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Sample records for intermittent peripheral tissue

  1. White adipose tissue coloring by intermittent fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelä, Riikka; Alitalo, Kari

    2017-11-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) has been shown to promote metabolic health in several organisms. Two recent papers show that IF induces white adipose tissue beiging and increases thermogenesis, which improves metabolic health in mice.

  2. Peripheral arterial disease and intermittent claudication: Efficacy of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To compare the effect of two training programmes and advice to exercise at home on physiological adaptations in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Design. 30 patients with a typical history of PAD and intermittent claudication were randomised to either an upper body strength training programme ...

  3. Intermittent peripheral tissue ischemia during coronary ischemia reduces myocardial infarction through a KATP-dependent mechanism: first demonstration of remote ischemic perconditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Rahbek; Smerup, M; Konstantinov, I E

    2006-01-01

    . Intermittent limb ischemia during myocardial ischemia reduces MI, preserves global systolic and diastolic function, and protects against arrhythmia during the reperfusion phase through a K(ATP) channel-dependent mechanism. Understanding this process may have important therapeutic implications for a range...

  4. Peripheral Chemoreception and Arterial Pressure Responses to Intermittent Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen levels, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of blood pressure. Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major clinical problem in adult humans and infants born preterm. Adult patients with recurrent apnea exhibit heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Adults born preterm are predisposed to early onset of hypertension. Available evidence suggests...

  5. Peripheral tissue oximetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyttel-Sorensen, Simon; Hessel, Trine Witzner; Greisen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of regional tissue oxygenation (rStO2) by near infrared spectroscopy enables non-invasive end-organ oxygen balance monitoring and could be a valuable tool in intensive care. However, the diverse absolute values and dynamics of different devices, and overall poor repeatability of measur......Estimation of regional tissue oxygenation (rStO2) by near infrared spectroscopy enables non-invasive end-organ oxygen balance monitoring and could be a valuable tool in intensive care. However, the diverse absolute values and dynamics of different devices, and overall poor repeatability......, and response to changing oxygenation by the down slope of rStO2 during vascular occlusion in the respective arm. 10 healthy adults, 21-29 years old, with double skinfolds on the forearm less than 10 mm participated. The median rStO2 was 70.7% (interquartile range (IQR) 7.7%), 68.4% (IQR 8.4%), and 64.6% (IQR 4...

  6. Peripheral Chemoreception and Arterial Pressure Responses to Intermittent Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K.; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2015-01-01

    Carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen levels, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of blood pressure. Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major clinical problem in adult humans and infants born preterm. Adult patients with recurrent apnea exhibit heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Adults born preterm are predisposed to early onset of hypertension. Available evidence suggests that carotid body chemoreflex contributes to hypertension caused by IH in both adults and neonates. Experimental models of IH provided important insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying carotid body chemoreflex-mediated hypertension. This article provides a comprehensive appraisal of how IH affects carotid body function, underlying cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms, and the contribution of chemoreflex to the hypertension. PMID:25880505

  7. Peripheral chemoreception and arterial pressure responses to intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R; Peng, Ying-Jie; Kumar, Ganesh K; Nanduri, Jayasri

    2015-04-01

    Carotid bodies are the principal peripheral chemoreceptors for detecting changes in arterial blood oxygen levels, and the resulting chemoreflex is a potent regulator of blood pressure. Recurrent apnea with intermittent hypoxia (IH) is a major clinical problem in adult humans and infants born preterm. Adult patients with recurrent apnea exhibit heightened sympathetic nerve activity and hypertension. Adults born preterm are predisposed to early onset of hypertension. Available evidence suggests that carotid body chemoreflex contributes to hypertension caused by IH in both adults and neonates. Experimental models of IH provided important insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying carotid body chemoreflex-mediated hypertension. This article provides a comprehensive appraisal of how IH affects carotid body function, underlying cellular, molecular, and epigenetic mechanisms, and the contribution of chemoreflex to the hypertension. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  8. Circadian clocks are resounding in peripheral tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey A Ptitsyn

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are prevalent in most organisms. Even the smallest disturbances in the orchestration of circadian gene expression patterns among different tissues can result in functional asynchrony, at the organism level, and may to contribute to a wide range of physiologic disorders. It has been reported that as many as 5%-10% of transcribed genes in peripheral tissues follow a circadian expression pattern. We have conducted a comprehensive study of circadian gene expression on a large dataset representing three different peripheral tissues. The data have been produced in a large-scale microarray experiment covering replicate daily cycles in murine white and brown adipose tissues as well as in liver. We have applied three alternative algorithmic approaches to identify circadian oscillation in time series expression profiles. Analyses of our own data indicate that the expression of at least 7% to 21% of active genes in mouse liver, and in white and brown adipose tissues follow a daily oscillatory pattern. Indeed, analysis of data from other laboratories suggests that the percentage of genes with an oscillatory pattern may approach 50% in the liver. For the rest of the genes, oscillation appears to be obscured by stochastic noise. Our phase classification and computer simulation studies based on multiple datasets indicate no detectable boundary between oscillating and non-oscillating fractions of genes. We conclude that greater attention should be given to the potential influence of circadian mechanisms on any biological pathway related to metabolism and obesity.

  9. Intermittent Hypoxia Alters Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Grigoryev, Dmitry N; Punjabi, Naresh M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Intermittent hypoxia of obstructive sleep apnea is implicated in the development and progression of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, which have been attributed to systemic inflammation. Intermittent hypoxia leads to pro-inflammatory gene up-regulation in cell culture, but the effects of intermittent hypoxia on gene expression in humans have not been elucidated. A cross-over study was performed exposing eight healthy men to intermittent hypoxia or control conditions for five hours with peripheral blood mononuclear cell isolation before and after exposures. Total RNA was isolated followed by gene microarrays and confirmatory real time reverse transcriptase PCR. Intermittent hypoxia led to greater than two fold up-regulation of the pro-inflammatory gene toll receptor 2 (TLR2), which was not increased in the control exposure. We hypothesize that up-regulation of TLR2 by intermittent hypoxia may lead to systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

  10. RESTOP: Retaining External Peripheral State in Intermittently-Powered Sensor Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez Arreola, Alberto; Balsamo, Domenico; Merrett, Geoff V; Weddell, Alex S

    2018-01-10

    Energy harvesting sensor systems typically incorporate energy buffers (e.g., rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors) to accommodate fluctuations in supply. However, the presence of these elements limits the miniaturization of devices. In recent years, researchers have proposed a new paradigm, transient computing, where systems operate directly from the energy harvesting source and allow computation to span across power cycles, without adding energy buffers. Various transient computing approaches have addressed the challenge of power intermittency by retaining the processor's state using non-volatile memory. However, no generic approach has yet been proposed to retain the state of peripherals external to the processing element. This paper proposes RESTOP, flexible middleware which retains the state of multiple external peripherals that are connected to a computing element (i.e., a microcontroller) through protocols such as SPI or I 2 C. RESTOP acts as an interface between the main application and the peripheral, which keeps a record, at run-time, of the transmitted data in order to restore peripheral configuration after a power interruption. RESTOP is practically implemented and validated using three digitally interfaced peripherals, successfully restoring their configuration after power interruptions, imposing a maximum time overhead of 15% when configuring a peripheral. However, this represents an overhead of only 0.82% during complete execution of our typical sensing application, which is substantially lower than existing approaches.

  11. The management of patients with peripheral arterial disease and intermittent claudication. Actual recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîrziu, Cristina; Bădilă, Elisabeta; Mehic, Florentina; Ghiorghe, S; Bartoş, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    In the general context of increasing prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in European population, we face with a significant rise of the incidence of atherothrombotic diseases. Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) represented for a long time a peripheral interest for cardiologist. The epidemiological studies in the latest years determine a reconsideration of the medical attitude in respect of PAD, motivated by an increase in its prevalence and, on the other hand, by the significant cardiovascular risk this disease carries with. Taking into account that fact and aiming at a better medical approach of these patients, we realized a review regarding therapeutic methods in patients with PAD and intermittent claudication based on the latest medical publications and in accord with the guide in force at the moment.

  12. Pseudofracture: an acute peripheral tissue trauma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwiche, Sophie S; Kobbe, Philipp; Pfeifer, Roman; Kohut, Lauryn; Pape, Hans-Christoph; Billiar, Timothy

    2011-04-18

    pseudofracture, as we wanted a sterile yet proportionally severe peripheral tissue trauma model. Hemorrhagic shock is a common finding in the setting of severe trauma, and the global hypoperfusion adds a very relevant element to a trauma model. The pseudofracture model can be easily combined with a hemorrhagic shock model for a multiple trauma model of high severity.

  13. Continuous tissue glucose monitoring correlates with measurement of intermittent capillary glucose in patients with distributive shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, D; Martínez, Ó; Blancas Gómez-Casero, R; Martín Parra, C; López Matamala, B; Estébanez, B; Chana, M

    2015-10-01

    Intermittent glycemic measurements in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) can result in episodes of severe hypoglycemia or in a poor control of glycemia range. We designed a study to assess accuracy and reliability of continuous monitoring of tissue glucose for patients with distributive shock. Consecutive patients admitted to the ICU with a diagnosis of distributive shock and the need of insulin infusion for glycemic control were included in the study. These patients were implanted a Continuous Glucose Control Monitoring System (CGMS) with the sensor inserted subcutaneously into the abdominal wall. CGMS values were recorded every 5min. Capillary glucose (CG) was monitored for adjusting insulin perfusion according to the ICU protocol. Correlation between both methods was assessed. A total of 11,673 CGMS and 348 CG values were recorded. In five patients, CGMS failed to detect tissue glucose. A glucose value <3.33mmol/l (<60mg/dl) was observed in 3.6% of CGMS and in 0.29% CG values. 295 pairs of measurements were included in the statistical analysis for correlation assessment. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.706. The Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.71 (p<0.0001, 95% CI 0.65-0.76). The mean of differences between both measurement methods was 0.22mmol/l (3.98mg/dl) (95% CI 0.66-7.31). When the Continuous Glucose Control Monitoring System (CGMS) is able to obtain data (75% of the patients), there is correlation between the values obtained by this method and capillary blood glucose in patients with distributive shock. CGMS can detect more episodes of glycemic excursions outside the normal range than intermittent capillary glucose monitoring. Variables that may impair glucose metabolism and peripheral soft tissues perfusion could impair CGMS measurements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  14. Intermittent pneumatic leg compressions enhance muscle performance and blood flow in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseguini, Bruno T; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Newcomer, Sean C; Yang, Hsiao T; Terjung, Ronald; Laughlin, M H

    2012-05-01

    Despite the escalating prevalence in the aging population, few therapeutic options exist to treat patients with peripheral arterial disease. Application of intermittent pneumatic leg compressions (IPC) is regarded as a promising noninvasive approach to treat this condition, but the clinical efficacy, as well the mechanistic basis of action of this therapy, remain poorly defined. We tested the hypothesis that 2 wk of daily application of IPC enhances exercise tolerance by improving blood flow and promoting angiogenesis in skeletal muscle in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to bilateral ligation of the femoral artery and randomly allocated to treatment or sham groups. Animals were anesthetized daily and exposed to 1-h sessions of bilateral IPC or sham treatment for 14-16 consecutive days. A third group of nonligated rats was also studied. Marked increases in treadmill exercise tolerance (∼33%, P < 0.05) and improved muscle performance in situ (∼10%, P < 0.05) were observed in IPC-treated animals. Compared with sham-treated controls, blood flow measured with isotope-labeled microspheres during in situ contractions tended to be higher in IPC-treated animals in muscles composed of predominantly fast-twitch white fibers, such as the plantaris (∼93%, P = 0.02). Capillary contacts per fiber and citrate synthase activity were not significantly altered by IPC treatment. Collectively, these data indicate that IPC improves exercise tolerance in a model of peripheral arterial insufficiency in part by enhancing blood flow to collateral-dependent tissues.

  15. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriques de Figueiredo, B.; Dejean, C.; Sargos, P.; Kantor, G.; Huchet, A.; Mamou, N.; Loiseau, H.

    2010-01-01

    Plexopathies and peripheral neuropathies appear progressively and with several years delay after radiotherapy. These lesions are observed principally after three clinical situations: supraclavicular and axillar irradiations for breast cancer, pelvic irradiations for various pathologies and limb irradiations for soft tissue sarcomas. Peripheral nerves and plexus (brachial and lumbosacral) are described as serial structures and are supposed to receive less than a given maximum dose linked to the occurrence of late injury. Literature data, mostly ancient, define the maximum tolerable dose to a threshold of 60 Gy and highlight also a great influence of fractionation and high fraction doses. For peripheral nerves, most frequent late effects are pain with significant differences of occurrence between 50 and 60 Gy. At last, associated pathologies (diabetes, vascular pathology, neuropathy) and associated treatments have probably to be taken into account as additional factors, which may increase the risk of these late radiation complications. (authors)

  16. Neural tissue engineering options for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaosong; Ding, Fei; Williams, David F

    2014-08-01

    Tissue engineered nerve grafts (TENGs) have emerged as a potential alternative to autologous nerve grafts, the gold standard for peripheral nerve repair. Typically, TENGs are composed of a biomaterial-based template that incorporates biochemical cues. A number of TENGs have been used experimentally to bridge long peripheral nerve gaps in various animal models, where the desired outcome is nerve tissue regeneration and functional recovery. So far, the translation of TENGs to the clinic for use in humans has met with a certain degree of success. In order to optimize the TENG design and further approach the matching of TENGs with autologous nerve grafts, many new cues, beyond the traditional ones, will have to be integrated into TENGs. Furthermore, there is a strong requirement for monitoring the real-time dynamic information related to the construction of TENGs. The aim of this opinion paper is to specifically and critically describe the latest advances in the field of neural tissue engineering for peripheral nerve regeneration. Here we delineate new attempts in the design of template (or scaffold) materials, especially in the context of biocompatibility, the choice and handling of support cells, and growth factor release systems. We further discuss the significance of RNAi for peripheral nerve regeneration, anticipate the potential application of RNAi reagents for TENGs, and speculate on the possible contributions of additional elements, including angiogenesis, electrical stimulation, molecular inflammatory mediators, bioactive peptides, antioxidant reagents, and cultured biological constructs, to TENGs. Finally, we consider that a diverse array of physicochemical and biological cues must be orchestrated within a TENG to create a self-consistent coordinated system with a close proximity to the regenerative microenvironment of the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Emerging nanotechnology approaches in tissue engineering for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Carla; Panseri, Silvia; Antonini, Stefania

    2011-02-01

    Effective nerve regeneration and functional recovery subsequent to peripheral nerve injury is still a clinical challenge. Autologous nerve graft transplantation is a feasible treatment in several clinical cases, but it is limited by donor site morbidity and insufficient donor tissue, impairing complete functional recovery. Tissue engineering has introduced innovative approaches to promote and guide peripheral nerve regeneration by using biomimetic conduits creating favorable microenvironments for nervous ingrowth, but despite the development of a plethora of nerve prostheses, few approaches have as yet entered the clinic. Promising strategies using nanotechnology have recently been proposed, such as the use of scaffolds with functionalized cell-binding domains, the use of guidance channels with cell-scale internally oriented fibers, and the possibility of sustained release of neurotrophic factors. This review addresses the fabrication, advantages, drawbacks, and results achieved by the most recent nanotechnology approaches in view of future solutions for peripheral nerve repair. Peripheral nerve repair strategies are very limited despite numerous advances on the field of neurosciences and regenerative medicine. This review discusses nanotechnology based strategies including scaffolds with functionalized cell binding domains, the use of guidance channels, and the potential use of sustained release neurotropic factors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sympathetic reflex control of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O

    1991-01-01

    Sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are essential for the maintenance of arterial blood pressure in upright position. It has been generally believed that supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes elicited by changes in baroreceptor activity play an important role. Recent studies on human...... sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes are blocked. Blood flow has been measure by the local 133Xe-technique. The results indicate the presence of spinal as well as supraspinal sympathetic vasoconstrictor reflexes to human peripheral tissues. Especially is emphasized the presence of a local sympathetic veno...... skeletal muscle, cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues of the limbs indicate that the situation is more complex. Measurements have been carried out during acute as well as chronic sympathetic denervation. Spinal sympathetic reflex mechanisms have been evaluated in tetraplegic patients, where supraspinal...

  19. Intermittent fasting up-regulates Fsp27/Cidec gene expression in white adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbowska, Joanna; Kochan, Zdzislaw

    2012-03-01

    Fat-specific protein of 27 kDa (FSP27) is a novel lipid droplet protein that promotes triacylglycerol storage in white adipose tissue (WAT). The regulation of the Fsp27 gene expression in WAT is largely unknown. We investigated the nutritional regulation of FSP27 in WAT. The effects of intermittent fasting (48 d, eight cycles of 3-d fasting and 3-d refeeding), caloric restriction (48 d), fasting-refeeding (3-d fasting and 3-d refeeding), and fasting (3 d) on mRNA expression of FSP27, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ2), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα), and M isoform of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (a positive control for PPARγ activation) in epididymal WAT and on serum triacylglycerol, insulin, and leptin levels were determined in Wistar rats. We also determined the effects of PPARγ activation by rosiglitazone or pioglitazone on FSP27 mRNA levels in primary rat adipocytes. Long-term intermittent fasting, in contrast to other dietary manipulations, significantly up-regulated Fsp27 gene expression in WAT. Moreover, in rats subjected to intermittent fasting, serum insulin levels were elevated; PPARγ2 and C/EBPα mRNA expression in WAT was increased, and there was a positive correlation of Fsp27 gene expression with PPARγ2 and C/EBPα mRNA levels. FSP27 mRNA expression was also increased in adipocytes treated with PPARγ agonists. Our study demonstrates that the transcription of the Fsp27 gene in adipose tissue may be induced in response to nutritional stimuli. Furthermore, PPARγ2, C/EBPα, and insulin may be involved in the nutritional regulation of FSP27. Thus intermittent fasting, despite lower caloric intake, may promote triacylglycerol deposition in WAT by increasing the expression of genes involved in lipid storage, such as Fsp27. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Melatonin membrane receptors in peripheral tissues: Distribution and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Radomir M.; Reiter, Russel J.; Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia; Ostrom, Rennolds S.; Slominski, Andrzej T.

    2012-01-01

    Many of melatonin’s actions are mediated through interaction with the G-protein coupled membrane bound melatonin receptors type 1 and type 2 (MT1 and MT2, respectively) or, indirectly with nuclear orphan receptors from the RORα/RZR family. Melatonin also binds to the quinone reductase II enzyme, previously defined the MT3 receptor. Melatonin receptors are widely distributed in the body; herein we summarize their expression and actions in non-neural tissues. Several controversies still exist regarding, for example, whether melatonin binds the RORα/RZR family. Studies of the peripheral distribution of melatonin receptors are important since they are attractive targets for immunomodulation, regulation of endocrine, reproductive and cardiovascular functions, modulation of skin pigmentation, hair growth, cancerogenesis, and aging. Melatonin receptor agonists and antagonists have an exciting future since they could define multiple mechanisms by which melatonin modulates the complexity of such a wide variety of physiological and pathological processes. PMID:22245784

  1. Intermittent straining accelerates the development of tissue properties in engineered heart valve tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubbens, M.P.; Mol, A.; Boerboom, R.A.; Bank, R.A.; Baaijens, F.P.T.; Bouten, C.V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue-engineered heart valves lack sufficient amounts of functionally organized structures and consequently do not meet in vivo mechanical demands. To optimize tissue architecture and hence improve mechanical properties, various in vitro mechanical conditioning protocols have been proposed, of

  2. Connective Tissue Reflex Massage for Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A.; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belen; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva; Quesada-Rubio, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of connective tissue massage to improve blood circulation and intermittent claudication symptoms in type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Ninety-eight type 2 diabetes patients with stage I or II-a peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (Leriche-Fontaine classification) were randomly assigned to a massage group or to a placebo group treated using disconnected magnetotherapy equipment. Peripheral arterial circulation was determined by measuring differential segmental arterial pressure, heart rate, skin temperature, oxygen saturation and skin blood flow. Measurements were taken before and at 30 min, 6 months and 1 year after the 15-week treatment. After the 15-week program, the groups differed (P < .05) in differential segmental arterial pressure in right lower limb (lower one-third of thigh, upper and lower one-third of leg) and left lower limb (lower one-third of thigh and upper and lower one-third of leg). A significant difference (P < .05) was also observed in skin blood flow in digits 1 and 4 of right foot and digits 2, 4 and 5 of left foot. ANOVA results were significant (P < .05) for right and left foot oxygen saturation but not for heart rate and temperature. At 6 months and 1 year, the groups differed in differential segmental arterial pressure in upper third of left and right legs. Connective tissue massage improves blood circulation in the lower limbs of type 2 diabetic patients at stage I or II-a and may be useful to slow the progression of PAD. PMID:19933770

  3. Connective Tissue Reflex Massage for Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease: Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelaida María Castro-Sánchez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of connective tissue massage to improve blood circulation and intermittent claudication symptoms in type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Ninety-eight type 2 diabetes patients with stage I or II-a peripheral arterial disease (PAD (Leriche-Fontaine classification were randomly assigned to a massage group or to a placebo group treated using disconnected magnetotherapy equipment. Peripheral arterial circulation was determined by measuring differential segmental arterial pressure, heart rate, skin temperature, oxygen saturation and skin blood flow. Measurements were taken before and at 30 min, 6 months and 1 year after the 15-week treatment. After the 15-week program, the groups differed (P<.05 in differential segmental arterial pressure in right lower limb (lower one-third of thigh, upper and lower one-third of leg and left lower limb (lower one-third of thigh and upper and lower one-third of leg. A significant difference (P<.05 was also observed in skin blood flow in digits 1 and 4 of right foot and digits 2, 4 and 5 of left foot. ANOVA results were significant (P<.05 for right and left foot oxygen saturation but not for heart rate and temperature. At 6 months and 1 year, the groups differed in differential segmental arterial pressure in upper third of left and right legs. Connective tissue massage improves blood circulation in the lower limbs of type 2 diabetic patients at stage I or II-a and may be useful to slow the progression of PAD.

  4. Sexual dimorphism in hepatic, adipose tissue and peripheral tissue insulin sensitivity in obese humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasper W. ter Horst

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Glucose and lipid metabolism differ between men and women, and women tend to have better whole-body or muscle insulin sensitivity. This may be explained, in part, by differences in sex hormones and adipose tissue distribution. Few studies have investigated gender differences in hepatic, adipose tissue and whole-body insulin sensitivity between severely obese men and women. In this study, we aimed to determine the differences in glucose metabolism between severely obese men and women using tissue-specific measurements of insulin sensitivity. Insulin sensitivity was compared between age and body mass index (BMI-matched obese men and women by a two-step euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with infusion of [6,6-2H2]glucose. Basal endogenous glucose production and insulin sensitivity of the liver, adipose tissue and peripheral tissues were assessed. Liver fat content was assessed by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in a subset of included subjects. We included 46 obese men and women (age, 48±2 vs 46±2 years, p=0.591; BMI, 41±1 vs 41±1 kg/m2, p=0.832. There was no difference in basal endogenous glucose production (14.4±1.0 vs 15.3±0.5 µmol•kg fat-free mass-1•min-1, p=0.410, adipose tissue insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of free fatty acids, 71.6±3.6 vs 76.1±2.6%, p=0.314 or peripheral insulin sensitivity (insulin-stimulated rate of disappearance of glucose, 26.2±2.1 vs 22.7±1.7 µmol•kg-1•min-1, p=0.211. Obese men were characterized by lower hepatic insulin sensitivity (insulin-mediated suppression of endogenous glucose production, 61.7±4.1 vs 72.8±2.5% in men vs women, resp., p=0.028. Finally, these observations could not be explained by differences in liver fat content (men vs women, 16.5±3.1 vs 16.0±2.5%, p=0.913, n=27.We conclude that obese men have lower hepatic, but comparable adipose tissue and peripheral tissue, insulin sensitivity compared to similarly obese women. Hepatic insulin resistance may

  5. Leptin receptor in peripheral adipose tissues of obese subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Sun Junjiang; Wang Zizheng; Wang Shukui; Fu Lei; Han Liu

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between leptin receptor and obesity by studying the leptin receptor density B max and dissociation constant K d in peripheral adipose tissue in subjects with different body weight mass (BMI). Methods: Leptin receptor density B max and K d were assayed via radioligand method in 71 cases, including 32 classified as obese, 19 over-weight and 20 normal control. Results: With the escalating of BMI, the leptin receptor density significantly decreased in obese and over-weight group compared with that in normal control (both P d values were of no differences among all three groups suggesting no correlation between the binding ability of leptin to its receptor and BMI. A negative correlation between BMI and B max (r=-0.76, P<0.01) displayed after all. Conclusion: Leptin receptor density correlates with the BMI in obese cases and it suggests that the down-regulation of leptin receptor may contribute to the occurrence of leptin resistance and obesity after-wards

  6. Peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation: influence of tissue non-homogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papazov Sava P

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripheral nerves are situated in a highly non-homogeneous environment, including muscles, bones, blood vessels, etc. Time-varying magnetic field stimulation of the median and ulnar nerves in the carpal region is studied, with special consideration of the influence of non-homogeneities. Methods A detailed three-dimensional finite element model (FEM of the anatomy of the wrist region was built to assess the induced currents distribution by external magnetic stimulation. The electromagnetic field distribution in the non-homogeneous domain was defined as an internal Dirichlet problem using the finite element method. The boundary conditions were obtained by analysis of the vector potential field excited by external current-driven coils. Results The results include evaluation and graphical representation of the induced current field distribution at various stimulation coil positions. Comparative study for the real non-homogeneous structure with anisotropic conductivities of the tissues and a mock homogeneous media is also presented. The possibility of achieving selective stimulation of either of the two nerves is assessed. Conclusion The model developed could be useful in theoretical prediction of the current distribution in the nerves during diagnostic stimulation and therapeutic procedures involving electromagnetic excitation. The errors in applying homogeneous domain modeling rather than real non-homogeneous biological structures are demonstrated. The practical implications of the applied approach are valid for any arbitrary weakly conductive medium.

  7. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells HIV DNA levels impact intermittently on neurocognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucette A Cysique

    Full Text Available To determine the contribution of peripheral blood mononuclear cells' (PBMCs HIV DNA levels to HIV-associated dementia (HAD and non-demented HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND in chronically HIV-infected adults with long-term viral suppression on combined antiretroviral treatment (cART.Eighty adults with chronic HIV infection on cART (>97% with plasma and CSF HIV RNA <50 copies/mL were enrolled into a prospective observational cohort and underwent assessments of neurocognition and pre-morbid cognitive ability at two visits 18 months apart. HIV DNA in PBMCs was measured by real-time PCR at the same time-points.At baseline, 46% had non-demented HAND; 7.5% had HAD. Neurocognitive decline occurred in 14% and was more likely in those with HAD (p<.03. Low pre-morbid cognitive ability was uniquely associated with HAD (p<.05. Log10 HIV DNA copies were stable between study visits (2.26 vs. 2.22 per 106 PBMC. Baseline HIV DNA levels were higher in those with lower pre-morbid cognitive ability (p<.04, and higher in those with no ART treatment during HIV infection 1st year (p = .03. Baseline HIV DNA was not associated with overall neurocognition. However, % ln HIV DNA change was associated with decline in semantic fluency in unadjusted and adjusted analyses (p = .01-.03, and motor-coordination (p = .02-.12 to a lesser extent.PBMC HIV DNA plays a role in HAD pathogenesis, and this is moderated by pre-morbid cognitive ability in the context of long-term viral suppression. While the HIV DNA levels in PBMC are not associated with current non-demented HAND, increasing HIV DNA levels were associated with a decline in neurocognitive functions associated with HAND progression.

  8. Adipose Tissue CLK2 Promotes Energy Expenditure during High-Fat Diet Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatting, Maximilian; Rines, Amy K; Luo, Chi; Tabata, Mitsuhisa; Sharabi, Kfir; Hall, Jessica A; Verdeguer, Francisco; Trautwein, Christian; Puigserver, Pere

    2017-02-07

    A promising approach to treating obesity is to increase diet-induced thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT), but the regulation of this process remains unclear. Here we find that CDC-like kinase 2 (CLK2) is expressed in BAT and upregulated upon refeeding. Mice lacking CLK2 in adipose tissue exhibit exacerbated obesity and decreased energy expenditure during high-fat diet intermittent fasting. Additionally, tissue oxygen consumption and protein levels of UCP1 are reduced in CLK2-deficient BAT. Phosphorylation of CREB, a transcriptional activator of UCP1, is markedly decreased in BAT cells lacking CLK2 due to enhanced CREB dephosphorylation. Mechanistically, CREB dephosphorylation is rescued by the inhibition of PP2A, a phosphatase that targets CREB. Our results suggest that CLK2 is a regulatory component of diet-induced thermogenesis in BAT through increased CREB-dependent expression of UCP1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) determinations before and during intermittent maximal androgen blockade in patients with metastatic prostatic carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kil, P. J. M.; Goldschmidt, H. M. J.; Wieggers, B. J. A.; Kariakine, O. B.; Studer, U. E.; Whelan, P.; Hetherington, J.; de Reijke, Th M.; Hoekstra, J. W.; Collette, L.

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of serially measured tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) levels in patients with metastatic prostatic carcinoma treated with intermittent maximal androgen blockade (MAB). To determine its value with respect to predicting response to treatment and time to

  10. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chausse, Bruno; Vieira-Lara, Marcel A; Sanchez, Angélica B; Medeiros, Marisa H G; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR) and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart.

  11. Intermittent fasting results in tissue-specific changes in bioenergetics and redox state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Chausse

    Full Text Available Intermittent fasting (IF is a dietary intervention often used as an alternative to caloric restriction (CR and characterized by 24 hour cycles alternating ad libitum feeding and fasting. Although the consequences of CR are well studied, the effects of IF on redox status are not. Here, we address the effects of IF on redox state markers in different tissues in order to uncover how changes in feeding frequency alter redox balance in rats. IF rats displayed lower body mass due to decreased energy conversion efficiency. Livers in IF rats presented increased mitochondrial respiratory capacity and enhanced levels of protein carbonyls. Surprisingly, IF animals also presented an increase in oxidative damage in the brain that was not related to changes in mitochondrial bioenergetics. Conversely, IF promoted a substantial protection against oxidative damage in the heart. No difference in mitochondrial bioenergetics or redox homeostasis was observed in skeletal muscles of IF animals. Overall, IF affects redox balance in a tissue-specific manner, leading to redox imbalance in the liver and brain and protection against oxidative damage in the heart.

  12. Chronic intermittent hypoxia activates nuclear factor-κB in cardiovascular tissues in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenberg, Harly; Ye Xiaobing; Wilson, David; Htoo, Aung K.; Hendersen, Todd; Liu Shufang

    2006-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms through which OSA promotes the development of cardiovascular disease are poorly understood. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that chronic exposure to intermittent hypoxia and reoxygenation (CIH) is a major pathologic factor causing cardiovascular inflammation, and that CIH-induces cardiovascular inflammation and pathology by activating the NF-κB pathway. We demonstrated that exposure of mice to CIH activated NF-κB in cardiovascular tissues, and that OSA patients had markedly elevated monocyte NF-κB activity, which was significantly decreased when obstructive apneas and their resultant CIH were eliminated by nocturnal CPAP therapy. The elevated NF-κB activity induced by CIH is accompanied by and temporally correlated to the increased expression of iNOS protein, a putative and important NF-κB-dependent gene product. Thus, CIH-mediated NF-κB activation may be a molecular mechanism linking OSA and cardiovascular pathologies seen in OSA patients

  13. The acute effects of lower limb intermittent negative pressure on foot macro- and microcirculation in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Heiberg Sundby

    Full Text Available Intermittent negative pressure (INP applied to the lower leg and foot increases foot perfusion in healthy volunteers. The aim of the present study was to describe the effects of INP to the lower leg and foot on foot macro- and microcirculation in patients with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD.In this experimental study, we analyzed foot circulation during INP in 20 patients [median (range: 75 (63-84yrs] with PAD. One leg was placed inside an air-tight vacuum chamber connected to an INP-generator. During application of INP (alternating 10s of -40mmHg/7s of atmospheric pressure, we continuously recorded blood flow velocity in a distal foot artery (ultrasound Doppler, skin blood flow on the pulp of the first toes (laser Doppler, heart rate (ECG, and systemic blood pressure (Finometer. After a 5-min baseline sequence (no pressure, a 10-min INP sequence was applied, followed by 5-min post-INP (no pressure. To compare and quantify blood flow fluctuations between sequences, we calculated cumulative up-and-down fluctuations in arterial blood flow velocity per minute.Onset of INP induced an increase in arterial flow velocity and skin blood flow. Peak blood flow velocity was reached 3s after the onset of negative pressure, and increased 46% [(95% CI 36-57, P<0.001] above baseline. Peak skin blood flow was reached 2s after the onset of negative pressure, and increased 89% (95% CI 48-130, P<0.001 above baseline. Cumulative fluctuations per minute were significantly higher during INP-sequences compared to baseline [21 (95% CI 12-30cm/s/min to 41 (95% CI 32-51cm/s/min, P<0.001]. Mean INP blood flow velocity increased significantly ~12% above mean baseline blood flow velocity [(6.7 (95% CI 5.2-8.3cm/s to 7.5 (95% CI 5.9-9.1cm/s, P = 0.03].INP increases foot macro- and microcirculatory flow pulsatility in patients with PAD. Additionally, application of INP resulted in increased mean arterial blood flow velocity.

  14. Continuous infusion versus intermittent flushing to prevent loss of function of peripheral intravenous catheters used for drug administration in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, A; McIntosh, D; Davies, M W

    2005-10-19

    The use of peripheral intravenous cannulae is common in newborn babies. Many of them require an intravenous line only for medications and not for fluid. Currently there is little uniformity in methods used to maintain cannula patency. The object of this review was to determine which method was better for maintaining intravenous lines used in neonates for intravenous medication only: intermittent flushing or continuous infusion We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2004), CINAHL (from 1982 to June 2004) and MEDLINE (from 1966 to June 2004) . Randomised controlled trials comparing continuous infusion to intermittent flushing to maintain patency of intravenous cannulas. Units of randomisation might include individual catheters or individual babies. Three reviewers independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. Two studies were eligible for inclusion. In one study only one of our primary outcomes was available: the duration of cannula patency for the first cannula used per infant was slightly longer in the continuous infusion group, but not significantly so, with a mean difference of -4.3 hours (95% CI -18.2 to 9.7). In the second study, only one of our primary outcomes was available: the mean (SD) number cannulas used per infant in the first 48 hours was less in the intermittent flush group with a mean difference of -0.76 cannulas (95% CI -1.37 to -0.15). No results were available for any of our other primary outcomes: in the published report, results were reported per catheter rather than per infant, a number of infants received more than one intravenous catheter (39 infants received an unknown number of catheters). The overall duration of cannula patency was significantly longer in the intermittent flush group with a mean duration of patency in the intermittent flush group of 2.1 days (SD 1.0) compared with the continuous infusion group where the mean duration of patency was 1.0 days (SD 0

  15. Synovial tissue heterogeneity in rheumatoid arthritis in relation to disease activity and biomarkers in peripheral blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baarsen, Lisa G. M.; Wijbrandts, Carla A.; Timmer, Trieneke C. G.; van der Pouw Kraan, Tineke C. T. M.; Tak, Paul P.; Verweij, Cornelis L.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical relevance of synovial tissue subtypes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and to search for peripheral blood (PB) markers that may serve as biomarkers for tissue subtypes. METHODS: Gene expression analysis using complementary DNA microarrays was applied on paired

  16. Utilization of 14C-tyrosine in brain and peripheral tissues of developmentally protein malnourished rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.; Leahy, J.P.; McConville, F.; Morgane, P.J.; Resnick, O.

    1978-01-01

    Prior studies of developmentally protein malnourished rats have reported substantial changes in brain and peripheral utilization of 14 C-leucine, 14 C-phenylalanine, and 14 C-tryptophan. In the present study rats born to dams fed a low protein diet (8% casein) compared to the offspring of control rats fed a normal diet (25% casein) showed few significant differences in the uptake and incorporation of 14 C-tyrosine into brain and peripheral tissues from birth to age 21 days. At birth, the 8% casein pups exhibited significant decreases in brain and peripheral tissue incorporation of tracer only at short post-injection times (10 and 20 min), but not at longer intervals (90 and 180 min). During ontogenetic development (Days 5-21), the 8% casein rats showed significant increases in uptake of 14 C-tyrosine into the brain and peripheral tissues on Day 11 and a significantly higher percent incorporation of tracer into brain protein on Day 21 as compared to the 25% casein rats. For the most part, there were no significant changes in incorporation of radioactivity in peripheral tissues for the 2 diet groups on these post-birth days. Overall, the data indicates that developmental protein malnutrition causes relatively fewer changes in brain and peripheral utilization of the semi-essential amino acid tyrosine than those observed in previous studies with essential amino acids

  17. Peripheral soft tissue ewing's sarcoma: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Shegufta

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A 22 years male patient presented with gradual left forearm swelling for 6 months. X ray forearm revealed large soft tissue swelling with tiny calcification and mild scalloping at inner aspect of ulna and ultrasonogram (USG revealed soft tissue mass having calcification and necrotic areas within and spectral Doppler showed arterial type of blood flow with no augmentation. Later computerized tomography (CT scan showed soft tissue mass with necrotic area and calcification with no bony involvement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with contrast revealed a large heterogeneously enhancing lobulated mixed intensity lesion in antero-medial compartment of the left forearm involving flexor group of muscles causing displacement of fat plane. MRI and subsequent histopathology of the lesion revealed it as a rare soft tissue Ewing’s sarcoma / primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET in extremity. Ibrahim Med. Coll. J. 2013; 7(2: 43-46

  18. Ultrasonic stimulation of peripheral nervous tissue: an investigation into mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, C J; Saffari, N; Rothwell, J

    2015-01-01

    Neuro-stimulation has wide ranging clinical and research potential but this is currently limited either by low resolution, penetration or by highly invasive procedures. It has been reported in previous studies that ultrasound is able to elicit a neuro-stimulatory effect at a higher resolution than other non-invasive approaches but both the underlying mechanism that makes this possible and the practical details of how it can be implemented are still poorly understood. The current study has identified the main issues that need to be resolved in the field, proposing several different approaches to tackling these areas. An isolated in vitro peripheral nerve bundle was chosen as a simple model to demonstrate and investigate the neuro-stimulatory effect after preliminary results showed successful stimulation in a skin-nerve preparation. Early results from the nerve bundle show successful neurostimulation, indicating that structures in the peripheral nerve axon are sensitive to ultrasound. Further research using this model should reveal more precisely what structures are being affected and how to optimise the effect, helping to inform the design of future procedures and devices used in in vivo applications

  19. Regulation of macrophage development and function in peripheral tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Yonit; Mortha, Arthur; Rahman, Adeeb; Merad, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are immune cells of haematopoietic origin that provide crucial innate immune defence and have tissue-specific functions in the regulation and maintenance of organ homeostasis. Recent studies of macrophage ontogeny, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic identity, have started to reveal the decisive role of the tissue stroma in the regulation of macrophage function. These findings suggest that most macrophages seed the tissues during embryonic development and functionally specialize in response to cytokines and metabolites that are released by the stroma and drive the expression of unique transcription factors. In this Review, we discuss how recent insights into macrophage ontogeny and macrophage–stroma interactions contribute to our understanding of the crosstalk that shapes macrophage function and the maintenance of organ integrity. PMID:26603899

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral soft tissue hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, M C; Stull, M A; Patt, R H; Freedman, M T [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (USA). Dept. of Radiology; Teitelbaum, G P [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (USA). Dept. of Radiology University of Southern California, Los Angeles (USA). Dept. of Radiology; Lack, E E [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (USA). Dept. of Pathology; Bogumill, G P [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (USA). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    1990-10-01

    Ten patients with soft tissue hemangiomas outside the central nervous system were studied with MR imaging. Eight patients were studied at 1.5 Tesla (T) with T{sub 1}-weighted and triple echo T{sub 2}-weighted sequences. Two additional patients were imaged on a 0.5-T system. The MR images were correlated with images from other modalities. It was found that prolonged T{sub 2}-weighted imaging together with standard spin echo T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} pulse sequences is a good substitute for contrast-enhanced CT and arteriographic evaluation of soft tissue hemangiomas. (orig./DG).

  1. 'Multi-associations': predisposed to misinterpretation of peripheral tissue oxygenation and circulation in neonates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, Gerhard; Pocivalnik, Mirjam; Pichler-Stachl, Elisabeth; Morris, Nicholas; Zotter, Heinz; Müller, Wilhelm; Urlesberger, Berndt; Riedl, Regina

    2011-01-01

    Interpretation of peripheral circulation in ill neonates is crucial but difficult. The aim was to analyse parameters potentially influencing peripheral oxygenation and circulation. In a prospective observational cohort study in 116 cardio-circulatory stable neonates, peripheral muscle near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with venous occlusion was performed. Tissue oxygenation index (TOI), mixed venous oxygenation (SvO 2 ), fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE), haemoglobin flow (Hbflow), oxygen delivery (DO 2 ), oxygen consumption (VO 2 ), and vascular resistance (VR) were assessed. Correlation coefficients between NIRS parameters and demographic parameters (gestational age, birth weight, age, actual weight, diameter of calf, subcutaneous adipose tissue), monitoring parameters (heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO 2 ), mean blood pressure (MAP), core/peripheral temperature, central/peripheral capillary refill time) and laboratory parameters (haemoglobin concentration (Hb-blood), pCO 2 ) were calculated. All demographic parameters except for Hbflow and DO 2 correlated with NIRS parameters. Heart rate correlated with TOI, SvO 2 , VO 2 and VR. SaO 2 correlated with FOE/FTOE. MAP correlated with Hbflow, DO 2 , VO 2 and VR. Core temperature correlated with FTOE. Peripheral temperature correlated with all NIRS parameters except VO 2 . Hb-blood correlated with FOE and VR. pCO 2 levels correlated with TOI and SvO 2 . The presence of multiple interdependent factors associated with peripheral oxygenation and circulation highlights the difficulty in interpreting NIRS data. Nevertheless, these findings have to be taken into account when analysing peripheral oxygenation and circulation data

  2. 'Multi-associations': predisposed to misinterpretation of peripheral tissue oxygenation and circulation in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Gerhard; Pocivalnik, Mirjam; Riedl, Regina; Pichler-Stachl, Elisabeth; Morris, Nicholas; Zotter, Heinz; Müller, Wilhelm; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2011-08-01

    Interpretation of peripheral circulation in ill neonates is crucial but difficult. The aim was to analyse parameters potentially influencing peripheral oxygenation and circulation. In a prospective observational cohort study in 116 cardio-circulatory stable neonates, peripheral muscle near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) with venous occlusion was performed. Tissue oxygenation index (TOI), mixed venous oxygenation (SvO(2)), fractional oxygen extraction (FOE), fractional tissue oxygen extraction (FTOE), haemoglobin flow (Hbflow), oxygen delivery (DO(2)), oxygen consumption (VO(2)), and vascular resistance (VR) were assessed. Correlation coefficients between NIRS parameters and demographic parameters (gestational age, birth weight, age, actual weight, diameter of calf, subcutaneous adipose tissue), monitoring parameters (heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)), mean blood pressure (MAP), core/peripheral temperature, central/peripheral capillary refill time) and laboratory parameters (haemoglobin concentration (Hb-blood), pCO(2)) were calculated. All demographic parameters except for Hbflow and DO(2) correlated with NIRS parameters. Heart rate correlated with TOI, SvO(2), VO(2) and VR. SaO(2) correlated with FOE/FTOE. MAP correlated with Hbflow, DO(2), VO(2) and VR. Core temperature correlated with FTOE. Peripheral temperature correlated with all NIRS parameters except VO(2). Hb-blood correlated with FOE and VR. pCO(2) levels correlated with TOI and SvO(2). The presence of multiple interdependent factors associated with peripheral oxygenation and circulation highlights the difficulty in interpreting NIRS data. Nevertheless, these findings have to be taken into account when analysing peripheral oxygenation and circulation data.

  3. [Fuzzing pattern recognition study on Raman spectrum of tumor peripheral tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lei; Zhao, Yuan-li; Ge, Xiang-hong; Zhang, Xiao-dong; Hao, Zhi-fang; Lü, Jing

    2006-06-01

    On the basis of some theories about fuzzing pattern recognition, the present article studied the data preprocessing of the Raman spectrum of tumor peripheral tissue, and feature extraction and selection. According to these features the authors improved the leaning towards the bigger membership function of trapezoidal distribution. The authors built the membership function of Raman spectrum of tumor peripheral tissue which belongs to malignant tumor on the basis of 40 specimens, and designed the classifier. The test of other 40 specimens showed that the discrimination of malignant tumor is 82.4%, while that of beginning tumor is 73.9%.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of 2-nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers in rodent peripheral nervous tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasai, K.; Shibamoto, Y.; Abe, M.; Takahashi, M.; Ito, T.; Nishimoto, S.

    1990-01-01

    The concentrations of seven 2-nitroimidazoles - including misonidazole, etanidazole (SR-2508), pimonidazole (Ro 03-8799), desmethylmisonidazole (Ro 05-9963), RK28, RP170 and KU2285 - were measured in the sciatic nerves of C3H/He mice using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The apparent biological half-lives of the compounds in the peripheral nerves were correlated to their hydrophilicity: the more hydrophilic the compound, the longer the apparent biological half-life in the peripheral nervous tissue of the mice. Measurement of drug exposure in the rodent peripheral nervous system, rather than in the brain, was a better indicator for estimating the occurrence of clinical peripheral neuropathy by 2-nitroimidazoles. (author)

  5. Pharmacokinetics of 2-nitroimidazole hypoxic cell radiosensitizers in rodent peripheral nervous tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasai, K.; Shibamoto, Y.; Abe, M. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Takahashi, M. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Chest Disease Research Inst.); Ito, T.; Nishimoto, S. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    The concentrations of seven 2-nitroimidazoles - including misonidazole, etanidazole (SR-2508), pimonidazole (Ro 03-8799), desmethylmisonidazole (Ro 05-9963), RK28, RP170 and KU2285 - were measured in the sciatic nerves of C3H/He mice using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The apparent biological half-lives of the compounds in the peripheral nerves were correlated to their hydrophilicity: the more hydrophilic the compound, the longer the apparent biological half-life in the peripheral nervous tissue of the mice. Measurement of drug exposure in the rodent peripheral nervous system, rather than in the brain, was a better indicator for estimating the occurrence of clinical peripheral neuropathy by 2-nitroimidazoles. (author).

  6. HIV-1 phylogenetic analysis shows HIV-1 transits through the meninges to brain and peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, Susanna L; Gray, Rebecca R; Salemi, Marco; Huysentruyt, Leanne C; McGrath, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Brain infection by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been investigated in many reports with a variety of conclusions concerning the time of entry and degree of viral compartmentalization. To address these diverse findings, we sequenced HIV-1 gp120 clones from a wide range of brain, peripheral and meningeal tissues from five patients who died from several HIV-1 associated disease pathologies. High-resolution phylogenetic analysis confirmed previous studies that showed a significant degree of compartmentalization in brain and peripheral tissue subpopulations. Some intermixing between the HIV-1 subpopulations was evident, especially in patients that died from pathologies other than HIV-associated dementia. Interestingly, the major tissue harboring virus from both the brain and peripheral tissues was the meninges. These results show that (1) HIV-1 is clearly capable of migrating out of the brain, (2) the meninges are the most likely primary transport tissues, and (3) infected brain macrophages comprise an important HIV reservoir during highly active antiretroviral therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sleep is not just for the brain: transcriptional responses to sleep in peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anafi, Ron C; Pellegrino, Renata; Shockley, Keith R; Romer, Micah; Tufik, Sergio; Pack, Allan I

    2013-05-30

    Many have assumed that the primary function of sleep is for the brain. We evaluated the molecular consequences of sleep and sleep deprivation outside the brain, in heart and lung. Using microarrays we compared gene expression in tissue from sleeping and sleep deprived mice euthanized at the same diurnal times. In each tissue, nearly two thousand genes demonstrated statistically significant differential expression as a function of sleep/wake behavioral state. To mitigate the influence of an artificial deprivation protocol, we identified a subset of these transcripts as specifically sleep-enhanced or sleep-repressed by requiring that their expression also change over the course of unperturbed sleep. 3% and 6% of the assayed transcripts showed "sleep specific" changes in the lung and heart respectively. Sleep specific transcripts in these tissues demonstrated highly significant overlap and shared temporal dynamics. Markers of cellular stress and the unfolded protein response were reduced during sleep in both tissues. These results mirror previous findings in brain. Sleep-enhanced pathways reflected the unique metabolic functions of each tissue. Transcripts related to carbohydrate and sulfur metabolic processes were enhanced by sleep in the lung, and collectively favor buffering from oxidative stress. DNA repair and protein metabolism annotations were significantly enriched among the sleep-enhanced transcripts in the heart. Our results also suggest that sleep may provide a Zeitgeber, or synchronizing cue, in the lung as a large cluster of transcripts demonstrated systematic changes in inter-animal variability as a function of both sleep duration and circadian time. Our data support the notion that the molecular consequences of sleep/wake behavioral state extend beyond the brain to include peripheral tissues. Sleep state induces a highly overlapping response in both heart and lung. We conclude that sleep enhances organ specific molecular functions and that it has a

  8. Imaging of tuberculosis. Pt. 5. Peripheral osteoarticular and soft-tissue tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugosson, C. [Dept. of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Nyman, R.S. [Dept. of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Brismar, J. [Dept. of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Larsson, S.G. [Dept. of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Lindahl, S. [Dept. of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Lundstedt, C. [Dept. of Radiology, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-07-01

    Purpose: To assess frequency, location, and appearance of peripheral osteoarticular and soft-tissue tuberculosis (TB). Material and Methods: Twenty-five of 503 patients with TB had peripheral osteoarticular TB and 5 had soft-tissue TB. Chest radiography, CT, and MR imaging were applied. Results: The location of the osteoarticular lesion was articular/epiphyseal in 14 patients, articular/metaphyseal in 3, and metaphyseal without joint involvement in 3. Involvement of flat bone was found in 4 patients (5 lesions). The morphologic appearance was similar to that of a lytic tumour in 9 patients (10 lesions) and that of a destructive joint lesion in 16 patients. The soft-tissue TB in all 5 patients presented as an abscess. Twelve patients had a total of 20 additional sites of involvement: Chest in 9, abdomen in 4, spine in 4, the neck in 3, and the central nervous system in one patient. Conclusion: On the basis of radiologic appearance, it can be difficult to differentiate peripheral osteoarticular and soft-tissue TB from other degenerative, inflammatory, or neoplastic disorders, and the importance of a high awareness is stressed in order to reach an early diagnosis. (orig.).

  9. Imaging of tuberculosis. Pt. 5. Peripheral osteoarticular and soft-tissue tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hugosson, C.; Nyman, R.S.; Brismar, J.; Larsson, S.G.; Lindahl, S.; Lundstedt, C.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess frequency, location, and appearance of peripheral osteoarticular and soft-tissue tuberculosis (TB). Material and Methods: Twenty-five of 503 patients with TB had peripheral osteoarticular TB and 5 had soft-tissue TB. Chest radiography, CT, and MR imaging were applied. Results: The location of the osteoarticular lesion was articular/epiphyseal in 14 patients, articular/metaphyseal in 3, and metaphyseal without joint involvement in 3. Involvement of flat bone was found in 4 patients (5 lesions). The morphologic appearance was similar to that of a lytic tumour in 9 patients (10 lesions) and that of a destructive joint lesion in 16 patients. The soft-tissue TB in all 5 patients presented as an abscess. Twelve patients had a total of 20 additional sites of involvement: Chest in 9, abdomen in 4, spine in 4, the neck in 3, and the central nervous system in one patient. Conclusion: On the basis of radiologic appearance, it can be difficult to differentiate peripheral osteoarticular and soft-tissue TB from other degenerative, inflammatory, or neoplastic disorders, and the importance of a high awareness is stressed in order to reach an early diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Peripheral laser iridoplasty opens angle in plateau iris by thinning the cross-sectional tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu J

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ji Liu,1,2 Tania Lamba,1 David A Belyea1 1Department of Ophthalmology, The George Washington University, Washington DC, USA; 2Yale Eye Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Plateau iris syndrome has been described as persistent angle narrowing or occlusion with intraocular pressure elevation after peripheral iridotomy due to the abnormal plateau iris configuration. Argon laser peripheral iridoplasty (ALPI is an effective adjunct procedure to treat plateau iris syndrome. Classic theory suggests that the laser causes the contraction of the far peripheral iris stroma, "pulls" the iris away from the angle, and relieves the iris-angle apposition. We report a case of plateau iris syndrome that was successfully treated with ALPI. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography confirmed the angle was open at areas with laser treatment but remained appositionally closed at untreated areas. Further analysis suggested significant cross-sectional thinning of the iris at laser-treated areas in comparison with untreated areas. The findings indicate that APLI opens the angle, not only by contracting the iris stroma, but also by thinning the iris tissue at the crowded angle. This is consistent with the ALPI technique to aim at the iris as far peripheral as possible. This case also suggests that spectral domain optical coherence tomography is a useful adjunct imaging tool to gonioscopy in assessing the angle condition. Keywords: plateau iris, optic coherence tomography, argon laser peripheral iridoplasty, angle-closure glaucoma

  11. Peripheral CLOCK regulates target-tissue glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity in a circadian fashion in man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelia Charmandari

    Full Text Available Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the "master" circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral "slave" counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans.We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs as non-synchronized controls.GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo.Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night.

  12. Peripheral CLOCK Regulates Target-Tissue Glucocorticoid Receptor Transcriptional Activity in a Circadian Fashion in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Chrousos, George P.; Lambrou, George I.; Pavlaki, Aikaterini; Koide, Hisashi; Ng, Sinnie Sin Man; Kino, Tomoshige

    2011-01-01

    Context and Objective Circulating cortisol fluctuates diurnally under the control of the “master” circadian CLOCK, while the peripheral “slave” counterpart of the latter regulates the transcriptional activity of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) at local glucocorticoid target tissues through acetylation. In this manuscript, we studied the effect of CLOCK-mediated GR acetylation on the sensitivity of peripheral tissues to glucocorticoids in humans. Design and Participants We examined GR acetylation and mRNA expression of GR, CLOCK-related and glucocorticoid-responsive genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained at 8 am and 8 pm from 10 healthy subjects, as well as in PBMCs obtained in the morning and cultured for 24 hours with exposure to 3-hour hydrocortisone pulses every 6 hours. We used EBV-transformed lymphocytes (EBVLs) as non-synchronized controls. Results GR acetylation was higher in the morning than in the evening in PBMCs, mirroring the fluctuations of circulating cortisol in reverse phase. All known glucocorticoid-responsive genes tested responded as expected to hydrocortisone in non-synchronized EBVLs, however, some of these genes did not show the expected diurnal mRNA fluctuations in PBMCs in vivo. Instead, their mRNA oscillated in a Clock- and a GR acetylation-dependent fashion in naturally synchronized PBMCs cultured ex vivo in the absence of the endogenous glucocorticoid, suggesting that circulating cortisol might prevent circadian GR acetylation-dependent effects in some glucocorticoid-responsive genes in vivo. Conclusions Peripheral CLOCK-mediated circadian acetylation of the human GR may function as a target-tissue, gene-specific counter regulatory mechanism to the actions of diurnally fluctuating cortisol, effectively decreasing tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids in the morning and increasing it at night. PMID:21980503

  13. Photoperiodic regulation of PER1 and PER2 protein expression in rat peripheral tissues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bendová, Zdeňka; Sumová, Alena

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 6 (2006), s. 623-632 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP309/02/D093; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant - others:EUCLOCK(XE) 018741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : circadian rhythms * peripheral tissue * PER proteins Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  14. Aging and Intermittent Fasting Impact on Transcriptional Regulation and Physiological Responses of Adult Drosophila Neuronal and Muscle Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sharon; Ratliff, Eric P; Molina, Brandon; El-Mecharrafie, Nadja; Mastroianni, Jessica; Kotzebue, Roxanne W; Achal, Madhulika; Mauntz, Ruth E; Gonzalez, Arysa; Barekat, Ayeh; Bray, William A; Macias, Andrew M; Daugherty, Daniel; Harris, Greg L; Edwards, Robert A; Finley, Kim D

    2018-04-10

    The progressive decline of the nervous system, including protein aggregate formation, reflects the subtle dysregulation of multiple functional pathways. Our previous work has shown intermittent fasting (IF) enhances longevity, maintains adult behaviors and reduces aggregates, in part, by promoting autophagic function in the aging Drosophila brain. To clarify the impact that IF-treatment has upon aging, we used high throughput RNA-sequencing technology to examine the changing transcriptome in adult Drosophila tissues. Principle component analysis (PCA) and other analyses showed ~1200 age-related transcriptional differences in head and muscle tissues, with few genes having matching expression patterns. Pathway components showing age-dependent expression differences were involved with stress response, metabolic, neural and chromatin remodeling functions. Middle-aged tissues also showed a significant increase in transcriptional drift-variance (TD), which in the CNS included multiple proteolytic pathway components. Overall, IF-treatment had a demonstrably positive impact on aged transcriptomes, partly ameliorating both fold and variance changes. Consistent with these findings, aged IF-treated flies displayed more youthful metabolic, behavioral and basal proteolytic profiles that closely correlated with transcriptional alterations to key components. These results indicate that even modest dietary changes can have therapeutic consequences, slowing the progressive decline of multiple cellular systems, including proteostasis in the aging nervous system.

  15. Aging and Intermittent Fasting Impact on Transcriptional Regulation and Physiological Responses of Adult Drosophila Neuronal and Muscle Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The progressive decline of the nervous system, including protein aggregate formation, reflects the subtle dysregulation of multiple functional pathways. Our previous work has shown intermittent fasting (IF enhances longevity, maintains adult behaviors and reduces aggregates, in part, by promoting autophagic function in the aging Drosophila brain. To clarify the impact that IF-treatment has upon aging, we used high throughput RNA-sequencing technology to examine the changing transcriptome in adult Drosophila tissues. Principle component analysis (PCA and other analyses showed ~1200 age-related transcriptional differences in head and muscle tissues, with few genes having matching expression patterns. Pathway components showing age-dependent expression differences were involved with stress response, metabolic, neural and chromatin remodeling functions. Middle-aged tissues also showed a significant increase in transcriptional drift-variance (TD, which in the CNS included multiple proteolytic pathway components. Overall, IF-treatment had a demonstrably positive impact on aged transcriptomes, partly ameliorating both fold and variance changes. Consistent with these findings, aged IF-treated flies displayed more youthful metabolic, behavioral and basal proteolytic profiles that closely correlated with transcriptional alterations to key components. These results indicate that even modest dietary changes can have therapeutic consequences, slowing the progressive decline of multiple cellular systems, including proteostasis in the aging nervous system.

  16. Endogenous peripheral hydrogen sulfide is propyretic: its permissive role in brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Renato N; Braga, Sara P; Breder, Jéssica S C; Batalhao, Marcelo E; Oliveira-Pelegrin, Gabriela R; Ferreira, Luiz Fernando R; Rocha, Maria José A; Carnio, Evelin C; Branco, Luiz G S

    2018-03-01

    What is the central question of this study? In fever, the most striking response in the acute phase reaction of systemic inflammation, plasma H 2 S concentration increases. However, the role of endogenous peripheral H 2 S in fever is unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? Endogenous peripheral H 2 S is permissive for increased brown adipose tissue thermogenesis to maintain thermal homeostasis in cold environments as well as to mount fever. This finding expands the physiological role of the gaseous modulator as a key regulator of thermal control in health (thermal homeostasis) and disease (fever in systemic inflammation). In recent years, hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) has been reported as a gaseous modulator acting in several tissues in health and disease. In animal models of systemic inflammation, the plasma H 2 S concentration increases in response to endotoxin (bacterial lipopolysaccharide, LPS). The most striking response in the acute phase reaction of systemic inflammation is fever, but we found no reports of the peripheral action of H 2 S on this thermoregulatory response. We aimed at investigating whether endogenous systemic H 2 S modulates LPS-induced fever. A temperature datalogger capsule was inserted in the abdominal cavity of male Wistar rats (220-270 g) to record body core temperature. These animals received an i.p. injection of a systemic H 2 S inhibitor (propargylglycine; 50 or 75 mg kg -1 ), immediately followed by an i.p. injection of LPS (50 or 2500 μg kg -1 ), and were exposed to different ambient temperatures (16, 22 or 27°C). At 22°C, but not at 27°C, propargylglycine at 75 mg kg -1 significantly attenuated (P endogenous peripheral H 2 S on brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis. Evidence on the modulatory role of peripheral H 2 S in BAT thermogenesis was strengthened when we discarded (i) the possible influence of the gas on febrigenic signalling (when measuring plasma cytokines), and (ii) its interaction with the nitric

  17. Hydrogel derived from porcine decellularized nerve tissue as a promising biomaterial for repairing peripheral nerve defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Liu, Sheng; Chen, Shihao; Qiu, Shuai; Rao, Zilong; Liu, Jianghui; Zhu, Shuang; Yan, Liwei; Mao, Haiquan; Zhu, Qingtang; Quan, Daping; Liu, Xiaolin

    2018-06-01

    Decellularized matrix hydrogels derived from tissues or organs have been used for tissue repair due to their biocompatibility, tunability, and tissue-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) components. However, the preparation of decellularized peripheral nerve matrix hydrogels and their use to repair nerve defects have not been reported. Here, we developed a hydrogel from porcine decellularized nerve matrix (pDNM-G), which was confirmed to have minimal DNA content and retain collagen and glycosaminoglycans content, thereby allowing gelatinization. The pDNM-G exhibited a nanofibrous structure similar to that of natural ECM, and a ∼280-Pa storage modulus at 10 mg/mL similar to that of native neural tissues. Western blot and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the pDNM-G consisted mostly of ECM proteins and contained primary ECM-related proteins, including fibronectin and collagen I and IV). In vitro experiments showed that pDNM-G supported Schwann cell proliferation and preserved cell morphology. Additionally, in a 15-mm rat sciatic nerve defect model, pDNM-G was combined with electrospun poly(lactic-acid)-co-poly(trimethylene-carbonate)conduits to bridge the defect, which did not elicit an adverse immune response and promoted the activation of M2 macrophages associated with a constructive remodeling response. Morphological analyses and electrophysiological and functional examinations revealed that the regenerative outcomes achieved by pDNM-G were superior to those by empty conduits and closed to those using rat decellularized nerve matrix allograft scaffolds. These findings indicated that pDNM-G, with its preserved ECM composition and nanofibrous structure, represents a promising biomaterial for peripheral nerve regeneration. Decellularized nerve allografts have been widely used to treat peripheral nerve injury. However, given their limited availability and lack of bioactive factors, efforts have been made to improve the efficacy

  18. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  19. Sleep is not just for the brain: transcriptional responses to sleep in peripheral tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Many have assumed that the primary function of sleep is for the brain. We evaluated the molecular consequences of sleep and sleep deprivation outside the brain, in heart and lung. Using microarrays we compared gene expression in tissue from sleeping and sleep deprived mice euthanized at the same diurnal times. Results In each tissue, nearly two thousand genes demonstrated statistically significant differential expression as a function of sleep/wake behavioral state. To mitigate the influence of an artificial deprivation protocol, we identified a subset of these transcripts as specifically sleep-enhanced or sleep-repressed by requiring that their expression also change over the course of unperturbed sleep. 3% and 6% of the assayed transcripts showed “sleep specific” changes in the lung and heart respectively. Sleep specific transcripts in these tissues demonstrated highly significant overlap and shared temporal dynamics. Markers of cellular stress and the unfolded protein response were reduced during sleep in both tissues. These results mirror previous findings in brain. Sleep-enhanced pathways reflected the unique metabolic functions of each tissue. Transcripts related to carbohydrate and sulfur metabolic processes were enhanced by sleep in the lung, and collectively favor buffering from oxidative stress. DNA repair and protein metabolism annotations were significantly enriched among the sleep-enhanced transcripts in the heart. Our results also suggest that sleep may provide a Zeitgeber, or synchronizing cue, in the lung as a large cluster of transcripts demonstrated systematic changes in inter-animal variability as a function of both sleep duration and circadian time. Conclusion Our data support the notion that the molecular consequences of sleep/wake behavioral state extend beyond the brain to include peripheral tissues. Sleep state induces a highly overlapping response in both heart and lung. We conclude that sleep enhances organ specific

  20. Nerve autografts and tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries: a 5-year bibliometric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Gao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With advances in biomedical methods, tissue-engineered materials have developed rapidly as an alternative to nerve autografts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries. However, the materials selected for use in the repair of peripheral nerve injuries, in particular multiple injuries and large-gap defects, must be chosen carefully. Various methods and materials for protecting the healthy tissue and repairing peripheral nerve injuries have been described, and each method or material has advantages and disadvantages. Recently, a large amount of research has been focused on tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries. Using the keywords "pe-ripheral nerve injury", "autotransplant", "nerve graft", and "biomaterial", we retrieved publications using tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries appearing in the Web of Science from 2010 to 2014. The country with the most total publications was the USA. The institutions that were the most productive in this field include Hannover Medical School (Germany, Washington University (USA, and Nantong University (China. The total number of publications using tissue-engineered materials for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries grad-ually increased over time, as did the number of Chinese publications, suggesting that China has made many scientific contributions to this field of research.

  1. Distribution of soya-saponin in brain and peripheral tissue after peritoneal injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Shigong; Wang Jianchun; Zhang Peiyin

    1997-01-01

    125 I-soya-saponin was prepared to study the distribution of soya-saponin in body of rat, as well as in different areas of brain when peritoneal injection. The results showed that the peak value of radioactive soya-saponin in all tissue appeared at 30 min after peritoneal injection. There were higher radioactivities in brain and suprarene comparing with other organs. The highest radioactivity was seen in hypothalamus among the every brain areas. It is a first report that soyasaponin can pass through the blood brain barrier when peripheral injection. The result also supported the opinion that soyasaponin might act on the hypothalamus and central regulation of cardiovascular system. Another finding was that soyasaponin also showed a higher affinity with adrenal gland, which indicated that the soyasaponin might possess of peripheral effect for regulation of cardiovascular system as well

  2. Tissue-engineered spiral nerve guidance conduit for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; Shah, Munish B; Lee, Paul; Yu, Xiaojun

    2018-06-01

    Recently in peripheral nerve regeneration, preclinical studies have shown that the use of nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) with multiple longitudinally channels and intra-luminal topography enhance the functional outcomes when bridging a nerve gap caused by traumatic injury. These features not only provide guidance cues for regenerating nerve, but also become the essential approaches for developing a novel NGC. In this study, a novel spiral NGC with aligned nanofibers and wrapped with an outer nanofibrous tube was first developed and investigated. Using the common rat sciatic 10-mm nerve defect model, the in vivo study showed that a novel spiral NGC (with and without inner nanofibers) increased the successful rate of nerve regeneration after 6 weeks recovery. Substantial improvements in nerve regeneration were achieved by combining the spiral NGC with inner nanofibers and outer nanofibrous tube, based on the results of walking track analysis, electrophysiology, nerve histological assessment, and gastrocnemius muscle measurement. This demonstrated that the novel spiral NGC with inner aligned nanofibers and wrapped with an outer nanofibrous tube provided a better environment for peripheral nerve regeneration than standard tubular NGCs. Results from this study will benefit for future NGC design to optimize tissue-engineering strategies for peripheral nerve regeneration. We developed a novel spiral nerve guidance conduit (NGC) with coated aligned nanofibers. The spiral structure increases surface area by 4.5 fold relative to a tubular NGC. Furthermore, the aligned nanofibers was coated on the spiral walls, providing cues for guiding neurite extension. Finally, the outside of spiral NGC was wrapped with randomly nanofibers to enhance mechanical strength that can stabilize the spiral NGC. Our nerve histological data have shown that the spiral NGC had 50% more myelinated axons than a tubular structure for nerve regeneration across a 10 mm gap in a rat sciatic nerve

  3. Adenoviral vector-mediated expression of a foreign gene in peripheral nerve tissue bridges implanted in the injured peripheral and central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blits, B; Dijkhuizen, Paul A; Carlstedt, Thomas P; Poldervaart, H A; Schiemanck, S; Boer, G J; Verhaagen, J

    1999-01-01

    Axons of the CNS do normally not regenerate after injury, in contrast to axons of the PNS. This is due to a different microenvironment at the site of the lesion as well as a particular intrinsic program of axonal regrowth. Although transplantation of peripheral nerve tissue bridges is perhaps the

  4. Immunohistochemical Analysis in the Rat Central Nervous System and Peripheral Lymph Node Tissue Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzemovic, Milena Z; Zeitelhofer, Manuel; Leisser, Marianne; Köck, Ulricke; Kury, Angela; Olsson, Tomas

    2016-11-14

    Immunohistochemistry (IHC) provides highly specific, reliable and attractive protein visualization. Correct performance and interpretation of an IHC-based multicolor labeling is challenging, especially when utilized for assessing interrelations between target proteins in the tissue with a high fat content such as the central nervous system (CNS). Our protocol represents a refinement of the standard immunolabeling technique particularly adjusted for detection of both structural and soluble proteins in the rat CNS and peripheral lymph nodes (LN) affected by neuroinflammation. Nonetheless, with or without further modifications, our protocol could likely be used for detection of other related protein targets, even in other organs and species than here presented.

  5. Ageing and chronic intermittent hypoxia mimicking sleep apnea do not modify local brain tissue stiffness in healthy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorba, Ignasi; Menal, Maria José; Torres, Marta; Gozal, David; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Colell, Anna; Montserrat, Josep M; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac

    2017-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of Alzheimer´s disease (AD), with the latter promoting alterations in brain tissue stiffness, a feature of ageing. Here, we assessed the effects of age and intermittent hypoxia (IH) on brain tissue stiffness in a mouse model of OSA. Two-month-old and 18-month-old mice (N=10 each) were subjected to IH (20% O 2 40s - 6% O 2 20s) for 8 weeks (6h/day). Corresponding control groups for each age were kept under normoxic conditions in room air (RA). After sacrifice, the brain was excised and 200-micron coronal slices were cut with a vibratome. Local stiffness of the cortex and hippocampus were assessed in brain slices placed in an Atomic Force Microscope. For both brain regions, the Young's modulus (E) in each animal was computed as the average values from 9 force-indentation curves. Cortex E mean (±SE) values were 442±122Pa (RA) and 455±120 (IH) for young mice and 433±44 (RA) and 405±101 (IH) for old mice. Hippocampal E values were 376±62 (RA) and 474±94 (IH) for young mice and 486±93 (RA) and 521±210 (IH) for old mice. For both cortex and hippocampus, 2-way ANOVA indicated no statistically significant effects of age or challenge (IH vs. RA) on E values. Thus, neither chronic IH mimicking OSA nor ageing up to late middle age appear to modify local brain tissue stiffness in otherwise healthy mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. An update-tissue engineered nerve grafts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitesh P; Lyon, Kristopher A; Huang, Jason H

    2018-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries (PNI) are caused by a range of etiologies and result in a broad spectrum of disability. While nerve autografts are the current gold standard for the reconstruction of extensive nerve damage, the limited supply of autologous nerve and complications associated with harvesting nerve from a second surgical site has driven groups from multiple disciplines, including biomedical engineering, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, and orthopedic surgery, to develop a suitable or superior alternative to autografting. Over the last couple of decades, various types of scaffolds, such as acellular nerve grafts (ANGs), nerve guidance conduits, and non-nervous tissues, have been filled with Schwann cells, stem cells, and/or neurotrophic factors to develop tissue engineered nerve grafts (TENGs). Although these have shown promising effects on peripheral nerve regeneration in experimental models, the autograft has remained the gold standard for large nerve gaps. This review provides a discussion of recent advances in the development of TENGs and their efficacy in experimental models. Specifically, TENGs have been enhanced via incorporation of genetically engineered cells, methods to improve stem cell survival and differentiation, optimized delivery of neurotrophic factors via drug delivery systems (DDS), co-administration of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and pretreatment with chondroitinase ABC (Ch-ABC). Other notable advancements include conduits that have been bioengineered to mimic native nerve structure via cell-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, and the development of transplantable living nervous tissue constructs from rat and human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Grafts composed of non-nervous tissues, such as vein, artery, and muscle, will be briefly discussed.

  7. Peripheral soft tissue hemangioma: MRI and histo-pathologic correlation (a report of 32 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Xiaojun; Zhou Haiwei; Shao Haijun; Li Chunsheng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the MRI findings of hemangiomas derived from soft tissue. Methods: MRI was performed on 32 cases with mass in the peripheral soft tissue. All cases were confirmed to be hemangioma histo-pathologically. Results: The masses were classified as four patterns on this series, namely: cavernous hemangiomas, 15 cases (46.9%), displayed as a spindle-shaped or irregular mass; Racemose, 9 cases (28%), had an honeycombed or racemose appearance; Capillary, 5 cases (15.6%), with an elongated mass-like configuration; Mixed, 3 case(9.4%), showed as an amouphus mass. The masses usually had equal or higher signal intensity as compared to muscle on T 1 WI and markedly high signal intensity on T 2 WI. Focal inhomogeneities of the lesions in pathological study represent areas of fibrosia, fat, thrombosis, smooth muscle or calcificatin. Conclusion: MRI is an useful tool not only to identifying the locatoion of the mass but also could specify the peripheral soft tisure hemangioma. (authors)

  8. Evaluation of several techniques to modify denatured muscle tissue to obtain a scaffold for peripheral nerve regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; den Dunnen, WFA; Schakenraad, JM; Robinson, PH

    The aim of this study was to (1) evaluate the effect of several preparation techniques of denatured muscle tissue to obtain an open three-dimensional structure, and (2) test if this scaffold is suitable for peripheral nerve regeneration. Four samples (A-D) of muscle tissue specimens were evaluated

  9. Tissue oxygenation in brain, muscle, and fat in a rat model of sleep apnea: differential effect of obstructive apneas and intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, Isaac; Farré, Ramon; Planas, Anna M; Torres, Marta; Bonsignore, Maria R; Navajas, Daniel; Montserrat, Josep M

    2011-08-01

    To test the hypotheses that the dynamic changes in brain oxygen partial pressure (PtO(2)) in response to obstructive apneas or to intermittent hypoxia differ from those in other organs and that the changes in brain PtO(2) in response to obstructive apneas is a source of oxidative stress. Prospective controlled animal study. University laboratory. 98 Sprague-Dawley rats. Cerebral cortex, skeletal muscle, or visceral fat tissues were exposed in anesthetized animals subjected to either obstructive apneas or intermittent hypoxia (apneic and hypoxic events of 15 s each and 60 events/h) for 1 h. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) presented a stable pattern, with similar desaturations during both stimuli. The PtO(2) was measured by a microelectrode. During obstructive apneas, a fast increase in cerebral PtO(2) was observed (38.2 ± 3.4 vs. 54.8 ± 5.9 mm Hg) but not in the rest of tissues. This particular cerebral response was not found during intermittent hypoxia. The cerebral content of reduced glutathione was decreased after obstructive apneas (46.2% ± 15.2%) compared to controls (100.0% ± 14.7%), but not after intermittent hypoxia. This antioxidant consumption after obstructive apneas was accompanied by increased cerebral lipid peroxidation under this condition. No changes were observed for these markers in the other tissues. These results suggest that cerebral cortex could be protected in some way from hypoxic periods caused by obstructive apneas. The increased cerebral PtO(2) during obstructive apneas may, however, cause harmful effects (oxidative stress). The obstructive apnea model appears to be more adequate than the intermittent hypoxia model for studying brain changes associated with OSA.

  10. [Molecular markers of Alzheimer disease early diagnostic: investigation perspectives of peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paltsev, M A; Zuev, V A; Kozhevnikova, E O; Linkova, N S; Kvetnaia, T V; Polyakova, V O; Kvetnoy, I M

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of elderly and old age people. For intravital diagnosis of the expression of signaling molecules - AD markers, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and peripheral tissues are used: lymphocytes and blood platelets, buccal and olfactory epithelium, skin fibroblasts. There are several changes in the production of hyper phosphorylated form of τ-protein, BACE1 and peptide Аβ42 in CSF in case of AD, but CSF taking may have a number of side effects. Less traumatic taking of sampling tissues for the diagnosis of AD is in use of epithelium biopsy and blood portion. An increase in the expression of the hyper phosphorylated form of τ-protein is shown in blood lymphocytes of AD patients. An increase in the content of high molecular weight forms of phosphorylated t-protein and amyloid precursor protein-APP was also revealed in blood platelets of AD patients. Changes in the amount of 2 miRNA families - miR-132 family and miR-134 family were revealed in blood cells 1-5 years before the manifestation of clinical signs of AD. An increase in the concentration of bound calcium, synthesis of peptides Aβ40 and Aβ42, τ protein was observed in AD skin fibroblasts. In the olfactory and buccal epithelium an increase in the expression of hyper phosphorylated form of τ-protein and Aβ peptide was detected in patients with AD. Verification of AD markers in peripheral tissues for biopsy have the important significant for life diagnostics, prevention and and target AD treatment.

  11. Antioxidant effect of sericin in brain and peripheral tissues of oxidative stress induced hypercholesterolemic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meetali Deori

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the antioxidant effect of crude sericin extract (CSE from Antheraea assamenisis (Aa in high cholesterol fed rats. Investigation was conducted by administering graded oral dose of 0.25 and 0.5 gm/kg body weight (b.w./day of CSE for a period of 28 days. Experiments were conducted in 30 rats and were divided into five groups: normal control (NC, high cholesterol fed (HCF, HCF + 0.065 gm/kg b.w./day fenofibrate (FF, HCF + sericin 0.25 gm/kg b.w./day (LSD and HCF + sericin 0.5 gm/kg b.w./day (HSD. In brain, heart, liver, serum and kidney homogenates nitric oxide (NO, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS, protein carbonyl content (PCC, superoxide dismutase (SOD, reduced glutathione (GSH was measured. LSD treatment prevented the alterations in GSH and PCC levels in hypercholesterolemic (HyC brain tissue homogenates of rats. CSE lowers the serum total cholesterol level in HyC rats by promoting fecal cholesterol (FC excretion. CSE increases FC level by promoting inhibition of cholesterol absorption in intestine. The endogenous antioxidant reduced significantly and the oxidative stress (OS marker TBARS level increases significantly in the peripheral tissue of HCF rats. However, the administration of LSD and HSD exhibited a good antioxidant activity by reducing the TBARS level and increasing the endogenous antioxidant in peripheral tissue. In addition, a histological examination revealed loss of normal liver and kidney architecture in cholesterol fed rats which were retained in sericin treated groups. The findings of this study suggested that CSE improves hypercholesterolemia in rats fed a HyC diet. Clinical relevance of this effect of CSE seems worthy of further studies.

  12. Chronic intermittent hypoxia from pedo-stage decreases glucose transporter 4 expression in adipose tissue and causes insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Cao, Zhao-long; Han, Fang; Gao, Zhan-cheng; He, Quan-ying

    2010-02-20

    The persistence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) symptoms after tonsil and/or adenoid (T&A) surgery are common in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We tested the hypothesis that disturbances of glucose transporters (GLUTs) in intraabdominal adipose tissue caused by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) from the pedo-period could facilitate the appearance of periphery insulin resistance in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. We tested the hypothesis that the changes of GLUTs in adipose tissue may be one of the reasons for persistent SDB among clinical OSA children after T&A surgery. Thirty 21-day-old SD rats were randomly divided into a CIH group, a chronic continuous hypoxia (CCH) group, and a normal oxygen group (control group) and exposed for 40 days. The changes of weight, fasting blood glucose and fasting blood insulin levels were measured. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp techniques were used to measure insulin resistance in each animal. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting were used to measure GLUT mRNA and proteins in intraabdominal adipose tissue. Additional intraabdomial white adipose tissue (WAT) was also processed into paraffin sections and directly observed for GLUTs1-4 expression. When compared with control group, CIH increased blood fasting insulin levels, (245.07 +/- 53.89) pg/ml vs. (168.63 +/- 38.70) pg/ml, P = 0.038, and decreased the mean glucose infusion rate (GIR), (7.25 +/- 1.29) mg x kg(-1) x min(-1) vs. (13.34 +/- 1.54) mg x kg(-1) x min(-1), P < 0.001. GLUT-4 mRNA and protein expression was significantly reduced after CIH compared with CCH or normal oxygen rats, 0.002 +/- 0.002 vs. 0.039 +/- 0.009, P < 0.001; 0.642 +/- 0.073 vs. 1.000 +/- 0.103, P = 0.035. CIH in young rats could induce insulin resistance via adverse effects on glycometabolism. These findings emphasize the importance of early detection and treatment of insulin insensitivity in obese childhood OSA.

  13. Distribution of internal pressure around bony prominences: implications to deep tissue injury and effectiveness of intermittent electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Leandro R; Liggins, Adrian; Uwiera, Richard R E; Poppe, Niek; Pehowich, Enid; Seres, Peter; Thompson, Richard B; Mushahwar, Vivian K

    2012-08-01

    The overall goal of this project is to develop interventions for the prevention of deep tissue injury (DTI), a form of pressure ulcers that originates in deep tissue around bony prominences. The present study focused on: (1) obtaining detailed measures of the distribution of pressure experienced by tissue around the ischial tuberosities, and (2) investigating the effectiveness of intermittent electrical stimulation (IES), a novel strategy for the prevention of DTI, in alleviating pressure in regions at risk of breakdown due to sustained loading. The experiments were conducted in adult pigs. Five animals had intact spinal cords and healthy muscles and one had a spinal cord injury that led to substantial muscle atrophy at the time of the experiment. A force-controlled servomotor was used to load the region of the buttocks to levels corresponding to 25%, 50% or 75% of each animal's body weight. A pressure transducer embedded in a catheter was advanced into the tissue to measure pressure along a three dimensional grid around the ischial tuberosity of one hind leg. For all levels of external loading in intact animals, average peak internal pressure was 2.01 ± 0.08 times larger than the maximal interfacial pressure measured at the level of the skin. In the animal with spinal cord injury, similar absolute values of internal pressure as that in intact animals were recorded, but the substantial muscle atrophy produced larger maximal interfacial pressures. Average peak internal pressure in this animal was 1.43 ± 0.055 times larger than the maximal interfacial pressure. Peak internal pressure was localized within a ±2 cm region medio-laterally and dorso-ventrally from the bone in intact animals and ±1 cm in the animal with spinal cord injury. IES significantly redistributed internal pressure, shifting the peak values away from the bone in spinally intact and injured animals. These findings provide critical information regarding the relationship between internal and

  14. Periodontal tissue activation by vibration: intermittent stimulation by resonance vibration accelerates experimental tooth movement in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Makoto; Chiba, Mirei; Ohashi, Toshiro; Sato, Masaaki; Shimizu, Yoshiyuki; Igarashi, Kaoru; Mitani, Hideo

    2008-04-01

    Accelerating the speed of orthodontic tooth movement should contribute to the shortening of the treatment period. This would be beneficial because long treatment times are a negative aspect of orthodontic treatment. In this study, we evaluated the effects of mechanical stimulation by resonance vibration on tooth movement, and we showed the cellular and molecular mechanisms of periodontal ligament responses. The maxillary first molars of 6-week-old male Wistar rats were moved to the buccal side by using an expansive spring for 21 days (n = 6, control group), and the amount of tooth movement was measured. Additional vibrational stimulation (60 Hz, 1.0 m/s(2)) was applied to the first molars by using a loading vibration system for 8 minutes on days 0, 7, and 14 during orthodontic tooth movement (n = 6, experimental group). The animals were killed under anesthesia, and each maxilla was dissected. The specimens were fixed, decalcified, and embedded in paraffin. Sections were used for immunohistochemical analysis of receptor activator of NF kappa B ligand (RANKL) expression. The number of osteoclasts in the alveolar bone was counted by using TRAP staining, and the amount of root resorption was measured in sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The average resonance frequency of the maxillary first molar was 61.02 +/- 8.38 Hz. Tooth movement in the experimental group was significantly greater than in the control group (P vibration might accelerate orthodontic tooth movement via enhanced RANKL expression in the periodontal ligament without additional damage to periodontal tissues such as root resorption.

  15. Polydeoxyribonucleotide Improves Peripheral Tissue Oxygenation and Accelerates Angiogenesis in Diabetic Foot Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seoyoung Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Polydeoxyribonucleotide (PDRN is known to have anti-inflammatory and angiogenic effects and to accelerate wound healing. The aim of this study was to investigate whether PDRN could improve peripheral tissue oxygenation and angiogenesis in diabetic foot ulcers. Methods This was a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial. Twenty patients with a non-healing diabetic foot ulcer were randomly distributed into a control group (n=10 and a PDRN group (n=10. Initial surgical debridement and secondary surgical procedures such as a split-thickness skin graft, primary closure, or local flap were performed. Between the initial surgical debridement and secondary surgical procedures, 0.9% normal saline (3 mL or PDRN was injected for 2 weeks by the intramuscular (1 ampule, 3 mL, 5.625 mg, 5 days per week and perilesional routes (1 ampule, 3 mL, 5.625 mg, 2 days per week. Transcutaneous oxygen tension (TcPO2 was evaluated using the Periflux System 5000 with TcPO2/CO2 unit 5040 before the injections and on days 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 after the start of the injections. A pathologic review (hematoxylin and eosin stain of the debrided specimens was conducted by a pathologist, and vessel density (average number of vessels per visual field was calculated. Results Compared with the control group, the PDRN-treated group showed improvements in peripheral tissue oxygenation on day 7 (P<0.01, day 14 (P<0.001, and day 28 (P<0.001. The pathologic review of the specimens from the PDRN group showed increased angiogenesis and improved inflammation compared with the control group. No statistically significant difference was found between the control group and the PDRN group in terms of vessel density (P=0.094. Complete healing was achieved in every patient. Conclusions In this study, PDRN improved peripheral tissue oxygenation. Moreover, PDRN is thought to be effective in improving inflammation and angiogenesis in diabetic foot ulcers.

  16. Fluoride Alteration of [3H]Glucose Uptake in Wistar Rat Brain and Peripheral Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalska, Anna; Kuter, Katarzyna; Żelazko, Aleksandra; Głogowska-Gruszka, Anna; Świętochowska, Elżbieta; Nowak, Przemysław

    2017-04-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the role of postnatal fluoride intake on [3H]glucose uptake and transport in rat brain and peripheral tissues. Sodium fluoride (NaF) in a concentration of 10 or 50 ppm was added to the drinking water of adult Wistar rats. The control group received distilled water. After 4 weeks, respective plasma fluoride levels were 0.0541 ± 0.0135 μg/ml (control), 0.0596 ± 0.0202 μg/ml (10 ppm), and 0.0823 ± 0.0199 μg/ml (50 ppm). Although plasma glucose levels were not altered in any group, the plasma insulin level in the fluoride (50 ppm) group was elevated (0.72 ± 0.13 μg/ml) versus the control group (0.48 ± 0.24 μg/ml) and fluoride (10 ppm) group. In rats receiving fluoride for 4 weeks at 10 ppm in drinking water, [3H]glucose uptake was unaltered in all tested parts of the brain. However, in rats receiving fluoride at 50 ppm, [3H]glucose uptake in cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus with hypothalamus was elevated, versus the saline group. Fluoride intake had a negligible effect on [3H]glucose uptake by peripheral tissues (liver, pancreas, stomach, small intestine, atrium, aorta, kidney, visceral tissue, lung, skin, oral mucosa, tongue, salivary gland, incisor, molars, and jawbone). In neither fluoride group was glucose transporter proteins 1 (GLUT 1) or 3 (GLUT 3) altered in frontal cortex and striatum versus control. On the assumption that increased glucose uptake (by neural tissue) reasonably reflects neuronal activity, it appears that fluoride damage to the brain results in a compensatory increase in glucose uptake and utilization without changes in GLUT 1 and GLUT 3 expression.

  17. Resveratrol attenuates intermittent hypoxia-induced macrophage migration to visceral white adipose tissue and insulin resistance in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Alba; Zhang, Shelley X L; Almendros, Isaac; Wang, Yang; Peris, Eduard; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Gozal, David

    2015-02-01

    Chronic intermittent hypoxia during sleep (IH), as occurs in sleep apnea, promotes systemic insulin resistance. Resveratrol (Resv) has been reported to ameliorate high-fat diet-induced obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. To examine the effect of Resv on IH-induced metabolic dysfunction, male mice were subjected to IH or room air conditions for 8 weeks and treated with either Resv or vehicle (Veh). Fasting plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and leptin were obtained, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index levels were calculated, and insulin sensitivity tests (phosphorylated AKT [also known as protein kinase B]/total AKT) were performed in 2 visceral white adipose tissue (VWAT) depots (epididymal [Epi] and mesenteric [Mes]) along with flow cytometry assessments for VWAT macrophages and phenotypes (M1 and M2). IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice showed initial reductions in food intake with later recovery, with resultant lower body weights after 8 weeks but with IH-Resv showing better increases in body weight vs IH-Veh. IH-Veh and IH-Resv mice exhibited lower fasting glucose levels, but only IH-Veh had increased homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index vs all 3 other groups. Leptin levels were preserved in IH-Veh but were significantly lower in IH-Resv. Reduced VWAT phosphorylated-AKT/AKT responses to insulin emerged in both Mes and Epi in IH-Veh but normalized in IH-Resv. Increases total macrophage counts and in M1 to M2 ratios occurred in IH-Veh Mes and Epi compared all other 3 groups. Thus, Resv ameliorates food intake and weight gain during IH exposures and markedly attenuates VWAT inflammation and insulin resistance, thereby providing a potentially useful adjunctive therapy for metabolic morbidity in the context of sleep apnea.

  18. Peripheral tissue homing receptor control of naïve, effector, and memory CD8 T cell localization in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, C Colin; Peske, J David; Engelhard, Victor Henry

    2013-01-01

    T cell activation induces homing receptors that bind ligands on peripheral tissue vasculature, programing movement to sites of infection and injury. There are three major types of CD8 effector T cells based on homing receptor expression, which arise in distinct lymphoid organs. Recent publications indicate that naïve, effector, and memory T cell migration is more complex than once thought; while many effectors enter peripheral tissues, some re-enter lymph nodes (LN), and contain central memory precursors. LN re-entry can depend on CD62L or peripheral tissue homing receptors. Memory T cells in LN tend to express the same homing receptors as their forebears, but often are CD62Lneg. Homing receptors also control CD8 T cell tumor entry. Tumor vasculature has low levels of many peripheral tissue homing receptor ligands, but portions of it resemble high endothelial venules (HEV), enabling naïve T cell entry, activation, and subsequent effector activity. This vasculature is associated with positive prognoses in humans, suggesting it may sustain ongoing anti-tumor responses. These findings reveal new roles for homing receptors expressed by naïve, effector, and memory CD8 T cells in controlling entry into lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues.

  19. Trends in the design of nerve guidance channels in peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiono, Valeria; Tonda-Turo, Chiara

    2015-08-01

    The current trend of peripheral nerve tissue engineering is the design of advanced nerve guidance channels (NGCs) acting as physical guidance for regeneration of nerves across lesions. NGCs should present multifunctional properties aiming to direct the sprouting of axons from the proximal nerve end, to concentrate growth factors secreted by the injured nerve ends, and to reduce the ingrowth of scar tissue into the injury site. A critical aspect in the design of NGCs is conferring them the ability to provide topographic, chemotactic and haptotactic cues that lead to functional nerve regeneration thus increasing the axon growth rate and avoiding or minimizing end-organ (e.g. muscle) atrophy. The present work reviews the recent state of the art in NGCs engineering and defines the external guide and internal fillers structural and compositional requirements that should be satisfied to improve nerve regeneration, especially in the case of large gaps (>2 cm). Techniques for NGCs fabrication were described highlighting the innovative approaches direct to enhance the regeneration of axon stumps compared to current clinical treatments. Furthermore, the possibility to apply stem cells as internal cues to the NGCs was discussed focusing on scaffold properties necessary to ensure cell survival. Finally, the optimized features for NGCs design were summarized showing as multifunctional cues are needed to produce NGCs having improved results in clinics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. PPAR gamma 2 prevents lipotoxicity by controlling adipose tissue expandability and peripheral lipid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gema Medina-Gomez

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma 2 (PPARg2 is the nutritionally regulated isoform of PPARg. Ablation of PPARg2 in the ob/ob background, PPARg2(-/- Lep(ob/Lep(ob (POKO mouse, resulted in decreased fat mass, severe insulin resistance, beta-cell failure, and dyslipidaemia. Our results indicate that the PPARg2 isoform plays an important role, mediating adipose tissue expansion in response to positive energy balance. Lipidomic analyses suggest that PPARg2 plays an important antilipotoxic role when induced ectopically in liver and muscle by facilitating deposition of fat as relatively harmless triacylglycerol species and thus preventing accumulation of reactive lipid species. Our data also indicate that PPARg2 may be required for the beta-cell hypertrophic adaptive response to insulin resistance. In summary, the PPARg2 isoform prevents lipotoxicity by (a promoting adipose tissue expansion, (b increasing the lipid-buffering capacity of peripheral organs, and (c facilitating the adaptive proliferative response of beta-cells to insulin resistance.

  1. Peripheral Tissue Involvement in Sporadic, Iatrogenic, and Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Mark W.; Ritchie, Diane; Smith, Nadine; McLoughlin, Victoria; Nailon, William; Samad, Sazia; Masson, Stephen; Bishop, Matthew; McCardle, Linda; Ironside, James W.

    2004-01-01

    Human prion diseases are rare fatal neurodegenerative conditions that occur as acquired, familial, or idiopathic disorders. A key event in their pathogenesis is the accumulation of an altered form of the prion protein, termed PrPSc, in the central nervous system. A novel acquired human prion disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, is thought to result from oral exposure to the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent. This disease differs from other human prion diseases in its neurological, neuropathological, and biochemical phenotype. We have used immunohistochemistry and Western blot techniques to analyze the tissue distribution and biochemical properties of PrPSc in peripheral tissues in a unique series of nine cases of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We have compared this with the distribution and biochemical forms found in all of the major subtypes of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and in a case of iatrogenic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease associated with growth hormone therapy. The results show that involvement of the lymphoreticular system is a defining feature of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, but that the biochemical isoform of PrPSc found is influenced by the cell type in which it accumulates. PMID:14695328

  2. Soapwort extract supplementation alters antioxidant status of serum, liver and heart tissues in growing Japanese quails reared under chronic intermittent cold stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bestami Dalkilic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidant effect of dietary soapwort extract supplementation was studied in growing Japanese quails suffering from chronic intermittent cold stress. For this purpose, a total of ninety 15-d-old quails were divided into three groups with three replicates. Chronic intermittent cold stress was applied every night between 22.00 to 06.00 h; starting at 14 °C for the first week, and gradually weekly lowered to 8 °C. Three groups were fed with corn-soy based standard diets supplemented with 0, 50, and 100 ppm soapwort extract for four weeks. At the end of the study, three males and three females were slaughtered to determine total antioxidant and oxidant status of serum, malondialdehyde, glutathione, glutathione peroxidase activity, superoxide dismutase of liver and heart tissues. Although the dietary soapwort extract had no effect on serum total antioxidant capacity, it significantly lowered the total oxidant status of serum in cold stressed quails. Glutathione and superoxide dismutase enzyme activity of liver and heart tissues were similar among groups. While the dietary soapwort extract had no effect on glutathione peroxidase activity of the heart tissue, it significantly increased glutathione peroxidase activity in the liver tissue. In relation to the control group, malondialdehyde concentrations in the liver and heart tissues were significantly lower in soapwort extract groups. These data suggest that dietary soapwort extract could alleviate the detrimental effects of oxidative stress in growing Japanese quails exposed to cold stress.

  3. Energy intermittency

    CERN Document Server

    Sorensen, Bent

    2014-01-01

    The first book to consider intermittency as a key point of an energy system, Energy Intermittency describes different levels of variability for traditional and renewable energy sources, presenting detailed solutions for handling energy intermittency through trade, collaboration, demand management, and active energy storage. Addressing energy supply intermittency systematically, this practical text:Analyzes typical time-distributions and intervals between episodes of demand-supply mismatch and explores their dependence on system layouts and energy source characteristicsSimulates scenarios regar

  4. Peripheral and central immune cell reservoirs in tissues from asymptomatic cats chronically infected with feline immunodeficiency virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparger, E. E.; Pitt, K. A.

    2017-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in cats results in life-long viral persistence and progressive immunopathology. We have previously described a cohort of experimentally infected cats demonstrating a progressive decline of peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell over six years in the face of apparent peripheral viral latency. More recently we reported findings from this same cohort that revealed popliteal lymph node tissue as sites for ongoing viral replication suggesting that tissue reservoirs are important in FIV immunopathogenesis during the late asymptomatic phase of infection. Results reported herein characterize important tissue reservoirs of active viral replication during the late asymptomatic phase by examining biopsied specimens of spleen, mesenteric lymph node (MLN), and intestine from FIV-infected and uninfected control cats. Peripheral blood collected coincident with harvest of tissues demonstrated severe CD4+ T-cell depletion, undetectable plasma viral gag RNA and rarely detectable peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-associated viral RNA (vRNA) by real-time PCR. However, vRNA was detectable in all three tissue sites from three of four FIV-infected cats despite the absence of detectable vRNA in plasma. A novel in situ hybridization assay identified B cell lymphoid follicular domains as microanatomical foci of ongoing FIV replication. Additionally, we demonstrated that CD4+ leukocyte depletion in tissues, and CD4+ and CD21+ leukocytes as important cellular reservoirs of ongoing replication. These findings revealed that tissue reservoirs support foci of ongoing viral replication, in spite of highly restricted viral replication in blood. Lentiviral eradication strategies will need address tissue viral reservoirs. PMID:28384338

  5. Peripheral and central immune cell reservoirs in tissues from asymptomatic cats chronically infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C D Eckstrand

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV infection in cats results in life-long viral persistence and progressive immunopathology. We have previously described a cohort of experimentally infected cats demonstrating a progressive decline of peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell over six years in the face of apparent peripheral viral latency. More recently we reported findings from this same cohort that revealed popliteal lymph node tissue as sites for ongoing viral replication suggesting that tissue reservoirs are important in FIV immunopathogenesis during the late asymptomatic phase of infection. Results reported herein characterize important tissue reservoirs of active viral replication during the late asymptomatic phase by examining biopsied specimens of spleen, mesenteric lymph node (MLN, and intestine from FIV-infected and uninfected control cats. Peripheral blood collected coincident with harvest of tissues demonstrated severe CD4+ T-cell depletion, undetectable plasma viral gag RNA and rarely detectable peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC-associated viral RNA (vRNA by real-time PCR. However, vRNA was detectable in all three tissue sites from three of four FIV-infected cats despite the absence of detectable vRNA in plasma. A novel in situ hybridization assay identified B cell lymphoid follicular domains as microanatomical foci of ongoing FIV replication. Additionally, we demonstrated that CD4+ leukocyte depletion in tissues, and CD4+ and CD21+ leukocytes as important cellular reservoirs of ongoing replication. These findings revealed that tissue reservoirs support foci of ongoing viral replication, in spite of highly restricted viral replication in blood. Lentiviral eradication strategies will need address tissue viral reservoirs.

  6. Peripheral and central immune cell reservoirs in tissues from asymptomatic cats chronically infected with feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstrand, C D; Sparger, E E; Pitt, K A; Murphy, B G

    2017-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection in cats results in life-long viral persistence and progressive immunopathology. We have previously described a cohort of experimentally infected cats demonstrating a progressive decline of peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell over six years in the face of apparent peripheral viral latency. More recently we reported findings from this same cohort that revealed popliteal lymph node tissue as sites for ongoing viral replication suggesting that tissue reservoirs are important in FIV immunopathogenesis during the late asymptomatic phase of infection. Results reported herein characterize important tissue reservoirs of active viral replication during the late asymptomatic phase by examining biopsied specimens of spleen, mesenteric lymph node (MLN), and intestine from FIV-infected and uninfected control cats. Peripheral blood collected coincident with harvest of tissues demonstrated severe CD4+ T-cell depletion, undetectable plasma viral gag RNA and rarely detectable peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-associated viral RNA (vRNA) by real-time PCR. However, vRNA was detectable in all three tissue sites from three of four FIV-infected cats despite the absence of detectable vRNA in plasma. A novel in situ hybridization assay identified B cell lymphoid follicular domains as microanatomical foci of ongoing FIV replication. Additionally, we demonstrated that CD4+ leukocyte depletion in tissues, and CD4+ and CD21+ leukocytes as important cellular reservoirs of ongoing replication. These findings revealed that tissue reservoirs support foci of ongoing viral replication, in spite of highly restricted viral replication in blood. Lentiviral eradication strategies will need address tissue viral reservoirs.

  7. Discrimination of prostate cancer from normal peripheral zone and central gland tissue by using dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbrecht, Marc R.; Huisman, Henkjan J.; Laheij, Robert J. F.; Jager, Gerrit J.; van Leenders, Geert J. L. H.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; Blickman, Johan G.; Barentsz, Jelle O.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate which parameters of dynamic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and T2 relaxation rate would result in optimal discrimination of prostatic carcinoma from normal peripheral zone (PZ) and central gland (CG) tissues and to correlate these parameters with tumor stage, Gleason score,

  8. Peripheral ovine progressive pneumonia provirus levels correlate with and predict histological tissue lesion severity in naturally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann-Hoesing, Lynn M; Noh, Susan M; White, Stephen N; Snekvik, Kevin R; Truscott, Thomas; Knowles, Donald P

    2009-04-01

    Studies were undertaken to determine whether anti-ovine progressive pneumonia virus (OPPV) antibody responses in serum or OPP provirus levels in peripheral blood associate with the degree of histologically measured tissue lesions in naturally OPPV-infected sheep. Sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and hematoxylin- and eosin-stained lung, mammary gland, carpal synovial membrane, and brain tissues from 11 OPPV-infected ewes (mean age of 8.6 years) and 5 OPPV-uninfected ewes (mean age of 6 years) were evaluated for lesion severity. Ovine progressive pneumonia (OPP) provirus levels and anti-OPPV antibody titers in peripheral blood and serum samples, respectively, were measured upon euthanasia and 3 years prior to euthanasia. Both mean peripheral OPP provirus levels and mean serum anti-surface envelope glycoprotein (anti-SU) antibody titers at the time of euthanasia were significantly higher in ewes with moderate to severe histological lesions than in ewes with no to mild histological lesions. However, although mean peripheral blood OPP provirus levels at euthanasia and 3 years prior to euthanasia significantly correlated with the highest histological lesion score for any affected tissue (two-tailed P values, 0.03 and 0.02), mean serum anti-SU antibody titers, anti-capsid antibody titers, and anti-transmembrane 90 antibody titers at euthanasia did not show a significant correlation with the highest histological lesion score for any tissue (two-tailed P values, 0.32, 0.97, and 0.18, respectively). These data are the first to show that OPP provirus levels predict and correlate with the extent of OPPV-related histological lesions in various OPPV-affected tissues. These findings suggest that peripheral OPP provirus levels quantitatively contribute more to the development of histological lesions than the systemic anti-SU antibody host immune response.

  9. Effects of stress on catecholamine stores in central and peripheral tissues of long-term socially isolated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronjak, S; Gavrilovic, L

    2006-06-01

    Both the peripheral sympatho-adrenomedullary and central catecholaminergic systems are activated by various psycho-social and physical stressors. Catecholamine stores in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, adrenal glands, and heart auricles of long-term socially isolated (21 days) and control 3-month-old male Wistar rats, as well as their response to immobilization of all 4 limbs and head fixed for 2 h and cold stress (4 degrees C, 2 h), were studied. A simultaneous single isotope radioenzymatic assay based on the conversion of catecholamines to the corresponding O-methylated derivatives by catechol-O-methyl-transferase in the presence of S-adenosyl-l-(3H-methyl)-methionine was used. The O-methylated derivatives were oxidized to 3H-vanilline and the radioactivity measured. Social isolation produced depletion of hypothalamic norepinephrine (about 18%) and hippocampal dopamine (about 20%) stores and no changes in peripheral tissues. Immobilization decreased catecholamine stores (approximately 39%) in central and peripheral tissues of control animals. However, in socially isolated rats, these reductions were observed only in the hippocampus and peripheral tissues. Cold did not affect hypothalamic catecholamine stores but reduced hippocampal dopamine (about 20%) as well as norepinephrine stores in peripheral tissues both in control and socially isolated rats, while epinephrine levels were unchanged. Thus, immobilization was more efficient in reducing catecholamine stores in control and chronically isolated rats compared to cold stress. The differences in rearing conditions appear to influence the response of adult animals to additional stress. In addition, the influence of previous exposure to a stressor on catecholaminergic activity in the brainstem depends on both the particular catecholaminergic area studied and the properties of additional acute stress. Therefore, the sensitivity of the catecholaminergic system to habituation appears to be tissue-specific.

  10. Effects of stress on catecholamine stores in central and peripheral tissues of long-term socially isolated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dronjak S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Both the peripheral sympatho-adrenomedullary and central catecholaminergic systems are activated by various psycho-social and physical stressors. Catecholamine stores in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, adrenal glands, and heart auricles of long-term socially isolated (21 days and control 3-month-old male Wistar rats, as well as their response to immobilization of all 4 limbs and head fixed for 2 h and cold stress (4ºC, 2 h, were studied. A simultaneous single isotope radioenzymatic assay based on the conversion of catecholamines to the corresponding O-methylated derivatives by catechol-O-methyl-transferase in the presence of S-adenosyl-l-(³H-methyl-methionine was used. The O-methylated derivatives were oxidized to ³H-vanilline and the radioactivity measured. Social isolation produced depletion of hypothalamic norepinephrine (about 18% and hippocampal dopamine (about 20% stores and no changes in peripheral tissues. Immobilization decreased catecholamine stores (approximately 39% in central and peripheral tissues of control animals. However, in socially isolated rats, these reductions were observed only in the hippocampus and peripheral tissues. Cold did not affect hypothalamic catecholamine stores but reduced hippocampal dopamine (about 20% as well as norepinephrine stores in peripheral tissues both in control and socially isolated rats, while epinephrine levels were unchanged. Thus, immobilization was more efficient in reducing catecholamine stores in control and chronically isolated rats compared to cold stress. The differences in rearing conditions appear to influence the response of adult animals to additional stress. In addition, the influence of previous exposure to a stressor on catecholaminergic activity in the brainstem depends on both the particular catecholaminergic area studied and the properties of additional acute stress. Therefore, the sensitivity of the catecholaminergic system to habituation appears to be tissue-specific.

  11. Porcine endogenous retroviral nucleic acid in peripheral tissues is associated with migration of porcine cells post islet transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binette, Tanya M; Seeberger, Karen L; Lyon, James G; Rajotte, Ray V; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2004-07-01

    Porcine islets represent an alternative source of insulin-producing tissue, however, porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV) remains a concern. In this study, SCID mice were transplanted with nonencapsulated (non-EC), microencapsulated (EC) or macroencapsulated (in a TheraCyte trade mark device) neonatal porcine islets (NPIs), and peripheral tissues were screened for presence of viral DNA and mRNA. To understand the role of an intact immune system in PERV incidence, mice with established NPI grafts were reconstituted with splenocytes. Peripheral tissues were screened for PERV and porcine DNA using PCR. Tissues with positive DNA were analyzed for PERV mRNA using RT-PCR. No significant difference was observed between non-EC and EC transplants regarding presence of PERV or porcine-specific DNA or mRNA. In reconstituted animals, little PERV or porcine DNA, and no PERV mRNA was detected. No PERV or porcine-specific DNA was observed in animals implanted with a TheraCyte trade mark device. In conclusion, an intact immune system significantly lowered the presence of PERV. Microencapsulation of islets did not alter PERV presence, however, macroencapsulation in the TheraCyte device did. Lower PERV incidence coincided with lower porcine DNA in peripheral tissues, linking the presence of PERV to migration of porcine cells.

  12. Explicit formula of finite difference method to estimate human peripheral tissue temperatures during exposure to severe cold stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanday, M A; Hussain, Fida

    2015-02-01

    During cold exposure, peripheral tissues undergo vasoconstriction to minimize heat loss to preserve the maintenance of a normal core temperature. However, vasoconstricted tissues exposed to cold temperatures are susceptible to freezing and frostbite-related tissue damage. Therefore, it is imperative to establish a mathematical model for the estimation of tissue necrosis due to cold stress. To this end, an explicit formula of finite difference method has been used to obtain the solution of Pennes' bio-heat equation with appropriate boundary conditions to estimate the temperature profiles of dermal and subdermal layers when exposed to severe cold temperatures. The discrete values of nodal temperature were calculated at the interfaces of skin and subcutaneous tissues with respect to the atmospheric temperatures of 25 °C, 20 °C, 15 °C, 5 °C, -5 °C and -10 °C. The results obtained were used to identify the scenarios under which various degrees of frostbite occur on the surface of skin as well as the dermal and subdermal areas. The explicit formula of finite difference method proposed in this model provides more accurate predictions as compared to other numerical methods. This model of predicting tissue temperatures provides researchers with a more accurate prediction of peripheral tissue temperature and, hence, the susceptibility to frostbite during severe cold exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation of SF1 Neurons in the Ventromedial Hypothalamus by DREADD Technology Increases Insulin Sensitivity in Peripheral Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Eulalia A; Okamoto, Shiki; Ishikawa, Ayako Wendy; Yokota, Shigefumi; Wada, Nobuhiro; Hirabayashi, Takahiro; Saito, Kumiko; Sato, Tatsuya; Takagi, Kazuyo; Wang, Chen-Chi; Kobayashi, Kenta; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Shioda, Seiji; Yoshimura, Yumiko; Minokoshi, Yasuhiko

    2017-09-01

    The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) regulates glucose and energy metabolism in mammals. Optogenetic stimulation of VMH neurons that express steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) induces hyperglycemia. However, leptin acting via the VMH stimulates whole-body glucose utilization and insulin sensitivity in some peripheral tissues, and this effect of leptin appears to be mediated by SF1 neurons. We examined the effects of activation of SF1 neurons with DREADD (designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs) technology. Activation of SF1 neurons by an intraperitoneal injection of clozapine- N -oxide (CNO), a specific hM3Dq ligand, reduced food intake and increased energy expenditure in mice expressing hM3Dq in SF1 neurons. It also increased whole-body glucose utilization and glucose uptake in red-type skeletal muscle, heart, and interscapular brown adipose tissue, as well as glucose production and glycogen phosphorylase a activity in the liver, thereby maintaining blood glucose levels. During hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp, such activation of SF1 neurons increased insulin-induced glucose uptake in the same peripheral tissues and tended to enhance insulin-induced suppression of glucose production by suppressing gluconeogenic gene expression and glycogen phosphorylase a activity in the liver. DREADD technology is thus an important tool for studies of the role of the brain in the regulation of insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  14. Tissue Clearance of {sup 131}I and Total Peripheral Resistance in Myocardial Infarction and Hypertension, and During Angiotensin Infusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, F. K.; Bors, K. J.; Long, T. E.; Lestina, J. [University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1971-02-15

    Tissue clearance of {sup 131}I from the thigh, cardiac output and peripheral resistance was determined in 25 patients: 13 normotensive with recent myocardial infarction but not in congestive heart failure, 7 with hypertension and 5 normotensive control subjects. The effect of the synthesized pressor agent Angiotensin II on the same three measurements was also studied. The present investigation continues a previous one of ours, where a tracer dose of {sup 131}I was injected into the thigh of patients with recent myocardial infarction without signs of heart failure, and its clearance was found to be longer than that of normal subjects. This was thought to be due to increased peripheral resistance or to reduced perfusion of the capillary bed secondary to lowered cardiac output, With the 25 subjects, injection into the thigh of tracer amounts of radioactive iodine was done by Hypospray, a method with distinct advantages over needle injection. After measuring tissue clearance of the tracer, cardiac output was determined by a method which records the transit of the injected radioactive bolus through the heart. The Angiotensin was administered by intravenous infusion to four of the normotensive and one of the hypertensive patients. Calculations of cardiac output, total peripheral resistance, mean blood pressure and blood volume were made by means of standard formulae. Results of the study confirmed expectations. Those patients with myocardial infarction who had delayed tissue clearance of {sup 131}I also had reduced cardiac output. The patients with hypertension had normal tissue clearance of {sup 131}I and normal cardiac output in the presence of increased peripheral resistance. Equivalent hypertension and increased peripheral resistance induced in normotensive subjects by Angiotensin resulted in lowered cardiac output and delayed tissue clearance of {sup 131}I. An increased sensitivity to Angiotensin was noted in hypertensive patients. The tissue clearance of {sup 131}I

  15. Tissue ablation accelerated by peripheral scanning mode with high-intensity focused ultrasound: a study on isolated porcine liver perfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Rui; Yin, Li; Yang, Han; Wang, Qi; Wu, Feng; Zou, Jian Zhong

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the feasibility of accelerated tissue ablation using a peripheral scanning mode with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to explore the effect of flow rate on total energy consumption of the target tissues. Using a model of isolated porcine liver perfusion via the portal vein and hepatic artery, we conducted a scanning protocol along the periphery of the target tissues using linear-scanned HIFU to carefully adjust the varying focal depth, generator power, scanning velocity and line-by-line interval over the entire ablation range. Porcine livers were divided into four ablation groups: group 1, n = 12, with dual-vessel perfusion; group 2, n = 11, with portal vein perfusion alone; group 3, n = 10, with hepatic artery perfusion alone; and group 4, n = 11, control group with no-flow perfusion. The samples were cut open consecutively at a thickness of 3 mm, and the actual ablation ranges were calculated along the periphery of the target tissues after triphenyl tetrazolium chloride staining. Total energy consumption was calculated as the sum of the energy requirements at various focal depths in each group. On the basis of the pre-supposed scanning protocol, the peripheral region of the target tissue formed a complete coagulation necrosis barrier in each group with varying dose combinations, and the volume of the peripheral necrotic area did not differ significantly among the four groups (p > 0.05). Furthermore, total energy consumption in each group significantly decreased with the corresponding decrease in flow rate (p Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Apoptosis in T lymphocytes from spleen tissue and peripheral blood of L. (L.) chagasi naturally infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Valéria Marçal Felix; Fattori, Karina Reinaldo; de Souza, Fausto; Eugênio, Flavia Rezende; dos Santos, Paulo Sérgio Patto; Rozza, Daniele Bernadete; Machado, Gisele Fabrino

    2012-03-23

    Dogs are the main domestic reservoirs of L. (L.) chagasi. Once in the vertebrate host, the parasite may cause visceral leishmaniasis, which can also be transmitted to humans. Infected symptomatic dogs show disorganization in the white pulp in spleen tissue and a reduction in T lymphocytes in peripheral blood. To investigate whether apoptosis is involved in white pulp disorganization and diminished T cell counts in peripheral blood, apoptotic T cells from the spleen and peripheral blood of dogs naturally infected with L. (L.) chagasi and presenting clinical manifestations were quantified and compared with healthy dogs. Thirteen symptomatic adult dogs infected by L. (L.) chagasi and six healthy dogs from a nonendemic area (controls) were included in the study. Samples from spleen and peripheral blood were used to quantify apoptosis in CD3 lymphocytes by flow cytometry using Anexin V and Multicaspase kits; the results were compared using the Mann Whitney test. The percentage of total T cells was lower in Leishmania infected dogs compared to healthy controls (Pspleen were higher in infected dogs than in controls (Pspleen white pulp and the percentage of apoptosis in the spleen. A significant effect on the level of white pulp morphological disorganization and percentage of apoptosis in spleen T cells was observed (F=20.45; P=0.0014). These data suggest that apoptosis is an important for the immunopathogenesis of canine visceral leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of peripheral vasodilative indices in skin tissue of type 1 diabetic rats by use of RGB images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Noriyuki; Nishidate, Izumi; Nakano, Kazuya; Aizu, Yoshihisa; Niizeki, Kyuichi

    2016-04-01

    We investigated a method to evaluate the arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin tissue of streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetic rats from RGB digital color images. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the dorsal reversed McFarlane skin flap are calculated based on the responses of change in the total blood concentration to occlusion of blood flow to and from the flap tissues at a pressure of 50 mmHg. The arterial inflow and the venous capacitance in the skin flap tissue were significantly reduced in type 1 diabetic rat group compared with the non-diabetic rat group. The results of the present study indicate the possibility of using the proposed method for evaluating the peripheral vascular dysfunctions in diabetes mellitus.

  18. Microsecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma stimulation of tissue macrophages for treatment of peripheral vascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, V., E-mail: vmiller@coe.drexel.edu; Lin, A.; Brettschneider, J.; Fridman, G.; Fridman, A. [AJ Drexel Plasma Institute, Drexel University, Camden, New Jersey 08103 (United States); Kako, F.; Gabunia, K.; Kelemen, S.; Autieri, M. [Department of Physiology, Independence Blue Cross Cardiovascular Research Center, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19140 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Angiogenesis is the formation of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels and normally occurs during the process of inflammatory reactions, wound healing, tissue repair, and restoration of blood flow after injury or insult. Stimulation of angiogenesis is a promising and an important step in the treatment of peripheral artery disease. Reactive oxygen species have been shown to be involved in stimulation of this process. For this reason, we have developed and validated a non-equilibrium atmospheric temperature and pressure short-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge plasma system, which can non-destructively generate reactive oxygen species and other active species at the surface of the tissue being treated. We show that this plasma treatment stimulates the production of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and CXCL 1 that in turn induces angiogenesis in mouse aortic rings in vitro. This effect may be mediated by the direct effect of plasma generated reactive oxygen species on tissue.

  19. Short Chain Fatty Acids in the Colon and Peripheral Tissues: A Focus on Butyrate, Colon Cancer, Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean M. McNabney

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased dietary fiber consumption has been associated with many beneficial effects, including amelioration of obesity and insulin resistance. These effects may be due to the increased production of short chain fatty acids, including propionate, acetate and butyrate, during fermentation of the dietary fiber in the colon. Indeed, oral and dietary supplementation of butyrate alone has been shown to prevent high fat-diet induced obesity and insulin resistance. This review focuses on sources of short chain fatty acids, with emphasis on sources of butyrate, mechanisms of fiber and butyrate metabolism in the gut and its protective effects on colon cancer and the peripheral effects of butyrate supplementation in peripheral tissues in the prevention and reversal of obesity and insulin resistance.

  20. Effect of low dose irradiation on subsets of T-lymphocyte of peripheral blood, spleen and tumor tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Huawei; Su Liaoyuan; Tian Hailin

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: In order to understand the mechanism of the stimulation effects of low dose radiation (LDR), the author observed the immune changes of T-lymphocyte subsets. Meteria and methods: Whole body of BALB/C bring-tumor mice were exposed to the doses of 5, 10, 20 and 50 cGy γ-rays. The changes of T-lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood, spleen and tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) were studied with flow cytometry (FCM). Results: the ratio of L 3 T 4 + /Lyt 2 + remarkable increased in the peripheral blood and spleen (p 3 T 4 + /Lyt 2 + further decreased in the TIL group of mice exposed 10 cGy (p 2 + molecules, were concentrated in the tumor tissues and they carried out the killing function to the tumor cells

  1. Early resuscitation with polymerized bovine hemoglobin reverses acidosis, but not peripheral tissue oxygenation, in a severe hamster shock model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein, Reto; Tsai, Amy G; Harder, Yves; Erni, Dominique; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2006-11-01

    Awake hamsters equipped with the dorsal window chamber preparation were subjected to hemorrhage of 50% of the estimated blood volume. Initial resuscitation (25% of estimated blood volume) with polymerized bovine hemoglobin (PBH) or 10% hydroxyethyl starch (HES) occurred in concert with an equivolumetric bleeding to simulate the early, prehospital setting (exchange transfusion). Resuscitation (25% of estimated blood volume) without bleeding was performed with PBH, HES, or autologous red blood cells (HES-RBCs). Peripheral microcirculation, tissue oxygenation, and systemic hemodynamic and blood gas parameters were assessed. After exchange transfusion, base deficit was -8.6 +/- 3.7 mmol/L (PBH) and -5.1 +/- 5.3 mmol/L (HES) (not significant). Functional capillary density was 17% +/- 6% of baseline (PBH) and 31% +/- 11% (HES) (P < 0.05) and arteriolar diameter 73% +/- 3% of baseline (PBH) and 90% + 5% (HES) (P < 0.01). At the end, hemoglobin levels were 3.7 +/- 0.3 g/dL with HES, 8.2 +/- 0.6 g/dL with PBH, and 10.4 +/- 0.8 g/dL with HES-RBCs (P < 0.01 HES vs. PBH and HES-RBCs, P < 0.05 PBH vs. HES-RBCs). Base excess was restored to baseline with PBH and HES-RBCs, but not with HES (P < 0.05). Functional capillary density was 46% +/- 5% of baseline (PBH), 62% + 20% (HES-RBCs), and 36% +/- 19% (HES) (P < 0.01 HES-RBCs vs. HES). Peripheral oxygen delivery and consumption was highest with HES-RBCs, followed by PBH (P < 0.05 HES-RBCs vs. PBH, P < 0.01 HES-RBCs and PBH vs. HES). In conclusion, the PBH led to a correction of base deficit comparable to blood transfusion. However, oxygenation of the peripheral tissue was inferior with PBH. This was attributed to its negative impact on the peripheral microcirculation caused by arteriolar vasoconstriction.

  2. Synovial Tissue Response to Treatment with TNF Blockers in Peripheral Spondyloarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paramarta, Jacqueline E.; Baeten, Dominique; de Rycke, Leen

    2011-01-01

    This review describes the synovial response to treatment in peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA). A series of recent studies demonstrates that the synovial histopathology is largely homogenous between different SpA subtypes and can be strongly modulated by effective treatment such as tumor necrosis

  3. Aluminum concentrations in central and peripheral areas of malignant breast lesions do not differ from those in normal breast tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues-Peres, Raquel Mary; Cadore, Solange; Febraio, Stefanny; Heinrich, Juliana Karina; Serra, Katia Piton; Derchain, Sophie F M; Vassallo, Jose; Sarian, Luis Otavio

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum is used in a wide range of applications and is a potential environmental hazard. The known genotoxic effects of aluminum might play a role in the development of breast cancer. However, the data currently available on the subject are not sufficient to establish a causal relationship between aluminum exposure and the augmented risk of developing breast cancer. To achieve maximum sensitivity and specificity in the determination of aluminum levels, we have developed a detection protocol using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The objective of the present study was to compare the aluminum levels in the central and peripheral areas of breast carcinomas with those in the adjacent normal breast tissues, and to identify patient and/or tumor characteristics associated with these aluminum levels. A total of 176 patients with breast cancer were included in the study. Samples from the central and peripheral areas of their tumors were obtained, as well as from the surrounding normal breast tissue. Aluminum quantification was performed using GFAAS. The average (mean ± SD) aluminum concentrations were as follows: central area, 1.88 ± 3.60 mg/kg; peripheral area, 2.10 ± 5.67 mg/kg; and normal area, 1.68 ± 11.1 mg/kg. Overall and two-by-two comparisons of the aluminum concentrations in these areas indicated no significant differences. We detected a positive relationship between aluminum levels in the peripheral areas of the tumors, age and menopausal status of the patients (P = .02). Using a sensitive quantification technique we detected similar aluminum concentrations in the central and peripheral regions of breast tumors, and in normal tissues. In addition, we did not detect significant differences in aluminum concentrations as related to the location of the breast tumor within the breast, or to other relevant tumor features such as stage, size and steroid receptor status. The next logical step is the assessment of whether the aluminum

  4. Aluminum concentrations in central and peripheral areas of malignant breast lesions do not differ from those in normal breast tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Aluminum is used in a wide range of applications and is a potential environmental hazard. The known genotoxic effects of aluminum might play a role in the development of breast cancer. However, the data currently available on the subject are not sufficient to establish a causal relationship between aluminum exposure and the augmented risk of developing breast cancer. To achieve maximum sensitivity and specificity in the determination of aluminum levels, we have developed a detection protocol using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS). The objective of the present study was to compare the aluminum levels in the central and peripheral areas of breast carcinomas with those in the adjacent normal breast tissues, and to identify patient and/or tumor characteristics associated with these aluminum levels. Methods A total of 176 patients with breast cancer were included in the study. Samples from the central and peripheral areas of their tumors were obtained, as well as from the surrounding normal breast tissue. Aluminum quantification was performed using GFAAS. Results The average (mean ± SD) aluminum concentrations were as follows: central area, 1.88 ± 3.60 mg/kg; peripheral area, 2.10 ± 5.67 mg/kg; and normal area, 1.68 ± 11.1 mg/kg. Overall and two-by-two comparisons of the aluminum concentrations in these areas indicated no significant differences. We detected a positive relationship between aluminum levels in the peripheral areas of the tumors, age and menopausal status of the patients (P = .02). Conclusions Using a sensitive quantification technique we detected similar aluminum concentrations in the central and peripheral regions of breast tumors, and in normal tissues. In addition, we did not detect significant differences in aluminum concentrations as related to the location of the breast tumor within the breast, or to other relevant tumor features such as stage, size and steroid receptor status. The next

  5. Dynamic culture of a thermosensitive collagen hydrogel as an extracellular matrix improves the construction of tissue-engineered peripheral nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lanfeng; Li, Rui; Liu, Wanguo; Dai, Jin; Du, Zhenwu; Wang, Xiaonan; Ma, Jianchao; Zhao, Jinsong

    2014-07-15

    Tissue engineering technologies offer new treatment strategies for the repair of peripheral nerve injury, but cell loss between seeding and adhesion to the scaffold remains inevitable. A thermosensitive collagen hydrogel was used as an extracellular matrix in this study and combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells to construct tissue-engineered peripheral nerve composites in vitro. Dynamic culture was performed at an oscillating frequency of 0.5 Hz and 35° swing angle above and below the horizontal plane. The results demonstrated that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells formed membrane-like structures around the poly-L-lactic acid scaffolds and exhibited regular alignment on the composite surface. Collagen was used to fill in the pores, and seeded cells adhered onto the poly-L-lactic acid fibers. The DNA content of the bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells was higher in the composites constructed with a thermosensitive collagen hydrogel compared with that in collagen I scaffold controls. The cellular DNA content was also higher in the thermosensitive collagen hydrogel composites constructed with the thermosensitive collagen hydrogel in dynamic culture than that in static culture. These results indicate that tissue-engineered composites formed with thermosensitive collagen hydrogel in dynamic culture can maintain larger numbers of seeded cells by avoiding cell loss during the initial adhesion stage. Moreover, seeded cells were distributed throughout the material.

  6. Alzheimer’s Disease Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Brain Tissue Stiffness Compared to Wild-type Mice in both Normoxia and following Intermittent Hypoxia Mimicking Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Menal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEvidence from patients and animal models suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA may increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD and that AD is associated with reduced brain tissue stiffness.AimTo investigate whether intermittent hypoxia (IH alters brain cortex tissue stiffness in AD mutant mice exposed to IH mimicking OSA.MethodsSix-eight month old (B6C3-Tg(APPswe,PSEN1dE985Dbo/J AD mutant mice and wild-type (WT littermates were subjected to IH (21% O2 40 s to 5% O2 20 s; 6 h/day or normoxia for 8 weeks. After euthanasia, the stiffness (E of 200-μm brain cortex slices was measured by atomic force microscopy.ResultsTwo-way ANOVA indicated significant cortical softening and weight increase in AD mice compared to WT littermates, but no significant effects of IH on cortical stiffness and weight were detected. In addition, reduced myelin was apparent in AD (vs. WT, but no significant differences emerged in the cortex extracellular matrix components laminin and glycosaminoglycans when comparing baseline AD and WT mice.ConclusionAD mutant mice exhibit reduced brain tissue stiffness following both normoxia and IH mimicking sleep apnea, and such differences are commensurate with increased edema and demyelination in AD.

  7. A systematic review of extravasation and local tissue injury from administration of vasopressors through peripheral intravenous catheters and central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubani, Osama M; Green, Robert S

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to collect and describe all published reports of local tissue injury or extravasation from vasopressor administration via either peripheral intravenous (IV) or central venous catheter. A systematic search of Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases was performed from inception through January 2014 for reports of adults who received vasopressor intravenously via peripheral IV or central venous catheter for a therapeutic purpose. We included primary studies or case reports of vasopressor administration that resulted in local tissue injury or extravasation of vasopressor solution. Eighty-five articles with 270 patients met all inclusion criteria. A total of 325 separate local tissue injury and extravasation events were identified, with 318 events resulting from peripheral vasopressor administration and 7 events resulting from central administration. There were 204 local tissue injury events from peripheral administration of vasopressors, with an average duration of infusion of 55.9 hours (±68.1), median time of 24 hours, and range of 0.08 to 528 hours. In most of these events (174/204, 85.3%), the infusion site was located distal to the antecubital or popliteal fossae. Published data on tissue injury or extravasation from vasopressor administration via peripheral IVs are derived mainly from case reports. Further study is warranted to clarify the safety of vasopressor administration via peripheral IVs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiosensitizing activity and pharmacokinetics of multiple dose administered KU-2285 in peripheral nerve tissue in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwai, Hiroyuki; Matsuno, Etsuko; Sasai, Keisuke; Abe, Mitsuyuki; Shibamoto, Yuta

    1994-01-01

    In a clinical trial in which a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer was administered repeatedly, the dose-limiting toxicity was found to be peripheral neuropathy. In the present study, the in vivo radiosensitizing activity of KU-2285 in combination with radiation dose fractionation, and the pharmacokinetics of cumulative dosing of KU-2285 in the peripheral nerves were examined. The ability of three nitroimidazoles, misonidazole (MISO), etanidazole (SR-2508) and KU-2285, to sensitize SCCVII tumors to radiation treatment has been compared for drug doses in the range 0-200 mg/kg. Single radiation doses or two different fractionation schedules (6 Gy/fractions x three fractions/48 h or 5 Gy/fractions x five fractions/48 h) were used; the tumor cell survival was determined using an in vivo/in vitro colony assay. The pharmacokinetics in the sciatic nerves were undertaken, when KU-2285 or etanidazole were injected at a dose of 200 mg/kg intravenously one, two, three, or four times at 2-h intervals. At less than 100 mg/kg, KU-2285 sensitized SCCVII tumors more than MISO and SR-2508 by fractionated irradiation. Evaluation of pharmacokinetics in the peripheral nerves showed that the apparent biological half-life of SR-2508 increased with the increases in the number of administrations, whereas that of KU-2285 became shorter. Since most clinical radiotherapy is given in small multiple fractions, KU-2285 appears to be a hypoxic cell radiosensitizer that could be useful in such regimens, and that poses no risk of chronic peripheral neurotoxicity. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  9. In vivo labelling in several rat tissues of 'peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benavides, J.; Guilloux, F.; Rufat, P.; Uzan, A.; Renault, C.; Dubroeucq, M.C.; Gueremy, C.; Le Fur, G. (Pharmuka Laboratoires, 92 - Gennevilliers (France))

    1984-03-16

    'Peripheral type' benzodiazepine binding sites in several rat tissues were labelled by intravenous injection of (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 and (/sup 3/H)RO5-4864. Binding was saturable in all tissues studied and regional distribution paralleled the in vitro binding. A similar potency order of displacing compounds was found in vivo and in vitro PK 11195 > PK 11211 > RO5-4864 > diazepam > dipyridamole > clonazepam. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using this technique to examine the effects of pharmacological manipulation on the binding sites in their native state. However, some properties (broader maximum during time course, higher percentage of particulate binding in the brain and independence of temperature) make (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 the most suitable ligand for this kind of studies.

  10. Analysis of changes of serum leptin, C-peptide levels and peripheral fat tissue leptin receptor expression in obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Tongxin; Sun Junjiang; Wang Shukui; Fu Lei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of obesity and obesity accompanied type two diabetes mellitus by investigating changes of serum leptin, C-peptide (C-P) levels and leptin receptor expression in peripheral adipose tissues. Methods: Peripheral leptin receptor density was measured via radio-ligand binding method, serum leptin and C - P levels were measured via radioimmunoassay in 91 cases (38 in obesity group, 23 in over weight, and 30 in normal controls). Results: With the increase of body mass index (BMI), the peripheral leptin receptor density of the over weight and obese cases decreased and was mash less than that of normal cases (both p<0.01, respectively). There was no statistical differences for Kd value among the three groups, suggesting no associated change between the binding ability of leptin receptor to its ligand. There was a negative correlation between BMI and leptin receptor density (r = -0.70, p < 0.01). The serum leptin and C-P levels in weight excess and obese subjects with type two DM were both increased, but significantly higher in obese group than those in weight excess group (p < 0.01). The increase of C-P was much marked than that of leptin. Serum C-P level was positively correlated with BMI. Conclusion: Changes of serum leptin, C-P levels and peripheral leptin receptor expression in cases with simple obesity and obesity accompanied with type two DM were related closely with BMI. Type 2 DM in obese subjects was related with leptin resistance and insulin resistance

  11. Role of percent peripheral tissue ablated on refractive outcomes following hyperopic LASIK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Fiona; Versace, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the effect of hyperopic laser in situ keratomileusis (H-LASIK) on corneal integrity, by investigating relationships between proportionate corneal tissue ablated and refractive outcomes at 3 months. Methods 18 eyes of 18 subjects treated with H-LASIK by Technolas 217c Excimer Laser were included in the study. Orbscan II Topography System was used to determine corneal volume and pachymetry 3mm temporally (3T). The volume of corneal tissue ablated was determined from the laser nomogram. Univariate associations between age, treatment, corneal volume, overall proportion of tissue removed, proportion of tissue removed at 3T, residual bed thickness at 3T and refractive outcomes 3 months post-LASIK were examined and independent factors associated with refractive outcomes determined using linear regression models. Results At 3 months post-LASIK, the mean difference to expected refractive outcome was -0.20 ± 0.64 (Range -2.00 to +1.00). In univariate analysis, difference to expected refractive outcome was associated with proportion of tissue removed at 3T (PLASIK, may present as either over or under-corrected at 3 months. The proportion of tissue removed at 3T was the single significant determinant of this outcome, suggesting unexpected biomechanical alterations resulting in corneal steepening. Future hyperopic LASIK procedures could consider proportionate volume of corneal tissue removed at 3T in addition to laser nomograms to achieve improved refractive outcomes. PMID:28151939

  12. Intrahepatic tissue pO2 during continuous or intermittent vascular inflow occlusion in a pig liver resection model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wagensveld, B. A.; van Gulik, T. M.; Gabeler, E. E.; van der Kleij, A. J.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Temporary vascular inflow occlusion of the liver (clamping of the hepatic pedicle) can prevent massive blood loss during liver resections. In this study, intrahepatic tissue pO2 was assessed as parameter of microcirculatory disturbances induced by ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) in the

  13. Measurements of free and total PSA, tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS), and CYFRA 21-1 in prostate cancer patients under intermittent androgen suppression therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theyer, G; Dürer, A; Theyer, U; Haberl, I; Ulsperger, E; Baumgartner, G; Hamilton, G

    1999-10-01

    The present study evaluated monthly measurements of free and total prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and the tumor proliferation markers tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) and cytokeratin fragment 21-1 (CYFRA 21-1) in patients with advanced prostate cancer receiving intermittent androgen suppression therapy (IAS). Thirty-four men received alternating cycles of 8 month androgen suppression and treatment cessation (mean duration, 10.3 months) until PSA increased to >20 microg/l. Measurements of testosterone, percentage of free PSA, TPS, and CYFRA 21-1 were performed using ELISA and RIA assays. Periods of androgen suppression resulted in reversible reductions of testosterone (from 6 +/- 0.8 to IAS cycle. TPS showed a decrease of 50% after 3 months, and CYFRA 21-1 a 25% decrease after 7 months of androgen suppression treatment. During treatment cessation, TPS exceeded the normal cutoff value of 90 U/l late in tumor regrowth (9-11 months), whereas CYFRA 21-1 remained below the normal cutoff value of 3.3 ng/ml. PSA is the best and most sensitive marker of prostate cancer regression and regrowth during IAS cycles of the markers tested in this study. Free PSA constitutes approximately 15% of total PSA (range, 5-32%), and its percentage showed no significant change during IAS cycles. The TPS and CYFRA 21-1 proliferation marker changes in IAS seem to be related mainly to effects on normal androgen-dependent tissues. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. [Effects of interleukin-18 and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in serum and gingival tissues of rat model with periodontitis exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Wang, Xiaoqin

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluates the expression of interleukin-18 (IL-18) and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-lα in rat periodontitis model exposed to normoxia and chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) environments. The possible correlation between periodontitis and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) was also investigated. Methods: Thirty-two Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly assigned into four groups: normoxia control, normoxia periodontitis, hypoxia control, and hypoxia periodontitis groups. The periodontitis models were established by ligating the bilateral maxillary second molars and employing high-carbohydrate diets. Rats in hypoxia control and hypoxia periodontitis groups were exposed to CIH treatment mimicking a moderately severe OSAHS condition. All animals were sacrificed after eight weeks, and the clinical periodontal indexes were detected. The levels of IL-18 and HIF-1α in serum and gingival tissues were determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The correlation between attachment loss (AL) and the levels of IL-18 and HIF-lα in hypoxia periodontitis group was evaluated. The levels of IL-18 and HIF-lα in hypoxia periodontitis group were significantly higher than that in normoxia periodontitis and hypoxia control groups (Pperiodontal tissues, which is correlated with IL-18 and HIF-lα levels.

  15. Intermittent hydronephrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knop, J.; Vogel, H.; Hupe, W.

    1981-01-01

    An intermittent hydronephrosis was observed in a 40-year old patient. This disease pattern is due to an incongruity between the formation of urine and the transport capacity in the ureteropelvic junction. The latent impediment of flow becomes manifest with increased urine secretion. Irreversible renal damage can be the result of the repeatedly occurring hydronephrotic crises. (orig.) [de

  16. Sleep is not just for the brain: transcriptional responses to sleep in peripheral tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Anafi, Ron C; Pellegrino, Renata; Shockley, Keith R; Romer, Micah; Tufik, Sergio; Pack, Allan I

    2013-01-01

    Background Many have assumed that the primary function of sleep is for the brain. We evaluated the molecular consequences of sleep and sleep deprivation outside the brain, in heart and lung. Using microarrays we compared gene expression in tissue from sleeping and sleep deprived mice euthanized at the same diurnal times. Results In each tissue, nearly two thousand genes demonstrated statistically significant differential expression as a function of sleep/wake behavioral state. To mitigate the...

  17. Management of patients with intermittent claudication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Spronk (Sandra)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIntermittent claudication is the first and mildest manifestation of peripheral arterial disease, caused by the atherosclerotic process of progressive narrowing of one or more of the arteries of the peripheral circulation.1 If the arterial system fails, it results in a progressive oxygen

  18. The effects of intermittent negative pressure on the lower extremities' peripheral circulation and wound healing in four patients with lower limb ischemia and hard-to-heal leg ulcers: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundby, Øyvind H; Høiseth, Lars Ø; Mathiesen, Iacob; Jørgensen, Jørgen J; Sundhagen, Jon O; Hisdal, Jonny

    2016-10-01

    Peripheral circulation is severely compromised in the advanced stages of peripheral arterial disease. Recently, it was shown that the application of -40 mmHg intermittent negative pressure (INP) to the lower leg and foot enhances macro- and microcirculation in healthy volunteers. In this case report, we describe the effects of INP treatment on four patients with lower limb ischemia and hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcers. We hypothesized that INP therapy may have beneficial hemodynamic and clinical effects in the patients. Four patients (age range: 61-79 years) with hard-to-heal leg and foot ulcers (6-24 months) and ankle-brachial pressure indices of ≤0.60 on the affected side were included. They were treated with an 8-week intervention period of -40 mmHg INP (10 sec negative pressure and 7 sec atmospheric pressure) on the lower limbs. A custom-made vacuum chamber was used to apply INP to the affected lower leg and foot for 2 h per day. After 8 weeks of INP therapy, one ulcer healed completely, while the other three ulcers were almost completely healed. These cases suggest that INP may facilitate wound healing. The theoretical foundation is that INP assists wound healing by improving blood flow to the small blood vessels in the affected limb, increasing the flow of oxygen and nutrients to the cells. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  19. Correlation between increasing tissue ischemia and circulating levels of angiogenic growth factors in peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalkanen, Juho; Hautero, Olli; Maksimow, Mikael; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Hakovirta, Harri

    2018-04-21

    The aim of the present study was to assess the circulating levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and other suggested therapeutic growth factors with the degree of ischemia in patients with different clinical manifestations of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) according to the Rutherford grades. The study cohort consists of 226 consecutive patients admitted to a Department of Vascular Surgery for elective invasive procedures. PAD patients were grouped according to the Rutherford grades after a clinical assessment. Ankle-brachial pressure indices (ABI) and absolute toe pressure (TP) values were measured. Serum levels of circulating VEGF, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) were measured from serum and analysed against Rutherford grades and peripheral hemodynamic measurements. The levels of VEGF (P = 0.009) and HGF (P correlations between Rutherford grades was detected as follows; VEGF (Pearson's correlation = 0.183, P = 0.004), HGF (Pearson's correlation = 0.253, P Pearson's correlation = 0.169, P = 0.008) and PDGF (Pearson's correlation = 0.296, P correlation with ABI (Pearson's correlation -0.19, P = 0.009) and TP (Pearson's correlation -0.20, P = 0.005) measurements. Our present observations show that the circulating levels of VEGF and other suggested therapeutic growth factors are significantly increased along with increasing ischemia. These findings present a new perspective to anticipated positive effects of gene therapies utilizing VEGF, HGF, and bFGF, because the levels of these growth factors are endogenously high in end-stage PAD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Central and peripheral mechanisms of the NPY system in the regulation of bone and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan-Chuan; Baldock, Paul A

    2012-02-01

    Skeletal research is currently undergoing a period of marked expansion. The boundaries of "bone" research are being re-evaluated and with this, a growing recognition of a more complex and interconnected biology than previously considered. One aspect that has become the focus of particular attention is the relationship between bone and fat homeostasis. Evidence from a number of avenues indicates that bone and adipose regulation are both related and interdependent. This review examines the neuropeptide Y (NPY) system, known to exert powerful control over both bone and fat tissue. The actions of this system are characterized by signaling both within specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and also the target tissues, mediated predominantly through two G-protein coupled receptors (Y1 and Y2). In bone tissue, elevated NPY levels act consistently to repress osteoblast activity. Moreover, both central Y2 receptor and osteoblastic Y1 receptor signaling act similarly to repress bone formation. Conversely, loss of NPY expression or receptor signaling induces increased osteoblast activity and bone mass in both cortical and cancellous envelopes. In fat tissue, NPY action is more complex. Energy homeostasis is powerfully altered by elevations in hypothalamic NPY, resulting in increases in fat accretion and body-wide energy conservation, through the action of locally expressed Y1 receptors, while local Y2 receptors act to inhibit NPY-ergic tone. Loss of central NPY expression has a markedly reduced effect, consistent with a physiological drive to promote fat accretion. In fat tissue, NPY and Y1 receptors act to promote lipogenesis, consistent with their roles in the brain. Y2 receptors expressed in adipocytes also act in this manner, showing an opposing action to their role in the hypothalamus. While direct investigation of these processes has yet to be completed, these responses appear to be interrelated to some degree. The starvation-based signal of elevated central NPY inducing

  1. Differential effects of diet composition and timing of feeding behavior on rat brown adipose tissue and skeletal muscle peripheral clocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul de Goede

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of feeding behavior and diet composition, as well as their possible interactions, on daily (clock gene expression rhythms have mainly been studied in the liver, and to a lesser degree in white adipose tissue (WAT, but hardly in other metabolic tissues such as skeletal muscle (SM and brown adipose tissues (BAT. We therefore subjected male Wistar rats to a regular chow or free choice high-fat-high sugar (fcHFHS diet in combination with time restricted feeding (TRF to either the light or dark phase. In SM, all tested clock genes lost their rhythmic expression in the chow light fed group. In the fcHFHS light fed group rhythmic expression for some, but not all, clock genes was maintained, but shifted by several hours. In BAT the daily rhythmicity of clock genes was maintained for the light fed groups, but expression patterns were shifted as compared with ad libitum and dark fed groups, whilst the fcHFHS diet made the rhythmicity of clock genes become more pronounced. Most of the metabolic genes in BAT tissue tested did not show any rhythmic expression in either the chow or fcHFHS groups. In SM Pdk4 and Ucp3 were phase-shifted, but remained rhythmically expressed in the chow light fed groups. Rhythmic expression was lost for Ucp3 whilst on the fcHFHS diet during the light phase. In summary, both feeding at the wrong time of day and diet composition disturb the peripheral clocks in SM and BAT, but to different degrees and thereby result in a further desynchronization between metabolically active tissues such as SM, BAT, WAT and liver.

  2. Effect of spinal sympathetic blockade upon postural changes of blood flow in human peripheral tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skagen, K; Haxholdt, O; Henriksen, O

    1982-01-01

    local nervous blockade was induced by Lidocaine in 133Xe labelled subcutaneous tissue on one side. During epidural blockade and tilt blood flow increased by 12% whereas blood flow decreased by 30% on the control side. Thus epidural blockade had no influence on the vasoconstrictor response...

  3. A new bioheat equation and its application to peripheral tissue and whole limb heat transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinbaum, S.

    1987-01-01

    Much of the mathematical modeling of heat transfer in perfused tissue over the past three decades has been based on the Pennes bioheat equation. This equation assumes that blood at the local arterial supply temperature reaches the capillaries where the primary thermal equilibration occurs because of the large surface area available for heat exchange. While this argument is correct for gas, water and solute transport, recent theoretical and experimental studies have shown that virtually no heat exchange occurs in vessels under 100 μm and that the primary mechanism for microvascular heat exchange is the imperfect heat exchange between the larger paired countercurrent microvessels that occur 3 to 6 generations prior to the capillaries. A new fundamental bioheat equations has been derived to describe this heat transfer mechanism. This equation contains a basic new expression for the thermal conductivity of perfused tissue which depends on the geometry and flow in the largest microvessels of the local tissue element and the direction of the vessels relative to the local tissue temperature gradient. Although the new equation appears to be complicated, it is shown that it can be applied with relative ease to a host of problems previously treated by the Pennes equation

  4. Electroactive biodegradable polyurethane significantly enhanced Schwann cells myelin gene expression and neurotrophin secretion for peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yaobin; Wang, Ling; Guo, Baolin; Shao, Yongpin; Ma, Peter X

    2016-05-01

    Myelination of Schwann cells (SCs) is critical for the success of peripheral nerve regeneration, and biomaterials that can promote SCs' neurotrophin secretion as scaffolds are beneficial for nerve repair. Here we present a biomaterials-approach, specifically, a highly tunable conductive biodegradable flexible polyurethane by polycondensation of poly(glycerol sebacate) and aniline pentamer, to significantly enhance SCs' myelin gene expression and neurotrophin secretion for peripheral nerve tissue engineering. SCs are cultured on these conductive polymer films, and the biocompatibility of these films and their ability to enhance myelin gene expressions and sustained neurotrophin secretion are successfully demonstrated. The mechanism of SCs' neurotrophin secretion on conductive films is demonstrated by investigating the relationship between intracellular Ca(2+) level and SCs' myelination. Furthermore, the neurite growth and elongation of PC12 cells are induced by adding the neurotrophin medium suspension produced from SCs-laden conductive films. These data suggest that these conductive degradable polyurethanes that enhance SCs' myelin gene expressions and sustained neurotrophin secretion perform great potential for nerve regeneration applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Scaffoldless tissue-engineered nerve conduit promotes peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery after tibial nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron M. Adams; Keith W. VanDusen; Tatiana Y. Kostrominova; Jacob P. Mertens; Lisa M. Larkin

    2017-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerve tissue may cause loss of function in both the nerve and the targeted muscles it innervates. This study compared the repair capability of engineered nerve conduit (ENC), engineered fibroblast conduit (EFC), and autograft in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap. ENCs were fabricated utilizing primary fibroblasts and the nerve cells of rats on embryonic day 15 (E15). EFCs were fabricated utilizing primary fi-broblasts only. Following a 12-week recovery, nerve repair was assessed by measuring contractile properties in the medial gastrocnemius muscle, distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, and histology of muscle and nerve. The autografts, ENCs and EFCs reestablished 96%, 87% and 84% of native distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, 100%, 44% and 44% of native specific force of medical gastrocnemius, and 63%, 61% and 67% of native medial gastrocnemius mass, re-spectively. Histology of the repaired nerve revealed large axons in the autograft, larger but fewer axons in the ENC repair, and many smaller axons in the EFC repair. Muscle histology revealed similar muscle fiber cross-sectional areas among autograft, ENC and EFC repairs. In conclusion, both ENCs and EFCs promot-ed nerve regeneration in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap repair, suggesting that the E15 rat nerve cells may not be necessary for nerve regeneration, and EFC alone can suffice for peripheral nerve injury repair.

  6. Intermittency '93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, A.

    1993-01-01

    The existing data definitely indicate the existence of intermittency, i.e. of self similar structures in the systems of particles created in high-energy collisions. The effect seems universal: it was found in most of the processes investigated and its measures parameters depend only weakly (if at all) on the process in question. Strong HBT effect was found, suggesting that intermittency is related to space-time structure of the pion source rather than to detailed momentum structure of the production amplitudes. There are indications that this space time structure may be fractal, but more data is needed to establish this. The theoretical explanation remains obscure: it seems that both parton cascade and hadronization play an important role. Their interrelation, however, remains a mystery. 5 figs., 19 refs

  7. Whole-tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis to differentiate benign peripheral neurogenic tumors from soft tissue sarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajo, Masanori; Fukukura, Yoshihiko; Hakamada, Hiroto; Yoneyama, Tomohide; Kamimura, Kiyohisa; Nagano, Satoshi; Nakajo, Masayuki; Yoshiura, Takashi

    2018-02-22

    Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analyses have been used to differentiate tumor grades and predict therapeutic responses in various anatomic sites with moderate success. To determine the ability of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a whole-tumor ADC histogram analysis to differentiate benign peripheral neurogenic tumors (BPNTs) from soft tissue sarcomas (STSs). Retrospective study, single institution. In all, 25 BPNTs and 31 STSs. Two-b value DWI (b-values = 0, 1000s/mm 2 ) was at 3.0T. The histogram parameters of whole-tumor for ADC were calculated by two radiologists and compared between BPNTs and STSs. Nonparametric tests were performed for comparisons between BPNTs and STSs. P histogram parameters except kurtosis and entropy differed significantly between BPNTs and STSs. 3 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018. © 2018 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Correlation of MLH1 and MGMT methylation levels between peripheral blood leukocytes and colorectal tissue DNA samples in colorectal cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Wang, Yibaina; Zhang, Zuoming; Yao, Xiaoping; Ge, Jie; Zhao, Yashuang

    2013-11-01

    CpG island methylation in the promoter regions of the DNA mismatch repair gene mutator L homologue 1 ( MLH1 ) and DNA repair gene O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase ( MGMT ) genes has been shown to occur in the leukocytes of peripheral blood and colorectal tissue. However, it is unclear whether the methylation levels in the blood leukocytes and colorectal tissue are correlated. The present study analyzed and compared the levels of MGMT and MLH1 gene methylation in the leukocytes of peripheral blood and colorectal tissues obtained from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The methylation levels of MGMT and MLH1 were examined using methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis. A total of 44 patients with CRC were selected based on the MLH1 and MGMT gene methylation levels in the leukocytes of the peripheral blood. Corresponding colorectal tumor and normal tissues were obtained from each patient and the DNA methylation levels were determined. The correlation coefficients were evaluated using Spearman's rank test. Agreement was determined by generalized κ-statistics. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (r) for the methylation levels of the MGMT and MLH1 genes in the leukocytes of the peripheral blood and normal colorectal tissue were 0.475 and 0.362, respectively (P=0.001 and 0.016, respectively). The agreement of the MGMT and MLH1 gene methylation levels in the leukocytes of the peripheral blood and normal colorectal tissue were graded as fair and poor (κ=0.299 and 0.126, respectively). The methylation levels of MGMT and MLH1 were moderately and weakly correlated between the patient-matched leukocytes and the normal colorectal tissue, respectively. Blood-derived DNA methylation measurements may not always represent the levels of normal colorectal tissue methylation.

  9. Relationship between serum adiponectin concentration, body condition score, and peripheral tissue insulin response of dairy cows during the dry period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Koster, J; Urh, C; Hostens, M; Van den Broeck, W; Sauerwein, H; Opsomer, G

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the relationship between serum adiponectin concentration and peripheral tissue insulin response in dairy cows with a variable body condition score (BCS) during the dry period. Cows were selected at the beginning of the dry period based on BCS (BCS 3.75, n = 5). Animals were followed from the beginning of the dry period by weekly blood sampling and assessment of BCS and backfat thickness. Weekly blood samples were analyzed for adiponectin concentration using a bovine specific ELISA. Hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp tests were performed at the end of the dry period to measure peripheral tissue insulin response. Insulin dose response curves were established for both glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Regression analysis revealed that the serum concentrations of adiponectin dropped at the end of the dry period (P insulin responsiveness (reflecting the maximal effect of insulin; r = 0.76, P insulin sensitivity (reflecting the insulin concentration needed to achieve halfmaximal effect; r = -0.54, P = 0.13). At the level of the fatty acid metabolism, greater adiponectin concentrations were negatively correlated with lower NEFA levels during the HEC test reflecting the insulin responsiveness of the NEFA metabolism (r = -0.61, P = 0.08), whereas there was no association with the insulin sensitivity of the NEFA metabolism (r = -0.16, P = 0.67). In conclusion, serum concentrations of adiponectin were negatively associated with the BCS of dairy cows during the dry period and positively associated with insulin responsiveness of the glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Deep tissue near infrared second derivative spectrophotometry for the assessment of claudication in peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsiaris, Aristotle G

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the application of a second derivative near infrared spectrophotometric (NIRS) technique to the human calf muscle in order to see if peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients can be discriminated from control subjects, before, during and after a standard treadmill exercise test. Three groups of human subjects were studied: group A consisted of 10 control subjects and groups B and C were formed by PAD patients classified as Fontaine's stage 2a (5 patients) and 2b (10 patients), respectively. The measurement protocol for all groups was 9.75 minutes of standing up (phase 1), 1 minute of exercise (phase 2) and 1 minute of rest (phase 3). Seven variables were defined at different times from the onset of the measurement protocol. All variables were significantly higher (p < 0.05) in group A in comparison to groups B and C. The level of significance was ten times higher (p < 0.005) at the onset (15 seconds) of the experiment and during phases 2 and 3. However, none of the variables in group B was significantly different from those in group C. It is shown for the first time that a second derivative NIRS technique can discriminate (p = 0.003) healthy subjects from PAD patients, in just 15 seconds of standing, with no exercise requirement. More experiments are required in order to uncover the full potential of the technique in the diagnosis of the PAD.

  11. In vitro evaluation of cell-seeded chitosan films for peripheral nerve tissue engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Wrobel, Sandra; Serra, Sofia Cristina; Samy, S. M.; Sousa, Nuno; Heimann, Claudia; Barwig, Christina; Grothe, Claudia; Salgado, A. J.; Talini, Kirsten Haastert

    2014-01-01

    Natural biomaterials have attracted an increasing interest in the field of tissue-engineered nerve grafts, representing a possible alternative to autologous nerve transplantation. With the prospect of developing a novel entubulation strategy for transected nerves with cell-seeded chitosan films, we examined the biocompatibility of such films in vitro. Different types of rat Schwann cells (SCs)-immortalized, neonatal, and adult-as well as rat bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC...

  12. Correlations between iron content in knee joint tissues and chosen indices of peripheral blood morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodziak-Dopierała, Barbara; Roczniak, Wojciech; Jakóbik-Kolon, Agata; Kluczka, Joanna; Koczy, Bogdan; Kwapuliński, Jerzy; Babuśka-Roczniak, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    Iron as a cofactor of enzymes takes part in the synthesis of the bone matrix. Severe deficiency of iron reduces the strength and mineral density of bones, whereas its excess may increase oxidative stress. In this context, it is essential to determine the iron content in knee joint tissues. The study objective was to determine the level of iron in the tissues of the knee joint, i.e., in the femoral bone, tibia and meniscus. Material for analysis was obtained during endoprosthetic surgery of the knee joint. Within the knee joint, the tibia, femur and meniscus were analyzed. Samples were collected from 50 patients, including 36 women and 14 men. The determination of iron content was performed with the ICP-AES method, using Varian 710-ES. The lowest iron content was in the tibia (27.04 μg/g), then in the meniscus (38.68 μg/g) and the highest in the femur (41.93 μg/g). Statistically significant differences were noted in the content of iron in knee joint tissues. In patients who underwent endoprosthesoplasty of the knee joint, statistically significant differences were found in the levels of iron in various components of the knee joint. The highest iron content was found in the femoral bone of the knee joint and then in the meniscus, the lowest in the tibia. The differences in iron content in the knee joint between women and men were not statistically significant.

  13. Differential impact of transplantation on peripheral and tissue-associated viral reservoirs: Implications for HIV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher W; Wang, Jianbin; Deleage, Claire; Reddy, Sowmya; Kaur, Jasbir; Polacino, Patricia; Reik, Andreas; Huang, Meei-Li; Jerome, Keith R; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Holmes, Michael C; Estes, Jacob D; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2018-04-01

    Autologous transplantation and engraftment of HIV-resistant cells in sufficient numbers should recapitulate the functional cure of the Berlin Patient, with applicability to a greater number of infected individuals and with a superior safety profile. A robust preclinical model of suppressed HIV infection is critical in order to test such gene therapy-based cure strategies, both alone and in combination with other cure strategies. Here, we present a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of latent infection using simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in pigtail macaques. We demonstrate that transplantation of CCR5 gene-edited hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) persist in infected and suppressed animals, and that protected cells expand through virus-dependent positive selection. CCR5 gene-edited cells are readily detectable in tissues, namely those closely associated with viral reservoirs such as lymph nodes and gastrointestinal tract. Following autologous transplantation, tissue-associated SHIV DNA and RNA levels in suppressed animals are significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05), relative to suppressed, untransplanted control animals. In contrast, the size of the peripheral reservoir, measured by QVOA, is variably impacted by transplantation. Our studies demonstrate that CCR5 gene editing is equally feasible in infected and uninfected animals, that edited cells persist, traffic to, and engraft in tissue reservoirs, and that this approach significantly reduces secondary lymphoid tissue viral reservoir size. Our robust NHP model of HIV gene therapy and viral persistence can be immediately applied to the investigation of combinatorial approaches that incorporate anti-HIV gene therapy, immune modulators, therapeutic vaccination, and latency reversing agents.

  14. Differential impact of transplantation on peripheral and tissue-associated viral reservoirs: Implications for HIV gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Peterson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Autologous transplantation and engraftment of HIV-resistant cells in sufficient numbers should recapitulate the functional cure of the Berlin Patient, with applicability to a greater number of infected individuals and with a superior safety profile. A robust preclinical model of suppressed HIV infection is critical in order to test such gene therapy-based cure strategies, both alone and in combination with other cure strategies. Here, we present a nonhuman primate (NHP model of latent infection using simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in pigtail macaques. We demonstrate that transplantation of CCR5 gene-edited hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs persist in infected and suppressed animals, and that protected cells expand through virus-dependent positive selection. CCR5 gene-edited cells are readily detectable in tissues, namely those closely associated with viral reservoirs such as lymph nodes and gastrointestinal tract. Following autologous transplantation, tissue-associated SHIV DNA and RNA levels in suppressed animals are significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05, relative to suppressed, untransplanted control animals. In contrast, the size of the peripheral reservoir, measured by QVOA, is variably impacted by transplantation. Our studies demonstrate that CCR5 gene editing is equally feasible in infected and uninfected animals, that edited cells persist, traffic to, and engraft in tissue reservoirs, and that this approach significantly reduces secondary lymphoid tissue viral reservoir size. Our robust NHP model of HIV gene therapy and viral persistence can be immediately applied to the investigation of combinatorial approaches that incorporate anti-HIV gene therapy, immune modulators, therapeutic vaccination, and latency reversing agents.

  15. Creating Interactions between Tissue-Engineered Skeletal Muscle and the Peripheral Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alec S T; Passey, Samantha L; Martin, Neil R W; Player, Darren J; Mudera, Vivek; Greensmith, Linda; Lewis, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Effective models of mammalian tissues must allow and encourage physiologically (mimetic) correct interactions between co-cultured cell types in order to produce culture microenvironments as similar as possible to those that would normally occur in vivo. In the case of skeletal muscle, the development of such a culture model, integrating multiple relevant cell types within a biomimetic scaffold, would be of significant benefit for investigations into the development, functional performance, and pathophysiology of skeletal muscle tissue. Although some work has been published regarding the behaviour of in vitro muscle models co-cultured with organotypic slices of CNS tissue or with stem cell-derived neurospheres, little investigation has so far been made regarding the potential to maintain isolated motor neurons within a 3D biomimetic skeletal muscle culture platform. Here, we review the current state of the art for engineering neuromuscular contacts in vitro and provide original data detailing the development of a 3D collagen-based model for the co-culture of primary muscle cells and motor neurons. The devised culture system promotes increased myoblast differentiation, forming arrays of parallel, aligned myotubes on which areas of nerve-muscle contact can be detected by immunostaining for pre- and post-synaptic proteins. Quantitative RT-PCR results indicate that motor neuron presence has a positive effect on myotube maturation, suggesting neural incorporation influences muscle development and maturation in vitro. The importance of this work is discussed in relation to other published neuromuscular co-culture platforms along with possible future directions for the field. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Leukocytic Response and Peripheral Venous Blood Lymphocyte Apoptosis as a Marker of Tissue Ischemia in Acute Massive Blood Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Borovkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the level of peripheral venous blood lymphocyte apoptosis and intraoperative hypoxia in victims with acute massive blood loss. Subjects and methods. Twenty-two patients with open and close chest and abdominal traumas complicated by acute massive blood loss were examined. All the patients were emergently operated on to stop bleeding. Tissue metabolism was evaluated from gases, acid-base parameters, and plasma lactate, glucose, potassium, and sodium levels. Apoptosis of mononuclear cells was studied and dead leukocytes were counted using flow cytometry. Results. Preoperatively, the victims were found to have venous hypoxemia, hyperlactatemia, hyperglycemia, moderate leukocytosis, and higher dead leukocyte counts. There were also raised counts of lymphocytes coming into the process of apoptosis. A significant relationship was found between monocyte counts and hypoxia values. At the end of surgery, oxygen balance values became stable and exerted an effect on the count of leukocytes, the relative level of granulocytes, the relative and absolute counts of dead and damaged leukocytes, and the concentration of lymphocytes in the victims’ venous blood during the early stages of apoptosis, as evidenced by nonlinear regression models. Conclusion. The indicators of immunocompetent cell apoptosis and the count of venous blood dead leukocytes along with lactate levels and venous hypoxemia parameters reflect the degree of tissue hypoxia and may be used as specific markers.

  17. Highly restricted diversity of TCR delta chains of the amphibian Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) in peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Sébastien; Kerfourn, Fabienne; Affaticati, Pierre; Guerci, Aline; Ravassard, Philippe; Fellah, Julien S

    2007-06-01

    Gammadelta T cells localize at mammalian epithelial surfaces to exert both protective and regulatory roles in response to infections. We have previously characterized the Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) T cell receptor delta (TRD) chain. In this study, TRD repertoires in spleen, liver, intestine and skin from larvae, pre-adult and adult axolotls were examined and compared to the thymic TRD repertoire. A TRDV transcript without N/D diversity, TRDV1S1-TRDJ1, dominates the TRD repertoires until sexual maturation. In adult tissues, this canonical transcript is replaced by another dominant TRDV1S1-TRDJ1 transcript. In the thymus, these two transcripts are detected early in development. Our results suggest that gammadelta T cells that express the canonical TRDV1S1-TRDJ1 transcript emerge from the thymus and colonize the peripheral tissues, where they are selectively expanded by recurrent ligands. This particular situation is probably related to the neotenic state and the slow development of the axolotl. In thymectomized axolotls, TRD repertoires appear different from those of normal axolotls, suggesting that extrathymic gammadelta T cell differentiation could occur. Gene expression analysis showed the importance of the gut in T cell development.

  18. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of caffeine in patients with intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, A H; Jensen, M B; Norager, C B

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent claudication is a disabling symptom of peripheral arterial disease for which few medical treatments are available. This study investigated the effect of caffeine on physical capacity in patients with intermittent claudication.......Intermittent claudication is a disabling symptom of peripheral arterial disease for which few medical treatments are available. This study investigated the effect of caffeine on physical capacity in patients with intermittent claudication....

  19. Dissociation between peripheral blood chimerism and tolerance to hindlimb composite tissue transplants: preferential localization of chimerism in donor bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahhal, Dina N; Xu, Hong; Huang, Wei-Chao; Wu, Shengli; Wen, Yujie; Huang, Yiming; Ildstad, Suzanne T

    2009-09-27

    Mixed chimerism induces donor-specific tolerance to composite tissue allotransplants (CTAs). In the present studies, we used a nonmyeloablative conditioning approach to establish chimerism and promote CTA acceptance. Wistar Furth (RT1A(u)) rats were conditioned with 600 to 300 cGy total body irradiation (TBI, day-1), and 100 x 10(6) T-cell-depleted ACI (RT1A(abl)) bone marrow cells were transplanted on day 0, followed by a 11-day course of tacrolimus and one dose of antilymphocyte serum (day 10). Heterotopic osteomyocutaneous flap transplantation was performed 4 to 6 weeks after bone marrow transplantation. Mixed chimerism was initially achieved in almost all recipients, but long-term acceptance of CTA was only achieved in rats treated with 600 cGy TBI. When anti-alphabeta-T-cell receptor (TCR) monoclonal antibody (mAb) (day-3) was added into the regimens, donor chimerism was similar to recipients preconditioned without anti-alphabeta-TCR mAb. However, the long-term CTA survival was significantly improved in chimeras receiving more than or equal to 300 cGy TBI plus anti-alphabeta-TCR mAb. Higher levels of donor chimerism were associated with CTA acceptance. The majority of flap acceptors lost peripheral blood chimerism within 6 months. However, donor chimerism persisted in the transplanted bone at significantly higher levels compared with other hematopoietic compartments. The compartment donor chimerism may be responsible for the maintenance of tolerance to CTA. Long-term acceptors were tolerant to a donor skin graft challenge even in the absence of peripheral blood chimerism. Mixed chimerism established by nonmyeloablative conditioning induces long-term acceptance of CTA, which is associated with persistent chimerism preferentially in the transplanted donor bone.

  20. Intermittent hyperthyreosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulman, F.G.; Tal, E.; Pfeifer, Y.; Superstine, E.

    1975-01-01

    Intermittent hyperthyreosis occurs under various forms of stress, especially heat stress. The clinician may diagnose such cases as masked or apathetic hyperthyroidism or 'forme fruste' hyperthyreosis or thyroid autonomy. As most routine and standard tests may here yield inconsistent results, it is the patients' anamnesis which may provide the clue. Our Bioclimatology Unit has now seen over 100 cases in which thyroid hypersensitivity towards heat was the most prominent syndrome: 10-15% of weather-sensitive patients are affected. The patients complain before or during heat spells of such contradictory symptoms as insomnia, irritability, tension, tachycardia, palpitations, precordial pain, dyspnoe, flushes with sweating or chills, tremor, abdominal pain or diarrhea, polyuria or pollakisuria, weight loss in spite of ravenous appetite, fatigue, exhaustion, depression, adynamia, lack of concentration and confusion. Determination of urinary neurohormones allows a differential diagnosis, intermittent hyperthyreosis being characterized by three cardinal symptoms: tachycardia - every case with more than 80 pulse beats being suspect (not specific); urinary histamine - every case excreting more than 90 μg/day being suspect. Again the drawback of this test is its lack of specificity, as histamine may also be increased in cases of allergy and spondylitis; urinary thyroxine - every case excreting more than 20 μg/day T-4 being suspect. This is the only specific test. Therapy should make use of lithium carbonate and betablockers. Propyl thiouracil is rarely required. (orig.) [de

  1. Prolonged Exposures to Intermittent Hypoxia Promote Visceral White Adipose Tissue Inflammation in a Murine Model of Severe Sleep Apnea: Effect of Normoxic Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gileles-Hillel, Alex; Almendros, Isaac; Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Nigdelioglu, Recep; Qiao, Zhuanhong; Hamanaka, Robert B; Mutlu, Gökhan M; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Gozal, David

    2017-03-01

    Increased visceral white adipose tissue (vWAT) mass results in infiltration of inflammatory macrophages that drive inflammation and insulin resistance. Patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) suffer from increased prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome. Murine models of intermittent hypoxia (IH) mimicking moderate-severe OSA manifest insulin resistance following short-term IH. We examined in mice the effect of long-term IH on the inflammatory cellular changes within vWAT and the potential effect of normoxic recovery (IH-R). Male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to IH for 20 weeks, and a subset was allowed to recover in room air (RA) for 6 or 12 weeks (IH-R). Stromal vascular fraction was isolated from epididymal vWAT and mesenteric vWAT depots, and single-cell suspensions were prepared for flow cytometry analyses, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and metabolic assays. IH reduced body weight and vWAT mass and IH-R resulted in catch-up weight and vWAT mass. IH-exposed vWAT exhibited increased macrophage counts (ATMs) that were only partially improved in IH-R. IH also caused a proinflammatory shift in ATMs (increased Ly6c(hi)(+) and CD36(+) ATMs). These changes were accompanied by increased vWAT insulin resistance with only partial improvements in IH-R. In addition, ATMs exhibited increased ROS production, altered metabolism, and changes in electron transport chain, which were only partially improved in IH-R. Prolonged exposures to IH during the sleep period induce pronounced vWAT inflammation and insulin resistance despite concomitant vWAT mass reductions. These changes are only partially reversible after 3 months of normoxic recovery. Thus, long-lasting OSA may preclude complete reversibility of metabolic changes. © Sleep Research Society (SRS) 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Fate in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Gaardsting, O; Hougaard Jensen, K

    1986-01-01

    , or an ankle/arm pressure index below 50% were individually significantly associated with progression of the arteriosclerotic disease. These findings show the importance of peripheral blood pressure measurements in the management of patients with intermittent claudication due to arteriosclerotic disease........ The rate of clinical progression of the arteriosclerotic disease (that is, rest pain or gangrene) of the worst affected leg was 7.5% in the first year after referral. Thereafter the rate was 2.2% a year. An ankle systolic blood pressure below 70 mm Hg, a toe systolic blood pressure below 40 mm Hg...... 113 of the patients (44%) had died. Causes of death were no different from those in the general population. Mortality was twice that of the general population matched for age and sex. Mortality among the men was twice that among the women. In men under 60 mortality was four times that expected...

  3. Matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases and angiogenic cytokines in peripheral blood of patients with thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komorowski, Jan; Pasieka, Z; Jankiewicz-Wika, J; Stepień, H

    2002-08-01

    Stimulation of growth of endothelial cells from preexisting blood vessels, i.e., angiogenesis, is one of the essential elements necessary to create a permissive environment in which a tumor can grow. During angiogenesis, the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of tissue enzymes contributes to normal (embriogenesis or wound repair) and pathologic tissue remodeling (chronic inflammation and tumor genesis). The proposed pathogenic roles of MMPs in cancer are tissue breakdown and remodeling during invasive tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) form a complex with MMPs, which in turn inhibits active MMPs. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) are unique among mediators of angiogenesis with synergistic effect, and both can also be secreted by thyroid cancer cells. The goal of the study was to evaluate the plasma blood concentration of VEGF, bFGF, MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-8, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in patients with cancer and in normal subjects. Twenty-two patients with thyroid cancers (papillary cancer, 11; partly papillary and partly follicular cancer, 3; anaplastic cancer, 5; medullary cancer, 3) and 16 healthy subjects (controls) were included in the study. VEGF, bFGF MMPs, and TIMPs were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In patients with thyroid cancer, normal VEGF concentrations (74.29 +/- 13.38 vs. 84.85 +/- 21.71 pg/mL; p > 0.05) and increased bFGF (29.52 +/- 4.99 vs. 6.05 +/- 1.43 pg/mL; p < 0.001), MMP-2 (605.95 +/- 81.83 vs. 148.75 +/- 43.53 ng/mL; p < 0.001), TIMP-2 (114.19 +/- 6.62 vs. 60.75 +/- 9.18 ng/mL; p < 0.001), as well as lower MMP-1 (0.70 +/- 0.42 vs. 3.87 +/- 0.53; p < 0.001) levels have been noted. Increased plasma levels of MMP-3 and MMP-9 were also found in patients with medullary carcinoma. In conclusion, predominance of MMP-2 over TIMP-2 and TIMP-1 over MMP-1 as well as increased concentration of bFGF in peripheral blood are

  4. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  5. Graft Product for Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation Enhances Thrombin Generation and Expresses Procoagulant Microparticles and Tissue Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidibe, Fatoumata; Spanoudaki, Anastasia; Vanneaux, Valerie; Mbemba, Elisabeth; Larghero, Jerome; Van Dreden, Patrick; Lotz, Jean-Pierre; Elalamy, Ismail; Larsen, Annette K; Gerotziafas, Grigoris T

    2018-05-01

    The beneficial effect of autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (APBSCT) may be compromised by acute vascular complications related to hypercoagulability. We studied the impact of graft product on thrombin generation of normal plasma and the expression of tissue factor (TF) and procoagulant platelet-derived procoagulant microparticles (Pd-MPs) in samples of graft products. Graft products from 10 patients eligible for APBSCT were mixed with platelet-poor plasma (PPP) or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) from healthy volunteers and assessed for in vitro thrombin generation. In control experiments, thrombin generation was assessed in (1) PPP and PRP without any exogenous TF and/or procoagulant phospholipids, (2) PPP with the addition of TF (5 pM) and procoagulant phospholipids (4 μM), (3) in PRP with the addition of TF (5 pM). Graft products were assessed with Western blot assay for TF expression, with a specific clotting assay for TF activity and with flow cytometry assay for Pd-MPs. The graft product enhanced thrombin generation and its procoagulant activity was related to the presence of Pd-MPs and TF. The concentration of Pd-MPs in the graft product was characterized by a significant interindividual variability. The present study reveals the need for a thorough quality control of the graft products regarding their procoagulant potential.

  6. Autoimmunity related to IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Peripheral neuropathy and connective tissue sensibilization caused by IgM M-proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jønsson, V; Schrøder, H D; Nolsøe, C

    1988-01-01

    of them, including two siblings with a demyelinating peripheral neuropathy, the IgM was bound to the myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) of peripheral nerves. One had axonal neuropathy with IgM activity against the peri- and endoneurium, while another case with post-infectious neuritis had IgM activity......In eight of 10 consecutive cases of IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), the M-protein had specificity towards various tissues as estimated by direct and indirect immunofluorescence studies of skin and/or sural nerve biopsies. Five of the cases had neuropathy. In three...

  7. Normal tissue tolerance to external beam radiation therapy: Peripheral nerves; Dose de tolerance a l'irradiation des tissus sains: les nerfs peripheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques de Figueiredo, B.; Dejean, C.; Sargos, P.; Kantor, G. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Bergonie, centre regional de lutte contre le cancer, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Huchet, A.; Mamou, N. [Service d' oncologie medicale et de radiotherapie, CHU Saint-Andre, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Loiseau, H. [Service de neurochirurgie, CHU Pellegrin, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    2010-07-15

    Plexopathies and peripheral neuropathies appear progressively and with several years delay after radiotherapy. These lesions are observed principally after three clinical situations: supraclavicular and axillar irradiations for breast cancer, pelvic irradiations for various pathologies and limb irradiations for soft tissue sarcomas. Peripheral nerves and plexus (brachial and lumbosacral) are described as serial structures and are supposed to receive less than a given maximum dose linked to the occurrence of late injury. Literature data, mostly ancient, define the maximum tolerable dose to a threshold of 60 Gy and highlight also a great influence of fractionation and high fraction doses. For peripheral nerves, most frequent late effects are pain with significant differences of occurrence between 50 and 60 Gy. At last, associated pathologies (diabetes, vascular pathology, neuropathy) and associated treatments have probably to be taken into account as additional factors, which may increase the risk of these late radiation complications. (authors)

  8. Peripheral neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy; Chronic pain - peripheral neuropathy ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 107. Shy ME. Peripheral neuropathies. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  9. Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 in the choroid plexus: a potential link between vascular pro-inflammatory mediators and the CNS during peripheral tissue inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, K.; Yang, H.-Y. T.; Berk, J. D.; Tran, J. H.; Iadarola, M. J.

    2009-01-01

    During peripheral tissue inflammation, inflammatory processes in the CNS can be initiated by blood-borne pro-inflammatory mediators. The choroid plexus, the site of CSF production, is a highly specialized interface between the vascular system and CNS, and thus, this structure may be an important element in communication between the vascular compartment and the CNS during peripheral tissue inflammation. We investigated the potential participation of the choroid plexus in this process during peripheral tissue inflammation by examining expression of the SCYA2 gene which codes for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). MCP-1 protein was previously reported to be induced in a variety of cells during peripheral tissue inflammation. In the basal state, SCYA2 is highly expressed in the choroid plexus as compared to other CNS tissues. During hind paw inflammation, SCYA2 expression was significantly elevated in choroid plexus, whereas it remained unchanged in a variety of brain regions. The SCYA2-expressing cells were strongly associated with the choroid plexus as vascular depletion of blood cells by whole-body saline flush did not significantly alter SCYA2 expression in the choroid plexus. In situ hybridization suggested that the SCYA2-expressing cells were localized to the choroid plexus stroma. To elucidate potential molecular mechanisms of SCYA2 increase, we examined genes in the NF-κβ signaling cascade including TNF-α, IL-1β and IκBα in choroid tissue. Given that we also detected increased levels of MCP-1 protein by ELISA, we sought to identify potential downstream targets of MCP-1 and observed altered expression levels of mRNAs encoding tight junction proteins TJP2 and claudin 5. Finally, we detected a substantial up-regulation of the transcript encoding E-selectin, a molecule which could participate in leukocyte recruitment to the choroid plexus along with MCP-1. Together, these results suggest that profound changes occur in the choroid plexus during

  10. Comprehensive evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration in the acute healing phase using tissue clearing and optical microscopy in a rodent model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yookyung Jung

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury (PNI, a common injury in both the civilian and military arenas, is usually associated with high healthcare costs and with patients enduring slow recovery times, diminished quality of life, and potential long-term disability. Patients with PNI typically undergo complex interventions but the factors that govern optimal response are not fully characterized. A fundamental understanding of the cellular and tissue-level events in the immediate postoperative period is essential for improving treatment and optimizing repair. Here, we demonstrate a comprehensive imaging approach to evaluate peripheral nerve axonal regeneration in a rodent PNI model using a tissue clearing method to improve depth penetration while preserving neural architecture. Sciatic nerve transaction and end-to-end repair were performed in both wild type and thy-1 GFP rats. The nerves were harvested at time points after repair before undergoing whole mount immunofluorescence staining and tissue clearing. By increasing the optic depth penetration, tissue clearing allowed the visualization and evaluation of Wallerian degeneration and nerve regrowth throughout entire sciatic nerves with subcellular resolution. The tissue clearing protocol did not affect immunofluorescence labeling and no observable decrease in the fluorescence signal was observed. Large-area, high-resolution tissue volumes could be quantified to provide structural and connectivity information not available from current gold-standard approaches for evaluating axonal regeneration following PNI. The results are suggestive of observed behavioral recovery in vivo after neurorrhaphy, providing a method of evaluating axonal regeneration following repair that can serve as an adjunct to current standard outcomes measurements. This study demonstrates that tissue clearing following whole mount immunofluorescence staining enables the complete visualization and quantitative evaluation of axons throughout

  11. Correlation of STATs family expression in oral lichen planus tissue with peripheral blood PD-1 and PD-L1 expression as well as immune function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of STATs family expression in oral lichen planus tissue with peripheral blood PD-1 and PD-L1 expression as well as immune function. Methods: A total of 47 patients diagnosed with oral lichen planus in our hospital between May 2015 and March 2016 were selected as the oral lichen planus group (OLP group of the study, and healthy volunteers receiving physical examination during the same period were selected as the control group of the study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected to detect the expression of PD-1, PD-L1 and immune cell surface marker molecules, serum was collected to detect the content of Th1 and Th2 cytokines as well as immunoglobulin, and oral lichen planus lesion tissue and adjacent normal tissue were collected to determine STATs family expression. Results: p-STAT1, p-STAT3 and p-STAT5a expression in lesion tissue were significantly higher than those in normal tissue while p-STAT2, p-STAT4 and p-STAT5b expression were not significantly different from those in normal tissue; PD-1 and PD-L1 mRNA expression as well as the mean fluorescence intensity of CD19+ in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of OLP group were significantly higher than those of control group and positively correlated with p-STAT1, p-STAT3 and p-STAT5a expression while the mean fluorescence intensity of CD3+, CD4+, CD8+ and CD16+CD56+ were significantly lower than those of control group and negatively correlated with p-STAT1, p-STAT3 and p-STAT5a expression; serum IFN-γ and IL-2 content of OLP group were significantly lower than those of control group and negatively correlated with p-STAT1, p-STAT3 and p-STAT5a expression while IL-4, IL-10, IgG, IgM and IgA content were significantly higher than those of control group and positively correlated with p-STAT1, p-STAT3 and p-STAT5a expression. Conclusion: p-STAT1, p-STAT3 and p-STAT5a expression abnormally increase in oral lichen planus tissues, and the Th1/Th2 cellular

  12. Effect of Lathyrus sativus and vitamin C on the status of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase and dipeptidyl-aminopeptidase-IV in the central and peripheral tissues and serum of guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, M.K.; Sarker, M.A.H.

    1992-05-01

    Studies on the effect of Lathyrus Sativus seeds (LLS) on aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) and on dipeptidyl-aminopeptidase-IV (DAP-IV) were carried out in the central and peripheral tissues and serum of LSS-treated and LSS plus vitamin C-treated guinea pigs. The feeding of LSS for 35 days decreased the AADC activity significantly in the brain and peripheral tissues, but the activity was recovered to normal level in the most tissues when vitamin C was added with the LSS. DAP-IV activity decreased in the peripheral tissues when treated with LSS, but the vitamin C administration with LSS did not recover the enzyme activity. The DAP-IV activity did not decrease significantly in any of the brain tissues of the LSS-treated group. (author). 18 refs, 2 tabs

  13. Naftidrofuryl for intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, T L M; Vander Stichele, R; Lehert, P; Van Bortel, L

    2008-04-16

    Lifestyle changes and cardiovascular prevention measures are a primary treatment for intermittent claudication (IC). Symptomatic treatment with vasoactive agents (Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical Classification (ATC) for medicines from the World Health Organisation class CO4A) is controversial. To evaluate evidence on the efficacy and safety of oral naftidrofuryl (ATC CO4 21) versus placebo on the pain-free walking distance (PFWD) of people with IC by using a meta-analysis based on individual patient data (IPD). The Cochrane Peripheral Vascular Diseases Group searched their Trials Register (last searched December 2007) and CENTRAL (last searched 2007, Issue 4). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, the Science Citation Index and contacted the authors and checked the reference lists of retrieved articles. We asked the manufacturing company for IPD. We included only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with low or moderate risk of bias for which the IPD were available. We collected data from the electronic data file or from the case report form and checked the data by a statistical quality control procedure. All randomized patients were analyzed following the intention-to-treat (ITT) principle. The geometric mean of the relative improvement in PFWD was calculated for both treatment groups in all identified studies. The effect of the drug was assessed compared with placebo on final walking distance (WDf) using multilevel and random-effect models and adjusting for baseline walking distance (WD0). For the responder analysis, therapeutic success was defined as an improvement of walking distance of at least 50%. We included seven studies in the IPD (n = 1266 patients). One of these studies (n = 183) was only used in the sensitivity analysis so that the main analysis included 1083 patients. The ratio of the relative improvement in PFWD (naftidrofuryl compared with placebo) was 1.37 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.32 to 1.51, P < 0.001). The

  14. Aggressive Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphomas (AITL) with Soft Tissue Extranodal Mass Varied Histopathological Patterns with Peripheral Blood, Bone Marrow, and Splenic Involvement and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Tanushri; Dutta, Rajat; Pramanik, S

    2018-03-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma (AITL) is a peripheral T cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma with an aggressive fatal course and it has varied clinical presentation with an uncommon presentation when they present as soft tissue masses or when there is spill in the peripheral blood or there are composite lymphomas that are rare presentations. Common presentations include lymphadenopathy, fever and systemic symptoms, hemolytic anemias, skin rashes, and rheumatoid arthritis. The classical histopathology is absence of follicles in lymph nodes with presence of high endothelial venules and the tumor cells of small to medium-sized lymphocytes with pale cytoplasm mixed with reactive T cells. On immunohistochemistry, the cells are positive for CD3, CD4, CD10, BCL2, and CXCL13. In this observational study, the clinicopathologic presentation and the immunohistochemical profile of five cases who initially presented with a soft tissue mass which is an extremely rare presentation of this rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that was diagnosed at our center with peripheral blood and bone marrow involvement and the clinicopathologic presentation, immunohistochemical profile, and response to treatment on follow-up are correlated with the literature review. One case had a fulminant and aggressive course and was fatal within 2 months of diagnosis. The rest of the four cases are on regular chemotherapy and follow-up. Our five cases had presented with soft tissue masses, two in the axillary regio,n two in the hand, and one in the scapular region with an extranodal presentation, and there was associated lymphadenopathy which developed subsequently with classic histomorphology and immunohistochemical findings. The age range was 46-54 years and all five cases were males. Three cases were with anemia (hemoglobin range 6.5-8.0 mg/dl) and all five cases were having peripheral blood plasmacytosis. Histopathology was classic with paracortical involvement with polymorphous population of cells with

  15. Differential effects of diet composition and timing of feeding behavior on rat brown adipose tissue and skeletal muscle peripheral clocks.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Goede, P.; Sen, Satish; Oosterman, Johanneke E; Kalsbeek, A.

    2018-01-01

    The effects of feeding behavior and diet composition,as well as their possible interactions,on daily (clock) gene expression rhythms have mainly been studied in the liver, and to a lesser degree in white adipose tissue(WAT), but hardly in other metabolic tissues such as skeletal muscle (SM) and

  16. Intermittent search strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénichou, O.; Loverdo, C.; Moreau, M.; Voituriez, R.

    2011-01-01

    This review examines intermittent target search strategies, which combine phases of slow motion, allowing the searcher to detect the target, and phases of fast motion during which targets cannot be detected. It is first shown that intermittent search strategies are actually widely observed at various scales. At the macroscopic scale, this is, for example, the case of animals looking for food; at the microscopic scale, intermittent transport patterns are involved in a reaction pathway of DNA-binding proteins as well as in intracellular transport. Second, generic stochastic models are introduced, which show that intermittent strategies are efficient strategies that enable the minimization of search time. This suggests that the intrinsic efficiency of intermittent search strategies could justify their frequent observation in nature. Last, beyond these modeling aspects, it is proposed that intermittent strategies could also be used in a broader context to design and accelerate search processes.

  17. Tissue-Muscle Perfusion Scintigraphy of the Lower Limbs in a Patient with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Ahmet

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of tissue perfusion as a hemodynamic consequence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD in diabetic patients is of great importance in the management of these patients.We present a noninvasive, functional method of 99mTc-MIBI (methoxy-isobutyl-isonitrile tissue-muscle perfusion scintigraphy (TMPS of the lower limbs, which assesses tissue perfusion in basal conditions (“rest” study and exercise conditions (“stress” study. Emphasis is given on perfusion reserve (PR as an important indicator of preservation of microcirculation and its local autoregulatory mechanisms in PAD. We present a case of a 71-year-old male diabetic patient with skin ulcers of the right foot and an ankle-brachial index >1.2 (0.9-1.1. Dynamic phase TMPS of the lower limbs showed decreased and late arterial vascularization of the right calf (RC with lower percentage of radioactivity in the 1st minute: RC 66%, left calf (LC 84%. PR was borderline with a value of 57% for LC and decreased for RC (42%. Functional assessment of hemodynamic consequences of PAD is important in evaluating both advanced and early PAD, especially the asymptomatic form. The method used to determine the TMPS of the lower limbs, can differentiate subtle changes in microcirculation and tissue perfusion

  18. Differential effects of phenylephrine and norepinephrine on peripheral tissue oxygenation during general anaesthesia : A randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poterman, Marieke; Vos, Jaap Jan; Vereecke, Hugo E. M.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Vanoverschelde, Henk; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kalmar, Alain F.

    BACKGROUND Phenylephrine and norepinephrine are two vasopressors commonly used to counteract anaesthesia-induced hypotension. Their dissimilar working mechanisms may differentially affect the macro and microcirculation, and ultimately tissue oxygenation. OBJECTIVES We investigated the differential

  19. Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the Blood and Peripheral Tissues of Wild Hawaiian Rats (Rattus rattus by a Quantitative PCR (qPCR Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan I Jarvi

    Full Text Available The nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a rat lungworm, a zoonotic pathogen that causes human eosinophilic meningitis and ocular angiostrongyliasis characteristic of rat lungworm (RLW disease. Definitive diagnosis is made by finding and identifying A. cantonensis larvae in the cerebral spinal fluid or by using a custom immunological or molecular test. This study was conducted to determine if genomic DNA from A. cantonensis is detectable by qPCR in the blood or tissues of experimentally infected rats. F1 offspring from wild rats were subjected to experimental infection with RLW larvae isolated from slugs, then blood or tissue samples were collected over multiple time points. Blood samples were collected from 21 rats throughout the course of two trials (15 rats in Trial I, and 6 rats in Trial II. In addition to a control group, each trial had two treatment groups: the rats in the low dose (LD group were infected by approximately 10 larvae and the rats in the high dose (HD group were infected with approximately 50 larvae. In Trial I, parasite DNA was detected in cardiac bleed samples from five of five LD rats and five of five HD rats at six weeks post-infection (PI, and three of five LD rats and five of five HD rats from tail tissue. In Trial II, parasite DNA was detected in peripheral blood samples from one of two HD rats at 53 minutes PI, one of two LD rats at 1.5 hours PI, one of two HD rats at 18 hours PI, one of two LD rats at five weeks PI and two of two at six weeks PI, and two of two HD rats at weeks five and six PI. These data demonstrate that parasite DNA can be detected in peripheral blood at various time points throughout RLW infection in rats.

  20. Detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in the Blood and Peripheral Tissues of Wild Hawaiian Rats (Rattus rattus) by a Quantitative PCR (qPCR) Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvi, Susan I; Pitt, William C; Farias, Margaret E; Shiels, Laura; Severino, Michael G; Howe, Kathleen M; Jacquier, Steven H; Shiels, Aaron B; Amano, Karis K; Luiz, Blaine C; Maher, Daisy E; Allison, Maureen L; Holtquist, Zachariah C; Scheibelhut, Neil T

    2015-01-01

    The nematode Angiostrongylus cantonensis is a rat lungworm, a zoonotic pathogen that causes human eosinophilic meningitis and ocular angiostrongyliasis characteristic of rat lungworm (RLW) disease. Definitive diagnosis is made by finding and identifying A. cantonensis larvae in the cerebral spinal fluid or by using a custom immunological or molecular test. This study was conducted to determine if genomic DNA from A. cantonensis is detectable by qPCR in the blood or tissues of experimentally infected rats. F1 offspring from wild rats were subjected to experimental infection with RLW larvae isolated from slugs, then blood or tissue samples were collected over multiple time points. Blood samples were collected from 21 rats throughout the course of two trials (15 rats in Trial I, and 6 rats in Trial II). In addition to a control group, each trial had two treatment groups: the rats in the low dose (LD) group were infected by approximately 10 larvae and the rats in the high dose (HD) group were infected with approximately 50 larvae. In Trial I, parasite DNA was detected in cardiac bleed samples from five of five LD rats and five of five HD rats at six weeks post-infection (PI), and three of five LD rats and five of five HD rats from tail tissue. In Trial II, parasite DNA was detected in peripheral blood samples from one of two HD rats at 53 minutes PI, one of two LD rats at 1.5 hours PI, one of two HD rats at 18 hours PI, one of two LD rats at five weeks PI and two of two at six weeks PI, and two of two HD rats at weeks five and six PI. These data demonstrate that parasite DNA can be detected in peripheral blood at various time points throughout RLW infection in rats.

  1. AN ELDERLY WOMAN WITH INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyer Naveed Wazir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report illustrates the misdiagnosis of intermittent claudication in an elderly with multiple cardiac risk factors. Careful clinical evaluation and imaging shifts the diagnosis from peripheral vascular disease to spinal stenosis. The decision whether to offer conservative therapy or proceed to spinal surgery requires an accurate assessment of the severity of the symptoms without ignoring the important role of patient preferences.

  2. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at ...

  3. Intermittency in branching models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, C.B.; Texas Univ., Austin; Hwa, R.C.; Oregon Univ., Eugene

    1990-01-01

    The intermittency properties of three branching models have been investigated. The factorial moments show power-law behavior as function of small rapidity width. The slopes and energy dependences reveal different characteristics of the models. The gluon model has the weakest intermittency. (orig.)

  4. Endurance Exercise Mobilizes Developmentally Early Stem Cells into Peripheral Blood and Increases Their Number in Bone Marrow: Implications for Tissue Regeneration

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    Krzysztof Marycz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endurance exercise has been reported to increase the number of circulating hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs in peripheral blood (PB as well as in bone marrow (BM. We therefore became interested in whether endurance exercise has the same effect on very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs, which have been described as a population of developmentally early stem cells residing in BM. Mice were run daily for 1 hour on a treadmill for periods of 5 days or 5 weeks. Human volunteers had trained in long-distance running for one year, six times per week. FACS-based analyses and RT-PCR of murine and human VSELs and HSPCs from collected bone marrow and peripheral blood were performed. We observed that endurance exercise increased the number of VSELs circulating in PB and residing in BM. In parallel, we observed an increase in the number of HSPCs. These observations were subsequently confirmed in young athletes, who showed an increase in circulating VSELs and HSPCs after intensive running exercise. We provide for the first time evidence that endurance exercise may have beneficial effects on the expansion of developmentally early stem cells. We hypothesize that these circulating stem cells are involved in repairing minor exercise-related tissue and organ injuries.

  5. Autoradiographic visualization of A 1-adenosine receptors in brain and peripheral tissues of rat and guinea pig using 125I-HPIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, R.G.; Lohse, M.J.; Jones, C.R.; Palacios, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A 1 -adenosine receptors were identified in sections of rat brain and guinea pig kidney with the radioiodinated agonist 1 25I-N 6 -p-hydroxyphenylisopropyladenosine ( 1 25I-HPIA) using in vitro autoradiography. The affinities of adenosine receptor ligands in competing with 1 25I-HPIA binding to tissue sections were in good agreement with those found in membranes and indicate that the binding site represents an A 1 pattern of [ 3 H]N 6 -cyclohexyladenosine ([ 3 H]CHA) binding sites determined previously, with highest densities in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus, the cerebellar cortex, some thalamic nuclei and certain layers of the cerebral cortex. In the guinea pig kidney 1 25I-HPIA labelled longitudinal structures in the medulla. This study demonstrates that 1 25I-HPIA allows the autoradiographic detection of A-1 adenosine receptors in the brain and peripheral organs and has the advantage of short exposure times (author)

  6. AGE-RELATED FEATURES OF PERIPHERAL BLOOD MARKERS IN CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS WITH NORMAL AND PATHOLOGICAL REMODELING OF BONE TISSUE

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    M. V. Dvornichenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities of total alkaline phosphatase (TALP and its bone isoform (BALP was greater in groups of children and adolescents in the late posttraumatic period (pattern of reparative bone remodeling and scoliosis (pathological bone remodeling, than in the control (healthy children and adolescents. The content of collagen type I degradation products (CrossLaps peripheral blood practically was unchanged. Examined group with posttraumatic period had high activity of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase form (TRACP. TALP activity reached minimum values in all the studied groups. In the process of children growing to 15–18 years old, as compared to 7–10 years old, reducing activity of remodeling was observed under physiological (healthy donors and reparative osteogenesis. It’s changes was recorded by significant decrease of the studied indicators. On the contrary, children 15–18 years old with scoliosis had maximum of the imbalance (activation/inhibition of various signs of osteogenesis of resorptive/synthetic bone processes. Also, for this group we discovered decrease osteocalcin concentration of 4 times in comparison with the group children of 7–10 years old. The detected growth of the correlations number in the correlation matrix of bone remodeling markers in case of scoliosis proposes the reduction of adaptation reserve of 15–18 years old adolescents, suffering from dysplasia of connective tissue. Thus, the pathophysiological and clinical significance of distant markers of bone metabolism screening in peripheral blood the is ambiguous. The interpretation of these indicators is difficult and largely depends on the clinical situation and age of patients. This requires improving the diagnostic approach to assess physiological and pathological remodeling of bone tissue by means of biochemical blood indicators. 

  7. Influence of 90Sr, adult thymectomy and antilymphocyteglobulin on haematopoietic tissues and peripheral blood leucocytes in CBA mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierke, P.

    1986-01-01

    The role or long-time immune suppression in carcinogenesis induced by the long-lived internal emitter 90 Sr, is investigated in an ongoing study. The experimental design is based on the assumption that impaired immune responsiveness, by other means than 90 Sr, might increase the neoplastic response in exposed individuals, and thus reflect a protective function, if existing. Intercomparison is made of the tumour yield in mice exposed to different single doses of 90 Sr and simultaneously subjected or not to long-term immune suppression by adult thymectomy (ATx) and/or antilymphocyteglobulin (ALG) treatment. Information on the general condition and responsiveness of the immune system, in the respective models, during tumour expectancy time, is essential for a conclusive evaluation of the results. To meet theses demands the present paper reports on histopathologic alternations in immune organs and changes in white blood cell counts, induced by the different combinations of 90 Sr, ATx + ALG treatment. The results confirm the prediction, that ATx + ALG is an efficient and, with respect to the purpose of the study, suitable treatment for additive long-term depression of the immune system in 90 Sr irradiated mice, evidenced in particular by increased depletion of monomorphonuclear cells (MNC) in lymphoid organs and peripheral blood. Subsequent reports will deal with functional immune parameters. (orig.)

  8. Intermittent degradation and schizotypy

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    Matthew W. Roché

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent degradation refers to transient detrimental disruptions in task performance. This phenomenon has been repeatedly observed in the performance data of patients with schizophrenia. Whether intermittent degradation is a feature of the liability for schizophrenia (i.e., schizotypy is an open question. Further, the specificity of intermittent degradation to schizotypy has yet to be investigated. To address these questions, 92 undergraduate participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing schizotypy and psychological state variables (e.g., anxiety, depression, and their reaction times were recorded as they did so. Intermittent degradation was defined as the number of times a subject’s reaction time for questionnaire items met or exceeded three standard deviations from his or her mean reaction time after controlling for each item’s information processing load. Intermittent degradation scores were correlated with questionnaire scores. Our results indicate that intermittent degradation is associated with total scores on measures of positive and disorganized schizotypy, but unrelated to total scores on measures of negative schizotypy and psychological state variables. Intermittent degradation is interpreted as potentially derivative of schizotypy and a candidate endophenotypic marker worthy of continued research.

  9. Autoimmunity and inflammation are independent of class II transactivator type PIV-dependent class II major histocompatibility complex expression in peripheral tissues during collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldburger, Jean-Marc; Palmer, Gaby; Seemayer, Christian; Lamacchia, Celine; Finckh, Axel; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Baeten, Dominique; Reith, Walter; Gabay, Cem

    2011-11-01

    To determine the regulation of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in order to investigate their role as nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Expression of class II MHC, class II MHC transactivator (CIITA), and Ciita isoforms PI, PIII, and PIV was examined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry in human synovial tissues, arthritic mouse joints, and human and murine FLS. CIA was induced in mice in which isoform PIV of Ciita was knocked out (PIV(-/-) ), in PIV(-/-) mice transgenic for CIITA in the thymus (K14 CIITA), and in their control littermates. HLA-DRA, total CIITA, and CIITA PIII messenger RNA levels were significantly increased in synovial tissue samples from patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with the levels in tissue from patients with osteoarthritis. Human FLS expressed surface class II MHC via CIITA PIII and PIV, while class II MHC expression in murine FLS was entirely mediated by PIV. Mice with a targeted deletion of CIITA PIV lack CD4+ T cells and were protected against CIA. The expression of CIITA was restored in the thymus of PIV(-/-) K14 CIITA-transgenic mice, which had a normal CD4+ T cell repertoire and normal surface levels of class II MHC on professional antigen-presenting cells, but did not induce class II MHC on FLS. Synovial inflammation and immune responses against type II collagen were similar in PIV(-/-) K14 CIITA-transgenic mice and control mice with CIA, but bone erosion was significantly reduced in the absence of PIV. Overexpression of class II MHC is tightly correlated with CIITA expression in arthritic synovium and in FLS. Selective targeting of Ciita PIV in peripheral tissues abrogates class II MHC expression by murine FLS but does not protect against inflammation and autoimmune responses in CIA. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  10. Expression and clinical significance of NF-毷B, CTGF and OPN in mononuclear cells in peripheral blood as well as renal tissues in patients with IgA nephropathy

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    Cheng-Luo Hao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the expression and clinical significance of NF-kB, CTGF and OPN in mononuclear cells in peripheral blood as well as renal tissues in patients with IgA nephropathy. Methods: A total of 25 nephropathy patients diagnosed with IgA nephropathy and 25 patients receiving nephrectomy due to trauma or tumor in our hospital were studied. Peripheral blood and kidney tissues were collected to test NF-kB, CTGF, OPN, T-bet, GATA-3, RORγT and Foxp3 expressions. Results: CTGF and OPN percentages in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and kidney tissues of nephropathy patients were higher than those of the control group. NF-kB, CTGF and OPN expressions were significantly higher in M1, E1, S1 group patients’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells and renal tissues than those in M0, E1 and S1 group. T-bet, GATA-3 and RORγT expressions in nephropathy patients’ peripheral blood were significantly higher than those in the control group, and were positively correlated with NF-kB, CTGF and OPN expressions. The expression of Foxp3 was significantly lower than that of control group, and was negatively correlated with NF-kB, CTGF and OPN expressions. Conclusions: The expression of NF-kB, CTGF and OPN in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and renal tissue in patients with IgA nephropathy is abnormally high and can evaluate the prognosis of the disease and the differentiation of CD4+T cells.

  11. The Effects of Walking or Walking-with-Poles Training on Tissue Oxygenation in Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease

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    Eileen G. Collins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This randomized trial proposed to determine if there were differences in calf muscle StO2 parameters in patients before and after 12 weeks of a traditional walking or walking-with-poles exercise program. Data were collected on 85 patients who were randomized to a traditional walking program ( or walking-with-poles program ( of exercise training. Patients walked for 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Seventy-one patients completed both the baseline and the 12-week follow-up progressive treadmill tests ( traditional walking and walking-with-poles. Using the near-infrared spectroscopy measures, StO2 was measured prior to, during, and after exercise. At baseline, calf muscle oxygenation decreased from % prior to the treadmill test to % at peak exercise. The time elapsed prior to reaching nadir StO2 values increased more in the traditional walking group when compared to the walking-with-poles group. Likewise, absolute walking time increased more in the traditional walking group than in the walking-with-poles group. Tissue oxygenation decline during treadmill testing was less for patients assigned to a 12-week traditional walking program when compared to those assigned to a 12-week walking-with-poles program. In conclusion, the 12-week traditional walking program was superior to walking-with-poles in improving tissue deoxygenation in patients with PAD.

  12. Intermittent injections of osteocalcin reverse autophagic dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress resulting from diet-induced obesity in the vascular tissue via the NFκB-p65-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bo; Li, Huixia; Liu, Jiali; Xu, Lin; Zang, Weijin; Wu, Shufang; Sun, Hongzhi

    2013-06-15

    The osteoblast-specific secreted molecule osteocalcin behaves as a hormone-regulating glucose and lipid metabolism, but the role of osteocalcin in cardiovascular disease (CVD) is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated the effect of osteocalcin on autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress secondary to diet-induced obesity in the vascular tissue of mice and in vascular cell models and clarified the intracellular events responsible for osteocalcin-mediated effects. The evidences showed that intermittent injections of osteocalcin in mice fed the high-fat diet were associated with a reduced body weight gain, decreased blood glucose and improved insulin sensitivity compared with mice fed the high-fat diet receiving vehicle. Simultaneously, the administration of osteocalcin not only attenuated autophagy and ER stress but also rescued impaired insulin signaling in vascular tissues of mice fed a high-fat diet. Consistent with these results in vivo, the addition of osteocalcin reversed autophagy and ER stress and restored defective insulin sensitivity in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the presence of tunicamycin or in knockout XBP-1 (a transcription factor which mediates ER stress response) cells or in Atg7(-/-) cells. The protective effects of osteocalcin were nullified by suppression of Akt, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) or nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB), suggesting that osteocalcin inhibits autophagy, ER stress and improves insulin signaling in the vascular tissue and cells under insulin resistance in a NFκB-dependent manner, which may be a promising therapeutic strategies of cardiovascular dysfunction secondary to obesity.

  13. Gastric cancer tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells impact peripheral blood mononuclear cells via disruption of Treg/Th17 balance to promote gastric cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Chen, Bin; Sun, Xiao-Xian; Zhao, Xiang-Dong; Zhao, Yuan-Yuan; Sun, Li; Xu, Chang-Gen; Shen, Bo; Su, Zhao-Liang; Xu, Wen-Rong; Zhu, Wei

    2017-12-01

    Gastric cancer tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (GC-MSCs) are important resident stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME) and have been shown to play a key role in gastric cancer progression. Whether GC-MSCs exert a tumor-promoting function by affecting anti-tumor immunity is still unclear. In this study, we used GC-MSC conditioned medium (GC-MSC-CM) to pretreat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy donors. We found that GC-MSC-CM pretreatment markedly reversed the inhibitory effect of PBMCs on gastric cancer growth in vivo, but did not affect functions of PBMCs on gastric cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis in vitro. PBMCs pretreated with GC-MSC-CM significantly promoted gastric cancer migration and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vitro and liver metastases in vivo. Flow cytometry analysis showed that GC-MSC-CM pretreatment increased the proportion of Treg cells and reduced that of Th17 cells in PBMCs. CFSE labeling and naïve CD4 + T cells differentiation analysis revealed that GC-MSC-CM disrupted the Treg/Th17 balance in PBMCs by suppressing Th17 cell proliferation and inducing differentiation of Treg cells. Overall, our collective results indicate that GC-MSCs impair the anti-tumor immune response of PBMCs through disruption of Treg/Th17 balance, thus providing new evidence that gastric cancer tissue-derived MSCs contribute to the immunosuppressive TME. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. CD11b⁺, Ly6G⁺ cells produce type I interferon and exhibit tissue protective properties following peripheral virus infection.

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    Matthew A Fischer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the innate immune system is containment of a pathogen at the site of infection prior to the initiation of an effective adaptive immune response. However, effector mechanisms must be kept in check to combat the pathogen while simultaneously limiting undesirable destruction of tissue resulting from these actions. Here we demonstrate that innate immune effector cells contain a peripheral poxvirus infection, preventing systemic spread of the virus. These innate immune effector cells are comprised primarily of CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁻ monocytes that accumulate initially at the site of infection, and are then supplemented and eventually replaced by CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁺ cells. The phenotype of the CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁺ cells resembles neutrophils, but the infiltration of neutrophils typically occurs prior to, rather than following, accumulation of monocytes. Indeed, it appears that the CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁺ cells that infiltrated the site of VACV infection in the ear are phenotypically distinct from the classical description of both neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages. We found that CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁺ cells produce Type I interferons and large quantities of reactive oxygen species. We also observed that depletion of Ly6G⁺ cells results in a dramatic increase in tissue damage at the site of infection. Tissue damage is also increased in the absence of reactive oxygen species, although reactive oxygen species are typically thought to be damaging to tissue rather than protective. These data indicate the existence of a specialized population of CD11b⁺Ly6C⁺Ly6G⁺ cells that infiltrates a site of virus infection late and protects the infected tissue from immune-mediated damage via production of reactive oxygen species. Regulation of the action of this population of cells may provide an intervention to prevent innate immune-mediated tissue destruction.

  15. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

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    Lut Tamam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etiological studies displayed the role of both psychosocial factors like childhood traumas and biological factors like dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems and genetics. In differential diagnosis of the disorder, disorders involving agression as a symptom such as alcohol and drug intoxication, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, personality changes due to general medical conditions and behavioral disorder should be considered. A combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches are suggested in the treatment of the disorder. This article briefly reviews the historical background, diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, etiology and treatment of intermittent explosive disorder.

  16. Intermittent heating of buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohonen, K

    1983-02-01

    Conditions for intermittent heating of buildings are considered both theoretically and experimentally. Thermal behaviour of buildings adn rooms in intermittent heating is simulated by a program based on the convective heat balance equation and by simplified RC-models. The preheat times and the heating energy savings compared with continuous heating are presented for typical lightweight, mediumweight and heavyweight classroom and office modules. Formulaes for estimating the oversizing of the radiator network, the maximum heat output of heat exchangers in district heating and the efficiency of heating boilers in intermittent heating are presented. The preheat times and heating energy savings with different heating control systems are determined also experimentally in eight existing buildings. In addition some principles for the planning and application of intermittent heating systems are suggested.

  17. Optimal intermittent search strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, F; Budde, C E; Wio, H S

    2009-01-01

    We study the search kinetics of a single fixed target by a set of searchers performing an intermittent random walk, jumping between different internal states. Exploiting concepts of multi-state and continuous-time random walks we have calculated the survival probability of a target up to time t, and have 'optimized' (minimized) it with regard to the transition probability among internal states. Our model shows that intermittent strategies always improve target detection, even for simple diffusion states of motion

  18. Effect of 4G-alpha-glucopyranosyl hesperidin on brown fat adipose tissue- and cutaneous-sympathetic nerve activity and peripheral body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiao; Nakamura, Hiroyasu; Fujisaki, Yoshiyuki; Tanida, Mamoru; Horii, Yuko; Fuyuki, Risa; Takumi, Hiroko; Shiraishi, Koso; Kometani, Takashi; Nagai, Katsuya

    2009-09-11

    Changes in the activity of the autonomic nervous system are good indicators of alterations in physiological phenomena such as the body temperature, blood glucose, blood pressure. Hesperidin, a flavanone known as vitamin P, has been shown to reduce the levels of serum lipids, cholesterol, and blood pressure. However, hesperidin is not water-soluble and is not well absorbed from the intestine. G-hesperidin (4G-alpha-glucopyranosyl hesperidin) is more water-soluble and more rapidly absorbed than hesperidin. In order to clarify the functions of G-hesperidin, we examined the effects of oral administration of G-hesperidin on interscapular brown adipose tissue-sympathetic nerve activity (BAT-SNA) and cutaneous sympathetic nerve activity (CASNA) in rats weighing about 300 g. In this study, we found that oral administration of 60 mg of G-hesperidin increased the BAT-SNA but decreased the CASNA in urethane-anesthetized rats. Since an elevation in BAT-SNA increases heat production (i.e. body temperature (BT)) and a decrease in CASNA increases cutaneous perfusion, we examined whether oral administration of G-hesperidin had an effect on the peripheral BT in rats. Consequently, we observed that the subcutaneous BT at the caudal end of the back after oral administration of 60 mg of G-hesperidin was significantly higher than the subcutaneous BT after oral administration of water in conscious rats. These findings suggest that G-hesperidin enhances the BAT-SNA and suppresses the CASNA resulting in an increase in the peripheral BT, probably by an increase in the thermogenesis in the BAT and an elevation in the cutaneous blood flow.

  19. Distribution of radiolabeled L-glutamate and D-aspartate from blood into peripheral tissues in naive rats: Significance for brain neuroprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klin, Yael; Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew; Ohayon, Sharon; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Blood glutamate has a half-life time of 2-3 min. → Blood glutamate is submitted to rapid decarboxylation. → Blood glutamate and its metabolites are mainly absorbed in skeletal muscle and liver. → The skeletal muscle and liver are now targets for potential drugs affording brain neuroprotection. -- Abstract: Excess L-glutamate (glutamate) levels in brain interstitial and cerebrospinal fluids (ISF and CSF, respectively) are the hallmark of several neurodegenerative conditions such as stroke, traumatic brain injury or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Its removal could prevent the glutamate excitotoxicity that causes long-lasting neurological deficits. As in previous studies, we have established the role of blood glutamate levels in brain neuroprotection, we have now investigated the contribution of the peripheral organs to the homeostasis of glutamate in blood. We have administered naive rats with intravenous injections of either L-[1- 14 C] Glutamic acid (L-[1- 14 C] Glu), L-[G- 3 H] Glutamic acid (L-[G- 3 H] Glu) or D-[2,3- 3 H] Aspartic acid (D-[2,3- 3 H] Asp), a non-metabolized analog of glutamate, and have followed their distribution into peripheral organs. We have observed that the decay of the radioactivity associated with L-[1- 14 C] Glu and L-[G- 3 H] Glu was faster than that associated with glutamate non-metabolized analog, D-[2,3- 3 H] Asp. L-[1- 14 C] Glu was subjected in blood to a rapid decarboxylation with the loss of 14 CO 2 . The three major sequestrating organs, serving as depots for the eliminated glutamate and/or its metabolites were skeletal muscle, liver and gut, contributing together 92% or 87% of total L-[U- 14 C] Glu or D-[2,3- 3 H] Asp radioactivity capture. L-[U- 14 C] Glu and D-[2,3- 3 H] Asp showed a different organ sequestration pattern. We conclude that glutamate is rapidly eliminated from the blood into peripheral tissues, mainly in non-metabolized form. The liver plays a central role in glutamate metabolism

  20. Distribution of radiolabeled L-glutamate and D-aspartate from blood into peripheral tissues in naive rats: Significance for brain neuroprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klin, Yael [Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew; Ohayon, Sharon; Shapira, Yoram [The Division of Anesthesiology, Soroka Medical Center and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Teichberg, Vivian I., E-mail: Vivian.teichberg@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Blood glutamate has a half-life time of 2-3 min. {yields} Blood glutamate is submitted to rapid decarboxylation. {yields} Blood glutamate and its metabolites are mainly absorbed in skeletal muscle and liver. {yields} The skeletal muscle and liver are now targets for potential drugs affording brain neuroprotection. -- Abstract: Excess L-glutamate (glutamate) levels in brain interstitial and cerebrospinal fluids (ISF and CSF, respectively) are the hallmark of several neurodegenerative conditions such as stroke, traumatic brain injury or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Its removal could prevent the glutamate excitotoxicity that causes long-lasting neurological deficits. As in previous studies, we have established the role of blood glutamate levels in brain neuroprotection, we have now investigated the contribution of the peripheral organs to the homeostasis of glutamate in blood. We have administered naive rats with intravenous injections of either L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glutamic acid (L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu), L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glutamic acid (L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glu) or D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Aspartic acid (D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp), a non-metabolized analog of glutamate, and have followed their distribution into peripheral organs. We have observed that the decay of the radioactivity associated with L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu and L-[G-{sup 3}H] Glu was faster than that associated with glutamate non-metabolized analog, D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp. L-[1-{sup 14}C] Glu was subjected in blood to a rapid decarboxylation with the loss of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. The three major sequestrating organs, serving as depots for the eliminated glutamate and/or its metabolites were skeletal muscle, liver and gut, contributing together 92% or 87% of total L-[U-{sup 14}C] Glu or D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp radioactivity capture. L-[U-{sup 14}C] Glu and D-[2,3-{sup 3}H] Asp showed a different organ sequestration pattern. We conclude that glutamate is rapidly eliminated from the blood into peripheral tissues

  1. Knockdown expression and hepatic deficiency reveal anatheroprotective role for SR-BI in liver and peripheral tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huby, Thierry; Doucet, Chantal; Dachet, Christiane; Ouzilleau,Betty; Ueda, Yukihiko; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward; Chapman, M. John; Lesnik, Philippe

    2006-07-18

    Scavenger receptor SR-BI has been implicated inHDL-dependent atheroprotective mechanisms. We report the generation of anSR-BI conditional knockout mouse model in which SR-BI gene targeting byloxP site insertion produced a hypomorphic allele (hypomSR-BI).Attenuated SR-BI expression in hypomSR-BI mice resulted in 2-foldelevation in plasma total cholesterol (TC) levels. Cre-mediated SR-BIgene inactivation of the hypomorphic SR-BI allele in hepatocytes(hypomSR-BI-KOliver) was associated with high plasma TC concentrations,increased plasma free cholesterol/TC (FC/TC) ratio, and alipoprotein-cholesterol profile typical of SR-BI-/- mice. Plasma TClevels were increased 2-fold in hypomSR-BI and control mice fed anatherogenic diet, whereas hypomSR-BI-KOliver and SR-BI-/- mice developedsevere hypercholesterolemia due to accumulation of FC-rich, VLDL-sizedparticles. Atherosclerosis in hypomSR-BI mice was enhanced (2.5-fold)compared with that in controls, but to a much lower degree than inhypomSR-BI-KOliver (32-fold) and SR-BI-/- (48-fold) mice. The lattermodels did not differ in either plasma lipid levels or in the capacity ofVLDL-sized lipoproteins to induce macrophage cholesterol loading.However, reduced atherosclerosis in hypomSR-BI-KOliver mice wasassociated with decreased lesional macrophage content as compared withthat in SR-BI-/- mice. These data imply that, in addition to its majoratheroprotective role in liver, SR-BI may exert an antiatherogenic rolein extrahepatic tissues.

  2. Peripheral tissue metabolism during off-pump versus on-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery: the microdialysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pojar, Marek; Mand'ák, Jirí; Cibícek, Norbert; Lonský, Vladimír; Dominik, Jan; Palicka, Vladimír; Kubícek, Jaroslav

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor and compare metabolic changes in the skeletal muscle during coronary artery bypass grafting surgery with and without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) by means of interstitial microdialysis. Glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol were assessed as markers of basic metabolism and tissue perfusion. Twenty patients undergoing surgical myocardial revascularization were enrolled in this pilot study. Ten patients were operated on without CPB (group A, off-pump) and 10 patients using normothermic CPB (group B, on-pump). Interstitial microdialysis was performed by a CMA 60 (CMA/Microdialysis AB, Sweden) probe, inserted into the patient's left deltoid muscle. Microdialysis measurements were performed at 30 min intervals. Glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glycerol were measured in samples using a CMA 600 Analyser (CMA/Microdialysis AB, Sweden). Results in both groups were statistically processed and the groups were compared. Both groups were similar with regards to preoperative characteristics. Dynamic changes of interstitial concentrations of the measured analytes were found in off-pump (group A) and on-pump (group B) patients during the operation. There were no significant differences in dialysate concentrations of glucose and lactate between the groups. Significant differences were detected in pyruvate concentrations, lactate-pyruvate ratio and glycerol concentrations between off-pump versus on-pump patients. Pyruvate concentrations were higher in the off-pump group (plactate-pyruvate ratios indicating the aerobic/anaerobic metabolism status were lower in the off-pump group (pglucose, glycerol, pyruvate and lactate were found in both groups of patients (off-pump and on-pump). The presented preliminary results suggest that extracorporeal circulation during cardiac operations could compromise skeletal muscle energy metabolism.

  3. Promoting peripheral myelin repair

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ye; Notterpek, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), peripheral nerves have a remarkable ability to regenerate and remyelinate. This regenerative capacity to a large extent is dependent on and supported by Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In a variety of paradigms, Schwann cells are critical in the removal of the degenerated tissue, which is followed by remyelination of newly-regenerated axons. This unique plasticity of Schwann cells has been the ...

  4. The Effect of Active versus Passive Recovery Periods during High Intensity Intermittent Exercise on Local Tissue Oxygenation in 18 - 30 Year Old Sedentary Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Kriel

    Full Text Available High intensity interval training (HIIT has been proposed as a time-efficient format of exercise to reduce the chronic disease burden associated with sedentary behaviour. Changes in oxygen utilisation at the local tissue level during an acute session of HIIT could be the primary stimulus for the health benefits associated with this format of exercise. The recovery periods of HIIT effect the physiological responses that occur during the session. It was hypothesised that in sedentary individuals, local and systemic oxygen utilisation would be higher during HIIT interspersed with active recovery periods, when compared to passive recovery periods.Twelve sedentary males (mean ± SD; age 23 ± 3 yr completed three conditions on a cycle ergometer: 1 HIIT with passive recovery periods between four bouts (HIITPASS 2 HIIT with active recovery periods between four bouts (HIITACT 3 HIITACT with four HIIT bouts replaced with passive periods (REC. Deoxygenated haemoglobin (HHb in the vastus lateralis (VL and gastrocnemius (GN muscles and the pre-frontal cortex (FH, oxygen consumption (VO2, power output and heart rate (HR were measured continuously during the three conditions.There was a significant increase in HHb at VL during bouts 2 (p = 0.017, 3 (p = 0.035 and 4 (p = 0.035 in HIITACT, compared to HIITPASS. Mean power output was significantly lower in HIITACT, compared to HIITPASS (p < 0.001. There was a significant main effect for site in both HIITPASS (p = 0.029 and HIITACT (p = 0.005. There were no significant differences in VO2 and HR between HIITPASS and HIITACT.The increase in HHb at VL and the lower mean power output during HIITACT could indicate that a higher level of deoxygenation contributes to decreased mechanical power in sedentary participants. The significant differences in HHb between sites indicates the specificity of oxygen utilisation.

  5. Effect of Intermittent Hypercapnia on Respiratory Control in Rat Pups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steggerda, Justin A.; Mayer, Catherine A.; Martin, Richard J.; Wilson, Christopher G.

    2010-01-01

    Preterm infants are subject to fluctuations in blood gas status associated with immature respiratory control. Intermittent hypoxia during early postnatal life has been shown to increase chemoreceptor sensitivity and destabilize the breathing pattern; however, intermittent hypercapnia remains poorly studied. Therefore, to test the hypothesis that intermittent hypercapnia results in altered respiratory control, we examined the effects of daily exposure to intermittent hypercapnia on the ventilatory response to subsequent hypercapnic and hypoxic exposure in neonatal rat pups. Exposure cycles consisted of 5 min of intermittent hypercapnia (5% CO2, 21% O2, balance N2) followed by 10 min of normoxia. Rat pups were exposed to 18 exposure cycles each day for 1 week, from postnatal day 7 to 14. We analyzed diaphragm electromyograms (EMGs) from pups exposed to subsequent acute hypercapnic (5% CO2) and hypoxic (12% O2) challenges. In response to a subsequent hypercapnia challenge, there was no significant difference in the ventilatory response between control and intermittent hypercapnia-exposed groups. In contrast, intermittent hypercapnia-exposed rat pups showed an enhanced ventilatory response to hypoxic challenge with an increase in minute EMG to 118 ± 14% of baseline versus 107 ± 13% for control pups (p < 0.05). We speculate that prior hypercapnic exposure may increase peripheral chemoreceptor response to subsequent hypoxic exposures and result in perturbed neonatal respiratory control. PMID:19752577

  6. Optimal intermittent search strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojo, F; Budde, C E [FaMAF, Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Cordoba (Argentina); Wio, H S [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Universidad de Cantabria and CSIC E-39005 Santander (Spain)

    2009-03-27

    We study the search kinetics of a single fixed target by a set of searchers performing an intermittent random walk, jumping between different internal states. Exploiting concepts of multi-state and continuous-time random walks we have calculated the survival probability of a target up to time t, and have 'optimized' (minimized) it with regard to the transition probability among internal states. Our model shows that intermittent strategies always improve target detection, even for simple diffusion states of motion.

  7. Intermittency and random matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, Dmitry; Illarionov, E. A.

    2015-08-01

    A spectacular phenomenon of intermittency, i.e. a progressive growth of higher statistical moments of a physical field excited by an instability in a random medium, attracted the attention of Zeldovich in the last years of his life. At that time, the mathematical aspects underlying the physical description of this phenomenon were still under development and relations between various findings in the field remained obscure. Contemporary results from the theory of the product of independent random matrices (the Furstenberg theory) allowed the elaboration of the phenomenon of intermittency in a systematic way. We consider applications of the Furstenberg theory to some problems in cosmology and dynamo theory.

  8. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ=9.3-μm CO2 laser: heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Staninec, Michal; Lee, Chulsung; Fried, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    A mechanically scanned CO2 laser operated at high laser pulse repetition rates can be used to rapidly and precisely remove dental decay. This study aims to determine whether these laser systems can safely ablate enamel and dentin without excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. Samples were derived from noncarious extracted molars. Pulpal temperatures were recorded using microthermocouples situated at the pulp chamber roof of samples (n=12), which were occlusally ablated using a rapid-scanning, water-cooled 300 Hz CO2 laser over a two minute time course. The mechanical strength of facially ablated dentin (n=10) was determined via four-point bend test and compared to control samples (n=10) prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Composite-to-enamel bond strength was measured via single-plane shear test for ablated/non-etched (n=10) and ablated/acid-etched (n=8) samples and compared to control samples (n=9) prepared by 320 grit wet sanding. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature at 19.0°C (s.d.=0.9) if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin and enamel, the treated surfaces were uniformly ablated and there were no cracks observable on the laser treated surfaces. Fourpoint bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d.=4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d.=2.7) for control (p>0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths of 31.2 MPa (s.d.=2.5, penamel without excessive heat accumulation and with minimal thermal damage. It is not clear whether the small (16%) but statistically significant reduction in the shear bond strength to enamel is clinically significant since the mean shear bond strength exceeded 30 MPa.

  9. Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morrissey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In vivo gene therapy directed at tissues of mesenchymal origin could potentially augment healing. We aimed to assess the duration and magnitude of transene expression in vivo in mice and ex vivo in human tissues. Methods. Using bioluminescence imaging, plasmid and adenoviral vector-based transgene expression in murine quadriceps in vivo was examined. Temporal control was assessed using a doxycycline-inducible system. An ex vivo model was developed and optimised using murine tissue, and applied in ex vivo human tissue. Results. In vivo plasmid-based transgene expression did not silence in murine muscle, unlike in liver. Although maximum luciferase expression was higher in muscle with adenoviral delivery compared with plasmid, expression reduced over time. The inducible promoter cassette successfully regulated gene expression with maximum levels a factor of 11 greater than baseline. Expression was re-induced to a similar level on a temporal basis. Luciferase expression was readily detected ex vivo in human muscle and tendon. Conclusions. Plasmid constructs resulted in long-term in vivo gene expression in skeletal muscle, in a controllable fashion utilising an inducible promoter in combination with oral agents. Successful plasmid gene transfection in human ex vivo mesenchymal tissue was demonstrated for the first time.

  10. Intermittent Testicular Torsion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-02

    Jun 2, 2017 ... had prior episodes of testicular pain, suggesting that they may have had intermittent torsion before .... None of the patients had antecedent history of sexual exposure, fever, or urinary tract infection .... torsion of the spermatic cord portends an increased risk of acute testicular infarction. J Urol 2008;180 4 ...

  11. The efficacy of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the improvement of walking distance in patients with peripheral arterial disease with intermittent claudication: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial: the TENS-PAD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besnier, Florent; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Grémeaux, Vincent; Riédel, Mélanie; Garrigues, Damien; Guiraud, Thibaut; Labrunée, Marc

    2017-08-10

    In patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), walking improvements are often limited by early pain onset due to vascular claudication. It would thus appear interesting to develop noninvasive therapeutic strategies, such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), to improve the participation of PAD patients in rehabilitation programmes, and thus improve their quality of life. Our team recently tested the efficacy of a single 45-min session of 10-Hz TENS prior to walking. TENS significantly delayed pain onset and increased the pain-free walking distance in patients with class-II PAD. We now seek to assess the efficacy of a chronic intervention that includes the daily use of TENS for 3 weeks (5 days a week) on walking distance in Leriche-Fontaine stage-II PAD patients. This is a prospective, double-blind, multicentre, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. One hundred subjects with unilateral PAD (Leriche-Fontaine stage II) will be randomised into two groups (1:1). For the experimental group (TENS group): the treatment will consist of stimulation of the affected leg (at a biphasic frequency of 10 Hz, with a pulse width of 200 μs, maximal intensity below the motor threshold) for 45 min per day, in the morning before the exercise rehabilitation programme, for 3 weeks, 5 days per week. For the control group (SHAM group): the placebo stimulation will be delivered according to the same modalities as for the TENS group but with a voltage level automatically falling to zero after 10 s of stimulation. First outcome: walking distance without pain. transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcPO 2 ) measured during a Strandness exercise test, peak oxygen uptake (VO 2 peak), endothelial function (EndoPAT®), Ankle-brachial Pressure Index, Body Mass Index, lipid profile (LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides), fasting glycaemia, HbA1c level, and the WELCH questionnaire. TENS-PAD is the first randomised controlled trial that uses transcutaneous electrical therapy as an

  12. Peripheral reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    Peripheral collisions, that is, collisions involving a small amount of overlap of nuclear matter, are discussed including inclusive interactions, the magnitude of the peripheral cross section, fragmentation, a compilation of experiments and available data, limiting fragmentation, factorization, some models, fragment momentum distributions, and future research directions

  13. Quasistatic Dynamics with Intermittency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leppänen, Juho; Stenlund, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    We study an intermittent quasistatic dynamical system composed of nonuniformly hyperbolic Pomeau–Manneville maps with time-dependent parameters. We prove an ergodic theorem which shows almost sure convergence of time averages in a certain parameter range, and identify the unique physical family of measures. The theorem also shows convergence in probability in a larger parameter range. In the process, we establish other results that will be useful for further analysis of the statistical properties of the model.

  14. Quasistatic Dynamics with Intermittency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppänen, Juho; Stenlund, Mikko, E-mail: mikko.stenlund@helsinki.fi [University of Helsinki, Department of Mathematics and Statistics (Finland)

    2016-06-15

    We study an intermittent quasistatic dynamical system composed of nonuniformly hyperbolic Pomeau–Manneville maps with time-dependent parameters. We prove an ergodic theorem which shows almost sure convergence of time averages in a certain parameter range, and identify the unique physical family of measures. The theorem also shows convergence in probability in a larger parameter range. In the process, we establish other results that will be useful for further analysis of the statistical properties of the model.

  15. Evaluation of continuous and intermittent myocardial topical negative pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Gesslein, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    Topical negative pressure, commonly used in wound therapy, has been shown to increase blood flow and stimulate angiogenesis in subcutaneous tissue and skeletal muscle. In wound therapy, intermittent negative pressure is often preferred to continuous negative pressure as tissue exposed to intermit...

  16. Intermittency in Complex Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mahjoub, Otman; Redondo, Jose M.

    2017-04-01

    Experimental results of the complex turbulent wake of a cilinder in 2D [1] and 3D flows [2] were used to investigate the scaling of structure functions, similar research was also performed on wave propagation and breaking in the Ocean [3], in the the stratified Atmosphere (ABL) [4] and in a 100large flume (UPC) for both regular and irregular waves, where long time series of waves propagating and generating breaking turbulence velocity rms and higher order measurements were taken in depth. [3,5] by means of a velocimeter SONTEK3-D. The probability distribution functions of the velocity differences and their non Gaussian distribution related to the energy spectrum indicate that irregularity is an important source of turbulence. From Kolmogorov's K41 and K61 intermittency correction: the p th-order longitudinal velocity structure function δul at scale l in the inertial range of three-dimensional fully developed turbulence is related by ⟨δup⟩ = ⟨(u(x+ l)- u(x))p⟩ ˜ ɛp0/3lp/3 l where ⟨...⟩ represents the spatial average over flow domain, with ɛ0 the mean energy dissipation per unit mass and l is the separation distance. The importance of the random nature of the energy dissipation led to the K62 theory of intermittency, but locality and non-homogeneity are key issues. p p/3 p/3 ξd ⟨δul⟩ ˜ ⟨ɛl ⟩l ˜ l and ξp = p 3 + τp/3 , where now ɛl is a fractal energy dissipation at scale l, τp/3 is the scaling of and ξp is the scaling exponent of the velocity structure function of order p. Both in K41 and K62, the structure functions of third order related to skewness is ξ3 = 1. But this is not true either. We show that scaling exponents ξp do deviate from early studies that only investigated homogeneous turbulence, where a large inertial range dominates. The use of multi-fractal analysis and improvements on Structure function calculations on standard Enhanced mixing is an essential property of turbulence and efforts to alter and to control

  17. Intermittency in nuclear multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploszajczak, M.; Tucholski, A.

    1990-07-01

    Fluctuations of the fragment size distribution in a percolation model and in nuclear multifragmentation following the breakup of high energy nuclei in the nuclear emulsion are studied using the method of scaled factorial moments. An intermittent patern of fluctuations is found in the data as well as in the percolation lattice calculation. This is a consequence of both a self-similarity in the fragment size distribution and a random character for the scaling law. These fluctuations are in general well-described by percolation model. The multifractal dimensions are calculated and their relevance to the study of possible critical behaviour is pointed out. (orig.)

  18. Multidimensional intermittency in hadronic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, J.; Hwa, R.C.

    1992-06-01

    The study of intermittency in high-energy hadronic collisions by the Monte Carlo code ECCO is extended to 3-dimensional phase space. Strong intermittency is found in agreement with the data. Fluctuation in the impact parameter is responsible for the intermittency in lnp T , and the transverse-momentum conservation leads to negative intermittency slopes in the azimuthal angle φ. The Ochs-Wosiek plots are linear in all dimensions having universal slopes. An exponent ν = 1.448 emerges to characterize multiparticle production in pp collisions. The properties of G moments are also examined, and the fractal dimensions determined

  19. Physiologic basis for intermittent hypoxic episodes in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R J; Di Fiore, J M; Macfarlane, P M; Wilson, C G

    2012-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxic episodes are typically a consequence of immature respiratory control and remain a troublesome challenge for the neonatologist. Furthermore, their frequency and magnitude are commonly underestimated by clinically employed pulse oximeter settings. In extremely low birth weight infants the incidence of intermittent hypoxia [IH] progressively increases over the first 4 weeks of postnatal life, with a subsequent plateau followed by a slow decline beginning at weeks six to eight. Over this period of unstable respiratory control, increased oxygen-sensitive peripheral chemoreceptor activity has been associated with a higher incidence of apnea of prematurity. In contrast, infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia [chronic neonatal lung disease] exhibit decreased peripheral chemosensitivity, although the effect on respiratory stability in this population is unclear. Such episodic hypoxia/reoxygenation in early life has the potential to sustain a proinflammatory cascade with resultant multisystem, including respiratory, morbidity. Therapeutic approaches for intermittent hypoxic episodes comprise careful titration of baseline or supplemental inspired oxygen as well as xanthine therapy to prevent apnea of prematurity. Characterization of the pathophysiologic basis for such intermittent hypoxic episodes and their consequences during early life is necessary to provide an evidence-based approach to their management.

  20. Promoting peripheral myelin repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ye; Notterpek, Lucia

    2016-09-01

    Compared to the central nervous system (CNS), peripheral nerves have a remarkable ability to regenerate and remyelinate. This regenerative capacity to a large extent is dependent on and supported by Schwann cells, the myelin-forming glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). In a variety of paradigms, Schwann cells are critical in the removal of the degenerated tissue, which is followed by remyelination of newly-regenerated axons. This unique plasticity of Schwann cells has been the target of myelin repair strategies in acute injuries and chronic diseases, such as hereditary demyelinating neuropathies. In one approach, the endogenous regenerative capacity of Schwann cells is enhanced through interventions such as exercise, electrical stimulation or pharmacological means. Alternatively, Schwann cells derived from healthy nerves, or engineered from different tissue sources have been transplanted into the PNS to support remyelination. These transplant approaches can then be further enhanced by exercise and/or electrical stimulation, as well as by the inclusion of biomaterial engineered to support glial cell viability and neurite extension. Advances in our basic understanding of peripheral nerve biology, as well as biomaterial engineering, will further improve the functional repair of myelinated peripheral nerves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic Effects of Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Sears, Dorothy D

    2017-08-21

    The objective of this review is to provide an overview of intermittent fasting regimens, summarize the evidence on the health benefits of intermittent fasting, and discuss physiological mechanisms by which intermittent fasting might lead to improved health outcomes. A MEDLINE search was performed using PubMed and the terms "intermittent fasting," "fasting," "time-restricted feeding," and "food timing." Modified fasting regimens appear to promote weight loss and may improve metabolic health. Several lines of evidence also support the hypothesis that eating patterns that reduce or eliminate nighttime eating and prolong nightly fasting intervals may result in sustained improvements in human health. Intermittent fasting regimens are hypothesized to influence metabolic regulation via effects on (a) circadian biology, (b) the gut microbiome, and (c) modifiable lifestyle behaviors, such as sleep. If proven to be efficacious, these eating regimens offer promising nonpharmacological approaches to improving health at the population level, with multiple public health benefits.

  2. Peripheral ossifying fibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameet Mani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF is an exophytic gingival mass of fibrous connective tissue covered with a surface epithelium associated with the formation of randomly dispersed foci of a mineralized product consisting of bone, cementum-like tissue, or dystrophic calcifications having a recurrent rate of nearly 20%. It is one of the most common reactive gingival lesions, which have often been called by the generic term "epulis." This case report describes the clinical and histopathological findings of POF, its differential diagnosis, and treatment.

  3. Symptomatic peripheral arterial disease: the value of a validated questionnaire and a clinical decision rule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bendermacher, Bianca L. W.; Teijink, Joep A. W.; Willigendael, Edith M.; Bartelink, Marie-Louise; Büller, Harry R.; Peters, Ron J. G.; Boiten, Jelis; Langenberg, Machteld; Prins, Martin H.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: If a validated questionnaire, when applied to patients reporting with symptoms of intermittent claudication, could adequately discriminate between those with and without peripheral arterial disease, GPs could avoid the diagnostic measurement of the ankle brachial index. AIM: To

  4. Lower-leg symptoms in peripheral arterial disease are associated with anxiety, depression, and anhedonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolderen, Kim G; Hoeks, Sanne E; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2009-01-01

    Patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) report diverse clinical manifestations that are not always consistent with classic intermittent claudication. We examined the degree to which atypical exertional leg symptoms, intermittent claudication, and exertional leg symptoms that begin at rest...... 2.5 and 4.0, p...

  5. Therapeutic Efficacy of Intermittent Cryotherapy in the Management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was therefore, designed to investigate the efficacy of intermittent cryotherapy in the management of pain among human subjects who sustained closed soft tissue injuries (CSTIs). Subjects' pre- and post-treatment pain perception scores (PPS) using visual analogue scale (VAS) and the sessions of treatment were ...

  6. Intermedia and Intermittency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veres Bálint

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly known that medial reflections have been initiated by attempts to secure the borders of discrete medial forms and to define the modus operandi of each essentialized medial area. Later on, the focus of study has shifted to plurimedial formations and the interactions between predefined medial genres. In the last few decades, taxonomic approaches to various multi-, inter-, and transmedial phenomena dominated the discussions, which offered invaluable support in mapping the terrain, but at the same time hindered the analysis of the ephemeral, time-dependent aspects of plurimedial operations. While we explore the properties of each medial configuration, we lose sight of the actual historical drivers that produce ever-new configurations. My thesis is that any discourse on intermediality should be paralleled by a discourse on cultural intermittency, and consequently, media studies should involve an approach that focuses on the “ecosystem” of the constantly renewing media configurations from the point of view of their vitalizing potential and capability to trigger heightened experiences. This approach draws much inspiration from K. Ludwig Pfeiffer’s media anthropology that gives orientation in my paper.

  7. Peripheral Vestibular System Disease in Vestibular Schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Nue; Hansen, Søren; Caye-Thomasen, Per

    2015-01-01

    density of the peripheral vestibular nerve branches, and atrophy of the neuroepithelium of the vestibular end organs. In cases with small tumors, peripheral disease occurred only in the tissue structures innervated by the specific nerve from which the tumor originated. CONCLUSION: Vestibular schwannomas...... are associated with distinctive disease of the peripheral vestibular tissue structures, suggesting anterograde degeneration and that dizziness in these patients may be caused by deficient peripheral vestibular nerve fibers, neurons, and end organs. In smaller tumors, a highly localized disease occurs, which...

  8. Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Induces Atherosclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Savransky, Vladimir; Nanayakkara, Ashika; Li, Jianguo; Bevans, Shannon; Smith, Philip L.; Rodriguez, Annabelle; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Obstructive sleep apnea, a condition leading to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), is associated with hyperlipidemia, atherosclerosis, and a high cardiovascular risk. A causal link between obstructive sleep apnea and atherosclerosis has not been established.

  9. Dynamic characterizers of spatiotemporal intermittency

    OpenAIRE

    Gupte, Neelima; Jabeen, Zahera

    2006-01-01

    Systems of coupled sine circle maps show regimes of spatiotemporally intermittent behaviour with associated scaling exponents which belong to the DP class, as well as regimes of spatially intermittent behaviour (with associated regular dynamical behaviour) which do not belong to the DP class. Both types of behaviour are seen along the bifurcation boundaries of the synchronized solutions, and contribute distinct signatures to the dynamical characterizers of the system, viz. the distribution of...

  10. Effect of viscoelastic properties of plantar soft tissues on plantar pressures at the first metatarsal head in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jan, Yih-Kuen; Rong, Daqian; Lung, Chi-Wen; Cuaderes, Elena; Boyce, Kari

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers are one of the most serious complications associated with diabetes mellitus. Current research studies have demonstrated that biomechanical alterations of the diabetic foot contribute to the development of foot ulcers. However, the changes of soft tissue biomechanical properties associated with diabetes and its influences on the development of diabetic foot ulcers have not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of diabetes on the biomechanical properties of plantar soft tissues and the relationship between biomechanical properties and plantar pressure distributions. We used the ultrasound indentation tests to measure force-deformation relationships of plantar soft tissues and calculate the effective Young's modulus and quasi-linear viscoelastic parameters to quantify biomechanical properties of plantar soft tissues. We also measured plantar pressures to calculate peak plantar pressure and plantar pressure gradient. Our results showed that diabetics had a significantly greater effective Young's modulus and initial modulus of quasi-linear viscoelasticity compared to non-diabetics. The plantar pressure gradient and biomechanical properties were significantly correlated. Our findings indicate that diabetes is linked to an increase in viscoelasticity of plantar soft tissues that may contribute to a higher peak plantar pressure and plantar pressure gradient in the diabetic foot. (paper)

  11. Interleukin-9 Overexpression and Th9 Polarization Characterize the Inflamed Gut, the Synovial Tissue, and the Peripheral Blood of Patients With Psoriatic Arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciccia, Francesco; Guggino, Giuliana; Ferrante, Angelo; Raimondo, Stefania; Bignone, Rodolfo; Rodolico, Vito; Peralta, Sergio; van Tok, Melissa; Cannizzaro, Alessandra; Schinocca, Claudia; Ruscitti, Piero; Cipriani, Paola; Giacomelli, Roberto; Alessandro, Riccardo; Dieli, Francesco; Rizzo, Aroldo; Baeten, Dominique; Triolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the expression and tissue distribution of Th9-related cytokines in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Quantitative gene expression analysis of Th1, Th17, and Th9 cytokines was performed in intestinal biopsy samples obtained from patients with PsA, HLA-B27-positive patients with

  12. A botanical compound, Padma 28, increases walking distance in stable intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drabaek, H; Mehlsen, J; Himmelstrup, H

    1993-01-01

    Thirty-six patients with a median age of sixty-seven years and a median duration of intermittent claudication of five years were randomized to either active treatment with Padma 28 or placebo. The effect of treatment was quantified by measurements of systemic and peripheral systolic blood pressur...

  13. Peripheral Circulatory Features during High-Frequency Jet Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Kontorovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the results of a study of peripheral circulatory features during high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV. The main specific features of peripheral circulation and oxygen transport during HFJV are formulated on the basis of a study of cardiac output (impedance cardiography, peripheral vascular resistance, peripheral vascular blood filling (photoplethysmogram analysis, adaptive peripheral blood flow reactions (spectral analysis of peripheral vascular pulsation. HFJV gives rise to the peculiar pattern of peripheral hemodynamics and tissue gas exchange, which is characterized by higher oxygen uptake without a decrease in mixed venous blood saturation, with normal extraction coefficient and preserved low peripheral vascular resistance. During HFJV, unlike traditional ventilation, the main peripheral hemodynamic feature is the increased capillary bed blood volume caused by the blood flow involvement of reserve capillaries under control of volume (parasympathetic regulation of adaptive peripheral hemodynamic reactions. Key words: high-frequency jet ventilation, oxygen transport, peripheral hemodynamics.

  14. Intermittency in 197Au fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabrowska, A.; Holynski, R.; Olszewski, A.; Szarska, M.; Wilczynska, B.; Wolter, W.; Wosiek, B.; Cherry, M.L.; Deines-Jones, P.; Jones, W.V.; Sengupta, K.; Wefel, B.

    1995-07-01

    The concept of factorial moments was applied to an analysis of the dynamical fluctuations in the charge distributions of the fragments emitted from gold nuclei with energies 10.6 and < 1.0 GeV/n interacting with emulsion nuclei. Clear evidence for intermittent fluctuations has been found in an analysis using all the particles released from the gold projectile, with a stronger effect observed below 1 GeV/n than at 10.6 GeV/n. For the full data sets, however, the intermittency effect was found to be very sensitive to the singly charged particles, and neglecting these particles strongly reduces the intermittency signal. When the analysis is restricted to the multiply charged fragments, an intermittency effect is revealed only for multifragmentation events, although one that is enhanced as compared to the analysis of all, singly and multiply charged, particles. The properties of the anomalous fractal dimensions suggest a sequential decay mechanism, rather than the existence of possible critical behaviour in the process of nuclear fragmentation. The likely influence of the charge conservation effects and the finite size of decaying systems on the observed intermittency signals was pointed out. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  15. Subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow in the forefoot during 24 hours. Labeling pattern and reproducibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Bülow, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1987-01-01

    Wash-out of 133xenon from a local depot in the subcutaneous adipose tissue in the forefoot was measured continuously during 24 hours on subsequent recordings in 51 feet (normal circulation: 10, intermittent claudication: 22 and ischaemic nocturnal rest pain: 19) with a mean time interval of 26 da...... was calculated to 10%, and for the ratio of blood flow from day to night to 5%. The method is thus considered apt as a monitor in the treatment of peripheral vascular disease, for example, surgery and medical therapy. As predominant source of error is the formation of oedema....

  16. Design and fabrication of a nanofibrous polycaprolactone tubular nerve guide for peripheral nerve tissue engineering using a two-pole electrospinning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panahi-Joo, Y; Abd-Emami, B; Bonakdar, S; Karkhaneh, A; Nourinia, A; Negahdari, B; Renaud, P

    2016-01-01

    Nerve guidance conduits are considered to be the new generation of scaffolds designed for nerve disorders. A tubular construct with a highly aligned fibrous structure, mimicking the endoneurium layer surrounding inner axons of a nerve fascicle, is a suitable candidate for a nerve guide. In this paper a new approach for the fabrication of 3D tubular nerve guides is introduced using simulation of a two-pole electrospinning system and describing its mechanism. The structure of this scaffold is then optimized using the Taguchi statistical method and after morphological studies by scanning electron microscopy, the crystallinity, tensile strength and protein adsorption of these highly aligned fibres are investigated, comparing them with semi-aligned and random fibres produced via conventional mandrel electrospinning. Cell attachment, proliferation and migration of PC12 neuronal like cells are studied on highly aligned, semi aligned and random structures, and morphological change and elongation are observed in PC12 cells. The results of these studies suggest that conduits fabricated using two-pole electrospinning are a suitable and promising scaffold for peripheral and even spinal nerve regeneration. This nerve guide has a great potential for further advanced modifications and regeneration in higher levels. (paper)

  17. Espectroscopia no infravermelho próximo para a monitorização da perfusão tecidual Near-infrared spectroscopy for monitoring peripheral tissue perfusion in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lima

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A espectroscopia no infravermelho próximo (NIRS tem sido principalmente usada na investigação da oxigenação periférica tecidual de forma não invasiva e contínua. O princípio da espectroscopia consiste na aplicação da luz no comprimento de onda do infravermelho-próximo para avaliar, de forma quantitativa e qualitativa, os componentes moleculares relacionadas à oxigenação tecidual. Baseado na relação das concentrações da deoxiemoglobina e da oxiemoglobina no tecido, a NIRS obtém informações para o cálculo da oxigenação tecidual. Embora possa ser aplicada em qualquer órgão, como método não invasivo é principalmente usada para a monitorização da oxigenação muscular periférica. Os parâmetros medidos pela NIRS podem ser calculados diretamente ou através de intervenções fisiológicas para alterar a circulação no local da aferição, sendo as mais usadas a oclusão arterial e a oclusão venosa. Deste modo, pode-se obter informações sobre a saturação do oxigênio muscular periférico e tecidual, bem como do fluxo sanguíneo e consumo de oxigênio local. Seu uso é direcionado principalmente para a monitorização da oxigenação tecidual periférica durante ressuscitação do choque no trauma e em pacientes sépticos, bem como a monitorização dos distúrbios da microcirculação regional. Esta revisão abordará os princípios físicos da espectroscopia no IV-próximo, e das principais aplicações clínicas deste instrumento de monitorização, com ênfase nos estudos que investigaram a utilidade da NIRS na área de terapia intensiva e também no setor de emergência clínica.Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is a non-invasive technique that allows determination of tissue oxygenation based on spectro-photometric quantitation of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin within a tissue. This technique has gained acceptance as a tool to monitor peripheral tissue perfusion in critically ill patient. NIRS principle is based on

  18. Chronic intermittent hypoxia predisposes to liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savransky, Vladimir; Nanayakkara, Ashika; Vivero, Angelica; Li, Jianguo; Bevans, Shannon; Smith, Philip L; Torbenson, Michael S; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2007-04-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). OSA is associated with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) in obese subjects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of CIH on the liver in the absence of obesity. Lean C57BL/6J mice (n = 15) on a regular chow diet were exposed to CIH for 12 weeks and compared with pair-fed mice exposed to intermittent air (IA, n = 15). CIH caused liver injury with an increase in serum ALT (224 +/- 39 U/l versus 118 +/- 22 U/l in the IA group, P fasting serum insulin levels, and mild elevation of fasting serum total cholesterol and triglycerides (TG). Liver TG content was unchanged, whereas cholesterol content was decreased. Histology showed swelling of hepatocytes, no evidence of hepatic steatosis, and marked accumulation of glycogen in hepatocytes. CIH led to lipid peroxidation of liver tissue with a malondialdehyde (MDA)/free fatty acids (FFA) ratio of 0.54 +/- 0.07 mmol/mol versus 0.30 +/- 0.01 mmol/mol in control animals (P obesity, CIH leads to mild liver injury via oxidative stress and excessive glycogen accumulation in hepatocytes and sensitizes the liver to a second insult, whereas NASH does not develop.

  19. Comparison of human memory CD8 T cell responses to adenoviral early and late proteins in peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Joshi

    Full Text Available Treatment of invasive adenovirus (Ad disease in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (SCT recipients with capsid protein hexon-specific donor T cells is under investigation. We propose that cytotoxic T cells (CTLs targeted to the late protein hexon may be inefficient in vivo because the early Ad protein E3-19K downregulates HLA class I antigens in infected cells. In this study, CD8+ T cells targeted to highly conserved HLA A2-restricted epitopes from the early regulatory protein DNA polymerase (P-977 and late protein hexon (H-892 were compared in peripheral blood (PB and tonsils of naturally infected adults. In tonsils, epitope-specific pentamers detected a significantly higher frequency of P-977+CD8+ T cells compared to H-892+CD8+ T cells; this trend was reversed in PB. Tonsil epitope-specific CD8+ T cells expressed IFN-γ and IL-2 but not perforin or TNF-α, whereas PB T cells were positive for IFN-γ, TNF-α, and perforin. Tonsil epitope-specific T cells expressed lymphoid homing marker CCR7 and exhibited lower levels of the activation marker CD25 but higher proliferative potential than PB T cells. Finally, in parallel with the kinetics of mRNA expression, P-977-specific CTLs lysed targets as early as 8 hrs post infection. In contrast, H-892-specific CTLs did not kill unless infected fibroblasts were pretreated with IFN-γ to up regulate HLA class I antigens, and cytotoxicity was delayed until 16-24 hours. These data show that, in contrast to hexon CTLs, central memory type DNA polymerase CTLs dominate the lymphoid compartment and kill fibroblasts earlier after infection without requiring exogenous IFN-γ. Thus, use of CTLs targeted to both early and late Ad proteins may improve the efficacy of immunotherapy for life-threatening Ad disease in SCT recipients.

  20. Differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain – acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mislav Klobučić

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of heme biosynthesis in liver due to deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme. Clinically, AIP is dominatedby a colicky type pain, which does not subside after taking usual analgesics. Additional frequent symptoms are vomiting, hypertension, peripheral neuropathy, seizures, depression, delirium and coma. This paper reported a case of a twenty-fi- ve-year-old female patient, who had undergone a period of six days between the first presentationto the medical department and the diagnosis confirmation. It has accentuated possible mistakes in symptomatic therapy administration as well as dangers of a delayed diagnosis.

  1. Accumulation of radioactivity in rat brain and peripheral tissues including salivary gland after intravenous administration of 14C-D-aspartic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Kazuhiro; Fukushima, Takeshi; Santa, Tomofumi; Homma, Hiroshi; Sugihara, Juko; Kodama, Hirohiko; Yoshikawa, Masayoshi.

    1997-01-01

    After the intravenous administration of 14 C-D-aspartic acid (Asp) into Sprague-Dawley rats (male, 7-week-old), the distribution and elimination of radioactivity was investigated by the whole body autoradiography. High radioactivities were detected in pineal gland, pituitary gland and salivary gland at 30 min after administration. The other tissues detected were liver, lung, adrenal gland, pancreas and spleen where D-Asp was reported to occur naturally. After 24 hr, the radioactivities were still detected at high levels in the pineal, pituitary and salivary glands. The data suggested the natural occurrence of D-Asp in salivary gland. After careful examination utilizing fluorescent derivatization and chiral separation by high-performance liquid chromatography, the presence of D-Asp was, for the first time, demonstrated in salivary gland in situ, the concentration of which was 7.85 ± 1.0 nmol/g. The administration of 14 C-L-Asp was also carried out. The data suggested that D-Asp in the circulating blood is one of the sources of the tissue D-Asp. (author)

  2. Seasoning ingredients in a medium-fat diet regulate lipid metabolism in peripheral tissues via the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Mitsuru; Yasuoka, Akihito; Yoshinuma, Haruka; Saito, Yoshikazu; Asakura, Tomiko; Tanabe, Soichi

    2018-03-01

    We fed rats noodle (N) -diet containing 30 wt.% instant noodle with a 26% fat-to-energy ratio for 30 days (N-group). Compared with rats that were fed the same amount of nutrients (C-group), the N-group showed lower liver triacylglycerol levels and higher fecal cholesterol levels. We then analyzed transcriptome of the hypothalamic-pituitary (HP), the liver and the white adipose tissue (WAT). Thyroid stimulating hormone (Tshb), and its partner, glycoprotein hormone genes were up-regulated in the HP of N-group. Sterol regulatory element binding transcription factors were activated in the liver of N-group, while an up-regulation of the angiogenic signal occurred in the WAT of N-group. N-group showed higher urine noradrenaline (NA) level suggesting that these tissue signals are regulated by NA and Tshb. The N-diet contains 0.326 wt.% glutamate, 0.00236 wt.% 6-shogaol and Maillard reaction products. Our results suggest that these ingredients may affect lipid homeostasis via the HP axis.

  3. Comparison of vancomycin and linezolid in patients with peripheral vascular disease and/or diabetes in an observational European study of complicated skin and soft-tissue infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckmann, C; Nathwani, D; Lawson, W; Corman, S; Solem, C; Stephens, J; Macahilig, C; Li, J; Charbonneau, C; Baillon-Plot, N; Haider, S

    2015-09-01

    Suboptimal antibiotic penetration into soft tissues can occur in patients with poor circulation due to peripheral vascular disease (PVD) or diabetes. We conducted a real-world analysis of antibiotic treatment, hospital resource use and clinical outcomes in patients with PVD and/or diabetes receiving linezolid or vancomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (MRSA cSSTIs) across Europe. This subgroup analysis evaluated data obtained from a retrospective, observational medical chart review study that captured patient data from 12 European countries. Data were obtained from the medical records of patients ≥ 18 years of age, hospitalized with an MRSA cSSTI between 1 July 2010 and 30 June 2011 and discharged alive by 31 July 2011. Hospital length of stay and length of treatment were compared between the treatment groups using inverse probability of treatment weights to adjust for clinical and demographic differences. A total of 485 patients had PVD or diabetes and received treatment with either vancomycin (n = 258) or linezolid (n = 227). After adjustment, patients treated with linezolid compared with vancomycin respectively had significantly shorter hospital stays (17.9 ± 13.6 vs. 22.6 ± 13.6 days; p linezolid and vancomycin groups, respectively (p linezolid compared with vancomycin. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Relationship between in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the expression of normal tissue damage following radiotherapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, J.B.P.; Burrill, W.; Spreadborough, A.R.; Levine, E.; Warren, C.; Scott, D.; Kiltie, A.E.; Roberts, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    There is a need for rapid and reliable tests for the prediction of normal tissue responses to radiotherapy, as this could lead to individualization of patient radiotherapy schedules and thus improvements in the therapeutic ratio. Because the use of cultured fibroblasts is too slow to be practicable in a clinical setting, we evaluated the predictive role of assays of lymphocyte chromosomal radiosensitivity in patients having radiotherapy for breast cancer. Radiosensitivity was assessed using a macronucleus (MN) assay at high dose rate (HDR) and low dose rate (LDR) on lymphocytes irradiated in the G 0 phase of the cell cycle (Scott D, Barber JB, Levine EL, Burril W, Roberts SA. Radiation-induced micronucleus induction in lymphocytes identifies a frequency of radiosensitive cases among breast cancer patients: a test for predisposition? Br. J. Cancer 1998;77;614-620) and an assay of G 2 phase chromatid radiosensitivity ('G 2 assay') (Scott D, Spreadborough A, Levine E, Roberts SA. Genetic predisposition in breast cancer. Lancet 1994; 344: 1444). In a study of acute reactions, blood samples were taken from breast cancer patients before the start of radiotherapy, and the skin reaction documented. 116 patients were tested with the HDR MN assay, 73 with the LDR MN assay and 123 with the G 2 assay. In a study of late reactions, samples were taken from a series of breast cancer patients 8-14 years after radiotherapy and the patients assessed for the severity of late effects according to the 'LENT SOMA' scales. 47 were tested with the HDR assay, 26 with the LDR assay and 19 with the G 2 assay. For each clinical endpoint, patients were classified as being normal reactors or 'highly radiosensitive patients' (HR patients (Burnet NG. Johansen J, Turesson I, Nyman J. Describing patients' normal tissue reactions: Concerning the possibility of individualising radiotherapy dose prescriptions based on potential predictive assays of normal tissue radiosensitivity. Int. J. Cancer 1998

  5. Postmortem concentrations of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) in peripheral blood and brain tissue - Differentiating between postmortem formation and antemortem intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ragnar; Rasmussen, Brian Schou; Johansen, Sys Stybe

    2017-01-01

    to fermentation processes. The endogenous nature of GHB leads to difficulty in interpretation of concentrations, as the source of GHB is not obvious. Postmortem brain and blood samples were collected from 221 individuals at autopsy. Of these, 218 were not suspected of having ingested GHB, while GHB intake....../kg (median 15.3mg/kg) in blood and not-detected to 9.8mg/kg (median 4.8mg/kg) in brain tissue. For case A, where intoxication with GHB was deemed to be the sole cause of death, the concentrations were 199 and 166mg/kg in blood and brain, respectively. For case B, where intoxication with GHB...

  6. Cyclosporine, a P-glycoprotein modulator, increases [18F]MPPF uptake in rat brain and peripheral tissues: microPET and ex vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacan, Goran; Way, Baldwin M.; Plenevaux, Alain; Defraiteur, Caroline; Lemaire, Christian; Aerts, Joel; Luxen, Andre; Rubins, Daniel J.; Cherry, Simon R.; Melega, William P.

    2008-01-01

    Pretreatment with cyclosporine, a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) modulator increases brain uptake of 4-(2'-methoxyphenyl)-1-[2'-(N-2''-pyridinyl)-p-[ 18 F] fluorobenzamido] ethylpiper azine ([ 18 F]MPPF) for binding to hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT 1A ) receptors. Those increases were quantified in rat brain with in vivo microPET and ex vivo tissue studies. Each Sprague-Dawley rat (n=4) received a baseline [ 18 F]MPPF microPET scan followed by second scan 2-3 weeks later that included cyclosporine pretreatment (50 mg/kg, i.p.). Maximum a posteriori reconstructed images and volumetric ROIs were used to generate dynamic radioactivity concentration measurements for hippocampus, striatum, and cerebellum, with simplified reference tissue method (SRTM) analysis. Western blots were used to semiquantify P-gp regional distribution in brain. MicroPET studies showed that hippocampus uptake of [ 18 F]MPPF was increased after cyclosporine; ex vivo studies showed similar increases in hippocampus and frontal cortex at 30 min, and for heart and kidney at 2.5 and 5 min, without concomitant increases in [ 18 F]MPPF plasma concentration. P-gp content in cerebellum was twofold higher than in hippocampus or frontal cortex. These studies confirm and extend prior ex vivo results (J. Passchier, et al., Eur J Pharmacol, 2000) that showed [ 18 F]MPPF as a substrate for P-gp. Our microPET results showed that P-gp modulation of [ 18 F]MPPF binding to 5-HT 1A receptors can be imaged in rat hippocampus. The heterogeneous brain distribution of P-gp appeared to invalidate the use of cerebellum as a nonspecific reference region for SRTM modeling. Regional quantitation of P-gp may be necessary for accurate PET assessment of 5-HT 1A receptor density when based on tracer uptake sensitive to P-gp modulation. (orig.)

  7. [Morphological substrate and pathogenetic mechanisms of pelvic pain syndrome in endometriosis. Part II. Peripheral nerve tissue remodeling in the foci of endometriosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, E A; Ovakimyan, A S; Paramonova, N B; Faizullina, N M; Kazachenko, I F; Adamyan, L V

    2016-01-01

    Endometriosis (EM) is morphologically characterized by the development of extrauterine endometrioid heterotopies, the major clinical symptoms of which is chronic pelvic pain, which is a serious problem not only in modern gynecology, but also in public health as a whole. to investigate neurogenic markers in the foci of EM of various sites and histological structure in women with and without pain syndrome. The investigation was performed using the operative material (resected segments of the intestine, bladder, rectovaginal septum, and small pelvic peritoneum) obtained from 52 women with an intraoperative and morphologically verified diagnosis of EM and (Group 1) and without (Group 2) pain syndrome. Immunohistochemical examination was made on paraffin-embedded tissue sections in accordance with the standard protocols, by using the antibodies: 1) anti-PGP 9.5 polyclonal rabbit antibodies; 2) mouse anti-human neurofilament (NF) protein monoclonal antibodies (Clone 2F1); 3) mouse anti-nerve growth factor (NGF) monoclonal antibodies; 4) monoclonal mouse anti-human NGF receptor p75 (NGFRp75) antibodies (Dako, Denmark). Our findings demonstrate differences in the expression of PGP 9.5, NFs, NGF, and NGFRp75 in the foci and adjacent tissue in painful and painless EM irrespective of the locations of heterotopies. The found molecular features are a manifestation of the remodeling of nerve fibers and nerve endings in the foci of EM and PGP9.5, NGF, and NGFRp75 give rise to nerve fiber neoformation and pain syndrome in EM. At the same time, the immunohistochemical phenotype of EM foci does not depend on their site and reflects the presence or absence of pain syndrome.

  8. [The modern principles of management of intermittent claudication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamzatov, T H; Svetlikov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Number of patients with peripheral arterial disease, despite various national public health programs, remains high and has no steady downward trend over the past few decades. Despite recent advances in drug therapy, сonservative approach in the management of peripheral arterial disease is often neglected by vascular surgeons. However, vast majority of patients with intermittent claudication, who receive comprehensive conservative treatment, including risk factor modification, exercise and drug therapy, may get significant improvement in quality of life by partial or complete relief of symptoms related to the disease. Patients strictly adhering to medical recommendations has favorable prognosis and progression of disease to the stage of critical limb ischemia is very unlikely. Noncompliant patients and those who continue smoking in particular, often experience progression of symptoms related to the disease. That may result in the need for surgical intervention aiming to prevent or delay the onset of critical limb ischemia.

  9. High-speed scanning ablation of dental hard tissues with a λ = 9.3 μm CO2 laser: adhesion, mechanical strength, heat accumulation, and peripheral thermal damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Daniel; Chang, Kwang; Hedayatollahnajafi, Saba; Staninec, Michal; Chan, Kenneth; Lee, Robert; Fried, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    CO2 lasers can be operated at high laser pulse repetition rates for the rapid and precise removal of dental decay. Excessive heat accumulation and peripheral thermal damage is a concern when using high pulse repetition rates. Peripheral thermal damage can adversely impact the mechanical strength of the irradiated tissue, particularly for dentin, and reduce the adhesion characteristics of the modified surfaces. The interpulpal temperature rise was recorded using microthermocouples situated at the roof of the pulp chamber on teeth that were occlusally ablated using a rapidly-scanned CO2 laser operating at 9.3 μm with a pulse duration of 10 to 15 μs and repetition rate of 300 Hz over a 2 min time course. The adhesion strength of laser treated enamel and dentin surfaces was measured for various laser scanning parameters with and without post-ablation acid etching using the single-plane shear test. The mechanical strength of laser-ablated dentin surfaces were determined via the four-point bend test and compared to control samples prepared with 320 grit wet sand paper to simulate conventional preparations. Thermocouple measurements indicated that the temperature remained below ambient temperature if water-cooling was used. There was no discoloration of either dentin or enamel laser treated surfaces, the surfaces were uniformly ablated, and there were no cracks visible. Four-point bend tests yielded mean mechanical strengths of 18.2 N (s.d. = 4.6) for ablated dentin and 18.1 N (s.d. = 2.7) for control (p > 0.05). Shear tests yielded mean bond strengths approaching 30 MPa for both enamel and dentin under certain irradiation conditions. These values were slightly lower than nonirradiated acid-etched control samples. Additional studies are needed to determine if the slightly lower bond strength than the acid-etched control samples is clinically significant. These measurements demonstrate that enamel and dentin surfaces can be rapidly ablated by CO2 lasers with minimal

  10. Impact of experimental hypothyroidism on monoamines level in discrete brain regions and other peripheral tissues of young and adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Wafaa A; Aly, Mona S; Rahman, Taghride Abdel; Shahat, Asmaa S

    2013-06-01

    The levels of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) in different brain regions as well as in blood plasma, cardiac muscle and adrenal gland of young and adult male albino rats were measured following experimentally induced hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism induced by daily oral administration of propylthiouracil (PTU, 5mg/kg body wt) caused a significant reduction in DA levels in most of the tissues examined of both young and adult rats after 21 and 28 days, in NE levels after all the time intervals studied in young rats, and after 21 and 28 days in adult rats. 5-HT exhibited a significant reduction in the selected brain regions and blood plasma after 21 and 28 days and in cardiac muscle after all the time intervals in the two age groups of animals. It may be suggested that the changes in monoamine levels induced by hypothyroidism may be due to disturbance in the synthesis and release of these amines through the neurons impairment or may be due to an alteration pattern of their synthesizing and/or degradative enzymes. Copyright © 2013 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Alterations in monoamines level in discrete brain regions and other peripheral tissues in young and adult male rats during experimental hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Wafaa A; Rahman, Taghride Abdel; Aly, Mona S; Shahat, Asmaa S

    2013-08-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of experimentally-induced hyperthyroidism on dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT) levels in different brain regions as well as in blood plasma, cardiac muscle and adrenal gland of young and adult male albino rats (60 rats of each age). Hyperthyroidism was induced by daily s.c. injection of L-thyroxine (L-T4, 500 μg/kg body wt.) for 21 consecutive days. Induction of hyperthyroidism caused a significant elevation in DA and 5-HT levels in most of the tissues studied of both young and adult animals after 7, 14, and 21 days. NE content significantly decreased after 21 days in most of the brain regions examined and after 14 and 21 days in blood plasma of young rats following hyperthyroidism. In adult rats, NE content decreased after 14 and 21 days in cardiac muscle and after 21 days only in adrenal gland. It may be suggested that the changes in monoamines level induced by hyperthyroidism may be due to disturbance in the synthesis, turnover and release of these amines through the neurons impairment or may attributed to an alteration pattern of their synthesis and/or degradative enzymes or changes in the sensitivity of their receptors. Copyright © 2013 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simulating Sleep Apnea by Exposure to Intermittent Hypoxia Induces Inflammation in the Lung and Liver

    OpenAIRE

    da Rosa, Darlan Pase; Forgiarini, Luiz Felipe; Baronio, Diego; Feijó, Cristiano Andrade; Martinez, Dênis; Marroni, Norma Possa

    2012-01-01

    Sleep apnea is a breathing disorder that results from momentary and cyclic collapse of the upper airway, leading to intermittent hypoxia (IH). IH can lead to the formation of free radicals that increase oxidative stress, and this mechanism may explain the association between central sleep apnea and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. We assessed the level of inflammation in the lung and liver tissue from animals subjected to intermittent hypoxia and simulated sleep apnea. A total of 12 C57BL/6 mice...

  13. Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Stomach: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woon Ju; Cho, June Sik; Shin, Kyung Sook; Jeong, Hyung Yong; Noh; Seung Moo; Song, Kyu Sang

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors (peripheral PNETs) are very rare and highly aggressive soft tissue malignancies originating from the neural crest. To the best of our knowledge, only a few cases of peripheral PNETs of the stomach have been reported in the literature. We report a case of large peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the stomach with MDCT findings in a 22-year-old man presenting epigastric pain and vomiting

  14. The effect of very-low-calorie diet on mRNA expression of inflammation-related genes in subcutaneous adipose tissue and peripheral monocytes of obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraz, M; Lacinova, Z; Drapalova, J; Haluzikova, D; Horinek, A; Matoulek, M; Trachta, P; Kavalkova, P; Svacina, S; Haluzik, M

    2011-04-01

    Low-grade inflammation links obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and cardiovascular diseases. To explore the expression profile of genes involved in inflammatory pathways in adipose tissue and peripheral monocytes (PM) of obese patients with and without T2DM at baseline and after dietary intervention. Two-week intervention study with very-low-calorie diet (VLCD). University hospital. Twelve obese females with T2DM, 8 obese nondiabetic females (OB) and 15 healthy age-matched females. Two weeks of VLCD (2500 kJ/d). Metabolic parameters, circulating cytokines, hormones, and mRNA expression of 39 genes in sc adipose tissue (SCAT) and PM. Both T2DM and OB group had significantly increased serum concentrations of circulating proinflammatory factors (C-reactive protein, TNFα, IL-6, IL-8), mRNA expression of macrophage antigen CD68 and proinflammatory chemokines (CCL-2, -3, -7, -8, -17, -22) in SCAT and complementary chemokine receptors (CCR-1, -2, -3, -5) and other proinflammatory receptors (toll-like receptor 2 and 4, TNF receptor superfamily 1A and 1B, IL-6R) in PM, with OB group showing less pronounced chemoattracting and proinflammatory profile compared to T2DM group. In T2DM patients VLCD decreased body weight, improved metabolic profile, and decreased mRNA expression of up-regulated CCRs in PM and chemokines [CCL 8, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 10] in SCAT. VLCD markedly increased mRNA expression of T-lymphocyte attracting chemokine CCL-17 in SCAT. Obese patients with and without T2DM have increased mRNA expression of chemotactic and proinflammatory factors in SCAT and expression of corresponding receptors in PM. Two weeks of VLCD significantly improved this profile in T2DM patients.

  15. Influence of intermittent pressure, fluid flow, and mixing on the regenerative properties of articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, S E; Heath, C A

    1999-11-05

    Equine articular chondrocytes, embedded within a polyglycolic acid nonwoven mesh, were cultured with various combinations of intermittent pressure, fluid flow, and mixing to examine the effects of different physical stimuli on neochondrogenesis from young cells. The cell/polymer constructs were cultured first in 125 ml spinner flasks for 1, 2, or 4 weeks and then in a perfusion system with intermittent pressure for a total of up to 6 weeks. Additional constructs were either cultured for all 6 weeks in the spinner flasks or for 1 week in spinners followed by 5 weeks in the perfusion system without intermittent pressure. Tissue constructs cultivated for 2 or 4 weeks in spinner flasks followed by perfusion with intermittent pressure had significantly higher concentrations of both sulfated glycosaminoglycan and collagen than constructs cultured entirely in spinners or almost entirely in the pressure/perfusion system. Initial cultivation in the spinner flasks, with turbulent mixing, enhanced both cell attachment and early development of the extracellular matrix. Subsequent culture with perfusion and intermittent pressure appeared to accelerate matrix formation. While the correlation was much stronger in the pressurized constructs, the compressive modulus was directly proportional to the concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycan in all physically stressed constructs. Constructs that were not stressed beyond the 1-week seeding period lost mechanical integrity upon harvest, suggesting that physical stimulation, particularly with intermittent pressure, of immature tissue constructs during their development may contribute to their ultimate biomechanical functionality. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Cardiovascular disease in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: the role of intermittent hypoxia and inflammation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Garvey, J F

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing evidence that intermittent hypoxia plays a role in the development of cardiovascular risk in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) through the activation of inflammatory pathways. The development of translational models of intermittent hypoxia has allowed investigation of its role in the activation of inflammatory mechanisms and promotion of cardiovascular disease in OSAS. There are noticeable differences in the response to intermittent hypoxia between body tissues but the hypoxia-sensitive transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and nuclear factor-kappaB appear to play a key role in mediating the inflammatory and cardiovascular consequences of OSAS. Expanding our understanding of these pathways, the cross-talk between them and the activation of inflammatory mechanisms by intermittent hypoxia in OSAS will provide new avenues of therapeutic opportunity for the disease.

  17. The effect of metabolic syndrome components on exercise performance in patients with intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Andrew W; Montgomery, Polly S

    2008-06-01

    To determine the effect of metabolic syndrome components on intermittent claudication, physical function, health-related quality of life, and peripheral circulation in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and to identify the metabolic syndrome components most predictive of each outcome measure. Patients limited by intermittent claudication with three (n = 48), four (n = 45), or five (n = 40) components of metabolic syndrome were studied. Patients were assessed on PAD-specific measures consisting of ankle-brachial index (ABI), initial claudication distance, absolute claudication distance, physical function measures, health-related quality of life, and calf blood flow and transcutaneous oxygen tension responses after 3 minutes of vascular occlusion. Initial claudication distance (mean +/- SD) progressively declined (P = .019) in those with three (203 +/- 167 m), four (124 +/- 77 m), and five (78 +/- 57 m) metabolic syndrome components, and absolute claudication distance progressively declined (P = .036) in these groups as well (414 +/- 224 m vs 323 +/- 153 m vs 249 +/- 152 m, respectively). Furthermore, compared with patients with only three components of metabolic syndrome, those with all five components had impaired values (P obesity was the predictor (P fasting glucose was the predictor (P intermittent claudication, physical function, health-related quality of life, and peripheral circulation. Abdominal obesity and elevated fasting glucose are the metabolic syndrome components that are most predictive of these outcome measures. Aggressively treating these metabolic syndrome components may be particularly important in managing symptoms and long-term prognosis of PAD patients.

  18. Propylthiouracil and peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Van Boekel

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a rare manifestation in hyperthyroidism. We describe the neurological manifestations of a 38 year old female with Graves' disease who developed peripheral neuropathy in the course of her treatment with propylthiouracil. After the drug was tapered off, the neurological signs disappeared. Therefore, we call attention for a possible toxic effect on peripheral nervous system caused by this drug.

  19. Chronic intermittent hypoxia preserves bone density in a mouse model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Marta; Montserrat, Josep M; Pavía, Javier; Dalmases, Mireia; Ros, Domenec; Fernandez, Yolanda; Barbé, Ferran; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2013-12-01

    Very recent clinical research has investigated whether obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may modulate bone homeostasis but the few data available are conflicting. Here we report novel data obtained in a mouse study specifically designed to determine whether chronic intermittent hypoxia realistically mimicking OSA modifies bone mineral density (BMD). Normal male and female mice and orchidectomized mice (N=10 each group) were subjected to a pattern of high-frequency intermittent hypoxia (20s at 5% and 40s at 21%, 60 cycles/h) for 6h/day. Identical groups breathing room air (normoxia) were the controls. After 32 days of intermittent hypoxia/normoxia the trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) in the peripheral femora were measured by micro-CT scanning. When compared with normoxia (two-way ANOVA), intermittent hypoxia did not significantly modify BMD in the three animal groups tested. Data in this study suggest that the type of intermittent hypoxia characterizing OSA, applied as a single challenge, preserves bone homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Iaia, F. Marcello; Krustrup, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The two Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (IR) tests evaluate an individual's ability to repeatedly perform intense exercise. The Yo-Yo IR level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) test focuses on the capacity to carry out intermittent exercise leading to a maximal activation of the aerobic system, whereas Yo-Yo IR level 2...

  1. Intermittent behavior of the logistic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Kress, G.; Haken, H.

    1981-03-01

    In the discrete logistic model a transition to chaotic behavior via intermittency occurs in a neighborhood of periodic bands. Intermittent behavior is also induced if a stable periodic orbit is perturbed by low-level external noise, whereas alterations due to computer digitalisation produce remarkable periodicities. We compare our numerical results with the predictions of Pomeau and Manneville for the Lorenz system.

  2. Cosmic Rays in Intermittent Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukurov, Anvar; Seta, Amit; Bushby, Paul J.; Wood, Toby S.; Snodin, Andrew P.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields is a diffusive process driven by the scattering of the charged particles by random magnetic fluctuations. Such fields are usually highly intermittent, consisting of intense magnetic filaments and ribbons surrounded by weaker, unstructured fluctuations. Studies of cosmic-ray propagation have largely overlooked intermittency, instead adopting Gaussian random magnetic fields. Using test particle simulations, we calculate cosmic-ray diffusivity in intermittent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields. The results are compared with those obtained from non-intermittent magnetic fields having identical power spectra. The presence of magnetic intermittency significantly enhances cosmic-ray diffusion over a wide range of particle energies. We demonstrate that the results can be interpreted in terms of a correlated random walk.

  3. Cosmic Rays in Intermittent Magnetic Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukurov, Anvar; Seta, Amit; Bushby, Paul J.; Wood, Toby S. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom); Snodin, Andrew P., E-mail: a.seta1@ncl.ac.uk, E-mail: amitseta90@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Applied Science, King Mongkut’s University of Technology North Bangkok, Bangkok 10800 (Thailand)

    2017-04-10

    The propagation of cosmic rays in turbulent magnetic fields is a diffusive process driven by the scattering of the charged particles by random magnetic fluctuations. Such fields are usually highly intermittent, consisting of intense magnetic filaments and ribbons surrounded by weaker, unstructured fluctuations. Studies of cosmic-ray propagation have largely overlooked intermittency, instead adopting Gaussian random magnetic fields. Using test particle simulations, we calculate cosmic-ray diffusivity in intermittent, dynamo-generated magnetic fields. The results are compared with those obtained from non-intermittent magnetic fields having identical power spectra. The presence of magnetic intermittency significantly enhances cosmic-ray diffusion over a wide range of particle energies. We demonstrate that the results can be interpreted in terms of a correlated random walk.

  4. Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Peripheral Neuropathy and Agent Orange VA presumes Veterans' early-onset ... 10 percent disabling by VA's rating regulations. About peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is a condition of the peripheral ...

  5. ANISOTROPIC INTERMITTENCY OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, K. T.; Kiyani, K. H.; Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B.

    2014-01-01

    A higher-order multiscale analysis of spatial anisotropy in inertial range magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is presented using measurements from the STEREO spacecraft in fast ambient solar wind. We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsässer field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multiexponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations are interpreted as evidence for the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. As such, these results present strong observational constraints on the statistical nature of intermittency in turbulent plasmas

  6. Prolonged Intermittent Renal Replacement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edrees, Fahad; Li, Tingting; Vijayan, Anitha

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged intermittent renal replacement therapy (PIRRT) is becoming an increasingly popular alternative to continuous renal replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury. There are significant practice variations in the provision of PIRRT across institutions, with respect to prescription, technology, and delivery of therapy. Clinical trials have generally demonstrated that PIRRT is non-inferior to continuous renal replacement therapy regarding patient outcomes. PIRRT offers cost-effective renal replacement therapy along with other advantages such as early patient mobilization and decreased nursing time. However, due to lack of standardization of the procedure, PIRRT still poses significant challenges, especially pertaining to appropriate drug dosing. Future guidelines and clinical trials should work toward developing consensus definitions for PIRRT and ensure optimal delivery of therapy. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intermittent fasting attenuates inflammasome activity in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Santro, Tomislav; Manzanero, Silvia; Widiapradja, Alexander; Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lee, Seung-Yoon; Chunduri, Prasad; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Stranahan, Alexis M; Mattson, Mark P; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2014-07-01

    Recent findings have revealed a novel inflammatory mechanism that contributes to tissue injury in cerebral ischemia mediated by multi-protein complexes termed inflammasomes. Intermittent fasting (IF) can decrease the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the periphery and brain. Here we investigated the impact of IF (16h of food deprivation daily) for 4months on NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activities following cerebral ischemia. Ischemic stroke was induced in C57BL/6J mice by middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion (I/R). IF decreased the activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, the expression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome proteins, and both IL-1β and IL-18 in the ischemic brain tissue. These findings demonstrate that IF can attenuate the inflammatory response and tissue damage following ischemic stroke by a mechanism involving suppression of NLRP1 and NLRP3 inflammasome activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Intermittent cold exposure enhances fat accumulation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Sun Yoo

    Full Text Available Due to its high energy consuming characteristics, brown adipose tissue (BAT has been suggested as a key player in energy metabolism. Cold exposure is a physiological activator of BAT. Intermittent cold exposure (ICE, unlike persistent exposure, is clinically feasible. The main objective of this study was to investigate whether ICE reduces adiposity in C57BL/6 mice. Surprisingly, we found that ICE actually increased adiposity despite enhancing Ucp1 expression in BAT and inducing beige adipocytes in subcutaneous white adipose tissue. ICE did not alter basal systemic insulin sensitivity, but it increased liver triglyceride content and secretion rate as well as blood triglyceride levels. Gene profiling further demonstrated that ICE, despite suppressing lipogenic gene expression in white adipose tissue and liver during cold exposure, enhanced lipogenesis between the exposure periods. Together, our results indicate that despite enhancing BAT recruitment, ICE in mice increases fat accumulation by stimulating de novo lipogenesis.

  9. Clinical impact of exercise in patients with peripheral arterial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovic, Marko; Jug, Borut; Lenasi, Helena

    2017-08-01

    Increasing prevalence, high morbidity and mortality, and decreased health-related quality of life are hallmarks of peripheral arterial disease. About one-third of peripheral arterial disease patients have intermittent claudication with deleterious effects on everyday activities, such as walking. Exercise training improves peripheral arterial disease symptoms and is recommended as first line therapy for peripheral arterial disease. This review examines the effects of exercise training beyond improvements in walking distance, namely on vascular function, parameters of inflammation, activated hemostasis and oxidative stress, and quality of life. Exercise training not only increases walking distance and physiologic parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease, but also improves the cardiovascular risk profile by helping patients achieve better control of hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity and dyslipidemia, thus further reducing cardiovascular risk and the prevalence of coexistent atherosclerotic diseases. American guidelines suggest supervised exercise training, performed for a minimum of 30-45 min, at least three times per week, for at least 12 weeks. Walking is the most studied exercise modality and its efficacy in improving cardiovascular parameters in patients with peripheral arterial disease has been extensively proven. As studies have shown that supervised exercise training improves walking performance, cardiovascular parameters and quality of life in patients with peripheral arterial disease, it should be encouraged and more often prescribed.

  10. Intermittent cranial lung herniation in two dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmini, Carlo; De Simone, Antonio; Valbonetti, Luca; Diana, Alessia

    2007-01-01

    Two aged dogs with chronic obstructive airway disease were evaluated because of intermittent swelling of the ventral cervical region. Radiographs made at expiration and caudal positioning of the forelimbs allowed identification of intermittent cervical lung herniation of the left and right cranial lung lobe in both dogs. Pulmonary hyperinflation, increased expiratory effort, and chronic coughing were considered responsible for the lung herniation. Cervical lung hernia should be included in the differential diagnoses of intermittent cervical swelling in dogs with chronic respiratory disorders associated with increased expiratory effort and chronic coughing.

  11. The Prognostic Value of International Prognostic Index and MIB-l Immunostaining of Peripheral Lymphoid Tissues and Bone Marrow in Patients with High-Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assem, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Cell kinetic data are important indicator of the aggressiveness of tumour and clinical response. The Ki-67 antigen plays a pivotal role in maintaining cell proliferation and the expression of this antigen was found to be a valuable indicator for aggressive disease in a variety of neoplastic disorders. Aim of the study: This study aimed to assess the prognostic significance of the expression of Ki-67 antigen in peripheral lymphoid tissues and bone marrow, using the monoclonal antibody MIB-l that is applicable in formaline-fixed paraffin embedded samples in cases with high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Material and methods: The MIB-I immunostaining was performed on 96 samples from 48 patients with high-grade non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The study was performed on tissue sections, nodal or extra nodal, as well as on BM smears or BM paraffin embedded sections of same patients. Ki-67 index was determined using image analyzer. Results: Forty-five out of the studied 48 cases (93.8%) were positive with a median labelling index of 20.425% (Range, 0-58%). We were able to detect bone marrow involvement by detecting MIB-l positive cells in BM samples of 29 patients who were not morphologically diagnosed to have BM infiltration. There was a strong correlation between BM positivity for Ki-67 and Ki-67 labelling index (p < 0.001). Twenty-eight (58.3%) out of the studied 48 cases achieved complete remission (CR). The median duration of CR was 35 months (range, 8-42 months) and the overall survival at 48 months was 35.4% (median 22 months, 95% CI, 13-31 months). The median Ki-67 index (20.425%) was chosen as a cut-off level for statistical analysis of the variables that influence clinical outcome. The probability of inducing CR was associated with low and low intermediate International Prognostic Index (IPI) whereas a low growth fraction was associated, although not significant, with a trend toward a higher probability of inducing a CR. In univariate analysis, high MIB1 labelling

  12. Effects of intermittent fasting and chronic swimming exercise on body composition and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Ruan Carlos Macedo de; Portari, Guilherme Vannucchi; Ferraz, Alex Soares Marreiros; da Silva, Tiago Eugênio Oliveira; Marocolo, Moacir

    2017-12-01

    Intermittent fasting protocol (IFP) has been suggested as a strategy to change body metabolism and improve health. The effects of IFP seem to be similar to aerobic exercise, having a hormetic adaptation according to intensity and frequency. However, the effects of combining both interventions are still unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of IFP with and without endurance-exercise training on body composition, food behavior, and lipid metabolism. Twenty-week-old Wistar rats were kept under an inverted circadian cycle of 12 h with water ad libitum and assigned to 4 different groups: control group (ad libitum feeding and sedentary), exercise group (ad libitum feeding and endurance training), intermittent fasting group (IF; intermittent fasting and sedentary), and intermittent fasting and exercise group (IFEX; intermittent fasting and endurance training). After 6 weeks, the body weight of IF and IFEX animals decreased without changes in food consumption. Yet, the body composition between the 2 groups was different, with the IFEX animals containing higher total protein and lower total fat content than the IF animals. The IFEX group also showed increases in total high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and increased intramuscular lipid content. The amount of brown adipose tissue was higher in IF and IFEX groups; however, the IFEX group showed higher expression levels of uncoupling protein 1 in this tissue, indicating a greater thermogenesis. The IFP combined with endurance training is an efficient method for decreasing body mass and altering fat metabolism, without inflicting losses in protein content.

  13. Intermittent sea-level acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivieri, M.; Spada, G.

    2013-10-01

    Using instrumental observations from the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL), we provide a new assessment of the global sea-level acceleration for the last ~ 2 centuries (1820-2010). Our results, obtained by a stack of tide gauge time series, confirm the existence of a global sea-level acceleration (GSLA) and, coherently with independent assessments so far, they point to a value close to 0.01 mm/yr2. However, differently from previous studies, we discuss how change points or abrupt inflections in individual sea-level time series have contributed to the GSLA. Our analysis, based on methods borrowed from econometrics, suggests the existence of two distinct driving mechanisms for the GSLA, both involving a minority of tide gauges globally. The first effectively implies a gradual increase in the rate of sea-level rise at individual tide gauges, while the second is manifest through a sequence of catastrophic variations of the sea-level trend. These occurred intermittently since the end of the 19th century and became more frequent during the last four decades.

  14. Social Smoking among Intermittent Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, Saul; Li, Xiaoxue; Dunbar, Michael S.; Ferguson, Stuart G.; Tindle, Hilary A.; Scholl, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background “Social smoking” - smoking mostly or even only with others – may be an important pattern that implies smoking motivated extrinsically by social influences. Non-daily smokers (intermittent smokers; ITS) are often assumed to be social smokers, with some authors even assuming that all ITS are social smokers (SS+). We sought to identify and characterize social smokers in a sample of ITS. Methods 204 adult ITS (smoking 4–27 days/month) recorded the circumstances of smoking in their natural settings using Ecological Momentary Assessment, while also recording their circumstances in nonsmoking moments. SS+ were defined as ITS who were with others when they smoked most of their cigarettes, and who were ≥ 50% more likely to be with others when smoking than when not. Results Only 13% of ITS were SS+. Although defined solely on the basis of presence of others, SS+ showed a distinct pattern of smoking across multiple dimensions: Compared to other ITS (who were significantly less likely to smoke when with others), SS+ smoking was more associated with socializing, being with friends and acquaintances, drinking alcohol, weekends, evening or nighttime, being in other people’s homes, but not their own home. SS+ smoking was low in the morning and increased in the evening. SS+ smoked fewer days/week and were less dependent, but did not differ demographically. Conclusions Social smoking does constitute a highly distinct smoking pattern, but is not common among adult ITS. PMID:26205313

  15. Intermittent ileocoecal intususception in adult

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambal, M.; Zonca, P.; Maly, T.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Aim of our paper is to present a case-report of chronic invagination in adult patient. Material: 28-years old woman with one year history of intermittent abdominal pain with symptoms of subileus state. She has underwent abdominal ultrasonography, abdominal X-ray, colonoscopy, irigography and abdominal CT. Appendectomy indicated for diagnosis of chronic appendicitis did not improve symptoms. Consecutively during acute problems were irigography and CT performed and diagnosis of an incomplete colon transversum obstruction of uncertain origin was established. There was stated suspicion of an intususception and patient was due to a repeated gastrointestinal passage indicated for an explorative laparotomy. During operation there was identified threefold invagination – colo-colonic, ileo-colonic and ileo-ileal. As a leading point of invagination was found in terminal ileum intraluminal polypous tumor 5 cm in diameter. Because of the secondary chronic changes of right colon wall and terminal ileum wall, after partial desinvagination right hemicolectomy was performed. Results: Patient was primary healed and now is without any subjective problems. Conclusion: Invagination is an acute abdominal event of obturative-strangulative type and it mainly occurs in infantile age. It is astonishing how long were patient´s difficulties lasting without obvious acute ileus. It is necessary in clinical practice to think on these rare reasons of gastrointestinal passage disorders. (author)

  16. A Primary Care Approach to the Diagnosis and Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, David L.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of this work are: (1) Be able to recognize characteristic symptoms of intermittent claudication (2) Diagnose PAD on the basis of history, physical exam, and simple limb blood pressure measurements (3) Recognize the significance of peripheral artery disease as a marker for coronary or cerebrovascular atherosclerosis (4) Provide appropriate medical management of atherosclerosis risk factors-- including use of antiplatelet therapy to reduce risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and death (5) Manage symptoms of intermittent claudication with program of smoking cessation, exercise, and medication The diagnosis of intermittent claudication secondary to peripheral artery disease (PAD) can often be made on the basis of history and physical examination. Additional evaluation of PAD is multi-modal and the techniques used will vary depending on the nature and severity of the patient's presenting problem. Most patients can be appropriately managed without referral for specialized diagnostic services or interventions.

  17. On-line intermittent connector anomaly detection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper investigates a non-traditional use of differential current sensor and current sensor to detect intermittent disconnection problems in connectors. An...

  18. Intermittent chaotic chimeras for coupled rotators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmi, Simona; Martens, Erik Andreas; Thutupalli, Shashi

    2015-01-01

    Two symmetrically coupled populations of N oscillators with inertia m display chaotic solutions with broken symmetry similar to experimental observations with mechanical pendulums. In particular, we report evidence of intermittent chaotic chimeras, where one population is synchronized and the other...

  19. Feigenbaum attractor and intermittency in particle collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batunin, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    The hypothesis is proposed that the Feigenbaum attractor arising as a limit set in an infinite pichfork bifurcation sequence for unimodal one-dimensional maps underlies the intermittency phenomena in particle collisions. 23 refs.; 8 figs

  20. Antral hyperplastic polyp causing intermittent gastric outlet obstruction: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtkaya-Yapicier Ozlem

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperplastic polyps are the most common polypoid lesions of the stomach. Rarely, they cause gastric outlet obstruction by prolapsing through the pyloric channel, when they arise in the prepyloric antrum. Case presentation A 62-year-old woman presented with intermittent nausea and vomiting of 4 months duration. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed a 30 mm prepyloric sessile polyp causing intermittent gastric outlet obstruction. Following submucosal injection of diluted adrenaline solution, the polyp was removed with a snare. Multiple biopsies were taken from the greater curvature of the antrum and the corpus. Rapid urease test for Helicobacter pylori yielded a negative result. Histopathologic examination showed a hyperplastic polyp without any evidence of malignancy. Biopsies of the antrum and the corpus revealed gastritis with neither atrophic changes nor Helicobacter pylori infection. Follow-up endoscopy after a 12-week course of proton pomp inhibitor therapy showed a complete healing without any remnant tissue at the polypectomy site. The patient has been symptom-free during 8 months of follow-up. Conclusions Symptomatic gastric polyps should be removed preferentially when they are detected at the initial diagnostic endoscopy. Polypectomy not only provides tissue to determine the exact histopathologic type of the polyp, but also achieves radical treatment.

  1. Intermittent Hypoxia Impairs Glucose Homeostasis in C57BL6/J Mice: Partial Improvement with Cessation of the Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Jan; Shimoda, Larissa A.; Drager, Luciano F.; Undem, Clark; McHugh, Holly; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y.; Punjabi, Naresh M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although several studies have suggested that intermittent hypoxia in obstructive sleep apnea may induce abnormalities in glucose homeostasis, it remains to be determined whether these abnormalities improve after discontinuation of the exposure. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of intermittent hypoxia on glucose homeostasis, beta cell function, and liver glucose metabolism and to investigate whether the impairments improve after the hypoxic exposure is discontinued. Interventions: C57BL6/J mice were exposed to 14 days of intermittent hypoxia, 14 days of intermittent air, or 7 days of intermittent hypoxia followed by 7 days of intermittent air (recovery paradigm). Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed to estimate whole-body insulin sensitivity and calculate measures of beta cell function. Oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue and glucose output from isolated hepatocytes were also assessed. Results: Intermittent hypoxia increased fasting glucose levels and worsened glucose tolerance by 67% and 27%, respectively. Furthermore, intermittent hypoxia exposure was associated with impairments in insulin sensitivity and beta cell function, an increase in liver glycogen, higher hepatocyte glucose output, and an increase in oxidative stress in the pancreas. While fasting glucose levels and hepatic glucose output normalized after discontinuation of the hypoxic exposure, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and impairments in beta cell function persisted. Conclusions: Intermittent hypoxia induces insulin resistance, impairs beta cell function, enhances hepatocyte glucose output, and increases oxidative stress in the pancreas. Cessation of the hypoxic exposure does not fully reverse the observed changes in glucose metabolism. Citation: Polak J; Shimoda LA; Drager LF; Undem C; McHugh H; Polotsky VY; Punjabi NM

  2. Intermittent Fasting Alleviates the Increase of Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Brain of a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease: Possibly Mediated by β-hydroxybutyrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingzhu Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent fasting has been demonstrated to protect against Alzheimer's disease (AD, however, the mechanism is unclear. Histone acetylation and lipoprotein lipase (LPL are involved in AD progression. Importantly, LPL has been documented to be regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs inhibitors (increase histone acetylation level in adipocyte and mesenchymal stem cells, or by fasting in adipose and muscle tissues. In brain, however, whether histone acetylation or fasting regulates LPL expression is unknown. This study was designed to demonstrate intermittent fasting may protect against AD through increasing β-hydroxybutyrate, a HDACs inhibitor, to regulate LPL. We also investigated microRNA-29a expression associating with regulation of LPL and histone acetylation. The results showed LPL mRNA expression was increased and microRNA-29a expression was decreased in the cerebral cortex of AD model mice (APP/PS1, which were alleviated by intermittent fasting. No significant differences were found in the total expression of LPL protein (brain-derived and located in capillary endothelial cells from peripheral tissues in the cerebral cortex of APP/PS1 mice. Further study indicated that LPL located in capillary endothelial cells was decreased in the cerebral cortex of APP/PS1 mice, which was alleviated by intermittent fasting. LPL and microRNA-29a expression were separately increased and down-regulated in 2 μM Aβ25−35-exposed SH-SY5Y cells, but respectively decreased and up-regulated in 10 μM Aβ25−35-exposed cells, which were all reversed by β-hydroxybutyrate. The increase of HDAC2/3 expression and the decrease of acetylated H3K9 and H4K12 levels were alleviated in APP/PS1 mice by intermittent fasting treatment, as well in 2 or 10 μM Aβ25−35-exposed cells by β-hydroxybutyrate treatment. These findings above suggested the results from APP/PS1 mice were consistent with those from cells treated with 2 μM Aβ25−35. Interestingly, LPL

  3. Intermittent Fasting Alleviates the Increase of Lipoprotein Lipase Expression in Brain of a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease: Possibly Mediated by β-hydroxybutyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingzhu; Li, Xinhui; Ren, Yahao; Zhao, Yue; Xing, Aiping; Jiang, Congmin; Chen, Yanqiu; An, Li

    2018-01-01

    Intermittent fasting has been demonstrated to protect against Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, the mechanism is unclear. Histone acetylation and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) are involved in AD progression. Importantly, LPL has been documented to be regulated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors (increase histone acetylation level) in adipocyte and mesenchymal stem cells, or by fasting in adipose and muscle tissues. In brain, however, whether histone acetylation or fasting regulates LPL expression is unknown. This study was designed to demonstrate intermittent fasting may protect against AD through increasing β-hydroxybutyrate, a HDACs inhibitor, to regulate LPL. We also investigated microRNA-29a expression associating with regulation of LPL and histone acetylation. The results showed LPL mRNA expression was increased and microRNA-29a expression was decreased in the cerebral cortex of AD model mice (APP/PS1), which were alleviated by intermittent fasting. No significant differences were found in the total expression of LPL protein (brain-derived and located in capillary endothelial cells from peripheral tissues) in the cerebral cortex of APP/PS1 mice. Further study indicated that LPL located in capillary endothelial cells was decreased in the cerebral cortex of APP/PS1 mice, which was alleviated by intermittent fasting. LPL and microRNA-29a expression were separately increased and down-regulated in 2 μM Aβ 25-35 -exposed SH-SY5Y cells, but respectively decreased and up-regulated in 10 μM Aβ 25-35 -exposed cells, which were all reversed by β-hydroxybutyrate. The increase of HDAC2/3 expression and the decrease of acetylated H3K9 and H4K12 levels were alleviated in APP/PS1 mice by intermittent fasting treatment, as well in 2 or 10 μM Aβ 25-35 -exposed cells by β-hydroxybutyrate treatment. These findings above suggested the results from APP/PS1 mice were consistent with those from cells treated with 2 μM Aβ 25-35 . Interestingly, LPL expression was

  4. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arslantunali D

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available D Arslantunali,1–3,* T Dursun,1,2,* D Yucel,1,4,5 N Hasirci,1,2,6 V Hasirci,1,2,7 1BIOMATEN, Center of Excellence in Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Middle East Technical University (METU, Ankara, Turkey; 2Department of Biotechnology, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 3Department of Bioengineering, Gumushane University, Gumushane, Turkey; 4Faculty of Engineering, Department of Medical Engineering, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 5School of Medicine, Department of Histology and Embryology, Acibadem University, Istanbul, Turkey; 6Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey; 7Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, METU, Ankara, Turkey *These authors have contributed equally to this work Abstract: Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type are being presented. Keywords: peripheral nerve injury, natural biomaterials, synthetic biomaterials

  5. Vasculitic peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Amini

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Primary systemic vasculitis in pre-capillary arteries is associated with peripheral neuropathy. In some types of systematic vasculitis about 60 % of patients have peripheral nervous system (PNS involvement. In vasculitic peripheral neuropathies (VPN a necrotizing and inflammatory process leads to narrowing of vasa nervorum lumen and eventually the appearance of ischemic lesions in peripheral nerves. Some features might be suggestive of VPN, like: axonal nerve degeneration, wallerian-like degeneration, and diameter irregularity of nerve. Peripheral nervous system (PNS destruction during systemic vasculitides should be considered, due to its frequency and early occurrence in vasculitis progression. The first line treatment of non systematic VPNs is corticosteroid agents, but these drugs might worsen the VPNs or systemic vasculitis.

  6. Complementary therapies for peripheral arterial disease: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittler, Max H; Ernst, Edzard

    2005-07-01

    While peripheral arterial disease (PAD) affects a considerable proportion of patients in the primary care setting, there is a high level of use of complementary treatment options. The aim was to assess the effectiveness of any type of complementary therapy for peripheral arterial disease. A systematic review was performed. Literature searches were conducted on Medline, Embase, Amed, and the Cochrane Library until December 2004. Hand-searches of medical journals and bibliographies were conducted. There were no restrictions regarding the language of publication. The screening of studies, selection, data extraction, the assessment of methodologic quality and validation were performed independently by the two reviewers. Data from randomized controlled trials, and systematic reviews and meta-analyses, which based their findings on the results of randomized controlled trials were included. Seven systematic reviews and meta-analyses and three additional randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. The evidence relates to acupuncture, biofeedback, chelation therapy, CO(2)-applications and the dietary supplements Allium sativum (garlic), Ginkgo biloba (ginkgo), omega-3 fatty acids, padma 28 and Vitamin E. Most studies included only patients with peripheral arterial disease in Fontaine stage II (intermittent claudication). The reviewed RCTs, systematic reviews and meta-analyses which based their findings on the results of RCTs suggest that G. biloba is effective compared with placebo for patients with intermittent claudication. Evidence also suggests that padma 28 is effective for intermittent claudication, although more data are required to confirm these findings. For all other complementary treatment options there is no evidence beyond reasonable doubt to suggest effectiveness for patients with peripheral arterial disease.

  7. Regulatable Transgene Expression for Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Kawata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN is a debilitating complication associated with drug treatment of cancer for which there are no effective strategies of prevention or treatment. In this study, we examined the effect of intermittent expression of neurotophin-3 (NT-3 or interleukin-10 (IL-10 from replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV-based regulatable vectors delivered by subcutaneous inoculation to the dorsal root ganglion (DRG on the development of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy. We constructed two different tetracycline (tet-on-based regulatable HSV vectors, one expressing NT-3 and the other expressing IL-10, in which the transactivator expression in the tet-on system was under the control of HSV latency-associated promoter 2 (LAP-2, and expression of the transgene was controlled by doxycycline (DOX. We examined the therapeutic effect of intermittent expression of the transgene in animals with paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy modeled by intraperitoneal injection of paclitaxel (16 mg/kg once a week for 5 weeks. Intermittent expression of either NT-3 or IL-10 3 days before and 1 day after paclitaxel administration protected animals against paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy over the course of 5 weeks. These results suggest the potential of regulatable vectors for prevention of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  8. Regulatable Transgene Expression for Prevention of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Daisuke; Wu, Zetang

    2017-09-15

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a debilitating complication associated with drug treatment of cancer for which there are no effective strategies of prevention or treatment. In this study, we examined the effect of intermittent expression of neurotophin-3 (NT-3) or interleukin-10 (IL-10) from replication-defective herpes simplex virus (HSV)-based regulatable vectors delivered by subcutaneous inoculation to the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) on the development of paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy. We constructed two different tetracycline (tet)-on-based regulatable HSV vectors, one expressing NT-3 and the other expressing IL-10, in which the transactivator expression in the tet-on system was under the control of HSV latency-associated promoter 2 (LAP-2), and expression of the transgene was controlled by doxycycline (DOX). We examined the therapeutic effect of intermittent expression of the transgene in animals with paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy modeled by intraperitoneal injection of paclitaxel (16 mg/kg) once a week for 5 weeks. Intermittent expression of either NT-3 or IL-10 3 days before and 1 day after paclitaxel administration protected animals against paclitaxel-induced peripheral neuropathy over the course of 5 weeks. These results suggest the potential of regulatable vectors for prevention of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy.

  9. Donating Peripheral Blood Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print this page My Cart Donating peripheral blood stem cells Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is a nonsurgical procedure to collect ... Donating bone marrow Donor experiences videos Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) donation is one of two methods of ...

  10. Peripheral Neuropathy: Symptoms and Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Utah Research News Make a Difference Symptoms of Peripheral Neuropathy Print This Page Peripheral Neuropathy symptoms usually start ... more slowly over many years. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy often include: A sensation of wearing an invisible “ ...

  11. Sympathoexcitation and arterial hypertension associated with obstructive sleep apnea and cyclic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, J Woodrow; Tamisier, Renaud; Liu, Yuzhen

    2015-12-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive episodes of upper airway obstruction during sleep. These obstructive episodes are characterized by cyclic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), by sleep fragmentation, and by hemodynamic instability, and they result in sustained sympathoexcitation and elevated arterial pressure that persist during waking, after restoration of normoxia. Early studies established that 1) CIH, rather than sleep disruption, accounts for the increase in arterial pressure; 2) the increase in arterial pressure is a consequence of the sympathoactivation; and 3) arterial hypertension after CIH exposure requires an intact peripheral chemoreflex. More recently, however, evidence has accumulated that sympathoactivation and hypertension after CIH are also dependent on altered central sympathoregulation. Furthermore, although many molecular pathways are activated in both the carotid chemoreceptor and in the central nervous system by CIH exposure, two specific neuromodulators-endothelin-1 and angiotensin II-appear to play crucial roles in mediating the sympathetic and hemodynamic response to intermittent hypoxia. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Intermittent ephemeral river-breaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniers, A. J.; MacMahan, J. H.; Gallagher, E. L.; Shanks, A.; Morgan, S.; Jarvis, M.; Thornton, E. B.; Brown, J.; Fujimura, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2011 we performed a field experiment in Carmel River State Beach, CA, at a time when the intermittent natural breaching of the ephemeral Carmel River occurred due to an unusually rainy period prior to the experiment associated with El Nino. At this time the river would fill the lagoon over the period of a number of days after which a breach would occur. This allowed us to document a number of breaches with unique pre- and post-breach topographic surveys, accompanying ocean and lagoon water elevations as well as extremely high flow (4m/s) velocities in the river mouth during the breaching event. The topographic surveys were obtained with a GPS-equipped backpack mounted on a walking human and show the evolution of the river breaching with a gradually widening and deepening river channel that cuts through the pre-existing beach and berm. The beach face is qualified as a steep with an average beach slope of 1:10 with significant reflection of the incident waves (MacMahan et al., 2012). The wave directions are generally shore normal as the waves refract over the deep canyon that is located offshore of the beach. The tide is mixed semi-diurnal with a range on the order of one meter. Breaching typically occurred during the low-low tide. Grain size is highly variable along the beach with layers of alternating fine and coarse material that could clearly be observed as the river exit channel was cutting through the beach. Large rocky outcroppings buried under the beach sand are also present along certain stretches of the beach controlling the depth of the breaching channel. The changes in the water level measured within the lagoon and the ocean side allows for an estimate of the volume flux associated with the breach as function of morphology, tidal elevation and wave conditions as well as an assessment of the conditions and mechanisms of breach closure, which occurred on the time scale of O(0.5 days). Exploratory model simulations will be presented at the

  13. Effect of ovariectomy on inflammation induced by intermittent hypoxia in a mouse model of sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Marta; Palomer, Xavier; Montserrat, Josep M; Vázquez-Carrera, Manel; Farré, Ramon

    2014-10-01

    Patient data report marked gender and pre-vs-postmenopausal differences in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, no experimental data are available on how sexual hormones modulate OSA consequences. Here we report novel results on estrogen-modulated heart and brain inflammation in female mice subjected to intermittent hypoxia, a major injurious challenge in OSA. C57BL/6J (14-week old) intact and ovariectomized mice (n=6 each) were subjected to intermittent hypoxia (20 s at 5% and 40s at 21%, 60 cycles/h; 6 h/day). Identical intact and ovariectomized groups breathing room air were controls. After 30 days, the gene expressions of interleukins 6 and 8 (IL-6, IL-8) in the brain and heart tissues were measured. Whereas, compared with normoxia, intermittent hypoxia considerably increased IL-6 and IL-8 gene expressions in intact females, no change was found in ovariectomized mice when comparing normoxia and intermittent hypoxia. These data suggest that estrogens modulate the inflammatory effects of intermittent hypoxia and point to further studies on the role played by sex hormones in OSA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Coherent Structures and Intermittency in Plasma Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Sen, Abhijit

    2008-01-01

    The paper discusses some fundamental issues related to the phenomenon of intermittency in plasma turbulence with particular reference to experimental observations in fusion devices. Intermittency is typically associated with the presence of coherent structures in turbulence. Since coherent structures can play an important role in governing the transport properties of a system they have received a great deal of attention in fusion research. We review some of the experimental measurements and numerical simulation studies on the presence and formation of coherent structures in plasmas and discuss their relevance to intermittency. Intermittency, as widely discussed in the context of neutral fluid turbulence, implies multiscaling behaviour in contrast to self-similar scaling patterns observed in self organized criticality (SOC) phenomenon. The experimental evidence from plasma turbulence measurements reveal a mixed picture--while some observations support the SOC model description others indicate the presence of multiscaling behaviour. We discuss these results in the light of our present understanding of plasma turbulence and in terms of certain unique aspects of intermittency as revealed by fluid models of plasmas.

  15. Intermittency in {sup 197}Au fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabrowska, A; Holynski, R; Olszewski, A; Szarska, M; Wilczynska, B; Wolter, W; Wosiek, B [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Cracow (Poland); Cherry, M L; Deines-Jones, P; Jones, W V; Sengupta, K; Wefel, B [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Waddington, C J [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). School of Physics and Astronomy; Pozharova, E A; Skorodko, T Yu [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); KLMM Collaboration

    1995-07-01

    The concept of factorial moments was applied to an analysis of the dynamical fluctuations in the charge distributions of the fragments emitted from gold nuclei with energies 10.6 and < 1.0 GeV/n interacting with emulsion nuclei. Clear evidence for intermittent fluctuations has been found in an analysis using all the particles released from the gold projectile, with a stronger effect observed below 1 GeV/n than at 10.6 GeV/n. For the full data sets, however, the intermittency effect was found to be very sensitive to the singly charged particles, and neglecting these particles strongly reduces the intermittency signal. When the analysis is restricted to the multiply charged fragments, an intermittency effect is revealed only for multifragmentation events, although one that is enhanced as compared to the analysis of all, singly and multiply charged, particles. The properties of the anomalous fractal dimensions suggest a sequential decay mechanism, rather than the existence of possible critical behaviour in the process of nuclear fragmentation. The likely influence of the charge conservation effects and the finite size of decaying systems on the observed intermittency signals was pointed out. (author). 37 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs.

  16. Knockdown of angiopoietin-like 2 mimics the benefits of intermittent fasting on insulin responsiveness and weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Cécile; Pinçon, Anthony; Bélanger, Alexandre Maxime; Luo, Xiaoyan; Gillis, Marc-Antoine; de Montgolfier, Olivia; Thorin-Trescases, Nathalie; Thorin, Éric

    2018-01-01

    Angiopoietin-like 2 (ANGPTL2) is an inflammatory adipokine linking obesity to insulin resistance. Intermittent fasting, on the other hand, is a lifestyle intervention able to prevent obesity and diabetes but difficult to implement and maintain. Our objectives were to characterize a link between ANGPTL2 and intermittent fasting and to investigate whether the knockdown of ANGPTL2 reproduces the benefits of intermittent fasting on weight gain and insulin responsiveness in knockdown and wild-type littermates mice. Intermittent fasting, access to food ad libitum once every other day, was initiated at the age of three months and maintained for four months. Intermittent fasting decreased by 63% (p < 0.05) gene expression of angptl2 in adipose tissue of wild-type mice. As expected, intermittent fasting improved insulin sensitivity (p < 0.05) and limited weight gain (p < 0.05) in wild-type mice. Knockdown mice fed ad libitum, however, were comparable to wild-type mice following the intermittent fasting regimen: insulin sensitivity and weight gain were identical, while intermittent fasting had no additional impact on these parameters in knockdown mice. Energy intake was similar between both wild-type fed intermittent fasting and ANGPTL2 knockdown mice fed ad libitum, suggesting that intermittent fasting and knockdown of ANGPTL2 equally lower feeding efficiency. These results suggest that the reduction of ANGPTL2 could be a useful and promising strategy to prevent obesity and insulin resistance, although further investigation of the mechanisms linking ANGPTL2 and intermittent fasting is warranted. Impact statement Intermittent fasting is an efficient diet pattern to prevent weight gain and improve insulin sensitivity. It is, however, a difficult regimen to follow and compliance is expected to be very low. In this work, we demonstrate that knockdown of ANGPTL2 in mice fed ad libitum mimics the beneficial effects of intermittent fasting on weight gain and insulin

  17. Effects of intermittent fasting on glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoni, Rona; Johnston, Kelly L; Collins, Adam L; Robertson, M Denise

    2017-08-01

    Two intermittent fasting variants, intermittent energy restriction (IER) and time-restricted feeding (TRF), have received considerable interest as strategies for weight-management and/or improving metabolic health. With these strategies, the pattern of energy restriction and/or timing of food intake are altered so that individuals undergo frequently repeated periods of fasting. This review provides a commentary on the rodent and human literature, specifically focusing on the effects of IER and TRF on glucose and lipid metabolism. For IER, there is a growing evidence demonstrating its benefits on glucose and lipid homeostasis in the short-to-medium term; however, more long-term safety studies are required. Whilst the metabolic benefits of TRF appear quite profound in rodents, findings from the few human studies have been mixed. There is some suggestion that the metabolic changes elicited by these approaches can occur in the absence of energy restriction, and in the context of IER, may be distinct from those observed following similar weight-loss achieved via modest continuous energy restriction. Mechanistically, the frequently repeated prolonged fasting intervals may favour preferential reduction of ectopic fat, beneficially modulate aspects of adipose tissue physiology/morphology, and may also impinge on circadian clock regulation. However, mechanistic evidence is largely limited to findings from rodent studies, thus necessitating focused human studies, which also incorporate more dynamic assessments of glucose and lipid metabolism. Ultimately, much remains to be learned about intermittent fasting (in its various forms); however, the findings to date serve to highlight promising avenues for future research.

  18. Peripheral Ulcerative Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... oval in shape. Diagnosis A doctor's evaluation Sometimes culture The diagnosis of peripheral ulcerative keratitis is suspected when the doctor sees the affected cornea in a person who also has a severe and/or long- ...

  19. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  20. Intermittent hypoxia impairs glucose homeostasis in C57BL6/J mice: partial improvement with cessation of the exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Jan; Shimoda, Larissa A; Drager, Luciano F; Undem, Clark; McHugh, Holly; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Punjabi, Naresh M

    2013-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Although several studies have suggested that intermittent hypoxia in obstructive sleep apnea may induce abnormalities in glucose homeostasis, it remains to be determined whether these abnormalities improve after discontinuation of the exposure. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of intermittent hypoxia on glucose homeostasis, beta cell function, and liver glucose metabolism and to investigate whether the impairments improve after the hypoxic exposure is discontinued. C57BL6/J mice were exposed to 14 days of intermittent hypoxia, 14 days of intermittent air, or 7 days of intermittent hypoxia followed by 7 days of intermittent air (recovery paradigm). Glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed to estimate whole-body insulin sensitivity and calculate measures of beta cell function. Oxidative stress in pancreatic tissue and glucose output from isolated hepatocytes were also assessed. Intermittent hypoxia increased fasting glucose levels and worsened glucose tolerance by 67% and 27%, respectively. Furthermore, intermittent hypoxia exposure was associated with impairments in insulin sensitivity and beta cell function, an increase in liver glycogen, higher hepatocyte glucose output, and an increase in oxidative stress in the pancreas. While fasting glucose levels and hepatic glucose output normalized after discontinuation of the hypoxic exposure, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and impairments in beta cell function persisted. Intermittent hypoxia induces insulin resistance, impairs beta cell function, enhances hepatocyte glucose output, and increases oxidative stress in the pancreas. Cessation of the hypoxic exposure does not fully reverse the observed changes in glucose metabolism.

  1. Forces and energetics of intermittent swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floryan, Daniel; Van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments are reported on intermittent swimming motions. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional pitching foil show that the mean thrust and power scale linearly with the duty cycle, from a value of 0.2 all the way up to continuous motions, indicating that individual bursts of activity in intermittent motions are independent of each other. This conclusion is corroborated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualizations, which show that the main vortical structures in the wake do not change with duty cycle. The experimental data also demonstrate that intermittent motions are generally energetically advantageous over continuous motions. When metabolic energy losses are taken into account, this conclusion is maintained for metabolic power fractions less than 1.

  2. Chaos synchronization based on intermittent state observer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo-Hui; Zhou Shi-Ping; Xu De-Ming

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the method of synchronizing slave to the master trajectory using an intermittent state observer by constructing a synchronizer which drives the response system globally tracing the driving system asymptotically. It has been shown from the theory of synchronization error-analysis that a satisfactory result of chaos synchronization is expected under an appropriate intermittent period and state observer. Compared with continuous control method,the proposed intermittent method can target the desired orbit more efficiently. The application of the method is demonstrated on the hyperchaotic Rossler systems. Numerical simulations show that the length of the synchronization interval rs is of crucial importance for our scheme, and the method is robust with respect to parameter mismatch.

  3. Unsteady propulsion by an intermittent swimming gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoz, Emre; Moored, Keith W.

    2018-01-01

    Inviscid computational results are presented on a self-propelled swimmer modeled as a virtual body combined with a two-dimensional hydrofoil pitching intermittently about its leading edge. Lighthill (1971) originally proposed that this burst-and-coast behavior can save fish energy during swimming by taking advantage of the viscous Bone-Lighthill boundary layer thinning mechanism. Here, an additional inviscid Garrick mechanism is discovered that allows swimmers to control the ratio of their added mass thrust-producing forces to their circulatory drag-inducing forces by decreasing their duty cycle, DC, of locomotion. This mechanism can save intermittent swimmers as much as 60% of the energy it takes to swim continuously at the same speed. The inviscid energy savings are shown to increase with increasing amplitude of motion, increase with decreasing Lighthill number, Li, and switch to an energetic cost above continuous swimming for sufficiently low DC. Intermittent swimmers are observed to shed four vortices per cycle that form into groups that are self-similar with the DC. In addition, previous thrust and power scaling laws of continuous self-propelled swimming are further generalized to include intermittent swimming. The key is that by averaging the thrust and power coefficients over only the bursting period then the intermittent problem can be transformed into a continuous one. Furthermore, the intermittent thrust and power scaling relations are extended to predict the mean speed and cost of transport of swimmers. By tuning a few coefficients with a handful of simulations these self-propelled relations can become predictive. In the current study, the mean speed and cost of transport are predicted to within 3% and 18% of their full-scale values by using these relations.

  4. Increased MCP-1 gene expression in monocytes of severe OSA patients and under intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Li-Pang; Chen, Ning-Hung; Lin, Yuling; Ko, Wen-Shan; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2016-03-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is known to be a risk factor of coronary artery disease. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), as a critical factor for monocyte infiltration, is known to play a role in the development of atherosclerosis. This study aimed to investigate the effect of intermittent hypoxia, the hallmark of OSA, on the MCP-1 expression of monocytes. Peripheral blood was sampled from 61 adults enrolled for suspected OSA. RNA was prepared from the isolated monocytes for the analysis of MCP-1. The effect of in vitro intermittent hypoxia on the regulation and function of MCP-1 was investigated on THP-1 monocytic cells and human monocytes. The mRNA and secreted protein levels were investigated by RT/real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Monocytic MCP-1 gene expression was found to be increased significantly in severe OSA patients. In vitro intermittent hypoxia was demonstrated to increase the mRNA and protein expression levels of MCP-1 dose- and time-dependently in THP-1 monocytic cells. The MCP-1 mRNA expression in monocytes isolated from OSA patient was induced to a much higher level compared to that from normal control. Pre-treatment with inhibitor for p42/44 MAPK or p38 MAPK suppressed the activation of MCP-1 expression by intermittent hypoxia. This is the first study to demonstrate the increase of MCP-1 gene expression in monocytes of severe OSA patients. In addition, monocytic MCP-1 gene expression can be induced under intermittent hypoxia.

  5. Effect of Simulated Intermittent Altitude on the Metabolic and Hematologic Parameters in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi Faramoushi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Type II diabetes is a metabolic disorder accompanied with insulin resistance of the whole body cells and is considered be the fifth cause of death in the world. Adaptation to altitude can lead to tolerance to many diseases. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of simulated intermittent altitude on the metabolic and hematologic parameters and liver function in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Methods: In the current experimental study, twenty four male Wistar rats weighing 220±20 gr were randomly divided into three groups; normal control group (NC, n=8, diabetic control group (D, n=8 received fat diet for 2 weeks then were injected with streptozotocin (37 mg/kg and diabetic+hypoxia group (D+H, n=8 including diabetic rat exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia (PiO2≈106 mm Hg, simulated altitude≈3400 m, 14% oxygen for 8 weeks. Diabetic, hematologic and lipid parameters as well as ALT and AST activities were measured in peripheral blood. Results: Our findings showed that intermittent hypoxia significantly decreased serum total cholesterol, LDL ,VLDL and triglyceride in D+H group compared to D group (p<0.05. Serum levels of fasting blood glucose and homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance HOMA-IR( index and ALT were decreased in D+H group vs. D group p<0.05. Also, hemoglubin and hematocrite level increased in D+H group in comparison to D group p<0.05. No significant difference was detected in red blood cell count in D+H vs. D group. Conclusion: Based on resultant data, it seems that intermittent exposure to hypoxia (simulated to chronic and intermittent lodgement in altitude can be used to control of type 2 diabetes by increasing hemoglobin, decreasing insulin resistance and improving liver function as well as lipid parameters.

  6. Positive effects of intermittent fasting in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Ng, Gavin Yong Quan; Poh, Luting; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2017-03-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary protocol where energy restriction is induced by alternate periods of ad libitum feeding and fasting. Prophylactic intermittent fasting has been shown to extend lifespan and attenuate the progress and severity of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular (e.g. stroke and myocardial infarction), neurodegenerative (e.g. Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) and cancerous diseases in animal models. Stroke is the second leading cause of death, and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity and physical inactivity have been associated with elevated risks of stroke in humans. Recent studies have shown that prophylactic IF may mitigate tissue damage and neurological deficit following ischemic stroke by a mechanism(s) involving suppression of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death pathways in animal stroke models. This review summarizes data supporting the potential hormesis mechanisms of prophylactic IF in animal models, and with a focus on findings from animal studies of prophylactic IF in stroke in our laboratory. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Shape of power spectrum of intermittent chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So, B.C.; Mori, H.

    1984-01-01

    Power spectra of intermittent chaos are calculated analytically. It is found that the power spectrum near onset point consists of a large number of Lorentzian lines with two peaks around frequencies ω = 0 and ω = ω 0 , where ω 0 is a fundamental frequency of a periodic orbit before the onset point, and furthermore the envelope of lines around ω = 0 obeys the power law 1/ + ω +2 , whereas the envelope around ω 0 obeys 1/ + ω-ω 0 +4 . The universality of these power law dependence in a certain class of intermittent chaos are clarified from a phenomenological view point. (author)

  8. Peripheral Mechanisms of Ischemic Myalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. Queme

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Musculoskeletal pain due to ischemia is present in a variety of clinical conditions including peripheral vascular disease (PVD, sickle cell disease (SCD, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS, and even fibromyalgia (FM. The clinical features associated with deep tissue ischemia are unique because although the subjective description of pain is common to other forms of myalgia, patients with ischemic muscle pain often respond poorly to conventional analgesic therapies. Moreover, these patients also display increased cardiovascular responses to muscle contraction, which often leads to exercise intolerance or exacerbation of underlying cardiovascular conditions. This suggests that the mechanisms of myalgia development and the role of altered cardiovascular function under conditions of ischemia may be distinct compared to other injuries/diseases of the muscles. It is widely accepted that group III and IV muscle afferents play an important role in the development of pain due to ischemia. These same muscle afferents also form the sensory component of the exercise pressor reflex (EPR, which is the increase in heart rate and blood pressure (BP experienced after muscle contraction. Studies suggest that afferent sensitization after ischemia depends on interactions between purinergic (P2X and P2Y receptors, transient receptor potential (TRP channels, and acid sensing ion channels (ASICs in individual populations of peripheral sensory neurons. Specific alterations in primary afferent function through these receptor mechanisms correlate with increased pain related behaviors and altered EPRs. Recent evidence suggests that factors within the muscles during ischemic conditions including upregulation of growth factors and cytokines, and microvascular changes may be linked to the overexpression of these different receptor molecules in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG that in turn modulate pain and sympathetic reflexes. In this review article, we will discuss the

  9. Determination and Distribution Study of Pogostone in Rat Tissues by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BEH C18 column with acetonitrile-water containing 0.1 % formic acid (55:45, v/v) as the mobile phase, ... Keywords: Ultra-fast liquid chromatography, Tissue distribution, Pogostone, Honokiol, Rats .... sample extraction, storage, and intermittent.

  10. Transdermal optogenetic peripheral nerve stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimon, Benjamin E.; Zorzos, Anthony N.; Bendell, Rhys; Harding, Alexander; Fahmi, Mina; Srinivasan, Shriya; Calvaresi, Peter; Herr, Hugh M.

    2017-06-01

    Objective: A fundamental limitation in both the scientific utility and clinical translation of peripheral nerve optogenetic technologies is the optical inaccessibility of the target nerve due to the significant scattering and absorption of light in biological tissues. To date, illuminating deep nerve targets has required implantable optical sources, including fiber-optic and LED-based systems, both of which have significant drawbacks. Approach: Here we report an alternative approach involving transdermal illumination. Utilizing an intramuscular injection of ultra-high concentration AAV6-hSyn-ChR2-EYFP in rats. Main results: We demonstrate transdermal stimulation of motor nerves at 4.4 mm and 1.9 mm depth with an incident laser power of 160 mW and 10 mW, respectively. Furthermore, we employ this technique to accurately control ankle position by modulating laser power or position on the skin surface. Significance: These results have the potential to enable future scientific optogenetic studies of pathologies implicated in the peripheral nervous system for awake, freely-moving animals, as well as a basis for future clinical studies.

  11. Which factors make clean intermittent (self) catheterisation successful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobussen-Boekhorst, H.; Beekman, J.; Wijlick, E. van; Schaafstra, J.; Kuppevelt, D. van; Heesakkers, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore which factors determine successful intermittent catheterisation. BACKGROUND: Intermittent catheterisation is a safe, effective treatment and is associated with improved quality of life, although negative issues are reported. Factors which determine adherence are

  12. Smoking Habits of Patients Undergoing Treatment for Intermittent Claudication in the Vascular Quality Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Joshua; Jabo, Brice; Patel, Sheela; Kiang, Sharon; Bianchi, Christian; Chiriano, Jason; Teruya, Theodore; Abou-Zamzam, Ahmed M

    2017-10-01

    Society for Vascular Surgery practice guidelines for the medical treatment of intermittent claudication give a GRADE 1A recommendation for smoking cessation. Active smoking is therefore expected to be low in patients suffering from intermittent claudication selected for vascular surgical intervention. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of smoking in patients undergoing intervention for intermittent claudication at the national level and to determine the relationship between smoking status and intervention. The Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) registries for infra-inguinal bypass, supra-inguinal bypass, and peripheral vascular intervention (PVI) were queried to identify patients who underwent invasive treatment for intermittent claudication. Patient factors, procedure type (bypass versus PVI), and level of disease (supra-inguinal versus infra-inguinal) were evaluated for associations with smoking status (active smoking or nonsmoking) by univariate and covariate analysis. Between 2010 and 2015, 101,055 procedures were entered in the 3 registries, with 40,269 (40%) performed for intermittent claudication. Complete data for analysis were present in 37,632 cases. At the time of intervention, 44% of patients were active smokers, with wide variation by regional quality group (16-53%). In covariate analysis, active smoking at treatment was associated with age smoking status. During follow-up, 36% of patients had quit smoking. Predictors of smoking cessation included age ≥70 years (RR 1.45), ABI ≥0.9 (RR 1.12), and bypass procedures (RR 1.22). At the time of treatment, 44% of patients undergoing intervention for intermittent claudication in the VQI were active smokers and there was a wide regional variation. Prevalence of active smoking was greater in the presence of younger age, fewer comorbidities, lower ABI, and supra-inguinal disease. Type of procedure performed, and in turn level of invasiveness required, did not appear to be influenced by smoking

  13. Fractal structures and intermittency in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafson, Goesta.

    1990-04-01

    New results are presented for fractal structures and intermittency in QCD parton showers. A geometrical interpretation of the anomalous dimension in QCD is given. It is shown that model predications for factorial moments in the PEP-PETRA energy range are increased. if the properties of directly produced pions are more carefully taken into account

  14. Intermittent demand : Linking forecasting to inventory obsolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunter, Ruud H.; Syntetos, Aris A.; Babai, M. Zied

    2011-01-01

    The standard method to forecast intermittent demand is that by Croston. This method is available in ERP-type solutions such as SAP and specialised forecasting software packages (e.g. Forecast Pro), and often applied in practice. It uses exponential smoothing to separately update the estimated demand

  15. Acute intermittent porphyria presenting as progressive muscular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute intermittent porphyria, the most common porphyria affecting the nervous system, typically presents with neurovisceral crises followed by a motor neuropathy. We describe a 23-year-old black South African man presenting with a progressive stuttering, lower motor neuron syndrome developing over months. He had not ...

  16. Cooling tower modification for intermittent operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midkiff, W.S.

    1975-03-01

    One of the cooling towers at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is being operated intermittently. The cooling tower has been modified to restrict air flow and to keep the tower from drying out. The modifications are relatively inexpensive, simple to operate, and have proved effective. (U.S.)

  17. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, A.K.; Hansen, Kristian Schultz; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess whether traditional birth attendants, drug-shop vendors, community reproductive health workers and adolescent peer mobilisers could administer intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) to pregnant women. The study w...

  18. Intermittent resistive faults in digital cmos circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Ebrahimi, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    A major threat in extremely dependable high-end process node integrated systems in e.g. Avionics are no failures found (NFF). One category of NFFs is the intermittent resistive fault, often originating from bad (e.g. Via or TSV-based) interconnections. This paper will show the impact of these faults

  19. Intermittent and global transitions in plasma turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlad, M.; Spineanu, F.; Itoh, K.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2003-07-01

    The dynamics of the transition processes in plasma turbulence described by the nonlinear Langevin equation (1) is studied. We show that intermittent or global transitions between metastable states can appear. The conditions for the generation of these transitions and their statistical characteristics are determined. (author)

  20. Radiothermometry indifferential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, L.I.; Kogan, E.A.; Yashunskaya, N.I.

    1991-01-01

    Methods of radiothermometry for differential diagnosis of peripheral lung formations using a radiometer operating within 10 cm-wave band were worked out. Altogether 59 patients (of them 45 men) were investigated. Temperature was measured on the chest surface in the area of a lung pathological formation projected on it. Placing its image on the heart and major vessel shadows was avoided. Mean temperature was calculated from 6-8 measurements. Temperature above a peripheral lung tumor was shown to be by 0.5 deg C higher than that of unchanged pulmonary tissue. Benign spheroidal formations (tuberculoma, hamartoma) were characterized by a decrease of 0.6-0.9 deg C as compared to unchanged pulmonary tissue. Comparison of operation of 2 radiometers (the second one operating in the 8 mm-wave band) has shown diagnostic advantages of the first one

  1. Intermittency in the particle production and in the nuclear multifragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.; Ploszajczak, M.

    1991-01-01

    Intermittency is a manifestation of scale invariance and randomness in physical systems. Intermittency in relativistic heavy-ion collisions and, in particular, the projectile dependence, multiplicity dependence and source-size dependence are discussed in the frame of the model of spatio-temporal intermittency. Moreover, recent theoretical results in intermittency studies of the nuclear multifragmentation are presented. (author) 35 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  2. Intermittent Rivers and Biodiversity. Large scale analyses between hydrology and ecology in intermittent rivers

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchard, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent rivers are characterized by a temporary interruption of their flow which can manifest in a variety of ways, as much on a spatial scale as on a temporal one. This particular aspect of intermittent river hydrology gives rise to unique ecosystems, combining both aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Neglected for a long time by scientists and once considered biologically depauperate and ecologically unimportant, these fragile habitats are nowadays acknowledged for their rendered service...

  3. Peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carzoglio, J.; Tancredi, N.; Capurro, S.; Ravecca, T.; Scarrone, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new case of peripheral epithelial odontogenic tumor (Pindborg tumor) is reported. It is localized in the superior right gingival region, a less frequent site, and has the histopathological features previously reported. Immunochemical studies were performed, revealing a differential positive stain to cytokeratins in tumor cells deeply seated in the tumor mass, probably related to tumoral cell heterogeneity.Interestingly, in this particular case S-100 protein positive reactivity was also detected in arborescent cells intermingled with tumoral cells, resembling Langerhans cells. Even though referred in the literature in central Pindborg tumors, no references were found about their presence in peripheral tumors, like the one that is presented here

  4. Role of Carotid Body in Intermittent Hypoxia-Related Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Oyarce, María Paz; Dias, Ana Carolina Rodrigues

    2017-05-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), a common breathing disorder, is recognized as an independent risk factor for systemic hypertension. Among the alterations induced by OSA, the chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is considered the main factor for the hypertension. Exposure of rodents to CIH is the gold-standard method to study the mechanisms involved in the cardiovascular alterations induced by OSA. Although it is well known that CIH produces hypertension, the underlying mechanisms are not totally elucidated. It is likely that the CIH-induced systemic oxidative stress and inflammation may elicit endothelial dysfunction and increase the arterial blood pressure. In addition, OSA patients and animals exposed to CIH show sympathetic hyperactivity and potentiated cardiorespiratory responses to acute hypoxia, suggesting that CIH enhances the peripheral hypoxic chemoreflex. Recent experimental evidences support the proposal that CIH selectively enhances carotid body (CB) chemosensory reactivity to oxygen, which in turn increases sympathetic outflow leading to neurogenic hypertension. In this review, we will discuss the supporting evidence for a critical role of the CB in the generation and maintenance of the hypertension induced by CIH, also, the contribution of oxidative stress to enhance CB chemosensory drive and the activation of sympathetic-related centers in the brain.

  5. External pneumatic intermittent compression for treatment of dependent pregnancy edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, M K; McCance, K L; Stewart, M L

    1982-01-01

    A portable external pneumatic intermittent compression (EPIC) device has been successful in reducing peripheral edema. This study explored the effectiveness of EPIC for treating dependent pregnancy edema. In the study, 42 healthy pregnant women received EPIC for 30 minutes at 40 torr while in the left lateral recumbent position: Group One with mid-thigh boots, and Group Two with below-knee boots. Prior to compression, descriptive data were gathered, leg circumference measurements made, and surface skin temperatures recorded for three sites per leg. Vital signs were taken and pedal edema subjectively indexed. Following compression, circumferences, skin temperatures, vital signs, and edema indices were rerecorded. Three volumes were calculated for each leg using a mathematical model of leg segments as conical frustum units. Mean volume reductions for each leg were significant. The mid-thigh-length boots produced greater mean volume decreases. The volume decrease for calf, lower leg, and foot frustum units were significant. EPIC holds promise as a useful treatment for dependent pregnancy edema.

  6. Scaffolds for peripheral nerve repair and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Sheng; Xu, Lai; Gu, Xiaosong

    2018-06-02

    Trauma-associated peripheral nerve defect is a widespread clinical problem. Autologous nerve grafting, the current gold standard technique for the treatment of peripheral nerve injury, has many internal disadvantages. Emerging studies showed that tissue engineered nerve graft is an effective substitute to autologous nerves. Tissue engineered nerve graft is generally composed of neural scaffolds and incorporating cells and molecules. A variety of biomaterials have been used to construct neural scaffolds, the main component of tissue engineered nerve graft. Synthetic polymers (e.g. silicone, polyglycolic acid, and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)) and natural materials (e.g. chitosan, silk fibroin, and extracellular matrix components) are commonly used along or together to build neural scaffolds. Many other materials, including the extracellular matrix, glass fabrics, ceramics, and metallic materials, have also been used to construct neural scaffolds. These biomaterials are fabricated to create specific structures and surface features. Seeding supporting cells and/or incorporating neurotrophic factors to neural scaffolds further improve restoration effects. Preliminary studies demonstrate that clinical applications of these neural scaffolds achieve satisfactory functional recovery. Therefore, tissue engineered nerve graft provides a good alternative to autologous nerve graft and represents a promising frontier in neural tissue engineering. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of caffeine in patients with intermittent claudication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momsen, A H; Jensen, M B; Norager, C B; Madsen, M R; Vestersgaard-Andersen, T; Lindholt, J S

    2010-10-01

    Intermittent claudication is a disabling symptom of peripheral arterial disease for which few medical treatments are available. This study investigated the effect of caffeine on physical capacity in patients with intermittent claudication. This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study included 88 patients recruited by surgeons from outpatient clinics. The participants abstained from caffeine for 48 h before each test and then received either a placebo or oral caffeine (6 mg/kg). After 75 min, pain-free and maximal walking distance on a treadmill, perceived pain, reaction times, postural stability, maximal isometric knee extension strength, submaximal knee extension endurance and cognitive function were measured. The analysis was by intention to treat. Caffeine increased the pain-free walking distance by 20.0 (95 per cent confidence interval 3.7 to 38.8) per cent (P = 0.014), maximal walking distance by 26.6 (12.1 to 43.0) per cent (P postural stability was reduced significantly, by 22.1 (11.7 to 33.4) per cent with eyes open (P < 0.001) and by 21.8 (7.6 to 37.8) per cent with eyes closed (P = 0.002). Neither reaction time nor cognition was affected. In patients with moderate intermittent claudication, caffeine increased walking distance, maximal strength and endurance, but affected balance adversely.

  8. Identification of the Causative Disease of Intermittent Claudication through Walking Motion Analysis: Feature Analysis and Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuyou Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent claudication is a walking symptom. Patients with intermittent claudication experience lower limb pain after walking for a short time. However, rest relieves the pain and allows the patient to walk again. Unfortunately, this symptom predominantly arises from not 1 but 2 different diseases: LSS (lumber spinal canal stenosis and PAD (peripheral arterial disease. Patients with LSS can be subdivided by the affected vertebra into 2 main groups: L4 and L5. It is clinically very important to determine whether patients with intermittent claudication suffer from PAD, L4, or L5. This paper presents a novel SVM- (support vector machine- based methodology for such discrimination/differentiation using minimally required data, simple walking motion data in the sagittal plane. We constructed a simple walking measurement system that is easy to set up and calibrate and suitable for use by nonspecialists in small spaces. We analyzed the obtained gait patterns and derived input parameters for SVM that are also visually detectable and medically meaningful/consistent differentiation features. We present a differentiation methodology utilizing an SVM classifier. Leave-one-out cross-validation of differentiation/classification by this method yielded a total accuracy of 83%.

  9. A neonatal mouse model of intermittent hypoxia associated with features of apnea in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun; Tuong, Chi Minh; Gozal, David

    2011-09-15

    A neonatal mouse model of intermittent hypoxia (IH) simulating the recurring hypoxia/reoxygenation episodes of apnea of prematurity (AOP) was developed. C57BL/6 P2 pups were culled for exposure to either intermittent hypoxia or intermittent air as control. The IH paradigms consisted of alternation cycles of 20.9% O2 and either 8.0% or 5.7% O2 every 120 or 140s for 6h a day during daylight hours from day 2 to day 10 postnatally, i.e., roughly equivalent to human brain development in the perinatal period. IH exposures elicited modest to severe decrease in oxygen saturation along with bradycardia in neonatal mice, which were severity-dependent. Hypomyelination in both central and peripheral nervous systems was observed despite the absence of visible growth retardation. The neonatal mouse model of IH in this study partially fulfills the current diagnostic criteria with features of AOP, and provides opportunities to reproduce in rodents some of the pathophysiological changes associated with this disorder, such as alterations in myelination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Johne's disease in cattle is associated with enhanced expression of genes encoding IL-5, GATA-3, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 2, and factors promoting apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coussens, P.M.; Pudrith, C.B.; Skovgaard, Kerstin

    2005-01-01

    remodeling deficiencies through higher expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) 1 and TIMP2 RNA and lower expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 14 RNA than similar cells from healthy controls, and that cells within the PBMC population of M. paratuberculosis-infected cows...... upon by quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR). Our results indicate that T cells within PBMCs from M. paratuberculosis-infected cows have adopted a predominant Th 2-like phenotype (enhanced expression of IL-5, GATA 3, and possibly IL-4 mRNA), that cells within infected cow PBMCs may exhibit tissue...

  11. Peripheral Artery Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pressure High blood cholesterol Coronary heart disease Stroke Metabolic syndrome Screening and Prevention Taking action to control your risk factors can help prevent or delay peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) and its complications. Know your family history of health problems related to P.A. ...

  12. [Consensus diagnosis and treatment of arterial intermittent claudication. Central Guidance Organization for Peer Review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitslaar, P J

    1997-12-06

    Intermittent claudication is an indicator of increased risk of cardiac and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality and as such a reason to look for modifiable risk factors for atherosclerosis. A vascular anamnesis and physical examination can reliably exclude presence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease in the lower extremities, but cannot reliably demonstrate its presence. Certainty about presence or absence of peripheral arterial occlusive disease can be obtained by determination of an ankle-brachial blood pressure index. The main method for the diagnosis of severity and localisation of stenoses and occlusions in the arteries to the legs is the echo-Doppler (duplex) examination. With this method the feasibility of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) can also be determined. Consequently, angiography has lost importance as a diagnostic method and is only still indicated as part of an interventional treatment (operation or PTA). Treatment should be aimed at both amelioration of symptoms and reduction of risk factors for atherosclerosis. A key-stone of the treatment is cessation of smoking. The role of pharmacotherapy in reducing symptomatology is only limited. Walking exercise can have a positive effect on walking distance and should always be tried. PTA is the treatment modality of first choice for stenoses in the aortoiliac and femoropopliteal arteries. For segmental occlusions in the iliac pathway, also recanalisation by means of PTA (in combination with stent placement) is a justifiable treatment option. In all other cases operative revascularisations give good functional results. Invasive treatments for patients with intermittent claudication should be performed within a multidisciplinary team.

  13. Intermittent control: a computational theory of human control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawthrop, Peter; Loram, Ian; Lakie, Martin; Gollee, Henrik

    2011-02-01

    The paradigm of continuous control using internal models has advanced understanding of human motor control. However, this paradigm ignores some aspects of human control, including intermittent feedback, serial ballistic control, triggered responses and refractory periods. It is shown that event-driven intermittent control provides a framework to explain the behaviour of the human operator under a wider range of conditions than continuous control. Continuous control is included as a special case, but sampling, system matched hold, an intermittent predictor and an event trigger allow serial open-loop trajectories using intermittent feedback. The implementation here may be described as "continuous observation, intermittent action". Beyond explaining unimodal regulation distributions in common with continuous control, these features naturally explain refractoriness and bimodal stabilisation distributions observed in double stimulus tracking experiments and quiet standing, respectively. Moreover, given that human control systems contain significant time delays, a biological-cybernetic rationale favours intermittent over continuous control: intermittent predictive control is computationally less demanding than continuous predictive control. A standard continuous-time predictive control model of the human operator is used as the underlying design method for an event-driven intermittent controller. It is shown that when event thresholds are small and sampling is regular, the intermittent controller can masquerade as the underlying continuous-time controller and thus, under these conditions, the continuous-time and intermittent controller cannot be distinguished. This explains why the intermittent control hypothesis is consistent with the continuous control hypothesis for certain experimental conditions.

  14. CONDITIONED ANALYSIS OF HIGH-LATITUDE SOLAR WIND INTERMITTENCY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amicis, R.; Consolini, G.; Bavassano, B.; Bruno, R.

    2012-01-01

    The solar wind is a turbulent medium displaying intermittency. Its intermittent features have been widely documented and studied, showing how the intermittent character is different in fast and slow wind. In this paper, a statistical conditioned analysis of the solar wind intermittency for a period of high-latitude fast solar wind is presented. In particular, the intermittent features are investigated as a function of the Alfvénic degree of fluctuations at a given scale. The results show that the main contribution to solar wind intermittency is due to non-Alfvénic structures, while Alfvénic increments are found to be characterized by a smaller level of intermittency than the previous ones. Furthermore, the lifetime statistics of Alfvénic periods are discussed in terms of a multiscale texture of randomly oriented flux tubes.

  15. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B.; McKeever, P.; Young, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of /sup 3/H-labeled PK 11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide) or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes.

  16. Intermittent character of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Roberto; Carbone, Vincenzo; Chapman, Sandra; Hnat, Bogdan; Noullez, Alain; Sorriso-Valvo, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Interplanetary magnetic field magnitude fluctuations are notoriously more intermittent than velocity fluctuations in both fast and slow wind. This behavior has been interpreted in terms of the anomalous scaling observed in passive scalars in fully developed hydrodynamic turbulence. In this paper, the strong intermittent nature of the interplanetary magnetic field is briefly discussed comparing results performed during different phases of the solar cycle. The scaling properties of the interplanetary magnetic field magnitude show solar cycle variation that can be distinguished in the scaling exponents revealed by structure functions. The scaling exponents observed around the solar maximum coincide, within the errors, to those measured for passive scalars in hydrodynamic turbulence. However, it is also found that the values are not universal in the sense that the solar cycle variation may be reflected in dependence on the structure of the velocity field

  17. Intermittency exponent of the turbulent energy cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleve, J.; Greiner, M.; Pearson, B.R.; Sreenivasan, K.R.

    2006-12-01

    We consider the turbulent energy dissipation from one-dimensional records in experiments using air and gaseous helium at cryogenic temperatures, and obtain the intermittency exponent via the two-point correlation function of the energy dissipation. The air data are obtained in a number of flows in a wind tunnel and the atmospheric boundary layer at a height of about 35 m above the ground. The helium data correspond to the centerline of a jet exhausting into a container. The air data on the intermittency exponent are consistent with each other and with a trend that increases with the Taylor microscale Reynolds number, R λ , of up to about 1000 and saturates thereafter. On the other hand, the helium data cluster around a constant value at nearly all R λ , this being about half of the asymptotic value for the air data. Some possible explanation is offered for this anomaly. (author)

  18. Effects of intermittent hypoxia on running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtscher, M; Gatterer, H; Faulhaber, M; Gerstgrasser, W; Schenk, K

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the effects of two 5-wk periods of intermittent hypoxia on running economy (RE). 11 male and female middle-distance runners were randomly assigned to the intermittent hypoxia group (IHG) or to the control group (CG). All athletes trained for a 13-wk period starting at pre-season until the competition season. The IHG spent additionally 2 h at rest on 3 days/wk for the first and the last 5 weeks in normobaric hypoxia (15-11% FiO2). RE, haematological parameters and body composition were determined at low altitude (600 m) at baseline, after the 5 (th), the 8 (th) and the 13 (th) week of training. RE, determined by the relative oxygen consumption during submaximal running, (-2.3+/-1.2 vs. -0.3+/-0.7 ml/min/kg, Ptraining phase. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  19. Optimal intermittent search strategies: smelling the prey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revelli, J A; Wio, H S; Rojo, F; Budde, C E

    2010-01-01

    We study the kinetics of the search of a single fixed target by a searcher/walker that performs an intermittent random walk, characterized by different states of motion. In addition, we assume that the walker has the ability to detect the scent left by the prey/target in its surroundings. Our results, in agreement with intuition, indicate that the prey's survival probability could be strongly reduced (increased) if the predator is attracted (or repelled) by the trace left by the prey. We have also found that, for a positive trace (the predator is guided towards the prey), increasing the inhomogeneity's size reduces the prey's survival probability, while the optimal value of α (the parameter that regulates intermittency) ceases to exist. The agreement between theory and numerical simulations is excellent.

  20. Optimal intermittent search strategies: smelling the prey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revelli, J A; Wio, H S [Instituto de Fisica de Cantabria, Universidad de Cantabria and CSIC, E-39005 Santander (Spain); Rojo, F; Budde, C E [Fa.M.A.F., Universidad Nacional de Cordoba, Ciudad Universitaria, X5000HUA Cordoba (Argentina)

    2010-05-14

    We study the kinetics of the search of a single fixed target by a searcher/walker that performs an intermittent random walk, characterized by different states of motion. In addition, we assume that the walker has the ability to detect the scent left by the prey/target in its surroundings. Our results, in agreement with intuition, indicate that the prey's survival probability could be strongly reduced (increased) if the predator is attracted (or repelled) by the trace left by the prey. We have also found that, for a positive trace (the predator is guided towards the prey), increasing the inhomogeneity's size reduces the prey's survival probability, while the optimal value of {alpha} (the parameter that regulates intermittency) ceases to exist. The agreement between theory and numerical simulations is excellent.

  1. Optimal Dynamics of Intermittent Water Supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, Anna; Wilkening, Jon; Rycroft, Chris

    2014-11-01

    In many urban areas of the developing world, piped water is supplied only intermittently, as valves direct water to different parts of the water distribution system at different times. The flow is transient, and may transition between free-surface and pressurized, resulting in complex dynamical features with important consequences for water suppliers and users. These consequences include degradation of distribution system components, compromised water quality, and inequitable water availability. The goal of this work is to model the important dynamics and identify operating conditions that mitigate certain negative effects of intermittent water supply. Specifically, we will look at valve parameters occurring as boundary conditions in a network model of transient, transition flow through closed pipes. Optimization will be used to find boundary values to minimize pressure gradients and ensure equitable water availability.

  2. Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow

    OpenAIRE

    F. F. van Ogtrop; R. W. Vervoort; G. Z. Heller; D. M. Stasinopoulos; R. A. Rigby

    2011-01-01

    Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow in semi-arid Australia poses a number of major challenges. One of the challenges relates to modelling zero, skewed, non-stationary, and non-linear data. To address this, a statistical model to forecast streamflow up to 12 months ahead is applied to five semi-arid catchments in South Western Queensland. The model uses logistic regression through Generalised Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) to determine th...

  3. Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow

    OpenAIRE

    F. F. van Ogtrop; R. W. Vervoort; G. Z. Heller; D. M. Stasinopoulos; R. A. Rigby

    2011-01-01

    Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow in semi-arid Australia poses a number of major challenges. One of the challenges relates to modelling zero, skewed, non-stationary, and non-linear data. To address this, a probabilistic statistical model to forecast streamflow 12 months ahead is applied to five semi-arid catchments in South Western Queensland. The model uses logistic regression through Generalised Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) to determine the probabil...

  4. Efficient search by optimized intermittent random walks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshanin, Gleb; Lindenberg, Katja; Wio, Horacio S; Burlatsky, Sergei

    2009-01-01

    We study the kinetics for the search of an immobile target by randomly moving searchers that detect it only upon encounter. The searchers perform intermittent random walks on a one-dimensional lattice. Each searcher can step on a nearest neighbor site with probability α or go off lattice with probability 1 - α to move in a random direction until it lands back on the lattice at a fixed distance L away from the departure point. Considering α and L as optimization parameters, we seek to enhance the chances of successful detection by minimizing the probability P N that the target remains undetected up to the maximal search time N. We show that even in this simple model, a number of very efficient search strategies can lead to a decrease of P N by orders of magnitude upon appropriate choices of α and L. We demonstrate that, in general, such optimal intermittent strategies are much more efficient than Brownian searches and are as efficient as search algorithms based on random walks with heavy-tailed Cauchy jump-length distributions. In addition, such intermittent strategies appear to be more advantageous than Levy-based ones in that they lead to more thorough exploration of visited regions in space and thus lend themselves to parallelization of the search processes.

  5. Rivaroxaban with or without aspirin in patients with stable peripheral or carotid artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anand, Sonia S; Bosch, Jackie; Eikelboom, John W

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with peripheral artery disease have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Antiplatelet agents are widely used to reduce these complications. METHODS: This was a multicentre, double-blind, randomised placebo-controlled trial for which patients were...... recruited at 602 hospitals, clinics, or community practices from 33 countries across six continents. Eligible patients had a history of peripheral artery disease of the lower extremities (previous peripheral bypass surgery or angioplasty, limb or foot amputation, intermittent claudication with objective...... evidence of peripheral artery disease), of the carotid arteries (previous carotid artery revascularisation or asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis of at least 50%), or coronary artery disease with an ankle-brachial index of less than 0·90. After a 30-day run-in period, patients were randomly assigned (1...

  6. Peripheral orbit model

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, Yasuo

    1975-01-01

    Peripheral orbit model, in which an incoming hadron is assumed to revolve in a peripheral orbit around a target hadron, is discussed. The non-diffractive parts of two-body reaction amplitudes of hadrons are expressed in terms of the radius, width an absorptivity of the orbit. The radius of the orbit is about 1 fm and the width of the orbit is determined by the range of the interaction between the hadrons. The model reproduces all available experimental data on differential cross-sections and polarizations of $K^{-}p\\to K^{-}p$ and $\\bar K^{\\circ}n$ reactions for all angles successfully. This contribution is not included in the proceedings since it will appear in Progress of Theoretical Physics Vol. 51 (1974) No 2. Any person interested in the subject may apply for reprints to the author.

  7. Intermittent pressure decreases human keratinocyte proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasca, Maria R; Shih, Alan T; West, Dennis P; Martinez, Wanda M; Micali, Giuseppe; Landsman, Adam S

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between pressure changes and keratinocyte proliferation by determining whether keratinocytes exposed to altered mechanical pressures would proliferate at different rates compared to control cells not subjected to pressure changes. Tissue culture flasks of human keratinocytes plated at an approximate density of 15,000 cells/cm(2) undergoing an intermittent cyclic pressure of 362 mm Hg at a frequency of 2.28 or 5.16 cycles/min (0.038 or 0.086 Hz) for 8 h were compared to control flasks grown at ambient room pressure. An in-line pressure transducer was used to monitor and adjust pressure within the cell chambers, using a solenoid valve. A thymidine incorporation assay assessed the amount of cell proliferation in each set of experiments. Differences in proliferation between keratinocytes subjected to cyclic pressure changes and control cells were found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05) in 4 out of 5 proliferation assays. Also, a higher frequency of pressure changes consistently generated a reduced proliferation rate compared to that seen in cells exposed to a lower frequency of pressure changes. These data indicate that keratinocytes undergoing intermittent pressure changes exhibit decreased proliferation rates compared to controls. Furthermore, an increased frequency rate seems to have a greater effect on proliferation than low-frequency rate pressure changes, suggesting that the stress caused by frequently changed pressure may play a greater role in reducing keratinocyte proliferation than the actual magnitude of load applied to the cells. Our results support the current treatment protocol of reducing speed and duration of walking on the site of the wound to promote healing of foot ulcers. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Laser peripheral iridoplasty for angle-closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Wai Siene; Ang, Ghee Soon; Azuara-Blanco, Augusto

    2012-02-15

    Angle-closure glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness in the world. Treatment is aimed at opening the anterior chamber angle and lowering the IOP with medical and/or surgical treatment (e.g. trabeculectomy, lens extraction). Laser iridotomy works by eliminating pupillary block and widens the anterior chamber angle in the majority of patients. When laser iridotomy fails to open the anterior chamber angle, laser iridoplasty may be recommended as one of the options in current standard treatment for angle-closure. Laser peripheral iridoplasty works by shrinking and pulling the peripheral iris tissue away from the trabecular meshwork. Laser peripheral iridoplasty can be used for crisis of acute angle-closure and also in non-acute situations.   To assess the effectiveness of laser peripheral iridoplasty in the treatment of narrow angles (i.e. primary angle-closure suspect), primary angle-closure (PAC) or primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) in non-acute situations when compared with any other intervention. In this review, angle-closure will refer to patients with narrow angles (PACs), PAC and PACG. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12), MEDLINE (January 1950 to January 2012), EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2012), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to January 2012), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 5 January 2012. We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in this review. Patients with narrow angles, PAC or PACG were eligible. We excluded studies that included only patients with acute presentations

  9. Peripheral artery questionnaire improves ankle brachial index screening in symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B-H; Cho, K-I; Spertus, J; Park, Y-H; Je, H-G; Shin, M-S; Lee, J-H; Jang, J-S

    2014-12-01

    The peripheral artery questionnaire (PAQ) is a disease-specific health status measure of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Whether the PAQ scores are associated with a PAD diagnosis among patients with symptoms suspicious for PAD is unknown and could help increase the pretest probability of ankle brachial index (ABI) screening among patients with suspicious symptoms. The PAQ was completed by 567 patients evaluated for potential intermittent claudication at six tertiary centres. Demographics, medical history, physical examination findings and the PAQ domain scores were compared with ABI. A diagnostic threshold PAQ scores. The correlation between the PAQ Summary Score and ABI was also calculated. The PAQ Summary Score was significantly lower in patients with low ABI as compared with those having a normal ABI (37.6 ± 19.0 vs. 70.1 ± 22.7, p PAQ Summary Score and ABI were highly correlated (r = 0.56, p PAQ Summary Score for predicting low ABI was 50.3 (AUC = 0.86, sensitivity 80.3%, specificity 78.3%). The PAQ Summary Score was associated with an increased likelihood of PAD in patients with suspected PAD symptoms, and a low summary score (≤ 50.3) was an optimal threshold for predicting PAD among patients referred for ABI. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effects of different acute hypoxic regimens on tissue oxygen profiles and metabolic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Christian; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Drager, Luciano F; Shin, Mi-Kyung; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2011-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep. Both obesity and OSA are associated with insulin resistance and systemic inflammation, which may be attributable to tissue hypoxia. We hypothesized that a pattern of hypoxic exposure determines both oxygen profiles in peripheral tissues and systemic metabolic outcomes, and that obesity has a modifying effect. Lean and obese C57BL6 mice were exposed to 12 h of intermittent hypoxia 60 times/h (IH60) [inspired O₂ fraction (Fi(O₂)) 21-5%, 60/h], IH 12 times/h (Fi(O₂) 5% for 15 s, 12/h), sustained hypoxia (SH; Fi(O₂) 10%), or normoxia while fasting. Tissue oxygen partial pressure (Pti(O₂)) in liver, skeletal muscle and epididymal fat, plasma leptin, adiponectin, insulin, blood glucose, and adipose tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured. In lean mice, IH60 caused oxygen swings in the liver, whereas fluctuations of Pti(O₂) were attenuated in muscle and abolished in fat. In obese mice, baseline liver Pti(O₂) was lower than in lean mice, whereas muscle and fat Pti(O₂) did not differ. During IH, Pti(O₂) was similar in obese and lean mice. All hypoxic regimens caused insulin resistance. In lean mice, hypoxia significantly increased leptin, especially during SH (44-fold); IH60, but not SH, induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in TNF-α secretion by fat. Obesity was associated with striking increases in leptin and TNF-α, which overwhelmed effects of hypoxia. In conclusion, IH60 led to oxygen fluctuations in liver and muscle and steady hypoxia in fat. IH and SH induced insulin resistance, but inflammation was increased only by IH60 in lean mice. Obesity caused severe inflammation, which was not augmented by acute hypoxic regimens.

  11. Mast cell degranulation breaks peripheral tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, V C; Wasiuk, A; Bennett, K A; Benson, M J; Elgueta, R; Waldschmidt, T J; Noelle, R J

    2009-10-01

    Mast cells (MC) have been shown to mediate regulatory T-cell (T(reg))-dependent, peripheral allograft tolerance in both skin and cardiac transplants. Furthermore, T(reg) have been implicated in mitigating IgE-mediated MC degranulation, establishing a dynamic, reciprocal relationship between MC and T(reg) in controlling inflammation. In an allograft tolerance model, it is now shown that intragraft or systemic MC degranulation results in the transient loss of T(reg) suppressor activities with the acute, T-cell dependent rejection of established, tolerant allografts. Upon degranulation, MC mediators can be found in the skin, T(reg) rapidly leave the graft, MC accumulate in the regional lymph node and the T(reg) are impaired in the expression of suppressor molecules. Such a dramatic reversal of T(reg) function and tissue distribution by MC degranulation underscores how allergy may causes the transient breakdown of peripheral tolerance and episodes of acute T-cell inflammation.

  12. An assessment of sex chromosome copy number in a phenotypic female patient with hypergonadtropic hypogonadism, primary amenorrhea and growth retardation by GTG-banding and FISH in peripheral blood and skin tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, I.M.D.; DeMoranville, B.; Grollino, M.G. [Brown Univ. School of Medicine, Providence, RI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The present report describes studies performed on an 18-year-old phenotypic female referred because of primary amenorrhea, hypergonadotropic hypoganadism and growth retardation. The clinical features raised the possibility of a gonadal dysgenesis. The ovaries were not identified on either side. Her testosterone was significantly elevated, with serum level at 48 ng/dl, and her free testosterone at 7 pg/ml. A GTG-banding analysis of 33 peripheral blood leukocytes revealed the modal number of chromosomes to be 46 per cell with a male sex constitution and normal appearing banding patterns (46,XY). In view of the clinical findings, additional cells were scored to rule out low percentage mosaicism. Out of 35 additional GTG-banded cells scored for the sex chromosomes, 4 cells (11.5%) were found to contain only one copy of the X chromosome. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) using dual color biotinylated X and Y probes (Imagenetics) was subsequently performed. Out of approximately 500 cells scored, 87% were found to be XY and 9% were found to be positive for the X signal only, versus 7% and 3% X signal only for 2 XY controls, aged 61 and 46, respectively. As loss of the Y chromosome has been reported in elderly males as well as certain males with leukemia, the age of the controls was important to note. To unequivocally establish the presence of mosaicism, a skin biopsy was obtained for fibroblast culture. Out of 388 total cells scored, 286 (74%) were found to be XY and 46 (12%) were found to be X, versus 99% XY and <1% X in controls. GTG-banding analysis of the same fibroblast culture is currently in progress. Preliminary data on this specimen thus far corroborate results of the FISH study. The presence of XY cells, along with an increased testosterone level, raises the distinct possibility of a gonadoblastoma. In view of this increased risk, arrangements are being made for the patient to have a laparoscopy and surgical removal of her presumptive streak gonads.

  13. Peripheral iridotomy for pigmentary glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelessi, Manuele; Lindsley, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Background Glaucoma is a chronic optic neuropathy characterized by retinal ganglion cell death resulting in damage to the optic nerve head and the retinal nerve fiber layer. Pigment dispersion syndrome is characterized by a structural disturbance in the iris pigment epithelium (the densely pigmented posterior surface of the iris) that leads to dispersion of the pigment and its deposition on various structures within the eye. Pigmentary glaucoma is a specific form of open-angle glaucoma found in patients with pigment dispersion syndrome. Topcial medical therapy is usually the first-line treatment; however, peripheral laser iridotomy has been proposed as an alternate treatment. Peripheral laser iridotomy involves creating an opening in the iris tissue to allow drainage of fluid from the posterior chamber to the anterior chamber and vice versa. Equalizing the pressure within the eye may help to alleviate the friction that leads to pigment dispersion and prevent visual field deterioration. However, the effectiveness of peripheral laser iridotomy in reducing the development or progression of pigmentary glaucoma is unknown. Objectives The objective of this review was to assess the effects of peripheral laser iridotomy compared with other interventions, including medication, trabeculoplasty, and trabeculectomy, or no treatment, for pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. Search methods We searched a number of electronic databases including CENTRAL, MEDLINE and EMBASE and clinical trials websites such as (mRCT) and ClinicalTrials.gov. We last searched the electronic databases on 2 November 2015. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that had compared peripheral laser iridotomy versus no treatment or other treatments for pigment dispersion syndrome and pigmentary glaucoma. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures for systematic reviews. Two review authors independently screened articles for eligibility

  14. Hovering and intermittent flight in birds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobalske, Bret W

    2010-01-01

    Two styles of bird locomotion, hovering and intermittent flight, have great potential to inform future development of autonomous flying vehicles. Hummingbirds are the smallest flying vertebrates, and they are the only birds that can sustain hovering. Their ability to hover is due to their small size, high wingbeat frequency, relatively large margin of mass-specific power available for flight and a suite of anatomical features that include proportionally massive major flight muscles (pectoralis and supracoracoideus) and wing anatomy that enables them to leave their wings extended yet turned over (supinated) during upstroke so that they can generate lift to support their weight. Hummingbirds generate three times more lift during downstroke compared with upstroke, with the disparity due to wing twist during upstroke. Much like insects, hummingbirds exploit unsteady mechanisms during hovering including delayed stall during wing translation that is manifest as a leading-edge vortex (LEV) on the wing and rotational circulation at the end of each half stroke. Intermittent flight is common in small- and medium-sized birds and consists of pauses during which the wings are flexed (bound) or extended (glide). Flap-bounding appears to be an energy-saving style when flying relatively fast, with the production of lift by the body and tail critical to this saving. Flap-gliding is thought to be less costly than continuous flapping during flight at most speeds. Some species are known to shift from flap-gliding at slow speeds to flap-bounding at fast speeds, but there is an upper size limit for the ability to bound (∼0.3 kg) and small birds with rounded wings do not use intermittent glides.

  15. Hovering and intermittent flight in birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobalske, Bret W, E-mail: bret.tobalske@mso.umt.ed [Field Research Station at Fort Missoula, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Two styles of bird locomotion, hovering and intermittent flight, have great potential to inform future development of autonomous flying vehicles. Hummingbirds are the smallest flying vertebrates, and they are the only birds that can sustain hovering. Their ability to hover is due to their small size, high wingbeat frequency, relatively large margin of mass-specific power available for flight and a suite of anatomical features that include proportionally massive major flight muscles (pectoralis and supracoracoideus) and wing anatomy that enables them to leave their wings extended yet turned over (supinated) during upstroke so that they can generate lift to support their weight. Hummingbirds generate three times more lift during downstroke compared with upstroke, with the disparity due to wing twist during upstroke. Much like insects, hummingbirds exploit unsteady mechanisms during hovering including delayed stall during wing translation that is manifest as a leading-edge vortex (LEV) on the wing and rotational circulation at the end of each half stroke. Intermittent flight is common in small- and medium-sized birds and consists of pauses during which the wings are flexed (bound) or extended (glide). Flap-bounding appears to be an energy-saving style when flying relatively fast, with the production of lift by the body and tail critical to this saving. Flap-gliding is thought to be less costly than continuous flapping during flight at most speeds. Some species are known to shift from flap-gliding at slow speeds to flap-bounding at fast speeds, but there is an upper size limit for the ability to bound ({approx}0.3 kg) and small birds with rounded wings do not use intermittent glides.

  16. Renewable energies: the cost of intermittency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crassous, Renaud; Roques, Fabien

    2013-01-01

    The authors indicate the different adaptations which will be required for the electric system to cope with the intermittency of solar and wind energy production, and propose an approximate assessment of the associated costs. Different types of adaptation are addressed: secure production in case of absence of wind or sun (electricity imports, construction of additional power stations), use of more flexible production means (gas turbines), grid extensions (connection to offshore production sites, routing of production one part of the country to the other). They think that beyond a 20 per cent share for renewable energies, these costs could rapidly increase

  17. Spatio-temporal intermittency on the sandpile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erzan, A.; Sinha, S.

    1990-08-01

    The self-organized critical state exhibited by a sandpile model is shown to correspond to motion on an attractor characterized by an invariant distribution of the height variable. The largest Lyapunov exponent is equal to zero. The model nonetheless displays intermittent chaos, with a multifractal distribution of local expansion coefficients in history space. Laminar spatio-temporal regions are interrupted by chaotic bursts caused by avalanches. We introduce the concept of local histories in configuration space and show that their expansion parameters also exhibit a multifractal distribution in time and space. (author). 22 refs, 5 figs

  18. Intermittent claudication in a professional rugby player.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, A E; Lewis, W A

    1992-04-01

    Intermittent claudication in a professional rugby player is described. The typical features of a delayed and difficult diagnosis of an external iliac artery stenosis were found. The noninvasive diagnostic protocol used to investigate this young patient with a minimal arterial lesion enabled accurate localization and angioplasty to be performed at the same time as diagnostic angiography. The patient was symptom free with normal arterial pressures on follow-up. It is suggested that appropriate noninvasive investigations should be performed before angiography in young people with minimal lesions.

  19. A stochastic model for intermittent search strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benichou, O; Coppey, M; Moreau, M; Suet, P H; Voituriez, R

    2005-01-01

    It is often necessary, in scientific or everyday life problems, to find a randomly hidden target. What is then the optimal strategy to reach it as rapidly as possible? In this article, we develop a stochastic theory for intermittent search behaviours, which are often observed: the searcher alternates phases of intensive search and slow motion with fast displacements. The first results of this theory have already been announced recently. Here we provide a detailed presentation of the theory, as well as the full derivation of the results. Furthermore, we explicitly discuss the minimization of the time needed to find the target

  20. Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaemia is a frequent condition during pregnancy, particularly among women from developing countries who have insufficient iron intake to meet increased iron needs of both the mother and the fetus. Traditionally, gestational anaemia has been prevented with the provision of daily iron supplements throughout pregnancy, but adherence to this regimen due to side effects, interrupted supply of the supplements, and concerns about safety among women with an adequate iron intake, have limited the use of this intervention. Intermittent (i.e. one, two or three times a week on non-consecutive days) supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals has recently been proposed as an alternative to daily supplementation. Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of intermittent supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals to pregnant women on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (23 March 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for ongoing studies and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies (23 March 2012). Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results This review includes 21 trials from 13 different countries, but only 18 trials (with 4072 women) reported on our outcomes of interest and contributed data to the review. All of these studies compared daily versus intermittent iron supplementation. Three studies provided iron alone, 12 iron+folic acid and three more iron plus multiple vitamins and minerals. Their methodological quality was mixed

  1. Daspsone Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P A Sarojini

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available A 24 year old lady being treated with 300 mg of dapsone daily for dermatitits herpetiformis, developed weakness and wasting of muscles of feet with claw hand deformity and t drop, 2 months tater. Neurological examination and nerve conduction studies conformed the presence of a peripheral motor neuropathy. Dapsone was discontinued and the patient was treated with cotrimatoxazole, gluten-free diet and supportive therapy. This satisfactorily controlled the dermatological lesion without adversely affecting the resolution of her neuropthy. Symptomatic improvement reported by the patient was confirmed by EMG and nerve conduction studies.

  2. Intermittent fasting and cardiovascular disease: current evidence and unresolved questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinsley, Grant M; Horne, Benjamin D

    2018-01-01

    Intermittent fasting has produced a variety of beneficial health effects in animal models, although high-quality research in humans has been limited. This special report examines current evidences for intermittent fasting in humans, discusses issues that require further examination, and recommends new research that can improve the knowledge base in this emerging research area. While potentially useful for health improvement, intermittent fasting requires further study prior to widespread implementation for health purposes. Randomized, longer-term studies are needed to determine whether using intermittent fasting as a lifestyle rather than a diet is feasible and beneficial for the health of some members of the human population.

  3. Atomistic Model of Fluorescence Intermittency of Colloidal Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, O.; Sargent, E. H.

    2014-01-01

    with foreign cations can stabilize the vacancies, inhibiting intermittency and improving quantum yield, providing an explanation of recent experimental observations. © 2014 American Physical Society.

  4. Workpiece Temperature Variations During Flat Peripheral Grinding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Vitalii A.; Repko, Aleksandr V.

    2018-06-01

    The paper presents the results of researches of temperature variations during flat peripheral grinding. It is shown that the temperature variations of the workpiece can reach 25...30% of the average values, which can lead to some thermal defects. A nonlinear two-dimensional thermophysical grinding model is suggested. It takes into account local changes in the cutting conditions: the fluctuation of the cut layer and the cutting force, the thermal impact of the cutting grains, and the presence of surface cavities in the intermittent wheel. For the numerical solution of the problem, the method of finite differences is adapted. Researches of the method stability and convergence are made, taking into account the specific nature of the problem. A high accuracy of the approximation of the boundary conditions and the nonlinear heat equation is provided. An experimental verification of the proposed thermophysical model was carried out with the use of installation for simultaneous measurement of the grinding force and temperature. It is shown that the discrepancy between the theoretical and experimental values of the grinding temperature does not exceed 5%. The proposed thermophysical model makes it possible to predict with high accuracy the temperature variations during grinding by the wheel periphery.

  5. Randomized, controlled trial comparing synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation plus pressure support in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Zenaida C; Claure, Nelson; Tauscher, Markus K; D'Ugard, Carmen; Vanbuskirk, Silvia; Bancalari, Eduardo

    2006-10-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation is associated with lung injury in preterm infants. In these infants, weaning from synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation may be delayed by their inability to cope with increased respiratory loads. The addition of pressure support to synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation can offset these loads and may facilitate weaning. The purpose of this work was to compare synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation and synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation plus pressure support in weaning from mechanical ventilation and the duration of supplemental oxygen dependency in preterm infants with respiratory failure. Preterm infants weighing 500 to 1000 g at birth who required mechanical ventilation during the first postnatal week were randomly assigned to synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation or synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation plus pressure support. In both groups, weaning followed a set protocol during the first 28 days. Outcomes were assessed during the first 28 days and until discharge or death. There were 107 infants enrolled (53 synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation plus pressure support and 54 synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation). Demographic and perinatal data, mortality, and morbidity did not differ between groups. During the first 28 days, infants in the synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation plus pressure support group reached minimal ventilator settings and were extubated earlier than infants in the synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation group. Total duration of mechanical ventilation, duration of oxygen dependency, and oxygen need at 36 weeks' postmenstrual age alone or combined with death did not differ between groups. However, infants in synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation plus pressure support within the 700- to 1000-g birth weight strata had a shorter oxygen dependency. The results of this study suggest that the addition of

  6. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance. PMID:19320048

  7. Intermittent fasting alleviates the neuropathic phenotype in a mouse model of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madorsky, Irina; Opalach, Katherine; Waber, Amanda; Verrier, Jonathan D; Solmo, Chelsea; Foster, Thomas; Dunn, William A; Notterpek, Lucia

    2009-04-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A (CMT1A) neuropathies linked to the misexpression of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) are progressive demyelinating disorders of the peripheral nervous system. In this study we asked whether dietary restriction by intermittent fasting (IF) could alleviate the neuropathic phenotype in the Trembler J (TrJ) mouse model of CMT1A. Our results show that neuropathic mice kept on a five month long IF regimen had improved locomotor performance compared to ad libitum (AL) fed littermates. The functional benefits of this dietary intervention are associated with an increased expression of myelin proteins combined with a thicker myelin sheath, less redundant basal lamina, and a reduction in aberrant Schwann cell proliferation. These morphological improvements are accompanied by a decrease in PMP22 protein aggregates, and enhanced expression of cytosolic chaperones and constituents of the autophagy-lysosomal pathway. These results indicate that dietary restriction is beneficial for peripheral nerve function in TrJ neuropathic mice, as it promotes the maintenance of locomotor performance.

  8. Synovial sarcoma mimicking benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larque, Ana B.; Nielsen, G.P.; Chebib, Ivan [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Pathology, Boston, MA (United States); Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-11-15

    To assess the radiographic and clinicopathologic features of synovial sarcoma of the nerve that were clinically or radiologically interpreted as benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Five patients with synovial sarcoma arising from the peripheral nerve and interpreted clinically and radiologically as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were identified. Clinicopathologic and imaging features were evaluated. There were three females and two males, ranging in age from 28 to 50 (mean 35.8) years. Most patients (4/5) complained of a mass, discomfort or pain. MR images demonstrated a heterogeneous, enhancing, soft tissue mass contiguous with the neurovascular bundle. On histologic examination, most tumors were monophasic synovial sarcoma (4/5). At the time of surgery, all tumors were noted to arise along or within a peripheral nerve. All patients were alive with no evidence of disease with median follow-up of 44 (range 32-237) months. For comparison, approximately 775 benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities were identified during the same time period. Primary synovial sarcoma of the nerve can mimic peripheral nerve sheath tumors clinically and on imaging and should be included in the differential diagnosis for tumors arising from peripheral nerves. (orig.)

  9. Label-free photoacoustic microscopy of peripheral nerves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Thomas Paul; Zhang, Chi; Yao, Da-Kang; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a common neurological problem that affects millions of people worldwide. Diagnosis and treatment of this condition are often hindered by the difficulties in making objective, noninvasive measurements of nerve fibers. Photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has the ability to obtain high resolution, specific images of peripheral nerves without exogenous contrast. We demonstrated the first proof-of-concept imaging of peripheral nerves using PAM. As validated by both standard histology and photoacoustic spectroscopy, the origin of photoacoustic signals is myelin, the primary source of lipids in the nerves. An extracted sciatic nerve sandwiched between two layers of chicken tissue was imaged by PAM to mimic the in vivo case. Ordered fibrous structures inside the nerve, caused by the bundles of myelin-coated axons, could be observed clearly. With further technical improvements, PAM can potentially be applied to monitor and diagnose peripheral neuropathies.

  10. Effects of vacusac in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Himmelstrup, H; Himmelstrup, Bodil; Mehlsen, J

    1991-01-01

    . Seventeen patients completed the study. The effect of treatment was quantified by measurements of systemic and peripheral systolic blood pressures and by measurements of the pain-free and the maximal walking distance on a treadmill. The ankle pressure index (ankle systolic pressure/arm systolic pressure...

  11. Chaos as an intermittently forced linear system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunton, Steven L; Brunton, Bingni W; Proctor, Joshua L; Kaiser, Eurika; Kutz, J Nathan

    2017-05-30

    Understanding the interplay of order and disorder in chaos is a central challenge in modern quantitative science. Approximate linear representations of nonlinear dynamics have long been sought, driving considerable interest in Koopman theory. We present a universal, data-driven decomposition of chaos as an intermittently forced linear system. This work combines delay embedding and Koopman theory to decompose chaotic dynamics into a linear model in the leading delay coordinates with forcing by low-energy delay coordinates; this is called the Hankel alternative view of Koopman (HAVOK) analysis. This analysis is applied to the Lorenz system and real-world examples including Earth's magnetic field reversal and measles outbreaks. In each case, forcing statistics are non-Gaussian, with long tails corresponding to rare intermittent forcing that precedes switching and bursting phenomena. The forcing activity demarcates coherent phase space regions where the dynamics are approximately linear from those that are strongly nonlinear.The huge amount of data generated in fields like neuroscience or finance calls for effective strategies that mine data to reveal underlying dynamics. Here Brunton et al.develop a data-driven technique to analyze chaotic systems and predict their dynamics in terms of a forced linear model.

  12. Transient analysis of intermittent multijet sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panao, Miguel R.O.; Moreira, Antonio Luis N. [Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, IN, Center for Innovation, Technology and Policy Research, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Durao, Diamantino G. [Universidade Lusiada, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-07-15

    This paper analyzes the transient characteristics of intermittent sprays produced by the single-point impact of multiple cylindrical jets. The aim is to perform a transient analysis of the intermittent atomization process to study the effect of varying the number of impinging jets in the hydrodynamic mechanisms of droplet formation. The results evidence that hydrodynamic mechanisms underlying the physics of ligament fragmentation in 2-impinging jets sprays also apply to sprays produced with more than 2 jets during the main period of injection. Ligaments detaching from the liquid sheet, as well as from its bounding rim, have been identified and associated with distinct droplet clusters, which become more evident as the number of impinging jets increases. Droplets produced by detached ligaments constitute the main spray, and their axial velocity becomes more uniformly distributed with 4-impinging jets because of a delayed ligament fragmentation. Multijet spray dispersion patterns are geometric depending on the number of impinging jets. Finally, an analysis on the Weber number of droplets suggests that multijet sprays are more likely to deposit on interposed surfaces, thus becoming a promising and competitive atomization solution for improving spray cooling. (orig.)

  13. Impact of intermittent fasting on glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varady, Krista A

    2016-07-01

    This article provides an overview of the most recent human trials that have examined the impact of intermittent fasting on glucose homeostasis. Our literature search retrieved one human trial of alternate day fasting, and three trials of Ramadan fasting published in the past 12 months. Current evidence suggests that 8 weeks of alternate day fasting that produces mild weight loss (4% from baseline) has no effect on glucose homeostasis. As for Ramadan fasting, decreases in fasting glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance have been noted after 4 weeks in healthy normal weight individuals with mild weight loss (1-2% from baseline). However, Ramadan fasting may have little impact on glucoregulatory parameters in women with polycystic ovarian syndrome who failed to observe weight loss. Whether intermittent fasting is an effective means of regulating glucose homeostasis remains unclear because of the scarcity of studies in this area. Large-scale, longer-term randomized controlled trials will be required before the use of fasting can be recommended for the prevention and treatment of metabolic diseases.

  14. Intermittency Statistics in the Expanding Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, M. E.; Parashar, T. N.; Matthaeus, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    The solar wind is observed to be turbulent. One of the open questions in solar wind research is how the turbulence evolves as the solar wind expands to great distances. Some studies have focused on evolution of the outer scale but not much has been done to understand how intermittency evolves in the expanding wind beyond 1 AU (see [1,2]). We use magnetic field data from Voyager I spacecraft from 1 to 10AU to study the evolution of statistics of magnetic discontinuities. We perform various statistical tests on these discontinuities and make connections to the physical processes occurring in the expanding wind.[1] Tsurutani, Bruce T., and Edward J. Smith. "Interplanetary discontinuities: Temporal variations and the radial gradient from 1 to 8.5 AU." Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics 84.A6 (1979): 2773-2787.[2] Greco, A., et al. "Evidence for nonlinear development of magnetohydrodynamic scale intermittency in the inner heliosphere." The Astrophysical Journal 749.2 (2012): 105.

  15. Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbonye, A.K.; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Magnussen, Pascal

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether traditional birth attendants, drug-shop vendors, community reproductive-health workers, or adolescent peer mobilizers could administer intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) for malaria with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine to pregnant women. METHODS: A non-randomized comm......OBJECTIVE: To assess whether traditional birth attendants, drug-shop vendors, community reproductive-health workers, or adolescent peer mobilizers could administer intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) for malaria with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine to pregnant women. METHODS: A non......-randomized community trial was implemented in 21 community clusters (intervention) and four clusters where health units provided routine IPTp (control). The primary outcome measures were access and adherence to IPTp, number of malaria episodes, prevalence of anaemia, and birth weight. Numbers of live births, abortions......, still births, and maternal and child deaths were secondary endpoints. FINDINGS: 1404 (67.5%) of 2081 with the new delivery system received two doses of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine versus 281 (39.9%) of 704 with health units (P malaria episodes decreased from 906 (49...

  16. Intermittent hyperthyreosis. A heat stress syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulman, F G; Tal, E; Pfeifer, Y; Superstine, E [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Applied Pharmacology

    1975-09-01

    Intermittent hyperthyreosis occurs under various forms of stress, especially heat stress. The clinician may diagnose such cases as masked or apathetic hyperthyroidism or 'forme fruste' hyperthyreosis or thyroid autonomy. As most routine and standard tests may here yield inconsistent results, it is the patients' anamnesis which may provide the clue. Our Bioclimatology Unit has now seen over 100 cases in which thyroid hypersensitivity towards heat was the most prominent syndrome: 10-15% of weather-sensitive patients are affected. The patients complain before or during heat spells of such contradictory symptoms as insomnia, irritability, tension, tachycardia, palpitations, precordial pain, dyspnoe, flushes with sweating or chills, tremor, abdominal pain or diarrhea, polyuria or pollakisuria, weight loss in spite of ravenous appetite, fatigue, exhaustion, depression, adynamia, lack of concentration and confusion. Determination of urinary neurohormones allows a differential diagnosis, intermittent hyperthyreosis being characterized by three cardinal symptoms: tachycardia - every case with more than 80 pulse beats being suspect (not specific); urinary histamine - every case excreting more than 90 ..mu..g/day being suspect. Again the drawback of this test is its lack of specificity, as histamine may also be increased in cases of allergy and spondylitis; urinary thyroxine - every case excreting more than 20 ..mu..g/day T-4 being suspect. This is the only specific test. Therapy should make use of lithium carbonate and betablockers. Propyl thiouracil is rarely required.

  17. Adequacy in dialysis: intermittent versus continuous therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, M; Nolph, K D

    2000-01-01

    A vital conceptual difference between intermittent and continuous dialysis therapies is the difference in the relationship between Kt/V urea and dietary protein intake. For a given level of protein intake the intermittent therapies require a higher Kt/V urea due to the reasons mentioned above. The recently released adequacy guidelines by DOQI for intermittent and continuous therapies are based on these assumptions. The link between adequacy targets and patient survival is well documented for an intermittent therapy like HD. For a continuous therapy like CAPD however, the evidence linking improved peritoneal clearance to better survival is not as direct. However, present consensus allows one to extrapolate results based on HD. The concept of earlier and healthier initiation of dialysis is gaining hold and incremental dialysis forms an integral aspect of the whole concept. Tools like urea kinetic modeling give us valuable insight in making mathematical projections about the timing as well as dosing of dialysis. Daily home hemodialysis is still an underutilized modality despite offering best survival figures. Hopefully, with increasing availability of better and simpler machines its use will increase. Still several questions remain unanswered. Despite availability of data in hemodialysis patients suggesting that an increased dialysis prescription leads to a better survival, optimal dialysis dose is yet to be defined. Concerns regarding methodology of such studies and conclusions thereof has been raised. Other issues relating to design of the studies, variation in dialysis delivery, use of uncontrolled historical standards and lack of patient randomization etc also need to be considered when designing such trials. Hopefully an ongoing prospective randomized trial, namely the HEMO study, looking at two precisely defined and carefully maintained dialysis prescriptions will provide some insight into adequacy of dialysis dose and survival. In diabetic patients, the

  18. Recurrent peripheral cemento-ossifying fibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Treville; Shetty, Subraj; Shetty, Arvind; Pereira, Svylvy

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral cement-ossifying fibroma (PCOF) is a rare osteogenic neoplasm that ordinarily presents as an epulis-like growth. It frequently occurs in maxillary anterior region in teenagers and young adults. We report a case of PCOF in a 42-year-old male, which was previously surgically excised and recurred after a period of 2 years. PCOF should be considered in the differential diagnosis of reactive hyperplastic lesions originating from gingiva. Hence, early diagnosis with proper surgical excision and aggressive curettage of the adjacent tissues is essential for prevention of recurrence.

  19. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-14

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  20. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B. Baker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h. Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1 potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2 the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3 what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports. Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before

  1. Actinomyces associated with persistent vaginal granulation tissue.

    OpenAIRE

    Wai, Clifford Y; Nihira, Mikio A; Drewes, Peter G; Chang, Joe S; Siddiqui, Momin T; Hemsell, David L

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report a case of symptomatic actinomycosis associated with vaginal suture erosion and granulation tissue refractory to conservative management, in an outpatient setting. CASE: Three months after total vaginal hysterectomy and uterosacral ligament vaginal vault suspension, a woman complained of painless, intermittent vaginal discharge and spotting. Despite cauterization of granulation tissue, vaginal spotting persisted for another month. On re-examination, braided polyester sutu...

  2. Drug-induced peripheral neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilholm, Ole Jakob; Christensen, Alex Alban; Zedan, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy can be caused by medication, and various descriptions have been applied for this condition. In this MiniReview, the term 'drug-induced peripheral neuropathy' (DIPN) is used with the suggested definition: Damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system caused by a chemical...... substance used in the treatment, cure, prevention or diagnosis of a disease. Optic neuropathy is included in this definition. A distinction between DIPN and other aetiologies of peripheral neuropathy is often quite difficult and thus, the aim of this MiniReview is to discuss the major agents associated...

  3. Raman spectroscopic detection of peripheral nerves towards nerve-sparing surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamikawa, Takeo; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2017-02-01

    The peripheral nervous system plays an important role in motility, sensory, and autonomic functions of the human body. Preservation of peripheral nerves in surgery, namely nerve-sparing surgery, is now promising technique to avoid functional deficits of the limbs and organs following surgery as an aspect of the improvement of quality of life of patients. Detection of peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves is required for the nerve-sparing surgery; however, conventional nerve identification scheme is sometimes difficult to identify peripheral nerves due to similarity of shape and color to non-nerve tissues or its limited application to only motor peripheral nerves. To overcome these issues, we proposed a label-free detection technique of peripheral nerves by means of Raman spectroscopy. We found several fingerprints of peripheral myelinated and unmyelinated nerves by employing a modified principal component analysis of typical spectra including myelinated nerve, unmyelinated nerve, and adjacent tissues. We finally realized the sensitivity of 94.2% and the selectivity of 92.0% for peripheral nerves including myelinated and unmyelinated nerves against adjacent tissues. Although further development of an intraoperative Raman spectroscopy system is required for clinical use, our proposed approach will serve as a unique and powerful tool for peripheral nerve detection for nerve-sparing surgery in the future.

  4. Intermittent, Non Cyclic Severe Mechanical Aortic Valve Regurgitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong Hyun; Song, Seunghwan; Lee, Myung-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical aortic prosthesis dysfunction can result from thrombosis or pannus formation. We describe an unusual case of intermittent, non cyclic mechanical aortic prosthesis dysfunction due to pannus formation with thrombus in the absence of systolic restriction of disk excursion, that presented with intermittent severe aortic regurgitation. PMID:24459568

  5. Intermittent versus Continuous Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Annette Sandahl; Lange, Christa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the delivery of the same amount of intermittent versus continuous physiotherapy given to children with cerebral palsy (CP). This was organized either in an intermittent regime four times a week for 4 weeks alternating with a 6-week treatment pause, or a continuous once or twice a week regime, both…

  6. Peripheral degenerative joint diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilzio Antonio da Silva

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is the most commonrheumatic disorder mainly in a geriatric population. Manifestationsare pain, stiffness and functional loss in the affected joint.According to etiology it is classifi ed as primary (or idiopathicand secondary. Some risk factors for disease development aregenetics, race, age, sex, obesity, occupational activities andarticular biomechanics. Pathogenesis is the same for any cause orlocalization, being catabolic alterations, with synthesis, inhibitionand reparing intent of the cartilage matrix. Metalloproteinases andcytokines (IL-1,IL-6,TNF-α actions promote infl ammatory reactionand cartilage degradation. Pain, the most important symptom,does not correlate with radiologic fi ndings. Peripheral osteoarthritisoccurs predominantly in the knee, hip and hand. Diagnosis is basedon clinical features, laboratorial tests and radiological changes.Rheumatological associations’ guidelines for treatment includenon-pharmacologic (education, physiotherapy, assistive devices,and pharmacologic (analgesics, anti-infl ammatory drugs therapyand surgery. Arthroplasty seems to work better than medicines, butshould be used if other treatments have failed.

  7. Production of fibrogenic cytokines by interleukin-2-treated peripheral blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, E J; Brock, B; Silber, I E

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the production of fibrogenic cytokines by interleukin-2 (IL-2)-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes and to examine their ability to stimulate the production of connective tissue. METHODS: Culture medium from human peripheral blood leukocytes incubated with or without IL-2 w...

  8. Medical image of the week: granulation tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganesh A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 57 year old woman presented with a tickling sensation in the back of throat and intermittent bleeding from the healing stoma one month after decannulation of her tracheostomy tube. On bronchoscopy a granuloma with surrounding granulation tissue was present in the subglottic space (Figure 1. Argon plasma coagulation (APC was performed to cauterize the granulation tissue (Figure 2. Formation of granulation tissue after tracheostomy is a common complication which can result in tracheal stenosis. APC and electrocautery using flexible bronchoscopy has been shown to safely and effectively remove the granulation tissue.

  9. Effects of intermittent fasting on metabolism in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Fernanda Reis de; Ikeoka, Dimas; Caramelli, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    This review analyzes the available literature on the impact of intermittent fasting (IF), a nutritional intervention, on different aspects of metabolism. The epidemic of metabolic disturbances, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome (MS), and diabetes mellitus type 2 has led to an increase in the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases, and affected patients might significantly benefit from modifications in nutritional habits. Recent experimental studies have elucidated some of the metabolic mechanisms involved with IF. Animal models have shown positive changes in glucose (lower plasma glucose and insulin levels) and in lipid metabolism (reduced visceral fat tissue and increased plasma adiponectin level), and an increased resistance to stress. Despite the limited number of samples studied, positive results have been reported on the impact of IF for human health. IF is reported to improve the lipid profile; to decrease inflammatory responses, reflected by changes in serum adipokine levels; and to change the expression of genes related to inflammatory response and other factors. Studies on obese individuals have shown that patient compliance was greater for IF than other traditional nutritional approaches (calorie restriction), and IF was found to be associated with low oxidative stress. Recent reports suggest that IF exerts a positive impact on the metabolic derangements commonly associated with cardiovascular diseases, and that it may be a viable and accessible intervention for most individuals. Therefore, further clinical studies are essential to test the effectiveness of IF in preventing and controlling metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Kynurenic Acid and Gpr35 Regulate Adipose Tissue Energy Homeostasis and Inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agudelo, Leandro Z; Ferreira, Duarte M S; Cervenka, Igor

    2018-01-01

    The role of tryptophan-kynurenine metabolism in psychiatric disease is well established, but remains less explored in peripheral tissues. Exercise training activates kynurenine biotransformation in skeletal muscle, which protects from neuroinflammation and leads to peripheral kynurenic acid accum...

  11. Intermittent metabolic switching, neuroplasticity and brain health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, Mark P.; Moehl, Keelin; Ghena, Nathaniel; Schmaedick, Maggie; Cheng, Aiwu

    2018-01-01

    During evolution, individuals whose brains and bodies functioned well in a fasted state were successful in acquiring food, enabling their survival and reproduction. With fasting and extended exercise, liver glycogen stores are depleted and ketones are produced from adipose-cell-derived fatty acids. This metabolic switch in cellular fuel source is accompanied by cellular and molecular adaptations of neural networks in the brain that enhance their functionality and bolster their resistance to stress, injury and disease. Here, we consider how intermittent metabolic switching, repeating cycles of a metabolic challenge that induces ketosis (fasting and/or exercise) followed by a recovery period (eating, resting and sleeping), may optimize brain function and resilience throughout the lifespan, with a focus on the neuronal circuits involved in cognition and mood. Such metabolic switching impacts multiple signalling pathways that promote neuroplasticity and resistance of the brain to injury and disease. PMID:29321682

  12. Compensatory mechanisms activated with intermittent energy restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Sílvia Ribeiro; Halset, Eline Holli; Gåsbakk, Sigrid

    2018-01-01

    Background & aims: Strong compensatory responses, with reduced resting metabolic rate (RMR), increased exercise efficiency (ExEff) and appetite, are activated when weight loss (WL) is achieved with continuous energy restriction (CER), which try to restore energy balance. Intermittent energy...... restriction (IER), where short spells of energy restriction are interspaced by periods of habitual energy intake, may offer some protection in minimizing those responses. We aimed to compare the effect of IER versus CER on body composition and the compensatory responses induced by WL. Methods: 35 adults (age......: 39 ± 9 y) with obesity (BMI: 36 ± 4 kg/m2) were randomized to lose a similar weight with an IER (N = 18) or a CER (N = 17) diet over a 12 week period. Macronutrient composition and overall energy restriction (33% reduction) were similar between groups. Body weight/composition, RMR, fasting...

  13. Towards an intermittency-friendly energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blarke, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Distributed cogeneration has played a key role in the implementation of sustainable energy policies for three decades. However, increasing penetration levels of intermittent renewables is challenging that position. The paradigmatic case of West Denmark indicates that distributed operators...... are capitulating as wind power penetration levels are moving above 25%; some operators are retiring cogeneration units entirely, while other operators are making way for heat-only boilers. This development is jeopardizing the system-wide energy, economic, and environmental benefits that distributed cogeneration...... still has to offer. The solution is for distributed operators to adapt their technology and operational strategies to achieve a better co-existence between cogeneration and wind power. Four options for doing so are analysed including a new concept that integrates a high pressure compression heat pump...

  14. Scale Dependence of Spatiotemporal Intermittence of Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Siddani, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    It is a common experience that rainfall is intermittent in space and time. This is reflected by the fact that the statistics of area- and/or time-averaged rain rate is described by a mixed distribution with a nonzero probability of having a sharp value zero. In this paper we have explored the dependence of the probability of zero rain on the averaging space and time scales in large multiyear data sets based on radar and rain gauge observations. A stretched exponential fannula fits the observed scale dependence of the zero-rain probability. The proposed formula makes it apparent that the space-time support of the rain field is not quite a set of measure zero as is sometimes supposed. We also give an ex.planation of the observed behavior in tenus of a simple probabilistic model based on the premise that rainfall process has an intrinsic memory.

  15. Beneficial effects of intermittent suction and pressure treatment in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Himmelstrup, H; Himmelstrup, Bodil

    1993-01-01

    administration. The treatment caused significant increments in the ADP thresholds for platelet aggregation, while the effects on fibrinolysis were uncertain. It is concluded that intermittent suction and pressure treatment offers a new approach for conservative treatment of intermittent claudication....... participated in an open trial investigating the possible effects of the treatment on platelet aggregation and fibrinolysis. Pain-free and maximal walking distances were measured on a treadmill, and systolic blood pressure was measured on the upper limb, the ankle, and the first toe bilaterally. The threshold...... for adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation was tested, and the fibrinolytic activity was estimated from the euglobulin clot lysis time. Active treatment resulted in significant improvements in pain-free and maximal walking distances, whereas no changes could be found during placebo...

  16. Intermittent fasting prompted recovery from dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Toshihiko; Otsubo, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Teruki; Inazuka, Fumika; Kobayashi, Eiko; Fukuda, Shinji; Inoue, Takuya; Higuchi, Kazuhide; Kawamura, Yuki I; Dohi, Taeko

    2017-09-01

    Fasting-refeeding in mice induces transient hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells, which is dependent on the lactate produced as a metabolite of commensal bacteria. We attempted to manipulate colonic epithelial cell turnover with intermittent fasting to prompt recovery from acute colitis. Acute colitis was induced in C57BL/6 mice by administration of dextran sulfate sodium in the drinking water for 5 days. From day 6, mice were fasted for 36 h and refed normal bait, glucose powder, or lactylated high-amylose starch. On day 9, colon tissues were subjected to analysis of histology and cytokine expression. The effect of lactate on the proliferation of colonocytes was assessed by enema in vivo and primary culture in vitro . Intermittent fasting resulted in restored colonic crypts and less expression of interleukin-1β and interleukin-17 in the colon than in mice fed ad libitum . Administration of lactate in the colon at refeeding time by enema or by feeding lactylated high-amylose starch increased the number of regenerating crypts. Addition of lactate but not butyrate or acetate supported colony formation of colonocytes in vitro . In conclusion, intermittent fasting in the resolution phase of acute colitis resulted in better recovery of epithelial cells and reduced inflammation.

  17. Simulating sleep apnea by exposure to intermittent hypoxia induces inflammation in the lung and liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rosa, Darlan Pase; Forgiarini, Luiz Felipe; Baronio, Diego; Feijó, Cristiano Andrade; Martinez, Dênis; Marroni, Norma Possa

    2012-01-01

    Sleep apnea is a breathing disorder that results from momentary and cyclic collapse of the upper airway, leading to intermittent hypoxia (IH). IH can lead to the formation of free radicals that increase oxidative stress, and this mechanism may explain the association between central sleep apnea and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. We assessed the level of inflammation in the lung and liver tissue from animals subjected to intermittent hypoxia and simulated sleep apnea. A total of 12 C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups and then exposed to IH (n = 6) or a simulated IH (SIH) (n = 6) for 35 days. We observed an increase in oxidative damage and other changes to endogenous antioxidant enzymes in mice exposed to IH. Specifically, the expression of multiple transcription factors, including hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), inducible NO synthase (iNOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and cleaved caspase 3 were shown to be increased in the IH group. Overall, we found that exposure to intermittent hypoxia for 35 days by simulating sleep apnea leads to oxidative stress, inflammation, and increased activity of caspase 3 in the liver and lung.

  18. Simulating Sleep Apnea by Exposure to Intermittent Hypoxia Induces Inflammation in the Lung and Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darlan Pase da Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea is a breathing disorder that results from momentary and cyclic collapse of the upper airway, leading to intermittent hypoxia (IH. IH can lead to the formation of free radicals that increase oxidative stress, and this mechanism may explain the association between central sleep apnea and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. We assessed the level of inflammation in the lung and liver tissue from animals subjected to intermittent hypoxia and simulated sleep apnea. A total of 12 C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups and then exposed to IH (n=6 or a simulated IH (SIH (n=6 for 35 days. We observed an increase in oxidative damage and other changes to endogenous antioxidant enzymes in mice exposed to IH. Specifically, the expression of multiple transcription factors, including hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α, nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, inducible NO synthase (iNOS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, and cleaved caspase 3 were shown to be increased in the IH group. Overall, we found that exposure to intermittent hypoxia for 35 days by simulating sleep apnea leads to oxidative stress, inflammation, and increased activity of caspase 3 in the liver and lung.

  19. Odontogenic keratocyst: a peripheral variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vij, H; Vij, R; Gupta, V; Sengupta, S

    2011-01-01

    Odontogenic keratocyst, which is developmental in nature, is an intraosseous lesion though on rare occasions it may occur in an extraosseous location. The extraosseous variant is referred to as peripheral odontogenic keratocyst. Though, clinically, peripheral odontogenic keratocyst resembles the gingival cyst of adults, it has histologic features that are pathognomonic of odontogenic keratocyst. This article presents a case of this uncommon entity.

  20. Conformally integrated stent cell resonators for wireless monitoring of peripheral artery disease

    KAUST Repository

    Viswanath, Anupam; Green, Scott Ryan; Kosel, Jü rgen; Gianchandani, Yogesh B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design and in vitro evaluation of magnetoelastic sensors intended for wireless monitoring of tissue accumulation in peripheral artery stents. The sensors, shaped like stent cells, are fabricated from 28-μm thick foils

  1. The relation of near-infrared spectroscopy with changes in peripheral circulation in critically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lima, Alexandre; van Bommel, Jasper; Sikorska, Karolina; van Genderen, Michel; Klijn, Eva; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Ince, Can; Bakker, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We conducted this observational study to investigate tissue oxygen saturation during a vascular occlusion test in relationship with the condition of peripheral circulation and outcome in critically ill patients. Prospective observational study. Multidisciplinary intensive care unit in a university

  2. [Intermittent Explosive Disorder: A Controversial Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan Pablo; Palacio, Juan David

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent explosive disorder (IED) is aan externalizing externalising disorder characterized characterised by recurrent aggression episodes. Even though this disorder was described several decades ago, and it carries personal and social consequences, there is little in the medical scientific literature on this. bibliographic production about it is scanty. To perform a conceptualization conceptualisation of this disorder, through the review and bibliometric analysis of the available scientific articles. A search was performed in databases with the english English terms intermittent explosive disorder, impulse disorders control [MeSH], in combination with other terms. A bibliometric analysis in the GoPubMed® search engineer was also performed using all data obtained in the search. was also perfomed. IED prevalence ranges from 1.4% to 7%, it presents more frequently during middle adolescence, and with more noticeable repercussions in men males than in womenfemales. The psychopathological core of IED is the impulsive aggressive behaviour that presents in the form of «attacks» that occurs in response to a lower precipitating stimulus. Scientific publications about IED are few and relatively recent, and the vast majority is provided bycomes from the United States (56.56%), and headed by a single author. This fact highlights the need to replicate the findings described about the IED in order to demonstrate the validity and reliability of its diagnostic criteria. It is possible that doubts about the existence of a diagnosis lead have led to such a scant literature about the IED. Available studies about IED allow have allowed characterizing a group of subjects with episodes of impulsive aggression to be characterised, but this description requires replication in different latitudesneeds to be repeated in different areas. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  3. Managing server clusters on intermittent power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Reducing the energy footprint of data centers continues to receive significant attention due to both its financial and environmental impact. There are numerous methods that limit the impact of both factors, such as expanding the use of renewable energy or participating in automated demand-response programs. To take advantage of these methods, servers and applications must gracefully handle intermittent constraints in their power supply. In this paper, we propose blinking—metered transitions between a high-power active state and a low-power inactive state—as the primary abstraction for conforming to intermittent power constraints. We design Blink, an application-independent hardware–software platform for developing and evaluating blinking applications, and define multiple types of blinking policies. We then use Blink to design both a blinking version of memcached (BlinkCache and a multimedia cache (GreenCache to demonstrate how application characteristics affect the design of blink-aware distributed applications. Our results show that for BlinkCache, a load-proportional blinking policy combines the advantages of both activation and synchronous blinking for realistic Zipf-like popularity distributions and wind/solar power signals by achieving near optimal hit rates (within 15% of an activation policy, while also providing fairer access to the cache (within 2% of a synchronous policy for equally popular objects. In contrast, for GreenCache, due to multimedia workload patterns, we find that a staggered load proportional blinking policy with replication of the first chunk of each video reduces the buffering time at all power levels, as compared to activation or load-proportional blinking policies.

  4. Peripheral Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... smokers aged 20 to 40. Smoking causes the blood vessels to tighten in everyone who smokes. But in people with Buerger’s disease, there is so much tightening in the vessels that a lack of oxygen to the cells (ischemia) or tissue death (necrosis) may result. The symptoms may be different for ...

  5. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces atherosclerosis via activation of adipose angiopoietin-like 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drager, Luciano F; Yao, Qiaoling; Hernandez, Karen L; Shin, Mi-Kyung; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Gay, Jason; Sussan, Thomas E; Jun, Jonathan C; Myers, Allen C; Olivecrona, Gunilla; Schwartz, Alan R; Halberg, Nils; Scherer, Philipp E; Semenza, Gregg L; Powell, David R; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2013-07-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea is a risk factor for dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis, which have been attributed to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). Intermittent hypoxia inhibits a key enzyme of lipoprotein clearance, lipoprotein lipase, and up-regulates a lipoprotein lipase inhibitor, angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4), in adipose tissue. The effects and mechanisms of Angptl4 up-regulation in sleep apnea are unknown. To examine whether CIH induces dyslipidemia and atherosclerosis by increasing adipose Angptl4 via hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). ApoE(-/-) mice were exposed to intermittent hypoxia or air for 4 weeks while being treated with Angptl4-neutralizing antibody or vehicle. In vehicle-treated mice, hypoxia increased adipose Angptl4 levels, inhibited adipose lipoprotein lipase, increased fasting levels of plasma triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein cholesterol, and increased the size of atherosclerotic plaques. The effects of CIH were abolished by the antibody. Hypoxia-induced increases in plasma fasting triglycerides and adipose Angptl4 were not observed in mice with germline heterozygosity for a HIF-1α knockout allele. Transgenic overexpression of HIF-1α in adipose tissue led to dyslipidemia and increased levels of adipose Angptl4. In cultured adipocytes, constitutive expression of HIF-1α increased Angptl4 levels, which was abolished by siRNA. Finally, in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, the severity of nocturnal hypoxemia predicted Angptl4 levels in subcutaneous adipose tissue. HIF-1-mediated increase in adipose Angptl4 and the ensuing lipoprotein lipase inactivation may contribute to atherosclerosis in patients with sleep apnea.

  6. Peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushant S Kamat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dentinogenic ghost cell tumors (DGCT are uncommon lesions mainly with rare peripheral types. This report presents a case of peripheral DGCT on the left side of the mandibular alveolar ridge of a heavy smoker, a 68-year-old man, with main presenting feature as a mild pain. Submandibular lymphadenopathy and radiological "saucerization" were evident. Differential diagnosis included fibroma, neurofibroma, peripheral ameloblastoma, peripheral odontogenic fibroma, and peripheral giant cell granuloma. Histologically, ameloblastoma-like epithelial elements were seen in association with grouped ghost cells. Proliferating polyhedral cells and stellate reticulum-like cells with various densities were spread over a wide range of the field. The lesion was curetted and after 2 years of follow up, it did not recur.

  7. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2006-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy (IAAT) may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  8. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2004-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  9. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2005-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  10. Enhancement of Intermittent Androgen Ablation Therapy by Finasteride Administration in Animal Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Zhou

    2003-01-01

    .... Intermittent androgen ablation therapy may slow down the development of androgen refractory tumors because intermittent recovery of androgens can induce differentiation of prostatic epithelial cells...

  11. Down-regulation of vascular PPAR-γ contributes to endothelial dysfunction in high-fat diet-induced obese mice exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanan; Zhang, Chunlian; Li, Haiou; Hou, Jingdong

    2017-10-14

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), is associated with endothelial dysfunction. The prevalence of OSA is linked to an epidemic of obesity. CIH has recently been reported to cause endothelial dysfunction in diet-induced obese animals by exaggerating oxidative stress and inflammation, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. PPAR-γ, a ligand-inducible transcription factor that exerts anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects, is down-regulated in the peripheral tissues in diet-induce obesity. We tested the hypothesis that down-regulation of vascular PPAR-γ in diet-induced obesity enhances inflammation and oxidative stress in response to CIH, resulting in endothelial dysfunction. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed either a high-fat diet (HFD) or a low-fat diet (LFD) and simultaneously exposed to CIH or intermittent air for 6 weeks. An additional HFD group received a combination of CIH and PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone for 6 weeks. Endothelial-dependent vasodilation was impaired only in HFD group exposed to CIH, compared with other groups, but was restored by concomitant pioglitazone treatment. Molecular studies revealed that vascular PPAR-γ expression and activity were reduced in HFD groups, compared with LFD groups, but were reversed by pioglitazone treatment. In addition, CIH elevated vascular expression of NADPH oxidase 4 and dihydroethidium fluorescence, and increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β in both LFD and HFD groups, but these increases was significantly greater in HFD group, along with decreased vascular eNOS activity. Pioglitazone treatment of HFD group prevented CIH-induced changes in above molecular markers. The results suggest that HFD-induced obesity down-regulates vascular PPAR-γ, which results in exaggerated oxidative stress and inflammation in response to CIH, contributing to endothelial dysfunction. This finding may provide new insights into the mechanisms by which OSA

  12. Peripheral Auditory Mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, J; Hubbard, A; Neely, S; Tubis, A

    1986-01-01

    How weIl can we model experimental observations of the peripheral auditory system'? What theoretical predictions can we make that might be tested'? It was with these questions in mind that we organized the 1985 Mechanics of Hearing Workshop, to bring together auditory researchers to compare models with experimental observations. Tbe workshop forum was inspired by the very successful 1983 Mechanics of Hearing Workshop in Delft [1]. Boston University was chosen as the site of our meeting because of the Boston area's role as a center for hearing research in this country. We made a special effort at this meeting to attract students from around the world, because without students this field will not progress. Financial support for the workshop was provided in part by grant BNS- 8412878 from the National Science Foundation. Modeling is a traditional strategy in science and plays an important role in the scientific method. Models are the bridge between theory and experiment. Tbey test the assumptions made in experim...

  13. Intermittent hypoxia increases insulin resistance in genetically obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polotsky, Vsevolod Y; Li, Jianguo; Punjabi, Naresh M; Rubin, Arnon E; Smith, Philip L; Schwartz, Alan R; O'Donnell, Christopher P

    2003-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea, a syndrome that leads to recurrent intermittent hypoxia, is associated with insulin resistance in obese individuals, but the mechanisms underlying this association remain unknown. We utilized a mouse model to examine the effects of intermittent hypoxia on insulin resistance in lean C57BL/6J mice and leptin-deficient obese (C57BL/6J-Lepob) mice. In lean mice, exposure to intermittent hypoxia for 5 days (short term) resulted in a decrease in fasting blood glucose levels (from 173 +/- 11 mg dl-1 on day 0 to 138 +/- 10 mg dl-1 on day 5, P obese mice, short-term intermittent hypoxia led to a decrease in blood glucose levels accompanied by a 607 +/- 136 % (P intermittent hypoxia was completely abolished by prior leptin infusion. Obese mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia for 12 weeks (long term) developed a time-dependent increase in fasting serum insulin levels (from 3.6 +/- 1.1 ng ml-1 at baseline to 9.8 +/- 1.8 ng ml-1 at week 12, P intermittent hypoxia is dependent on the disruption of leptin pathways.

  14. Putting intelligent structured intermittent auscultation (ISIA) into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Robyn M; Skinner, Joan P; Foureur, Maralyn J

    2016-06-01

    Fetal monitoring guidelines recommend intermittent auscultation for the monitoring of fetal wellbeing during labour for low-risk women. However, these guidelines are not being translated into practice and low-risk women birthing in institutional maternity units are increasingly exposed to continuous cardiotocographic monitoring, both on admission to hospital and during labour. When continuous fetal monitoring becomes routinised, midwives and obstetricians lose practical skills around intermittent auscultation. To support clinical practice and decision-making around auscultation modality, the intelligent structured intermittent auscultation (ISIA) framework was developed. The purpose of this discussion paper is to describe the application of intelligent structured intermittent auscultation in practice. The intelligent structured intermittent auscultation decision-making framework is a knowledge translation tool that supports the implementation of evidence into practice around the use of intermittent auscultation for fetal heart monitoring for low-risk women during labour. An understanding of the physiology of the materno-utero-placental unit and control of the fetal heart underpin the development of the framework. Intelligent structured intermittent auscultation provides midwives with a robust means of demonstrating their critical thinking and clinical reasoning and supports their understanding of normal physiological birth. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Liposomes to target peripheral neurons and Schwann cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sooyeon Lee

    Full Text Available While a wealth of literature for tissue-specific liposomes is emerging, optimal formulations to target the cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS are lacking. In this study, we asked whether a novel formulation of phospholipid-based liposomes could be optimized for preferential uptake by microvascular endothelia, peripheral neurons and Schwann cells. Here, we report a unique formulation consisting of a phospholipid, a polymer surfactant and cholesterol that result in enhanced uptake by targeted cells. Using fluorescently labeled liposomes, we followed particle internalization and trafficking through a distinct route from dextran and escape from degradative compartments, such as lysosomes. In cultures of non-myelinating Schwann cells, liposomes associate with the lipid raft marker Cholera toxin, and their internalization is inhibited by disruption of lipid rafts or actin polymerization. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis does not significantly impact liposome entry. To evaluate the efficacy of liposome targeting in tissues, we utilized myelinating explant cultures of dorsal root ganglia and isolated diaphragm preparations, both of which contain peripheral neurons and myelinating Schwann cells. In these models, we detected preferential liposome uptake into neurons and glial cells in comparison to surrounding muscle tissue. Furthermore, in vivo liposome administration by intramuscular or intravenous injection confirmed that the particles were delivered to myelinated peripheral nerves. Within the CNS, we detected the liposomes in choroid epithelium, but not in myelinated white matter regions or in brain parenchyma. The described nanoparticles represent a novel neurophilic delivery vehicle for targeting small therapeutic compounds, biological molecules, or imaging reagents into peripheral neurons and Schwann cells, and provide a major advancement toward developing effective therapies for peripheral

  16. Subintimal Angioplasty for Peripheral Arterial Occlusive Disease: A Systematic Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Met, Rosemarie; Lienden, Krijn P. Van; Koelemay, Mark J. W.; Bipat, Shandra; Legemate, Dink A.; Reekers, Jim A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to summarize outcomes of subintimal angioplasty (SA) for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. The Cochrane Library, Medline and Embase databases were searched to perform a systematic review of the literature from 1966 through May 2007 on outcomes of SA for peripheral arterial occlusive disease of the infrainguinal vessels. The keywords 'percutaneous intentional extraluminal revascularization,' 'subintimal angioplasty,' 'peripheral arterial disease,' 'femoral artery,' 'popliteal artery,' and 'tibial artery' were used. Assessment of study quality was done using a form based on a checklist of the Dutch Cochrane Centre. The recorded outcomes were technical and clinical success, primary (assisted) patency, limb salvage, complications, and survival, in relation to the clinical grade of disease (intermittent claudication or critical limb ischemia [CLI] or mixed) and location of lesion (femoropopliteal, crural, or mixed). Twenty-three cohort studies including a total of 1549 patients (range, 27 to 148) were included in this review. Methodological and reporting quality were moderate, e.g., there was selection bias and reporting was not done according to the reporting standards. These and significant clinical heterogeneity obstructed a meta-analysis. Reports about length of the lesion and TASC classification were too various to summarize or were not mentioned at all. The technical success rates varied between 80% and 90%, with lower rates for crural lesions compared with femoral lesions. Complication rates ranged between 8% and 17% and most complications were minor. After 1 year, clinical success was between 50% and 70%, primary patency was around 50% and limb salvage varied from 80% to 90%. In conclusion, taking into account the methodological shortcomings of the included studies, SA can play an important role in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease, especially in the case of critical limb ischemia. Despite the moderate patency

  17. Photoluminescence intermittency of semiconductor quantum dots in dielectric environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaac, A.

    2006-08-11

    The experimental studies presented in this thesis deal with the photoluminescence intermittency of semiconductor quantum dots in different dielectric environments. Detailed analysis of intermittency statistics from single capped CdSe/ZnS, uncapped CdSe and water dispersed CdSe/ZnS QDs in different matrices provide experimental evidence for the model of photoionization with a charge ejected into the surrounding matrix as the source of PL intermittency phenomenon. We propose a self-trapping model to explain the increase of dark state lifetimes with the dielectric constant of the matrix. (orig.)

  18. Intermittent fasting: a "new" historical strategy for controlling seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L; Rubenstein, James E; Kossoff, Eric H

    2013-05-01

    In antiquity, fasting was a treatment for epilepsy and a rationale for the ketogenic diet (KD). Preclinical data indicate the KD and intermittent fasting do not share identical anticonvulsant mechanisms. We implemented an intermittent fasting regimen in six children with an incomplete response to a KD. Three patients adhered to the combined intermittent fasting/KD regimen for 2 months and four had transient improvement in seizure control, albeit with some hunger-related adverse reactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Intermittent hypoxia simulating obstructive sleep apnea causes pulmonary inflammation and activates the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeying; Chai, Yanling; He, Xiaojie; Ai, Li; Sun, Xia; Huang, Yiling; Li, Yongxia

    2017-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder with high morbidity in adults. OSA damages multiple organs and tissues, including the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems, the metabolism system, the lungs, liver and heart. OSA-induced damage is earliest and greatest to the pulmonary tissue. The present study established a rat OSA model of differing severity by inducing intermittent hypoxia with different concentrations of O 2 and it was determined that OSA caused a severe oxidative stress response and pulmonary inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. OSA increased serum levels of C-reactive protein and 8-isoprostane and elevated the expression of malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in the pulmonary tissue. Furthermore, the expression of two important antioxidants, superoxide dismutase and glutathione, was downregulated following intermittent hypoxia. By contrast, levels of cylooxygenase 2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase, which are crucial in the antioxidative response, increased. In addition, OSA activates the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase (OH)-1 antioxidative signaling pathway. Finally, all increases and decreases in levels of inflammatory and antioxidative substances were dependent on oxygen concentrations. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that OSA, simulated by intermittent hypoxia, caused an oxidative stress response and pulmonary inflammation, and activated the canonical antioxidative Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway in a dose-dependent manner. These results may facilitate the development of clinical therapies to treat pulmonary diseases caused by OSA.

  20. Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccote, Sila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Homan, Gregory [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Anderson, Robert [Olivine, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Hernandez, John [Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot - Phase 2 (IRM2) was designed to study the feasibility of demand-side resources to participate into the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) wholesale market as proxy demand resources (PDR). The pilot study focused on understanding the issues related with direct participation of third-parties and customers including customer acceptance; market transformation challenges (wholesale market, technology); technical and operational feasibility; and value to the rate payers, DR resource owners and the utility on providing an enabling mechanism for DR resources into the wholesale markets. The customer had the option of committing to either three contiguous hour blocks for 24 days or six contiguous hours for 12 days a month with day-ahead notification that aligned with the CAISO integrated forward market. As a result of their being available, the customer was paid $10/ kilowatt (kW)-month for capacity in addition to CAISO energy settlements. The participants were limited to no more than a 2 megawatt (MW) capacity with a six-month commitment. Four participants successfully engaged in the pilot. In this report, we provide the description of the pilot, participant performance results, costs and value to participants as well as outline some of the issues encountered through the pilot. Results show that participants chose to participate with storage and the value of CAISO settlements were significantly lower than the capacity payments provided by the utility as incentive payments. In addition, this pilot revealed issues both on the participant side and system operations side. These issues are summarized in the report.The Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot - Phase 2 (IRM2) was designed to study the feasibility of demand-side resources to participate into the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) wholesale market as proxy demand resources (PDR). The pilot study focused on understanding the issues related with

  1. Peripheral changes in endometriosis-associated pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morotti, Matteo; Vincent, Katy; Brawn, Jennifer; Zondervan, Krina T.; Becker, Christian M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Pain remains the cardinal symptom of endometriosis. However, to date, the underlying mechanisms are still only poorly understood. Increasing evidence points towards a close interaction between peripheral nerves, the peritoneal environment and the central nervous system in pain generation and processing. Recently, studies demonstrating nerve fibres and neurotrophic and angiogenic factors in endometriotic lesions and their vicinity have led to increased interest in peripheral changes in endometriosis-associated pain. This review focuses on the origin and function of these nerves and factors as well as possible peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to the generation and modulation of pain in women with endometriosis. METHODS We conducted a systematic search using several databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL) of publications from January 1977 to October 2013 to evaluate the possible roles of the peripheral nervous system in endometriosis pathophysiology and how it can contribute to endometriosis-associated pain. RESULTS Endometriotic lesions and peritoneal fluid from women with endometriosis had pronounced neuroangiogenic properties with increased expression of new nerve fibres, a shift in the distribution of sensory and autonomic fibres in some locations, and up-regulation of several neurotrophins. In women suffering from deep infiltrating endometriosis and bowel endometriosis, in which the anatomical distribution of lesions is generally more closely related to pelvic pain symptoms, endometriotic lesions and surrounding tissues present higher nerve fibre densities compared to peritoneal lesions and endometriomas. More data are needed to fully confirm a direct correlation between fibre density in these locations and the amount of perceived pain. A better correlation between the presence of nerve fibres and pain symptoms seems to exist for eutopic endometrium. However, this appears not to be exclusive to endometriosis. No correlation between

  2. Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma T-Cell Lymphoma Transformed Mycosis Fungoides Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia Young Adult Lymphoma Overview Treatment Options Relapsed/Refractory Long-term ...

  3. Network node for peripheral sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobbitt, J.; Johnson, M.

    1977-01-01

    A module which enables several independent computer systems to share the peripherals (graphics display and line printer) of a PDP-11 computer is described. The module requires no software support in the PDP-11

  4. Diagnostic comparison of malaria infection in peripheral blood, placental blood and placental biopsies in Cameroonian parturient women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anchang-Kimbi Judith K

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sub-Saharan Africa, Plasmodium falciparum malaria in pregnancy presents an enormous diagnostic challenge. The epidemiological and clinical relevance of the different types of malaria diagnosis as well as risk factors associated with malaria infection at delivery were investigated. Method In a cross-sectional survey, 306 women reporting for delivery in the Mutenegene maternity clinic, Fako division, South West province, Cameroon were screened for P. falciparum in peripheral blood, placental blood and placental tissue sections by microscopy. Information relating to the use of intermittent preventive treatment in pregnancy with sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine, history of fever attack, infant birth weights and maternal anaemia were recorded. Results Among these women, P. falciparum infection was detected in 5.6%, 25.5% and 60.5% of the cases in peripheral blood, placental blood and placental histological sections respectively. Placental histology was more sensitive (97.4% than placental blood film (41.5% and peripheral blood (8.0% microscopy. In multivariate analysis, age (≤ 20 years old (OR = 4.61, 95% CI = 1.47 – 14.70, history of fever attack (OR = 2.98, 95% CI = 1.58 – 5.73 were significant risk factors associated with microscopically detected parasitaemia. The use of ≥ 2 SP doses (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.06 – 0.52 was associated with a significant reduction in the prevalence of microscopic parasitaemia at delivery. Age (>20 years (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.15 – 0.75 was the only significant risk factor associated with parasitaemia diagnosed by histology only in univariate analysis. Microscopic parasitaemia (OR = 2.74, 95% CI = 1.33–5.62 was a significant risk factor for maternal anaemia at delivery, but neither infection detected by histology only, nor past infection were associated with increased risk of anaemia. Conclusion Placenta histological examination was the most sensitive indicator of malaria infection at

  5. Intermittent claudication-like syndrome secondary to atherosclerosis in a yellow-naped Amazon parrot (Amazona ochrocephala auropalliata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Holder, Kali A; Bauer, Rudy; Schnellbacher, Rodney; Pariaut, Romain; Tully, Thomas N; Wakamatsu, Nobuko

    2011-12-01

    A 25-year-old yellow-naped Amazon parrot (Amazona ochrocephala auropalliata) was presented for nasal discharge and sneezing. Physical examination revealed poor feather quality, a mild serous nasal discharge, and a mass on the dorsal surface of the oral cavity. Cytologic examination of a mass aspirate as well as results of a choanal culture revealed squamous metaplasia of the salivary glands and bacterial rhinitis, respectively. Following resolution of the presenting conditions, the patient was presented for hind limb weakness and ataxia. The clinical signs were transient and generally resolved with rest but could be reproduced after stressful episodes, such as restraint for procedures or treatment. Test results from a complete blood count, biochemistry profile, whole-body radiographs, needle electromyography of the leg muscles, and an edrophonium challenge test were within reference limits. Based on the clinical signs and results of the diagnostic workup, the presumptive diagnosis was intermittent claudication, a condition caused by peripheral vascular disease and defined as intermittent weakness and pain in the legs induced by exercise and relieved by rest. Shortly after initiation of treatment with isoxsuprine, the bird died. Postmortem examination and histopathology revealed severe atherosclerotic lesions throughout the vascular system with stenotic lesions present in the abdominal aorta and femoral arteries. Electron microscopic examination of the great arteries was also performed and helped to further characterize the nature of the lesions. This case is the first report, to our knowledge, of an intermittent claudication-like syndrome associated with peripheral atherosclerosis in a psittacine bird. In addition, the distribution and some of the macroscopic and histopathologic features of the lesions differ from previous descriptions of atherosclerosis in psittacine birds.

  6. Sex differences associated with intermittent swim stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Timothy A; Libman, Matthew K; Wooten, Katherine L; Drugan, Robert C

    2013-11-01

    Various animal models of depression have been used to seek a greater understanding of stress-related disorders. However, there is still a great need for novel research in this area, as many individuals suffering from depression are resistant to current treatment methods. Women have a higher rate of depression, highlighting the need to investigate mechanisms of sex differences. Therefore, we employed a new animal model to assess symptoms of depression, known as intermittent swim stress (ISS). In this model, the animal experiences 100 trials of cold water swim stress. ISS has already been shown to cause signs of behavioral depression in males, but has yet to be assessed in females. Following ISS exposure, we looked at sex differences in the Morris water maze and forced swim test. The results indicated a spatial learning effect only in the hidden platform task between male and female controls, and stressed and control males. A consistent spatial memory effect was only seen for males exposed to ISS. In the forced swim test, both sexes exposed to ISS exhibited greater immobility, and the same males and females also showed attenuated climbing and swimming, respectively. The sex differences could be due to different neural substrates for males and females. The goal of this study was to provide the first behavioral examination of sex differences following ISS exposure, so the stage of estrous cycle was not assessed for the females. This is a necessary future direction for subsequent experiments. The current article highlights the importance of sex differences in response to stress.

  7. Treatment of variable and intermittently flowing wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocasoy, Günay

    1993-11-01

    The biological treatment of wastewaters originating from hotels and residential areas of seasonal use, flowing intermittently, is difficult due to the fact that bacteria cannot survive during periods of no-flow. An investigation has been conducted in order to develop a system which will be able to overcome the difficulties encountered. After a long investigation the following system has given satisfactory results. The wastewater was taken initially into an aeration tank operating as a sequential batch reactor. Waste was taken after the sedimentation phase of the reactor into a coagulation-flocculation tank where it was treated by chemical means, and then settled in order to separate the floes. When the population of bacteria in the aeration tank reached the required level, the physico-chemical treatment was terminated and the tank used for chemical treatment has been started to be used as an equalization tank while the aeration and sedimentation tanks have been used as an activated sludge unit. This system has been proved to be a satisfactory method for the above mentioned wastes.

  8. Mesoscopic fluctuations and intermittency in aging dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibani, P.

    2006-01-01

    Mesoscopic aging systems are characterized by large intermittent noise fluctuations. In a record dynamics scenario (Sibani P. and Dall J., Europhys. Lett., 64 (2003) 8) these events, quakes, are treated as a Poisson process with average αln (1 + t/tw), where t is the observation time, tw is the age and α is a parameter. Assuming for simplicity that quakes constitute the only source of de-correlation, we present a model for the probability density function (PDF) of the configuration autocorrelation function. Beside α, the model has the average quake size 1/q as a parameter. The model autocorrelation PDF has a Gumbel-like shape, which approaches a Gaussian for large t/tw and becomes sharply peaked in the thermodynamic limit. Its average and variance, which are given analytically, depend on t/tw as a power law and a power law with a logarithmic correction, respectively. Most predictions are in good agreement with data from the literature and with the simulations of the Edwards-Anderson spin-glass carried out as a test.

  9. Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ogtrop, F. F.; Vervoort, R. W.; Heller, G. Z.; Stasinopoulos, D. M.; Rigby, R. A.

    2011-11-01

    Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow in semi-arid Australia poses a number of major challenges. One of the challenges relates to modelling zero, skewed, non-stationary, and non-linear data. To address this, a statistical model to forecast streamflow up to 12 months ahead is applied to five semi-arid catchments in South Western Queensland. The model uses logistic regression through Generalised Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS) to determine the probability of flow occurring in any of the systems. We then use the same regression framework in combination with a right-skewed distribution, the Box-Cox t distribution, to model the intensity (depth) of the non-zero streamflows. Time, seasonality and climate indices, describing the Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures, are tested as covariates in the GAMLSS model to make probabilistic 6 and 12-month forecasts of the occurrence and intensity of streamflow. The output reveals that in the study region the occurrence and variability of flow is driven by sea surface temperatures and therefore forecasts can be made with some skill.

  10. Acute intermittent porphyria in Argentina: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbino, Gabriela Nora; Gerez, Esther Noemí; Varela, Laura Sabina; Melito, Viviana Alicia; Parera, Victoria Estela; Batlle, Alcira; Rossetti, María Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases that arise from deficiencies in the heme biosynthetic pathway. A partial deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) produces a hepatic disorder named Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP); the acute porphyria is more frequent in Argentina. In this paper we review the results obtained for 101 Argentinean AIP families and 6 AIP families from foreign neighbour countries studied at molecular level at Centro de Investigaciones sobre Porfirinas y Porfirias (CIPYP). Thirty-five different mutations were found, of which 14 were described for the first time in our population. The most prevalent type of mutations was the missense mutations (43%) followed by splice defects (26%) and small deletions (20%). An odd case of a double heterozygous presentation of AIP in a foreign family from Paraguay is discussed. Moreover, it can be noted that 38 new families were found carrying the most frequent mutation in Argentina (p.G111R), increasing to 55.66% the prevalence of this genetic change in our population and adding further support to our previous hypothesis of a founder effect for this mutation in Argentina. Identification of patients with an overt AIP is important because treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis, but more critical is the identification of asymptomatic relatives to avoid acute attacks which may progress to death.

  11. Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. F. van Ogtrop

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow in semi-arid Australia poses a number of major challenges. One of the challenges relates to modelling zero, skewed, non-stationary, and non-linear data. To address this, a statistical model to forecast streamflow up to 12 months ahead is applied to five semi-arid catchments in South Western Queensland. The model uses logistic regression through Generalised Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS to determine the probability of flow occurring in any of the systems. We then use the same regression framework in combination with a right-skewed distribution, the Box-Cox t distribution, to model the intensity (depth of the non-zero streamflows. Time, seasonality and climate indices, describing the Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures, are tested as covariates in the GAMLSS model to make probabilistic 6 and 12-month forecasts of the occurrence and intensity of streamflow. The output reveals that in the study region the occurrence and variability of flow is driven by sea surface temperatures and therefore forecasts can be made with some skill.

  12. Scaling, Intermittency and Decay of MHD Turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarian, A.; Cho, Jungyeon

    2005-01-01

    We discuss a few recent developments that are important for understanding of MHD turbulence. First, MHD turbulence is not so messy as it is usually believed. In fact, the notion of strong non-linear coupling of compressible and incompressible motions along MHD cascade is not tenable. Alfven, slow and fast modes of MHD turbulence follow their own cascades and exhibit degrees of anisotropy consistent with theoretical expectations. Second, the fast decay of turbulence is not related to the compressibility of fluid. Rates of decay of compressible and incompressible motions are very similar. Third, viscosity by neutrals does not suppress MHD turbulence in a partially ionized gas. Instead, MHD turbulence develops magnetic cascade at scales below the scale at which neutrals damp ordinary hydrodynamic motions. Forth, density statistics does not exhibit the universality that the velocity and magnetic field do. For instance, at small Mach numbers the density is anisotropic, but it gets isotropic at high Mach numbers. Fifth, the intermittency of magnetic field and velocity are different. Both depend on whether the measurements are done in a local system of reference oriented along the local magnetic field or in the global system of reference related to the mean magnetic field

  13. Increased C-C chemokine receptor 2 gene expression in monocytes of severe obstructive sleep apnea patients and under intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Li-Pang; Chen, Ning-Hung; Lin, Shih-Wei; Chang, Ying-Ling; Liao, Hsiang-Ruei; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Chao, I-Ju; Lin, Yuling; Pang, Jong-Hwei S

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is known to be a risk factor of coronary artery disease. The chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes to the endothelium in the early atherosclerosis is important. This study aimed to investigate the effect of intermittent hypoxia, the hallmark of OSA, on the chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes. Peripheral blood was sampled from 54 adults enrolled for suspected OSA. RNA was prepared from the isolated monocytes for the analysis of C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). The effect of intermittent hypoxia on the regulation and function of CCR2 was investigated on THP-1 monocytic cells and monocytes. The mRNA and protein expression levels were investigated by RT/real-time PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. Transwell filter migration assay and cell adhesion assay were performed to study the chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes. Monocytic CCR2 gene expression was found to be increased in severe OSA patients and higher levels were detected after sleep. Intermittent hypoxia increased the CCR2 expression in THP-1 monocytic cells even in the presence of TNF-α and CRP. Intermittent hypoxia also promoted the MCP-1-mediated chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells. Furthermore, inhibitor for p42/44 MAPK or p38 MAPK suppressed the activation of monocytic CCR2 expression by intermittent hypoxia. This is the first study to demonstrate the increase of CCR2 gene expression in monocytes of severe OSA patients. Monocytic CCR2 gene expression can be induced under intermittent hypoxia which contributes to the chemotaxis and adhesion of monocytes.

  14. Intermittency in multiparticle production analyzed by means of stochastic theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartl, A.; Suzuki, N.

    1990-01-01

    Intermittency in multiparticle production is described by means of probability distributions derived from pure birth stochastic equations. The UA1, TASSO, NA22 and cosmic ray data are analyzed. 24 refs., 1 fig. (Authors)

  15. Factors Relevant to Utility Integration of Intermittent Renewable Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Y.; Parsons, B.

    1993-08-24

    This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among fmdings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface, (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels am feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also indentified.

  16. Factors relevant to utility integration of intermittent renewable technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Yih-huei; Parsons, B.K.

    1993-08-01

    This study assesses factors that utilities must address when they integrate intermittent renewable technologies into their power-supply systems; it also reviews the literature in this area and has a bibliography containing more than 350 listings. Three topics are covered: (1) interface (hardware and design-related interconnection), (2) operability/stability, and (3) planning. This study finds that several commonly held perceptions regarding integration of intermittent renewable energy technologies are not valid. Among findings of the study are the following: (1) hardware and system design advances have eliminated most concerns about interface; (2) cost penalties have not occurred at low to moderate penetration levels (and high levels are feasible); and (3) intermittent renewable energy technologies can have capacity values. Obstacles still interfering with intermittent renewable technologies are also identified.

  17. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajsrinivas Parthasarathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic carotid – basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA. The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo.

  18. Composeable Chat over Low-Bandwidth Intermittent Communication Links

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilcox, D. R

    2007-01-01

    Intermittent low-bandwidth communication environments, such as those encountered in U.S. Navy tactical radio and satellite links, have special requirements that do not pertain to commercial applications...

  19. Sliding Intermittent Control for BAM Neural Networks with Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqiang Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the exponential stability problem for a class of delayed bidirectional associative memory (BAM neural networks with delays. A sliding intermittent controller which takes the advantages of the periodically intermittent control idea and the impulsive control scheme is proposed and employed to the delayed BAM system. With the adjustable parameter taking different particular values, such a sliding intermittent control method can comprise several kinds of control schemes as special cases, such as the continuous feedback control, the impulsive control, the periodically intermittent control, and the semi-impulsive control. By using analysis techniques and the Lyapunov function methods, some sufficient criteria are derived for the closed-loop delayed BAM neural networks to be globally exponentially stable. Finally, two illustrative examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme and the obtained theoretical results.

  20. Computing moving and intermittent queue propagation in highway work zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Drivers may experience intermittent congestion and moving queue conditions in work zones due to several reasons such as presence of lane closure, roadway geometric changes, higher demand, lower speed, and reduced capacity. The congestion and queue ha...

  1. Sensing and characterization of EMI during intermittent connector anomalies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper presents a new on-line methodology for detecting intermittent disconnection failures. The detection principle operates on the fundamental Lorentz Law that...

  2. The effect of calf neuromuscular electrical stimulation and intermittent pneumatic compression on thigh microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Shayan; Immins, Tikki; Wainwright, Thomas W

    2017-05-01

    This study compares the effectiveness of a neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) device and an intermittent pneumatic compression (IPC) device on enhancing microcirculatory blood flow in the thigh of healthy individuals, when stimulation is carried out peripherally at the calf. Blood microcirculation of ten healthy individuals was recorded using laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) technique. A region of interest (ROI) was marked on each participant thigh. The mean flux within the ROI was calculated at four states: rest, NMES device with visible muscle actuation (VMA), NMES device with no visible muscle actuation (NVMA) and IPC device. Both NMES and IPC devices increased blood flow in the thigh when stimulation was carried out peripherally at the calf. The NMES device increased mean blood perfusion from baseline by 399.8% at the VMA state and 150.6% at the NVMA state, IPC device increased the mean blood perfusion by 117.3% from baseline. The NMES device at VMA state increased microcirculation by more than a factor of 3 in contrast to the IPC device. Even at the NVMA state, the NMES device increased blood flow by 23% more than the IPC device. Given the association between increased microcirculation and reduced oedema, NMES may be a more effective modality than IPC at reducing oedema, therefore further research is needed to explore this. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intermittent screening and treatment versus intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: a randomised controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Tagbor

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp may be compromised by the spread of resistance to sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP across Africa. But little information exists on alternative drugs for IPTp or alternative strategies for the prevention of malaria in pregnancy. Therefore, we have investigated whether screening with a rapid diagnostic test and treatment of those who are positive (IST at routine antenatal clinic attendances is as effective and as safe as SP-IPTp in pregnant women.During antenatal clinic sessions in six health facilities in Ghana held between March 2007 and September 2007, 3333 pregnant women who satisfied inclusion criteria were randomised into three intervention arms (1 standard SP-IPTp, (2 IST and treatment with SP or (3 IST and treatment with amodiaquine+artesunate (AQ+AS. All women received a long-lasting insecticide treated net. Study women had a maximum of three scheduled follow-up visits following enrollment. Haemoglobin concentration and peripheral parasitaemia were assessed between 36 and 40 weeks of gestation. Birth weight was measured at delivery or within 72 hours for babies delivered at home. Parasite prevalence at enrollment in primigravidae and in multigravidae was 29.6% and 10.2% respectively. At 36-40 weeks of gestation the prevalence of asymptomatic parasitaemia was 12.1% in study women overall and was very similar in all treatment groups. The risk of third trimester severe anaemia or low birth weight did not differ significantly between the three treatment groups regardless of gravidity. IST with AQ+AS or SP was not inferior to SP-IPTp in reducing the risk of low birth weight (RD  =  -1.17[95%CI; -4.39-1.02] for IST-SP vs. SP-IPTp and RD = 0.78[95%CI; -2.11-3.68] for IST-AQAS vs. SP-IPTp; third trimester severe anaemia (RD = 0.29[95%CI; -0.69-1.30] for IST-SP vs. SP-IPTp and RD  =  -0.36[95%CI;-1.12-0.44] for IST-AQAS vs. SP-IPTp.The results of this study

  4. Acute impact of intermittent pneumatic leg compression frequency on limb hemodynamics, vascular function, and skeletal muscle gene expression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Ryan D; Roseguini, Bruno T; Thyfault, John P; Crist, Brett D; Laughlin, M H; Newcomer, Sean C

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms by which intermittent pneumatic leg compression (IPC) treatment effectively treats symptoms associated with peripheral artery disease remain speculative. With the aim of gaining mechanistic insight into IPC treatment, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of IPC frequency on limb hemodynamics, vascular function, and skeletal muscle gene expression. In this two study investigation, healthy male subjects underwent an hour of either high-frequency (HF; 2-s inflation/3-s deflation) or low-frequency (LF; 4-s inflation/16-s deflation) IPC treatment of the foot and calf. In study 1 (n = 11; 23.5 ± 4.7 yr), subjects underwent both HF and LF treatment on separate days. Doppler/ultrasonography was used to measure popliteal artery diameter and blood velocity at baseline and during IPC treatment. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and peak reactive hyperemia blood flow (RHBF) were determined before and after IPC treatment. In study 2 (n = 19; 22.0 ± 4.6 yr), skeletal muscle biopsies were taken from the lateral gastrocnemius of the treated and control limb at baseline and at 30- and 150-min posttreatment. Quantitative PCR was used to assess mRNA concentrations of genes associated with inflammation and vascular remodeling. No treatment effect on vascular function was observed. Cuff deflation resulted in increased blood flow (BF) and shear rate (SR) in both treatments at the onset of treatment compared with baseline (P < 0.01). BF and SR significantly diminished by 45 min of HF treatment only (P < 0.01). Both treatments reduced BF and SR and elevated oscillatory shear index compared with baseline (P < 0.01) during cuff inflation. IPC decreased the mRNA expression of cysteine-rich protein 61 from baseline and controls (P <0 .01) and connective tissue growth factor from baseline (P < 0.05) in a frequency-dependent manner. In conclusion, a single session of IPC acutely impacts limb hemodynamics and skeletal muscle gene expression in a frequency

  5. Boldness and intermittent locomotion in the bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander D.M. Wilson; Jean-Guy J. Godin

    2009-01-01

    Intermittent locomotion, characterized by moves interspersed with pauses, is a common pattern of locomotion in animals, but its ecological and evolutionary significance relative to continuous locomotion remains poorly understood. Although many studies have examined individual differences in both intermittent locomotion and boldness separately, to our knowledge, no study to date has investigated the relationship between these 2 traits. Characterizing and understanding this relationship is impo...

  6. Intermittent Hypoxic Episodes in Preterm Infants: Do They Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Richard J.; Wang, Katherine; Köroğlu, Özge; Di Fiore, Juliann; Kc, Prabha

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxic episodes are typically a consequence of immature respiratory control and remain a troublesome challenge for the neonatologist. Furthermore, their frequency and magnitude are underestimated by clinically employed pulse oximeter settings. In extremely low birth weight infants the incidence of intermittent hypoxia progressively increases over the first 4 weeks of postnatal life, with a subsequent plateau followed by a slow decline beginning at weeks 6–8. Such episodic hypoxi...

  7. Mobility and cloud: operating in intermittent, austere network conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Wee, Toon Joo; Ling, Yu Xian Eldine

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Cloud computing is emerging as the mainstream platform for a range of on-demand applications, services, and infrastructure. Before the benefits of cloud computing are realized, several technology challenges must be addressed. Operating in intermittent and austere network conditions is one of such challenges, which navy ships face when communicating with land-based cloud computing environments. Given limited bandwidth and intermittent c...

  8. The Multifactorial role of Peripheral Nervous System in Bone Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gkiatas, Ioannis; Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Pakos, Emilios E.; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis; Gelalis, Ioannis; Vekris, Marios; Korompilias, Anastasios

    2017-09-01

    Bone alters its metabolic and anabolic activities in response to the variety of systemic and local factors such as hormones and growth factors. Classical observations describing abundance of the nerve fibers in bone also predict a paradigm that the nervous system influences bone metabolism and anabolism. Since 1916 several investigators tried to analyze the effect of peripheral nervous system in bone growth and most of them advocated for the positive effect of innervation in the bones of growing organisms. Moreover, neuronal tissue controls bone formation and remodeling. The purpose of this mini-review is to present the most recent data concerning the influence of innervation on bone growth, the current understanding of the skeletal innervation and their proposed physiological effects on bone metabolism as well as the implication of denervation in human skeletal biology in the developing organism since the peripheral neural trauma as well as peripheral neuropathies are common and they have impact on the growing skeleton.

  9. Effect of intermittent oral administration of ponazuril on experimental Sarcocystis neurona infection of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Robert J; Tanhauser, Susan T; Gillis, Karen D; Mayhew, Ian G; Kennedy, Tom J

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of intermittent oral administration of ponazuril on immunoconversion against Sarcocystis neurona in horses inoculated intragastrically with S neurona sporocysts. 20 healthy horses that were seronegative for S neurona-specific IgG. 5 control horses were neither inoculated with sporocysts nor treated. Other horses (5 horses/group) each received 612,500 S neurona sporocysts via nasogastric tube (day 0) and were not treated or were administered ponazuril (20 mg/kg, PO) every 7 days (beginning on day 5) or every 14 days (beginning on day 12) for 12 weeks. Blood and CSF samples were collected on day - 1 and then every 14 days after challenge for western blot assessment of immunoconversion. Clinical signs of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM) were monitored, and tissues were examined histologically after euthanasia. Sera from all challenged horses yielded positive western blot results within 56 days. Immunoconversion in CSF was detected in only 2 of 5 horses that were treated weekly; all other challenged horses immunoconverted within 84 days. Weekly administration of ponazuril significantly reduced the antibody response against the S neurona 17-kd antigen in CSF. Neurologic signs consistent with EPM did not develop in any group; likewise, histologic examination of CNS tissue did not reveal protozoa or consistent degenerative or inflammatory changes. Administration of ponazuril every 7 days, but not every 14 days, significantly decreased intrathecal anti-S neurona antibody responses in horses inoculated with S neurona sporocysts. Protocols involving intermittent administration of ponazuril may have application in prevention of EPM.

  10. Randomized trial of intermittent or continuous amnioinfusion for variable decelerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, B K; Terrone, D A; Barrow, J H; Isler, C M; Barrilleaux, P S; Roberts, W E

    2000-10-01

    To determine whether continuous or intermittent bolus amnioinfusion is more effective in relieving variable decelerations. Patients with repetitive variable decelerations were randomized to an intermittent bolus or continuous amnioinfusion. The intermittent bolus infusion group received boluses of 500 mL of normal saline, each over 30 minutes, with boluses repeated if variable decelerations recurred. The continuous infusion group received a bolus infusion of 500 mL of normal saline over 30 minutes and then 3 mL per minute until delivery occurred. The ability of the amnioinfusion to abolish variable decelerations was analyzed, as were maternal demographic and pregnancy outcome variables. Power analysis indicated that 64 patients would be required. Thirty-five patients were randomized to intermittent infusion and 30 to continuous infusion. There were no differences between groups in terms of maternal demographics, gestational age, delivery mode, neonatal outcome, median time to resolution of variable decelerations, or the number of times variable decelerations recurred. The median volume infused in the intermittent infusion group (500 mL) was significantly less than that in the continuous infusion group (905 mL, P =.003). Intermittent bolus amnioinfusion is as effective as continuous infusion in relieving variable decelerations in labor. Further investigation is necessary to determine whether either of these techniques is associated with increased occurrence of rare complications such as cord prolapse or uterine rupture.

  11. Sinusoidal visuomotor tracking: intermittent servo-control or coupled oscillations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, D M; Sternad, D

    2001-12-01

    In visuomotor tasks that involve accuracy demands, small directional changes in the trajectories have been taken as evidence of feedback-based error corrections. In the present study variability, or intermittency, in visuomanual tracking of sinusoidal targets was investigated. Two lines of analyses were pursued: First, the hypothesis that humans fundamentally act as intermittent servo-controllers was re-examined, probing the question of whether discontinuities in the movement trajectory directly imply intermittent control. Second, an alternative hypothesis was evaluated: that rhythmic tracking movements are generated by entrainment between the oscillations of the target and the actor, such that intermittency expresses the degree of stability. In 2 experiments, participants (N = 6 in each experiment) swung 1 of 2 different hand-held pendulums, tracking a rhythmic target that oscillated at different frequencies with a constant amplitude. In 1 line of analyses, the authors tested the intermittency hypothesis by using the typical kinematic error measures and spectral analysis. In a 2nd line, they examined relative phase and its variability, following analyses of rhythmic interlimb coordination. The results showed that visually guided corrective processes play a role, especially for slow movements. Intermittency, assessed as frequency and power components of the movement trajectory, was found to change as a function of both target frequency and the manipulandum's inertia. Support for entrainment was found in conditions in which task frequency was identical to or higher than the effector's eigenfrequency. The results suggest that it is the symmetry between task and effector that determines which behavioral regime is dominant.

  12. Uncoupling of Vascular Nitric Oxide Synthase Caused by Intermittent Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH, is often present in diabetic (DB patients. Both conditions are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that diabetic endothelial dysfunction is further compromised by CIH. Methods. Adult male diabetic (BKS.Cg-Dock7m +/+ Leprdb/J (db/db mice (10 weeks old and their heterozygote littermates were subjected to CIH or intermittent air (IA for 8 weeks. Mice were separated into 4 groups: IA (intermittent air nondiabetic, IH (intermittent hypoxia nondiabetic, IADB (intermittent air diabetic, and IHDB (intermittent hypoxia diabetic groups. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation and modulation by basal nitric oxide (NO were analyzed using wire myograph. Plasma 8-isoprostane, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA were measured using ELISA. Uncoupling of eNOS was measured using dihydroethidium (DHE staining. Results. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation and basal NO production were significantly impaired in the IH and IADB group compared to IA group but was more pronounced in IHDB group. Levels of 8-isoprostane, IL-6, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were ≈2-fold higher in IH and IADB groups and were further increased in the IHDB group. Conclusion. Endothelial dysfunction is more pronounced in diabetic mice subjected to CIH compared to diabetic or CIH mice alone. Oxidative stress, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were exacerbated by CIH in diabetic mice.

  13. A Quantitative Trait Locus (LSq-1) on Mouse Chromosome 7 Is Linked to the Absence of Tissue Loss After Surgical Hindlimb Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dokun, Ayotunde O.; Keum, Sehoon; Hazarika, Surovi; Li, Yongjun; Lamonte, Gregory M.; Wheeler, Ferrin; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Annex, Brian H.

    2010-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) caused by occlusive atherosclerosis of the lower extremity has 2 major clinical manifestations. Critical limb ischemia is characterized by rest pain and/or tissue loss and has a ≥40% risk of death and major amputation. Intermittent claudication causes pain on walking, has no tissue loss, and has amputation plus mortality rates of 2% to 4% per year. Progression from claudication to limb ischemia is infrequent. Risk factors in most PAD patients overlap. Thus, we hypothesized that genetic variations may be linked to presence or absence of tissue loss in PAD. Methods and Results Hindlimb ischemia (murine model of PAD) was induced in C57BL/6, BALB/c, C57BL/6×BALB/c (F1), F1×BALB/c (N2), A/J, and C57BL/6J-Chr7A/J/NaJ chromosome substitution strains. Mice were monitored for perfusion recovery and tissue necrosis. Genome-wide scanning with polymorphic markers across the 19 murine autosomes was performed on the N2 mice. Greater tissue loss and poorer perfusion recovery occurred in BALB/c than in the C57BL/6 strain. Analysis of 105 N2 progeny identified a single quantitative trait locus on chromosome 7 that exhibited significant linkage to both tissue necrosis and extent of perfusion recovery. Using the appropriate chromosome substitution strain, we demonstrate that C57BL/6-derived chromosome 7 is required for tissue preservation. Conclusions We have identified a quantitative trait locus on murine chromosome 7 (LSq-1) that is associated with the absence of tissue loss in a preclinical model of PAD and may be useful in identifying gene(s) that influence PAD in humans. PMID:18285563

  14. Intermittent hypoxia induces hyperlipidemia in lean mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianguo; Thorne, Laura N; Punjabi, Naresh M; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Schwartz, Alan R; Smith, Philip L; Marino, Rafael L; Rodriguez, Annabelle; Hubbard, Walter C; O'Donnell, Christopher P; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2005-09-30

    Obstructive sleep apnea, a syndrome leading to recurrent intermittent hypoxia (IH), has been associated previously with hypercholesterolemia, independent of underlying obesity. We examined the effects of experimentally induced IH on serum lipid levels and pathways of lipid metabolism in the absence and presence of obesity. Lean C57BL/6J mice and leptin-deficient obese C57BL/6J-Lep(ob) mice were exposed to IH for five days to determine changes in serum lipid profile, liver lipid content, and expression of key hepatic genes of lipid metabolism. In lean mice, exposure to IH increased fasting serum levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, phospholipids (PLs), and triglycerides (TGs), as well as liver TG content. These changes were not observed in obese mice, which had hyperlipidemia and fatty liver at baseline. In lean mice, IH increased sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP-1) levels in the liver, increased mRNA and protein levels of stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD-1), an important gene of TG and PL biosynthesis controlled by SREBP-1, and increased monounsaturated fatty acid content in serum, which indicated augmented SCD-1 activity. In addition, in lean mice, IH decreased protein levels of scavenger receptor B1, regulating uptake of cholesterol esters and HDL by the liver. We conclude that exposure to IH for five days increases serum cholesterol and PL levels, upregulates pathways of TG and PL biosynthesis, and inhibits pathways of cholesterol uptake in the liver in the lean state but does not exacerbate the pre-existing hyperlipidemia and metabolic disturbances in leptin-deficient obesity.

  15. Intermittency and Topology of Shock Induced Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez, Jackson; Redondo, Jose M.; Ben Mahjoub, Otman; Malik, Nadeem; Vila, Teresa

    2016-04-01

    The advance of a Rayleigh-Taylor front is described in Linden & Redondo (1991),[1-3] and may be shown to follow a quadratic law in time where the width of the growing region of instability depends on the local mixing efficiency of the different density fluids that accelerate against each other g is the acceleration and A is the Atwood number defined as the diference of densities divided by their sum. This results show the independence of the large amplitude structures on the initial conditions the width of the mixing region depends also on the intermittency of the turbulence. Then dimensional analysis may also depend on the relevant reduced acceleration driven time and the molecular reactive time akin to Damkholer number and the fractal structure of the contact zone [2,4]. Detailed experiments and simulations on RT and RM shock induced fronts analized with respect to structure functions are able to determine which mechanisms are most effective in local mixing which increase the effective fractal dimension, as well as the effect of higher order geometrical parameters, such as the structure functions, in non-homogeneous fluids (Mahjoub et al 1998)[5]. The structure of a Mixing blob shows a relatively sharp head with most of the mixing taking place at the sides due to what seems to be shear instability very similar to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, but with sideways accelerations. The formation of the blobs and spikes with their secondary instabilities produces a turbulent cascade, evident just after about 1 non-dimensional time unit, from a virtual time origin that takes into account the linear growth phase, as can be seen by the growth of the fractal dimension for different volume fractions. Two-dimensional cuts of the 3D flow also show that vortex flows have closed or spiral streamlines around their core. Examples of such flows can be also seen in the laboratory, for example at the interface of atwo-layer stratified fluid in a tank in which case streamlines

  16. Peripheral arterial disease and revascularization of the diabetic foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, R O; Brownrigg, J; Hinchliffe, R J

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes is a complex disease with many serious potential sequelae, including large vessel arterial disease and microvascular dysfunction. Peripheral arterial disease is a common large vessel complication of diabetes, implicated in the development of tissue loss in up to half of patients with diabetic foot ulceration. In addition to peripheral arterial disease, functional changes in the microcirculation also contribute to the development of a diabetic foot ulcer, along with other factors such as infection, oedema and abnormal biomechanical loading. Peripheral arterial disease typically affects the distal vessels, resulting in multi-level occlusions and diffuse disease, which often necessitates challenging distal revascularisation surgery or angioplasty in order to improve blood flow. However, technically successful revascularisation does not always result in wound healing. The confounding effects of microvascular dysfunction must be recognised--treatment of a patient with a diabetic foot ulcer and peripheral arterial disease should address this complex interplay of pathophysiological changes. In the case of non-revascularisable peripheral arterial disease or poor response to conventional treatment, alternative approaches such as cell-based treatment, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and the use of vasodilators may appear attractive, however more robust evidence is required to justify these novel approaches. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Peripheral formalin injection induces unique spinal cord microglial phenotypic changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kai-Yuan; Tan, Yong-Hui; Sung, Backil; Mao, Jianren

    2014-01-01

    Microglia are resident immune cells of brain and activated by peripheral tissue injury. In the present study, we investigated the possible induction of several microglial surface immunomolecules in the spinal cord, including leukocyte common antigen (LCA/CD45), MHC class I antigen, MHC class II antigen, Fc receptor, and CD11c following formalin injection into the rat’s hind paw. CD45 and MHC class I were upregulated in the activated microglia, which was evident on day 3 with the peak expression on day 7 following peripheral formalin injection. There was a very low basal expression of MHC class II, CD11c, and the Fc receptor, which did not change after the formalin injection. These results, for the first time, indicate that peripheral formalin injection can induce phenotypic changes of microglia with distinct upregulation of CD45 and MHC class I antigen. The data suggest that phenotypic changes of the activated microglia may be a unique pattern of central changes following peripheral tissue injury. PMID:19015000

  18. Peripheral Serotonin: a New Player in Systemic Energy Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Jun; Kim, Hail; Park, Sangkyu

    2015-01-01

    Whole body energy balance is achieved through the coordinated regulation of energy intake and energy expenditure in various tissues including liver, muscle and adipose tissues. A positive energy imbalance by excessive energy intake or insufficient energy expenditure results in obesity and related metabolic diseases. Although there have been many obesity treatment trials aimed at the reduction of energy intake, these strategies have achieved only limited success because of their associated adverse effects. An ancient neurotransmitter, serotonin is among those traditional pharmacological targets for anti-obesity treatment because it exhibits strong anorectic effect in the brain. However, recent studies suggest the new functions of peripheral serotonin in energy homeostasis ranging from the endocrine regulation by gut-derived serotonin to the autocrine/paracrine regulation by adipocyte-derived serotonin. Here, we discuss the role of serotonin in the regulation of energy homeostasis and introduce peripheral serotonin as a possible target for anti-obesity treatment. PMID:26628041

  19. Perfusion imaging in the peripheral vasculature using interventional C-arm systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giordano, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    In peripheral revascularization procedures, an obstructed vessel is unblocked to restore the blood flow to the tissue. Currently, treatment assessment is carried out by angiography which allows only for a qualitative inspection of the blood flow in arteries. Periprocedural assessment of tissue

  20. Concordance of genotype for polymorphisms in DNA isolated from peripheral blood and colorectal cancer tumor samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Huis-Tanja, Lieke; Kweekel, Dinemarie; Gelderblom, Hans; Koopman, Miriam; Punt, Kees; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; van der Straaten, Tahar

    2013-01-01

    Background & aim: Results from different pharmacogenetic association studies in colorectal cancer are often conflicting. Both peripheral blood and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue are routinely used as DNA source. This could cause bias due to somatic alterations in tumor tissue, such

  1. Pressure Autoregulation Measurement Techniques in Adult Traumatic Brain Injury, Part I: A Scoping Review of Intermittent/Semi-Intermittent Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Donnelly, Joseph; Calviello, Leanne; Menon, David K; Smielewski, Peter; Czosnyka, Marek

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a systematic, scoping review of commonly described intermittent/semi-intermittent autoregulation measurement techniques in adult traumatic brain injury (TBI). Nine separate systematic reviews were conducted for each intermittent technique: computed tomographic perfusion (CTP)/Xenon-CT (Xe-CT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), arteriovenous difference in oxygen (AVDO 2 ) technique, thigh cuff deflation technique (TCDT), transient hyperemic response test (THRT), orthostatic hypotension test (OHT), mean flow index (Mx), and transfer function autoregulation index (TF-ARI). MEDLINE ® , BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library (inception to December 2016), and reference lists of relevant articles were searched. A two tier filter of references was conducted. The total number of articles utilizing each of the nine searched techniques for intermittent/semi-intermittent autoregulation techniques in adult TBI were: CTP/Xe-CT (10), PET (6), MRI (0), AVDO 2 (10), ARI-based TCDT (9), THRT (6), OHT (3), Mx (17), and TF-ARI (6). The premise behind all of the intermittent techniques is manipulation of systemic blood pressure/blood volume via either chemical (such as vasopressors) or mechanical (such as thigh cuffs or carotid compression) means. Exceptionally, Mx and TF-ARI are based on spontaneous fluctuations of cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) or mean arterial pressure (MAP). The method for assessing the cerebral circulation during these manipulations varies, with both imaging-based techniques and TCD utilized. Despite the limited literature for intermittent/semi-intermittent techniques in adult TBI (minus Mx), it is important to acknowledge the availability of such tests. They have provided fundamental insight into human autoregulatory capacity, leading to the development of continuous and more commonly applied techniques in the intensive care unit (ICU). Numerous methods of

  2. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  3. Intermittent single point machining of brittle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, E

    1999-12-07

    A series of tests were undertaken to explore diamond tool wear in the intermittent cutting of brittle materials, specifically silicon. The tests were carried out on a plain way No. 3 Moore machine base equipped as a flycutter with a motorized Professional Instruments 4R air bearing spindle. The diamond tools were made by Edge Technologies with known crystal orientation and composition and sharpened with either an abrasive or chemical process, depending on the individual test. The flycutting machine configuration allowed precise control over the angle at which the tool engages the anisotropic silicon workpiece. In contrast, the crystallographic orientation of the silicon workpiece changes continuously during on-axis turning. As a result, it is possible to flycut a workpiece in cutting directions that are known to be easy or hard. All cuts were run in the 100 plane of the silicon, with a slight angle deliberately introduced to ensure that the 100 plane is engaged in ''up-cutting'' which lengthens the tool life. A Kistler 9256 dynamometer was used to measure the cutting forces in order to gain insight into the material removal process and tool wear during testing. The dynamometer provides high bandwidth force measurement with milli-Newton resolution and good thermal stability. After many successive passes over the workpiece, it was observed that the cutting forces grow at a rate that is roughly proportional to the degradation of the workpiece surface finish. The exact relationship between cutting force growth and surface finish degradation was not quantified because of the problems associated with measuring surface finish in situ. However, a series of witness marks were made during testing in an aluminum sample that clearly show the development of wear flats on the tool nose profile as the forces grow and the surface finish worsens. The test results show that workpieces requiring on the order of two miles of track length can be made with low tool

  4. Peripheral Atherectomy: Applications and Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittleider, Derek; Russell, Erich

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral atherectomy is a class of procedures that is rapidly increasing in volume. Multiple classes of devices exist, and newer variants are added to the market annually. The devices see wide application for de novo lesions, in-stent restenosis, and adjunctive therapy for drug-coated balloons. The body of evidence supporting atherectomy is less robust than for many other peripheral therapies. The frequency and severity of complications from atherectomy can be significant compared with angioplasty and stenting, and familiarity with preventative and bailout techniques is essential for the interventionalist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Atherectomy for peripheral arterial disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londero, Louise Skovgaard; Høgh, Annette Langager; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal

    2015-04-13

    Symptomatic peripheral arterial disease is managed according to national and international guidelines and the number of vascular reconstructions performed each year has increased over the past decade mainly due to an increasing frequency of endovascular procedures. Atherectomy as an alternative to the established treatment of symptomatic peripheral arterial disease has recently been analysed in a Cochrane review. In Denmark, atherectomy is not performed and so far the evidence is poor as the method is not an alternative to the established treatment in this country.

  6. Imaging of the peripheral retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Kernt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The technical progress of the recent years has revolutionized imaging in ophthalmology. Scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (SLO, digital angiography, optical coherence tomography (OCT, and detection of fundus autofluorescence (FAF have fundamentally changed our understanding of numerous retinal and choroidal diseases. Besides the tremendous advances in macular diagnostics, there is more and more evidence that central pathologies are often directly linked to changes in the peripheral retina. This review provides a brief overview on current posterior segment imaging techniques with a special focus on the peripheral retina.

  7. Complex economic dynamics: Chaotic saddle, crisis and intermittency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chian, Abraham C.-L.; Rempel, Erico L.; Rogers, Colin

    2006-01-01

    Complex economic dynamics is studied by a forced oscillator model of business cycles. The technique of numerical modeling is applied to characterize the fundamental properties of complex economic systems which exhibit multiscale and multistability behaviors, as well as coexistence of order and chaos. In particular, we focus on the dynamics and structure of unstable periodic orbits and chaotic saddles within a periodic window of the bifurcation diagram, at the onset of a saddle-node bifurcation and of an attractor merging crisis, and in the chaotic regions associated with type-I intermittency and crisis-induced intermittency, in non-linear economic cycles. Inside a periodic window, chaotic saddles are responsible for the transient motion preceding convergence to a periodic or a chaotic attractor. The links between chaotic saddles, crisis and intermittency in complex economic dynamics are discussed. We show that a chaotic attractor is composed of chaotic saddles and unstable periodic orbits located in the gap regions of chaotic saddles. Non-linear modeling of economic chaotic saddle, crisis and intermittency can improve our understanding of the dynamics of financial intermittency observed in stock market and foreign exchange market. Characterization of the complex dynamics of economic systems is a powerful tool for pattern recognition and forecasting of business and financial cycles, as well as for optimization of management strategy and decision technology

  8. Controls on streamflow intermittence in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, S. K.; Puntenney, K.; Martin, C.; Weber, R.; Gerlich, J.; Hammond, J. C.; Lefsky, M. A.

    2017-12-01

    Intermittent streams comprise more than 60% of the channel length in semiarid northern Colorado, yet little is known about their flow magnitude and timing. We used field surveys, stream sensors, and remote sensing to quantify spatial and temporal patterns of streamflow intermittence in the Cache la Poudre basin in 2016-2017. To evaluate potential controls on streamflow intermittence, we delineated the drainage area to each monitored point and quantified the catchment's mean precipitation, temperature, snow persistence, slope, aspect, vegetation type, soil type, and bedrock geology. During the period of study, most streams below 2500 m elevation and drainage areas >1 km2 had perennial flow, whereas nearly all streams with drainage areas <1 km2 had intermittent flow. For the high elevation intermittent streams, stream locations often differed substantially from the locations mapped in standard GIS data products. Initial analyses have identified no clearly quantifiable controls on flow duration of high elevation streams, but field observations indicate subsurface flow paths are important contributors to surface streams.

  9. Intermittent synchronization in a network of bursting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choongseok; Rubchinsky, Leonid L.

    2011-09-01

    Synchronized oscillations in networks of inhibitory and excitatory coupled bursting neurons are common in a variety of neural systems from central pattern generators to human brain circuits. One example of the latter is the subcortical network of the basal ganglia, formed by excitatory and inhibitory bursters of the subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus, involved in motor control and affected in Parkinson's disease. Recent experiments have demonstrated the intermittent nature of the phase-locking of neural activity in this network. Here, we explore one potential mechanism to explain the intermittent phase-locking in a network. We simplify the network to obtain a model of two inhibitory coupled elements and explore its dynamics. We used geometric analysis and singular perturbation methods for dynamical systems to reduce the full model to a simpler set of equations. Mathematical analysis was completed using three slow variables with two different time scales. Intermittently, synchronous oscillations are generated by overlapped spiking which crucially depends on the geometry of the slow phase plane and the interplay between slow variables as well as the strength of synapses. Two slow variables are responsible for the generation of activity patterns with overlapped spiking, and the other slower variable enhances the robustness of an irregular and intermittent activity pattern. While the analyzed network and the explored mechanism of intermittent synchrony appear to be quite generic, the results of this analysis can be used to trace particular values of biophysical parameters (synaptic strength and parameters of calcium dynamics), which are known to be impacted in Parkinson's disease.

  10. Characterization of intermittency in zooplankton behaviour in turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalec, François-Gaël; Schmitt, François G; Souissi, Sami; Holzner, Markus

    2015-10-01

    We consider Lagrangian velocity differences of zooplankters swimming in still water and in turbulence. Using cumulants, we quantify the intermittency properties of their motion recorded using three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry. Copepods swimming in still water display an intermittent behaviour characterized by a high probability of small velocity increments, and by stretched exponential tails. Low values arise from their steady cruising behaviour while heavy tails result from frequent relocation jumps. In turbulence, we show that at short time scales, the intermittency signature of active copepods clearly differs from that of the underlying flow, and reflects the frequent relocation jumps displayed by these small animals. Despite these differences, we show that copepods swimming in still and turbulent flow belong to the same intermittency class that can be modelled by a log-stable model with non-analytical cumulant generating function. Intermittency in swimming behaviour and relocation jumps may enable copepods to display oriented, collective motion under strong hydrodynamic conditions and thus, may contribute to the formation of zooplankton patches in energetic environments.

  11. Scaling the Thrust Production and Energetics of Inviscid Intermittent Swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoz, Emre; Moored, Keith

    2015-11-01

    Many fish have adopted an intermittent swimming gait sometimes referred as a burst-and-coast behavior. By using this gait, fish have been estimated at reducing their energetic cost of swimming by about 50%. Lighthill proposed that the skin friction drag of an undulating body can be around 400% greater than a rigidly-held coasting body, which may explain the energetic savings of intermittent swimming. Recent studies have confirmed the increase in skin friction drag over an undulating body, however, the increase is on the order of 20-70%. This more modest gain in skin friction drag is not sufficient to lead to the observed energy savings. Motivated by these observations, we investigate the inviscid mechanisms behind intermittent swimming for parameters typical of biology. We see that there is an energy savings at a fixed swimming speed for intermittent swimming as compared to continuous swimming. Then we consider three questions: What is the nature of the inviscid mechanism that leads to the observed energy savings, how do the forces and energetics of intermittent swimming scale with the swimming parameters, and what are the limitations to the benefit? Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzola, MURI grant number N00014-14-1-0533.

  12. Intermittent fasting in mice does not improve hindlimb motor performance after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streijger, Femke; Plunet, Ward T; Plemel, Jason Ryan; Lam, Clarrie K; Liu, Jie; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2011-06-01

    Previously, we reported that every-other-day-fasting (EODF) in Sprague-Dawley rats initiated after cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) effectively promoted functional recovery, reduced lesion size, and enhanced sprouting of the corticospinal tract. More recently, we also showed improved behavioral recovery with EODF after a moderate thoracic contusion injury in rats. In order to make use of transgenic mouse models to study molecular mechanisms of EODF, we tested here whether this intermittent fasting regimen was also beneficial in mice after SCI. Starting after SCI, C57BL/6 mice were fed a standard rodent chow diet either with unrestricted access or feeding every other day. Over a 14-week post-injury period, we assessed hindlimb locomotor function with the Basso Mouse Scale (BMS) open-field test and horizontal ladder, and the spinal cords were evaluated histologically to measure white and grey matter sparing. EODF resulted in an overall caloric restriction of 20% compared to animals fed ad libitum (AL). The EODF-treated animals exhibited a ∼ 14% reduction in body weight compared to AL mice, and never recovered to their pre-operative body weight. In contrast to rats on an intermittent fasting regimen, mice exhibited no increase in blood ketone bodies by the end of the second, third, and fourth day of fasting. EODF had no beneficial effect on tissue sparing and failed to improve behavioral recovery of hindlimb function. Hence this observation stands in stark contrast to our earlier observations in Sprague-Dawley rats. This is likely due to the difference in the metabolic response to intermittent fasting as evidenced by different ketone levels during the first week of the EODF regimen.

  13. Peripheral Nerve Fibers and Their Neurotransmitters in Osteoarthritis Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grässel, Susanne; Muschter, Dominique

    2017-04-28

    The importance of the nociceptive nervous system for maintaining tissue homeostasis has been known for some time, and it has also been suggested that organogenesis and tissue repair are under neuronal control. Changes in peripheral joint innervation are supposed to be partly responsible for degenerative alterations in joint tissues which contribute to development of osteoarthritis. Various resident cell types of the musculoskeletal system express receptors for sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters, allowing response to peripheral neuronal stimuli. Among them are mesenchymal stem cells, synovial fibroblasts, bone cells and chondrocytes of different origin, which express distinct subtypes of adrenoceptors (AR), receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Some of these cell types synthesize and secrete neuropeptides such as SP, and they are positive for tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH), the rate limiting enzyme for biosynthesis of catecholamines. Sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters are involved in the pathology of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which manifests mainly in the joints. In addition, they seem to play a role in pathogenesis of priori degenerative joint disorders such as osteoarthritis (OA). Altogether it is evident that sensory and sympathetic neurotransmitters have crucial trophic effects which are critical for joint tissue and bone homeostasis. They modulate articular cartilage, subchondral bone and synovial tissue properties in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, in addition to their classical neurological features.

  14. The role of kinesitherapy and electrotherapeutic procedures in non-operative management of patients with intermittent claudications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Miroslav D; Marković, Danica M; Dragaš, Marko V; Končar, Igor B; Banzić, Igor L; Ille, Mihailo E; Davidović, Lazar B

    2016-06-01

    To examine the effects of physical therapy (kinesitherapy and electrotherapeutic procedures) on the course of peripheral arterial occlusive disease by monitoring the changes in values of claudication distance and ankle-brachial indexes. Prospective randomized study included 47 patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease manifested by intermittent claudications associated with ankle-brachial indexes values ranging from 0.5 to 0.9. Patients from the first group (25 pts) were treated with medicamentous therapy, walking exercises beyond the pain threshold, dynamic low-burden kinesi exercises and electrotherapeutic ageneses (interference therapy, diadynamic therapy, and electromagnetic field), while the second group of patients (22 pts) was treated with "conventional" non-operative treatment - medicamentous therapy and walking exercises. The values of newly established absolute claudication distance and ankle-brachial indexes were measured. Significant increase of absolute claudication distance in both groups of patients was registered, independently of therapeutic protocol applied (p operative treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease patients, improving their functional ability and thus postponing surgical treatment. However, further investigations including larger number of patients are needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  16. MEGACARYOCYTES IN THE PERIPHERAL CIRCULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minot, George R.

    1922-01-01

    A megacaryocyte is seen commonly as an occasional cell in the peripheral blood of patients with myelogenous leucemia. Less commonly they appear in relatively large numbers. These giant cells also may occur in the blood under other conditions. Their presence is indicative of a bone marrow under intense strain. PMID:19868650

  17. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Bias in Peripheral Depression Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, André F; Köhler, Cristiano A; Brunoni, André R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To aid in the differentiation of individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) from healthy controls, numerous peripheral biomarkers have been proposed. To date, no comprehensive evaluation of the existence of bias favoring the publication of significant results or inflating effect...

  19. What Is Peripheral Artery Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or bluish color to the skin A lower temperature in one leg compared to the other leg Poor nail growth on the toes and decreased hair growth on the legs Erectile dysfunction, especially among men who have diabetes Diagnosis Peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) is diagnosed based ...

  20. Intermittency in Hall-magnetohydrodynamics with a strong guide field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Imazio, P.; Martin, L. N.; Dmitruk, P.; Mininni, P. D.

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed study of intermittency in the velocity and magnetic field fluctuations of compressible Hall-magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with an external guide field. To solve the equations numerically, a reduced model valid when a strong guide field is present is used. Different values for the ion skin depth are considered in the simulations. The resulting data are analyzed computing field increments in several directions perpendicular to the guide field, and building structure functions and probability density functions. In the magnetohydrodynamic limit, we recover the usual results with the magnetic field being more intermittent than the velocity field. In the presence of the Hall effect, field fluctuations at scales smaller than the ion skin depth show a substantial decrease in the level of intermittency, with close to monofractal scaling

  1. Generation of intermittent gravitocapillary waves via parametric forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Gustavo; Falcón, Claudio

    2018-04-01

    We report on the generation of an intermittent wave field driven by a horizontally moving wave maker interacting with Faraday waves. The spectrum of the local gravitocapillary surface wave fluctuations displays a power law in frequency for a wide range of forcing parameters. We compute the probability density function of the local surface height increments, which show that they change strongly across time scales. The structure functions of these increments are shown to display power laws as a function of the time lag, with exponents that are nonlinear functions of the order of the structure function. We argue that the origin of this scale-invariant intermittent spectrum is the Faraday wave pattern breakup due to its advection by the propagating gravity waves. Finally, some interpretations are proposed to explain the appearance of this intermittent spectrum.

  2. Multiparticle correlations and intermittency in high energy collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P.

    1992-01-01

    The analysis of the intermittency signal observed in high energy experiments is presented using multiparticle distributions and correlation functions. The effect of the dimensional projection of the multiparticle distributions on one or two-dimensional subspace is discussed. The structure of the multiparticle cumulants is analyzed for the DELPHI e + e - annihilation data. The model of spatiotemporal intermittency is discussed in details and is shown to reproduce qualitatively the dependence of the intermittency strength on the target and projectile nuclei. A 1-dimensional (1D) cellular-automaton and a 1D forest-fire model is studied. On the example of the noncritical 1D Ising model the difficulties of the scaled factorial moment (SFM) method in extracting genuine scaling behaviour is illustrated. All these studies could serve as tools to test the sensibility of the SFM method as used in the analysis of the high energy production. (K.A.) 122 refs.; 38 figs.; 3 tabs

  3. Intermittency in e+e- and lepton-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugano, K.

    1990-01-01

    The intermittency data in e + e - and lepton-hadron collisions are reviewed. The power-law behavior of the moments has been established by various e + e - experiments and a μp experiment. The intermittency in the two-dimensional space of rapidity and azimuthal angle is much stronger than in the rapidity space only. The neutrino-nucleus data indicate significant effects from nuclear reinteractions. The LUND parton shower model fits the data better than the matrix element model without special retuning. The relations among the moments of different orders are in good agreement with the predictions by the negative binomial and pure birth distributions. The origin of the intermittency in e + e - and μp collisions is consistent with the self-similar cascade mechanism of jet formation. 11 refs., 7 figs

  4. Analyzing the Efficiency of Introduction of the Intermittent Heating Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimova, E.; Shcherbak, A.

    2017-11-01

    The efficiency of introduction of an optimal intermittent heating mode for a service center building in Chelyabinsk is estimated. The optimal intermittent heating mode ensures heat energy saving while maintaining the required microclimate parameters. The graphical dependencies of the amount of heat energy saving on the heat retention of the building and the outdoor air temperature are shown. The fundamental formulas which were the basis for calculating the periods of cooling, warming and expenditures of heat energy for the two heating modes are given. The literature on the issue is reviewed, the main points, advantages and disadvantages in the works of both Russian and foreign authors are revealed. The calculation was carried out in compliance with the modern state standards and regulatory documents. The capital costs of a system construction with an intermittent heating mode are determined.

  5. Photonic integrated circuits unveil crisis-induced intermittency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsaklian Dal Bosco, Andreas; Akizawa, Yasuhiro; Kanno, Kazutaka; Uchida, Atsushi; Harayama, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuyuki

    2016-09-19

    We experimentally investigate an intermittent route to chaos in a photonic integrated circuit consisting of a semiconductor laser with time-delayed optical feedback from a short external cavity. The transition from a period-doubling dynamics to a fully-developed chaos reveals a stage intermittently exhibiting these two dynamics. We unveil the bifurcation mechanism underlying this route to chaos by using the Lang-Kobayashi model and demonstrate that the process is based on a phenomenon of attractor expansion initiated by a particular distribution of the local Lyapunov exponents. We emphasize on the crucial importance of the distribution of the steady-state solutions introduced by the time-delayed feedback on the existence of this intermittent dynamics.

  6. Obstructive sleep apnea and cancer: effects of intermittent hypoxia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukwa, Wojciech; Migacz, Ewa; Druc, Karolina; Grzesiuk, Elzbieta; Czarnecka, Anna M

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder characterized by pauses in regular breathing. Apneic episodes lead to recurrent hypoxemia-reoxygenation cycles with concomitant cellular intermittent hypoxia. Studies suggest that intermittent hypoxia in OSA may influence tumorigenesis. This review presents recent articles on the potential role of OSA in cancer development. Relevant research has focused on: molecular pathways mediating the influence of intermittent hypoxia on tumor physiology, animal and epidemiological human studies linking OSA and cancer. Current data relating OSA to risk of neoplastic disease remain scarce, but recent studies reveal the potential for a strong relation. More work is, therefore, needed on the impact of OSA on many cancer-related aspects. Results may offer enlightenment for improved cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  7. ANESTHETIC MANAGEMENT FOR A PATIENT WITH ACUTE INTERMITTENT PORPHYRIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Savić

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria is a rare metabolic disorder resulting from a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase, enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway. Its inheritance is autosomal dominant. A deficiency of porphobilinogen deaminase is not sufficient by its self to produce acute intermittent porphyria, and other activating factors must also be present. These include some drugs, hormones, infection, injury and alcohol. Besides others, anesthetics have been implicated in the triggering of a number of severe porphyric reactions. Although there is no clinical evidence, the fear of hypothesized porphyrinogenicity of repetitive anesthetics exposures still remains. Despite these doubts, we report here the case of uneventful repeated exposure to anesthetics in a patient suffering from acute intermittent porphyria, within a fifteen- month period. On both occasions, the patient was safely exposed to certain anesthetics included: propofol, sevoflurane, rocuronium, midazolam and fentanyl.

  8. Effect of Linguizhugan decoction on hyperlipidemia rats with intermittent fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yubin; Qin, Jian; Ke, Bin; Zhang, Junjie; Shi, Lanying; Li, Qiong

    2013-04-01

    To explore the effect of Linguizhugan decoction on hyperlipidemia rats with caloric restriction. The hyperlipidemia model of rat was induced by high fat diet for 8 weeks. After the model was established, 26 rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: the control group (n = 6), the model group (n = 6), the intermittent fasting (IF) group (n = 8), and the IF and herbal medicine (IFH) group (n = 6). IF group was applied intermittent fasting every other day. The IFH group was given Linguizhugan decoction every day and intermittent fasting every other day. Blood samples were taken at the end of 16 weeks, and serum ghrelin and lipid was tested. Serum ghrelin in the IF group significantly increased (P < 0.01). Serum ghrelin in IFH group was lower than the IF group (P < 0.05), but higher than the model group (P < 0.01). Linguizhugan decoction may play a part in regulation of energy and appetite in hyperlipidemia rats with IF.

  9. Multiparticle correlations and intermittency in high energy collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Bozek, P

    1992-01-01

    In this work the analysis of the intermittency signal observed in high energy experi- ments is done using multiparticle distributions and correlation functions. The effect of the dimensional projection of the multiparticle distributions on one or two-dimensional subspace is discussed. The structure of the multiparticle cumulants is analyzed for the DELPHI e + e~ annihilation data. The language of the self-similar distribution func- tions, which is used in this work, is shown to be largely equivalent to the well known a-model. In the case of the ultrarelativistic nuclear collisions, where the Monte-Carlo simulations fail to reproduce the data, we argue that the observed intermittency pattern is a signal of some nonlinear effect beyond the simple superposition of nucleon-nucleon collisions. The model of spatiotemporal intermittency is discussed in details and is shown to reproduce qualitatively the dependence of t...

  10. Effect of intermittent cold exposure on brown fat activation, obesity, and energy homeostasis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Ravussin

    Full Text Available Homeotherms have specific mechanisms to maintain a constant core body temperature despite changes in thermal environment, food supply, and metabolic demand. Brown adipose tissue, the principal thermogenic organ, quickly and efficiently increases heat production by dissipating the mitochondrial proton motive force. It has been suggested that activation of brown fat, via either environmental (i.e. cold exposure or pharmacologic means, could be used to increase metabolic rate and thus reduce body weight. Here we assess the effects of intermittent cold exposure (4°C for one to eight hours three times a week on C57BL/6J mice fed a high fat diet. Cold exposure increased metabolic rate approximately two-fold during the challenge and activated brown fat. In response, food intake increased to compensate fully for the increased energy expenditure; thus, the mice showed no reduction in body weight or adiposity. Despite the unchanged adiposity, the cold-treated mice showed transient improvements in glucose homeostasis. Administration of the cannabinoid receptor-1 inverse agonist AM251 caused weight loss and improvements in glucose homeostasis, but showed no further improvements when combined with cold exposure. These data suggest that intermittent cold exposure causes transient, meaningful improvements in glucose homeostasis, but without synergy when combined with AM251. Since energy expenditure is significantly increased during cold exposure, a drug that dissociates food intake from metabolic demand during cold exposure may achieve weight loss and further metabolic improvements.

  11. Intermittency inhibited by transport: An exactly solvable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanette, Damián H.

    1994-04-01

    Transport is incorporated in a discrete-time stochastic model of a system undergoing autocatalytic reactions of the type A-->2A and A-->0, whose population field is known to exhibit spatiotemporal intermittency. The temporal evolution is exactly solved, and it is shown that if the transport process is strong enough, intermittency is inhibited. This inhibition is nonuniform, in the sense that, as transport is strengthened, low-order population moments are affected before the high-order ones. Numerical simulations are presented to support the analytical results.

  12. Hierarchy compensation of non-homogeneous intermittent atmospheric turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Jose M.; Mahjoub, Otman B.; Cantalapiedra, Inma R.

    2010-05-01

    In this work a study both the internal turbulence energy cascade intermittency evaluated from wind speed series in the atmospheric boundary layer, as well as the role of external or forcing intermittency based on the flatness (Vindel et al 2008)is carried out. The degree of intermittency in the stratified ABL flow (Cuxart et al. 2000) can be studied as the deviation, from the linear form, of the absolute scaling exponents of the structure functions as well as generalizing for non-isotropic and non-homogeneous turbulence, even in non-inertial ranges (in the Kolmogorov-Kraichnan sense) where the scaling exponents are not constant. The degree of intermittency, evaluated in the non-local quasi-inertial range, is explained from the variation with scale of the energy transfer as well as the dissipation. The scale to scale transfer and the structure function scaling exponents are calculated and from these the intermittency parametres. The turbulent diffusivity could also be estimated and compared with Richardson's law. Some two point correlations and time lag calculations are used to investigate the time and spatial integral length scales obtained from both Lagrangian and Eulerian correlations and functions, and we compare these results with both theoretical and laboratory data. We develop a theoretical description of how to measure the different levels of intermittency following (Mahjoub et al. 1998, 2000) and the role of locality in higher order exponents of structure function analysis. Vindel J.M., Yague C. and Redondo J.M. (2008) Structure function analysis and intermittency in the ABL. Nonlin. Processes Geophys., 15, 915-929. Cuxart J, Yague C, Morales G, Terradellas E, Orbe J, Calvo J, Fernández A, Soler M R, Infante C, Buenestado P, Espinalt A, Joergensen H E, Rees J M, Vilá J, Redondo J M, Cantalapiedra R and Conangla L (2000): Stable atmospheric boundary-layer experiment in Spain (Sables 98): a report, Boundary-Layer Meteorology 96, 337-370 Mahjoub O

  13. The intermittency of vector fields and random-number generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, A. O.; Sokoloff, D. D.; Tutubalin, V. N.

    2017-09-01

    We examine how well natural random-number generators can reproduce the intermittency phenomena that arise in the transfer of vector fields in random media. A generator based on the analysis of financial indices is suggested as the most promising random-number generator. Is it shown that even this generator, however, fails to reproduce the phenomenon long enough to confidently detect intermittency, while the C++ generator successfully solves this problem. We discuss the prospects of using shell models of turbulence as the desired generator.

  14. Intermittent characteristics in coupling between turbulence and zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujisawa, A; Shimizu, A; Nakano, H; Ohshima, S; Itoh, K; Nagashima, Y; Itoh, S-I; Iguchi, H; Yoshimura, Y; Minami, T; Nagaoka, K; Takahashi, C; Kojima, M; Nishimura, S; Isobe, M; Suzuki, C; Akiyama, T; Ido, T; Matsuoka, K; Okamura, S; Diamond, P H

    2007-01-01

    An extended application of Gabour's wavelet to bicoherence analysis succeeds in resolving the instantaneous structure of three wave couplings between disparate scale electric field fluctuations in the high temperature core in a toroidal plasma device named the compact helical system. The obtained results quantify an intermittent linkage between turbulence and zonal flows-a highlighted issue in the present plasma research. This is the first demonstration that the intermittent nature of the three wave coupling should underlie the turbulence power modulation due to zonal flows

  15. Obstructive sleep apnea: role of intermittent hypoxia and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Anna M; Mehra, Reena

    2014-10-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea results in intermittent hypoxia via repetitive upper airway obstruction leading to partial or complete upper airway closure, apneas and hypopneas, respectively. Intermittent hypoxia leads to sympathetic nervous system activation and oxidative stress with a resultant systemic inflammatory cascade. The putative mechanism by which obstructive sleep apnea has been linked to numerous pathologic conditions including stoke, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and metabolic derangements is through these systemic effects. Treatment of obstructive sleep apnea appears to reduce systemic markers of inflammation and ameliorates the adverse sequelae of this disease. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  16. Dealing with uncertainty in modeling intermittent water supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, A. M.; Rycroft, C.; Wilkening, J.

    2015-12-01

    Intermittency in urban water supply affects hundreds of millions of people in cities around the world, impacting water quality and infrastructure. Building on previous work to dynamically model the transient flows in water distribution networks undergoing frequent filling and emptying, we now consider the hydraulic implications of uncertain input data. Water distribution networks undergoing intermittent supply are often poorly mapped, and household metering frequently ranges from patchy to nonexistent. In the face of uncertain pipe material, pipe slope, network connectivity, and outflow, we investigate how uncertainty affects dynamical modeling results. We furthermore identify which parameters exert the greatest influence on uncertainty, helping to prioritize data collection.

  17. Multi-scale magnetic field intermittence in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that intermittent magnetic field fluctuations in the plasma sheet exhibit transitory, localized, and multi-scale features. We propose a multifractal-based algorithm, which quantifies intermittence on the basis of the statistical distribution of the "strength of burstiness", estimated within a sliding window. Interesting multi-scale phenomena observed by the Cluster spacecraft include large-scale motion of the current sheet and bursty bulk flow associated turbulence, interpreted as a cross-scale coupling (CSC process.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail; plasma sheet – Space plasma physics (turbulence

  18. Influence of dose-time relationship on the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogelnik, H.D.; Vienna Univ.

    1977-01-01

    The development of peripheral neutopathies of cranial nerves and of the brachial plexus following curative doses of irradiation is closely related with the total dose applied, the number and size of the individual doses per fraction and the overall time. Additional important factors for the occurrence of these late complications are the volume of tissue irradiated and the stage of disease. In the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathy a combined effect of different factors seems likely. (orig.) [de

  19. Microdialysis assessment of peripheral metabolism in critical limb ischemia after endovascular revascularization

    OpenAIRE

    Tozzi, Matteo; Muscianisi, Elisa; Piffaretti, Gabriele; Castelli, Patrizio

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Critical limb ischemia is a chronic pathologic condition defined by the lack of blood flow in peripheral circulation. Microdialysis is a well-known and sensitive method for the early detection of tissue ischemia. The aim of the present study was to use microdialysis in order to analyse cellular metabolism changes after peripheral endovascular revascularization. Methods Ten patients diagnosed with critical limb ischemia was enrolled. CMA 60 (CMA® - Solna, Sweden) catheter w...

  20. A Structured Review of Antithrombotic Therapy in Peripheral Artery Disease With a Focus on Revascularization: A TASC (InterSociety Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Artery Disease) Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Connie N; Norgren, Lars; Ansel, Gary M; Capell, Warren H; Fletcher, John P; Fowkes, F Gerry R; Gottsäter, Anders; Hitos, Kerry; Jaff, Michael R; Nordanstig, Joakim; Hiatt, William R

    2017-06-20

    Peripheral artery disease affects >200 million people worldwide and is associated with significant limb and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Limb revascularization is recommended to improve function and quality of life for symptomatic patients with peripheral artery disease with intermittent claudication who have not responded to medical treatment. For patients with critical limb ischemia, the goals of revascularization are to relieve pain, help wound healing, and prevent limb loss. The baseline risk of cardiovascular and limb-related events demonstrated among patients with stable peripheral artery disease is elevated after revascularization and related to atherothrombosis and restenosis. Both of these processes involve platelet activation and the coagulation cascade, forming the basis for the use of antiplatelet and anticoagulant therapies to optimize procedural success and reduce postprocedural cardiovascular risk. Unfortunately, few high-quality, randomized data to support use of these therapies after peripheral artery disease revascularization exist, and much of the rationale for the use of antiplatelet agents after endovascular peripheral revascularization is extrapolated from percutaneous coronary intervention literature. Consequently, guideline recommendations for antithrombotic therapy after lower limb revascularization are inconsistent and not always evidence-based. In this context, the purpose of this structured review is to assess the available randomized data for antithrombotic therapy after peripheral arterial revascularization, with a focus on clinical trial design issues that may affect interpretation of study results, and highlight areas that require further investigation. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Enhancement characteristics of benign and malignant focal peripheral nodules in the peripheral zone of the prostate gland studied using contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, J.; Yang, J.-C.; Luo, Y.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Shi, H.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To assess the value of contrast-enhanced grey-scale transrectal ultrasound (CETRUS) in predicting the nature of peripheral zone hypoechoic lesions of the prostate. Materials and Methods: Ninety-one patients with peripheral zone hypoechoic lesions on ultrasound were evaluated with CETRUS followed by lesion-specific and sextant transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies. The enhancement patterns of the lesions were observed and graded subjectively using adjacent peripheral zone tissue as the reference. Time to enhancement (AT), time to peak intensity (TTP) and peak intensity (PI) were quantified within each nodule. Ultrasound findings were correlated with biopsy findings. Results: Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the hypoechoic lesions revealed prostate cancer in 44 patients and benign prostatic diseases in 47. The intensity of enhancement within the lesions were graded as no enhancement, increased, equal, or decreased compared with adjacent peripheral zone tissue in two, 30, five and seven in the prostate cancer group and 14, 15, four and 14 in the benign group, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). The peak enhancement intensity was found to be the most optimal discriminatory parameter (area under curve AUC 0.70; 95% CI: 0.58, 0.82). Conclusion: Malignant hypoechoic nodules in the peripheral zone of the prostate are more likely to enhance early and more intensely on CETRUS. A non-enhanced hypoechoic peripheral zone lesion was more likely to be benign

  2. Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000234.htm Angioplasty and stent placement - peripheral arteries - discharge To use the sharing ... peripheral artery). You may have also had a stent placed. To perform the procedure: Your doctor inserted ...

  3. Hypothyroidism: Can It Cause Peripheral Neuropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypothyroidism: Can it cause peripheral neuropathy? Can hypothyroidism cause peripheral neuropathy and, if so, how is it treated? Answers from Todd B. Nippoldt, M.D. Hypothyroidism — a condition in which your ...

  4. Effects of Intermittent Fasting, Caloric Restriction, and Ramadan Intermittent Fasting on Cognitive Performance at Rest and During Exercise in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherif, Anissa; Roelands, Bart; Meeusen, Romain; Chamari, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review was to highlight the potent effects of intermittent fasting on the cognitive performance of athletes at rest and during exercise. Exercise interacts with dietary factors and has a positive effect on brain functioning. Furthermore, physical activity and exercise can favorably influence brain plasticity. Mounting evidence indicates that exercise, in combination with diet, affects the management of energy metabolism and synaptic plasticity by affecting molecular mechanisms through brain-derived neurotrophic factor, an essential neurotrophin that acts at the interface of metabolism and plasticity. The literature has also shown that certain aspects of physical performance and mental health, such as coping and decision-making strategies, can be negatively affected by daylight fasting. However, there are several types of intermittent fasting. These include caloric restriction, which is distinct from fasting and allows subjects to drink water ad libitum while consuming a very low-calorie food intake. Another type is Ramadan intermittent fasting, which is a religious practice of Islam, where healthy adult Muslims do not eat or drink during daylight hours for 1 month. Other religious practices in Islam (Sunna) also encourage Muslims to practice intermittent fasting outside the month of Ramadan. Several cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have shown that intermittent fasting has crucial effects on physical and intellectual performance by affecting various aspects of bodily physiology and biochemistry that could be important for athletic success. Moreover, recent findings revealed that immunological variables are also involved in cognitive functioning and that intermittent fasting might impact the relationship between cytokine expression in the brain and cognitive deficits, including memory deficits.

  5. Intermittent intravenous followed by intermittent oral 1 alpha(OH)D3 treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism in uraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandi, L; Daugaard, H; Egsmose, C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine whether intermittent oral 1 alpha(OH)D3 treatment of patients on haemodialysis with secondary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) was able to maintain the marked suppression of PTH, which previously had been induced by an intermittent intravenous administration of 1 alpha(OH)D3....... Simultaneously, the effect of the different routes of administration of 1 alpha(OH)D3 on the circulating levels of N- and C-terminal PTH fragments was measured. DESIGN: An open study of patients on chronic haemodialysis. SETTING: Renal division, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. SUBJECTS: A total of 26...

  6. Tissue engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, John P; Bronzino, Joseph D

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly viewed as the future of medicine, the field of tissue engineering is still in its infancy. As evidenced in both the scientific and popular press, there exists considerable excitement surrounding the strategy of regenerative medicine. To achieve its highest potential, a series of technological advances must be made. Putting the numerous breakthroughs made in this field into a broad context, Tissue Engineering disseminates current thinking on the development of engineered tissues. Divided into three sections, the book covers the fundamentals of tissue engineering, enabling technologies, and tissue engineering applications. It examines the properties of stem cells, primary cells, growth factors, and extracellular matrix as well as their impact on the development of tissue engineered devices. Contributions focus on those strategies typically incorporated into tissue engineered devices or utilized in their development, including scaffolds, nanocomposites, bioreactors, drug delivery systems, and gene t...

  7. Investigation on the mechanism of peripheral axonal injury in glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun- Hong Zhao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare the angles of longitudinal section of sclera around optic nerve heads and the never fiber layer changes in healthy adults and patients with glaucoma, and to investigate the mechanism of peripheral retinal axonal injury, with the combined knowledge of biomechanics. METHODS: The optical nerves and their peripheral tissue specimen in the 12 eyes from health adult donators and 12 eyes from glaucoma patient donators were dyed by Glees' method to compare the angles of longitudinal section of sclera around optic nerve heads(through optic nerve center, and to observe the anatomical features of the peripheral retinal axons. RESULTS: The mean angle of longitudinal section of sclera around optic nerve in healthy adults was 73.3°, while that in patients with absolute glaucoma was 75.6°. The difference showed no significance(t=1.44, P>0.05. There was a sharp bend in the course of peripheral optical fiber in healthy adults. However, the optic nerve fiber disappeared completely in patients with glaucoma end stage. CONCLUSION: The angle between the medial edge and leading edge of sclera(around optic nerve headsis an acute angle. The optical fiber in glaucoma end stage disappeared completely. The phenomenon may be related to high intraocular pressure, the sclera shape, the shear modulus of sclera and axons, and “axonal bending-injury” mechanism.

  8. Peripheral endocannabinoids regulate skeletal muscle development and maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongjiao Zhao

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As a principal tissue responsible for insulin-mediated glucose uptake, skeletal muscle is important for whole-body health. The role of peripheral endocannabinoids as regulators of skeletal muscle metabolism has recently gained a lot of interest, as endocannabinoid system disorders could cause peripheral insulin resistance. We investigated the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in skeletal muscle development and maintenance. Cultures of C2C12 cells, primary satellite cells and mouse skeletal muscle single fibers were used as model systems for our studies. We found an increase in cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 mRNA and endocannabinoid synthetic enzyme mRNA skeletal muscle cells during differentiation. We also found that activation of CB1 inhibited myoblast differentiation, expanded the number of satellite cells, and stimulated the fast-muscle oxidative phenotype. Our findings contribute to understanding of the role of the endocannabinoid system in skeletal muscle metabolism and muscle oxygen consumption, and also help to explain the effects of the peripheral endocannabinoid system on whole-body energy balance.

  9. Coaching Peripheral Vision Training for Soccer Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Nelson Kautzner, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Brazilian Soccer began developing its current emphasis on peripheral vision in the late 1950s, by initiative of coach of the Canto do Rio Football Club, in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, a pioneer in the development of peripheral vision training in soccer players. Peripheral vision training gained world relevance when a young talent from Canto do Rio,…

  10. Peripheral Neuropathy – Clinical and Electrophysiological Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tae; Prasad, Kalpana; Lloyd, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This article is a primer on the pathophysiology and clinical evaluation of peripheral neuropathy for the radiologist. Magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) has utility in the diagnosis of many focal peripheral nerve lesions. When combined with history, examination, electrophysiology, and laboratory data, future advancements in high-field MRN may play an increasingly important role in the evaluation of patients with peripheral neuropathy. PMID:24210312

  11. Monitoring sweep in peripheral waterflood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouser, B.J.; Al-Askar, Y.A.; Hassoun, T.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the techniques used and the results obtained in monitoring the water advance in a peripheral waterflood of a carbonate reservoir. The peripheral pattern used in the subject reservoir gives a water advanced similar to that obtained in a water drive reservoir. However, monitoring this particular reservoir is complicated by the use of a low salinity brine for flooding and the areal shape of the reservoir. The use of pulsed neutron capture logging in conjunction with production logging has been effective in differentiating between oil and water in porous zones in existing producers. The use of the two logs has been successful despite the problems normally encountered when logging open hole completions in a reservoir being flooded with a low salinity brine. Results have been confirmed and enhanced by open hole logs of new wells being drilled in the water invaded areas

  12. Structured intermittent interruption of chronic HIV infection treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy: effects on leptin and TNF-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjona, M Montes de Oca; Pérez-Cano, R; Garcia-Juárez, R; Martín-Aspas, A; del Alamo, C Fernández Gutiérrez; Girón-González, J A

    2006-04-01

    The changes in nutritional parameters and adipocytokines after structured intermittent interruption of highly active antiretroviral treatment of patients with chronic HIV infection are analyzed. Twenty-seven patients with chronic HIV infection (median CD4+ T cell count/microl: nadir, 394; at the beginning of structured interruptions, 1041; HIV viral load: nadir, 41,521 copies/ml; at the beginning of structured interruptions triglycerides, cholesterol, leptin, and tumor necrosis factor and its soluble receptors I and II were determined. After the three cycles of intermittent interruptions of therapy, no significant differences in CD4+ T cell count/microl, viral load, or serum concentrations of cholesterol or triglycerides with reference to baseline values were found. A near-significant higher fatty mass (skinfold thicknesses, at the end, 121 mm, at the beginning, 100 mm, p = 0.100), combined with a significant increase of concentration of leptin (1.5 vs. 4.7 ng/ml, p = 0,044), as well as a decrease in serum concentrations of soluble receptors of tumor necrosis factor (TNFRI, 104 vs. 73 pg/ml, p = 0.022; TNFRII 253 vs. 195 pg/ml, p = 0.098) were detected. Structured intermittent interruption of highly active antiretroviral treatment of patients with chronic HIV infection induces a valuable positive modification in markers of lipid turnover and adipose tissue mass.

  13. Governance, legislation and protection of intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Institutions and processes governing the conveyance and control of water have a long history. In this chapter, we discuss the extent to which water governance systems consider the management of intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) and identify where research could inf...

  14. Biomonitoring of intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbington, Rachel; Chadd, Richard; Cid, Núria; Csabai, Zoltán; Miliša, Marko; Morais, Manuela; Munné, Antoni; Pařil, Petr; Pešić, Vladimir; Tziortzis, Iakovos; Verdonschot, Ralf C.M.; Datry, Thibault

    2018-01-01

    Intermittent rivers and ephemeral streams (IRES) are common across Europe and dominate some Mediterranean river networks. In all climate zones, IRES support high biodiversity and provide ecosystem services. As dynamic ecosystems that transition between flowing, pool, and dry states, IRES are

  15. Small-world networks exhibit pronounced intermittent synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Anshul; Mitra, Chiranjit; Kohar, Vivek; Sinha, Sudeshna; Kurths, Jürgen

    2017-11-01

    We report the phenomenon of temporally intermittently synchronized and desynchronized dynamics in Watts-Strogatz networks of chaotic Rössler oscillators. We consider topologies for which the master stability function (MSF) predicts stable synchronized behaviour, as the rewiring probability (p) is tuned from 0 to 1. MSF essentially utilizes the largest non-zero Lyapunov exponent transversal to the synchronization manifold in making stability considerations, thereby ignoring the other Lyapunov exponents. However, for an N-node networked dynamical system, we observe that the difference in its Lyapunov spectra (corresponding to the N - 1 directions transversal to the synchronization manifold) is crucial and serves as an indicator of the presence of intermittently synchronized behaviour. In addition to the linear stability-based (MSF) analysis, we further provide global stability estimate in terms of the fraction of state-space volume shared by the intermittently synchronized state, as p is varied from 0 to 1. This fraction becomes appreciably large in the small-world regime, which is surprising, since this limit has been otherwise considered optimal for synchronized dynamics. Finally, we characterize the nature of the observed intermittency and its dominance in state-space as network rewiring probability (p) is varied.

  16. Intermittency and multifractional Brownian character of geomagnetic time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Consolini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Earth's magnetosphere exhibits a complex behavior in response to the solar wind conditions. This behavior, which is described in terms of mutifractional Brownian motions, could be the consequence of the occurrence of dynamical phase transitions. On the other hand, it has been shown that the dynamics of the geomagnetic signals is also characterized by intermittency at the smallest temporal scales. Here, we focus on the existence of a possible relationship in the geomagnetic time series between the multifractional Brownian motion character and the occurrence of intermittency. In detail, we investigate the multifractional nature of two long time series of the horizontal intensity of the Earth's magnetic field as measured at L'Aquila Geomagnetic Observatory during two years (2001 and 2008, which correspond to different conditions of solar activity. We propose a possible double origin of the intermittent character of the small-scale magnetic field fluctuations, which is related to both the multifractional nature of the geomagnetic field and the intermittent character of the disturbance level. Our results suggest a more complex nature of the geomagnetic response to solar wind changes than previously thought.

  17. Optimal Integration of Intermittent Renewables: A System LCOE Stochastic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Lucheroni

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose a system level approach to value the impact on costs of the integration of intermittent renewable generation in a power system, based on expected breakeven cost and breakeven cost risk. To do this, we carefully reconsider the definition of Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE when extended to non-dispatchable generation, by examining extra costs and gains originated by the costly management of random power injections. We are thus lead to define a ‘system LCOE’ as a system dependent LCOE that takes properly into account intermittent generation. In order to include breakeven cost risk we further extend this deterministic approach to a stochastic setting, by introducing a ‘stochastic system LCOE’. This extension allows us to discuss the optimal integration of intermittent renewables from a broad, system level point of view. This paper thus aims to provide power producers and policy makers with a new methodological scheme, still based on the LCOE but which updates this valuation technique to current energy system configurations characterized by a large share of non-dispatchable production. Quantifying and optimizing the impact of intermittent renewables integration on power system costs, risk and CO 2 emissions, the proposed methodology can be used as powerful tool of analysis for assessing environmental and energy policies.

  18. Intermittency in multihadron production: An analysis using stochastic theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biyajima, M.

    1989-01-01

    Multiplicity data of the NA22, KLM, and UA1 collaborations are analysed by means of probability distributions derived in the framework of pure birth stochastic equations. The intermittent behaviour of the KLM and UA1 data is well reproduced by the theory. A comparison with the negative binomial distribution is also made. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab. (Authors)

  19. Clean intermittent self-catheterisation - principles and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Narayanaswamy

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This review of the literature on the principles and prac-tice of clean intermittent self-catheterisation includes the role of antiseptics/antibiotics, and outcome. It covers ac-ceptance of the technique, urinary tract infection, conti-nence, and preservation of upper urinary tract.

  20. Two-scale analysis of intermittency in fully developed turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badii, R; Talkner, P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    A self-affinity test for turbulent time series is applied to experimental data for the estimation of intermittency exponents. The method employs exact relations satisfied by joint expectations of observables computed across two different length scales. One of these constitutes a verification tool for the existence and the extent of the inertial range. (author) 2 figs., 13 refs.