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Sample records for intermittent androgen suppression

  1. Nonlinear system identification for prostate cancer and optimality of intermittent androgen suppression therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Taiji; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2013-09-01

    These days prostate cancer is one of the most common types of malignant neoplasm in men. Androgen ablation therapy (hormone therapy) has been shown to be effective for advanced prostate cancer. However, continuous hormone therapy often causes recurrence. This results from the progression of androgen-dependent cancer cells to androgen-independent cancer cells during the continuous hormone therapy. One possible method to prevent the progression to the androgen-independent state is intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy, which ceases dosing intermittently. In this paper, we propose two methods to estimate the dynamics of prostate cancer, and investigate the IAS therapy from the viewpoint of optimality. The two methods that we propose for dynamics estimation are a variational Bayesian method for a piecewise affine (PWA) system and a Gaussian process regression method. We apply the proposed methods to real clinical data and compare their predictive performances. Then, using the estimated dynamics of prostate cancer, we observe how prostate cancer behaves for various dosing schedules. It can be seen that the conventional IAS therapy is a way of imposing high cost for dosing while keeping the prostate cancer in a safe state. We would like to dedicate this paper to the memory of Professor Luigi M. Ricciardi.

  2. Intermittent versus continuous androgen suppression therapy: do we have consensus yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchan, N C; Goldenberg, S L

    2010-09-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been a cornerstone in the management of advanced prostate cancer for more than 50 years, but several aspects of the therapy remain controversial. Research since the mid-1980s has looked at the use of intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) as a way to reduce the side effects and costs of continuous androgen suppression. During that same time, testing for prostate-specific antigen resulted in forward stage migration both at diagnosis and at the time of treatment initiation. Earlier treatment has led to prolonged periods of ADT and increasing recognition of the resultant metabolic complications. With preclinical evidence suggesting a potential benefit for ias in terms of time to androgen independence, with phase II and III studies producing optimistic results, and with the potential for reductions in cost and complications, ias has become a popular modality of therapy around the globe. Large prospective randomized studies, currently ongoing, will ultimately determine the legitimate place of IAS in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  3. A nonlinear competitive model of the prostate tumor growth under intermittent androgen suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Tong-Jun; Yuan, Chang-Qing; Xie, Jing-Hui; Hao, Fang-Fang

    2016-09-01

    Hormone suppression has been the primary modality of treatment for prostate cancer. However long-term androgen deprivation may induce androgen-independent (AI) recurrence. Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) is a potential way to delay or avoid the AI relapse. Mathematical models of tumor growth and treatment are simple while they are capable of capturing the essence of complicated interactions. Game theory models have analyzed that tumor cells can enhance their fitness by adopting genetically determined survival strategies. In this paper, we consider the survival strategies as the competitive advantage of tumor cells and propose a new model to mimic the prostate tumor growth in IAS therapy. Then we investigate the competition effect in tumor development by numerical simulations. The results indicate that successfully IAS-controlled states can be achieved even though the net growth rate of AI cells is positive for any androgen level. There is crucial difference between the previous models and the new one in the phase diagram of successful and unsuccessful tumor control by IAS administration, which means that the suggestions from the models for medication can be different. Furthermore we introduce quadratic logistic terms to the competition model to simulate the tumor growth in the environment with a finite carrying capacity considering the nutrients or inhibitors. The simulations show that the tumor growth can reach an equilibrium state or an oscillatory state with the net growth rate of AI cells being androgen independent. Our results suggest that the competition and the restraint of a limited environment can enhance the possibility of relapse prevention.

  4. Quantitative mathematical modeling of PSA dynamics of prostate cancer patients treated with intermittent androgen suppression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yoshito Hirata; Koichiro Akakura; Celestia S.Higano; Nicholas Bruchovsky; Kazuyuki Aihara

    2012-01-01

    If a mathematical model is to be used in the diagnosis,treatment,or prognosis of a disease,it must describe the inherent quantitative dynamics of the state.An ideal candidate disease is prostate cancer owing to the fact that it is characterized by an excellent biomarker,prostate-specific antigen (PSA),and also by a predictable response to treatment in the form of androgen suppression therapy.Despite a high initial response rate,the cancer will often relapse to a state of androgen independence which no longer responds to manipulations of the hormonal environment.In this paper,we present relevant background information and a quantitative mathematical model that potentially can be used in the optimal management of patients to cope with biochemical relapse as indicated by a rising PSA.

  5. Type I Collagen Synthesis Marker Procollagen I N-Terminal Peptide (PINP) in Prostate Cancer Patients Undergoing Intermittent Androgen Suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard.hamilton@toc.lbg.ac.at; Olszewski-Hamilton, Ulrike [Ludwig Boltzmann Cluster of Translational of Oncology, Nussdorfer Strasse 64, Vienna A-1090 (Austria); Theyer, Gerhard [Hospital Kittsee, Kittsee A-2421, Burgenland (Austria)

    2011-09-15

    Intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) therapy for prostate cancer patients attempts to maintain the hormone dependence of the tumor cells by cycles alternating between androgen suppression (AS) and treatment cessation till a certain prostate-specific antigen (PSA) threshold is reached. Side effects are expected to be reduced, compared to standard continuous androgen suppression (CAS) therapy. The present study examined the effect of IAS on bone metabolism by determinations of serum procollagen I N-terminal peptide (PINP), a biochemical marker of collagen synthesis. A total of 105 treatment cycles of 58 patients with prostate cancer stages ≥pT2 was studied assessing testosterone, PSA and PINP levels at monthly intervals. During phases of AS lasting for up to nine months PSA levels were reversibly reduced, indicating apoptotic regression of the prostatic tumors. Within the first cycle PINP increased at the end of the AS period and peaked in the treatment cessation phase. During the following two cycles a similar pattern was observed for PINP, except a break in collagen synthesis as indicated by low PINP levels in the first months off treatment. Therefore, measurements of the serum PINP concentration indicated increased bone matrix synthesis in response to >6 months of AS, which uninterruptedly continued into the first treatment cessation phase, with a break into each of the following two pauses. In summary, synthesis of bone matrix collagen increases while degradation decreases during off-treatment phases in patients undergoing IAS. Although a direct relationship between bone matrix turnover and risk of fractures is difficult to establish, IAS for treatment of biochemical progression of prostate tumors is expected to reduce osteoporosis in elderly men often at high risk for bone fractures representing a highly suitable patient population for this kind of therapy.

  6. Risks of Serious Toxicities from Intermittent versus Continuous Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Advanced Prostate Cancer: A Population Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Huei-Ting; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Philips, George K; Barac, Ana; Fu, Alex Z; Penson, David F; Zhou, Yingjun; Potosky, Arnold L

    2017-05-01

    Randomized trials have shown that intermittent androgen deprivation therapy for patients with advanced prostate cancer may improve sexual and physical functioning compared to continuous androgen deprivation therapy without compromising survival. To our knowledge it is unknown whether intermittent androgen deprivation therapy alters the risk of serious toxicities associated with continuous androgen deprivation therapy. We performed a population based cohort study of 9,772 men 66 years old or older who were diagnosed with advanced prostate cancer from 2002 to 2011 and treated with androgen deprivation therapy. Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy was defined as a single 90-day interval between 2 androgen deprivation therapy sessions during which patients visited their physicians or underwent prostate specific antigen testing. Outcomes included acute myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, type 2 diabetes and fracture. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate the HRs of the comparative risk of serious toxicities between intermittent and continuous androgen deprivation therapy. A total of 2,113 (22%), 769 (9%) and 899 men (9%) had a new cardiovascular event, diabetes or fracture, respectively, within 5 years of starting androgen deprivation therapy. Compared to the continuous androgen deprivation therapy group, the intermittent therapy group was at lower risk for serious cardiovascular events (HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.53-0.77), particularly in reducing the risk of heart failure (HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.49-0.78) and fracture (HR 0.52, 95% CI 0.38-0.70, each p deprivation therapy was associated with a lower risk of heart failure and fracture compared to continuous androgen deprivation therapy. This raises toxicity concerns for continuous relative to intermittent therapy and suggests that intermittent androgen deprivation therapy may represent a safer therapeutic choice in elderly men with advanced prostate cancer. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association

  7. Suppression of methanogenesis in hydrogen fermentation by intermittent feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jeonghee; Kim, Tae Gwan; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether intermittent feeding by using a concentrated carbon source is an appropriate method for selective enrichment of hydrogenesis by means of methanogen suppression. In a conventional reactor fed continuously for 10 d, methanogens increased from 2.8 × 10(7) to 1.1 × 10(9) gene copy number (GCN)/mg-cell dry weight, and methane concentration in the resulting biogas was 5.8%. However, when a carbon source was intermittently supplied for 10 d to the reactor, the number of methanogens was reduced 98.9% from 2.77 × 10(7) to 1.2 × 10(3) GCN/mg-cell dry weight, and methane was not detected during this period of intermittent feeding. Intermittent feeding shifted the dominants in the reactor from Clostridiaceae (70.5%) and Lactobacillaceae (11.0%) to Acetobacteraceae (62.0%) and Clostridiaceae (38.0%). In the reactor operated in continuous feeding mode after intermittent feeding, methane concentration was below 0.3% and the portion of methanogens in the bacterial community was maintained below 0.2%. These results suggest that the intermittent feeding of a carbon source during hydrogen production processes is a suitable method to suppress the activity of methanogens.

  8. Minoxidil may suppress androgen receptor-related functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Lin, An-Chi; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chung, Wen-Hung; Wu, Wen-Guey

    2014-04-30

    Although minoxidil has been used for more than two decades to treat androgenetic alopecia (AGA), an androgen-androgen receptor (AR) pathway-dominant disease, its precise mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that minoxidil may influence the AR or its downstream signaling. These tests revealed that minoxidil suppressed AR-related functions, decreasing AR transcriptional activity in reporter assays, reducing expression of AR targets at the protein level, and suppressing AR-positive LNCaP cell growth. Dissecting the underlying mechanisms, we found that minoxidil interfered with AR-peptide, AR-coregulator, and AR N/C-terminal interactions, as well as AR protein stability. Furthermore, a crystallographic analysis using the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) revealed direct binding of minoxidil to the AR in a minoxidil-AR-LBD co-crystal model, and surface plasmon resonance assays demonstrated that minoxidil directly bound the AR with a K(d) value of 2.6 µM. Minoxidil also suppressed AR-responsive reporter activity and decreased AR protein stability in human hair dermal papilla cells. The current findings provide evidence that minoxidil could be used to treat both cancer and age-related disease, and open a new avenue for applications of minoxidil in treating androgen-AR pathway-related diseases.

  9. Protein phosphatase 1 suppresses androgen receptor ubiquitylation and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaming; Han, Weiwei; Gulla, Sarah; Simon, Nicholas I; Gao, Yanfei; Cai, Changmeng; Yang, Hongmei; Zhang, Xiaoping; Liu, Jihong; Balk, Steven P; Chen, Shaoyong

    2016-01-12

    The phosphoprotein phosphatases are emerging as important androgen receptor (AR) regulators in prostate cancer (PCa). We reported previously that the protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1α) can enhance AR activity by dephosphorylating a site in the AR hinge region (Ser650) and thereby decrease AR nuclear export. In this study we show that PP1α increases the expression of wildtype as well as an S650A mutant AR, indicating that it is acting through one or more additional mechanisms. We next show that PP1α binds primarily to the AR ligand binding domain and decreases its ubiquitylation and degradation. Moreover, we find that the PP1α inhibitor tautomycin increases phosphorylation of AR ubiquitin ligases including SKP2 and MDM2 at sites that enhance their activity, providing a mechanism by which PP1α may suppress AR degradation. Significantly, the tautomycin mediated decrease in AR expression was most pronounced at low androgen levels or in the presence of the AR antagonist enzalutamide. Consistent with this finding, the sensitivity of LNCaP and C4-2 PCa cells to tautomycin, as assessed by PSA synthesis and proliferation, was enhanced at low androgen levels or by treatment with enzalutamide. Together these results indicate that PP1α may contribute to stabilizing AR protein after androgen deprivation therapies, and that targeting PP1α or the AR-PP1α interaction may be effective in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

  10. Metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer undergoing intermittent androgen-deprivation therapy

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    Rezaei, Mohammadali Mohammadzadeh; Rezaei, Mohammadhadi Mohammadzadeh; Ghoreifi, Alireza; Kerigh, Behzad Feyzzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of metabolic syndrome in men with prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT), especially intermittent type, has not been completely evaluated. The aim of this study is to evaluate metabolic syndrome in men with PCa undergoing intermittent ADT. Methods: In this longitudinal study, we studied the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components in 190 patients who were undergoing intermittent ADT. The metabolic syndrome was defined according to the Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. All metabolic parameters, including lipid profile, blood glucose, blood pressures, and waist circumferences of the patients were measured six and 12 months after treatment. Results: Mean age of the patients was 67.5 ± 6.74 years. The incidence of metabolic syndrome after six and 12 months was 6.8% and 14.7%, respectively. Analysis of various components of the metabolic syndrome revealed that patients had significantly higher overall prevalence of hyperglycemia, abdominal obesity, and hypertriglyceridemia in their six- and 12-month followups, but blood pressure has not been changed in the same period except for diastolic blood pressure after six months. Conclusions: Although there was an increased risk of metabolic syndrome in patients receiving intermittent ADT, it was lower than other studies that treated the same patients with continuous ADT. Also it seems that intermittent ADT has less metabolic complications than continuous ADT and could be used as a safe alternative in patients with advanced and metastatic PCa. PMID:27695584

  11. Improving intermittent androgen deprivation therapy: lessons learned from basic and translational research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul A Parikh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy (IADT is an alternative to continuous androgen deprivation therapy (ADT in prostate cancer patients with nonmetastatic disease. ADT is associated with numerous side effects such as hot flashes, sexual dysfunction, anemia, fatigue, loss of muscle mass, osteoporosis, metabolic syndrome and premature cardiovascular disease. IADT was developed with the intention of improving the quality of life and to delay progression of prostate cancer to castration resistance. The benefits of slightly improved quality of life by IADT compared to ADT were demonstrated in multiple clinical trials. IADT was noted to be noninferior to ADT in patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer but in studies performed in patients with metastatic prostate cancer, the results were inconclusive. Our recent studies suggested that the administration of 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors during the off-cycle of IADT can significantly prolong the survival of mice bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was short. This review discusses the survival benefit of 5 alpha-reductase inhibition in IADT in animal models and the potential translation of this finding into clinic.

  12. Predictors of prostate volume reduction following neoadjuvant cytoreductive androgen suppression

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    Krishan R. Jethwa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Limited duration cytoreductive neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT is used prior to definitive radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer to decrease prostate volume. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of NHT on prostate volume before permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB, and determine associated predictive factors. Material and methods : Between June 1998 and April 2012, a total of 1,110 patients underwent PPB and 207 patients underwent NHT. Of these, 189 (91.3% underwent detailed planimetric transrectal ultrasound before and after NHT prior to PPB. Regression analysis was used to assess predictors of absolute and percentage change in prostate volume after NHT. Results: The median duration of NHT was 4.9 months with inter quartile range (IQR, 4.2-6.6 months. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA reduced by a median of 97% following NHT. The mean prostate volume before NHT was 62.5 ± 22.1 cm 3 (IQR: 46-76 cm 3 , and after NHT, it was 37.0 ± 14.5 cm 3 (IQR: 29-47 cm 3 . The mean prostate volume reduction was 23.4 cm 3 (35.9%. Absolute prostate volume reduction was positively correlated with initial volume and inversely correlated with T-stage, Gleason score, and NCCN risk group. In multivariate regression analyses, initial prostate volume (p < 0.001 remained as a significant predictor of absolute and percent prostate volume reduction. Total androgen suppression was associated with greater percent prostate volume reduction than luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa alone (p = 0.001. Conclusions : Prostate volume decreased by approximately one third after 4.9 months of NHT, with total androgen suppression found to be more efficacious in maximizing cytoreduction than LHRHa alone. Initial prostate volume is the greatest predictor for prostate volume reduction.

  13. Suppression of spiral waves using intermittent local electric shock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Jun; Ying He-Ping; Li Yan-Long

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, an intermittent local electric shock scheme is proposed to suppress stable spiral waves in the Barkley model by a weak electric shock (about 0.4 to 0.7) imposed on a random selected n × n grids (n = 1-5, compared with the original 256×256 lattice) and monitored synchronically the evolutions of the activator on the grids as the sampled signal of the activator steps out a given threshold (i.e., the electric shock works on the n × n grids if the activator u (≤) 0.4 or u (≥) 0.8). The numerical simulations show that a breakup of spiral is observed in the media state evolution to finally obtain homogeneous states if the electric shock with appropriate intensity is imposed.

  14. Testicular steroidogenesis is locally regulated by androgen via suppression of Nur77.

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    Song, Chin-Hee; Gong, Eun-Yeung; Park, Ji soo; Lee, Keesook

    2012-06-01

    Steroidogenesis in the testis is regulated by a negative feedback mechanism through the hypothalamus-pituitary-testis axis. Recent studies suggest that besides this long-loop regulation, testicular steroidogenesis is also locally regulated by androgen. However, the molecular mechanism behind this additional regulatory pathway has been poorly addressed. In the present study, we demonstrate that liganded androgen receptor (AR) suppresses the transcriptional activity of Nur77 on steroidogenic enzyme gene promoters, affecting testicular steroidogenesis. AR physically interacts and colocalizes with Nur77 in the nucleus in the presence of androgen. AR inhibits Nur77 transactivation by competing mainly with coactivators such as SRC-1 for Nur77 binding. These results suggest that androgen, through binding to AR, directly acts as a signal inhibiting the expression of steroidogenic enzyme genes in Leydig cells, eventually resulting in decreased testicular steroidogenesis. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that androgen acts locally to regulate testicular steroidogenesis, and may provide its action mechanism.

  15. Effect of Intermittent Androgen Blockade on the Quality of Life of Patients with Advanced Prostate Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of intermittent androgen blockade (IAB) on the quality of life (QOL) of patients with advanced prostatic carcinoma (APC).METHODS Investigations on the QOL of 51 APC patients receiving IAB treatment, totaling 3 times, i.e. 6 months before and after, and 12 months after treatment, were perform using the EORTC QLQ-C30 measuring scale and QLQ-PR25 scale.RESULTS Although IAB became an economic burden for the families, it was lessened during the intermission (P<0.05). The overall health status significantly improved 6 months after IAB treatment (P<0.01), especially during the intermission (P<0.05), with a total or local easement of pain (P<0.01) and an improvement of urinary function (P<0.01). Although there was impairment,to various degrees, in many functions of the patients on the 6th month of treatment, such as the physical function (P<0.05), role function (P<0.05), the emotional (P<0.01) and the social functions (P<0.01), with an enhancement of fatigue (P<0.01), these functions gradually recovered by the 12th month as the intermission started. Treatment-related symptoms such as flushing and mammary swelling significantly emerged on the 6th treatment month (P<0.01), and lessened on the 12th (P<0.01). During the treatment period,therewas an notable drop in sexual interest (P<0.01), with a deprivation of sex life, but revived to various degrees during the intermission (P<0.01).CONCLUSION Although IAB treatment of APC patients did impair the physiologic and psychologic status of patients to varying degrees, these were improved and restored during the intermission.

  16. Effect of androgen suppression compared with androgen receptor blockade on arterial stiffness in men with prostate cancer.

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    Dockery, Frances; Bulpitt, Christopher J; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Vernon, Clare; Rajkumar, Chakravarthi

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous testosterone and estradiol are thought to be cardio-protective in men. We wanted to determine the effects of 2 different anti-androgen therapies on arterial stiffness as one suppresses (goserelin--a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analog) while the other increases (bicalutamide--an androgen receptor blocker) both testosterone and estradiol. We conducted a randomized trial on 43 men (mean age, 71.2 +/- 6.2 years) with localized prostate cancer. They received either goserelin or bicalutamide for 24 weeks. Carotid-femoral (C-F) and carotid-radial (C-R) pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured. Twenty age- and disease-matched men with prostate cancer on no active treatment were studied in a similar manner. After 12 weeks of goserelin, radial artery PWV increased significantly from baseline and a nonsignificant increase was observed in femoral PWV (change from baseline radial: +1.4 m/s, P = .002, femoral: +0.9 m/s, P = .127) Both PWV measures increased significantly with bicalutamide (change from baseline radial: +0.8, femoral: +0.9 m/s, P or= .967 at 12 weeks and P >or= .07 at 24 weeks). The untreated men studied in parallel showed no changes at 12 or 24 weeks in either PWV measure. Anti-androgen treatment in men might increase large artery stiffness, an adverse cardiovascular risk factor; however, the effect was not maintained with testosterone receptor blockade, in the longer term, but tended to be sustained with suppression therapy. This could relate to the different sex hormone effects of the 2 therapies.

  17. Chemical Suppression of the Reactivated Androgen Signaling Pathway in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    of cyclopamine on androgen signaling in LNCaP cells. (A) Real time qPCR was used to measure relative expression of KLK3, KLK2, PGC or SHH mRNA in...response to Shh signaling . Science 1998, 280:1603-1607. 20. Chen JK, Taipale J, Cooper MK, Beachy PA: Inhibition of Hedgehog signaling by direct...body, although all can simi- larly engage with receptor to initiate the signaling process. Shh is synthesized as a propolypeptide that is processed

  18. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Kokontis

    Full Text Available The majority of prostate cancer (PCa patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1; and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1 and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  19. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

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    Kokontis, John M; Lin, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yu; Fukuchi, Junichi; Hiipakka, Richard A; Chung, Chi-Jung; Chan, Tzu-Min; Liao, Shutsung; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR) and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1); and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1) and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  20. Duration of short-course androgen suppression therapy and the risk of death as a result of prostate cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    D'Amico, Anthony V

    2011-12-10

    We evaluated whether the duration of androgen suppression therapy (AST) had an impact on the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in men with unfavorable-risk prostate cancer (PC) within established Gleason score (GS) categories.

  1. Androgen-androgen receptor system improves chronic inflammatory conditions by suppressing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in adipocytes via transcriptional regulation

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    Morooka, Nobukatsu, E-mail: amorooka@gunma-u.ac.jp [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Ueguri, Kei [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Yee, Karen Kar Lye [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan); Human Resources Cultivation Center, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryushi, Gunma, 376-8515 (Japan); Yanase, Toshihiko [Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes Mellitus, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Jonan-ku, Fukuoka, 814-0180 (Japan); Sato, Takashi [Institute for Molecular and Cellular Regulation, Gunma University, 3-39-15 Showa-machi, Maebashi, Gunma, 371-8512 (Japan)

    2016-09-02

    Age-related decreases in sex hormones are closely related to chronic inflammation in obesity and metabolic diseases. Particularly, the molecular basis of androgen activity in regulating inflammation and controlling metabolism remains largely unknown. Obese adipocytes secrete monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a key chemokine that promotes the infiltration of monocytes/macrophages into adipose tissue, thereby leading to metabolic disorders. Here, we studied the role of androgen-androgen receptor (AR) action in regulating MCP-1 expression in adipose tissue. We observed the induction of Mcp-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes co-cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, Mcp-1 expression was upregulated by culturing in conditioned medium derived from inflammatory macrophages (M1-Mφ) containing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We found that sex hormones downregulated TNF-α-induced Mcp-1 and interleukin (Il)-6 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, luciferase-reporter analysis indicated that MCP-1 promoter activity was predominantly suppressed by dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-AR interactions through functional canonical nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) sites, whereas non-canonical NF-κB site containing important flanking sequences exhibited minor contributions to DHT-AR transcriptional repression. These findings suggested that androgen-AR suppressed obesity-induced chronic inflammation in adipose tissue. - Highlights: • DHT, non-aromatizable androgen suppresses Mcp-1 expression in adipocytes. • Mcp-1 transcription was negatively regulated by DHT-AR action. • DHT-AR selectively regulates Mcp-1 transcription through distinct NF-κB sites.

  2. Androgen-androgen receptor system improves chronic inflammatory conditions by suppressing monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 gene expression in adipocytes via transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morooka, Nobukatsu; Ueguri, Kei; Yee, Karen Kar Lye; Yanase, Toshihiko; Sato, Takashi

    2016-09-02

    Age-related decreases in sex hormones are closely related to chronic inflammation in obesity and metabolic diseases. Particularly, the molecular basis of androgen activity in regulating inflammation and controlling metabolism remains largely unknown. Obese adipocytes secrete monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), a key chemokine that promotes the infiltration of monocytes/macrophages into adipose tissue, thereby leading to metabolic disorders. Here, we studied the role of androgen-androgen receptor (AR) action in regulating MCP-1 expression in adipose tissue. We observed the induction of Mcp-1 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes co-cultured with RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, Mcp-1 expression was upregulated by culturing in conditioned medium derived from inflammatory macrophages (M1-Mφ) containing tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). We found that sex hormones downregulated TNF-α-induced Mcp-1 and interleukin (Il)-6 expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Furthermore, luciferase-reporter analysis indicated that MCP-1 promoter activity was predominantly suppressed by dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-AR interactions through functional canonical nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) sites, whereas non-canonical NF-κB site containing important flanking sequences exhibited minor contributions to DHT-AR transcriptional repression. These findings suggested that androgen-AR suppressed obesity-induced chronic inflammation in adipose tissue.

  3. The androgen receptor is transcriptionally suppressed by proteins that bind single-stranded DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, M E; Tindall, D J

    1995-05-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a nuclear transcription factor that is essential for development of the male urogenital tract. In the current work, we have characterized the mouse androgen receptor suppressor (mARS). A single, 20-base pair, region (TCCCCCCACCCACCCCC-CCT) was sufficient for suppression in chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assays. Northern analysis indicated that translational regulation is not necessary for the suppression. Analysis of the AR mRNA half-life indicated that the mARS does not affect AR RNA degradation. Gel mobility assays showed that the mARS is bound by multiple proteins that can recognize single-stranded DNA and RNA. In addition, differing proteins are expressed in distinct tissues. Purification of some of these proteins has shown that a doublet of 33 and 35 kDa binds to the G-rich strand and that a 52-kDa protein binds to the C-rich strand. Southwestern blots have confirmed that these proteins are indeed recognized by the mARS. The results of these experiments indicate that the AR 5'-untranslated region contains a suppressor element that can be bound by multiple proteins. The mARS appears to be acting either by altering transcription initiation or blocking transcription elongation. Characterization of this suppressor may provide insight into the physiological means by which the AR is regulated.

  4. Peripheral androgen receptor gene suppression rescues disease in mouse models of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Andrew P; Yu, Zhigang; Murray, Sue; Peralta, Raechel; Low, Audrey; Guo, Shuling; Yu, Xing Xian; Cortes, Constanza J; Bennett, C Frank; Monia, Brett P; La Spada, Albert R; Hung, Gene

    2014-05-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR), a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC) transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  5. Peripheral Androgen Receptor Gene Suppression Rescues Disease in Mouse Models of Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew P. Lieberman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA is caused by the polyglutamine androgen receptor (polyQ-AR, a protein expressed by both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle. Although viewed as a motor neuronopathy, data from patients and mouse models suggest that muscle contributes to disease pathogenesis. Here, we tested this hypothesis using AR113Q knockin and human bacterial artificial chromosome/clone (BAC transgenic mice that express the full-length polyQ-AR and display androgen-dependent weakness, muscle atrophy, and early death. We developed antisense oligonucleotides that suppressed AR gene expression in the periphery but not the CNS after subcutaneous administration. Suppression of polyQ-AR in the periphery rescued deficits in muscle weight, fiber size, and grip strength, reversed changes in muscle gene expression, and extended the lifespan of mutant males. We conclude that polyQ-AR expression in the periphery is an important contributor to pathology in SBMA mice and that peripheral administration of therapeutics should be explored for SBMA patients.

  6. Activin B is produced early in antral follicular development and suppresses thecal androgen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J M; Henderson, S; Souza, C; Ludlow, H; Groome, N; McNeilly, A S

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the role of activin B during folliculogenesis. This study investigated the expression levels of activin/inhibin subunits (βA, βB, and α), steroid enzyme, and gonadotrophin receptors in theca (TC) and granulosa cells (GC) by QPCR and activin A and B and inhibin A protein levels in follicular fluid (FF) of developing sheep follicles during estrus and anestrus. The effect of activin B on androgen production from primary TC cultures in vitro was also assessed. During folliculogenesis, in anestrus and estrus, FF activin B concentrations and thecal and GC activin βB mRNA levels decreased as follicle diameter increased from 1–3 to >6 mm regardless of estrogenic status. Estrogenic preovulatory follicles had reduced concentrations of FF activins B and A, and TC and GCs expressed higher levels of activin βA mRNA at 3–4 mm, and TCs more inhibin α mRNA at >4 mm stages of development compared with nonestrogenic follicles. Activin B decreased androstenedione production from primary TCs in vitro, an effect blocked by inhibin A. Thus, sheep follicles 1–3 mm in diameter contained high FF levels of activin B, which decreased as the follicle size increased, and, like activin A, suppressed thecal androgen production in vitro, an effect blocked by inhibin. Furthermore, the theca of large estrogenic follicles expressed high levels of inhibin α and activin βA mRNA suggesting local thecal derived inhibin A production. This would inhibit the negative effects of thecal activins B and A ensuring maximum androgen production for enhanced estradiol production by the preovulatory follicle(s). PMID:22450673

  7. Loss of androgen receptor-dependent growth suppression by prostate cancer cells can occur independently from acquiring oncogenic addiction to androgen receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M D'Antonio

    Full Text Available The conversion of androgen receptor (AR signaling as a mechanism of growth suppression of normal prostate epithelial cells to that of growth stimulation in prostate cancer cells is often associated with AR mutation, amplification and over-expression. Thus, down-regulation of AR signaling is commonly therapeutic for prostate cancer. The E006AA cell line was established from a hormone naïve, localized prostate cancer. E006AA cells are genetically aneuploid and grow equally well when xenografted into either intact or castrated male NOG but not nude mice. These cells exhibit: 1 X chromosome duplication and AR gene amplification, although paradoxically not coupled with increased AR expression, and 2 somatic, dominant-negative Serine-599-Glycine loss-of-function mutation within the dimerization surface of the DNA binding domain of the AR gene. No effect on the growth of E006AA cells is observed using targeted knockdown of endogenous mutant AR, ectopic expression of wild-type AR, or treatment with androgens or anti-androgens. E006AA cells represent a prototype for a newly identified subtype of prostate cancer cells that exhibit a dominant-negative AR loss-of-function in a hormonally naïve patient. Such loss-of-function eliminates AR-mediated growth suppression normally induced by normal physiological levels of androgens, thus producing a selective growth advantage for these malignant cells in hormonally naïve patients. These data highlight that loss of AR-mediated growth suppression is an independent process, and that, without additional changes, is insufficient for acquiring oncogene addiction to AR signaling. Thus, patients with prostate cancer cells harboring such AR loss-of-function mutations will not benefit from aggressive hormone or anti-AR therapies even though they express AR protein.

  8. Impact of age on the biochemical failure and androgen suppression after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer in chilean men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel P Murray

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: After radical prostatectomy, the older men with pathological features of Gleason score ≥ 8, pT3 tumors, and positive extracapsular extension had higher frequency of biochemical failure and the presence of CPCs. The treatment of androgen blockade was less successful to suppress the disease relapse in the older men than that in the younger man.

  9. A New Range Sidelobe Suppression Technique for Randomly Intermittent Spectra HF Radar Signal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Dong-po; LIU Xing-zhao

    2005-01-01

    The randomly intermittent spectra (RIS) signal is employed to combat spectrum congestion in radar and other radio services to evade the external interferences in high-frequency (HF) and ultrahigh-frequency (UHF)bands. However, the spectra discontinuity of the signal gets rise to high range sidelobes when matching the refleeted echo, which is much more difficult for targets detection. So it is indispensable to investigate the technique for sidelobes suppression of the range profile when RIS signal is utilized, This paper introduced a new processing technique based on time domain filtering to lower the range sidelobes. A robust and effetive algorithm is adopted to solve the coefficients of the filter, and the restriction on the desired response of the filter is derived. The simulation results show that the peak range sidelobe can be reduced to -27 dB from -9.5 dB while the frequency band span (FBS) is 200 kHz.

  10. Monocyte/macrophage androgen receptor suppresses cutaneous wound healing in mice by enhancing local TNF-alpha expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jiann-Jyh; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chuang, Kuang-Hsiang; Chang, Philip; Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Wen-Jye; Chang, Chawnshang

    2009-12-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal more slowly in elderly males than in elderly females, suggesting a role for sex hormones in the healing process. Indeed, androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling has been shown to inhibit cutaneous wound healing. AR is expressed in several cell types in healing skin, including keratinocytes, dermal fibroblasts, and infiltrating macrophages, but the exact role of androgen/AR signaling in these different cell types remains unclear. To address this question, we generated and studied cutaneous wound healing in cell-specific AR knockout (ARKO) mice. General and myeloid-specific ARKO mice exhibited accelerated wound healing compared with WT mice, whereas keratinocyte- and fibroblast-specific ARKO mice did not. Importantly, the rate of wound healing in the general ARKO mice was dependent on AR and not serum androgen levels. Interestingly, although dispensable for wound closure, keratinocyte AR promoted re-epithelialization, while fibroblast AR suppressed it. Further analysis indicated that AR suppressed wound healing by enhancing the inflammatory response through a localized increase in TNF-alpha expression. Furthermore, AR enhanced local TNF-alpha expression via multiple mechanisms, including increasing the inflammatory monocyte population, enhancing monocyte chemotaxis by upregulating CCR2 expression, and enhancing TNF-alpha expression in macrophages. Finally, targeting AR by topical application of a compound (ASC-J9) that degrades AR protein resulted in accelerated healing, suggesting a potential new therapeutic approach that may lead to better treatment of wound healing.

  11. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  12. Lifestyle intervention in men with advanced prostate cancer receiving androgen suppression therapy: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourke, Liam; Doll, Helen; Crank, Helen; Daley, Amanda; Rosario, Derek; Saxton, John M

    2011-04-01

    Healthy lifestyle behaviors could have a role in ameliorating some of the adverse effects of androgen suppression therapy (AST) in men with prostate cancer. The primary aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of a tapered supervised exercise program in combination with dietary advice in men with advanced prostate cancer receiving AST. Advanced prostate cancer patients receiving AST for a minimum of 6 months were randomized to a 12-week lifestyle program comprising aerobic and resistance exercise, plus dietary advice (n = 25), or standard care (n = 25). Exercise behavior, dietary macronutrient intake, quality of life, fatigue, functional fitness, and biomarkers associated with disease progression were assessed at baseline, after the intervention, and at 6 months. The lifestyle group showed improvements in exercise behavior (P lifestyle interventions have potential to evoke improvements in exercise and dietary behavior, in addition to other important health outcomes in men with advanced prostate cancer receiving AST. This study shows for the first time that pragmatic lifestyle interventions are feasible and could have a positive impact on health behaviors and other key outcomes in men with advanced prostate cancer receiving AST.

  13. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-03-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  14. Catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II suppress the androgen receptor signaling and prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haolong; Xie, Ning; Gleave, Martin E; Dong, Xuesen

    2015-08-21

    Although the new generation of androgen receptor (AR) antagonists like enzalutamide (ENZ) prolong survival of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), AR-driven tumors eventually recur indicating that additional therapies are required to fully block AR function. Since DNA topoisomerase II (Topo II) was demonstrated to be essential for AR to initiate gene transcription, this study tested whether catalytic inhibitors of Topo II can block AR signaling and suppress ENZ-resistant CRPC growth. Using multiple prostate cancer cell lines, we showed that catalytic Topo II inhibitors, ICRF187 and ICRF193 inhibited transcription activities of the wild-type AR, mutant ARs (F876L and W741C) and the AR-V7 splice variant. ICRF187 and ICRF193 decreased AR recruitment to target promoters and reduced AR nuclear localization. Both ICRF187 and ICRF193 also inhibited cell proliferation and delayed cell cycling at the G2/M phase. ICRF187 inhibited tumor growth of castration-resistant LNCaP and 22RV1 xenografts as well as ENZ-resistant MR49F xenografts. We conclude that catalytic Topo II inhibitors can block AR signaling and inhibit tumor growth of CRPC xenografts, identifying a potential co-targeting approach using these inhibitors in combination with AR pathway inhibitors in CRPC.

  15. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Dayal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1 to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  16. Camptothecin disrupts androgen receptor signaling and suppresses prostate cancer cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shicheng, E-mail: liusc59@yahoo.co.jp [Research and Development Department, Nipro Patch Co., Ltd., 8-1, Minamisakae-cho, Kasukabe, Saitama 344-0057 (Japan); Yuan, Yiming [Department of Geriatrics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Okumura, Yutaka; Shinkai, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Hitoshi [Research and Development Department, Nipro Patch Co., Ltd., 8-1, Minamisakae-cho, Kasukabe, Saitama 344-0057 (Japan)

    2010-04-02

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the main therapeutic target for treatment of metastatic prostate cancers. The present study demonstrates that the topoisomerase I inhibitor camptothecin selectively inhibits androgen-responsive growth of prostate cancer cells. Camptothecin strikingly inhibited mutated and wild-type AR protein expression in LNCaP and PC-3/AR cells. This inhibition coincided with decreased androgen-mediated AR phosphorylation at Ser{sup 81} and reduced androgen-mediated AR transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, camptothecin disrupted the association between AR and heat shock protein 90 and impeded binding of the synthetic androgen [{sup 3}H]R1881 to AR in LNCaP cells. Camptothecin also blocked androgen-induced AR nuclear translocation, leading to downregulation of the AR target gene PSA. In addition to decreasing the intracellular and secreted prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, camptothecin markedly inhibited androgen-stimulated PSA promoter activity. Collectively, our data reveal that camptothecin not only serves as a traditional genotoxic agent but, by virtue of its ability to target and disrupt AR, may also be a novel candidate for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Role of non-genomic androgen signalling in suppressing proliferation of fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoria, G; Giovannelli, P; Di Donato, M; Ciociola, A; Hayashi, R; Bernal, F; Appella, E; Auricchio, F; Migliaccio, A

    2014-12-04

    The functions of androgen receptor (AR) in stromal cells are still debated in spite of the demonstrated importance of these cells in organ development and diseases. Here, we show that physiological androgen concentration (10 nM R1881 or DHT) fails to induce DNA synthesis, while it consistently stimulates cell migration in mesenchymal and transformed mesenchymal cells. Ten nanomolar R1881 triggers p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and its stabilization in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Activation of Rac and its downstream effector DYRK 1B is responsible for p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and cell quiescence. Ten nanomolar androgen also inhibits transformation induced by oncogenic Ras in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Overexpression of an AR mutant unable to interact with filamin A, use of a small peptide displacing AR/filamin A interaction, and filamin A knockdown indicate that the androgen-triggered AR/filamin A complex regulates the pathway leading to p27 Ser10 phosphorylation and cell cycle arrest. As the AR/filamin A complex is also responsible for migration stimulated by 10 nM androgen, our report shows that the androgen-triggered AR/filamin A complex controls, through Rac 1, the decision of cells to halt cell cycle and migration. This study reveals a new and unexpected role of androgen/AR signalling in coordinating stromal cell functions.

  18. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Growth Suppression of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chae Kim

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR mediates the developmental, physiologic, and pathologic effects of androgens including 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT. However, the mechanisms whereby AR regulates growth suppression and differentiation of luminal epithelial cells in the prostate gland and proliferation of malignant versions of these cells are not well understood, though they are central to prostate development, homeostasis, and neoplasia. Here, we identify androgen-responsive genes that restrain cell cycle progression and proliferation of human prostate epithelial cell lines (HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and we investigate the mechanisms through which AR regulates their expression. DHT inhibited proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, and cell cycle analysis revealed a prolonged G1 interval. In the cell cycle, the G1/S-phase transition is initiated by the activity of cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK complexes, which relieve growth suppression. In HPr-1AR, cyclin D1/2 and CDK4/6 mRNAs were androgen-repressed, whereas CDK inhibitor, CDKN1A, mRNA was androgen-induced. The regulation of these transcripts was AR-dependent, and involved multiple mechanisms. Similar AR-mediated down-regulation of CDK4/6 mRNAs and up-regulation of CDKN1A mRNA occurred in PC3-Lenti-AR. Further, CDK4/6 overexpression suppressed DHT-inhibited cell cycle progression and proliferation of HPr-1AR and PC3-Lenti-AR, whereas CDKN1A overexpression induced cell cycle arrest. We therefore propose that AR-mediated growth suppression of HPr-1AR involves cyclin D1 mRNA decay, transcriptional repression of cyclin D2 and CDK4/6, and transcriptional activation of CDKN1A, which serve to decrease CDK4/6 activity. AR-mediated inhibition of PC3-Lenti-AR proliferation occurs through a similar mechanism, albeit without down-regulation of cyclin D. Our findings provide insight into AR-mediated regulation of prostate epithelial cell proliferation.

  19. Sarcopenia and change in body composition following maximal androgen suppression with abiraterone in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezaro, C; Mukherji, D; Tunariu, N; Cassidy, A M; Omlin, A; Bianchini, D; Seed, G; Reid, A H M; Olmos, D; de Bono, J S; Attard, G

    2013-07-23

    Standard medical castration reduces muscle mass. We sought to characterize body composition changes in men undergoing maximal androgen suppression with and without exogenous gluocorticoids. Cross-sectional areas of total fat, visceral fat and muscle were measured on serial CT scans in a post-hoc analysis of patients treated in Phase I/II trials with abiraterone followed by abiraterone and dexamethasone 0.5 mg daily. Linear mixed regression models were used to account for variations in time-on-treatment and baseline body mass index (BMI). Fifty-five patients received a median of 7.5 months abiraterone followed by 5.4 months abiraterone and dexamethasone. Muscle loss was observed on single-agent abiraterone (maximal in patients with baseline BMI >30, -4.3%), but no further loss was observed after addition of dexamethasone. Loss of visceral fat was also observed on single-agent abiraterone, (baseline BMI >30 patients -19.6%). In contrast, addition of dexamethasone led to an increase in central visceral and total fat and BMI in all the patients. Maximal androgen suppression was associated with loss of muscle and visceral fat. Addition of low dose dexamethasone resulted in significant increases in visceral and total fat. These changes could have important quality-of-life implications for men treated with abiraterone.

  20. Natural killer cells suppress enzalutamide resistance and cell invasion in the castration resistant prostate cancer via targeting the androgen receptor splicing variant 7 (ARv7).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Chou, Fu-Ju; Li, Lei; Lin, Chang-Yi; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2017-07-10

    Despite the success of androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with the newly developed anti-androgen enzalutamide (Enz, also known as MDV3100) to suppress castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in extending patient survival by an extra 4.8 months, eventually patients die with the development of Enz resistance that may involve the induction of the androgen receptor (AR) splicing variant ARv7. Here we identify an unrecognized role of Natural Killer (NK) cells in the prostate tumor microenvironment that can be better recruited to the CRPC cells to suppress ARv7 expression resulting in suppressing the Enz resistant CRPC cell growth and invasion. Mechanism dissection revealed that CRPC cells, compared to normal prostate epithelial cells, could recruit more NK cells that might then lead to alterations of the microRNA-34 and microRNA-449 to suppress both ARv7 expression and ARv7-induced EZH2 expression to suppress CRPC cell invasion. Together, these results identify a new potential therapy using recruited NK cells to better suppress the Enz resistance and cell invasion in CRPC at the later enzalutamide resistant stage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In an Ovine Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) Prenatal Androgens Suppress Female Fetal Renal Gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Fiona; Rae, Michael T; Späth, Katharina; Boswell, Lyndsey; McNeilly, Alan S; Duncan, W Colin

    2015-01-01

    Increased maternal androgen exposure during pregnancy programmes a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-like condition, with metabolic dysfunction, in adult female offspring. Other in utero exposures associated with the development of insulin resistance, such as intrauterine growth restriction and exposure to prenatal glucocorticoids, are associated with altered fetal gluconeogenesis. We therefore aimed to assess the effect of maternal androgenisation on the expression of PEPCK and G6PC in the ovine fetus. Pregnant Scottish Greyface sheep were treated with twice weekly testosterone propionate (TP; 100mg) or vehicle control from day 62 to day 102 of gestation. At day 90 and day 112 fetal plasma and liver and kidney tissue was collected for analysis. PEPCK and G6PC expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting. PEPCK and G6PC were localised to fetal hepatocytes but maternal androgens had no effect on female or male fetuses. PEPCK and G6PC were also localised to the renal tubules and renal PEPCK (P<0.01) and G6PC (P = 0.057) were lower in females after prenatal androgenisation with no change in male fetuses. These tissue and sex specific observations could not be explained by alterations in fetal insulin or cortisol. The sexual dimorphism may be related to the increase in circulating estrogen (P<0.01) and testosterone (P<0.001) in females but not males. The tissue specific effects may be related to the increased expression of ESR1 (P<0.01) and AR (P<0.05) in the kidney when compared to the fetal liver. After discontinuation of maternal androgenisation female fetal kidney PEPCK expression normalised. These data further highlight the fetal and sexual dimorphic effects of maternal androgenisation, an antecedent to adult disease and the plasticity of fetal development.

  2. In an Ovine Model of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS Prenatal Androgens Suppress Female Fetal Renal Gluconeogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Connolly

    Full Text Available Increased maternal androgen exposure during pregnancy programmes a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS-like condition, with metabolic dysfunction, in adult female offspring. Other in utero exposures associated with the development of insulin resistance, such as intrauterine growth restriction and exposure to prenatal glucocorticoids, are associated with altered fetal gluconeogenesis. We therefore aimed to assess the effect of maternal androgenisation on the expression of PEPCK and G6PC in the ovine fetus. Pregnant Scottish Greyface sheep were treated with twice weekly testosterone propionate (TP; 100mg or vehicle control from day 62 to day 102 of gestation. At day 90 and day 112 fetal plasma and liver and kidney tissue was collected for analysis. PEPCK and G6PC expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting. PEPCK and G6PC were localised to fetal hepatocytes but maternal androgens had no effect on female or male fetuses. PEPCK and G6PC were also localised to the renal tubules and renal PEPCK (P<0.01 and G6PC (P = 0.057 were lower in females after prenatal androgenisation with no change in male fetuses. These tissue and sex specific observations could not be explained by alterations in fetal insulin or cortisol. The sexual dimorphism may be related to the increase in circulating estrogen (P<0.01 and testosterone (P<0.001 in females but not males. The tissue specific effects may be related to the increased expression of ESR1 (P<0.01 and AR (P<0.05 in the kidney when compared to the fetal liver. After discontinuation of maternal androgenisation female fetal kidney PEPCK expression normalised. These data further highlight the fetal and sexual dimorphic effects of maternal androgenisation, an antecedent to adult disease and the plasticity of fetal development.

  3. The Master Neural Transcription Factor BRN2 Is an Androgen Receptor-Suppressed Driver of Neuroendocrine Differentiation in Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Jennifer L; Thaper, Daksh; Vahid, Sepideh; Davies, Alastair; Ketola, Kirsi; Kuruma, Hidetoshi; Jama, Randy; Nip, Ka Mun; Angeles, Arkhjamil; Johnson, Fraser; Wyatt, Alexander W; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin E; Lin, Dong; Rubin, Mark A; Collins, Colin C; Wang, Yuzhuo; Beltran, Himisha; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms controlling the emergence of lethal neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC), especially those that are consequences of treatment-induced suppression of the androgen receptor (AR), remain elusive. Using a unique model of AR pathway inhibitor-resistant prostate cancer, we identified AR-dependent control of the neural transcription factor BRN2 (encoded by POU3F2) as a major driver of NEPC and aggressive tumor growth, both in vitro and in vivo Mechanistic studies showed that AR directly suppresses BRN2 transcription, which is required for NEPC, and BRN2-dependent regulation of the NEPC marker SOX2. Underscoring its inverse correlation with classic AR activity in clinical samples, BRN2 expression was highest in NEPC tumors and was significantly increased in castration-resistant prostate cancer compared with adenocarcinoma, especially in patients with low serum PSA. These data reveal a novel mechanism of AR-dependent control of NEPC and suggest that targeting BRN2 is a strategy to treat or prevent neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate tumors.

  4. A qualitative study evaluating experiences of a lifestyle intervention in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen suppression therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bourke Liam

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The severe iatrogenic hypogonadal state induced by medical castration used for treatment of prostate cancer is associated with adverse effects including fatigue, increased fracture risk, and a decrease in skeletal muscle function, which negatively impact quality of life. We have previously reported beneficial changes in healthy lifestyle behaviors, physical function and fatigue as a result of a novel combined exercise and dietary advice intervention (a lifestyle intervention in men with prostate cancer on androgen suppression therapy (AST. The aim of this research was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of the lifestyle intervention in these men with advanced prostate cancer receiving androgen suppression therapy (AST. Methods Twelve men with prostate cancer on AST took part in three focus groups in a UK higher education institution following the 12 week intervention. Sessions lasted between 45 and 60 minutes in duration. All discussions were audio-taped and transcribed. A framework analysis approach was applied to the focus group data. An initial coding framework was developed from a priori issues listed in the topic guide and extended and refined following initial familiarization with the focus group transcripts. Line by line indexing of the transcripts was undertaken iteratively to allow for the incorporation of new codes. Coded sections of text were grouped together (charted into themes and subthemes prior to a further process of comparison and interpretation. Results None of the participants involved in the trial were provided with information on how lifestyle changes might be beneficial to men with prostate cancer during the course of their standard medical treatment. We present novel findings that this intervention was considered beneficial for reducing anxiety around treatment and fear of disease progression. Men were supportive of the benefits of the intervention over conventional cancer survival discussion group

  5. Natural proteasome inhibitor celastrol suppresses androgen-independent prostate cancer progression by modulating apoptotic proteins and NF-kappaB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Dai

    Full Text Available Celastrol is a natural proteasome inhibitor that exhibits promising anti-tumor effects in human malignancies, especially the androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC with constitutive NF-κB activation. Celastrol induces apoptosis by means of proteasome inhibition and suppresses prostate tumor growth. However, the detailed mechanism of action remains elusive. In the current study, we aim to test the hypothesis that celastrol suppresses AIPC progression via inhibiting the constitutive NF-κB activity as well as modulating the Bcl-2 family proteins.We examined the efficacy of celastrol both in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the role of NF-κB in celastrol-mediated AIPC regression. We found that celastrol inhibited cell proliferation in all three AIPC cell lines (PC-3, DU145 and CL1, with IC₅₀ in the range of 1-2 µM. Celastrol also suppressed cell migration and invasion. Celastrol significantly induced apoptosis as evidenced by increased sub-G1 population, caspase activation and PARP cleavage. Moreover, celastrol promoted cleavage of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1 and activated the pro-apoptotic protein Noxa. In addition, celastrol rapidly blocked cytosolic IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of RelA. Likewise, celastrol inhibited the expression of multiple NF-κB target genes that are involved in proliferation, invasion and anti-apoptosis. Celastrol suppressed AIPC tumor progression by inhibiting proliferation, increasing apoptosis and decreasing angiogenesis, in PC-3 xenograft model in nude mouse. Furthermore, increased cellular IκBα and inhibited expression of various NF-κB target genes were observed in tumor tissues.Our data suggest that, via targeting the proteasome, celastrol suppresses proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis by inducing the apoptotic machinery and attenuating constitutive NF-κB activity in AIPC both in vitro and in vivo. Celastrol as an active ingredient of traditional herbal medicine could thus be

  6. ASC-J9(®) suppresses castration resistant prostate cancer progression via degrading the enzalutamide-induced androgen receptor mutant AR-F876L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ronghao; Lin, Wanying; Lin, Changyi; Li, Lei; Sun, Yin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-08-28

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with the newly developed powerful anti-androgen enzalutamide (Enz, also known as MDV3100) has promising therapeutic effects to suppress castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and extending patients' lives an extra 4.8 months. However, most Enz therapy eventually fails with the development of Enz resistance. The detailed mechanisms how CRPC develops Enz resistance remain unclear and may involve multiple mechanisms. Among them, the induction of the androgen receptor (AR) mutant AR-F876L in some CRPC patients may represent one driving force that confers Enz resistance. Here, we demonstrate that the AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9(®), not only degrades wild-type AR, but also has the ability to target AR-F876L. The consequence of suppressing AR-F876L may then abrogate AR-F876L mediated CRPC cell proliferation and metastasis. Thus, developing ASC-J9(®) as a new therapeutic approach may represent a novel therapy to better suppress CRPC that has already developed Enz resistance.

  7. Can prophylactic breast irradiation contribute to cardiac toxicity in patients with prostate cancer receiving androgen suppressing drugs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molls Michael

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgen suppression treatment (AST might increase the risk of cardiac morbidity in prostate cancer patients. Possible explanations were provided, however, they disregard the potential contribution of prophylactic radiotherapy to the mamillary regions (PMRT, prescribed to avoid gynecomastia. Methods We studied the exposure of the heart in a typical electron beam PMRT setting by evaluating computed tomography (CT scans in 40 non-cancer patients (age 65 and 75 years in 50% each and 17 prostate cancer patients. Five of the younger, 7 of the older and 4 of the cancer patients had significant cardiac disease. Results The median distance between skin and outer heart contour decreased with age. In all three groups, patients with cardiac morbidity had smaller distances. When using the CT-determined PMRT beam energy, 10% of the younger, 15% of the older and none of the prostate cancer patients would receive approximately 50% of the prescription dose to a part of the heart (2 had no history of cardiac disease. When using the clinically rather than CT-determined beam energy, as often done in daily practice, an additional 12.5% of the non-cancer and 12% of the prostate cancer patients would be exposed to comparably high doses. Conclusion The present data provide preliminary evidence that PMRT might be a factor that contributes to cardiac side effects. Previous studies that established a relationship between AST and cardiac morbidity did not include information on delivery of PMRT.

  8. Elucidation of the mechanism of suppressed steroidogenesis during androgen deprivation therapy of prostate cancer patients using a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, H; Katano, T; Nishida, K; Kinoshita, H; Matsuda, T; Ito, S

    2016-09-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard medical approach to the management of prostate cancer. Patients switched from a GnRH antagonist to a GnRH agonist, did not experience a testosterone surge in spite of the occurrence of luteinizing hormone (LH) surge in our protocol of clinical study. To clarify this observation, male mice pre-treated with two different doses of the GnRH antagonist degarelix for 28 days were further administered the GnRH agonist leuprolide or chorionic gonadotropin, and testosterone production of the mice was studied. Serum LH and testosterone levels, the size of Leydig cells, and expression level of steroidogenesis-related genes in the testis were analyzed. Treatment of mice with a high dose of degarelix (0.1 μg/mouse; HDG), but not a low dose (0.05 μg/mouse; LDG), for 28 days reproduced declined steroidogenesis observed in prostate cancer patients during ADT switched from a GnRH antagonist to a GnRH agonist. The size of the Leydig cells in the HDG mice was not significantly different from that in naive mice. Although expression levels of StAR, P450scc, and 17β HSD increased significantly in the LDH testis, those in the HDG testis did not change. Treatment of mice with a high dose of degarelix for 28 days reproduced the decline in steroidogenesis observed in prostate cancer patients during ADT. In this animal model, we demonstrated that initial ADT may inhibit the ability of Leydig cells to produce testosterone by suppressing the expression of genes involved in steroidogenesis, such as StAR, P450scc, and 17βHSD.

  9. Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) interacts with androgen receptor (AR) and suppresses SBMA-mutant-AR-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Yukio; Fujinaga, Ryutaro; Zhao, Changjiu; Yanai, Akie; Shinoda, Koh

    2006-08-01

    Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1), an interactor of huntingtin, has been known as an essential component of the stigmoid body (STB) and recently reported to play a protective role against neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease (HD). In the present study, subcellular association between HAP1 and androgen receptor (AR) with a long polyglutamine tract (polyQ) derived from spinal-and-bulbar-muscular-atrophy (SBMA) was examined using HEp-2 cells cotransfected with HAP1 and/or normal ARQ25, SBMA-mutant ARQ65 or deletion-mutant AR cDNAs. The results provided the first clear evidence that HAP1 interacts with AR through its ligand-binding domain in a polyQ-length-dependent manner and forms prominent inclusions sequestering polyQ-AR, and that addition of dihydrotestosterone reduces the association strength of HAP1 with ARQ25 more dramatically than that with ARQ65. Furthermore, SBMA-mutant-ARQ65-induced apoptosis was suppressed by cotransfection with HAP1. Our findings strongly suggest that HAP1/STB is relevant to polyQ-length-dependent modification on subcellular AR functions and critically involved in pathogenesis of not only HD but also SBMA as an important intrinsic neuroprotectant determining the threshold for cellular vulnerability to apoptosis. Taking together with previous reports that HAP1/STB is selectively expressed in the brain regions spared from degenerative targets in HD and SBMA, the current study might explain the region-specific occurrence of neurodegeneration in both diseases, shedding light on common aspects of their molecular pathological mechanism and yet-to-be-uncovered diagnostic or therapeutic applications for HD and SBMA patients.

  10. Neuronal Androgen Receptor Regulates Insulin Sensitivity via Suppression of Hypothalamic NF-κB–Mediated PTP1B Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Liu, Ning-Chun; Sparks, Janet D.; Yeh, Shuyuan; Fang, Lei-Ya; Chen, Lumin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Clinical investigations highlight the increased incidence of metabolic syndrome in prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Studies using global androgen receptor (AR) knockout mice demonstrate that AR deficiency results in the development of insulin resistance in males. However, mechanisms by which AR in individual organs coordinately regulates insulin sensitivity remain unexplored. Here we tested the hypothesis that functional AR in the brain contributes ...

  11. Androgens and women's health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, G P

    1998-01-01

    Androgenic disorders are those conditions in women characterized by excessive androgen action. They are the most common endocrinopathy of women, affecting from 10% to 20%. Signs are: persistent acne, hirsutism and androgenic alopecia, which is the female equivalent of male pattern baldness. A subgroup, those traditionally labeled as having polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), additionally have anovulation, as well as menstrual abnormalities and, often, obesity. Although women with androgenic disorders usually present themselves for help with the skin or menstrual changes, there are other important implications regarding their health. Women with PCOS have varying degrees of insulin resistance, and an increased incidence of Type II diabetes mellitus, as well as unfavorable lipid patterns. The presence of these risk factors is suggested by upper segment obesity, darkening of the skin, and the other skin changes that make up acanthosis nigricans. Diagnosis involves measurement of circulating androgens (of which free testosterone is most important), together with prolactin and FSH when menstrual dysfunction is present. Many women with androgenic skin changes have normal serum androgen levels, suggesting increased end organ sensitivity to androgens. Others have hyperandrogenism (of ovarian or adrenal origin). Treatment is usually successful in controlling acne, reducing hirsutism and stabilizing, or partially reversing, androgenic alopecia. Pharmacological approaches involve suppressing androgen levels, for example, the use of an appropriate oral contraceptive, or antagonizing androgen action with several medications that have this activity. Unfortunately, most women with androgenic disorders are frustrated in their efforts to obtain medical help. Understanding androgenic disorders will enable the physician to significantly help the majority of women with these conditions.

  12. Androgens and the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bondy, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  13. Exercise can prevent and even reverse adverse effects of androgen suppression treatment in men with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, D A; Taaffe, D R; Spry, N; Newton, R U

    2007-01-01

    Side effects accompanying androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), including sarcopenia, loss of bone mass and reduction in muscle strength, can compromise physical function, particularly in older patients. Exercise, specifically resistance training, may be an effective and cost-efficient strategy to limit or even reverse some of these adverse effects during and following therapy. In this review, we discuss common morphological and physiological ADT-related side effects or 'Androgen Deprivation and Sarcopenia-Related Disorders' and the existing clinical trials incorporating physical exercise in prostate cancer patients receiving active therapy. Further, training concepts and guidelines are provided for prescribing resistance exercise programs for this population.

  14. Identification of a new androgen receptor (AR) co-regulator BUD31 and related peptides to suppress wild-type and mutated AR-mediated prostate cancer growth via peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liu, Jai-Shin; Wu, Po-Long; Guan, Hong-Hsiang; Chen, Yuh-Ling; Lin, An-Chi; Ting, Huei-Ju; Pang, See-Tong; Yeh, Shauh-Der; Ma, Wen-Lung; Chen, Chung-Jung; Wu, Wen-Guey; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-12-01

    Treatment with individual anti-androgens is associated with the development of hot-spot mutations in the androgen receptor (AR). Here, we found that anti-androgens-mt-ARs have similar binary structure to the 5α-dihydrotestosterone-wt-AR. Phage display revealed that these ARs bound to similar peptides, including BUD31, containing an Fxx(F/H/L/W/Y)Y motif cluster with Tyr in the +5 position. Structural analyses of the AR-LBD-BUD31 complex revealed formation of an extra hydrogen bond between the Tyr+5 residue of the peptide and the AR. Functional studies showed that BUD31-related peptides suppressed AR transactivation, interrupted AR N-C interaction, and suppressed AR-mediated cell growth. Combination of peptide screening and X-ray structure analysis may serve as a new strategy for developing anti-ARs that simultaneously suppress both wt and mutated AR function.

  15. Suppressing methane emission and global warming potential from rice fields through intermittent drainage and green biomass amendment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haque, Md. M.; Biswas, J. C.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, P. J.

    2016-01-01

    Winter cover crops are recommended to improve soil quality and carbon sequestration, although their use as green manure can significantly increase methane (CH4) emission from paddy soils. Soil management practices can be used to reduce CH4 emission from paddy soils, but intermittent drainage is rega

  16. Effect of Antisense Mediated BCL-2 Suppression on the Expression of the Androgen Receptor and Coactivating p300 and CREB Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin Rubenstein

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (oligos have been employed against in vivo and in vitro prostate cancer models. While most oligos target growth factors or their receptors, others are directed against inhibitors of apoptosis or mediators of androgen activity. In previous experiments, mono- and bispecific oligos directed against bcl-2 suppressed both the targeted bcl-2 protein (an inhibitor of apoptosis and non-targeted caspase-3 (a promoter of apoptosis, potentially negating the effect of therapeutic bcl-2 inhibition. Subsequently we reported that AR and p300 expression were significantly enhanced by these oligos. In a continuation of this study, we now report that the expression of another androgen receptor co-stimulatory protein, CREB binding protein (CREBBP, is not similarly increased. These data suggest that oligo treatment directed against bcl-2 can be evaded through compensatory increases in AR and p300 expression. Increased AR and p300 expression may transition the tumor to a more dedifferentiated and aggressive phenotype. However, not all co-stimulating proteins (CREBBP are involved, and this may be important when controlling unanticipated (compensatory effects of gene therapy.

  17. Androgen resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Ieuan A; Deeb, Asma

    2006-12-01

    Androgen resistance causes the androgen insensitivity syndrome in its variant forms and is a paradigm of clinical syndromes associated with hormone resistance. In its complete form, the syndrome causes XY sex reversal and a female phenotype. Partial resistance to androgens is a common cause of ambiguous genitalia of the newborn, but a similar phenotype may result from several other conditions, including defects in testis determination and androgen biosynthesis. The biological actions of androgens are mediated by a single intracellular androgen receptor encoded by a gene on the long arm of the X chromosome. Mutations in this gene result in varying degrees of androgen receptor dysfunction and phenotypes that often show poor concordance with the genotype. Functional characterization and three-dimensional modelling of novel mutant receptors has been informative in understanding the mechanism of androgen action. Management issues in syndromes of androgen insensitivity include decisions on sex assignment, timing of gonadectomy in relation to tumour risk, and genetic and psychological counselling.

  18. ASC-J9 Suppresses Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Growth through Degradation of Full-length and Splice Variant Androgen Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Yamashita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Early studies suggested androgen receptor (AR splice variants might contribute to the progression of prostate cancer (PCa into castration resistance. However, the therapeutic strategy to target these AR splice variants still remains unresolved. Through tissue survey of tumors from the same patients before and after castration resistance, we found that the expression of AR3, a major AR splice variant that lacks the AR ligand-binding domain, was substantially increased after castration resistance development. The currently used antiandrogen, Casodex, showed little growth suppression in CWR22Rv1 cells. Importantly, we found that AR degradation enhancer ASC-J9 could degrade both full-length (fAR and AR3 in CWR22Rv1 cells as well as in C4-2 and C81 cells with addition of AR3. The consequences of such degradation of both fAR and AR3 might then result in the inhibition of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in vitro. More importantly, suppression of AR3 specifically by short-hairpin AR3 or degradation of AR3 by ASC-J9 resulted in suppression of AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in CWR22Rv1-fARKD (fAR knockdown cells in which DHT failed to induce, suggesting the importance of targeting AR3. Finally, we demonstrated the in vivo therapeutic effects of ASC-J9 by showing the inhibition of PCa growth using the xenografted model of CWR22Rv1 cells orthotopically implanted into castrated nude mice with undetectable serum testosterone. These results suggested that targeting both fAR- and AR3-mediated PCa growth by ASC-J9 may represent the novel therapeutic approach to suppress castration-resistant PCa. Successful clinical trials targeting both fAR and AR3 may help us to battle castration-resistant PCa in the future.

  19. PLCε knockdown inhibits prostate cancer cell proliferation via suppression of Notch signalling and nuclear translocation of the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin; Wu, Xiaohou; Ou, Liping; Yang, Xue; Wang, Xiaorong; Tang, Min; Chen, E; Luo, Chunli

    2015-06-28

    Phospholipase Cε (PLCε), a key regulator of diverse cellular functions, has been implicated in various malignancies. Indeed, PLCε functions include cell proliferation, apoptosis and malignant transformation. Here, we show that PLCε expression is elevated in prostate cancer (PCa) tissues compared to benign prostate tissues. Furthermore, PLCε depletion using an adenovirally delivered shRNA significantly decreased cell growth and colony formation, arresting the PC3 and LNCaP cell lines in the S phase of the cell cycle. We also observed that PLCε was significantly correlated with Notch1 and androgen receptor (AR). Additionally, we demonstrate that the activation of both the Notch and AR signalling pathways is involved in PLCε-mediated oncogenic effects in PCa. Our findings suggest that PLCε is a putative oncogene and prognostic marker, potentially representing a novel therapeutic target for PCa.

  20. Suppression of rat and human androgen biosynthetic enzymes by apigenin: Possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiudi; Wang, Guimin; Li, Xiaoheng; Liu, Jianpeng; Hong, Tingting; Zhu, Qiqi; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Apigenin is a natural flavone. It has recently been used as a chemopreventive agent. It may also have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by inhibiting androgen production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on the steroidogenesis of rat immature Leydig cells and some human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat immature Leydig cells were incubated for 3h with 100μM apigenin without (basal) or with 1ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and 20μM of the following steroid substrates: 22R-hydroxychloesterol (22R), pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione (D4). The medium levels of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL), the primary androgen produced by rat immature Leydig cells, were measured. Apigenin significantly inhibited basal, 8BR, 22R, PREG, P4, and D4 stimulated DIOL production in rat immature Leydig cells. Further study showed that apigenin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 11.41±0.7, 8.98±0.10, and 9.37±0.07μM, respectively. Apigenin inhibited human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 2.17±0.04 and 1.31±0.09μM, respectively. Apigenin is a potent inhibitor of rat and human steroidogenic enzymes, being possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  1. Neuronal androgen receptor regulates insulin sensitivity via suppression of hypothalamic NF-κB-mediated PTP1B expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Liu, Ning-Chun; Sparks, Janet D; Yeh, Shuyuan; Fang, Lei-Ya; Chen, Lumin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-02-01

    Clinical investigations highlight the increased incidence of metabolic syndrome in prostate cancer (PCa) patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Studies using global androgen receptor (AR) knockout mice demonstrate that AR deficiency results in the development of insulin resistance in males. However, mechanisms by which AR in individual organs coordinately regulates insulin sensitivity remain unexplored. Here we tested the hypothesis that functional AR in the brain contributes to whole-body insulin sensitivity regulation and to the metabolic abnormalities developed in AR-deficient male mice. The mouse model selectively lacking AR in the central nervous system and AR-expressing GT1-7 neuronal cells were established and used to delineate molecular mechanisms in insulin signaling modulated by AR. Neuronal AR deficiency leads to reduced insulin sensitivity in middle-aged mice. Neuronal AR regulates hypothalamic insulin signaling by repressing nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-mediated induction of protein-tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Hypothalamic insulin resistance leads to hepatic insulin resistance, lipid accumulation, and visceral obesity. The functional deficiency of AR in the hypothalamus leads to male mice being more susceptible to the effects of high-fat diet consumption on PTP1B expression and NF-κB activation. These findings suggest that in men with PCa undergoing ADT, reduction of AR function in the brain may contribute to insulin resistance and visceral obesity. Pharmacotherapies targeting neuronal AR and NF-κB may be developed to combat the metabolic syndrome in men receiving ADT and in elderly men with age-associated hypogonadism.

  2. Possible role for growth hormone in suppressing acylated ghrelin and hunger ratings during and after intermittent exercise of different intensities in obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholipour, Majid; Kordi, Mohamad Reza; Taghikhani, Mohamad; Ravasi, Ali Asghar; Gaeini, Abas Ali; Tabrizi, Arezoo

    2014-01-01

    Body weight is influenced by both food intake and energy expenditure. Acylated ghrelin enhances appetite, and its circulating level is suppressed by growth hormone. Data on the acylated ghrelin responses to exercise of different intensities in obese individuals are currently not available. This study examined the effects of an intermittent exercise protocol on acylated ghrelin levels and hunger ratings in obese people. Nine inactive male ran on the treadmill at 0900 with progressive intensities of 50, 60, 70, and 80% of VO2max for 10, 10, 5, and 2 min respectively. Blood samples were collected before the exercise at 0845 (-15 min as the resting values), after each workload (10, 23, 31, and 36 min during exercise), and at 30, 60, and 120 min thereafter. The control trial was conducted under identical conditions with the exception of exercise. Compared to the baseline, both acylated ghrelin levels and hunger ratings were suppressed at 70% of VO2max during exercise (17.74 vs. 9.80 pmol/L and 4.84 vs. 2.96 unit respectively) and remained significantly lower than the control trial 2 h after the cessation of exercise (13.95 vs. 20.32 pmol/L and 3.33 vs. 6.04 unit, respectively). Growth Hormone increased during the exercise period and peaked at 80% of VO2max. These findings indicate that acylated ghrelin concentrations and hunger ratings are suppressed during exercise and two hours thereafter in obese individuals, and it is possible that Growth Hormone caused the suppression of acylated ghrelin.

  3. Possible role for growth hormone in suppressing acylated ghrelin and hunger ratings during and after intermittent exercise of different intensities in obese individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Gholipour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Body weight is influenced by both food intake and energy expenditure. Acylated ghrelin enhances appetite, and its circulating level is suppressed by growth hormone. Data on the acylated ghrelin responses to exercise of different intensities in obese individuals are currently not available. This study examined the effects of an intermittent exercise protocol on acylated ghrelin levels and hunger ratings in obese people. Nine inactive male ran on the treadmill at 0900 with progressive intensities of 50, 60, 70, and 80% of VO2max for 10, 10, 5, and 2 min respectively. Blood samples were collected before the exercise at 0845 (-15 min as the resting values, after each workload (10, 23, 31, and 36 min during exercise, and at 30, 60, and 120 min thereafter. The control trial was conducted under identical conditions with the exception of exercise. Compared to the baseline, both acylated ghrelin levels and hunger ratings were suppressed at 70% of VO2max during exercise (17.74 vs. 9.80 pmol/L and 4.84 vs. 2.96 unit respectively and remained significantly lower than the control trial 2 h after the cessation of exercise (13.95 vs. 20.32 pmol/L and 3.33 vs. 6.04 unit, respectively. Growth Hormone increased during the exercise period and peaked at 80% of VO2max. These findings indicate that acylated ghrelin concentrations and hunger ratings are suppressed during exercise and two hours thereafter in obese individuals, and it is possible that Growth Hormone caused the suppression of acylated ghrelin.

  4. The effect of intense intermittent training with and without taking vitamin E on mRNA expression of p53/PTEN tumor suppressing genes in prostate glands of male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Esmaeil Afzalpour

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity and diet are the most important modifiable determinants of cancer risk. The objective of this study was to examine the effect of intense intermittent training with and without taking vitamin E on expression of p53 and PTEN tumor suppressing genes in the prostate gland of male rats. For this purpose, 50 Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly assigned into 5 groups: [1] control (CON, n = 10, [2] sham (S, n = 10, [3] intense intermittent training (IIT, n = 10, [4] intense intermittent training + vitamin E (IIT + VE, n = 10, [5] vitamin E (VE, n = 10. Protocol of this study was implemented for 6 days per week for 6 weeks, with observing the overload principle on the motorized treadmill. After implementing training protocol, expression rate of p53 and PTEN genes reduced significantly (p<0.000, p<0.031, respectively. Taking vitamin E with intermittent training caused significant reduction in p53 expression (p<0.013, while it caused significant increase in expression of PTEN (p<0.035. These results showed that intense intermittent training reduces expression of p53 and PTEN tumor suppressing genes and taking supplementation vitamin E along with this type of training could cause different effects in expression of these tumor suppressor genes.

  5. Targeting the unique methylation pattern of androgen receptor (AR) promoter in prostate stem/progenitor cells with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-AZA) leads to suppressed prostate tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Lee, Soo Ok; Liang, Liang; Luo, Jie; Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Li, Lei; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2012-11-16

    Androgen receptor (AR) expression surveys found that normal prostate/prostate cancer (PCa) stem/progenitor cells, but not embryonic or mesenchymal stem cells, expressed little AR with high methylation in the AR promoter. Mechanism dissection revealed that the differential methylation pattern in the AR promoter could be due to differential expression of methyltransferases and binding of methylation binding protein to the AR promoter region. The low expression of AR in normal prostate/PCa stem/progenitor cells was reversed after adding 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, a demethylating agent, which could then lead to decreased stemness and drive cells into a more differentiated status, suggesting that the methylation in the AR promoter of prostate stem/progenitor cells is critical not only in maintaining the stemness but also critical in protection of cells from differentiation. Furthermore, induced AR expression, via alteration of its methylation pattern, led to suppression of the self-renewal/proliferation of prostate stem/progenitor cells and PCa tumorigenesis in both in vitro assays and in vivo orthotopic xenografted mouse studies. Taken together, these data prove the unique methylation pattern of AR promoter in normal prostate/PCa stem/progenitor cells and the influence of AR on their renewal/proliferation and differentiation. Targeting PCa stem/progenitor cells with alteration of methylated AR promoter status might provide a new potential therapeutic approach to battle PCa because the PCa stem/progenitor cells have high tumorigenicity.

  6. Seeking behavior, place conditioning, and resistance to conditioned suppression of feeding in rats intermittently exposed to palatable food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Sánchez, Clara; Santos, Jeffrey W; Smith, Karen L; Ferragud, Antonio; Sabino, Valentina; Cottone, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    Binge eating disorder is characterized by excessive consumption of highly palatable food within short periods of time accompanied by loss of control over eating. Extensive evidence provides support for the consideration of binge eating disorder as an addiction-like disorder. In this study, we wanted to determine whether rats undergoing an operant binge-like eating procedure could develop maladaptive forms of conditioned feeding behaviors. For this purpose, we trained male rats to self-administer either a sugary, highly palatable diet ("Palatable" rats) or a chow diet ("Chow" rats) for 1 hour a day. After escalation and stabilization of palatable food intake, we tested Chow and Palatable rats in (a) a conditioned place preference test, (b) a second-order schedule of reinforcement, (c) a cue-induced suppression of feeding test. In the conditioned place preference task, Palatable rats spent significantly more time in the compartment that was previously paired with the palatable food, compared to Chow controls. Furthermore, in the second-order schedule of reinforcement task, Palatable rats exhibited active lever responding 4- to 6-fold higher than Chow control rats. Finally, in the cue-induced suppression of feeding test, although Chow control subjects reduced responding by 32% in the presence of the conditioned punishment, Palatable rats persevered in responding despite the aversive cue. These results further characterize this animal model of binge-like eating and provide additional evidence for the addictive properties of highly palatable food.

  7. Energy intermittency

    CERN Document Server

    Sorensen, Bent

    2014-01-01

    The first book to consider intermittency as a key point of an energy system, Energy Intermittency describes different levels of variability for traditional and renewable energy sources, presenting detailed solutions for handling energy intermittency through trade, collaboration, demand management, and active energy storage. Addressing energy supply intermittency systematically, this practical text:Analyzes typical time-distributions and intervals between episodes of demand-supply mismatch and explores their dependence on system layouts and energy source characteristicsSimulates scenarios regar

  8. A Phase 1/2 Trial of Brief Androgen Suppression and Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (FASTR) for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, Glenn, E-mail: Glenn.bauman@lhsc.on.ca [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Western University and London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Ferguson, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allan Blair Cancer Centre, Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada); Lock, Michael; Chen, Jeff; Ahmad, Belal; Venkatesan, V.M.; Sexton, Tracy; D' Souza, David [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Western University and London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Loblaw, Andrew [Department of Radiation Medicine, University of Toronto and Odette Cancer Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Warner, Andrew; Rodrigues, George [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Oncology, Western University and London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To initiate a phase 1/2 trial to examine the tolerability of a condensed combined-modality protocol for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Men scoring ≥3 on the Vulnerable Elderly Scale (VES) or refusing conventionally fractionated treatment for high-risk prostate cancer were eligible to participate. Androgen suppression was delivered for 12 months, and radiation therapy was delivered using 25 Gy to pelvic nodes delivered synchronously with 40 Gy to the prostate given as 1 fraction per week over 5 weeks. The phase 1 component included predetermined stopping rules based on 6-month treatment-related toxicity, with trial suspension specified if there were ≥6 of 15 patients (40%) or ≥3 of 15 (20%) who experienced grade ≥2 or ≥3 gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity, respectively. Results: Sixteen men were enrolled, with 7 men meeting the criteria of VES ≥3 and 9 men having a VES <3 but choosing the condensed treatment. One man was not treated owing to discovery of a synchronous primary rectal cancer. Four patients (26%) experienced grade ≥2 toxicity at 6 weeks after treatment. There were 9 of 15 (60%) who experienced grade ≥2 GI or GU toxicity and 4 of 15 (26%) grade ≥3 GI or GU toxicity at 6 months, and 5 of 15 (30%) grade ≥2 GI and GU toxicity at 6 months. A review of the 15 cases did not identify any remedial changes, thus the phase 1 criteria were not met. Conclusion: This novel condensed treatment had higher than anticipated late toxicities and was terminated before phase 2 accrual. Treatment factors, such as inclusion of pelvic lymph node radiation therapy, planning constraints, and treatment margins, or patient factors related to the specific frail elderly population may be contributing.

  9. A low carbohydrate, high protein diet suppresses intratumoral androgen synthesis and slows castration-resistant prostate tumor growth in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokidis, H Bobby; Yieng Chin, Mei; Ho, Victor W; Adomat, Hans H; Soma, Kiran K; Fazli, Ladan; Nip, Ka Mun; Cox, Michael; Krystal, Gerald; Zoubeidi, Amina; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2015-06-01

    likely to be mechanistic drivers behind the observed tumor growth suppression.

  10. Differential regulation of LncRNA-SARCC suppresses VHL-mutant RCC cell proliferation yet promotes VHL-normal RCC cell proliferation via modulating androgen receptor/HIF-2α/C-MYC axis under hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, W; Sun, Y; Jiang, M; Wang, M; Gasiewicz, T A; Zheng, J; Chang, C

    2016-09-15

    It is well established that hypoxia contributes to tumor progression in a hypoxia inducible factor-2α (HIF-2α)-dependent manner in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), yet the role of long noncoding RNAs (LncRNAs) involved in hypoxia-mediated RCC progression remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that LncRNA-SARCC (Suppressing Androgen Receptor in Renal Cell Carcinoma) is differentially regulated by hypoxia in a von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-dependent manner both in RCC cell culture and clinical specimens. LncRNA-SARCC can suppress hypoxic cell cycle progression in the VHL-mutant RCC cells while derepress it in the VHL-restored RCC cells. Mechanism dissection reveals that LncRNA-SARCC can post-transcriptionally regulate androgen receptor (AR) by physically binding and destablizing AR protein to suppress AR/HIF-2α/C-MYC signals. In return, HIF-2α can transcriptionally regulate the LncRNA-SARCC expression via binding to hypoxia-responsive elements on the promoter of LncRNA-SARCC. The negative feedback modulation between LncRNA-SARCC/AR complex and HIF-2α signaling may then lead to differentially modulated RCC progression in a VHL-dependent manner. Together, these results may provide us a new therapeutic approach via targeting this newly identified signal from LncRNA-SARCC to AR-mediated HIF-2α/C-MYC signals against RCC progression.

  11. Quality-of-life outcomes in high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with helical tomotherapy in a hypofractionated radiation schedule with long-term androgen suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, N.; Krauze, A.V.; Yee, D.; Parliament, M.; Mihai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Joseph, K.; Murtha, A.; Amanie, J.; Kamal, M.; Pearcey, R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We examined the impact of hypofractionated radiation therapy and androgen suppression therapy (ast) on quality of life (qol) in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods Between March 2005 and March 2007, 60 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were enrolled in a prospective phase ii study. All patients received 68 Gy (2.72 Gy per fraction) to the prostate gland and 45 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Of the 60 patients, 58 received ast. The University of California–Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Index questionnaire was used to prospectively measure qol at baseline (month 0) and at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months after radiation treatment. The generalized estimating equation approach was used to compare the qol scores at 1, 6, 12, 18, 24, 30, and 36 months with those at baseline. Results We observed a significant decrease in qol items related to bowel and sexual function. Several qol items related to bowel function were significantly adversely affected at both 1 and 6 months, with improvement toward 6 months. Although decreased qol scores persisted beyond the 6-month mark, they began to re-approach baseline at the 18- to 24-month mark. Most sexual function items were significantly adversely affected at both 1 and 6 months, but the effects were not considered to be a problem by most patients. A complete return to baseline was not observed for either bowel or sexual function. Urinary function items remained largely unaffected, with overall urinary function being the only item adversely affected at 6 months, but not at 1 month. Urinary function returned to baseline and remained unimpaired from 18 months onwards. Conclusions In our study population, who received hypofractionated radiation delivered using dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy with inclusion of the pelvic lymph nodes, and 2–3 years of ast prescription, qol with respect to bowel and sexual function was significantly affected; qol with

  12. Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuky, Jacqueline, E-mail: vukyja@ohsu.edu [Section of Community Hematology/Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Pham, Huong T. [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Warren, Sarah; Douglass, Erika [Benaroya Research Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Badiozamani, Kasra [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Madsen, Berit; Hsi, Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, WA (United States); Song Guobin [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be

  13. [Androgen-deprivation therapy in prostate cancer: clinical evidence and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, F; Calarco, A; Totaro, A; Sacco, E; Volpe, A; Racioppi, M; D'Addessi, A; Bassi, P F

    2010-01-01

    Androgens are involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer even if the mechanism is not well-recognized. For this reason androgen-deprivation therapy remains a milestone for the treatment of patients with advanced and metastatic disease and, in the last years, in conjunction with radiotherapy and surgery in locally advanced tumors. Alternative options, such as intermittent deprivation suppression, seem to be promising in terms of clinical benefits and toxicity profile. However, current therapies present side effects, such as testosterone surge with consequent clinical flare-up, metabolic syndrome and hormone-resistance, which develops after a variable number of years. Novel therapies such as LH-RH antagonists and prolonged depot LH-RH analogues have been developed in order to avoid clinical flare-up and testosterone microsurges. Novel androgen synthesis inhibitors, such as abiraterone acetate and MDV3100, have been recently discovered and tested as promising hormonal second-line agents in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Finally, long-term side effects from androgen deprivation, such as osteoporosis, sarcopenic obesity and cardiovascular morbidity should be carefully monitored and properly treated.

  14. Short androgenic suppression and high dose radiotherapy (80 Gy) for prostate cancer with intermediate risk: interim analysis of randomized trial 14 by the Group of uro-genital tumour investigations (Getug); Suppression androgenique courte et radiotherapie de haute dose (80 Gy) pour cancer prostatique de risque intermediaire: analyse interimaire de l'essai randomise 14 du Groupe d'etudes des tumeurs urogenitales (Getug)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubray, B. [CRLCC Henri-Becquerel, Rouen (France); Beckendorf, V.; Harter, V. [CRLCCAIexis-Vautrin, Vandceuvre- les-Nancy (France); Guerif, S. [CHU La Miletrie, Poitiers (France); Le Prise, E. [CRLCCEugene-Marquis, Rennes (France); Reynaud-Bougnoux, A. [Corad Henry-S.-Kaplan, Tours (France); Hannoun Levi, J.M. [CRLCCAntoine-Lacassagne, Nice (France); Nguyeng, T.D. [InstitutJean-Godinot, Reims (France); Hennequin, C. [CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Cretin, J. [Clinique de Valdegour, Nimes (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report an interim analysis of a randomized trial for the assessment of the contribution of a short androgenic suppression to a high-dose irradiation on patients suffering from an intermediate risk localized prostate cancer. The study concerned a bit less than 400 patients treated between 2003 and 2010. About half of them had hormonotherapy, and the other half not. Results are discussed in terms of biochemical or clinical control probability, of cumulative grade-3 and grade-4 toxicity rates. The benefit of androgenic suppression does not reach a statistic significant threshold. Short communication

  15. Labda-8(17),12,14-trien-19-oic acid contained in fruits of Cupressus sempervirens suppresses benign prostatic hyperplasia in rat and in vitro human models through inhibition of androgen and STAT-3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Singh, Vishal; Kumar, Rajeev; Khan, Mohammad F; Singh, Anil K; Sharma, Rolee; Arya, Kamal R; Maikhuri, J P; Dalela, Diwakar; Maurya, Rakesh; Gupta, Gopal

    2014-08-01

    Fruit extract of Cupressus sempervirens (CS), which is used traditionally to treat Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)-like urinary symptoms in patients, was scientifically validated for anti-BPH activity. The ethanolic fruit extract of CS inhibited proliferation of human BPH-stromal cells and the activity was localized to its chloroform-soluble, diterpene-rich fraction. Eight major diterpenes isolated from this fraction exhibited moderate to potent activity and the most active diterpene (labda-8(17),12,14-trien-19-oic acid) exhibited an IC50 of 37.5 μM (antiproliferative activity against human BPH-stromal cells). It significantly inhibited activation (phosphorylation) of Stat-3 in BPH-stromal cells and prevented transactivation of androgen sensitive KLK3/PSA and TMPRSS2 genes in LNCaP cells. Labda-8(17),12,14-trien-19-oic acid-rich CS fraction prevented prostatic hyperplasia in rat model and caused TUNEL labeling of stromal cells with lower expressions of IGF-I, TGF-ß and PCNA, and bcl-2/bax ratio. Human BPH tissues exhibited precise lowering of stromal component after incubation in labda-8(17),12,14-trien-19-oic acid, ex vivo. We conclude that labda-8(17),12,14-trien-19-oic acid contained in CS exhibits anti-BPH activity through inhibition of stromal proliferation and suppression of androgen action in the prostate, presenting a unique lead structure for further optimization of anti-BPH activity.

  16. Androgen and bone mass in men

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AnnieW.C.Kung

    2003-01-01

    Androgens have multiple actions on the skeleton throughout life. Androgens promote skeletal growth and accumulation of minerals during puberty and adolescence and stimulate osteoblast but suppress osteoclast function,activity and lifespan through complex mechanisms. Also androgens increase periosteal bone apposition, resulting in larger bone size and thicker cortical bone in men. There is convincing evidence to show that aromatization to estrogens was an important pathway for mediating the action of testosterone on bone physiology. Estrogen is probably the dominant sex steroid regulating bone resorption in men, but both testosterone and estrogen are important in maintaining bone formation. ( Asian J Androl 2003 Jun; 5: 148-154)

  17. Treatment of androgenic disorders in women: acne, hirsutism, and alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, G P; Bergfeld, W F

    1990-01-01

    Androgen excess disorders--acne, alopecia, and hirsutism--can be treated effectively with endocrine therapy such as androgen receptor blockers or antagonists, or with androgen suppression. Spironolactone, estrogen, and dexamethasone are considered the most effective approaches to treatment. Whatever the modality, careful planning is key to success, with recognition that response rates vary from patient to patient. A treatment regimen generally continues for at least 2 years.

  18. Androgen receptor signaling is required for androgen-sensitive human prostate cancer cell proliferation and survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Day Wanda V

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Androgens and androgen receptors (AR regulate normal prostate development and growth. They also are involved in pathological development of prostatic diseases, including benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH and prostate cancer (PCa. Antiandrogen therapy for PCa, in conjunction with chemical or surgical castration, offers initial positive responses and leads to massive prostate cell death. However, cancer cells later appear as androgen-independent PCa. To investigate the role of AR in prostate cell proliferation and survival, we introduced a vector-based small interfering RNA (siRNA. This siRNA targeted 5'-untranslated region of AR mRNA for extended suppression of AR expression in androgen-sensitive human prostate LNCaP cells. Results The siRNA design successfully suppressed endogenous AR expression, as revealed by western blotting and immunofluorescence staining in LNCaP cells. LNCaP cells did not proliferate in the absence of AR and underwent apoptosis, based on elevated phospho-Histone H2B expression and higher number of apoptotic body as compared to control cells. Conclusion We demonstrated that AR is vital for prostate cell proliferation and survival in this androgen-sensitive prostate cell line. These results further strengthen the hypothesis that AR can be a therapeutic target for treating androgen-sensitive stages of PCa. Unlike antiandorgens, however, siRNA targeting AR provides a direct inactivation of AR function through the suppression of AR protein expression.

  19. Androgen excess: Investigations and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizneva, Daria; Gavrilova-Jordan, Larisa; Walker, Walidah; Azziz, Ricardo

    2016-11-01

    Androgen excess (AE) is a key feature of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and results in, or contributes to, the clinical phenotype of these patients. Although AE will contribute to the ovulatory and menstrual dysfunction of these patients, the most recognizable sign of AE includes hirsutism, acne, and androgenic alopecia or female pattern hair loss (FPHL). Evaluation includes not only scoring facial and body terminal hair growth using the modified Ferriman-Gallwey method but also recording and possibly scoring acne and alopecia. Moreover, assessment of biochemical hyperandrogenism is necessary, particularly in patients with unclear or absent hirsutism, and will include assessing total and free testosterone (T), and possibly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) and androstenedione, although these latter contribute limitedly to the diagnosis. Assessment of T requires use of the highest quality assays available, generally radioimmunoassays with extraction and chromatography or mass spectrometry preceded by liquid or gas chromatography. Management of clinical hyperandrogenism involves primarily either androgen suppression, with a hormonal combination contraceptive, or androgen blockade, as with an androgen receptor blocker or a 5α-reductase inhibitor, or a combination of the two. Medical treatment should be combined with cosmetic treatment including topical eflornithine hydrochloride and short-term (shaving, chemical depilation, plucking, threading, waxing, and bleaching) and long-term (electrolysis, laser therapy, and intense pulse light therapy) cosmetic treatments. Generally, acne responds to therapy relatively rapidly, whereas hirsutism is slower to respond, with improvements observed as early as 3 months, but routinely only after 6 or 8 months of therapy. Finally, FPHL is the slowest to respond to therapy, if it will at all, and it may take 12 to 18 months of therapy for an observable response.

  20. Androgen receptor mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.W. Jenster (Guido); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); J.A.G.M. van der Korput (J. A G M); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); A.L.M. Boehmer (Annemie); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractMale sexual differentiation and development proceed under direct control of androgens. Androgen action is mediated by the intracellular androgen receptor, which belongs to the superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors. At least three pathological situations are associated wit

  1. Androgens and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderschueren, Dirk; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Boonen, Steven; Lindberg, Marie K; Bouillon, Roger; Ohlsson, Claes

    2004-06-01

    Loss of estrogens or androgens increases the rate of bone remodeling by removing restraining effects on osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis, and also causes a focal imbalance between resorption and formation by prolonging the lifespan of osteoclasts and shortening the lifespan of osteoblasts. Conversely, androgens, as well as estrogens, maintain cancellous bone mass and integrity, regardless of age or sex. Although androgens, via the androgen receptor (AR), and estrogens, via the estrogen receptors (ERs), can exert these effects, their relative contribution remains uncertain. Recent studies suggest that androgen action on cancellous bone depends on (local) aromatization of androgens into estrogens. However, at least in rodents, androgen action on cancellous bone can be directly mediated via AR activation, even in the absence of ERs. Androgens also increase cortical bone size via stimulation of both longitudinal and radial growth. First, androgens, like estrogens, have a biphasic effect on endochondral bone formation: at the start of puberty, sex steroids stimulate endochondral bone formation, whereas they induce epiphyseal closure at the end of puberty. Androgen action on the growth plate is, however, clearly mediated via aromatization in estrogens and interaction with ERalpha. Androgens increase radial growth, whereas estrogens decrease periosteal bone formation. This effect of androgens may be important because bone strength in males seems to be determined by relatively higher periosteal bone formation and, therefore, greater bone dimensions, relative to muscle mass at older age. Experiments in mice again suggest that both the AR and ERalpha pathways are involved in androgen action on radial bone growth. ERbeta may mediate growth-limiting effects of estrogens in the female but does not seem to be involved in the regulation of bone size in males. In conclusion, androgens may protect men against osteoporosis via maintenance of cancellous bone mass and

  2. Suppression of testosterone does not blunt mRNA expression of myoD, myogenin, IGF, myostatin or androgen receptor post strength training in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvorning, Thue; Andersen, Marianne; Brixen, Kim

    2007-01-01

    We hypothesized that suppression of endogenous testosterone blunts mRNA expression post strength training (ST). Twenty-two young men were randomized for treatment with the GnRH analogue goserelin (3.6 mg every 4 weeks) or placebo for a period of 12 weeks. The ST period of 8 weeks started at week ...... events were the same, despite divergent muscle hypertrophy and strength gains........ Strength test, blood sampling, muscle biopsies, and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan were performed at weeks 4 and 12. Muscle biopsies were taken during the final ST session (pre, post 4 h, and post 24 h). Resting serum testosterone decreased significantly (P ... group (P Muscle strength and muscle mass showed a tendency to increase more in the placebo group than in the goserelin group (P = 0...

  3. Comparative study of intermittent versus continuous androgen blockade in the treatment of prostate cancer%间歇性与持续性雄激素阻断治疗前列腺癌的临床对照研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱绍兴; 陈剑晖; 李永生; 王彬; 李启镛

    2008-01-01

    group IAD, 60.9%(14/23) and 52.2%(12/23) in group CAD, respec-tively. There were significant differences between the 2 groups(P<0.05). Conclusions IAD thera-py can alleviate the side effects of androgen deprivation therapy and improve the life quality. The effica-cy of prolonging the time to androgen independence of IAD therapy is similar to CAD therapy.

  4. Androgens and the skeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, M K; Vandenput, L; Movèrare Skrtic, S; Vanderschueren, D; Boonen, S; Bouillon, R; Ohlsson, C

    2005-03-01

    Loss of estrogens or androgens causes bone loss by increasing the rate of bone remodeling, and also causes an imbalance between resorption and formation by prolonging the lifespan of osteoclasts and shortening the lifespan of osteoblasts. Conversely, treatment with androgens, as well as estrogens, maintains cancellous bone mass and integrity, regardless of age or sex. Both androgens, via the androgen receptor (AR), and estrogens, via the estrogen receptors (ERs) can exert these effects, but the relative contribution of these 2 pathways remains uncertain. Androgens, like estrogens, stimulate endochondral bone formation at the start of puberty, whereas they induce epiphyseal closure at the end of puberty, thus, they have a biphasic effect. Androgen action on the growth plate is, however, clearly mediated via aromatization into estrogens and interaction with ER alpha. Androgens increase, while estrogens decrease radial growth. This differential effect of the sex steroids may be important because bone strength in males seems to be determined by higher periosteal bone formation and, therefore, greater bone dimensions. Experiments in mice suggest that both the AR and ER alpha pathways are involved in androgen action on radial bone growth. ER beta may mediate growth-limiting effects of estrogens in the female but does not seem to be involved in the regulation of bone size in males. In conclusion, androgens may protect men against osteoporosis via maintenance of cancellous bone mass and expansion of cortical bone. This androgen action on bone is mediated by the AR and ER alpha.

  5. Up-regulation of Bcl-2 is required for the progression of prostate cancer cells from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent growth stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuting Lin; Junichi Fukuchi; Richard A Hiipakka; John M Kokontis; Jialing Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Bcl-2 is an anti-apoptotic oncoprotein and its protein levels are inversely correlated with prognosis in many cancers.However, the role of Bcl-2 in the progression of prostate cancer is not clear. Here we report that Bcl-2 is required for the progression of LNCaP prostate cancer cells from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent growth stage. The mRNA and protein levels of Bcl-2 are significantly increased in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells, shRNA-mediated gene silencing of Bcl-2 in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells promotes UV-induced apoptosis and suppresses the growth of prostate tumors in vivo. Growing androgen-dependent cells under androgen-deprivation conditions results in formation of androgen-independent colonies; and the transition from androgen-dependent to androgen-independent growth is blocked by ectopic expression of the Bcl-2 antagonist Bax or Bcl-2 shRNA. Thus, our results demonstrate that Bcl-2 is not only critical for the survival of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells, but is also required for the progression of prostate cancer cells from an androgen-dependent to an androgen-independent growth stage.

  6. Intermittent changing axis deviation with intermittent left anterior hemiblock during atrial flutter with subclinical hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo

    2009-06-26

    Subclinical hyperthyroidism is an increasingly recognized entity that is defined as a normal serum free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine levels with a thyroid-stimulating hormone level suppressed below the normal range and usually undetectable. It has been reported that subclinical hyperthyroidism is not associated with CHD or mortality from cardiovascular causes but it is usually associated with a higher heart rate and a higher risk of supraventricular arrhythmias including atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. Intermittent changing axis deviation during atrial fibrillation has also rarely been reported. We present a case of intermittent changing axis deviation with intermittent left anterior hemiblock in a 59-year-old Italian man with atrial flutter and subclinical hyperthyroidism. To our knowledge, this is the first report of intermittent changing axis deviation with intermittent left anterior hemiblock in a patient with atrial flutter.

  7. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of t

  8. Androgens and breast cancer in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2011-09-01

    Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies support the notion that androgens inhibit mammary proliferation and, thus, may protect from breast cancer. On the other hand, administration of conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens and may, thus, enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk, but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  9. A Counterregulatory Mechanism Impacting Androgen Suppression Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    publication (accepted); acknowledgement of federal support (yes). 11 Books or other non-periodical, one-time publications. Report any book, monograph ...instruments or equipment; • research material (e.g., Germplasm; cell lines, DNA probes, animal models); • clinical interventions; • new...R. D. (2013). Laser capture microdissection-reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (LCM-RRBS) maps changes in DNA methylation associated with

  10. A Counterregulatory Mechanism Impacting Androgen Suppression Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Chromosomes Cancer 51, 949e960. Fu, B., Guo, M., Wang, S., Campagna, D., Luo, M., Herman , J.G., et al., 2007. Evaluation of GATA-4 and GATA-5 methylation...Parvinen M, de Rooij DG, Hess MW, Raatikainen-Ahokas A, Sainio K, Rauvala H, Lakso M, Pichel JG, Westphal H, Saarma M, Sariola H. Regulation of cell fate

  11. Proteomic changes in rat spermatogenesis in response to in vivo androgen manipulation; impact on meiotic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G Stanton

    Full Text Available The production of mature sperm is reliant on androgen action within the testis, and it is well established that androgens act on receptors within the somatic Sertoli cells to stimulate male germ cell development. Mice lacking Sertoli cell androgen receptors (AR show late meiotic germ cell arrest, suggesting Sertoli cells transduce the androgenic stimulus co-ordinating this essential step in spermatogenesis. This study aimed to identify germ cell proteins responsive to changes in testicular androgen levels and thereby elucidate mechanisms by which androgens regulate meiosis. Testicular androgen levels were suppressed for 9 weeks using testosterone and estradiol-filled silastic implants, followed by a short period of either further androgen suppression (via an AR antagonist or the restoration of intratesticular testosterone levels. Comparative proteomics were performed on protein extracts from enriched meiotic cell preparations from adult rats undergoing androgen deprivation and replacement in vivo. Loss of androgenic stimulus caused changes in proteins with known roles in meiosis (including Nasp and Hsp70-2, apoptosis (including Diablo, cell signalling (including 14-3-3 isoforms, oxidative stress, DNA repair, and RNA processing. Immunostaining for oxidised DNA adducts confirmed spermatocytes undergo oxidative stress-induced DNA damage during androgen suppression. An increase in PCNA and an associated ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (Ubc13 suggested a role for PCNA-mediated regulation of DNA repair pathways in spermatocytes. Changes in cytoplasmic SUMO1 localisation in spermatocytes were paralleled by changes in the levels of free SUMO1 and of a subunit of its activating complex, suggesting sumoylation in spermatocytes is modified by androgen action on Sertoli cells. We conclude that Sertoli cells, in response to androgens, modulate protein translation and post-translational events in spermatocytes that impact on their metabolism, survival, and

  12. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    OpenAIRE

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs).

  13. A physiological role for androgen actions in the absence of androgen receptor DNA binding activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Tammy P S; Clarke, Michele V; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Lee, Nicole K L; Davey, Rachel A; MacLean, Helen E

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that androgens have physiological actions via non-DNA binding-dependent androgen receptor (AR) signaling pathways in males, using our genetically modified mice that express a mutant AR with deletion of the 2nd zinc finger of the DNA binding domain (AR(ΔZF2)) that cannot bind DNA. In cultured genital skin fibroblasts, the mutant AR(ΔZF2) has normal ligand binding ability, phosphorylates ERK-1/2 in response to 1 min DHT treatment (blocked by the AR antagonist bicalutamide), but has reduced androgen-dependent nuclear localization compared to wildtype (WT). AR(ΔZF2) males have normal baseline ERK-1/2 phosphorylation, with a 1.5-fold increase in Akt phosphorylation in AR(ΔZF2) muscle vs WT. To identify physiological actions of non-DNA binding-dependent AR signaling, AR(ΔZF2) males were treated for 6 weeks with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Cortical bone growth was suppressed by DHT in AR(ΔZF2) mice (6% decrease in periosteal and 7% decrease in medullary circumference vs untreated AR(ΔZF2) males). In conclusion, these data suggest that non-DNA binding dependent AR actions suppress cortical bone growth, which may provide a mechanism to fine-tune the response to androgens in bone.

  14. Intermittent degradation and schizotypy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Roché

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent degradation refers to transient detrimental disruptions in task performance. This phenomenon has been repeatedly observed in the performance data of patients with schizophrenia. Whether intermittent degradation is a feature of the liability for schizophrenia (i.e., schizotypy is an open question. Further, the specificity of intermittent degradation to schizotypy has yet to be investigated. To address these questions, 92 undergraduate participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires assessing schizotypy and psychological state variables (e.g., anxiety, depression, and their reaction times were recorded as they did so. Intermittent degradation was defined as the number of times a subject’s reaction time for questionnaire items met or exceeded three standard deviations from his or her mean reaction time after controlling for each item’s information processing load. Intermittent degradation scores were correlated with questionnaire scores. Our results indicate that intermittent degradation is associated with total scores on measures of positive and disorganized schizotypy, but unrelated to total scores on measures of negative schizotypy and psychological state variables. Intermittent degradation is interpreted as potentially derivative of schizotypy and a candidate endophenotypic marker worthy of continued research.

  15. Defining "intermittent UVR exposure"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodekær, Mette; Philipsen, Peter Alshede; Petersen, Bibi Øager;

    2016-01-01

    to define and quantify “intermittent UVR exposure” by an objective measure. Methods: A broad study population of adults and children had data collected during a summer period. Data were personal UVR dosimetry measurements, from which the number of “intermittent days” was derived, sun behaviour diaries.......001). The corresponding numbers for prediction of nevi and lentigo density by retrospective questionnaire data was lower (R2 = 0.11, R2 = 0.26, p defined objective measure of intermittent UVR exposure. This measure may provide a better prediction of solar skin damage and CMM...

  16. Update on androgenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorneycroft, I H

    1999-02-01

    The development of a new generation of progestins deemed less androgenic than their earlier counterparts has led to a number of misconceptions regarding their possible benefits in combination oral contraceptives. All combination oral contraceptives are beneficial for treating such androgenic conditions as acne and hirsutism. The only expressed androgenic effect of some first- and second-generation combined oral contraceptives are changes in plasma lipid and lipoprotein levels. However, the overall effect of today's low-dose oral contraceptives is largely lipid neutral, and human and monkey studies have shown that oral contraceptive use is associated with reduced, not increased, atherosclerosis rates. Myocardial infarction rates are not increased among oral contraceptive users, except among those who are heavy smokers.

  17. Reinforcing aspects of androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Ruth I

    2004-11-15

    Are androgens reinforcing? Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, often with negative long-term health consequences. As a result, in 1991, testosterone was declared a controlled substance. Recently, Brower [K.J. Brower, Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence. Curr. Psychiatry Rep. 4 (2002) 377-387.] proposed a two-stage model of AAS dependence. Users initiate steroid use for their anabolic effects on muscle growth. With continued exposure, dependence on the psychoactive effects of AAS develops. However, it is difficult in humans to separate direct psychoactive effects of AAS from the user's psychological dependence on the anabolic effects of AAS. Thus, studies in laboratory animals are useful to explore androgen reinforcement. Testosterone induces a conditioned place preference in rats and mice, and is voluntarily consumed through oral, intravenous, and intracerebroventricular self-administration in hamsters. Active, gonad-intact male and female hamsters will deliver 1 microg/microl testosterone into the lateral ventricles. Indeed, some individuals self-administer testosterone intracerebroventricularly to the point of death. Male rats develop a conditioned place preference to testosterone injections into the nucleus accumbens, an effect blocked by dopamine receptor antagonists. These data suggest that androgen reinforcement is mediated by the brain. Moreover, testosterone appears to act through the mesolimbic dopamine system, a common substrate for drugs of abuse. Nonetheless, androgen reinforcement is not comparable to that of cocaine or heroin. Instead, testosterone resembles other mild reinforcers, such as caffeine, nicotine, or benzodiazepines. The potential for androgen addiction remains to be determined.

  18. Intermittent Explosive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lut Tamam

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent explosive disorder is an impulse control disorder characterized by the occurrence of discrete episodes of failure to resist aggressive impulses that result in violent assault or destruction of property. Though the prevalence intermittent explosive disorder has been reported to be relatively rare in frontier studies on the field, it is now common opinion that intermittent explosive disorder is far more common than previously thought especially in clinical psychiatry settings. Etiological studies displayed the role of both psychosocial factors like childhood traumas and biological factors like dysfunctional neurotransmitter systems and genetics. In differential diagnosis of the disorder, disorders involving agression as a symptom such as alcohol and drug intoxication, antisocial and borderline personality disorders, personality changes due to general medical conditions and behavioral disorder should be considered. A combination of pharmacological and psychotherapeutic approaches are suggested in the treatment of the disorder. This article briefly reviews the historical background, diagnostic criteria, epidemiology, etiology and treatment of intermittent explosive disorder.

  19. Androgen receptor drives cellular senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yelena Mirochnik

    Full Text Available The accepted androgen receptor (AR role is to promote proliferation and survival of prostate epithelium and thus prostate cancer progression. While growth-inhibitory, tumor-suppressive AR effects have also been documented, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we for the first time link AR anti-cancer action with cell senescence in vitro and in vivo. First, AR-driven senescence was p53-independent. Instead, AR induced p21, which subsequently reduced ΔN isoform of p63. Second, AR activation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS and thereby suppressed Rb phosphorylation. Both pathways were critical for senescence as was proven by p21 and Rb knock-down and by quenching ROS with N-Acetyl cysteine and p63 silencing also mimicked AR-induced senescence. The two pathways engaged in a cross-talk, likely via PML tumor suppressor, whose localization to senescence-associated chromatin foci was increased by AR activation. All these pathways contributed to growth arrest, which resolved in senescence due to concomitant lack of p53 and high mTOR activity. This is the first demonstration of senescence response caused by a nuclear hormone receptor.

  20. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Sindhu Sharma, Kuldeep Singh, Sanjay Dhar*,Yudhvir Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) present at several differentiation from genetic defects to endorgan resistance thereby producing gender dilema dispelled by sex hormones signature.It is quite traumaticfor the patients and family of the affected baby. Extreme sensitivity and awareness on the part of thecaring doctor is necessary for early diagnosis of case of AIS &for successful outcome.

  1. Partial Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindhu Sharma, Kuldeep Singh, Sanjay Dhar*,Yudhvir Gupta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS present at several differentiation from genetic defects to endorgan resistance thereby producing gender dilema dispelled by sex hormones signature.It is quite traumaticfor the patients and family of the affected baby. Extreme sensitivity and awareness on the part of thecaring doctor is necessary for early diagnosis of case of AIS &for successful outcome.

  2. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001180.htm Androgen insensitivity syndrome To use the ... a condition in which the opening of the urethra is on the underside of the penis, instead of ... they can develop cancer, just like any undescended testicle. Estrogen replacement is ...

  3. Beyond androgen deprivation: ancillary integrative strategies for targeting the androgen receptor addiction of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Mark F; Hejazi, Jalal; Rastmanesh, Reza

    2014-09-01

    The large majority of clinical prostate cancers remain dependent on androgen receptor (AR) activity for proliferation even as they lose their responsiveness to androgen deprivation or antagonism. AR activity can be maintained in these circumstances by increased AR synthesis--often reflecting increased NF-κB activation; upregulation of signaling pathways that promote AR activity in the absence of androgens; and by emergence of AR mutations or splice variants lacking the ligand-binding domain, which render the AR constitutively active. Drugs targeting the N-terminal transactivating domain of the AR, some of which are now in preclinical development, can be expected to inhibit the activity not only of unmutated ARs but also of the mutant forms and splice variants selected for by androgen deprivation. Concurrent measures that suppress AR synthesis or boost AR turnover could be expected to complement the efficacy of such drugs. A number of nutraceuticals that show efficacy in prostate cancer xenograft models--including polyphenols from pomegranate, grape seed, and green tea, the crucifera metabolite diindolylmethane, and the hormone melatonin--have the potential to suppress AR synthesis via downregulation of NF-κB activity; clinical doses of salicylate may have analogous efficacy. The proteasomal turnover of the AR is abetted by diets with a high ratio of long-chain omega-3 to omega-6 fatty acids, which are beneficial in prostate cancer xenograft models; berberine and sulforaphane, by inhibiting AR's interaction with its chaperone Hsp90, likewise promote AR proteasomal degradation and retard growth of human prostate cancer in nude mice. Hinge region acetylation of the AR is required for optimal transactivational activity, and low micromolar concentrations of the catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) can inhibit such acetylation--possibly explaining the ability of EGCG administration to suppress androgenic activity and cell proliferation in prostate cancer

  4. One and the same androgen for all? towards designer androgens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LouisJGGooren; NhuThanhNguyen

    1999-01-01

    The introduction of designer oestrogens as a treatment medality in hormone replacement in women has invited to consider the concept of compounds with selective androgenic effects for male honnone replacement therapy. The full spectrum of the actions of testosterone may not be necessary of even undesired for certain indications for testosterone treatment, To define for what indications certain androgenic properties are desired and undesired more insight in basic androgen (patho)physiology is required. There is convincing evidence that aromatization of androgenic compounds to nestrogens might be an advantage for maintenance of bone mass and it might also mitigate negative effects of androgens on bichemical parameters of cardiovascular risks: the potentially negative effects of oestmgens on prostate pathology in ageing men needs further elucidation. While the role of dihydro-testosterone (DHT) for the male sexual differentiation and for pubertal sexual maturation is evident, its role in mature and ageing males seems less significant or may even be harmful. It is, however, of note that a negative effect of DHT on prostate pathophysiolog~ is certainly not proven.For male contraception a progestational agent with strong androgenic properties might be an asset. For most of the androgenic actions the critical levels of androgens are not well established. The latter is relevant since the large amount of androgen molecules required for its biological actions (as compared to oestrogens) is an impediment in androgen replacement medalities. There may be room for more biopotent androgens since delivery of large amounts of androgen molecules to the circulation poses problems fur treatment modalities. ( Asian J Andro11999 Jun; 1:21 -28)

  5. Metabolic syndrome, androgens, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with increases in androgen levels. In men, reductions in androgen levels are associated with inflammation, and androgen supplements reduce inflammation. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. This review discusses the possibility that the effects of androgens on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae may differ between males and females.

  6. 5α-Reductase Inhibition Suppresses Testosterone-Induced Initial Regrowth of Regressed Xenograft Prostate Tumors in Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Ramos Garcia, Raquel; Pascal, Laura E.; Wang, Yujuan; Ma, Hei M.; O'Malley, Katherine; Eisermann, Kurtis; Shevrin, Daniel H.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Vessella, Robert L.; Nelson, Joel B.; Parikh, Rahul A.

    2013-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment for patients with prostate-specific antigen progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer. An alternative to continuous ADT is intermittent ADT (IADT), which allows recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor. IADT offers patients a reduction in side effects associated with ADT, improved quality of life, and reduced cost with no difference in overall survival. Our previous studies showed that IADT coupled with 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI), which blocks testosterone conversion to DHT could prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was fixed. To further investigate this clinically relevant observation, we measured the time course of testosterone-induced regrowth of regressed LuCaP35 and LNCaP xenograft tumors in the presence or absence of a 5ARI. 5α-Reductase inhibitors suppressed the initial regrowth of regressed prostate tumors. However, tumors resumed growth and were no longer responsive to 5α-reductase inhibition several days after testosterone replacement. This finding was substantiated by bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 staining of LuCaP35 tumors, which showed inhibition of prostate tumor cell proliferation by 5ARI on day 2, but not day 14, after testosterone replacement. 5α-Reductase inhibitors also suppressed testosterone-stimulated proliferation of LNCaP cells precultured in androgen-free media, suggesting that blocking testosterone conversion to DHT can inhibit prostate tumor cell proliferation via an intracrine mechanism. These results suggest that short off-cycle coupled with 5α-reductase inhibition could maximize suppression of prostate tumor growth and, thus, improve potential survival benefit achieved in combination with IADT. PMID:23671262

  7. ANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Kanan; Sonali

    2014-01-01

    The condition is inherited as X - linked recessive gene 1 . The underlying pathology is the inability of end organs to respond to androgens. These cases are phenotypically and psychologically female with adequate breast development , normal external genitalia , a vagina with variable depth , absent /sparse pubic hair and axillary hair. The exact incidence in India is not known but the reported incidence is 1 in 2 , 000 to 1 in 62 ,400 worldwi...

  8. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tančić-Gajić Milina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS belongs to disorders of sex development, resulting from complete or partial resistance to the biological actions of androgens in persons who are genetically males (XY with normally developed testes and age-appropriate for males of serum testosterone concentration. Case Outline. A 21-year-old female patient was admitted at our Clinic further evaluation and treatment of testicular feminization syndrome, which was diagnosed at the age of 16 years. The patient had never menstruated. On physical examination, her external genitalia and breast development appeared as completely normal feminine structures but pubic and axillary hair was absent. Cytogenetic analysis showed a 46 XY karyotype. The values of sex hormones were as in adult males. The multisliced computed tomography (MSCT showed structures on both sides of the pelvic region, suggestive of testes. Bilateral orchiectomy was performed. Hormone replacement therapy was prescribed after gonadectomy. Vaginal dilatation was advised to avoid dyspareunia. Conclusion. The diagnosis of complete androgen insensitivity is based on clinical findigs, hormonal analysis karyotype, visualization methods and genetic analysis. Bilateral gonadectomy is generally recommended in early adulthood to avoid the risk of testicular malignancy. Vaginal length may be short requiring dilatation in an effort to avoid dyspareunia. Vaginal surgery is rarely indicated for the creation of a functional vagina. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175067

  9. Chronic intermittent hypoxia-induced neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus is attenuated by telmisartan through suppression of iNOS/NO and inhibition of lipid peroxidation and inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiao; Guo, Xueling; Deng, Yan; Zhu, Die; Shang, Jin; Liu, Huiguo

    2015-01-30

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD), but little is known about the precise mechanism of OSAS-induced AD. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nitric oxide (NO) are known to play key roles in the development of AD. Several studies have confirmed that an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, telmisartan, beneficially regulates NOS and NO. Here, we examined the neuroprotective effects of telmisartan against hippocampal apoptosis induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the most characteristic pathophysiological change of OSAS. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to 8h of intermittent hypoxia per day with or without telmisartan for eight weeks. Neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region, NOS activity, NO content, and the presence of inflammatory agents and radical oxygen species in the hippocampus were determined. The results showed that CIH activated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), increased NO content, and enhanced lipid peroxidation and inflammatory responses in the hippocampus. Treatment with telmisartan inhibited excessive iNOS and NO generation and reduced lipid peroxidation and inflammatory responses. In addition, telmisartan significantly ameliorated the hippocampal apoptosis induced by CIH. In conclusion, Pre-CIH telmisartan administration attenuated CIH-induced hippocampal apoptosis partly by regulating NOS activity, inhibiting excessive NO generation, and reducing lipid peroxidation and inflammatory responses.

  10. Intermittency and exotic channels

    CERN Document Server

    Bialas, A

    1994-01-01

    It is pointed out that accurate measurements of short-range two-particle correlations in like-charge K\\pi and in \\pi^ 0\\pi^ 0 channels should be very helpful in determining the origin of the \\lq\\lq intermittency\\rq\\rq\\ phenomenon observed recently for the like-charge pion pairs.

  11. Glucocorticoid- and androgen-secreting black adrenocortical adenomas: unique cause of corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanabe, Akiyo; Aiba, Motohiko; Hizuka, Naomi; Takano, Kazue; Zhang, Jun; Young, William F

    2011-01-01

    To describe the unique association of corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome caused by cortisol- and androgen-secreting black adrenal cortical adenomas with myelolipomatous change. We report the clinical, laboratory, radiologic, and pathologic findings from 2 patients who presented with androgen excess and typical signs and symptoms of Cushing syndrome. Endocrine investigations showed high serum cortisol concentrations that lacked diurnal rhythm, undetectable plasma corticotropin concentrations, and absence of serum cortisol suppression after overnight dexamethasone suppression tests. Serum levels of adrenal androgens were elevated. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed unilateral adrenal masses (largest lesional diameters 4.0 and 3.1 cm). On the basis of the plurihormonal hypersecretion and the imaging characteristics, adrenocortical carcinoma was considered as a possible diagnosis. However, histopathologic analysis in both patients revealed black adrenal cortical adenomas with myelolipomatous change. After surgery, adrenal androgens normalized, and the signs and symptoms of Cushing syndrome and androgen excess resolved. There was no evidence of recurrent disease at last follow-up. A unique form of corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome is described: cortisol- and androgen-secreting black adrenal cortical adenomas with myelolipomatous change. Although most patients with corticotropin-independent Cushing syndrome associated with androgen excess prove to have adrenocortical carcinoma, the clinician should be aware of the possibility of benign, black adrenal adenomas in this clinical setting.

  12. Aberrant E2F activation by polyglutamine expansion of androgen receptor in SBMA neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Ito, Saya; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Murata, Takuya; Furutani, Takashi; Shirode, Yuko; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Kimura, Shuhei; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sally; Lim, Jinseon; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Kouzmenko, Alexander P; Aigaki, Toshiro; Tabata, Tetsuya; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Kato, Shigeaki

    2009-03-10

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a polyglutamine repeat (polyQ) expansion within the human androgen receptor (AR). Unlike other neurodegenerative diseases caused by abnormal polyQ expansion, the onset of SBMA depends on androgen binding to mutant human polyQ-AR proteins. This is also observed in Drosophila eyes ectopically expressing the polyQ-AR mutants. We have genetically screened mediators of androgen-induced neurodegeneration caused by polyQ-AR mutants in Drosophila eyes. We identified Rbf (Retinoblastoma-family protein), the Drosophila homologue of human Rb (Retinoblastoma protein), as a neuroprotective factor. Androgen-dependent association of Rbf or Rb with AR was remarkably potentiated by aberrant polyQ expansion. Such potentiated Rb association appeared to attenuate recruitment of histone deacetyltransferase 1 (HDAC1), a corepressor of E2F function. Either overexpression of Rbf or E2F deficiency in fly eyes reduced the neurotoxicity of the polyQ-AR mutants. Induction of E2F function by polyQ-AR-bound androgen was suppressed by Rb in human neuroblastoma cells. We conclude that abnormal expansion of polyQ may potentiate innate androgen-dependent association of AR with Rb. This appears to lead to androgen-dependent onset of SBMA through aberrant E2F transactivation caused by suppressed histone deacetylation.

  13. Fate in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Gaardsting, O; Hougaard Jensen, K

    1986-01-01

    The fate of 257 consecutive patients (100 women) aged 36-85 years (mean 65) first seen with intermittent claudication in 1977 was analysed after a mean of 6.5 (SD 0.5) years. When first seen none of the patients complained of rest pain or had ulcers or gangrenous lesions on the feet. At follow up....... The rate of clinical progression of the arteriosclerotic disease (that is, rest pain or gangrene) of the worst affected leg was 7.5% in the first year after referral. Thereafter the rate was 2.2% a year. An ankle systolic blood pressure below 70 mm Hg, a toe systolic blood pressure below 40 mm Hg......, or an ankle/arm pressure index below 50% were individually significantly associated with progression of the arteriosclerotic disease. These findings show the importance of peripheral blood pressure measurements in the management of patients with intermittent claudication due to arteriosclerotic disease....

  14. Feigning Acute Intermittent Porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania Elkhatib

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP is an autosomal dominant genetic defect in heme synthesis. Patients with this illness can have episodic life-threatening attacks characterized by abdominal pain, neurological deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. Feigning this illness has not been reported in the English language literature to date. Here, we report on a patient who presented to the hospital with an acute attack of porphyria requesting opiates. Diligent assessment of extensive prior treatment records revealed thirteen negative tests for AIP.

  15. ANDROGEN LEVELS IN PREECLAMPSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Valadan

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality during pregnancy. Several independent investigators have demonstrated the association of androgens with hypertension. The main purpose of this study was to determine whether maternal levels of sex hormones, especially testosterone, are higher in patients with preeclampsia than in matched normotensive control subjects. Serum levels of testosterone, free testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S and estradiol were measured in 60 subjects in the 3rd trimester of pregnancy with documented preeclampsia (including 30 cases of mild and 30 cases of severe preeclampsia and 60 healthy normotensive women with similar maternal and gestational ages and body mass index (BMI and neonatal sex. All subjects were primigravid with singleton pregnancies. Cases of polycystic ovary (PCO, diabetes, chronic hypertension and chronic systemic diseases such as lupus and patients using steroid hormones and anti-hypertensive drugs were excluded. Levels of testosterone, DHEA-S and estradiol were not higher in primigravid women with preeclampsia than in normotensive women with similar gestational and maternal ages, BMI and neonatal sex. There were no significant differences in sex hormones measured between groups of mild and severe preeclampsia and normotensive women. There were also no significant differences in sex hormone levels according to neonatal sex. These findings are against the hypothesis of mediating or amplifying role of high androgen levels in pathophysiology of preeclampsia.

  16. Androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Nicolás; Motos, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is a disorder caused by a mutation of the gene encoding the androgen receptor (AR; Xq11-q12). The prevalence of AIS has been estimated to be one case in every 20,000 to 64,000 newborn males for the complete syndrome (CAIS), and the prevalence is unknown for the partial syndrome (PAIS). The symptoms range from phenotypically normal males with impaired spermatogenesis to phenotypically normal women with primary amenorrhea. Various forms of ambiguous genitalia have been observed at birth. The diagnosis is confirmed by determining the exact mutation in the AR gene. PAIS individuals require precise diagnosis as early as possible so that the sex can be assigned, treatment can be recommended, and they can receive proper genetic counseling. After birth, differential diagnosis should be performed using other forms of abnormal sexual differentiation of primary amenorrhea. The treatment of AIS is based on reinforcement sexual identity, gonadectomy planning, and hormone replacement therapy. The prognosis for CAIS is good if the testicular tissue is removed at the appropriate time. For PAIS, the prognosis depends on the ambiguity of the genitalia and physical and psychosocial adjustment to the assigned sex.

  17. Androgen and prostatic stroma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-JieNIU; Teng-XiangMA; IuZHANG; YongXU; Rui-FaHAN; GuangSUN

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the effect of androgen on the proliferation,differentiation and regression of canine prostatic stromal cells in vivo and human stromal cells in vitro.Methods:Twenty-two dogs,including 15 normal prostate doge and 7 prostatic hyperplasia dogs,had their serum concentration of testosterone and estrodiol determined by radioimmunoassay before and after castration.The expression of androgen receptor(AR)and estrogen receptor(ER)in the prostate were analysed by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR before and after castration.Light microscopy,transmission electron microscopy and TUNEL assay were carried out successively before and after castration to evaluate the prostatic histomorphology.In vitro serum-free cell cultures from human prostatic stroma were established and exposed to dihydrotestosterone(DHT).The proliferation of the cell culture was detected by MTT assay.The expression of TGFβ bFGF,AR,and smooth muscle cell(SMC) specific proteins (myosin and/or smoothelin)were detected using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR.The differentiation from fibroblasts to smooth muscle cells was deduced by measuring the expression of SMC specific proteins.Results:Before castration,the serum concentrations of testosterone and estrodiol were not statistically different between normal and hyperplasia groups.Following castration,the serum concentration of testerone decreased rapidly in 2 days,and the concentration of estrodiol had no significant change compared with the pre-castration data.In the prostate,AR was presented in both the epithelial and stromal cells and the AR mRNA level was higher in hyperplasia than in normal prostate tissues(P<0.05).While ER predominantly existed in the prostate stromal cells and the ER mRNA had no difference between the hyperplasia and the normal group.Within the early phase of castration(

  18. Castration induces up-regulation of intratumoral androgen biosynthesis and androgen receptor expression in an orthotopic VCaP human prostate cancer xenograft model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuuttila, Matias; Yatkin, Emrah; Kallio, Jenny; Savolainen, Saija; Laajala, Teemu D; Aittokallio, Tero; Oksala, Riikka; Häkkinen, Merja; Keski-Rahkonen, Pekka; Auriola, Seppo; Poutanen, Matti; Mäkelä, Sari

    2014-08-01

    Androgens are key factors involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and PCa growth can be suppressed by androgen deprivation therapy. In a considerable proportion of men receiving androgen deprivation therapy, however, PCa progresses to castration-resistant PCa (CRPC), making the development of efficient therapies challenging. We used an orthotopic VCaP human PCa xenograft model to study cellular and molecular changes in tumors after androgen deprivation therapy (castration). Tumor growth was monitored through weekly serum prostate-specific antigen measurements, and mice with recurrent tumors after castration were randomized to treatment groups. Serum prostate-specific antigen concentrations showed significant correlation with tumor volume. Castration-resistant tumors retained concentrations of intratumoral androgen (androstenedione, testosterone, and 5α-dihydrotestosterone) at levels similar to tumors growing in intact hosts. Accordingly, castration induced up-regulation of enzymes involved in androgen synthesis (CYP17A1, AKR1C3, and HSD17B6), as well as expression of full-length androgen receptor (AR) and AR splice variants (AR-V1 and AR-V7). Furthermore, AR target gene expression was maintained in castration-resistant xenografts. The AR antagonists enzalutamide (MDV3100) and ARN-509 suppressed PSA production of castration-resistant tumors, confirming the androgen dependency of these tumors. Taken together, the findings demonstrate that our VCaP xenograft model exhibits the key characteristics of clinical CRPC and thus provides a valuable tool for identifying druggable targets and for testing therapeutic strategies targeting AR signaling in CRPC.

  19. In vivo modulation of androgen receptor by androgens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V·L·Kumar; V·Kumar

    2002-01-01

    Aim:To study the effect of androgen and antiandrogen on the level of androgen receptor(AR)mRNA.Methods:The totalRNA was extracted from the prostate and analyzed by slot blot analysis,The blots were hybrid-ized with ARcDNA probe and 1Aprobe(internal control)and autoradionraphy was performed.The intensity of signal was measured with a densitometer and the ratio of AR RNAand1ARNAwas calculated.Results:Androgenic deprivation produced by castration decreased the weight of the prostate and increased the levels of ARmRNA.Treatment of the castrated rats with testostrone increased the weight of prostate and decreased the levels of ARmRNA.Treatment of normal rats with flutamide decreased the weight of the gland and increased the levels of AR mRNA.Conclusion:Androgens produce proliferative effect on the prostate and negatively regulate the AR transcription.

  20. A regulatory role of androgen in ovarian steroidogenesis by rat granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Toru; Kamada, Yasuhiko; Hosoya, Takeshi; Fujita, Shiho; Nishiyama, Yuki; Iwata, Nahoko; Hiramatsu, Yuji; Otsuka, Fumio

    2017-09-01

    Excess androgen and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in the ovarian follicle has been suggested to be involved in the pathophysiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Here we investigated the impact of androgen and IGF-I on the regulatory mechanism of ovarian steroidogenesis using rat primary granulosa cells. It was revealed that androgen treatment with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) amplified progesterone synthesis in the presence of FSH and IGF-I, whereas it had no significant effect on estrogen synthesis by rat granulosa cells. In accordance with the effects of androgen on steroidogenesis, DHT enhanced the expression of progesterogenic factors and enzymes, including StAR, P450scc and 3βHSD, and cellular cAMP synthesis induced by FSH and IGF-I. Of note, treatment with DHT and IGF-I suppressed Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and transcription of the BMP target gene Id-1, suggesting that androgen and IGF-I counteract BMP signaling that inhibits FSH-induced progesterone synthesis in rat granulosa cells. DHT was revealed to suppress the expression of BMP-6 receptors, consisting of ALK-2, ALK-6 and ActRII, while it increased the expression of inhibitory Smads in rat granulosa cells. In addition, IGF-I treatment upregulated androgen receptor (AR) expression and DHT treatment suppressed IGF-I receptor expression on rat granulosa cells. Collectively, the results indicate that androgen and IGF-I mutually interact and accelerate progesterone production, at least in part, by regulating endogenous BMP signaling in rat granulosa cells. Cooperative effects of androgen and IGF-I counteract endogenous BMP-6 activity in rat granulosa cells, which is likely to be functionally linked to the steroidogenic property shown in the PCOS ovary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A; Reier, Paul J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Fuller, David D

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a "respiratory memory"). AIH elicits similar phrenic "long-term facilitation" (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors.

  2. Intermittency in Complex Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Mahjoub, Otman; Redondo, Jose M.

    2017-04-01

    Experimental results of the complex turbulent wake of a cilinder in 2D [1] and 3D flows [2] were used to investigate the scaling of structure functions, similar research was also performed on wave propagation and breaking in the Ocean [3], in the the stratified Atmosphere (ABL) [4] and in a 100large flume (UPC) for both regular and irregular waves, where long time series of waves propagating and generating breaking turbulence velocity rms and higher order measurements were taken in depth. [3,5] by means of a velocimeter SONTEK3-D. The probability distribution functions of the velocity differences and their non Gaussian distribution related to the energy spectrum indicate that irregularity is an important source of turbulence. From Kolmogorov's K41 and K61 intermittency correction: the p th-order longitudinal velocity structure function δul at scale l in the inertial range of three-dimensional fully developed turbulence is related by ⟨δup⟩ = ⟨(u(x+ l)- u(x))p⟩ ˜ ɛp0/3lp/3 l where ⟨...⟩ represents the spatial average over flow domain, with ɛ0 the mean energy dissipation per unit mass and l is the separation distance. The importance of the random nature of the energy dissipation led to the K62 theory of intermittency, but locality and non-homogeneity are key issues. p p/3 p/3 ξd ⟨δul⟩ ˜ ⟨ɛl ⟩l ˜ l and ξp = p 3 + τp/3 , where now ɛl is a fractal energy dissipation at scale l, τp/3 is the scaling of and ξp is the scaling exponent of the velocity structure function of order p. Both in K41 and K62, the structure functions of third order related to skewness is ξ3 = 1. But this is not true either. We show that scaling exponents ξp do deviate from early studies that only investigated homogeneous turbulence, where a large inertial range dominates. The use of multi-fractal analysis and improvements on Structure function calculations on standard Enhanced mixing is an essential property of turbulence and efforts to alter and to control

  3. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity.

  4. ANDROGEN REPLACEMENT THERAPY IN POSTMENOPAUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Meden Vrtovec

    2008-12-01

    Scientific studies and clinical experiences have not provided until now the answers to thequestion: »Whom to treat, when, why and for how long should androgens be used for HRTin postmenopausal women?«

  5. Anabolic-androgenic steroids and the adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogol, A D; Yesalis, C E

    1992-03-01

    This article has reviewed some of the hormonal and behavioral maturation that occurs during adolescence, which are characterized by remarkable physical changes and behavioral vulnerability. Risk taking of many varieties is common and drugs (including anabolic-androgenic steroids) form a part of the prevailing culture in many places. These steroids probably are not severe health hazards when taken intermittently and in low to moderate doses. The 17-alkylated derivatives are clearly the more likely to cause hepatotoxicity. Thus, the scare tactics formerly used (severe constitutional side effects) are doomed to failure. The tenuous link between these drugs and objective behavioral and addictive effects must be strengthened before health strategies based on this issue can be validated. Clearly, the lack of scientific information has impeded, if not precluded, the formulation of an effective health education strategy. The most potent deterrent to the use of steroid drugs by athletes must be the moral issue of fair play and maintaining a "level playing field." We strongly support directed research in these areas and hope that the credibility of the scientific community can be regained after its faulted "stop steroid use" campaigns based on the lack of steroid efficacy in bringing about desired results or on their dire consequences have been replaced with credible evidence to refute their use on these and other grounds.

  6. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Kesha; Lee, Nicole K L; Zajac, Jeffrey D; MacLean, Helen E

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (AR(ΔZF2)) versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57(Kip2), Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR(∆ZF2) muscle, and the expression of all but p57(Kip2) was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  7. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kesha Rana; Nicole KL Lee; Jeffrey D Zajac; Helen E MacLean

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor(AR)‑regulated genes ininvitroandinvivomodels. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factormyogenin was signiifcantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity(ARΔZF2) versus wildtype mice, demonstrating thatmyogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligaseFbxo32 was repressed by 12h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, andc‑Myc expression was decreased in testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7, p57Kip2, Igf2 andcalcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all butp57Kip2was also decreased in testosterone‑treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase‑mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  8. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesha Rana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 versus wildtype mice, demonstrating that myogenin is repressed by the androgen/AR pathway. The ubiquitin ligase Fbxo32 was repressed by 12 h dihydrotestosterone treatment in human skeletal muscle cell myoblasts, and c-Myc expression was decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle, and increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle. The expression of a group of genes that regulate the transition from myoblast proliferation to differentiation, Tceal7 , p57 Kip2, Igf2 and calcineurin Aa, was increased in AR∆ZF2 muscle, and the expression of all but p57 Kip2 was also decreased in testosterone-treated orchidectomized male muscle compared to control orchidectomized male muscle. We conclude that in males, androgens act via the AR in part to promote peak muscle mass by maintaining myoblasts in the proliferative state and delaying the transition to differentiation during muscle growth and development, and by suppressing ubiquitin ligase-mediated atrophy pathways to preserve muscle mass in adult muscle.

  9. Role of androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HiroyoshiSuzuki; HaruoIto

    1999-01-01

    The growth of prostate cancer is sensitive to androgen, and hormonal therapy has been used for treatment of ad-vanced cancer. About 80 % of prostate cancers initially respond to hormonal therapy, howcrver, more than half of the re-sponders gradtmlly become resistant to this therapy. Changes in tumors from an androgen-responsive to an androgen-unre-sponsive state have been widely discussed. Since androgen action is mediated by androgen receptor (AR), abnonnalitiesof AR is believed to play an important role of the loss of androgen responsiveness in prostate cancer. "Ilais article focusedon the role of AR in the progression of prostate cancer.

  10. Comment on "Intermittent plate tectonics?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenaga, Jun

    2008-06-06

    Silver and Behn (Reports, 4 January 2008, p. 85) proposed that intermittent plate tectonics may resolve a long-standing paradox in Earth's thermal evolution. However, their analysis misses one important term, which subsequently brings their main conclusion into question. In addition, the Phanerozoic eustasy record indicates that the claimed effect of intermittency is probably weak.

  11. Pharmacological characterization of AC-262536, a novel selective androgen receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piu, Fabrice; Gardell, Luis R; Son, Thomas; Schlienger, Nathalie; Lund, Birgitte W; Schiffer, Hans H; Vanover, Kim E; Davis, Robert E; Olsson, Roger; Bradley, Stefania Risso

    2008-03-01

    Because of the limitations and liabilities of current testosterone therapies, non-steroidal tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators may provide a clinically meaningful advance in therapy. Using a functional cell-based assay AC-262536 was identified as a potent and selective AR ligand, with partial agonist activity relative to the natural androgen testosterone. A 2-week chronic study in castrated male rats indicated that AC-262536 significantly improves anabolic parameters in these animals, especially in stimulating the growth of the levator ani and in suppressing elevated LH levels. In sharp contrast to testosterone, AC-262536 has weak androgenic effects, as measured by prostate and seminal vesicle weights. Thus, AC-262536 represents a novel class of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) with beneficial anabolic effects.

  12. Metabolic Effects of Intermittent Fasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Ruth E; Sears, Dorothy D

    2017-08-21

    The objective of this review is to provide an overview of intermittent fasting regimens, summarize the evidence on the health benefits of intermittent fasting, and discuss physiological mechanisms by which intermittent fasting might lead to improved health outcomes. A MEDLINE search was performed using PubMed and the terms "intermittent fasting," "fasting," "time-restricted feeding," and "food timing." Modified fasting regimens appear to promote weight loss and may improve metabolic health. Several lines of evidence also support the hypothesis that eating patterns that reduce or eliminate nighttime eating and prolong nightly fasting intervals may result in sustained improvements in human health. Intermittent fasting regimens are hypothesized to influence metabolic regulation via effects on (a) circadian biology, (b) the gut microbiome, and (c) modifiable lifestyle behaviors, such as sleep. If proven to be efficacious, these eating regimens offer promising nonpharmacological approaches to improving health at the population level, with multiple public health benefits.

  13. Androgen therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buvat, Jacques

    2003-11-01

    The physiological role of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and DHEA sulphate (DHEAS) is poorly understood. It depends in a large part on their transformation into testosterone and estradiol. The capacity of DHEA as a neurosteroid, the recent discovery of putative specific DHEA receptors on endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells, the steady decrease of DHEA production from the 40s on, together with certain human epidemiologic data as well as various beneficial effects of DHA supplementation in rodents have suggested the possibility that this steroid is involved in cognitive and memory, metabolic and vascular, immune and sexual functions and in their aging. However, epidemiologic studies are conflicting, and no well-designed clinical trials have definitely substantiated the role of DHEA in these functions in humans, or the utility and safety of DHEA supplementation. However, beneficial effects seem plausible in women with several conditions according to the results of double-blind placebo-controlled trials: the dose of 30 to 50 mg seems beneficial to the mood, sense of well being and sexual desire and activity of women with adrenal insufficiency. The only long-term trial of supplementation devoted to women over 60 reported significant increases in bone mineral density and, in the 70-79-year-old subgroup, in sexual desire, arousal, activity and satisfaction. The dose of 200 mg also proved to decrease disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus. Lastly, high DHEA doses have improved mood in various groups of patients of any age and gender with depressive symptoms. The use of DHEA therapy may also be discussed in women of any age when a trial of androgen supplementation seems justified because of the existence of an inhibited sexual desire or a sexual arousal disorder associated with documented androgen deficiency. The rather weak conversion of DHEA into testosterone protects from the risk of overdosing associated with testosterone preparations. However, it must

  14. Androgen receptor roles in insulin resistance and obesity in males: the linkage of androgen-deprivation therapy to metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, I-Chen; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sparks, Janet D; Yeh, Shuyuan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed malignancies in men. Androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) is the first-line treatment and fundamental management for men with advanced PCa to suppress functions of androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling. ADT is effective at improving cancer symptoms and prolonging survival. However, epidemiological and clinical studies support the notion that testosterone deficiency in men leads to the development of metabolic syndrome that increases cardiovascular disease risk. The underlying mechanisms by which androgen/AR signaling regulates metabolic homeostasis in men are complex, and in this review, we discuss molecular mechanisms mediated by AR signaling that link ADT to metabolic syndrome. Results derived from various AR knockout mouse models reveal tissue-specific AR signaling that is involved in regulation of metabolism. These data suggest that steps be taken early to manage metabolic complications associated with PCa patients receiving ADT, which could be accomplished using tissue-selective modulation of AR signaling and by treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents.

  15. Acute intermittent porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrick, Ariane L; McColl, Kenneth E L

    2005-04-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is characterised by neurovisceral crises the most common clinical presentation of which is abdominal pain. It is an autosomal dominant condition with incomplete penetrance and is potentially life-threatening. The key point in management is to suspect and confirm the diagnosis as early as possible in order to treat the attack and to avoid inappropriate treatments which may exacerbate the crisis. In this chapter we briefly outline the haem biosynthetic pathway and how deficiencies in individual enzymes give rise to the different porphyrias. We then describe the clinical features and diagnosis of AIP, followed by a discussion of pathogenesis, highlighting advances in the molecular biology of AIP and introducing the debate as to whether neurovisceral crises might result from porphyrin precursor neurotoxicity or from haem deficiency. Finally we discuss management, including family screening, avoidance of triggering factors, analgesia, maintenance of a high calorie intake, and administration of haem derivatives.

  16. Efficacy and safety of degarelix in Korean patients with prostate cancer requiring androgen deprivation therapy: Open-label multicenter phase III study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalsan You

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Overall, degarelix was effective and well tolerated in Korean patients. Testosterone suppression was noninferior to that in non-Asian patients and safety findings were as would be expected for elderly men with PCa undergoing androgen deprivation therapy.

  17. ANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The condition is inherited as X - linked recessive gene 1 . The underlying pathology is the inability of end organs to respond to androgens. These cases are phenotypically and psychologically female with adequate breast development , normal external genitalia , a vagina with variable depth , absent /sparse pubic hair and axillary hair. The exact incidence in India is not known but the reported incidence is 1 in 2 , 000 to 1 in 62 ,400 worldwide . These patients have male karyotyping (XY wi th negative sex chromatin with undescended gonads. These cases are rarely diagnosed before puberty. Though rare , these are extremely distressing to the concerned individuals requiring expert handling. Management should include psychological counseling not only to determine the sexual mentation but also to help those individuals to cope with their problems. The chance of malignancy developing in the gonad with Y chromosome are about 20%.Surgical removal of the gonad is mandatory but can be delayed till 18 ye ars to permit breast development and epiphyseal closure. The aim of presenting this case is to develop awareness regarding this rare syndrome X - linked genetic disorder which runs in families

  18. Hypochlorite Oxidation of Select Androgenic Steroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their s...

  19. Intermedia and Intermittency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veres Bálint

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly known that medial reflections have been initiated by attempts to secure the borders of discrete medial forms and to define the modus operandi of each essentialized medial area. Later on, the focus of study has shifted to plurimedial formations and the interactions between predefined medial genres. In the last few decades, taxonomic approaches to various multi-, inter-, and transmedial phenomena dominated the discussions, which offered invaluable support in mapping the terrain, but at the same time hindered the analysis of the ephemeral, time-dependent aspects of plurimedial operations. While we explore the properties of each medial configuration, we lose sight of the actual historical drivers that produce ever-new configurations. My thesis is that any discourse on intermediality should be paralleled by a discourse on cultural intermittency, and consequently, media studies should involve an approach that focuses on the “ecosystem” of the constantly renewing media configurations from the point of view of their vitalizing potential and capability to trigger heightened experiences. This approach draws much inspiration from K. Ludwig Pfeiffer’s media anthropology that gives orientation in my paper.

  20. Intermittency in spiral Poiseuille flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, M; Abshagen, J; Menck, A; Pflster, G [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, University of Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The results of an experimental study on intermittent spiral vortices observed in a counter-rotating Taylor-Couette system with an additional axial through flow, i.e. Spiral-Poiseuille flow, are presented. Convectively unstable upstream propagating spiral vortices appear in the laminar basic flow from an oscillatory instability and in general become absolutely unstable at higher inner cylinder Reynolds number. It is found that at Reynolds numbers above the absolute stability border the spiral vortices become unstable and a complex flow state showing intermittent bursts appears. The intermittent flow state is characterised by an irregular alternation between clearly distinguishable 'laminar' phases corresponding to up-and downstream propagating spiral vortices as well as propagating Taylor vortices. For a sufficiently high rate of axial through flow it is found that intermittency can occur directly from the convectively unstable regime of the upstream propagating spiral vortices.

  1. Coho salmon dependence on intermittent streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.J. Wigington; J.L. Ebersole; M.E. Colvin; S.G. Leibowitz; B. Miller; B. Hansen; H. Lavigne; D. White; J.P. Baker; M.R. Church; J.R. Brooks; M.A. Cairns; J.E. Compton

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we quantify the contributions of intermittent streams to coho salmon production in an Oregon coastal watershed. We provide estimates of (1) proportion of spawning that occurred in intermittent streams, (2) movement of juveniles into intermittent streams, (3) juvenile survival in intermittent and perennial streams during winter, and (4) relative size of...

  2. IN VIVO AND IN VITRO ANTI-ANDROGENIC EFFECTS OF DE-71

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, we showed that the PBDE mixture, DE-71, delayed preputial separation (PPS) and suppressed the growth of androgen-dependent tissues in the Wistar rat following a peri-pubertal exposure. These effects occurred concurrently with hypothyroidism and suggested that in additi...

  3. Laparoscopic gonedectomy in a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    G Bhaskararao; Himabindu, Y; Samir Ranjan Nayak; M Sriharibabu

    2014-01-01

    Complete Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a disorder of hormone resistance characterized by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype. The pathogenesis of CAIS involves a defective androgen receptor gene located on X-chromosome at Xq11-12and end organ insensitivity to androgens, although androgen concentrations are appropriate for the age of the patient. There are three major types of androgen insensitivity syndrome: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, minimal androgen ...

  4. 4-Nitro-3-phenylphenol has both androgenic and anti-androgenic-like effects in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trisomboon, Jiratthiya; Li, ChunMei; Suzuki, Akira; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effect of endocrine disruption of 4-nitro-3-phenylphenol (PNMPP) on immature male Wistar-Imamichi rats, the rat pituitary was exposed to PNMPP (10(-5)-10(-9) M) for 24 h with or without gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in experiment I. In addition, the Leydig cells (10(-5)-10(-9) M) were exposed to PNMPP for 24 h with or without human chronic gonadotropin (hCG) in experiment II. Our results showed that the PNMPP at 10(-5)-10(-7) M suppressed follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) productions from GnRH-stimulated pituitary cells. At the same time, PNMPP 10(-5)-10(-7) M induced an increase in testosterone production from the Leydig cells treated with or without hCG. Based on our results, it can be concluded that that PNMPP might have both androgen agonist action by decreasing FSH and LH production in the pituitary and anti-androgenic action by increasing testosterone production in the Leydig cell.

  5. Androgen receptor non-nuclear regulation of prostate cancer cell invasion mediated by Src and matriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarif, Jelani C; Lamb, Laura E; Schulz, Veronique V; Nollet, Eric A; Miranti, Cindy K

    2015-03-30

    Castration-resistant prostate cancers still depend on nuclear androgen receptor (AR) function despite their lack of dependence on exogenous androgen. Second generation anti-androgen therapies are more efficient at blocking nuclear AR; however resistant tumors still develop. Recent studies indicate Src is highly active in these resistant tumors. By manipulating AR activity in several different prostate cancer cell lines through RNAi, drug treatment, and the use of a nuclear-deficient AR mutant, we demonstrate that androgen acting on cytoplasmic AR rapidly stimulates Src tyrosine kinase via a non-genomic mechanism. Cytoplasmic AR, acting through Src enhances laminin integrin-dependent invasion. Active Matriptase, which cleaves laminin, is elevated within minutes after androgen stimulation, and is subsequently shed into the medium. Matriptase activation and shedding induced by cytoplasmic AR is dependent on Src. Concomitantly, CDCP1/gp140, a Matriptase and Src substrate that controls integrin-based migration, is activated. However, only inhibition of Matriptase, but not CDCP1, suppresses the AR/Src-dependent increase in invasion. Matriptase, present in conditioned medium from AR-stimulated cells, is sufficient to enhance invasion in the absence of androgen. Thus, invasion is stimulated by a rapid but sustained increase in Src activity, mediated non-genomically by cytoplasmic AR, leading to rapid activation and shedding of the laminin protease Matriptase.

  6. Laparoscopic gonedectomy in a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskararao, G; Himabindu, Y; Nayak, Samir Rajan; Sriharibabu, M

    2014-07-01

    Complete Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a disorder of hormone resistance characterized by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype. The pathogenesis of CAIS involves a defective androgen receptor gene located on X-chromosome at Xq11-12and end organ insensitivity to androgens, although androgen concentrations are appropriate for the age of the patient. There are three major types of androgen insensitivity syndrome: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, minimal androgen insensitivity syndrome, and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome includes multidisciplinary approach and involves gonedectomy to avoid gonadal tumors in later life. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and psychological support are required in long-term basis.

  7. Development of an androgen reporter gene assay (AR-LUX) utilizing a human cell line with an endogenously regulated androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankvoort, B M; de Groene, E M; van Meeteren-Kreikamp, A P; Witkamp, R F; Rodenburg, R J; Aarts, J M

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the work described in this report is to develop and characterize a cell-based androgen reporter assay. For this purpose, the androgen receptor (AR) expressing human breast cancer cell line T47D was stably transfected with a luciferase gene under transcriptional control of the PB-ARE-2 androgen response element. The application of this cell line in an endogenous Androgen Receptor-mediated LUciferase eXpression assay (AR-LUX) was validated. An EC50 value of 86 pM was determined for the standard androgen R1881 with a detection limit of 46 pM. Other androgens like dihydrotestosterone, 17beta-trenbolone, and bolasterone also induced luciferase expression, while anti-androgens suppressed these responses. As expected, AR-mediated responses were also elicited by high concentrations of the steroids progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, d-aldosterone, and dexamethasone, with observed EC50 values 10 to 350,000 times higher than that for R1881. A unique feature of the AR-LUX assay is that effects on modulation of active endogenous AR-levels are reliably reflected in the luciferase induction response, as exemplified by vitamin D, all-trans-retinoic acid, epigallocatechin gallate, and forskolin. This feature is especially useful when assessing complex mixtures, e.g., environmental samples or natural compound libraries. From these data it is concluded that the AR-LUX assay is a reliable in vitro test system for the detection and quantification of AR-mediated biological effects. The 96-well plate format makes the assay particularly suitable for high-throughput screening.

  8. Testosterone suppression in men with prostate cancer leads to an increase in arterial stiffness and hyperinsulinaemia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dockery, Frances; Bulpitt, Christopher J; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Donaldson, Mandy; Rajkumar, Chakravarthi

    2003-01-01

    .... Arterial stiffness (or 'compliance') was measured in 16 men (71+/-9 years, mean+/-S.D.) prior to, and 3 months after, complete androgen suppression with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogues as treatment for prostate cancer...

  9. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosents@sutterhealth.org [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Hunt, Daniel [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sartor, A. Oliver [Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Pienta, Kenneth J. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gomella, Leonard [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Rajan, Raghu [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kerlin, Kevin J. [Community Clinical Oncology Program, Southeast Cancer Control Consortium, Inc, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Dobelbower, Michael [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Shipley, William U. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Donavanik, Viroon [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, Wilmington, Delaware (United States); Rotman, Marvin [State University of New York Health Science Center–Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Hartford, Alan C. [Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Michalski, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Seider, Michael [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Kim, Harold [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); and others

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥7 or clinical stage ≥T2 and GS ≥8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. Results: A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). Conclusions: NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for

  10. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Escape Mechanisms from Androgen Ablation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    of CAG repeats in the Machado-Joseph disease , spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and androgen receptor genes. Hum. Mol. Genet. 4, 1585-1590. Rundlett, S . E... diseases such as Huntington disease and spinal and bulbar muscular atro- phy, which is commonly called Kennedy’s disease . This finding has been attributed...STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and

  11. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  12. Intermittency in spherical Couette dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Raphaël; 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.033011

    2013-01-01

    We investigate dynamo action in three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent spherical Couette flows. Close to the onset of dynamo action, the magnetic field exhibits an intermittent behavior, characterized by a series of short bursts of the magnetic energy separated by low-energy phases. We show that this behavior corresponds to the so-called on-off intermittency. This behavior is here reported for dynamo action with realistic boundary conditions. We investigate the role of magnetic boundary conditions in this phenomenon.

  13. Genotype versus phenotype in families with androgen insensitivity syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boehmer, ALM; Bruggenwirth, H; Van Assendelft, C; Otten, BJ; Verleun-Mooijman, MCT; Niermeijer, MF; Brunner, HG; Rouwe, CW; Waelkens, JJ; Oostdijk, W; Kleijer, WJ; Van der Kwast, TH; De Vroede, MA; Drop, SLS

    2001-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome encompasses a wide range of phenotypes, which are caused by numerous different mutations in the AR gene. Detailed information on the genotype/ phenotype relationship in androgen insensitivity syndrome is important for sex assignment, treatment of androgen insensitivit

  14. Reptides and Proteins Interacting with the Androgen Receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. van de Wijngaart (Dennis)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAndrogens are important sex steroid hormones. The androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are essential for normal male sexual differentiation and for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues, including the prostate. Androgens mediate their effects by bin

  15. Androgens modulate male-derived endothelial cell homeostasis using androgen receptor-dependent and receptor-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Estay, Verónica; Carreño, Daniela V; Fuenzalida, Patricia; Watts, Anica; San Francisco, Ignacio F; Montecinos, Viviana P; Sotomayor, Paula C; Ebos, John; Smith, Gary J; Godoy, Alejandro S

    2017-02-01

    Sex-related differences in the role of androgen have been reported in cardiovascular diseases and angiogenesis. Moreover, androgen receptor (AR) has been causally involved in the homeostasis of human prostate endothelial cells. However, levels of expression, functionality and biological role of AR in male- and female-derived human endothelial cells (ECs) remain poorly characterized. The objectives of this work were (1) to characterize the functional expression of AR in male- and female-derived human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC), and (2) to specifically analyze the biological effects of DHT, and the role of AR on these effects, in male-derived HUVECs (mHUVECs). Immunohistochemical analyses of tissue microarrays from benign human tissues confirmed expression of AR in ECs from several androgen-regulated and non-androgen-regulated human organs. Functional expression of AR was validated in vitro in male- and female-derived HUVECs using quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting and AR-mediated transcriptional activity assays. Our results indicated that functional expression of AR in male- and female-derived HUVECs was heterogeneous, but not sex dependent. In parallel, we analyzed in depth the biological effects of DHT, and the role of AR on these effects, on proliferation, survival and tube formation capacity in mHUVECs. Our results indicated that DHT did not affect mHUVEC survival; however, DHT stimulated mHUVEC proliferation and suppressed mHUVEC tube formation capacity. While the effect of DHT on proliferation was mediated through AR, the effect of DHT on tube formation did not depend on the presence of a functional AR, but rather depended on the ability of mHUVECs to further metabolize DHT. (1) Heterogeneous expression of AR in male- and female-derived HUVEC could define the presence of functionally different subpopulations of ECs that may be affected differentially by androgens, which could explain, at least in part, the pleiotropic effects of androgen on

  16. Nrf1 and Nrf2 transcription factors regulate androgen receptor transactivation in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A Schultz

    Full Text Available Despite androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, persistent androgen receptor (AR signaling enables outgrowth of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. In prostate cancer (PCa cells, ADT may enhance AR activity through induction of oxidative stress. Herein, we investigated the roles of Nrf1 and Nrf2, transcription factors that regulate antioxidant gene expression, on hormone-mediated AR transactivation using a syngeneic in vitro model of androgen dependent (LNCaP and castration resistant (C4-2B PCa cells. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT stimulated transactivation of the androgen response element (ARE was significantly greater in C4-2B cells than in LNCaP cells. DHT-induced AR transactivation was coupled with higher nuclear translocation of p65-Nrf1 in C4-2B cells, as compared to LNCaP cells. Conversely, DHT stimulation suppressed total Nrf2 levels in C4-2B cells but elevated total Nrf2 levels in LNCaP cells. Interestingly, siRNA mediated silencing of Nrf1 attenuated AR transactivation while p65-Nrf1 overexpression enhanced AR transactivation. Subsequent studies showed that Nrf1 physically interacts with AR and enhances AR's DNA-binding activity, suggesting that the p65-Nrf1 isoform is a potential AR coactivator. In contrast, Nrf2 suppressed AR-mediated transactivation by stimulating the nuclear accumulation of the p120-Nrf1 which suppressed AR transactivation. Quantitative RT-PCR studies further validated the inductive effects of p65-Nrf1 isoform on the androgen regulated genes, PSA and TMPRSS2. Therefore, our findings implicate differential roles of Nrf1 and Nrf2 in regulating AR transactivation in PCa cells. Our findings also indicate that the DHT-stimulated increase in p65-Nrf1 and the simultaneous suppression of both Nrf2 and p120-Nrf1 ultimately facilitates AR transactivation in CRPC cells.

  17. Androgens and the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Anders; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2002-01-01

    Hypogonadal men share a variety of signs and symptoms such as decreased muscle mass, osteopoenia, increased fat mass, fatigue, decreased libido and cognitive dysfunctions. Controlled trials have demonstrated favourable effects of androgen substitution therapy on these signs and symptoms in men wi...... in some elderly males with low-normal testosterone levels. However, at this point in time, widespread use of testosterone in an elderly male population outside controlled clinical trials seems inappropriate....

  18. Synthetic Androgens as Designer Supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacologic...

  19. Identification of androgen-responsive genes that are alternatively regulated in androgen-dependent and androgen-independent rat prostate tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfundt, R.; Smit, F.P.; Jansen, Corine; Aalders, T.W.; Straatman, H.M.P.M.; Vliet, W. van der; Isaacs, J.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Schalken, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of androgen-dependent prostate tumors progress toward incurable, androgen-independent tumors. The identification of androgen-responsive genes, which are still actively transcribed in the tumors of patients who have undergone androgen ablation, may shed light on the molecular mechan

  20. Intermittent control of coexisting attractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wiercigroch, Marian; Ing, James; Pavlovskaia, Ekaterina

    2013-06-28

    This paper proposes a new control method applicable for a class of non-autonomous dynamical systems that naturally exhibit coexisting attractors. The central idea is based on knowledge of a system's basins of attraction, with control actions being applied intermittently in the time domain when the actual trajectory satisfies a proximity constraint with regards to the desired trajectory. This intermittent control uses an impulsive force to perturb one of the system attractors in order to switch the system response onto another attractor. This is carried out by bringing the perturbed state into the desired basin of attraction. The method has been applied to control both smooth and non-smooth systems, with the Duffing and impact oscillators used as examples. The strength of the intermittent control force is also considered, and a constrained intermittent control law is introduced to investigate the effect of limited control force on the efficiency of the controller. It is shown that increasing the duration of the control action and/or the number of control actuations allows one to successfully switch between the stable attractors using a lower control force. Numerical and experimental results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. Positive effects of intermittent fasting in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fann, David Yang-Wei; Ng, Gavin Yong Quan; Poh, Luting; Arumugam, Thiruma V

    2017-03-01

    Intermittent fasting (IF) is a dietary protocol where energy restriction is induced by alternate periods of ad libitum feeding and fasting. Prophylactic intermittent fasting has been shown to extend lifespan and attenuate the progress and severity of age-related diseases such as cardiovascular (e.g. stroke and myocardial infarction), neurodegenerative (e.g. Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease) and cancerous diseases in animal models. Stroke is the second leading cause of death, and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity and physical inactivity have been associated with elevated risks of stroke in humans. Recent studies have shown that prophylactic IF may mitigate tissue damage and neurological deficit following ischemic stroke by a mechanism(s) involving suppression of excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death pathways in animal stroke models. This review summarizes data supporting the potential hormesis mechanisms of prophylactic IF in animal models, and with a focus on findings from animal studies of prophylactic IF in stroke in our laboratory.

  2. Effect of low-dose oral contraceptives on androgenic markers and acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorneycroft, I H; Stanczyk, F Z; Bradshaw, K D; Ballagh, S A; Nichols, M; Weber, M E

    1999-11-01

    Oral contraceptives (OC) suppress excess androgen production; however, different progestins in combination with low-dose estrogens produce divergent effects on sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and testosterone that may influence clinical outcomes. This multicenter, open-label, randomized study compared biochemical androgen profiles and clinical outcomes associated with two OC containing the same amounts of ethinyl estradiol (EE, 20 micrograms) but different progestins, levonorgestrel (LNG, 100 micrograms), and norethindrone acetate (NETA, 1000 micrograms). Fifty-eight healthy women (18-28 years old) received three cycles of treatment with LNG/EE (n = 30) or NETA/EE (n = 28). The results showed that LNG reduced androgen levels in three compartments--adrenal, ovarian, and peripheral. NETA reduced only adrenal and peripheral androgens. Despite a 2.2-fold greater relative increase in SHBG with NETA than LNG, bioavailable testosterone (T) was reduced by the same amount with LNG and NETA. Both treatments improved acne and were well tolerated. Low-dose OC (EE, 20 micrograms) are effective in reducing circulating androgens and acne lesions without causing weight gain. Although LNG and NETA affected secondary markers differently, both OC formulations produced an equivalent decrease in bioavailable.

  3. Estren promotes androgen phenotypes in primary lymphoid organs and submandibular glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustafsson Jan-Åke

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogens and androgens have extensive effects on the immune system, for example they suppress both T and B lymphopoiesis in thymus and bone marrow. Submandibular glands are sexually dimorphic in rodents, resulting in larger granular convoluted tubules in males compared to females. The aim of the present experiments was to investigate the estrogenic and androgenic effects of 4-estren-3α,17β-diol (estren on thymus, bone marrow and submandibular glands, and compare the effects to those of 17β-estradiol (E2 and 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT, respectively. Estrogen receptors (ERs were blocked by treatment of mice with the ER-antagonist ICI 182,780; also, knock-out mice lacking one or both ERs were used. Results As expected, the presence of functional ERs was mandatory for all the effects of E2. Similar to DHT-treatment, estren-treatment resulted in decreased thymus weight, as well as decreased frequency of bone marrow B cells. Treatment with estren or DHT also resulted in a shift in submandibular glands towards an androgen phenotype. All the effects of estren and DHT were independent of ERs. Conclusion Our study is the first to show that estren has similar effects as the androgen DHT on lymphopoiesis in thymus and bone marrow, and on submandibular glands, and that these effects are independent of estrogen receptors. This supports the hypothesis of estren being able to signal through the androgen receptor.

  4. Effect of MK-906, a specific 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, on serum androgens and androgen conjugates in normal men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittmaster, R S; Stoner, E; Thompson, D L; Nance, D; Lasseter, K C

    1989-01-01

    To determine the hormonal effects of MK-906, an orally active 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, on serum androgens and androgen conjugates, 12 healthy men were given 10, 20, 50, and 100 mg MK-906 2 weeks apart in randomized order in a 4-period crossover design. Serum testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), androstanediol glucuronide, and androsterone glucuronide were measured before and 24 hours after each dose. The effect of MK-906 on glucuronyl transferase activity, the enzyme responsible for androstanediol glucuronide and androsterone glucuronide formation, was assessed in vitro using rat prostate tissue. Serum T levels were unchanged after all doses. Serum DHT, androstanediol glucuronide, and androsterone glucuronide were suppressed by 70, 40, and 56%, respectively, after the 10-mg dose, and by 82, 52, and 66% after the 100-mg dose (P less than 0.02 for the comparison between the 10 and 100-mg doses for all three steroids), respectively. Baseline serum T and DHT levels were strongly correlated (R = 0.89, P = 0.0002), as were androstanediol glucuronide and androsterone glucuronide levels (R = 0.78, P = 0.003), but there was no correlation between DHT levels and the levels of either conjugated steroid. MK-906 had no effect on glucuronyl transferase activity in vitro. It was concluded that single doses of MK-906 suppress both conjugated and unconjugated 5 alpha-reduced androgens. While all three steroids appeared to be good markers of systemic 5 alpha-reductase inhibition, further research will be needed to determine which steroid best reflects tissue DHT levels in patients receiving these inhibitors.

  5. Suppression effects on musical and verbal memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schendel, Zachary A; Palmer, Caroline

    2007-06-01

    Three experiments contrasted the effects of articulatory suppression on recognition memory for musical and verbal sequences. In Experiment 1, a standard/comparison task was employed, with digit or note sequences presented visually or auditorily while participants remained silent or produced intermittent verbal suppression (saying "the") or musical suppression (singing "la"). Both suppression types decreased performance by equivalent amounts, as compared with no suppression. Recognition accuracy was lower during suppression for visually presented digits than during that for auditorily presented digits (consistent with phonological loop predictions), whereas accuracy was equivalent for visually presented notes and auditory tones. When visual interference filled the retention interval in Experiment 2, performance with visually presented notes but not digits was impaired. Experiment 3 forced participants to translate visually presented music sequences by presenting comparison sequences auditorily. Suppression effects for visually presented music resembled those for digits only when the recognition task required sensory translation of cues.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of androgen and antiandrogen action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.W. Kuil (Cor)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe steroid hormones testosterone and 5a-dihydrotestosterone (androgens) control the development, differentiation and function of male reproductive and accessory sex tissues, such as seminal vesicle, epididymis and prostate. Changes in cell properties induced by androgens require the pre

  7. Molecular mechanisms of androgen receptor functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Steketee (Karine)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe androgens testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are steroid hormones, which are necessary for development and maintenance of the functions of the male sex organs, including the prostate. Androgens also play an important role in benign abnormalities of the prostate and in the

  8. Molecular mechanisms of androgen receptor functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Steketee (Karine)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThe androgens testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) are steroid hormones, which are necessary for development and maintenance of the functions of the male sex organs, including the prostate. Androgens also play an important role in benign abnormalities of the prostate and in the

  9. Androgens inhibit the osteogenic response to mechanical loading in adult male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnesael, Mieke; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Dubois, Vanessa; Deboel, Ludo; Delisser, Peter; Behets, Geert J; D'Haese, Patrick C; Carmeliet, Geert; Claessens, Frank; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Androgens are well known to enhance exercise-induced muscle hypertrophy; however, whether androgens also influence bone's adaptive response to mechanical loading remains unclear. We studied the adaptive osteogenic response to unilateral in vivo mechanical loading of tibia in adult male mice in both a long- and a short-term experimental set-up. Mice were divided into four groups: sham operated, orchidectomized (ORX), T (ORX+T), or nonaromatizable dihydrotestosterone (ORX+DHT) replacement. Significant interactions between androgen status and osteogenic response to mechanical loading were observed. Cortical thickness increased by T (0.14 vs 0.11 mm sham, P<.05) and DHT (0.17 vs 0.11 mm sham, P<.05). However, T partially (+36%) and DHT completely (+10%) failed to exhibit the loading-related increase observed in sham (+107%) and ORX (+131%, all P<.05) mice. ORX decreased periosteal bone formation, which was restored to sham levels by T and DHT. However, both androgens completely suppressed the loading-related increase in periosteal bone formation. Short-term loading decreased the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes in sham, whereas in control fibulas, ORX decreased and T increased the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes. Loading no longer down-regulated sclerostin in the ORX or T groups. In conclusion, both T and DHT suppress the osteogenic response to mechanical loading.

  10. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  11. Evaluation of RU58841 as an anti-androgen in prostate PC3 cells and a topical anti-alopecia agent in the bald scalp of stumptailed macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, H J; Wilding, G; Uno, H; Inui, S; Goldsmith, L; Messing, E; Chang, C

    1998-08-01

    The effect of androgen receptor transcriptional activation by RU58841, a nonsteroidal anti-androgen, was studied in the human prostate cancer PC3 cell line by cotransfection with wild-type androgen receptor (wt AR) and an androgen-responsive reporter (MMTV-ARE-CAT) construct. Anti-and rogens, hydroxyflutamide, and Casodex, and the antiestrogen, genistein, were studied in parallel for comparison with RU58841. The wt AR was activated only by the androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Neither the anti-androgens nor antiestrogen can enhance AR transcriptional activity at 10(-11)-10(-7)M in PC3 cells. Hydroxyflutamide, RU58841, and Casodex, but not genistein, displayed competitively suppressive effects on DHT activation of wt AR. The potency of RU58841 was comparable to that of hydroxyflutamide. From this result, topical application of RU58841, which is considered to be a potential therapy for skin diseases, may induce systemic side effects. However, RU58841, on topical application, revealed a potent increase in density, thickening, and length of hair in the macaque model of androgenetic alopecia, whereas no systemic effects were detected. Together our results suggest that RU58841 may have potent antagonism to the wt AR and could be considered as a topically applied active anti-androgen for the treatment of androgen-dependent skin disorders, such as acne, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism.

  12. Intermittent exotropia: Surgical treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Aditya Kelkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical management of intermittent exotropias (IXTs is ambiguous, with techniques of management varying widely between institutions. This review aims to examine available literature on the surgical management of IXT. A literature search was performed using PubMed, Web of Knowledge, LILACS, and the University of Liverpool Orthoptic Journals and Conference Transactions Database. All English-language papers published between 1958 and the present day were considered.

  13. Power-constrained intermittent control

    OpenAIRE

    Gawthrop, P.; Wagg, D.; Neild, S.; Wang, L

    2013-01-01

    In this article, input power, as opposed to the usual input amplitude, constraints are introduced in the context of intermittent control. They are shown to result in a combination of quadratic optimisation and quadratic constraints. The main motivation for considering input power constraints is its similarity with semi-active control. Such methods are commonly used to provide damping in mechanical systems and structures. It is shown that semi-active control can be re-expressed and generalised...

  14. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison K. Heather

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping.

  15. Androgen-stimulated UDP-glucose dehydrogenase expression limits prostate androgen availability without impacting hyaluronan levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qin; Galbenus, Robert; Raza, Ashraf; Cerny, Ronald L.; Simpson, Melanie A.

    2009-01-01

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) oxidizes UDP-glucose to UDP-glucuronate, an essential precursor for production of hyaluronan (HA), proteoglycans, and xenobiotic glucuronides. High levels of HA turnover in prostate cancer are correlated with aggressive progression. UGDH expression is high in the normal prostate even though HA accumulation is virtually undetectable. Thus, its normal role in the prostate may be to provide precursors for glucuronosyltransferase enzymes, which inactivate and solubilize androgens by glucuronidation. In this report, we quantified androgen dependence of UGDH, glucuronosyltransferase, and HA synthase expression. Androgen dependent and independent human prostate cancer cell lines were used to test the effects of UGDH manipulation on tumor cell growth, HA production and androgen glucuronidation. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) increased UGDH expression ≈2.5-fold in androgen dependent cells. However, upregulation of UGDH did not affect HA synthase expression or enhance HA production. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that DHT was converted to a glucuronide, DHT-G, at a six-fold higher level in androgen dependent cells relative to androgen independent cells. The increased solubilization and elimination of DHT corresponded to slower cellular growth kinetics, which could be reversed in androgen dependent cells by treatment with a UDP-glucuronate scavenger. Collectively, these results suggest that dysregulated expression of UGDH could promote the development of androgen independent tumor cell growth by increasing available levels of intracellular androgen. PMID:19244115

  16. Immune activation is inversely related to, but does not cause variation in androgen levels in a cichlid fish species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ros, Albert F. H.; Oliveira, Rui F.; Dijkstra, Peter D.; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Studies on birds and mammals indicate that sexual traits may signal superior health because active immunity, like inflammatory responses to infections, is suppressive to the production of androgens that facilitate the expression of these traits. Here we test this possible pathway for honest signalin

  17. Androgen receptor expression in human ovarian and uterine tissue of long term androgen-treated transsexual women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Chadha; T.D. Pache; F.J. Huikeshoven (Frans); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen receptor (AR) modulation in human uteri and ovaries of long term androgen-treated transsexual female patients was investigated. Androgen receptor expression was evaluated immunohistochemically in the ovaries of 11 and the endometria and myometria of six androgen-treated transsex

  18. Inhibition of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer by Estrogenic Compounds Is Associated with Increased Expression of Immune-Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilsa M. Coleman

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The clinical utility of estrogens for treating prostate cancer (CaP was established in the 1940s by Huggins. The classic model of the anti-CaP activity of estrogens postulates an indirect mechanism involving the suppression of androgen production. However, clinical, preclinical studies have shown that estrogens exert growth-inhibitory effects on CaP under low-androgen conditions, suggesting additional modes whereby estrogens affect CaP cells and/or the microenvironment. Here we have investigated the activity of 17β estradiol (E2 against androgen-independent CaP, identified molecular alterations in tumors exposed to E2. E2 treatment inhibited the growth of all four androgen-independent CaP xenografts studied (LuCaP 35V, LuCaP 23.1AI, LuCaP 49, LuCaP 58 in castrated male mice. The molecular basis of growth suppression was studied by cDNA microarray analysis, which indicated that multiple pathways are altered by E2 treatment. Of particular interest are changes in transcripts encoding proteins that mediate immune responses, regulate androgen receptor signaling. In conclusion, our data show that estrogens have powerful inhibitory effects on CaP in vivo in androgendepleted environments, suggest novel mechanisms of estrogen-mediated antitumor activity. These results indicate that incorporating estrogens into CaP treatment protocols could enhance therapeutic efficacy even in cases of advanced disease.

  19. Selective androgen receptor modulators: in pursuit of tissue-selective androgens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omwancha, Josephat; Brown, Terry R

    2006-10-01

    The androgen receptor mediates the androgenic and anabolic activity of the endogenous steroids testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Current knowledge of the androgen receptor protein structure, and the molecular mechanisms surrounding the binding properties and activities of agonists and antagonists has led to the design and development of novel nonsteroidal ligands with selected tissue-specific androgen receptor agonist and antagonist activities. The activity of these compounds, termed selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs), is directed toward the maintenance or enhancement of anabolic effects on bone and muscle with minimal androgenic effects on prostate growth. SARMs are of potential therapeutic value in the treatment of male hypogonadism, osteoporosis, frailty and muscle wasting, burn injury and would healing, anemia, mood and depression, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

  20. Androgens in pregnancy: roles in parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makieva, Sofia; Saunders, Philippa T K; Norman, Jane E

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the physiology of pregnancy enables effective management of pregnancy complications that could otherwise be life threatening for both mother and fetus. A functional uterus (i) retains the fetus in utero during pregnancy without initiating stretch-induced contractions and (ii) is able to dilate the cervix and contract the myometrium at term to deliver the fetus. The onset of labour is associated with successful cervical remodelling and contraction of myometrium, arising from concomitant activation of uterine immune and endocrine systems. A large body of evidence suggests that actions of local steroid hormones may drive changes occurring in the uterine microenvironment at term. Although there have been a number of studies considering the potential role(s) played by progesterone and estrogen at the time of parturition, the bio-availability and effects of androgens during pregnancy have received less scrutiny. The aim of this review is to highlight potential roles of androgens in the biology of pregnancy and parturition. A review of published literature was performed to address (i) androgen concentrations, including biosynthesis and clearance, in maternal and fetal compartments throughout gestation, (ii) associations of androgen concentrations with adverse pregnancy outcomes, (iii) the role of androgens in the physiology of cervical remodelling and finally (iv) the role of androgens in the physiology of myometrial function including any impact on contractility. Some, but not all, androgens increase throughout gestation in maternal circulation. The effects of this increase are not fully understood; however, evidence suggests that increased androgens might regulate key processes during pregnancy and parturition. For example, androgens are believed to be critical for cervical remodelling at term, in particular cervical ripening, via regulation of cervical collagen fibril organization. Additionally, a number of studies highlight potential roles for androgens

  1. Androgens in pregnancy: roles in parturition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makieva, Sofia; Saunders, Philippa T.K.; Norman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding the physiology of pregnancy enables effective management of pregnancy complications that could otherwise be life threatening for both mother and fetus. A functional uterus (i) retains the fetus in utero during pregnancy without initiating stretch-induced contractions and (ii) is able to dilate the cervix and contract the myometrium at term to deliver the fetus. The onset of labour is associated with successful cervical remodelling and contraction of myometrium, arising from concomitant activation of uterine immune and endocrine systems. A large body of evidence suggests that actions of local steroid hormones may drive changes occurring in the uterine microenvironment at term. Although there have been a number of studies considering the potential role(s) played by progesterone and estrogen at the time of parturition, the bio-availability and effects of androgens during pregnancy have received less scrutiny. The aim of this review is to highlight potential roles of androgens in the biology of pregnancy and parturition. METHODS A review of published literature was performed to address (i) androgen concentrations, including biosynthesis and clearance, in maternal and fetal compartments throughout gestation, (ii) associations of androgen concentrations with adverse pregnancy outcomes, (iii) the role of androgens in the physiology of cervical remodelling and finally (iv) the role of androgens in the physiology of myometrial function including any impact on contractility. RESULTS Some, but not all, androgens increase throughout gestation in maternal circulation. The effects of this increase are not fully understood; however, evidence suggests that increased androgens might regulate key processes during pregnancy and parturition. For example, androgens are believed to be critical for cervical remodelling at term, in particular cervical ripening, via regulation of cervical collagen fibril organization. Additionally, a number of studies highlight

  2. Androgen-responsive gene database: integrated knowledge on androgen-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mei; Ma, Yunsheng; Chen, Congcong; Fu, Xuping; Yang, Shu; Li, Xia; Yu, Guohua; Mao, Yumin; Xie, Yi; Li, Yao

    2009-11-01

    Androgen signaling plays an important role in many biological processes. Androgen Responsive Gene Database (ARGDB) is devoted to providing integrated knowledge on androgen-controlled genes. Gene records were collected on the basis of PubMed literature collections. More than 6000 abstracts and 950 original publications were manually screened, leading to 1785 human genes, 993 mouse genes, and 583 rat genes finally included in the database. All the collected genes were experimentally proved to be regulated by androgen at the expression level or to contain androgen-responsive regions. For each gene important details of the androgen regulation experiments were collected from references, such as expression change, androgen-responsive sequence, response time, tissue/cell type, experimental method, ligand identity, and androgen amount, which will facilitate further evaluation by researchers. Furthermore, the database was integrated with multiple annotation resources, including National Center for Biotechnology Information, Gene Ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, to reveal the biological characteristics and significance of androgen-regulated genes. The ARGDB web site is mainly composed of the Browse, Search, Element Scan, and Submission modules. It is user friendly and freely accessible at http://argdb.fudan.edu.cn. Preliminary analysis of the collected data was performed. Many disease pathways, such as prostate carcinogenesis, were found to be enriched in androgen-regulated genes. The discovered androgen-response motifs were similar to those in previous reports. The analysis results are displayed in the web site. In conclusion, ARGDB provides a unified gateway to storage, retrieval, and update of information on androgen-regulated genes.

  3. Expanding the therapeutic use of androgens via selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a novel class of androgen receptor (AR) ligands that might change the future of androgen therapy dramatically. With improved pharmacokinetic characteristics and tissue-selective pharmacological activities, SARMs are expected to greatly extend the clinical applications of androgens to osteoporosis, muscle wasting, male contraception and diseases of the prostate. Mechanistic studies with currently available SARMs will help to define the contributions of differential tissue distribution, tissue-specific expression of 5α-reductase, ligand-specific regulation of gene expression and AR interactions with tissue-specific coactivators to their observed tissue selectivity, and lead to even greater expansion of selective anabolic therapies. PMID:17331889

  4. Expanding the therapeutic use of androgens via selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a novel class of androgen receptor (AR) ligands that might change the future of androgen therapy dramatically. With improved pharmacokinetic characteristics and tissue-selective pharmacological activities, SARMs are expected to greatly extend the clinical applications of androgens to osteoporosis, muscle wasting, male contraception and diseases of the prostate. Mechanistic studies with currently available SARMs will help to define the contributions of differential tissue distribution, tissue-specific expression of 5alpha-reductase, ligand-specific regulation of gene expression and AR interactions with tissue-specific coactivators to their observed tissue selectivity, and lead to even greater expansion of selective anabolic therapies.

  5. Intermittent redesign of continuous controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawthrop, Peter J.; Wang, Liuping

    2010-08-01

    The reverse-engineering idea developed by Maciejowski in the context of model-based predictive control is applied to the redesign of continuous-time compensators as intermittent controllers. Not only does this give a way of designing constrained input and state versions of continuous-time compensators but also provides a method for turning continuous-time compensators into event-driven versions. The procedure is illustrated by three examples: an event-driven PID controller relevant to the human balance control problem, a constrained version of the classical mechanical vibration absorber of den Hartog and an event driven and constrained vibration absorber.

  6. ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS AND DEPENDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IHSAN SARI

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Anabolic androgenic steroids are used for sportive, cosmetic, therapeutic and occupational reasons and there are many side effects reported (George, 2005; Nieminen et al., 1996; O'Sullivan et al., 2000. Prevalence of anabolic steroids’ use also indicates the importance of this topic. Moreover, it is now known that use of anabolic steroids could lead to dependence which could be psychological or/and physiological (Copeland et al., 2000. It isimportant to know about all aspects of anabolic steroids including dependence. Therefore, this study has attempted to give an insight into use of anabolic steroids and dependence. The discussion will focus on prevalence, reasons, and side effects of use and physiological and psychological dependence

  7. Synthetic androgens as designer supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed.

  8. ABUSE OF ANABOLIC ANDROGENIC STEROIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Yavari

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available According to the International Olympic Committee, the abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASS is found in over 50% of positive doping tests. AASS abuse is not restricted to the organized sports andwidespread use. It remains as an unsolved public-health problem.Lower black market price, easier access to AASS, bodybuilding clubs and internet advertising are factors of this increasingly misuse. There is not real data about the prevalence of AASS abuse in various populations or countries, because most of athletes or students, due to their prohibition or ethical aspects do not admit to AASS abuse. Often they are aware of the risks of their choice and yet, are eager to put themselves at risk without deeper consideration. The abusers use them to improve their physical fitness and appearance.Present article has been collected to elucidate the risks and adverse effects of AASS and explanation of mechanisms of these events.

  9. Oestrogen-androgen crosstalk in the pathophysiology of erectile dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BSrilatha; PGAdaikan

    2003-01-01

    Ageing in man is associated with a decline in testosterone following changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis. This may offset the physiologic equilibrium between oestrogen and androgen and at some point when the ratio of free testosterone to oestradiol reaches a critical level, the oestrogenic gonadotropin suppressive effect predominates with decreased release of FSH and LH. Adding to this endocrinal complexity is the continued peripheral conversion to oestradiol through aromatisation. Although the androgen deficiency is not the sole cause for impotence in the elderly, there is a gradual decrease in nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT) and spontaneous morning erections with ageing. Despite the age related increase in oestrogen levels, the information on the pathophysiological role of the "female hormone" in erectile dysfunction has been scanty. Together with our identification of oestrogen receptors within the penile cavernosum, we have delineated dysfunctional changes on male erection mediated by oestradiol.These findings parallel the recent concerns over environmental oestrogens on fertility declines in young men. Oestrogenic activity is also present in plants and thereby in human diet. These phytoestrogens are structurally and functionally similar to oestradiol and more potent than the environmental oestrogenic chemicals such as organochlorine and phenolic compounds. Thus in the light of growing concerns of possible compromising effects on sexuality by endogenous and environmental oestrogens, we are faced with the scientific need to delineate their role on the mechanism of male erectile pathway in health and disease for clinical correlates and prognostics.

  10. The relationship between follicular fluid androgen concentrations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in PCOS patients and controls and correlate that with the hormonal ... function attending the Fertility Unit in Mansoura University Hospital. ... is required for the optimal performance of female reproduction , but that excessive androgen signaling ...

  11. Androgen receptor roles in spermatogenesis and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-08-01

    Androgens such as testosterone are steroid hormones essential for normal male reproductive development and function. Mutations of androgen receptors (AR) are often found in patients with disorders of male reproductive development, and milder mutations may be responsible for some cases of male infertility. Androgens exert their action through AR and its signalling in the testis is essential for spermatogenesis. AR is not expressed in the developing germ cell lineage so is thought to exert its effects through testicular Sertoli and peri-tubular myoid (PTM) cells. AR signalling in spermatogenesis has been investigated in rodent models where testosterone levels are chemically supressed or models with transgenic disruption of AR. These models have pinpointed the steps of spermatogenesis that require AR signalling, specifically maintenance of spermatogonial numbers, blood-testis barrier integrity, completion of meiosis, adhesion of spermatids and spermiation, together these studies detail the essential nature of androgens in the promotion of male fertility.

  12. Acne vulgaris related to androgens - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khondker, L; Khan, S I

    2014-01-01

    Sebum production is stimulated by androgens and is the key in the development of acne vulgaris. Several investigators have looked for direct relationships between serum androgen levels, sebum secretion rate and the presence of acne. The presence of acne in prepubertal girls and sebum production in both sexes correlate with serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels. Although increased serum androgen levels correlate with the presence of severe nodular acne in men and women, these levels are often within the normal range in mild to moderate acne. This raises the question of whether there is an increased local production of androgens within the sebaceous gland of patients with acne vulgaris that leads to increased sebum secretion.

  13. Androgen deficiency and metabolic syndrome in men

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Ashley G; Zhao, Fujun; Lee, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a growing health concern worldwide. Initially a point of interest in cardiovascular events, the cluster of HTN, obesity, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance known as MetS has become associated with a variety of other disease processes, including androgen deficiency and late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). Men with MetS are at a higher risk of developing androgen deficiency, and routine screening of testosterone (T) is advised in this population. The pathophysiology of ...

  14. Laparoscopic gonedectomy in a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Bhaskararao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Complete Androgen insensitivity syndrome is a disorder of hormone resistance characterized by a female phenotype in an individual with an XY karyotype. The pathogenesis of CAIS involves a defective androgen receptor gene located on X-chromosome at Xq11-12and end organ insensitivity to androgens, although androgen concentrations are appropriate for the age of the patient. There are three major types of androgen insensitivity syndrome: Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome, minimal androgen insensitivity syndrome, and partial androgen insensitivity syndrome. Management of androgen insensitivity syndrome includes multidisciplinary approach and involves gonedectomy to avoid gonadal tumors in later life. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT and psychological support are required in long-term basis.

  15. Molecular cell biology of androgen receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Nigel C; Gardiner, Robert A; Hooper, John D; Johnson, David W; Gobe, Glenda C

    2010-06-01

    The classical action of androgen receptor (AR) is to regulate gene transcriptional processes via AR nuclear translocation, response element binding and recruitment of, or crosstalk with, transcription factors. AR also utilises non-classical, non-genomic mechanisms of signal transduction. These precede gene transcription or protein synthesis, and involve steroid-induced modulation of cytoplasmic or cell membrane-bound regulatory proteins. Despite many decades of investigation, the role of AR in gene regulation of cells and tissues remains only partially characterised. AR exerts most of its effects in sex hormone-dependent tissues of the body, but the receptor is also expressed in many tissues not previously thought to be androgen sensitive. Thus it is likely that a complex, more over-arching, role for AR exists. Each AR domain co-ordinates a multitude of individual and vital roles via a diverse array of interacting partner molecules that are necessary for cellular and tissue development and maintenance. Aberrant AR activity, promoted by mutations or binding partner misregulation, can present as many clinical manifestations including androgen insensitivity syndrome and prostate cancer. In the case of malignant prostate cancer, treatment generally revolves around androgen deprivation therapies designed to interfere with AR action and the androgen signalling axis. Androgen therapies for prostate cancer often fail, highlighting a real need for increased research into AR function.

  16. Clinical markers of androgenicity in acne vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan-Dare, R A; Hughes, B R; Cunliffe, W J

    1988-12-01

    Androgenic stimulation of sebaceous glands is necessary for development of acne. If hyperandrogenaemia were a major determinant of acne in women, the frequency of other clinical markers of androgenicity should increase with acne severity. To investigate this, 268 female subjects (aged 12-44 years) were studied. Subjects were divided into groups on the basis of acne severity: physiological, moderate, and severe. With exclusion of women taking oral contraceptives or anti-androgen therapy, subjects in each group were similar with respect to age at menarche and incidence of menstrual irregularity of amenorrhoea. Reports of excessive body hair, and clinical hirsutes on examination were few and there were no significant differences between acne severity groups. No correlation was observed between acne and hirsutes grades in all subjects (rank correlation coefficient = 0.096). Mild male pattern androgenic alopecia occurred in similar proportions of subjects in the three groups. Female pattern androgenic alopecia was observed in only two subjects. We have shown no correlation between acne severity and clinical markers of androgenicity in women. This suggests that in most cases factors other than hyperandrogenaemia are necessary for the development of acne.

  17. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  18. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  19. Androgen Depletion Induces Senescence in Prostate Cancer Cells through Down-regulation of Skp2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Pernicová

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Although the induction of senescence in cancer cells is a potent mechanism of tumor suppression, senescent cells remain metabolically active and may secrete a broad spectrum of factors that promote tumorigenicity in neighboring malignant cells. Here we show that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT, a widely used treatment for advanced prostate cancer, induces a senescence-associated secretory phenotype in prostate cancer epithelial cells, indicated by increases in senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, heterochromatin protein 1β foci, and expression of cathepsin B and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3. Interestingly, ADT also induced high levels of vimentin expression in prostate cancer cell lines in vitro and in human prostate tumors in vivo. The induction of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype by androgen depletion was mediated, at least in part, by down-regulation of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2, whereas the neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer cells was under separate control. These data demonstrate a previously unrecognized link between inhibition of androgen receptor signaling, down-regulation of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2, and the appearance of secretory, tumor-promoting senescent cells in prostate tumors. We propose that ADT may contribute to the development of androgen-independent prostate cancer through modulation of the tissue microenvironment by senescent cells.

  20. Sexually dimorphic fin regeneration in zebrafish controlled by androgen/GSK3 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachtrab, Gregory; Czerwinski, Michael; Poss, Kenneth D

    2011-11-22

    Certain fish and amphibians regenerate entire fins and limbs after amputation, whereas such potential is absent in birds and limited in mammals to digit tips [1, 2]. Additionally, regenerative success can change during life stages. Anuran tadpoles gradually lose the capacity to regenerate limbs [3, 4], and digit regeneration occurs more effectively in fetal mice and human children than adults [5-8]. Little is known about mechanisms that control regenerative capacity. Here, we identify an unexpected difference between male and female zebrafish in the regenerative potential of a major appendage. Males display regenerative defects in amputated pectoral fins, caused by impaired blastemal proliferation. This regenerative failure emerges after sexual maturity, is mimicked in androgen-treated females, and is suppressed in males by androgen receptor antagonism. Androgen signaling maintains expression of dkk1b and igfbp2a, which encode secreted inhibitors of Wnt and Igf signaling, respectively. Furthermore, the regulatory target of Wnts and Igfs, GSK3β, is inefficiently inactivated in male fin regenerates compared with females. Pharmacological inhibition of GSK3 in males increases blastemal proliferation and restores regenerative pattern. Our findings identify a natural sex bias in appendage regenerative capacity and indicate an underlying regulatory circuit in which androgen locally restricts key morphogenetic programs after amputation.

  1. Transcriptional regulation of myotrophic actions by testosterone and trenbolone on androgen-responsive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fan; McCoy, Sean C; Ross, Heather H; Bernardo, Joseph A; Beharry, Adam W; Senf, Sarah M; Judge, Andrew R; Beck, Darren T; Conover, Christine F; Cannady, Darryl F; Smith, Barbara K; Yarrow, Joshua F; Borst, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    Androgens regulate body composition and skeletal muscle mass in males, but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, we demonstrated that trenbolone (a potent synthetic testosterone analogue that is not a substrate for 5-alpha reductase or for aromatase) induces myotrophic effects in skeletal muscle without causing prostate enlargement, which is in contrast to the known prostate enlarging effects of testosterone. These previous results suggest that the 5α-reduction of testosterone is not required for myotrophic action. We now report differential gene expression in response to testosterone versus trenbolone in the highly androgen-sensitive levator ani/bulbocavernosus (LABC) muscle complex of the adult rat after 6weeks of orchiectomy (ORX), using real time PCR. The ORX-induced expression of atrogenes (Muscle RING-finger protein-1 [MuRF1] and atrogin-1) was suppressed by both androgens, with trenbolone producing a greater suppression of atrogin-1 mRNA compared to testosterone. Both androgens elevated expression of anabolic genes (insulin-like growth factor-1 and mechano-growth factor) after ORX. ORX-induced increases in expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mRNA were suppressed by trenbolone treatment, but not testosterone. In ORX animals, testosterone promoted WNT1-inducible-signaling pathway protein 2 (WISP-2) gene expression while trenbolone did not. Testosterone and trenbolone equally enhanced muscle regeneration as shown by increases in LABC mass and in protein expression of embryonic myosin by western blotting. In addition, testosterone increased WISP-2 protein levels. Together, these findings identify specific mechanisms by which testosterone and trenbolone may regulate skeletal muscle maintenance and growth.

  2. Cardiovascular physiology of androgens and androgen testosterone therapy in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Shanhong; Komesaroff, Paul A; Sudhir, Krishnankutty

    2009-03-01

    Women before menopause are at relatively lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with age-matched men and after menopause this gender advantage disappears. Androgen has been known to be an independent factor contributing to the higher male susceptibility to CVD, through adverse effects on lipids, blood pressure, and glucose metabolism. High androgen levels also contribute to CVD development in women with polycystic ovary syndrome as well as androgen abusing athletes and body builders. On the other hand, decline in androgen levels, as a result of ageing in men, is associated with hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Postmenopausal women, particularly those with oophorectomy are generally in low levels of sex hormones and androgen insufficiency is independently associated with the higher incidence of atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Androgen testosterone therapy (ATT) has been commonly used to improve well-being and libido in aging men with low androgen levels. The therapy has been demonstrated also to effectively reduce atherogenesis in these people. The use of ATT in postmenopausal women has increased in recent years and to date, however, the cardiovascular benefits of such therapy in these women remain uncertain. This review focuses on research regarding the impact of endogenous androgens and ATT on the cardiovascular physiology and CVD development in postmenopausal women.

  3. Radiation characteristics of intermittence exhaust noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Shengdun; SHANG Chunyang; ZHAO Zhigang; SHI Weixiang

    2000-01-01

    Aerodynamic characteristics, the noise characteristics in the course of intermittence exhaust are investigated and the expressions for sound pressure level of the noise generated by single-pole source and quadrupole source in the intermittence exhaust noise are established. The effects of all parameters in pneumatic system on the noise are also comprehensively studied.

  4. COHO SALMON DEPENDENCE ON INTERMITTENT STREAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In February 2006, the US Supreme Court heard cases that may affect whether intermittent streams are jurisdictional waters under the Clean Water Act. In June 2006, however, the cases were remanded to the circuit court, leaving the status of intermittent streams uncertain once agai...

  5. Selective androgen receptor modulators as improved androgen therapy for advanced breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2014-11-01

    Androgens were at one time a therapeutic mainstay in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. Despite comparable efficacy, SERMs and aromatase inhibitors eventually became the therapies of choice due to in part to preferred side-effect profiles. Molecular characterization of breast tumors has revealed an abundance of androgen receptor expression but the choice of an appropriate androgen receptor ligand (agonist or antagonist) has been confounded by multiple conflicting reports concerning the role of the receptor in the disease. Modern clinical efforts have almost exclusively utilized antagonists. However, the recent clinical development of selective androgen receptor modulators with greatly improved side-effect profiles has renewed interest in androgen agonist therapy for advanced breast cancer.

  6. Kinetic intermittency in magnetized plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Teaca, Bogdan; Told, Daniel; Jenko, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We employ magnetized plasma turbulence, described by a gyrokinetic formalism in an interval ranging from the end of the fluid scales to the electron gyroradius, to introduce the first study of kinetic intermittency, in which nonlinear structures formed directly in the distribution functions are analyzed by accounting for velocity space correlations generated by linear (Landau resonance) and nonlinear phase mixing. Electron structures are found to be strongly intermittent and dominated by linear phase mixing, while nonlinear phase mixing dominates the weakly intermittent ions. This is the first time spatial intermittency and linear phase mixing are shown to be self-consistently linked for the electrons and, as the magnetic field follows the intermittency of the electrons at small scales, explain why magnetic islands are places dominated by Landau damping in steady state turbulence.

  7. Optical diagnostics of intermittent flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, V.L.; Naumov, I.V.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2007-01-01

    The efficiency of combined use of different optical techniques for flow diagnostics is demonstrated with the practically important case of intense swirling flows. It is shown that, when applied separately, commonly used optical measuring techniques, such as laser Doppler anemometry and particle...... image velocimetry, frequently give erroneous results, especially for the transition flow and developed nonstationary flow. However, their combined use in diagnostics of unsteady (intermittent) flows significantly improves both the temporal and spatial resolution of measurements. Such a complex approach...... is for the first time applied for diagnostics of the flow pattern in a closed cylinder with a rotating end face with the aim of studying the changeover from the steady axisymmetric to unsteady asymmetric flow over a wide range of flow parameters. It is found that such a transition is notable for azimuthal...

  8. Intermittent transport in edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.; Nielsen, A.H.; Juul Rasmussen, J. [Association EURATOM-Riso National Laboratory, Optics and Plasma Research, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2004-07-01

    The properties of low-frequency convective fluctuations and transport are investigated for the boundary region of magnetized plasmas. We employ a two-dimensional fluid model for the evolution of the global plasma quantities in a geometry and with parameters relevant to the scrape-off layer of confined toroidal plasmas. Strongly intermittent plasma transport is regulated by self-consistently generated sheared poloidal flows and is mediated by burst ejection of particles and heat from the bulk plasma in the form of blobs. Coarse grained probe signals reveal a highly skewed and flat distribution on short time scales, but tends towards a normal distribution at large time scales. Conditionally averaged signals are in perfect agreement with experimental measurements. (authors)

  9. Cooperative controls with intermittent communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dan; Chen, Genshe; Cruz, Jose B., Jr.; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Lynch, Robert

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a solution to the cooperative path planning with limited communication problem in two phases. In the first (offline) phase, a Pareto-optimal path problem is formulated to find a reference path and the graph cuts minimization method is used to speedily calculate the optimal solution. In the second (online) phase, a foraging algorithm is used to dynamically refine the reference path to meet the dynamic constraints of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAVs), during which an open-loop feedback optimal (OLFO) controller is used to estimate the states which may be unavailable due to infrequent battlefield information updates. Furthermore, an adaptive Markov decision process is proposed to deal with intermittent asynchronous information flow. The method is demonstrated in a simulation for a swarm of Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) teams with various communication ranges.

  10. Intermittent dystonia in Hartnup disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darras, B T; Ampola, M G; Dietz, W H; Gilmore, H E

    1989-01-01

    A 6-month-old girl developed intermittent dystonic posture of the legs and eczematous dermatitis without ataxia. Qualitative and quantitative urine amino acid testing confirmed the diagnosis of Hartnup disease. Cranial computed tomography, electroencephalogram, electromyogram/nerve conduction study, posterior tibial somatosensory evoked potentials, 24-hour electroencephalographic telemetry, and metrizamide myelogram were normal. Spinal fluid hydroxy-indoleacetic acid concentration was less than or equal to 2 S.D. of normal; oral tryptophan loading (70 mg/kg) resulted in a two-fold rise in cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid concentration. Tryptophan administered alone or with nicotinic acid failed to improve the dystonia; however, trihexyphenidyl (1-2 mg/kg/day) dramatically improved it. Hartnup disease should be considered in children with unexplained dystonia.

  11. Lattice splitting under intermittent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Schläpfer, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We study the splitting of regular square lattices subject to stochastic intermittent flows. By extensive Monte Carlo simulations we reveal how the time span until the occurence of a splitting depends on various flow patterns imposed on the lattices. Increasing the flow fluctuation frequencies shortens this time span which reaches a minimum before rising again due to inertia effects incorporated in the model. The size of the largest connected component after the splitting is rather independent of the flow fluctuations but sligthly decreases with the link capacities. Our results are relevant for assessing the robustness of real-life systems, such as electric power grids with a large share of renewable energy sources including wind turbines and photovoltaic systems.

  12. Androgen-induced cell migration: role of androgen receptor/filamin A association.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Castoria

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Androgen receptor (AR controls male morphogenesis, gametogenesis and prostate growth as well as development of prostate cancer. These findings support a role for AR in cell migration and invasiveness. However, the molecular mechanism involved in AR-mediated cell migration still remains elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mouse embryo NIH3T3 fibroblasts and highly metastatic human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells harbor low levels of transcriptionally incompetent AR. We now report that, through extra nuclear action, AR triggers migration of both cell types upon stimulation with physiological concentrations of the androgen R1881. We analyzed the initial events leading to androgen-induced cell migration and observed that challenging NIH3T3 cells with 10 nM R1881 rapidly induces interaction of AR with filamin A (FlnA at cytoskeleton. AR/FlnA complex recruits integrin beta 1, thus activating its dependent cascade. Silencing of AR, FlnA and integrin beta 1 shows that this ternary complex controls focal adhesion kinase (FAK, paxillin and Rac, thereby driving cell migration. FAK-null fibroblasts migrate poorly and Rac inhibition by EHT impairs motility of androgen-treated NIH3T3 cells. Interestingly, FAK and Rac activation by androgens are independent of each other. Findings in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells strengthen the role of Rac in androgen signaling. The Rac inhibitor significantly impairs androgen-induced migration in these cells. A mutant AR, deleted of the sequence interacting with FlnA, fails to mediate FAK activation and paxillin tyrosine phosphorylation in androgen-stimulated cells, further reinforcing the role of AR/FlnA interaction in androgen-mediated motility. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present report, for the first time, indicates that the extra nuclear AR/FlnA/integrin beta 1 complex is the key by which androgen activates signaling leading to cell migration. Assembly of this ternary complex may control organ development

  13. Analytical approach to continuous and intermittent bottleneck flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbing, D.; Johansson, A.; Mathiesen, Joachim Kaj;

    2006-01-01

    Many-particle-inspired theory, Continuous and Intermittent Bottleneck Flows Udgivelsesdato: Oct. 20......Many-particle-inspired theory, Continuous and Intermittent Bottleneck Flows Udgivelsesdato: Oct. 20...

  14. Hypoxia-Independent Downregulation of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 Targets by Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragnum, Harald Bull [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Røe, Kathrine [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Division of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Holm, Ruth; Vlatkovic, Ljiljana [Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Nesland, Jahn Marthin [Department of Pathology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Aarnes, Eva-Katrine [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Ree, Anne Hansen [Division of Medicine, Department of Oncology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog (Norway); Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Flatmark, Kjersti [Department of Tumor Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Seierstad, Therese [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Faculty of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen (Norway); Lilleby, Wolfgang [Department of Oncology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway); Lyng, Heidi, E-mail: heidi.lyng@rr-research.no [Department of Radiation Biology, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo (Norway)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: We explored changes in hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1) signaling during androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenografts under conditions in which no significant change in immunostaining of the hypoxia marker pimonidazole had occurred. Methods and Materials: Gene expression profiles of volume-matched androgen-exposed and androgen-deprived CWR22 xenografts, with similar pimonidazole-positive fractions, were compared. Direct targets of androgen receptor (AR) and HIF1 transcription factors were identified among the differentially expressed genes by using published lists. Biological processes affected by ADT were determined by gene ontology analysis. HIF1α protein expression in xenografts and biopsy samples from 35 patients receiving neoadjuvant ADT was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results: A total of 1344 genes showed more than 2-fold change in expression by ADT, including 35 downregulated and 5 upregulated HIF1 targets. Six genes were shared HIF1 and AR targets, and their downregulation was confirmed with quantitative RT-PCR. Significant suppression of the biological processes proliferation, metabolism, and stress response in androgen-deprived xenografts was found, consistent with tumor regression. Nineteen downregulated HIF1 targets were involved in those significant biological processes, most of them in metabolism. Four of these were shared AR and HIF1 targets, including genes encoding the regulatory glycolytic proteins HK2, PFKFB3, and SLC2A1. Most of the downregulated HIF1 targets were induced by hypoxia in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines, confirming their role as hypoxia-responsive HIF1 targets in prostate cancer. Downregulation of HIF1 targets was consistent with the absence of HIF1α protein in xenografts and downregulation in patients by ADT (P<.001). Conclusions: AR repression by ADT may lead to downregulation of HIF1 signaling independently of hypoxic fraction, and this may contribute to

  15. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, Andrea; Iaquinto, Gaetano; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......The objectives were to assess the beneficial and harmful effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  16. Inhalation of hydrogen gas attenuates left ventricular remodeling induced by intermittent hypoxia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tetsuya; Yoshioka, Toshitaka; Hasegawa, Kenichi; Miyamura, Masatoshi; Mori, Tatsuhiko; Ukimura, Akira; Matsumura, Yasuo; Ishizaka, Nobukazu

    2011-09-01

    Sleep apnea syndrome increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We previously reported that intermittent hypoxia increases superoxide production in a manner dependent on nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate and accelerates adverse left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Recent studies have suggested that hydrogen (H(2)) may have an antioxidant effect by reducing hydroxyl radicals. In this study, we investigated the effects of H(2) gas inhalation on lipid metabolism and LV remodeling induced by intermittent hypoxia in mice. Male C57BL/6J mice (n = 62) were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (repetitive cycle of 1-min periods of 5 and 21% oxygen for 8 h during daytime) for 7 days. H(2) gas (1.3 vol/100 vol) was given either at the time of reoxygenation, during hypoxic conditions, or throughout the experimental period. Mice kept under normoxic conditions served as controls (n = 13). Intermittent hypoxia significantly increased plasma levels of low- and very low-density cholesterol and the amount of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal-modified protein adducts in the LV myocardium. It also upregulated mRNA expression of tissue necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and brain natriuretic peptide, increased production of superoxide, and induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, nuclear deformity, mitochondrial degeneration, and interstitial fibrosis. H(2) gas inhalation significantly suppressed these changes induced by intermittent hypoxia. In particular, H(2) gas inhaled at the timing of reoxygenation or throughout the experiment was effective in preventing dyslipidemia and suppressing superoxide production in the LV myocardium. These results suggest that inhalation of H(2) gas was effective for reducing oxidative stress and preventing LV remodeling induced by intermittent hypoxia relevant to sleep apnea.

  17. Androgen circle of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homburg, Roy

    2009-07-01

    Although the aetiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is still not known and the search for causative genes is proving elusive, it is generally agreed that hyperandrogenism is at the heart of the syndrome. Here, it is proposed that excess androgens are the root cause of PCOS starting from their influence on the female fetus in programming gene expression, producing the characteristic signs and symptoms which are then exacerbated by a propagation of excess ovarian androgen production from multiple small follicles, anovulation and insulin resistance in the reproductive life-span, thus setting up a vicious perpetual circle of androgen excess. This opinion paper, rather than being a full-scale review, is intentionally biased in support of this hypothesis that androgen excess is the 'root of all evil' in PCOS; in the hope that its acceptance could lead to more direct treatment of the syndrome in all its facets rather than the symptomatic treatment of side effects of androgen excess that we are addressing today.

  18. Prostate cancer characteristics associated with response to pre-receptor targeting of the androgen axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe A Mostaghel

    Full Text Available Factors influencing differential responses of prostate tumors to androgen receptor (AR axis-directed therapeutics are poorly understood, and predictors of treatment efficacy are needed. We hypothesized that the efficacy of inhibiting DHT ligand synthesis would associate with intra-tumoral androgen ratios indicative of relative dependence on DHT-mediated growth.We characterized two androgen-sensitive prostate cancer xenograft models after androgen suppression by castration in combination with the SRD5A inhibitor, dutasteride, as well as a panel of castration resistant metastases obtained via rapid autopsy.In LuCaP35 tumors (intra-tumoral T:DHT ratio 2:1 dutasteride suppressed DHT to 0.02 ng/gm and prolonged survival vs. castration alone (337 vs.152 days, HR 2.8, p = 0.0015. In LuCaP96 tumors (T:DHT 10:1, survival was not improved despite similar DHT reduction (0.02 ng/gm. LuCaP35 demonstrated higher expression of steroid biosynthetic enzymes maintaining DHT levels (5-fold higher SRD5A1, 41 fold higher, 99-fold higher RL-HSD, p<0.0001 for both, reconstitution of intra-tumoral DHT (to ∼30% of untreated tumors, and ∼2 fold increased expression of full length AR. In contrast, LuCaP96 demonstrated higher levels of steroid catabolizing enzymes (6.9-fold higher AKR1C2, 3000-fold higher UGT2B15, p = 0.002 and p<0.0001 respectively, persistent suppression of intra-tumoral DHT, and 6-8 fold induction of full length AR and the ligand independent V7 AR splice variant. Human metastases demonstrated bio-active androgen levels and AR full length and AR splice-variant expression consistent with the range observed in xenografts.Intrinsic differences in basal steroidogenesis, as well as variable expression of full length and splice-variant AR, associate with response and resistance to pre-receptor AR ligand suppression. Expression of steroidogenic enzymes and AR isoforms may serve as potential biomarkers of sensitivity to potent AR-axis inhibition and

  19. Discovery AND Therapeutic Promise OF Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiyun; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and the maintenance of male secondary characteristics, such as bone mass, muscle mass, body composition, and spermatogenesis. The main disadvantages of steroidal androgens are their undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The recent discovery of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) provides a promising alternative for testosterone replacement therapies with advantages including oral bioavailability, flexibility of structural modification, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the lack of steroid-related side effects. PMID:15994457

  20. Discovery and therapeutic promise of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiyun; Kim, Juhyun; Dalton, James T

    2005-06-01

    Androgens are essential for male development and the maintenance of male secondary characteristics, such as bone mass, muscle mass, body composition, and spermatogenesis. The main disadvantages of steroidal androgens are their undesirable physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties. The recent discovery of nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) provides a promising alternative for testosterone replacement therapies with advantages including oral bioavailability, flexibility of structural modification, androgen receptor specificity, tissue selectivity, and the lack of steroid-related side effects.

  1. Assessing Relative Volatility/Intermittency/Energy Dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency even when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...... process in particular. While this estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, we apply it also to energy price data. Moreover, we develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for relative power variations of Brownian semistationary...... processes and Ito semimartingales and discuss how it can be used for inference on relative volatility/intermittency....

  2. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  3. Computational Investigation on the Allosteric Modulation of Androgen Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Min-Rui; LI Jun-Qian

    2012-01-01

    Androgens have similar structures with different biological activities. To identify molecular determinants responsible for the activity difference, we have docked six steroidal androgens to the binding site or the surface of androgen receptor by using molecular docking with computational investigation. The energy was calculated respectively based on the QM (quantum mechanics) and MM (molecular mechanics) methods. The result shows that the allosteric modulation of androgen receptor plays an important role in the binding process between androgens and receptor. The open state receptor is less stable than the close state one, but the latter is more favorable for binding with androgens. It is worthy of note that when the androgen receptors binding or without binding with androgen are in close state, they are difficult to return to their open state. This phenomenon is an exception of the well known two-state model theory in which the two states are reversible. Whether the internal of close state androgen receptor has a combination of androgen or not, the androgen receptor surface can be combined with another androgen, and their surface binding energies could be very close. The result is consistent with the experimental observations, but this phenomenon of continuous combination from open state is also an exception of the two-state model theory.

  4. The transcriptional programme of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Alastair D; Massie, Charlie E; Neal, David E

    2014-03-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is essential for normal prostate and prostate cancer cell growth. AR transcriptional activity is almost always maintained even in hormone relapsed prostate cancer (HRPC) in the absence of normal levels of circulating testosterone. Current molecular techniques, such as chromatin-immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), have permitted identification of direct AR-binding sites in cell lines and human tissue with a distinct coordinate network evident in HRPC. The effectiveness of novel agents, such as abiraterone acetate (suppresses adrenal androgens) or enzalutamide (MDV3100, potent AR antagonist), in treating advanced prostate cancer underlines the on-going critical role of the AR throughout all stages of the disease. Persistent AR activity in advanced disease regulates cell cycle activity, steroid biosynthesis and anabolic metabolism in conjunction with regulatory co-factors, such as the E2F family, c-Myc and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) transcription factors. Further treatment approaches must target these other factors.

  5. High dose androgen therapy in male pseudohermaphroditism due to 5 alpha-reductase deficiency and disorders of the androgen receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Price, P; Wass, J. A.; Griffin, J E; Leshin, M; Savage, M O; Large, D. M.; Bu'Lock, D E; Anderson, D. C.; Wilson, J. D.; Besser, G M

    1984-01-01

    We describe the clinical and biochemical features of six men with male pseudohermaphroditism due to androgen resistance. Each of the subjects had male-gender behavior but incomplete virilization. The underlying defects in androgen metabolism were defined by studies of the 5 alpha-reductase enzyme and the androgen receptor in fibroblasts cultured from biopsies of genital skin. Four of the six have 5 alpha-reductase deficiency, and two have defects of the androgen receptor (the Reifenstein synd...

  6. Relationships between androgens, serotonin gene expression and innervation in male macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, C L; Coleman, K; Phu, K; Reddy, A P; Phu, A

    2014-08-22

    Androgen administration to castrated individuals was purported to decrease activity in the serotonin system. However, we found that androgen administration to castrated male macaques increased fenfluramine-induced serotonin release as reflected by increased prolactin secretion. In this study, we sought to define the effects of androgens and aromatase inhibition on serotonin-related gene expression in the dorsal raphe, as well as serotonergic innervation of the LC. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with (1) placebo, (2) testosterone (T), (3) dihydrotestosterone (DHT; non-aromatizable androgen) and ATD (steroidal aromatase inhibitor), or (4) Flutamide (FLUT; androgen antagonist) and ATD (n=5/group). This study reports the expression of serotonin-related genes: tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and the serotonin 1A autoreceptor (5HT1A) using digoxigenin-ISH and image analysis. To examine the production of serotonin and the serotonergic innervation of a target area underlying arousal and vigilance, we measured the serotonin axon density entering the LC with ICC and image analysis. TPH2 and SERT expression were significantly elevated in T- and DHT + ATD-treated groups over placebo- and FLUT + ATD-treated groups in the dorsal raphe (p expression between the groups. There was a significant decrease in the pixel area of serotonin axons and in the number of varicosities in the LC across the treatment groups with T > placebo > DHT + ATD = FLUT + ATD treatments. Comparatively, T- and DHT + ATD-treated groups had elevated TPH2 and SERT gene expression, but the DHT + ATD group had markedly suppressed serotonin axon density relative to the T-treated group. Further comparison with previously published data indicated that TPH2 and SERT expression reflected yawning and basal prolactin secretion. The serotonin axon density in the LC agreed with the area under the fenfluramine

  7. Effect of androgen on Kiss1 expression and luteinizing hormone release in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Kinuyo; Kunimura, Yuyu; Matsumoto, Keisuke; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2017-06-01

    Hyperandrogenic women have various grades of ovulatory dysfunction, which lead to infertility. The purpose of this study was to determine whether chronic exposure to androgen affects the expression of kisspeptin (ovulation and follicle development regulator) or release of luteinizing hormone (LH) in female rats. Weaned females were subcutaneously implanted with 90-day continuous-release pellets of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and studied after 10 weeks of age. Number of Kiss1-expressing cells in both the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and arcuate nucleus (ARC) was significantly decreased in ovary-intact DHT rats. Further, an estradiol-induced LH surge was not detected in DHT rats, even though significant differences were not observed between DHT and non-DHT rats with regard to number of AVPV Kiss1-expressing cells or gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-immunoreactive (ir) cells in the presence of high estradiol. Kiss1-expressing and neurokinin B-ir cells were significantly decreased in the ARC of ovariectomized (OVX) DHT rats compared with OVX non-DHT rats; pulsatile LH secretion was also suppressed in these animals. Central injection of kisspeptin-10 or intravenous injection of a GnRH agonist did not affect the LH release in DHT rats. Notably, ARC Kiss1-expressing cells expressed androgen receptors (ARs) in female rats, whereas only a few Kiss1-expressing cells expressed ARs in the AVPV. Collectively, our results suggest excessive androgen suppresses LH surge and pulsatile LH secretion by inhibiting kisspeptin expression in the ARC and disruption at the pituitary level, whereas AVPV kisspeptin neurons appear to be directly unaffected by androgen. Hence, hyperandrogenemia may adversely affect ARC kisspeptin neurons, resulting in anovulation and menstrual irregularities. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  8. Using Anabolic Androgenic Steroids in Sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefa Lök

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is known that sportsmen especially youngers who engaged in athletism, weight lifting and body building sport have beenusing ‘‘Anabolic Androgenic Steroid’’ (AAS intensively for purpose of doping during world sport history. Used dopingsubstances to increase sport performance differ from sport branches. In some sport branches, it is used to diminish neuralstress while in other sport branches it is used to increase force, endurance and resistance against exhaustion. Today amongsportsmen using ergogenic substances to increase rivalry and physical performance for purpose of doping are increased. Inthis study using anabolic androgenic steroids in sports will be assessed.

  9. Sky dancer: an intermittent system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Anne; Rodríguez Romero, Jesse Alexander; Damián Díaz Andrade, Oscar

    2009-11-01

    Sky dancers attract people sight to make advertising. What is the origin of those large vertical tubes fluctuations above an air blower? This study complements the previous one [1] about the system analysis from a dynamical system point of view. As a difference from the ``garden hose-instability'' [2], the tube shape has got ``break points''. Those ``break points'' separate the air-filled bottom tube portion from its deflated top portion. We record the tube dynamics with a high-speed videocamera simultaneously that we measure the pressure at the air blower exit. The intermittent pressure evolution displays picks when the tube fluctuates. We compare those overpressure values with the ones that appears in a rigid tube whose exit is partially obstructed. [1] F. Castillo Flores & A. Cros ``Transition to chaos of a vertical collapsible tube conveying air flow'' J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 166, 012017 (2009). [2] A. S. Greenwald & J. Dungundji ``Static and dynamic instabilities of a propellant line'' MIT Aeroelastic and Structures Research Lab, AFOSR Sci. Report: AFOSR 67-1395 (1967).

  10. Intermittent chaotic chimeras for coupled rotators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmi, Simona; Martens, Erik Andreas; Thutupalli, Shashi

    2015-01-01

    Two symmetrically coupled populations of N oscillators with inertia m display chaotic solutions with broken symmetry similar to experimental observations with mechanical pendulums. In particular, we report evidence of intermittent chaotic chimeras, where one population is synchronized and the other...

  11. Improved Intermittency Analysis of Single Event Data

    OpenAIRE

    Janik, R. A.; Ziaja, B.

    1998-01-01

    The intermittency analysis of single event data (particle moments) in multiparticle production is improved, taking into account corrections due to the reconstruction of history of a particle cascade. This approach is tested within the framework of the $\\alpha$-model.

  12. On-line intermittent connector anomaly detection

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper investigates a non-traditional use of differential current sensor and current sensor to detect intermittent disconnection problems in connectors. An...

  13. Beneficial effects of intermittent suction and pressure treatment in intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, J; Himmelstrup, H; Himmelstrup, Bodil

    1993-01-01

    The present study reports on the effects of a physical treatment modality in patients with intermittent claudication. During this treatment a major part of the skin surface is subjected to intermittent suction and pressure. In a previous, preliminary study the authors found a beneficial effect...... administration. The treatment caused significant increments in the ADP thresholds for platelet aggregation, while the effects on fibrinolysis were uncertain. It is concluded that intermittent suction and pressure treatment offers a new approach for conservative treatment of intermittent claudication....

  14. Effects of high intensity intermittent exercise on serum Immunoglobulin’s and Complement system response in youth soccer players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Shirvani

    2013-11-01

    Conclusion: In general, it seems that performing a 90- minute intermittent exercise session by young soccer players can cause stress and act as a suppressive factor against immunoglobulin G and A. Hence, it is likely that repeating such an exercise makes young soccer players prone to upper respiratory tract infection, resulting in the reduction of the two major immunoglobulins.

  15. Lacunarity and intermittency in fluid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. A.; Fournier, J.-D.; Spiegel, E. A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that oscillations in the high-order moments of turbulent velocity fields are inherent to the fractal character of intermittent turbulence and are a feature of the lacunarity of fractal sets. Oscillations in simple Cantor sets are described, and a single parameter to measure lacunarity is identified. The connection between oscillations in fractals and in the turbulent velocity correlations is discussed using the phenomenological beta model of intermittent turbulence (Frisch et al., 1978).

  16. Emission Enhancement and Intermittency in Polycrystalline Organolead Halide Perovskite Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic-organic halide organometal perovskites have demonstrated very promising performance for opto-electronic applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, lasers, single-photon sources, etc. However, the little knowledge on the underlying photophysics, especially on a microscopic scale, hampers the further improvement of devices based on this material. In this communication, correlated conventional photoluminescence (PL characterization and wide-field PL imaging as a function of time are employed to investigate the spatially- and temporally-resolved PL in CH3NH3PbI3−xClx perovskite films. Along with a continuous increase of the PL intensity during light soaking, we also observe PL blinking or PL intermittency behavior in individual grains of these films. Combined with significant suppression of PL blinking in perovskite films coated with a phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM layer, it suggests that this PL intermittency is attributed to Auger recombination induced by photoionized defects/traps or mobile ions within grains. These defects/traps are detrimental for light conversion and can be effectively passivated by the PCBM layer. This finding paves the way to provide a guideline on the further improvement of perovskite opto-electronic devices.

  17. Intermittent exposure to xenon protects against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Jia

    Full Text Available Aminoglycoside antibiotics, especially gentamicin, are widely used to treat Gram-negative infections due to their efficacy and low cost. Nevertheless the use of gentamicin is limited by its major side effect, nephrotoxicity. Xenon (Xe provided substantial organoprotective effects in acute injury of the brain and the heart and protected against renal ischemic-reperfusion injury. In this study, we investigated whether xenon could protect against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were intermittently exposed to either 70% xenon or 70% nitrogen (N2 balanced with 30% oxygen before and during gentamicin administration at a dose of 100 mg/kg for 7 days to model gentamicin-induced kidney injury. We observed that intermittent exposure to Xe provided morphological and functional renoprotection, which was characterized by attenuation of renal tubular damage, apoptosis, and oxidative stress, but not a reduction in inflammation. We also found that Xe pretreatment upregulated hypoxia-inducible factor 2α (HIF-2α and its downstream effector vascular endothelial growth factor, but not HIF-1α. With regard to the three HIF prolyl hydroxylases, Xe pretreatment upregulated prolyl hydroxylase domain-containing protein-2 (PHD2, suppressed PHD1, and had no influence on PHD3 in the rat kidneys. Pretreatment with Xe also increased the expression of miR-21, a microRNA known to have anti-apoptotic effects. These results support Xe renoprotection against gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  18. Antioxidants Abrogate Alpha-Tocopherylquinone-Mediated Down-Regulation of the Androgen Receptor in Androgen-Responsive Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Fajardo

    Full Text Available Tocopherylquinone (TQ, the oxidation product of alpha-tocopherol (AT, is a bioactive molecule with distinct properties from AT. In this study, AT and TQ are investigated for their comparative effects on growth and androgenic activity in prostate cancer cells. TQ potently inhibited the growth of androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines (e.g., LAPC4 and LNCaP cells, whereas the growth of androgen-independent prostate cancer cells (e.g., DU145 cells was not affected by TQ. Due to the growth inhibitory effects induced by TQ on androgen-responsive cells, the anti-androgenic properties of TQ were examined. TQ inhibited the androgen-induced activation of an androgen-responsive reporter and inhibited the release of prostate specific antigen from LNCaP cells. TQ pretreatment was also found to inhibit AR activation as measured using the Multifunctional Androgen Receptor Screening assay. Furthermore, TQ decreased androgen-responsive gene expression, including TM4SF1, KLK2, and PSA over 5-fold, whereas AT did not affect the expression of androgen-responsive genes. Of importance, the antiandrogenic effects of TQ on prostate cancer cells were found to result from androgen receptor protein down-regulation produced by TQ that was not observed with AT treatment. Moreover, none of the androgenic endpoints assessed were affected by AT. The down-regulation of androgen receptor protein by TQ was abrogated by co-treatment with antioxidants. Overall, the biological actions of TQ were found to be distinct from AT, where TQ was found to be a potent inhibitor of cell growth and androgenic activity in androgen-responsive prostate cancer cells.

  19. Androgen inhibits the growth of carcinoma cell lines established from prostate cancer xenografts that escape androgen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly-Pharaboz, Marie-Odile; Kalach, Jean-Jacques; Pharaboz, Julie; Chantepie, Jacqueline; Nicolas, Brigitte; Baille, Marie-Laurence; Ruffion, Alain; Benahmed, Mohamed; André, Jean

    2008-07-01

    Most prostate cancers escape endocrine therapy by diverse mechanisms. One of them might be growth repression by androgen. We reported that androgen represses the growth in culture of MOP cells (a sub-line of LNCaP cells) and that of MOP cell xenografts, although tumor growth becomes androgen-independent (AI). Here we explore whether AI tumors contain androgen-responsive cells. ME carcinoma cells were established from AI tumors. The responses to androgen were examined by cell counting, DAPI labeling, flow cytometry, PSA immunoassay and tumor size follow-up. Androgen receptors (AR) were analyzed by western blotting and DNA sequencing. The pattern of responses of these cells to androgen was compared to that of MOP cells and that of JAC cells established from LNCaP-like MOP cells. R1881, a synthetic androgen: (1) repressed the growth of all the six ME cell lines obtained, MOP and JAC cells, (2) augmented the secretion of PSA, (3) induced spectacular cell bubbling/fragmentation and (4) blocked the cell cycle and induced a modest increase of apoptosis. All the androgen-repressed cells expressed the same level of mutated AR as LNCaP cells. In nude mice, the growth of ME-2 cell xenografts displayed transient androgen repression similar to that of MOP cells. In culture neither fibroblasts nor extra-cellular matrix altered the effects of R1881 on cell proliferation. These results demonstrate that androgen-independent tumors contain androgen-responsive cells. The apparent discrepancy between the responses to androgen of tumors and those of carcinoma cells in culture suggests that microenvironmental factors contribute to the androgen responsiveness of tumor cells in vivo. These modifications, albeit unspecified, could be suitable targets for restoring the androgen responsiveness of AI tumors.

  20. [Role of androgen in the elderly. Current status of development of selective androgen receptor modulator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Toshihiko

    2013-08-01

    The research to develop a drug, so called selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) , which shows beneficial androgenic action on bone and muscle, but hardly possesses the stimulatory action on prostate has been making a progress. However, no drug is available in the market at present. Most of such drugs are developed, aiming at the application to age-related muscle reduction (sarcopenia) and osteoporosis. We are now trying to develop a SARM which may have beneficial effect on metabolic syndrome.

  1. Kinase modulation of androgen receptor signaling: implications for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kalpit; Bradbury, Neil A.

    2017-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors play essential roles in the development and progression of prostate cancer, a disease that claims roughly 28,000 lives annually. In addition to androgen biding, androgen receptor activity can be regulated via several post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination, acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation & SUMO-ylation. Off these modifications, phosphorylation has been the most extensively studied. Modification by phosphorylation can alter androgen receptor localization, protein stability and transcriptional activity, ultimately leading to changes in the biology of cancer cells and cancer progression. Understanding, role of phosphorylated androgen receptor species holds the key to identifying a potential therapeutic drug target for patients with prostate cancer and castrate resistant prostate cancer. Here, we present a brief review of recently discovered protein kinases phosphorylating AR, focusing on the functional role of phosphorylated androgen receptor species in prostate cancer and castrate resistant prostate cancer. PMID:28580371

  2. Androgen-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle protein balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Michael L; Steiner, Jennifer L; Gordon, Bradley S

    2017-02-22

    Androgens significantly alter muscle mass in part by shifting protein balance in favor of net protein accretion. During various atrophic conditions, the clinical impact of decreased production or bioavailability of androgens (termed hypogonadism) is important as a loss of muscle mass is intimately linked with survival outcome. While androgen replacement therapy increases muscle mass in part by restoring protein balance, this is not a comprehensive treatment option due to potential side effects. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which androgens alter protein balance is needed for the development of androgen-independent therapies. While the data in humans suggest androgens alter protein balance (both synthesis and breakdown) in the fasted metabolic state, a predominant molecular mechanism(s) behind this observation is still lacking. This failure is likely due in part to inconsistent experimental design between studies including failure to control nutrient/feeding status, the method of altering androgens, and the model systems utilized.

  3. Androgen receptor modulators: a marriage of chemistry and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Iain J

    2013-06-01

    Androgenic steroids are important for male development in utero and secondary sexual characteristics at puberty. In addition, androgens play a role in non-reproductive tissues, such as bone and muscle in both sexes. The actions of the androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are mediated by a single receptor protein, the androgen receptor. Over the last 60-70 years there has been considerable research interest in the development of inhibitors of androgen receptor for the management of diseases such as prostate cancer. However, more recently, there is also a growing appreciation of the need for selective androgen modulators that would demonstrate tissue-selective agonist or antagonist activity. The chemistry and biology of selective agonists, antagonists and selective androgen receptor modulators will be discussed in this review.

  4. Quarkonium suppression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Petreczky

    2003-04-01

    I discuss quarkonium suppression in equilibrated strongly interacting matter. After a brief review of basic features of quarkonium production I discuss the application of recent lattice data on the heavy quark potential to the problem of quarkonium dissociation as well as the problem of direct lattice determination of quarkonium properties in finite temperature lattice QCD.

  5. The androgen receptor and estrogen receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterkamp, H.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) and the estrogen receptors (ER) are members of the nuclear receptor (NR) family. These NRs are distinguished from the other transcription factors by their ability to control gene expression upon ligand binding (steroids, retinoids, thyroid hormone, vitamin D, fatty acids,

  6. Leverpatologi associeret med anaboliske-androgene steroider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Katrine; Søe, Martin Jensen; Gluud, C N

    1994-01-01

    This review regards the liver damaging side-effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). It seems that AAS can cause development of peliosis hepatis, subcellular changes of hepatocytes, hepatocellular hyperplasia and hepatocellular adenomas. On the other hand, it has not been convincingly proved...

  7. Development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Coss, Christopher C; Dalton, James T

    2017-06-15

    The Androgen Receptor (AR), a member of the steroid hormone receptor family, plays important roles in the physiology and pathology of diverse tissues. AR ligands, which include circulating testosterone and locally synthesized dihydrotestosterone, bind to and activate the AR to elicit their effects. Ubiquitous expression of the AR, metabolism and cross reactivity with other receptors limit broad therapeutic utilization of steroidal androgens. However, the discovery of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) and other tissue-selective nuclear hormone receptor modulators that activate their cognate receptors in a tissue-selective manner provides an opportunity to promote the beneficial effects of androgens and other hormones in target tissues with greatly reduced unwanted side-effects. In the last two decades, significant resources have been dedicated to the discovery and biological characterization of SARMs in an effort to harness the untapped potential of the AR. SARMs have been proposed as treatments of choice for various diseases, including muscle-wasting, breast cancer, and osteoporosis. This review provides insight into the evolution of SARMs from proof-of-concept agents to the cusp of therapeutic use in less than two decades, while covering contemporary views of their mechanisms of action and therapeutic benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Deciphering the selective androgen receptor modulators paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Sui, Zhihua

    2013-02-01

    The development and potential clinical use of tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have advanced tremendously over the past few years. A key aspect of SARMs is the ability to clearly differentiate between the anabolic and androgenic activities. SARMs provide therapeutic opportunities in a variety of diseases, including muscle wasting associated with burns, cancer, end-stage renal disease, osteoporosis, frailty and hypogonadism. The aim of the present paper is to summarize the current standing of research and development of SARMs and plausible molecular mechanisms underlying the potential for selective modulation of androgen receptor (AR) by different ligands. This paper also provides an update on SARM discovery paradigms for preclinical evaluations. Promising results have been obtained in preclinical investigations and initial clinical trials, but long-term safety, tolerability and efficacy studies in patients are still necessary. Preclinically, improving knowledge of tissue selectivity at the molecular level, developing AR selectivity transcription profile, exploring in vitro/in vivo correlation, along with expanding selectivity evaluation among more androgen responsive tissues would accelerate the discovery of a new generation of more selective and safer clinical candidates, minimize false leads and hasten development of effective approaches for an expanded range of clinical conditions.

  9. Small molecule screening reveals a transcription-independent pro-survival function of androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narizhneva, Natalia V; Tararova, Natalia D; Ryabokon, Petro; Shyshynova, Inna; Prokvolit, Anatoly; Komarov, Pavel G; Purmal, Andrei A; Gudkov, Andrei V; Gurova, Katerina V

    2009-12-15

    In prostate cancer (PCa) patients, initial responsiveness to androgen deprivation therapy is frequently followed by relapse due to development of treatment-resistant androgen-independent PCa. This is typically associated with acquisition of mutations in AR that allow activity as a transcription factor in the absence of ligand, indicating that androgen-independent PCa remains dependent on AR function. Our strategy to effectively target AR in androgen-independent PCa involved using a cell-based readout to isolate small molecules that inhibit AR transactivation function through mechanisms other than modulation of ligand binding. A number of the identified inhibitors were toxic to AR-expressing PCa cells regardless of their androgen dependence. Among these, some only suppressed PCa cell growth (ARTIS), while others induced cell death (ARTIK). ARTIK, but not ARTIS, compounds caused disappearance of AR protein from treated cells. siRNA against AR behaved like ARTIK compounds, while a dominant negative AR mutant that prevents AR-mediated transactivation but does not eliminate the protein showed only a growth suppressive effect. These observations reveal a transcription-independent function of AR that is essential for PCa cell viability and, therefore, is an ideal target for anti-PCa treatment. Indeed, several of the identified AR inhibitors demonstrated in vivo efficacy in mouse models of PCa and are candidates for pharmacologic optimization.

  10. Epithelial ovarian cancer: testing the 'androgens hypothesis'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Catherine M; Green, Adèle C; Nagle, Christina M; Jordan, Susan J; Whiteman, David C; Bain, Christopher J; Webb, Penelope M

    2008-12-01

    In 1998, Risch proposed a hypothesis for the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer relating to the role of androgens in stimulating epithelial cell proliferation. Although this hypothesis has been widely discussed, direct evidence to support it is scant. To address this issue, we have conducted a detailed analysis of factors possibly associated with high circulating levels of androgens, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), hirsutism and acne (all clinically associated with hyperandrogenism) using the data collected in an Australia-wide, population-based case-control study. Cases aged 18-79 years with a new diagnosis of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (n=1276) or borderline malignant tumour (n=315) were identified through a network of clinics and cancer registries throughout Australia. Controls (n=1508) were selected from the National Electoral Roll. Women self-reported a history of PCOS, acne, hirsutism and also use of testosterone supplements or the androgenic medication Danazol. We found no evidence that a history of PCOS, acne or hirsutism was associated with ovarian cancer overall, or with specific subtypes, with the exception of serous borderline tumours that were positively associated with a history of PCOS (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.0-6.1). Women who had ever used testosterone supplements had an increased risk of ovarian cancer (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.1-12.0); however, use of the androgenic medication Danazol did not increase risk (OR 1.0; 95% CI 0.4-2.9). Overall, our results do not support the hypothesis that androgen-related disorders increase the risk of ovarian cancer.

  11. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer: long-term safety and patient outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Hamed Ahmadi, Siamak Daneshmand Institute of Urology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT constitutes the first-line treatment for patients with locally advanced tumors, recurrent or metastatic disease. Given its widespread use, clinicians should be familiar with common side effects of this treatment. This review focuses on common side effects of ADT and available treatment options to control the side effects. Also, it briefly compares continuous ADT with other therapeutic approaches for androgen deprivation in prostate cancer patients. Similar to hormonal medications, newer non-hormonal therapeutic options including gabapentin and acupuncture have at best moderate effect in controlling hot flashes in patients on ADT. Supervised and/or home exercise programs significantly improve ADT-related fatigue, metabolic/cardiovascular side effects, and cognitive dysfunction. Denosumab, a human monoclonal antibody against RANK-L, is more effective than bisphosphonates in preventing skeletal-related events in patients with metastatic or castrate-resistant prostate cancer and unlike bisphosphonates, it can also reduce the risk of vertebral fractures in men receiving ADT for non-metastatic prostate cancer. Toremifene, a selective estrogen receptor inhibitor, has dual beneficial effects on ADT-related osteoporosis and metabolic dysfunction. Metformin coupled with lifestyle modification is also a well-tolerated treatment for metabolic changes during ADT. While producing similar oncological outcomes, intermittent ADT is associated with higher quality of life in patients under ADT by improving bone health, less metabolic and hematologic complications, and fewer hot flashes and sexual dysfunction events. Keywords: prostate cancer, androgen deprivation therapy, adverse effects, therapy

  12. Human CMTM2/CKLFSF2 enhances the ligand-induced transactivation of the androgen receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU DaZhen; YIN CaiHua; ZHANG YingMei; TIAN LinJie; LI Ting; LI Dan; MA DaLong; GUO YingLu; WANG Ying

    2009-01-01

    CKLF (chemokine-like factor)-Iike MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link domain) transmembrane domain containing (CMTM) is a novel gene family. One member of this family, CMTM2, also named chemokine-like factor superfamily 2 (CKLFSF2), is expressed highly in the testis and moderately in the prostate, marrow and peripheral blood cells. However, the function of human CMTM2 remains unknown. Here, we found that CMTM2 was upregulated in 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated LNCaP cells. We investigated the relationship between CMTM2 and the androgen receptor. Our results showed that CMTM2 enhanced DHT-mediated androgen receptor (AR) transactiration and the expression of prostate specific antigen (PSA). We also observed that CMTM2 enhanced the AR protein level, which was reversed by silencing endogenous CMTM2 expression, which suggested that CMTM2 might play an important role in maintaining the AR protein level. We also found that CMTM2 suppressed Akt activation. A previous study showed that Akt could phosphorylate AR at Ser210 and Ser790 and lead to AR ubiquitylation and degradation as well as suppression of AR activity.Taken together, suppressing Akt activation and increasing the AR protein level might be one of the mechanisms for the CMTM2-mediated enhancement of AR transactivation.

  13. The androgen receptor has no direct antiresorptive actions in mouse osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnesael, Mieke; Jardi, Ferran; Deboel, Ludo; Laurent, Michaël R; Dubois, Vanessa; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Davey, Rachel A; Carmeliet, Geert; Claessens, Frank; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2015-08-15

    Androgen deficiency or androgen receptor knockout (ARKO) causes high-turnover osteopenia, but the target cells for this effect remain unclear. To examine whether AR in osteoclasts directly suppresses bone resorption, we crossed AR-floxed with cathepsin K-Cre mice. Osteoclast-specific ARKO (ocl-ARKO) mice showed no changes neither in osteoclast surface nor in bone microarchitecture nor in the response to orchidectomy and androgen replacement, indicating that the AR in osteoclasts is not critical for bone maintenance. In line with the lack of a bone phenotype, the levels of AR were very low in osteoclast-enriched cultures derived from bone marrow (BM) and undetectable in osteoclasts generated from spleen precursors. Since tibiae of ubiquitous ARKO mice displayed increased osteoclast counts, the role of AR was further explored using cell cultures from these animals. Osteoclast generation and activity in vitro were similar between ARKO and wildtype control (WT) mice. In co-culture experiments, BM stromal cells (BMSCs) were essential for the suppressive action of AR on osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast activity. Stimulation with 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D3 increased Rankl and decreased Tnfsf11 (osteoprotegerin, Opg) gene expression in BMSCs more than in osteoblasts. This increase in the Rankl/Opg ratio following 1,25(OH)2D3 stimulation was lower, not higher, in ARKO mice. Runx2 expression in BMSCs was however higher in ARKO vs. WT, suggesting that ARKO mice may more readily commit osteoprogenitor cells to osteoblastogenesis. In conclusion, the AR does not seem to suppress bone resorption through direct actions in osteoclasts. BMSCs may however represent an alternative AR target in the BM milieu.

  14. External Beam Radiation Therapy and Abiraterone in Men With Localized Prostate Cancer: Safety and Effect on Tissue Androgens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Eunpi [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Mostaghel, Elahe A. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington (United States); Russell, Kenneth J.; Liao, Jay J.; Konodi, Mark A. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Kurland, Brenda F. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Marck, Brett T. [Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington (United States); Matsumoto, Alvin M. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, Washington (United States); Dalkin, Bruce L. [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Montgomery, R. Bruce, E-mail: rbmontgo@uw.edu [University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: Optimizing androgen suppression may provide better control of localized prostate cancer (PCa). Numerous trials have supported the benefit of combining androgen deprivation therapy with definitive radiation therapy in men with locally advanced or high-grade disease. Addition of abiraterone to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa) with radiation has not been reported. We examined the safety of this combination as well as its impact on androgen suppression. Methods and Materials: A prospective, phase 2 study was conducted in men with localized PCa treated with 6 months of neoadjuvant and concurrent abiraterone with LHRHa and radiation. Duration of adjuvant LHRHa was at the discretion of the treating clinician. Prostate biopsy assays were obtained prior to the start of therapy and prior to radiation. Sera and tissue androgen levels were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results: A total of 22 men with intermediate- (n=3) and high-risk PCa (n=19) received study therapy. Sixteen men completed the intended course of abiraterone, and 19 men completed planned radiation to 77.4 to 81 Gy. Radiation to pelvic nodes was administered in 20 men. The following grade 3 toxicities were reported: lymphopenia (14 patients), fatigue (1 patient), transaminitis (2 patients), hypertension (2 patients), and hypokalemia (1 patient). There were no grade 4 toxicities. All 21 men who complied with at least 3 months of abiraterone therapy had a preradiation prostate-specific antigen (PSA) concentration nadir of <0.3 ng/mL. Median levels of tissue androgen downstream of CYP17A were significantly suppressed after treatment with abiraterone, and upstream steroids were increased. At median follow-up of 21 months (range: 3-37 months), only 1 patient (who had discontinued abiraterone at 3 months) had biochemical relapse. Conclusions: Addition of abiraterone to LHRHa with radiation is safe and achieves effective prostatic androgen suppression

  15. Intermittent ephemeral river-breaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniers, A. J.; MacMahan, J. H.; Gallagher, E. L.; Shanks, A.; Morgan, S.; Jarvis, M.; Thornton, E. B.; Brown, J.; Fujimura, A.

    2012-12-01

    In the summer of 2011 we performed a field experiment in Carmel River State Beach, CA, at a time when the intermittent natural breaching of the ephemeral Carmel River occurred due to an unusually rainy period prior to the experiment associated with El Nino. At this time the river would fill the lagoon over the period of a number of days after which a breach would occur. This allowed us to document a number of breaches with unique pre- and post-breach topographic surveys, accompanying ocean and lagoon water elevations as well as extremely high flow (4m/s) velocities in the river mouth during the breaching event. The topographic surveys were obtained with a GPS-equipped backpack mounted on a walking human and show the evolution of the river breaching with a gradually widening and deepening river channel that cuts through the pre-existing beach and berm. The beach face is qualified as a steep with an average beach slope of 1:10 with significant reflection of the incident waves (MacMahan et al., 2012). The wave directions are generally shore normal as the waves refract over the deep canyon that is located offshore of the beach. The tide is mixed semi-diurnal with a range on the order of one meter. Breaching typically occurred during the low-low tide. Grain size is highly variable along the beach with layers of alternating fine and coarse material that could clearly be observed as the river exit channel was cutting through the beach. Large rocky outcroppings buried under the beach sand are also present along certain stretches of the beach controlling the depth of the breaching channel. The changes in the water level measured within the lagoon and the ocean side allows for an estimate of the volume flux associated with the breach as function of morphology, tidal elevation and wave conditions as well as an assessment of the conditions and mechanisms of breach closure, which occurred on the time scale of O(0.5 days). Exploratory model simulations will be presented at the

  16. Burst-suppression is reactive to photic stimulation in comatose children with acquired brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nita, Dragos A.; Moldovan, Mihai; Sharma, Roy

    2016-01-01

    -suppression in children with acquired brain injury. Methods: Intensive care unit electroencephalographic monitoring recordings containing burst-suppression were obtained from 5 comatose children with acquired brain injury of various etiologies. Intermittent photic stimulation was performed at 1 Hz for 1 min to assess...

  17. Intermittency in 2D soap film turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Cerbus, R T

    2013-01-01

    The Reynolds number dependency of intermittency for 2D turbulence is studied in a flowing soap film. The Reynolds number used here is the Taylor microscale Reynolds number R_{\\lambda}, which ranges from 20 to 800. Strong intermittency is found for both the inverse energy and direct enstrophy cascades as measured by (a) the pdf of velocity differences P(\\delta u(r)) at inertial scales r, (b) the kurtosis of P(\\partial_x u), and (c) the scaling of the so-called intermittency exponent \\mu, which is zero if intermittency is absent. Measures (b) and (c) are quantitative, while (a) is qualitative. These measurements are in disagreement with some previous results but not all. The velocity derivatives are nongaussian at all R_{\\lambda} but show signs of becoming gaussian as R_{\\lambda} increases beyond the largest values that could be reached. The kurtosis of P(\\delta u(r)) at various r indicates that the intermittency is scale dependent. The structure function scaling exponents also deviate strongly from the Kraichn...

  18. Ligand-dependent inhibition of beta-catenin/TCF signaling by androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesire, Dennis R; Isaacs, William B

    2002-12-01

    Beta-catenin signaling may contribute to prostate cancer (CaP) progression. Although beta-catenin is known to upregulate T cell factor (TCF) target gene expression in CaP cells, recent evidence demonstrates its capacity to enhance ligand-dependent androgen receptor (AR) function. Thus, we wished to further understand the interaction between these two pathways. We find in both CaP cells (CWR22-Rv1, LAPC-4, DU145) and non-CaP cells (HEK-293, TSU, SW480, HCT-116) that beta-catenin/TCF-related transcription (CRT), as measured by activation of a synthetic promoter and that of cyclin D1, is inhibited by androgen treatment. This inhibition is AR-dependent, as it only occurs in cells expressing AR endogenously or transiently, and is abrogated by AR antagonists. Additional analyses convey that the ligand-dependent nature of CRT suppression depends on transactivation-competent AR in the nucleus, but not on indirect effects stemming from AR target gene expression. Given the recent work identifying an AR/beta-catenin interaction, and from our finding that liganded AR does not prompt gross changes in the constitutive nuclear localization of TCF4 or mutant beta-catenin, we hypothesized that transcription factor (i.e. AR and TCF) competition for beta-catenin recruitment may explain, in part, androgen-induced suppression of CRT. To address this idea, we expressed an AR mutant lacking its DNA-binding domain (DBD). This receptor could not orchestrate ligand-dependent CRT repression, thereby providing support for those recent data implicating the AR DBD/LBD as necessary for beta-catenin interaction. Further supporting this hypothesis, TCF/LEF over-expression counteracts androgen-induced suppression of CRT, and requires beta-catenin binding activity to do so. Interestingly, TCF4 over-expression potently antagonizes AR function; however, this inhibition may occur independently of beta-catenin/TCF4 interaction. These results from TCF4 over-expression analyses, taken together, provide

  19. Emerging potential of parenteral estrogen as androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Imran Ali Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT is a key management strategy for prostate cancer (PC, achieved commonly by administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonist (LHRHa, ADT markedly suppresses both male and female sex hormones which results in "castration syndrome", a constellation of adverse events such as muscle weakness, impairment of glucose and lipid metabolism, impotence, osteoporosis, and fractures. Recent evidence suggests that estrogen, in the parenteral form, may emerge as an alternative to LHRHa as it offers potential benefits of arresting PC growth as well as avoiding some of the estrogen deficiency related toxicities of LHRHa by maintaining endogenous levels of estrogen.

  20. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and anti-Müllerian hormone levels before and after laparoscopic gonadectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Kusumi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We report cases of two sisters with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS. A complete female appearance, blind-ending vagina, and testes in the pelvis are characteristics of CAIS. Prophylactic laparoscopic gonadectomy was performed in both cases. Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH level is known to be very high in patients with CAIS; AMH is secreted by Sertoli cells and testosterone suppresses the secretion. In our cases, serum AMH was very high before gonadectomy and dramatically decreased after gonadectomy. AMH could be the diagnostic feature for patients with CAIS.

  1. A novel approach to breast cancer prevention: reducing excessive ovarian androgen production in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secreto, Giorgio; Sieri, Sabina; Agnoli, Claudia; Grioni, Sara; Muti, Paola; Zumoff, Barnett; Sant, Milena; Meneghini, Elisabetta; Krogh, Vittorio

    2016-08-01

    Minimizing endogenous estrogen production and activity in women at high risk for breast cancer is a prominent approach to prevention of the disease. A number of clinical trials have shown that the administration of selective-estrogen receptor modulators or aromatase inhibitors significantly reduces the incidence of breast cancer in healthy women. Unfortunately, these drugs often produce adverse effects on the quality of life and are, therefore, poorly accepted by many women, even those who are at high risk for breast cancer. We propose a novel alternative approach to decreasing estrogen production: suppression of ovarian synthesis of the androgen precursors of estrogens by administration of long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs to women with ovarian stromal hyperplasia. The specific target population would be elderly postmenopausal women, at increased risk of breast cancer, and with high blood levels of testosterone, marker of ovarian hyperandrogenemia, and recognized factor of risk for breast cancer. Testosterone levels are measured at baseline to identify women at risk and during the follow-up to evaluate the effectiveness of therapy. The postmenopausal ovary is an important source of excessive androgen production which originates from the ovarian interstitial cell hyperplasia frequently present in breast cancer patients. We propose to counter the source of androgen excess in women with ovarian stromal hyperplasia, thus reducing the substrate for estrogen formation without completely inhibiting estrogen synthesis. Available evidence indicates that gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogs can be safely used for breast cancer prevention in postmenopausal women.

  2. Intermittent rainfall in dynamic multimedia fate modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwich, E G

    2001-03-01

    It has been shown that steady-state multimedia models (level III fugacity models) lead to a substantial underestimate of air concentrations for chemicals with a low Henry's law constant (H multimedia models are used to estimate the spatial range or inhalation exposure. A dynamic model of pollutant fate is developed for conditions of intermittent rainfall to calculate the time profile of pollutant concentrations in different environmental compartments. The model utilizes a new, mathematically efficient approach to dynamic multimedia fate modeling that is based on the convolution of solutions to the initial conditions problem. For the first time, this approach is applied to intermittent conditions. The investigation indicates that the time-averaged pollutant concentrations under intermittent rainfall can be approximated by the appropriately weighted average of steady-state concentrations under conditions with and without rainfall.

  3. The Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bangsbo, Jens; Iaia, F. Marcello; Krustrup, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The two Yo-Yo intermittent recovery (IR) tests evaluate an individual's ability to repeatedly perform intense exercise. The Yo-Yo IR level 1 (Yo-Yo IR1) test focuses on the capacity to carry out intermittent exercise leading to a maximal activation of the aerobic system, whereas Yo-Yo IR level 2...... (Yo-Yo IR2) determines an individual's ability to recover from repeated exercise with a high contribution from the anaerobic system. Evaluations of elite athletes in various sports involving intermittent exercise showed that the higher the level of competition the better an athlete performs in the Yo-Yo...... IR tests. Performance in the Yo-Yo IR tests for young athletes increases with rising age. The Yo-Yo IR tests have shown to be a more sensitive measure of changes in performance than maximum oxygen uptake. The Yo-Yo IR tests provide a simple and valid way to obtain important information...

  4. Magnetic field generation by intermittent convection

    CERN Document Server

    Chertovskih, R; Chimanski, E V

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic field generation by convective flows in transition to weak turbulence is studied numerically. By fixing the Prandtl number at P=0.3 and varying the Rayleigh number (Ra) as a control parameter in three-dimensional Rayleigh-Benard convection of an electrically conducting fluid, a recently reported route to hyperchaos involving quasiperiodic regimes, crises and chaotic intermittent attractors is followed, and the critical magnetic Prandtl number ($P_m^c$) for dynamo action is determined as a function of Ra. A mechanism for the onset of on-off intermittency in the magnetic energy is described, the most beneficial convective regimes for dynamo action are identified, and how intermittency affects the dependence of $P_m^c$ on Ra is discussed.

  5. Chaos synchronization based on intermittent state observer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Guo-Hui; Zhou Shi-Ping; Xu De-Ming

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the method of synchronizing slave to the master trajectory using an intermittent state observer by constructing a synchronizer which drives the response system globally tracing the driving system asymptotically. It has been shown from the theory of synchronization error-analysis that a satisfactory result of chaos synchronization is expected under an appropriate intermittent period and state observer. Compared with continuous control method,the proposed intermittent method can target the desired orbit more efficiently. The application of the method is demonstrated on the hyperchaotic Rossler systems. Numerical simulations show that the length of the synchronization interval rs is of crucial importance for our scheme, and the method is robust with respect to parameter mismatch.

  6. Forces and energetics of intermittent swimming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floryan, Daniel; Van Buren, Tyler; Smits, Alexander J.

    2017-08-01

    Experiments are reported on intermittent swimming motions. Water tunnel experiments on a nominally two-dimensional pitching foil show that the mean thrust and power scale linearly with the duty cycle, from a value of 0.2 all the way up to continuous motions, indicating that individual bursts of activity in intermittent motions are independent of each other. This conclusion is corroborated by particle image velocimetry (PIV) flow visualizations, which show that the main vortical structures in the wake do not change with duty cycle. The experimental data also demonstrate that intermittent motions are generally energetically advantageous over continuous motions. When metabolic energy losses are taken into account, this conclusion is maintained for metabolic power fractions less than 1.

  7. Intermittency in Switching Power Converters: Theoretical Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yu-fei; CHEN Jun-ning; TSE Chi K.; QIU Shui-sheng; KE Dao-ming; SHI Long-xing; SUN Wei-feng

    2006-01-01

    In view of reasonable explanation of intermittent subharmonics and chaos that can be gained from coupling filter between circuits,this paper discusses a method that maps time bifurcation with parameter bifurcation.Based on this mapping method,the general analysis method of characteristic multiplier,which is originally aimed at parameter bifurcation,can be used for the study of intermittency,i.e.,time bifurcation.In this paper,all researches coming from characteristic multipliers,parameter-bifurcation diagrams,and the largest Lyapunov exponent indicate the same results as those produced by simulation and experiment.Thus,it is proved theoretically that the intermittency in switching power converter can be explained in terms of coupling of spurious interference.

  8. Assessing relative volatility/intermittency/energy dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko S.; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...... process in particular. This estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, but it is also applicable in other areas. We develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for realised relative power variations of Brownian semistationary processes......, and introduce inference methods based on the theory. We also discuss how to extend the asymptotic theory to other classes of processes exhibiting stochastic volatility/intermittency. As an empirical application, we study relative energy dissipation in data of atmospheric turbulence....

  9. Synchronization of Intermittently Coupled Dynamical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the synchronization phenomenon of an intermittently coupled dynamical network in which the coupling among nodes can occur only at discrete instants and the coupling configuration of the network is time varying. A model of intermittently coupled dynamical network consisting of identical nodes is introduced. Based on the stability theory for impulsive differential equations, some synchronization criteria for intermittently coupled dynamical networks are derived. The network synchronizability is shown to be related to the second largest and the smallest eigenvalues of the coupling matrix, the coupling strength, and the impulsive intervals. Using the chaotic Chua system and Lorenz system as nodes of a dynamical network for simulation, respectively, the theoretical results are verified and illustrated.

  10. Androgen insensitivity syndrome: do trinucleotide repeats in androgen receptor gene have any role?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Singh Rajender; Nalini J. Gupta; Baidyanath Chakravarty; Lalji Singh; Kumarasamy Thangaraj

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the role of CAG and GGN repeats as genetic background affecting androgen insensitivity syn- drome (AIS) phenotype. Methods: We analyzed lengths of androgen receptor (AR)-CAG and GGN repeats in 69 AIS cases, along with 136 unrelated normal male individuals. The lengths of repeats were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by allelic genotyping to determine allele length. Results: Our study revealed significantly shorter mean lengths of CAG repeats in patients (mean 18.25 repeats, range 14-26 repeats) in comparison to the controls (mean 22.57 repeats, range 12-39 repeats) (two-tailed P < 0.0001). GGN repeats, however, did not differ significantly between patients (mean 21.48 repeats) and controls (mean 21.21 repeats) (two- tailed P = 0.474). Among patients' groups, the mean number of CAG repeats in partial androgen insensitivity cases (mean 15.83 repeats) was significantly less than in complete androgen insensitivity cases (mean 19.46 repeats) (two- tailed P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The findings suggest that shorter lengths of repeats in the AR gene might act as low penetrance genetic background in varying manifestation of androgen insensitivity. (Asian J Androl 2008 Jul; 10: 616-624)

  11. Study of Androgen and Androgen Receptor in Relation to Insulin Resistance in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    初永丽; 孙永玉; 邱红玉

    2003-01-01

    In order to investigate the relationship between serum testosterone level and expression of androgen receptors in ovary in relation to insulin resistance in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Serum testosterone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay in 17 patients with PCOS and 20 cases as control group. The expression of androgen receptor in ovary was detected by immunohistochemistry method. The results showed that serum testosterone level [ (3. 1± 1.5) nmol/L] and insulin resistance index (0. 85±0. 49) in patients with PCOS were significantly higher than in control group (P<0. 05), and showed a positive relation (r=0. 65, P<0. 01). The expression levels of androgen receptor in ovary of patients with PCOS were significantly higher than that in control group (P<0.05). The optical density value was positively related with insulin resistance index (r=0.59,P<0. 01). It was concluded that androgen and androgen receptor could accelerate insulin resistance and the interaction of them might aggravate the pathophysiological change in PCOS.

  12. Androgens and Androgen Derivatives: Science, Myths, and Theories: Explored From a Special Operations Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Melissa L; Deuster, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Androgen use outside of legitimate medical therapy is a perceived concern that is drawing attention across military and specifically Special Operations Forces (SOF) communities. For leadership and the medical community to properly address the issue and relate to those individuals who are using or considering use, it will be crucial to understand the scope of the problem. Limited data suggest that the prevalence of androgen use may be increasing, and inferences made from the scientific literature suggest that SOF may be a population of concern. While risks of androgen use are well known, there are little data specific to military performance that can be applied to a rigorous risk:benefit analysis, allowing myths and poorly supported theories to perpetuate within the community. Further efforts to define the potential benefits balanced against the short- and long-term risks should be undertaken. Providers within the SOF community should arm themselves with information to engage androgen users and leadership in meaningful discussion regarding androgen use.

  13. Intermittently connected mobile ad hoc networks

    CERN Document Server

    Jamalipour, Abbas

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years, there has been extensive research activity in the emerging area of Intermittently Connected Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (ICMANs). By considering the nature of intermittent connectivity in most real word mobile environments without any restrictions placed on users' behavior, ICMANs are eventually formed without any assumption with regard to the existence of a end-to-end path between two nodes wishing to communicate. It is different from the conventional Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs), which have been implicitly viewed as a connected graph with established complete paths betwe

  14. Androgen levels in women with various forms of ovarian dysfunction : Associations with cardiometabolic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daan, N. M P; Jaspers, L.; Koster, M. P H; Broekmans, F. J M; De Rijke, Y. B.; Franco, O. H.; Laven, J. S E; Kavousi, M.; Fauser, B. C J M

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Are differences in androgen levels among women with various forms of ovarian dysfunction associated with cardiometabolic abnormalities? SUMMARY ANSWER Androgen levels differed substantially between women with and without ovarian dysfunction, and increased androgen levels were associat

  15. Androgen receptor gene polymorphism in zebra species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki Ito

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Androgen receptor genes (AR have been found to have associations with reproductive development, behavioral traits, and disorders in humans. However, the influence of similar genetic effects on the behavior of other animals is scarce. We examined the loci AR glutamine repeat (ARQ in 44 Grevy's zebras, 23 plains zebras, and three mountain zebras, and compared them with those of domesticated horses. We observed polymorphism among zebra species and between zebra and horse. As androgens such as testosterone influence aggressiveness, AR polymorphism among equid species may be associated with differences in levels of aggression and tameness. Our findings indicate that it would be useful to conduct further studies focusing on the potential association between AR and personality traits, and to understand domestication of equid species.

  16. The Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, B; Lehvaslaiho, H; Beitel, L K; Lumbroso, R; Pinsky, L; Trifiro, M

    1998-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. The total number of reported mutations has risen from 272 to 309 in the past year. We have expanded the database: (i) by giving each entry an accession number; (ii) by adding information on the length of polymorphic polyglutamine (polyGln) and polyglycine (polyGly) tracts in exon 1; (iii) by adding information on large gene deletions; (iv) by providing a direct link with a completely searchable database (courtesy EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute). The addition of the exon 1 polymorphisms is discussed in light of their possible relevance as markers for predisposition to prostate or breast cancer. The database is also available on the internet (http://www.mcgill. ca/androgendb/ ), from EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (ftp. ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen ), or as a Macintosh FilemakerPro or Word file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  17. Androgen Receptor Roles in the Development of Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    IZUMI, KOUJI; Mizokami, Atsushi; Lin, Wen-Jye; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a major cause of lower urinary tract symptoms, with an increased volume of transitional zone and associated with increased stromal cells. It is known that androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signaling plays a key role in development of BPH, and that blockade of this signaling decreases BPH volume and can relieve lower urinary tract symptoms, but the mechanisms of androgen/AR signaling in BPH development remain unclear, and the effectiveness of current drugs fo...

  18. Consequences of use of anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casavant, Marcel J; Blake, Kathleen; Griffith, Jill; Yates, Andrew; Copley, LaRae M

    2007-08-01

    Whether providing anticipatory guidance to the young adolescent patient, conducting a preparticipation examination on a young athlete, or treating a sick user of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs), the primary care physician must be familiar with the adverse consequences of the use of these compounds. This article reviews the endocrine, cardiovascular, neuropsychiatric, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatic, and miscellaneous effects of AASs, highlighting effects reported in children and adolescents, and relying on consequences in adults when pediatric data is unavailable.

  19. New Selective Estrogen and Androgen Receptor Modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Bart L.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of Review The present review focuses on the most significant recent findings regarding selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs). SERMs, which interact with estrogen receptor (ER)-α and ER-β in multiple tissues, continue to generate clinical interest in potential applications in as many disorders as the tissues in which the two known receptors are found. SARMs have been demonstrated to have fewer clinical applications to date, but continue to be investigated for use in multiple disorders in which androgen receptor (AR) modulation is likely to be important. Both types of compounds hold great promise for therapeutic use in multiple hormonal disorders involving tissue-specific effects mediated by estrogen or androgen receptors. Recent Findings While SERMs have been available for clinical use for 50 years, recent investigation has focused on large randomized clinical trials for newer indications of older agents, or smaller clinical trials of newer agents with improved clinical activity and reduced side effects in specific tissues. In particular, the large, prospective, randomized, controlled, multi-year STAR and RUTH clinical trials have recently shown interesting similarities and differences between tamoxifen and raloxifene in estrogen-responsive tissues. Lasofoxifene and arzoxifene are two newer SERMs that have recently been demonstrated to improve bone mineral density and lower serum cholesterol values compared to older SERMs in smaller clinical trials. SARMs are a newer category of drug still being investigated mostly at the basic and preclinical level, with fewer clinical trials available for review. SARMs are currently being investigated mostly for use in prostate cancer at different stages, but hold promise for multiple other applications. Summary Recent clinical trials indicate that selective estrogen receptor modulators are useful in treatment of disorders of bone and mineral metabolism and

  20. Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Gomez Malave, Heber; Flores-Urrutia, Monica C; Dowswell, Therese

    2015-10-19

    Anaemia is a frequent condition during pregnancy, particularly among women in low- and middle-income countries. Traditionally, gestational anaemia has been prevented with daily iron supplements throughout pregnancy, but adherence to this regimen due to side effects, interrupted supply of the supplements, and concerns about safety among women with an adequate iron intake, have limited the use of this intervention. Intermittent (i.e. two or three times a week on non-consecutive days) supplementation has been proposed as an alternative to daily supplementation. To assess the benefits and harms of intermittent supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals to pregnant women on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (31 July 2015), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (31 July 2015) and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies (31 July 2015). Randomised or quasi-randomised trials. We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. This review includes 27 trials from 15 countries, but only 21 trials (with 5490 women) contributed data to the review. All studies compared daily versus intermittent iron supplementation. The methodological quality of included studies was mixed and most had high levels of attrition.The overall assessment of the quality of the evidence for primary infant outcomes was low and for maternal outcomes very low.Of the 21 trials contributing data, three studies provided intermittent iron alone, 14 intermittent iron + folic acid and four intermittent iron plus multiple vitamins and minerals in comparison with the same composition of supplements provided in a daily regimen.Overall, for women receiving any intermittent

  1. Hematological changes during androgen deprivation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mathis Grossmann; Jeffrey D Zajac

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been associated with a plethora of adverse effects,consistent with the androgen dependency of multiple reproductive and somatic tissues.One such tissue is the hemopoietic system,and one of the most predictable consequences of ADT is the development of anemia.Although anemia caused by ADT is rarely severe,ADT is often given to frail,elderly men with increased susceptibility to anemia due to multiple other causes.ADT-associated anemia may contribute to fatigue and reduced quality of life (QoL) in such men,although this requires further study.While anemia is an independent risk factor of mortality in men with prostate cancer,it is not known whether treatment of ADT-associated anemia alters clinically important outcomes,or whether treatment affects mortality.Awareness of the phenomenon of ADT-induced anemia should avoid unnecessary work-up in mild cases of normocytic normochromic anemia.However,assessment and treatment of more severe anemia may be required.This should be determined on an individual basis.In contrast to the well-described actions of ADT on erythrepoiesis,its effect on other hemopoietic lineages has been less well elucidated.While preclinical studies have found roles for androgens in maturation and differentiated function of neutrophils,lymphocytes and platelets,the implications of these findings for men with prostate cancer receiving ADT require further studies.

  2. Androgen levels and female social dominance in Lemur catta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Engelhardt, N; Kappeler, P M; Heistermann, M

    2000-01-01

    Morphological and behavioural traits which improve agonistic power are subject to intrasexual selection and, at the proximate level, are influenced by circulating androgens. Because intrasexual selection in mammals is more intense among males, they typically dominate females. Female social dominance is therefore unexpected and, indeed, rare. Ring-tailed lemurs (Lemur catta) are sexually monomorphic primates in which all adult females dominate all males. The goal of our study was to test the prediction that female dominance in this species is associated with high androgen levels. Using two captive groups, we collected data on agonistic behaviour and non-invasively assessed their androgen concentrations in faeces and saliva by enzyme immunoassay. We found that adult female L. catta do not have higher androgen levels than males. However, during the mating season there was a twofold increase in both the androgen levels and conflict rates among females. This seasonal increase in their androgen levels was probably not due to a general increase in ovarian hormone production because those females showing the strongest signs of follicular development tended to have low androgen concentrations. At the individual level neither the individual aggression rates nor the proportion of same-sexed individuals dominated were correlated with their androgen levels. We conclude that female dominance in ring-tailed lemurs is neither based on physical superiority nor on high androgen levels and that it is equally important to study male subordination and prenatal brain priming effects for a complete understanding of this phenomenon. PMID:11007329

  3. Androgens exert sexually dimorphic effects on angiogenesis: novel insight into the relationship between androgens and cardiovascular disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katya B Rubinow; John K Amory; Stephanie T Page

    2011-01-01

    @@ The effects of androgen exposure on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in men remain poorly understood.Given the earlier incidence of CVD among men relative to women, androgens historically have been assumed to potentiate CVD in men.However,mounting clinical data challenge this assumption and increasingly implicate low levels of circulating testosterone as a risk factor for CVD and mortality.1,2 In their recenfly published report 'A sex-specific role for androgens in angiogenesis',3 Sieveking and colleagues make striking observations regarding the impact of androgens on angiogenesis and recovery from ischemic injury, important components of vascular repair which might provide a mechanism whereby androgens could exert protective cardiovascular effects.Moreover, these findings were sex-specific in both in vitro and in vivo model systems, suggesting a sexually dimorphic effect of androgens in modulating CVD.

  4. Pharm GKB: Porphyria, Acute Intermittent [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: PharmGKB Accession Id: PA166048717 External Vocabularies NDFRT: Porphyria, Acute... Intermittent (N0000003536) Common Searches Search Medline Plus Search CTD Pharm GKB: Porphyria, Acute Intermittent ...

  5. Effects of androgens on insulin action in women: is androgen excess a component of female metabolic syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbould, A

    2008-10-01

    Hyperinsulinemia as a consequence of insulin resistance causes hyperandrogenemia in women. The objective was to review evidence for the converse situation, i.e. whether androgens adversely influence insulin action. Androgen excess could potentially contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes, and in obese peripubertal girls. An Entrez-PubMed search was conducted to identify studies addressing the relationship of androgens with metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes in women. Studies reporting outcomes of androgen administration, interventions to reduce androgen effects in hyperandrogenemic women, and basic studies investigating androgen effects on insulin target tissues were reviewed. Multiple studies showed associations between serum testosterone and insulin resistance or metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes risk in women, but their cross-sectional nature did not allow conclusions about causality. Androgen administration to healthy women was associated with development of insulin resistance. Intervention studies in women with hyperandrogenism were limited by small subject numbers and use of indirect methods for assessing insulin sensitivity. However, in three of the seven studies using euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamps, reduction of androgen levels or blockade of androgen action improved insulin sensitivity. Testosterone administration to female rats caused skeletal muscle insulin resistance. Testosterone induced insulin resistance in adipocytes of women in vitro. In conclusion, the metabolic consequences of androgen excess in women have been under-researched. Studies of long-term interventions that lower androgen levels or block androgen effects in young women with hyperandrogenism are needed to determine whether these might protect against metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes in later life.

  6. Intermittent demand : Linking forecasting to inventory obsolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunter, Ruud H.; Syntetos, Aris A.; Babai, M. Zied

    2011-01-01

    The standard method to forecast intermittent demand is that by Croston. This method is available in ERP-type solutions such as SAP and specialised forecasting software packages (e.g. Forecast Pro), and often applied in practice. It uses exponential smoothing to separately update the estimated demand

  7. Intermittent resistive faults in digital cmos circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoff, Hans G.; Ebrahimi, H.

    2015-01-01

    A major threat in extremely dependable high-end process node integrated systems in e.g. Avionics are no failures found (NFF). One category of NFFs is the intermittent resistive fault, often originating from bad (e.g. Via or TSV-based) interconnections. This paper will show the impact of these faults

  8. Current drive induced by intermittent trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakach, R. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee (DRFC), 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gell, Y. [CET, Israel (Israel)

    1999-02-01

    We propose a mechanism for driving a current in a dispersive plasma based on intermittent trapping of electrons in a ponderomotive well generated by two- counterpropagating electron cyclotron waves. By choosing properly the parameters of the system, this mechanism is expected to induce a high efficiency current drive. (authors)

  9. Intermittent Swimming with a Flexible Propulsor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akoz, Emre; Zeyghami, Samane; Moored, Keith

    2016-11-01

    Some animals propel themselves by using an intermittent swimming gait known as a burst-and-glide or a burst-and-coast motion. These swimmers tend to have a more pronounced pitching of their caudal fins than heaving leading to low non-dimensional heave-to-pitch ratios. Recent work has shown that when this ratio is sufficiently low the efficiency of an intermittently heaving/pitching airfoil can be significantly improved over a continuously oscillating airfoil. However, fish that swim with an intermittent gait, such as cod and saithe, do not have rigid fins, but instead have highly flexible fins. To examine the performance and flow structures of an intermittent swimmer with a flexible propulsor, a fast boundary element method solver strongly coupled with a torsional-spring structural model was developed. A self-propelled virtual body combined with a flexible-hinged pitching airfoil is used to model a free-swimming animal and its flexible caudal fin. The duty cycle of the active to the coasting phase of motion, the torsional spring flexibility and the forcing frequency are all varied. The cost-of-transport and the swimming speed are measured and connected to the observed wake patterns. Supported by the Office of Naval Research under Program Director Dr. Bob Brizzolara, MURI Grant Number N00014-14-1-0533.

  10. INTERMITTENCY, A TEST FOR STRING FRAGMENTATION PROCESSES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHOLTEN, O

    The Artru-Mennessier and the string fragmentation procedure as implemented in the code VENUS have been compared. The two fragmentation prescriptions predict a similar rapidity spectrum including its energy dependence and event multiplicities, but give rise to very different intermittency results.

  11. Management of patients with intermittent claudication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Spronk (Sandra)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractIntermittent claudication is the first and mildest manifestation of peripheral arterial disease, caused by the atherosclerotic process of progressive narrowing of one or more of the arteries of the peripheral circulation.1 If the arterial system fails, it results in a progressive oxygen

  12. Androgen synthesis inhibitors in the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark N Stein; Neal Patel; Alexander Bershadskiy; Alisa Sokoloff; Eric A Singer

    2014-01-01

    Suppression of gonadal testosterone synthesis represents the standard ifrst line therapy for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer. However, in the majority of patients who develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), it is possible to detect persistent activation of the androgen receptor (AR) through androgens produced in the adrenal gland or within the tumor itself. Abiraterone acetate was developed as an irreversible inhibitor of the dual functional cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP17 with activity as a 17α-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase. CYP17 is necessary for production of nongonadal androgens from cholesterol. Regulatory approval of abiraterone in 2011, based on a phase III trial showing a signiifcant improvement in overall survival (OS) with abiraterone and prednisone versus prednisone, represented proof of principle that targeting AR is essential for improving outcomes in men with CRPC. Inhibition of 17α-hydroxylase by abiraterone results in accumulation of upstream mineralocorticoids due to loss of cortisol-mediated suppression of pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), providing a rationale for development of CYP17 inhibitors with increased speciifcity for 17,20-lyase (orteronel, galeterone and VT-464) that can potentially be administered without exogenous corticosteroids. In this article, we review the development of abiraterone and other CYP17 inhibitors;recent studies with abiraterone that inform our understanding of clinical parameters such as drug effects on quality-of-life, potential early predictors of response, and optimal sequencing of abiraterone with respect to other agents;and results of translational studies providing insights into resistance mechanisms to CYP17 inhibitors leading to clinical trials with drug combinations designed to prolong abiraterone beneift or restore abiraterone activity.

  13. Androgen regulation of the TMPRSS2 gene and the effect of a SNP in an androgen response element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël; Helsen, Christine; Joniau, Steven; Claessens, Frank

    2013-12-01

    More than 50% of prostate cancers have undergone a genomic reorganization that juxtaposes the androgen-regulated promoter of TMPRSS2 and the protein coding parts of several ETS oncogenes. These gene fusions lead to prostate-specific and androgen-induced ETS expression and are associated with aggressive lesions, poor prognosis, and early-onset prostate cancer. In this study, we showed that an enhancer at 13 kb upstream of the TMPRSS2 transcription start site is crucial for the androgen regulation of the TMPRSS2 gene when tested in bacterial artificial chromosomal vectors. Within this enhancer, we identified the exact androgen receptor binding sequence. This newly identified androgen response element is situated next to two binding sites for the pioneer factor GATA2, which were identified by DNase I footprinting. Both the androgen response element and the GATA-2 binding sites are involved in the enhancer activity. Importantly, a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs8134378) within this androgen response element reduces binding and transactivation by the androgen receptor. The presence of this SNP might have implications on the expression and/or formation levels of TMPRSS2 fusions, because both have been shown to be influenced by androgens.

  14. Intermittent Aeration in Biological Treatment of Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Doan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: E-coating process is widely used to provide a protective coating layer on metal parts in the automotive and metal finishing industry. The wastewater from the coating process contains organic compounds that are used in the cleaning, pretreatment and coating steps. Organic pollutants can be removed biologically. In the aerobic biological treatment, water aeration accounts for a significant portion of the total operating cost of the treatment process. Intermittent aeration is thus of benefit since it would reduce the energy consumption in the wastewater treatment. In the present study, wastewater from an electro-coating process was treated biologically using a packed column as an aerator where the wastewater was aerated by a countercurrent air flow. The objective was to obtain an optimum aeration cycle. Approach: Intermittent aeration time was varied at different preset cycles. An operational optimum of the aeration time (or air-water contacting time in the column was determined from the BOD5 removal after a certain treatment period. For continuous aeration of the wastewater, the air-liquid contacting time in the column was 52 min for 24 h of treatment. A unit energy consumption for pumping liquid and air, which was defined as the energy consumption per percent BOD5 removed, was used as a criterion to determine the optimum contacting time. Results: Optimum air-liquid contacting times were found to be about 38, 26 and 22 min for the treatment times of 24, 48 and 72 h, consecutively. This indicates that 27-58% saving on the unit energy consumption can be achieved using intermittent aeration of the wastewater. On the basis of the overall BOD5 removal, 17% and 23% savings in energy were observed with the intermittent aeration as compared to the continuous aeration of the wastewater for 48 and 72 h. Conclusion: The results obtained indicate that an appropriate intermittent aeration cycle can bring about a substantial energy saving

  15. 40 CFR 51.119 - Intermittent control systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermittent control systems. 51.119... Intermittent control systems. (a) The use of an intermittent control system (ICS) may be taken into account in... of any constant pollution control system which was in use before December 31, 1970, or the...

  16. Androgen Receptor Promotes Ligand-Independent Prostate Cancer Progression through c-Myc Upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lina; Schwartzman, Jacob; Gibbs, Angela; Lisac, Robert; Kleinschmidt, Richard; Wilmot, Beth; Bottomly, Daniel; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter; McWeeney, Shannon; Alumkal, Joshi

    2013-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is the principal therapeutic target in prostate cancer. For the past 70 years, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been the major therapeutic focus. However, some patients do not benefit, and those tumors that do initially respond to ADT eventually progress. One recently described mechanism of such an effect is growth and survival-promoting effects of the AR that are exerted independently of the AR ligands, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. However, specific ligand-independent AR target genes that account for this effect were not well characterized. We show here that c-Myc, which is a key mediator of ligand-independent prostate cancer growth, is a key ligand-independent AR target gene. Using microarray analysis, we found that c-Myc and AR expression levels strongly correlated with each other in tumors from patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) progressing despite ADT. We confirmed that AR directly regulates c-Myc transcription in a ligand-independent manner, that AR and c-Myc suppression reduces ligand-independent prostate cancer cell growth, and that ectopic expression of c-Myc attenuates the anti-growth effects of AR suppression. Importantly, treatment with the bromodomain inhibitor JQ1 suppressed c-Myc function and suppressed ligand-independent prostate cancer cell survival. Our results define a new link between two critical proteins in prostate cancer – AR and c-Myc – and demonstrate the potential of AR and c-Myc-directed therapies to improve prostate cancer control. PMID:23704919

  17. Effects of intermittent versus continuous parathyroid hormone administration on condylar chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Qi; Wan, Qilong; Yang, Rongtao; Zhou, Haihua [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); Li, Zubing, E-mail: lizubing0827@163.com [The State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Basic Science of Stomatology (Hubei-MOST) and Key Laboratory of Oral Biomedicine Ministry of Education, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, 237 Luoyu Road, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different PTH administration exerts different effects on condylar chondrocyte. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intermittent PTH administration suppresses condylar chondrocyte proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Continuous PTH administration maintains condylar chondrocyte proliferating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Intermittent PTH administration enhances condylar chondrocyte differentiation. -- Abstract: Endochondral ossification is a complex process involving chondrogenesis and osteogenesis regulated by many hormones and growth factors. Parathyroid hormone (PTH), one of the key hormones regulating bone metabolism, promotes osteoblast differentiation and osteogenesis by intermittent administration, whereas continuous PTH administration inhibits bone formation. However, the effects of PTH on chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation are still unclear. In this study, intermittent PTH administration presented enhanced effects on condylar chondrocyte differentiation and bone formation, as demonstrated by increased mineral nodule formation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, up-regulated runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2), ALP, collagen type X (COL10a1), collagen type I (COL1a1), osteocalcin (OCN), bone sialoprotein (BSP), bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and osterix (OSX) mRNA and/or protein expression. On the contrary, continuous PTH administration promoted condylar chondrocyte proliferation and suppressed its differentiation, as demonstrated by up-regulated collagen type II (COL2a1) mRNA expression, reduced mineral nodule formation and down-regulated expression of the mRNAs and/or proteins mentioned above. Our data suggest that PTH can regulate condylar chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, depending on the type of PTH administration. These results provide new insight into the effects of PTH on condylar chondrocytes and new evidence for using local PTH administration to cure mandibular

  18. In vitro translation of androgen receptor cRNA results in an activated androgen receptor protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); P.E. de Ruiter (Petra); J. Trapman (Jan); G.W. Jenster (Guido); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractTranslation of androgen receptor (AR) cRNA in a reticulocyte lysate and subsequent analysis of the translation products by SDS/PAGE showed a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 108 kDa. Scatchard-plot analysis revealed a single binding component with

  19. A competitive inhibitor that reduces recruitment of androgen receptor to androgen-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Milu T; Wilson, Elizabeth M; Shapiro, David J

    2012-07-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) has a critical role in the growth and progression of androgen-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancers. To identify novel inhibitors of AR transactivation that block growth of prostate cancer cells, a luciferase-based high-throughput screen of ~160,000 small molecules was performed in cells stably expressing AR and a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-luciferase reporter. CPIC (1-(3-(2-chlorophenoxy) propyl)-1H-indole-3-carbonitrile) was identified as a small molecule that blocks AR transactivation to a greater extent than other steroid receptors. CPIC inhibited AR-mediated proliferation of androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines, with minimal toxicity in AR-negative cell lines. CPIC treatment also reduced the anchorage-independent growth of LAPC-4 prostate cancer cells. CPIC functioned as a pure antagonist by inhibiting the expression of AR-regulated genes in LAPC-4 cells that express wild-type AR and exhibited weak agonist activity in LNCaP cells that express the mutant AR-T877A. CPIC treatment did not reduce AR levels or alter its nuclear localization. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the site of action of CPIC. CPIC inhibited recruitment of androgen-bound AR to the PSA promoter and enhancer sites to a greater extent than bicalutamide. CPIC is a new therapeutic inhibitor that targets AR-mediated gene activation with potential to arrest the growth of prostate cancer.

  20. Comparative safety evaluation of selective androgen receptor modulators and anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seul Min; Lee, Byung-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) have been in use for decades for the treatment of short stature, severe burns, HIV wasting syndrome, osteoporosis, and anemia. However, their lack of selective effects on certain symptoms and unfavorable pharmacokinetic properties has limited their long-term usage in clinics. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have some advantages over AASs; they are highly specific for androgen receptors, are orally available, and, most importantly, act as strong receptor agonists in skeletal muscle and bone, and as weak agonists or antagonists in androgen-responsive tissues such as the prostate and sebaceous glands. The exact molecular mechanism, however, has not been fully elucidated. This article includes a toxicological review of major AASs, and a comparative safety analysis of major AASs and SARMs in clinical trials to evaluate the therapeutic potential of SARMs. Based on the robust tissue selectivity of SARMs over AASs, they are worth considering as a promising therapeutic option for the treatment of various muscle-wasting diseases.

  1. In the mood for sex : The value of androgens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apperloo, MJA; Van der Stege, JG; Hoek, A; Schultz, WCMW

    2003-01-01

    Androgen substitution is increasingly being employed to enhance sexual desire in women based on the assumption that low androgen levels cause low sexual desire, Sexual functioning in women is complex; therefore, decreased sexual interest can have various causes. An adequate female sexual biopsycboso

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ANDROGENS AND ANTIANDROGENS: AN EXPANDING CHEMICAL UNIVERSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the last ten years, awareness has grown about environmental chemicals that display antiandrogenic or androgenic activity. While studies in the early 1990s focused on pesticides that acted as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, it soon became evident that this was not the ...

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL ANDROGENS AND ANTIANDROGENS: AN EXPANDING CHEMICAL UNIVERSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Within the last ten years, awareness has grown about environmental chemicals that display antiandrogenic or androgenic activity. While studies in the early 1990s focused on pesticides that acted as androgen receptor (AR) antagonists, it soon became evident that this was not the ...

  4. In the mood for sex : The value of androgens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apperloo, MJA; Van der Stege, JG; Hoek, A; Schultz, WCMW

    2003-01-01

    Androgen substitution is increasingly being employed to enhance sexual desire in women based on the assumption that low androgen levels cause low sexual desire, Sexual functioning in women is complex; therefore, decreased sexual interest can have various causes. An adequate female sexual

  5. Development of selective androgen receptor modulators and their therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Rodan, Gideon A; Schmidt, Azi

    2002-01-01

    Androgens control a broad range of physiological functions. The androgen receptor (AR), a steroid receptor that mediates the diverse biological actions of androgens, is a ligand inducible transcription factor. Abnormalities in the androgen signaling system result in many disturbances ranging from changes in gender determination and sexual development to psychiatric and emotional disorders. Androgen replacement therapy can improve many clinical conditions including hypogonadism and osteoporosis, but is limited by the lack of efficacious and safe therapeutic agents with easy delivery options. Recent progress in the area of gene regulation by steroid receptors and by selective receptor modulators provides an opportunity to examine if selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) could address some of the problems associated with current androgen therapy. Since the composition of the transcriptional initiation complex recruited by liganded AR determines the specificity of gene regulation, synthetic ligands aimed at initiating transcription of tissue and promoter specific genes offers hope for developing better androgen therapy. Establishment of assays that predict synthetic ligand activity is critical for SARM development. Advancement in high throughput compound screening and gene fingerprinting technologies, such as microarrays and proteomics, will facilitate and accelerate identification of effective SARMs.

  6. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Gluud, C

    2006-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  7. [Wheat androgenic embryoids and calli: data of scanning electron microscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruglova, N N; Gorbunova, V Iu; Abramov, S N; Sel'dimirova, O A

    2001-01-01

    The surface of wheat androgenic embryoids and calli at different developmental stages was studied using SEM. The embryoids were already characterized by regular cell divisions at the early developmental stages, while the calli were represented by irregular cell conglomerates. This trend was preserved during further development of androgenic structures. SEM studies of the surface of so-called secondary embryoids confirmed these observations.

  8. Androgens regulate Hedgehog signalling and proliferation in androgen-dependent prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirab, Nanor; Terry, Stéphane; Giton, Frank; Caradec, Josselin; Chimingqi, Mihelaiti; Moutereau, Stéphane; Vacherot, Francis; de la Taille, Alexandre; Kouyoumdjian, Jean-Claude; Loric, Sylvain

    2012-09-15

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is androgen sensitive in its development and progression to metastatic disease. Hedgehog (Hh) pathway activation is important in the initiation and growth of various carcinomas including PCa. We and others have observed aberrations of Hh pathway during the progression of PCa to the castration-resistant state. The involvement of androgen signalling in Hh pathway activation, however, remains largely elusive. Here we investigate the direct role of androgen signalling on Hh pathway. We examined the effect of Dihydrosterone (DHT), antiandrogen, bicalutamide, and Hh pathway inhibitor, KAAD-cyclopamine in four human prostate cell lines (two cancerous: LNCaP, VCaP, and two normal: PNT2 and PNT2-ARm which harbours a mutant version of androgen receptor (AR) that is commonly found in LNCaP). Cell proliferation as well as Hh pathway members (SHH, IHH, DHH, GLI, PTCH) mRNA expression levels were assessed. We showed that KAAD-cyclopamine decreased cell proliferation of DHT-stimulated LNCaP, VCaP and PNT2-ARm cells. SHH expression was found to be downregulated by DHT in all AR posititve cells. The negative effect of DHT on SHH expression was counteracted when cells were treated by bicalutamide. Importantly, KAAD-cyclopamine treatment seemed to inhibit AR activity. Moreover, bicalutamide as well as KAAD-cyclopamine treatments induced GLI and PTCH expression in VCaP and PNT2-ARm. Our results suggest that Hh pathway activity can be regulated by androgen signalling. Specifically, we show that the DHT-induced inhibition of Hh pathway is AR dependent. The mutual interaction between these two pathways might be important in the regulation of cell proliferation in PCa.

  9. Synthesis of esters of androgens with unsaturated fatty acids for androgen requiring therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, F; Garofalo, A; Aloisi, A M; Lamponi, S; Magnani, A; Petroni, A

    2013-06-01

    Androgens' metabolism and activity are gaining a more and more important role in human physiology particularly referring to aging and to neurodegenerative diseases. Androgen treatment is often required for long-lasting disorders. In order to improve their duration and effects, androgens can be administered as esters of carboxylic acids. The novelty of our research is the use of esters of androgens with specific unsaturated fatty acids, in order to reduce possible side effects particularly related to chronic pathologies with altered lipid homeostasis such as X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy and cardiovascular disorders. Thus the esters of the main androgenic substances testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and their metabolite 5α-androstan-3α,17β-diol were chemically obtained by coupling with different unsaturated fatty acids. To this aim, fatty acids with various degree of unsaturation and belonging to different series were selected. Specifically, oleic acid (18:1, n-9), linoleic acid (18:2, n-6), and the n-3 fatty acids, α-linolenic acid (18:3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6) were used obtaining corresponding esters with acceptable yields and good degree of purity. All the synthesized compounds were tested for their cytotoxic activities in mouse NIH3T3 and human astrocyte cell lines. The esters demonstrated good tolerability and no in vitro cytotoxic effect in both cell cultures. After these promising preliminary results, the esters will be suitable for in vivo studies in order to ascertain their pharmacokinetic characteristics and their biological effects.

  10. Novel mutations of androgen receptor: a possible mechanism of bicalutamide withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takahito; Miyazaki, Jun-ichi; Araki, Hideo; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Kusaka, Masami; Miyamoto, Masaomi

    2003-01-01

    Most prostate cancers (PCs) become resistant to combined androgen blockade therapy with surgical or medical castration and antiandrogens after several years. Some of these refractory PCs regress after discontinuation of antiandrogen administration [antiandrogen withdrawal syndrome (AWS)]. Although the molecular mechanisms of the AWS are not fully understood because of the lack of suitable experimental models, one hypothesis of the mechanism is mutation of androgen receptor (AR). However, bicalutamide, which has become the most prevalent pure antiandrogen, does not work as an agonist for any mutant AR detected thus far in PC. To elucidate the mechanisms of the AWS, we established and characterized novel LNCaP cell sublines, LNCaP-cxDs, which were generated in vitro by culturing androgen-dependent LNCaP-FGC human PC cells in androgen-depleted medium with bicalutamide to mimic the combined androgen blockade therapy. LNCaP-FGC cells did not grow at first, but they started to grow after 6-13 weeks of culture. Bicalutamide stimulated LNCaP-cxD cell growth and increased prostate-specific antigen secretion from LNCaP-cxD cells both in vitro and in vivo. Sequencing of AR transcripts revealed that the AR in LNCaP-cxD cells harbors a novel mutation in codon 741, TGG (tryptophan) to TGT (cysteine; W741C), or in codon 741, TGG to TTG (leucine; W741L), in the ligand-binding domain. Transactivation assays showed that bicalutamide worked as an agonist for both W741C and W741L mutant ARs. Importantly, another antiandrogen, hydroxyflutamide, worked as an antagonist for these mutant ARs. In summary, we demonstrate for the first time that within only 6-13 weeks of in vitro exposure to bicalutamide, LNCaP-FGC cells, whose growth had initially been suppressed, came to use bicalutamide as an AR agonist via W741 AR mutation to survive. Our data strongly support the hypothesis that AR mutation is one possible mechanism of the AWS and suggest that flutamide might be effective as a second

  11. A simple model for turbulence intermittencies

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbert, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Whether turbulence intermittencies shall be described by a log-Poisson, a log-stable pdf or other distributions is still debated nowadays. In this paper, a bridge between polymer physics, self-avoiding walk and random vortex stretching is established which may help in getting a new insight on this topics. Actually a very simple relationship between stability index of the stable law and the well known Flory exponent stemming from polymer physics is established. Moreover the scaling of turbulence intermittencies with Reynolds number is also obtained and the overall picture is very close to Tennekes' simple model for the fine scale structure of turbulence [Phys. Fluids, 11, 3 (1968)] : vortex tubes of Kolmogorov length width are bend by bigger vortices of Taylor length scale. This thus results in both a simple and sound model with no fitting parameter needed.

  12. Insights from intermittent binocular rivalry and EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Pitts

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Novel stimulation and analytical approaches employed in EEG studies of ambiguous figures have recently been applied to binocular rivalry. The combination of intermittent stimulus presentation and EEG source imaging has begun to shed new light on the neural underpinnings of binocular rivalry. Here, we review the basics of the intermittent paradigm and highlight methodological issues important for interpreting previous results and designing future experiments. We then outline current analytical approaches, including EEG microstates, event-related potentials, and statistically-based source estimation, and propose a spatio-temporal model that integrates findings from several studies. Finally, we discuss the advantages and limitations of using binocular rivalry as a tool to investigate the neural basis of perceptual awareness.

  13. Towards an intermittency-friendly energy system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blarke, Morten

    2012-01-01

    . However, well-designed heat pump concepts are more cost-effective than electric boilers, and in future markets where the gas/electricity price ratio is likely to increase, compression heat pumps in combination with intermediate thermal storages represent a superior potential for combining an intermittency-friendly...... are capitulating as wind power penetration levels are moving above 25%; some operators are retiring cogeneration units entirely, while other operators are making way for heat-only boilers. This development is jeopardizing the system-wide energy, economic, and environmental benefits that distributed cogeneration...... using low-temperature heat recovered from flue gasses in combination with an intermediate cold storage, which enables the independent operation of heat pump and cogenerator. It is found that an electric boiler provides consistent improvements in the intermittency-friendliness of distributed cogeneration...

  14. INTERMITTENCY AND SCALING IN TURBULENT CONVECTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emily S. C. CHING

    2003-01-01

    Both the velocity and temperature measurements taken in turbulent Rayleigh-B'enard convection experiments have been analyzed. It is found that both the velocity and temperature fluctuations are intermittent and can be well-described by the She-Leveque hierarchical structure. A positive correlation between the vertical velocity and the temperature differences is found both at the center,near the sidewall and near the bottom of the convection cell, supporting that buoyancy is significant in the Bolgiano regime. Moreover, the intermittent nature of the temperature fluctuations in the Bolgiano regime can be attributed to the variations in the temperature dissipation rate. However, the relations between the velocity and temperature structure functions and their correlations implied by the Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling are not supported by experimental measurements.

  15. Scaling and Intermittency in Animal Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Harnos, A; Lawrence, A B; Vattay, G

    1999-01-01

    Scale-invariant spatial or temporal patterns and Lévy flight motion have been observed in a large variety of biological systems. It has been argued that animals in general might perform Lévy flight motion with power law distribution of times between two changes of the direction of motion. Here we study the temporal behaviour of nesting gilts. The time spent by a gilt in a given form of activity has power law probability distribution without finite average. Further analysis reveals intermittent eruption of certain periodic behavioural sequences which are responsible for the scaling behaviour and indicates the existence of a critical state. We show that this behaviour is in close analogy with temporal sequences of velocity found in turbulent flows, where random and regular sequences alternate and form an intermittent sequence.

  16. The safety, pharmacokinetics, and effects of LGD-4033, a novel nonsteroidal oral, selective androgen receptor modulator, in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaria, Shehzad; Collins, Lauren; Dillon, E Lichar; Orwoll, Katie; Storer, Thomas W; Miciek, Renee; Ulloor, Jagadish; Zhang, Anqi; Eder, Richard; Zientek, Heather; Gordon, Gilad; Kazmi, Syed; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Bhasin, Shalender

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about potential adverse effects of testosterone on prostate have motivated the development of selective androgen receptor modulators that display tissue-selective activation of androgenic signaling. LGD-4033, a novel nonsteroidal, oral selective androgen receptor modulator, binds androgen receptor with high affinity and selectivity. Objectives. To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and effects of ascending doses of LGD-4033 administered daily for 21 days on lean body mass, muscle strength, stair-climbing power, and sex hormones. In this placebo-controlled study, 76 healthy men (21-50 years) were randomized to placebo or 0.1, 0.3, or 1.0 mg LGD-4033 daily for 21 days. Blood counts, chemistries, lipids, prostate-specific antigen, electrocardiogram, hormones, lean and fat mass, and muscle strength were measured during and for 5 weeks after intervention. LGD-4033 was well tolerated. There were no drug-related serious adverse events. Frequency of adverse events was similar between active and placebo groups. Hemoglobin, prostate-specific antigen, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, or QT intervals did not change significantly at any dose. LGD-4033 had a long elimination half-life and dose-proportional accumulation upon multiple dosing. LGD-4033 administration was associated with dose-dependent suppression of total testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels. follicle-stimulating hormone and free testosterone showed significant suppression at 1.0-mg dose only. Lean body mass increased dose dependently, but fat mass did not change significantly. Hormone levels and lipids returned to baseline after treatment discontinuation. LGD-4033 was safe, had favorable pharmacokinetic profile, and increased lean body mass even during this short period without change in prostate-specific antigen. Longer randomized trials should evaluate its efficacy in improving physical function

  17. Visualising androgen receptor activity in male and female mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Alwyn Dart

    Full Text Available Androgens, required for normal development and fertility of males and females, have vital roles in the reproductive tract, brain, cardiovascular system, smooth muscle and bone. Androgens function via the androgen receptor (AR, a ligand-dependent transcription factor. To assay and localise AR activity in vivo we generated the transgenic "ARE-Luc" mouse, expressing a luciferase reporter gene under the control of activated endogenous AR. In vivo imaging of androgen-mediated luciferase activity revealed several strongly expressing tissues in the male mouse as expected and also in certain female tissues. In males the testes, prostate, seminal vesicles and bone marrow all showed high AR activity. In females, strong activity was seen in the ovaries, uterus, omentum tissue and mammary glands. In both sexes AR expression and activity was also found in salivary glands, the eye (and associated glands, adipose tissue, spleen and, notably, regions of the brain. Luciferase protein expression was found in the same cell layers as androgen receptor expression. Additionally, mouse AR expression and activity correlated well with AR expression in human tissues. The anti-androgen bicalutamide reduced luciferase signal in all tissues. Our model demonstrates that androgens can act in these tissues directly via AR, rather than exclusively via androgen aromatisation to estrogens and activation of the estrogen receptor. Additionally, it visually demonstrates the fundamental importance of AR signalling outside the normal role in the reproductive organs. This model represents an important tool for physiological and developmental analysis of androgen signalling, and for characterization of known and novel androgenic or antiandrogenic compounds.

  18. Deoxyribonucleic acid-binding ability of androgen receptors in whole cells: implications for the actions of androgens and antiandrogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.W. Kuil (Cor); E. Mulder (Eppo)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractIn whole cells, the effects of several androgens and antiandrogens on the in the induction of DNA binding for the human wild-type androgen receptor (AR) and a mutant receptor ARL (LNCaP mutation; codon 868, Thr to Ala) were examined and related to the transc

  19. Functional analysis of a novel androgen receptor mutation, Q902K, in an individual with partial androgen insensitivity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Umar (Arzu); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); N.M. Van (Mai); M. van Leeuwen (Marije); M.M.P.J. Verbiest (Michael); W.J. Kleijer (Wim); D. Dooijes (Dennis); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAndrogen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is caused by defects in the androgen receptor (AR) that render the AR partially or completely inactive. As a result, embryonic sex differentiation is impaired. Here, we describe a novel mutation in the AR found in a patient with par

  20. RAINBOW TROUT ANDROGEN RECEPTOR ALPHA AND THE HUMAN ANDROGEN RECEPTOR: COMPARISONS IN THE COS WHOLE CELL BINDING ASSAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainbow Trout Androgen Receptor Alpha And Human Androgen Receptor: Comparisons in the COS Whole Cell Binding Assay Mary C. Cardon, L. Earl Gray, Jr. and Vickie S. WilsonU.S. Environmental Protection Agency, ORD, NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle...

  1. Bladder calculi complicating intermittent clean catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, M A; Sonda, L P; Diokno, A C; Vidyasagar, M

    1983-10-01

    Eight male patients on clean intermittent catheterization programs for neurogenic bladder dysfunction developed vesical calculi around pubic hairs inadvertently introduced into the bladder, acting as a nidus for incrustation. In three patients, the radiographic appearance of serpentine calcifications in the pelvis was highly consistent with calcareous deposits on strands of hair. Familiarity with this radiologic appearance should suggest the diagnosis in the appropriate clinical setting and help avoid misinterpretation of these calcifications, atypical of usual bladder stones.

  2. Intermittent chaotic chimeras for coupled rotators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmi, Simona; Martens, Erik A; Thutupalli, Shashi; Torcini, Alessandro

    2015-09-01

    Two symmetrically coupled populations of N oscillators with inertia m display chaotic solutions with broken symmetry similar to experimental observations with mechanical pendulums. In particular, we report evidence of intermittent chaotic chimeras, where one population is synchronized and the other jumps erratically between laminar and turbulent phases. These states have finite lifetimes diverging as a power law with N and m. Lyapunov analyses reveal chaotic properties in quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions for globally coupled dissipative systems.

  3. AN ELDERLY WOMAN WITH INTERMITTENT CLAUDICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayyer Naveed Wazir

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report illustrates the misdiagnosis of intermittent claudication in an elderly with multiple cardiac risk factors. Careful clinical evaluation and imaging shifts the diagnosis from peripheral vascular disease to spinal stenosis. The decision whether to offer conservative therapy or proceed to spinal surgery requires an accurate assessment of the severity of the symptoms without ignoring the important role of patient preferences.

  4. Cardiac calcification in acute intermittent porphyria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmoy Ghatak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aetiology of pericardial calcifications can be multifactorial. Tuberculosis has been reported as the most common cause. Other known causes include uraemia, asbestosis, post-traumatic or postoperative. We report a rare case of pericardial calcification seen in a patient with established acute intermittent porphyria. A direct causal relationship cannot be established between porphyria and pericardial calcification, but it may be due to deposition of the porphyrin in the pericardium.

  5. Treatment of febrile seizures with intermittent clobazam

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    Fifty children, 24 female and 26 male, with ages varying from 6 to 72 months (mean=23.7 m.) that experienced at least one febrile seizure (FS) entered a prospective study of intermittent therapy with clobazam. Cases with severe neurological abnormalities, progressive neurological disease, afebrile seizures, symptomatic seizures of other nature, or seizures during a central nervous system infection were excluded. Seizures were of the simple type in 25 patients, complex in 20 and unclassified i...

  6. Androgen responses to resistance exercise%抗阻运动的睾酮应答

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文安

    2014-01-01

    1986 and 2013. Final y 46 literatures addressing the research progress is analyzed about androgen responses to resistance exercise were included. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Studies have shown that, weight lifting (power snatch and power clean), squating, and deadlifting produced higher testosterone levels than the smal muscle groups. Under the same load, eccentric and concentric contractions produced the same hormone response. Adequate training amount and intensity may change the circulating testosterone levels. Short sports intermittent time led to a higher testosterone response than the long intermittent time. The free testosterone levels in youth group were significantly increased compared with the older group before and after exercise. Nutrition intervention affected acute testosterone responses to resistance exercise. Changes in exercise intensity and amount wil alter quiet testosterone levels, once returned to normal training, testosterone levels wil return to baseline values. Resistance exercise can increase androgen receptor content in human skeletal muscles.

  7. Intermittent radio galaxies and source statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C S

    1997-01-01

    We suggest that extragalactic radio sources are intermittent on timescales of 10^4-10^5 yr. Using a simple spherical model of a cocoon/shock system, it is found that inactive sources fade rapidly in radio luminosity but the shock in the ambient medium continues to expand supersonically, thereby keeping the whole source structure intact during the inactive phases. The fading of inactive sources, and the effect of the intermittency on the expansion velocity, can readily explain the observed over-abundance of small radio sources. In particular, the plateau in the observed distribution of sizes found by O'Dea & Baum (1997) can be interpreted as being due to intermittency. The model predicts that very young sources will be particularly radio luminous, once the effects of absorption have been accounted for. Furthermore, it predicts the existence of a significant number of faint `coasting' sources. These might be detectable in deep, low-frequency radio maps, or via the X-ray and optical emission line properties ...

  8. Androgen receptor accelerates premature senescence of human dermal papilla cells in association with DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chien Yang

    Full Text Available The dermal papilla, located in the hair follicle, expresses androgen receptor and plays an important role in hair growth. Androgen/Androgen receptor actions have been implicated in the pathogenesis of androgenetic alopecia, but the exact mechanism is not well known. Recent studies suggest that balding dermal papilla cells exhibit premature senescence, upregulation of p16(INK4a, and nuclear expression of DNA damage markers. To investigate whether androgen/AR signaling influences the premature senescence of dermal papilla cells, we first compared frontal scalp dermal papilla cells of androgenetic alopecia patients with matched normal controls and observed that premature senescence is more prominent in the dermal papilla cells of androgenetic alopecia patients. Exposure of androgen induced premature senescence in dermal papilla cells from non-balding frontal and transitional zone of balding scalp follicles but not in beard follicles. Overexpression of the AR promoted androgen-induced premature senescence in association with p16(INK4a upregulation, whereas knockdown of the androgen receptor diminished the effects of androgen. An analysis of γ-H2AX expression in response to androgen/androgen receptor signaling suggested that DNA damage contributes to androgen/androgen receptor-accelerated premature senescence. These results define androgen/androgen receptor signaling as an accelerator of premature senescence in dermal papilla cells and suggest that the androgen/androgen receptor-mediated DNA damage-p16(INK4a axis is a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of androgenetic alopecia.

  9. L712V mutation in the androgen receptor gene causes complete androgen insensitivity syndrome due to severe loss of androgen function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajender, Singh; Gupta, Nalini J; Chakrabarty, Baidyanath; Singh, Lalji; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2013-12-11

    Inability to respond to the circulating androgens is named as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene are the most common cause of AIS. A cause and effect relationship between some of these mutations and the AIS phenotype has been proven by in vitro studies. Several other mutations have been identified, but need to be functionally validated for pathogenicity. Screening of the AR mutations upon presumptive diagnosis of AIS is recommended. We analyzed a case of complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) for mutations in the AR gene. Sequencing of the entire coding region revealed C>G mutation (CTT-GTT) at codon 712 (position according to the NCBI database) in exon 4 of the gene, resulting in replacement of leucine with valine in the ligand-binding domain of the AR protein. No incidence of this mutation was observed in 230 normal male individuals analyzed for comparison. In vitro androgen binding and transactivation assays using mutant clone showed approximately 71% loss of ligand binding and about 76% loss of transactivation function. We conclude that CAIS in this individual was due to L712V substitution in the androgen receptor protein.

  10. Androgens and estrogens in skeletal sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Michaël; Antonio, Leen; Sinnesael, Mieke; Dubois, Vanessa; Gielen, Evelien; Classens, Frank; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Bone is an endocrine tissue expressing androgen and estrogen receptors as well as steroid metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivity of circulating sex steroids is modulated by sex hormone-binding globulin and local conversion in bone tissue, for example, from testosterone (T) to estradiol (E2) by aromatase, or to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-reductase enzymes. Our understanding of the structural basis for gender differences in bone strength has advanced considerably over recent years due to increasing use of (high resolution) peripheral computed tomography. These microarchitectural insights form the basis to understand sex steroid influences on male peak bone mass and turnover in cortical vs trabecular bone. Recent studies using Cre/LoxP technology have further refi ned our mechanistic insights from global knockout mice into the direct contributions of sex steroids and their respective nuclear receptors in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and other cells to male osteoporosis. At the same time, these studies have reinforced the notion that androgen and estrogen defi ciency have both direct and pleiotropic effects via interaction with, for example, insulin-like growth factor 1, inflammation, oxidative stress, central nervous system control of bone metabolism, adaptation to mechanical loading, etc., This review will summarize recent advances on these issues in the fi eld of sex steroid actions in male bone homeostasis.

  11. Androgens and estrogens in skeletal sexual dimorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Laurent

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Bone is an endocrine tissue expressing androgen and estrogen receptors as well as steroid metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivity of circulating sex steroids is modulated by sex hormone-binding globulin and local conversion in bone tissue, for example, from testosterone (T to estradiol (E2 by aromatase, or to dihydrotestosterone by 5α-reductase enzymes. Our understanding of the structural basis for gender differences in bone strength has advanced considerably over recent years due to increasing use of (high resolution peripheral computed tomography. These microarchitectural insights form the basis to understand sex steroid influences on male peak bone mass and turnover in cortical vs trabecular bone. Recent studies using Cre/LoxP technology have further refi ned our mechanistic insights from global knockout mice into the direct contributions of sex steroids and their respective nuclear receptors in osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes, and other cells to male osteoporosis. At the same time, these studies have reinforced the notion that androgen and estrogen defi ciency have both direct and pleiotropic effects via interaction with, for example, insulin-like growth factor 1, inflammation, oxidative stress, central nervous system control of bone metabolism, adaptation to mechanical loading, etc., This review will summarize recent advances on these issues in the fi eld of sex steroid actions in male bone homeostasis.

  12. Interocular suppression in children with deprivation amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Lisa; Chen, Zidong; Li, Jinrong; Black, Joanna; Dai, Shuan; Yuan, Junpeng; Yu, Minbin; Thompson, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    In patients with anisometropic or strabismic amblyopia, interocular suppression can be minimized by presenting high contrast stimulus elements to the amblyopic eye and lower contrast elements to the fellow eye. This suggests a structurally intact binocular visual system that is functionally suppressed. We investigated whether suppression can also be overcome by contrast balancing in children with deprivation amblyopia due to childhood cataracts. To quantify interocular contrast balance, contrast interference thresholds were measured using an established dichoptic global motion technique for 21 children with deprivation amblyopia, 14 with anisometropic or mixed strabismic/anisometropic amblyopia and 10 visually normal children (mean age mean=9.9years, range 5-16years). We found that interocular suppression could be overcome by contrast balancing in most children with deprivation amblyopia, at least intermittently, and all children with anisometropic or mixed anisometropic/strabismic amblyopia. However, children with deprivation amblyopia due to early unilateral or bilateral cataracts could tolerate only very low contrast levels to the stronger eye indicating strong suppression. Our results suggest that treatment options reliant on contrast balanced dichoptic presentation could be attempted in a subset of children with deprivation amblyopia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Complex modulation of androgen responsive gene expression by methoxyacetic acid

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    Stanley Kerri A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optimal androgen signaling is critical for testicular development and spermatogenesis. Methoxyacetic acid (MAA, the primary active metabolite of the industrial chemical ethylene glycol monomethyl ether, disrupts spermatogenesis and causes testicular atrophy. Transcriptional trans-activation studies have indicated that MAA can enhance androgen receptor activity, however, whether MAA actually impacts the expression of androgen-responsive genes in vivo, and which genes might be affected is not known. Methods A mouse TM3 Leydig cell line that stably expresses androgen receptor (TM3-AR was prepared and analyzed by transcriptional profiling to identify target gene interactions between MAA and testosterone on a global scale. Results MAA is shown to have widespread effects on androgen-responsive genes, affecting processes ranging from apoptosis to ion transport, cell adhesion, phosphorylation and transcription, with MAA able to enhance, as well as antagonize, androgenic responses. Moreover, testosterone is shown to exert both positive and negative effects on MAA gene responses. Motif analysis indicated that binding sites for FOX, HOX, LEF/TCF, STAT5 and MEF2 family transcription factors are among the most highly enriched in genes regulated by testosterone and MAA. Notably, 65 FOXO targets were repressed by testosterone or showed repression enhanced by MAA with testosterone; these include 16 genes associated with developmental processes, six of which are Hox genes. Conclusions These findings highlight the complex interactions between testosterone and MAA, and provide insight into the effects of MAA exposure on androgen-dependent processes in a Leydig cell model.

  14. Recent advances in the development of selective androgen receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuqing; Lanter, James C; Sui, Zhihua

    2009-09-01

    The androgens testosterone and its more potent tissue metabolite 5-alpha-dihydrotesterone regulate diverse physiological process involving both reproductive and non-reproductive functions. Most of the signaling effects of androgens are mediated through the androgen receptor (AR), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of transcription factors. The AR has been a target for drug development focused on the treatment of pathological conditions arising from abnormal androgen levels or altered target tissue responsiveness, the improvement of physical performance and the regulation of male fertility. The primary focus for drug design has been the synthesis of chemicals to regulate the transcriptional activity of AR based on the structural and functional properties of the ligands, with a recent preference for selectively anabolic non-steroidals. A new class of molecules targeting androgen receptors called selective androgen receptor modulators is being developed, analogous to the clinically successful and at present marketed selective estrogen receptor modulators. This article highlights and reviews research advances in this field that have been published in patent literature since 2003. The structural diversity of selective androgen receptor modulators has dramatically increased. Several compounds have emerged as clinical and preclinical candidates.

  15. Selective androgen receptor modulators for frailty and osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Edward J; Moore, William J; Freedman, Leonard P; Nagpal, Sunil

    2007-10-01

    Androgens play an important role not only in male sexual differentiation, puberty, sexual behavior and spermatogenesis, but also in the maintenance of bone architecture and muscle mass and strength. For decades, steroidal androgens have been used by hypogonadal and aging men as hormone replacement therapy, and abused by prominent athletes as anabolic agents for enhancing physical performance. The use of steroidal androgens is associated with hepatotoxicity, potential for prostate stimulation, virilizing actions and other side effects resulting from their cross-reactivity to related steroid receptors. Therefore, to utilize the therapeutic potential of the androgen receptor for the treatment of indications such as osteoporosis and frailty, several pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies are developing non-steroidal tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) that retain the beneficial properties of natural androgens and exhibit better therapeutic indices. This article reviews the mechanism of androgen action, novel non-steroidal ligands under development and future directions of SARM research for the discovery of novel modulators for frailty and osteoporosis.

  16. Smoking patterns and stimulus control in intermittent and daily smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Shiffman

    Full Text Available Intermittent smokers (ITS - who smoke less than daily - comprise an increasing proportion of adult smokers. Their smoking patterns challenge theoretical models of smoking motivation, which emphasize regular and frequent smoking to maintain nicotine levels and avoid withdrawal, but yet have gone largely unexamined. We characterized smoking patterns among 212 ITS (smoking 4-27 days per month compared to 194 daily smokers (DS; smoking 5-30 cigarettes daily who monitored situational antecedents of smoking using ecological momentary assessment. Subjects recorded each cigarette on an electronic diary, and situational variables were assessed in a random subset (n=21,539 smoking episodes; parallel assessments were obtained by beeping subjects at random when they were not smoking (n=26,930 non-smoking occasions. Compared to DS, ITS' smoking was more strongly associated with being away from home, being in a bar, drinking alcohol, socializing, being with friends and acquaintances, and when others were smoking. Mood had only modest effects in either group. DS' and ITS' smoking were substantially and equally suppressed by smoking restrictions, although ITS more often cited self-imposed restrictions. ITS' smoking was consistently more associated with environmental cues and contexts, especially those associated with positive or "indulgent" smoking situations. Stimulus control may be an important influence in maintaining smoking and making quitting difficult among ITS.

  17. Intermittent Oral Versus Intravenous Alfacalcidol in Dialysis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitwalli Ahmed

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage renal failure (ESRF on maintenance dialysis, commonly develop secondary hyperparathyroidism and renal osteodystrophy (ROD. Alfacalcidol, taken orally or administered intravenously, is known to reverse these complications. In this study, 19 ESRF patients, who were on dialysis (13 on hemodialysis and six on peritoneal dialysis for longer than six months and having serum parathormone levels at least four times normal and serum calcium less than 2.1 mmol/L, were randomly allocated to treatment with oral or intravenous (i.v. alfacalcidol for a period of 12 months. There were six patients on hemodialysis (HD and three on peritoneal dialysis (PD in the oral treatment group while in the i.v. group there were seven patients on HD and three on PD. Clinical and serial biochemical assessments showed no statistically significant difference between the orally- and i.v.-treated patients in terms of suppressing secondary hyperparathyroidism and osteodystrophy. However, patients with features of mild ROD on bone histology, had more satisfactory changes in biochemistry when compared to others. Our results further support the use of intermittent oral alfacalcidol in ESRF patients because of its cost effectiveness, ease of administration and convenience, especially for peritoneal dialysis patients.

  18. Aberrant splicing of androgenic receptor mRNA results in synthesis of a nonfunctional receptor protein in a patient with androgen insensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Kuiper, G.G.J.M.; Faber, P.W.; van Rooij, H.C.J.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J.; Brinkmann, A.O. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Schweikert, H.U. (Univ. of Bonn (Germany)); Zegers, N.D. (Medical Biological Laboratory-Organization for Applied Scientific Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Hodgins, M.B. (Glasgow Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1990-10-01

    Androgen insensitivity is a disorder in which the correct androgen response in an androgen target cell is impaired. The clinical symtpoms of this X chromosome-linked syndrome are presumed to be caused by mutations in the androgen receptor gene. The authors report a G {r arrow} T mutation in the splice donor site of intron 4 of the androgen receptor gene of a 46, XY subject lacking detectable androgen binding to the receptor and with the complete form of androgen insensitivity. This point mutation completely abolishes normal RNA splicing at the exon 4/intron 4 boundary and results in the activation of a cryptic splice donor site in exon 4, which leads to the deletion of 123 nucleotides from the mRNA. Translation of the mutant mRNA results in an androgen receptor protein {approx}5 kDa smaller than the wild type. This mutated androgen receptor protein was unable to bind androgens and unable to activate transcription of an androgen-regulated reporter gene construct. This mutation in the human androgen receptor gene demonstrates the importance of an intact steroid-binding domain for proper androgen receptor functioning in vivo.

  19. Androgens regulate gene expression in avian skeletal muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Fuxjager

    Full Text Available Circulating androgens in adult reproductively active male vertebrates influence a diversity of organ systems and thus are considered costly. Recently, we obtained evidence that androgen receptors (AR are expressed in several skeletal muscles of three passeriform birds, the golden-collared manakin (Manacus vitellinus, zebra finch (Taenopygia guttata, and ochre-bellied flycatcher (Mionectes oleagieus. Because skeletal muscles that control wing movement make up the bulk of a bird's body mass, evidence for widespread effects of androgen action on these muscles would greatly expand the functional impact of androgens beyond their well-characterized effects on relatively discrete targets throughout the avian body. To investigate this issue, we use quantitative PCR (qPCR to determine if androgens alter gene mRNA expression patterns in wing musculature of wild golden-collared manakins and captive zebra finches. In manakins, the androgen testosterone (T up-regulated expression of parvalbumin (PV and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I, two genes whose products enhance cellular Ca(2+ cycling and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle fibers. In T-treated zebra finches, the anti-androgen flutamide blunted PV and IGF-I expression. These results suggest that certain transcriptional effects of androgen action via AR are conserved in passerine skeletal muscle tissue. When we examined wing muscles of manakins, zebra finches and ochre-bellied flycatchers, we found that expression of PV and IGF-I varied across species and in a manner consistent with a function for AR-dependent gene regulation. Together, these findings imply that androgens have the potential to act on avian muscle in a way that may enhance the physicality required for successful reproduction.

  20. Regulation of androgen action during establishment of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Douglas A; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2016-07-01

    During the establishment of pregnancy, the ovarian-derived hormones progesterone and oestradiol regulate remodelling of the endometrium to promote an environment that is able to support and maintain a successful pregnancy. Decidualisation is characterised by differentiation of endometrial stromal cells that secrete growth factors and cytokines that regulate vascular remodelling and immune cell influx. This differentiation process is critical for reproduction, and inadequate decidualisation is implicated in the aetiology of pregnancy disorders such as foetal growth restriction and preeclampsia. In contrast to progesterone and oestradiol, the role of androgens in regulating endometrial function is poorly understood. Androgen receptors are expressed in the endometrium, and androgens are reported to regulate both the transcriptome and the secretome of endometrial stromal cells. In androgen-target tissues, circulating precursors are activated to mediate local effects, and recent studies report that steroid concentrations detected in endometrial tissue are distinct to those detected in the peripheral circulation. New evidence suggests that decidualisation results in dynamic changes in the expression of androgen biosynthetic enzymes, highlighting a role for pre-receptor regulation of androgen action during the establishment of pregnancy. These results suggest that such enzymes could be future therapeutic targets for the treatment of infertility associated with endometrial dysfunction. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that androgens play a beneficial role in regulating the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Future studies should be focussed on investigating the safety and efficacy of androgen supplementation with the potential for utilisation of novel therapeutics, such as selective androgen receptor modulators, to improve reproductive outcomes in women.

  1. [Significance of sex hormone binding globulin and free androgen index in the estimation of androgenic cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, F Y; Lauritzen, C

    1990-01-01

    Hormone analyses for hirsute women suggested that free testosterone was most revealing in biological effects and sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) was quantitatively persuative. Presented in this paper are the measurements of testosterone, androstendion, dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHAS), SHBG, androstandiol and free androgen index (FAI) in 51 women with hirsutism. 92% of the hirsute women with elevated androgen level showed decrease in SHBG values and increase in FAI. 17 females with hirsutism revealed abnormally high androstandiol values which were highly related to the values of total and free testosterone (r = 0.78, r = 0.80, respectively). It is suggested that in clinical practice SHBG and FAI should also be measured besides testosterone and DHAS.

  2. Cardiovascular protection by ezetimibe and influence on oxidative stress in mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ryuji; Nishioka, Satoshi; Nomura, Atsuo; Ijiri, Yoshio; Miyamura, Masatoshi; Ukimura, Akira; Okada, Yoshikatsu; Kitaura, Yasushi; Hayashi, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    Ezetimibe is as an inhibitor of NPC1L1 protein, which has a key role in cholesterol absorption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of ezetimibe on the plasma lipid profile, atherosclerotic lesions, and cardiomyocyte ultrastructure in an animal model of atherosclerosis with intermittent hypoxia. Apolipoprotein E-knockout mice received a high-fat diet for 30 days. Then animals were exposed to intermittent hypoxia for 10 days or were maintained under normoxic conditions. In the ezetimibe group, ezetimibe (5 mg/kg/day) was added to the diet. Under normoxic conditions, the total cholesterol level was significantly lower in the ezetimibe group (63.6±6.6 mg/dl) than in the control group (116.3±16.9 mg/dl, PIntermittent hypoxia accelerated atherosclerosis associated with increased superoxide production, which also caused degeneration of cardiomyocytes, mitochondrial abnormalities, and interstitial fibrosis. Compared with the control group, the ezetimibe group showed significantly less advanced atherosclerotic lesions and lower superoxide production in the thoracic aorta, as well as reduced oxidative stress, preservation of cardiomyocyte ultrastructure, and reduced interstitial fibrosis in the left ventricular myocardium. In conclusion, ezetimibe not only reduces total cholesterol, but also prevents the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events due to intermittent hypoxia at least partly through suppression of oxidative stress.

  3. [Anabolic androgenic steroids in amateur sports in the Netherlands].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woerdeman, Jorn; de Hon, Olivier; Levi, Marcel; de Ronde, W Pim

    2010-01-01

    In the Netherlands an estimated 20,000 people use anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS). The use of AAS is particularly common in regular visitors to gyms and fitness centres. AAS are usually synthetic derivatives of testosterone with both an anabolic and an androgenic effect. AAS have many side effects like liver damage (oral use) or infections (intramuscular use), which can be explained partly by the androgenic effect and partly by the manner of use. Many of these side effects are only reported in case studies and have not been systematically investigated.

  4. A simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, C.P.; Bauman, J.E.; Hahn, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    Female birds deposit significant amounts of steroid hormones into the yolks of their eggs. Studies have demonstrated that these hormones, particularly androgens, affect nestling growth and development. In order to measure androgen concentrations in avian egg yolks, most authors follow the extraction methods outlined by Schwabl (1993. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 90:11446-11450). We describe a simplified method for extracting androgens from avian egg yolks. Our method, which has been validated through recovery and linearity experiments, consists of a single ethanol precipitation that produces substantially higher recoveries than those reported by Schwabl.

  5. [Bone and Men's Health. Bone selective androgen receptor modulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Kazuyuki

    2010-02-01

    Androgen, one of the sex steroid hormones shows various biological activities on the corresponding various tissues. Many efforts to produce novel drug materials maintaining a desired biological activity with an adequate tissue selectivity, which is so-called selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) , are being performed. As one of such efforts, studies on SARMs against bone tissues which possess a significant potential to stimulate a bone formation with reducing undesirable androgenic virilizing activities are in progress all over the world. This review focuses on the research and development activities of such SARMs and discuses their usefulness for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  6. Analysis of estrogens and androgens in postmenopausal serum and plasma by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingqing; Bottalico, Lisa; Mesaros, Clementina; Blair, Ian A

    2015-07-01

    Liquid chromatography-selected reaction monitoring/mass spectrometry-based methodology has evolved to the point where accurate analyses of trace levels of estrogens and androgens in postmenopausal serum and plasma can be accomplished with high precision and accuracy. A suite of derivatization procedures has been developed, which together with modern mass spectrometry instrumentation provide investigators with robust and sensitive methodology. Pre-ionized derivatives are proving to be useful as they are not subject to suppression of the electrospray signal. Postmenopausal women with elevated plasma or serum estrogens are thought to be at increased risk for breast and endometrial cancer. Therefore, significant advances in risk assessment should be possible now that reliable methodology is available. It is also possible to conduct analyses of multiple estrogens in plasma or serum. Laboratories that are currently employing liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry methodology can now readily implement this strategy. This will help conserve important plasma and serum samples available in Biobanks, as it will be possible to conduct high sensitivity analyses using low initial sample volumes. Reported levels of both conjugated and non-conjugated estrogen metabolites are close to the limits of sensitivity of many assays to date, urging caution in the interpretation of these low values. The analysis of serum androgen precursors in postmenopausal women has not been conducted routinely in the past using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry methodology. Integration of serum androgen levels into the panel of metabolites analyzed could provide additional information for assessing cancer risk and should be included in the future.

  7. S578N mutation of the androgen receptor in an adolescent with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yuan; WANG De-fen; LI Xiao-ying; YANG Jun; WANG Wei

    2010-01-01

    @@ Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) was first described by the American gynecologist Morris in 1953 and was initially described in 82 patients.1 The syndrome was designated "testicular feminization syndrome" , because the testes produce hormones with estrogen-like actions.1 Clinical AIS manifestations include the appearance of normal female external genitalia without internal female genital organs. Other clinical manifestations include undescended testes, normal female breast development, and scant axillary and pubic hair. AIS is the most common condition that cancause male undermasculinisation.

  8. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Sinnesael, Mieke; Cielen, Nele; Helsen, Christine; Clinckemalie, Liesbeth; Spans, Lien; Gayan-Ramirez, Ghislaine; Deldicque, Louise; Hespel, Peter; Carmeliet, Geert; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2014-07-01

    Androgens have well-established anabolic actions on skeletal muscle, although the direct effects of the androgen receptor (AR) in muscle remain unclear. We generated satellite cell-specific AR-knockout (satARKO) mice in which the AR is selectively ablated in satellite cells, the muscle precursor cells. Total-limb maximal grip strength is decreased by 7% in satARKO mice, with soleus muscles containing ∼10% more type I fibers and 10% less type IIa fibers than the corresponding control littermates. The weight of the perineal levator ani muscle is markedly reduced (-52%). Thus, muscle AR is involved in fiber-type distribution and force production of the limb muscles, while it is a major determinant of the perineal muscle mass. Surprisingly, myostatin (Mstn), a strong inhibitor of skeletal muscle growth, is one of the most androgen-responsive genes (6-fold reduction in satARKO) through direct transcription activation by the AR. Consequently, muscle hypertrophy in response to androgens is augmented in Mstn-knockout mice. Our finding that androgens induce Mstn signaling to restrain their own anabolic actions has implications for the treatment of muscle wasting disorders.-Dubois, V., Laurent, M. R., Sinnesael, M., Cielen, N., Helsen, C., Clinckemalie, L., Spans, L., Gayan-Ramirez, G., Deldicque, L., Hespel, P., Carmeliet, G., Vanderschueren, D., and Claessens, F. A satellite cell-specific knockout of the androgen receptor reveals myostatin as a direct androgen target in skeletal muscle.

  9. UNSTEADY INTERMITTENT FLOW IN A ROTATING CURVED PIPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Jian-an; SHEN Xin-rong; CHEN Hua-jun; ZHANG Ben-zhao

    2004-01-01

    The effects of rotation and intermittent fre quency on the flow transition of secondary flow and, main flow were examined in detail. Certain hitherto unknown flow patterns were found. A numerical study was performed to study the characteristics of unsteady intermittent flow in a rotating curved pipe. Due to the rotation, both the Coriolis force and the centrifugal force could contribute to the unsteady intermittent flow and some complicated phenomena can be found. The results indicate that the unsteady intermittent flow are mainly characterized by five parameters: the Dean number Dn , the curvatureκ, the maximal force ratio F (of the Coriolis force to the centrifugal force in a cycle), the intermittent frequency parameter η(the ratio of a pulslating time to the cycle period), and the Womersley number α. Present works shows the natures of the unsteady intermittent flow in a rotating curved pipe.

  10. The PPAR{gamma} ligand ciglitazone regulates androgen receptor activation differently in androgen-dependent versus androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Patrice E.; Lyles, Besstina E.; Stewart, LaMonica V., E-mail: lstewart@mmc.edu

    2010-12-10

    The androgen receptor (AR) regulates growth and progression of androgen-dependent as well as androgen-independent prostate cancer cells. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonists have been reported to reduce AR activation in androgen-dependent LNCaP prostate cancer cells. To determine whether PPAR{gamma} ligands are equally effective at inhibiting AR activity in androgen-independent prostate cancer, we examined the effect of the PPAR{gamma} ligands ciglitazone and rosiglitazone on C4-2 cells, an androgen- independent derivative of the LNCaP cell line. Luciferase-based reporter assays and Western blot analysis demonstrated that PPAR{gamma} ligand reduced dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced increases in AR activity in LNCaP cells. However, in C4-2 cells, these compounds increased DHT-induced AR driven luciferase activity. In addition, ciglitazone did not significantly alter DHT-mediated increases in prostate specific antigen (PSA) protein or mRNA levels within C4-2 cells. siRNA-based experiments demonstrated that the ciglitazone-induced regulation of AR activity observed in C4-2 cells was dependent on the presence of PPAR{gamma}. Furthermore, overexpression of the AR corepressor cyclin D1 inhibited the ability of ciglitazone to induce AR luciferase activity in C4-2 cells. Thus, our data suggest that both PPAR{gamma} and cyclin D1 levels influence the ability of ciglitazone to differentially regulate AR signaling in androgen-independent C4-2 prostate cancer cells.

  11. Identification and characterization of the minimal androgen-regulated kidney-specific kidney androgen-regulated protein gene promoter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The kidney androgen-regulated protein (Kap) gene is tissue specific and regulated by androgen in mouse kidney proximal tubule cells (PTCs). In the present study, we aimed to identify the minimal PTC-specific androgen-regulated Kap promoter and analyze its androgen response elements (AREs).Adeletion series of the Kap1542 promoter/luciferase constructs were assayed in opossum kidney (OK) PTCs in the presence or absence of 15 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Kap 1542 and Kap637 had low activity and no androgen induction; Kap224 had a basal activity that was 4- to 5-fold higher than that of Kap 1542, but was only sfightly induced by DHT. Kap 147 had a basal activity that was 2- to 3-fold higher than that of Kap 1542 and was induced by DHT 4- to 6-fold. Kap77 abol-ished basal promoter activity but was still induced by DHT. Results showed that, in vitro, Kap147 was a minimal androgen-regulated promoter. Transient transfection in different cells demonstrated that Kap147 specifically initi-ated reporter gene expression in PTCs. Sequence analysis revealed two potential AREs located at positions -124 and -39 of Kap147. Mutational assays showed that only the ARE at -124 was involved in androgen response in OK cells. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay also verified -124 ARE bound specifically to androgen receptor. In conclusion, we defined the minimal Kap 147 promoter that may be a good model for the study of kidney PTC-specific expression and molecular mechanisms that lead to an androgen-specific responsiveness in vivo.

  12. Advantages and Limitations of Androgen Receptor-Based Methods for Detecting Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Abuse as Performance Enhancing Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Kathy; Yazdi, Tahmineh; Masharani, Umesh; Tyrrell, Blake; Butch, Anthony; Schaufele, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone (T) and related androgens are performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) abused by some athletes to gain competitive advantage. To monitor unauthorized androgen abuse, doping control programs use mass spectrometry (MS) to detect androgens, synthetic anabolic-androgenic steroids (AASs) and their metabolites in an athlete's urine. AASs of unknown composition will not be detected by these procedures. Since AASs achieve their anabolic effects by activating the Androgen Receptor (AR), cell-based bioassays that measure the effect of a urine sample on AR activity are under investigation as complementary, pan-androgen detection methods. We evaluated an AR BioAssay as a monitor for androgen activity in urine pre-treated with glucuronidase, which releases T from the inactive T-glucuronide that predominates in urine. AR BioAssay activity levels were expressed as 'T-equivalent' concentrations by comparison to a T dose response curve. The T-equivalent concentrations of androgens in the urine of hypogonadal participants supplemented with T (in whom all androgenic activity should arise from T) were quantitatively identical to the T measurements conducted by MS at the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory (0.96 ± 0.22). All 17 AASs studied were active in the AR BioAssay; other steroids were inactive. 12 metabolites of 10 commonly abused AASs, which are used for MS monitoring of AAS doping because of their prolonged presence in urine, had reduced or no AR BioAssay activity. Thus, the AR BioAssay can accurately and inexpensively monitor T, but its ability to monitor urinary AASs will be limited to a period immediately following doping in which the active AASs remain intact.

  13. Wnt inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) is regulated by androgens and enhances androgen-dependent prostate development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Kimberly P; Mehta, Vatsal; Branam, Amanda M; Abler, Lisa L; Buresh-Stiemke, Rita A; Joshi, Pinak S; Schmitz, Christopher T; Marker, Paul C; Vezina, Chad M

    2012-12-01

    Fetal prostate development from urogenital sinus (UGS) epithelium requires androgen receptor (AR) activation in UGS mesenchyme (UGM). Despite growing awareness of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the UGS, we are still limited in our knowledge of androgen-responsive genes in UGM that initiate prostate ductal development. We found that WNT inhibitory factor 1 (Wif1) mRNA is more abundant in male vs. female mouse UGM in which its expression temporally and spatially overlaps androgen-responsive steroid 5α-reductase 2 (Srd5a2). Wif1 mRNA is also present in prostatic buds during their elongation and branching morphogenesis. Androgens are necessary and sufficient for Wif1 expression in mouse UGS explant mesenchyme, and testicular androgens remain necessary for normal Wif1 expression in adult mouse prostate stroma. WIF1 contributes functionally to prostatic bud formation. In the presence of androgens, exogenous WIF1 protein increases prostatic bud number and UGS basal epithelial cell proliferation without noticeably altering the pattern of WNT/β-catenin-responsive Axin2 or lymphoid enhancer binding factor 1 (Lef1) mRNA. Wif1 mutant male UGSs exhibit increased (Sfrp)2 and (Sfrp)3 expression and form the same number of prostatic buds as the wild-type control males. Collectively our results reveal Wif1 as one of the few known androgen-responsive genes in the fetal mouse UGM and support the hypothesis that androgen-dependent Wif1 expression is linked to the mechanism of androgen-induced prostatic bud formation.

  14. Clinical investigation of surgery for intermittent exotropia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chong-qing YANG; Ye SHEN; Yang-shun GU; Wei HAN

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the time and postoperative binocular vision of strabismus surgery for children with intermittent exotropia (X (T)). Methods: A retrospective investigation was conducted in 80 child patients with intermittent exotropia. Pre- and postoperative angles of deviation fixating at near (33cm) and distant targets (6m) were measured with the prolonged alternate cover testing. The binocular function was assessed with synoptophore. Twenty-one patients took the postoperative synoptophore exercise. Results: (1) A week after surgery, 96.2% of the 80 patients had binocular normotopia, while a year after surgery, 91.3% of the 80 patients had binocular normotopia; (2) Preoperatively, 58 patients had near stereoacuity, while postoperatively, 72 patients achieved near stereoacuity (P<0.05); (3) Preoperatively, 64 patients had Grade I for the synoptophore evaluation and postoperatively, 76 patients achieved Grade I. Meanwhile, 55 patients had Grade Ⅱpreoperatively and 72 achieved Grade Ⅱ postoperatively. For Grade Ⅲ, there were 49 patients preoperatively and 64 patients postoperatively (P<0.05); (4) Patients of 5~8 years old had a significantly better recovery rate of binocular vision than those of 9~18 years old (P<0.05); (5)Patients taking postoperative synoptophore exercise had a better binocular vision than those taking no exercise (P<0.05). Conclusions: (1) Strabismus surgery can help to preserve or restore the binocular vision for intermittent exotropia; (2) Receiving the surgery at young ages may develop better postoperative binocular vision; (3) The postoperative synoptophore exercise can help to restore the binocular vision.

  15. Hovering and intermittent flight in birds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobalske, Bret W, E-mail: bret.tobalske@mso.umt.ed [Field Research Station at Fort Missoula, Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Two styles of bird locomotion, hovering and intermittent flight, have great potential to inform future development of autonomous flying vehicles. Hummingbirds are the smallest flying vertebrates, and they are the only birds that can sustain hovering. Their ability to hover is due to their small size, high wingbeat frequency, relatively large margin of mass-specific power available for flight and a suite of anatomical features that include proportionally massive major flight muscles (pectoralis and supracoracoideus) and wing anatomy that enables them to leave their wings extended yet turned over (supinated) during upstroke so that they can generate lift to support their weight. Hummingbirds generate three times more lift during downstroke compared with upstroke, with the disparity due to wing twist during upstroke. Much like insects, hummingbirds exploit unsteady mechanisms during hovering including delayed stall during wing translation that is manifest as a leading-edge vortex (LEV) on the wing and rotational circulation at the end of each half stroke. Intermittent flight is common in small- and medium-sized birds and consists of pauses during which the wings are flexed (bound) or extended (glide). Flap-bounding appears to be an energy-saving style when flying relatively fast, with the production of lift by the body and tail critical to this saving. Flap-gliding is thought to be less costly than continuous flapping during flight at most speeds. Some species are known to shift from flap-gliding at slow speeds to flap-bounding at fast speeds, but there is an upper size limit for the ability to bound ({approx}0.3 kg) and small birds with rounded wings do not use intermittent glides.

  16. Acute intermittent porphyria in the puerperium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sparić Radmila

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute intermittent porphyria emerges as a result of partial defect of porphobilinogen deaminase and is manifested by repeated episodes of somatic, psychiatric and neurological disorders. The disease is conducted via the autosomaldominant gene of variable penetration, so most of the carriers never experience seizures. Timely making of diagnosis, screening of blood relatives of the patient and education of patients on avoidance of provoking factors are the key to adequate treatment. Case Outline. A 23-year-old patient having born the third child was hospitalized due to pains in the abdomen and convulsive seizures nine days after the vaginal delivery. At admittance, she suffered a generalized convulsive seizure of clonic-tonic type. The patient immediately underwent a complete clinical, laboratory, bacteriological and ultrasound examination. Bearing in mind the fact that the patient had several convulsive seizures even after the given neurological therapy, haem-arginate was introduced into therapy during four days. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The administration of haem-arginate led to the normalization of blood pressure, pulse and bowel function. The patient was treated by a team of doctors, in the intensive care ward, with the use of medicaments, which are allowed in the case of acute porphyria. Sixteen days after the admittance, with clean neurological status and gynaecological and ultra-sound findings, she was released for ambulatory treatment. Conclusion. The presented case exhibits the gravity of making a diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria in puerperium and the necessity of multi-disciplinary approach in treating this disease. Acute intermittent porphyria should be considered in cases of ambiguous abdominal pain, as well as in patients having abdominal pains followed by neuro-psychiatric disorders.

  17. Intermittent Microwave Drying of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Li; Tao Zhang; Chenglai Wu; Chunqing Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of present study was to characterize the intermittent microwave drying of wheat seeds. Results revealed that microwave on time percentage (MOTP) and initial moisture content were the main parameters which influenced the intermittent microwave drying rate and the germination capacity of dried seeds. Best intermittent microwave drying (power: 800 W; seed sample weight: 100 g, microwave on time in each cycle: 32 s) without significantly decreasing the germination rate was...

  18. Long term and transitional intermittent smokers: a longitudinal study.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindström, Martin; Isacsson, Sven-Olof

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate differences in snuff consumption, sociodemographic and psychosocial characteristics between baseline intermittent smokers that had become daily smokers, stopped smoking or remained intermittent smokers at the one year follow up. Design/setting/participants/measurements: A population of 12 507 individuals interviewed at baseline in 1992-94 and at a one year follow up, aged 45-69 years, was investigated in a longitudinal study. The three groups of baseline intermittent...

  19. Intermittent fasting: a "new" historical strategy for controlling seizures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L; Rubenstein, James E; Kossoff, Eric H

    2013-05-01

    In antiquity, fasting was a treatment for epilepsy and a rationale for the ketogenic diet (KD). Preclinical data indicate the KD and intermittent fasting do not share identical anticonvulsant mechanisms. We implemented an intermittent fasting regimen in six children with an incomplete response to a KD. Three patients adhered to the combined intermittent fasting/KD regimen for 2 months and four had transient improvement in seizure control, albeit with some hunger-related adverse reactions.

  20. Intermittent oral iron supplementation during pregnancy (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Rosas, Juan Pablo; De-Regil, Luz Maria; Dowswell, Therese; Viteri, Fernando E

    2014-01-01

    Background Anaemia is a frequent condition during pregnancy, particularly among women from developing countries who have insufficient iron intake to meet increased iron needs of both the mother and the fetus. Traditionally, gestational anaemia has been prevented with the provision of daily iron supplements throughout pregnancy, but adherence to this regimen due to side effects, interrupted supply of the supplements, and concerns about safety among women with an adequate iron intake, have limited the use of this intervention. Intermittent (i.e. one, two or three times a week on non-consecutive days) supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals has recently been proposed as an alternative to daily supplementation. Objectives To assess the benefits and harms of intermittent supplementation with iron alone or in combination with folic acid or other vitamins and minerals to pregnant women on neonatal and pregnancy outcomes. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (23 March 2012). We also searched the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) for ongoing studies and contacted relevant organisations for the identification of ongoing and unpublished studies (23 March 2012). Selection criteria Randomised or quasi-randomised trials. Data collection and analysis We assessed the methodological quality of trials using standard Cochrane criteria. Two review authors independently assessed trial eligibility, extracted data and conducted checks for accuracy. Main results This review includes 21 trials from 13 different countries, but only 18 trials (with 4072 women) reported on our outcomes of interest and contributed data to the review. All of these studies compared daily versus intermittent iron supplementation. Three studies provided iron alone, 12 iron+folic acid and three more iron plus multiple vitamins and minerals. Their methodological quality was mixed

  1. [Acute intermittent porphyria and inappropriate ADH syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tébar, M T; Aguilera, L

    2010-05-01

    A 44-year-old woman complained of abdominal pain of 4 days' duration accompanied by vomiting and painful urination. The admitting physician noted neurologic signs consistent with axonal polyneuropathy and hyponatremia. In the absence of other explanations for the syndrome, SIADH was diagnosed. Because of the nonspecific nature of the observations, the patient was assessed by various specialists and admitted to the anesthetic recovery unit due to worsening of neurologic signs and suspicion of acute intermittent porphyria. The diagnosis was confirmed by laboratory findings of elevated d-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen levels and normal stool porphyrins. The patient improved with intravenous hematin infused over 4 days.

  2. Intermittent Atrioventricular Block following Fingolimod Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Gialafos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 47-year-old female patient with multiple sclerosis (MS developed symptomatic intermittent 2nd degree atrioventricular block (AVB of five-hour duration, five hours after the first two doses of fingolimod, that resolved completely. Frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability (HRV revealed increased parasympathetic activity and decreased sympathetic tone, while modified Ewing tests were suggestive of impaired cardiac sympathetic function. We hypothesize that expression of this particular arrhythmia might be related to autonomic nervous system (ANS dysfunction due to demyelinating lesions in the upper thoracic spinal cord, possibly augmented by the parasympathetic effect of the drug.

  3. Muscle coordination changes during intermittent cycling sprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Basset, Fabien A; Falgairette, Guy

    2005-06-03

    Maximal muscle power is reported to decrease during explosive cyclical exercises owing to metabolic disturbances, muscle damage, and adjustments in the efferent neural command. The aim of the present study was to analyze the influence of inter-muscle coordination in fatigue occurrence during 10 intermittent 6-s cycling sprints, with 30-s recovery through electromyographic activity (EMG). Results showed a decrease in peak power output with sprint repetitions (sprint 1 versus sprint 10: -11%, Pcycling sprints of short duration, decreased possibly due to the inability of muscles to maintain maximal force. This reduction in maximal power output occurred in parallel to changes in the muscle coordination pattern after fatigue.

  4. Transition to turbulence, intermittence, and vortex fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bershadskii, A.G.

    1985-09-01

    A model is developed which describes the fluctuation coalescence of vortices at moderately high Reynolds numbers. The model is found to be in good agreement with experimental data on (1) flow intermittence in a boundary layer, a round jet, and a plane wake; (2) the effect of a magnetic field on the formation of a turbulent energy spectrum behind a grid and on turbulent fluctuations and friction in ducts; (3) formation of a turbulent energy spectrum in a boundary layer and in ducts. 12 references.

  5. Activation of two mutant androgen receptors from human prostatic carcinoma by adrenal androgens and metabolic derivatives of testosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culig, Z; Stober, J; Gast, A; Peterziel, H; Hobisch, A; Radmayr, C; Hittmair, A; Bartsch, G; Cato, A C; Klocker, H

    1996-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central regulatory role in prostatic carcinoma and is a target of androgen ablation therapy. Recent detection of mutant receptors in tumor specimens suggest a contribution of AR alterations to progression towards androgen independence. In a specimen derived from metastatic prostate cancer we have reported a point mutation in the AR gene that leads to a single amino acid exchange in the ligand binding domain of the receptor. Another amino acid exchange resulting from a point mutation was also identified 15 amino acids away from our mutation. This mutation was detected in the AR gene isolated from an organ-confined prostatic tumor. Here we report the functional characterization of the two mutant receptors in the presence of adrenal androgens and testosterone metabolites. These studies were performed by cotransfecting androgen-responsive reporter genes and either the wild-type or mutant AR expression vectors into receptor negative DU-145 and CV-1 cells. The indicator genes used consisted of the promoter of the androgen-inducible prostate-specific antigen gene or the C' Delta9 enhancer fragment from the promoter of the mouse sex-limited protein driving the expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene. Cotransfection-transactivation assays revealed that the adrenal androgen androstenedione and two products of testosterone metabolism, androsterone and androstandiol, induced reporter gene activity more efficiently in the presence of the mutant receptors than in the presence of the wild-type receptor. No difference between wild-type and mutant receptors was observed in the presence of the metabolite androstandione. The interaction of receptor-hormone complexes with target DNA was studied in vitro by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Dihydrotestosterone and the synthetic androgen mibolerone induced a faster migrating complex with all receptors, whereas the androgen metabolite androstandione induced this

  6. Diagnosing Intermittent and Persistent Faults using Static Bayesian Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megshoel, Ole Jakob

    2010-01-01

    Both intermittent and persistent faults may occur in a wide range of systems. We present in this paper the introduction of intermittent fault handling techniques into ProDiagnose, an algorithm that previously only handled persistent faults. We discuss novel algorithmic techniques as well as how our static Bayesian networks help diagnose, in an integrated manner, a range of intermittent and persistent faults. Through experiments with data from the ADAPT electrical power system test bed, generated as part of the Second International Diagnostic Competition (DXC-10), we show that this novel variant of ProDiagnose diagnoses intermittent faults accurately and quickly, while maintaining strong performance on persistent faults.

  7. Control of on-off intermittency by slow parametric modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reategui, Rider Jaimes; Pisarchik, Alexander N

    2004-06-01

    We study on-off intermittent behavior in two coupled double-well Duffing oscillators with stochastic driving and demonstrate that, by using slow harmonic modulation applied to an accessible system parameter, the intermittent attractors can be completely eliminated. The influence of noise is also investigated. Power-law scaling of the average laminar time with a critical exponent of -1 as a function of both the amplitude and frequency of the control modulation is found near the onset of intermittency, which is a signature of on-off intermittency.

  8. Intermittent lag synchronization in a driven system of coupled oscillators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alexander N Pisarchik; Rider Jaimes-Reátegui

    2005-04-01

    We study intermittent lag synchronization in a system of two identical mutually coupled Duffing oscillators with parametric modulation in one of them. This phenomenon in a periodically forced system can be seen as intermittent jump from phase to lag synchronization, during which the chaotic trajectory visits a periodic orbit closely. We demonstrate different types of intermittent lag synchronizations, that occur in the vicinity of saddle-node bifurcations where the system changes its dynamical state, and characterize the simplest case of period-one intermittent lag synchronization.

  9. Androgen deprivation therapy-associated vasomotor symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason M Jones; Manish Kohli; Charles L Loprinzi

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is widely used as standard therapy in the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer.While efficacious,ADT is associated with multiple side effects,including decreased libido,erectile dysfunction,diabetes,loss of muscle tone and altered body composition,osteoporosis,lipid changes,memory loss,gynecomastia and hot flashes.The breadth of literature for the treatment of hot flashes is much smaller in men than that in women.While hormonal therapy of hot flashes has been shown to be effective,multiple non-hormonal medications and treatment methods have also been developed.This article reviews current options for the treatment of hot flashes in patients taking ADT.

  10. Androgenic alopecia in women: an Indian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Aggarwal, Ashok K; Midha, Reshmi

    2013-01-01

    The authors sought to investigate androgenic alopecia (AA) utilizing clinical and investigative procedures to establish the pattern of AA in the Indian subcontinent. A total of 35 consecutive women presenting with AA were included. After obtaining informed consent, a detailed history/examination, hair pull test, trichogram, and a scalp biopsy were performed in patients. AA classification was attempted across Ludwig and Norwood guidelines. Of 35 women, 16 had grade I, 10 had grade II, and 1 had grade III Ludwig classification. In addition, 6 other women had Christmas tree baldness: 1 each of fronto-parietal and male pattern baldness. Several investigations including hormonal profile were inconclusive; however, hair pull test and trichogram may be helpful in understanding the sequence in AA in women. AA has infrequently been reported, particularly India and in Asia in general.

  11. Anabolic androgenic steroid-induced hepatotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Peter; Llewellyn, William; Van Mol, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) have been abused for decades by both professional and amateur athletes in order to improve physical performance or muscle mass. AAS abuse can cause adverse effects, among which are hepatotoxic effects. These effects include cholestatic icterus and possibly peliosis hepatis and hepatocellular carcinoma or adenoma. In particular, 17α-alkylated AAS appear to be hepatotoxic, whereas nonalkylated AAS appear not to be. The 17α-alkyl substitution retards hepatic metabolism of the AAS rendering it orally bioavailable. The mechanism responsible for the hepatotoxicity induced by 17α-alkylated AAS remains poorly understood. However, oxidative stress has been repeatedly shown to be associated with it. In this manuscript we present a hypothesis which describes a potential mechanism responsible for AAS-induced hepatotoxicity, based on several observations from the literature which suggest oxidative stress being a causal factor.

  12. Androgen Receptor-Mediated Genomic Androgen Action Augments Ischemia-Induced Neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Yuen Ting; Lecce, Laura; Tan, Joanne T M; Bursill, Christina A; Handelsman, David J; Ng, Martin K C

    2016-12-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that androgens regulate ischemia-induced neovascularization. However, the role of genomic androgen action mediated by androgen receptor (AR), a ligand-activated nuclear transcription factor, remains poorly understood. Using an AR knockout (KO) mouse strain that contains a transcriptionally inactive AR (AR(Δex3)KO), we examined the role of AR genomic function in modulating androgen-mediated augmentation of ischemia-induced neovascularization. Castrated wild-type (AR(WT)) and AR(Δex3)KO mice were implanted with 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or placebo pellets after hindlimb ischemia (HLI). DHT modulation of angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, key processes for vascular repair and regeneration, was examined. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging revealed that DHT enhanced blood flow recovery in AR(WT) mice post-HLI. In AR(WT) mice, DHT enhanced angiogenesis by down-regulating prolyl hydroxylase 2 and augmenting hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) levels in the ischemic tissues post-HLI. DHT also enhanced the production and mobilization of Sca1+/CXCR4+ progenitor cells in the bone marrow (BM) and circulating blood, respectively, in AR(WT) mice. By contrast, DHT-mediated enhancement of blood flow recovery was abrogated in AR(Δex3)KO mice. DHT modulation of HIF-1α expression was attenuated in AR(Δex3)KO mice. DHT-induced HIF-1α transcriptional activity and DHT-augmented paracrine-mediated endothelial cell tubule formation were attenuated in fibroblasts isolated from AR(Δex3)KO mice in vitro. Furthermore, DHT-induced augmentation of Sca1+/CXCR4+ progenitor cell production and mobilization was absent in AR(Δex3)KO mice post-HLI. BM transplantation revealed that ischemia-induced mobilization of circulating progenitor cells was abolished in recipients of AR(Δex3)KO BM. Together, these results indicate that androgen-mediated augmentation of ischemia-induced neovascularization is dependent on genomic AR transcriptional activation.

  13. GON4L Drives Cancer Growth through a YY1-Androgen Receptor-CD24 Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Neeraj; Dancik, Garrett M; Goodspeed, Andrew; Costello, James C; Owens, Charles; Duex, Jason E; Theodorescu, Dan

    2016-09-01

    In principle, the inhibition of candidate gain-of-function genes defined through genomic analyses of large patient cohorts offers an attractive therapeutic strategy. In this study, we focused on changes in expression of CD24, a well-validated clinical biomarker of poor prognosis and a driver of tumor growth and metastasis, as a benchmark to assess functional relevance. Through this approach, we identified GON4L as a regulator of CD24 from screening a pooled shRNA library of 176 candidate gain-of-function genes. GON4L depletion reduced CD24 expression in human bladder cancer cells and blocked cell proliferation in vitro and tumor xenograft growth in vivo Mechanistically, GON4L interacted with transcription factor YY1, promoting its association with the androgen receptor to drive CD24 expression and cell growth. In clinical bladder cancer specimens, expression of GON4L, YY1, and CD24 was elevated compared with normal bladder urothelium. This pathway is biologically relevant in other cancer types as well, where CD24 and the androgen receptor are clinically prognostic, given that silencing of GON4L and YY1 suppressed CD24 expression and growth of human lung, prostate, and breast cancer cells. Overall, our results define GON4L as a novel driver of cancer growth, offering new biomarker and therapeutic opportunities. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5175-85. ©2016 AACR.

  14. The role of GH and IGF-I in mediating anabolic effects of testosterone on androgen-responsive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Carlo; Bhasin, Shalender; Tangherlini, Frances; Barton, Elisabeth R; Ganno, Michelle; Zhang, Anqi; Shansky, Janet; Vandenburgh, Herman H; Travison, Thomas G; Jasuja, Ravi; Morris, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone (T) supplementation increases skeletal muscle mass, circulating GH, IGF-I, and im IGF-I expression, but the role of GH and IGF-I in mediating T's effects on the skeletal muscle remains poorly understood. Here, we show that T administration increased body weight and the mass of the androgen-dependent levator ani muscle in hypophysectomized as well as castrated plus hypophysectomized adult male rats. T stimulated the proliferation of primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSKMCs) in vitro, an effect blocked by transfecting hSKMCs with small interference RNA targeting human IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR). In differentiation conditions, T promoted the fusion of hSKMCs into larger myotubes, an effect attenuated by small interference RNA targeting human IGF-IR. Notably, MKR mice, which express a dominant negative form of the IGF-IR in skeletal muscle fibers, treated with a GnRH antagonist (acyline) to suppress endogenous T, responded to T administration by an attenuated increase in the levator ani muscle mass. In conclusion, circulating GH and IGF-I are not essential for mediating T's effects on an androgen-responsive skeletal muscle. IGF-I signaling plays an important role in mediating T's effects on skeletal muscle progenitor cell growth and differentiation in vitro. However, IGF-IR signaling in skeletal muscle fibers does not appear to be obligatory for mediating the anabolic effects of T on the mass of androgen-responsive skeletal muscles in mice.

  15. Male osteoporosis and androgenic therapy: from testosterone to SARMs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilotti, Antonio; Falchetti, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    As in the women, male osteoporosis represents an important social problem, amplified by the increasing life expectance.Differently from women, 50% of male osteoporosis is secondary to treatments and/or diseases that make mandatory their search through an accurate clinical investigations in every newly diagnosed osteoporotic men. Male osteoporosis is frequently underdiagnosed and consequently undertreated, and too often it is revealed only after the occurrence of a fragility fracture. Androgens may prevent the loss of cancellous bone and stimulate periosteal cortical bone apposition. The anabolic effect of testosterone on both bone and muscle, is limited by the high incidence of androgenic side effects. Hypogonadism is the only situation where the benefits of the use of testosterone formulations exceed the side effects. Selective androgen receptor modulators can dissociate androgenic and anabolic effect on different tissues with various strategies. Many compounds have been studied with positive results in vivo and in clinical trials.

  16. Multiple arterial thromboses associated with anabolic androgenic steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCulloch, Neil Arthur; Abbas, Jonathan Raihan; Simms, Malcolm Harold

    2014-03-01

    The use of supraphysiological doses of anabolic androgenic steroids can have serious side effects. This article reports the case of a young man who suffered potentially life-threatening arterial thromboses following the use of these drugs.

  17. A PRACTICAL APPROACH TO THE DETECTION OF ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE-MUTATIONS AND PEDIGREE ANALYSIS IN FAMILIES WITH X-LINKED ANDROGEN INSENSITIVITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    RISSTALPERS, C; HOOGENBOEZEM, T; SLEDDENS, HFBM; VERLEUNMOOIJMAN, MCT; DEGENHART, HJ; DROP, SLS; HALLEY, DJJ; Oosterwijk, Jan; HODGINS, MB; TRAPMAN, J; BRINKMANN, AO

    1994-01-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is an X-linked disorder in which defects in the androgen receptor gene have prevented the normal development of both internal and external male structures in 46,XY individuals. This survey reports the analysis of 11 AIS subjects. The androgen receptor gene of th

  18. Adaptive intermittent control: A computational model explaining motor intermittency observed in human behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Yutaka; Tanaka, Masato; Inoue, Yasuyuki

    2015-07-01

    It is a fundamental question how our brain performs a given motor task in a real-time fashion with the slow sensorimotor system. Computational theory proposed an influential idea of feed-forward control, but it has mainly treated the case that the movement is ballistic (such as reaching) because the motor commands should be calculated in advance of movement execution. As a possible mechanism for operating feed-forward control in continuous motor tasks (such as target tracking), we propose a control model called "adaptive intermittent control" or "segmented control," that brain adaptively divides the continuous time axis into discrete segments and executes feed-forward control in each segment. The idea of intermittent control has been proposed in the fields of control theory, biological modeling and nonlinear dynamical system. Compared with these previous models, the key of the proposed model is that the system speculatively determines the segmentation based on the future prediction and its uncertainty. The result of computer simulation showed that the proposed model realized faithful visuo-manual tracking with realistic sensorimotor delays and with less computational costs (i.e., with fewer number of segments). Furthermore, it replicated "motor intermittency", that is, intermittent discontinuities commonly observed in human movement trajectories. We discuss that the temporally segmented control is an inevitable strategy for brain which has to achieve a given task with small computational (or cognitive) cost, using a slow control system in an uncertain variable environment, and the motor intermittency is the side-effect of this strategy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Differentiation and proliferation of periosteal osteoblast progenitors are differentially regulated by estrogens and intermittent parathyroid hormone administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Mami; Rached, Marie Therese; Dworakowski, Elzbieta; Bilezikian, John P; Kousteni, Stavroula

    2008-11-01

    The periosteum is now widely recognized as a homeostatic and therapeutic target for actions of sex steroids and intermittent PTH administration. The mechanisms by which estrogens suppress but PTH promotes periosteal expansion are not known. In this report, we show that intermittent PTH(1-34) promotes differentiation of periosteal osteoblast precursors as evidenced by the stimulation of the expression or activity of alkaline phosphatase as well as of targets of the bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) and Wnt pathways. In contrast, 17beta-estradiol (E2) had no effect by itself. However, it attenuated PTH- or BMP-2-induced differentiation of primary periosteal osteoblast progenitors. Administration of intermittent PTH to ovariectomized mice induced rapid phosphorylation of the BMP-2 target Smad1/5/8 in the periosteum. A replacement dose of E2 had no effect by itself but suppressed PTH-induced phosphorylation of Smad1/5/8. In contrast to its effects to stimulate periosteal osteoblast differentiation, PTH promoted and subsequently suppressed proliferation of periosteal osteoblast progenitors in vitro and in vivo. E2 promoted proliferation and attenuated the antiproliferative effect of PTH. Both hormones protected periosteal osteoblasts from apoptosis induced by various proapoptotic agents. These observations suggest that the different effects of PTH and estrogens on the periosteum result from opposing actions on the recruitment of early periosteal osteoblast progenitors. Intermittent PTH promotes osteoblast differentiation from periosteum-derived mesenchymal progenitors through ERK-, BMP-, and Wnt-dependent signaling pathways. Estrogens promote proliferation of early osteoblast progenitors but inhibit their differentiation by osteogenic agents such as PTH or BMP-2.

  20. Integrated expression profiling and ChIP-seq analyses of the growth inhibition response program of the androgen receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biaoyang Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The androgen receptor (AR plays important roles in the development of male phenotype and in different human diseases including prostate cancers. The AR can act either as a promoter or a tumor suppressor depending on cell types. The AR proliferative response program has been well studied, but its prohibitive response program has not yet been thoroughly studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Previous studies found that PC3 cells expressing the wild-type AR inhibit growth and suppress invasion. We applied expression profiling to identify the response program of PC3 cells expressing the AR (PC3-AR under different growth conditions (i.e. with or without androgens and at different concentration of androgens and then applied the newly developed ChIP-seq technology to identify the AR binding regions in the PC3 cancer genome. A surprising finding was that the comparison of MOCK-transfected PC3 cells with AR-transfected cells identified 3,452 differentially expressed genes (two fold cutoff even without the addition of androgens (i.e. in ethanol control, suggesting that a ligand independent activation or extremely low-level androgen activation of the AR. ChIP-Seq analysis revealed 6,629 AR binding regions in the cancer genome of PC3 cells with an FDR (false discovery rate cut off of 0.05. About 22.4% (638 of 2,849 can be mapped to within 2 kb of the transcription start site (TSS. Three novel AR binding motifs were identified in the AR binding regions of PC3-AR cells, and two of them share a core consensus sequence CGAGCTCTTC, which together mapped to 27.3% of AR binding regions (1,808/6,629. In contrast, only about 2.9% (190/6,629 of AR binding sites contains the canonical AR matrix M00481, M00447 and M00962 (from the Transfac database, which is derived mostly from AR proliferative responsive genes in androgen dependent cells. In addition, we identified four top ranking co-occupancy transcription factors in the AR binding regions, which

  1. Major enzymes controlling the androgenic pressure in the developing lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Yves; Provost, Pierre R

    2013-09-01

    A sex difference is observed in the incidence and morbidity of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) of the neonate and in bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The involvement of androgens is well evidenced in RDS and it is suspected in BPD. Interestingly, the developing lung is not an inert tissue just exposed to circulating androgens, but is rather an active androgen metabolizing tissue, expressing enzymes involved in both androgen synthesis and inactivation. The present review focuses on the major enzymes involved in androgen metabolism within the developing lung. Testosterone synthesis and inactivation by AKR1C3/Akr1c6 (human/mouse 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) type 5) and HSD17B2 (17β-HSD type 2), respectively, play an important role in the developing lung. Akr1c14 (3α-HSD) shows a strong increase in expression according to developmental time. The canalicular stage of lung development corresponding to the surge of surfactant lipid synthesis, which is linked to RDS, as well as saccularization/alveolarization, which are linked to BPD, are covered by this review for the mouse and human species. The androgen metabolizing enzymes expressed within the developing lung can become potential pharmaceutical targets in the objective of accelerating lung maturation by specific treatments. The classic deleterious effects of androgens on lung maturation and the surge of surfactant synthesis in males are well known. Conversely, androgens also have positive impacts on the development of both male and female lungs. Steroidogenic enzymes are key regulators of these positive effects. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'CSR 2013'.

  2. Impact of Early Postnatal Androgen Exposure on Voice Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisa, Leila; Leonel, Maria L.; Gonçalves, Maria I. R.; Pletsch, Francisco; Sade, Elis R.; Custódio, Gislaine; Zagonel, Ivete P. S.; Longui, Carlos A.; Figueiredo, Bonald C.

    2012-01-01

    Background The impact of early postnatal androgen exposure on female laryngeal tissue may depend on certain characteristics of this exposure. We assessed the impact of the dose, duration, and timing of early androgen exposure on the vocal development of female subjects who had been treated for adrenocortical tumor (ACT) in childhood. Methods The long-term effects of androgen exposure on the fundamental vocal frequency (F0), vocal pitch, and final height and the presence of virilizing signs were examined in 9 adult (age, 18.4 to 33.5 years) and 10 adolescent (13.6 to 17.8 years) female ACT patients. We also compared the current values with values obtained 0.9 years to 7.4 years after these subjects had undergone ACT surgery, a period during which they had shown normal androgen levels. Results Of the 19 subjects, 17 (89%) had been diagnosed with ACT before 4 years of age, 1 (5%) at 8.16 years, and 1 (5%) at 10.75 years. Androgen exposure (2 to 30 months) was sufficiently strong to cause pubic hair growth in all subjects and clitoromegaly in 74% (14/19) of the subjects, but did not reduce their height from the target value. Although androgen exposure induced a remarkable reduction in F0 (132 Hz) and moderate pitch virilization in 1 subject and partial F0 virilization, resulting in F0 of 165 and 169 Hz, in 2 subjects, the majority had normal F0 ranging from 189 to 245 Hz. Conclusions Female laryngeal tissue is less sensitive to androgen exposure between birth and adrenarche than during other periods. Differential larynx sensitivity to androgen exposure in childhood and F0 irreversibility in adulthood are age-, concentration-, duration-, and timing-dependent events that may also be affected by exposure to inhibitory or stimulatory hormones. Further studies are required to better characterize each of these factors. PMID:23284635

  3. Alternative splicing of the androgen receptor in polycystic ovary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fangfang; Pan, Jiexue; Liu, Ye; Meng, Qing; Lv, Pingping; Qu, Fan; Ding, Guo-Lian; Klausen, Christian; Leung, Peter C. K.; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Yao, Weimiao; Zhou, Cai-Yun; Shi, Biwei; ZHANG, JUNYU; Sheng, Jianzhong

    2015-01-01

    Excess androgens and abnormal follicle development, largely due to ovarian granulosa cell (GC) dysfunction, characterize polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common endocrinopathy of women predisposing to infertility. Thus, it is important to understand GC dysfunction. The androgen receptor (AR) is widely believed to be an essential regulator of GC biology. High expression of AR in GCs is primarily considered to associate with PCOS. However, we show that AR alternative splice variants in GCs d...

  4. Expression of androgen receptor target genes in skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to determine the mechanisms of the anabolic actions of androgens in skeletal muscle by investigating potential androgen receptor (AR)-regulated genes in in vitro and in vivo models. The expression of the myogenic regulatory factor myogenin was significantly decreased in skeletal muscle from testosterone-treated orchidectomized male mice compared to control orchidectomized males, and was increased in muscle from male AR knockout mice that lacked DNA binding activity (ARΔZF2 ) versus w...

  5. Androgen receptor and histone lysine demethylases in ovine placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellane R Cleys

    Full Text Available Sex steroid hormones regulate developmental programming in many tissues, including programming gene expression during prenatal development. While estradiol is known to regulate placentation, little is known about the role of testosterone and androgen signaling in placental development despite the fact that testosterone rises in maternal circulation during pregnancy and in placenta-induced pregnancy disorders. We investigated the role of testosterone in placental gene expression, and focused on androgen receptor (AR. Prenatal androgenization decreased global DNA methylation in gestational day 90 placentomes, and increased placental expression of AR as well as genes involved in epigenetic regulation, angiogenesis, and growth. As AR complexes with histone lysine demethylases (KDMs to regulate AR target genes in human cancers, we also investigated if the same mechanism is present in the ovine placenta. AR co-immunoprecipitated with KDM1A and KDM4D in sheep placentomes, and AR-KDM1A complexes were recruited to a half-site for androgen response element (ARE in the promoter region of VEGFA. Androgenized ewes also had increased cotyledonary VEGFA. Finally, in human first trimester placental samples KDM1A and KDM4D immunolocalized to the syncytiotrophoblast, with nuclear KDM1A and KDM4D immunostaining also present in the villous stroma. In conclusion, placental androgen signaling, possibly through AR-KDM complex recruitment to AREs, regulates placental VEGFA expression. AR and KDMs are also present in first trimester human placenta. Androgens appear to be an important regulator of trophoblast differentiation and placental development, and aberrant androgen signaling may contribute to the development of placental disorders.

  6. Impact of early postnatal androgen exposure on voice development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Grisa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of early postnatal androgen exposure on female laryngeal tissue may depend on certain characteristics of this exposure. We assessed the impact of the dose, duration, and timing of early androgen exposure on the vocal development of female subjects who had been treated for adrenocortical tumor (ACT in childhood. METHODS: The long-term effects of androgen exposure on the fundamental vocal frequency (F0, vocal pitch, and final height and the presence of virilizing signs were examined in 9 adult (age, 18.4 to 33.5 years and 10 adolescent (13.6 to 17.8 years female ACT patients. We also compared the current values with values obtained 0.9 years to 7.4 years after these subjects had undergone ACT surgery, a period during which they had shown normal androgen levels. RESULTS: Of the 19 subjects, 17 (89% had been diagnosed with ACT before 4 years of age, 1 (5% at 8.16 years, and 1 (5% at 10.75 years. Androgen exposure (2 to 30 months was sufficiently strong to cause pubic hair growth in all subjects and clitoromegaly in 74% (14/19 of the subjects, but did not reduce their height from the target value. Although androgen exposure induced a remarkable reduction in F0 (132 Hz and moderate pitch virilization in 1 subject and partial F0 virilization, resulting in F0 of 165 and 169 Hz, in 2 subjects, the majority had normal F0 ranging from 189 to 245 Hz. CONCLUSIONS: Female laryngeal tissue is less sensitive to androgen exposure between birth and adrenarche than during other periods. Differential larynx sensitivity to androgen exposure in childhood and F0 irreversibility in adulthood are age-, concentration-, duration-, and timing-dependent events that may also be affected by exposure to inhibitory or stimulatory hormones. Further studies are required to better characterize each of these factors.

  7. Anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambaldi, A; Iaquinto, G; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease.......Alcohol is one of the most common causes of liver disease in the Western World today. Randomised clinical trials have examined the effects of anabolic-androgenic steroids for alcoholic liver disease....

  8. Identification and characterisation of an androgen receptor from zebrafish Danio rerio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Anne; Andersen, Ole; Bjerregaard, Poul

    2007-01-01

    Androgens play key roles in vertebrate sex differentiation, gonadal differentiation and sexual behaviour. The action of androgens is primarily mediated through androgen receptors (ARs). The present study describes the isolation, sequencing and initial characterisation of an androgen receptor from...... to determine Kd for the zfARd12. The characterisation of this zfAR provides a new perspective for understanding the mechanisms underlying androgen actions in a model vertebrate species commonly used for studies investigating potential endocrine disrupters.......Androgens play key roles in vertebrate sex differentiation, gonadal differentiation and sexual behaviour. The action of androgens is primarily mediated through androgen receptors (ARs). The present study describes the isolation, sequencing and initial characterisation of an androgen receptor from...

  9. Influence of Dehydration on Intermittent Sprint Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jon-Kyle; Laurent, C Matt; Allen, Kimberly E; Green, J Matt; Stolworthy, Nicola I; Welch, Taylor R; Nevett, Michael E

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the effects of dehydration on intermittent sprint performance and perceptual responses. Eight male collegiate baseball players completed intermittent sprints either dehydrated (DEHY) by 3% body mass or euhydrated (EU). Body mass was reduced through exercise in the heat with controlled fluid restriction occurring 1 day before the trial. Participants completed twenty-four 30-m sprints divided into 3 bouts of 8 sprints with 45 seconds of rest between each sprint and 3 minutes between each bout. Perceived recovery status (PRS) scale was recorded before the start of each trial. Heart rate (HR), ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) (0-10 OMNI scale), and perceived readiness (PR) scale were recorded after every sprint, and session RPE (SRPE) was recorded 20 minutes after completing the entire session. A 2 (condition) × 3 (bout of sprints) repeated-measures ANOVA revealed a significant main effect of condition on mean sprint time (p = 0.03), HR (p Dehydration impaired sprint performance, negatively altered perception of recovery status before exercise, and increased RPE and HR response.

  10. Intermittent heat instabilities in an air plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Mouël, Jean-Louis; Kossobokov, Vladimir G.; Perrier, Frederic; Morat, Pierre

    2016-08-01

    We report the results of heating experiments carried out in an abandoned limestone quarry close to Paris, in an isolated room of a volume of about 400 m3. A heat source made of a metallic resistor of power 100 W was installed on the floor of the room, at distance from the walls. High-quality temperature sensors, with a response time of 20 s, were fixed on a 2 m long bar. In a series of 24 h heating experiments the bar had been set up horizontally at different heights or vertically along the axis of the plume to record changes in temperature distribution with a sampling time varying from 20 to 120 s. When taken in averages over 24 h, the temperatures present the classical shape of steady-state plumes, as described by classical models. On the contrary, the temperature time series show a rich dynamic plume flow with intermittent trains of oscillations, spatially coherent, of large amplitude and a period around 400 s, separated by intervals of relative quiescence whose duration can reach several hours. To our knowledge, no specific theory is available to explain this behavior, which appears to be a chaotic interaction between a turbulent plume and a stratified environment. The observed behavior, with first-order factorization of a smooth spatial function with a global temporal intermittent function, could be a universal feature of some turbulent plumes in geophysical environments.

  11. Effect of intermittent treatment with tamoxifen on reproduction in male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. K. Gill-Sharma; N. Balasinor; P. Parte

    2001-01-01

    Aim: To identify the antifertility effect of intrmittent oral administration of tamoxifen in male rat. Methods:Tamoxifen was administered orally at a dose of 0.4 mg@kg- 1@ d-1 with an intermittent regime for 120 days. Treated and control rats were mated with cycling female rats on days 60, 90 and 120 of treatment. The mated males were sacri riced and the weights of reproductive organs were recorded, and the semm levels of LH, FSH, testosterone and estradi ol estimated by radioimmunoassay. In the female rats, the numbers of implantation sites, corpora lutea, and numbers of normal and resorbed foetuses were recorded on d 21 of gestation. The potency, fecundity, fertility index, litter size and post-implantation loss were then calculated. Results: The fecundity of male rats was completely suppressed by tamoxifen while the potency was maintained at the control level. The fertility index was significantly decreased. No vi able litters were sired. Post implantation loss, indicative of non-viable embryos, was observed but was not significantly increased above the control level. The weights of the testes, epididymides, ventral prostate and seminal vesicles were significantly reduced. The blood LH and testosterone levels were significantly decreased, but not FSH and estradiol.Conclusion: Intermittent oral tarnoxifen administration completely suppressed the fecundity of adult male rats with reserved potency.

  12. Androgen receptor: structure, role in prostate cancer and drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M H Eileen; Li, Jun; Xu, H Eric; Melcher, Karsten; Yong, Eu-leong

    2015-01-01

    Androgens and androgen receptors (AR) play a pivotal role in expression of the male phenotype. Several diseases, such as androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) and prostate cancer, are associated with alterations in AR functions. Indeed, androgen blockade by drugs that prevent the production of androgens and/or block the action of the AR inhibits prostate cancer growth. However, resistance to these drugs often occurs after 2-3 years as the patients develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, a functional AR remains a key regulator. Early studies focused on the functional domains of the AR and its crucial role in the pathology. The elucidation of the structures of the AR DNA binding domain (DBD) and ligand binding domain (LBD) provides a new framework for understanding the functions of this receptor and leads to the development of rational drug design for the treatment of prostate cancer. An overview of androgen receptor structure and activity, its actions in prostate cancer, and how structural information and high-throughput screening have been or can be used for drug discovery are provided herein.

  13. Female adipocyte androgen synthesis and the effects of insulin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cadagan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders characterized by insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, and its presence can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease significantly. The metabolic syndrome is associated with increased circulating androgen levels in women, which may originate from the ovaries and adrenal glands. Adipocytes are also able to synthesise steroid hormones, and this output has been hypothesised to increase with elevated insulin plasma concentrations. However, the contribution of the adipocytes to the circulating androgen levels in women with metabolic syndrome is limited and the effects of insulin are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of steroid precursors and synthetic enzymes in human adipocyte biopsies as markers of possible adipocyte androgen synthesis. We examined pre and mature adipocytes taken from tissue biopsies of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue of participating women from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, of the Royal Derby Hospital. The results showed the potential for localised adipocyte androgen synthesis through the presence of the androgen precursor progesterone, as well as the steroid-converting enzyme 17α-hydroxylase. Furthermore, we found the controlled secretion of androstenedione in vitro and that insulin treatment caused levels to increase. Continued examination of a localised source of androgen production is therefore of clinical relevance due to its influence on adipocyte metabolism, its negative impact on female steroidogenic homeostasis, and the possible aggravation this may have when associated to obesity and obesity related metabolic abnormalities such as hyperinsulinaemia.

  14. Androgens and cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoletini, I; Vitale, C; Pelliccia, F; Fossati, C; Rosano, G M C

    2014-12-01

    Androgens play a pivotal role in cardiovascular function and their effects differ between men and women. In postmenopausal women, testosterone replacement within physiological levels is associated with overall well-being. However, a definitive explanation as to how androgens have an impact on cardiovascular health in postmenopausal women and whether they may be used for cardiovascular treatment has yet to be established. With these aims, a systematic review of the existing studies on the link between androgens and cardiovascular disease and the effects of testosterone therapy on cardiovascular outcomes in postmenopausal women has been conducted. The few existing studies on cardiovascular outcomes in postmenopausal women indicate no effect or a deleterious effect of increasing androgens and increased cardiovascular risk. However, there is evidence of a favorable effect of androgens on surrogate cardiovascular markers in postmenopausal women, such as high density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, body fat mass and triglycerides. Further studies are therefore needed to clarify the impact of therapy with androgens on cardiovascular health in postmenopausal women. The cardiovascular effect of testosterone or methyltestosterone with or without concomitant estrogens needs to be elucidated.

  15. Hormone Treatment and Muscle Anabolism during Aging: Androgens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, E. Lichar; Durham, William J.; Urban, Randall J.; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with a gradual decline in circulating testosterone concentrations and decreased musculature in men. While testosterone administration is often considered when symptoms of hypogonadism are presented, the long-term effects of androgen use on muscle physiology are not yet fully understood. The definition of hypogonadism in men remains obscure but is generally indicated by total testosterone concentrations less than a threshold value of 300-500 ng/dL. Androgen replacement therapy is generally safe in men and women with low endogenous testosterone concentrations. The development of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) may provide additional options in treatment of hypogonadism while lowering the potential of side effects often associated with long-term androgen use. Androgen administration, either alone or in combination with other treatments, can be successful in improving muscle mass by increasing protein anabolism and reducing protein catabolism in men and women. Further research is necessary to optimize the anabolic and anticatabolic properties of androgens for treatment and prevention of muscle loss in men and women. PMID:20452103

  16. Enhanced evaluation of selective androgen receptor modulators in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto-Duessel, M; He, M; Adamson, T W; Jones, J O

    2013-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a class of drugs that control the activity of the androgen receptor (AR), which mediates the response to androgens, in a tissue-selective fashion. They are specifically designed to reduce the possible complications that result from the systemic inhibition or activation of AR in patients with diseases that involve androgen signalling. However, there are no ideal in vivo models for evaluating candidate SARMs. Therefore, we created a panel of androgen-responsive genes in clinically relevant AR expressing tissues including prostate, skin, bone, fat, muscle, brain and kidney. We used select genes from this panel to compare transcriptional changes in response to the full agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and the SARM bolandiol at 16 h and 6 weeks. We identified several genes in each tissue whose expression at each of these time points correlates with the known tissue-specific effects of these compounds. For example, in the prostate we found four genes whose expression was much lower in animals treated with bolandiol compared with animals treated with DHT for 6 weeks, which correlated well with differences in prostate weight. We demonstrate that adding molecular measurements (androgen-regulated gene expression) to the traditional physiological measurements (tissue weights, etc.) makes the evaluation of potential SARMs more accurate, thorough and perhaps more rapid by allowing measurement of selectivity after only 16 h of drug treatment.

  17. Regionalization of patterns of flow intermittence from gauging station records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelder, T. H.; Datry, T.; Lamouroux, N.; Larned, S. T.; Sauquet, E.; Pella, H.; Catalogne, C.

    2013-07-01

    Understanding large-scale patterns in flow intermittence is important for effective river management. The duration and frequency of zero-flow periods are associated with the ecological characteristics of rivers and have important implications for water resources management. We used daily flow records from 628 gauging stations on rivers with minimally modified flows distributed throughout France to predict regional patterns of flow intermittence. For each station we calculated two annual times series describing flow intermittence; the frequency of zero-flow periods (consecutive days of zero flow) in each year of record (FREQ; yr-1), and the total number of zero-flow days in each year of record (DUR; days). These time series were used to calculate two indices for each station, the mean annual frequency of zero-flow periods (mFREQ; yr-1), and the mean duration of zero-flow periods (mDUR; days). Approximately 20% of stations had recorded at least one zero-flow period in their record. Dissimilarities between pairs of gauges calculated from the annual times series (FREQ and DUR) and geographic distances were weakly correlated, indicating that there was little spatial synchronization of zero flow. A flow-regime classification for the gauging stations discriminated intermittent and perennial stations, and an intermittence classification grouped intermittent stations into three classes based on the values of mFREQ and mDUR. We used random forest (RF) models to relate the flow-regime and intermittence classifications to several environmental characteristics of the gauging station catchments. The RF model of the flow-regime classification had a cross-validated Cohen's kappa of 0.47, indicating fair performance and the intermittence classification had poor performance (cross-validated Cohen's kappa of 0.35). Both classification models identified significant environment-intermittence associations, in particular with regional-scale climate patterns and also catchment area, shape

  18. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B. Baker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h. Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1 potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2 the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3 what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports. Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before

  19. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay B.; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2015-01-01

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a

  20. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lindsay B; Rollo, Ian; Stein, Kimberly W; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2015-07-14

    Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports) are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1-2 h). Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1) potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2) the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3) what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports). Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30-60 g/h in the form of a 6%-7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before and during a game

  1. Disruption of androgen and estrogen receptor activity in prostate cancer by a novel dietary diterpene carnosol: implications for chemoprevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremy J.; Syed, Deeba N.; Suh, Yewseok; Heren, Chenelle R.; Saleem, Mohammad; Siddiqui, Imtiaz A.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Emerging data is suggesting that estrogens, in addition to androgens, may also be contributing to the development of prostate cancer (PCa). In view of this notion agents that target estrogens, in addition to androgens, may be a novel approach for PCa chemoprevention and treatment. Thus, the identification and development of non-toxic dietary agents capable of disrupting androgen receptor (AR) in addition to estrogen receptor (ER) could be extremely useful in the management of PCa. Through molecular modeling we found carnosol, a dietary diterpene fits within the ligand binding domain of both AR and ER-α. Using a TR-FRET assay we found that carnosol interacts with both AR and ER-α and additional experiments confirmed that it functions as a receptor antagonist with no agonist effects. LNCaP, 22Rv1, and MCF7 cells treated with carnosol (20–40 µM) showed decreased protein expression of AR and ER-α. Oral administration of carnosol at 30 mg/kg five days weekly for 28 days to 22Rv1 PCa xenografted mice suppressed tumor growth by 36% (p = 0.028) and was associated with a decrease in serum PSA by 26% (p=0.0042). These properties make carnosol unique to any known anti-androgen or anti-estrogen investigated so far for the simultaneous disruption of AR and ER-α. We suggest that carnosol may be developed or chemically modified through more rigorous structure activity relationship studies for a new class of investigational agents - a dual AR/ER modulator. PMID:20736335

  2. The nonsteroidal effects of diethylstilbestrol: the rationale for androgen deprivation therapy without estrogen deprivation in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherr, Douglas S; Pitts, W Reid

    2003-11-01

    During the last 2 decades there has been an increase in the number of men with prostate cancer placed on luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist therapy. In addition, the duration of individual therapy has extended from what was once only a few months to, in many cases, several years. As a result there has been an increase in the incidence of side effects, including osteoporosis, decreased cognitive abilities, vascular stiffness and fatigue. We explored the use of estrogen in the form of diethylstilbestrol (DES) as an alternative treatment for men with prostate cancer, and introduce the concept of androgen deprivation without estrogen deprivation. In doing so we hope to elucidate some of the nonhormonal nonsteroidal effects of DES. Furthermore, we hope to define the mechanisms by which DES can be useful when LH-RH agonist therapy or orchiectomy has failed. We comprehensively reviewed the literature from 1935 to the present regarding estrogen and antiandrogen therapy. Our search focused on issues pertaining to side effects, efficacy and nonsteroidal effects of antiandrogens and estrogens. It is readily apparent from the literature that androgen deprivation with DES can achieve effective prostate cancer control with demonstrable benefits compared to conventional LH-RH agonist therapy. In particular, rates of bone resorption and osteoporosis are less with the use of estrogen therapies. Estrogen has a clear beneficial effect on cognitive function. The estrogen metabolite 2-methoxyestradiol has significant antiangiogenic and pro-apoptotic effects. These effects give estrogens an added anticancer effect not otherwise seen in conventional LH-RH agonist therapy. The efficacy of 1 mg DES extends well beyond its androgen suppressive effects. Androgen deprivation without estrogen deprivation is a concept that deserves further attention in the urological community.

  3. [Anti-androgen therapy for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuno, Masahisa; Banno, Haruhiko; Suzuki, Keisuke; Hashizume, Atsushi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Sobue, Gen

    2012-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), or Kennedy's disease, is an adult-onset lower motor neuron disease caused by the expansion of a trinucleotide CAG repeat encoding a polyglutamine tract within the first exon of the androgen receptor (AR) gene. The testosterone-dependent nuclear accumulation of polyglutamine-expanded AR protein is central to the pathogenesis. This hypothesis is supported by pre-clinical studies showing that testosterone deprivation ameliorates motor neuron degeneration in animal modes of SBMA. In a randomized placebo-controlled multi-centric clinical trial, leuprorelin, which suppresses secretion of testosterone, showed no definite effect on motor functions, although there was the improvement of swallowing function in a subgroup of patients whose disease duration was less than 10 years. Elucidation of the entire disease mechanism, early initiation of therapeutic intervention, and sensitive outcome measures to evaluate drug effect appear to be the key to a successful translational research on SBMA.

  4. Androgen deprivation of the PC-310 [correction of prohormone convertase-310] human prostate cancer model system induces neuroendocrine differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jongsma (Johan); M.H. Oomen; M.A. Noordzij (Marinus); W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); G.J. Martens; Th.H. van der Kwast (Theo); F.H. Schröder (Fritz); G.J. van Steenbrugge (Gert Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractNeuroendocrine (NE) cells are androgen-independent cells and secrete growth-modulating neuropeptides via a regulated secretory pathway (RSP). We studied NE differentiation after androgen withdrawal in the androgen-dependent prostate cancer xenograft PC-310.

  5. Piperine, a Bioactive Component of Pepper Spice Exerts Therapeutic Effects on Androgen Dependent and Androgen Independent Prostate Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common solid malignancy in men, with 32,000 deaths annually. Piperine, a major alkaloid constituent of black pepper, has previously been reported to have anti-cancer activity in variety of cancer cell lines. The effect of piperine against prostate cancer is not currently known. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the anti-tumor mechanisms of piperine on androgen dependent and androgen independent prostate cancer cells. Here, we show that piperine inhibited th...

  6. Influence of gonadal hormones on the behavioral effects of intermittent hypoxia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Taryn G; Jenkins, Richelle; Magalang, Ulysses J; Nelson, Randy J

    2015-03-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by repetitive upper airway obstruction resulting in cyclic intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep in affected individuals. OSA occurs more frequently in postmenopausal than premenopausal women and the severity of OSA increases after menopause. Gonadal hormones can influence brain and behavior; testosterone and estrogens in particular can enhance spatial learning and memory. We hypothesized that estrogens may protect mice from IH-induced hippocampal morphological and behavioral changes. To test this hypothesis we exposed intact or gonadectomized male and female mice to room air or IH [15 cycles/h, 8 h/day, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2) nadir of 5%] for a total of 30 days. During the final 4 days of IH, mice were tested for anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors. After cessation of IH exposure mice were tested on the Barnes maze and passive avoidance tests to assess learning and memory. Ovariectomy paired with IH treatment, impaired spatial learning and memory compared to all other female groups. Intact male mice receiving IH treatment also had impaired learning and memory compared with intact or castrated male mice exposed to room air. Learning and memory changes were mirrored by changes in basilar dendritic length of the CA1 region of the hippocampus. These data suggest that estrogens provide protection against IH-induced deficits, whereas androgens partially exacerbate IH-induced deficits on learning and memory.

  7. Abiraterone and other novel androgen-directed strategies for the treatment of prostate cancer: a new era of hormonal therapies is born.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Michael T; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2012-08-01

    The number of life-prolonging therapies proven effective in the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) has been limited until recently. In the past 2 years several such therapies have come to market. In 2010, the autologous immunotherapy sipuleucel-T and the next-generation taxane cabazitaxel were approved in this setting. However, abundant evidence has shown that CRPC growth continues to be driven through androgen-dependent signaling. Both of these drugs fail to take advantage of this targetable oncogenic pathway. Potent specific inhibitors of cytochrome P450-17 have been engineered with the aim of suppressing androgen synthesis beyond that seen with the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists/antagonists. Abiraterone acetate was developed by rational design based on a pregnenolone parent structure. Its approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was granted in 2011 based on phase III data demonstrating an overall survival advantage compared with placebo. More recently, other drugs that act along the androgen signaling pathway, such as orteronel (TAK-700), galeterone (TOK-001), enzalutamide (MDV3100) and ARN-509, have shown promise in clinical trials. Some of these are expected to gain FDA approval in the near future. Here, we review abiraterone and other novel androgen-directed therapeutic strategies for the management of advanced prostate cancer.

  8. Dexamethasone-suppression adrenal scintigraphy in hyperandrogenism: concise communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gross, M.D.; Freitas, J.E.; Swanson, D.P.; Woodbury, M.C.; Schteingart, D.E.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the contribution of adrenal-derived androgens in women with hirsutism, adrenal scintigrams under dexamethasone suppression (DS) were performed on 35 women with increasing facial or body hair and irregular or absent menses. Based upon the DS regimen chosen (8 mg/d for 2 days or 4 md/d for 7 days before the injection of 6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethylnorcholesterol), three imaging patterns were identified. The first was the absence of uptake before 3 days (8-mg DS) or before 5 days (4-mg DS) after injection. This imaging pattern was seen in 17 of the 35 patients studied and was considered normal. The second pattern was bilateral uptake earlier than 3 days (8-mg DS regimen) or 5 days (4-mg DS) after injection. This was seen in 13 of the 35 patients and was interpreted as bilateral early visualization. Adrenal-vein catheterization performed on six patients with this pattern showed increased adrenal-vein testosterone. The third pattern, observed in five patients, was unilateral early visualization, which in four cases investigated to date was the result of an adrenocortical adenoma. This study confirms the adrenal cortex as a source of androgens in women with hirsutism and hyperandrogenism and demonstrates that DS adrenal scintigraphy can be utilized to identify those women in whom adrenal-derived androgens contribute to their hyperandrogenism.

  9. Dual-color bioluminescent bioreporter for forensic analysis: evidence of androgenic and anti-androgenic activity of illicit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevenini, Luca; Michelini, Elisa; D'Elia, Marcello; Guardigli, Massimo; Roda, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Bioassays represent promising complementary techniques to conventional analytical approaches used in doping analysis to detect illicit drugs like anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS). The fact that all AAS share a common mechanism of action via the human androgen receptor (hAR) enables the use of bioassays, relying on the activation of hAR as antidoping screening tools. Previously, we developed a dual-color bioreporter based on yeast cells engineered to express hAR and androgen response elements driving the expression of the bioluminescent (BL) reporter protein Photinus pyralis luciferase. A second reporter protein, the red-emitting luciferase PpyRE8, was introduced in the bioreporter as internal viability control. Here, we report the first forensic application of a straightforward, accurate, and cost-effective bioassay, relying on spectral resolution of the two BL signals, in 96-microwell format. The bioreporter responds to dihydrotestosterone as reference androgen in a concentration-dependent manner from 0.08 to 1,000 nM with intra- and inter-assay variation coefficients of 11.4 % and 13.1 %, respectively. We also demonstrated the suitability of this dual-color bioreporter to assess (anti)-androgenic activity of pure AAS, mixtures of AAS, and other illicit drugs provided by the Scientific Police. Significant anti-androgenic activity was observed in samples labeled as marijuana and hashish, containing Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol as major constituent.

  10. Bound by Children: Intermittent Cohabitation and Living Together Apart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross-Barnet, Caitlin; Cherlin, Andrew; Burton, Linda

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we examine variations in low-income mothers' patterns of intermittent cohabitation and the voluntary and involuntary nature of these unions. Intermittent cohabitation involves couples living together and separating in repeating cycles. Using Three-City Study ethnographic data, we identified 45 low-income mothers involved in these…

  11. Intermittent Turbulence in Stratified Flow over a Canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boing, S.; Jonker, H.J.J.; Wiel, van de B.J.H.; Moene, A.F.

    2010-01-01

    During the night turbulence can often be very intermittent, occurring in sudden vigorous bursts after prolonged periods of low-intensity. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain intermittency. The present study focuses on the role of porous surface elements, which influence the mean wind

  12. Environmental heat stress, hyperammonemia and nucleotide metabolism during intermittent exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Rasmussen, Peter; Drust, Barry

    2006-01-01

    Abstract  This study investigated the influence of environmental heat stress on ammonia (NH3) accumulation in relation to nucleotide metabolism and fatigue during intermittent exercise. Eight males performed 40 min of intermittent exercise (15 s at 306±22 W alternating with 15 s of unloaded cycli...

  13. On dual descriptions of intermittency in a jet

    CERN Document Server

    Peschanski, R

    1996-01-01

    Models of intermittent behaviour are usually formulated using a set of multiplicative random weights on a Cayley tree. However, intermittency in particle multiproduction from QCD jets is related to fragmentation of an additive quantum number, e.g. energy-momentum. We exhibit the non-trivial stochastic mapping between these {\\it additive} and {\\it multiplicative} cascading processes.

  14. Intermittent versus Continuous Physiotherapy in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Annette Sandahl; Lange, Christa

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of the delivery of the same amount of intermittent versus continuous physiotherapy given to children with cerebral palsy (CP). This was organized either in an intermittent regime four times a week for 4 weeks alternating with a 6-week treatment pause, or a continuous once or twice a week regime, both…

  15. 21 CFR 868.5955 - Intermittent mandatory ventilation attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermittent mandatory ventilation attachment. 868.5955 Section 868.5955 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... mandatory ventilation attachment. (a) Identification. An intermittent mandatory ventilation (IMV)...

  16. Mouse leydig cells with different androgen production potential are resistant to estrogenic stimuli but responsive to bisphenol a which attenuates testosterone metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iuliia Savchuk

    Full Text Available It is well known that estrogens and estrogen-like endocrine disruptors can suppress steroidogenic gene expression, attenuate androgen production and decrease differentiation of adult Leydig cell lineage. However, there is no information about the possible link between the potency of Leydig cells to produce androgens and their sensitivity to estrogenic stimuli. Thus, the present study explored the relationship between androgen production potential of Leydig cells and their responsiveness to estrogenic compounds. To investigate this relationship we selected mouse genotypes contrasting in sex hormone levels and differing in testosterone/estradiol (T/E2 ratio. We found that two mouse genotypes, CBA/Lac and C57BL/6j have the highest and the lowest serum T/E2 ratio associated with increased serum LH level in C57BL/6j compared to CBA/Lac. Analysis of steroidogenic gene expression demonstrated significant upregulation of Cyp19 gene expression but coordinated suppression of LHR, StAR, 3βHSDI and Cyp17a1 in Leydig cells from C57BL/6j that was associated with attenuated androgen production in basal and hCG-stimulated conditions compared to CBA/Lac mice. These genotype-dependent differences in steroidogenesis were not linked to changes in the expression of estrogen receptors ERα and Gpr30, while ERβ expression was attenuated in Leydig cells from C57BL/6j compared to CBA/Lac. No effects of estrogenic agonists on steroidogenesis in Leydig cells from both genotypes were found. In contrast, xenoestrogen bisphenol A significantly potentiated hCG-activated androgen production by Leydig cells from C57BL/6j and CBA/Lac mice by suppressing conversion of testosterone into corresponding metabolite 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol. All together our data indicate that developing mouse Leydig cells with different androgen production potential are resistant to estrogenic stimuli, while xenoestrogen BPA facilitates hCG-induced steroidogenesis in mouse Leydig cells via

  17. Mouse leydig cells with different androgen production potential are resistant to estrogenic stimuli but responsive to bisphenol a which attenuates testosterone metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savchuk, Iuliia; Söder, Olle; Svechnikov, Konstantin

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that estrogens and estrogen-like endocrine disruptors can suppress steroidogenic gene expression, attenuate androgen production and decrease differentiation of adult Leydig cell lineage. However, there is no information about the possible link between the potency of Leydig cells to produce androgens and their sensitivity to estrogenic stimuli. Thus, the present study explored the relationship between androgen production potential of Leydig cells and their responsiveness to estrogenic compounds. To investigate this relationship we selected mouse genotypes contrasting in sex hormone levels and differing in testosterone/estradiol (T/E2) ratio. We found that two mouse genotypes, CBA/Lac and C57BL/6j have the highest and the lowest serum T/E2 ratio associated with increased serum LH level in C57BL/6j compared to CBA/Lac. Analysis of steroidogenic gene expression demonstrated significant upregulation of Cyp19 gene expression but coordinated suppression of LHR, StAR, 3βHSDI and Cyp17a1 in Leydig cells from C57BL/6j that was associated with attenuated androgen production in basal and hCG-stimulated conditions compared to CBA/Lac mice. These genotype-dependent differences in steroidogenesis were not linked to changes in the expression of estrogen receptors ERα and Gpr30, while ERβ expression was attenuated in Leydig cells from C57BL/6j compared to CBA/Lac. No effects of estrogenic agonists on steroidogenesis in Leydig cells from both genotypes were found. In contrast, xenoestrogen bisphenol A significantly potentiated hCG-activated androgen production by Leydig cells from C57BL/6j and CBA/Lac mice by suppressing conversion of testosterone into corresponding metabolite 5α-androstane-3α,17β-diol. All together our data indicate that developing mouse Leydig cells with different androgen production potential are resistant to estrogenic stimuli, while xenoestrogen BPA facilitates hCG-induced steroidogenesis in mouse Leydig cells via attenuation of

  18. Intermittent Behavior and Synchronization of Two Coupled Noisy Driven Oscillators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Maria dos Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The coupled system of two forced Liénard-type oscillators has applications in diode-based electric circuits and phenomenological models for the heartbeat. These systems typically exhibit intermittent transitions between laminar and chaotic states; what affects their performance and, since noise is always present in such systems, dynamical models should include these effects. Accordingly, we investigated numerically the effect of noise in two intermittent phenomena: the intermittent transition to synchronized behavior for identical and unidirectionally coupled oscillators, and the intermittent transition to chaos near a periodic window of bidirectionally coupled oscillators. We found that the transition from a nonsynchronized to a synchronized state exhibits a power-law scaling with exponent 3/2 characterizing on-off intermittency. The inclusion of noise adds an exponential tail to this scaling.

  19. Magnetic Reconnection and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, K T; Gosling, J T; Greco, A; Servidio, S; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C; Phan, T D

    2014-01-01

    A statistical relationship between magnetic reconnection, current sheets and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind is reported for the first time using in-situ measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We identify intermittency as non-Gaussian fluctuations in increments of the magnetic field vector, $\\mathbf{B}$, that are spatially and temporally non-uniform. The reconnection events and current sheets are found to be concentrated in intervals of intermittent turbulence, identified using the partial variance of increments method: within the most non-Gaussian 1% of fluctuations in $\\mathbf{B}$, we find 87%-92% of reconnection exhausts and $\\sim$9% of current sheets. Also, the likelihood that an identified current sheet will also correspond to a reconnection exhaust increases dramatically as the least intermittent fluctuations are removed from the dataset. Hence, the turbulent solar wind contains a hierarchy of intermittent magnetic field structures that are increasingly linked to current sheets, which ...

  20. Intermittent drying of beans in a spouted bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Oliveira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Carioca beans are a highly nutritious grain, in terms of the amount of protein, iron and potassium as well as carbohydrates and fiber and as a source of vitamins. The moisture content of recently picked beans is too high for good preservation and storage, resulting in the need for drying before packaging. In this work, the drying of Carioca beans in a laboratory scale spouted bed under intermittent conditions of the drying air was experimentally analyzed. Experiments carried out consisted of two types of intermittent regime: intermittence in the spout regime, referred to as spouted/fixed bed and intermittence of the air supply to the bed, called spouted bed/rest. The results were compared to those for bean drying in a spouted bed dryer without intermittence.

  1. High-dose phenobarbital with intermittent short-acting barbiturates for acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Takashi; Takayanagi, Masaru; Kitamura, Taro; Nishio, Toshiyuki; Numata, Yurika; Endo, Wakaba; Haginoya, Kazuhiro; Ohura, Toshihiro

    2016-08-01

    Acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures (AERRPS) is characterized by repetitive seizures during the acute and chronic phases and has a poor neurological outcome. Burst-suppression coma via continuous i.v. infusion of a short-acting barbiturate is used to terminate refractory seizures, but the severe side-effects of short-acting barbiturates are problematic. We report on a 9-year-old boy with AERRPS who was effectively treated with very-high-dose phenobarbital (VHDPB) combined with intermittent short-acting barbiturates. VHDPB side-effects were mild, especially compared with those associated with continuous i.v. infusion of short-acting barbiturates (dosage, 40-75 mg/kg/day; maximum blood level, 290 μg/mL). Using VHDPB as the main treatment, short-acting barbiturates were used intermittently and in small amounts. This is the first report to show that VHDPB, combined with intermittent short-acting barbiturates, can effectively treat AERRPS. After treatment, convulsions were suppressed and daily life continued, but intellectual impairment and high-level dysfunction remained. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  2. Prostate specific antigen in boys with precocious puberty before and during gonadal suppression by GnRH agonist treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Müller, J; Skakkebaek, N E

    1997-01-01

    In healthy boys, the pituitary-gonadal axis exhibits diurnal variation in early puberty. Serum testosterone levels are higher during the night and low or immeasurable during the day. These fluctuating levels of circulating androgens in early pubertal boys are difficult to monitor. Prostate specific...... antigen (PSA) is a marker of the androgen-dependent prostatic epithelial cell activity and it is used in the diagnosis and surveillance of adult patients with prostatic cancer. We have measured PSA concentrations in serum from boys with precocious puberty before and during gonadal suppression with Gn...

  3. Androgen deprivation causes truncation of the C-terminal region of androgen receptor in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Naoki; Inoue, Kaoru; Yamaji, Ryoichi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Inui, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) acts as a ligand-dependent transcription factor, whereas mutant AR lacking the C-terminal ligand-binding domain functions in a ligand-independent manner. In the present study we report that the C-terminal truncated AR, which we named AR-NH1 (the N-terminal fragment of AR cleaved in the neighborhood of helix 1 of the ligand-binding domain), is produced in LNCaP prostatic carcinoma cells. The AR-NH1 of ~90 kDa was observed in an androgen-independent LNCaP subline and was further accumulated by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. MG132 treatment caused the accumulation of AR-NH1 even in parent LNCaP cells. AR-NH1 was produced in the absence of ligand or in the presence of the AR antagonist bicalutamide, whereas AR agonists suppressed its production. AR-NH1 was detected with different AR antibodies recognizing amino acid residues 1-20 and 300-316 and was also generated from exogenous AR. Both siRNA-mediated AR knockdown and treatment with a serine protease inhibitor (4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulfonyl fluoride) reduced AR-NH1 levels. According to the predicted cleavage site (between amino acid residues 660-685) and its nuclear localization, it is assumed that AR-NH1 functions as a constitutively active transcription factor. These data suggest that AR-NH1 is produced under hormone therapy and contributes to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer due to its ligand-independent transcriptional activity.

  4. Scintillation-Induced Intermittency in SETI

    CERN Document Server

    Cordes, J M; Sagan, Carl Edward; Cordes, James M.; Sagan, Carl

    1997-01-01

    We consider interstellar scintillations as a cause of intermittency in radio signals from extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI). We demonstrate that scintillations are very likely to allow initial detections of narrowband signals from distant sources (> 100 pc), while making redetections improbable. We consider three models in order to assess the non-repeating, narrowband events found in recent SETI and to analyze large surveys in general: (I) Radiometer noise; (II) A population of constant Galactic sources undergoing interstellar scintillation,; and (III) Real, transient signals (or hardware errors) of either terrestrial or ET origin. We apply likelihood and Bayesian tests of the models to The Planetary Society/Harvard META data. We find that Models II and III are both highly preferred to Model I, but that Models II and III are about equally likely. Ruling out Model II in favor of Model III requires many more reobservations than were conducted in META *or* the reobservation threshold must be much lower than wa...

  5. [Intermittent compression of the subclavian vein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraval, M

    1980-01-01

    The pathology of the cervico-thoracic channel is now well understood. Intermittent venous compression in the costo-clavicular space by the subclavian muscle can lead to acute occlusion of the venous trunk. It is important to make an early diagnosis of such compression before the stage of occlusive phlebitis. Clinical examination and dynamic phlebography allow the diagnosis to be made. Resection of the first rib is the ideal treatment. The mode of approach to the first rib is debatable since it seems that when venous symptomatology is dominant, the axillary method of Roos is not the best approach. A combined sub- and supra-clavicular approach permits a wide decompression of the vein and a more complete excision of the rib.

  6. Scale Dependence of Spatiotemporal Intermittence of Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Prasun K.; Siddani, Ravi K.

    2011-01-01

    It is a common experience that rainfall is intermittent in space and time. This is reflected by the fact that the statistics of area- and/or time-averaged rain rate is described by a mixed distribution with a nonzero probability of having a sharp value zero. In this paper we have explored the dependence of the probability of zero rain on the averaging space and time scales in large multiyear data sets based on radar and rain gauge observations. A stretched exponential fannula fits the observed scale dependence of the zero-rain probability. The proposed formula makes it apparent that the space-time support of the rain field is not quite a set of measure zero as is sometimes supposed. We also give an ex.planation of the observed behavior in tenus of a simple probabilistic model based on the premise that rainfall process has an intrinsic memory.

  7. Turbulent flows and intermittency in laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmet, F.; Antonia, R. A.; Danaila, L.

    2001-10-01

    In turbulent flows, the transfer of energy from large to small scales is strongly intermittent, in contradiction with Kolmogorov's (Dokl. Akad. Nauk. SSSR 30 (1941) 299; hereafter K41) assumptions. The statistical properties associated with these energy transfer fluctuations at a given scale r have been widely studied theoretically, experimentally and numerically over the last 30 years or so. Such fluctuations are also encountered in various Planetary and Space Science domains. The present paper presents a review of laboratory experiments which clearly display the fractal nature of the (spatial or temporal) energy distribution at scale r, the departures from the K41 predictions being generally quantified through high-order moments of velocity increments.

  8. Voltage Stability Evaluation Incorporating Wind Power Intermittency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Libao SHI; Yang ZHAO; Yixin NI; Liangzhong YAO; Masoud BAZARGAN

    2013-01-01

    A simulation framework is proposed to evaluate the voltage stability of power systems incorporating wind power intermittency.Firstly,the power output modelings of three types of wind turbines are discussed.Secondly,the Jensen model is employed to simulate the wind farm with the wake effect.The Monte Carlo based technique is used to conduct the voltage stability evaluation incorporating the randomness of the wind speed based on the Weibull probability distribution.Thirdly,the relative sensitivity index (RSI) is calculated to identify weak buses during analysis.Finally,case studies with different simulation scenarios are carried out.Some statistical results involving weakness probability,expected value and variance of RSI as well as preliminary conclusions are drawn based on numerical simulation results.

  9. Population dynamics in an intermittent refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, E. H.; Anteneodo, C.

    2016-10-01

    Population dynamics is constrained by the environment, which needs to obey certain conditions to support population growth. We consider a standard model for the evolution of a single species population density, which includes reproduction, competition for resources, and spatial spreading, while subject to an external harmful effect. The habitat is spatially heterogeneous, there existing a refuge where the population can be protected. Temporal variability is introduced by the intermittent character of the refuge. This scenario can apply to a wide range of situations, from a laboratory setting where bacteria can be protected by a blinking mask from ultraviolet radiation, to large-scale ecosystems, like a marine reserve where there can be seasonal fishing prohibitions. Using analytical and numerical tools, we investigate the asymptotic behavior of the total population as a function of the size and characteristic time scales of the refuge. We obtain expressions for the minimal size required for population survival, in the slow and fast time scale limits.

  10. Compensatory mechanisms activated with intermittent energy restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Sílvia Ribeiro; Halset, Eline Holli; Gåsbakk, Sigrid

    2017-01-01

    : 39 ± 9 y) with obesity (BMI: 36 ± 4 kg/m2) were randomized to lose a similar weight with an IER (N = 18) or a CER (N = 17) diet over a 12 week period. Macronutrient composition and overall energy restriction (33% reduction) were similar between groups. Body weight/composition, RMR, fasting......) were measured before and after WL. Results: Changes in body weight (≈12.5% WL) and composition were similar in both groups. Fasting RQ and ExEff at 10 W increased in both groups. Losing weight, either by IER or CER dieting, did not induce significant changes in subjective appetite ratings. RMR......Background & aims: Strong compensatory responses, with reduced resting metabolic rate (RMR), increased exercise efficiency (ExEff) and appetite, are activated when weight loss (WL) is achieved with continuous energy restriction (CER), which try to restore energy balance. Intermittent energy...

  11. Clinical relevance of intermittent tumour blood flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, Ralph E.; Aquino-Parsons, Christina [British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver (Canada)

    2001-12-01

    One of the goals of translational cancer research is to understand basic 'phenomena' so that tumour response to therapy can be improved. One such phenomenon is intermittent tumour blood flow. The impact of the transient hypoxia that results from decreased tumour blood flow is now beginning to be appreciated in preclinical systems, and also receiving some attention in clinical practise. Thus in this article we review the nature and frequency of microregional blood flow changes in preclinical and clinical tumours and examine the impact of those changes on response to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Additionally, the implications of non-constant blood flow for both the growth of the unperturbed tumour and the regrowth of surviving tumour clonogens during and after therapy are examined.

  12. [Intermittent Explosive Disorder: A Controversial Diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan Pablo; Palacio, Juan David

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent explosive disorder (IED) is aan externalizing externalising disorder characterized characterised by recurrent aggression episodes. Even though this disorder was described several decades ago, and it carries personal and social consequences, there is little in the medical scientific literature on this. bibliographic production about it is scanty. To perform a conceptualization conceptualisation of this disorder, through the review and bibliometric analysis of the available scientific articles. A search was performed in databases with the english English terms intermittent explosive disorder, impulse disorders control [MeSH], in combination with other terms. A bibliometric analysis in the GoPubMed® search engineer was also performed using all data obtained in the search. was also perfomed. IED prevalence ranges from 1.4% to 7%, it presents more frequently during middle adolescence, and with more noticeable repercussions in men males than in womenfemales. The psychopathological core of IED is the impulsive aggressive behaviour that presents in the form of «attacks» that occurs in response to a lower precipitating stimulus. Scientific publications about IED are few and relatively recent, and the vast majority is provided bycomes from the United States (56.56%), and headed by a single author. This fact highlights the need to replicate the findings described about the IED in order to demonstrate the validity and reliability of its diagnostic criteria. It is possible that doubts about the existence of a diagnosis lead have led to such a scant literature about the IED. Available studies about IED allow have allowed characterizing a group of subjects with episodes of impulsive aggression to be characterised, but this description requires replication in different latitudesneeds to be repeated in different areas. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  13. Treatment of febrile seizures with intermittent clobazam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manreza, M L; Gherpelli, J L; Machado-Haertel, L R; Pedreira, C C; Heise, C O; Diament, A

    1997-12-01

    Fifty children, 24 female and 26 male, with ages varying from 6 to 72 months (mean = 23.7 m.) that experienced at least one febrile seizure (FS) entered a prospective study of intermittent therapy with clobazam. Cases with severe neurological abnormalities, progressive neurological disease, afebrile seizures, symptomatic seizures of other nature, or seizures during a central nervous system infection were excluded. Seizures were of the simple type in 25 patients, complex in 20 and unclassified in 5. The mean follow-up period was 7.9 months (range = 1 to 23 m.), and the age at the first seizure varied from 5 to 42 months (mean = 16.8 m.). Clobazam was administered orally during the febrile episode according to the child's weight: up to 5 kg, 5 mg/day; from 5 to 10 kg, 10 mg/day; from 11 to 15 kg, 15 mg/day, and over 15 kg, 20 mg/day. There were 219 febrile episodes, with temperature above 37.8 degrees C, in 40 children during the study period. Twelve children never received clobazam and 28 received the drug at least once. Drug efficacy was measured by comparing FS recurrence in the febrile episodes that were treated with clobazam with those in which only antipyretic measures were taken. Ten children (20%) experienced a FS during the study period. Of the 171 febrile episodes treated with clobazam there were only 3 recurrences (1.7%), while of the 48 episodes treated only with antipyretic measures there were 11 recurrences (22.9%), a difference highly significant (p diazepam in the intermittent treatment of FS recurrence.

  14. Androgen receptor function links human sexual dimorphism to DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Ammerpohl

    Full Text Available Sex differences are well known to be determinants of development, health and disease. Epigenetic mechanisms are also known to differ between men and women through X-inactivation in females. We hypothesized that epigenetic sex differences may also result from sex hormone functions, in particular from long-lasting androgen programming. We aimed at investigating whether inactivation of the androgen receptor, the key regulator of normal male sex development, is associated with differences of the patterns of DNA methylation marks in genital tissues. To this end, we performed large scale array-based analysis of gene methylation profiles on genomic DNA from labioscrotal skin fibroblasts of 8 males and 26 individuals with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS due to inactivating androgen receptor gene mutations. By this approach we identified differential methylation of 167 CpG loci representing 162 unique human genes. These were significantly enriched for androgen target genes and low CpG content promoter genes. Additional 75 genes showed a significant increase of heterogeneity of methylation in AIS compared to a high homogeneity in normal male controls. Our data show that normal and aberrant androgen receptor function is associated with distinct patterns of DNA-methylation marks in genital tissues. These findings support the concept that transcription factor binding to the DNA has an impact on the shape of the DNA methylome. These data which derived from a rare human model suggest that androgen programming of methylation marks contributes to sexual dimorphism in the human which might have considerable impact on the manifestation of sex-associated phenotypes and diseases.

  15. Hypobaric intermittent hypoxia attenuates hypoxia-induced depressor response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hypobaric intermittent hypoxia (HIH produces many favorable effects in the cardiovascular system such as anti-hypertensive effect. In this study, we showed that HIH significantly attenuated a depressor response induced by acute hypoxia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sprague-Dawley rats received HIH in a hypobaric chamber simulating an altitude of 5000 m. The artery blood pressure (ABP, heart rate (HR and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA were recorded in anesthetized control rats and rats received HIH. The baseline ABP, HR and RSNA were not different between HIH and control rats. Acute hypoxia-induced decrease in ABP was significantly attenuated in HIH rat compared with control rats. However, acute hypoxia-induced increases in HR and RSNA were greater in HIH rat than in control rats. After removal of bilateral ascending depressor nerves, acute hypoxia-induced depressor and sympathoexcitatory responses were comparable in control and HIH rats. Furthermore, acute hypoxia-induced depressor and sympathoexcitatory responses did not differ between control and HIH groups after blocking ATP-dependent K(+ channels by glibenclamide. The baroreflex function evaluated by intravenous injection of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside was markedly augmented in HIH rats compared with control rats. The pressor and sympathoexcitatory responses evoked by intravenous injection of cyanide potassium were also significantly greater in HIH rats than in control rats. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that HIH suppresses acute hypoxia-induced depressor response through enhancement of baroreflex and chemoreflex function, which involves activation of ATP-dependent K(+ channels. This study provides new information and underlying mechanism on the beneficiary effect of HIH on maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis.

  16. Influence of oestrogen and androgen on modelling of the mandibular condylar bone in ovariectomized and orchiectomized growing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T; Kawata, T; Tokimasa, C; Tanne, K

    2001-01-01

    Oestrogen and androgen exert a substantial influence on bone metabolism, but any differences in their influence on modelling of the condyle, a mandibular growth site, have not been fully clarified. The purpose here was to examine histological and histochemical differences in the condyle of ovariectomized (OVX) or orchiectomized (ORX) mice given injections of oestrogen (E(2), 17 beta-oestradiol) or non-aromatizable androgen (DHT, 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone). Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice (n=170) were used: they were divided equally into six experimental groups (OVX, ORX, OVX+E(2), ORX+E(2), OVX+DHT, ORX+DHT), and non-treatment male and female control groups. In each experimental group, five mice were killed 2,4,8 and 12 weeks after OVX and ORX. Oestrogen or androgen were given daily after the surgery by subcutaneous injection of E(2) or DHT. Increases in the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells induced in the OVX and ORX mice from 4 to 12 weeks after surgery were obviously suppressed by E(2) and DHT. The trabecular bone volume in the OVX and ORX mice treated with DHT had only increased at 12 weeks after surgery, whereas the E(2) injected mice exhibited a substantial increase from 4 to 12 weeks after surgery. E(2) injected into the OVX and ORX mice increased the trabecular bone volume earlier than did DHT, and both E(2) and DHT suppressed osteoclast differentiation similarly during the same period. These results suggest that metabolic responses of osteoclasts and osteoblasts to E(2) and DHT may be different, producing somewhat different patterns of bone modelling in males and females.

  17. Growth hormone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003376.htm Growth hormone suppression test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone suppression test determines whether growth hormone production ...

  18. Dexamethasone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medication. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  19. Review of Androgenic Anabolic Steroid Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Borges; G. Eisele; C. Byrd

    2001-07-31

    An area that has been overlooked within personnel security evaluations is employee use of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS). Current drug testing within the federal government does not include testing for anabolic steroids, and the difficulties to implement such testing protocols-not to mention the cost involved-make AAS testing highly improbable. The basis of this report is to bring to the forefront the damage that anabolic steroids can cause from both a physical and a psychological standpoint. Most individuals who use AASs do so to increase their muscle mass because they wish to gain some type of competitive edge during athletic competition or they wish to enhance their physical features for self-satisfaction and self-esteem (i.e., body building). Security officers are one group of men who often take high doses of anabolic steroids, according to the Second Report of the Senate Standing Committee (1990). The negative psychological characteristics for AAS use is extensive and includes prominent hostility, aggressiveness, irritability, euphoria, grandiose beliefs, hyperactivity, reckless behavior, increased sexual appetite, unpredictability, poor impulse control, mood fluctuations, and insomnia. The drug may invoke a sense of power and invincibility (Leckman and Scahill, 1990). Depressive symptoms, such as anhedonia, fatigue, impaired concentration, decreased libido, and even suicidality (Pope and Katz, 1992) have been noted with steroid withdrawal. It appears that long-term users of AAS experience similar characteristics as other substance abusers (i.e., craving, dependence, and withdrawal symptoms).

  20. Expression of Androgen Receptor in Meningiomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the expression of androgen receptor (AR) in meningiomas and its relation to tumor proliferative potential, we examined the expression of AR and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) by avidine-biotin complex immunohistochemistry in 39 cases of meningiomas. Of the 39 cases of meningiomas, 20(51 %) showed positive AR immunoreactivity. The AR expression positivity rates were 31 % (6/19) in benign meningiomas, 58 % (7/12) in atypical meningiomas, 87.5 % (7/8) in malignant meningiomas, respectively. In addition to the tumor cells, cells of microvascular endothelial proliferation were frequently AR positive. Malignant meningiomas had a significantly higher percentage of AR positive cells compared with atypical and benign meningiomas (P<0.05). The mean proliferating cell nuclear antigen labeling index (PCNA LI) was significantly higher in the malignant meningiomas when compared with atypical meningiomas (P<0.05) and benign meningiomas (P<0.05). AR positive meningiomas had higher PCNA LI than AR negative meningiomas (P<0.05). The expression of AR in tumor tissues was significantly related with PCNA LI. These data indicated that AR in the meningiomas was correlated with histological grade and AR might participate in the growth of these tumors and tumor angiogenesis. The measurement of AR in these tumors may indirectly represent tumor growth potential.

  1. Effect of androgen deprivation on penile ultrastructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou-JunSHEN; Xie-LaiZHOU; Ying-LiLU; Zhao-DianCHEN

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the ultrastructural changes of penile corpus cavernosum and tunica albuginea in rats treated with castration or finasteride.Methods:Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats of nine weeks old were randomly divided into three groups with 6 rats each,Group A served as the control,Group B was castrated and Group C,treated with finasteride,Four weeks later,rats were anesthetized and blood samples obtained for the determination of serum testosterone(T)and dihydrotestosterone(DHT) levels;penile tissues were taken for scanning electron microscopy.Results:The T,free T and DHT levels in Group B and the DHT level in Group C were significantly lower than those in Group A(P0.05).Elastic fibers in the tunica albuginea of Group A were very rich and arranged regularly and undulatedly,but in Group B,most of the elastic fibers were replaced by collagenous fibers.In Group C,the tunica albuginea was mainly composed of thick and irregular-arranged collagenous fibers.In Group A,there were abundant smooth muscle fibers in the trabeculae of corpus cavernosum,but they were much less in Group C and scarce or even disappeared in Group B.In Groups B and C,the diminished/disappeared smooth muscle fibers were replaced by irregularly arranged collagenous fibers.Conclusion:In rats,androgen is essential for maintaining the normal structure of penile tunica albuginea and corpus carvenosum.

  2. Regulation of progesterone-binding breast cyst protein GCDFP-24 secretion by estrogens and androgens in human breast cancer cells: a new marker of steroid action in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, J; Dauvois, S; Haagensen, D E; Lévesque, C; Mérand, Y; Labrie, F

    1990-06-01

    We have previously demonstrated that androgens are potent inhibitors of breast cancer cell proliferation under both basal and estrogen-induced incubation conditions, while they suppress expression of the estrogen and progesterone receptors. To better understand the mechanisms responsible for the antagonism between androgens and estrogens in breast cancer and to obtain a new tumor marker for the actions of these two steroids, we have investigated the effects of androgens and estrogens on expression of the major protein found in human breast gross cystic disease fluid, namely GCDFP-24. This study was performed in ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. After a 9-day incubation period, physiological concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol stimulated proliferation of ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 cells by 2- to 3.5-fold while simultaneously exerting a marked 70-90% inhibition of GCDFP-24 secretion. The estrogenic effects on GCDFP-24 secretion and cell proliferation were both competitively blocked by simultaneous incubation with the new steroidal pure antiestrogen EM-139. On the other hand, a maximal concentration (10 nM) of the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone decreased by 50% the proliferation of ZR-75-1 cells; the half-maximal inhibitory effect was exerted at 0.01 nM. The androgen exerted a 3- to 4-fold stimulatory effect on GCDFP-24 secretion at an EC50 value of 0.01 nM. The effect of dihydrotestosterone on these parameters was competitively blocked by simultaneous incubation with the pure antiandrogen OH-flutamide. The present data show that the effects of estrogens and androgens in ZR-75-1 cells on GCDFP-24 secretion and cell growth are opposite. Similarly, in MCF-7 cells, estrogens stimulate cell growth, while GCDFP-24 secretion is inhibited. The present data also suggest that GCDFP-24 could well be a good biochemical marker for monitoring the response to androgenic and antiestrogenic compounds in the therapy of advanced breast cancer.

  3. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPCa) increased the neighboring PCa chemo-resistance via altering the PTHrP/p38/Hsp27/androgen receptor (AR)/p21 signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yun; Sun, Yin; Hu, Shuai; Luo, Jie; Li, Lei; Li, Xin; Yeh, Shuyuan; Jin, Jie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic neuroendocrine cells (NE) are an integral part of prostate cancer (PCa) that are associated with PCa progression. As the current androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with anti-androgens may promote the neuroendocrine PCa (NEPCa) development, and few therapies can effectively suppress NEPCa, understanding the impact of NEPCa on PCa progression may help us to develop better therapies to battle PCa. Here we found NEPCa cells could increase the docetaxel-resistance of their neighboring PCa cells. Mechanism dissection revealed that through secretion of PTHrP, NEPCa cells could alter the p38/MAPK/Hsp27 signals in their neighboring PCa cells that resulted in increased androgen receptor (AR) activity via promoting AR nuclear translocation. The consequences of increased AR function might then increase docetaxel-resistance via increasing p21 expression. In vivo xenograft mice experiments also confirmed NEPCa could increase the docetaxel-resistance of neighboring PCa, and targeting this newly identified PTHrP/p38/Hsp27/AR/p21 signaling pathway with either p38 inhibitor (SB203580) or sh-PTHrP may result in improving/restoring the docetaxel sensitivity to better suppress PCa. PMID:27375022

  4. Androgens and skeletal muscle: cellular and molecular action mechanisms underlying the anabolic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2012-05-01

    Androgens increase both the size and strength of skeletal muscle via diverse mechanisms. The aim of this review is to discuss the different cellular targets of androgens in skeletal muscle as well as the respective androgen actions in these cells leading to changes in proliferation, myogenic differentiation, and protein metabolism. Androgens bind and activate a specific nuclear receptor which will directly affect the transcription of target genes. These genes encode muscle-specific transcription factors, enzymes, structural proteins, as well as microRNAs. In addition, anabolic action of androgens is partly established through crosstalk with other signaling molecules such as Akt, myostatin, IGF-I, and Notch. Finally, androgens may also exert non-genomic effects in muscle by increasing Ca(2+) uptake and modulating kinase activities. In conclusion, the anabolic effect of androgens on skeletal muscle is not only explained by activation of the myocyte androgen receptor but is also the combined result of many genomic and non-genomic actions.

  5. Postmenopausal serum androgens, oestrogens and breast cancer risk: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaks, R.; Rinaldi, S.; Key, T.J.; Berrino, F.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Biessy, C.; Dossus, L.; Lukanova, A.; Bingham, S.; Khaw, K-T.; Allen, N.E.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Gils, C.H. van; Grobbee, D.E.; Boeing, H.; Lahmann, P.H.; Nagel, G.; Chang-Claude, J.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Fournier, A.; Thiébaut, A.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Quirós, J.R.; Tormo, M-J.; Ardanaz, E.; Amiano, P.; Krogh, V.; Palli, D.; Panico, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Trichopoulou, A.; Kalapothaki, V.; Trichopoulos, D.; Ferrari, P.; Norat, T.; Saracci, R.; Riboli, E.

    2005-01-01

    Considerable experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated endogenous sex steroids — notably androgens and oestrogens — promote breast tumour development. In spite of this evidence, postmenopausal androgen replacement therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or testosterone has

  6. Postmenopausal serum androgens, oestrogens and breast cancer risk : the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaks, R; Rinaldi, S; Key, TJ; Berrino, F; Peeters, PHM; Biessy, C; Dossus, L; Lukanova, A; Binghan, S; Khaw, KTG; Allen, NE; Bueno-De-Mesquita, HB; van Gils, CH; Grobbee, D; Boeing, H; Lahmann, PH; Nagel, G; Chang-Claude, J; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Fournier, A; Thiebaut, A; Gonzalez, CA; Quiros, [No Value; Tormo, MJ; Ardanaz, E; Amiano, P; Krogh, [No Value; Palli, D; Panico, S; Tumino, R; Vineis, P; Trichopoulou, A; Kalapothaki, [No Value; Trichopoulos, D; Ferrari, P; Norat, T; Saracci, R; Riboli, E

    2005-01-01

    Considerable experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated endogenous sex steroids - notably androgens and oestrogens - promote breast tumour development. In spite of this evidence, postmenopausal androgen replacement therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or testosterone has

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Preclinical Characterization of the Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator (SARM) RAD140.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Chris P; Shomali, Maysoun; Lyttle, C Richard; O'Dea, Louis St L; Herendeen, Hillary; Gallacher, Kyla; Paquin, Dottie; Compton, Dennis R; Sahoo, Bishwabhusan; Kerrigan, Sean A; Burge, Matthew S; Nickels, Michael; Green, Jennifer L; Katzenellenbogen, John A; Tchesnokov, Alexei; Hattersley, Gary

    2011-02-10

    This report describes the discovery of RAD140, a potent, orally bioavailable, nonsteroidal selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM). The characterization of RAD140 in several preclinical models of anabolic androgen action is also described.

  8. Manipulation of male attractiveness induces rapid changes in avian maternal yolk androgen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, Sjouke A.; Komdeur, Jan; Vedder, Oscar; Engelhardt, Nikolaus von; Korsten, Peter; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2009-01-01

    Avian eggs contain maternal androgens that may adjust offspring development to environmental conditions. We review evidence and functional explanations for the relationship between androgen concentrations in avian eggs and male attractiveness. Experimental studies in captive birds show generally pos

  9. Postmenopausal serum androgens, oestrogens and breast cancer risk : the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaks, R; Rinaldi, S; Key, TJ; Berrino, F; Peeters, PHM; Biessy, C; Dossus, L; Lukanova, A; Binghan, S; Khaw, KTG; Allen, NE; Bueno-De-Mesquita, HB; van Gils, CH; Grobbee, D; Boeing, H; Lahmann, PH; Nagel, G; Chang-Claude, J; Clavel-Chapelon, F; Fournier, A; Thiebaut, A; Gonzalez, CA; Quiros, [No Value; Tormo, MJ; Ardanaz, E; Amiano, P; Krogh, [No Value; Palli, D; Panico, S; Tumino, R; Vineis, P; Trichopoulou, A; Kalapothaki, [No Value; Trichopoulos, D; Ferrari, P; Norat, T; Saracci, R; Riboli, E

    2005-01-01

    Considerable experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated endogenous sex steroids - notably androgens and oestrogens - promote breast tumour development. In spite of this evidence, postmenopausal androgen replacement therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or testosterone has

  10. Postmenopausal serum androgens, oestrogens and breast cancer risk: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaks, R.; Rinaldi, S.; Key, T.J.; Berrino, F.; Peeters, P.H.M.; Biessy, C.; Dossus, L.; Lukanova, A.; Bingham, S.; Khaw, K-T.; Allen, N.E.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.; Gils, C.H. van; Grobbee, D.E.; Boeing, H.; Lahmann, P.H.; Nagel, G.; Chang-Claude, J.; Clavel-Chapelon, F.; Fournier, A.; Thiébaut, A.; Gonzalez, C.A.; Quirós, J.R.; Tormo, M-J.; Ardanaz, E.; Amiano, P.; Krogh, V.; Palli, D.; Panico, S.; Tumino, R.; Vineis, P.; Trichopoulou, A.; Kalapothaki, V.; Trichopoulos, D.; Ferrari, P.; Norat, T.; Saracci, R.; Riboli, E.

    2005-01-01

    Considerable experimental and epidemiological evidence suggests that elevated endogenous sex steroids — notably androgens and oestrogens — promote breast tumour development. In spite of this evidence, postmenopausal androgen replacement therapy with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) or testosterone has

  11. Manipulation of male attractiveness induces rapid changes in avian maternal yolk androgen deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, Sjouke A.; Komdeur, Jan; Vedder, Oscar; Engelhardt, Nikolaus von; Korsten, Peter; Groothuis, Ton G.G.

    2009-01-01

    Avian eggs contain maternal androgens that may adjust offspring development to environmental conditions. We review evidence and functional explanations for the relationship between androgen concentrations in avian eggs and male attractiveness. Experimental studies in captive birds show generally

  12. The suppression of prostate LNCaP cancer cells growth by Selenium nanoparticles through Akt/Mdm2/AR controlled apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling; Yuan, Qing; Zhu, Huarui; Li, Ying; Guo, Quanyi; Wang, Qin; Bi, Xiaolin; Gao, Xueyun

    2011-09-01

    The trace element Selenium is suggested having cancer prevention activity and used as food supplement. Previous results had shown Selenium nanoparticles are safer compared with other Selenium compounds like selenomethionine, sodium selenite and monomethylated Selenium, however, its anticancer activity and intrinsic mechanisms are still elusive. Here, we prepared Selenium nanoparticles and investigated its inherent anticancer mechanisms. We found Selenium nanoparticles inhibit growth of prostate LNCaP cancer cells partially through caspases mediated apoptosis. Selenium nanoparticles suppress transcriptional activity of androgen receptor via down-regulating its mRNA and protein expression. Moreover, Selenium nanoparticles activate Akt kinase by increasing its phosphorylation, promote Akt-dependent androgen receptor phosphorylation and Mdm2 regulated degradation through proteasome pathway. We suggest Selenium nanoparticles suppress prostate cancer cells growth by disrupting androgen receptor, implicating a potential application in cancer treatment.

  13. Refinement of the androgen response element based on ChIP-Seq in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stephen; Qi, Jianfei; Filipp, Fabian V

    2016-09-14

    Sequence motifs are short, recurring patterns in DNA that can mediate sequence-specific binding for proteins such as transcription factors or DNA modifying enzymes. The androgen response element (ARE) is a palindromic, dihexameric motif present in promoters or enhancers of genes targeted by the androgen receptor (AR). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) we refined AR-binding and AREs at a genome-scale in androgen-insensitive and androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell lines. Model-based searches identified more than 120,000 ChIP-Seq motifs allowing for expansion and refinement of the ARE. We classified AREs according to their degeneracy and their transcriptional involvement. Additionally, we quantified ARE utilization in response to somatic copy number amplifications, AR splice-variants, and steroid treatment. Although imperfect AREs make up 99.9% of the motifs, the degree of degeneracy correlates negatively with validated transcriptional outcome. Weaker AREs, particularly ARE half sites, benefit from neighboring motifs or cooperating transcription factors in regulating gene expression. Taken together, ARE full sites generate a reliable transcriptional outcome in AR positive cells, despite their low genome-wide abundance. In contrast, the transcriptional influence of ARE half sites can be modulated by cooperating factors.

  14. Androgen dependence of hirsutism, acne, and alopecia in women: retrospective analysis of 228 patients investigated for hyperandrogenism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karrer-Voegeli, Sandra; Rey, François; Reymond, Marianne J; Meuwly, Jean-Yves; Gaillard, Rolf C; Gomez, Fulgencio

    2009-01-01

    the other diagnostic groups. These included hyperandrogenism (hirsutism or elevated androgens) and eumenorrhea (101 patients; 44.3%); normal androgens (acne or alopecia and eumenorrhea) (51 patients; 22.4%); isolated low SHBG (7 patients; 3.1%); nonclassical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (4 patients; 1.8% of total, 4.9% of patients undergoing cosyntropin stimulation tests); and ovarian tumor (2 patients; 0.9%).Ethinylestradiol and high-dose cyproterone acetate treatment lowered the hirsutism score to 53.5% of baseline at 1 year, and was also effective in treating acne and alopecia. The clinical benefit is ascribed to the peripheral antiandrogenic effect of cyproterone acetate as well as the hormone-suppressive effect of this combination. Salivary testosterone showed the most marked proportional decrease of all the androgens under treatment. Cost-effectiveness and tolerance of ethinylestradiol and high-dose cyproterone acetate compared well with other antiandrogenic drug therapies for hirsutism. The less potent therapy with spironolactone only, a peripheral antiandrogen without hormone-suppressive effect, was effective in treating isolated alopecia in patients with normal androgens.

  15. Genetics of androgen metabolism in women with infertility and hypoandrogenism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shohat-Tal, Aya; Sen, Aritro; Barad, David H; Kushnir, Vitaly; Gleicher, Norbert

    2015-07-01

    Hypoandrogenism in women with low functional ovarian reserve (LFOR, defined as an abnormally low number of small growing follicles) adversely affects fertility. The androgen precursor dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) is increasingly used to supplement treatment protocols in women with LFOR undergoing in vitro fertilization. Due to differences in androgen metabolism, however, responses to DHEA supplementation vary between patients. In addition to overall declines in steroidogenic capacity with advancing age, genetic factors, which result in altered expression or enzymatic function of key steroidogenic proteins or their upstream regulators, might further exacerbate variations in the conversion of DHEA to testosterone. In this Review, we discuss in vitro studies and animal models of polymorphisms and gene mutations that affect the conversion of DHEA to testosterone and attempt to elucidate how these variations affect female hormone profiles. We also discuss treatment options that modulate levels of testosterone by targeting the expression of steroidogenic genes. Common variants in genes encoding DHEA sulphotransferase, aromatase, steroid 5α-reductase, androgen receptor, sex-hormone binding globulin, fragile X mental retardation protein and breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein have been implicated in androgen metabolism and, therefore, can affect levels of androgens in women. Short of screening for all potential genetic variants, hormonal assessments of patients with low testosterone levels after DHEA supplementation facilitate identification of underlying genetic defects. The genetic predisposition of patients can then be used to design individualized fertility treatments.

  16. Analysis of Androgen Receptor Gene Mutations in female with infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyar Sari

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background : Infertility is a multifactorial disease. Hormonal disorders and genetic factors are important in female infertility. Development and maturation of ovulation are depending on the molecular signaling pathways in response to androgens. Over hundreds of mutations leading to resistance gene function in androgen receptor (AR has been recorded. One of them is polymorphic region 5'UTR. Thus regarding to the role of androgen receptor in infertility, the aim of the present study was to investigate the association between gene mutations AR and infertility in Iranian women Materials and Methods: In this study of 50 infertile women and 80 healthy women as a control, blood samples were taken. After extraction of DNA, PCR method was used to determine the AR gene mutations. Results: In the present study in '5UTR area at position +25 androgen receptor gene a T nucleotide deletion was observed. , therefore single nucleotide mutations did not change in the androgen receptor gene expression, so indicates the lack of communication between the AR gene mutations in the promoter region of 23 to 214+ in women with infertility. According to the results of this study are significant differences between the two groups of patients and healthy women was not found (P=0.5. Conclusion: Results indicated no correlation between mutations in the promoter region of 23 to 214+ AR genes in the population studied women with infertility

  17. Androgenic anabolic steroid use among male adolescents in Falkenberg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, S

    1995-01-01

    Recent reports show that androgenic anabolic steroids are used by many teenagers, not as a deliberate attempt to give them strength, better athletic performance, etc., but to improve their looks. The so-called macho cult among young boys tempts them into using androgenic anabolic steroids to give them bigger muscles and a more powerful appearance. This study was undertaken to investigate the prevalence of androgenic anabolic steroid use among teenagers in a small town and to create a platform for future work with the aim of decreasing the misuse of these drugs. In Falkenberg, a town in the county of Halland in the west of Sweden, the pupils at two high schools were investigated by means of an anonymous multiple-choice questionnaire. A total of 1383 students (688 males and 695 females) aged 14-19 years participated in the study, giving a participation rate of 96%. The number of answers completed was 99%. The use of androgenic anabolic steroids is a reality among male teenagers in Falkenberg, with 5.8% of them using the drugs. Among 15- to 16-year-old boys misuse of these drugs is as high as 10%, and of these 50% (5.0% of total) also inject ampoules of the drugs. This prevalence is alarming since the adverse effects of androgenic anabolic steroids are more serious in teenagers. Serious action must be taken to inform teenagers of the consequences of misusing drugs.

  18. Identification of Comamonas testosteroni as an androgen degrader in sewage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Lung; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Yang, Fu-Chun; Ismail, Wael; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Shih, Chao-Jen; Wu, Yu-Ching; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported the masculinization of freshwater wildlife exposed to androgens in polluted rivers. Microbial degradation is a crucial mechanism for eliminating steroid hormones from contaminated ecosystems. The aerobic degradation of testosterone was observed in various bacterial isolates. However, the ecophysiological relevance of androgen-degrading microorganisms in the environment is unclear. Here, we investigated the biochemical mechanisms and corresponding microorganisms of androgen degradation in aerobic sewage. Sewage samples collected from the Dihua Sewage Treatment Plant (Taipei, Taiwan) were aerobically incubated with testosterone (1 mM). Androgen metabolite analysis revealed that bacteria adopt the 9, 10-seco pathway to degrade testosterone. A metagenomic analysis indicated the apparent enrichment of Comamonas spp. (mainly C. testosteroni) and Pseudomonas spp. in sewage incubated with testosterone. We used the degenerate primers derived from the meta-cleavage dioxygenase gene (tesB) of various proteobacteria to track this essential catabolic gene in the sewage. The amplified sequences showed the highest similarity (87–96%) to tesB of C. testosteroni. Using quantitative PCR, we detected a remarkable increase of the 16S rRNA and catabolic genes of C. testosteroni in the testosterone-treated sewage. Together, our data suggest that C. testosteroni, the model microorganism for aerobic testosterone degradation, plays a role in androgen biodegradation in aerobic sewage. PMID:27734937

  19. Two cases of androgen insensitivity due to somatic mosaicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie J. Nokoff

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the androgen receptor (AR. The incidence of AIS is estimated to be 1 in 99,000. Complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS is characterized by a 46,XY karyotype with external genitalia that appear typically female and results from mutations that render the androgen receptor non-functional. Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS results from partial loss of function mutations in AR. Rarely, PAIS results from somatic mosaicism for an AR mutation and not from a hypomorphic variant. We present two cases of PAIS due to somatic mosaicism, one caused by a novel nonsense mutation and one caused by a missense mutation previously reported in CAIS. Two patients with atypical genitalia presented to our multidisciplinary clinic for disorders of sex development and sequencing of AR was performed as part of the diagnostic evaluation. In case one, AR sequencing revealed mosaicism for a nonsense mutation, c.1331T > A; p.Leu444Ter. This mutation has not previously been reported, but is presumed to be pathogenic. In case two, AR sequencing revealed a mosaic missense mutation, c.2279 C > A; p.Ser760Tyr, which has previously been reported in CAIS but not in PAIS. Similar phenotypes may result from AR mutations that are present in a mosaic state with full loss of function or hypomorphic mutations that partially impair the function of the protein in either all tissues or in a mosaic state.

  20. Stromal Androgen Receptor Roles in the Development of Normal Prostate, Benign Prostate Hyperplasia, and Prostate Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wen, Simeng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Tian, Jing; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-01-01

    The prostate is an androgen-sensitive organ that needs proper androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signals for normal development. The progression of prostate diseases, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), also needs proper androgen/AR signals. Tissue recombination studies report that stromal, but not epithelial, AR plays more critical roles via the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions to influence the early process of prostate development. However, in BPH and PCa,...

  1. Androgen action during male sex differentiation includes suppression of cranial suspensory ligament development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. Emmen (Judith); A. McLuskey; J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe cranial suspensory ligament is located on the border of the cranial (mesonephric) mesentery in adult female mammals, which runs between the cranial pole of the internal genitalia and the dorsal abdominal wall. Absence of the cranial suspensory ligament i

  2. Osteoporosis in men treated with androgen suppression therapy for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholz, Ruth Canty; Conde, Francisco; Rutledge, Dana N

    2002-01-01

    Men with advanced or metastatic prostate cancer commonly receive long-term treatment with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist therapy. This prolonged treatment causes a hypogonadal state of chronic testosterone deficiency. Similar to estrogen deficiency in postmenopausal women, testosterone deficiency among these men negatively affects bone metabolism through a complex self-regulating, negative feedback system and subsequent reduction in bone formation. If left undetected or untreated, the risk for osteoporosis rises. Osteoporosis increases the likelihood of fracture, especially of the hips. Researchers are studying the effects of LHRH agonist therapy on osteoporosis and other related conditions to determine whether interventions, such as pharmacologic agents (e.g., bisphosphonates), dietary supplements (e.g., calcium, vitamin D), and exercise, can slow or prevent the process and assist healthcare providers in knowing how to counsel patients. Current recommendations are found in the literature on glucocorticoid-induced and menopausal osteoporosis. Nurses need to stay abreast of current knowledge in this area, as it is expanding rapidly.

  3. New Strategy for Prostate Cancer Prevention Based on Selenium Suppression of Androgen Receptor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    combination in prostate cancer chemoprevention. Emodin is a phytochemical that has been shown to induce AR degradation (18). We hypothesize that the...Since the induction of PSA screening , the majority of the prostate cancers diagnosed are asymptomatic, early-stage, small volume diseases. Current

  4. Ferruginol suppresses survival signaling pathways in androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Zambuzzi, Willian Fernando; Ruela de Sousa, Roberta Regina; Areche, Carlos; Santos de Souza, Ana Carolina; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Rodriguez, Jaime A.; Monteiro de Souza Brito, Alba Regina; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; den Hertog, Jeroen; de Paula, Eneida; Ferreira, Carmen Verissima

    2008-01-01

    Ferruginol, a bioactive compound isolated from a Chilean tree (Podocarpaceae), attracts attention as a consequence of its pharmacological properties, which include anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, cardioprotective, anti-oxidative, anti-plasmodial and anti-ulcerogenic actions. Nevertheless, the molecular

  5. Ferruginol suppresses survival signaling pathways in androgen-independent human prostate cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Zambuzzi, Willian Fernando; Ruela de Sousa, Roberta Regina; Areche, Carlos; Santos de Souza, Ana Carolina; Aoyama, Hiroshi; Schmeda-Hirschmann, Guillermo; Rodriguez, Jaime A.; Monteiro de Souza Brito, Alba Regina; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; den Hertog, Jeroen; de Paula, Eneida; Ferreira, Carmen Verissima

    2008-01-01

    Ferruginol, a bioactive compound isolated from a Chilean tree (Podocarpaceae), attracts attention as a consequence of its pharmacological properties, which include anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, cardioprotective, anti-oxidative, anti-plasmodial and anti-ulcerogenic actions. Nevertheless, the molecular

  6. Suppression of fertility in adult dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenhoudt, C; Santos, N R; Fontbonne, A

    2014-06-01

    Unfortunately, the overpopulation of dogs is still a problem in the majority of countries and even though surgical methods of sterilization, the most traditional and commonly used technique, have been intensively performed, the impact on the dog population is negligible. The neutering of companion animals as ovariohysterectomy (spaying) or orchidectomy (castration) has its limitations because of the cost, the need of a surgical environment and the risk of surgical and/or anaesthetical complications (ACCD 2009). In fact, surgical castration has been banished in some northern European countries and has limited acceptance in other countries. In a survey performed in Sao Paulo, Brazil, 56.5% of the owners of adopted shelter dogs were against the surgical procedure for different reasons (Soto et al. 2005). Currently, the options for contraception, defined as suppression of fertility are based on hormonal treatment. The treatments can be divided into analogues of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), progestins and androgens. Other possibilities of contraception are via the immunological system with vaccinations against GnRH, the luteinizing hormone (LH) receptor and the zona pellucida proteins. Finally, there is also the intra-epididymal or intratesticular injection of sclerosing substances in dogs. Mechanical devices to disrupt fertility are not used anymore due to the side effects. Suppression of fertility in adult dogs will be reviewed in order of use and possible impact on the dog population. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  7. Next-generation steroidogenesis inhibitors, dutasteride and abiraterone, attenuate but still do not eliminate androgen biosynthesis in 22RV1 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Steven; Deb, Subrata; Ming, Dong Sheng; Adomat, Hans; Hosseini-Beheshti, Elham; Zoubeidi, Amina; Gleave, Martin; Guns, Emma S Tomlinson

    2014-10-01

    cells, the combined inhibition of androgen production and blockade of AR can exceed the effect of MDV3100. Further characterization of bypass mechanisms that may develop as a response to these inhibitors is necessary to achieve optimal suppression of testosterone and DHT synthesis as a part of therapeutic regimens for the treatment of CRPC.

  8. Intratumoral de novo steroid synthesis activates androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer and is upregulated by treatment with CYP17A1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Changmeng; Chen, Sen; Ng, Patrick; Bubley, Glenn J; Nelson, Peter S; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Marck, Brett; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Simon, Nicholas I; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Shaoyong; Balk, Steven P

    2011-10-15

    Relapse of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) that occurs after androgen deprivation therapy of primary prostate cancer can be mediated by reactivation of the androgen receptor (AR). One important mechanism mediating this AR reactivation is intratumoral conversion of the weak adrenal androgens DHEA and androstenedione into the AR ligands testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. DHEA and androstenedione are synthesized by the adrenals through the sequential actions of the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP11A1 and CYP17A1, so that CYP17A1 inhibitors such as abiraterone are effective therapies for CRPC. However, the significance of intratumoral CYP17A1 and de novo androgen synthesis from cholesterol in CRPC, and the mechanisms contributing to CYP17A1 inhibitor resistance/relapse, remain to be determined. We report that AR activity in castration-resistant VCaP tumor xenografts can be restored through CYP17A1-dependent de novo androgen synthesis, and that abiraterone treatment of these xenografts imposes selective pressure for increased intratumoral expression of CYP17A1, thereby generating a mechanism for development of resistance to CYP17A1 inhibitors. Supporting the clinical relevance of this mechanism, we found that intratumoral expression of CYP17A1 was markedly increased in tumor biopsies from CRPC patients after CYP17A1 inhibitor therapy. We further show that CRPC cells expressing a progesterone responsive T877A mutant AR are not CYP17A1 dependent, but that AR activity in these cells is still steroid dependent and mediated by upstream CYP11A1-dependent intraturmoral pregnenolone/progesterone synthesis. Together, our results indicate that CRPCs resistant to CYP17A1 inhibition may remain steroid dependent and therefore responsive to therapies that can further suppress de novo intratumoral steroid synthesis.

  9. Enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release following intermittent sprint training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Lunde, Per; Levin, Kasper

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of intermittent sprint training on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function, nine young men performed a 5 wk high-intensity intermittent bicycle training, and six served as controls. SR function was evaluated from resting vastus lateralis muscle biopsies, before and after...... the training period. Intermittent sprint performance (ten 8-s all-out periods alternating with 32-s recovery) was enhanced 12% (P training. The 5-wk sprint training induced a significantly higher (P ...-977) arbitrary units Ca(2+). g protein(-1). min(-1) (after). The relative SR density of functional ryanodine receptors (RyR) remained unchanged after training; there was, however, a 48% (P

  10. Evaluation of continuous and intermittent myocardial topical negative pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindstedt, Sandra; Malmsjö, Malin; Gesslein, Bodil

    2008-01-01

    to intermittent therapy shows twice as much granulation tissue formation than that exposed to continuous pressure after 2 weeks of therapy. The present study was designed to elucidate the differences in microvascular blood flow in the left anterior descending artery area between continuous and intermittent......Topical negative pressure, commonly used in wound therapy, has been shown to increase blood flow and stimulate angiogenesis in subcutaneous tissue and skeletal muscle. In wound therapy, intermittent negative pressure is often preferred to continuous negative pressure as tissue exposed...... myocardial topical negative pressure of -50 mmHg....

  11. Enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release following intermittent sprint training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørtenblad, Niels; Lunde, Per; Levin, Kasper

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of intermittent sprint training on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function, nine young men performed a 5 wk high-intensity intermittent bicycle training, and six served as controls. SR function was evaluated from resting vastus lateralis muscle biopsies, before and after...... the training period. Intermittent sprint performance (ten 8-s all-out periods alternating with 32-s recovery) was enhanced 12% (P training. The 5-wk sprint training induced a significantly higher (P ...-977) arbitrary units Ca(2+). g protein(-1). min(-1) (after). The relative SR density of functional ryanodine receptors (RyR) remained unchanged after training; there was, however, a 48% (P

  12. Photoluminescence intermittency of semiconductor quantum dots in dielectric environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaac, A.

    2006-08-11

    The experimental studies presented in this thesis deal with the photoluminescence intermittency of semiconductor quantum dots in different dielectric environments. Detailed analysis of intermittency statistics from single capped CdSe/ZnS, uncapped CdSe and water dispersed CdSe/ZnS QDs in different matrices provide experimental evidence for the model of photoionization with a charge ejected into the surrounding matrix as the source of PL intermittency phenomenon. We propose a self-trapping model to explain the increase of dark state lifetimes with the dielectric constant of the matrix. (orig.)

  13. Characterizing and Comparing Young Adult Intermittent and Daily Smokers

    OpenAIRE

    Lenk, Kathleen M.; Chen, Vincent; Bernat, Debra H.; Forster, Jean L.; Rode, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    To examine young adult smoking patterns, we interviewed 732 smokers (from five U.S. upper Midwestern states) via telephone in 2006. We first defined two groups of intermittent smokers—low (smoked 1–14 days in past 30) and high (smoked 15–29 days in past 30), and then analyzed differences between these two groups and daily smokers. Low intermittent smokers were much less likely than high intermittent smokers to consider themselves smokers, feel addicted, or smoke with friends. Daily smokers we...

  14. Interlaboratory comparison of four in vitro assays for assessing androgenic and antiandrogenic activity of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Körner, Wolfgang; Vinggaard, Anne; Terouanne, B.

    2004-01-01

    steroidal androgens, two antiandrogens, an androgenic control, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and an antiandrogenic control, bicalutamide (ICI 176,334). All laboratories correctly detected the androgenic activity of 4-androsten-3,17-dione and 17alpha-methyl-testosterone. For both compounds...

  15. Interrogating Androgen Receptor Mediated Gene Expression and Tumor Progression by Molecular Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-10-01

    Edwards J, Bartlett JM . The androgen receptor and signal-transduc- tion pathways in hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Part 2. Androgen- One of the key...34. Kim J, Jia L, Tilley WD, Coetzee GA. Dynamic methylation of histone modulation of androgen receptor transcriptional activity by the nuclear H3 at

  16. Identification of an AR mutation-negative class of androgen insensitivity by determining endogenous AR activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornig, N.C.; Ukat, M.; H.U. Schweikert (H.); O. Hiort (Olaf); Werner, R.; S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); M.L. Cools (Martine); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); L. Audí (Laura); S.F. Ahmed (S. Faisal); Demiri, J.; Rodens, P.; Worch, L.; Wehner, G.; Kulle, A.E.; Dunstheimer, D.; Müller-Roßberg, E.; T. Reinehr (Thomas); Hadidi, A.T.; Eckstein, A.K.; Van Der Horst, C.; Seif, C.; R. Siebert (Reiner); O. Ammerpohl (Ole); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractContext: Only approximately 85%of patients with a clinical diagnosis complete androgen insensitivity syndrome and less than 30%with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome can be explained by inactivating mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. Objective: The objective of the study

  17. Proteomic analysis of androgen-regulated protein expression in a mouse fetal vas deferens cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Umar (Arzu); T.M. Luider (Theo); C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDuring sex differentiation, androgens are essential for development of the male genital tract. The Wolffian duct is an androgen-sensitive target tissue that develops into the epididymis, vas deferens, and seminal vesicle. The present study aimed to identify androgen-reg

  18. Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiliccote, Sila [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Homan, Gregory [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Anderson, Robert [Olivine, Inc., San Ramon, CA (United States); Hernandez, John [Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot - Phase 2 (IRM2) was designed to study the feasibility of demand-side resources to participate into the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) wholesale market as proxy demand resources (PDR). The pilot study focused on understanding the issues related with direct participation of third-parties and customers including customer acceptance; market transformation challenges (wholesale market, technology); technical and operational feasibility; and value to the rate payers, DR resource owners and the utility on providing an enabling mechanism for DR resources into the wholesale markets. The customer had the option of committing to either three contiguous hour blocks for 24 days or six contiguous hours for 12 days a month with day-ahead notification that aligned with the CAISO integrated forward market. As a result of their being available, the customer was paid $10/ kilowatt (kW)-month for capacity in addition to CAISO energy settlements. The participants were limited to no more than a 2 megawatt (MW) capacity with a six-month commitment. Four participants successfully engaged in the pilot. In this report, we provide the description of the pilot, participant performance results, costs and value to participants as well as outline some of the issues encountered through the pilot. Results show that participants chose to participate with storage and the value of CAISO settlements were significantly lower than the capacity payments provided by the utility as incentive payments. In addition, this pilot revealed issues both on the participant side and system operations side. These issues are summarized in the report.The Intermittent Renewable Management Pilot - Phase 2 (IRM2) was designed to study the feasibility of demand-side resources to participate into the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) wholesale market as proxy demand resources (PDR). The pilot study focused on understanding the issues related with

  19. Comparison of the Pharmacological Effects of a Novel Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator, the 5α-Reductase Inhibitor Finasteride, and the Antiandrogen Hydroxyflutamide in Intact Rats: New Approach for Benign Prostate Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenqing; Kearbey, Jeffrey D.; Nair, Vipin A.; Chung, Kiwon; Parlow, A. F.; Miller, Duane D.; Dalton, James T.

    2007-01-01

    Tissue-selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) demonstrate tissue selectivity in both castrated and intact male rats, behaving as partial agonists in androgenic tissues (i.e. prostate and seminal vesicle), but full agonists in anabolic tissues (i.e. levator ani muscle). The partial agonist activity of SARMs (compounds S-1 and S-4) in the prostate of intact rats suggested that SARM could be used for androgen suppression in the treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH). This study was designed to explore the mechanisms of action of SARM and to characterize the tissue selectivity of S-1 in intact male rats compared with that of hydroxyflutamide (antiandrogen) and finasteride (5α-reductase inhibitor), two major drugs used for androgen suppression treatment of BPH. In intact male rats, S-1 (5, 10, and 25 mg/kg) selectively decreased the prostate weight with similar efficacy to finasteride (5 mg/kg), without affecting the levator ani muscle or increasing the plasma levels of testosterone, LH, and FSH. Hydroxyflutamide (0.5, 1, 5, 10, and 25 mg/kg), however, decreased both the prostate and levator ani muscle weights without any selectivity and increased plasma hormone levels in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, S-1 and S-4 showed very weak inhibitory effects toward transiently expressed type I and II human 5α-reductase (Ki, >20 µM) during in vitro assays. Therefore, although S-1 and finasteride showed very similar suppressive effects in the prostate of intact male rats, they decreased prostate size via different mechanisms of action. S-1 simply worked as androgen receptor partial agonist, whereas finasteride inhibited prostatic 5α-reductase. These studies indicate that SARMs may demonstrate clinical utility as single agent or combination therapy for BPH. PMID:15308613

  20. Prevalent flucocorticoid and androgen activity in US water sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavreva, Diana A.; George, Anuja A.; Klausmeyer, Paul; Varticovski, Lyuba; Sack, Daniel; Voss, Ty C.; Schiltz, R. Louis; Blazer, Vicki; Iwanowiczl, Luke R.; Hager, Gordon L.

    2012-01-01

    Contamination of the environment with endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is a major health concern. The presence of estrogenic compounds in water and their deleterious effect are well documented. However, detection and monitoring of other classes of EDCs is limited. Here we utilize a high-throughput live cell assay based on sub-cellular relocalization of GFP-tagged glucocorticoid and androgen receptors (GFP-GR and GFP-AR), in combination with gene transcription analysis, to screen for glucocorticoid and androgen activity in water samples. We report previously unrecognized glucocorticoid activity in 27%, and androgen activity in 35% of tested water sources from 14 states in the US. Steroids of both classes impact body development, metabolism, and interfere with reproductive, endocrine, and immune systems. This prevalent contamination could negatively affect wildlife and human populations.

  1. Gonadal and adrenal androgen secretion in hirsute females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molta, L; Schwartz, U

    1986-05-01

    The pathophysiology of glandular androgen hypersecretion must be regarded as a continuous process without sharp borderlines from normal to non-tumorous conditions, such as polycystic ovaries and hyperthecosis, to neoplastic disease. Hirsutism and related symptoms are most often caused by excess androgens of ovarian and/or adrenal origin, i.e. testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, delta 4-androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulphate. As demonstrated by selective catheterization of glandular effluents, combined hypersecretion occurs more frequently then either purely gonadal or adrenal overproduction. No correlation can be found between the type, frequency and extent of hormonal changes and the clinical, laparoscopic, angiographic, or histological findings. Dynamic function tests do not reliably discriminate between the various aetiological subgroups due to extremely variable and even non-specific individual responsiveness. Selective catheterization is presently the most sensitive method for the preoperative identification and localization of androgen-secreting neoplasms.

  2. Contributions by the CAG-repeat Polymorphism of the Androgen Receptor Gene and Circulating Androgens to Muscle Size. Odense Androgen Study - A Population-based Study of 20-29 Year-old Danish Men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Leo; Hagen, Claus; Wraae, Kristian;

    2007-01-01

    Context: The number of CAG-repeats within the CAG-repeat polymorphism of the androgen receptor gene is inversely correlated with the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor. Objective: To study the effect of the CAG-repeat number and circulating androgens on muscle size, to examine......-repeat number correlated inversely with thigh and axial muscle area and with lower and upper extremity lean body mass. Except for upper extremity lean body mass, these findings remained significant in multivariate analyses controlling for circulating androgens, physical activity, smoking, alcohol intake...

  3. Detection of androgen receptor in human prostatic adenoma by autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demura, Takayoshi; Sakashita, Shigeo; Takamura, Takao; Kuroda, Kazuhide (Asahikawa Medical Coll., Hokkaido (Japan))

    1982-09-01

    We developed a new amplified method to detect the localization of androgen receptors within the human prostatic tissue specimens. The tissue sections were treated with 50 ..mu..l of 100 nM tritiated dihydrotestosterone (/sup 3/H-DHT). The binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to receptors was demonstrated as silver grains on the stained tissue sections. The binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was inhibited by additional non-radioactive DHT remarkably and by testosterone partially, but not affected by additional progesterone and 17..beta..-estradiol. No binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the bladder tissue was found. These results showed that the binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the prostatic tissue was a specific reaction of /sup 3/H-DHT and androgen receptor. Androgen receptors were seen in the nuclei and the cytoplasmas of glandular epithelial cells of prostate. However, stromal cells contained less abundant androgen receptors. The method reported here has several advantages in detecting the androgen receptor of the prostatic tissue in comparison with the radioreceptor assay and other histochemical methods. 1) The needle biopsied specimens are big enough to examine. 2) Morphological observations are also possible on the same specimen because the specimens are stained with hematoxylin simultaneously. Therefore, we can know the relative ratio of androgen receptor positive cells and negative cells. 3) Binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the receptor with this method may be more specific than other histochemical methods, since binding of /sup 3/H-DHT to the receptor was inhibited by 200-fold excess of non-radioactive DHT. 4) Treatment of scintillator, fluorographic technique shortens the exposure periods. The exposure periods are approximately six to twelve times shorter than that of the conventional autoradiography.

  4. The Relationship between Androgenic Alopecia and Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Rahmatpour Rokni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC and Androgenic Alopecia (AGA i are both common diseases in elder men. It seems that androgen plays a crucial role in the growth and development of prostate cancer. Therefore, the current study intended to investigate the relationship between androgenic alopecia and prostate cancer. The present study is a case-control study conducted on 75 patients with prostate cancer (case group referring to Imam Khomeini Hospital in Sari, Iran. The case group was compared with the control group (75 healthy individuals. The intended questionnaire of the study included information such as the age, sex, duration of disease, stage of disease, level of PSA, time diagnosis and time of interview for all the participants. The results of interview and clinical examination along with the patient’s information all were filled in the questionnaire and were statistically analyzed by SPSS after data collection. The mean age of PC group and healthy group was respectively 69.08 ± 8.97 and 68 .45 ± 10.16 years. The average level of PSA was 10.86 ± 11.7 and 2.66 ± 2.7 ng/ml in PC and healthy group in turn. The average duration of cancer was 12.63 ± 9.19 months in PC group. Furthermore, about 6.7% of cancer patients were in stage I, 48% were stage II, 29.3% were in stage III and 16% were in stage IV of prostate cancer. Besides, the number of cancer patients who had both frontal and vertex alopecia (baldness altogether exceeded healthy individuals (P=0.002. According to the results of the present study, there was a significant relationship between prostate cancer and androgenic alopecia which might have been caused by the effect of androgens on both diseases. Consequently, androgenic alopecia can be considered as one of the risk factors associated with prostate cancer.

  5. [Use and abuse of androgens and anabolic steroids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alén, M

    1993-01-01

    At therapeutic dosages, androgen and anabolic steroids enhance neither muscle strength nor competitive performance. Endogenous androgen secretion is inhibited, and the net effect is negligible. The dosages taken by athletes and body-builders are 10-50 fold greater than the therapeutic dosages, and give rise to hyperandrogenic conditions. Although this improves endurance, strength and muscle development, at the same time a manifest hormone disturbance is developed with a variety of consequences. Abusers, who as a rule inject illicit preparations themselves, are also at risk of hepatitis and HIV.

  6. Influence of obesity and androgen deficiency on prostatic blood circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Tyuzikov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In Study at 120 Diabetes Mellitus II type men the high frequency Obesity (71,7% and Androgen Deficiency (52,8—64,5% of the patients depending on a degree of the indemnification and them pathogenic authentic communications were shown. The blood level of total testosterone was represented by the critical factor of Prostatic arterial Blood Circulation. Obesity and Androgen Deficiency are seem as independent risk factors to development of ischemic prostatopathy, such as Prostatic blood circulation Disorders can develop earlier than other variants of the diabetic microangiophaty.

  7. Optimizing Ligand Efficiency of Selective Androgen Receptor Modulators (SARMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handlon, Anthony L; Schaller, Lee T; Leesnitzer, Lisa M; Merrihew, Raymond V; Poole, Chuck; Ulrich, John C; Wilson, Joseph W; Cadilla, Rodolfo; Turnbull, Philip

    2016-01-14

    A series of selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) containing the 1-(trifluoromethyl)benzyl alcohol core have been optimized for androgen receptor (AR) potency and drug-like properties. We have taken advantage of the lipophilic ligand efficiency (LLE) parameter as a guide to interpret the effect of structural changes on AR activity. Over the course of optimization efforts the LLE increased over 3 log units leading to a SARM 43 with nanomolar potency, good aqueous kinetic solubility (>700 μM), and high oral bioavailability in rats (83%).

  8. Cutaneous sporotrichosis. Intermittent treatment (pulses) with itraconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonifaz, Alexandro; Fierro, Leonel; Saúl, Amado; Ponce, Rosa María

    2008-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous and exceptionally deep mycosis caused by a dimorphic fungus, Sporothrix schenckii. Itraconazole is a triazole derivative leading to good results in the treatment of sporotrichosis. Patients with cutaneous sporotrichosis proven with mycological tests (direct examination and culture) were enrolled. All patients underwent laboratory tests (at baseline and on a monthly basis) and received oral itraconazole 400 mg/day for one week with a 3-week break (pulses); thereafter the drug was administered as pulses until clinical and mycological cure was achieved. Five patients with sporotrichosis were enrolled, 4 with cutaneous lymphangitic form and one with fixed cutaneous form. Clinical and mycological cure was achieved in 4/5 cases (80%), with a mean number of pulses of 3.5. No patient had side effects and no laboratory test abnormalities occurred. Intermittent or pulsed itraconazole was effective in treating cutaneous sporotrichosis. It may be considered as a new treatment choice that entails an important reduction in total medication use.

  9. Contraction stress test by intermittent nipple stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, J F; Sutliff, G; Robinson, D

    1984-05-01

    Although the nonstress test has generally supplanted the contraction stress test as the primary test for assessment of fetal well-being, the contraction stress test continues to be useful. Objectionable factors of the contraction stress test have included the time required to complete the test and the frequent necessity for intravenous oxytocin. The authors developed a contraction stress test protocol using contractions produced by intermittent nipple stimulation and used the method for 345 tests on 193 high-risk pregnancies during a 15-month period. The women were instructed to stimulate one breast, through their clothes, for two minutes and then to rest for five minutes. This cycle was repeated as necessary, but was interrupted whenever contractions began. Using this protocol, the authors were successful in achieving an adequate contraction frequency with every attempt, and hyperstimulation was not more frequent than previously reported with the standard contraction stress test. The average time requirement was 45 minutes. No unexplained stillbirths occurred after a negative test.

  10. Acute Intermittent Porphyria in Argentina: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Nora Cerbino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Porphyrias are a group of metabolic diseases that arise from deficiencies in the heme biosynthetic pathway. A partial deficiency in hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS produces a hepatic disorder named Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP; the acute porphyria is more frequent in Argentina. In this paper we review the results obtained for 101 Argentinean AIP families and 6 AIP families from foreign neighbour countries studied at molecular level at Centro de Investigaciones sobre Porfirinas y Porfirias (CIPYP. Thirty-five different mutations were found, of which 14 were described for the first time in our population. The most prevalent type of mutations was the missense mutations (43% followed by splice defects (26% and small deletions (20%. An odd case of a double heterozygous presentation of AIP in a foreign family from Paraguay is discussed. Moreover, it can be noted that 38 new families were found carrying the most frequent mutation in Argentina (p.G111R, increasing to 55.66% the prevalence of this genetic change in our population and adding further support to our previous hypothesis of a founder effect for this mutation in Argentina. Identification of patients with an overt AIP is important because treatment depends on an accurate diagnosis, but more critical is the identification of asymptomatic relatives to avoid acute attacks which may progress to death.

  11. Intermittent everolimus administration for malignant insulinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzi, Maria Pia; Tampellini, Marco; Scagliotti, Giorgio Vittorio; Priola, Adriano; Terzolo, Massimo; Pia, Anna; Berruti, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Insulinoma is a rare form of insulin-secreting pancreatic islet cell neuroendocrine (NE) tumor. The medical treatment of the malignant NE disease of the pancreas deeply changed in the last years, thanks to the introduction of new target molecules, as everolimus. Even if the exact mechanism is not actually known, one of the side effects of everolimus, hyperglycemia, has been demonstrated to be useful to contrast the typical hypoglycemia of the insulinoma. We report the case of a patient with a metastatic malignant insulinoma treated with intermittent everolimus, obtaining an important improvement in the quality of life; this suggests the necessity of preclinical studies to analyze the cellular pathways involved in insulin-independent gluconeogenesis. Learning points Effect of somatostatin analogs is long-lasting in the control of functioning NE tumors.Persistent everolimus control of hypoglycemia despite serum insulin levels and disease progression.Open issue: are disease progression and the increase in serum markers the only valid criteria to reject a treatment? PMID:25298880

  12. Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. F. van Ogtrop

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-range forecasting of intermittent streamflow in semi-arid Australia poses a number of major challenges. One of the challenges relates to modelling zero, skewed, non-stationary, and non-linear data. To address this, a probabilistic statistical model to forecast streamflow 12 months ahead is applied to five semi-arid catchments in South Western Queensland. The model uses logistic regression through Generalised Additive Models for Location, Scale and Shape (GAMLSS to determine the probability of flow occurring in any of the systems. We then use the same regression framework in combination with a right-skewed distribution, the Box-Cox t distribution, to model the intensity (depth of the non-zero streamflows. Time, seasonality and climate indices, describing the Pacific and Indian Ocean sea surface temperatures, are tested as covariates in the GAMLSS model to make probabilistic 12-month forecasts of the occurrence and intensity of streamflow. The output reveals that in the study region the occurrence and variability of flow is driven by sea surface temperatures and therefore forecasts can be made with some skill.

  13. Multifractality and intermittency in the solar wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Macek

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the complex dynamics of the solar wind's fluctuating plasma parameters, there is a detectable, hidden order described by a chaotic strange attractor which has a multifractal structure. The multifractal spectrum has been investigated using Voyager (magnetic field data in the outer heliosphere and using Helios (plasma data in the inner heliosphere. We have also analyzed the spectrum for the solar wind attractor. The spectrum is found to be consistent with that for the multifractal measure of the self-similar one-scale weighted Cantor set with two parameters describing uniform compression and natural invariant probability measure of the attractor of the system. In order to further quantify the multifractality, we also consider a generalized weighted Cantor set with two different scales describing nonuniform compression. We investigate the resulting multifractal spectrum depending on two scaling parameters and one probability measure parameter, especially for asymmetric scaling. We hope that this generalized model will also be a useful tool for analysis of intermittent turbulence in space plasmas.

  14. Challenges, developments and perspectives in intermittent ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although more than half the world's river networks comprise channels that periodically cease to flow and dry [intermittent rivers (IRs)], river ecology was largely developed from and for perennial systems. Ecological knowledge of IRs is rapidly increasing, so there is a need to synthesise this knowledge and deepen ecological understanding.In this Special Issue, we bring together 13 papers spanning observational case studies, field and laboratory experiments and reviews to guide research and management in this productive field of freshwater science. We summarise new developments in IR ecology, identify research gaps and needs, and address how the study of IRs as highly dynamic ecosystems informs ecological understanding more broadly.This series of articles reveals that contemporary IR ecology is a multifaceted and maturing field of research at the interface between aquatic and terrestrial ecology. This research contributes to fresh water and general ecology by testing concepts across a range of topics, including disturbance ecology, metacommunity ecology and coupled aquatic-terrestrial ecosystems.Drying affects flow continuity through time and flow connectivity across longitudinal, lateral and vertical dimensions of space, which aligns well with the recent emphasis of mainstream ecology on meta-system perspectives. Although most articles here focus on the wet phase, there is growing interest in dry phases, and in the terrestrial vegetation and invertebrate assemb

  15. Sex differences associated with intermittent swim stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Timothy A; Libman, Matthew K; Wooten, Katherine L; Drugan, Robert C

    2013-11-01

    Various animal models of depression have been used to seek a greater understanding of stress-related disorders. However, there is still a great need for novel research in this area, as many individuals suffering from depression are resistant to current treatment methods. Women have a higher rate of depression, highlighting the need to investigate mechanisms of sex differences. Therefore, we employed a new animal model to assess symptoms of depression, known as intermittent swim stress (ISS). In this model, the animal experiences 100 trials of cold water swim stress. ISS has already been shown to cause signs of behavioral depression in males, but has yet to be assessed in females. Following ISS exposure, we looked at sex differences in the Morris water maze and forced swim test. The results indicated a spatial learning effect only in the hidden platform task between male and female controls, and stressed and control males. A consistent spatial memory effect was only seen for males exposed to ISS. In the forced swim test, both sexes exposed to ISS exhibited greater immobility, and the same males and females also showed attenuated climbing and swimming, respectively. The sex differences could be due to different neural substrates for males and females. The goal of this study was to provide the first behavioral examination of sex differences following ISS exposure, so the stage of estrous cycle was not assessed for the females. This is a necessary future direction for subsequent experiments. The current article highlights the importance of sex differences in response to stress.

  16. Finite dissipation and intermittency in magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mininni, P D; Pouquet, A

    2009-08-01

    We present an analysis of data stemming from numerical simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence up to grid resolution of 1536(3) points and up to Taylor Reynolds number of approximately 1200 . The initial conditions are such that the initial velocity and magnetic fields are helical and in equipartition, while their correlation is negligible. Analyzing the data at the peak of dissipation, we show that the dissipation in MHD seems to asymptote to a constant as the Reynolds number increases, thereby strengthening the possibility of fast reconnection events in the solar environment for very large Reynolds numbers. Furthermore, intermittency of MHD flows, as determined by the spectrum of anomalous exponents of structure functions of the velocity and the magnetic field, is stronger than that of fluids, confirming earlier results; however, we also find that there is a measurable difference between the exponents of the velocity and those of the magnetic field, reminiscent of recent solar wind observations. Finally, we discuss the spectral scaling laws that arise in this flow.

  17. Intermittent priapism as a clinical feature of lumbar spinal stenosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rojas, J I; Zurrú-Ganen, M C; Romano, M; Patrucco, L; Cristiano, E

    2007-01-01

    .... Patients with lumbar spinal stenosis may present a variety of signs and symptoms. One such syndrome is neurogenic intermittent claudication, characterized by radicular symptoms exacerbated by walking or standing and relieved by rest...

  18. Isolated intermittent vertigo: A presenting feature of persistent trigeminal artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajsrinivas Parthasarathy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic carotid – basilar anastomosis when persistent in adult life can present with a variety of neurological symptoms. We present a patient with isolated intermittent vertigo attributable to the embryonic anastomosis and describe the different types of persistent trigeminal artery. A 76-year-old Caucasian man presented with isolated intermittent vertigo and symptoms suggestive of anterior and posterior circulation strokes. Impaired vasomotor reactivity was demonstrated on insonation of the anterior and posterior cerebral arteries in this patient with a persistent left trigeminal artery and 75% stenosis of the left internal carotid artery (ICA. The symptom of intermittent vertigo resolved with carotid endarterectomy. Decreased flow across the stenotic segment of the ICA which subserved the posterior circulation resulted in basilar insufficiency. Hypoperfusion to the flocculonodular lobe supplied by the anterior inferior cerebellar artery is a likely cause for the intermittent vertigo.

  19. Revealing Intermittency in Nuclear Multifragmentation with 4$\\PI$ Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Baldo, Marcello; Rapisarda, A

    1993-01-01

    The distortion on the intermittency signal, due to detection efficiency and to the presence of pre--equilibrium emitted particles, is studied in a schematic model of nuclear multi- fragmentation. The source of the intermittency signal is modeled with a percolating system. The efficiency is schematized by a simple function of the fragment size, and the presence of pre--equilibrium particles is simulated by an additional non--critical fragment source. No selection on the events is considered, and therefore all events are used to calculate the moments. It is found that, despite the absence of event selection, the intermittency signal is quite resistant to the distortion due to the apparatus efficiency, while the inclusion of pre--equilibrium particles in the moment calculation can substantially reduce the strength of the signal. Pre--equilibrium particles should be therefore carefully separated from the rest of the detected fragments, before the intermittency analysis on experimental charge or mass distributions...

  20. Sensing and characterization of EMI during intermittent connector anomalies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper presents a new on-line methodology for detecting intermittent disconnection failures. The detection principle operates on the fundamental Lorentz Law that...