 1986. Only two of the nine studies supported the traditional label format mandated by the Code of Federal Regulations, and one study partially supported it. Four of the nine studies that evaluated graphic presentations of nutrition information found that consumer comprehension of nutrition information was improved with a graphic format for nutrition labeling: three studies supported the use of bar graphs and one study supported the use of a pie chart. Full disclosure (ie, complete nutrient and ingredient labeling) was preferred by consumers in two of the three studies that examined this variable. The third study supported three types of information disclosure dependent upon socioeconomic class. In those studies that tested graphics, a bar graph format was significantly preferred and showed better consumer comprehension than the traditional format.

  3. Automation of Tabular Application Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Zykin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers automation problems of the interface formation between a table and a relational database. The task description is formalized and the description of the existing approaches to formation of data representations on an example of widely widespread CASE-tools is submitted. The definition of intermediate data representation as a ”join table” is offered, which is used for maintenance of correctness of data representation formation, and also is necessary for direct and inverse data transformations. On the basis of lossless join property and realized dependencies, the concept and a way of context formation of the application and restrictions is introduced. The considered material is further used for constructing an inverse data transformation from tabular presentation into a relational one. On the basis of relationships properties on a database scheme, the partial order on the relations is established, and the restriction of acyclic databases schemes is introduced. The received results are further used at the analysis of principles of formation of inverse data transformation, and the basic details of such a transformation algorithm are considered.

  4. Formative assessment: a student perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, D A; Guinea, A I; McCarthy, W H

    1994-09-01

    An educator's view would be that formative assessment has an important role in the learning process. This study was carried out to obtain a student perspective of the place of formative assessment in the curriculum. Final-year medical students at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital took part in four teaching sessions, each structured to integrate teaching with assessment. Three assessment methods were used; the group objective structured clinical examination (G-OSCE), structured short answer (SSA) questions and a pre/post-test multiple choice questionnaire (MCQ). Teaching sessions were conducted on the subject areas of traumatology, the 'acute abdomen', arterial disorders and cancer. Fifty-five students, representing 83% of those who took part in the programme, responded to a questionnaire where they were asked to rate (on a 5-point Likert scale) their response to general questions about formative assessment and 13 specific questions concerning the comparative value of the three assessment modalities. Eighty-nine per cent of respondents felt that formative assessment should be incorporated into the teaching process. The SSA assessment was regarded as the preferred modality to reinforce previous teaching and test problem-solving skills. The MCQ was the least favoured assessment method. The effect size variable between the total scores for the SSA and MCQ was 0.64. The variable between G-OSCE and SSA/MCQ was 0.26 and 0.33 respectively. Formative assessment is a potentially powerful method to direct learning behaviour. Students should have input into the methods used.

  5. The Physics of Planetesimal Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Jacob; Armitage, Philip; Youdin, Andrew; Li, Rixin

    2015-12-01

    Planetesimals are the precursors to planets, and understanding their formation is an essential step towards developing a complete theory of planet formation. For small solid particles (e.g., dust grains) to coagulate into planetesimals, however, requires that these particles grow beyond centimeter sizes; with traditional coagulation physics, this is very difficult. The streaming instability, which is a clumping process akin to the pile-up of cars in a traffic jam, generates sufficiently high solid densities that the mutual gravity between the clumped particles eventually causes their collapse towards planetesimal mass and size scales. Exploring this transition from dust grains to planetesimals is still in its infancy but is extremely important if we want to understand the basics of planet formation. Here, I present a series of high resolution, first principles numerical simulations of potoplanetary disk gas and dust to study the clumping of particles via the streaming instability and the subsequent collapse towards planetesimals. These simulations have been employed to characterize the planetesimal population as a function of radius in protoplanetary disks. The results of these simulations will be crucial for planet formation models to correctly explain the formation and configuration of solar systems.

  6. Exoplanets Detection, Formation, Properties, Habitability

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, John W

    2008-01-01

    This edited, multi-author volume will be an invaluable introduction and reference to all key aspects in the field of exoplanet research. The reviews cover: Detection methods and properties of known exoplanets, Detection of extrasolar planets by gravitational microlensing. The formation and evolution of terrestrial planets in protoplanetary and debris disks. The brown dwarf-exoplanet connection. Formation, migration mechanisms and properties of hot Jupiters. Dynamics of multiple exoplanet systems. Doppler exoplanet surveys. Searching for exoplanets in the stellar graveyard. Formation and habitability of extra solar planets in multiple star systems. Exoplanet habitats and the possibilities for life. Moons of exoplanets: habitats for life. Contributing authors: •Rory Barnes •David P. Bennett •Jian Ge •Nader Haghighipour •Patrick Irwin •Hugh Jones •Victoria Meadows •Stanimir Metchev •I. Neill Reid •George Rieke •Caleb Scharf •Steinn Sigurdsson

  7. Modularity in New Market Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez, Ron; Hang, Chang Chieh

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we appraise the ways in which use of closed-system proprietary product architectures versus open-system modular product architectures is likely to influence the dynamics and trajectory of new product market formation. We compare the evolutions of new markets in China for gas......-powered two-wheeled vehicles (G2WVs) based (initially) on closed-system proprietary architectures and for electric-powered two-wheeled vehicles (E2WVs) based on open-system modular architectures. We draw on this comparison to suggest ways in which the use of the two different kinds of architectures...... as the basis for new kinds of products may result in very different patterns and speeds of new market formation. We then suggest some key implications of the different dynamics of market formation associated with open-system modular architectures for both the competence-based strategic management (CBSM...

  8. Cosmic strings and galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertschinger, E.

    1989-01-01

    Cosmic strings have become increasingly popular candidates as seeds for the formation of structure in the universe. This scenario, remains a serious cosmogonical model despite close scrutiny. In constrast, magnetic monopoles and domain walls - relic topological defects as are cosmic strings - are disastrous for cosmology if they are left over from the early universe. The production of heavy cosmic strings is speculative, as it depends on the details of ultrahigh energy physics. Fortunately, speculation about cosmic strings is not entirely idle because, if they exist and are heavy enough to seed galaxy formation, cosmic strings can be detected astronomically. Failure to detect cosmic strings would impose some constraints on grand unified theories (GUTs); their discovery would have exciting consequences for high energy physics and cosmology. This article reviews the basic physics of nonsuperconducting cosmic strings, highlighting the field theory aspects, and provides a progress report on calculations of structure formation with cosmic strings

  9. 'TV Format Protection through Marketing Strategies?'

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sukhpreet

    2008-01-01

    Commercially successful programme ideas are often imitated or adapted. Television formats, in particular, are routinely copied. Starting from radio formats in the 1950s to game shows and reality programme formats of today, producers have accused others of “stealing”. Although formats constitute one of the most important exports for British TV producers, there is still no certainty about the legal protection of TV formats from copycat versions. Since TV formats fail to fall neatly within the d...

  10. Regulation of Reactionary Dentine Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, V C M; Sharpe, P T

    2018-04-01

    During the treatment of dental caries that has not penetrated the tooth pulp, maintenance of as much unaffected dentine as possible is a major goal during the physical removal of decayed mineral. Damage to dentine leads to release of fossilized factors (transforming growth factor-β [TGF-β] and bone morphogenic protein [BMP]) in the dentine that are believed to stimulate odontoblasts to secrete new "tertiary" dentine (reactionary dentine). This is formed on the pulpal surface of existing dentine and rethickens the dentine. We have previously shown that activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is pivotal for tooth repair in exposed pulp injury, and the pathway can be activated by small-molecule GSK-3 antagonists, resulting in enhanced reparative dentine formation. Here, we use a nonexposed pulp injury model to investigate the mechanisms of reactionary dentine formation in vivo, using small molecules to modulate the Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, and BMP pathways. We found that a local increase of Wnt activation at the injury site enhances reactionary dentine secretion. In addition, inhibition of TGF-β, BMP, or Wnt pathways does not impede reactionary dentine formation, although inhibition of TGF-β and/or BMP signaling does result in more disorganized, nontubular reactionary dentine. This suggests that Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays no major role in the formation of reactionary dentine, but in common with reparative dentine formation, exogenous elevation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling can enhance tertiary dentine formation. Release of latent TGF-β or BMPs from dentine is not required for the deposition of mineral to form reactionary dentine but does play a role in its organization.

  11. Radionuclide migration in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbreau, A.; Heremans, R.; Skytte Jensen, B.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive waste disposal into geological formation is based on the capacity of rocks to confine radioactivity for a long period of time. Radionuclide migration from the repository to the environment depends on different mechanisms and phenomena whose two main ones are groundwater flow and the retention and ion-exchange property of rocks. Many studies are underway presently in EEC countries concerning hydrodynamic characteristics of deep geological formations as well as in radionuclide retention capacity and modelling. Important results have already been achieved which show the complexity of some phenomena and further studies shall principally be developed taking into account real conditions of the repository and its environment

  12. Pattern formations and oscillatory phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    Patterns and their formations appear throughout nature, and are studied to analyze different problems in science and make predictions across a wide range of disciplines including biology, physics, mathematics, chemistry, material science, and nanoscience. With the emergence of nanoscience and the ability for researchers and scientists to study living systems at the biological level, pattern formation research has become even more essential. This book is an accessible first of its kind guide for scientists, researchers, engineers, and students who require a general introduction to thi

  13. The formation of ice sails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, A. C.; Mayer, C.

    2017-11-01

    Debris-covered glaciers are prone to the formation of a number of supraglacial geomorphological features, and generally speaking, their upper surfaces are far from level surfaces. Some of these features are due to radiation screening or enhancing properties of the debris cover, but theoretical explanations of the consequent surface forms are in their infancy. In this paper we consider a theoretical model for the formation of "ice sails", which are regularly spaced bare ice features which are found on debris-covered glaciers in the Karakoram.

  14. Market formation and market selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Raalte, C.L.J.P.

    1996-01-01

    The organization of markets is an important field of inquiry in modern economic theory. This monograph analyzes models which consider the formation and selection of markets. In these models, markets are organized by middlemen and used by traders. In Part I of the monograph, coalitions of middlemen

  15. A Model of Partnership Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talman, A.J.J.; Yang, Z.F.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a model of partnership formation. A set of agents wants to conduct some business or other activities. Agents may act alone or seek a partner for cooperation and need in the latter case to consider with whom to cooperate and how to share the profit in a collaborative and

  16. The Road to Galaxy Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Keel, William C

    2007-01-01

    The formation of galaxies is one of the greatest puzzles in astronomy, the solution is shrouded in the depths of space and time, but has profound implications for the universe we observe today. The book discusses the beginnings of the process from cosmological observations and calculations, considers the broad features of galaxies that we need to explain and what we know of their later history. The author compares the competing theories for galaxy formation and considers the progress expected from new generations of powerful telescopes both on earth and in space. In this second edition the author has retained the observationally-based approach of the first edition, a feature which was particularly well-reviewed: Writing in Nature, Carlton Baugh noted in February 2003 that “It is refreshing, in a market dominated by theorists, to come across a book on galaxy formation written from an observational perspective. The Road to Galaxy Formation should prove to be a handy primer on observations for graduate student...

  17. Analysis of Disulfide Bond Formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakman, Ineke; Lamriben, Lydia; van Zadelhoff, Guus; Hebert, Daniel N.

    2017-01-01

    In this unit, protocols are provided for detection of disulfide bond formation in cultures of intact cells and in an in vitro translation system containing isolated microsomes or semi-permeabilized cells. First, the newly synthesized protein of interest is biosynthetically labeled with radioactive

  18. A model of partnership formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talman, A.J.J.; Yang, Z.F.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of partnership formation. A number of agents want to conduct some business or other activities. Agents may act alone or seek a partner for cooperation and need in the latter case to consider with whom to cooperate and how to share the profit in a collaborative and

  19. Is All Formative Influence Immoral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillson, John

    2018-01-01

    Is it true that all formative influence is unethical, and that we ought to avoid influencing children (and indeed anyone at all)? There are more or less defensible versions of this doctrine, and we shall follow some of the strands of argument that lead to this conclusion. It seems that in maintaining that all influence is immoral, one commits…

  20. Exciton Formation in Disordered Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klochikhin, A.; Reznitsky, A.; Permogorov, S.

    1999-01-01

    Stationary luminescence spectra of disordered solid solutions can be accounted by the model of localized excitons. Detailed analysis of the long time decay kinetics of luminescence shows that exciton formation in these systems is in great extent due to the bimolecular reaction of separated carrie...