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Sample records for intermetallic materials phase

  1. Intermetallics as innovative CRM-free materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novák, Pavel; Jaworska, Lucyna; Cabibbo, Marcello

    2018-03-01

    Many of currently used technical materials cannot be imagined without the use of critical raw materials. They require chromium (e.g. in stainless and tool steels), tungsten and cobalt (tool materials, heat resistant alloys), niobium (steels and modern biomaterials). Therefore there is a need to find substitutes to help the European economy. A promising solution can be the application of intermetallics. These materials offer wide variety of interesting properties, such as high hardness and wear resistance or high chemical resistance. In this paper, the overview of possible substitute materials among intermetallics is presented. Intermetallics based on aluminides and silicides are shown as corrosion resistant materials, composites composed of ceramics in intermetallic matrix as possible tool materials. The manufacturing processes are being developed to minimize the disadvantages of these materials, mainly the room-temperature brittleness.

  2. Investigation on thixojoining to produce hybrid components with intermetallic phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyboldt, Christoph; Liewald, Mathias

    2018-05-01

    Current research activities at the Institute for Metal Forming Technology of the University of Stuttgart are focusing on the manufacturing of hybrid components using semi-solid forming strategies. One process investigated is the joining of different materials in the semi-solid state and is so called "thixojoining". In this process, metallic inlays are inserted into the semi-solid forming die before the actual forming process and are then joined with a material which was heated up to its semi-solid state. Earlier investigations have shown that using this process a very well-shaped form closure can be produced. Furthermore, it was found that sometimes intermetallic phases are built between the different materials, which decisively influence the part properties of such hybrid components for its future application. Within the framework presented in this paper, inlays made of aluminum, brass and steel were joined with aluminum in the semi-solid state. The aim of the investigations was to create an intermetallic bond between the different materials. For this investigations the liquid phase fraction of the aluminum and the temperature of the inlay were varied in order to determine the influence on the formation of the intermetallic phase. Forming trials were performed using a semi-solid forming die with a disk shaped design. Furthermore, the intermetallic phase built was investigated using microsections.

  3. Phase transformations in intermetallic phases in zirconium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippov, V. P., E-mail: vpfilippov@mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Kirichenko, V. G. [Kharkiv National Karazin University (Ukraine); Salomasov, V. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Khasanov, A. M. [University of North Carolina – Asheville, Chemistry Department (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Phase change was analyzed in intermetallic compounds of zirconium alloys (Zr – 1.03 at.% Fe; Zr – 0.51 at.% Fe; Zr – 0.51 at.% Fe – M(M = Nb, Sn). Mössbauer spectroscopy on {sup 57}Fe nuclei in backscattering geometry with the registration of the internal conversion electrons and XRD were used. Four types of iron bearing intermetallic compounds with Nb were detected. A relationship was found between the growth process of intermetallic inclusions and segregation of these phases. The growth kinetics of inclusions possibly is not controlled by bulk diffusion, and a lower value of the iron atom’s activation energy of migration can be attributed to the existence of enhanced diffusion paths and interface boundaries.

  4. Intermetallic-Based High-Temperature Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1999-04-25

    The intermetallic-based alloys for high-temperature applications are introduced. General characteristics of intermetallics are followed by identification of nickel and iron aluminides as the most practical alloys for commercial applications. An overview of the alloy compositions, melting processes, and mechanical properties for nickel and iron aluminizes are presented. The current applications and commercial producers of nickel and iron aluminizes are given. A brief description of the future prospects of intermetallic-based alloys is also given.

  5. Persistent local chemical bonds in intermetallic phase formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yanwen [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Bian, Xiufang, E-mail: xfbian@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Qin, Xubo [Key Laboratory for Liquid–Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Zhang, Shuo; Huang, Yuying [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2014-05-01

    We found a direct evidence for the existence of the local chemical Bi–In bonds in the BiIn{sub 2} melt. These bonds are strong and prevail, dominating the structure evolution of the intermetallic clusters. From the local structure of the melt-quenched BiIn{sub 2} ribbon, the chemical Bi–In bonds strengthen compared with those in the equilibrium solidified alloy. The chemical bonds in BiIn{sub 2} melt retain to solid during a rapid quenching process. The results suggest that the intermetallic clusters in the melt evolve into the as-quenched intermetallic phase, and the intermetallic phase originates from the chemical bonds between unlike atoms in the melt. The chemical bonds preserve the chemical ordered clusters and dominate the clusters evolution.

  6. Chemical Frustration. A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Daniel C [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-23

    Final technical report for "Chemical Frustration: A Design Principle for the Discovery of New Complex Alloy and Intermetallic Phases" funded by the Office of Science through the Materials Chemistry Program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  7. Fe-Zn intermetallic phases prepared by diffusion annealing and spark-plasma sintering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, P.; Cinert, Jakub; Pala, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 2 (2016), s. 253-256 ISSN 1580-2949 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Fe-Zn intermetallics * spark-plasma sintering * diffusion annealing * phase composition * hardness Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 0.436, year: 2016

  8. The nucleation and growth of intermetallic Al-Pt phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, A.; Barna, P.B.; Labar, J. l.

    2002-01-01

    The nucleation and growth of intermetallic Al-Pt phases on amorphous carbon was investigated by half shadow technique in co-deposited thin films. In such experimental condition, the composition of the deposited films varied in the range of Al x Pt 1-x (0≤x≤0.6). The coexistence of Al 5 Pt, Al 2 Pt, Al 3 Pt 2 intermetallic phases have been found in the whole range with varying ratio. Vapour depositions were performed in an UHV system. The Al and Pt components were evaporated simultaneously onto amorphous carbon layer supported by TEM micro-grids. Deposition rates were controlled separately by quartz crystal monitors. Substrate temperature during deposition was 350 grad C. A special evaporation arrangement made possible to create a half shadow area on the substrate in which the quantity one of the components increased from zero to the wanted composition of the sample. The composition of the zones was determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) in TEM. The intermetallic phases developed in the sample were investigated by analytical TEM (Philips CM20) and high resolution TEM (JEOL 3010 UHR). The electron diffraction patterns have been evaluated by ProcessDiffraction program. (Authors)

  9. Synthesis and design of silicide intermetallic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation and corrosion resistance for applications of importance to the U.S. processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature materials and important applications in major energy-intensive U.S. processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with Schuller International Inc. targeted at the area of MoSi{sub 2}-based high temperature materials and components for fiberglass melting and processing applications. The authors are also developing an interaction with the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop silicides for high temperature radiant gas burner applications, for the glass and other industries. Current experimental emphasis is on the development and characterization of MoSi{sub 2}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} and MoSi{sub 2}-SiC composites, the plasma spraying of MoSi{sub 2}-based materials, and the joining of MoSi{sub 2} materials to metals.

  10. The Role of Second Phase Intermetallic Particles on the Spall Failure of 5083 Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Bradley Survice Engineering Company, Aberdeen, MD A reprint from Journal of Dynamic Behavior of Materials. 2016;2:476–483...Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, MD, USA 2 Survice Engineering Company, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Aberdeen, MD, USA 123 J...2016) 2:476–483 479 123 ligaments between cracks and a second phase intermetallic particle (identified by black arrow) above the crack with an average

  11. Intermetallic alloys - overview on new materials developments for structural applications in West Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, G.

    1990-01-01

    As a result of recent research on intermetallics for high-temperature applications several alloy systems which are based on intermetallics are regarded as promising for new materials developments, and respective developments have been initiated in West Germany. The present work is aimed a lightweight materials on one hand and at high-temperature high-strength materials on the other hand. The overview surveys the work in West Germany on γ-TiAl, Ti 5 Si 3 -based alloys, Mg 2 Si-Al, NiAl-Cr, Al 3 Nb-NiAl and Laves phase-based alloys, and the mechanical properties - strength, ductility and/or toughness - are described. (orig.) [de

  12. Morphology of intermetallic phases in Al-Si cast alloys and their fracture behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Hurtalová

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Applications of Al-Si cast alloys in recent years have increased especially in the automotive industry (dynamic exposed cast, en-gine parts, cylinder heads, pistons and so on. Controlling the microstructure of secondary aluminium cast alloys is very important, because these alloys contain more additional elements that form various intermetallic phases in the structure. Therefore, the contribution is dealing with the valuation type of intermetallic phases and their identification with using optical and scanning microscopy. Some of the intermetallic phases could be identified on the basis of morphology but some of them must be identified according EDX analysis. The properties of alu-minium alloy are affected by morphology of intermetallic phases and therefore it is necessary to study morphology and its fracture behav-iour. The present work shows morphology and typical fracture behaviour as the most common intermetallic phases forming in Al-Si alloys.

  13. Sn and Ti influences on intermetallic phases damage in hot dip galvanizing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Di Cocco

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Protection against metallic materials corrosion is one of the most important means to reduce both maintenance costs and environmental impact. In the last years new studies on chemical baths compositions and fluxes have been performed in order to improve processes, corrosion resistance and mechanical behavior of Zn based coatings. Chemical bath composition is often improved by the Sn addition which increases the fluidity of the melt. Ti addition makes the coatings to change color under appropriate heat treatment. In this work a comparative microstructural analysis, in Zn-Sn and Zn-Ti coatings, is performed to evaluate intermetallic phases formation kinetics and the influence of intermetallic microstructure on coating damage under constant bending deformation.

  14. Amorphous phase formation in intermetallic Mg2Ni alloy synthesized by ethanol wet milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, H.-W.; Chyou, S.-D.; Wang, S.-H.; Yang, M.-W.; Hsu, C.-Y.; Tien, H.-C.; Huang, N.-N.

    2009-01-01

    The hydriding/dehydriding properties of an intermetallic Mg 2 Ni alloy synthesized by wet ball milling in ethanol have been investigated. The appearance of the particle surface after different milling methods is one obvious difference. The alloyed powders prepared by either dry milling or wet milling under ethanol were characterized for phase content by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). The results show that two broad diffuse peaks, which are an ionic-organic-Mg amorphous material, appear in addition to the nickel element peaks. This unexpected amorphous phase has the special hydrogen absorbing/desorbing features.

  15. Development of New Cryocooler Regenerator Materials-Ductile Intermetallic Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gschneidner, K.A.; Pecharsky, A.O.; Pecharsky, V.K.

    2004-01-01

    The volumetric heat capacities of a number of binary and ternary Er- and Tm-based intermetallic compounds, which exhibited substantial ductilities, were measured from ∼3 to ∼350 K. They have the RM stoichiometry (where R = Er or Tm, and M is a main group or transition metal) and crystallize in the CsCl-type structure. The heat capacities of the Tm-based compounds are in general larger than the corresponding Er-based materials. Many of them have heat capacities which are significantly larger than those of the low temperature ( 2 , Er 3 Ni and ErNi. Utilization of the new materials as regenerators in the various cryocoolers should improve the performance of these refrigeration units for cooling below 15 K

  16. Influence of the ion implantation on the nanoscale intermetallic phases formation in Ni-Ti system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalashnikov, M.P.; Kurzina, I.A.; Bozhko, I.A.; Kozlov, E.V.; Fortuna, S.V.; Sivin, D.O.; Stepanov, I.B.; Sharkeev, Yu.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The ion implantation at a high intensity mode is an effective method for modification of the surface properties of metals and alloys. Improvement of mechanical and tribological properties of irradiated materials using the high intensity implantation is connected with an element composition and microstructure modification of the surface and subsurface layers. One shows a great interest in intermetallic phase's synthesis by ion implantation, because of unique physical-mechanical properties of the intermetallic compounds. The influence of the irradiation conditions on the structural state and surface properties of implanted materials is not clear enough. The study of the factors influencing on the formation of the surface ion - alloyed layers of metal targets having the high tribological and mechanical properties by high intensity ion implantation is actual. The aim of the present work is a study of the microstructure, phase composition, physical and mechanical properties of the ion-alloyed Ni surfaces formed at high intensity implantation of Ti ions. The implantation Ti ions into Ni samples at high intensity mode was realized using ion source 'Raduga - 5'. The implantation Ti ions into Ni was carried out at accelerating voltage 20 kV for 2 h. The regimes were differed in the samples temperature (580 - 700 K), the distance from the ion implanted samples to the ion source (0.43-0.93 m) and the dose of irradiated ions (0.3·10 18 -2.9·10 18 ion/cm -2 ). The element composition of the implanted samples was analyzed by the electron spectroscopy. The structural-phase state of the Ni ion-modified layers was investigated by the transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. Additionally, the investigation of mechanical and tribological properties of the implanted Ni samples was carried out. It was established that the maximum thickness of the ion-alloyed nickel layers at high intensity mode allows forming the nanoscale intermetallic phases (Ni

  17. Experimental formation enthalpies for intermetallic phases and other inorganic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, George; Meschel, S. V.; Nash, Philip; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The standard enthalpy of formation of a compound is the energy associated with the reaction to form the compound from its component elements. The standard enthalpy of formation is a fundamental thermodynamic property that determines its phase stability, which can be coupled with other thermodynamic data to calculate phase diagrams. Calorimetry provides the only direct method by which the standard enthalpy of formation is experimentally measured. However, the measurement is often a time and energy intensive process. We present a dataset of enthalpies of formation measured by high-temperature calorimetry. The phases measured in this dataset include intermetallic compounds with transition metal and rare-earth elements, metal borides, metal carbides, and metallic silicides. These measurements were collected from over 50 years of calorimetric experiments. The dataset contains 1,276 entries on experimental enthalpy of formation values and structural information. Most of the entries are for binary compounds but ternary and quaternary compounds are being added as they become available. The dataset also contains predictions of enthalpy of formation from first-principles calculations for comparison. PMID:29064466

  18. Application of mechanical alloying to synthesis of intermetallic phases based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymek, S.

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical alloying is the process of synthesis of powder materials during milling in high energetic mills, usually ball mills. The central event in mechanical alloying is the ball-powder-ball collision. Powder particles are trapped between the colliding balls during milling and undergo deformation and/or fracture. Fractured parts are cold welded. The continued fracture and cold welding results in a uniform size and chemical composition of powder particles. The main applications of mechanical alloying are: processing of ODS alloys, syntheses of intermetallic phases, synthesis of nonequilibrium structures (amorphous alloys, extended solid solutions, nanocrystalline, quasi crystals) and magnetic materials. The present paper deals with application of mechanical alloying to synthesis Ni A l base intermetallic phases as well as phases from the Nb-Al binary system. The alloy were processed from elemental powders. The course of milling was monitored by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. After milling, the collected powders were sieved by 45 μm grid and hot pressed (Nb alloys and NiAl) or hot extruded (NiAl). The resulting material was fully dense and exhibited fine grain (< 1 μm) and uniform distribution of oxide dispersoid. The consolidated material was compression and creep tested. The mechanical properties of mechanically alloys were superior to properties of their cast counterparts both in the room and elevated temperatures. Higher strength of mechanically alloyed materials results from their fine grains and from the presence of dispersoid. At elevated temperatures, the Nb-Al alloys have higher compression strength than NiAl-based alloys processed at the same conditions. The minimum creep rates of mechanically alloyed Nb alloys are an order of magnitude lower than analogously processed NiAl-base alloys. (author)

  19. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Prabhu Paulraj; Rajnish Garg

    2015-01-01

    Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS) have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic pha...

  20. Application of feal intermetallic phase matrix based alloys in the turbine components of a turbocharger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cebulski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a possible application of the state-of-the-art alloys based on the FeAl intermetallic phases as materials for the manufacture of heat-proof turbine components in an automobile turbocharger. The research was aimed at determining the resistance to corrosion of Fe40Al5CrTiB alloy in a gaseous environment containing 9 % O2 + 0,2 % HCl + 0,08 % SO2 + N2. First the kinetics of corrosion processes for the considered alloy were determined at the temperatures of 900 °C, 1 000 °C and 1 100 °C, which was followed by validation under operating conditions. To do so, the tests were carried out over a distance of 20 000 km. The last stage involved examination of the surfaces after the test drive. The obtained results are the basis for further research in this field.

  1. EFFECT OF INTERMETALLIC PHASES ON CORROSION BEHAVIOR AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL AND SUPER-DUPLEX STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Paulraj

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS and Super Duplex Stainless Steel (SDSS have excellent integration of mechanical and corrosion properties. However, the formation of intermetallic phases is a major problem in their usage. The mechanical and corrosion properties are deteriorated due to the presence of intermetallic phases. These phases are induced during welding, prolonged exposure to high temperatures, and improper heat treatments. The main emphasis of this review article is on intermetallic phases and their effects on corrosion and mechanical properties. First the effect of various alloying elements on DSS and SDSS has been discussed followed by formation of various intermetallic phases. The intermetallic phases affect impact toughness and corrosion resistance significantly. Their deleterious effect on weldments has also been reviewed.

  2. Effect of intermetallic phases on the anodic oxidation and corrosion of 5A06 aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song-mei; Li, Ying-dong; Zhang, You; Liu, Jian-hua; Yu, Mei

    2015-02-01

    Intermetallic phases were found to influence the anodic oxidation and corrosion behavior of 5A06 aluminum alloy. Scattered intermetallic particles were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) after pretreatment. The anodic film was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and its corrosion resistance was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and Tafel polarization in NaCl solution. The results show that the size of Al-Fe-Mg-Mn particles gradually decreases with the iron content. During anodizing, these intermetallic particles are gradually dissolved, leading to the complex porosity in the anodic film beneath the particles. After anodizing, the residual particles are mainly silicon-containing phases, which are embedded in the anodic film. Electrochemical measurements indicate that the porous anodic film layer is easily penetrated, and the barrier plays a dominant role in the overall protection. Meanwhile, self-healing behavior is observed during the long immersion time.

  3. Atom probe tomography of intermetallic phases and interfaces formed in dissimilar joining between Al alloys and steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmens, B.; Springer, H.; Duarte, M.J.; De Graeve, I.; De Strycker, J.; Raabe, D.; Verbeken, K.

    2016-01-01

    While Si additions to Al are widely used to reduce the thickness of the brittle intermetallic seam formed at the interface during joining of Al alloys to steel, the underlying mechanisms are not clarified yet. The developed approach for the site specific atom probe tomography analysis revealed Si enrichments at grain and phase boundaries between the θ (Fe 4 Al 13 ) and η (Fe 2 Al 5 ) phase, up to about ten times that of the concentration in Al. The increase in Si concentration could play an important role for the growth kinetics of the intermetallic phases formed for example in hot-dip aluminizing of steel. - Highlights: •Si additions to Al reduce thickness of intermetallic seam in joining with steel. •Approach developed for the site specific APT analysis of the intermetallic seam •Si enrichment at grain and phase boundaries possibly affects growth of intermetallics.

  4. Study of the structure and development of the set of reference materials of composition and structure of heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Chabina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Relevance of research: There are two sizes (several microns and nanodimensional of strengthening j'-phase in single-crystal heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys, used for making blades of modern gas turbine engines (GTD. For in-depth study of structural and phase condition of such alloys not only qualitative description of created structure is necessary, but quantitative analysis of alloy components geometrical characteristics. Purpose of the work: Development of reference material sets of heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloy composition and structure. Research methods: To address the measurement problem of control of structural and geometrical characteristics of single-crystal heat resisting and intermetallic alloys by analytical microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis the research was carried out using certified measurement techniques on facilities, entered in the Register of Measurement Means of the Russian Federation. The research was carried out on microsections, foils and plates, cut in the plane {100}. Results: It is established that key parameters, defining the properties of these alloys are particle size of strengthening j' -phase, the layer thickness of j-phase between them and parameters of phases lattice. Metrological requirements for reference materials of composition and structure of heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys are formulated. The necessary and sufficient reference material set providing the possibility to determine the composition and structure parameters of single-crystal heat resisting nickel and intermetallic alloys is defined. The developed RM sets are certified as in-plant reference materials. Conclusion: The reference materials can be used for graduation of spectral equipment when conducting element analysis of specified class alloys; for calibration of means of measuring alloy structure parameters; for measurement of alloys phases lattice parameters; for structure reference pictures

  5. Electronic structure and phase stability during martensitic transformation in Al-doped ZrCu intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Feng; Shen Ping; Liu Tao; Lin Qiaoli; Jiang Qichuan

    2010-01-01

    Martensitic transformation, phase stability and electronic structure of Al-doped ZrCu intermetallics were investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations using the pseudopotentials plane wave method. The formation energy calculations indicate that the stability of the ZrCu phase increases with the increasing Al content. Al plays a decisive role in controlling the formation and microstructures of the martensite phases in Zr-Cu-Al alloys. The total energy difference between ZrCu (B2) austenite and ZrCu martensite plays an important role in the martensitic transformation. The phase stability is dependent on its electronic structure. The densities of states (DOS) of the intermetallics were discussed in detail.

  6. Formation of intermetallic phases in AlSi7Fe1 alloy processed under microgravity and forced fluid flow conditions and their influence on the permeability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, S.; Ratke, L.; Zimmermann, G.; Budenkova, O.

    2016-03-01

    Ternary Al-6.5wt.%Si-0.93wt.%Fe alloy samples were directionally solidified on-board of the International Space Station ISS in the ESA payload Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) equipped with Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) under both purely diffusive and stimulated convective conditions induced by a rotating magnetic field. Using different analysis techniques the shape and distribution of the intermetallic phase β-Al5SiFe in the dendritic microstructure was investigated, to study the influence of solidification velocity and fluid flow on the size and spatial arrangement of intermetallics. Deep etching as well as 3-dimensional computer tomography measurements characterized the size and the shape of β-Al5SiFe platelets: Diffusive growth results in a rather homogeneous distribution of intermetallic phases, whereas forced flow promotes an increase in the amount and the size of β-Al5SiFe platelets in the centre region of the samples. The β-Al5SiFe intermetallics can form not only simple platelets, but also be curved, branched, crossed, interacting with dendrites and porosity located. This leads to formation of large and complex groups of Fe-rich intermetallics, which reduce the melt flow between dendrites leading to lower permeability of the mushy zone and might significantly decrease feeding ability in castings.

  7. Multiscale modeling of the influence of Fe content in a Al-Si-Cu alloy on the size distribution of intermetallic phases and micropores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junsheng; Lee, Peter D.; Li Mei; Allison, John

    2010-01-01

    A multiscale model was developed to simulate the formation of Fe-rich intermetallics and pores in quaternary Al-Si-Cu-Fe alloys. At the microscale, the multicomponent diffusion equations were solved for multiphase (liquid-solid-gas) materials via a finite difference framework to predict microstructure formation. A fast and robust decentered plate algorithm was developed to simulate the strong anisotropy of the solid/liquid interfacial energy for the Fe-rich intermetallic phase. The growth of porosity was controlled by local pressure drop due to solidification and interactions with surrounding solid phases, in addition to hydrogen diffusion. The microscale model was implemented as a subroutine in a commercial finite element package, producing a coupled multiscale model. This allows the influence of varying casting conditions on the Fe-rich intermetallics, the pores, and their interactions to be predicted. Synchrotron x-ray tomography experiments were performed to validate the model by comparing the three-dimensional morphology and size distribution of Fe-rich intermetallics as a function of Fe content. Large platelike Fe-rich β intermetallics were successfully simulated by the multiscale model and their influence on pore size distribution in shape castings was predicted as a function of casting conditions.

  8. Mechanism of forming interfacial intermetallic compounds at interface for solid state diffusion bonding of dissimilar materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, P.; Liu, D.

    2006-01-01

    The formation of brittle intermetallic compounds at the interfaces of diffusion bonds is the main cause which leads to poor bond strength. Therefore, it is very important to study and establish the formation and growth model of intermetallic compounds at the interfaces for the control process of diffusion bonding. In this paper, according to the diffusion kinetics and the thermodynamics, the principle of formation of intermetallic compounds at interfaces in the multi-component diffusion couple, the flux-energy principle, is put forward. In the light of diffusion theory, the formation capacity of the phase at the interfaces is determined by specific properties of the composition in the diffusion couple and the composition ratio of the formed phase is in agreement with the diffusion flux. In accordance with the flux-energy principle, the microstructure of the Ni/TC4 interface is Ni/TiNi 3 /TiNi/Ti 2 Ni/TC4, the microstructure of the TC4/00Cr18Ni9Ti interface is 00Cr18Ni9Ti/TiFe 2 /TiFe/Ti 2 Fe/TC4, and the microstructure of the TiAl/40Cr interface is 40Cr/TiC/Ti 3 Al + FeAl + FeAl 2 /TiAl. Multi-intermetallic compounds with the equivalent flux-energy can be formed at the interfaces at the same time

  9. Vanadium Influence on Iron Based Intermetallic Phases in AlSi6Cu4 Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolibruchová D.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Negative effect of iron in Al-Si alloys mostly refers with iron based intermetallic phases, especially Al5FeSi phases. These phases are present in platelet-like forms, which sharp edges are considered as main cracks initiators and also as contributors of porosity formation. In recent times, addition of some elements, for example Mn, Co, Cr, Ni, V, is used to reduce influence of iron. Influence of vanadium in aluminium AlSi6Cu4 alloy with intentionally increased iron content is presented in this article. Vanadium amount has been graduated and chemical composition of alloy has been analysed by spectral analysis. Vanadium influence on microstructural changes was evaluated by microstructural analysis and some of intermetallic particles were reviewed by EDX analysis.

  10. Intermetallic phases in the iron-rich region of the Zr-Fe phase diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovsky, M.S. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Materiales; Arias, D. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Dept. de Materiales

    1996-04-01

    Intermetallic phases in the Fe-rich region of the Zr-Fe system are studied by X-ray diffraction and optical and electron microscopy. The chemical composition of each phase has been quantitatively measured in a electron microprobe. The stable phases found in this region are ZrFe{sub 2}, Zr{sub 6}Fe{sub 23} and ({alpha}Fe). ZrFe{sub 2} is identified as a cubic Laves type phase (C15) and the ZrFe{sub 2}/ZrFe{sub 2}+Zr{sub 6}Fe{sub 23} boundary composition is 73{+-}1 at.% Fe. Zr{sub 6}Fe{sub 23} is a cubic phase of the Th{sub 6}Mn{sub 23} type and its composition is 80.0{+-}1.5 at.% Fe. The eutectic L{r_reversible}Zr{sub 6}Fe{sub 23}+{tau}-Fe transformation temperature and composition are 1325 C and 91{+-}1 at.% Fe, respectively. The solubility of Zr in {tau}-Fe at 1012 C is 500{+-}50 appm and 1000{+-}100 appm close to the eutectic temperature. (orig.).

  11. Intermetallic phases in the iron-rich region of the Zr-Fe phase diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granovsky, M.S.; Arias, D.

    1996-01-01

    Intermetallic phases in the Fe-rich region of the Zr-Fe system are studied by X-ray diffraction and optical and electron microscopy. The chemical composition of each phase has been quantitatively measured in a electron microprobe. The stable phases found in this region are ZrFe 2 , Zr 6 Fe 23 and (αFe). ZrFe 2 is identified as a cubic Laves type phase (C15) and the ZrFe 2 /ZrFe 2 +Zr 6 Fe 23 boundary composition is 73±1 at.% Fe. Zr 6 Fe 23 is a cubic phase of the Th 6 Mn 23 type and its composition is 80.0±1.5 at.% Fe. The eutectic L↔Zr 6 Fe 23 +τ-Fe transformation temperature and composition are 1325 C and 91±1 at.% Fe, respectively. The solubility of Zr in τ-Fe at 1012 C is 500±50 appm and 1000±100 appm close to the eutectic temperature. (orig.)

  12. Phase equilibria of Al3(Ti,V,Zr) intermetallic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.I.; Han, S.Z.; Choi, S.K.; Lee, H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Trialuminides such as DO 22 -structured Al 3 Ti are promising candidates as potential materials for elevated temperature applications because of their attractive high temperature strength and excellent oxidation resistance along with their low density. However, in the tetragonal structure, slip systems are restricted due to low symmetry and the primary deformation mode is twinning. And, therefore, monolithic trialuminide compounds have been very impractical to be used as structural materials. When transition elements such as Ti, V and Zr which constitute trialuminides are alloyed in aluminum, they have low solubilities and low diffusion coefficients in the Al matrix. If precipitated as trialuminide intermetallics, they maintain a small lattice mismatch with the Al matrix, which reduces the interfacial energy between matrix and precipitates. As a result, these precipitates would have a large coarsening resistance in the matrix. As most of the previous works have been concentrated on the microstructural stability and mechanical properties, thermochemical properties will be treated in this work. In this study, phase equilibria and diagrams of Al 3 (Ti,V,Zr) systems will be experimentally determined and then thermodynamically analyzed with a hope to extend to the Al-Al 3 (Ti,V,Zr) composite system. This approach will then be used as a guide for alloy design of Al-Al 3 (Ti,V,Zr) composite system

  13. The role of intermetallic phases in the corrosion of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Campos, Maria del Rosario

    2016-07-25

    A new concept to develop a RE based Mg alloy with improved corrosion resistance was followed in the current work. Based on subsequent characterisation steps to eliminate less suitable RE elements the best microstructure for improved corrosion resistance was identified. At first, the corrosion properties of selected RE elements were determined. Based on these results RE elements that have a potential to enhance the corrosion resistance of Mg-RE alloys were selected. Two aspects of RE elements were important for the selection: the electrochemical properties and the solid solubility in Mg. If the solubility limit of RE elements in the Mg matrix is exceeded, they form intermetallic phases with Mg. By performing galvanic coupling measurements the compatibility between Mg matrix and intermetallic phases were estimated. At that point three binary Mg-RE alloys systems remained (Mg-Ce, Mg-La, and Mg-Gd). To evaluate the influence of composition (amount of intermetallic phases) on the corrosion behaviour, four concentrations were cast with 1, 5, 10 and 15 wt. % of RE. Ce and La have a lower solid solubility in Mg matrix generating higher volume fraction of the secondary phases, thus higher dissolution rates in the binary Mg-RE alloys. While Gd with higher solid solubility shows a different behaviour. Additions of up to 10 wt. % Gd resulted in similar behaviour compared to 1 wt. % Gd addition. The most promising results were obtained for the Mg-Gd system with 10 wt. % Gd. Thus, the microstructure of this alloy was further modified by heat treatments to understand the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour. A ternary element was used to attempt further optimisation of the corrosion performance. Additions of Al, Zn, Ga and Y did not show any improvement in the corrosion resistance of Mg10Gd. This is due to increasing volume fractions of critical more noble phases and the microstructure dominated by eutectic phase formation. Thus galvanic effects became much

  14. The role of intermetallic phases in the corrosion of magnesium-rare earth alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Campos, Maria del Rosario

    2016-01-01

    A new concept to develop a RE based Mg alloy with improved corrosion resistance was followed in the current work. Based on subsequent characterisation steps to eliminate less suitable RE elements the best microstructure for improved corrosion resistance was identified. At first, the corrosion properties of selected RE elements were determined. Based on these results RE elements that have a potential to enhance the corrosion resistance of Mg-RE alloys were selected. Two aspects of RE elements were important for the selection: the electrochemical properties and the solid solubility in Mg. If the solubility limit of RE elements in the Mg matrix is exceeded, they form intermetallic phases with Mg. By performing galvanic coupling measurements the compatibility between Mg matrix and intermetallic phases were estimated. At that point three binary Mg-RE alloys systems remained (Mg-Ce, Mg-La, and Mg-Gd). To evaluate the influence of composition (amount of intermetallic phases) on the corrosion behaviour, four concentrations were cast with 1, 5, 10 and 15 wt. % of RE. Ce and La have a lower solid solubility in Mg matrix generating higher volume fraction of the secondary phases, thus higher dissolution rates in the binary Mg-RE alloys. While Gd with higher solid solubility shows a different behaviour. Additions of up to 10 wt. % Gd resulted in similar behaviour compared to 1 wt. % Gd addition. The most promising results were obtained for the Mg-Gd system with 10 wt. % Gd. Thus, the microstructure of this alloy was further modified by heat treatments to understand the influence of microstructural changes on corrosion behaviour. A ternary element was used to attempt further optimisation of the corrosion performance. Additions of Al, Zn, Ga and Y did not show any improvement in the corrosion resistance of Mg10Gd. This is due to increasing volume fractions of critical more noble phases and the microstructure dominated by eutectic phase formation. Thus galvanic effects became much

  15. Magnetic-field induced phase transitions in intermetallic rare-earth ferrimagnets with a compensation point

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sabdenov, Ch.K.; Davydova, M.D.; Zvezdin, K.A.; Gorbunov, Denis; Tereshina, I. S.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Zvezdin, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 5 (2017), s. 551-558 ISSN 1063-777X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-03593S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : rare-earth intermetallics * phase diagram * field-induced transition * magnetic anisotropy * high magnetic fields Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.) Impact factor: 0.804, year: 2016

  16. Fracture and fatigue considerations in the development of ductile-phase reinforced intermetallic-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswara Rao, K.T.; Ritchie, R.O.

    1994-01-01

    The salient microstructural factors influencing fracture and fatigue-crack growth resistance of ductile-particle reinforced intermetallic-matrix composites at ambient temperature are reviewed through examples from the Nb/MoSi 2 , TiNb/TiAl, Nb/TiAl and Nb/Nb 3 Al systems; specific emphasis is placed on properties and morphology of the reinforcement and its interfacial properties with the matrix. It is shown that composites must be fabricated with a high aspect ratio ductile-reinforcement morphology in order to promote crack-particle interception and resultant crack bridging for improved fracture and fatigue properties. Concurrently, however, the ductile phases have contrasting effects on crack growth under monotonic vs. cyclic loading suggesting that composite microstructures tailored for optimal toughness may not necessarily yield optimal fatigue resistance. Perspectives for the future development of damage-tolerant intermetallic-composite microstructures are discussed

  17. X-ray diffraction study of the phase purity, order and texture of ductile B2 intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulay, R.P.; Wollmershauser, J.A.; Heisel, M.A. [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4745 (United States); Bei, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Material Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Russell, A.M. [Iowa State University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Agnew, S.R., E-mail: sra4p@virginia.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4745 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Representatives (AgY, CuY, AgEr, CuDy, MgY and MgCe) of the newly discovered family of ductile stoichiometric B2 intermetallic (metal-rare-earth element, MR) compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction, to determine if their anomalous ductility is related to an exceptional level of phase purity, lack of chemical ordering or a strong crystallographic texture. Brittle NiAl served as an anti-type in this study. We found that all of the rare-earth compounds, except MgY, have a significant volume fraction ({approx}5-20 vol.%) of second phases (M{sub 2}R intermetallics and R{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxides), which has not been reported in previous studies of these materials. The most ductile of observed MR compounds, AgY, is highly ordered. A moderate texture was observed in AgY, which may explain its higher ductility (using polycrystal modeling) as compared to other MR compounds. However, the intrinsic polycrystalline ductility of these compounds in the randomly textured state (like that observed in CuY) still has no specific, definitive explanation.

  18. X-ray diffraction study of the phase purity, order and texture of ductile B2 intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulay, R.P.; Wollmershauser, J.A.; Heisel, M.A.; Bei, H.; Russell, A.M.; Agnew, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    Representatives (AgY, CuY, AgEr, CuDy, MgY and MgCe) of the newly discovered family of ductile stoichiometric B2 intermetallic (metal-rare-earth element, MR) compounds were characterized by X-ray diffraction, to determine if their anomalous ductility is related to an exceptional level of phase purity, lack of chemical ordering or a strong crystallographic texture. Brittle NiAl served as an anti-type in this study. We found that all of the rare-earth compounds, except MgY, have a significant volume fraction (∼5-20 vol.%) of second phases (M 2 R intermetallics and R 2 O 3 oxides), which has not been reported in previous studies of these materials. The most ductile of observed MR compounds, AgY, is highly ordered. A moderate texture was observed in AgY, which may explain its higher ductility (using polycrystal modeling) as compared to other MR compounds. However, the intrinsic polycrystalline ductility of these compounds in the randomly textured state (like that observed in CuY) still has no specific, definitive explanation.

  19. Synthesis and design of intermetallic materials - molybdenum disilicide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, J.J.; Castro, R.G.; Butt, D.P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The objective of this program is to develop structural silicide-based composite materials with optimum combinations of elevated temperature strength/creep resistance, low temperature fracture toughness, and high temperature oxidation resistance for applications of importance to the U.S. processing industry. A further objective is to develop silicide-based prototype industrial components. The ultimate aim of the program is to work with industry to transfer the structural silicide materials technology to the private sector in order to promote international competitiveness in the area of advanced high temperature composite materials and important applications in major energy-intensive U.S. processing industries. The program presently has a number of developing industrial connections, including a CRADA with the advanced materials company Advanced Refractory Technologies Inc. and interactions targeted at developing industrial gas burner and metal and glass melting/processing applications. Current experimental emphasis is on the development and characterization of SiC reinforced-MoSi{sub 2} matrix composites, plasma sprayed MoSi{sub 2}-based materials and microlaminate composites, and MoSi{sub 2} reinforced-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix composites. We are developing processing methods for MoSi{sub 2{minus}}based materials and microlaminate composites, and MoSi{sub 2} reinforced-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} matrix composites. We are developing processing methods for MoSi{sub 2{minus}} based materials, such as plasma spraying/spray forming and electrophoretic deposition. We are also pursuing the fabrication of prototype industrial gas burner and injection tube components of these materials, as well as prototype components for glass processing.

  20. Identification of intermetallic phases in a eutectic Al-Si casting alloy using electron backscatter diffraction pattern analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kral, M.V.; McIntyre, H.R.; Smillie, M.J.

    2004-01-01

    Intermetallic phases in sand cast eutectic Al-Si alloys were characterized using a combination of SEM, EDS and EBSD pattern analysis. Chinese script α-phase particles were consistent with cubic Al 19 (Fe,Mn) 5 Si 2 . Plate-shaped β-phase particles were consistent with tetragonal Al 3 (Fe,Mn)Si 2

  1. Iron Intermetallic Phases in the Alloy Based on Al-Si-Mg by Applying Manganese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podprocká R.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Manganese is an effective element used for the modification of needle intermetallic phases in Al-Si alloy. These particles seriously degrade mechanical characteristics of the alloy and promote the formation of porosity. By adding manganese the particles are being excluded in more compact shape of “Chinese script” or skeletal form, which are less initiative to cracks as Al5FeSi phase. In the present article, AlSi7Mg0.3 aluminium foundry alloy with several manganese content were studied. The alloy was controlled pollution for achieve higher iron content (about 0.7 wt. % Fe. The manganese were added in amount of 0.2 wt. %, 0.6 wt. %, 1.0 wt. % and 1.4 wt. %. The influence of the alloying element on the process of crystallization of intermetallic phases were compared to microstructural observations. The results indicate that increasing manganese content (> 0.2 wt. % Mn lead to increase the temperature of solidification iron rich phase (TAl5FeSi and reduction this particles. The temperature of nucleation Al-Si eutectic increase with higher manganese content also. At adding 1.4 wt. % Mn grain refinement and skeleton particles were observed.

  2. Microstructural and Material Quality Effects on Rolling Contact Fatigue of Highly Elastic Intermetallic Ball Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Howard, S. Adam; Thomas, Fransua; Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2016-01-01

    Rolling element bearings made from highly-elastic intermetallic materials (HIM)s, such as 60NiTi, are under development for applications that require superior corrosion and shock resistance. Compared to steel, intermetallics have been shown to have much lower rolling contact fatigue (RCF) stress capability in simplified 3-ball on rod (ASTM STP 771) fatigue tests. In the 3-ball tests, poor material quality and microstructural flaws negatively affect fatigue life but such relationships have not been established for full-scale 60NiTi bearings. In this paper, 3-ball-on-rod fatigue behavior of two quality grades of 60NiTi are compared to the fatigue life of full-scale 50mm bore ball bearings made from the same materials. 60NiTi RCF rods with material or microstructural flaws suffered from infant mortality failures at all tested stress levels while high quality 60NiTi rods exhibited no failures at lower stress levels. Similarly, tests of full-scale bearings made from flawed materials exhibited early surface fatigue and through crack type failures while bearings made from high quality material did not fail even in long-term tests. Though the full-scale bearing test data is yet preliminary, the results suggest that the simplified RCF test is a good qualitative predictor of bearing performance. These results provide guidance for materials development and to establish minimum quality levels required for successful bearing operation and life.

  3. The corrosion resistance of HVOF sprayed coatings with intermetallic phases in aggressive environments

    OpenAIRE

    B. Formanek; J. Cizner; B. Szczucka-Lasota; R. Przeliorz

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The cyclic corrosion behavior of coatings with intermetallic matrix ( FeAl, NiAl and FeAl-TiAl) was investigated in aggressive gases.Design/methodology/approach: The composite coatings strengthened by a fine dispersive Al2O3 and other ceramic phases were thermally sprayed by HVOF method in Jet Kote 2 system. A kinetics test was carried out by periodic method for exposure times of up to 500 hours. Mass changes of the studied coatings during the corrosion test are presented. The surfac...

  4. A phase-field model for non-equilibrium solidification of intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assadi, H.

    2007-01-01

    Intermetallics may exhibit unique solidification behaviour-including slow growth kinetics, anomalous partitioning and formation of unusual growth morphologies-because of departure from local equilibrium. A phase-field model is developed and used to illustrate these non-equilibrium effects in solidification of a prototype B2 intermetallic phase. The model takes sublattice compositions as primary field variables, from which chemical long-range order is derived. The diffusive reactions between the two sublattices, and those between each sublattice and the liquid phase are taken as 'internal' kinetic processes, which take place within control volumes of the system. The model can thus capture solute and disorder trapping effects, which are consistent-over a wide range of the solid/liquid interface thickness-with the predictions of the sharp-interface theory of solute and disorder trapping. The present model can also take account of solid-state ordering and thus illustrate the effects of chemical ordering on microstructure formation and crystal growth kinetics

  5. Formation and transformation of binary intermetallic phases in high purity Al-Fe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griger, A.; Stefaniay, V.; Kovacs-Csetenyi, E.; Turmezey, T.

    1990-01-01

    The solid solubility of iron in aluminium is very low (<0.04%), (all compositions are given in w%) therefore most of the iron content appears as intermetallic phases in combination with aluminium and other elements. The amount of iron does not exceed the level of the eutectic concentration in the commercial aluminium alloys, however the non-desired effect of these primary phases of large size must be taken into consideration. In the case of rapid solidification (RS) the eutectic point shifts to higher values of iron content. The eutectic has a very fine structure and the primary phases formed at high cooling rates have also very low particle size. Because of it, for the sake of improvement of the thermo-mechanical properties of the RS aluminium alloys the quantity of iron can be increased up to 8-10%. Above this concentration the favourable properties do not develop while the elongation decreases

  6. Low-temperature thermal expansion of metastable intermetallic Fe-Cr phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorbunoff, A.; Levin, A.A.; Meyer, D.C.

    2009-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficients (TEC) of metastable disordered intermetallic Fe-Cr phases formed in thin Fe-Cr alloy films prepared by an extremely non-equilibrium method of the pulsed laser deposition are studied. The lattice parameters of the alloys calculated from the low-temperature wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXRD) patterns show linear temperature dependencies in the temperature range 143-293 K and a deviation from the linearity at lower temperatures. The linear thermal expansion coefficients determined from the slopes of the linear portions of the temperature-lattice parameter dependencies differ significantly from phase to phase and from the values expected for the body-centered cubic (b.c.c.) Fe 1-x Cr x solid solutions. Strain-crystallite size analysis of the samples is performed. Predictions about the Debye temperature and the mechanical properties of the alloys are made.

  7. A theoretical search for intermetallic compounds and solution phases in the binary system Sn/Zn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Appen, Joerg von; Dronskowski, Richard; Hack, Klaus

    2004-10-06

    The binary system Sn/Zn was theoretically investigated by a classical thermodynamic analysis (CALPHAD approach) and by density-functional total-energy calculations on the basis of the LDA/GGA, plane waves/muffin-tin orbitals, and supercell geometries. In harmony with experimental data, both methods agree in that there is only very small solubility between the elements and no formation of a stable intermetallic phase over the entire compositional range. For the hypothetical composition Sn{sub 2}Zn, a total of 30 different crystal structures was quantum-mechanically optimized, and the chemical bondings of Sn{sub 2}Zn adopting the CaF{sub 2} and HgBr{sub 2} structures were analyzed in detail; generally, the more ionic structure types are better suited for the Sn{sub 2}Zn composition than typical intermetallic ones. Theoretical enthalphy-pressure diagrams were generated to explore high-pressure compound formation, and the observed transition pressures between the {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} allotropes of tin were correctly reproduced by electronic structure theory.

  8. Phase transitions and magnetocaloric effects in intermetallic compounds MnFeX (X=P, As, Si, Ge)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegus, O.; Bao Li-Hong; Song Lin

    2013-01-01

    Since the discovery of giant magnetocaloric effect in MnFeP 1−x As x compounds, much valuable work has been performed to develop and improve Fe 2 P-type transition-metal-based magnetic refrigerants. In this article, the recent progress of our studies on fundamental aspects of theoretical considerations and experimental techniques, effects of atomic substitution on the magnetism and magnetocalorics of Fe 2 P-type intermetallic compounds MnFeX (X=P, As, Ge, Si) is reviewed. Substituting Si (or Ge) for As leads to an As-free new magnetic material MnFeP 1−x Si(Ge) x . These new materials show large magnetocaloric effects resembling MnFe(P, As) near room temperature. Some new physical phenomena, such as huge thermal hysteresis and ‘virgin’ effect, were found in new materials. On the basis of Landau theory, a theoretical model was developed for studying the mechanism of phase transition in these materials. Our studies reveal that MnFe(P, Si) compound is a very promising material for room-temperature magnetic refrigeration and thermo-magnetic power generation. (topical review - magnetism, magnetic materials, and interdisciplinary research)

  9. Phase transition of intermetallic TbPt at high temperature and high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fei; Wu, Xiang; Yang, Ke; Qin, Shan

    2018-04-01

    Here we present synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction experiments combined with diamond anvil cell and laser heating techniques on the intermetallic rare earth compound TbPt (Pnma and Z  =  4) up to 32.5 GPa and ~1800 K. The lattice parameters of TbPt exhibit continuous compression behavior up to 18.2 GPa without any evidence of phase transformation. Pressure-volume data were fitted to a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with V 0  =  175.5(2) Å3, {{K}{{T0}}}   =  110(5) GPa and K{{T0}}\\prime   =  3.8(7). TbPt exhibits anisotropic compression with β a   >  β b   >  β c and the ratio of axial compressibility is 2.50:1.26:1.00. A new monoclinic phase of TbPt assigned to the Pc or P2/c space group was observed at 32.5 GPa after laser heating at ~1800 K. This new phase is stable at high pressure and presented a quenchable property on decompression to ambient conditions. The pressure-volume relationship is well described by the second-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, which yields V 0  =  672(4) Å3, {{K}{{T0}}}   =  123(6) GPa, which is about ~14% more compressible than the orthorhombic TbPt. Our results provide more information on the structure and elastic property view, and thus a better understanding of the physical properties related to magnetic structure in some intermetallic rare earth alloys.

  10. Multifunctional phenomena in rare-earth intermetallic compounds with a laves phase structure: giant magnetostriction and magnetocaloric effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tereshina, I.; Cwik, J.; Tereshina, Evgeniya; Politova, G.; Burkhanov, G.; Chzhan, V.; Ilyushin, A.; Miller, M.; Zaleski, A.; Nenkov, K.; Schultz, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 11 (2014), s. 2504604 ISSN 0018-9464 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : giant magnetostriction * Laves phase structure * magnetic anisotropy * magnetocaloric effect * rare-earth intermetallic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.386, year: 2014

  11. Quantitative assessment of intermetallic phase precipitation in a super duplex stainless steel weld metal using automatic image analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, A. [AB Sandvik Steel, Sandviken (Sweden). R and D Centre; Nilsson, J.-O. [AB Sandvik Steel, R and D Centre, Sandviken (Sweden); Bonollo, F. [Univ. di Padova, DTGSI, Vicenza (Italy)

    1999-07-01

    The microstructure of weld metal of the type 25%Cr-10%Ni-4%Mo-0.28%N in both as-welded and isothermally heat treated (temperature range: 700-1050 C: time range: 10s-72h) conditions has been investigated. Multipass welding was performed in Ar+2%N{sub 2} atmosphere using GTAW. By means of the electron diffraction technique. {sigma}-phase and {chi}-phase were detected and investigated. {chi}-phase precipitated more readily than {sigma}-phase and was found to be a precursor to {sigma}-phase by providing suitable nucleation sites. Quantitative image analysis of ferrite and intermetallic phases was performed as well as manual point counting (ISO 9042). Automatic image analysis was found to be more accurate. The results were used to assess the TTT-diagram with respect to intermetallic phase formation. On the basis of these results a CCT-diagram was computed, considering the intermetallic phase formation described by an Avrami type equation and adopting the additivity rule. (orig.)

  12. Formation of intermetallic phases in AlSi7Fe1 alloy processed under microgravity and forced fluid flow conditions and their influence on the permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Steinbach, Sonja; Ratke, Lorenz; Zimmermann, Gerhard; Budenkova, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Ternary Al-6.5wt.%Si-0.93wt.%Fe alloy samples were directionally solidified on-board of the International Space Station ISS in the ESA payload Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) equipped with Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) under both purely diffusive and stimulated convective conditions induced by a rotating magnetic field. Using different analysis techniques the shape and distribution of the intermetallic phase β-Al 5 SiFe in the dendritic microstructure was investigated, to study the influence ...

  13. Structure evolution of multilayer materials of heat-resistant intermetallic compounds under the influence of temperature in the process of diffusion welding under pressure and their mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzhov, Valeriy P.; Karpov, Michael I.; Prokhorov, Dmitriy V. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Multilayer materials of high-resistant intermetallic compounds of some transition metals with aluminum and silicon were obtained by diffusion welding of packages, collected from a large number of the respective foils, such as niobium and aluminum. Materials of intermetallics with silicon were obtained by the welding of packages built from metal foils with Si-coating. The change in the structure according to the temperature of the welding was studied, and the high-temperature bending strength was determined. Key words: multilayer composite, high-resistant material, intermetallic compound, diffusion welding, package rolling, layered structure, bending strength.

  14. Data on a Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Alexander J; Bhowmik, Ayan; Purkayastha, Surajit; Jones, Nicholas G; Giuliani, Finn; Clegg, William J; Dye, David; Stone, Howard J

    2017-10-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled "Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates" (Knowles et al.) [1]. The composite comprised a Fe 2 (Mo, Ti) matrix with bcc (Mo, Ti) precipitated laths produced in situ by an aging heat treatment, which was shown to confer a toughening effect (Knowles et al.) [1]. Here, details are given on a focused ion beam (FIB) slice and view experiment performed on the composite so as to determine that the 3D morphology of the bcc (Mo, Ti) precipitates were laths rather than needles. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (S(TEM)) micrographs of the microstructure as well as energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) maps are presented that identify the elemental partitioning between the C14 Laves matrix and the bcc laths, with Mo rejected from the matrix into laths. A TEM selected area diffraction pattern (SADP) and key is provided that was used to validate the orientation relation between the matrix and laths identified in (Knowles et al.) [1] along with details of the transformation matrix determined.

  15. Data on a Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Knowles

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Laves phase intermetallic matrix composite in situ toughened by ductile precipitates” (Knowles et al. [1]. The composite comprised a Fe2(Mo, Ti matrix with bcc (Mo, Ti precipitated laths produced in situ by an aging heat treatment, which was shown to confer a toughening effect (Knowles et al. [1]. Here, details are given on a focused ion beam (FIB slice and view experiment performed on the composite so as to determine that the 3D morphology of the bcc (Mo, Ti precipitates were laths rather than needles. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (S(TEM micrographs of the microstructure as well as energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX maps are presented that identify the elemental partitioning between the C14 Laves matrix and the bcc laths, with Mo rejected from the matrix into laths. A TEM selected area diffraction pattern (SADP and key is provided that was used to validate the orientation relation between the matrix and laths identified in (Knowles et al. [1] along with details of the transformation matrix determined.

  16. Effect of grain refiner on intermetallic phase formation in directional solidification of 6xxx series wrought Al alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, G.; O' Reilly, K.; Cantor, B. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Centre for Adv. Mat. and Composites; Hamerton, R.; Worth, J.

    2000-07-01

    The effect of a grain refiner on the formation of intermetallic phases in a directionally solidified (Bridgman grown) model 6xxx series wrought Al alloy has been investigated using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A base alloy with and without Al-Ti-B grain refiner was directionally solidified in a Bridgman furnace at growth velocities in the range of 5-120 mm/min. In both cases, the Fe-containing intermetallic phases present were found to be mainly {alpha}-AlFeSi and {beta}-AlFeSi. However, in the alloy with grain refiner solidified at 5mm/min, Al{sub 13}Fe{sub 4} was also observed. Quantitative XRD results indicated that the addition of Al-Ti-B grain refiner has a strong influence on the relative quantities of intermetallic phases forming during solidification at different growth velocities, which was also confirmed by TEM observations. TEM observations also show that depending on where the {beta}-AlFeSi particles solidified e.g. grain boundaries or triple grain junctions, the size and morphology of the particles may change dramatically. TiB{sub 2} particles were observed to nucleate {beta}-AlFeSi at low and high growth velocities in the 6xxx series Al alloys. (orig.)

  17. Effects of filling material and laser power on the formation of intermetallic compounds during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of steel and aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Xinjiang; Jin, Xiangzhong; Peng, Nanxiang; Ye, Ying; Wu, Sigen; Dai, Houfu

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, two kinds of materials, Ni and Zn, are selected as filling material during laser-assisted friction stir butt welding of Q235 steel and 6061-T6 aluminum alloy, and their influences on the formation of intermetallic compounds on the steel/aluminum interface of the joints were first studied. SEM was used to analyze the profile of the intermetallic compound layer and the fractography of tensile fracture surfaces. In addition, EDS was applied to investigate the types of the intermetallic compounds. The results indicate that a thin iron-abundant intermetallic compound layer forms and ductile fracture mode occurs when Ni is added, but a thick aluminum-abundant intermetallic compound layer generates and brittle fracture mode occurs when Zn is added. So the tensile strength of the welds with Ni as filling material is greater than that with Zn as filling material. Besides, the effect of laser power on the formation of intermetallic compound layer when Ni is added was investigated. The preheated temperature field produced by laser beam in the cross section of workpiece was calculated, and the tensile strength of the joints at different laser powers was tested. Results show that only when suitable laser power is adopted, can suitable preheating temperature of the steel reach, then can thin intermetallic compound layer form and high tensile strength of the joints reach. Either excessive or insufficient laser power will reduce the tensile strength of the joints.

  18. Synthesis and reactivity of single-phase Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Hwan, E-mail: kim.jaehwan@jaea.go.jp [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Iwakiri, Hirotomo; Furugen, Tatsuaki [Faculty of Education Elementary and Secondary School Teacher Training Program, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Nakamichi, Masaru [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Preliminary synthesis of single-phase Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} was succeeded. • Reactivity difference between beryllium and beryllides may be caused by a lattice strain. • Oxidation of Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} at high temperatures results in the formation of TiO{sub 2}. • Simulation results reveal that a stable site for hydrogen at the center of tetrahedron exists. - Abstract: To investigate feasibility for application of Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} as a neutron multiplier as well as a refractory material, single-phase Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} intermetallic compounds were synthesized using an annealing heat treatment of the starting powder and a plasma sintering method. Scanning electron microscopic observations and X-ray diffraction measurements reveal that the single-phase Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} compounds were successfully synthesized. We examined the reactivity of Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2} with 1% H{sub 2}O and discovered that a larger stoichiometric amount of Ti resulted in the formation of TiO{sub 2} on the surface at high temperatures. This oxidation may also contribute to an increase in both weight gain and generation of H{sub 2}. This suggests that the formation of the Ti-depleted Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2−x} layer as a result of oxidation facilitates an increased reactivity with H{sub 2}O. To evaluate the safety aspects of Be{sub 17}Ti{sub 2}, we also investigated the hydrogen positions and solution energies based on the first principle. The calculations reveal that there are 10 theoretical sites, where 9 of these sites have hydrogen solution energies with a positive value (endothermic) and 1 site located at the center of a tetrahedron comprising two Be and two Ti atoms gives a negative value (exothermic).

  19. A metastable HCP intermetallic phase in Cu-Al bilayer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Limei

    2006-07-01

    For the present study, three kinds of layered Cu/Al films have been fabricated. The first kind of samples were multilayered Cu/Al films deposited by sputtering on (001)Si. The individual layer thicknesses were 100 nm, 200 nm and 400 nm, while the total film thickness of 800 nm was kept constant, thus leading to multilayer systems with 8, 4 and 2 layers, respectively. The second type of samples were Cu/Al bilayer films grown on (0001) sapphire by sputtering, with individual layer thicknesses of 400 nm. The third type of samples were bilayer films (100 nm Cu and 100 nm Al) deposited on (0001)sapphire by MBE at room temperature. Applying conventional transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, different epitaxial growth behaviors were found in these films. All multilayer films from the first type were polycrystalline. The second type of films show a (111) FCC texture and possess intermetallic phases at the interfaces. HRTEM investigations displayed that along [111]FCC, the atomic structure of the interlayer has an ABAB stacking sequence, which is identical with a hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure in [0001] direction, but not with the ABCABC stacking sequence of Cu and Al in [111]FCC. The lattice parameters of the HCP structure at the interlayer were determined from a model which gave the best agreement between the experimental and simulated images. The parameters are: a=b=0.256 nm, c=0.419 nm, ?=120 , with the space group of P6m2. Furthermore, lattice distortion analysis revealed that the lattice parameters of the HCP phase are increasing from the near-Cu-side to the near-Al-side. The chemical composition of the interlayer was investigated by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). EDS linescans were performed from pure Al to pure Cu layers. In order to examine the stability of this HCP phase, in-situ heating experiments were performed in the HRTEM at {proportional_to}600 C. Ex-situ heating experiments were performed at different temperatures to

  20. Intermetallic and metal-rich phases in the system Li-Ba-In-N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Vajenine, Grigori V.; Kienle, Lorenz; Duppel, Viola; Simon, Arndt

    2010-01-01

    Three new intermetallic phases, BaLi 2.1 In 1.9 , BaLi 1.12 In 0.98 , and BaLi 1.06 In 1.16 and two subnitrides Li 35 In 45 Ba 39 N 9 and LiIn 2 Ba 3 N 0.83 have been synthesized and their crystal structures have been determined. According to single crystal X-ray diffraction data BaLi 2.1 In 1.9 and BaLi 1.12 In 0.98 crystallize with hexagonal symmetry (BaLi 2.1 In 1.9 : P6 3 /mmc, a=10.410(2), c=8.364(2) A, Z=6, V=785.0(2) A 3 ) and BaLi 1.12 In 0.98 : P6/mmm, a=17.469(1), c=10.6409(7) A, Z=30, V=2813.5(8) A 3 ), while BaLi 1.06 In 1.16 has a rhombohedral structure (R-3c, a=18.894(3), c=85.289(17) A, Z=276, V=26368(8) A 3 ). BaLi 2.1 In 1.9 is isostructural with the known phase BaLi 4 . The phase BaLi 1.12 In 0.98 is structurally related to Na 8 K 23 Cd 12 In 48 , while BaLi 1.06 In 1.16 is isostructural with Li 33.3 Ba 13.1 Ca 3 . A sample containing structurally similar BaLi 1.12 In 0.98 and BaLi 1.02 In 1.16 was also investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Li 35 In 45 Ba 39 N 9 and LiIn 2 Ba 3 N 0.83 crystallize with tetragonal (I-42m, a=15.299(2), c=30.682(6) A, Z=2, V=7182(2) A 3 ) and cubic (Fd-3m, a=14.913(2) A, Z=8, V=3316.7(7) A 3 ) symmetry, respectively. While the first-mentioned subnitride belongs to the Li 80 Ba 39 N 9 structure type, the second extends the structural family of Ba 6 In 4.78 N 2.72 . The structural features of the new compounds are discussed in comparison to the known phases and the results of total energy calculations. - Graphical abstract: One-dimensional chain of face-sharing centered icosahedra in BaLi 2.1 In 1.9

  1. X-ray nano-diffraction study of Sr intermetallic phase during solidification of Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manickaraj, Jeyakumar; Gorny, Anton; Shankar, Sumanth, E-mail: shankar@mcmaster.ca [Light Metal Casting Research Centre (LMCRC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Cai, Zhonghou [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-02-17

    The evolution of strontium (Sr) containing intermetallic phase in the eutectic reaction of Sr-modified Al-Si hypoeutectic alloy was studied with high energy synchrotron beam source for nano-diffraction experiments and x-ray fluorescence elemental mapping. Contrary to popular belief, Sr does not seem to interfere with the Twin Plane Re-entrant Edge (TPRE) growth mechanism of eutectic Si, but evolves as the Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}Sr phase during the eutectic reaction at the boundary between the eutectic Si and Al grains.

  2. Evolution of Fe based intermetallic phases in Al–Si hypoeutectic casting alloys: Influence of the Si and Fe concentrations, and solidification rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorny, Anton; Manickaraj, Jeyakumar; Cai, Zhonghou; Shankar, Sumanth

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Anomalous evolution of Fe based intermetallic phases in Al–Si–Fe alloys. •XRF coupled with nano-diffraction to confirm the nano-size Fe intermetallic phases. •Crystallography of the θ-Al 13 Fe 4 , τ 5 -Al 8 Fe 2 Si and τ 6 -Al 9 Fe 2 Si 2 phases. •Peritectic reactions involving the Fe intermetallic phases in Al–Si–Fe alloys. -- Abstract: Al–Si–Fe hypoeutectic cast alloy system is very complex and reported to produce numerous Fe based intermetallic phases in conjunction with Al and Si. This publication will address the anomalies of phase evolution in the Al–Si–Fe hypoeutectic casting alloy system; the anomaly lies in the peculiarities in the evolution and nature of the intermetallic phases when compared to the thermodynamic phase diagram predictions and past publications of the same. The influence of the following parameters, in various combinations, on the evolution and nature of the intermetallic phases were analyzed and reported: concentration of Si between 2 and 12.6 wt%, Fe between 0.05 and 0.5 wt% and solidification rates of 0.1, 1, 5 and 50 K s −1 . Two intermetallic phases are observed to evolve in these alloys under these solidification conditions: the τ 5 -Al 8 SiFe 2 and τ 6 -Al 9 Fe 2 Si 2 . The τ 5 -Al 8 SiFe 2 phase evolves at all levels of the parameters during solidification and subsequently transforms into the τ 6 -Al 9 Fe 2 Si 2 through a peritectic reaction when promoted by certain combinations of solidification parameters such as higher Fe level, lower Si level and slower solidification rates. Further, it is also hypothesized from experimental evidences that the θ-Al 13 Fe 4 binary phase precludes the evolution of the τ 5 during solidification and subsequently transforms into the τ 6 phase during solidification. These observations are anomalous to the publications as prior art and simulation predictions of thermodynamic phase diagrams of these alloys, wherein, only one intermetallic phases in the

  3. Two-phase materials for high-temperature service

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nabarro, FRN

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available load is carried by the g phase, which is a ductile material; at high temperatures the g phase is weak, and 0966-9795/00/$ - see front matter #2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. PII: S0966-9795(00)00030-3 Intermetallics 8 (2000) 979?985 www...-temperature phase of ZrO2 containing 4.5 mol% per cent Y2O3 has the cubic ?uorite structure. A 980 F.R.N. Nabarro / Intermetallics 8 (2000) 979?985 face-centred cube of Zr atoms, with 4 Zr atoms in the unit cell, contains a simple cube of 8 O-atoms. On cooling...

  4. Microstructural and Material Quality Effects on Rolling Contact Fatigue of Highly Elastic Intermetallic NiTi Ball Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Howard, S. Adam; Thomas, Fransua; Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling element bearings made from highly-elastic intermetallic materials (HIM)s, such as 60NiTi, are under development for applications that require superior corrosion and shock resistance. Compared to steel, intermetallics have been shown to have much lower rolling contact fatigue (RCF) stress capability in simplified 3-ball on rod (ASTM STP 771) fatigue tests. In the 3-ball tests, poor material quality and microstructural flaws negatively affect fatigue life but such relationships have not been established for full-scale 60NiTi bearings. In this paper, 3-ball-on-rod fatigue behavior of two quality grades of 60NiTi are compared to the fatigue life of full-scale 50mm bore ball bearings made from the same materials. 60NiTi RCF rods with material or microstructural flaws suffered from infant mortality failures at all tested stress levels while high quality 60NiTi rods exhibited no failures at lower stress levels. Similarly, tests of full-scale bearings made from flawed materials exhibited early surface fatigue and through crack type failures while bearings made from high quality material did not fail even in long-term tests. Though the full-scale bearing test data is yet preliminary, the results suggest that the simplified RCF test is a good qualitative predictor of bearing performance. These results provide guidance for materials development and to establish minimum quality levels required for successful bearing operation and life.

  5. Wear-resistant powder materials with intermetallic hardening. I. Nonporous materials for antifriction purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karapetyan, G.K.; Akopov, N.L.; Karapetyan, F.K.; Manukyan, N.N.

    1987-09-01

    This article investigates the wear resistance, microhardness, microstructure, and crystal-phase behavior of a molybdenum alloy solid lubricant under cyclic wear and sliding friction tests against steel 45. Calculated and experimental results are given.

  6. Intermetallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dileep; Yusufoglu, Yusuf; Timofeeva, Elena; Routbort, Jules

    2015-07-14

    A process for preparing intermetallic nanoparticles of two or more metals is provided. In particular, the process includes the steps: a) dispersing nanoparticles of a first metal in a solvent to prepare a first metal solution, b) forming a reaction mixture with the first metal solution and a reducing agent, c) heating the reaction mixture to a reaction temperature; and d) adding a second metal solution containing a salt of a second metal to the reaction mixture. During this process, intermetallic nanoparticles, which contain a compound with the first and second metals are formed. The intermetallic nanoparticles with uniform size and a narrow size distribution is also provided. An electrochemical device such as a battery with the intermetallic nanoparticles is also provided.

  7. The solidification and structure of Al-17wt.%Si alloy modified with intermetallic phases containing Ti and Fe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Piątkowski

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the process of casting and solidification of Al-17wt.%Si alloy that have been modified with composite powdercontaining the intermetallic phases of Ti and Fe. The chemical and phase composition of the applied modifier was described with thefollowingformula:FeAlx–TiAlx–Al2O3. Applying the method of thermal analysis ATD, the characteristic parameters of the solidificationprocess were determined, and exo-and endothermic effects of the modifying powder on the run of the silumin solidification curves wereobserved. By the methods of light, scanning, and X-ray microscopy, the structure of alloy and the chemical composition of the dispersionhardening precipitates were examined. A change in the morphology of Al-Si eutectic from the lamellar to fibrous type was reportedtogether with changes in the form of complex eutectics of an Al-Si-Ti and Al-Si-Fe type and size reduction of primary silicon crystals.

  8. Phase-change materials handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Handbook describes relationship between phase-change materials and more conventional thermal control techniques and discusses materials' space and terrestrial applications. Material properties of most promising phase-change materials and purposes and uses of metallic filler materials in phase-change material composites are provided.

  9. Synthesis of a single phase of high-entropy Laves intermetallics in the Ti-Zr-V-Cr-Ni equiatomic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, T. P.; Mukhopadhyay, Semanti; Mishra, S. S.; Mukhopadhyay, N. K.; Srivastava, O. N.

    2017-12-01

    The high-entropy Ti-Zr-V-Cr-Ni (20 at% each) alloy consisting of all five hydride-forming elements was successfully synthesised by the conventional melting and casting as well as by the melt-spinning technique. The as-cast alloy consists entirely of the micron size hexagonal Laves Phase of C14 type; whereas, the melt-spun ribbon exhibits the evolution of nanocrystalline Laves phase. There was no evidence of any amorphous or any other metastable phases in the present processing condition. This is the first report of synthesising a single phase of high-entropy complex intermetallic compound in the equiatomic quinary alloy system. The detailed characterisation by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed the existence of a single-phase multi-component hexagonal C14-type Laves phase in all the as-cast, melt-spun and annealed alloys. The lattice parameter a = 5.08 Å and c = 8.41 Å was determined from the annealed material (annealing at 1173 K). The thermodynamic calculations following the Miedema's approach support the stability of the high-entropy multi-component Laves phase compared to that of the solid solution or glassy phases. The high hardness value (8.92 GPa at 25 g load) has been observed in nanocrystalline high-entropy alloy ribbon without any cracking. It implies that high-yield strength ( 3.00 GPa) and the reasonable fracture toughness can be achieved in this high-entropy material.

  10. Homogeneous (Cu, Ni)6Sn5 intermetallic compound joints rapidly formed in asymmetrical Ni/Sn/Cu system using ultrasound-induced transient liquid phase soldering process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z L; Dong, H J; Song, X G; Zhao, H Y; Tian, H; Liu, J H; Feng, J C; Yan, J C

    2018-04-01

    Homogeneous (Cu, Ni) 6 Sn 5 intermetallic compound (IMC) joints were rapidly formed in asymmetrical Ni/Sn/Cu system by an ultrasound-induced transient liquid phase (TLP) soldering process. In the traditional TLP soldering process, the intermetallic joints formed in Ni/Sn/Cu system consisted of major (Cu, Ni) 6 Sn 5 and minor Cu 3 Sn IMCs, and the grain morphology of (Cu, Ni) 6 Sn 5 IMCs subsequently exhibited fine rounded, needlelike and coarse rounded shapes from the Ni side to the Cu side, which was highly in accordance with the Ni concentration gradient across the joints. However, in the ultrasound-induced TLP soldering process, the intermetallic joints formed in Ni/Sn/Cu system only consisted of the (Cu, Ni) 6 Sn 5 IMCs which exhibited an uniform grain morphology of rounded shape with a remarkably narrowed Ni concentration gradient. The ultrasound-induced homogeneous intermetallic joints exhibited higher shear strength (61.6 MPa) than the traditional heterogeneous intermetallic joints (49.8 MPa). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Prediction of intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhanov, Gennady S; Kiselyova, N N

    2009-01-01

    The problems of predicting not yet synthesized intermetallic compounds are discussed. It is noted that the use of classical physicochemical analysis in the study of multicomponent metallic systems is faced with the complexity of presenting multidimensional phase diagrams. One way of predicting new intermetallics with specified properties is the use of modern processing technology with application of teaching of image recognition by the computer. The algorithms used most often in these methods are briefly considered and the efficiency of their use for predicting new compounds is demonstrated.

  12. Structural, electronic and elastic properties of RERu{sub 2} (RE=Pr and Nd) Laves phase intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, Deepika, E-mail: deepika89shrivastava@gmail.com; Sanyal, Sankar P. [Department of Physics, Barkatullah university, Bhopal, 462026 (India)

    2016-05-06

    We have performed the first-principles calculations to study the structural, electronic and elastic properties of RERu{sub 2} (RE = Pr and Nd) Laves phase intermetallic compounds using full-potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method based on density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) for exchange and correlation potential. The optimized lattices constant are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data. The electronic properties are analyzed in terms of band structures, total and partial density of states, which confirm their metallic character. The calculated elastic constants infer that these compounds are mechanically stable in C15 (MgCu{sub 2} type) structure and found to be ductile in nature.

  13. Composites having an intermetallic containing matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, D.C.; Brupbacher, J.M.; Christodoulou, L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a composite material. It comprises: a dispersion of in-situ precipitated second phase particles selected from the group consisting of borides, carbides, nitrides, and sulfides, in an intermetallic containing matrix selected from the group consisting of the aluminides, silicides, and beryllides of nickel, copper, titanium, cobalt, iron, platinum, gold, silver, niobium, tantalum, zinc, molybdenum, hafnium, tin, tungsten, lithium, magnesium, thorium, chromium, vanadium, zirconium, and manganese

  14. Evolution of Fe based intermetallic phases in Al–Si hypoeutectic casting alloys: Influence of the Si and Fe concentrations, and solidification rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorny, Anton; Manickaraj, Jeyakumar [Light Metal Casting Research Centre (LMCRC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Cai, Zhonghou [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Shankar, Sumanth, E-mail: shankar@mcmaster.ca [Light Metal Casting Research Centre (LMCRC), Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street W, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: •Anomalous evolution of Fe based intermetallic phases in Al–Si–Fe alloys. •XRF coupled with nano-diffraction to confirm the nano-size Fe intermetallic phases. •Crystallography of the θ-Al{sub 13}Fe{sub 4}, τ{sub 5}-Al{sub 8}Fe{sub 2}Si and τ{sub 6}-Al{sub 9}Fe{sub 2}Si{sub 2} phases. •Peritectic reactions involving the Fe intermetallic phases in Al–Si–Fe alloys. -- Abstract: Al–Si–Fe hypoeutectic cast alloy system is very complex and reported to produce numerous Fe based intermetallic phases in conjunction with Al and Si. This publication will address the anomalies of phase evolution in the Al–Si–Fe hypoeutectic casting alloy system; the anomaly lies in the peculiarities in the evolution and nature of the intermetallic phases when compared to the thermodynamic phase diagram predictions and past publications of the same. The influence of the following parameters, in various combinations, on the evolution and nature of the intermetallic phases were analyzed and reported: concentration of Si between 2 and 12.6 wt%, Fe between 0.05 and 0.5 wt% and solidification rates of 0.1, 1, 5 and 50 K s{sup −1}. Two intermetallic phases are observed to evolve in these alloys under these solidification conditions: the τ{sub 5}-Al{sub 8}SiFe{sub 2} and τ{sub 6}-Al{sub 9}Fe{sub 2}Si{sub 2}. The τ{sub 5}-Al{sub 8}SiFe{sub 2} phase evolves at all levels of the parameters during solidification and subsequently transforms into the τ{sub 6}-Al{sub 9}Fe{sub 2}Si{sub 2} through a peritectic reaction when promoted by certain combinations of solidification parameters such as higher Fe level, lower Si level and slower solidification rates. Further, it is also hypothesized from experimental evidences that the θ-Al{sub 13}Fe{sub 4} binary phase precludes the evolution of the τ{sub 5} during solidification and subsequently transforms into the τ{sub 6} phase during solidification. These observations are anomalous to the publications as prior art and

  15. Phase change materials handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, D. V.; Hoover, M. J.; Oneill, M. J.

    1971-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide theory and data needed by the thermal design engineer to bridge the gap between research achievements and actual flight systems, within the limits of the current state of the art of phase change materials (PCM) technology. The relationship between PCM and more conventional thermal control techniques is described and numerous space and terrestrial applications of PCM are discussed. Material properties of the most promising PCMs are provided; the purposes and use of metallic filler materials in PCM composites are presented; and material compatibility considerations relevant to PCM design are included. The engineering considerations of PCM design are described, especially those pertaining to the thermodynamic and heat transfer phenomena peculiar to PCM design. Methods of obtaining data not currently available are presented. The special problems encountered in the space environment are described. Computational tools useful to the designer are discussed. In summary, each aspect of the PCM problem important to the design engineer is covered to the extent allowed by the scope of this effort and the state of the art.

  16. Characterization and hardness of TiCu–Ti2Cu3 intermetallic material fabricated by mechanical alloying and subsequent annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbarpour, Mohammad Reza; Hesari, Feridoun Alikhani

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the microstructural and phase evolutions during mechanical alloying (MA) and subsequent heat treatment of Cu–Ti powder mixture are investigated through x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and micro-hardness measurements. The obtained experimental results demonstrated that after an optimum MA time of 30 h, TiCu intermetallic compound was achieved with a mean grain size of ≈8 nm and a high micro-hardness value of ≈634 Hv. Annealing the milled powder at different temperatures resulted in formation of major TiCu and Ti 2 Cu 3 , and minor Ti 2 Cu and Cu 4 Ti nanocrystalline phases, release of internal strain, and coarsening of grains. The amount of TiCu phase and the grain size increased with increase of the annealing temperature. Micro-hardness value of ≈765 Hv was recorded when the milled TiCu powder was annealed at 850 °C. This superior high micro-hardness value can be attributed to formation of higher amount of TiCu phase. (paper)

  17. Transformation of iron containing constituent intermetallic particles during hydrothermal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgaonkar, Shruti; Din, Rameez Ud; Kasama, Takeshi

    2018-01-01

    in the alloys. Furthermore, electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis revealed that the during the steam treatment, the Fe enriched areas of the Al (Fe-Si) Mn type intermetallic particles were transformed into Fe2O3 and Fe3O4 phases, while energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy line profile measurements...... by scanning transmission electron microscope showed that Mn and Si were leached out and incorporated into the surrounding oxide layer. Further, the part of intermetallic phase was transformed into polycrystalline material....

  18. Phase stability, electronic, elastic and thermodynamic properties of Al-RE intermetallics in Mg-Al-RE alloy: A first principles study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.L. Chen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Electronic structure and elastic properties of Al2Y, Al3Y, Al2Gd and Al3Gd phases were investigated by means of first-principles calculations from CASTEP program based on density functional theory (DFT. The ground state energy and elastic constants of each phase were calculated, the formation enthalpy (ΔH, bulk modulus (B, shear modulus (G, Young's modulus (E, Poisson's ratio (ν and anisotropic coefficient (A were derived. The formation enthalpy shows that Al2RE is more stable than Al3RE, and Al-Y intermetallics have stronger phase stability than Al-Gd intermetallics. The calculated mechanical properties indicate that all these four intermetallics are strong and hard brittle phases, it may lead to the similar performance when deforming due to their similar elastic constants. The total and partial electron density of states (DOS, Mulliken population and metallicity were calculated to analyze the electron structure and bonding characteristics of the phases. Finally, phonon calculation was conducted, and the thermodynamic properties were obtained and further discussed.

  19. Omega phase in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, S.K.; Vohra, Y.K.; Chidambaram, R.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is reviewed under the headings: introduction; occurrence and some systematics of omega phase; crystallography; physical properties; kinetics of formation, synthesis and metastability of omega phase; electronic structure of omega phase; electronic basis for omega phase stability; omega phase formation under combined thermal and pressure treatment in alloys; transformation mechanisms and models for diffuse omega phase; conclusion. The following elements of nuclear interest (or their alloys) are included: Zr, Hf, Nb, V, Mo. (U.K.)

  20. Structure data of elements and intermetallic phases. SubVol. B. Sulfides, selenides, tellurides. Pt. 1. Ag-Al-Cd-S. Cu-Te-Yb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellwege, K H; Hellwege, A M [eds.; Eisenmann, B; Schaefer, H

    1986-01-01

    Volume III/14 'Structure data of elements and intermetallic phases' is a supplement to and extension of Volume III/6. Since the publication of III/6 in 1971 (considering original papers up to 1967), the amount of new information for these substances has increased rapidly. Therefore the data had to be divided into several parts. The first part, III/14b1, is presented herewith. In Volume III/6, simple sulfides, selenides and tellurides were treated together with the intermetallic phases. The data are compiled in the same way as in III/6: for each substance the space group, lattice constants, their dependence on temperature and pressure, and other information is listed in the tables. In several cases, mostly for solid solutions, diagrams are given which are added in a separate chapter. Original papers containing a complete structure analysis are referred to in the tables. (orig./GSCH).

  1. Phase stability and decomposition processes in Ti-Al based intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakai, Kiyomichi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790 (Japan); Ono, Toshiaki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790 (Japan); Ohtsubo, Hiroyuki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790 (Japan); Ohmori, Yasuya [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ehime University, 3 Bunkyo-cho, Matsuyama 790 (Japan)

    1995-02-28

    The high-temperature phase equilibria and the phase decomposition of {alpha} and {beta} phases were studied by crystallographic analysis of the solidification microstructures of Ti-48at.%Al and Ti-48at.%Al-2at.%X (X=Mn, Cr, Mo) alloys. The effects on the phase stability of Zr and O atoms penetrating from the specimen surface were also examined for Ti-48at.%Al and Ti-50at.%Al alloys. The third elements Cr and Mo shift the {beta} phase region to higher Al concentrations, and the {beta} phase is ordered to the {beta}{sub 2} phase. The Zr and O atoms stabilize {beta} and {alpha} phases respectively. In the Zr-stabilized {beta} phase, {alpha}{sub 2} laths form with accompanying surface relief, and stacking faults which relax the elastic strain owing to lattice deformation are introduced after formation of {alpha}{sub 2} order domains. Thus shear is thought to operate after the phase transition from {beta} to {alpha}{sub 2} by short-range diffusion. A similar analysis was conducted for the Ti-Al binary system, and the transformation was interpreted from the CCT diagram constructed qualitatively. ((orig.))

  2. Omega phase in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, S.K.; Vohra, Y.K.; Chidambaram, R.

    1982-01-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: introduction; occurrence and some systematics of omega phase (omega phase in Ti, Zr and Hf under high pressures; omega phase in Group IV transition metal alloys; omega in other systems; omega embryos at high temperatures); crystallography (omega structure; relationship of ω-structure to bcc (β) and hcp (α) structures); physical properties; kinetics of formation, synthesis and metastability of omega phase (kinetics of α-ω transformation under high pressures; kinetics of β-ω transformation; synthesis and metastability studies); electronic structure of omega phase (electronic structure models; band structure calculations; theoretical results and experimental studies); electronic basis for omega phase stability (unified phase diagram; stability of omega phase); omega phase formation under combined thermal and pressure treatment in alloys (Ti-V alloys under pressure - a prototype case study; P-X phase diagrams for alloys; transformation mechanisms and models for diffuse omega phase (is omega structure a charge density distortion of the bcc phase; nature of incommensurate ω-structure and models for diffuse scattering); conclusion. (U.K.)

  3. First Principles Investigation of the Mechanical, Thermodynamic and Electronic Properties of FeSn{sub 5} and CoSn{sub 5} Intermetallic Phases under Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wenming; Liu, Jing; Wang, Hong [China Building Materials Academy, Beijing (China); Zhang, Zhenwei [Linyi Academy of Technology Cooperation and Application, Linyi (China); Zhang, Liang [NeoTrident Technology Ltd., Shanghai (China); Bu, Yuxiang [Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2017-02-15

    For guidance for developing Fe/Co-Sn-based anode materials for lithium-ion batteries, the mechanical, thermodynamic and electronic properties of FeSn{sub 5} and CoSn{sub 5} intermetallic phases under pressures ranging from 0 to 30 GPa have been investigated systematically using first-principles total-energy calculations within the framework of the generalized gradient approximation. The pressure was found to have significant effects on the mechanical, thermodynamic and electronic properties of these compounds. In the selected pressure range, CoSn{sub 5} has a more negative formation enthalpy than FeSn{sub 5}. Based on the calculated elastic constants, the bulk modulus, shear modulus, and Young's modulus were determined via the Viogt-Reuss-Hill averaging scheme. The variations of specific heats at constant volume for FeSn{sub 5} and CoSn{sub 5} in a wide pressure (0 - 30 GPa) and temperature (0 - 1000 K) range are also predicted from phonon density of states calculation. The calculated results suggested that both FeSn{sub 5} and CoSn{sub 5} are mechanically stable at pressure from 0 to 30 GPa. FeSn{sub 5} is dynamically stable at pressure up to, 30 GPa, at least, however, CoSn{sub 5} is dynamically stable no higher than 15 GPa.

  4. On the fabricability of a composite material containing the FCC matrix with embedded ductile B2 intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinifar, Mehdi; Malakhov, Dmitri V.

    2010-01-01

    An imaginary composite material containing a ductile Al-rich FCC matrix with embedded particles of ductile RMg intermetallics (R is a rare-earth metal) may possess high strength and formability thus making it suitable as a replacement for steel in automotive applications. Although different fabrications routes can be explored, a direct-chill casting is likely least expensive of them. A crucial question is whether it is possible to find such a composition of the ternary Al-R-Mg melt whose solidification would result in the desired Al/RMg structure. In order to answer the question, a thermodynamic model of the Al-La-Mg system was built using the CALPHAD method. The model, whose validity was demonstrated by calorimetric experiments, was then used to prove that the FCC + LaMg composite material could not be produced via casting. Similar properties of rare-earth metals suggest that the conclusion based on the analysis of the particular Al-La-Mg case, will likely remain valid for other rare-earth elements.

  5. Electrochemical properties of the passive film on bulk Zr–Fe–Cr intermetallic fabricated by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Yakui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ling, Yunhan, E-mail: yhling@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Lai, Wensheng [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Xing, Shupei; Ma, Wen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Inner Mongolia University of Technology, Huhhot 010051 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • SPS was employed to prepare Zr-based intermetallics which were commonly existed in zircaloy. • Zr-based intermetallics act as cathode when they embedded in zirconium matrix. • The passive films on surface of intermetallics behaved as n-type semiconductors. • Carrier concentration of Zr(Fe{sub 3}Cr){sub 2} was much lower than that of other intermetallics. - Abstract: Although Zr-based second phase particles (SPPs) are important factors influencing corrosion resistance of zircaloy cladding materials, the corrosion behavior of SPPs has not been investigated by means of electrochemical method so far. In order to clarify the role of SPPs commonly existed in zircaloy, bulk Zr-based intermetallics were firstly fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) at temperatures 1373 K and an applied pressure of 60 MPa in this work. Both the natural passive film on surface and oxidation behavior of intermetallic has been investigated in this work. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern showed that as-prepared intermetallic of crystal structure belongs to Laves phase with AB{sub 2} type. Electrochemical measurement of passive film on surface of bulk Zr-based intermetallic exhibited significant difference with that of zirconium. Potentiodynamic measurements results revealed that intermetallic exhibited higher corrosion potential and lower corrosion current density than that of pure zirconium, implying that Zr-based second phase will act as cathode when they are included in zirconium matrix. Meanwhile, significant improvement of Zr–Fe–Cr intermetallic on the water chemistry corrosion resistance was demonstrated comparing with Zr–Fe and Zr–Cr binary intermetallics.

  6. Magnetic, transport and magnetocaloric properties in the Laves phase intermetallic Ho (Co1−xAlx)2 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, T.I.; Nikitin, S.A.; Tskhadadze, G.A.; Koshkid’ko, Yu.S.; Suski, W.; Iwasieczko, W.; Badurski, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The Al influence on magnetic properties of the Ho (Co 1-x Al x ) 2 compounds is analyzed. • The first-order magnetic transition appears in sample with Al concentrations x ≤ 0.06. • The MCE and Curie temperature TC demonstrate complex Al concentration dependences. • The magnetoresistance for sample with Al concentration x = 0.06 (58%) is maximum. • High magnetic fields changes the Curie temperature T c of the Ho (Co 1−x Al x ) 2 compounds. - Abstract: The magnetization, magnetoresistivity and magnetocaloric effect (MCE) of the Ho (Co 1−x Al x ) 2 Laves phase intermetallic compounds for x ⩽ 0.2 have been investigated. Complex measurements have been carried out in order to determine the influence of substitution in the Co sublattice by Al on the Co moment, type of the magnetic transition and related properties of these compounds. A comparative analysis of the magnetic, transport and magnetocaloric properties of Ho (Co 1−x Al x ) 2 alloys under various Al concentration is represented. Substitutions at the Co site by Al are found to result in the appearance of itinerant electron metamagnetism (IEM) at the small Al concentrations and in positive magnetovolume effect, leading to an initial increase in the ordering temperature; on the other hand the magnetic phase transition temperature as well as ΔT (MCE) do not depend in direct way on the Al concentration. The 16% increase of magnetocaloric effect for the alloy with x = 0.02 is detected in relation to maternal HoCo 2 . A giant value of magnetoresistivity (58%) is observed for the alloy with the same Al concentration

  7. Intermetallics structures, properties, and statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Steurer, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this book is clearly on the statistics, topology, and geometry of crystal structures and crystal structure types. This allows one to uncover important structural relationships and to illustrate the relative simplicity of most of the general structural building principles. It also allows one to show that a large variety of actual structures can be related to a rather small number of aristotypes. It is important that this book is readable and beneficial in the one way or another for everyone interested in intermetallic phases, from graduate students to experts in solid-state chemistry/physics/materials science. For that purpose it avoids using an enigmatic abstract terminology for the classification of structures. The focus on the statistical analysis of structures and structure types should be seen as an attempt to draw the background of the big picture of intermetallics, and to point to the white spots in it, which could be worthwhile exploring. This book was not planned as a textbook; rather, it...

  8. Abrasive wear of intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawk, J.A.; Alman, D.E.; Wilson, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines is investigating the wear behavior of a variety of advanced materials. Among the many materials under evaluation are intermetallic alloys based on the compounds: Fe 3 Al, Ti 3 Al, TiAl, Al 3 Ti, NiAl and MoSi 2 . The high hardness, high modulus, low density, and superior environmental stability of these compounds make them attractive for wear materials. This paper reports on the abrasive wear of alloys and composites based on the above compounds. The abrasive wear behavior of these alloys and composites are compared to other engineering materials used in wear applications

  9. Hot-working behavior of an advanced intermetallic multi-phase γ-TiAl based alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwaighofer, Emanuel, E-mail: emanuel.schwaighofer@unileoben.ac.at [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Roseggerstr. 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Clemens, Helmut [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Roseggerstr. 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Lindemann, Janny [Chair of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Technology, Brandenburg University of Technology, Konrad-Wachsmann-Allee 17, D-03046 Cottbus (Germany); GfE Fremat GmbH, Lessingstr. 41, D-09599 Freiberg (Germany); Stark, Andreas [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Mayer, Svea [Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversität Leoben, Roseggerstr. 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2014-09-22

    New high-performance engine concepts for aerospace and automotive application enforce the development of lightweight intermetallic γ-TiAl based alloys with increased high-temperature capability above 750 °C. Besides an increased creep resistance, the alloy system must exhibit sufficient hot-workability. However, the majority of current high-creep resistant γ-TiAl based alloys suffer from poor workability, whereby grain refinement and microstructure control during hot-working are key factors to ensure a final microstructure with sufficient ductility and tolerance against brittle failure below the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature. Therefore, a new and advanced β-solidifying γ-TiAl based alloy, a so-called TNM alloy with a composition of Ti–43Al–4Nb–1Mo–0.1B (at%) and minor additions of C and Si, is investigated by means of uniaxial compressive hot-deformation tests performed with a Gleeble 3500 simulator within a temperature range of 1150–1300 °C and a strain rate regime of 0.005–0.5 s{sup −1} up to a true deformation of 0.9. The occurring mechanisms during hot-working were decoded by ensuing constitutive modeling of the flow curves by a novel phase field region-specific surface fitting approach via a hyperbolic-sine law as well as by evaluation through processing maps combined with microstructural post-analysis to determine a safe hot-working window of the refined TNM alloy. Complementary, in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiments in combination with an adapted quenching and deformation dilatometer were conducted for a deeper insight about the deformation behavior of the alloy, i.e. phase fractions and texture evolution as well as temperature uncertainties arising during isothermal and non-isothermal compression. It was found that the presence of β-phase and the contribution of particle stimulated nucleation of ζ-Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} silicides and h-type carbides Ti{sub 2}AlC enhance the dynamic recrystallization behavior during

  10. Hot-working behavior of an advanced intermetallic multi-phase γ-TiAl based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaighofer, Emanuel; Clemens, Helmut; Lindemann, Janny; Stark, Andreas; Mayer, Svea

    2014-01-01

    New high-performance engine concepts for aerospace and automotive application enforce the development of lightweight intermetallic γ-TiAl based alloys with increased high-temperature capability above 750 °C. Besides an increased creep resistance, the alloy system must exhibit sufficient hot-workability. However, the majority of current high-creep resistant γ-TiAl based alloys suffer from poor workability, whereby grain refinement and microstructure control during hot-working are key factors to ensure a final microstructure with sufficient ductility and tolerance against brittle failure below the brittle-to-ductile transition temperature. Therefore, a new and advanced β-solidifying γ-TiAl based alloy, a so-called TNM alloy with a composition of Ti–43Al–4Nb–1Mo–0.1B (at%) and minor additions of C and Si, is investigated by means of uniaxial compressive hot-deformation tests performed with a Gleeble 3500 simulator within a temperature range of 1150–1300 °C and a strain rate regime of 0.005–0.5 s −1 up to a true deformation of 0.9. The occurring mechanisms during hot-working were decoded by ensuing constitutive modeling of the flow curves by a novel phase field region-specific surface fitting approach via a hyperbolic-sine law as well as by evaluation through processing maps combined with microstructural post-analysis to determine a safe hot-working window of the refined TNM alloy. Complementary, in situ high energy X-ray diffraction experiments in combination with an adapted quenching and deformation dilatometer were conducted for a deeper insight about the deformation behavior of the alloy, i.e. phase fractions and texture evolution as well as temperature uncertainties arising during isothermal and non-isothermal compression. It was found that the presence of β-phase and the contribution of particle stimulated nucleation of ζ-Ti 5 Si 3 silicides and h-type carbides Ti 2 AlC enhance the dynamic recrystallization behavior during deformation within

  11. Phase and microstructural characterization of Mo–Si–B multiphase intermetallic alloys produced by pressureless sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taleghani, P.R.; Bakhshi, S.R.; Borhani, G.H.; Erfanmanesh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Active and ultra-fine Mo–Si–B powders were produced by mechanical alloying. • The phases of MoSi 2 and MoB were obtained by sintering Mo–57Si–10B at 1400 °C for 2 h. • Composite based on MoB/MoSi 2 was obtained by sintering Mo–47Si–23B at 1300 °C for 3 h. • High content of MoB in the composite based on MoB/MoSi 2 increased density. • High hardness of the composite based on MoB/MoSi 2 is related to MoB matrix. -- Abstract: In this study Mo–47Si–23B and Mo–57Si–10B powders (at.%) was milled for 20 h in attritor ball mill with a rotational speed of 365 rpm and the ball/powder mass ratio 20/1. After degassing of As-mechanically alloyed powders at 450 °C, the powders were pressed into cylindrical samples with 25 mm diameter under 600 MPa pressure. The samples were sintered by using of a tube resistance furnace under Ar atmosphere. Phase and microstructure characteristic of mechanically alloyed powders and sintered samples, were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Also hardness test was performed. Homogeneous distribution of active and ultra-fine powders were obtained after milling for 20 h. Mo–57Si–10B alloy with MoB and MoSi 2 dominant phases was produced by sintering at 1400 °C for 2 h. Dominant phases similar to Mo–57Si–10B alloy sintered at 1400 °C for 2 h could be synthesized in Mo–47Si–23B alloy after sintering at 1300 °C for 3 h, but volume fraction of MoB phase was different. The Mo–47Si–23B alloy contained a higher phase fraction of MoB compound as compared to Mo–57Si–10B alloy. Very high density in Mo–47Si–23B alloys was obtained, due to the presence of high volume fraction of MoB phase. Formation heat of MoB acted as a positive potential to increase driving force of sintering and consequently bulk density. Finally, a uniform and fine distribution of MoSi 2 particles in MoB continuous matrix in the microstructure of Mo-47Si

  12. Nanoscale phase change memory materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Marissa A; Jeyasingh, Rakesh Gnana David; Wong, H-S Philip; Milliron, Delia J

    2012-08-07

    Phase change memory materials store information through their reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states. For typical metal chalcogenide compounds, their phase transition properties directly impact critical memory characteristics and the manipulation of these is a major focus in the field. Here, we discuss recent work that explores the tuning of such properties by scaling the materials to nanoscale dimensions, including fabrication and synthetic strategies used to produce nanoscale phase change memory materials. The trends that emerge are relevant to understanding how such memory technologies will function as they scale to ever smaller dimensions and also suggest new approaches to designing materials for phase change applications. Finally, the challenges and opportunities raised by integrating nanoscale phase change materials into switching devices are discussed.

  13. Intermetallic semiconducting films

    CERN Document Server

    Wieder, H H

    1970-01-01

    Intermetallic Semiconducting Films introduces the physics and technology of AшВv compound films. This material is a type of a polycrystalline semiconductor that is used for galvanomagnetic device applications. Such material has a high electron mobility that is ideal for generators and magnetoresistors. The book discusses the available references on the preparation and identification of the material. An assessment of its device applications and other possible use is also enumerated. The book describes the structures and physical parts of different films. A section of the book covers the three t

  14. A study of the oxidation of nickel-titanium intermetallics. II. Phase composition of the scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuprina, V G [Institut Problem Materialovedeniia, Kiev (Ukrainian SSR)

    1989-06-01

    The phase composition of the scale formed on NiTi during oxidation in air in the temperature range 600-1000 C was investigated by X-ray diffraction and layer-by-layer metallographic analyses. The scale was found to contain NiO, NiO.TiO2, TiO2, Ti2O3, Ti3O5, Ni, and Ni(Ti) solid solution; an Ni3Ti sublayer was present at the scale-alloy boundary. Oxygen diffusion in the scale toward the sublayer and counterdiffusion of Ni(+2) were found to be the principal processes responsible for NiTi oxidation. 8 refs.

  15. Hydrogen in intermetallic phases: the system titanium--nickel--hydrogen. Wasserstoff in intermetallischen phasen am beispiel des systems titan-nickel-wasserftoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchner, H.; Gutjahr, M. A.; Beccu, K. D.; Saeufferer, H.

    1972-07-01

    The intermetallic phases Ti/sub 2/-Ni (E9/sub 3/-type) and TiNi (B2-type) are able to absorb great amounts of hydrogen interstitially. The E9/sub 3/-structure forms four isotypic hydrogen phases, the lattice parameters of which increase with increasing hydrogen contents (..delta..d/sub max/ = 5.3%). The stoichiometric formulas are: Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 0/./sub 5/; Ti/sub 2/NiH; Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 2/; Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 2/./sub 5/. The lattice parameter of the B2-structure increases from 3.01 A to 3.10 A (..delta..d = 3%), thus forming the stoichiometric TiNiH phase. The TiNiH structure possesses an eight-fold superlattice having a B2 type cell. The positions of hydrogen in the two intermetallic phases Ti/sub 2/Ni and TiNi are discussed from the geometrical point of view. Neutron diffraction diagrams verify these positions for only two hydrogen phases (Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 0/./sub 5/; Ti/sub 2/NiH). Because of extreme experimental difficulties, the exact hydrogen positions in the phases Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 2/; Ti/sub 2/NiH/sub 2/./sub 5/; TiNiH are still unknown.

  16. Mechanical properties of aluminium matrix composites reinforced with intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, B.; Garcia-Escorial, A.; Ibanez, J.; Lieblich, M.

    2001-01-01

    In this work 2124 aluminium matrix composites reinforced with Ni 3 Al, NiAl, MoSi 2 and Cr 3 Si intermetallic powder particles have been investigated. For comparison purposes, un reinforced 2124 and reinforced with SiC have also been studied. In all cases, the same powder metallurgy route was used, i. e. the 2124 alloy was obtained by rapid solidification and the intermetallic particles by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). The matrix and the intermetallics were mechanically blended, cold compacted and finally hot extruded. Tensile tests were carried out in T1 and T4 treatments. Results indicate that mechanical properties depend strongly on the tendency to form new phases at the matrix-intermetallic interface during processing and/or further thermal treatments. The materials which present better properties are those that present less reaction between matrix and intermetallic reinforcement, i. e. MoSi 2 and SiC reinforced composites. (Author) 9 refs

  17. Microstructure evolution and dislocation behaviour in high chromium, fully ferritic steels strengthened by intermetallic Laves phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Barrilao, Jennifer; Kuhn, Bernd; Wessel, Egbert

    2018-05-01

    In the present study a stainless, high strength, ferritic (non-martensitic) steel was analysed regarding microstructure and particle evolution. The preceding hot-rolling process of the steel results in the formation of sub-grain structures, which disappear over time at high temperature. Besides that the formation of particle-free zones was observed. The pronounced formation of these zones preferentially appears close to high angle grain boundaries and is considered to be responsible for long-term material failure under creep conditions. The reasons for this are lacking particle hardening and thus a concentration and accumulation of deformation in the particle free areas close to the grain boundaries. Accordingly in-depth investigations were performed by electron microscopy to analyse dislocation behaviour and its possible effect on the mechanical response of these weak areas. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Electrochemical evaluation of adsorption and oxidation of the carbon monoxide towards ordered intermetallic phases Pt-M (M=Mn, Pb, Sb e Sn); Avaliacao eletroquimica da adsorcao e oxidacao do monoxido de carbono sobre fases intermetalicas ordenadas Pt-M (M=Mn, Pb, Sb e Sn)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolai, A L; Miguel-Junior, E; Silva, R I.V. da; Angelo, A C.D. [UNESP, Bauru, SP (Brazil). Depto. de Quimica. Lab. de Eletrocatalise

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the experimental results obtained from the electrochemical evaluation of Pt ordered intermetallic phases (PtMn, PtPb, PtSb, PtSn) as electrode materials towards the CO oxidation reaction. The intermetallics showed a higher performance than pure Pt in the same experimental conditions. PtSn has presented the highest performance among the evaluated materials. There was not observed a clear relationship between the electrocatalytic activity of the materials and their ability in producing oxygen species at lower anodic potentials, suggesting that surface electronic density and structural characteristics of the electrode surfaces must be the properties to be investigated in order to explain the obtained results. (author)

  19. Sintered cobalt-rare earth intermetallic product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.G.

    1975-01-01

    This patent describes a sintered product having substantially stable permanent magnet properties in air at room temperature. It comprises compacted particulate cobalt--rare earth alloy consisting essentially of a Co 5 R intermetallic phase and a CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase, where R is a rare earth metal. The Co 5 R intermetallic phase is present in an amount of at least 65 percent by weight of the sintered product and the CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase is present in a positive amount having a value ranging up to about 35 percent by weight of the product. The sintered product has a density of at least 87 percent and has pores which are substantially noninterconnecting and wherein the component grains have an average size less than 30 microns

  20. Kinetics of intermetallic phase formation at the interface of Sn-Ag-Cu-X (X = Bi, In) solders with Cu substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodulova, Erika; Palcut, Marian; Lechovic, Emil; Simekova, Beata; Ulrich, Koloman

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → In substitutes Sn in intermetallic compounds formed at the Cu-solder interface. → Bi and In decrease the parabolic rate constant of Cu 3 Sn layer growth. → In increases the parabolic rate constant of Cu 6 Sn 5 layer growth. → High In concentrations should be avoided since they may lead to a pre-mature solder joint degradation. - Abstract: The effects of Bi and In additions on intermetallic phase formation in lead-free solder joints of Sn-3.7Ag-0.7Cu; Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu-1.0Bi and Sn-1.5Ag-0.7Cu-9.5In (composition given in weight %) with copper substrate are studied. Soldering of copper plate was conducted at 250 deg. C for 5 s. The joints were subsequently aged at temperatures of 130-170 deg. C for 2-16 days in a convection oven. The aged interfaces were analyzed by optical microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) microanalysis. Two intermetallic layers are observed at the interface - Cu 3 Sn and Cu 6 Sn 5 . Cu 6 Sn 5 is formed during soldering. Cu 3 Sn is formed during solid state ageing. Bi and In decrease the growth rate of Cu 3 Sn since they appear to inhibit tin diffusion through the grain boundaries. Furthermore, indium was found to produce a new phase - Cu 6 (Sn,In) 5 instead of Cu 6 Sn 5 , with a higher rate constant. The mechanism of the Cu 6 (Sn,In) 5 layer growth is discussed and the conclusions for the optimal solder chemical composition are presented.

  1. The chemical phenol extraction of intermetallic particles from casting AlSi5Cu1Mg alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrówka-Nowotnik, G; Sieniawski, J; Nowotnik, A

    2010-03-01

    This paper presents a chemical extraction technique for determination of intermetallic phases formed in the casting AlSi5Cu1Mg aluminium alloy. Commercial aluminium alloys contain a wide range of intermetallic particles that are formed during casting, homogenization and thermomechanical processing. During solidification, particles of intermetallics are dispersed in interdendritic spaces as fine primary phases. Coarse intermetallic compounds that are formed in this aluminium alloy are characterized by unique atomic arrangement (crystallographic structure), morphology, stability, physical and mechanical properties. The volume fraction, chemistry and morphology of the intermetallics significantly affect properties and material behaviour during thermomechanical processing. Therefore, accurate determination of intermetallics is essential to understand and control microstructural evolution in Al alloys. Thus, in this paper it is shown that chemical phenol extraction method can be applied for precise qualitative evaluation. The results of optical light microscopy LOM, scanning electron microscopy SEM and X-ray diffraction XRD analysis reveal that as-cast AlSi5Cu1Mg alloy contains a wide range of intermetallic phases such as Al(4)Fe, gamma- Al(3)FeSi, alpha-Al(8)Fe(2)Si, beta-Al(5)FeSi, Al(12)FeMnSi.

  2. Titanium as an intermetallic phase stabilizer and its effect on the mechanical and thermal properties of Al-Si-Mg-Cu-Ti alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se-Weon [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, 6 Cheomdan-gwagiro 208 beon-gil, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-480 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hoon-Sung [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-ro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kumai, Shinji [Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, S8-10, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    The effect of precipitation of intermetallics on the mechanical and thermal properties of Al-6.5Si-0.44Mg-0.9Cu-(Ti) alloys (in wt%) during various artificial aging treatments was studied using a universal testing machine and a laser flash apparatus. The solution treatment of the alloy samples was conducted at 535 °C for 6 h, followed by quenching in warm water. The solution-treated samples were artificially aged for 5 h at different temperatures ranging from 170 °C to 220 °C. After the artificial aging treatment, the Al-6.5Si-0.44Mg-0.9Cu alloy (the Ti-free alloy) had a lower ultimate tensile strength (UTS) than the Al-6.5Si-0.44Mg-0.9Cu-0.2Ti alloy. The UTS response of the alloys was enhanced by the addition of Ti, with the maximum UTS showing an increase from 348 MPa for the Ti-free alloy to 363 MPa for that containing 0.2 wt% Ti, aged at 180 °C. The Ti-free alloy had a higher thermal diffusivity than the Ti-containing alloy over all temperature ranges. Upon increasing the temperature from 180 °C to 220 °C, the room temperature thermal diffusivities increased because the solute concentration in the α-Al matrix rapidly decreased. In particular, the thermal diffusivity increased significantly between 200 °C and 400 °C. This temperature range matched the range of intermetallic phase precipitation as confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and measurement of the coefficient of thermal expansion. During the artificial aging treatment, the intermetallic phases precipitated and grew rapidly. These reactions induced a reduction of the solute atoms in the solid solution, thus producing a more significant reduction in the thermal diffusivity. As the temperature was increased to above 400 °C, the formation of intermetallic phases ceased, and the thermal diffusivity showed a steady value, regardless of the aging temperature.

  3. Summary of workshop on high temperature materials based on Laves phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The Offices of Fossil Energy and Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy jointly sponsored the Workshop on High Temperature Materials Based on Laves Phases in conjunction with the Tenth Annual Conference on Fossil Energy Materials held at the Radisson Summit Hill Hotel in Knoxville, Tennessee on May 14-16, 1996. The objective of this workshop was to review the current status and to address critical issues in the development of new-generation high-temperature structural materials based on Laves phases. The one-day workshop included two sessions of overview presentations and a session of discussion on critical scientific and technological issues. The Laves phases represent an abundant class of intermetallic alloys with possible high-temperature structural applications. Laves phases form at or near the AB{sub 2} composition, and there are over 360 binary Laves phases. The ability of these alloys to dissolve considerable amounts of ternary alloying additions provides over 900 combined binary and ternary Laves phases. Many Laves phases have unique properties which make them attractive for high-temperature structural use. At half their homologous temperature, they retain >0.85 of their ambient yield strength, which is higher than all other intermetallics. Many of the Laves phases also have high melting temperatures, excellent creep properties, reasonably low densities, and for alloys containing Cr, Al, Si or Be, good oxidation resistance. Despite these useful properties, the tendency for low-temperature brittleness has limited the potential application of this large class of alloys.

  4. Isothermal section of the ternary phase diagram U–Fe–Ge at 900 °C and its new intermetallic phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, M.S., E-mail: mish@itn.pt [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague (Czech Republic); CCTN, IST/CFMCUL, University of Lisbon, Nuclear and Technological Campus, P-2695-066 Bobadela (Portugal); Berthebaud, D.; Lignie, A.; El Sayah, Z.; Moussa, C.; Tougait, O. [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, Chimie du Solide et Matériaux, Université Rennes 1, UMR CNRS 6226, 263 Avenue du Général Leclerc, 35042 Rennes (France); Havela, L. [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, Ke Karlovu 5, 121 16 Prague (Czech Republic); Gonçalves, A.P. [CCTN, IST/CFMCUL, University of Lisbon, Nuclear and Technological Campus, P-2695-066 Bobadela (Portugal)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • Isothermal section of the U–Fe–Ge at 900 °C was investigated. • Ten ternary compounds and four significant solubility ranges were found. • Three new compounds and a solid solution were discovered. - Abstract: The isothermal section at 900 °C of the U–Fe–Ge ternary system was assessed using experimental results from X-ray diffraction and observations by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy chemical analysis. The phase diagram at this temperature is characterized by the formation of fourteen stable phases: four homogeneity ranges and ten intermetallic compounds. Among these, there is an extension of the binary compound UFe{sub 2} into the ternary system (UFe{sub 2−x}Ge{sub x,}x < 0.15), three ternary line compounds, U{sub 2}Fe{sub 17−x}Ge{sub x} (2 < x < 3.7), UFe{sub 1−x}Ge{sub 2} (0.58 < x < 0.78), UFe{sub 6+x}Ge{sub 6−x} (x < 0.7), and ten ternary stoichiometric compounds, U{sub 2}Fe{sub 3}Ge, U{sub 6}Fe{sub 16}Ge{sub 7}, UFe{sub 4}Ge{sub 2}, U{sub 6}Fe{sub 22}Ge{sub 13}, UFeGe, U{sub 3}Fe{sub 4}Ge{sub 4}, UFe{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, U{sub 34}Fe{sub 3.32}Ge{sub 33}, U{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}Ge{sub 7}, and U{sub 9}Fe{sub 7}Ge{sub 24}.

  5. Intermetallics: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris, D. G.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermetallics have seen extensive world-wide attention over the past decades. For the most part these studies have examined multi-phase aluminide based alloys, because of their high stiffness, combined with reasonable strength and ductility, good structural stability and oxidation resistance, and attempted to improve current Ni-base superalloys, Ti-base alloys, or Fe-base stainless steels for structural aerospace applications. The current status of development and application of such materials is briefly reviewed. Future developments are taking intermetallics from the realm of "improved high-temperature but low-ductility metallic alloys" into the realm of "improved aggressive-environment, high-toughness ceramic-like alloys". Such evolution will be outlined.

    Durante los últimos décadas ha habido un desarrollo de los intermetálicos, sobre todo por aplicaciones estructurales a alta temperatura en aplicaciones aeroespaciales, donde, por su rigidez alta, en combinación con una resistencia mecánica y ductilidad razonable, su buena estabilidad estructural y resistencia a la oxidación, han sido vistos como versiones avanzadas y mejoradas de las aleaciones metálicas como, por ejemplo, las superaleaciones a base de nitrógeno y las aleaciones de titanio. Se discute el desarrollo importante durante las últimas décadas, y también los nuevos desarrollos probables durante los próximos años. Se podrían ver los intermetálicos como versiones mejoradas de los cerámicos.

  6. Thermal stability of (AlSi)x(ZrVTi) intermetallic phases in the Al–Si–Cu–Mg cast alloy with additions of Ti, V, and Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaha, S.K.; Czerwinski, F.; Kasprzak, W.; Friedman, J.; Chen, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Al–Si–Cu–Mg alloy was modified by introducing Zr, V, and Ti. • The chemistry of the phases was identified using SEM/EDX. • The crystal lattice parameters of the phases were characterized using EBSD. • To investigate the phase stability, XRD was performed up to 600 °C. • Thermal analysis was done to find out the possible phase transformation reactions. - Abstract: The Al–Si–Cu–Mg cast alloy was modified with additions of Ti–V–Zr to improve the thermal stability of intermetallics at increased temperatures. A combination of electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and high temperature X-ray diffraction was explored to identify phases and temperatures of their thermal stability. The micro-additions of transition metals led to formation of several (AlSi) x (TiVZr) phases with D0 22 /D0 23 tetragonal crystal structure and different lattice parameters. While Cu and Mg rich phases along with the eutectic Si dissolved at temperatures from 300 to 500 °C, the (AlSi) x (TiVZr) phases were stable up to 696–705 °C which is the beneficial to enhance the high temperature properties. Findings of this study are useful for selecting temperatures during melting and heat treatment of Al–Si alloys with additions of transition metals

  7. Low-Temperature Synthesis Routes to Intermetallic Superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaak, Raymond E

    2008-01-08

    Over the past few years, our group has gained expertise at developing low-temperature solution-based synthetic pathways to complex nanoscale solids, with particular emphasis on nanocrystalline intermetallic compounds. Our synthetic capabilities are providing tools to reproducibly generate intermetallic nanostructures with simultaneous control over crystal structure, composition, and morphology. This DOE-funded project aims to expand these capabilities to intermetallic superconductors. This could represent an important addition to the tools that are available for the synthesis and processing of intermetallic superconductors, which traditionally utilize high-temperature, high-pressure, thin film, or gas-phase vacuum deposition methods. Our current knowledge of intermetallic superconductors suggests that significant enhancements could result from the inherent benefits of low-temperature solution synthesis, e.g. metastable phase formation, control over nanoscale morphology to facilitate size-dependent property studies, robust and inexpensive processability, low-temperature annealing and consolidation, and impurity incorporation (for doping, stoichiometry control, flux pinning, and improving the critical fields). Our focus is on understanding the superconducting properties as a function of synthetic route, crystal structure, crystallite size, and morphology, and developing the synthetic tools necessary to accomplish this. This research program can currently be divided into two classes of superconducting materials: intermetallics (transition metal/post transition metal) and metal carbides/borides. Both involve the development and exploitation of low-temperature synthesis routes followed by detailed characterization of structures and properties, with the goal of understanding how the synthetic pathways influence key superconducting properties of selected target materials. Because of the low-temperature methods used to synthesize them and the nanocrystalline morphologies

  8. Simulation of the precipitation process of ordered intermetallic compounds in binary and ternary Ni-Al-based alloys by the phase-field model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Hua; Zhao Yuhong; Zhao Yuhui

    2009-01-01

    With the microscopic phase-field model, atomic-scale computer simulation programs for the precipitation mechanism of the ordered intermetallic compound γ' in binary Ni-15.5 at.%Al alloy, θ and γ' in ternary Ni 75 Al x V 25-x alloys were worked out based on the microscopic diffusion equation and non-equilibrium free energy. The simulation can be applied to the whole precipitation process and composition range. A prior assumptions on the new phase structure or transformation path was unnecessary, the possible non-equilibrium phases, atomic clustering and ordering could be described automatically, and atomic images, order parameters and volume fractions of precipitates were obtained. Computer simulation was performed systematically on the precipitation mechanism, precipitation sequence of θ and γ' in complicated system with ordering and clustering simultaneously. Through the simulated atomic images and chemical order parameters of precipitates, we can explain the complex precipitation mechanisms of θ (Ni 3 V) and γ' (Ni 3 Al) ordered phases. For the binary alloy, the precipitation mechanism of γ' phase has the characteristic of both non-classical nucleation and growth (NCNG) and congruent ordering and spinodal decomposition (COSD). For the ternary alloys, the precipitation characteristic of γ' phase transforms from NCNG to COSD gradually, otherwise, the precipitation characteristic of θ phase transforms from COSD to NCNG mechanism gradually

  9. Influence of annealing time and temperature on the Fe3Al intermetallic alloys microstructure modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Garbala

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available There is an industry interesting in intermetallic alloys in recent years. There are widely possibilities to adopt this kind of materials for structural units. More expensive materials can be replaced by them. A property which limits their wider application is the low plasticity at environment and elevated temperatures. In paper the results of the thermal microstructure modification are shown. To this end, the influence of annealing time and temperature on the intermetallic phase Fe3Al grain size was investigated. The impact of these factors on micro-hardness was examined as well. It was found that these operations cause the grain size reduction and the micro-hardness decrease.

  10. FY 1992 Report on the survey results. Surveys on trends of research and development of advanced materials for severe environments (Intermetallic compounds); 1992 nendo chotaikankyosei senshin zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu (kinzokukan kagobutsu) ni kakawaru kenkyu doko chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    The trends of the ongoing researches on intermetallic compounds are surveyed through interviews and inquiries, in order to evaluate the results of the projects and research and development of the advanced materials for severe environments, and also to survey the research trends. The survey results are pigeonholed into 4 general categories; (1) research trends in the USA, UK and Germany, (2) notable topics of recent progress in intermetallic research and development, (3) evaluation of the projects, and (4) lists of the results of the researches on the Al-Ti and Al-Nb intermetallic compounds. The ongoing projects include those for intermetallic compounds of high specific strength and of high melting point, the former being represented by Al-Ti compounds and the latter by Al-Nb compounds, for aircraft and space development purposes. The projects are evaluated, viewed from materials and purposes/targets pursued by the projects, R and D organizations, and degree of attention the projects are attracting. The intermetallic compounds are extensively studied and attracting attention in various countries, but possibilities of achieving the set targets are rather pessimistic. (NEDO)

  11. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  12. Phase transformations im smart materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newnham, R.E.

    1998-01-01

    One of the qualities that distinguishes living systems from inanimate matter is the ability to adapt to changes in the environment. Smart materials have the ability to perform both sensing and actuating functions and are, therefore, capable of imitating this rudimentary aspect of life. Four of the most widely used smart materials are piezoelectric Pb(Zr, Ti)O 3 , electrostrictive Pb(Mg, Nb)O 3 , magnetostrictive (Tb, Dy)Fe 2 and the shape-memory alloy NiTi. All four are ferroic with active domain walls and two phase transformations, which help to tune the properties of these actuator materials. Pb(Zr, Ti)O 3 is a ferroelectric ceramic which is cubic at high temperature and becomes ferroelectric on cooling through the Curie temperature. At room temperature, it is poised on a rhombohedral-tetragonal phase boundary which enhances the piezoelectric coefficients. Terfenol, (Tb, Dy)Fe 2 , is also cubic at high temperature and then becomes magnetic on cooling through its Curie temperature. At room temperature, it too is poised on a rhombohedral-tetragonal transition which enhances its magnetostriction coefficients. Pb(Mg, Nb)O 3 and nitinol (NiTi) are also cubic at high temperatures and on annealing transform to a partially ordered state. On further cooling, Pb(Mg, Nb)O 3 passes through a diffuse phase transformation at room temperature where it exhibits very large dielectric and electrostrictive coefficients. Just below room temperature, it transforms to a ferroelectric rhombohedral phase. The partially ordered shape-memory alloy NiTi undergoes an austenitic (cubic) to martensitic (mono-clinic) phase change just above room temperature. It is easily deformed in the martensitic state but recovers its original shape when reheated to austenite

  13. The combined use of EBSD and EDX analyses for the identification of complex intermetallic phases in multicomponent Al-Si piston alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-L.; Thomson, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Multicomponent Al-Si based casting alloys are used for a variety of engineering applications, including for example, piston alloys. Properties include good castability, high strength, light weight, good wear resistance and low thermal expansion. In order for such alloys to continue operation to increasingly higher temperatures, alloy element modifications are continually being made to further enhance the properties. Improved mechanical and physical properties are strongly dependent upon the morphologies, type and distribution of the second phases, which are in turn a function of alloy composition and cooling rate. The presence of additional elements in the Al-Si alloy system allows many complex intermetallic phases to form, which make characterisation non-trivial. These include, for example, CuAl 2 , Al 3 Ni 2 , Al 7 Cu 4 Ni, Al 9 FeNi and Al 5 Cu 2 Mg 8 Si 6 phases, all of which may have some solubility for additional elements. Identification is often non-trivial due to the fact that some of the phases have either similar crystal structures or only subtle changes in their chemistries. A combination of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) has therefore been used for the identification of the various phases. This paper will present comparisons of phase identification methodologies using EBSD alone, and in combination with chemical information, either directly or through post processing.

  14. Polymers in phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.C.; Brites, M.J.; Alexandre, J.H. [National Lab. for Energy and Geology, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-07-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) which are the core of latent heat thermal energy storage systems are currently an area of investigation of increasing interest. Several substances differing in physical and chemical characteristics as well as in thermal behavior have been studied as PCMS{sup 1-3}. In order to meet the requisites of particular systems, auxiliary materials are often used with specific functions. This bibliographic survey shows that polymeric materials have been proposed either as the PCM itself in solid-liquid or solid-solid transitions or to perform auxiliary functions of shape stabilisation and microencapsulation for solid-liquid PCMs. The PCMs have an operating temperature ranging from around 0 C (for the system water/polyacrilamid) to around 127 C (for crosslinked HDPE). (orig.)

  15. Solidifying incongruently melting intermetallic phases as bulk single phases using the example of Al{sub 2}Cu and Q-phase in the Al-Mg-Cu-Si system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeffler, Andrea [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena (Germany); Groebner, Joachim; Hampl, Milan [Institute of Metallurgy, Clausthal University of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Engelhardt, Hannes [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena (Germany); Schmid-Fetzer, Rainer [Institute of Metallurgy, Clausthal University of Technology, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany); Rettenmayr, Markus, E-mail: M.Rettenmayr@uni-jena.de [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Friedrich-Schiller-University, Jena (Germany)

    2012-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples consisting of pure Al{sub 2}Cu and 95% Q-phase respectively were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Q-phase composition is Al{sub 17}Cu{sub 9}Mg{sub 44}Si{sub 30}, its solubility range is negligible. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Q-phase peritectic temperature was determined by DSC measurements as 703 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new thermodynamic dataset for the Q-phase has been assessed. - Abstract: Plane front directional solidification experiments were carried out for preparing incongruently melting intermetallic phases in the quaternary alloy system Al-Cu-Mg-Si, particularly the binary Al{sub 2}Cu phase and the quaternary phase ('Q-phase'). By this method, bulk samples that consist of only a single phase are generated. Sample sections consisting of 100% single phase Al{sub 2}Cu and of 95% Q-phase, respectively, were obtained. The composition of the Q-phase was measured by Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The measured concentrations are close to the Al{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}Mg{sub 9}Si{sub 7} composition that has recently been predicted as most stable by ab initio calculations. A peritectic temperature of 703 Degree-Sign C for the reaction Q {yields} L + Mg{sub 2}Si + (Si) was determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). An optimization of the Calphad database was performed considering the measured composition and peritectic temperature. For validating the optimized database, Scheil calculations were performed and compared with the experimentally determined sequence of solidifying phases.

  16. Microstructure Characterization and Wear-Resistant Properties Evaluation of an Intermetallic Composite in Ni–Mo–Si System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyuan Huang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Intermetallic compounds have been studied for their potential application as structural wear materials or coatings on engineering steels. In the present work, a newly designed intermetallic composite in a Ni–Mo–Si system was fabricated by arc-melting process with commercially pure metal powders as starting materials. The chemical composition of this intermetallic composite is 45Ni–40Mo–15Si (at %, selected according to the ternary alloy diagram. The microstructure was characterized using optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, and the wear-resistant properties at room temperature were evaluated under different wear test conditions. Microstructure characterization showed that the composite has a dense and uniform microstructure. XRD results showed that the intermetallic composite is constituted by a binary intermetallic compound NiMo and a ternary Mo2Ni3Si metal silicide phase. Wear test results indicated that the intermetallic composite has an excellent wear-resistance at room-temperature, which is attributed to the high hardness and strong atomic bonding of constituent phases NiMo and Mo2Ni3Si.

  17. Sintered cobalt-rare earth intermetallic product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz, M.C.

    1975-01-01

    A process is described for preparing novel sintered cobalt--rare earth intermetallic products which can be magnetized to form permanent magnets having stable improved magnetic properties. A cobalt--rare earth metal alloy is formed having a composition which at sintering temperature falls outside the composition covered by the single Co 5 R intermetallic phase on the rare earth richer side. The alloy contains a major amount of the Co 5 R intermetallic phase and a second solid CoR phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase. The specific cobalt and rare earth metal content of the alloy is substantially the same as that desired in the sintered product. The alloy, in particulate form, is pressed into compacts and sintered to the desired density. The sintered product is comprised of a major amount of the Co 5 R solid intermetallic phase and up to about 35 percent of the product of the second solid CoR intermetallic phase which is richer in rare earth metal content than the Co 5 R phase

  18. Phase transformations in engineering materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, M.A.M.; Lawson, A.C.; Dunand, D.C.

    1996-01-01

    Phase transformations in engineering materials are inevitably related to mechanical behavior and are often precursors to residual stress and distortion. Neutron scattering in general is a valuable tool for studying their effects, and pulsed neutrons are of special value, because of the inherently comprehensive crystallographic coverage they provide in each measurement. At the Manuel Lujan neutron scattering center several different research programs have addressed the relationships between phase transformation/mechanical behavior and residual strains. Three disparate examples are presented; (1) stress induced transformation in a NiTi shape memory alloy, (2) cryogenically induced transformation in a quenched 5180 steel, and (3) time resolved evolution of strain induced martensite in 304 stainless steel. In each case a brief description of the principle result will be discussed in the context of using neutrons for the measurement

  19. Nanoscale phase-change materials and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Qinghui; Wang, Yuxi; Zhu, Jia

    2017-01-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) that can reversibly transit between crystalline and amorphous phases have been widely used for data-storage and other functional devices. As PCMs scale down to nanoscale, the properties and transition procedures can vary, bringing both challenges and opportunities in scalability. This article describes the physical structures, properties and applications of nanoscale phase-change materials and devices. The limitations and performance of scaling properties in phase-change materials and the recent progress and challenges in phase-change devices are presented. At the end, some emerging applications related to phase-change materials are also introduced. (topical review)

  20. Nanoscale phase-change materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qinghui; Wang, Yuxi; Zhu, Jia

    2017-06-01

    Phase-change materials (PCMs) that can reversibly transit between crystalline and amorphous phases have been widely used for data-storage and other functional devices. As PCMs scale down to nanoscale, the properties and transition procedures can vary, bringing both challenges and opportunities in scalability. This article describes the physical structures, properties and applications of nanoscale phase-change materials and devices. The limitations and performance of scaling properties in phase-change materials and the recent progress and challenges in phase-change devices are presented. At the end, some emerging applications related to phase-change materials are also introduced.

  1. X-ray and magnetic studies on intermetallic phases of the type CaCu5 using noble metals and strontium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heumann, T.; Birnschein, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    The intermetallic phases SrAu 5 , SrAg 5 and SrPd 5 and their binary part systems with the specific noble metals as well as the pseudobinary series SrAu 5 -SrPd 5 and SrAg 5 -SrPd 5 are dealt with within the framework of this lecture. The noble metals gold, silver and palladium form AB 5 phases with strontium which cristallize in CaCu 5 structure. The atomic susceptibilities of the part systems Ag-SrAg 5 and Au-SrAu 5 as a function of the Sr concentration, of the part system Pd-SrPd 5 as a function of the temperature and the Sr concentration, of Au-Pd as a function of the Pd concentration, of the series SrAu 5 -SrPd 5 as a function of the SrPd 5 concentration, of the series SrAg 5 -SrPd 5 as function of the SrPd 5 concentration, the electrical resistance of Ag-SrAg 5 and Au-SrAu 5 as function of the Sr concentration, the lattice constants of the series SrAu 5 -SrPd 5 as a function of the SrPd 5 concentration, as well as the number of effective magnetones in the system Au-Pd as a function of the Pd concentration, were measured and evaluated. (orig./LH) [de

  2. Phase change materials science and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Raoux, Simone

    2009-01-01

    ""Phase Change Materials: Science and Applications"" provides a unique introduction of this rapidly developing field. This clearly written volume describes the material science of these fascinating materials from a theoretical and experimental perspective.

  3. Phase transformation and morphology of the intermetallic compounds formed at the Sn-9Zn-3.5Ag/Cu interface in aging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hon, M.-H.; Chang, T.-C.; Wang, M.-C.

    2008-01-01

    The morphology and phase transformation of the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed at the Sn-9Zn-3.5Ag/Cu interface in a solid-state reaction have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The monoclinic η'-Cu 6 Sn 5 transforms to the hexagonal η-Cu 6 Sn 5 and the orthorhombic Cu 5 Zn 8 transforms to the body-centered cubic (bcc) γ-Cu 5 Zn 8 as aged at 180 deg. C. The scallop-shaped Cu 6 Sn 5 layer is retained after aging at 180 deg. C for 1000 h. In the solid-state reaction, Ag is repelled from η'-Cu 6 Sn 5 and reacts with Sn to form Ag 3 Sn, and the Cu 5 Zn 8 layer decomposes. Kirkendall voids are not observed at the Sn-9Zn-3.5Ag/Cu interface even after aging at 180 deg. C for 1000 h

  4. Phase transformation and morphology of the intermetallic compounds formed at the Sn-9Zn-3.5Ag/Cu interface in aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hon, M.-H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chang, T.-C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, 1 Ta-Hsueh Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Electronic and Optoelectronics Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Bldg. 11, 195, Sec. 4, Chung-Hsing Road, Chutung, Hsinchu, 310, Taiwan (China); Wang, M.-C. [Faculty of Fragrance and Cosmetics, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shi-Chuan 1st Road, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: mcwang@kmu.edu.tw

    2008-06-30

    The morphology and phase transformation of the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) formed at the Sn-9Zn-3.5Ag/Cu interface in a solid-state reaction have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction (ED), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS). The monoclinic {eta}'-Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} transforms to the hexagonal {eta}-Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} and the orthorhombic Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} transforms to the body-centered cubic (bcc) {gamma}-Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} as aged at 180 deg. C. The scallop-shaped Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} layer is retained after aging at 180 deg. C for 1000 h. In the solid-state reaction, Ag is repelled from {eta}'-Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} and reacts with Sn to form Ag{sub 3}Sn, and the Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} layer decomposes. Kirkendall voids are not observed at the Sn-9Zn-3.5Ag/Cu interface even after aging at 180 deg. C for 1000 h.

  5. Zirconium intermetallics and hydrogen uptake during corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1987-04-01

    The routes by which hydrogen can enter zirconium alloys containing second phase particles during corrosion are discussed. Both direct diffusion through the bulk of the oxide film, and migration through second phase particles that intersect the surface are considered. An examination of results for hydrogen uptake by zirconium alloys during the early stages of oxidation, when the oxide film is still coherent, suggests that for Zr, Zr-1%Cu and Zr-1%Fe the hydrogen enters by diffusing through the bulk ZrO 2 film, whereas for the Zircaloys the primary migration route may be through the intermetallics. The steps in the latter process are discussed and the evidence available on the properties of the intermetallics collated. A comparison of these data with results for hydrogen uptake by two series of ternary alloys (Zr-1%Nb - 1%X, Zr-1%Cu - 1%X) suggests that high hydrogen uptakes often correlate with intermetallics with high hydrogen solubilities and vice versa. The properties of Zr(Fe/Cr) 2+x intermetallics are examined in an attempt to understand the behaviour of the Zircaloys, and it is concluded that present data establishing composition and unit cell dimensions for such intermetallic particles are not of sufficient accuracy to permit a correlation

  6. Production of nanograined intermetallics using high-pressure torsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhamidi, Ali; Edalati, Kaveh; Horita, Zenji, E-mail: horita@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Formation of intermetallics is generally feasible at high temperatures when the lattice diffusion is fast enough to form the ordered phases. This study shows that nanograined intermetallics are formed at a low temperature as 573 K in Al- 25 mol% Ni, Al- 50 mol.% Ni and Al- 50 mol% Ti powder mixtures through powder consolidation using high-pressure torsion (HPT). For the three compositions, the hardness gradually increases with straining but saturates to the levels as high as 550-920 Hv. In addition to the high hardness, the TiAl material exhibits high yield strength as {approx}3 GPa with good ductility as {approx}23%, when they are examined by micropillar compression tests. X-ray diffraction analysis and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveal that the significant increase in hardness and strength is due to the formation of nanograined intermetallics such as Al{sub 3}Ni, Al{sub 3}Ni{sub 2}, TiAl{sub 3}, TiAl{sub 2} and TiAl with average grain sizes of 20-40 nm (author)

  7. Chemistry and Properties of Complex Intermetallics from Metallic Fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri G. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-03-28

    This project investigated the reaction chemistry and synthesis of new intermetallic materials with complex compositions and structures using metallic fluxes as solvents. It was found that the metallic fluxes offer several key advantages in facilitating the formation and crystal growth of new materials. The fluxes mostly explored were liquid aluminum, gallium and indium. The main purpose of this project was to exploit the potential of metallic fluxes as high temperature solvent for materials discovery in the broad class of intermetallics. This work opened new paths to compound formation. We discovered many new Si (or Ge)-based compounds with novel structures, bonding and physicochemical properties. We created new insights about the reaction chemistry that is responsible for stabilizing the new materials. We also studied the structural and compositional relationships to understand their properties. We investigated the use of Group-13 metals Al, Ga and In as solvents and have generated a wide variety of new results including several new ternary and quaternary materials with fascinating structures and properties as well as new insights as to how these systems are stabilized in the fluxes. The project focused on reactions of metals from the rare earth element family in combination with transition metals with Si and Ge. For example molten gallium has serves both as a reactive and non-reactive solvent in the preparation and crystallization of intermetallics in the system RE/M/Ga/Ge(Si). Molten indium behaves similarly in that it too is an excellent reaction medium, but it gives compounds that are different from those obtained from gallium. Some of the new phase identified in the aluminide class are complex phases and may be present in many advanced Al-matrix alloys. Such phases play a key role in determining (either beneficially or detrimentally) the mechanical properties of advanced Al-matrix alloys. This project enhanced our basic knowledge of the solid state chemistry

  8. Reversible switching in phase-change materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech Wełnic; Matthias Wuttig

    2008-01-01

    Phase-change materials are successfully employed in optical data storage and are becoming a promising candidate for future electronic storage applications. Despite the increasing technological interest, many fundamental properties of these materials remain poorly understood. However, in the last few years the understanding of the material properties of phase-change materials has increased significantly. At the same time, great advances have been achieved in technological applications in elect...

  9. PCM Concrete. [Phase Change Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juul Andersen, T. [Danish Technological Institute, Taastrup (Denmark); Poulsen, H.-H. [BASF A/S, Roedekro (Denmark); Passov, F. [Spaencom A/S, Hedehusene (Denmark); Heiselberg, P. [Aalborg Univ..Aalborg (Denmark)

    2013-04-01

    PCM-Concrete was a research and development project launched in 2009 and finished in 2012. The project, which was funded by The Danish National Advanced Technology Foundation, had a total budget of 1.7 million Euros and included 4 partners: Danish Technological Institute (project manager), Aalborg University, BASF A/S and Spaencom A/S. The overall vision of the project was to reduce energy consumption for heating and cooling in buildings by developing high-performance concrete structures microencapsulated Phase Change Materials (PCM). The PCM used in the project was Micronal produced by BASF A/S. Micronal is small capsules with an acrylic shell and inside a wax with a melting point at approx. 23 deg. C equal to a comfortable indoor temperature. During the melting process thermal energy is transferred to chemical reaction (melting/solidification) depending on PCM being heated up or cooled down. Adding Micronal to concrete would theoretically increase the thermal mass of the concrete and improve the diurnal heat capacity which is the amount of energy that can be stored and released during 24 hours. Nevertheless, it is a relatively new technology that has not received much attention, yet. In the PCM-Concrete project 5 main investigations were carried out: 1) Development of concrete mix design with PCM. 2) Investigation of thermal properties of the PCM concrete: thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, density. 3) Up-scaling the research to industrial production of PCM-concrete structures. 4) Testing energy efficiency in full scale. 5) Confronting aesthetic and acoustic barriers to full exploitation of the potential of PCM-concrete structures. The results from the test program showed: 1) That the diurnal heat storage capacity is higher for all 4 hollow core decks with tiles attached compared to the reference hollow core deck. 2) The hollow core decks with concrete tiles without PCM performs slightly better than the tiles with PCM. 3) That is was impossible to

  10. Plasticity enhancement mechanisms in refractory metals and intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibala, R.; Chang, H.; Czarnik, C.M.; Edwards, K.M.; Misra, A.

    1993-01-01

    Plasticity enhancement associated with surface films and precipitates or dispersoids in bcc refractory metals is operative in ordered intermetallic compounds. Some results are given for NiAl and MoSi 2 -based materials. The monotonic and cyclic plasticity of NiAl at room temperature can be enhanced by surface films. Ductile second phases also enhance the plasticity of NiAl. MoSi 2 exhibits similar effects of surface films and dispersoids, but primarily at elevated temperatures. The plasticity enhancement is associated with enhanced dislocation generation from constrained deformation at the film-substrate or precipitate/dispersoid-matrix interface of the composite systems

  11. Synthesis and characterization of Fe-Ti-Sb intermetallic compounds: Discovery of a new Slater-Pauling phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghibolashrafi, N.; Keshavarz, S.; Hegde, Vinay I.; Gupta, A.; Butler, W. H.; Romero, J.; Munira, K.; LeClair, P.; Mazumdar, D.; Ma, J.; Ghosh, A. W.; Wolverton, C.

    2016-03-01

    Compounds of Fe, Ti, and Sb were prepared using arc melting and vacuum annealing. Fe2TiSb , expected to be a full Heusler compound crystallizing in the L 21 structure, was shown by XRD and SEM analyses to be composed of weakly magnetic grains of nominal composition Fe1.5TiSb with iron-rich precipitates in the grain boundaries. FeTiSb, a composition consistent with the formation of a half-Heusler compound, also decomposed into Fe1.5TiSb grains with Ti-Sb rich precipitates and was weakly magnetic. The dominant Fe1.5TiSb phase appears to crystallize in a defective L 21 -like structure with iron vacancies. Based on this finding, a first-principles DFT-based binary cluster expansion of Fe and vacancies on the Fe sublattice of the L 21 structure was performed. Using the cluster expansion, we computationally scanned >103 configurations and predict a novel, stable, nonmagnetic semiconductor phase to be the zero-temperature ground state. This new structure is an ordered arrangement of Fe and vacancies, belonging to the space group R 3 m , with composition Fe1.5TiSb , i.e., between the full- and half-Heusler compositions. This phase can be visualized as alternate layers of L 21 phase Fe2TiSb and C 1b phase FeTiSb, with layering along the [111] direction of the original cubic phases. Our experimental results on annealed samples support this predicted ground-state composition, but further work is required to confirm that the R 3 m structure is the ground state.

  12. Multifunctional Composite Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Polymeric composite materials that are currently utilized in aircraft structures are susceptible to significant damage from lightning strikes. Enhanced electrical...

  13. Toughening and creep in multiphase intermetallics through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It has however often been the case that the process of ductilisation or toughening has also led to a decrease in high temperature properties, especially creep. In this paper we describe approaches to the ductilisation of two different classes of intermetallic alloys through alloying to introduce beneficial, second phase effects.

  14. Effects of ductile phase volume fraction on the mechanical properties of Ti-Al3Ti metal-intermetallic laminate (MIL) composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Richard D.; Jiang Fengchun; Kulin, Robb M.; Vecchio, Kenneth S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Residual Al improves the mechanical properties of Ti-Al 3 Ti MIL composites. → Residual Al can eliminate intermetallic centerline delaminations in MILs. → Low levels of residual Al increase fracture toughness in MIL composites. → MIL stiffness, strength, and fracture toughness can be optimized at low Al levels. - Abstract: Metal-intermetallic laminate (MIL) composites consisting of alternating layers of Ti, Al, and the intermetallic Al 3 Ti have been fabricated by reactive foil sintering in open air. Six initially identical stacks of alternating Ti-3Al-2.5 V and 1100-Al foils were processed for different lengths of time, yielding specimens with different metal and intermetallic volume fractions. Their mechanical properties have been investigated with an emphasis on the effect of residual Al at the intermetallic centerline on composite strength and fracture toughness, as well as fracture and failure modes. Samples were cut from each composite plate (in layer orientations parallel and perpendicular to the intended load direction) for mechanical testing in compression and four-point bending under quasi-static and high-rate loading conditions. Examination of the damaged specimens and their fracture surfaces by optical and scanning electron microscopy was performed to establish a correlation between the failure mechanisms present, composite strength, and microstructure. Results indicated that regardless of loading direction, cracks always initiated in the intermetallic region, rarely at the centerline, and crack propagation and failure were heavily influenced by the thickness of the residual aluminum layers. There is an ideal residual aluminum volume fraction that represents the amount of ductile reinforcement that maximizes the combined properties of strength, toughness and stiffness.

  15. Intelligent Radiative Materials, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An opportunity to boost energy efficiency in homes and buildings exists through the design of functional radiative properties in glass and other building materials....

  16. A New Thermodynamic Parameter to Predict Formation of Solid Solution or Intermetallic Phases in High Entropy Alloys (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-02

    George , Relative effects of enthalpy and entropy on the phase stability of equiatomic high-entropy alloys, Acta Mater. 61 (2013) 2628e2638. [4] B... Cantor , I.T.H. Chang, P. Knight, A.J.B. Vincent, Microstructural development in equiatomic multicomponent alloys, Mater. Sci. Eng. A 375e377 (2004...an Al0.5CoCrCuFeNi high entropy alloy, In- termetallics 31 (2012) 165e172. [24] Z. Wu, H. Bei, F. Otto, G.M. Pharr, E.P. George , Recovery

  17. The μ3 model of acids and bases: extending the Lewis theory to intermetallics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Timothy E; Fredrickson, Daniel C

    2012-04-02

    A central challenge in the design of new metallic materials is the elucidation of the chemical factors underlying the structures of intermetallic compounds. Analogies to molecular bonding phenomena, such as the Zintl concept, have proven very productive in approaching this goal. In this Article, we extend a foundational concept of molecular chemistry to intermetallics: the Lewis theory of acids and bases. The connection is developed through the method of moments, as applied to DFT-calibrated Hückel calculations. We begin by illustrating that the third and fourth moments (μ(3) and μ(4)) of the electronic density of states (DOS) distribution tune the properties of a pseudogap. μ(3) controls the balance of states above and below the DOS minimum, with μ(4) then determining the minimum's depth. In this way, μ(3) predicts an ideal occupancy for the DOS distribution. The μ(3)-ideal electron count is used to forge a link between the reactivity of transition metals toward intermetallic phase formation, and that of Lewis acids and bases toward adduct formation. This is accomplished through a moments-based definition of acidity which classifies systems that are electron-poor relative to the μ(3)-ideal as μ(3)-acidic, and those that are electron-rich as μ(3)-basic. The reaction of μ(3) acids and bases, whether in the formation of a Lewis acid/base adduct or an intermetallic phase, tends to neutralize the μ(3) acidity or basicity of the reactants. This μ(3)-neutralization is traced to the influence of electronegativity differences at heteroatomic contacts on the projected DOS curves of the atoms involved. The role of μ(3)-acid/base interactions in intermetallic phases is demonstrated through the examination of 23 binary phases forming between 3d metals, the stability range of the CsCl type, and structural trends within the Ti-Ni system.

  18. Solid-state transformation of Fe-rich intermetallic phases in Al–5.0Cu–0.6Mn squeeze cast alloy with variable Fe contents during solution heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Bo [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Gui Zhou University, Guiyang 550000 (China); Zhang, Weiwen, E-mail: mewzhang@scut.edu.cn [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhao, Yuliang; Li, Yuanyuan [School of Mechanical and Automotive Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The Al–5.0 wt.% Cu–0.6 wt.% Mn alloys with a variable Fe content were prepared by squeeze casting. Optical microscopy (OM), Deep etching technique, scanning electron microscopy(SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the solid-state transformation of Fe-rich intermetallics during the solution heat treatment. The results showed that the Chinese script-like α-Fe, Al{sub 6}(FeMn) and needle-like Al{sub 3}(FeMn) phases transform to a new Cu-rich β-Fe (Al{sub 7}Cu{sub 2}(FeMn)) phase during solution heat treatment. The possible reaction and overall transformation kinetics of the solid-state phase transformation for the Fe-rich intermetallics were investigated. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The α-Fe, Al{sub 6}(FeMn) and Al{sub 3}(FeMn) phases change to the β-Fe phases. • Possible reactions of Fe phases during solution heat treatment are discussed. • The overall fractional transformation rate follows an Avrami curve.

  19. Solid-state transformation of Fe-rich intermetallic phases in Al–5.0Cu–0.6Mn squeeze cast alloy with variable Fe contents during solution heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Bo; Zhang, Weiwen; Zhao, Yuliang; Li, Yuanyuan

    2015-01-01

    The Al–5.0 wt.% Cu–0.6 wt.% Mn alloys with a variable Fe content were prepared by squeeze casting. Optical microscopy (OM), Deep etching technique, scanning electron microscopy(SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the solid-state transformation of Fe-rich intermetallics during the solution heat treatment. The results showed that the Chinese script-like α-Fe, Al 6 (FeMn) and needle-like Al 3 (FeMn) phases transform to a new Cu-rich β-Fe (Al 7 Cu 2 (FeMn)) phase during solution heat treatment. The possible reaction and overall transformation kinetics of the solid-state phase transformation for the Fe-rich intermetallics were investigated. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The α-Fe, Al 6 (FeMn) and Al 3 (FeMn) phases change to the β-Fe phases. • Possible reactions of Fe phases during solution heat treatment are discussed. • The overall fractional transformation rate follows an Avrami curve

  20. Hard magnetic off-stoichiometric (Fe,Sb){sub 2+x}Hf{sub 1-x} intermetallic phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goll, D.; Gross, T.; Loeffler, R.; Pflanz, U.; Vogel, T.; Kopp, A.; Grubesa, T.; Schneider, G. [Aalen University, Materials Research Institute (Germany)

    2017-09-15

    By high-throughput screening the ternary Fe-Hf-Sb system, off-stoichiometric (Fe,Sb){sub 2+x}Hf{sub 1-x} with a composition of Fe60.0-Hf26.5-Sb13.5 with high potential as hard magnetic phase is discovered. By quantitative domain structure analysis, promising intrinsic properties of J{sub s} ∝ 1 T, K{sub 1} ∝ 1.5 MJ m{sup -3} are found at room temperature. By magnetometry, bulk intrinsic properties of J{sub s} ∝ 0.7 T, K{sub 1} ∝ 1.4 MJ m{sup -3} are found. Alloying elements like Co or Mn turns out to be an effective adjusting screw on the crystal structure and ferromagnetic behavior. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Development of intermetallic coatings for fusion power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.H.; Domenico, T.; Dragel, G.; Clark, R.

    1994-03-01

    In the design of liquid-metal cooling systems, corrosion resistance of structural materials and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) force and its subsequent influence on thermal hydraulics and corrosion are major concerns. The objective of this study is to develop stable corrosion-resistant electrical insulator coatings at the liquid-metal/structural-material interface, with emphasis on electrically insulating coatings that prevent adverse MHD-generated currents from passing through the structural walls. Vanadium and V-base alloys are potential materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor. Insulator coatings inside the tubing are required when the system is cooled by liquid metals. Various intermetallic films were produced on V, V-t, and V-20 Ti, V-5Cr-t and V-15Cr-t, and Ti, and Types 304 and 316 stainless steel. The intermetallic layers were developed by exposure of the materials to liquid lithium of 3--5 at.% and containing dissolved metallic solutes at temperatures of 416--880 degrees C. Subsequently, electrical insulator coatings were produced by reaction of the reactive layers with dissolved nitrogen in liquid lithium or by air oxidation under controlled conditions at 600--1000 degrees C. These reactions converted the intermetallic layers to electrically insulating oxide/nitride or oxy-nitride layers. This coating method could be applied to a commercial product. The liquid metal can be used over and over because only the solutes are consumed within the liquid metal. The technique can be applied to various shapes because the coating is formed by liquid-phase reaction. This paper will discuss initial results on the nature of the coatings and their in-situ electrical resistivity characteristics in liquid lithium at high temperatures

  2. Theoretical study of phase forming of NaZn sub 1 sub 3 -type rare-earth intermetallics

    CERN Document Server

    Chang Hong; Liang Jing Kui; Rao Guang Hui

    2003-01-01

    By using the interatomic pair potential obtained with the lattice inversion method, the stability of RT sub 1 sub 3 sub - sub x M sub x (R = La, Ce, Pr and Nd; T=Co and Fe; M=Si, Al, Cr, V and Ti) of the NaZn sub 1 sub 3 type and its derivative structure are studied. The structural transition of LaT sub 1 sub 3 sub - sub x Si sub x (T=Co and Fe) between the cubic one with the space group Fm3c and the tetragonal one with I4/mcm is imitated from the viewpoint of energy. As for the function of the third elements, Al and Si are beneficial to the phase stability of RT sub 1 sub 3 sub - sub x M sub x , whereas Cr, Ti and V are unfavourable to the stability. In the calculation, the range of x, with which RT sub 1 sub 3 sub - sub x M sub x could crystallize in the cubic or tetragonal structures, agrees with the experiments very well. The calculated crystallographic parameters coincide with the experimental observation. In the cubic structure, Si and Al prefer the 96i site, and in the tetragonal structure Si first occ...

  3. From phase-change materials to thermoelectrics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Matthias N.; Rosenthal, Tobias; Oeckler, Oliver [Dept. of Chemistry, Ludwig Maximilian Univ. Munich (Germany); Stiewe, Christian [German Aerospace Center, Cologne (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Metastable tellurides play an important role as phase-change materials in data storage media and non-volatile RAM devices. The corresponding crystalline phases with very simple basic structures are not stable as bulk materials at ambient conditions, however, for a broad range of compositions they represent stable high-temperature phases. In the system Ge/Sb/Te, rocksalt-type high-temperature phases are characterized by a large number of vacancies randomly distributed over the cation position, which order as 2D vacancy layers upon cooling. Short-range order in quenched samples produces pronounced nanostructures by the formation of twin domains and finite intersecting vacancy layers. As phase-change materials are usually semimetals or small-bandgap semiconductors and efficient data storage requires low thermal conductivity, bulk materials with similar compositions and properties can be expected to exhibit promising thermoelectric characteristics. Nanostructuring by phase transitions that involve partial vacancy ordering may enhance the efficiency of such thermoelectrics. We have shown that germanium antimony tellurides with compositions close to those used as phase-change materials in rewritable Blu-Ray Discs, e.g. (GeTe){sub 12}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, exhibit thermoelectric figures of merit of up to ZT = 1.3 at 450 C if a nanodomain structure is induced by rapidly quenching the cubic high-temperature phase. Structural changes have been elucidated by X-ray diffraction and high-resolution electron microscopy. (orig.)

  4. Heat transfer in multi-phase materials

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a profound understanding, which physical processes and mechanisms cause the heat transfer in composite and cellular materials. It shows models for all important classes of composite materials and introduces into the latest advances. In three parts, the book covers Composite Materials (Part A), Porous and Cellular Materials (Part B) and the appearance of a conjoint solid phase and fluid aggregate (Part C).

  5. 60NiTi Intermetallic Material Evaluation for Lightweight and Corrosion Resistant Spherical Sliding Bearings for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Jefferson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center and the Kamatics subsidiary of the Kaman Corporation conducted the experimental evaluation of spherical sliding bearings made with 60NiTi inner races. The goal of the project was to assess the feasibility of manufacturing lightweight, corrosion resistant bearings utilizing 60NiTi for aerospace and industrial applications. NASA produced the bearings in collaboration with Abbott Ball Corporation and Kamatics fabricated bearing assemblies utilizing their standard reinforced polymer liner material. The assembled bearings were tested in oscillatory motion at a load of 4.54kN (10,000 lb), according to the requirements of the plain bearing specification SAE AS81820. Several test bearings were exposed to hydraulic fluid or aircraft deicing fluid prior to and during testing. The results show that the 60NiTi bearings exhibit tribological performance comparable to conventional stainless steel (440C) bearings. Further, exposure of 60NiTi bearings to the contaminant fluids had no apparent performance effect. It is concluded that 60NiTi is a feasible bearing material for aerospace and industrial spherical bearing applications.

  6. Phase change materials in energy sector - applications and material requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuta, Marta; Wójcik, Tadeusz M.

    2015-05-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) have been applying in many areas. One of them is energy field. PCMs are interesting for the energy sector because their use enables thermal stabilization and storage of large amount of heat. It is major issue for safety of electronic devices, thermal control of buildings and vehicles, solar power and many others energy domains. This paper contains preliminary results of research on solid-solid phase change materials designed for thermal stabilisation of electronic devices.

  7. Crystallization kinetics of phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Michael; Sontheimer, Tobias; Wuttig, Matthias [I. Physikalisches Institut (1A), RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Phase change materials are fascinating materials. They can be rapidly switched between two metastable states, the amorphous and crystalline phase, which show pronounced contrast in their optical and electrical properties. They are already widely used as the active layer in rewritable optical media and are expected to be used in the upcoming phase change random access memory (PRAM). Here we show measurements of the crystallization kinetics of chalcogenide materials that lead to a deeper understanding of these processes. This work focuses mainly on the Ge-Sb-Te system but also includes Ag-In-Te materials. The crystallization behaviour of these materials was investigated with an ex-situ annealing method employing the precise oven of a differential scanning calorimeter and imaging techniques employing atomic force microscopy and optical microscopy.

  8. Influence of heat treatment on hardness and kinetics of growth of intermetallic compound interlayer in titanium-steel composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shmorgun, V.G.; Slaustin, O.V.; Trykov, Yu.P.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment conditions on microhardness and diffusion interlayer thickness is studied for composite material of titanium VT1-O + steel 08kp + titanium VT1-O. Heat treatments are carried out at temperatures of 800-1000 deg C and holding at heat for 3 h in a vacuum furnace (1 x 10 -4 mmHg) as well as in an electric furnace with coating a dual protective layer. It is stated that the hardness and the thickness of the interlayer are higher after heat treatment in an ordinary electric furnaces as compared to vacuum heating. all other things being equal. Annealed in electric furnace specimens are water quenched from temperatures of 600-950 deg C. It is shown that the hardness of the interlayer increases sharply when hardening from 650 deg C comparing with annealed specimens (from 4.5-5.2 to 7-9 GPa). The quenching from 700 and 800 deg C results in an interlayer hardness decrease down to 4.8-5.4 and 3.1-3 GPa respectively. A quenching temperature increase up to 800-900 deg C is accompanied by a monotonic enhancement of hardness from 3.5-4.8 up to 5.1-6.8 GPa [ru

  9. Phase transformations, stability, and materials interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Brewer, L.; Cost, J.R.; Shewmon, P.

    1977-07-01

    The proceedings of the Materials Sciences Workshop on Phase Transformations, Stability, and Materials Interactions are divided into sections according to the following topics: (I) workshop scope and priorities; (II) study group reports--ERDA mission needs; (III) study group reports--technical area research priorities

  10. Phase change material for temperature control and material storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessling, Jr., Francis C. (Inventor); Blackwood, James M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A phase change material comprising a mixture of water and deuterium oxide is described, wherein the mole fraction of deuterium oxide is selected so that the mixture has a selected phase change temperature within a range between 0.degree. C. and 4.degree. C. The mixture is placed in a container and used for passive storage and transport of biomaterials and other temperature sensitive materials. Gels, nucleating agents, freezing point depression materials and colorants may be added to enhance the characteristics of the mixture.

  11. Preparation of Ti3Al intermetallic compound by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tsutomu; Fukui, Takahiro

    2018-04-01

    Sintered compacts of single phase Ti3Al intermetallic compound, which have excellent potential as refractory materials, were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). A raw powder of Ti3Al intermetallic compound with an average powder diameter of 176 ± 56 μm was used in this study; this large powder diameter is disadvantageous for sintering because of the small surface area. The samples were prepared at sintering temperatures (Ts) of 1088, 1203, and 1323 K, sintering stresses (σs) of 16, 32, and 48 MPa, and a sintering time (ts) of 10 min. The calculated relative densities based on the apparent density of Ti3Al provided by the supplier were approximately 100% under all sintering conditions. From the experimental results, it was evident that SPS is an effective technique for dense sintering of Ti3Al intermetallic compounds in a short time interval. In this report, the sintering characteristics of Ti3Al intermetallic compacts are briefly discussed and compared with those of pure titanium compacts.

  12. Spark plasma sintering of titanium aluminide intermetallics and its composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoshan, Abdelhakim Ahmed

    Titanium aluminide intermetallics are a distinct class of engineering materials having unique properties over conventional titanium alloys. gamma-TiAl compound possesses competitive physical and mechanical properties at elevated temperature applications compared to Ni-based superalloys. gamma-TiAl composite materials exhibit high melting point, low density, high strength and excellent corrosion resistance. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) is one of the powder metallurgy techniques where powder mixture undergoes simultaneous application of uniaxial pressure and pulsed direct current. Unlike other sintering techniques such as hot iso-static pressing and hot pressing, SPS compacts the materials in shorter time (< 10 min) with a lower temperature and leads to highly dense products. Reactive synthesis of titanium aluminide intermetallics is carried out using SPS. Reactive sintering takes place between liquid aluminum and solid titanium. In this work, reactive sintering through SPS was used to fabricate fully densified gamma-TiAl and titanium aluminide composites starting from elemental powders at different sintering temperatures. It was observed that sintering temperature played significant role in the densification of titanium aluminide composites. gamma-TiAl was the predominate phase at different temperatures. The effect of increasing sintering temperature on microhardness, microstructure, yield strength and wear behavior of titanium aluminide was studied. Addition of graphene nanoplatelets to titanium aluminide matrix resulted in change in microhardness. In Ti-Al-graphene composites, a noticeable decrease in coefficient of friction was observed due to the influence of self-lubrication caused by graphene.

  13. Containerless automated processing of intermetallic compounds and composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. R.; Joslin, S. M.; Reviere, R. D.; Oliver, B. F.; Noebe, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    An automated containerless processing system has been developed to directionally solidify high temperature materials, intermetallic compounds, and intermetallic/metallic composites. The system incorporates a wide range of ultra-high purity chemical processing conditions. The utilization of image processing for automated control negates the need for temperature measurements for process control. The list of recent systems that have been processed includes Cr, Mo, Mn, Nb, Ni, Ti, V, and Zr containing aluminides. Possible uses of the system, process control approaches, and properties and structures of recently processed intermetallics are reviewed.

  14. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Stiebra, L; Cabulis, U; Knite, M

    2014-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage (TES) have become an important subject of research in recent years. Using PCMs for thermal energy storage provides a solution to increase the efficiency of the storage and use of energy in many domestic and industrial sectors. Phase change TES systems offer a number of advantages over other systems (e.g. chemical storage systems): particularly small temperature distance between the storage and retrieval cycles, small unit sizes and lo...

  15. Thermal Energy Storage with Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Gabriela SOCACIU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal energy storage (TES systems provide several alternatives for efficient energy use and conservation. Phase change materials (PCMs for TES are materials supplying thermal regulation at particular phase change temperatures by absorbing and emitting the heat of the medium. TES in general and PCMs in particular, have been a main topic in research for the last 30 years, but although the information is quantitatively enormous, it is also spread widely in the literature, and difficult to find. PCMs absorb energy during the heating process as phase change takes place and release energy to the environment in the phase change range during a reverse cooling process. PCMs possesses the ability of latent thermal energy change their state with a certain temperature. PCMs for TES are generally solid-liquid phase change materials and therefore they need encapsulation. TES systems using PCMs as a storage medium offers advantages such as high TES capacity, small unit size and isothermal behaviour during charging and discharging when compared to the sensible TES.

  16. Quality criteria for phase change materials selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitorino, Nuno; Abrantes, João C.C.; Frade, Jorge R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Selection criteria of phase change materials for representative applications. • Selection criteria based on reliable solutions for latent heat transfer. • Guidelines for the role of geometry and heat transfer mechanisms. • Performance maps based on PCM properties, operating conditions, size and time scales. - Abstract: Selection guidelines are primary criterion for optimization of materials for specific applications in order to meet simultaneous and often conflicting requirements. This is mostly true for technologies and products required to meet the main societal needs, such as energy. In this case, gaps between supply and demand require strategies for energy conversion and storage, including thermal storage mostly based on phase change materials. Latent heat storage is also very versatile for thermal management and thermal control by allowing high storage density within narrow temperature ranges without strict dependence between stored thermal energy and temperature. Thus, this work addressed the main issues of latent heat storage from a materials selection perspective, based on expected requirements of applications in thermal energy storage or thermal regulation. Representative solutions for the kinetics of latent heat charge/discharge were used to derive optimization guidelines for high energy density, high power, response time (from fast response to thermal inertia), etc. The corresponding property relations were presented in graphical forms for a wide variety of prospective phase change materials, and for wide ranges of operating conditions, and accounting for changes in geometry and mechanisms.

  17. Thermal stability of (AlSi){sub x}(ZrVTi) intermetallic phases in the Al–Si–Cu–Mg cast alloy with additions of Ti, V, and Zr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaha, S.K. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada); Czerwinski, F., E-mail: Frank.Czerwinski@nrcan.gc.ca [CanmetMATERIALS, Natural Resources Canada, 183 Longwood Road South, Hamilton, Ontario L8P 0A5 (Canada); Kasprzak, W. [CanmetMATERIALS, Natural Resources Canada, 183 Longwood Road South, Hamilton, Ontario L8P 0A5 (Canada); Friedman, J.; Chen, D.L. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2014-11-10

    Highlights: • Al–Si–Cu–Mg alloy was modified by introducing Zr, V, and Ti. • The chemistry of the phases was identified using SEM/EDX. • The crystal lattice parameters of the phases were characterized using EBSD. • To investigate the phase stability, XRD was performed up to 600 °C. • Thermal analysis was done to find out the possible phase transformation reactions. - Abstract: The Al–Si–Cu–Mg cast alloy was modified with additions of Ti–V–Zr to improve the thermal stability of intermetallics at increased temperatures. A combination of electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, and high temperature X-ray diffraction was explored to identify phases and temperatures of their thermal stability. The micro-additions of transition metals led to formation of several (AlSi){sub x}(TiVZr) phases with D0{sub 22}/D0{sub 23} tetragonal crystal structure and different lattice parameters. While Cu and Mg rich phases along with the eutectic Si dissolved at temperatures from 300 to 500 °C, the (AlSi){sub x}(TiVZr) phases were stable up to 696–705 °C which is the beneficial to enhance the high temperature properties. Findings of this study are useful for selecting temperatures during melting and heat treatment of Al–Si alloys with additions of transition metals.

  18. Fatigue of superalloys and intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoloff, N.S.

    1993-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of intermetallic alloys and their composites is contrasted to that of nickel-base superalloys. The roles of microstructure and slip planarity are emphasized. Obstacles to use of intermetallics under cyclic loading conditions are described and future research directions are suggested

  19. Recent advances in ordered intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.T.

    1995-01-01

    Ordered intermetallic alloys based on aluminides and silicides offer many advantages for structural use at elevated temperatures in hostile environments. Their attractive properties include excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance, light weight, and superior strength at elevated temperatures. The major concern for structural use of intermetallics was their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. For the past ten years, considerable effort has been devoted to the research and development of ordered intermetallic alloys, and good progress has been made on understanding intrinsic and extrinsic factors controlling brittle fracture in intermetallic alloys based on aluminides and silicides. Parallel efforts on alloy design have led to the development of a number of ductile and strong intermetallic alloys based on Ni(3)Al, NiAl, Fe(3)Al, FeAl, Ti(3)Al and TiAl systems for structural applications. (orig.)

  20. Theoretical Energy Release of Thermites, Intermetallics, and Combustible Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, S.H.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1999-05-14

    Thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels have long been used in pyrotechnic applications. Advantages of these systems typically include high energy density, high combustion temperature, and a wide range of gas production. They generally exhibit high temperature stability and possess insensitive ignition properties. For the specific applications of humanitarian demining and disposal of unexploded ordnance, these pyrotechnic formulations offer additional benefits. The combination of high thermal input with low brisance can be used to neutralize the energetic materials in mines and other ordnance without the "explosive" high-blast-pressure events that can cause extensive collateral damage to personnel, facilities, and the environment. In this paper, we review the applications, benefits, and characteristics of thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels. Calculated values for reactant density, heat of reaction (per unit mass and per unit volume), and reaction temperature (without and with consideration of phase changes and the variation of specific heat values) are tabulated. These data are ranked in several ways, according to density, heat of reaction, reaction temperature, and gas production.

  1. Cerium intermetallics CeTX. Review III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poettgen, Rainer; Janka, Oliver [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Chevalier, Bernard [Bordeaux Univ., Pessac (France). Inst. de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Bordeaux

    2016-05-01

    The structure-property relationships of CeTX intermetallics with structures other than the ZrNiAl and TiNiSi type are systematically reviewed. These CeTX phases form with electron-poor and electron-rich transition metals (T) and X = Mg, Zn, Cd, Hg, Al, Ga, In, Tl, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb, P, As, Sb, and Bi. The review focusses on the crystal chemistry, the chemical bonding peculiarities, and the magnetic and transport properties. Furthermore {sup 119}Sn Moessbauer spectroscopic data, high-pressure studies, hydrogenation reactions and the formation of solid solutions are reviewed. This paper is the third of a series of four reviews on equiatomic intermetallic cerium compound [Part I: R. Poettgen, B. Chevalier, Z. Naturforsch. 2015, 70b, 289; Part II: R. Poettgen, B. Chevalier, Z. Naturforsch. 2015, 70b, 695].

  2. Transitional Phenomena on Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wójcik Tadeusz M.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant problem with technology development is transferring of large heat fluxes, which requires constant heat transfer temperature (in the specified temperature range. This problem concern mainly the nuclear energetics, space technologies, military technologies and most of all electronics containing integrated circuits with very large scale of integrations. Intensive heat transfer and thermal energy storage are possible by the use of phase change materials (PCMs. In the paper there are presented preliminary results of research on the use of liquid-gas (L-G PCMs and solid-solid phase change materials (S-S PCMs. For L-G PCMs the boiling characteristics were determined by increasing and decreasing the heat flux, which for certain sets of structural parameters of the heating surface and the physical properties of the liquid induce a variety of forms of transitional phenomena. Thermal energy storage is much more effective when using PCMs than sensible heat.

  3. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    NASA has expressed a need for reusable, environmentally friendly, phase change coating that is capable of withstanding the heat loads that have historically required an ablative thermal insulation. The Space Shuttle Program currently relies on ablative materials for thermal protection. The problem with an ablative insulation is that, by design, the material ablates away, in fulfilling its function of cooling the underlying substrate, thus preventing the insulation from being reused from flight to flight. The present generation of environmentally friendly, sprayable, ablative thermal insulation (MCC-l); currently use on the Space Shuttle SRBs, is very close to being a reusable insulation system. In actual flight conditions, as confirmed by the post-flight inspections of the SRBs, very little of the material ablates. Multi-flight thermal insulation use has not been qualified for the Space Shuttle. The gap that would have to be overcome in order to implement a reusable Phase Change Coating (PCC) is not unmanageable. PCC could be applied robotically with a spray process utilizing phase change material as filler to yield material of even higher strength and reliability as compared to MCC-1. The PCC filled coatings have also demonstrated potential as cryogenic thermal coatings. In experimental thermal tests, a thin application of PCC has provided the same thermal protection as a much thicker and heavier application of a traditional ablative thermal insulation. In addition, tests have shown that the structural integrity of the coating has been maintained and phase change performance after several aero-thermal cycles was not affected. Experimental tests have also shown that, unlike traditional ablative thermal insulations, PCC would not require an environmental seal coat, which has historically been required to prevent moisture absorption by the thermal insulation, prevent environmental degradation, and to improve the optical and aerodynamic properties. In order to reduce

  4. Phase change material thermal capacitor clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  5. Addition of iron for the removal of the {beta}-AlFeSi intermetallic by refining of {alpha}-AlFeSi phase in an Al-7.5Si-3.6Cu alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belmares-Perales, S. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Zaldivar-Cadena, A.A., E-mail: azaldiva70@hotmail.com [Facultad de Ingenieria Civil, Departamento de Ecomateriales y Energia, Instituto de Ingenieria Civil, Av. Fidel Velasquez and Av. Universidad S/N, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, N.L. 66450 (Mexico)

    2010-10-25

    Addition of iron into the molten metal for the removal of the {beta}-AlFeSi intermetallic by refining of {alpha}-AlFeSi phase has been studied. Solidification conditions and composition determine the final microstructure and mechanical properties of a casting piece. It is known that increasing the iron content will produce an increasing of the {alpha}-AlFeSi and {beta}-AlFeSi phases. This phenomenon was confirmed with calculations made by Thermo-Calc{sup TM} software and validated with experimental results, however, the technique of iron addition in this study plays an important role on the solidification kinetics of these iron phases because the refining of {alpha}-AlFeSi and removal of {beta}-AlFeSi phases can be improved. Final results showed an improvement in mechanical properties by removal and refining of {beta}-AlFeSi and {alpha}-AlFeSi phases, respectively. This study shows a new method of removal of {beta}-AlFeSi that could be adopted in the aluminum smelting industry in aluminum alloys with a low cooling rate with a secondary dendritic spacing of about 37 {mu}m.

  6. Addition of iron for the removal of the β-AlFeSi intermetallic by refining of α-AlFeSi phase in an Al-7.5Si-3.6Cu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belmares-Perales, S.; Zaldivar-Cadena, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Addition of iron into the molten metal for the removal of the β-AlFeSi intermetallic by refining of α-AlFeSi phase has been studied. Solidification conditions and composition determine the final microstructure and mechanical properties of a casting piece. It is known that increasing the iron content will produce an increasing of the α-AlFeSi and β-AlFeSi phases. This phenomenon was confirmed with calculations made by Thermo-Calc TM software and validated with experimental results, however, the technique of iron addition in this study plays an important role on the solidification kinetics of these iron phases because the refining of α-AlFeSi and removal of β-AlFeSi phases can be improved. Final results showed an improvement in mechanical properties by removal and refining of β-AlFeSi and α-AlFeSi phases, respectively. This study shows a new method of removal of β-AlFeSi that could be adopted in the aluminum smelting industry in aluminum alloys with a low cooling rate with a secondary dendritic spacing of about 37 μm.

  7. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 . The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  8. Electrical transport in crystalline phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woda, Michael

    2012-01-06

    In this thesis, the electrical transport properties of crystalline phase change materials are discussed. Phase change materials (PCM) are a special class of semiconducting and metallic thin film alloys, typically with a high amount of the group five element antimony or the group six element tellurium, such as Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}. The unique property portfolio of this material class makes it suitable for memory applications. PCMs reveal fast switching between two stable room-temperature phases (amorphous and crystalline) realized by optical laser or electrical current pulses in memory devices. Additionally, a pronounced property contrast in form of optical reflectivity and electrical conductivity between the amorphous and crystalline phase is the characteristic fingerprint of PCMs. The emerging electrical solid state memory PCRAM is a very promising candidate to replace Flash memory in the near future or to even become a universal memory, which is non-volatile and shows the speed and cyclability of DRAM. One of the main technological challenges is the switching process into the amorphous state, which is the most power demanding step. In order to reduce the switching power, the crystalline resistivity needs to be increased at a given voltage. Thus understanding and tayloring of this property is mandatory. In this work, first the technological relevance, i.e. optical and electrical memory concepts based on PCMs are introduced. Subsequently a description of the physical properties of PCMs in four categories is given. Namely, structure, kinetics, optical properties and electrical properties are discussed. Then important recent developments such as the identification of resonant bonding in crystalline PCMs and a property predicting coordination scheme are briefly reviewed. The following chapter deals with the theoretical background of electrical transport, while the next chapter introduces the experimental techniques: Sputtering, XRR, XRD, DSC, thermal annealing

  9. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.

    1992-01-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (p.c.m.) is disclosed. The silica particles have a critical size of about 7.times.10.sup.-3 to about 7.times.10.sup.-2 microns and the pcm must be added to the silica in an amount of 80 wt. % or less pcm per combined weight of silica and pcm. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a pcm material. The silica-pcm mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub.

  10. Dry powder mixes comprising phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, I.O.

    1994-02-01

    Free flowing, conformable powder-like mix of silica particles and a phase change material (PCM) is provided. The silica particles have a critical size of about 0.005 to about 0.025 microns and the PCM must be added to the silica in an amount of 75% or less PCM per combined weight of silica and PCM. The powder-like mix can be used in tableware items, medical wraps, tree wraps, garments, quilts and blankets, and in cementitious compositions of the type in which it is beneficial to use a PCM material. The silica-PCM mix can also be admixed with soil to provide a soil warming effect and placed about a tree, flower, or shrub. 2 figures.

  11. Material Engineering for Phase Change Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, David M.

    As semiconductor devices continue to scale downward, and portable consumer electronics become more prevalent there is a need to develop memory technology that will scale with devices and use less energy, while maintaining performance. One of the leading prototypical memories that is being investigated is phase change memory. Phase change memory (PCM) is a non-volatile memory composed of 1 transistor and 1 resistor. The resistive structure includes a memory material alloy which can change between amorphous and crystalline states repeatedly using current/voltage pulses of different lengths and magnitudes. The most widely studied PCM materials are chalcogenides - Germanium-Antimony-Tellerium (GST) with Ge2Sb2Te3 and Germanium-Tellerium (GeTe) being some of the most popular stochiometries. As these cells are scaled downward, the current/voltage needed to switch these materials becomes comparable to the voltage needed to sense the cell's state. The International Roadmap for Semiconductors aims to raise the threshold field of these devices from 66.6 V/mum to be at least 375 V/mum for the year 2024. These cells are also prone to resistance drift between states, leading to bit corruption and memory loss. Phase change material properties are known to influence PCM device performance such as crystallization temperature having an effect on data retention and litetime, while resistivity values in the amorphous and crystalline phases have an effect on the current/voltage needed to write/erase the cell. Addition of dopants is also known to modify the phase change material parameters. The materials G2S2T5, GeTe, with dopants - nitrogen, silicon, titanium, and aluminum oxide and undoped Gallium-Antimonide (GaSb) are studied for these desired characteristics. Thin films of these compositions are deposited via physical vapor deposition at IBM Watson Research Center. Crystallization temperatures are investigated using time resolved x-ray diffraction at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  12. Structural and Electronic Investigations of Complex Intermetallic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Hyunjin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    structures of these and related materials. Such calculations allow us to examine various interactions at the atomic scale, interactions which include orbital overlap, two-electron interactions, and Madelung terms. Moreover, these electronic studies also provide links between the angstrom-scale atomic interactions and the macro-scale physical properties, such as magnetism. Over the past few decades, there have been many significant developments toward understanding structure-bonding-property relationships in extended solids in terms of variables including atomic size, valence electron concentration, and electronegativity. However, many simple approaches based on electron counting, e.g., the octet rule, the 18-electron rule, or Wade's rules for boranes, cannot be applied adequately or universally to many of the more complex intermetallic compounds. For intermetallic phases that include late transition metals and post transition main group elements as their constituents, one classification scheme has been developed and effectively applied by using their valence electron count per atom (vec). These compounds are known as Hume-Rothery electron phases, and they have a variety of structure types with vec < 2.0 as shown in Table 1.

  13. 2. Intermetallic compounds with lanthanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elemans, J.B.A.A.

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical considerations are given concerning the structures of intermetallic compounds of the lanthanides and thorium (R) on the one hand, and with Fe, Co or Ni (M) on the other. They all derive from the parent composition RM 5 with the CaCu 5 hexagonal structure. This consists of alternate layers in which the M atoms are distinguished as M 1 and M 2 . The other compounds whose structures are studied are obtained by systematic replacement of R by M, or vice versa. In the first type, every third R is replaced by two M's yielding R 2 M 17 compounds. The substitution may be truly random or structured in two ways: so that either the hexagonal structure is maintained or that it is converted into a rhombihedral one. In the second type, one M (in a M 1 position) out of every five is replaced by one R, giving rise to RM 2 compounds which form Laves phases. In the third type, the M 1 's are replaced by R's, resulting in compounds RM 3 . In the fourth type, every third M is replaced by R, yielding R 2 M 7 compounds. With M = Co and R a light lanthanide, the compounds are ferromagnets; with R yttrium, thorium, or a heavy lanthanide, they are ferrimagnets. The preparation of the compounds in an arc-melting apparatus under an Ar-atmosphere followed by annealing is described

  14. Superplastic ceramics and intermetallics and their potential applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadsworth, J.; Nieh, T.G.

    1994-11-01

    Recent advances in the basic understanding of superplasticity and superplastic forming of ceramics and intermetallics are reviewed. Fine-grained superplastic ceramics, including yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, Y- or MgO-doped Al 2 O 3 Hydroxyapatite, β-spodumene glass ceramics, Al 2 0 3 -YTZP two-phase composites, SiC-Si 3 N 4 and Fe-Fe 3 C composites, are discussed. Superplasticity in the nickel-base (e.g., Ni 3 Al and Ni 3 Si) and titanium-base intermetallics (TiAl and T1 3 Al), is described. Deformation mechanisms as well as microstructural requirements and effects such as grain size, grain growth, and grain-boundary phases, on the superplastic deformation behavior am addressed. Factors that control the superplastic tensile elongation of ceramics are discussed. Superplastic forming, and particularly biaxial gas-pressure forming, of several ceramics and intermetallics are presented with comments on the likelihood of commercial application

  15. Magnetocaloric materials and first order phase transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves Bez, Henrique

    and magnetocaloric regenerative tests. The magnetic, thermal and structural properties obtained from such measurements are then evaluated through different models, i.e. the Curie-Weiss law, the Bean-Rodbell model, the free electron model and the Debye model.The measured magnetocaloric properties of La0.67Ca0.33MnO3...... heat capacity, magnetization and entropy change measurements. By measuring bulky particles (with a particle size in the range of 5001000 μm) of La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hz with first order phase transition, it was possible to observe very sharp transitions. This is not the case for finer ground particles which......This thesis studies the first order phase transitions of the magnetocaloric materials La0.67Ca0.33MnO3 and La(Fe,Mn,Si)13Hz trying to overcome challenges that these materials face when applied in active magnetic regenerators. The study is done through experimental characterization and modelling...

  16. Passive thermal management using phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganatra, Yash Yogesh

    The trend of enhanced functionality and reducing thickness of mobile devices has. led to a rapid increase in power density and a potential thermal bottleneck since. thermal limits of components remain unchanged. Active cooling mechanisms are not. feasible due to size, weight and cost constraints. This work explores the feasibility. of a passive cooling system based on Phase Change Materials (PCMs) for thermal. management of mobile devices. PCMs stabilize temperatures due to the latent heat. of phase change thus increasing the operating time of the device before threshold. temperatures are exceeded. The primary contribution of this work is the identification. of key parameters which influence the design of a PCM based thermal management. system from both the experiments and the numerical models. This work first identifies strategies for integrating PCMs in an electronic device. A. detailed review of past research, including experimental techniques and computational. models, yields key material properties and metrics to evaluate the performance of. PCMs. Subsequently, a miniaturized version of a conventional thermal conductivity. measurement technique is developed to characterize thermal resistance of PCMs. Further, latent heat and transition temperatures are also characterized for a wide. range of PCMs. In-situ measurements with PCMs placed on the processor indicate that some. PCMs can extend the operating time of the device by as much as a factor of 2.48. relative to baseline tests (with no PCMs). This increase in operating time is investigated. by computational thermal models that explore various integration locations, both at the package and device level.

  17. Strong, ductile, and thermally stable Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusoe, Keith J; Vijayan, Sriram; Bissell, Thomas R; Chen, Jie; Morley, Jack E; Valencia, Leopolodo; Dongare, Avinash M; Aindow, Mark; Lee, Seok-Woo

    2017-01-09

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) and nanocrystalline metals (NMs) have been extensively investigated due to their superior strengths and elastic limits. Despite these excellent mechanical properties, low ductility at room temperature and poor microstructural stability at elevated temperatures often limit their practical applications. Thus, there is a need for a metallic material system that can overcome these performance limits of BMGs and NMs. Here, we present novel Cu-based metal-intermetallic nanostructured composites (MINCs), which exhibit high ultimate compressive strengths (over 2 GPa), high compressive failure strain (over 20%), and superior microstructural stability even at temperatures above the glass transition temperature of Cu-based BMGs. Rapid solidification produces a unique ultra-fine microstructure that contains a large volume fraction of Cu 5 Zr superlattice intermetallic compound; this contributes to the high strength and superior thermal stability. Mechanical and microstructural characterizations reveal that substantial accumulation of phase boundary sliding at metal/intermetallic interfaces accounts for the extensive ductility observed.

  18. High temperature oxidation behavior of TiAl-based intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stroosnijder, M.F.; Sunderkoetter, J.D.; Haanappel, V.A.C.

    1996-01-01

    TiAl-based intermetallic compounds have attracted considerable interest as structural materials for high-temperature applications due to their low density and substantial mechanical strength at high temperatures. However, one major drawback hindering industrial application arises from the insufficient oxidation resistance at temperatures beyond 700 C. In the present contribution some general aspects of high temperature oxidation of TiAl-based intermetallics will be presented. This will be followed by a discussion of the influence of alloying elements, in particular niobium, and of the effect of nitrogen in the oxidizing environment on the high temperature oxidation behavior of such materials

  19. Anomalous phase change characteristics in Fe-Te materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, X. T.; Song, W. D.; Ji, R.; Ho, H. W.; Wang, L.; Hong, M. H.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials have become significantly attractive due to its unique characteristics for its extensive applications. In this paper, a kind of phase change material, which consists of Fe and Te components, is developed. The crystallization temperature of the Fe-Te materials is 180 deg. C for Fe 1.19 Te and can be adjusted by the Fe/Te ratio. High-speed phase change in the Fe-Te materials has been demonstrated by nanosecond laser irradiation. Comparing to conventional phase change materials, the Fe-Te materials exhibit an anomalous optical property that has higher reflectivity at amorphous than crystalline state, which is useful for data storage design.

  20. Reaction kinetics of the formation of intermetallic Fe – Zn during hot - dip galvanizing of steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review article mainly describes the composition of intermetallic Fe - Zn, i.e. zeta (ζ, delta (δ1k + δ1p, gamma1 (Γ1 and gamma (Γ on galvanized steel during low temperature galvanization (t ~ 450 °C. It gives detailed the formation, growth of individual phases during galvanization and their interaction. In terms of the kinetics, the formation of the coating is defined by a parabolic kinetic equation of the growth of different intermetallic phases under ideal conditions. From the available literature the rate constants of the formation of individual intermetallic phases and also for the total coating are cited. The composition of the intermetallic phases, iron content, crystal structure, and group symmetry in which the surface of galvanized steel forms.

  1. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  2. A highly active PtCu3 intermetallic core-shell, multilayered Pt-skin, carbon embedded electrocatalyst produced by a scale-up sol-gel synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bele, M; Jovanovič, P; Pavlišič, A; Jozinović, B; Zorko, M; Rečnik, A; Chernyshova, E; Hočevar, S; Hodnik, N; Gaberšček, M

    2014-11-07

    We present a novel, scaled-up sol-gel synthesis which enables one to produce 20 g batches of highly active and stable carbon supported PtCu3 nanoparticles as cathode materials for low temperature fuel cell application. We confirm the presence of an ordered intermetallic phase underneath a multilayered Pt-skin together with firm embedment of nanoparticles in the carbon matrix.

  3. Constitutive modeling of multiphase materials including phase transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Khan, A.S.; Meredith, C; Farrokh, B

    2011-01-01

    A constitutive model is developed for materials involving two or more different phases in their microstructure such as DP (Dual Phase) or TRIP (TRansformation Induced Plasticity) steels. Homogenization of the response of the phases is achieved by the Mean-Field method. One of the phases in TRIP

  4. Quaternary borocarbides: New class of intermetallic superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, R.; Gupta, L. C.; Dhar, S. K.; Mazumdar, Chandan; Hossain, Zakir; Godart, C.; Levy-Clement, C.; Padalia, B. D.; Vijayaraghavan, R.

    1995-01-01

    Our recent discovery of superconductivity (SC) in the four-element multiphase Y-Ni-B-C system at an elevated temperature (TC approximately 12 K) has opened up great possibilities of identifying new superconducting materials and generating new physics. Superconductivity with Tc (greater than 20 K) higher than that known so far in bulk intermetallics has been observed in multiphase Y-Pd-B-C and Th-Pd-B-C systems and a family of single phase materials RENi2B2C (RE= Y, rare earth) have been found. Our investigations show YNi2B2C to be a strong coupling hard type-II SC. HC2(T) exhibits an unconventional temperature dependence. Specific heat and magnetization studies reveal coexistence of SC and magnetism in RNi2B2C (R = Ho, Er, Tm) with magnetic ordering temperatures (Tc approximately 8 K, 10.5 K, 11 K and Tm approximately 5 K, approximately 7K, approximately 4 K respectively) that are remarkably higher than those in known magnetic superconductors . Mu-SR studies suggest the possibility of Ni atoms carrying a moment in TmNi2B2C. Resistivity results suggests a double re-entrant transition (SC-normal-SC) in HoNi2B2C. RENi2B2C (RE = Ce, Nd, Gd) do not show SC down to 4.2 K. The Nd- and Gd-compounds order magnetically at approximately 4.5 K and approximately 19.5 K, respectively. Two SC transitions are observed in Y-Pd-B-C (Tc approximately 22 K, approximately 10 K) and in Th-Pd-B-C (Tc approximately 20 K, approximately 14 K) systems, which indicate that there are at least two structures which support SC in these borocarbides. In our multiphase ThNi2B2C we observe SC at approximately 6 K. No SC was seen in multiphase UNi2B2C, UPd2B2C, UOs2Ge2C and UPd5B3C(0.35) down to 4.2 K. Tc in YNi2B2C is depressed by substitutions (Gd, Th and U at Y-sites and Fe, Co at Ni-sites).

  5. Application of phase-change materials in memory taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lei; Tu, Liang; Wen, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Phase-change materials are suitable for data storage because they exhibit reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states that have distinguishable electrical and optical properties. Consequently, these materials find applications in diverse memory devices ranging from conventional optical discs to emerging nanophotonic devices. Current research efforts are mostly devoted to phase-change random access memory, whereas the applications of phase-change materials in other...

  6. Production of low oxygen contamination orthorhombic Ti-Al-Nb intermetallic foil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gill, S.C.; Peters, J.A.; Blatter, P.; Jaquet, J.C.; Morris, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    Aerospace industries continue the search for high performance materials, and recent years have seen rapid developments being made in the capabilities of Ti-Al based intermetallic alloys. Interest in these alloys is caused by their attractive combination of strength and density, but major drawbacks include brittleness at low temperature and sensitivity to interstitial contamination. Development of a relatively new class of alloys was stimulated in 1988 by the discovery of Banerjee et al. of a Ti-Al-Nb orthorhombic (O) phase based on the Ti 2 AlNb composition. Some important applications for these alloys require the use of foil ( 2 phase and leads to material embrittlement. ELIT (Extra Low Interstitial Transfer) pack-rolling, developed by Sulzer Innotec, offers a technique to avoid oxygen contamination

  7. Effects of iron on intermetallic compound formation in scandium modified Al–Si–Mg Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patakham, Ussadawut [National Metal and Materials Technology Center, National Science and Technology Development Agency, 114 Thailand Science Park, Klong Nueng, Klong Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand); Limmaneevichitr, Chaowalit, E-mail: chaowalit.lim@mail.kmutt.ac.th [Production Engineering Department, Faculty of Engineering, King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Utid Rd., Bangmod, Tungkhru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Iron reduces the modification effects of scandium in Al–Si–Mg alloys. • Morphologies of Sc-rich intermetallic phases vary with Fe and Sc contents and the cooling rates. • Sc neutralizes effects of Fe by changing Fe-rich intermetallic phases from platelets to more cubic. - Abstract: In general, iron has a strong tendency to dissolve in molten aluminum. Iron has very low solid solubility in aluminum–silicon casting alloys, so it will form intermetallic compounds that cause detrimental effects on mechanical properties. In this work, the effects of iron on intermetallic compound formations in scandium modified Al–Si–Mg alloys were studied. There were two levels of iron addition (0.2 and 0.4 wt.%) and two levels of scandium addition (0.2 and 0.4 wt.%). We found that the effects of scandium modification decreased with increasing iron addition. The morphologies of the complex intermetallic compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) techniques. It was found that scandium changes the morphology of Fe-rich intermetallic compounds from β-phase (plate-like) to α-phase, which reduces the harmful effects of β-phase.

  8. Microstructure and tribological properties of NiMo/Mo2Ni3Si intermetallic 'in-situ' composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gui Yongliang; Song Chunyan; Yang Li; Qin Xiaoling

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Wear resistant NiMo/Mo 2 Ni 3 Si intermetallic 'in-situ' composites was fabricated successfully with Mo-Ni-Si powder blends as the starting materials. Microstructure of the NiMo/Mo 2 Ni 3 Si composites consists of Mo 2 Ni 3 Si primary dendrites, binary intermetallic phase NiMo and small amount of Ni/NiMo eutectics structure. The NiMo/Mo 2 Ni 3 Si composites exhibited high hardness and outstanding tribological properties under room-temperature dry-sliding wear test conditions which were attributed to the covalent-dominant strong atomic bonds and excellent combination of strength and ductility and toughness. - Abstract: Wear resistant NiMo/Mo 2 Ni 3 Si intermetallic 'in-situ' composites with a microstructure of ternary metal silicide Mo 2 Ni 3 Si primary dendritic, the long strip-like NiMo intermetallic phase, and a small amount of Ni/NiMo eutectics structure were designed and fabricated using molybdenum, nickel and silicon elemental powders. Friction and wear properties of NiMo/Mo 2 Ni 3 Si composites were evaluated under different contact load at room-temperature dry-sliding wear test conditions. Microstructure, worn surface morphologies and subsurface microstructure were characterized by OM, XRD, SEM and EDS. Results indicate that NiMo/Mo 2 Ni 3 Si composites have low fiction coefficient, excellent wear resistance and sluggish wear-load dependence. The dominant wear mechanisms of NiMo/Mo 2 Ni 3 Si composites are soft abrasion and slightly superficial oxidative wear.

  9. Influence of Filler Alloy Composition and Process Parameters on the Intermetallic Layer Thickness in Single-Sided Cold Metal Transfer Welding of Aluminum-Steel Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvayeh, Zahra; Vallant, Rudolf; Sommitsch, Christof; Götzinger, Bruno; Karner, Werner; Hartmann, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    Hybrid components made of aluminum alloys and high-strength steels are typically used in automotive lightweight applications. Dissimilar joining of these materials is quite challenging; however, it is mandatory in order to produce multimaterial car body structures. Since especially welding of tailored blanks is of utmost interest, single-sided Cold Metal Transfer butt welding of thin sheets of aluminum alloy EN AW 6014 T4 and galvanized dual-phase steel HCT 450 X + ZE 75/75 was experimentally investigated in this study. The influence of different filler alloy compositions and welding process parameters on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, which forms between the weld seam and the steel sheet, was studied. The microstructures of the weld seam and of the intermetallic layer were characterized using conventional optical light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results reveal that increasing the heat input and decreasing the cooling intensity tend to increase the layer thickness. The silicon content of the filler alloy has the strongest influence on the thickness of the intermetallic layer, whereas the magnesium and scandium contents of the filler alloy influence the cracking tendency. The layer thickness is not uniform and shows spatial variations along the bonding interface. The thinnest intermetallic layer (mean thickness < 4 µm) is obtained using the silicon-rich filler Al-3Si-1Mn, but the layer is more than twice as thick when different low-silicon fillers are used.

  10. Advancement of Compositional and Microstructural Design of Intermetallic γ-TiAl Based Alloys Determined by Atom Probe Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Thomas; Clemens, Helmut; Mayer, Svea

    2016-01-01

    Advanced intermetallic alloys based on the γ-TiAl phase have become widely regarded as most promising candidates to replace heavier Ni-base superalloys as materials for high-temperature structural components, due to their facilitating properties of high creep and oxidation resistance in combination with a low density. Particularly, recently developed alloying concepts based on a β-solidification pathway, such as the so-called TNM alloy, which are already incorporated in aircraft engines, have emerged offering the advantage of being processible using near-conventional methods and the option to attain balanced mechanical properties via subsequent heat-treatment. Development trends for the improvement of alloying concepts, especially dealing with issues regarding alloying element distribution, nano-scale phase characterization, phase stability, and phase formation mechanisms demand the utilization of high-resolution techniques, mainly due to the multi-phase nature of advanced TiAl alloys. Atom probe tomography (APT) offers unique possibilities of characterizing chemical compositions with a high spatial resolution and has, therefore, been widely used in recent years with the aim of understanding the materials constitution and appearing basic phenomena on the atomic scale and applying these findings to alloy development. This review, thus, aims at summarizing scientific works regarding the application of atom probe tomography towards the understanding and further development of intermetallic TiAl alloys. PMID:28773880

  11. Growth kinetics of the intermetallic phase in diffusion-soldered (Cu-5 at.%Ni)/Sn/(Cu-5 at.%Ni) interconnections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierzbicka-Miernik, A.; Miernik, K.; Wojewoda-Budka, J.; Szyszkiewicz, K.; Filipek, R.; Litynska-Dobrzynska, L.; Kodentsov, A.; Zieba, P.

    2013-01-01

    A stereological analysis was carried out in order to obtain the kinetics parameters of the (Cu1-xNix)6Sn5 growth in the diffusion soldered (Cu–5 at.%Ni)/Sn/(Cu–5 at.%Ni) interconnections where previously anomalous fast growth of this phase was described. The n-parameter in the equation x = ktn was

  12. Thermodynamics and kinetics of the formation of rare earth intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deodhar, S.S.

    1975-01-01

    Heats of reaction of rare earth intermetallics with iron, cobalt and nickel were determined using Differential Thermal Analysis technique. The intermetallic compounds studied were of MgCu 2 type Laves phases and the rare earth elements studied were praseodymium, gadolinium, dyprosium and erbium. The reactions were exothermic and the heats of reaction were generally high. They varied from the low of -2.5 kcal/g mole for Fe 2 Gd to the high of -35.3 kcal/g mole for Ni 2 Er. The magnitudes of heats of reaction were always greater for the intermetallics of heavy rare earth elements. The rare earth intermetallics studied were either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic. The variations in the magnetic moments and the heats of reaction with respect to the atomic number of the rare earth elements followed certain trends. The similarities were observed in the trends of two properties. Electronic configuration for the MgCu 2 type rare earth intermetallics is proposed using Engel--Brewer correlation for metallic structures and the structural features of the Laves phase compounds. Kinetics of the reactions between the rare earth elements and iron, cobalt, and nickel was studied. The rate of reaction was diffusion controlled in each case. The Valensi--Carter equation for the diffusion mechanism satisfactorily described the kinetic behavior. The magnitudes of activation energies and frequency factors were determined. The reactions can be characterized by their reaction temperatures since they always begin at definite temperatures. It was observed that the reaction began at a higher temperature if the activation energy for the reaction was high

  13. Diffusion mechanisms in intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larikov, L N [ANU, Inst. Metallofiziki, Kiev (Ukraine)

    1992-08-01

    Recent research aimed at the identification of the principal mechanisms of diffusion in intermetallics is reviewed. In particular, attention is given to the effect of the type of interatomic bond on the contribution of different mechanisms to diffusion in ordered metallic compounds. Results of an analysis of experimental determinations of diffusion coefficients D(A) and D(B) in binary intermetallics (CuZn, Cu3Sn, AuCd, AgZn, AgMg, InSb, GaSb, AlSb, Fe3Al, FeAl, FeAl3, Ni3Al, Ni3Nb, FeSn, FeSn2, Ni3Sn2, Ni3Sn4, Co3Sn2, CoSn, CoSn2, and CoGa) are presented, and it is shown that the D(A)/D(B) ratio differs substantially for different diffusion mechanisms. 60 refs.

  14. Microstructure characterization of multi-phase composites and utilization of phase change materials and recycled rubbers in cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshgin, Pania

    2011-12-01

    This research focuses on two important subjects: (1) Characterization of heterogeneous microstructure of multi-phase composites and the effect of microstructural features on effective properties of the material. (2) Utilizations of phase change materials and recycled rubber particles from waste tires to improve thermal properties of insulation materials used in building envelopes. Spatial pattern of multi-phase and multidimensional internal structures of most composite materials are highly random. Quantitative description of the spatial distribution should be developed based on proper statistical models, which characterize the morphological features. For a composite material with multi-phases, the volume fraction of the phases as well as the morphological parameters of the phases have very strong influences on the effective property of the composite. These morphological parameters depend on the microstructure of each phase. This study intends to include the effect of higher order morphological details of the microstructure in the composite models. The higher order statistics, called two-point correlation functions characterize various behaviors of the composite at any two points in a stochastic field. Specifically, correlation functions of mosaic patterns are used in the study for characterizing transport properties of composite materials. One of the most effective methods to improve energy efficiency of buildings is to enhance thermal properties of insulation materials. The idea of using phase change materials and recycled rubber particles such as scrap tires in insulation materials for building envelopes has been studied.

  15. Heat storage system utilizing phase change materials government rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.

    2000-09-12

    A thermal energy transport and storage system is provided which includes an evaporator containing a mixture of a first phase change material and a silica powder, and a condenser containing a second phase change material. The silica powder/PCM mixture absorbs heat energy from a source such as a solar collector such that the phase change material forms a vapor which is transported from the evaporator to the condenser, where the second phase change material melts and stores the heat energy, then releases the energy to an environmental space via a heat exchanger. The vapor is condensed to a liquid which is transported back to the evaporator. The system allows the repeated transfer of thermal energy using the heat of vaporization and condensation of the phase change material.

  16. Intermetallic matrix composites; Proceedings of the MRS Symposium, San Francisco, CA, Apr. 18-20, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anton, D.L.; Martin, P.L.; Miracle, D.B.; Mcmeeking, R.

    1990-01-01

    The present volume on intermetallic matrix composites discusses the modeling, processing, microstructure/property relationships, and compatibility of intermetallic matrix composites. Attention is given to models for the strength of ductile matrix composites, innovative processing techniques for intermetallic matrix composites, ductile phase toughening of brittle intermetallics, and reactive synthesis of NbAl3 matrix composites. Topics addressed include solidification processing of NbCr2 alloys, Ta and Nb reinforced MoSi2, the microstructure and mechanical behavior of Ni3Al-matrix composites, and ductile-phase toughening of Cr3Si with chromium. Also discussed are dislocation morphologies in TiB2/NiAl, the development of highly impact resistant NiAl matrix composites, the effect of notches on the fatigue life of the SCS-6Ti3Al composite, and the chemical stability of fiber-metal matrix composites

  17. Phase change materials in non-volatile storage

    OpenAIRE

    Ielmini, Daniele; Lacaita, Andrea L.

    2011-01-01

    After revolutionizing the technology of optical data storage, phase change materials are being adopted in non-volatile semiconductor memories. Their success in electronic storage is mostly due to the unique properties of the amorphous state where carrier transport phenomena and thermally-induced phase change cooperate to enable high-speed, low-voltage operation and stable data retention possible within the same material. This paper reviews the key physical properties that make this phase so s...

  18. Latent Heat Storage Through Phase Change Materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    reducing storage volume for different materials. The examples are numerous: ... Latent heat is an attractive way to store solar heat as it provides high energy storage density, .... Maintenance of the PCM treated fabric is easy. The melted PCM.

  19. Universal Orbital Material Processing Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address NASA need for sustainable space operations and full utilization of the International Space Station (ISS) and specifically to advance the "Materials,...

  20. Microstructure and tribological properties of Ti–Cu intermetallic compound coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Chun; Zhou, Jiansong; Yu, Youjun; Wang, Lingqian; Zhou, Huidi; Chen, Jianmin

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ti–Cu coating has been synthesized on pure Ti substrate by laser cladding. ► Microstructure and tribological properties of Ti–Cu coating were analyzed. ► The prepared Ti–Cu intermetallic compound coating has excellent wear resistance. -- Abstract: Ti–Cu intermetallic compound coating has been in situ synthesized successfully on pure Ti substrate by laser cladding using copper powder as the precursor. It has been found that the prepared coating mainly contains of TiCu, TiCu 3 , Ti 3 Cu, and Ti phases. The transmission electron microscopy results conform further the existence of Ti–Cu intermetallic compound in the fabricated coating. Tribological properties of the prepared Ti–Cu intermetallic compound coating were systematically evaluated. It was found that normal loads and sliding speeds have a strong influence on the friction coefficient and wear rate of Ti–Cu intermetallic compound coating. Namely, the friction coefficient of the Ti–Cu intermetallic compound coating decreased with increasing normal load and sliding speed. The wear rate of the Ti–Cu intermetallic compound coating decreased rapidly with increasing sliding speed, while the wear rate increased as the normal load increased.

  1. Numerical research of influence of laser radiation parameters on the formation of intermetallic phases from metal powders in selective laser melting technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapovichev, A. V.; Knyazeva, A. G.; Smelov, V. G.

    2017-10-01

    A large number of factors influence the quality of the material obtained with selective laser melting. Through correct understanding and managing these factors, it is possible to achieve the necessary quality of the materials, which is highly competitive to the traditional production methods. The technique of selective laser melting is a complex process in which a large number of parameters affect the quality of the final product. The complexity of the process of selective laser melting consists of many thermal, physical and chemical interactions, which are influenced by a large number of parameters. The main parameters of SLM are scanning rate, laser radiation power and layer thickness. In the framework of this paper, there was made an attempt to take into account real physical and chemical processes taking place during the selective laser melting of an Ni-Al alloy.

  2. Phase Change Material Thermal Power Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Chao, Yi (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An energy producing device, for example a submersible vehicle for descending or ascending to different depths within water or ocean, is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a temperature-responsive material to which a hydraulic fluid is associated. A pressurized storage compartment stores the fluid as soon as the temperature-responsive material changes density. The storage compartment is connected with a hydraulic motor, and a valve allows fluid passage from the storage compartment to the hydraulic motor. An energy storage component, e.g. a battery, is connected with the hydraulic motor and is charged by the hydraulic motor when the hydraulic fluid passes through the hydraulic motor. Upon passage in the hydraulic motor, the fluid is stored in a further storage compartment and is then sent back to the area of the temperature-responsive material.

  3. Ultrafast and Highly Reversible Sodium Storage in Zinc-Antimony Intermetallic Nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Anmin [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department; Gan, Li-yong [Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu, Sichuan, (China). Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology of Materials; Cheng, Yingchun [Nanjing Univ. of Technology (China). Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM); Tao, Xinyong [Zhejiang Univ. of Technology, Hangzhou (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering; Yuan, Yifei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Sharifi-Asl, Soroosh [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department; He, Kun [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department; Asayesh-Ardakani, Hasti [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department; Vasiraju, Venkata [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering; Lu, Jun [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Mashayek, Farzad [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department; Klie, Robert [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Department of Physics; Vaddiraju, Sreeram [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Artie McFerrin Department of Chemical Engineering; Schwingenschlögl, Udo [King Abdullah Univ. of Science and Technology, Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Shahbazian-Yassar, Reza [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States). Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department

    2015-12-17

    The progress on sodium-ion battery technology faces many grand challenges, one of which is the considerably lower rate of sodium insertion/deinsertion in electrode materials due to the larger size of sodium (Na) ions and complicated redox reactions compared to the lithium-ion systems. Here, it is demonstrated that sodium ions can be reversibly stored in Zn-Sb intermetallic nanowires at speeds that can exceed 295 nm s-1. Remarkably, these values are one to three orders of magnitude higher than the sodiation rate of other nanowires electrochemically tested with in situ transmission electron micro­scopy. It is found that the nanowires display about 161% volume expansion after the first sodiation and then cycle with an 83% reversible volume expansion. Despite their massive expansion, the nanowires can be cycled without any cracking or facture during the ultrafast sodiation/desodiation process. Additionally, most of the phases involved in the sodiation/desodiation process possess high electrical conductivity. More specifically, the NaZnSb exhibits a layered structure, which provides channels for fast Na+ diffusion. This observation indicates that Zn-Sb intermetallic nanomaterials offer great promise as high rate and good cycling stability anodic materials for the next generation of sodium-ion batteries.

  4. Influence of gas detonation spraying conditions on the quality of Fe-Al intermetallic protective coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senderowski C.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present generalized research results and analyses of the quality of coatings produced with self decomposing Fe-Al intermetallic powders deposited on 1045 steel in the gas detonation spraying (GDS. A number of GDS experiments has been carried out with significantly changed operational spraying parameters (the volume of the fuel gas, carrier gas, distance and the frequency of spraying which define the process energy level directly influencing the quality of the coating. On the basis of the initial results the choice of the process parameters has been made to obtain the most advantageous set of geometrical and physical-mechanical properties of the coating material and substrate. The quality of the coatings was considered by taking into account the grain morphology, chemical content, phase inhomogeneity, cohesive porosity, as well as adhesive porosity in the substrate coating joint. The coating roughness was also considered. It was found that all GDS coatings produced are built with lamellar splats which result from the GDS process transformed (changed plasticity and geometry powder particles forming the deposit. The result of the GDS spraying parameters optimization is the lack of signs of melting of the material (even in microareas while the geometry of the deposited grains is considerably changed. This phenomenon has been considered as a proof of high plasticity of the GDS formed Fe-Al intermetallic coatings.

  5. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popelar, Carl F.; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA with a suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for the vessels described above, Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. An initial characterization of the strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth properties was performed in Phase 1. Based on the results and recommendations of Phase 1, a more extensive material property characterization effort was developed in this Phase 2 effort. This Phase 2 characterization included additional strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth of the multilayer vessel and head materials. In addition, some more limited characterization of the welds and heat affected zones (HAZs) were performed. This report

  6. Phase change materials: science and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raoux, Simone; Wuttig, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    ... are the Ovonic threshold switch, the multi-state Ovonic Universal Memory (OUM), and the Ovonic cognitive device which emulates the biological neurons with its plasticity and synaptic activity. The field of amorphous and disordered materials created not only a basic new area of science, but also important new technologies. It should be kept in mind that...

  7. Application of phase-change materials in memory taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Tu, Liang; Wen, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Phase-change materials are suitable for data storage because they exhibit reversible transitions between crystalline and amorphous states that have distinguishable electrical and optical properties. Consequently, these materials find applications in diverse memory devices ranging from conventional optical discs to emerging nanophotonic devices. Current research efforts are mostly devoted to phase-change random access memory, whereas the applications of phase-change materials in other types of memory devices are rarely reported. Here we review the physical principles of phase-change materials and devices aiming to help researchers understand the concept of phase-change memory. We classify phase-change memory devices into phase-change optical disc, phase-change scanning probe memory, phase-change random access memory, and phase-change nanophotonic device, according to their locations in memory hierarchy. For each device type we discuss the physical principles in conjunction with merits and weakness for data storage applications. We also outline state-of-the-art technologies and future prospects.

  8. Preparation and characterization of the Li(17)Pb(83) eutectic alloy and the LiPb intermetallic compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jauch, U.; Karcher, V.; Schulz, B.

    1986-01-01

    Li(17)Pb(83) and LiPb were prepared from the pure elements in amounts of several hundred grams. The resolidified samples were characterized by melting points (eutectic temperature), chemical analysis and metallography. Using differential thermal analysis the heats of fusion were determined and the behaviour of the intermetallic phase LiPb in vacuum and high purified He was studied. The results from these investigations were applied to characterize Li(17)Pb(83) prepared in high amounts for technical application as a potential liquid breeder material. (orig.)

  9. The behavior of intermetallic compounds at large plastic strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, G.T.; Embury, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper contains a summary of a broad study of intermetallics which includes the following materials, Ni 3 Al, Ti-48Al-1V, Ti-24Al-11Nb, Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb, and Ti-24.5 Al-10.5Nb-1.5Mo. Much effort has been devoted to the study of ordered materials at modes plastic strains and the problem of premature failure. However by utilizing stress states other than simple tension it is possible to study the deformation of intermetallic compounds up to large plastic strains and to consider the behavior of these materials in the regime where stresses approach the theoretical stress. The current work outlines studies of the work hardening rate of a number of titanium and nickel-based intermetallic compounds deformed in compression. Attention is given to the structural basis of the sustained work hardening. The large strain plasticity of these materials is summarized in a series of diagrams. Fracture in these materials in compression occurs via catastrophic shear at stresses of the order of E/80 (where E is the elastic modulus)

  10. Phase segregation, interfacial intermetallic growth and electromigration-induced failure in Cu/In–48Sn/Cu solder interconnects under current stressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yi; Lim, Adeline B.Y.; Luo, Kaiming; Chen, Zhong; Wu, Fengshun; Chan, Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure in Cu/In–48Sn/Cu solder bump interconnects at a current density of 0.7 × 10"4 A/cm"2 and ambient temperature of 55 °C has been investigated. During electromigration, tin (Sn) atoms migrated from cathode to anode, while indium (In) atoms migrated from anode to cathode. As a result, the segregation of the Sn-rich phase and the In-rich phase occurred. A Sn-rich layer and an In-rich layer were formed at the anode and the cathode, respectively. The accumulation rate of the Sn-rich layer was 1.98 × 10"−"9 cm/s. The atomic flux of Sn was calculated to be approximately 1.83 × 10"1"3 atoms/cm"2s. The product of the diffusivity and the effective charge number of Sn was determined to be approximately 3.13 × 10"−"1"0 cm"2/s. The In–48Sn/Cu IMC showed a two layer structure of Cu_6(Sn,In)_5, adjacent to the Cu, and Cu(In,Sn)_2, adjacent to the solder. Both the cathode IMC and the anode IMC thickened with increasing electromigration time. The IMC evolution during electromigration was strongly influenced by the migration of Cu atoms from cathode to anode and the accumulation of Sn-rich and In-rich layers. During electromigration, the Cu(In,Sn)_2 at the cathode interface thickened significantly, with a spalling characteristic, due to the accumulation of In-rich layer and the migration of Cu atoms - while the Cu(In,Sn)_2 at the anode interface reduced obviously, due to the accumulation of Sn-rich layer. The mechanism of electromigration-induced failure in Cu/In–48Sn/Cu interconnects was the cathode Cu dissolution-induced solder melt, which led to the rapid consumption of Cu in the cathode pad during liquid-state electromigration and this finally led to the failure. - Highlights: • Sn migrates to the anode, while In migrates to the cathode, during EM in Cu/In–48Sn/Cu. • The atomic flux of Sn has been calculated. • The interfacial IMCs were identified as: Cu_6(Sn,In)_5 + Cu(In,Sn)_2. • The interface evolution is strongly

  11. Electronic structure and properties of rare earth and actinide intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmayr, H.R.

    1984-01-01

    There are 188 contributions, experimental and theoretical, a few on rare earth and actinide elements but mostly on rare earth and actinide intermetallic compounds and alloys. The properties dealt with include 1) crystal structure, 2) magnetic properties and magnetic structure, 3) magnetic phase transformations and valence fluctuations, 4) electrical properties and superconductivity and their temperature, pressure and magnetic field dependence. A few papers deal with crystal growth and novel measuring methods. (G.Q.)

  12. Interface-related deformation phenomena in intermetallic γ-titanium aluminides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, F.; Wagner, R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of titanium aluminides towards higher ductility concentrates on Ti-rich alloys which are composed of the intermetallic phases γ(TiAl) and α 2 (Ti 3 Al). The two phases form a lamellar microstructure with various types of interfaces. The deformation behaviour of these materials was investigated by compression tests, which were performed for different orientations of the interfacial boundaries with respect to the sample axis. With regard to the mechanical properties the structure of the interfaces and the micromechanisms of deformation were studied by conventional and high resolution electron microscopy. Accordingly, the interfacial boundaries impede the propagation of slip across the lamellae, leading to an athermal contribution to the flow stress. (orig.)

  13. Interface-related deformation phenomena in intermetallic γ-titanium aluminides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, F.; Wagner, R.

    1993-01-01

    The development of titanium aluminides towards higher ductility concentrates on Ti-rich alloys which are composed of the intermetallic phases γ(TiAl) and α2(Ti3Al). The two phases form a lamellar microstructure with various types of interfaces. The deformation behaviour of these materials was investigated by compression tests, which were performed for different orientations of the interfacial boundaries with respect to the sample axis. With regard to the mechanical properties the structure of the interfaces and the micromechanisms of deformation were studied by conventional and high resolution electron microscopy. Accordingly, the interfacial boundaries impede the propagation of slip across the lamellae, leading to an athermal contribution to the flow stress.

  14. Codeformation processing of mechanically-dissimilar metal/intermetallic composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marte, Judson Sloan

    A systematic and scientific approach has been applied to the study of codeformation processing. A series of composites having mechanically-dissimilar phases were developed in which the high temperature flow behavior of the reinforcement material could be varied independent of the matrix. This was accomplished through the use of a series of intermetallic matrix composites (IMCs) as discontinuous reinforcements in an otherwise conventional metal matrix composite. The IMCs are produced using an in-situ reaction synthesis technique, called the XD(TM) process. The temperature of the exothermic synthesis reaction, called the adiabatic temperature, has been calculated and shown to increase with increasing volume percentage of TiB2 reinforcement. Further, this temperature has been shown to effect the size and spacing of the TiB2, microstructural features which are often used in discontinuous composite strength models. Study of the high temperature flow behavior of the components of the metal/IMC composite is critical to the development of an understanding of codeformation. A series of compression tests performed at 1000° to 1200°C and strain-rates of 10-3 and 10-4 sec-1. Peak flow stresses were used to evaluate the influence of material properties and process conditions. These data were incorporated into phenomenologically-based constitutive equations that have been used to predict the flow behavior. It has been determined that plastic deformation of the IMCs occurs readily, and is largely TiB2 independent, at temperatures approaching the melting point of the intermetallic matrices. Ti-6Al-4V/IMC powder blends were extruded at high temperatures to achieve commensurately deformed microstructures. The results of codeformation processing were analyzed in terms of the plastic strain of the IMC particulates. IMC particle deformation was shown to increase with increasing IMC particle size, volume percentage of IMC, extrusion temperature, homologous temperature, extrusion

  15. Micromechanisms of fracture and fatigue in Ti3Al based and TiAl based intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, A.W.; Chave, R.A.; Hippsley, C.A.; Bowen, P.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanisms of fracture and fatigue crack growth resistance in specific Ti 3 Al based and TiAl based intermetallics are reviewed. Effects of test temperature, environment and microstructure on crack growth resistance are considered in detail for several Ti 3 Al and Ti'Al based intermetallic systems under development. The implications of these studies for the structural reliability of these materials is also addressed briefly. (orig.)

  16. Nickel nanostructured materials from liquid phase photodeposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuffrida, Salvatore; Condorelli, Guglielmo G.; Costanzo, Lucia L.; Ventimiglia, Giorgio; Nigro, Raffaella Lo; Favazza, Maria; Votrico, Enrico; Bongiorno, Corrado; Fragala, Ignazio L.

    2007-01-01

    Liquid Phase Photo-Deposition (LPPD) technique has been used to obtain both colloidal particles and thin films of metallic and chloride nickel from solutions of only precursor Ni(acac) 2 (acac=2,4-pentandionato). Metallic nickel was obtained from ethanol solutions by direct nickel(II) photoreduction at 254 nm and by acetone sensitised reaction at 300 nm. In this latter process the rate was higher than in the first one. NiCl 2 was formed from CCl 4 solution by a solvent-initiated reaction. TEM analysis, performed on colloidal particles of nickel, showed that their dimensions are in the range 2-4 nm. The films did not present carbon contamination and were characterized by AFM, XPS and GIXRD. Metallic films consisted of particles of 20-40 nm that are the result of the aggregation of smaller crystallites (4-5 nm). Larger agglomerations (around 200 nm) have been observed for NiCl 2 films

  17. 60NiTi Intermetallic Material Evaluation for Lightweight and Corrosion Resistant Spherical Sliding Bearings for Aerospace Applications, Report on NASA-Kamatics SAA3-1288

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Jefferson, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Under NASA Space Act Agreement (SAA3-1288), NASA Glenn Research Center and the Kamatics subsidiary of the Kaman Corporation conducted the experimental evaluation of spherical sliding bearings made with 60NiTi inner races. The goal of the project was to assess the feasibility of manufacturing lightweight, corrosion resistant bearings utilizing 60NiTi for aerospace and industrial applications. NASA produced the bearings in collaboration with Abbott Ball Corporation and Kamatics fabricated bearing assemblies utilizing their standard reinforced polymer liner material. The assembled bearings were tested in oscillatory motion at a load of 4.54 kN (10,000 lb), according to the requirements of the plain bearing specification SAE AS81820. Several test bearings were exposed to hydraulic fluid or aircraft deicing fluid prior to and during testing. The results show that the 60NiTi bearings exhibit tribological performance comparable to conventional stainless steel (440C) bearings. Further, exposure of 60NiTi bearings to the contaminant fluids had no apparent performance effect. It is concluded that 60NiTi is a feasible bearing material for aerospace and industrial spherical bearing applications.

  18. Sputter-Resistant Materials for Electric Propulsion, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase 2 project shall develop sputter-resistant materials for use in electric propulsion test facilities and for plume shields on spacecraft using electric...

  19. Low Cost, Light Weight Materials for Mirrors, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During the phase I program Northwestern and APS, Inc., have manufactured several different materials systems that are lighter than Beryllium and stiffer than...

  20. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R.; Scorey, Clive; Sikka, Vinod K.; Deevi, Seetharama C.; Fleischhauer, Grier; Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton; German, Randall M.

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  1. Organic Phase Change Materials And Their Textile Applications: An Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Sarıer, Nihal; Önder, Emel

    2012-01-01

    An organic phase change material (PCM) possesses the ability to absorb and release large quantity of latent heat during a phase change process over a certain temperature range. The use of PCMs in energy storage and thermal insulation has been tested scientifically and industrially in many applications. The broad based research and development studies concentrating on the characteristics of known organic PCMs and new materials as PCM candidates, the storage methods of PCMs, as well as the reso...

  2. The phase field technique for modeling multiphase materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer-Loginova, I.; Singer, H. M.

    2008-10-01

    This paper reviews methods and applications of the phase field technique, one of the fastest growing areas in computational materials science. The phase field method is used as a theory and computational tool for predictions of the evolution of arbitrarily shaped morphologies and complex microstructures in materials. In this method, the interface between two phases (e.g. solid and liquid) is treated as a region of finite width having a gradual variation of different physical quantities, i.e. it is a diffuse interface model. An auxiliary variable, the phase field or order parameter \\phi(\\vec{x}) , is introduced, which distinguishes one phase from the other. Interfaces are identified by the variation of the phase field. We begin with presenting the physical background of the phase field method and give a detailed thermodynamical derivation of the phase field equations. We demonstrate how equilibrium and non-equilibrium physical phenomena at the phase interface are incorporated into the phase field methods. Then we address in detail dendritic and directional solidification of pure and multicomponent alloys, effects of natural convection and forced flow, grain growth, nucleation, solid-solid phase transformation and highlight other applications of the phase field methods. In particular, we review the novel phase field crystal model, which combines atomistic length scales with diffusive time scales. We also discuss aspects of quantitative phase field modeling such as thin interface asymptotic analysis and coupling to thermodynamic databases. The phase field methods result in a set of partial differential equations, whose solutions require time-consuming large-scale computations and often limit the applicability of the method. Subsequently, we review numerical approaches to solve the phase field equations and present a finite difference discretization of the anisotropic Laplacian operator.

  3. Nickel nanostructured materials from liquid phase photodeposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuffrida, Salvatore, E-mail: sgiuffrida@unict.it; Condorelli, Guglielmo G.; Costanzo, Lucia L.; Ventimiglia, Giorgio [Universita degli Studi di Catania and INSTM UdR di, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche (Italy); Nigro, Raffaella Lo [IMM-CNR (Italy); Favazza, Maria; Votrico, Enrico [Universita degli Studi di Catania and INSTM UdR di, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche (Italy); Bongiorno, Corrado [IMM-CNR (Italy); Fragala, Ignazio L. [Universita degli Studi di Catania and INSTM UdR di, Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche (Italy)

    2007-08-15

    Liquid Phase Photo-Deposition (LPPD) technique has been used to obtain both colloidal particles and thin films of metallic and chloride nickel from solutions of only precursor Ni(acac){sub 2} (acac=2,4-pentandionato). Metallic nickel was obtained from ethanol solutions by direct nickel(II) photoreduction at 254 nm and by acetone sensitised reaction at 300 nm. In this latter process the rate was higher than in the first one. NiCl{sub 2} was formed from CCl{sub 4} solution by a solvent-initiated reaction. TEM analysis, performed on colloidal particles of nickel, showed that their dimensions are in the range 2-4 nm. The films did not present carbon contamination and were characterized by AFM, XPS and GIXRD. Metallic films consisted of particles of 20-40 nm that are the result of the aggregation of smaller crystallites (4-5 nm). Larger agglomerations (around 200 nm) have been observed for NiCl{sub 2} films.

  4. Method of production multifilamentary intermetallic superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marancik, W.G.; Young, M.S.

    1980-01-01

    A method of making A-15 type intermetallic superconductors is disclosed which features elimination of numerous annealing steps. Nb or V filaments are embedded in Cu matrices; annular layers of Sn or Ga, respectively, separated from each other by Cu layers, provide the other component of the intermetallic superconductors Nb3Sn and V3Ga

  5. Intermetallic alloys: Deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, B.

    1988-01-01

    The state of the art in intermetallic alloys development with particular emphasis on deformation, mechanical and fracture behaviour is documented. This review paper is prepared to lay the ground stones for a future work on mechanical property characterization and fracture behaviour of intermetallic alloys at GKSS. (orig.)

  6. Advanced materials for future Phase II LHC collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Dallocchio, A; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Artoos, K

    2009-01-01

    Phase I collimators, equipped with Carbon-Carbon jaws, effectively met specifications for the early phase of LHC operation. However, the choice of carbon-based materials is expected to limit the nominal beam intensity mainly because of the high RF impedance and limited efficiency of the collimators. Moreover, C/C may be degraded by high radiation doses. To overcome these limitations, new Phase II secondary collimators will complement the existing system. Their extremely challenging requirements impose a thorough material investigation effort aiming at identifying novel materials combining very diverse properties. Relevant figures of merit have been identified to classify materials: Metal-diamonds composites look a promising choice as they combine good thermal, structural and stability properties. Molybdenum is interesting for its good thermal stability. Ceramics with non-conventional RF performances are also being evaluated. The challenges posed by the development and industrialization of these materials are ...

  7. Vacuum brazing of TiAl48Cr2Nb2 casting alloys based on TiAl (γ intermetallic compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Mirski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing interest in modern engineering materials characterised by increasingly better operational parameters combined with a necessity to obtain joints of such materials representing good operation properties create important research and technological problems of today. These issues include also titanium joints or joints of titanium alloys based on intermetallic compounds. Brazing is one of the basic and sometimes even the only available welding method used for joining the aforesaid materials in production of various systems, heat exchangers and, in case of titanium alloys based on intermetallic compounds, turbine elements and space shuttle plating etc. This article presents the basic physical and chemical properties as well as the brazability of alloys based on intermetallic compounds. The work also describes the principle and mechanisms of diffusion-brazed joint formation as well as reveals the results of metallographic and strength tests involving diffusion-welded joints of TiAl48Cr3Nb2 casting alloy based on TiAl (γ phase with the use of sandwich-type layers of silver-based parent metal (grade B- Ag72Cu-780 (AG 401 and copper (grade CF032A. Structural examination was performed by means of light microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM and energy dispersion spectrometer (EDS. Furthermore, the article reveals the results of shear strength tests involving the aforementioned joints.

  8. Discovery of Intermetallic Compounds from Traditional to Machine-Learning Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliynyk, Anton O; Mar, Arthur

    2018-01-16

    Intermetallic compounds are bestowed by diverse compositions, complex structures, and useful properties for many materials applications. How metallic elements react to form these compounds and what structures they adopt remain challenging questions that defy predictability. Traditional approaches offer some rational strategies to prepare specific classes of intermetallics, such as targeting members within a modular homologous series, manipulating building blocks to assemble new structures, and filling interstitial sites to create stuffed variants. Because these strategies rely on precedent, they cannot foresee surprising results, by definition. Exploratory synthesis, whether through systematic phase diagram investigations or serendipity, is still essential for expanding our knowledge base. Eventually, the relationships may become too complex for the pattern recognition skills to be reliably or practically performed by humans. Complementing these traditional approaches, new machine-learning approaches may be a viable alternative for materials discovery, not only among intermetallics but also more generally to other chemical compounds. In this Account, we survey our own efforts to discover new intermetallic compounds, encompassing gallides, germanides, phosphides, arsenides, and others. We apply various machine-learning methods (such as support vector machine and random forest algorithms) to confront two significant questions in solid state chemistry. First, what crystal structures are adopted by a compound given an arbitrary composition? Initial efforts have focused on binary equiatomic phases AB, ternary equiatomic phases ABC, and full Heusler phases AB 2 C. Our analysis emphasizes the use of real experimental data and places special value on confirming predictions through experiment. Chemical descriptors are carefully chosen through a rigorous procedure called cluster resolution feature selection. Predictions for crystal structures are quantified by evaluating

  9. Valence instabilities in cerium intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijkman, W.H.

    1982-01-01

    The primary purpose of this investigation was to study the magnetic behaviour of cerium in intermetallic compounds, that show an IV behaviour, e.g. CeSn 3 . In the progress of the investigations, it became of interest to study the effect of changes in the lattice of the IV compound by substituting La or Y for Ce, thus constituting the Cesub(1-x)Lasub(x)Sn 3 and Cesub(1-x)Ysub(x)Sn 3 quasibinary systems. A second purpose was to examine the possibility of introducing instabilities in the valency of a trivalent intermetallic cerium compound: CeIn 3 , also by La and Y-substitutions in the lattice. Measurements on the resulting Cesub(1-x)Lasub(x)In 3 and Cesub(1-x)Ysub(x)In 3 quasibinaries are described. A third purpose was to study the (gradual) transition from a trivalent cerium compound into an IV cerium compound. This was done by examining the magnetic properties of the CeInsub(x)Snsub(3-x) and CePbsub(x)Snsub(3-x) systems. Finally a new possibility was investigated: that of the occurrence of IV behaviour in CeSi 2 , CeSi, and in CeGa 2 . (Auth.)

  10. The role of intermetallic precipitates in Ti-62222S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, D J [US Air Force Mater. Directorate Wright Lab., Wright Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Broderick, T F [US Air Force Mater. Directorate Wright Lab., Wright Patterson AFB, OH (United States); Woodhouse, J B [UES Inc, Dayton, OH (United States); Hoenigman, J R [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States). Research Inst.

    1996-08-15

    Samples of Ti-62222-0.23wt.%Si were heat treated and aged at temperatures ranging from 1150 F to 1500 F with the view of effecting selective precipitation of {alpha}{sub 2} precipitates and silicides (i.e. Ti{sub x}Zr{sub 5-x}Si{sub 3}). The effect of these intermetallic precipitates on the mechanical properties and fracture morphology was assessed via three separate microstructural conditions: Ti-62222S with {alpha}{sub 2} precipitates, Ti-62222S with {alpha}{sub 2} and silicide precipitates, and Ti-62222S with silicide precipitates. Both types of intermetallic precipitate appear to lower the fracture toughness, however {alpha}{sub 2} promotes intergranular fracture while silicides lead to transgranular failure and dimpling. The combined presence of the {alpha}{sub 2} and silicides leads to mixed mode failure. Further, since {alpha}{sub 2} is present in the {alpha} phase and silicides precipitate out in the {beta} phase, it appears that the effect of each of these intermetallics in Ti-62222S is additive rather than synergistic. (orig.)

  11. Cerium intermetallics with TiNiSi-type structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janka, Oliver; Niehaus, Oliver; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie; Chevalier, Bernard [Bordeaux Univ. CNRS (UPR 9048), Pessac (France). Inst. de Chimie de la Matiere Condensee de Bordeaux (ICMCB)

    2016-08-01

    Intermetallic compounds with the equiatomic composition CeTX that crystallize with the orthorhombic TiNiSi-type structure can be synthesized with electron-rich transition metals (T) and X = Zn, Al, Ga, Si, Ge, Sn, As, Sb, and Bi. The present review focusses on the crystal chemistry and chemical bonding of these CeTX phases and on their physical properties, {sup 119}Sn and {sup 121}Sb Moessbauer spectra, high-pressure effects, hydrogenation reactions and the formation of solid solutions in order to elucidate structure-property relationships. This paper is the final one of a series of four reviews on equiatomic intermetallic cerium compounds [Part I: Z. Naturforsch. 2015, 70b, 289; Part II: Z. Naturforsch. 2015, 70b, 695; Part III: Z. Naturforsch. 2016, 71b, 165].

  12. Discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites via XD synthesis. [exothermal dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K. S.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    A review is given of recent results obtained for discontinuously reinforced intermetallic matrix composites produced using the XD process. Intermetallic matrices investigated include NiAl, multiphase NiAl + Ni2AlTi, CoAl, near-gamma titanium aluminides, and Ll2 trialuminides containing minor amounts of second phase. Such mechanical properties as low and high temperature strength, compressive and tensile creep, elastic modulus, ambient ductility, and fracture toughness are discussed as functions of reinforcement size, shape, and volume fraction. Microstructures before and after deformation are examined and correlated with measured properties. An observation of interest in many of the systems examined is 'dispersion weakening' at high temperatures and high strain rates. This behavior is not specific to the XD process; rather similar observations have been reported in other discontinuous composites. Proposed mechanisms for this behavior are presented.

  13. Theoretical energy release of thermites, intermetallics, and combustible metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, S.H.; Grubelich, M.C.

    1998-06-01

    Thermite (metal oxide) mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels have long been used in pyrotechnic applications. Advantages of these systems typically include high energy density, impact insensitivity, high combustion temperature, and a wide range of gas production. They generally exhibit high temperature stability, and possess insensitive ignition properties. In this paper, the authors review the applications, benefits, and characteristics of thermite mixtures, intermetallic reactants, and metal fuels. Calculated values for reactant density, heat of reaction (per unit mass and per unit volume), and reaction temperature (without and with consideration of phase changes and the variation of specific heat values) are tabulated. These data are ranked in several ways, according to density, heat of reaction, reaction temperature, and gas production.

  14. Aging mechanisms in amorphous phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raty, Jean Yves; Zhang, Wei; Luckas, Jennifer; Chen, Chao; Mazzarello, Riccardo; Bichara, Christophe; Wuttig, Matthias

    2015-06-24

    Aging is a ubiquitous phenomenon in glasses. In the case of phase-change materials, it leads to a drift in the electrical resistance, which hinders the development of ultrahigh density storage devices. Here we elucidate the aging process in amorphous GeTe, a prototypical phase-change material, by advanced numerical simulations, photothermal deflection spectroscopy and impedance spectroscopy experiments. We show that aging is accompanied by a progressive change of the local chemical order towards the crystalline one. Yet, the glass evolves towards a covalent amorphous network with increasing Peierls distortion, whose structural and electronic properties drift away from those of the resonantly bonded crystal. This behaviour sets phase-change materials apart from conventional glass-forming systems, which display the same local structure and bonding in both phases.

  15. Portable Thermoelectric Power Generator Coupled with Phase Change Material

    OpenAIRE

    Lim Chong C.; Al-Kayiem Hussain H.; Sing Chin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Solar is the intermittent source of renewable energy and all thermal solar systems having a setback on non-functioning during the night and cloudy environment. This paper presents alternative solution for power generation using thermoelectric which is the direct conversion of temperature gradient of hot side and cold side of thermoelectric material to electric voltage. Phase change material with latent heat effect would help to prolong the temperature gradient across thermoelectric material f...

  16. First-principles screening of structural properties of intermetallic compounds on martensitic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ikeda, Yuji; Tanaka, Isao

    2017-11-01

    Martensitic transformation with good structural compatibility between parent and martensitic phases are required for shape memory alloys (SMAs) in terms of functional stability. In this study, first-principles-based materials screening is systematically performed to investigate the intermetallic compounds with the martensitic phases by focusing on energetic and dynamical stabilities as well as structural compatibility with the parent phase. The B2, D03, and L21 crystal structures are considered as the parent phases, and the 2H and 6M structures are considered as the martensitic phases. In total, 3384 binary and 3243 ternary alloys with stoichiometric composition ratios are investigated. It is found that 187 alloys survive after the screening. Some of the surviving alloys are constituted by the chemical elements already widely used in SMAs, but other various metallic elements are also found in the surviving alloys. The energetic stability of the surviving alloys is further analyzed by comparison with the data in Materials Project Database (MPD) to examine the alloys whose martensitic structures may cause further phase separation or transition to the other structures.

  17. Multi-component intermetallic electrodes for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Michael M; Trahey, Lynn; Vaughey, John T

    2015-03-10

    Multi-component intermetallic negative electrodes prepared by electrochemical deposition for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries are disclosed. More specifically, the invention relates to composite intermetallic electrodes comprising two or more compounds containing metallic or metaloid elements, at least one element of which can react with lithium to form binary, ternary, quaternary or higher order compounds, these compounds being in combination with one or more other metals that are essentially inactive toward lithium and act predominantly, but not necessarily exclusively, to the electronic conductivity of, and as current collection agent for, the electrode. The invention relates more specifically to negative electrode materials that provide an operating potential between 0.05 and 2.0 V vs. metallic lithium.

  18. A review on phase change energy storage: materials and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farid, Mohammed M.; Khudhair, Amar M.; Razack, Siddique Ali K.; Al-Hallaj, Said

    2004-01-01

    Latent heat storage is one of the most efficient ways of storing thermal energy. Unlike the sensible heat storage method, the latent heat storage method provides much higher storage density, with a smaller temperature difference between storing and releasing heat. This paper reviews previous work on latent heat storage and provides an insight to recent efforts to develop new classes of phase change materials (PCMs) for use in energy storage. Three aspects have been the focus of this review: PCM materials, encapsulation and applications. There are large numbers of phase change materials that melt and solidify at a wide range of temperatures, making them attractive in a number of applications. Paraffin waxes are cheap and have moderate thermal energy storage density but low thermal conductivity and, hence, require large surface area. Hydrated salts have larger energy storage density and higher thermal conductivity but experience supercooling and phase segregation, and hence, their application requires the use of some nucleating and thickening agents. The main advantages of PCM encapsulation are providing large heat transfer area, reduction of the PCMs reactivity towards the outside environment and controlling the changes in volume of the storage materials as phase change occurs. The different applications in which the phase change method of heat storage can be applied are also reviewed in this paper. The problems associated with the application of PCMs with regards to the material and the methods used to contain them are also discussed

  19. Ground state searches in fcc intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolverton, C.; de Fontaine, D.; Ceder, G.; Dreysse, H.

    1991-12-01

    A cluster expansion is used to predict the fcc ground states, i.e., the stable phases at zero Kelvin as a function of composition, for alloy systems. The intermetallic structures are not assumed, but derived regorously by minimizing the configurational energy subject to linear constraints. This ground state search includes pair and multiplet interactions which spatially extend to fourth nearest neighbor. A large number of these concentration-independent interactions are computed by the method of direct configurational averaging using a linearized-muffin-tin orbital Hamiltonian cast into tight binding form (TB-LMTO). The interactions, derived without the use of any adjustable or experimentally obtained parameters, are compared to those calculated via the generalized perturbation method extention of the coherent potential approximation within the context of a KKR Hamiltonian (KKR-CPA-GPM). Agreement with the KKR-CPA-GPM results is quite excellent, as is the comparison of the ground state results with the fcc-based portions of the experimentally-determined phase diagrams under consideration

  20. Irregular Homogeneity Domains in Ternary Intermetallic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Joubert

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ternary intermetallic A–B–C systems sometimes have unexpected behaviors. The present paper examines situations in which there is a tendency to simultaneously form the compounds ABx, ACx and BCx with the same crystal structure. This causes irregular shapes of the phase homogeneity domains and, from a structural point of view, a complete reversal of site occupancies for the B atom when crossing the homogeneity domain. This work reviews previous studies done in the systems Fe–Nb–Zr, Hf–Mo–Re, Hf–Re–W, Mo–Re–Zr, Re–W–Zr, Cr–Mn–Si, Cr–Mo–Re, and Mo–Ni–Re, and involving the topologically close-packed Laves, χ and σ phases. These systems have been studied using ternary isothermal section determination, DFT calculations, site occupancy measurement using joint X-ray, and neutron diffraction Rietveld refinement. Conclusions are drawn concerning this phenomenon. The paper also reports new experimental or calculated data on Co–Cr–Re and Fe–Nb–Zr systems.

  1. Thermal energy storage using phase change materials fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Amy S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the use of solid‐liquid phase change materials to store significant amounts of energy in the latent heat of fusion. The proper selection of materials for different applications is covered in detail, as is the use of high conductivity additives to enhance thermal diffusivity. Dr. Fleischer explores how applications of PCMS have expanded over the past 10 years to include the development of high efficiency building materials to reduce heating and cooling needs, smart material design for clothing, portable electronic systems thermal management, solar thermal power plant design and many others. Additional future research directions and challenges are also discussed.

  2. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis. Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; Popelar, Carl F.; Page, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA a comprehensive suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for aging multilayer pressure vessels, Southwest Research Institute (R) (SwRI) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. This report describes Phase 1 of this effort which includes a preliminary material property assessment as well as a fractographic, fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analyses of an induced flaw in the outer shell of a representative multilayer vessel that was subjected to cyclic pressure test. SwRI performed this Phase 1 effort under contract to the Digital Wave Corporation in support of their contract to Jacobs ATOM for the NASA Ames Research Center.

  3. Study on the Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Behaviors of Fe-(20, 45) wt%Gd Intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Bo Kyeong; Baik, Youl; Choi, Yong [Dankook University, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Byung Moon [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Fe-(20, 45 wt%) Gd intermetallics were vacuum arc melted as the mother alloy of a neutron shielding and absorbing material. The structure of the cast Fe-20 wt%Gd intermetallics had primary dendrites with a short width of about 2 μm, which became coarse with increasing Gd content. The final compositions of the Fe-20 wt%Gd and Fe-45 wt%Gd intermetallics determined by Rietveld refinement were mainly Fe{sub 3}Gd with 26.6 at%Fe{sub 2}Gd, and Fe{sub 3}Gd with various intermetallics like 13.9 at%Fe{sub 2}Gd, 7.3 at%Fe{sub 9}Gd and 3.9 at%Fe{sub 17}Gd{sub 2}, respectively. The micro-hardnesses, yield strength, ultimate compressive strength and elongation of the Fe-20 wt%Gd intermetallics were 629±12 Hv, 753 MPa, 785 MPa and 4%, respectively, and those of the Fe-45 wt%Gd intermetallics were 741±13 Hv, 772 MPa, 823 MPa and 3%. Passivity was not present in artificial sea water at room temperature. The corrosion potentials and the corrosion rates of the Fe-20 wt%Gd and Fe-45 wt%Gd intermetallics were –624 mV{sub SHE}, 2.771 mA/cm{sup 2} , and –804 mV{sub SHE}, 3.397 mA/cm{sup 2} , respectively. The corroded surface of the Fe-Gd intermetallics contained corrosion products like gadolinium with iron, which detached to leave a trail of pits.

  4. Crack resistance behaviour of an intermetallic Ti-Al-Si-Nb alloy at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittkowsky, B.U.; Pfuff, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    The room temperature crack growth behaviour of a Ti-Al-Si-Nb alloy consisting of the two intermetallic phases (Ti, Nb) 3 (Al, Si) and (Ti, Nb) 5 (Si, Al) 3 is investigated in the present paper. The material exhibits a heterogeneous disordered microstructure and fails in a brittle manner. Crack growth is associated with a pronounced crack resistance behaviour. For a sample of nominally identical specimens the R-curves scatter around a mean curve with a standard deviation which remains roughly constant as the crack grows. A natural extension of the bundle model introduced in a previous paper is used to simulate R-curves and their scatter is in reasonably good agreement with the experimental findings. (orig.)

  5. Studies of hydrogen absorption and desorption processes in advanced intermetallic hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Masashi

    2005-07-01

    This work is a part of the research program performed in the Department of Energy Systems, Institute for Energy Technology (Kjeller, Norway), which is focused on the development of the advanced hydrogen storage materials. The activities are aimed on studies of the mechanisms of hydrogen interactions with intermetallic alloys with focus on establishing an interrelation between the crystal structure, thermodynamics and kinetics of the processes in the metal-hydrogen systems, on the one hand, and hydrogen storage properties (capacity, rates of desorption, hysteresis). Many of the materials under investigation have potential to be applied in applications, whereas some already have been commercialised in the world market. A number of metals take up considerable amounts of hydrogen and form chemical compounds with H, metal hydrides. Unfortunately, binary hydrides are either very stable (e.g. for the rare earth metals [RE], Zr, Ti, Mg: metal R) or are formed at very high applied pressures of hydrogen gas (e.g. for the transition metals, Ni, Co, Fe, etc.: Metal T). However, hydrogenation process becomes easily reversible at very convenient from practical point of view conditions, around room temperature and at H2 pressures below 1 MPa for the two-component intermetallic alloys R{sub x}T{sub y}. This raised and maintains further interest to the intermetallic hydrides as solid H storage materials. Materials science research of this thesis is focused on studies of the reasons staying behind the beneficial effect of two non-transition elements M(i.e., In and Sn) contributing to the formation of the ternary intermetallic alloys R{sub x}T{sub y}M{sub 2}., on the hydrogen storage behaviours. Particular focus is on two aspects where the remarkable improvement of ordinary metal hydrides is achieved via introduction of In and Sn: a) Increase of the volume density of stored hydrogen in solid materials to the record high level. b) Improvement of the kinetics of hydrogen charge and

  6. Subthreshold electrical transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, Manuel Le; Kaes, Matthias; Sebastian, Abu; Krebs, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Chalcogenide-based phase-change materials play a prominent role in information technology. In spite of decades of research, the details of electrical transport in these materials are still debated. In this article, we present a unified model based on multiple-trapping transport together with 3D Poole–Frenkel emission from a two-center Coulomb potential. With this model, we are able to explain electrical transport both in as-deposited phase-change material thin films, similar to experimental conditions in early work dating back to the 1970s, and in melt-quenched phase-change materials in nanometer-scale phase-change memory devices typically used in recent studies. Experimental measurements on two widely different device platforms show remarkable agreement with the proposed mechanism over a wide range of temperatures and electric fields. In addition, the proposed model is able to seamlessly capture the temporal evolution of the transport properties of the melt-quenched phase upon structural relaxation. (paper)

  7. Recent Advances on Neuromorphic Systems Using Phase-Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Lu, Shu-Ren; Wen, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Realization of brain-like computer has always been human's ultimate dream. Today, the possibility of having this dream come true has been significantly boosted due to the advent of several emerging non-volatile memory devices. Within these innovative technologies, phase-change memory device has been commonly regarded as the most promising candidate to imitate the biological brain, owing to its excellent scalability, fast switching speed, and low energy consumption. In this context, a detailed review concerning the physical principles of the neuromorphic circuit using phase-change materials as well as a comprehensive introduction of the currently available phase-change neuromorphic prototypes becomes imperative for scientists to continuously progress the technology of artificial neural networks. In this paper, we first present the biological mechanism of human brain, followed by a brief discussion about physical properties of phase-change materials that recently receive a widespread application on non-volatile memory field. We then survey recent research on different types of neuromorphic circuits using phase-change materials in terms of their respective geometrical architecture and physical schemes to reproduce the biological events of human brain, in particular for spike-time-dependent plasticity. The relevant virtues and limitations of these devices are also evaluated. Finally, the future prospect of the neuromorphic circuit based on phase-change technologies is envisioned.

  8. Recent Advances on Neuromorphic Systems Using Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Lu, Shu-Ren; Wen, Jing

    2017-12-01

    Realization of brain-like computer has always been human's ultimate dream. Today, the possibility of having this dream come true has been significantly boosted due to the advent of several emerging non-volatile memory devices. Within these innovative technologies, phase-change memory device has been commonly regarded as the most promising candidate to imitate the biological brain, owing to its excellent scalability, fast switching speed, and low energy consumption. In this context, a detailed review concerning the physical principles of the neuromorphic circuit using phase-change materials as well as a comprehensive introduction of the currently available phase-change neuromorphic prototypes becomes imperative for scientists to continuously progress the technology of artificial neural networks. In this paper, we first present the biological mechanism of human brain, followed by a brief discussion about physical properties of phase-change materials that recently receive a widespread application on non-volatile memory field. We then survey recent research on different types of neuromorphic circuits using phase-change materials in terms of their respective geometrical architecture and physical schemes to reproduce the biological events of human brain, in particular for spike-time-dependent plasticity. The relevant virtues and limitations of these devices are also evaluated. Finally, the future prospect of the neuromorphic circuit based on phase-change technologies is envisioned.

  9. Lightweight Phase-Change Material For Solar Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Philip

    1993-01-01

    Lightweight panels containing phase-change materials developed for use as heat-storage elements of compact, lightweight, advanced solar dynamic power system. During high insolation, heat stored in panels via latent heat of fusion of phase-change material; during low insolation, heat withdrawn from panels. Storage elements consist mainly of porous carbon-fiber structures imbued with germanium. Developed for use aboard space station in orbit around Earth, also adapted to lightweight, compact, portable solar-power systems for use on Earth.

  10. Cold storage with phase change material for building ventilation

    OpenAIRE

    Butala, Vincenc; Stritih, Uroš

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical analysis of building coolingusing night-time cold accumulation in phase change material (PCM), otherwise known as the "free-cooling" or "passive-cooling" principle. The phase change materials were used in ceilings and floors. The free-cooling principle is explained and some of the types of PCMs suitable for summer cooling are listed. An experiment was conducted using paraffin with a melting point of 22 °C as the PCM to store cold during the ni...

  11. Materials Behavior Research Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The purpose is to evaluate mechanical properties of materials including metals, intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, and ceramic-matrix composites under typical...

  12. Optimization of a phase change material wallboard for building use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznik, Frederic; Virgone, Joseph; Noel, Jean

    2008-01-01

    In construction, the use of phase change materials (PCM) allows the storage/release of energy from the solar radiation and/or internal loads. The application of such materials for lightweight construction (e.g., a wood house) makes it possible to improve thermal comfort and reduce energy consumption. A wallboard composed of a new PCM material is investigated in this paper to enhance the thermal behavior of a lightweight internal partition wall. The paper focuses on the optimization of phase change material thickness. The in-house software CODYMUR is used to optimize the PCM wallboard by the means of numerical simulations. The results show that an optimal PCM thickness exists. The optimal PCM thickness value is then calculated for use in construction

  13. Optimization of a phase change material wallboard for building use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznik, Frederic; Virgone, Joseph [Thermal Sciences Center of Lyon, CNRS, UMR 5008, INSA de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Bat Freyssinet, 40 Rue des Arts, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Noel, Jean [Free-lance Scientific Software Developer, 15 Place Carnot, 69002 Lyon (France)

    2008-08-15

    In construction, the use of phase change materials (PCM) allows the storage/release of energy from the solar radiation and/or internal loads. The application of such materials for lightweight construction (e.g., a wood house) makes it possible to improve thermal comfort and reduce energy consumption. A wallboard composed of a new PCM material is investigated in this paper to enhance the thermal behavior of a lightweight internal partition wall. The paper focuses on the optimization of phase change material thickness. The in-house software CODYMUR is used to optimize the PCM wallboard by the means of numerical simulations. The results show that an optimal PCM thickness exists. The optimal PCM thickness value is then calculated for use in construction. (author)

  14. Intergranular and inter-phased boundaries in the materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslanides, A.; Backhaus-Ricoult, M.; Bayle-Guillemaud, P.

    2000-01-01

    This document collects the abstracts of the talks presented during the colloquium J2IM on the intergranular and inter-phased boundaries in the materials. Around the themes of the interfaces behaviour and grain boundaries defects in materials, these days dealt with the microstructure behaviour in many domains such as the interfaces in batteries, the irradiation damages and the special case of the fuel-cladding interactions, the stressed interfaces, the alumina or silicon carbides substrates. (A.L.B.)

  15. Encapsulation of phase change materials using rice-husk-char

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gondora, Wayne; Doudin, Khalid; Nowakowski, Daniel J.; Xiao, Bo; Ding, Yulong; Bridgwater, Tony; Yuan, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Rice-husk-char particles are successfully used in the encapsulation of phase change materials. • Carbon-based phase change microcapsules aim at using the high thermal conductivity of carbon materials. • Carbon from biomass can be used in low and intermediate heat harvest and storage. • Carbon in biomass is captured and to be used in improving energy efficiency. - Abstract: This paper explored a new approach to prepare phase change microcapsules using carbon-based particles via Pickering emulsions for energy storage applications. Rice-husk-char, a by-product in biofuel production, containing 53.58 wt% of carbon was used as a model carbon-based material to encapsulate hexadecane. As a model phase change material, hexadecane was emulsified in aqueous suspensions of rice-husk-char nanoparticles. Water soluble polymers poly(diallyldimethyl-ammonium chloride) and poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) were used to fix the rice-husk-char nanoparticles on the emulsion droplets through layer-by-layer assembly to enhance the structural stability of the microcapsules. The microcapsules formed are composed of a thin shell encompassing a large core consisting of hexadecane. Thermal gravimetrical and differential scanning calorimeter analyses showed the phase change enthalpy of 80.9 kJ kg"−"1 or 120.0 MJ m"−"3. Design criteria of phase change microcapsules and preparation considerations were discussed in terms of desired applications. This work demonstrated possible utilisations of biomass-originated carbon-based material for thermal energy recovery and storage applications, which can be a new route of carbon capture and utilisation.

  16. Intermetallics Synthesis in the Fe–Al System via Layer by Layer 3D Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floran Missemer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Intermetallide phase formation was studied in a powdered Fe–Al system under layer by layer laser cladding with the aim of fabricating the gradient of properties by means of changing the Fe–Al concentration ratio in the powder mixture from layer to layer. The relationships between the laser cladding parameters and the intermetallic phase structures in the consecutively cladded layers were determined. In order to study the structure formation an optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, measurement of microhardness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectroscopy analysis were used after the laser synthesis of intermetallic compounds.

  17. State of the art on phase change material slurries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youssef, Ziad; Delahaye, Anthony; Huang Li; Trinquet, François; Fournaison, Laurence; Pollerberg, Clemens; Doetsch, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A bibliographic study on PCM slurries. ► Clathrate Hydrate slurry, Microencapsulated PCM Slurry, shape-stabilized PCM slurries and Phase Change Material Emulsions. ► Formation, thermo-physical, rheological, heat transfers properties and applications of these four PCS systems. ► The use of thermal energy storage and distribution based on PCM slurries can improve the refrigerating machine performances. - Abstract: The interest in using phase change slurry (PCS) media as thermal storage and heat transfer fluids is increasing and thus leading to an enhancement in the number of articles on the subject. In air-conditioning and refrigeration applications, PCS systems represent a pure benefit resulting in the increase of thermal energy storage capacity, high heat transfer characteristics and positive phase change temperatures which can occur under low pressures. Hence, they allow the increase of energy efficiency and reduce the quantity of thermal fluids. This review describes the formation, thermo-physical, rheological, heat transfer properties and applications of four PCS systems: Clathrate hydrate slurry (CHS), Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials Slurry (MPCMS), shape-stabilized PCM slurries (SPCMSs) and Phase Change Material Emulsions (PCMEs). It regroups a bibliographic summary of important information that can be very helpful when such systems are used. It also gives interesting and valuable insights on the choice of the most suitable PCS media for laboratory and industrial applications.

  18. Phase change materials and the perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead

  19. Phase Change Materials and the perception of wetness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead

  20. Performance enhancement of hermetic compressor using phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, I. M.; Rady, M. A.; Huzayyin, A. S.

    2015-08-01

    The present study is motivated by the need for the research of simple measures for increasing energy efficiency of hermetic compressor. The measure is the application of phase change materials for performance enhancement. The first experimental study should be guide for choice of PCM. It has been performed to investigate the effects of thermostat setting temperature on the performance of hermetic compressor. The effects of thermostat setting temperature with and without load on power consumption have been analyzed. Performance enhancement using phase change materials (PCMs) has been studied by employing a phase change material Rubitherm-42 (RT-42) on the top surface of compressor. Choice of PCM material is based on basic compressor performance measured in the first part of the present study. Experiments have been carried out for different load values and different quantities of PCM. The quantity and phase change characteristic of PCM are essential parameters that determine the percentage of performance enhancement in term of energy consumption. Reduction of energy consumption of about 10% has been achieved in the present study by using PCM. The present study shows that how to reduce the electrical power consumption to enhance compressor heat dissipation method to improve efficiency.

  1. Polymeric compositions incorporating polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1989-01-01

    A polymeric composition comprising a polymeric material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the composition is useful in making molded and/or coated materials such as flooring, tiles, wall panels and the like; paints containing polyethylene glycols or end-capped polyethylene glycols are also disclosed.

  2. Plasticity induced phase transformation in molecular crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Koslowski, Marisol

    2014-01-01

    Solid state amorphization (SSA) can be achieved in crystalline materials including metal alloys, intermetallics, semiconductors, minerals and molecular crystals. Even though the mechanisms may differ in different materials, the crystalline to amorphous transformation occurs when the crystal reaches a metastable state in which its free energy is higher than that of the amorphous phase. SSA is observed in metal alloys because of interdiffusion of the crystalline elements during mechanical milli...

  3. Materials Characterization and Microelectronic Implementation of Metal-insulator Transition Materials and Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    materials like crystalline semiconductors, graphene , and composites, the materials discussed here could have a significant impact. This thesis investigates...diagnosis [124], crystallinity of pharmaceutical materials [125], materials diagnosis for restoration of paintings [126], and materials research [127...temperature dots and paint were placed on samples on the substrate. Temperature dots are typically used in the transportation of goods such as food in order

  4. Fiscal 1991 achievement report on next-generation industrial structure technology. Research and development of advanced materials for extreme environments (Development of methane fueled aeroengine); 1991 nendo chotaikankyosei senshin zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Methane nenryo kokukiyo engine no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-03-01

    Research and development was carried out for intermetallic compounds and fiber reinforced intermetallic compound composite materials for use as advanced materials. Activities were conducted in the four fields of (1) high specific strength intermetallic compounds, (2) high melting point intermetallic compounds, (3) fiber reinforced intermetallic compound composite materials, and (4) a comprehensive survey and research. In Field (1), ternary phase diagrams (Mo, Nb) were prepared for Ti-Al-X (X=metal) systems, and studies were made of alloy designs for Ti-Al based high specific strength intermetallic compounds. In Field (2), binary phase diagrams were prepared for Nb-Al systems, and the effect of phase and structure on their basic properties were investigated. A powder manufacturing tester was designed and built, and basic powder manufacturing tests were conducted. In Field (3), studies were made of heat treatment and surface coating technologies, and a silicon carbide based fiber was developed, excellent in oxidation resistance. In Field (4), technical trends were surveyed, and studies were made as to basic technical tasks to discharge for the development of materials for aeroengines. (NEDO)

  5. Intermetallic compounds of Ni and Ga as catalysts for the synthesis of methanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharafutdinov, Irek; Elkjær, Christian Fink; de Carvalho, Hudson Wallace Pereira

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we present a detailed study of the formation of supported intermetallic Ni–Ga catalysts for CO2 hydrogenation to methanol. The bimetallic phase is formed during a temperature-programmed reduction of the metal nitrates. By utilizing a combination of characterization techniques......, in particular in situ and ex situ X-ray diffraction, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy combined with electron energy loss spectroscopy and X-ray fluorescence, we have studied the formation of intermetallic Ni–Ga catalysts of two compositions: NiGa and Ni5Ga3. These methods...... demonstrate that the catalysts with the desired intermetallic phase and composition are formed upon reduction in hydrogen and enable us to propose a mechanism of the Ni–Ga nanoparticles formation. By studying the effect of calcination prior to catalyst reduction, we show that the reactivity depends...

  6. Development of Latent Heat Storage Phase Change Material Containing Plaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana BAJARE

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the development of latent heat storage Phase Change Material (PCM containing plaster as in passive application. Due to the phase change, these materials can store higher amounts of thermal energy than traditional building materials and can be used to add thermal inertia to lightweight constructions. It was shown that the use of PCMs have advantages stabilizing the room temperature variations during summer days, provided sufficient night ventilation is allowed. Another advantage of PCM usage is stabilized indoor temperature on the heating season. The goal of this study is to develop cement and lime based plaster containing microencapsulated PCM. The plaster is expected to be used for passive indoor applications and enhance the thermal properties of building envelope. The plaster was investigated under Scanning Electron Microscope and the mechanical, physical and thermal properties of created plaster samples were determined.

  7. Round-Robin Test of Paraffin Phase-Change Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidi, S.; Mehling, H.; Hemberger, F.; Haussmann, Th.; Laube, A.

    2015-11-01

    A round-robin test between three institutes was performed on a paraffin phase-change material (PCM) in the context of the German quality association for phase-change materials. The aim of the quality association is to define quality and test specifications for PCMs and to award certificates for successfully tested materials. To ensure the reproducibility and comparability of the measurements performed at different institutes using different measuring methods, a round-robin test was performed. The sample was unknown. The four methods used by the three participating institutes in the round-robin test were differential scanning calorimetry, Calvet calorimetry and three-layer calorimetry. Additionally, T-history measurements were made. The aim of the measurements was the determination of the enthalpy as a function of temperature. The results achieved following defined test specifications are in excellent agreement.

  8. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin, E-mail: wphsieh@stanford.edu; Mao, Wendy L. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Zalden, Peter [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Wuttig, Matthias [I. Physikalisches Institut (IA), RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); JARA – Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Lindenberg, Aaron M. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, PULSE Institute, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2013-11-04

    We used high-pressure Raman spectroscopy to study the evolution of vibrational frequencies of the phase change materials (PCMs) Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5}, GeSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}, and SnSb{sub 2}Te{sub 4}. We found that the critical pressure for triggering amorphization in the PCMs decreases with increasing vacancy concentration, demonstrating that the presence of vacancies, rather than differences in the atomic covalent radii, is crucial for pressure-induced amorphization in PCMs. Compared to the as-deposited amorphous phase, the pressure-induced amorphous phase has a similar vibrational spectrum but requires much lower laser power to transform into the crystalline phase, suggesting different kinetics of crystallization, which may have implications for applications of PCMs in non-volatile data storage.

  9. Al/Ni metal intermetallic composite produced by accumulative roll bonding and reaction annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozaffari, A.; Hosseini, M.; Manesh, H. Danesh

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Al/Ni metallic composites produced by accumulative roll bonding were heat treated at different temperatures and periods, to investigate the effect of reaction annealing on the structure and mechanical properties. → Based on the annealing conditions, various intermetallic phases were formed. The structure and composition of the composites were detected by SEM and XRD techniques. → The strength of the initial metallic composite can be improved due to the formation of the hard intermetallic phases, by the heat treatment process. - Abstract: In this research, Al/Ni multilayers composites were produced by accumulative roll bonding and then annealed at different temperatures and durations. The structure and mechanical properties of the fabricated metal intermetallic composites (MICs) were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses were used to evaluate the structure and composition of the composite. The Al 3 Ni intermetallic phase is formed in the Al/Ni interface of the samples annealed at 300 and 400 deg. C. When the temperature increased to 500 deg. C, the Al 3 Ni 2 phase was formed in the composite structure and grew, while the Al 3 Ni and Al phases were simultaneously dissociated. At these conditions, the strength of MIC reached the highest content and was enhanced by increasing time. At 600 deg. C, the AlNi phase was formed and the mechanical properties of MIC were intensively degraded due to the formation of structural porosities.

  10. Materials research for passive solar systems: Solid-state phase-change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D. K.; Webb, J. D.; Burrows, R. W.; McFadden, J. D. O.; Christensen, C.

    1985-03-01

    A set of solid-state phase-change materials is being evaluated for possible use in passive solar thermal energy storage systems. The most promising materials are organic solid solutions of pentaerythritol (C5H12O4), pentaglycerinve (C5H12O3), and neopentyl glycol (C5H12O2). Solid solution mixtures of these compounds can be tailored so that they exhibit solid-to-solid phase transformations at any desired temperature between 25 C and 188 C, and have latent heats of transformation etween 20 and 70 cal/g. Transformation temperatures, specific heats, and latent heats of transformation have been measured for a number of these materials. Limited cyclic experiments suggest that the solid solutions are stable. These phase-change materials exhibit large amounts of undercooling; however, the addition of certain nucleating agents as particulate dispersions in the solid phase-change material greatly reduces this effect. Computer simulations suggest that the use of an optimized solid-state phase-change material in a Trombe wall could provide better performance than a concrete Trombe wall four times thicker and nine times heavier.

  11. Fracture toughness of ordered intermetallic compounds exhibiting limited ductility and mechanical properties of ion-irradiated polycrystalline NiAl. Final report, July 1, 1986 - June 30, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardell, A.J.

    1997-09-01

    The focus of the research performed under the auspices of this grant changed several times during the lifetime of the project. The initial activity was an investigation of irradiation-induced amorphization of ordered intermetallic compounds, using energetic protons as the bombarding species. Two significant events stimulated a change of direction: (1) the proton accelerating facility that the authors had been using at the California State University at Los Angeles became unavailable late in 1988 because of a personnel matter involving the only individual capable of operating the machine; (2) they learned that disordering and amorphization of intermetallic compounds produced interesting effects on their mechanical properties. Loss of access t the local accelerator prompted a collaboration with Dr. Droa Pedraza of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), enabling access to the accelerator at ORNL. The influence of disordering and amorphization on mechanical properties ultimately stimulated the development of a miniaturized disk-bend testing (MDBT) facility, the intent of which was to provide semiquantitative and even quantitative measures of the mechanical behavior of ion-irradiated ordered intermetallic alloys. The second phase of the project involved the perfection and usage of the MDBT, and involved exploratory experiments on unirradiated materials like amorphous alloy ribbons and brittle grain boundaries in Ni 3 Al. This report is a brief summary of the research highlights of the project, organized according to the activity that was emphasized at the time

  12. Atomic interaction of the MEAM type for the study of intermetallics in the Al–U alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascuet, M.I. [CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fernández, J.R., E-mail: julrfern@cnea.gov.ar [CONICET, Avda. Rivadavia 1917, 1033 Buenos Aires (Argentina); CAC-CNEA, Avda. Gral Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina); UNSAM, Avda. Gral Paz 1499, 1650 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-12-15

    Interaction for both pure Al and Al–U alloys of the MEAM type are developed. The obtained Al interatomic potential assures its compatibility with the details of the framework presently adopted. The Al–U interaction fits various properties of the Al{sub 2}U, Al{sub 3}U and Al{sub 4}U intermetallics. The potential verifies the stability of the intermetallic structures in a temperature range compatible with that observed in the phase diagram, and also takes into account the greater stability of these structures relative to others that are competitive in energy. The intermetallics are characterized by calculating elastic and thermal properties and point defect parameters. Molecular dynamics simulations show a growth of the Al{sub 3}U intermetallic in the Al/U interface in agreement with experimental evidence. - Highlights: • Potential parameters for Al and Al–U systems are obtained. • Intermetallics are characterized by calculating elastic and thermal properties. • Point defect diffusivities are calculated for the three intermetallics. • Growth of the Al{sub 3}U intermetallic is shown to occur in the Al/U interface as in the real alloy.

  13. Atomic interaction of the MEAM type for the study of intermetallics in the Al–U alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascuet, M.I.; Fernández, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Interaction for both pure Al and Al–U alloys of the MEAM type are developed. The obtained Al interatomic potential assures its compatibility with the details of the framework presently adopted. The Al–U interaction fits various properties of the Al_2U, Al_3U and Al_4U intermetallics. The potential verifies the stability of the intermetallic structures in a temperature range compatible with that observed in the phase diagram, and also takes into account the greater stability of these structures relative to others that are competitive in energy. The intermetallics are characterized by calculating elastic and thermal properties and point defect parameters. Molecular dynamics simulations show a growth of the Al_3U intermetallic in the Al/U interface in agreement with experimental evidence. - Highlights: • Potential parameters for Al and Al–U systems are obtained. • Intermetallics are characterized by calculating elastic and thermal properties. • Point defect diffusivities are calculated for the three intermetallics. • Growth of the Al_3U intermetallic is shown to occur in the Al/U interface as in the real alloy.

  14. Highly tilted liquid crystalline materials possessing a direct phase transition from antiferroelectric to isotropic phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewska, K.; Drzewiński, W. [Institute of Chemistry, Military University of Technology, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Czerwiński, M., E-mail: mczerwinski@wat.edu.pl [Institute of Chemistry, Military University of Technology, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Dąbrowski, R. [Institute of Chemistry, Military University of Technology, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Piecek, W. [Institute of Applied Physics, Military University of Technology, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2016-03-01

    Pure compounds and multicomponent mixtures with a broad temperature range of high tilted liquid crystalline antiferroelectric phase and a direct phase transition from antiferroelectric to isotropic phase, were obtained. X-ray diffraction analysis confirms these kinds of materials form a high tilted anticlinic phase, with a fixed layer spacing and very weak dependency upon temperature, after the transition from the isotropic phase. Due to this, not only pure orthoconic antiferroelectric liquid crystals but also those with a moderate tilt should generate a good dark state. Furthermore, due to the increased potential for forming anticlinic forces, such materials could minimize a commonly observed asymmetry of a rise and fall switching times at a surface stabilized geometry. - Highlights: • The new class of liquid crystalline materials with the direct SmC{sub A}*. • Iso phase transition were obtained. • Materials possess the layer spacing fixed and very weak dependent upon temperature. • Smectic layers without shrinkage are observed. • A good dark state can be generate in SSAFLC.

  15. Estructura y propiedades del material compuesto de base cobre reforzado con partículas intermetálicas de TiB2. // Structure and properties of copper base reinforced with intermetallic particles of TiB2 material.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. López J.

    2002-09-01

    copper base reinforced alloy by means ofdispersion of TiB2 intermetalic ceramic is carried out. The copper-ceramic mechanical mixture was obtainedalloying powdered copper of 140 mm size with 1% and 2% of TiB2 in volume, dispers e in a planetary mill ofmartens itic stainless of high energy, with 12 and 36 hours milling in argon atmosphere using reason ofbolls/mass load in 10:1 powder. The powdered alloy consolidation was carried out in two stages.The objective of the study, is to investigate the evolution of mechanical and electric properties associated tomicroestructure changes taken place by compactacion process and hot lamination.Key words. Copper alloy, mechanical properties, microestructure, hot rolling.

  16. Microstructure and properties of Ti-Al intermetallic/Al2O3 layers produced on Ti6Al2Mo2Cr titanium alloy by PACVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitek, R.; Bolek, T.; Mizera, J.

    2018-04-01

    The paper presents investigation of microstructure and corrosion resistance of the multi-component surface layers built of intermetallic phases of the Ti-Al system and an outer Al2O3 ceramic sub-layer. The layers were produced on a two phase (α + β) Ti6Al2Mo2Cr titanium alloy using the PACVD method with the participation of trimethylaluminum vapors. The layers are characterized by a high surface hardness and good corrosion, better than that of these materials in the starting state. In order to find the correlation between their structure and properties, the layers were subjected to examinations using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), surface analysis by XPS, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and analyses of the chemical composition (EDS). The properties examined included: the corrosion resistance and the hydrogen absorptiveness. Moreover growth of the Al2O3 ceramic layer and its influence on the residual stress distribution was simulated using finite element method [FEM]. The results showed that the produced layer has amorphous-nano-crystalline structure, improved corrosion resistance and reduces the permeability of hydrogen as compared with the base material of Ti6Al2Mo2Cr -titanium alloy.

  17. Intermetallic Strengthened Alumina-Forming Austenitic Steels for Energy Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Bin [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Baker, Ian [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)

    2016-03-31

    In order to achieve energy conversion efficiencies of >50 % for steam turbines/boilers in power generation systems, the materials required must be strong, corrosion-resistant at high temperatures (>700°C), and economically viable. Austenitic steels strengthened with Laves phase and L12 precipitates, and alloyed with aluminum to improve oxidation resistance, are potential candidate materials for these applications. The creep resistance of these alloys is significantly improved through intermetallic strengthening (Laves-Fe2Nb + L12-Ni3Al precipitates) without harmful effects on oxidation resistance. Microstructural and microchemical analyses of the recently developed alumina-forming austenitic (AFA) steels (Fe-14Cr-32Ni-3Nb-3Al-2Ti-based) indicated they are strengthened by Ni3Al(Ti) L12, NiAl B2, Fe2Nb Laves phase and MC carbide precipitates. Different thermomechanical treatments (TMTs) were performed on these stainless steels in an attempt to further improve their mechanical properties. The thermo-mechanical processing produced nanocrystalline grains in AFA alloys and dramatically increased their yield strength at room temperature. Unfortunately, the TMTs didn’t increase the yield strengths of AFA alloys at ≥700ºC. At these temperatures, dislocation climb is the dominant mechanism for deformation of TMT alloys according to strain rate jump tests. After the characterization of aged AFA alloys, we found that the largest strengthening effect from L12 precipitates can be obtained by aging for less than 24 h. The coarsening behavior of the L12 precipitates was not influenced by carbon and boron additions. Failure analysis and post-mortem TEM analysis were performed to study the creep failure mechanisms of these AFA steels after creep tests. Though the Laves and B2-NiAl phase precipitated along the boundaries can improve the creep properties, cracks were

  18. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloucek, Petr (Inventor); Reynolds, Daniel R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  19. Vibration damping and heat transfer using material phase changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloucek, Petr [Houston, TX; Reynolds, Daniel R [Oakland, CA

    2009-03-24

    A method and apparatus wherein phase changes in a material can dampen vibrational energy, dampen noise and facilitate heat transfer. One embodiment includes a method for damping vibrational energy in a body. The method comprises attaching a material to the body, wherein the material comprises a substrate, a shape memory alloy layer, and a plurality of temperature change elements. The method further comprises sensing vibrations in the body. In addition, the method comprises indicating to at least a portion of the temperature change elements to provide a temperature change in the shape memory alloy layer, wherein the temperature change is sufficient to provide a phase change in at least a portion of the shape memory alloy layer, and further wherein the phase change consumes a sufficient amount of kinetic energy to dampen at least a portion of the vibrational energy in the body. In other embodiments, the shape memory alloy layer is a thin film. Additional embodiments include a sensor connected to the material.

  20. Disorder-induced localization in crystalline phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, T; Jost, P; Volker, H; Woda, M; Merkelbach, P; Schlockermann, C; Wuttig, M

    2011-03-01

    Localization of charge carriers in crystalline solids has been the subject of numerous investigations over more than half a century. Materials that show a metal-insulator transition without a structural change are therefore of interest. Mechanisms leading to metal-insulator transition include electron correlation (Mott transition) or disorder (Anderson localization), but a clear distinction is difficult. Here we report on a metal-insulator transition on increasing annealing temperature for a group of crystalline phase-change materials, where the metal-insulator transition is due to strong disorder usually associated only with amorphous solids. With pronounced disorder but weak electron correlation, these phase-change materials form an unparalleled quantum state of matter. Their universal electronic behaviour seems to be at the origin of the remarkable reproducibility of the resistance switching that is crucial to their applications in non-volatile-memory devices. Controlling the degree of disorder in crystalline phase-change materials might enable multilevel resistance states in upcoming storage devices.

  1. Dual phase magnetic material component and method of forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, Laura Cerully; DiDomizio, Richard; Johnson, Francis

    2017-04-25

    A magnetic component having intermixed first and second regions, and a method of preparing that magnetic component are disclosed. The first region includes a magnetic phase and the second region includes a non-magnetic phase. The method includes mechanically masking pre-selected sections of a surface portion of the component by using a nitrogen stop-off material and heat-treating the component in a nitrogen-rich atmosphere at a temperature greater than about 900.degree. C. Both the first and second regions are substantially free of carbon, or contain only limited amounts of carbon; and the second region includes greater than about 0.1 weight % of nitrogen.

  2. Intermetallic compound development for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munroe, P.R.

    2000-01-01

    lntermetallic compounds have been vigorously researched for the past twenty years. As a result of these studies the fundamental behaviour of a number of transition metal aluminides and suicides is now well understood, and a number of alloys with commercially acceptable properties have been developed. Future challenges for these alloys, for example Ni 3 AI, TiAI and Fe 3 AI, are focused on the development of large-scale production routes. However, there remain a number of other intermetallic compounds, such as Laves phases, which exhibit some promising properties, but little is presently known about their intrinsic behaviour. For compounds such as these more fundamental studies are required

  3. Magnetic properties of rare-earth intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchmayr, H.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the concepts at present used to explain the magnetic properties of rare-earth intermetallics which have been the subject of numerous investigations in recent years. Rare-earth intermetallics with the formula Rsub(a)Bsub(b) are divided according to the magnetic moment of the B atom(s). If there is no magnetic moment present at the B-site, the exchange is only between the magnetic moments at the R-sites, which can only be of indirect character. One possible model is still the RKKY model, although it usually gives in practice only a qualitative description of the magnetic properties. Typical R-B compounds with the B-moment equal to zero are (for instance) the RA1 2 compounds, and related compounds such as the RZn and RCd compounds as well as compounds of the general formula RB 2 (B = Ni, Os, Ir, Pd, Ru or Rh). Of all intermetallics with nonzero B-moment, the R-3d intermetallics are the most important. These intermetallics can be formed with Mn, Fe, Co and Ni. In these systems there exist in principle three interactions, namely between the R-R, R-3d and 3d-3d atoms. The most important is usually the latter interaction. After a short discussion of the crystal structures which occur with R-3d intermetallics, the basic magnetic properties of R-3d intermetallics are presented. These properties are discussed with respect to the formation of a magnetic moment at the 3d site in the framework of present band theories. Special emphasis is given to a discussion of the localized or itinerant character of 3d electrons. (author)

  4. Characterization of Concrete Mixes Containing Phase Change Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paksoy, H.; Kardas, G.; Konuklu, Y.; Cellat, K.; Tezcan, F.

    2017-10-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) can be used in passive building applications to achieve near zero energy building goals. For this purpose PCM can be added in building structures and materials in different forms. Direct incorporation, form stabilization and microencapsulation are different forms used for PCM integration in building materials. In addition to thermal properties of PCM itself, there are several other criteria that need to be fulfilled for the PCM enhanced building materials. Mechanical properties, corrosive effects, morphology and thermal buffering have to be determined for reliable and long-term applications in buildings. This paper aims to give an overview of characterization methods used to determine these properties in PCM added fresh concrete mixes. Thermal, compressive strength, corrosion, and microscopic test results for concrete mixes with PCM are discussed.

  5. Ultrafast and Highly Reversible Sodium Storage in Zinc-Antimony Intermetallic Nanomaterials

    KAUST Repository

    Nie, Anmin

    2015-12-17

    The progress on sodium-ion battery technology faces many grand challenges, one of which is the considerably lower rate of sodium insertion/deinsertion in electrode materials due to the larger size of sodium (Na) ions and complicated redox reactions compared to the lithium-ion systems. Here, it is demonstrated that sodium ions can be reversibly stored in Zn-Sb intermetallic nanowires at speeds that can exceed 295 nm s-1. Remarkably, these values are one to three orders of magnitude higher than the sodiation rate of other nanowires electrochemically tested with in situ transmission electron microscopy. It is found that the nanowires display about 161% volume expansion after the first sodiation and then cycle with an 83% reversible volume expansion. Despite their massive expansion, the nanowires can be cycled without any cracking or facture during the ultrafast sodiation/desodiation process. In addition, most of the phases involved in the sodiation/desodiation process possess high electrical conductivity. More specifically, the NaZnSb exhibits a layered structure, which provides channels for fast Na+ diffusion. This observation indicates that Zn-Sb intermetallic nanomaterials offer great promise as high rate and good cycling stability anodic materials for the next generation of sodium-ion batteries. Sodium ions can be stored in Zn4 Sb3 nanowires with a speed of 295.5 nm/s, which is one to three orders of magnitude higher than that of other nanowires electrochemically tested by the same method. Despite their massive expansion, the nanowires can be cycled dozens of times without any internal fracture during the ultrafast sodiation/desodiation process. © 2015 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Study and development of NiAl intermetallic coating on hypo-eutectoid steel using highly activated composite granules of the Ni-Al system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahzad, Aamir; Zadorozhnyy, Vladislav Yu.; Pavlov, Mikhail D.; Semenov, Dmitri V.; Kaloshkin, Sergey D. [National Univ. of Science and Technology (MISIS), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2018-01-15

    NiAl intermetallic coating thickness of about 50 μm was fabricated on hypo-eutectoid steel by mechanical alloying using pre-activated Ni-Al composite granules as coating material. First, Ni and Al powders were mixed with the composition of Ni-50 at.% Al and mechanically activated in a planetary ball mill, until the composite granules of this powder mixture, having maximum activity (9 cm sec{sup -1}), were formed after 120 min of milling at 200 rpm. The composite granules were then taken out from the planetary ball mill just before the critical time, i. e. the time at which these granules synthesize and convert to an intermetallic NiAl compound. The highly activated composite granules of Ni-Al were then put into the vial of a vibratory ball mill with the substrate on top of the chamber. After mechanical alloying for 60 min in the vibratory ball mill, the composite granules were synthesized fully and heat was produced during the synthesis which helped producing a thick and strong adhesive coating of NiAl intermetallic on the steel substrate. The main advantage of this technique is that not only is time saved but also there is no need for any post mechanical alloying process such as annealing or laser treatment etc. to get homogeneous, strongly bonded intermetallic coatings. X-ray diffraction analysis clearly indicates the formation of NiAl phase. Micro-hardness of the coating and substrate was also measured. The cross-sectional microstructure of the composite granules and the final coating were studied by scanning electron microscopy.

  7. Portable Thermoelectric Power Generator Coupled with Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Chong C.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar is the intermittent source of renewable energy and all thermal solar systems having a setback on non-functioning during the night and cloudy environment. This paper presents alternative solution for power generation using thermoelectric which is the direct conversion of temperature gradient of hot side and cold side of thermoelectric material to electric voltage. Phase change material with latent heat effect would help to prolong the temperature gradient across thermoelectric material for power generation. Besides, the concept of portability will enable different power source like solar, wasted heat from air conditioner, refrigerator, stove etc, i.e. to create temperature different on thermoelectric material for power generation. Furthermore, thermoelectric will generate direct current which is used by all the gadgets like Smartphone, tablet, laptop etc. The portable concept of renewable energy will encourage the direct usage of renewable energy for portable gadgets. The working principle and design of portable thermoelectric power generator coupled with phase change material is presented in this paper.

  8. Phase field modeling of rapid crystallization in the phase-change material AIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Fatemeh; Boussinot, Guillaume; Spatschek, Robert; Brener, Efim A.; Apel, Markus

    2017-07-01

    We carry out phase field modeling as a continuum simulation technique in order to study rapid crystallization processes in the phase-change material AIST (Ag4In3Sb67Te26). In particular, we simulate the spatio-temporal evolution of the crystallization of a molten area of the phase-change material embedded in a layer stack. The simulation model is adapted to the experimental conditions used for recent measurements of crystallization rates by a laser pulse technique. Simulations are performed for substrate temperatures close to the melting temperature of AIST down to low temperatures when an amorphous state is involved. The design of the phase field model using the thin interface limit allows us to retrieve the two limiting regimes of interface controlled (low temperatures) and thermal transport controlled (high temperatures) dynamics. Our simulations show that, generically, the crystallization velocity presents a maximum in the intermediate regime where both the interface mobility and the thermal transport, through the molten area as well as through the layer stack, are important. Simulations reveal the complex interplay of all different contributions. This suggests that the maximum switching velocity depends not only on material properties but also on the precise design of the thin film structure into which the phase-change material is embedded.

  9. The role of phase change materials for the sustainable energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuta Marta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unceasing global economic development leads to continuous increase of energy demand. Considering the limited conventional resources of energy as well as impact on the environment associated with its use, it is important to focus on the rational management of energy resources and on supporting the development of new technologies related to both conventional and renewable energy resources. In a number of cases the use of phase change materials (PCMs turns out to be a reasonable solution. This paper contains a summary of well-studied and known, previously used solutions based on phase change materials as well as novel possibilities, which are under development. It has been decided to investigate this topic due to the wide range of highly effective solutions. The review is focused on selected applications of PCMs for technologies which are designed to improve energy efficiency and on PCMs used in technologies based on renewable energy sources.

  10. Dynamically Reconfigurable Metadevice Employing Nanostructured Phase-Change Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhihua; Evans, Philip G; Haglund, Richard F; Valentine, Jason G

    2017-08-09

    Mastering dynamic free-space spectral control and modulation in the near-infrared (NIR) and optical regimes remains a challenging task that is hindered by the available functional materials at high frequencies. In this work, we have realized an efficient metadevice capable of spectral control by minimizing the thermal mass of a vanadium dioxide phase-change material (PCM) and placing the PCM at the feed gap of a bow-tie field antenna. The device has an experimentally measured tuning range of up to 360 nm in the NIR and a modulation depth of 33% at the resonant wavelength. The metadevice is configured for integrated and local heating, leading to faster switching and more precise spatial control compared with devices based on phase-change thin films. We envisage that the combined advantages of this device will open new opportunities for signal processing, memory, security, and holography at optical frequencies.

  11. Microencapsulated Phase-Change Materials For Storage Of Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, David P.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes research on engineering issues related to storage and transport of heat in slurries containing phase-change materials in microscopic capsules. Specific goal of project to develop lightweight, compact, heat-management systems used safely in inhabited areas of spacecraft. Further development of obvious potential of technology expected to lead to commercialization and use in aircraft, electronic equipment, machinery, industrial processes, and other sytems in which requirements for management of heat compete with severe restrictions on weight or volume.

  12. Phase change - memory materials - composition, structure, and properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frumar, M.; Frumarová, Božena; Wágner, T.; Hrdlička, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 18, suppl.1 (2007), S169-S174 ISSN 0957-4522. [International Conference on Optical and Optoelectronic Properties of Materials and Applications 2006. Darwin, 16.06.2006-20.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/0627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : phase change memory Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.947, year: 2007

  13. Artefacts in geometric phase analysis of compound materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Jonathan J P; Beanland, Richard; Alexe, Marin; Cockburn, John W; Revin, Dmitry G; Zhang, Shiyong Y; Sanchez, Ana M

    2015-10-01

    The geometric phase analysis (GPA) algorithm is known as a robust and straightforward technique that can be used to measure lattice strains in high resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images. It is also attractive for analysis of aberration-corrected scanning TEM (ac-STEM) images that resolve every atom column, since it uses Fourier transforms and does not require real-space peak detection and assignment to appropriate sublattices. Here it is demonstrated that, in ac-STEM images of compound materials with compositionally distinct atom columns, an additional geometric phase is present in the Fourier transform. If the structure changes from one area to another in the image (e.g. across an interface), the change in this additional phase will appear as a strain in conventional GPA, even if there is no lattice strain. Strategies to avoid this pitfall are outlined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Reconfigurable optical manipulation by phase change material waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianhang; Mei, Shengtao; Wang, Qian; Liu, Hong; Lim, Chwee Teck; Teng, Jinghua

    2017-05-25

    Optical manipulation by dielectric waveguides enables the transportation of particles and biomolecules beyond diffraction limits. However, traditional dielectric waveguides could only transport objects in the forward direction which does not fulfill the requirements of the next generation lab-on-chip system where the integrated manipulation system should be much more flexible and multifunctional. In this work, bidirectional transportation of objects on the nanoscale is demonstrated on a rectangular waveguide made of the phase change material Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 (GST) by numerical simulations. Either continuous pushing forces or pulling forces are generated on the trapped particles when the GST is in the amorphous or crystalline phase. With the technique of a femtosecond laser induced phase transition on the GST, we further proposed a reconfigurable optical trap array on the same waveguide. This work demonstrates GST waveguide's potential of achieving multifunctional manipulation of multiple objects on the nanoscale with plausible optical setups.

  15. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, ,gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  16. Controllable biomimetic adhesion using embedded phase change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krahn, J; Sameoto, D; Menon, C

    2011-01-01

    In many cases, such as in the instance of climbing robots or temporary adhesives, there is the need to be able to dynamically control the level of adhesion a biomimetic dry adhesive can provide. In this study, the effect of changing the backing layer stiffness of a dry adhesive is examined. Embedding a phase change material within the backing of a synthetic dry adhesive sheet allows the stiffness to be tailored at different points of a preload and adhesion cycle. Larger contact areas and more equal load sharing between adhesive fibres can be achieved by increasing the backing layer stiffness after initial deformation when the adhesive backing is loaded in its softened state. Adhesion behaviour is examined when the backing layer is maintained in solid and softened phases during complete load cycles and for load cycles under the condition of contact with the softened phase backing followed by pull-off during the solid phase. Absolute adhesion force is increased for trials in which a soft backing layer hardens prior to pull-off. This effect is due to the increased contact area made between the rounded probe and the softened material during preloading and the more equal load sharing condition during pull-off when the backing layer becomes stiff again

  17. Molecular simulation of capillary phase transitions in flexible porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Vincent K.; Siderius, Daniel W.; Mahynski, Nathan A.

    2018-03-01

    We used flat-histogram sampling Monte Carlo to study capillary phase transitions in deformable adsorbent materials. Specifically, we considered a pure adsorbate fluid below its bulk critical temperature within a slit pore of variable pore width. The instantaneous pore width is dictated by a number of factors, such as adsorbate loading, reservoir pressure, fluid-wall interaction, and bare adsorbent properties. In the slit pores studied here, the bare adsorbent free energy was assumed to be biparabolic, consisting of two preferential pore configurations, namely, the narrow pore and the large pore configurations. Four distinct phases could be found in the adsorption isotherms. We found a low-pressure phase transition, driven primarily by capillary condensation/evaporation and accompanied by adsorbent deformation in response. The deformation can be a relatively small contraction/expansion as seen in elastic materials, or a large-scale structural transformation of the adsorbent. We also found a high-pressure transition driven by excluded volume effects, which tends to expand the material and thus results in a large-scale structural transformation of the adsorbent. The adsorption isotherms and osmotic free energies can be rationalized by considering the relative free energy differences between the basins of the bare adsorbent free energy.

  18. A phenomenological approach of solidification of polymeric phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrani, Seyed Amir; Royon, Laurent; Abou, Bérengère; Osipian, Rémy; Azzouz, Kamel; Bontemps, André

    2017-01-01

    Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are widely used in thermal energy storage and thermal management systems due to their small volume for a given stored energy and their capability for maintaining nearly constant temperatures. However, their performance is limited by their low thermal conductivity and possible leaks while in the liquid phase. One solution is to imprison the PCM inside a polymer mesh to create a Polymeric Phase Change Material (PPCM). In this work, we have studied the cooling and solidification of five PPCMs with different PCMs and polymer fractions. To understand the heat transfer mechanisms involved, we have carried out micro- and macrorheological measurements in which Brownian motion of tracers embedded in PPCMs has been depicted and viscoelastic moduli have been measured, respectively. Beyond a given polymer concentration, it was shown that the Brownian motion of the tracers is limited by the polymeric chains and that the material exhibits an elastic behavior. This would suggest that heat transfer essentially occurs by conduction, instead of convection. Experiments were conducted to measure temperature variation during cooling of the five samples, and a semi-empirical model based on a phenomenological approach was proposed as a practical tool to choose and size PPCMs.

  19. Phase diagrams of superconducting materials: Metallurgy, fabrication, and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flukiger, R.

    1981-01-01

    Because a large number of investigations on superconducting material have been made on insufficiently characterized samples, and with temperature phase diagrams which contained serious errors, phase diagrams are studied. It is seen that the variation of critical temperature as a function of chemical composition for a given compound can be used as a supplementary tool in determining composition with greater accuracy. The consequent search for higher critical temperature value in specified materials has led to a new concept in determining high temperature phase diagrams. Most of this paper is devoted to the study of bulk binary, pseudobinary, or ternary superconductors at their equilibrium state. As will be shown in several cases, these data serve as standard values and are of great help in understanding the superconducting behavior in materials produced by non-equilibrium methods, i.e., splat-cooling, thin film preparation by either sputtering, co-evaporation, or CVD, and diffusion processes in multifilamentary composite wires. An example for the departure from thermal equilibrium is the retention of metastable composition by a fast quenching rate

  20. Structural and functional intermetallics - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varin, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    This overview presents the current status of the research and development of both structural and functional intermetallics. On the one hand, the discussion is focused on commercialization and existing industrial applications of intermetallics. Within this frame the applications of titanium aluminides (TiAl) for turbocharger rotors and exhaust valves in automotive industry are being discussed. Advances in the applications of TiAl alloys for the next generation of turbine blades in aerospace/aircraft segment are also presented. The entire spectrum of nickel and iron aluminide alloys developed commercially by the Oak Ridge national Laboratory (USA) and the examples of their application in various segments of industry are thoroughly discussed. Some inroads made in the application of directionally solidified (DS) multiphase niobium silicides (Nb 3 Si+Nb 5 Si 3 ) in situ intermetallic composites with the goal of pushing the service temperature envelope of turbine blades to ∼ 1200-1300 o C are also discussed. On the other hand, various topics in basic or curiosity driven research of titanium aluminides and trialuminides, iron aluminides and high temperature structural silicides are discussed. Some very recent findings on the improvements in fracture toughness and strength of titanium trialuminides and magnetic behaviour of unconventionally cold - worked iron aluminides are highlighted. The topic of functional intermetallics is limited to the systems must suitable for hydrogen storage applications. A perspective on the directions of future research and development of intermetallics is also provided. (author)

  1. Microstructure and tribological properties of TiAg intermetallic compound coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Chun; Chen Jianmin; Zhou Jiansong; Zhao Jierong; Wang Linqian; Yu Youjun; Zhou Huidi

    2011-01-01

    TiAg intermetallic compound coating has been in situ synthesized successfully on pure Ti substrate by laser cladding using Ag powder as the precursor. It has been found that the prepared coating mainly comprised TiAg and Ti phases. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy results further conform the existence of TiAg intermetallic compound in the prepared coating. The magnified high resolution transmission electron microscopy images shown that the laser cladding coating contains TiAg nanocrystalline with the size of about 4 nm. Tribological properties of the prepared TiAg intermetallic compound coating were systematically evaluated. It was found that the friction coefficient and wear rate was closely related to the normal load and sliding speed, i.e., the friction coefficient of the prepared TiAg intermetallic compound coating decreased with increasing normal load and sliding speed. The wear rate of the TiAg intermetallic compound coating decreased rapidly with increasing sliding speed, while the wear rate increased as the normal load increased.

  2. Microstructure and tribological properties of TiAg intermetallic compound coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Chun [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Chen Jianmin, E-mail: chenjm@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhou Jiansong [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhao Jierong; Wang Linqian; Yu Youjun [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhou Huidi [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2011-10-01

    TiAg intermetallic compound coating has been in situ synthesized successfully on pure Ti substrate by laser cladding using Ag powder as the precursor. It has been found that the prepared coating mainly comprised TiAg and Ti phases. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy results further conform the existence of TiAg intermetallic compound in the prepared coating. The magnified high resolution transmission electron microscopy images shown that the laser cladding coating contains TiAg nanocrystalline with the size of about 4 nm. Tribological properties of the prepared TiAg intermetallic compound coating were systematically evaluated. It was found that the friction coefficient and wear rate was closely related to the normal load and sliding speed, i.e., the friction coefficient of the prepared TiAg intermetallic compound coating decreased with increasing normal load and sliding speed. The wear rate of the TiAg intermetallic compound coating decreased rapidly with increasing sliding speed, while the wear rate increased as the normal load increased.

  3. Fiscal 1990 achievement report on next-generation industrial structure technology. Research and development of advanced materials for extreme environments (Development of methane fueled aeroengine); 1990 nendo chotaikankyosei senshin zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Methane nenryo kokukiyo engine no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-03-01

    Research efforts went on for the development of advanced materials, that is, intermetallic compounds and fiber reinforced intermetallic compound composite materials. Activities were conducted in the four fields of (1) high specific strength intermetallic compounds, (2) high melting point intermetallic compounds, (3) fiber reinforced intermetallic compound composite materials, and (4) a comprehensive survey. In Field (1), ternary phase diagrams (Mo, Nb) were prepared for Ti-Al-X (X=metal) systems, and studies were conducted of systematic methods for developing Ti-Al based high specific strength intermetallic compound materials. In Field (2), work was started to prepare binary phase diagrams for Nb-Al systems, and studies were conducted about their basic characteristics and characteristic governing factors. A powder manufacturing tester was designed and built, and basic tests were started for powder manufacturing. In Field (3), a success was attained in fabricating a low oxygen fiber rendered infusible by electron beam irradiation, and the infusible fiber was found to be high in quality. Studies were started of coatings for the fiber to achieve still higher performance. In Field (4), technical trends were surveyed, coordination was effected between various technology developing activities, and the results were put to proper management and then disseminated. (NEDO)

  4. Ultrafast characterization of phase-change material crystallization properties in the melt-quenched amorphous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyasingh, Rakesh; Fong, Scott W; Lee, Jaeho; Li, Zijian; Chang, Kuo-Wei; Mantegazza, Davide; Asheghi, Mehdi; Goodson, Kenneth E; Wong, H-S Philip

    2014-06-11

    Phase change materials are widely considered for application in nonvolatile memories because of their ability to achieve phase transformation in the nanosecond time scale. However, the knowledge of fast crystallization dynamics in these materials is limited because of the lack of fast and accurate temperature control methods. In this work, we have developed an experimental methodology that enables ultrafast characterization of phase-change dynamics on a more technologically relevant melt-quenched amorphous phase using practical device structures. We have extracted the crystallization growth velocity (U) in a functional capped phase change memory (PCM) device over 8 orders of magnitude (10(-10) 10(8) K/s), which reveals the extreme fragility of Ge2Sb2Te5 in its supercooled liquid phase. Furthermore, these crystallization properties were studied as a function of device programming cycles, and the results show degradation in the cell retention properties due to elemental segregation. The above experiments are enabled by the use of an on-chip fast heater and thermometer called as microthermal stage (MTS) integrated with a vertical phase change memory (PCM) cell. The temperature at the PCM layer can be controlled up to 600 K using MTS and with a thermal time constant of 800 ns, leading to heating rates ∼10(8) K/s that are close to the typical device operating conditions during PCM programming. The MTS allows us to independently control the electrical and thermal aspects of phase transformation (inseparable in a conventional PCM cell) and extract the temperature dependence of key material properties in real PCM devices.

  5. Negative thermal expansion induced by intermetallic charge transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Masaki; Oka, Kengo; Nabetani, Koichiro

    2015-06-01

    Suppression of thermal expansion is of great importance for industry. Negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials which shrink on heating and expand on cooling are therefore attracting keen attention. Here we provide a brief overview of NTE induced by intermetallic charge transfer in A-site ordered double perovskites SaCu 3 Fe 4 O 12 and LaCu 3 Fe 4- x Mn x O 12 , as well as in Bi or Ni substituted BiNiO 3 . The last compound shows a colossal dilatometric linear thermal expansion coefficient exceeding -70 × 10 -6 K -1 near room temperature, in the temperature range which can be controlled by substitution.

  6. Pressure effect on magnetic and magnetotransport properties of intermetallic and colossal magnetoresistance oxide compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arnold, Zdeněk; Ibarra, M. R.; Algarabel, P. A.; Marquina, C.; De Teresa, J. M.; Morellon, L.; Blasco, J.; Magen, C.; Prokhnenko, Olexandr; Kamarád, Jiří; Ritter, C.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 17, - (2005), S3035-S3055 ISSN 0953-8984 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : pressure effect * intermetallic compounds * magnetic properties * magnetic phase transitions * magnetotransport properties * oxides Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.145, year: 2005

  7. First principles electronic and thermal properties of some AlRE intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, Vipul; Sanyal, Sankar P.; Rajagopalan, M.

    2008-01-01

    A study on structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic cubic B 2 -type AlRE (RE=Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr and Lu) intermetallics has been done theoretically. The self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital method is used to describe the electronic properties of these intermetallics at ambient and at high pressure. These compounds show metallic behavior under ambient conditions. The variation of density of states under compression indicates some possibility of structural phase transformation in AlLa, AlCe and AlPr. Thermal properties like Debye temperature and Grueneisen constant are calculated at T=0 K and at ambient pressure within the Debye-Grueneisen model and compared with the others' theoretical results. Our results are in good agreement. We have also performed a pressure-induced variation of Debye temperature and have found a decrease in Debye temperature around 40 kbar in AlRE (RE=La, Ce, Pr) intermetallics

  8. Microstructure and Tribological Properties of Mo-40Ni-13Si Multiphase Intermetallic Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunyan; Wang, Shuhuan; Gui, Yongliang; Cheng, Zihao; Ni, Guolong

    2016-12-06

    Intermetallic compounds are increasingly being expected to be utilized in tribological environments, but to date their implementation is hindered by insufficient ductility at low and medium temperatures. This paper presents a novel multiphase intermetallic alloy with the chemical composition of Mo-40Ni-13Si (at %). Microstructure characterization reveals that a certain amount of ductile Mo phases formed during the solidification process of a ternary Mo-Ni-Si molten alloy, which is beneficial to the improvement of ductility of intermetallic alloys. Tribological properties of the designed alloy-including wear resistance, friction coefficient, and metallic tribological compatibility-were evaluated under dry sliding wear test conditions at room temperature. Results suggest that the multiphase alloy possesses an excellent tribological property, which is attributed to unique microstructural features and thereby a good combination in hardness and ductility. The corresponding wear mechanism is explained by observing the worn surface, subsurface, and wear debris of the alloy, which was found to be soft abrasive wear.

  9. Phase change materials and the perception of wetness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiest, Wouter M Bergmann; Kosters, N Dolfine; Kappers, Astrid M L; Daanen, Hein A M

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are increasingly incorporated in textiles in order to serve as a thermal buffer when humans change from a hot to a cold environment and the reverse. Due to the absence of wetness sensors in the skin, cooling of the skin may be perceived as a sensation of wetness instead of cold. In order to investigate if this phenomenon occurs when manipulating textiles, nine subjects were asked to touch or manipulate PCM-treated and untreated fabrics. In 75% of the cases, the subjects indicated that the treated material felt wetter than the untreated material independent of the way the textiles were manipulated. We conclude that incorporating PCMs in textiles may lead to a feeling of wetness which might be uncomfortable. Therefore, we recommend investigating a change in cooling properties to minimise this feeling. This article describes a psychophysical experiment into the sensation of wetness of textiles treated with phase change materials. It was found that in 75% of the cases, subjects found the treated fabric to feel wetter than the untreated. This may affect the comfort of wearing clothes made of these textiles.

  10. Recent progresses and achievements in photovoltaic-phase change material technology: A review with special treatment on photovoltaic thermal-phase change material systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, M.M.; Pandey, A.K.; Hasanuzzaman, M.; Rahim, N.A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Broad summary of phase change materials based cooling for photovoltaic modules. • Compendium on phase change materials that are mostly used in photovoltaic systems. • Extension of heat availability period by 75–100% with phase change material. • Heat storage potential improves by 33–50% more with phase change material. • Future trend and move in photovoltaic thermal research. - Abstract: This communication lays out an appraisal on the recent works of phase change materials based thermal management techniques for photovoltaic systems with special focus on the so called photovoltaic thermal-phase change material system. Attempt has also been made to draw wide-ranging classification of both photovoltaic and photovoltaic thermal systems and their conventional cooling or heat harvesting methods developed so far so that feasible phase change materials application area in these systems can be pointed out. In addition, a brief literature on phase change materials with particular focus on their solar application has also been presented. Overview of the researches and studies establish that using phase change materials for photovoltaic thermal control is technically viable if some issues like thermal conductivity or phase stability are properly addressed. The photovoltaic thermal-phase change material systems are found to offer 33% (maximum 50%) more heat storage potential than the conventional photovoltaic-thermal water system and that with 75–100% extended heat availability period and around 9% escalation in output. Reduction in temperature attained with photovoltaic thermal-phase change material system is better than that with regular photovoltaic-thermal water system, too. Studies also show the potential of another emerging technology of photovoltaic thermal-microencapsulated phase change material system that makes use of microencapsulated phase change materials in thermal regulation. Future focus areas on photovoltaic thermal-phase change

  11. Phase analysis of nano-phase materials using selected area electron diffraction in the TEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labar, J. L.

    2002-01-01

    In analogy to X-ray power diffraction (XRD), we are developing a method to help phase identification when examining a large number of grains simultaneously by electron diffraction. Although XRD is well established, it can not be used for small quantities of materials (volumes below 1 mm 3 ). Examining a usual TEM sample with thickness of 100 nm and using a selected area of 1 mm in diameter, the selected area electron diffraction pattern (SAED) carries information about several thousands of grains from a material with an average grain size of about 10 nm. The accuracy of XRD can not be attained by electron diffraction (ED). However, simultaneous visual observation of the nanostructure is an additional benefit of TEM (beside the small amount of needed material). The first step of the development project was the development of a computer program ('ProcessDiffraction') that processes digital versions of SAED patterns and presents them in an XRD-like form (intensity vs. scattering vector). In the present version (V2.0.3) phase identification is carried out by comparing the measured distribution to 'Markers', i.e. data of known phases. XRD data cards are used if the detailed structure of a phase is not known. Kinematic electron diffraction intensities are calculated for phases with known atomic positions (Author)

  12. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  13. Sb-Te Phase-change Materials under Nanoscale Confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalawela, Chandrasiri A.

    Size, speed and efficiency are the major challenges of next generation nonvolatile memory (NVM), and phase-change memory (PCM) has captured a great attention due to its promising features. The key for PCM is rapid and reversible switching between amorphous and crystalline phases with optical or electrical excitation. The structural transition is associated with significant contrast in material properties which can be utilized in optical (CD, DVD, BD) and electronic (PCRAM) memory applications. Importantly, both the functionality and the success of PCM technology significantly depend on the core material and its properties. So investigating PC materials is crucial for the development of PCM technology to realized enhanced solutions. In regards to PC materials, Sb-Te binary plays a significant role as a basis to the well-known Ge-Sb-Te system. Unlike the conventional deposition methods (sputtering, evaporation), electrochemical deposition method is used due to its multiple advantages, such as conformality, via filling capability, etc. First, the controllable synthesis of Sb-Te thin films was studied for a wide range of compositions using this novel deposition method. Secondly, the solid electrolytic nature of stoichiometric Sb2Te3 was studied with respect to precious metals. With the understanding of 2D thin film synthesis, Sb-Te 1D nanowires (18 - 220 nm) were synthesized using templated electrodeposition, where nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) was used as a template for the growth of nanowires. In order to gain the controllability over the deposition in high aspect ratio structures, growth mechanisms of both the thin films and nanowires were investigated. Systematic understanding gained thorough previous studies helped to formulate the ultimate goal of this dissertation. In this dissertation, the main objective is to understand the size effect of PC materials on their phase transition properties. The reduction of effective memory cell size in conjunction with

  14. Microencapsulated Phase Change Composite Materials for Energy Efficient Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Alexander

    This study aims to elucidate how phase change material (PCM)-composite materials can be leveraged to reduce the energy consumption of buildings and to provide cost savings to ratepayers. Phase change materials (PCMs) can store thermal energy in the form of latent heat when subjected to temperatures exceeding their melting point by undergoing a phase transition from solid to liquid state. Reversibly, PCMs can release this thermal energy when the system temperature falls below their solidification point. The goal in implementing composite PCM walls is to significantly reduce and time-shift the maximum thermal load on the building in order to reduce and smooth out the electricity demand for heating and cooling. This Ph.D. thesis aims to develop a set of thermal design methods and tools for exploring the use of PCM-composite building envelopes and for providing design rules for their practical implementation. First, detailed numerical simulations were used to show that the effective thermal conductivity of core-shell-matrix composites depended only on the volume fraction and thermal conductivity of the constituent materials. The effective medium approximation reported by Felske (2004) was in very good agreement with numerical predictions of the effective thermal conductivity. Second, a carefully validated transient thermal model was used to simulate microencapsulated PCM-composite walls subjected to diurnal or annual outdoor temperature and solar radiation flux. It was established that adding microencapsulated PCM to concrete walls both substantially reduced and delayed the thermal load on the building. Several design rules were established, most notably, (i) increasing the volume fraction of microencapsulated PCM within the wall increases the energy savings but at the potential expense of mechanical properties [1], (ii) the phase change temperature leading to the maximum energy and cost savings should equal the desired indoor temperature regardless of the climate

  15. Cementitious building material incorporating end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, Ival O.; Griffen, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    A cementitious composition comprising a cementitious material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the compositions are useful in making pre-formed building materials such as concrete blocks, brick, dry wall and the like or in making poured structures such as walls or floor pads; the glycols can be encapsulated to reduce their tendency to retard set.

  16. Artefacts in geometric phase analysis of compound materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Jonathan J.P., E-mail: j.j.p.peters@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Beanland, Richard; Alexe, Marin [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Cockburn, John W.; Revin, Dmitry G.; Zhang, Shiyong Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Sanchez, Ana M., E-mail: a.m.sanchez@warwick.ac.uk [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    The geometric phase analysis (GPA) algorithm is known as a robust and straightforward technique that can be used to measure lattice strains in high resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM) images. It is also attractive for analysis of aberration-corrected scanning TEM (ac-STEM) images that resolve every atom column, since it uses Fourier transforms and does not require real-space peak detection and assignment to appropriate sublattices. Here it is demonstrated that, in ac-STEM images of compound materials with compositionally distinct atom columns, an additional geometric phase is present in the Fourier transform. If the structure changes from one area to another in the image (e.g. across an interface), the change in this additional phase will appear as a strain in conventional GPA, even if there is no lattice strain. Strategies to avoid this pitfall are outlined. - Highlights: • GPA is shown to produce incorrect strains when applied to images of compound materials. • A mathematical description is laid out for why GPA can produce artefacts. • The artefact is demonstrated using experimental and simulated data. • A ‘rule’ is set to avoid this artefact in GPA.

  17. Intermetallic superconductors - The state of development in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsyth, E.

    1991-01-01

    The commercial fabrication of intermetallic superconductors has reached a high degree of maturity in the past thirty years. The only significant, commercial requirement for superconducting wire is the construction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) devices for medical diagnosis. In addition to this demand there are one-time projects such as a high energy particle accelerators which often need considerable quantities of superconducting material over the few years of construction. R and D projects also provide a fluctuating market for superconducting materials, in the past the projects have included power apparatus such as generators, motors, energy storage and transmission cables, and magnets for experimental fusion reactors. Superconducting magnetically levitated trains have undergone full scale trials in Japan and Germany. This is by no means a comprehensive list of all the possible applications. Virtually all the devices requiring a magnetic field to be produced by superconducting windings have used NbTi wire, but a few experimental Nb 3 Sn high field magnets have been constructed. In the case of these materials commercial vendors can provide a high degree of quality assurance on such characteristics as critical current, coupling effects and mechanical tolerances. This paper discusses the market for intermetallic and ceramic superconductors, their fabrication properties, applications, and cost

  18. Effect of phase change material on the heat transfer rate of different building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mushfiq; Alam, Shahnur; Ahmed, Dewan Hasan

    2017-12-01

    Phase change material (PCM) is widely known as latent heat storage. A comprehensive study is carried out to investigate the effect of PCM on heat transfer rate of building materials. Paraffin is used as PCM along with different conventional building materials to investigate the heat transfer rate from the heated region to the cold region. PCM is placed along with the three different types of building materials like plaster which is well know building material in urban areas and wood and straw which are commonly used in rural areas for roofing as well as wall panel material and investigated the heat transfer rate. An experimental setup was constructed with number of rectangular shape aluminum detachable casing (as cavity) and placed side by side. Series of rectangular cavity filled with convent ional building materials and PCM and these were placed in between two chambers filled with water at different temperature. Building materials and PCM were placed in different cavities with different combinations and investigated the heat transfer rate. The results show that using the PCM along with other building materials can be used to maintain lower temperature at the inner wall and chamber of the cold region. Moreover, the placement or orientation of the building materials and PCM make significant contribution to heat transfer rate from the heated zone to the cold zone.

  19. An experimental study of praseodymium intermetallic compounds at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greidanus, F.J.A.M.

    1982-01-01

    In this thesis the author studies the low temperature properties of praseodymium intermetallic compounds. In chapter 2 some of the techniques used for the experiments described in the subsequent chapters are discussed. A set-up to perform specific-heat experiments below 1 K and a technique for performing magnetic susceptibility measurments below 1 K, using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) are described. Chapter 3 is devoted to the theory of interacting Pr 3+ ions. Both bilinear and biquadratic interactions are dealt with in a molecular-field approximation. It is shown that first as well as second-order phase transitions can occur, depending on the nature of the ground state, and on the ratio of magnetic to crystal-field interactions. In chapters 4, 5, 6 and 7 experimental results on the cubic Laves phase compounds PrRh 2 , PrIr 2 , PrPt 2 , PrRu 2 and PrNi 2 are presented. From inelastic neutron scattering experiments the crystalline electric field parameters of the above compounds are determined. In chapters 5 and 6 susceptibility, neutron-diffraction, hyperfine specific-heat, low-field magnetization, pulsed-field magnetization, specific-heat and resistivity measurements are presented. In chapter 7 the specific heat and differential susceptibility of PrNi 2 below 1 K are studied. Finally, in chapter 8 praseodymium intermetallic compounds with low-symmetry singlet ground states, and cubic compounds with magnetic doublet ground states are studied. (Auth.)

  20. Study of Phase Change Materials Applied to CPV Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zun-Hao Shih

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are lots of factors which can directly affect output efficiency of photovoltaic device. One of them is high temperature which would cause adverse effect to solar cell. When solar cell is operated in high temperature, the cell’s output efficiency will become low. Therefore, improving thermal spreading of solar cell is an important issue. In this study, we focused on finding new materials to enhance the thermal dispreading and keep the temperature of solar cell as low as possible. The new materials are different from conventional metal ones; they are called “phase change materials (PCMs” which are mainly applied to green buildings. We chose two kinds of PSMs to study their thermal dispreading ability and to compare them with traditional aluminum material. These two kinds of PCMs are wax and lauric acid. We made three aluminum-based cuboids as heat sinking units and two of them were designed with hollow space to fill in the PCMs. We applied electric forward bias on solar cells to simulate the heat contributed from the concentrated sunlight. Then we observed the thermal distribution of these three kinds of thermal spreading materials. Two levels of forward biases were chosen to test the samples and analyze the experiment results.

  1. Enhanced laminated composite phase change material for energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darkwa, J.; Zhou, T. [Centre for Sustainable Energy Technologies (CSET), The University of Nottingham Ningbo, 199 Taikang East Road, Ningbo 315100 (China)

    2011-02-15

    This paper summarises studies undertaken towards the development of a laminated composite aluminium/hexadecane phase change material (PCM) drywall based on previous analytical work. The study also covered the selection and testing of various types of adhesive materials and identified Polyvinyl acetate (PVA) material as a suitable bonding material. For the purpose of comparison pure hexadecane and composite aluminium/hexadecane samples were developed and tested. The test results revealed faster thermal response by the aluminium/hexadecane sample regarding the rate of heat flux and also achieved about 10% and 15% heat transfer enhancements during the charging and discharging periods respectively. Its measured effective thermal conductivity also increased remarkably to 1.25 W/mK as compared with 0.15 W/mK for pure hexadecane. However there was about 5% less total cumulative thermal energy discharged at the end of the test which indicates that its effective thermal capacity was reduced by the presence of the aluminium particles. The study has shown that some of the scientific and technical barriers associated with the development of laminated composite PCM drywall systems can be overcome but further investigations of effects of adhesive materials are needed. (author)

  2. Microstructural analyses of intermetallic TiAl(Nb)-compounds prepared by arc melting and by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.

    1988-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds based on TiAl with Nb or V as alloying additions prepared by powder metallurgy (P/M) and arc melting (A/M) techniques have been investigated with respect to their potential as new high temperature materials. All the alloys with nominal Al-concentrations 34-36 wt% contain two phases, γ-TiAl and α 2 -Ti 3 Al, but significant differences in the distribution of γ and α 2 were found between the P/M and A/M materials. The role of impurities during processing and the microstructural stability in the planned service temperature range 700-1000 0 C are discussed. In the P/M TiAl alloys two carbide precipitates have been found, which are the cubic Perovskite-AlTi 3 C phase in the γ-matrix and the hexagonal H-AlTi 2 (C, N) phase at grain boundaries. At high temperatures the AlTi 3 C phase dissolves and is replaced by more stable H-phase, and therefore no longer contributes to the high temperature strength of the material. Mechanical properties of both the P/M and A/M alloys are compared in association with the processing methods and the resulting microstructures. (orig.) With 71 figs., 22 tabs [de

  3. Microcracking and macroscopic failure in intermetallic titanium aluminides; Mikrorissbildung und makroskopisches Versagen in intermetallischen Titanaluminiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesand-Valk, B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    2000-07-01

    This paper deals with the correlations between microstructural disorder, that means statistical distribution of phases and local material properties, and macroscopic failure of disordered multiphase materials. On a microscopic level the microstructural disorder leads to randomly distributed local damage before failure (in brittle materials to microcracks) and eventually to localisation of damage. On a macroscopic level the value and scatter of fracture strength and its dependence on specimen size are essentially determined by the microstructural disorder. The failure behaviour is treated by using the discrete chain-of-bundles-model, which treats the details of the microstructure not explicitly but as locally distributed fluctuations of characteristical material parameters. The model has been verified by comparing with experimental results for four intermetallic titanium aluminides and its validity has been demonstrated. (orig.) [German] Die Arbeit behandelt die Zusammenhaenge zwischen der Stochastizitaet des Gefueges, das heisst, einer statistischen Verteilung von Phasen und lokalen Materialeigenschaften und dem makroskopischen Versagen von ungeordneten mehrphasigen Werkstoffen. Auf mikroskopischer Ebene fuehrt die Stochastizitaet des Gefueges vor dem Versagen zu lokalen Schaedigungen (in sproeden Werkstoffen zu Mikrorissen) und schliesslich (abhaengig vom Grad der Unordnung) zur Lokalisierung des Bruchgeschehens. Makroskopisch werden die Groesse und Streuung von Bruchfestigkeitswerten und ihre Probengroessenabhaengigkeit durch die mikrostrukturelle Unordnung wesentlich bestimmt. Dieses Versagensverhalten wird in dem diskreten Chain-of-Bundles-Modell beschrieben, das die Details der Mikrostruktur nicht explizit sondern als lokale statistische Schwankungen von charakteristischen Werkstoffparametern erfasst. Am Beispiel von vier ausgewaehlten Titan-Aluminiden wird das Modell validiert und verifiziert. (orig.)

  4. Design of materials with extreme thermal expansion using a three-phase topology optimization method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Torquato, S.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with extremal or unusual thermal expansion coefficients are designed using a three-phase topology optimization method. The composites are made of two different material phases and a void phase. The topology optimization method consists in finding the distribution of material phases...... materials having maximum directional thermal expansion (thermal actuators), zero isotropic thermal expansion, and negative isotropic thermal expansion. It is shown that materials with effective negative thermal expansion coefficients can be obtained by mixing two phases with positive thermal expansion...

  5. Thermal analysis of a double layer phase change material floor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Xing; Zhang Xiaosong

    2011-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) can be used to shift the cooling or heating load from the peak period to the off-peak period. In this paper, a new double layer phase change material (PCM) floor is put forward. The two layers of PCM have different melting temperature. The system is used to store heat or cold energy in the off-peak period and release them in the peak period during heating or cooling. According to the numerical model built in this paper, the thermal performances of the floor are analyzed. The results show that the optimal melting temperatures of PCMs exist. The fluctuations of the floor surface temperatures and the heat fluxes will be reduced and the system still can provide a certain amount of heat or cold energy after the heat pump or chiller has been turned off for a long time. Compared to the floor without PCM, the energy released by the floor with PCM in peak period will be increased by 41.1% and 37.9% during heating and cooling when the heat of fusion of PCM is 150 kJ/kg. - Highlights: → A new double layer phase change material floor is put forward. → The system is used to store heat or cold energy in the off-peak period and release them in the peak period during heating or cooling. → The optimal melting temperatures of PCMs in the system exist. → The heat and cold energy released by the floor with PCM in peak period can be increased by 41.1% and 37.9%.

  6. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-09-14

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  7. Electronic transport in amorphous phase-change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckas, Jennifer Maria

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials combine a pronounced contrast in resistivity and reflectivity between their disordered amorphous and ordered crystalline state with very fast crystallization kinetics. Due to this exceptional combination of properties phase-change materials find broad application in non-volatile optical memories such as CD, DVD or Bluray Disc. Furthermore, this class of materials demonstrates remarkable electrical transport phenomena in their disordered state, which have shown to be crucial for their application in electronic storage devices. The threshold switching phenomenon denotes the sudden decrease in resistivity beyond a critical electrical threshold field. The threshold switching phenomenon facilitates the phase transitions at practical small voltages. Below this threshold the amorphous state resistivity is thermally activated and is observed to increase with time. This effect known as resistance drift seriously hampers the development of multi-level storage devices. Hence, understanding the physical origins of threshold switching and resistance drift phenomena is crucial to improve non-volatile phase-change memories. Even though both phenomena are often attributed to localized defect states in the band gap, the defect state density in amorphous phase-change materials has remained poorly studied. Starting from a brief introduction of the physics of phase-change materials this thesis summarizes the most important models behind electrical switching and resistance drift with the aim to discuss the role of localized defect states. The centerpiece of this thesis is the investigation of defects state densities in different amorphous phase-change materials and electrical switching chalcogenides. On the basis of Modulated Photo Current (MPC) Experiments and Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy, a sophisticated band model for the disordered phase of the binary phase-change alloy GeTe has been developed. By this direct experimental approach the band-model for a

  8. NNWSI Phase II materials interaction test procedure and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project is investigating the volcanic tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. This report describes a test method (Phase II) that has been developed to measure the release of radionuclides from the waste package under simulated repository conditions, and provides information on materials interactions that may occur in the repository. The results of 13 weeks of testing using the method are presented, and an analog test is described that investigates the relationship between the test method and expected repository conditions. 9 references, 10 figures, 11 tables

  9. Crystal structure of the binder phase in a model HfC-TiC-Ni material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiligers, Christiane; Neethling, Johannes H.

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of the binder phase in a model HfC-TiC-Ni sample produced by hot pressing is investigated. The nature of the binder depends on the amount of Hf and Ti that remains in solution with Ni after cooling. Four different crystal structures are identified by analysis of electron diffraction patterns obtained using transmission electron microscopy techniques and the composition of the phases determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Three of the phases are cubic; Ni, Ni 3 (Ti,Hf) and Ni 23 (Ti,Hf) 6 with lattice parameters of 3.52 ± 0.05, 3.52 ± 0.03 and 10.70 ± 0.40 A, respectively. The hexagonal phase is an intermetallic Ni 3 Ti phase, with lattice parameters of a = b = 5.00 ± 0.20 A and c = 8.16 ± 0.20 A. The crystal structures are confirmed by simulations of the electron diffraction patterns using JEMS software

  10. Review on phase change materials for building applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia SOCACIU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In nowadays, the Phase Change Material (PCM is a viable alternative for reducing the energy consumption and for increase the thermal comfort in buildings. The use of PCM in building applications provides the potential to increase the indoor thermal comfort for occupants due to the reduced indoor temperature fluctuations and lower global energy consumption. The possibility to incorporate the PCM into the material of construction for cooling and heating the buildings gained the interest of researchers from all the world because the PCM have a high heat of fusion, meaning it is capable to storing and release large amounts of energy in the form of heat during its melting and solidifying process at a specific temperature.

  11. Mathematical modeling of phase interaction taking place in materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinigrad, M.

    2002-01-01

    The quality of metallic products depends on their composition and structure. The composition and the structure are determined by various physico-chemical and technological factors. One of the most important and complicated problems in the modern industry is to obtain materials with required composition, structure and properties. For example, deep refining is a difficult task by itself, but the problem of obtaining the material with the required specific level of refining is much more complicated. It will take a lot of time and will require a lot of expanses to solve this problem empirically and the result will be far from the optimal solution. The most effective way to solve such problems is to carry out research in two parallel direction. Comprehensive analysis of thermodynamics, kinetics and mechanisms of the processes taking place at solid-liquid-gaseous phase interface and building of the clear well-based physico-chemical model of the above processes taking into account their interaction. Development of mathematical models of the specific technologies which would allow to optimize technological processes and to ensure obtaining of the required properties of the products by choosing the optimal composition of the raw materials. We apply the above unique methods. We developed unique methods of mathematical modeling of phase interaction at high temperatures. These methods allows us to build models taking into account: thermodynamic characteristics of the processes, influence of the initial composition and temperature on the equilibrium state of the reactions, kinetics of homogeneous and heterogeneous processes, influence of the temperature, composition, speed of the gas flows, hydrodynamic and thermal factors on the velocity of the chemical and diffusion processes. The models can be implemented in optimization of various metallurgical processes in manufacturing of steels and non-ferrous alloys as well as in materials refining, alloying with special additives

  12. Microstructural evolution of Ni40Zr60 alloy during early stage of mechanical alloying of intermetallic compounds NiZr2 and Ni11Zr9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee Peeyew; Koch, C.C.

    1994-01-01

    The microstructural change of Ni 40 Zr 60 alloy during mechanical alloying of mixtures of the intermetallic compounds NiZr 2 and Ni 11 Zr 9 has been studied by transmission electron microscopy. A specific ''cauliflower'' phase was formed during early stage of mechanical alloying process. It is suggested that the solid state reaction between intermetallic compounds NiZr 2 and Ni 11 Zr 9 is not the only origin for the formation of the ''cauliflower'' phase. ((orig.))

  13. Surfaces of Intermetallics: Quasicrystals and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuen, Chad [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this work is to characterize surfaces of intermetallics, including quasicrystals. In this work, surface characterization is primarily focused on composition and structure using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) performed under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) conditions.

  14. Phase Change Material Heat Sink for an ISS Flight Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Gregory; Stieber, Jesse; Sheth, Rubik; Ahlstrom, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A flight experiment is being constructed to utilize the persistent microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS) to prove out operation of a microgravity compatible phase change material (PCM) heat sink. A PCM heat sink can help to reduce the overall mass and volume of future exploration spacecraft thermal control systems (TCS). The program is characterizing a new PCM heat sink that incorporates a novel phase management approach to prevent high pressures and structural deformation that often occur with PCM heat sinks undergoing cyclic operation in microgravity. The PCM unit was made using brazed aluminum construction with paraffin wax as the fusible material. It is designed to be installed into a propylene glycol and water cooling loop, with scaling consistent with the conceptual designs for the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle. This paper reports on the construction of the PCM heat sink and on initial ground test results conducted at UTC Aerospace Systems prior to delivery to NASA. The prototype will be tested later on the ground and in orbit via a self-contained experiment package developed by NASA Johnson Space Center to operate in an ISS EXPRESS rack.

  15. Integrating Phase-Change Materials into Automotive Thermoelectric Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein Altstedde, Mirko; Rinderknecht, Frank; Friedrich, Horst

    2014-06-01

    Because the heat emitted by conventional combustion-engine vehicles during operation has highly transient properties, automotive thermoelectric generators (TEG) are intended for a particular operating state (design point). This, however, leads to two problems. First, whenever the combustion engine runs at low load, the maximum operating temperature cannot be properly utilised; second, a combustion engine at high load requires partial diversion of exhaust gas away from the TEG to protect the thermoelectric modules. An attractive means of stabilising dynamic exhaust behaviour (thereby keeping the TEG operating status at the design point for as long as possible) is use of latent heat storage, also known as phase-change materials (PCM). By positioning PCM between module and exhaust heat conduit, and choosing a material with a phase-change temperature matching the module's optimum operating temperature, it can be used as heat storage. This paper presents results obtained during examination of the effect of integration of latent heat storage on the potential of automotive TEG to convert exhaust heat. The research resulted in the development of a concept based on the initial integration idea, followed by proof of concept by use of a specially created prototype. In addition, the potential amount of energy obtained by use of a PCM-equipped TEG was calculated. The simulations indicated a significant increase in electrical energy was obtained in the selected test cycle.

  16. Three-dimensional nanomechanical mapping of amorphous and crystalline phase transitions in phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, Ilja; Huey, Bryan D; Kolosov, Oleg V

    2013-11-13

    The nanostructure of micrometer-sized domains (bits) in phase-change materials (PCM) that undergo switching between amorphous and crystalline phases plays a key role in the performance of optical PCM-based memories. Here, we explore the dynamics of such phase transitions by mapping PCM nanostructures in three dimensions with nanoscale resolution by combining precision Ar ion beam cross-sectional polishing and nanomechanical ultrasonic force microscopy (UFM) mapping. Surface and bulk phase changes of laser written submicrometer to micrometer sized amorphous-to-crystalline (SET) and crystalline-to-amorphous (RESET) bits in chalcogenide Ge2Sb2Te5 PCM are observed with 10-20 nm lateral and 4 nm depth resolution. UFM mapping shows that the Young's moduli of crystalline SET bits exceed the moduli of amorphous areas by 11 ± 2%, with crystalline content extending from a few nanometers to 50 nm in depth depending on the energy of the switching pulses. The RESET bits written with 50 ps pulses reveal shallower depth penetration and show 30-50 nm lateral and few nanometer vertical wavelike topography that is anticorrelated with the elastic modulus distribution. Reverse switching of amorphous RESET bits results in the full recovery of subsurface nanomechanical properties accompanied with only partial topography recovery, resulting in surface corrugations attributed to quenching. This precision sectioning and nanomechanical mapping approach could be applicable to a wide range of amorphous, nanocrystalline, and glass-forming materials for 3D nanomechanical mapping of amorphous-crystalline transitions.

  17. Heat transfer characteristics of building walls using phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irsyad, M.; Pasek, A. D.; Indartono, Y. S.; Pratomo, A. W.

    2017-03-01

    Minimizing energy consumption in air conditioning system can be done with reducing the cooling load in a room. Heat from solar radiation which passes through the wall increases the cooling load. Utilization of phase change material on walls is expected to decrease the heat rate by storing energy when the phase change process takes place. The stored energy is released when the ambient temperature is low. Temperature differences at noon and evening can be utilized as discharging and charging cycles. This study examines the characteristics of heat transfer in walls using phase change material (PCM) in the form of encapsulation and using the sleeve as well. Heat transfer of bricks containing encapsulated PCM, tested the storage and released the heat on the walls of the building models were evaluated in this study. Experiments of heat transfer on brick consist of time that is needed for heat transfer and thermal conductivity test as well. Experiments were conducted on a wall coated by PCM which was exposed on a day and night cycle to analyze the heat storage and heat release. PCM used in these experiments was coconut oil. The measured parameter is the temperature at some points in the brick, walls and ambient temperature as well. The results showed that the use of encapsulation on an empty brick can increase the time for thermal heat transfer. Thermal conductivity values of a brick containing encapsulated PCM was lower than hollow bricks, where each value was 1.3 W/m.K and 1.6 W/m.K. While the process of heat absorption takes place from 7:00 am to 06:00 pm, and the release of heat runs from 10:00 pm to 7:00 am. The use of this PCM layer can reduce the surface temperature of the walls of an average of 2°C and slows the heat into the room.

  18. Influence of intermetallic growth on the mechanical properties of Zn–Sn–Cu–Bi/Cu solder joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Fei; Yao, Jia; Liang, Jingwei; Qiu, Xiaoming, E-mail: qiuxm13@163.com

    2015-11-15

    The formation of intermetallic reaction layers and their influence on shear strength and fractography was investigated between the Zn–Sn–Cu–Bi (ZSCB) and Cu substrate during the liquid state reaction at 450 °C after 10–90 s. Results showed that reliable solder joints could be obtained at 450 °C after 15–30 s of wetting, accompanied by the creation of scallop ε-CuZn{sub 5}, flat γ-Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} and β-CuZn intermetallic layers in ZSCB/Cu interface. However, with excess increase of soldering time, a transient intermetallic ε-CuZn{sub 4} phase was nuclear and grew at ε-CuZn{sub 5}/γ-Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} interface, which apparently deteriorated the shear strength of solder joints from 76.5 MPa to 51.6 MPa. The sensitivity of the fracture proportion was gradually transformed from monotonic ε-CuZn{sub 5} to the mixture of ε-CuZn{sub 4} and ε-CuZn{sub 5} intermetallic cleavage. Furthermore, the growth mechanism of ε-CuZn{sub 4} intermetallic phase at the ZSCB/Cu interface was discussed. - Highlights: • There are four interfacial intermetallic layers formed at the Zn–Sn–Cu–Bi/Cu interface. • The growth mechanism of ε-CuZn{sub 4} intermetallic phase was discussed. • The wetting time of Zn–Sn–Cu–Bi solder in contact with Cu substrate is a key parameter.

  19. Phase transition transistors based on strongly-correlated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Masaki

    2013-03-01

    The field-effect transistor (FET) provides electrical switching functions through linear control of the number of charges at a channel surface by external voltage. Controlling electronic phases of condensed matters in a FET geometry has long been a central issue of physical science. In particular, FET based on a strongly correlated material, namely ``Mott transistor,'' has attracted considerable interest, because it potentially provides gigantic and diverse electronic responses due to a strong interplay between charge, spin, orbital and lattice. We have investigated electric-field effects on such materials aiming at novel physical phenomena and electronic functions originating from strong correlation effects. Here we demonstrate electrical switching of bulk state of matter over the first-order metal-insulator transition. We fabricated FETs based on VO2 with use of a recently developed electric-double-layer transistor technique, and found that the electrostatically induced carriers at a channel surface drive all preexisting localized carriers of 1022 cm-3 even inside a bulk to motion, leading to bulk carrier delocalization beyond the electrostatic screening length. This non-local switching of bulk phases is achieved with just around 1 V, and moreover, a novel non-volatile memory like character emerges in a voltage-sweep measurement. These observations are apparently distinct from those of conventional FETs based on band insulators, capturing the essential feature of collective interactions in strongly correlated materials. This work was done in collaboration with K. Shibuya, D. Okuyama, T. Hatano, S. Ono, M. Kawasaki, Y. Iwasa, and Y. Tokura. This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSAP) through its ``Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST Program).''

  20. A tem investigation on intermetallic particles in zircaloy-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarminto, Harini Sosiati; Kuwano, Noriyuki; Oki, Kensuke

    1996-01-01

    Tem investigation were conducted on the heat treated zircaloy-2 having the composition of Zr containing 1.6% Sn, 0.2% Fe, 0.1% Cr and 0.05% Ni (%wt) in order tostudy the characteristics of intermetallic particles related to the microstructural basis on the corrosion effect. Forged zircaloy-2 was annealed in the β-phase at 1050 C degrees for various isothermally in the α-phase region at 650 and 750 C degrees, followed by water quenching. The size precipates, the lower became their number. By increasing the annealing temperature, the growth of precipitates formed in this zircaloy-2 were of the Zr(Cr,Fe) 2 and Zr 2 (Fe,Cr,Ni) types. These kinds of precipitates and the ratios of Fe/Cr were independent of size and shape of precipitates and annealing time and temperature. (author), 16 refs, 2 tabs, 5 figs

  1. DOE-EPSCoR. Exchange interactions in epitaxial intermetallic layered systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeClair, Patrick R. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Gary, Mankey J. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2015-05-25

    The goal of this research is to develop a fundamental understanding of the exchange interactions in epitaxial intermetallic alloy thin films and multilayers, including films and multilayers of Fe-Pt, Co-Pt and Fe-P-Rh alloys deposited on MgO and Al2O3 substrates. Our prior results have revealed that these materials have a rich variety of ferromagnetic, paramagnetic and antiferromagnetic phases which are sensitive functions of composition, substrate symmetry and layer thickness. Epitaxial antiferromagnetic films of FePt alloys exhibit a different phase diagram than bulk alloys. The antiferromagnetism of these materials has both spin ordering transitions and spin orienting transitions. The objectives include the study of exchange-inversion materials and the interface of these materials with ferromagnets. Our aim is to formulate a complete understanding of the magnetic ordering in these materials, as well as developing an understanding of how the spin structure is modified through contact with a ferromagnetic material at the interface. The ultimate goal is to develop the ability to tune the phase diagram of the materials to produce layered structures with tunable magnetic properties. The alloy systems that we will study have a degree of complexity and richness of magnetic phases that requires the use of the advanced tools offered by the DOE-operated national laboratory facilities, such as neutron and x-ray scattering to measure spin ordering, spin orientations, and element-specific magnetic moments. We plan to contribute to DOE’s mission of producing “Materials by Design” with properties determined by alloy composition and crystal structure. We have developed the methods for fabricating and have performed neutron diffraction experiments on some of the most interesting phases, and our work will serve to answer questions raised about the element-specific magnetizations using the magnetic x-ray dichroism techniques and interface magnetism in layered structures

  2. Interaction of intermetallic compounds formed by rare earths, scandium, yttrium and 3d-transition metals, with gaseous ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilkin, S.P.; Volkova, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of the RT n intermetallic compounds, where R Sc, Y, rare earths, T = Fe, Co, Ni; n = 2,3,5, with gaseous ammonia under pressure of 1MPa and at temperatures of 293, 723 and 798 K is studied. It is established on the basis of roentgenographic studied, chemical analysis data, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and specific surface measurements that metallic matrixes of intermetallides decompose into nitrides and transition metal phases at temperatures of 723 and 798 K under effect of ammonia and independent of structural types of the source materials; partial or complete decomposition of intermetallides through ammonia with formation of transition metal mixture, binary hydrides and nitrides of the most electropositive metal the above systems occurs at the temperature of 293 K depending on the heat of the source compounds and their tendency to decomposition under ammonia effect

  3. Automated first-principles mapping for phase-change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Marc; Maintz, Stefan; Dronskowski, Richard

    2017-04-05

    Plotting materials on bi-coordinate maps according to physically meaningful descriptors has a successful tradition in computational solid-state science spanning more than four decades. Equipped with new ab initio techniques introduced in this work, we generate an improved version of the treasure map for phase-change materials (PCMs) as introduced previously by Lencer et al. which, other than before, charts all industrially used PCMs correctly. Furthermore, we suggest seven new PCM candidates, namely SiSb 4 Te 7 , Si 2 Sb 2 Te 5 , SiAs 2 Te 4 , PbAs 2 Te 4 , SiSb 2 Te 4 , Sn 2 As 2 Te 5 , and PbAs 4 Te 7 , to be used as synthetic targets. To realize aforementioned maps based on orbital mixing (or "hybridization") and ionicity coordinates, structural information was first included into an ab initio numerical descriptor for sp 3 orbital mixing and then generalized beyond high-symmetry structures. In addition, a simple, yet powerful quantum-mechanical ionization measure also including structural information was introduced. Taken together, these tools allow for (automatically) generating materials maps solely relying on first-principles calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The role of zinc on the chemistry of complex intermetallic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Weiwei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Combining experiments and electronic structure theory provides the framework to design and discover new families of complex intermetallic phases and to understand factors that stabilize both new and known phases. Using solid state synthesis and multiple structural determinations, ferromagnetic β-Mn type Co8+xZn12–x was analyzed for their crystal and electronic structures.

  5. Effect of Mn and Fe on the Formation of Fe- and Mn-Rich Intermetallics in Al–5Mg–Mn Alloys Solidified Under Near-Rapid Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulin Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mn was an important alloying element used in Al–Mg–Mn alloys. However, it had to be limited to a low level (<1.0 wt % to avoid the formation of coarse intermetallics. In order to take full advantage of the benefits of Mn, research was carried out to investigate the possibility of increasing the content of Mn by studying the effect of cooling rate on the formation of Fe- and Mn-rich intermetallics at different content levels of Mn and Fe. The results indicated that in Al–5Mg–Mn alloy with low Fe content (<0.1 wt %, intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn was small in size and amount. With increasing Mn content, intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn increased, but in limited amount. In high-Fe-containing Al–5Mg–Mn alloys (0.5 wt % Fe, intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn became the dominant phase, even in the alloy with low Mn content (0.39 wt %. Cooling rate played a critical role in the refinement of the intermetallics. Under near-rapid cooling, intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn was extremely refined. Even in the high Mn and/or high-Fe-containing alloys, it still demonstrated fine Chinese script structures. However, once the alloy composition passed beyond the eutectic point, the primary intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn phase displayed extremely coarse platelet-like morphology. Increasing the content of Fe caused intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn to become the primary phase at a lower Mn content.

  6. Electric vehicles batteries thermal management systems employing phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianniciello, Lucia; Biwolé, Pascal Henry; Achard, Patrick

    2018-02-01

    Battery thermal management is necessary for electric vehicles (EVs), especially for Li-ion batteries, due to the heat dissipation effects on those batteries. Usually, air or coolant circuits are employed as thermal management systems in Li-ion batteries. However, those systems are expensive in terms of investment and operating costs. Phase change materials (PCMs) may represent an alternative which could be cheaper and easier to operate. In fact, PCMs can be used as passive or semi-passive systems, enabling the global system to sustain near-autonomous operations. This article presents the previous developments introducing PCMs for EVs battery cooling. Different systems are reviewed and solutions are proposed to enhance PCMs efficiency in those systems.

  7. Modeling of subcooling and solidification of phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günther, Eva; Mehling, Harald; Hiebler, Stefan

    2007-12-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) are able to store thermal energy in small temperature intervals very efficiently due to their high latent heat. Particularly high storage capacity is found in salt hydrates. Salt hydrates however often show subcooling, thus inhibiting the release of the stored heat. In the state of the art simulations of PCM, the effect of subcooling is almost always neglected. This is a practicable approach for small subcooling, but it is problematic for subcooling in the order of the driving temperature gradient on unloading the storage. In this paper, we first present a new algorithm to simulate subcooling in a physically proper way. Then, we present a parametric study to demonstrate the main features of the algorithm and a comparison of computed and experimentally obtained data. The new algorithm should be particularly useful in simulating applications with low cooling rates, for example building applications.

  8. Color printing enabled by phase change materials on paper substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Kai Ji

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We have coated phase change materials (PCMs on rough and flexible substrates to achieve multicolor changeable devices. The principle of the device is based on an earlier discovery that lights have strong interference effect in PCM films, leading to various colors by reflection. In this work, paper substrates are laminated by parylene layers to protect the device from water before coated with functional PCM films. The PCM-based color printing (PCP on paper is not affected by rough surfaces and shows a similar color appearance as that on smooth surfaces. In particular, the color-printed device can be patterned by UV lithography to display a clear and tunable optical image, and it exhibits a low sensitivity to the angle of view. Such PCP has potential applications for low-cost, disposable, and flexible displays.

  9. Plastic phase change material and articles made therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhari, Ramin

    2016-04-19

    The present invention generally relates to a method for manufacturing phase change material (PCM) pellets. The method includes providing a melt composition, including paraffin and a polymer. The paraffin has a melt point of between about 10.degree. C. and about 50.degree. C., and more preferably between about 18.degree. C. and about 28.degree. C. In one embodiment, the melt composition includes various additives, such as a flame retardant. The method further includes forming the melt composition into PCM pellets. The method further may include the step of cooling the melt to increase the melt viscosity before pelletizing. Further, PCM compounds are provided having an organic PCM and a polymer. Methods are provided to convert the PCM compounds into various form-stable PCMs. A method of coating the PCMs is included to provide PCMs with substantially no paraffin seepage and with ignition resistance properties.

  10. Color printing enabled by phase change materials on paper substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong-Kai; Tong, Hao; Qian, Hang; Liu, Nian; Xu, Ming; Miao, Xiang-Shui

    2017-12-01

    We have coated phase change materials (PCMs) on rough and flexible substrates to achieve multicolor changeable devices. The principle of the device is based on an earlier discovery that lights have strong interference effect in PCM films, leading to various colors by reflection. In this work, paper substrates are laminated by parylene layers to protect the device from water before coated with functional PCM films. The PCM-based color printing (PCP) on paper is not affected by rough surfaces and shows a similar color appearance as that on smooth surfaces. In particular, the color-printed device can be patterned by UV lithography to display a clear and tunable optical image, and it exhibits a low sensitivity to the angle of view. Such PCP has potential applications for low-cost, disposable, and flexible displays.

  11. Force law in material media, hidden momentum and quantum phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kholmetskii, Alexander L.; Missevitch, Oleg V.; Yarman, T.

    2016-01-01

    We address to the force law in classical electrodynamics of material media, paying attention on the force term due to time variation of hidden momentum of magnetic dipoles. We highlight that the emergence of this force component is required by the general theorem, deriving zero total momentum for any static configuration of charges/currents. At the same time, we disclose the impossibility to add this force term covariantly to the Lorentz force law in material media. We further show that the adoption of the Einstein–Laub force law does not resolve the issue, because for a small electric/magnetic dipole, the density of Einstein–Laub force integrates exactly to the same equation, like the Lorentz force with the inclusion of hidden momentum contribution. Thus, none of the available expressions for the force on a moving dipole is compatible with the relativistic transformation of force, and we support this statement with a number of particular examples. In this respect, we suggest applying the Lagrangian approach to the derivation of the force law in a magnetized/polarized medium. In the framework of this approach we obtain the novel expression for the force on a small electric/magnetic dipole, with the novel expression for its generalized momentum. The latter expression implies two novel quantum effects with non-topological phases, when an electric dipole is moving in an electric field, and when a magnetic dipole is moving in a magnetic field. These phases, in general, are not related to dynamical effects, because they are not equal to zero, when the classical force on a dipole is vanishing. The implications of the obtained results are discussed.

  12. Phase Transformation in Cast Superaustenitic Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Phillips, Nathaniel Steven [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Superaustenitic stainless steels constitute a group of Fe-based alloys that are compositionally balanced to have a purely austenitic matrix and exhibit favorable pitting and crevice corrosion resistant properties and mechanical strength. However, intermetallic precipitates such as sigma and Laves can form during casting or exposure to high-temperature processing, which degrade the corrosion and mechanical properties of the material. The goal of this study was to accurately characterize the solid-solid phase transformations seen in cast superaustenitic stainless steels. Heat treatments were performed to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formations in alloys CN3MN and CK3MCuN. Microstructures were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, WDS). The equilibrium microstructures, composed primarily of sigma and Laves within purely austenitic matrices, showed slow transformation kinetics. Factors that determine the extent of transformation, including diffusion, nucleation, and growth, are discussed.

  13. Synthesis of nano intermetallic Nb{sub 3}Sn by mechanical alloying and annealing at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, M., E-mail: marlope@udec.cl [Department of Materials Engineering, Universidad de Concepción, Edmundo Larenas 270, Concepción (Chile); Jiménez, J.A. [Department of Physical Metallurgy, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalúrgicas, C.S.I.C., Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ramam, K.; Mangalaraja, R.V. [Department of Materials Engineering, Universidad de Concepción, Edmundo Larenas 270, Concepción (Chile)

    2014-11-05

    Highlights: • Intermetallic Nb{sub 3}Sn nano grains were synthesized by powder metallurgy route. • Structure analysis was studied using a multiphase Rietveld refinement fit. • The presence of Nb{sub 3}Sn 86% and NbO 8% was identified. • More tin content in the equilibrium Nb–Sn diagram was obtained. • Magnetic properties show Nb{sub 3}Sn powders are soft super paramagnetic materials. - Abstract: In this study, intermetallic Nb{sub 3}Sn of nanometer-sized grains was synthesized by powder metallurgy route. Elemental powders of Nb and Sn in the stoichiometric proportions were mechanically alloyed for 3 h in a high-energy mill under a protective atmosphere of argon. X-ray diffraction patterns of milled powders confirmed the formation of a Nb(Sn) solid solution evidenced by the presence of Nb peaks only, which are shifted to higher angles. Rietveld refinements used to analyze this XRD pattern indicated a better fit when a tetragonal structure with the space group I4/mmm is used instead the Nb cubic lattice with space group Im−3m. Size-strain analysis from line-broadening of peak profiles by using “double-Voigt” approaches showed that the broadening is due to both a small crystallite size (around 6 nm) and microstrains. Subsequent heat treatment of the Nb(Sn) powder mixture was required for the formation of the Nb{sub 3}Sn ordered phase. X-ray diffraction patterns obtained after a thermal treatment at 700 °C for 1 h were fitted using a multiphase Rietveld refinement. Although the resulting powders are composed mainly by Nb{sub 3}Sn (up to 87 weight%), certain amount of other intermetallic phases like Nb{sub 6}Sn{sub 5}, NbSn{sub 2} and Nb and Sn oxides were also determined. In agreement with the Rietveld refinement analysis, microprobe analysis also revealed that changes in chemical composition at different sites of powder particles are preserved even after annealing at 700 °C. Magnetic properties measured at 300 K on resulted Nb{sub 3}Sn powders

  14. Subscale Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rubik; Hansen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Supplemental heat rejection devices are required in many spacecraft as the radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demand. One means of obtaining additional heat rejection is through the use of phase change material heat exchangers (PCM HX's). PCM HX's utilize phase change to store energy in unfavorable thermal environments (melting) and reject the energy in favorable environments (freezing). Traditionally, wax has been used as a PCM on spacecraft. However, water is an attractive alternative because it is capable of storing about 40% more energy per unit mass due to its higher latent heat of fusion. The significant problem in using water as a PCM is its expansion while freezing, leading to structural integrity concerns when housed in an enclosed heat exchanger volume. Significant investigation and development has taken place over the past five years to understand and overcome the problems associated with water PCM HX's. This paper reports on the final efforts by Johnson Space Center's Thermal Systems Branch to develop a water based PCM HX. The test article developed and reported on is a subscale version of the full-scale water-based PCM HX's constructed by Mezzo Technologies. The subscale unit was designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation and previous full-scale water PCM HX development. Design modifications to the subscale unit included use of urethane bladder, decreased aspect ratio, perforated protection sheet, and use of additional mid-plates. Testing of the subscale unit was successful and 150 cycles were completed without fail.

  15. Analysis of wallboard containing a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, J. J.; Heberle, D. P.

    Phase change materials (PCMs) used on the interior of buildings hold the promise for improved thermal performance by reducing the energy requirements for space conditioning and by improving thermal comfort by reducing temperature swings inside the building. Efforts are underway to develop a gypsum wallboard containing a hydrocarbon PCM. With a phase change temperature in the room temperature range, the PCM wallboard adds substantially to the thermal mass of the building while serving the same architectural function as conventional wallboard. To determine the thermal and economic performance of this PCM wallboard, the Transient Systems Simulation Program (TRNSYS) was modified to accommodate walls that are covered with PCM plasterboard, and to apportion the direct beam solar radiation to interior surfaces of a building. The modified code was used to simulate the performance of conventional and direct-gain passive solar residential-sized buildings with and without PCM wallboard. Space heating energy savings were determined as a function of PCM wallboard characteristics. Thermal comfort improvements in buildings containing the PCM were qualified in terms of energy savings. The report concludes with a present worth economic analysis of these energy savings and arrives at system costs and economic payback based on current costs of PCMs under study for the wallboard application.

  16. Phase Change Energy Storage Material Suitable for Solar Heating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Li, Haihua; Zhang, Lihui; Liu, Zhenfa

    2018-01-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to investigate the thermal properties of palmitic acid, myristic acid, laurel acid and the binary composite of palmitic/laurel acid and palmitic/myristic acid. The results showed that the phase transition temperatures of the three monomers were between 46.9-65.9°C, and the latent heats were above 190 J/g, which could be used as solar energy storage material. When the mass ratio of Palmitic acid and myristic was 1:1, the eutectic mixture could be formed. The latent heat of the eutectic mixture was 186.6 J/g, the melting temperature and the solidification temperature was 50.6°C and 43.8°C respectively. The latent heat of phase change and the melting temperature had not obvious variations after 400 thermal cycles, which proved that the binary composite had good thermal stability and was suitable for solar floor radiant heating system.

  17. Diffusion in intermetallic compounds studied using short-lived radioisotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Diffusion – the long range movement of atoms – plays an important role in materials processing and in determining suitable applications for materials. Conventional radiotracer methods for measuring diffusion can determine readily how distributions of radioactive probe atoms in samples evolve under varying experimental conditions. It is possible to obtain limited information about atomic jump rates and pathways from these measurements; however, it is desirable to make more direct observations of the atomic jumps by using experimental methods that are sensitive to atomic scale processes. One such method is time-differential perturbed $\\gamma$–$\\gamma$-angular correlation spectroscopy (PAC). Two series of PAC experiments using $^{111m}$Cd are proposed to contribute to fundamental understanding of diffusion in intermetallic compounds. The goal of the first is to determine the dominant vacancy species in several Li$_{2}$-structured compounds and see if the previously observed change in diffusion mechanism th...

  18. An Overview of 2014 SBIR Phase I and Phase II Materials Structures for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program focuses on technological innovation by investing in development of innovative concepts and technologies to help NASA mission directorates address critical research needs for Agency programs. This report highlights nine of the innovative SBIR 2014 Phase I and Phase II projects that emphasize one of NASA Glenn Research Center's six core competencies-Materials and Structures for Extreme Environments. The technologies cover a wide spectrum of applications such as high temperature environmental barrier coating systems, deployable space structures, solid oxide fuel cells, and self-lubricating hard coatings for extreme temperatures. Each featured technology describes an innovation, technical objective, and highlights NASA commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an opportunity for NASA engineers, researchers, and program managers to learn how NASA SBIR technologies could help their programs and projects, and lead to collaborations and partnerships between the small SBIR companies and NASA that would benefit both.

  19. Si-Sb-Te materials for phase change memory applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao Feng; Song Zhitang; Ren Kun; Zhou Xilin; Cheng Yan; Wu Liangcai; Liu Bo

    2011-01-01

    Si-Sb-Te materials including Te-rich Si 2 Sb 2 Te 6 and Si x Sb 2 Te 3 with different Si contents have been systemically studied with the aim of finding the most suitable Si-Sb-Te composition for phase change random access memory (PCRAM) use. Si x Sb 2 Te 3 shows better thermal stability than Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 or Si 2 Sb 2 Te 6 in that Si x Sb 2 Te 3 does not have serious Te separation under high annealing temperature. As Si content increases, the data retention ability of Si x Sb 2 Te 3 improves. The 10 years retention temperature for Si 3 Sb 2 Te 3 film is ∼ 393 K, which meets the long-term data storage requirements of automotive electronics. In addition, Si richer Si x Sb 2 Te 3 films also show improvement on thickness change upon annealing and adhesion on SiO 2 substrate compared to those of Ge 2 Sb 2 Te 5 or Si 2 Sb 2 Te 6 films. However, the electrical performance of PCRAM cells based on Si x Sb 2 Te 3 films with x > 3.5 becomes worse in terms of stable and long-term operations. Si x Sb 2 Te 3 materials with 3 < x < 3.5 are proved to be suitable for PCRAM use to ensure good overall performance.

  20. Water Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Ribik B.; Atwell, Matt; Cheek, Ann; Agarwal, Muskan; Hong, Steven; Patel, Aashini,; Nguyen, Lisa; Posada, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft’s radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a “topper” to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. Studies conducted in this paper investigate utilizing water’s high latent heat of formation as a PCM, as opposed to traditional waxes, and corresponding complications surrounding freezing water in an enclosed volume. Work highlighted in this study is primarily visual and includes understanding ice formation, freeze front propagation, and the solidification process of water/ice. Various test coupons were constructed of copper to emulate the interstitial pin configuration (to aid in conduction) of the proposed water PCM HX design. Construction of a prototypic HX was also completed in which a flexible bladder material and interstitial pin configurations were tested. Additionally, a microgravity flight was conducted where three copper test articles were frozen continuously during microgravity and 2-g periods and individual water droplets were frozen during microgravity.

  1. A new method to estimate the atomic volume of ternary intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pani, M.; Merlo, F.

    2011-01-01

    The atomic volume of an A x B y C z ternary intermetallic compound can be calculated starting from volumes of some proper A-B, A-C and B-C binary phases. The three methods by Colinet, Muggianu and Kohler, originally used to estimate thermodynamic quantities, and a new method here proposed, were tested to derive volume data in eight systems containing 91 ternary phases with the known structure. The comparison between experimental and calculated volume values shows the best agreement both for the Kohler method and for the new proposed procedure. -- Graphical abstract: Synopsys: the volume of a ternary intermetallic compound can be calculated starting from volumes of some binary phases, selected by the methods of Colinet, Muggianu, Kohler and a new method proposed here. The so obtained values are compared with the experimental ones for eight ternary systems. Display Omitted Research highlights: → The application of some thermodinamic methods to a crystallochemical problem. → The prevision of the average atomic volume of ternary intermetallic phases. → The proposal of a new procedure to select the proper starting set of binary phases.

  2. Physical properties of the GaPd2 intermetallic catalyst in bulk and nanoparticle morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wencka, M.; Schwerin, J.; Klanjšek, M.

    2015-01-01

    Intermetallic compound GaPd2 is a highly selective catalyst material for the semi-hydrogenation of acetylene. We have determined anisotropic electronic, thermal and magnetic properties of a GaPd2 monocrystal along three orthogonal orthorhombic directions of the structure. By using 69Ga and 71Ga NMR...... properties of the GaPd2 phase on going from the bulk material to the nanoparticles morphology, we have synthesized GaPd2/SiO2 supported nanoparticles and determined their electronic DOS at εF from the 71Ga NMR spin-lattice relaxation rate. The electronic DOS of the GaPd2 was also studied theoretically from...... spectroscopy, we have determined the electric-field-gradient tensor at the Ga site in the unit cell and the Knight shift, which yields the electronic density of states (DOS) at the Fermi energy εF. The DOS at εF was determined independently also from the specific heat. To see the change of electronic...

  3. Pressure-induced phenomena in U intermetallics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sechovský, V.; Honda, F.; Prokeš, K.; Syshchenko, O.; Andreev, Alexander V.; Kamarád, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2003), s. 1377-1386 ISSN 0587-4254. [International Conference on Strongly Correlated Electron Systems (SCES 02). Cracow, 10.07.2002-13.07.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/02/0739 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914; CEZ:MSM 113200002 Keywords : pressure effect * intermetallics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2003

  4. Electron-Poor Polar Intermetallics: Complex Structures, Novel Clusters, and Intriguing Bonding with Pronounced Electron Delocalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qisheng; Miller, Gordon J

    2018-01-16

    Intermetallic compounds represent an extensive pool of candidates for energy related applications stemming from magnetic, electric, optic, caloric, and catalytic properties. The discovery of novel intermetallic compounds can enhance understanding of the chemical principles that govern structural stability and chemical bonding as well as finding new applications. Valence electron-poor polar intermetallics with valence electron concentrations (VECs) between 2.0 and 3.0 e - /atom show a plethora of unprecedented and fascinating structural motifs and bonding features. Therefore, establishing simple structure-bonding-property relationships is especially challenging for this compound class because commonly accepted valence electron counting rules are inappropriate. During our efforts to find quasicrystals and crystalline approximants by valence electron tuning near 2.0 e - /atom, we observed that compositions close to those of quasicrystals are exceptional sources for unprecedented valence electron-poor polar intermetallics, e.g., Ca 4 Au 10 In 3 containing (Au 10 In 3 ) wavy layers, Li 14.7 Mg 36.8 Cu 21.5 Ga 66 adopting a type IV clathrate framework, and Sc 4 Mg x Cu 15-x Ga 7.5 that is incommensurately modulated. In particular, exploratory syntheses of AAu 3 T (A = Ca, Sr, Ba and T = Ge, Sn) phases led to interesting bonding features for Au, such as columns, layers, and lonsdaleite-type tetrahedral frameworks. Overall, the breadth of Au-rich polar intermetallics originates, in part, from significant relativistics effect on the valence electrons of Au, effects which result in greater 6s/5d orbital mixing, a small effective metallic radius, and an enhanced Mulliken electronegativity, all leading to ultimate enhanced binding with nearly all metals including itself. Two other successful strategies to mine electron-poor polar intermetallics include lithiation and "cation-rich" phases. Along these lines, we have studied lithiated Zn-rich compounds in which structural

  5. Digestive ripening facilitated atomic diffusion at nanosize regime: Case of AuIn{sub 2} and Ag{sub 3}In intermetallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Neha [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Jagirdar, Balaji R., E-mail: jagirdar@ipc.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Klabunde, Kenneth J. [Department of Chemistry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A digestive ripening facilitated interatomic diffusion process is presented. • Nearly monodisperse AuIn{sub 2} and Ag{sub 3}In intermetallic nanoparticles were synthesized. • Optimization of reaction temperature facilitates interatomic transfer. • Presence of excess ligand plays a crucial role in the digestive ripening process. - Abstract: Monodisperse colloidal gold–indium (AuIn{sub 2}) intermetallic nanoparticles have been synthesized from Au and In colloids using the digestive ripening process. Formation of the intermetallic proceeds via digestive ripening facilitated atomic diffusion of Au and In atoms from the Au and In nanoparticles followed simultaneously by their growth in the solution. Optimization of the reaction temperature was found to be crucial for the formation of AuIn{sub 2} intermetallic from gold and indium nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the presence of nearly monodisperse nanoparticles of Au and AuIn{sub 2} with particle size distribution of 3.7 ± 1.0 nm and 5.0 ± 1.6 nm, respectively. UV–visible spectral studies brought out the absence of SPR band in pure AuIn{sub 2} intermetallic nanoparticles. Optical study and electron microscopy, in combination with powder X-ray diffraction established phase pure AuIn{sub 2} intermetallic nanoparticles unambiguously. The potential of such an unprecedented approach has been further exploited in the synthesis of Ag{sub 3}In intermetallic nanoparticles with the dimension of less than 10 nm.

  6. MD study of primary damage in L10 TiAl structural intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voskoboinikov, Roman E.

    2013-01-01

    Computer modelling by molecular dynamics has been applied to study the radiation damage created in collision cascades in L1 0 TiAl intermetallic compound. Either Al or Ti primary knock-on atoms (PKA) with energy 5 keV ⩽ E PKA ⩽ 20 keV were introduced in the intermetallic crystals at temperatures ranging from 100 K to 900 K. At least 24 different cascade for each (E PKA , T, PKA type) set were modelled in order to simulate a random spatial and temporal distribution of PKAs and provide statistical reliability of the results. The total yield of more than 760 simulated cascades is the largest yet reported for this binary intermetallic material. A comprehensive treatment of the modelling results has been carried out. The number of Frenkel pairs, fraction of Al and Ti vacancies, self-interstitial atoms and anti-sites as a function of (E PKA , T, PKA type) has been established. Preferred formation of Al self-interstitial atoms has been detected in L1 0 TiAl structural intermetallics exposed to irradiation

  7. Corrosion Study and Intermetallics Formation in Gold and Copper Wire Bonding in Microelectronics Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Breach

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A comparison study on the reliability of gold (Au and copper (Cu wire bonding is conducted to determine their corrosion and oxidation behavior in different environmental conditions. The corrosion and oxidation behaviors of Au and Cu wire bonding are determined through soaking in sodium chloride (NaCl solution and high temperature storage (HTS at 175 °C, 200 °C and 225 °C. Galvanic corrosion is more intense in Cu wire bonding as compared to Au wire bonding in NaCl solution due to the minimal formation of intermetallics in the former. At all three HTS annealing temperatures, the rate of Cu-Al intermetallic formation is found to be three to five times slower than Au-Al intermetallics. The faster intermetallic growth rate and lower activation energy found in this work for both Au/Al and Cu/Al as compared to literature could be due to the thicker Al pad metallization which removed the rate-determining step in previous studies due to deficit in Al material.

  8. Study of Material Compatibility for a Thermal Energy Storage System with Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songgang Qiu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of stainless steel 316L and Inconel 625 for use in a latent heat thermal energy storage (TES system was investigated. A NaCl–NaF eutectic mixture with a melting temperature of 680 °C was used as the phase change material (PCM. Containers were filled with the PCM prior to heating to 750 °C, then examined after 100 and 2500 h of high-temperature exposure by analyzing the material surface and cross-section areas. A small amount of corrosion was present in both samples after 100 h. Neither sample suffered significant damage after 2500 h. The undesirable inter-granular grain boundary attack found in SS316L samples was in the order of 1–2 µm in depth. On Inconel 625 sample surface, an oxide complex formed, resisting material dissolution into the PCM. The surface morphology of tested samples remained largely unchanged after 2500 h, but the corrosion pattern changed from an initially localized corrosion penetration to a more uniform type. After 2500 h, the corrosion depth of Inconel 625 remained at roughly 1–2 µm, indicating that the corrosion rate decelerated. Both materials demonstrated good compatibility with the chosen NaF–NaCl eutectic salt, but the low corrosion activity in Inconel 625 samples shows a performance advantage for long term operation.

  9. Applications of graphite-enabled phase change material composites to improve thermal performance of cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingli; Lin, Zhibin; Wu, Lili; Wang, Jinhui; Gong, Na

    2017-11-01

    Enhancing the thermal efficiency to decrease the energy consumption of structures has been the topic of much research. In this study, a graphite-enabled microencapsulated phase change material (GE-MEPCM) was used in the production of a novel thermal energy storage engineered cementitious composite feathering high heat storage capacity and enhanced thermal conductivity. The surface morphology and particle size of the microencapsulated phase change material (MEPCM) were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal properties of MEPCM was determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In addition, thermal and mechanical properties of the cementitious mortar with different admixtures were explored and compared with those of a cementitious composite. It was shown that the latent heat of MEPCM was 162 J/g, offering much better thermal energy storage capacity to the cementitious composite. However, MEPCM was found to decrease the thermal conductivity of the composite, which can be effectively solved by adding natural graphite (NG). Moreover, the incorporation of MEPCM has a certain decrease in the compressive strength, mainly due to the weak interfaces between MEPCM and cement matrix.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Ice Phase Change Material Heat Exchangers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCM) may be useful for spacecraft thermal control systems that involve cyclical heat loads or cyclical thermal environments. Thermal energy can be stored in the PCM during peak heat loads or in adverse thermal environments. The stored thermal energy can then be released later during minimum heat loads or in more favorable thermal environments. This can result in a decreased turndown ratio for the radiator and a reduced system mass. The use of water as a PCM rather than the more traditional paraffin wax has the potential for significant mass reduction since the latent heat of formation of water is approximately 70% greater than that of wax. One of the potential drawbacks of using ice as a PCM is its potential to rupture its container as water expands upon freezing. In order to develop a space qualified ice PCM heat exchanger, failure mechanisms must first be understood. Therefore, a methodical experimental investigation has been undertaken to demonstrate and document specific failure mechanisms due to ice expansion in the PCM. A number of ice PCM heat exchangers were fabricated and tested. Additionally, methods for controlling void location in order to reduce the risk of damage due to ice expansion were investigated. This paper presents an overview of the results of this investigation from the past three years.

  11. Continued Water-Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott W.; Sheth, Rubik B.; Poynot, Joe; Giglio, Tony; Ungar, Gene K.

    2015-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to meet the full heat rejection demands. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HX's do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development two full-scale, Orion sized water-based PCM HX's were constructed by Mezzo Technologies. These HX's were designed by applying prior research on freeze front propagation to a full-scale design. Design options considered included bladder restraint and clamping mechanisms, bladder manufacturing, tube patterns, fill/drain methods, manifold dimensions, weight optimization, and midplate designs. Two units, Units A and B, were constructed and differed only in their midplate design. Both units failed multiple times during testing. This report highlights learning outcomes from these tests and are applied to a final sub-scale PCM HX which is slated to be tested on the ISS in early 2017.

  12. Bonding in phase change materials: concepts and misconceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. O.

    2018-04-01

    Bonding concepts originating in chemistry are surveyed from a condensed matter perspective, beginning around 1850 with ‘valence’ and the word ‘bond’ itself. The analysis of chemical data in the 19th century resulted in astonishing progress in understanding the connectivity and stereochemistry of molecules, almost without input from physicists until the development of quantum mechanics in 1925 and afterwards. The valence bond method popularized by Pauling and the molecular orbital methods of Hund, Mulliken, Bloch, and Hückel play major roles in the subsequent development, as does the central part played by the kinetic energy in covalent bonding (Ruedenberg and others). ‘Metallic’ (free electron) and related approaches, including pseudopotential and density functional theories, have been remarkably successful in understanding structures and bonding in molecules and solids. We discuss these concepts in the context of phase change materials, which involve the rapid and reversible transition between amorphous and crystalline states, and note the confusion that some have caused, in particular ‘resonance’ and ‘resonant bonding’.

  13. Continued Water-Based Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott; Poynot, Joe

    2014-01-01

    In a cyclical heat load environment such as low Lunar orbit, a spacecraft's radiators are not sized to reject the full heat load requirement. Traditionally, a supplemental heat rejection device (SHReD) such as an evaporator or sublimator is used to act as a "topper" to meet the additional heat rejection demands. Utilizing a Phase Change Material (PCM) heat exchanger (HX) as a SHReD provides an attractive alternative to evaporators and sublimators as PCM HXs do not use a consumable, thereby leading to reduced launch mass and volume requirements. In continued pursuit of water PCM HX development two full-scale, Orion sized water-based PCM HX's were constructed by Mezzo Technologies. These HX's were designed by applying prior research and experimentation to the full scale design. Design options considered included bladder restraint and clamping mechanisms, bladder manufacturing, tube patterns, fill/drain methods, manifold dimensions, weight optimization, and midplate designs. Design and construction of these HX's led to successful testing of both PCM HX's.

  14. Effect of Mn and Fe on the Formation of Fe- and Mn-Rich Intermetallics in Al–5Mg–Mn Alloys Solidified Under Near-Rapid Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulin; Huang, Gaoren; Sun, Yimeng; Zhang, Li; Huang, Zhenwei; Wang, Jijie; Liu, Chunzhong

    2016-01-01

    Mn was an important alloying element used in Al–Mg–Mn alloys. However, it had to be limited to a low level (Al–5Mg–Mn alloy with low Fe content (Al6(Fe,Mn) was small in size and amount. With increasing Mn content, intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) increased, but in limited amount. In high-Fe-containing Al–5Mg–Mn alloys (0.5 wt % Fe), intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) became the dominant phase, even in the alloy with low Mn content (0.39 wt %). Cooling rate played a critical role in the refinement of the intermetallics. Under near-rapid cooling, intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) was extremely refined. Even in the high Mn and/or high-Fe-containing alloys, it still demonstrated fine Chinese script structures. However, once the alloy composition passed beyond the eutectic point, the primary intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) phase displayed extremely coarse platelet-like morphology. Increasing the content of Fe caused intermetallic Al6(Fe,Mn) to become the primary phase at a lower Mn content. PMID:28787888

  15. Effect of Mn and Fe on the Formation of Fe- and Mn-Rich Intermetallics in Al-5Mg-Mn Alloys Solidified Under Near-Rapid Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulin; Huang, Gaoren; Sun, Yimeng; Zhang, Li; Huang, Zhenwei; Wang, Jijie; Liu, Chunzhong

    2016-01-29

    Mn was an important alloying element used in Al-Mg-Mn alloys. However, it had to be limited to a low level (Al-5Mg-Mn alloy with low Fe content (Al₆(Fe,Mn) was small in size and amount. With increasing Mn content, intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) increased, but in limited amount. In high-Fe-containing Al-5Mg-Mn alloys (0.5 wt % Fe), intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) became the dominant phase, even in the alloy with low Mn content (0.39 wt %). Cooling rate played a critical role in the refinement of the intermetallics. Under near-rapid cooling, intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) was extremely refined. Even in the high Mn and/or high-Fe-containing alloys, it still demonstrated fine Chinese script structures. However, once the alloy composition passed beyond the eutectic point, the primary intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) phase displayed extremely coarse platelet-like morphology. Increasing the content of Fe caused intermetallic Al₆(Fe,Mn) to become the primary phase at a lower Mn content.

  16. Control of interfacial intermetallic compounds in Fe–Al joining by Zn addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J. [Key Laboratory of Robot and Welding Automation of Jiangxi Province, School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Center for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Li, Y.L., E-mail: liyulong1112ster@gmail.com [Key Laboratory of Robot and Welding Automation of Jiangxi Province, School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Zhang, H. [Key Laboratory of Robot and Welding Automation of Jiangxi Province, School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Guo, W. [Center for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Zhou, Y. [Center for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2015-10-01

    By Zn addition to the fusion zone, the interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMCs) of laser Al/steel joint changed from layered Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} and needle-like FeAl{sub 3} to layered Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5−x}Zn{sub x} and dispersed FeZn{sub 10} with minor Al-rich amorphous phase. This resulted in an improvement in the joint strength and the change of failure mode.

  17. PAC and μSr investigations of light interstitial diffusion in intermetallic hydrides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, P.; Baudry, A.

    1988-01-01

    Specific aspects of the Perturbed Angular Correlation (PAC) of gamma rays concerning its application to the study of atomic diffusion in solids are presented. PAC results recently obtained on the 181 Ta probe in several crystalline and amorphous phases of Zr 2 Ni hydrides are briefly summarized. Preliminary μSR results relative to these intermetallic hydrides are presented and compared to the PAC data

  18. Fiscal 1992 achievement report on next-generation industrial structure technology. Research and development of advanced materials for extreme environments (Development of methane fueled aeroengine); 1992 nendo chotaikankyosei senshin zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Methane nenryo kokukiyo engine no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    Research and development was carried out for intermetallic compounds and fiber reinforced intermetallic compound composite materials for use as advanced materials at high temperatures. Activities were conducted in the four fields of (1) high specific strength intermetallic compounds, (2) high melting point intermetallic compounds, (3) fiber reinforced intermetallic compound composite materials, and (4) a comprehensive survey. In Field (1), Mo, Nb, and Cr were added to Ti-Al systems and ternary phase diagrams were prepared for them, and isostatic forging was combined with heat treatment for the collection of basic data for achieving an optimum microstructure. Basic technologies were established for the manufacture of sheets by isothermal rolling. In Field (2), Ti, Ta, and W were added to Nb-Al systems and partial ternary phase diagrams were prepared for them. Specimen materials were subjected to a high-temperature compression test, when a specimen containing 10% of W recorded 230MPa at 1,600 degrees C. In Field (3), a silicon carbide based fiber was developed and it demonstrated the excellence of low oxygen fibers with respect to thermal properties after being rendered infusible by electron beam irradiation. (NEDO)

  19. The Effects of Grain Refinement and Rare Earth Intermetallics on Mechanical Properties of As-Cast and Wrought Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourbahari, Bita; Mirzadeh, Hamed; Emamy, Massoud

    2018-03-01

    The effects of rare earth intermetallics and grain refinement by alloying and hot extrusion on the mechanical properties of Mg-Gd-Al-Zn alloys have been studied to elucidate some useful ways to enhance the mechanical properties of magnesium alloys. It was revealed that aluminum as an alloying element is a much better grain refining agent compared with gadolinium, but the simultaneous presence of Al and Gd can refine the as-cast grain size more efficiently. The presence of fine and widely dispersed rare earth intermetallics was found to be favorable to achieve finer recrystallized grains during hot deformation by extrusion. The presence of coarse dendritic structure in the GZ61 alloy, grain boundary eutectic containing Mg17Al12 phase in the AZ61 alloy, and rare earth intermetallics with unfavorable morphology in the Mg-4Gd-2Al-1Zn alloy was found to be detrimental to mechanical properties of the alloy in the as-cast condition. As a result, the microstructural refinement induced by hot extrusion process resulted in a significant enhancement in strength and ductility of the alloys. The presence of intermetallic compounds in the extruded Mg-4Gd-2Al-1Zn and Mg-2Gd-4Al-1Zn alloys deteriorated tensile properties, which was related to the fact that such intermetallic compounds act as stress risers and microvoid initiation sites.

  20. Phase-change material as a thermal storage media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Chazly, Nihad M; Khattab, Nagwa M [Dokki, Cairo (Egypt)

    2000-07-01

    Heat storage based on the sensible heating of media such as water, rock and earth represent the first generation of solar energy storage subsystems and technology for their utilization. However, recently the heat storage based on the latent heat associated with a change in phase of a material offers many advantages over sensible heat storage. The most important characteristic of such a subsystem is its a sufficient storage capacity. An idealized model visualizing a thermal capacitor using a phase change material is constructed and subjected to simulated solar system environmental conditions. The proposed model is of a flat plate geometry consisting of two panels compartments forming the body of the capacitor containing the paraffin, leaving at their inner surfaces a thin passage allowing the water flow. The whole structure was assumed to be insulated to minimize heat loss. An analysis of the model is conducted using Goodman technique to generate data about the temperature distribution, the melt thickness, and the heat stored in the PCM under conditions of: ( i ) constant mass flow rate tests for various water inlet temperatures and ( ii ) constant water inlet temperature for various mass flow rate. A FORTRAN computer program was constructed to perform the analysis. It was found the water outlet temperature increases with time until it becomes nearly equals to the inlet temperature. Increasing the mass flow rate for a given inlet temperature, decreases the time required for outlet temperature to reach a given value. Increasing inlet temperature for a given mass flow rate gives a very rapid decrease in the time required for the outlet water temperature to reach a given value. Instantaneous rate of heat storage was determined from the inlet-to- exit temperature differential and measured flow rate. This rate was then integrated numerically to determine the cumulative total energy stored as a function of time. It was found that the instantaneous rate of heat storage

  1. Joining thick section aluminum to steel with suppressed FeAl intermetallic formation via friction stir dovetailing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reza-E-Rabby, Md.; Ross, Kenneth; Overman, Nicole R.; Olszta, Matthew J.; McDonnell, Martin; Whalen, Scott A.

    2018-04-01

    A new solid-phase technique called friction stir dovetailing (FSD) has been developed for joining thick section aluminum to steel. In FSD, mechanical interlocks are formed at the aluminum-steel interface and are reinforced by metallurgical bonds where intermetallic growth has been uniquely suppressed. Lap shear testing shows superior strength and extension at failure compared to popular friction stir approaches where metallurgical bonding is the only joining mechanism. High resolution microscopy revealed the presence of a 40-70 nm interlayer having a composition of 76.4 at% Al, 18.4 at% Fe, and 5.2 at% Si, suggestive of limited FeAl3 intermetallic formation.

  2. Development of Phase Change Materials for RF Switch Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Matthew Russell

    For decades chalcogenide-based phase change materials (PCMs) have been reliably implemented in optical storage and digital memory platforms. Owing to the substantial differences in optical and electronic properties between crystalline and amorphous states, device architectures requiring a "1" and "0" or "ON" and "OFF" states are attainable with PCMs if a method for amorphizing and crystallizing the PCM is demonstrated. Taking advantage of more than just the binary nature of PCM electronic properties, recent reports have shown that the near-metallic resistivity of some PCMs allow one to manufacture high performance RF switches and related circuit technologies. One of the more promising RF switch technologies is the Inline Phase Change Switch (IPCS) which utilizes GeTe as the active material. Initial reports show that an electrically isolated, thermally coupled thin film heater can successfully convert GeTe between crystalline and amorphous states, and with proper design an RF figure of merit cutoff frequency (FCO) of 12.5 THz can be achieved. In order to realize such world class performance a significant development effort was undertaken to understand the relationship between fundamental GeTe properties, thin film deposition method and resultant device properties. Deposition pressure was found to be the most important deposition process parameter, as it was found to control Ge:Te ratio, oxygen content, Ar content, film density and surface roughness. Ultimately a first generation deposition process produced GeTe films with a crystalline resistivity of 3 ohm-mum. Upon implementing these films into IPCS devices, post-cycling morphological analysis was undertaken using STEM and related analyses. It was revealed that massive structural changes occur in the GeTe during switching, most notably the formation of an assembly of voids along the device centerline and large GeTe grains on either side of the so-called active region. Restructuring of this variety was tied to

  3. MULTIFUNCTIONAL, SELF-HEALING HYBRIDSIL MATERIALS FOR EVA SPACE SUIT PRESSURE GARMENT SYSTEMS, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Phase II SBIR transition of NanoSonic's high flex HybridSil space suit bladder and glove materials will provide a pivotal funding bridge toward Phase III...

  4. Quantitative method of X-ray diffraction phase analysis of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czuba, J.; Dziedzic, A.

    1978-01-01

    Quantitative method of X-ray diffraction phase analysis of building materials, with use of internal standard, has been presented. The errors committed by determining the content of particular phases have been also given. (author)

  5. Mechanical and oxidation properties of some B2 rare earth–magnesium intermetallic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stumphy, Brad [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-12-15

    The remainder of Chapter 1 provides background information on three main topics. First is a discussion about the basic structure and composition of binary B2 intermetallic compounds. Second, the mechanical properties of intermetallics are examined, starting with the cause for the typically inherent brittleness observed in B2 intermetallics. A number of B2 compounds have been found to possess an abnormal level of ductility compared to other intermetallics in this class, including a handful of other rare earth–non-rare earth (RM) B2 line compounds, and these findings are also discussed. Finally, oxidation studies of rare earth metals, focusing on yttrium and cerium, as well as magnesium and some B2 materials are discussed. Chapter 2 is an in-depth look into certain aspects of the laboratory work done during this study. The many challenges and difficulties encountered required that a variety of laboratory techniques be attempted in the making, processing, and testing of these two intermetallic materials. The results and ensuing discussion for the mechanical testing that was performed are found in Chapter 3. Tensile and compression testing results for YMg are shown first, followed by those for CeMg. Some samples were made using electrical discharge machining (EDM) while others were polished into the desired shape. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) was utilized to inspect surfaces of the tensile and compression samples. Hardness values and attempts to determine fracture toughness are also recorded before beginning the discussion. Chapter 4 follows the same basic format for the oxidation study portion of the research. Oxidation curves for CeMg are followed by a qualitative chemical analysis using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The YMg oxidation curves are shown next followed by an x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the oxidation process for this material and a discussion of the results. Chapter 5 is a summary of the research performed in the mechanical and

  6. First principle studies of electronic and magnetic properties of Lanthanide-Gold (RAu) binary intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Sardar [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara, 18800 Pakistan (Pakistan); Department of Chemistry, University of Malakand, Chakdara, 18800 Pakistan (Pakistan); Ahmad, Rashid, E-mail: rashmad@gmail.com [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara, 18800 Pakistan (Pakistan); Department of Chemistry, University of Malakand, Chakdara, 18800 Pakistan (Pakistan); Jalali-Asadabadi, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Isfahan (UI), Hezar Gerib Avenue, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ali, Zahid [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara, 18800 Pakistan (Pakistan); Department of Physics, University of Malakand, Chakdara, 18800 Pakistan (Pakistan); Ahmad, Iftikhar [Center for Computational Materials Science, University of Malakand, Chakdara, 18800 Pakistan (Pakistan); Vice Chancellor, Abbott Abad University of Science and Technology, Abbott Abad (Pakistan)

    2017-01-15

    In this article we explore the electronic and magnetic properties of RAu intermetallics (R=Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb and Lu) for the first time. These properties are calculated by using GGA, GGA+U and hybrid density functional theory (HF) approaches. Our calculations show that HF provides superior results, consistent to the experimentally reported data. The chemical bonding between rare-earth and gold atoms within these compounds are explained on the basis of spin dependent electronic clouds in different planes, which shows predominantly ionic and metallic nature between Au and R atoms. The Cohesive energies of RAu compounds show direct relation with the melting points. Spin-dependent electronic band structure demonstrates that all these compounds are metallic in nature. The magnetic studies show that HoAu and LuAu are stable in non-magnetic structure, PrAu is stable in ferromagnetic phase and CeAu, NdAu, SmAu, GdAu, TbAu, DyAu, ErAu, TmAu, YbAu are anti-ferromagnetic materials.

  7. Electride and superconductivity behaviors in Mn5Si3-type intermetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaoqing; Wang, Bosen; Xiao, Zewen; Lu, Yangfan; Kamiya, Toshio; Uwatoko, Yoshiya; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Hosono, Hideo

    2017-08-01

    Electrides are unique in the sense that they contain localized anionic electrons in the interstitial regions. Yet they exist with a diversity of chemical compositions, especially under extreme conditions, implying generalized underlying principles for their existence. What is rarely observed is the combination of electride state and superconductivity within the same material, but such behavior would open up a new category of superconductors. Here, we report a hexagonal Nb5Ir3 phase of Mn5Si3-type structure that falls into this category and extends the electride concept into intermetallics. The confined electrons in the one-dimensional cavities are reflected by the characteristic channel bands in the electronic structure. Filling these free spaces with foreign oxygen atoms serves to engineer the band topology and increase the superconducting transition temperature to 10.5 K in Nb5Ir3O. Specific heat analysis indicates the appearance of low-lying phonons and two-gap s-wave superconductivity. Strong electron-phonon coupling is revealed to be the pairing glue with an anomalously large ratio between the superconducting gap Δ0 and Tc, 2Δ0/kBTc = 6.12. The general rule governing the formation of electrides concerns the structural stability against the cation filling/extraction in the channel site.

  8. Effect of Sr and solidification conditions on characteristics of intermetallic in Al-Si 319 industrial alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza-Cuadra, J.; Gallegos-Acevedo, P.; Mancha-Molinar, H.; Picado, A.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to determine the effect of strontium (Sr) on the characteristic of intermetallic phases, particularly the Al 5 FeSi phase which present morphology of platelets or needle-like. The results showed that within the range of variables studied, the modification process caused the disappearance of the needles and only occur the precipitation of phase α (chinese script-like). Refinement of the intermetallic phases occurs in conjunction with the refinement in grain size. Both parameters depend strongly on local cooling rate (T), temperature gradient (G) and apparent rate of solidification front (V). In the case of equiaxed structures the refinement of grain size and intermetallic occurs with increasing local cooling rate and temperature gradient and decrease the apparent rate of solidification front. In the case of columnar structures, refinement of grains and intermetallic requires the increase in values of the three variables indicated. Moreover, the addition of Sr resulted in the modification of silicon eutectic, as noted in others research works.

  9. Fiscal 1993 achievement report on next-generation industrial structure technology (Advanced materials for extreme environments - Development of methane fueled aeroengine); 1993 nendo chotaikankyosei senshin zairyo no kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Methane nenryo kokukiyo engine no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    Efforts were exerted to develop advanced materials for use under extreme environments, which were intermetallic compounds and fiber reinforced intermetallic compound composite materials excellent in heat resistance, specific strength, oxidation resistance, or the like. For the development of intermetallic compounds, efforts were made to develop Ti-Al-X (X=metal) high specific strength intermetallic compounds and Nb-Al-X (X=metal) high melting point intermetallic compounds. Ternary phase diagrams were prepared and the effect of added elements on basic characteristics was investigated. Basics of element technologies (texture control, melting, casting, and isothermal rolling) for manufacturing panel materials were studied and, in the case of Ti-Al-X systems, Ti-Al thin panels were fabricated. In the case of Nb-Al-X systems, items were experimentally fabricated by casting in an effort to study precision casting technology optimization. For the development of composite materials, efforts were made to develop SiC based and SiMC (M=metal) based fibers, and studies were carried out to complex them with Ti-Al based matrices. (NEDO)

  10. A diffraction based study of the deformation mechanisms in anomalously ductile B2 intermetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulay, Rupalee Prashant

    phase transformations in CoTi and CoZr. Also, post deformation characterization did not reveal any evidence of twinning. However, TEM based g·b analysis and EBSD based in-grain misorientation axis (IGMA) analysis showed that beyond a transition in the strain hardening behavior in CoTi, slip modes involving dislocations with and Burgers vectors are activated. The slip of such dislocations can reduce stress concentrations that could otherwise lead to premature fracture, thus providing a satisfying explanation for the anomalous ductility of CoTi and related compounds, like CoZr. Dislocation self-energy calculations accounting for elastic anisotropy suggest that the choice of slip direction in these alloys is mobility-, rather than source-, limited. The reach of this "ductilizing effect" over B2 alloys was explored by producing, characterizing, and testing a number of simple metal-rare earth metal compounds, namely MgY, MgNd and MgCe. MgR intermetallics with the B2 structure were found to be brittle and exhibit a cleavage type fracture indicating that the ductilizing effect is not as widespread as was initially thought. MgY and MgNd were found to primarily cleave along the {100} planes, while MgCe was found to cleave on the {111} planes. A large Bauschinger effect was observed in several of the anomalously ductile B2 compounds, such that the material actually begins to yield in the reverse direction on unloading. When only the primary slip mode {011} is active in CoZr (prior to a transition in strain hardening), the buildup of intergranular stresses is large and is chiefly responsible for the observed Bauschinger effect. However, past the aforementioned transition in strain hardening, the effect of intergranular stresses diminishes. The results demonstrate that the activation of hard, secondary slip modes causes the internal strains to develop more uniformly among the grains, thus reducing the intergranular stresses which cause the Bauschinger effect. Crystal plasticity

  11. Study of improving the thermal response of a construction material containing a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaouatni, A.; Martaj, N.; Bennacer, R.; Elomari, M.; El Ganaoui, M.

    2016-09-01

    The use of phase change materials (PCMs) for improving the thermal comfort in buildings has become an attractive application. This solution contributes to increasing the thermal inertia of the building envelope and reducing power consumption. A building element filled with a PCM and equipped with ventilation tubes is proposed, both for increasing inertia and contributing to refreshing building envelope. A numerical simulation is conducted by the finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics, which aims to test the thermal behaviour of the developed solution. An experimental study is carried out on a concrete block containing a PCM with ventilation tubes. The objective is to see the effect of PCM coupled with ventilation on increasing the inertia of the block. The results show the ability of this new solution to ensure an important thermal inertia of a building.

  12. FY 1997 report on the improvement of toughness of silicide system intermetallic compounds by complex texture; 1997 nendo chosa hokokusho (fukugo soshikika ni yoru silicide kei kinzokukan kagobutsu no kyojinsei kaizen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    In order to develop new materials superior in both room- temperature ductility and high-temperature strength, the basic data on MoSi2 intermetallic compounds with complex texture were stored. Intermetallic compound is one of the promising candidates of new super heat-resistant materials superior to conventional super heat-resistant alloys, however, it is extremely poor in ductility at room temperature. Based on available information on isothermal sectional phase diagrams of ternary system (Mo-Si-X system) composed of Mo silicide and the third element (X), some alloy systems were selected in consideration of use of carbide and nitride stably existing as dispersed phase of deposits at high temperature. A knowledge on phase diagrams of ternary system specimens with various compositions was obtained through arc melting, X-ray diffraction and texture observation, and heat treatment conditions for obtaining target complex textures were also determined. Storage of the basic data suggested that improvement of the ductility is possible by forming fine texture through addition of the third element and teat treatment. 21 refs., 58 figs., 15 tabs.

  13. Studies of cluster-assembled materials: From gas phase to condensed phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lin

    . After being mass gated in a reflectron equipped time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS) and deposited onto TEM grids, the resultant specimens can be loaded onto high-resolution TEM investigation via electron diffraction. In conclusion, soft-landing of mass selected clusters has been shown to be a successful approach to obtain structural information on Zr-Met-Car cluster-assembled materials collected from the gas phase. TEM images indicate the richness of the morphologies associated with these cluster crystals. However, passivation methods are expected to be examined further to overcome the limited stabilities of these novel clusters. From this initial study, it's shown the promising opportunity to study other Met-Cars species and more cluster-based materials. Experimental results of reactions run with a solvothermal synthesis method obtained while searching for new Zr-C cluster assembled materials, are reported. One unexpected product in single crystal form was isolated and tentatively identified by X-ray diffraction to be [Zr6i O(OH)O12·2(Bu)4], with space group P2 1/n and lattice parameters of a = 12.44 A, b = 22.06 A, c = 18.40 A, alpha = 90°, beta = 105°, gamma = 90°, V = 4875 A3 and R 1 = 3.15% for the total observed data (I ≥ 2 sigma I) and oR2 = 2.82%. This novel hexanuclear Zr(IV)-oxo-hydroxide cluster anion may be the first member in polyoxometalates class with metal atoms from the IVB group and having Oh symmetry. Alternatively, it may be the first member in {[(Zr6Z)X 12]X6}m- class with halides replaced by oxo- and hydroxyl groups and with an increased oxidation state of Zr. It is predicted to bear application potentials directed by both families. This work could suggest a direction in which the preparation of Zr-C cluster-assembled materials in a liquid environment may be eventually fulfilled. 1,3-Bis(diethylphosphino)propane (depp) protected small gold clusters are studied via multiple techniques, including Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

  14. Fracture toughness of Ceramic-Fiber-Reinforced Metallic-Intermetallic-Laminate (CFR-MIL) composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vecchio, Kenneth S.; Jiang, Fengchun

    2016-01-01

    Novel Ceramic-Fiber-Reinforced-Metal-Intermetallic-Laminate (CFR-MIL) composites, Ti–Al 3 Ti–Al 2 O 3 –Al, were synthesized by reactive foil sintering in air. Microstructure controlled material architectures were achieved with continuous Al 2 O 3 fibers oriented in 0° and 90° layers to form fully dense composites in which the volume fractions of all four component phases can be tailored. Bend fracture specimens were cut from the laminate plates in divider orientation, and bend tests were performed to study the fracture behavior of CFR-MIL composites under three-point and four-point bending loading conditions. The microstructures and fractured surfaces of the CFR-MIL composites were examined using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy to establish a correlation between the fracture toughness, fracture surface morphology and microstructures of CFR-MIL composites. The fracture and toughening mechanisms of the CFR-MIL composites are also addressed. The present experimental results indicate that the fracture toughness of CFR-MIL composites determined by three- and four-point bend loading configurations are quite similar, and increased significantly compared to MIL composites without ceramic fiber reinforcement. The interface cracking behavior is related to the volume fraction of the brittle Al 3 Ti phase and residual ductile Al, but the fracture toughness values appear to be insensitive to the ratio of these two phases. The toughness appears to be dominated by the ductility/strength of the Ti layers and the strength and crack bridging effect of the ceramic fibers.

  15. Rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics: Structure-bonding-property relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, M. K. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    The explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding property relationships. The work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn{sub 13}-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides Re2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x)81

  16. Rare-Earth Transition-Metal Intermetallics: Structure-bonding-Property Relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Mi-Kyung [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Our explorations of rare-earth, transition metal intermetallics have resulted in the synthesis and characterization, and electronic structure investigation, as well as understanding the structure-bonding-property relationships. Our work has presented the following results: (1) Understanding the relationship between compositions and properties in LaFe13-xSix system: A detailed structural and theoretical investigation provided the understanding of the role of a third element on stabilizing the structure and controlling the transformation of cubic NaZn13-type structures to the tetragonal derivative, as well as the relationship between the structures and properties. (2) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth iron silicides RE2-xFe4Si14-y and proposed superstructure: This compound offers complex structural challenges such as fractional occupancies and their ordering in superstructure. (3) Electronic structure calculation of FeSi2: This shows that the metal-semiconductor phase transition depends on the structure. The mechanism of band gap opening is described in terms of bonding and structural distortion. This result shows that the electronic structure calculations are an essential tool for understanding the relationship between structure and chemical bonding in these compounds. (4) Synthesis of new ternary rare-earth Zinc aluminides Tb3Zn3.6Al7.4: Partially ordered structure of Tb3.6Zn13-xAl7.4 compound provides new insights into the formation, composition and structure of rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics. Electronic structure calculations attribute the observed composition to optimizing metal-metal bonding in the electronegative (Zn, Al) framework, while the specific ordering is strongly influenced by specific orbital interactions. (5) Synthesis of new structure type of Zn39(CrxAl1-x

  17. Modification of NiAl intermetallic coatings processed by PTA with chromium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Diogo Henrique Sepel; Brunetti, Cristiano; Pintaude, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Ana Sofia Climaco Monteiro d'

    2010-01-01

    Equipment that operate under high-temperatures can be protected with NiAl intermetallic coatings mainly because of their metallurgical stability. This study as it evaluates the effect of chromium carbide added to Ni-Al intermetallic coatings processed by PTA. Three Ni-Al-Cr23C6 powder mixtures with different carbide fractions (15, 30 and 45 wt%) and another without carbides were deposited by PTA on an AISI 304 stainless steel plate, using two different current intensities (100 and 150A). Coatings were evaluated regarding the presence of welding defects, and resultant microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers microhardness and EDS chemical composition were also determined. NiAl and Cr_7C_3 development was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. A combination of NiAl/Cr-Fe-Ni phases was identified. The hardness was strongly related to the formed phases and their amounts. Besides presenting advances toward the development of coatings which can withstand severe operation conditions, the present study shows that PTA hardfacing is able to produce reinforced intermetallic coatings for high-temperature applications. (author)

  18. Pressure effect on magnetic and magnetotransport properties of intermetallic and colossal magnetoresistance oxide compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnold, Z; Ibarra, M R; Algarabel, P A; Marquina, C; Teresa, Jose MarIa de; Morellon, L; Blasco, J; Magen, C; Prokhnenko, O; Kamarad, J; Ritter, C

    2005-01-01

    The joint power of neutron diffraction and pressure techniques allows us to characterize under unique conditions the nature and different role of basic interactions in solids. We have covered a broad phenomenology in archetypical compounds: intermetallics and magnetic oxides. We have selected compounds in which the effect of moderate pressure is able to modify the electronic structure and bond angles that in turn are in the bases of magnetic and structural transitions. Complex magnetic and structural phase diagrams are reported for compounds with magnetic (Tb 1-X Y X Mn 2 ) and structural (RE 5 Si 4-X Ge X ) instabilities. Pressure-induced change of the magnetic structure in (R 2 Fe 17 ) intermetallics and the effect on the colossal magnetoresistance manganites are described

  19. Novel Nanocrystalline Intermetallic Coatings for Metal Alloys in Coal-fired Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang; H. Y. Sohn

    2009-08-31

    Intermetallic coatings (iron aluminide and nickel aluminide) were prepared by a novel reaction process. In the process, the aluminide coating is formed by an in-situ reaction between the aluminum powder fed through a plasma transferred arc (PTA) torch and the metal substrate (steel or Ni-base alloy). Subjected to the high temperature within an argon plasma zone, aluminum powder and the surface of the substrate melt and react to form the aluminide coatings. The prepared coatings were found to be aluminide phases that are porosity-free and metallurgically bonded to the substrate. The coatings also exhibit excellent high-temperature corrosion resistance under the conditions which simulate the steam-side and fire-side environments in coal-fired boilers. It is expected that the principle demonstrated in this process can be applied to the preparation of other intermetallic and alloy coatings.

  20. Thermal Expansion of Ni3Al Intermetallic Compound: Experiment and Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hai-Peng; Lü Peng; Zhou Kai; Wei Bing-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The thermal expansion of Ni 3 Al intermetallic compound is determined by a thermal dilatometer and simulated by the molecular dynamics method. The results of the linear thermal expansion coefficients are presented from 200 K up to the maximum temperature of 1600 K. The single phase of Ni 3 Al intermetallic compound is confirmed by x-ray diffraction together with DSC melting and solidification peaks, from which the solidus and the liquidus temperatures are obtained to be 1660 and 1695 K, respectively. The measured linear thermal expansion coefficient increases from 1.5 × 10 −5 to 2.7 × 10 −5 K −1 in the experimental temperature range, in good agreement with the data obtained by the molecular dynamics simulation, just a slight difference from the temperature dependence coefficient. Furthermore, the atomic structure and position are presented to reveal the atom distribution change during thermal expansion of Ni 3 Al compound. (paper)

  1. The shock Hugoniot of the intermetallic alloy Ti-46.5Al-2Nb-2Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millett, Jeremy; Gray, George T. Rusty III; Bourne, Neil

    2000-01-01

    Plate impact experiments were conducted on a γ-titanium aluminide (TiAl) based ordered intermetallic alloy. Stress measurements were recorded using manganin stress gauges supported on the back of TiAl targets using polymethylmethacrylate windows. The Hugoniot in stress-particle velocity space for this TiAl alloy was deduced using impedance matching techniques. The results in this study are compared to the known Hugoniot data of the common alpha-beta engineering Ti-based alloy Ti-6Al-4V. The results of the current study on the intermetallic alloy TiAl support that TiAl possesses a significantly higher stress for a given particle velocity than the two-phase Ti-6Al-4V alloy. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  2. Bulk Nano-structured Materials for Turbomachinery Components, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I effort seeks to exploit some of the tremendous benefits that could be attained from a revolutionary new approach to grain refinement in bulk...

  3. Engineered Materials for Advanced Gas Turbine Engine, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop innovative composite powders and composites that will surpass the properties of currently identified materials for advanced gas turbine...

  4. Multifunctional Carbon Electromagnetic Materials - Motors & Actuators, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The purpose of the proposal is to apply multifunctional carbon electromagnetic materials, including carbon nanotube electrical thread (replaces copper wire) and...

  5. Non-Catalytic Self Healing Composite Material Solution, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fiber reinforce polymer (FRP) composite materials are seeing increasing use in the construction of a wide variety of aerospace structures. However, uncertainties...

  6. High-pressure phase transitions of deep earth materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Kei

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in synchrotron XRD measurements combined with laser-heated diamond-anvil cell (LHDAC) techniques have enabled us to search for a novel phase transition at extremely high pressure and temperature. A phase transition from MgSiO 3 perovskite to post-perovskite was discovered through a drastic change in XRD patterns above 120 GPa and 2500 K, corresponding to the condition in the lowermost mantle (Murakami et al., 2004; Oganov and Ono, 2004). A pressure-induced phase transformation from ABO 3 -type perovskite to any denser structures was not known at that time. This new MgSiO 3 polymorph called post-perovskite has an orthorhombic symmetry (space group: Cmcm) with a sheet-stacking structure. The Mg site in post-perovskite is smaller than that in perovskite, which results in a volume reduction by 1.0-1.5% from perovskite structure. The electrical conductivity of post-perovskite is higher by three orders of magnitude than that of perovskite at similar pressure range (Ohta et al., 2008). This is likely due to a shorter Fe-Fe distance in post-perovskite structure, while conduction mechanism is yet to be further examined. Phase transition boundary between perovskite and post-perovskite has been determined in a wide temperature range up to 4400 K at 170 GPa (Tateno et al., 2008). Phase relations of Fe alloys have been also studied at core pressures (>135 GPa), although the generation of high temperature is more difficult at higher pressures. A new high-pressure B2 phase of B2 phase of FeS was recently discovered above 180 GPa (Sata et al., 2008). The Fe-Ni alloys have a wide pressure-temperature stability field of fcc phase at the core pressure range, depending on the Ni content (Kuwayama et al., 2008). (author)

  7. A simple route to Cu{sub x}Sn{sub (100−x)} intermetallic nanoparticle catalyst for ultra-phenol hydroxylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pithakratanayothin, Sakollapath [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College and Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Tongsri, Ruangdaj [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit - PM-RDU, National Metal and Materials Technology Center, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Chaisuwan, Thanyalak [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College and Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Wongkasemjit, Sujitra, E-mail: dsujitra@chula.ac.th [The Petroleum and Petrochemical College and Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2016-09-15

    A practical methodology and novel, economical materials were proposed to successfully prepare nanoparticle catalysts for phenol hydroxylation. The preparation was carried out via mechanical alloying (MA) of Cu{sub x}Sn{sub (100−x)} powder mixtures (where x = 30, 50, 70, and 100%wt). The mechanical alloyed nanoparticles were characterized using various techniques. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that η-Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5}, ε-Cu{sub 3}Sn, and CuSn phases could be formed in the mechanical alloyed Cu{sub x}Sn{sub (100−x)} materials. Transmission electron micrographs and selected area electron diffraction patterns confirmed the presence of η-Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5}, ε-Cu{sub 3}Sn, and CuSn phases. Activity of the catalysts, using the optimal conditions of 70 °C reaction temperature for 1 h, 50 mg of Cu{sub 0.5}Sn{sub 0.5}, and 1:3 phenol:H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ratio, provided more than 98% conversion with 70% catechol (CAT) and 29% hydroquinone (HQ). Experimental results suggested that the presence of the ε-Cu{sub 3}Sn phase gave higher activity while Sn reduced benzoquinone (BQ) to HQ. The catalyst maintained its stability with no structural collapse for more than 24 h. - Highlights: • Cu{sub x}Sn{sub y} intermetallic as a catalyst was successfully synthesized via mechanical alloying. • Cu{sub x}Sn{sub y} intermetallics promoted impressive phenol hydroxylation. • 98% conversion was achieved with high selectivity of catechol.

  8. Mechanical Components from Highly Recoverable, Low Apparent Modulus Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Santo, II (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor); Stanford, Malcolm K. (Inventor); DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A material for use as a mechanical component is formed of a superelastic intermetallic material having a low apparent modulus and a high hardness. The superelastic intermetallic material is conditioned to be dimensionally stable, devoid of any shape memory effect and have a stable superelastic response without irrecoverable deformation while exhibiting strains of at least 3%. The method of conditioning the superelastic intermetallic material is described. Another embodiment relates to lightweight materials known as ordered intermetallics that perform well in sliding wear applications using conventional liquid lubricants and are therefore suitable for resilient, high performance mechanical components such as gears and bearings.

  9. Development of ductile cementitious composites incorporating microencapsulated phase change materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savija, B.; Lukovic, M.; Chaves Figueiredo, S.; de Mendoca Filho, Fernando Franca; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In the past two decades, much research has been devoted to overcoming the inherent brittleness of cementitious materials. To that end, several solutions have been proposed, mainly utilizing fibres. One of the most promising classes of materials is strain hardening cementitious composite

  10. Ductile Binder Phase For Use With Almgb14 And Other Hard Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Bruce A.; Russell, Alan; Harringa, Joel

    2005-07-26

    This invention relates to a ductile binder phase for use with AlMgB14 and other hard materials. The ductile binder phase, a cobalt-manganese alloy, is used in appropriate quantities to tailor good hardness and reasonable fracture toughness for hard materials so they can be used suitably in industrial machining and grinding applications.

  11. Asymmetrical bonding in cold spraying of dissimilar materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikbakht, R.; Seyedein, S. H.; Kheirandish, S.; Assadi, H.; Jodoin, B.

    2018-06-01

    Characteristics of particle bonding, especially for dissimilar materials, remains a key question in cold spray deposition. There are limited reports in direct correlation to particle/substrate bonding and peripheral shear zones. Cold spraying experiments and numerical simulations are conducted to characterise and analyse the correlation between bonding and peripheral shear zones for asymmetric particle/substrate pairs of intermetallic-forming elements of nickel and titanium. The correlation between metallic bonding and highly strained areas is explored in view of the growth of the intermetallic phase at the particle/substrate interface during subsequent heat treatments. Characterisation of the as-sprayed samples reveal that for the Ni(particle)/Ti(substrate) pair, plastic deformation of the particle is dominating over substrate deformation. However, for the Ti(particle)/Ni(substrate) pair, it is observed that the substrate and particle deform to similar extents. Characterisation of the samples after a brief heat treatment at 700 °C indicate that intermetallic formation, and hence metallurgical bonding of the pairs is more likely to occur at the particle peripheries where the interface areas are highly strained, and rarely achieved at the particle base. Results also reveal that bonding extends from peripheries toward the central part of the interfaces with increasing the impact velocity. The kinetics of interfacial intermetallic formation at peripheral areas and its correlation to particle bonding is discussed in view of deformation-enhanced interdiffusion.

  12. Nano-Phase Powder Based Exothermic Braze Repair Technology For RCC Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase II project will advance innovative, cost effective and reliable nano-phase exothermic RCC joining processes (ExoBrazeTM) in order to be able to reinforce...

  13. Solid state phase change materials for thermal energy storage in passive solar heated buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D. K.; Christensen, C.

    1983-11-01

    A set of solid state phase change materials was evaluated for possible use in passive solar thermal energy storage systems. The most promising materials are organic solid solutions of pentaerythritol, pentaglycerine and neopentyl glycol. Solid solution mixtures of these compounds can be tailored so that they exhibit solid-to-solid phase transformations at any desired temperature within the range from less than 25 deg to 188 deg. Thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity, density and volumetric expansion were measured. Computer simulations were used to predict the performance of various Trombe wall designs incorporating solid state phase change materials. Optimum performance was found to be sensitive to the choice of phase change temperatures and to the thermal conductivity of the phase change material. A molecular mechanism of the solid state phase transition is proposed and supported by infrared spectroscopic evidence.

  14. Preparation and characterization of a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xi Peng; Gu Xiaohua; Cheng Bowen; Wang Yufei

    2009-01-01

    Here we reported a two-step procedure for preparing a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material. Firstly, a copolymer monomer containing a polyethylene glycol monomethyl ether (MPEG) phase change unit and a vinyl unit was synthesized via the modification of hydrogen group of MPEG. Secondly, by copolymerization of the copolymer monomer and phenyl ethylene, a novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change heat storage material was prepared. The composition, structure and properties of the novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change material were characterized by IR, 1 H NMR, DSC, WAXD, and POM, respectively. The results show that the novel polymeric based solid-solid phase change material possesses of excellent crystal properties and high phase change enthalpy.

  15. The use of lipids as phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phase change materials (PCMs) are substances capable of absorbing and releasing large 2 amounts of thermal energy (heat or cold) as latent heat over constant temperature as they 3 undergo a change in state of matter (phase transition), commonly, between solid and 4 liquid phases. Since the late 194...

  16. Influence of severe plastic deformation on intermetallic particles in Mg-12 wt.%Zn alloy investigated using transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Němec, M.; Gärtnerová, V.; Jäger, A.

    2016-01-01

    The in-depth microstructural characterization of intermetallic particles in an Mg-12 wt.%Zn binary alloy subjected to a severe plastic deformation is presented. The alloy was processed by four passes via equal channel angular pressing with an applied back pressure at a gradually decreasing temperature and analyzed using transmission electron microscopy techniques to observe the influence of processing on intermetallic particles. The results are compared with the initial state of the material prior to severe plastic deformation. The microstructural evolution of the α-Mg matrix and the Mg 21 Zn 25 , Mg 51 Zn 20 and MgZn 2 was analyzed using bright field imaging, selected area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark field imaging in scanning mode. The plastic deformation process influenced the α-Mg matrix and each type of intermetallic particle. The α-Mg matrix consisted of two types of areas. The first type of area had a highly deformed structure, and the second type of area had a partially recrystallized structure with an average grain size of approximately 250 nm. The Mg 21 Zn 25 microparticles exhibited distinct forms in the α-Mg matrix that were characterized as a single-crystalline form, a nano-crystalline form and a broken up form. No evidence of Mg 51 Zn 20 nanoparticles within the α-Mg matrix was found in the microstructure, which indicates their dissolution or phase transformation during the deformation process. MgZn 2 nanoparticles exhibited different behavior in both types of α-Mg matrix. Two orientation relationships toward the highly deformed α-Mg matrix were observed; however, there was no relationship toward the partially recrystallized α-Mg matrix. Additionally, the growth of the MgZn 2 nanoparticles was different in the two types of α-Mg matrix. The Mg 51 Zn 20 nanoparticles inside Mg 21 Zn 25 microparticles exhibited a distinct behavior within the single-crystalline or nano

  17. Nature of phase transitions in crystalline and amorphous GeTe-Sb2Te3 phase change materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, B; Sen, S; Clark, S M

    2011-09-28

    The thermodynamic nature of phase stabilities and transformations are investigated in crystalline and amorphous Ge(1)Sb(2)Te(4) (GST124) phase change materials as a function of pressure and temperature using high-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell. The phase transformation sequences upon compression, for cubic and hexagonal GST124 phases are found to be: cubic → amorphous → orthorhombic → bcc and hexagonal → orthorhombic → bcc. The Clapeyron slopes for melting of the hexagonal and bcc phases are negative and positive, respectively, resulting in a pressure dependent minimum in the liquidus. When taken together, the phase equilibria relations are consistent with the presence of polyamorphism in this system with the as-deposited amorphous GST phase being the low entropy low-density amorphous phase and the laser melt-quenched and high-pressure amorphized GST being the high entropy high-density amorphous phase. The metastable phase boundary between these two polyamorphic phases is expected to have a negative Clapeyron slope. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  18. Feasibility of using microencapsulated phase change materials as filler for improving low temperature performance of rubber sealing materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Avinash; Shubin, Sergey N; Alcock, Ben; Freidin, Alexander B; Thorkildsen, Brede; Echtermeyer, Andreas T

    2017-11-01

    The feasibility of a novel composite rubber sealing material to improve sealing under transient cooling (in a so-called blowdown scenario) is investigated here. A composite of hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) filled with Micro Encapsulated Phase Change Materials (MEPCM) is described. The fillers contain phase change materials that release heat during the phase transformation from liquid to solid while cooling. This exotherm locally heats the rubber and may improve the function of the seal during a blowdown event. A representative HNBR-MEPCM composite was made and the critical thermal and mechanical properties were obtained by simulating the temperature distribution during a blowdown event. Simulations predict that the MEPCM composites can delay the temperature decrease in a region of the seal during the transient blowdown. A sensitivity analysis of material properties is also presented which highlights possible avenues of improvement of the MEPCMs for sealing applications.

  19. Materials Information for Science and Technology (MIST): Project overview: Phase 1 and 2 and general considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grattidge, W.; Westbrook, J.; McCarthy, J.; Northrup, C. Jr.; Rumble, J. Jr.

    1986-11-01

    The National Bureau of Standards and the Department of Energy have embarked on a program to build a demonstration computerized materials data system called Materials Information for Science and Technology (MIST). This report documents the first two phases of the project. The emphasis of the first phase was on determining what information was needed and how it could impact user productivity. The second phase data from the Aerospace Metal Handbook on a set of alloys was digitized and incorporated in the system.

  20. Thermal Stability Test of Sugar Alcohols as Phase Change Materials for Medium Temperature Energy Storage Application

    OpenAIRE

    Solé, Aran; Neumann, Hannah; Niedermaier, Sophia; Cabeza, Luisa F.; Palomo, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Sugar alcohols are potential phase change materials candidates as they present high phase change enthalpy values, are non-toxic and low cost products. Three promising sugar-alcohols were selected: D-mannitol, myo-inositol and dulcitol under high melting enthalpy and temperature criterion. Thermal cycling tests were performed to study its cycling stability which can be determining when selecting the suitable phase change material. D-mannitol and dulcitol present poor thermal stability...

  1. Effect of Iron-Containing Intermetallic Particles on the Corrosion Behaviour of Aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambat, Rajan

    2006-01-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the corrosion behaviour of binary Al-Fe alloys containing iron at levels between 0.04 and 0.42 wt.% was investigated by electrochemical measurements in both acidic and alkaline chloride solutions. Comparing solution heat-treated and quenched materials with samples...... with {100} facets, and are observed to contain numerous intermetallic particles. Fine facetted filaments also radiate out from the periphery of pits. The results demonstrate that the corrosion of "pure" 99.96% Al is thus dominated by the role of iron, which is the main impurity, and its electrochemical...... that had been subsequently annealed to promote precipitation of Al3Fe intermetallic particles, it was found that annealing increases both the cathodic and anodic reactivity. The increased cathodic reactivity is believed to be directly related to the increased available surface area of the iron...

  2. Analysis of writing and erasing behaviours in phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyot, B. E-mail: bhyot@cea.fr; Poupinet, L.; Gehanno, V.; Desre, P.J

    2002-09-01

    An understanding of the process involved in writing and erasing of phase-change optical recording media is vital to the development of new, and the improvement of existing, products. The present work investigates both experimental and theoretical laser-induced fast structural transformations of GeSbTe thin films. Optical and microstructural changes are correlated using both a static tester and transmission electron microscopy. In the second part of this paper we try to elucidate the physics underlying the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation under short-pulse laser excitation. Both thermal and thermodynamical behaviours must be taken into account to illustrate real processes.

  3. Analysis of writing and erasing behaviours in phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyot, B.; Poupinet, L.; Gehanno, V.; Desre, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    An understanding of the process involved in writing and erasing of phase-change optical recording media is vital to the development of new, and the improvement of existing, products. The present work investigates both experimental and theoretical laser-induced fast structural transformations of GeSbTe thin films. Optical and microstructural changes are correlated using both a static tester and transmission electron microscopy. In the second part of this paper we try to elucidate the physics underlying the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transformation under short-pulse laser excitation. Both thermal and thermodynamical behaviours must be taken into account to illustrate real processes

  4. Advanced Insulation Materials for Cryogenic Propellant Storage Applications, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Materials Technology, Inc responds to the NASA solicitation Topic X9 entitled "Propulsion and Propellant Storage" under subtopic X9-01, "Long Term Cryogenic...

  5. Raman Mapping for the Investigation of Nano-phased Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouadec, G.; Bellot-Gurlet, L.; Baron, D.; Colomban, Ph.

    Nanosized and nanophased materials exhibit special properties. First they offer a good compromise between the high density of chemical bonds by unit volume, needed for good mechanical properties and the homogeneity of amorphous materials that prevents crack initiation. Second, interfaces are in very high concentration and they have a strong influence on many electrical and redox properties. The analysis of nanophased, low crystallinity materials is not straigtforward. The recording of Raman spectra with a geometric resolution close to 0.5 \\upmu {text{ m}^3} and the deep understanding of the Raman signature allow to locate the different nanophases and to predict the properties of the material. Case studies are discussed: advanced polymer fibres, ceramic fibres and composites, textured piezoelectric ceramics and corroded (ancient) steel.

  6. Alternative materials for FDOT sign structures : phase I literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Inspections of tubular sign structures by the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) have : revealed occurrences of premature corrosion on the inside of galvanized steel tubes. As a result, FDOT : engineers are seeking alternative materials that...

  7. Advanced Thermal Interface Material Systems for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ultimate aim of proposed efforts are to develop innovative material and process (M increase thermal cycles before degradation and efforts to ensure ease of...

  8. Integrated Computational Material Engineering Technologies for Additive Manufacturing, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — QuesTek Innovations, a pioneer in Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) and a Tibbetts Award recipient, is teaming with University of Pittsburgh,...

  9. Additively Manufactured Multi-Material Insert, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Parabilis Space Technologies is pleased to propose development of a novel additive manufacturing method which enables the use of multiple dissimilar materials in an...

  10. High Temperature Electrical Insulation Materials for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA's future space science missions cannot be realized without the state of the art high temperature insulation materials of which higher working temperature, high...

  11. Modeling of Impact Properties of Auxetic Materials Phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    over the more conventional engineering materials, such as higher indentation resistance, higher fracture toughness and greater resistance to impact...entrant materials were fixed at L=H=1.0 mm from which the rib lengths and thickness for each test case could be calculated using Equations (5) and (6...specimen. In all finite element models, the horizontal (2h) and diagonal (l) ribs shown in Figure 2 were idealized by ten and five shell elements

  12. Thermal property prediction and measurement of organic phase change materials in the liquid phase near the melting point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, William E.; Warzoha, Ronald; Weigand, Rebecca; Fleischer, Amy S.; Wemhoff, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Liquid-phase thermal properties for five phase change materials were estimated. • Various liquid phase and phase transition thermal properties were measured. • The thermal diffusivity was found using a best path to prediction approach. • The thermal diffusivity predictive method shows 15% agreement for organic PCMs. - Abstract: Organic phase change materials (PCMs) are a popular choice for many thermal energy storage applications including solar energy, building envelope thermal barriers, and passive cooling of portable electronics. Since the extent of phase change during a heating or cooling process is dependent upon rapid thermal penetration into the PCM, accurate knowledge of the thermal diffusivity of the PCM in both solid and liquid phases is crucial. This study addresses the existing gaps in information for liquid-phase PCM properties by examining an approach that determines the best path to prediction (BPP) for the thermal diffusivity of both alkanes and unsaturated acids. Knowledge of the BPP will enable researchers to explore the influence of PCM molecular structure on bulk thermophysical properties, thereby allowing the fabrication of optimized PCMs. The BPP method determines which of the tens of thousands of combinations of 22 different available theoretical techniques provides best agreement with thermal diffusivity values based on reported or measured density, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity for each of five PCMs (heneicosane, tricosane, tetracosane, oleic acid, and linoleic acid) in the liquid phase near the melting point. Separate BPPs were calibrated for alkanes based on heneicosane and tetracosane, and for the unsaturated acids. The alkane and unsaturated acid BPPs were then tested on a variety of similar materials, showing agreement with reported/measured thermal diffusivity within ∼15% for all materials. The alkane BPP was then applied to find that increasing the length of alkane chains decreases the PCM thermal

  13. Doped SbTe phase change material in memory cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    in ‘t Zandt, M.A.A.; Jedema, F.J.; Gravesteijn, Dirk J; Gravesteijn, D.J.; Attenborough, K.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Phase Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM) is investigated as replacement for Flash. The memory concept is based on switching a chalcogenide from the crystalline (low ohmic) to the amorphous (high ohmic) state and vice versa. Basically two memory cell concepts exist: the Ovonic Unified Memory (OUM)

  14. The materialization phase in the colour rope picture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, J.

    1987-11-01

    The initial phase of ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions where matter in form of quarks and real gluons is created is described in terms of a phenomenological strings with multiple colour charge sources at their ends. Consequences upon different observables are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  15. Control surface wettability with nanoparticles from phase-change materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Brink, G. H.; van het Hof, P. J.; Chen, B.; Sedighi, M.; Kooi, B. J.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-01-01

    The wetting state of surfaces can be controlled physically from the highly hydrophobic to hydrophilic states using the amorphous-to-crystalline phase transition of Ge2Sb2Te5 (GST) nanoparticles as surfactant. Indeed, contact angle measurements show that by increasing the surface coverage of the

  16. Gas-Solid Reaction Route toward the Production of Intermetallics from Their Corresponding Oxide Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Ahmed

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Near-net shape forming of metallic components from metallic powders produced in situ from reduction of corresponding pure metal oxides has not been explored to a large extent. Such a process can be probably termed in short as the “Reduction-Sintering” process. This methodology can be especially effective in producing components containing refractory metals. Additionally, in situ production of metallic powder from complex oxides containing more than one metallic element may result in in situ alloying during reduction, possibly at lower temperatures. With this motivation, in situ reduction of complex oxides mixtures containing more than one metallic element has been investigated intensively over a period of years in the department of materials science, KTH, Sweden. This review highlights the most important features of that investigation. The investigation includes not only synthesis of intermetallics and refractory metals using the gas solid reaction route but also study the reaction kinetics and mechanism. Environmentally friendly gases like H2, CH4 and N2 were used for simultaneous reduction, carburization and nitridation, respectively. Different techniques have been utilized. A thermogravimetric analyzer was used to accurately control the process conditions and obtain reaction kinetics. The fluidized bed technique has been utilized to study the possibility of bulk production of intermetallics compared to milligrams in TGA. Carburization and nitridation of nascent formed intermetallics were successfully carried out. A novel method based on material thermal property was explored to track the reaction progress and estimate the reaction kinetics. This method implies the dynamic measure of thermal diffusivity using laser flash method. These efforts end up with a successful preparation of nanograined intermetallics like Fe-Mo and Ni-W. In addition, it ends up with simultaneous reduction and synthesis of Ni-WN and Ni-WC from their oxide mixtures

  17. Diffusion in substitutionally disordered B2 intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belova, I.V.; Murch, G.E.

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a comprehensive diffusion kinetics theory is formulated to describe seamlessly tracer and chemical diffusion in antistructurally disordered B2 intermetallics showing positive and negative deviations from stoichiometry. The theory is based around unit processes consisting of six-jump cycles that can be assisted by intrinsic and extrinsic antistructural atoms of either atomic species. The Ising alloy model is used to illustrate the formalism, but the formalism can be adapted to other models. Expressions are developed for the tracer diffusion coefficients, the phenomenological coefficients, the intrinsic diffusion coefficients, the interdiffusion coefficient and the various correlation factor components. Results for the tracer and collective correlation factors and the vacancy wind factor (in interdiffusion) are in excellent agreement with results from Monte Carlo computer simulations based around single vacancy jumps. (author)

  18. Deuterium absorption and material phase characteristics of Zr2Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, A.; Mosley, W.C.; Holder, J.S.; Brooks, K.N.

    1992-01-01

    Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of polished surfaces, electron probe microanalysis, and X-ray powder diffractometry indicated the presence of a continuous Zr 2 Fe phase with secondary phases of ZrFe 2 , Zr 5 FeSn, α-Zr, and Zr 6 Fe 3 O. A statistically-designed experiment to determine the effects of temperature, time, and vacuum quality On activation of St 198 revealed that when activated at low temperature (350 degrees C) deuterium absorption rate was slower when the vacuum quality was pwr (2.5 Pa vs. 3x10 -4 Pa). However, at higher activation temperature (500 degrees C), deuterium absorption rate was fast and was independent of vacuum quality. Deuterium pressure-composition-temperature (P-C-T) data are reported for St 198 in the temperature range 200--500 degrees C. The P-C-T data over the full range of deuterium loading and at temperatures of 350 degrees C and below is described by: K 0e -(ΔH α /RT)=PD 2 q 2 /(q*-q) 2 where ΔHα and K 0 have values of 101.8 kJ·mole -1 and 3.24x10 -8 Pa -1 , and q* is 15.998 kPa·L -1 ·g -1 . At higher temperatures, one or more secondary reactions in the solid phase occur that slowly consume D 2 from the gas phase. XRD suggests these reactions to be: 2 Zr 2 FeD x → x ZrD 2 + x/3 ZrFe 2 + (2 - 2/3x) Zr 2 Fe and Zr 2 FeD x + (2 -1/2x) D 2 → ZrD 2 + Fe, where 0 < x < 3. Reaction between gas phase deuterium and Zr2FC formed in the first reaction accounts for the observed consumption of deuterium from the gas phase by this reaction

  19. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  20. Stowing of radioactive materials package during land transport. Third phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilles, P.; Chevalier, G.; Pouard, M.; Jolys, J.C.; Draulans, J.; Lafontaine, I.

    1984-01-01

    Phase 3 of this study is mainly experimental. The study is based on the work performed during 2 former studies: phase 1: definition and analysis of reference accidental conditions, and phase 2: selection of some reference accidents and computation of the deceleration forces. The main goal of the study is to draw up a reference document, giving some guidances for the stowing of packages on conveyances for land transportation. The third phase includes four frontal impact tests. The reference package used is a French IL-37 container weighing about 1.3 t. The first test was performed using a truck, loaded with two IL-37 containers and launched at a speed of 50 km/h against a fixed obstacle. The deceleration curve the behaviour of each package and the behaviour of stowing systems are compared with the theoretical results. Various measurements were made during the test: vehicle impact speed; vehicle deceleration, measured at different points on the frame, package deceleration, displacement of attachment points. The impact was filmed from different angles. The second test was performed in the same impact conditions but with a waggon instead of a truck, and loaded with one container. The front of the waggon was equipped with special shock absorbers to obtain the same deceleration as recorded during the truck impact (first test). In the third test the stowing systems were reinforced by a nylon one in order to obtain information of stowing systems of that type and to increase the energy absorption capacity. In the fourth test in addition to being stowed the package was also chocked. The results obtained have shown that it is possible to maintain a package on a truck platform even during a severe frontal impact

  1. Microstructure and Tribological Properties of Mo–40Ni–13Si Multiphase Intermetallic Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunyan; Wang, Shuhuan; Gui, Yongliang; Cheng, Zihao; Ni, Guolong

    2016-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds are increasingly being expected to be utilized in tribological environments, but to date their implementation is hindered by insufficient ductility at low and medium temperatures. This paper presents a novel multiphase intermetallic alloy with the chemical composition of Mo–40Ni–13Si (at %). Microstructure characterization reveals that a certain amount of ductile Mo phases formed during the solidification process of a ternary Mo–Ni–Si molten alloy, which is beneficial to the improvement of ductility of intermetallic alloys. Tribological properties of the designed alloy—including wear resistance, friction coefficient, and metallic tribological compatibility—were evaluated under dry sliding wear test conditions at room temperature. Results suggest that the multiphase alloy possesses an excellent tribological property, which is attributed to unique microstructural features and thereby a good combination in hardness and ductility. The corresponding wear mechanism is explained by observing the worn surface, subsurface, and wear debris of the alloy, which was found to be soft abrasive wear. PMID:28774106

  2. First principles electronic and thermal properties of some AlRE intermetallics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Vipul; Sanyal, Sankar P.; Rajagopalan, M.

    2008-10-01

    A study on structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic cubic B 2-type AlRE (RE=Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr and Lu) intermetallics has been done theoretically. The self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital method is used to describe the electronic properties of these intermetallics at ambient and at high pressure. These compounds show metallic behavior under ambient conditions. The variation of density of states under compression indicates some possibility of structural phase transformation in AlLa, AlCe and AlPr. Thermal properties like Debye temperature and Grüneisen constant are calculated at T=0 K and at ambient pressure within the Debye-Grüneisen model and compared with the others’ theoretical results. Our results are in good agreement. We have also performed a pressure-induced variation of Debye temperature and have found a decrease in Debye temperature around 40 kbar in AlRE (RE=La, Ce, Pr) intermetallics.

  3. First principles electronic and thermal properties of some AlRE intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vipul [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Hoshangabad Road, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh 462 026 (India)], E-mail: vips73@yahoo.com; Sanyal, Sankar P. [Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Hoshangabad Road, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh 462 026 (India); Rajagopalan, M. [Department of Physics, Anna University, Chennai-600 025 (India)

    2008-10-01

    A study on structural and electronic properties of non-magnetic cubic B{sub 2}-type AlRE (RE=Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr and Lu) intermetallics has been done theoretically. The self-consistent tight binding linear muffin tin orbital method is used to describe the electronic properties of these intermetallics at ambient and at high pressure. These compounds show metallic behavior under ambient conditions. The variation of density of states under compression indicates some possibility of structural phase transformation in AlLa, AlCe and AlPr. Thermal properties like Debye temperature and Grueneisen constant are calculated at T=0 K and at ambient pressure within the Debye-Grueneisen model and compared with the others' theoretical results. Our results are in good agreement. We have also performed a pressure-induced variation of Debye temperature and have found a decrease in Debye temperature around 40 kbar in AlRE (RE=La, Ce, Pr) intermetallics.

  4. Microstructure and Tribological Properties of Mo–40Ni–13Si Multiphase Intermetallic Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Song

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermetallic compounds are increasingly being expected to be utilized in tribological environments, but to date their implementation is hindered by insufficient ductility at low and medium temperatures. This paper presents a novel multiphase intermetallic alloy with the chemical composition of Mo–40Ni–13Si (at %. Microstructure characterization reveals that a certain amount of ductile Mo phases formed during the solidification process of a ternary Mo–Ni–Si molten alloy, which is beneficial to the improvement of ductility of intermetallic alloys. Tribological properties of the designed alloy—including wear resistance, friction coefficient, and metallic tribological compatibility—were evaluated under dry sliding wear test conditions at room temperature. Results suggest that the multiphase alloy possesses an excellent tribological property, which is attributed to unique microstructural features and thereby a good combination in hardness and ductility. The corresponding wear mechanism is explained by observing the worn surface, subsurface, and wear debris of the alloy, which was found to be soft abrasive wear.

  5. Theoretical potential for low energy consumption phase change memory utilizing electrostatically-induced structural phase transitions in 2D materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehn, Daniel A.; Li, Yao; Pop, Eric; Reed, Evan J.

    2018-01-01

    Structural phase-change materials are of great importance for applications in information storage devices. Thermally driven structural phase transitions are employed in phase-change memory to achieve lower programming voltages and potentially lower energy consumption than mainstream nonvolatile memory technologies. However, the waste heat generated by such thermal mechanisms is often not optimized, and could present a limiting factor to widespread use. The potential for electrostatically driven structural phase transitions has recently been predicted and subsequently reported in some two-dimensional materials, providing an athermal mechanism to dynamically control properties of these materials in a nonvolatile fashion while achieving potentially lower energy consumption. In this work, we employ DFT-based calculations to make theoretical comparisons of the energy required to drive electrostatically-induced and thermally-induced phase transitions. Determining theoretical limits in monolayer MoTe2 and thin films of Ge2Sb2Te5, we find that the energy consumption per unit volume of the electrostatically driven phase transition in monolayer MoTe2 at room temperature is 9% of the adiabatic lower limit of the thermally driven phase transition in Ge2Sb2Te5. Furthermore, experimentally reported phase change energy consumption of Ge2Sb2Te5 is 100-10,000 times larger than the adiabatic lower limit due to waste heat flow out of the material, leaving the possibility for energy consumption in monolayer MoTe2-based devices to be orders of magnitude smaller than Ge2Sb2Te5-based devices.

  6. Analyse of possibilities of increasing housing energy efficiency by application of phase-changing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučeljić-Vavan Sanja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Refurbishment of existing building stock using energy-saving phase-changing smart materials and technologies, in addition to improved indoor climatic conditions, offer an opportunity for increasing housing energy efficiency and value. This fast developing technology becomes increasingly cost-effective with much shorter payback periods. However, it is undertaken only on a limited scale; because of lack of knowledge about their changeable properties and dynamism in that they behave in response to energy fields. Main characteristics, which make them different form others, are: immediacy transience, self-actuation, selectivity and directness. Phase change processes invariably involve the absorbing, storing or releasing of large amounts of energy in the form of latent heat. These processes are reversible and phase-changing materials can undergo an unlimited number of cycles without degradation. Since phase-changing materials can be designed to absorb or release energy at predictable temperatures, they have naturally been explored for use in architecture as a way of helping deal with the thermal environment in a building. Technologies based on sealing phase-changing materials into small pellets have achieved widespread use in connection with radiant floor heating systems, phase change wallboards, mortar or facade systems. Thermal characteristics of existing buildings can be improved on increasing their thermal-stored mass by implementation products of phase-changing smart materials. In addition to contributing to carbon reduction and energy security, using phase-changing materials in the building sector stimulates innovations.

  7. Role of intermetallics on the mechanical fatigue behavior of Cu–Al ball bond interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassnig, A., E-mail: alice.lassnig@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Wien (Austria); Pelzer, R. [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Siemensstrae 2, 9500 Villach (Austria); Gammer, C. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Physics of Nanostructured Materials, Boltzmanngasse 5, 1090 Wien (Austria); National Center for Electron Microscopy, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Khatibi, G. [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology and Analytics, Getreidemarkt 9, 1060 Wien (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    The mechanical fatigue behavior of Cu–Al interfaces occurring in thermosonic ball bonds –typically used in microelectronic packages for automotive applications – is investigated by means of a specially designed fatigue test technique. Fully reversed cyclic shear stresses are induced at the bond interface, leading to subsequent fatigue lift off failure and revealing the weakest site of the bond. A special focus is set on the role of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMC) on the fatigue performance of such interfaces. Therefore fatigue life curves were obtained for three representative microstructural states: The as-bonded state is compared to two annealed states at 200 °C for 200 h and at 200 °C for 2000 h respectively. In the moderately annealed state two IMC layers (Al{sub 2}Cu, Al{sub 4}Cu{sub 9}) could be identified, whereas in the highly aged state the original pad metallization was almost entirely consumed and AlCu is formed as a third IMC. Finally, the crack path is traced back as a function of interfacial microstructure by means of electron microscopy techniques. Whereas conventional static shear tests reveal no significant decrease of the bond shear force with increased IMC formation the fatigue tests prove a clear degradation in the cyclic mechanical performance. It can be concluded that during cycling the crack deflects easily into the formed intermetallics, leading to early failure of the ball bonds due to their brittle nature. - Highlights: • High cycle fatigue of various miniaturized Cu–Al interfaces is investigated. • Interfacial intermetallic compounds consist of Al2Cu, AlCu and Al4Cu9. • Static shear strength shows minor dependency on interfacial phase formation. • Fatigue tests prove significant degradation with intermetallic compound evolution. • Fatigue fracture surface analysis reveal microstructure dependent crack path.

  8. Role of intermetallics on the mechanical fatigue behavior of Cu–Al ball bond interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassnig, A.; Pelzer, R.; Gammer, C.; Khatibi, G.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical fatigue behavior of Cu–Al interfaces occurring in thermosonic ball bonds –typically used in microelectronic packages for automotive applications – is investigated by means of a specially designed fatigue test technique. Fully reversed cyclic shear stresses are induced at the bond interface, leading to subsequent fatigue lift off failure and revealing the weakest site of the bond. A special focus is set on the role of interfacial intermetallic compounds (IMC) on the fatigue performance of such interfaces. Therefore fatigue life curves were obtained for three representative microstructural states: The as-bonded state is compared to two annealed states at 200 °C for 200 h and at 200 °C for 2000 h respectively. In the moderately annealed state two IMC layers (Al 2 Cu, Al 4 Cu 9 ) could be identified, whereas in the highly aged state the original pad metallization was almost entirely consumed and AlCu is formed as a third IMC. Finally, the crack path is traced back as a function of interfacial microstructure by means of electron microscopy techniques. Whereas conventional static shear tests reveal no significant decrease of the bond shear force with increased IMC formation the fatigue tests prove a clear degradation in the cyclic mechanical performance. It can be concluded that during cycling the crack deflects easily into the formed intermetallics, leading to early failure of the ball bonds due to their brittle nature. - Highlights: • High cycle fatigue of various miniaturized Cu–Al interfaces is investigated. • Interfacial intermetallic compounds consist of Al2Cu, AlCu and Al4Cu9. • Static shear strength shows minor dependency on interfacial phase formation. • Fatigue tests prove significant degradation with intermetallic compound evolution. • Fatigue fracture surface analysis reveal microstructure dependent crack path

  9. Relaxed energy for transversely isotropic two-phase materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šilhavý, Miroslav; Padovani, C.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 67, 3 (2002), s. 187-204 ISSN 0374-3535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/00/1516 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1019905 Keywords : double-well materials * transverse isotropy * quasiconvexity Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2002

  10. Comparative analyses on dynamic performances of photovoltaic–thermal solar collectors integrated with phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Di; Jia, Yuting; Alva, Guruprasad; Liu, Lingkun; Fang, Guiyin

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The dynamic model of photovoltaic–thermal collector with phase change material was developed. • The performances of photovoltaic–thermal collector are performed comparative analyses. • The performances of photovoltaic–thermal collector with phase change material were evaluated. • Upper phase change material mode can improve performances of photovoltaic–thermal collector. - Abstract: The operating conditions (especially temperature) of photovoltaic–thermal solar collectors have significant influence on dynamic performance of the hybrid photovoltaic–thermal solar collectors. Only a small percentage of incoming solar radiation can be converted into electricity, and the rest is converted into heat. This heat leads to a decrease in efficiency of the photovoltaic module. In order to improve the performance of the hybrid photovoltaic–thermal solar collector, we performed comparative analyses on a hybrid photovoltaic–thermal solar collector integrated with phase change material. Electrical and thermal parameters like solar cell temperature, outlet temperature of air, electrical power, thermal power, electrical efficiency, thermal efficiency and overall efficiency are simulated and analyzed to evaluate the dynamic performance of the hybrid photovoltaic–thermal collector. It is found that the position of phase change material layer in the photovoltaic–thermal collector has a significant effect on the performance of the photovoltaic–thermal collector. The results indicate that upper phase change material mode in the photovoltaic–thermal collector can significantly improve the thermal and electrical performance of photovoltaic–thermal collector. It is found that overall efficiency of photovoltaic–thermal collector in ‘upper phase change material’ mode is 10.7% higher than that in ‘no phase change material’ mode. Further, for a photovoltaic–thermal collector with upper phase change material, it is verified that 3 cm

  11. Quantitative determination of the crystalline phases of the ceramic materials utilizing the Rietveld method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniess, C.T.; Prates, P.B.; Lima, J.C. de; Kuhnen, N.C.; Riella, H.G.; Maliska, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic materials have properties defined by their chemical and micro-structural composition. The quantification of the crystalline phases is a fundamental stage in the determination of the structure, properties and applications of a ceramic material. Within this context, this study aims is the quantitative determination of the crystalline phases of the ceramic materials developed with addition of mineral coal bottom ash, utilizing the X ray diffraction technique, through the method proposed by Rietveld. For the formulation of the ceramic mixtures a {3,3} simplex-lattice design was used, giving ten formulations of three components (two different types of clays and coal bottom ash). The crystalline phases identified in the ceramic materials after sintering at 1150 deg C during two hours are: quartz, tridimite, mullite and hematite. The proposed methodology utilizing the Rietveld method for the quantification relating to crystalline phases of the materials was shown to be adequate and efficient. (author)

  12. Thermal Protection Performance of Carbon Aerogels Filled with Magnesium Chloride Hexahydrate as a Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kazemi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon aerogels are comprised of a class of low density open-cell foams with large void space, nanometer pore size and composed of sparsely semi-colloidal nanometer sized particles forming an open porous structure. Phase change materials are those with high heat of fusion that could absorb and release a large amount of energy at the time of phase transition. These materials are mostly used as thermal energy storage materials but in addition they could serve as an obstacle for passage of heat during phase changes and this has led to their use in thermal protection systems. In this study, the effect of magnesium chloride hexahydrate, as a phase change material (melting point 115°C, on thermal properties of carbon aerogels is investigated. Thermal performance tests are designed and used for comparing the temperature-time behavior of the samples. DSC is applied to obtain the latent heat of melting of the phase change materials and the SEM tests are used to analyze the microstructure and morphology of carbon aerogels. The results show that the low percentage of phase change materials in carbon aerogels does not have any significant positive effect on carbon aerogels thermal properties. However, these properties are improved by increasing the percentage of phase change materials. With high percentage of phase change materials, a sample surface at 300°C would display an opposite surface with a significant drop in temperature increases, while at 115-200°C, with carbon aerogels, having no phase change materials, there is a severe reduction in the rate of temperature increase of the sample.

  13. Combinatorial materials synthesis and high-throughput screening: an integrated materials chip approach to mapping phase diagrams and discovery and optimization of functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, X D

    Combinatorial materials synthesis methods and high-throughput evaluation techniques have been developed to accelerate the process of materials discovery and optimization and phase-diagram mapping. Analogous to integrated circuit chips, integrated materials chips containing thousands of discrete different compositions or continuous phase diagrams, often in the form of high-quality epitaxial thin films, can be fabricated and screened for interesting properties. Microspot x-ray method, various optical measurement techniques, and a novel evanescent microwave microscope have been used to characterize the structural, optical, magnetic, and electrical properties of samples on the materials chips. These techniques are routinely used to discover/optimize and map phase diagrams of ferroelectric, dielectric, optical, magnetic, and superconducting materials.

  14. A universal preconditioner for simulating condensed phase materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packwood, David; Ortner, Christoph, E-mail: c.ortner@warwick.ac.uk [Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kermode, James, E-mail: j.r.kermode@warwick.ac.uk [Warwick Centre for Predictive Modelling, School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Mones, Letif [Mathematics Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Engineering Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Bernstein, Noam [Center for Materials Physics and Technology, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Woolley, John [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Gould, Nicholas [Scientific Computing Department, STFC-Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Csányi, Gábor, E-mail: gc121@cam.ac.uk [Engineering Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-28

    We introduce a universal sparse preconditioner that accelerates geometry optimisation and saddle point search tasks that are common in the atomic scale simulation of materials. Our preconditioner is based on the neighbourhood structure and we demonstrate the gain in computational efficiency in a wide range of materials that include metals, insulators, and molecular solids. The simple structure of the preconditioner means that the gains can be realised in practice not only when using expensive electronic structure models but also for fast empirical potentials. Even for relatively small systems of a few hundred atoms, we observe speedups of a factor of two or more, and the gain grows with system size. An open source Python implementation within the Atomic Simulation Environment is available, offering interfaces to a wide range of atomistic codes.

  15. Single crystal growth of europium and ytterbium based intermetallic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The difference between an intermetallic compound and a regular metal (e.g., ... intriguing properties, there have not been any reports of thorough investigations of .... scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive ...

  16. Magnetocaloric effect in rare-earth intermetallics: Recent trends

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... intermetallic hydrides, manganite oxides, Ni–Mn–Sb-type shape memory ... With the help of temperature-dependent heat capacity information in various applied .... for relative cooling power and a wide working temperature range of about ...

  17. Methods of fabricating cermet materials and methods of utilizing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C.

    2006-04-04

    Methods of fabricating cermet materials and methods of utilizing the same such as in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The cermet material may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an aluminia phase. The mixture may be pressed to form a green compact body and then heated in a nitrogen-containing atmosphere so as to melt aluminum particles and form the cermet. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The cermet material may also be formed so as to pass an electrical current therethrough to heat the material during use.

  18. Methods of producing cermet materials and methods of utilizing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C [Idaho Falls, ID

    2008-12-30

    Methods of fabricating cermet materials and methods of utilizing the same such as in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The cermet material may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. The mixture may be pressed to form a green compact body and then heated in a nitrogen-containing atmosphere so as to melt aluminum particles and form the cermet. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The cermet material may also be formed so as to pass an electrical current therethrough to heat the material during use.

  19. Ceramic-intermetallic composites produced by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering

    CERN Document Server

    Cabanas-Moreno, J G; Martínez-Sanchez, R; Delgado-Gutierrez, O; Palacios-Gomez, J; Umemoto, M

    1998-01-01

    Nano-and microcomposites of intermetallic (Co/sub 3/Ti, AlCo/sub 2 /Ti) and ceramic (TiN, Ti(C, N), Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) phases have been produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS) of powders resulting from mechanical alloying of Al-Co-Ti elemental powder mixtures. The mechanically alloyed powders consisted of mixtures of nanocrystalline and amorphous phases which, on sintering, transformed into complex microstructures of the intermetallic and ceramic phases. For Al contents lower than about 30 at% in the original powder mixtures, the use of SPS led to porosities of 1-2% in the sintered compacts and hardness values as high as ~1700 kg/mm/sup 2/; in these cases, the composite matrix was TiN and Ti(C, N), with the Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ phase found as finely dispersed particles in the matrix and the Co /sub 3/Ti and AlCo/sub 2/Ti phases as interdispersed grains. (19 refs).

  20. The intermetallic ThRh5: microstructure and enthalpy increments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Aparna; Joshi, A.R.; Kaity, Santu; Mishra, R.; Roy, S.B.

    2013-01-01

    Actinide intermetallics are one of the most interesting and important series of compounds. Thermochemistry of these compounds play significant role in understand the nature of bonding in alloys and nuclear fuel performance. In the present paper we report synthesis and characterization of thorium based intermetallic compound ThRh 5 (s) by SEM/EDX technique. The mechanical properties and enthalpy increment as a function of temperature of the alloy has been measured. (author)

  1. Essential Magnesium Alloys Binary Phase Diagrams and Their Thermochemical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mezbahul-Islam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based alloys are becoming a major industrial material for structural applications because of their potential weight saving characteristics. All the commercial Mg alloys like AZ, AM, AE, EZ, ZK, and so forth series are multicomponent and hence it is important to understand the phase relations of the alloying elements with Mg. In this work, eleven essential Mg-based binary systems including Mg-Al/Zn/Mn/Ca/Sr/Y/Ni/Ce/Nd/Cu/Sn have been reviewed. Each of these systems has been discussed critically on the aspects of phase diagram and thermodynamic properties. All the available experimental data has been summarized and critically assessed to provide detailed understanding of the systems. The phase diagrams are calculated based on the most up-to-date optimized parameters. The thermodynamic model parameters for all the systems except Mg-Nd have been summarized in tables. The crystallographic information of the intermetallic compounds of different binary systems is provided. Also, the heat of formation of the intermetallic compounds obtained from experimental, first principle calculations and CALPHAD optimizations are provided. In addition, reoptimization of the Mg-Y system has been done in this work since new experimental data showed wider solubility of the intermetallic compounds.

  2. Synthesis and characteristics of composite phase change humidity control materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Menghao; Chen, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    ) and the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to determine the thermal properties and thermal stability. Both the moisture transfer coefficient and moisture buffer value (MBV) of different PCHCMs were measured by the improved cup method. The DSC results showed that the SiO2 shell can reduce the super...... synthesized with methyl triethoxysilane by the sol–gel method. The vesuvianite, sepiolite and zeolite were used as hygroscopic materials. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to measure the morphology profiles of the microcapsules and PCHCM. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC...

  3. New ternary intermetallics, based magnesium, for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roquefere, J.G.

    2009-05-01

    The use of fossil fuels (non-renewable energy) is responsible for increasing the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Among the considered alternatives, hydrogen is seen as the most attractive energy vector. The storage in intermetallics makes it possible to obtain mass and volume capacities (e.g. 140 g/L) higher than those obtained by liquid form or under pressure (respectively 71 and 40 g/L). We have synthesised Mg and Rare Earth based compounds (RE = Y, Ce and Gd), derived from the cubic Laves phases AB2. Their physical and chemical properties have been studied (hydrogenation, electrochemistry, magnetism,...). The conditions of sorption (P and T) are particularly favorable (i.e. absorption at room temperature and atmospheric pressure). Besides, to improve the sorption kinetics of metallic magnesium, the compounds developed previously were used as catalysts. Thus, GdMgNi4 was milled with magnesium and the speeds of absorption and desorption of the mixture are found higher than those obtained for the composites Mg+Ni or Mg+V, which are reference systems. A theoretical approach (DFT) was used to model the electronic structure of the ternary compounds (i.e. REMgNi4) and thus to predict or confirm the experimental results. (authors)

  4. Synthesis, Characterization and Properties of Nanoparticles of Intermetallic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiSalvo, Francis J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2015-03-12

    The research program from 2010 to the end of the grant focused on understanding the factors important to the synthesis of single phase intermetallic nano-particles (NPs), their size, crystalline order, surface properties and electrochemical activity. The synthetic method developed is a co-reduction of mixtures of single metal precursors by strong, soluble reducing agents in a non-protic solvent, tetrahydrofuran (THF). With some exceptions, the particles obtained by room temperature reduction are random alloys that need to be annealed at modest temperatures (200 to 600 °C) in order to develop an ordered structure. To avoid significant particle size growth and agglomeration, the particles must be protected by surface coatings. We developed a novel method of coating the metal nanoparticles with KCl, a by-product of the reduction reaction if the proper reducing agents are employed. In that case, a composite product containing individual metal nanoparticles in a KCl matrix is obtained. The composite can be heated to at least 600 °C without significant agglomeration or growth in particle size. Washing the annealed product in the presence of catalyst supports in ethylene glycol removes the KCl and deposits the particles on the support. Six publications present the method and its application to producing and studying new catalyst/support combinations for fuel cell applications. Three publications concern the use of related methods to explore new lithium-sulfur battery concepts.

  5. Computer simulations of disordering kinetics in irradiated intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaczer, M.; Caro, A.; Victoria, M.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    1994-01-01

    Molecular-dynamics computer simulations of collision cascades in intermetallic Cu 3 Au, Ni 3 Al, and NiAl have been performed to study the nature of the disordering processes in the collision cascade. The choice of these systems was suggested by the quite accurate description of the thermodynamic properties obtained using embedded-atom-type potentials. Since melting occurs in the core of the cascades, interesting effects appear as a result of the superposition of the loss (and subsequent recovery) of the crystalline order and the evolution of the chemical order, both processes being developed on different time scales. In our previous simulations on Ni 3 Al and Cu 3 Au [T. Diaz de la Rubia, A. Caro, and M. Spaczer, Phys. Rev. B 47, 11 483 (1993)] we found a significant difference between the time evolution of the chemical short-range order (SRO) and the crystalline order in the cascade core for both alloys, namely the complete loss of the crystalline structure but only partial chemical disordering. Recent computer simulations in NiAl show the same phenomena. To understand these features we study the liquid phase of these three alloys and present simulation results concerning the dynamical melting of small samples, examining the atomic mobility, the relaxation time, and the saturation value of the chemical short-range order. An analytic model for the time evolution of the SRO is given

  6. Performance evaluation on solar still integrated with nano-composite phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajasekhar, G.; Eswaramoorthy, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper communicates the performance evaluation of single slope solar still integrated with nano-composite phase change materials and compare with the experimental results of with and without phase change materials. A solar still with 1 m"2 surface area is developed with non-selective coating of absorber sheet with the provision of thermal energy storage materials. The solar still is tested on typical days with and without thermal energy storage materials. It is found that from the experimental studies that nano-materials (Al_2O_3) dispersed in paraffin wax is giving better cumulative yield of distillate than paraffin wax alone and without paraffin wax thermal storage. The daily efficiency of the solar still is computed for solar still with nano-composite phase change materials is 45% and solar still paraffin wax alone thermal storage is 40% and solar still without any thermal storage is 38%. It is concluded from the experimental studies; solar still integrated with nano-composite phase change materials gives better performance than with and without phase change material alone. (authors)

  7. Phase II evaluation of waste concrete road materials for use in oyster aquaculture - field test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The overall objective of this study was to determine the suitability of recycled concrete aggregate : (RCA) from road projects as bottom conditioning material for on-bottom oyster aquaculture in the : Chesapeake Bay. During this Phase of the study, t...

  8. Next Generation , Lightweight, Durable Boot Materials to Provide Active & Passive Thermal Protection, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA Phase I SBIR program is to leverage lightweight, durable materials developed by NanoSonic for use within extra vehicular activity (EVA)...

  9. Reversible Copolymer Materials for FDM 3-D Printing of Non-Standard Plastics, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group Inc. (CRG) proposes to continue efforts from the 2015 NASA SBIR Phase I topic H14.03 ?Reversible Copolymer Materials for FDM 3D Printing...

  10. Innovative Structural and Material Concepts for Low-Weight Low-Drag Aircraft Design, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of this multi-phase project is to explore, develop, integrate, and test several innovative structural design concepts and new material...

  11. Synchrotron radiation : characteristics and application in structural studies and phase transformations of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craievich, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    The main characteristics of the synchrotron radiation for studying atomic structure and phase transformations in materials are presented. Some specific applications in alloys, glass and solids are described. (E.G.) [pt

  12. Integration of Magneto-Optical Materials for Novel Optical Devices & Magnetophotonic Crystals, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work proposes to capitalize on our Phase I success in monolithically integrating magneto-optic and magnetic materials with semiconductor platforms in order to...

  13. Phase II evaluation of waste concrete road materials for use in oyster aquaculture - field test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The overall objective of this study was to determine the suitability of recycled concrete : aggregate (RCA) from road projects as bottom conditioning material for on-bottom oyster : aquaculture in the Chesapeake Bay. During this Phase of the study, t...

  14. Microencapsulation of butyl stearate as a phase change material by interfacial polycondensation in a polyurea system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Liang [College of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: doseng_1982@hotmail.com; Xu Lingling; Shang Hongbo; Zhang Zhibin [College of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2009-03-15

    For the last 20 years, microencapsulated phase change materials (MicroPCMs), which combine microencapsulation technology and phase change material, have been attracted more and more interest. By overcoming some limitations of the PCMs, the MicroPCMs improve the efficiency of PCMs and make it possible to apply PCMs in many areas. In this experiment, polyurea microcapsules containing phase change materials were prepared using interfacial polycondensation method. Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) and ethylenediamine (EDA) were chosen as monomers. Butyl stearate was employed as a core material. The MicroPCMs' properties have been characterized by dry weight analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform IR spectra analysis and optical microscopy. The results show that the MicroPCMs were synthesized successfully and that, the phase change temperature was about 29 deg. C, the latent heat of fusion was about 80 J g{sup -1}, the particle diameter was 20-35 {mu}m.

  15. Microencapsulation of butyl stearate as a phase change material by interfacial polycondensation in a polyurea system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Liang; Xu Lingling; Shang Hongbo; Zhang Zhibin

    2009-01-01

    For the last 20 years, microencapsulated phase change materials (MicroPCMs), which combine microencapsulation technology and phase change material, have been attracted more and more interest. By overcoming some limitations of the PCMs, the MicroPCMs improve the efficiency of PCMs and make it possible to apply PCMs in many areas. In this experiment, polyurea microcapsules containing phase change materials were prepared using interfacial polycondensation method. Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) and ethylenediamine (EDA) were chosen as monomers. Butyl stearate was employed as a core material. The MicroPCMs' properties have been characterized by dry weight analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform IR spectra analysis and optical microscopy. The results show that the MicroPCMs were synthesized successfully and that, the phase change temperature was about 29 deg. C, the latent heat of fusion was about 80 J g -1 , the particle diameter was 20-35 μm

  16. Microencapsulation of butyl stearate as a phase change material by interfacial polycondensation in a polyurea system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chen; Lingling, Xu; Hongbo, Shang; Zhibin, Zhang [College of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2009-03-15

    For the last 20 years, microencapsulated phase change materials (MicroPCMs), which combine microencapsulation technology and phase change material, have been attracted more and more interest. By overcoming some limitations of the PCMs, the MicroPCMs improve the efficiency of PCMs and make it possible to apply PCMs in many areas. In this experiment, polyurea microcapsules containing phase change materials were prepared using interfacial polycondensation method. Toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) and ethylenediamine (EDA) were chosen as monomers. Butyl stearate was employed as a core material. The MicroPCMs' properties have been characterized by dry weight analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform IR spectra analysis and optical microscopy. The results show that the MicroPCMs were synthesized successfully and that, the phase change temperature was about 29 C, the latent heat of fusion was about 80 J g{sup -1}, the particle diameter was 20-35 {mu}m. (author)

  17. Mechanical properties of thermomechanical treated hyper-eutectic Al-Si-(Fe, Mn, Cu) materials

    OpenAIRE

    Umezawa, Osamu

    2005-01-01

    Tensile and high-cycle fatigue behavior of thermomechanical treated hyper-eutectic Al-Si-(Fe, Mn, Cu) materials were studied. Through the repeated thermomechanical treatment (RTMT) which is a repeat of the multi steps cold-working followed by heat treatment, Si crystals and/or intermetallic compounds were broken into some fragments and dispersed in the aluminum matrix. Fine dispersion of the second phase particles exhibited good ductility, since early fracture was overcome. A few large Si cry...

  18. Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, first half FY 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This report contains sections on: Fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals; interfaces, adhesion, and bonding; energetic materials; plutonium research; synchrotron radiation-based materials science; atomistic approach to the interaction of surfaces with the environment: actinide studies; properties of carbon fibers; buried layer formation using ion implantation; active coherent control of chemical reaction dynamics; inorganic and organic aerogels; synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels; structural transformation and precursor phenomena in advanced materials; magnetic ultrathin films, surfaces, and overlayers; ductile-phase toughening of refractory-metal intermetallics; particle-solid interactions; electronic structure evolution of metal clusters; and nanoscale lithography induced chemically or physically by modified scanned probe microscopy

  19. Field experiments on the use of phase changing materials, insulation materials and passive solar radiation in the built environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Entrop, Alexis Gerardus; Brouwers, Jos; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; McCarthy, J.; Foliente, G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an experimental research facility to assess the effectiveness of Phase Change Materials (PCM), that can be used for passive solar heating. Four test boxes are constructed representing the conventional and future Dutch building practices regarding insulation

  20. THE EFFECT OF PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS ON THE TENSILE STRENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HERROELEN Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available PCM’s need some important properties to have use such as high heat storage capacity, easy availability and low cost and can have different effects such as flavour, softness or exchange of heat. They are put inside of microcapsules, so they can be inbedded inside the strain, otherwise it wouldn’t be so effective. So basically the microcapsules consist of a core that’s the PCM and a polymer shell. This shell needs to be strong enough to hold the PCM and also withstand up to a certain level of heat and mechanical damage. This study investigates the tensile strength of fabrics composed by fibres, some of these fibres have benn inbedded phase change microcapsules (PCM’s. The investigated fabrics are divided by composition and by structure. By knitting the fabrics in different structures you could be able to investigate which knitting way could be the most effective to have a high tensile strength. Tensile strength tests are performed on specimens with different structures but also with different compositions which could indicate that some strains are tougher then others and more specifically if the PCM’s have a different effect on them.

  1. Rare earth-ruthenium-magnesium intermetallics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Sebastian; Kersting, Marcel; Heletta, Lukas; Poettgen, Rainer [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie

    2017-07-01

    Eight new intermetallic rare earth-ruthenium-magnesium compounds have been synthesized from the elements in sealed niobium ampoules using different annealing sequences in muffle furnaces. The compounds have been characterized by powder and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Sm{sub 9.2}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 17.8} (a=939.6(2), c=1779(1) pm), Gd{sub 11}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 16} (a=951.9(2), c=1756.8(8) pm), and Tb{sub 10.5}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 16.5} (a=942.5(1), c=1758.3(4) pm) crystallize with the tetragonal Nd{sub 9.34}Ru{sub 6}Mg{sub 17.66} type structure, space group I4/mmm. This structure exhibits a complex condensation pattern of square-prisms and square-antiprisms around the magnesium and ruthenium atoms, respectively. Y{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} (a=344.0(1), c=2019(1) pm) and Tb{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} (a=341.43(6), c=2054.2(7) pm) adopt the Er{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} structure and Tm{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg (a=337.72(9), c=1129.8(4) pm) is isotypic with Sc{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg. Tm{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} (a=337.35(9), c=2671(1) pm) and Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} (a=335.83(5), c=2652.2(5) pm) are the first ternary ordered variants of the Ti{sub 3}Cu{sub 4} type, space group I4/mmm. These five compounds belong to a large family of intermetallics which are completely ordered superstructures of the bcc subcell. The group-subgroup scheme for Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} is presented. The common structural motif of all three structure types are ruthenium-centered rare earth cubes reminicent of the CsCl type. Magnetic susceptibility measurements of Y{sub 2}RuMg{sub 2} and Lu{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}Mg{sub 2} samples revealed Pauli paramagnetism of the conduction electrons.

  2. Structural properties of the metastable state of phase change materials investigated by synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkelbach, Philipp; Eijk, Julia van; Wuttig, Matthias [I. Phys. Institut (IA), RWTH Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Braun, Carolin [Institut fuer Anorg. Chemie, CAU Kiel, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Phase change alloys are among the most promising materials for novel data storage devices. Since several years Phase Change Materials based on Ge-Sb-Te- alloys have been used in optical data storage solutions like rewriteable CDs and DVDs. Recently these alloys have been explored as potential candidates for fast nonvolatile electrical data storage devices in Phase Change Random Access Memory (PCRAM). Besides attracting considerable interest from the commercial point of view phase change materials are very interesting also due to their remarkable physical properties. They have the ability to be reversibly switched within a few nanoseconds between the amorphous and the crystalline phase, while changing their physical properties such as optical reflectivity and electrical resistivity significantly. Even though the electronic properties show a drastical contrast such fast transitions can only be caused by small atomic rearrangements. This behavior calls for a deeper understanding of the structural properties of the alloys. We have performed powder diffraction measurements of the crystal phase of various GeSbTe alloys, to determine the structural similarities and differences of several alloys. Understanding the crystal structure of phase change materials is a key to a deeper insight into the properties of these promising materials.

  3. Replacement of Ablators with Phase-Change Material for Thermal Protection of STS Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Raj K.; Stuckey, Irvin; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As part of the research and development program to develop new Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials for aerospace applications at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), an experimental study was conducted on a new concept for a non-ablative TPS material. Potential loss of TPS material and ablation by-products from the External Tank (ET) or Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) during Shuttle flight with the related Orbiter tile damage necessitates development of a non-ablative thermal protection system. The new Thermal Management Coating (TMC) consists of phase-change material encapsulated in micro spheres and a two-part resin system to adhere the coating to the structure material. The TMC uses a phase-change material to dissipate the heat produced during supersonic flight rather than an ablative material. This new material absorbs energy as it goes through a phase change during the heating portion of the flight profile and then the energy is slowly released as the phase-change material cools and returns to its solid state inside the micro spheres. The coating was subjected to different test conditions simulating design flight environments at the NASA/MSFC Improved Hot Gas Facility (IHGF) to study its performance.

  4. Modeling and impacts of the latent heat of phase change and specific heat for phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoggin, J.; Khan, R. S.; Silva, H.; Gokirmak, A.

    2018-05-01

    We model the latent heats of crystallization and fusion in phase change materials with a unified latent heat of phase change, ensuring energy conservation by coupling the heat of phase change with amorphous and crystalline specific heats. We demonstrate the model with 2-D finite element simulations of Ge2Sb2Te5 and find that the heat of phase change increases local temperature up to 180 K in 300 nm × 300 nm structures during crystallization, significantly impacting grain distributions. We also show in electrothermal simulations of 45 nm confined and 10 nm mushroom cells that the higher amorphous specific heat predicted by this model increases nucleation probability at the end of reset operations. These nuclei can decrease set time, leading to variability, as demonstrated for the mushroom cell.

  5. Speci﬿c contact resistance of phase change materials to metal electrode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; in 't Zandt, Micha A.A.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2010-01-01

    For phase change random access memory (PCRAM) cells, it is important to know the contact resistance of phase change materials (PCMs) to metal electrodes at the contacts. In this letter, we report the systematic determination of the speci﬿c contact resistance (Ͽc ) of doped Sb2Te and Ge2Sb2Te5 to TiW

  6. Evaluation of waste concrete road materials for use in oyster aquaculture - Phase 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This project was the final phase of a three-phase project. The primary objective was to determine the suitability of recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) from road projects as a bottom conditioning material for on-bottom oyster aquaculture in the Chesap...

  7. Bias dependent specic contact resistance of phase change material to metal contacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; in 't Zandt, Micha; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of contact resistance of phase change materials (PCM) to metal electrodes is important for scaling, device modeling and optimization of phase change random access memory (PCRAM) cells. In this article, we report the systematic determination of the speci_c contact resistance (_c) with

  8. Electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of amorphous solid phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dong; Wu, Liangcai; Wen, Lin; Ma, Liya; Zhang, Xingyao; Li, Yudong; Guo, Qi; Song, Zhitang

    2018-04-01

    The electron-beam-irradiation-induced crystallization of phase change materials in a nano sized area was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. Amorphous phase change materials changed to a polycrystalline state after being irradiated with a 200 kV electron beam for a long time. The results indicate that the crystallization temperature strongly depends on the difference in the heteronuclear bond enthalpy of the phase change materials. The selected area electron diffraction patterns reveal that Ge2Sb2Te5 is a nucleation-dominated material, when Si2Sb2Te3 and Ti0.5Sb2Te3 are growth-dominated materials.

  9. Design rules for phase-change materials in data storage applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lencer, Dominic; Salinga, Martin [I. Physikalisches Institut IA, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Wuttig, Matthias [I. Physikalisches Institut IA, RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance, Section Fundamentals of Future Information Technology (JARA-FIT), 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2011-05-10

    Phase-change materials can rapidly and reversibly be switched between an amorphous and a crystalline phase. Since both phases are characterized by very different optical and electrical properties, these materials can be employed for rewritable optical and electrical data storage. Hence, there are considerable efforts to identify suitable materials, and to optimize them with respect to specific applications. Design rules that can explain why the materials identified so far enable phase-change based devices would hence be very beneficial. This article describes materials that have been successfully employed and discusses common features regarding both typical structures and bonding mechanisms. It is shown that typical structural motifs and electronic properties can be found in the crystalline state that are indicative for resonant bonding, from which the employed contrast originates. The occurence of resonance is linked to the composition, thus providing a design rule for phase-change materials. This understanding helps to unravel characteristic properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity which are discussed in the subsequent section. Then, turning to the transition kinetics between the phases, the current understanding and modeling of the processes of amorphization and crystallization are discussed. Finally, present approaches for improved high-capacity optical discs and fast non-volatile electrical memories, that hold the potential to succeed present-day's Flash memory, are presented. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Design rules for phase-change materials in data storage applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencer, Dominic; Salinga, Martin; Wuttig, Matthias

    2011-05-10

    Phase-change materials can rapidly and reversibly be switched between an amorphous and a crystalline phase. Since both phases are characterized by very different optical and electrical properties, these materials can be employed for rewritable optical and electrical data storage. Hence, there are considerable efforts to identify suitable materials, and to optimize them with respect to specific applications. Design rules that can explain why the materials identified so far enable phase-change based devices would hence be very beneficial. This article describes materials that have been successfully employed and dicusses common features regarding both typical structures and bonding mechanisms. It is shown that typical structural motifs and electronic properties can be found in the crystalline state that are indicative for resonant bonding, from which the employed contrast originates. The occurence of resonance is linked to the composition, thus providing a design rule for phase-change materials. This understanding helps to unravel characteristic properties such as electrical and thermal conductivity which are discussed in the subsequent section. Then, turning to the transition kinetics between the phases, the current understanding and modeling of the processes of amorphization and crystallization are discussed. Finally, present approaches for improved high-capacity optical discs and fast non-volatile electrical memories, that hold the potential to succeed present-day's Flash memory, are presented. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Unique Bond Breaking in Crystalline Phase Change Materials and the Quest for Metavalent Bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min; Cojocaru-Mirédin, Oana; Mio, Antonio M; Keutgen, Jens; Küpers, Michael; Yu, Yuan; Cho, Ju-Young; Dronskowski, Richard; Wuttig, Matthias

    2018-05-01

    Laser-assisted field evaporation is studied in a large number of compounds, including amorphous and crystalline phase change materials employing atom probe tomography. This study reveals significant differences in field evaporation between amorphous and crystalline phase change materials. High probabilities for multiple events with more than a single ion detected per laser pulse are only found for crystalline phase change materials. The specifics of this unusual field evaporation are unlike any other mechanism shown previously to lead to high probabilities of multiple events. On the contrary, amorphous phase change materials as well as other covalently bonded compounds and metals possess much lower probabilities for multiple events. Hence, laser-assisted field evaporation in amorphous and crystalline phase change materials reveals striking differences in bond rupture. This is indicative for pronounced differences in bonding. These findings imply that the bonding mechanism in crystalline phase change materials differs substantially from conventional bonding mechanisms such as metallic, ionic, and covalent bonding. Instead, the data reported here confirm a recently developed conjecture, namely that metavalent bonding is a novel bonding mechanism besides those mentioned previously. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Experimental Studies of Phase Change and Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials in a Cold Storage/Transportation System with Solar Driven Cooling Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Zheng; Wei Zhang; Fei Liang; Shuang Lin; Xiangyu Jin

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the different properties of phase change material (PCM) and Microencapsulated phase change material (MEPCM) employed to cold storage/transportation system with a solar-driven cooling cycle. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) tests have been performed to analyze the materials enthalpy, melting temperature range, and temperature range of solidification. KD2 Pro is used to test the thermal conductivities of phase change materials slurry and the results were used to compar...

  13. Effect of intermetallic precipitation on the properties of multi passed duplex stainless steel weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Seong Han [Technology research institute, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hae Woo [Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    This study investigated the effect of the aging time of weldment of 24Cr-3.5Mo duplex stainless steel on the microstructure and corrosion behavior. After performing FCAW, we carried out heat treatments at varying times at 850 ℃ and performed observation of microstructure, potentio dynamic test, SEM-EDS analysis, and X-ray diffraction analysis. As the aging time increased, the fraction of δ-ferrite decreased sharply, but the fraction of γ slightly increased. The σ phase was generated at a non-metallic inclusion along the grain boundaries of δ-ferrite and γ, while the χ phase was generated in the structure of δ-ferrite. As the intermetallic compounds increased, the critical pitting potential fell sharply, and PREN of the surrounding structure decreased by 5 due to precipitation of the σ phase in 3.5% NaCl at 60 ℃. Pitting occurred intensively under a multi-pass line which relatively had more intermetallic compounds, and the precipitation of the σ phase caused the formation of Cr carbide.

  14. Effect of intermetallic precipitation on the properties of multi passed duplex stainless steel weldment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Seong Han; Lee, Hae Woo

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of the aging time of weldment of 24Cr-3.5Mo duplex stainless steel on the microstructure and corrosion behavior. After performing FCAW, we carried out heat treatments at varying times at 850 ℃ and performed observation of microstructure, potentio dynamic test, SEM-EDS analysis, and X-ray diffraction analysis. As the aging time increased, the fraction of δ-ferrite decreased sharply, but the fraction of γ slightly increased. The σ phase was generated at a non-metallic inclusion along the grain boundaries of δ-ferrite and γ, while the χ phase was generated in the structure of δ-ferrite. As the intermetallic compounds increased, the critical pitting potential fell sharply, and PREN of the surrounding structure decreased by 5 due to precipitation of the σ phase in 3.5% NaCl at 60 ℃. Pitting occurred intensively under a multi-pass line which relatively had more intermetallic compounds, and the precipitation of the σ phase caused the formation of Cr carbide.

  15. Examination of rapid phase change in copper wires to improve material models and understanding of burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olles, Joseph; Garasi, Christopher; Ball, J. Patrick

    2017-11-01

    Electrically-pulsed wires undergo multiple phase changes including a postulated metastable phase resulting in explosive wire growth. Simulations using the MHD approximation attempt to account for the governing physics, but lack the material properties (equations-of-state and electrical conductivity) to accurately predict the phase evolution of the exploding (bursting) wire. To explore the dynamics of an exploding copper wire (in water), we employ a digital micro-Schlieren streak photography technique. This imaging quantifies wire expansion and shock waves emitted from the wire during phase changes. Using differential voltage probes, a Rogowski coil, and timing fiducials, the phase change of the wire is aligned with electrical power and energy deposition. Time-correlated electrical diagnostics and imaging allow for detailed validation of MHD simulations, comparing observed phases with phase change details found in the material property descriptions. In addition to streak imaging, a long exposure image is taken to capture axial striations along the length of the wire. These images are used to compare with results from 3D MHD simulations which propose that these perturbations impact the rate of wire expansion and temporal change in phases. If successful, the experimental data will identify areas for improvement in the material property models, and modeling results will provide insight into the details of phase change in the wire with correlation to variations in the electrical signals.

  16. Lattice disorder in strongly correlated lanthanide and actinide intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, C.H.; Bauer, E.D.; Maple, M.B.; Lawrence, J.M.; Kwei, G.H.; Sarrao, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Lanthanide and actinide intermetallic compounds display a wide range of correlated-electron behavior, including ferromagnetism, antiferromagnetism, nonmagnetic (Kondo) ground states, and so-called 'non-Fermi liquid' (NFL) behavior. The interaction between f electrons and the conduction band is a dominant factor in determining the ground state of a given system. However, lattice disorder can create a distribution of interactions, generating unusual physical properties. These properties may include NFL behavior in many materials. In addition, lattice disorder can cause deviations from standard Kondo behavior that is less severe than NFL behavior. A review of the lattice disorder mechanism within a tight-binding model is presented, along with measurements of the YbBCu 4 and UPd x Cu 5-x systems, demonstrating the applicability of the model. These measurements indicate that while the YbBCu 4 system appears to be well ordered, both site interchange and continuous bond-length disorder occur in the UPd x Cu 5-x series. Nevertheless, the measured bond-length disorder in UPdCu 4 does not appear to be enough to explain the NFL properties simply with the Kondo disorder model. (au)

  17. Crack propagation in touch ductile materials. Phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venter, R.D.; Sinclair, A.N.; McCammond, D.

    1989-06-01

    The thrust of this work was to investigate published J material resistance and stress-strain data applicable to the understanding of crack propagation in tough ductile steels, particularly SA 106 Grade B pipe steel. This data has been assembled from PIFRAC, AECB report INFO-0254-1 and Ontario Hydro sources and has been uniformly formatted and presented to facilitate comparison and assessment. While the data is in many aspects incomplete it has enabled an evaluation of the influence of temperature, specimen thickness and specimen orientation to be made in the context of the experimental J-R curves so determined. Comparisons of the stress-strain data within the Ramburg-Osgood formulation are also considered. A further component of this report addresses the development of the required software to utilize what is referred to as the engineering approach to elasto-plastic analysis to investigate the load carrying capacity of selected cracked pipe geometries which are representative of applied crack propagation studies associated with piping systems in the nuclear industry. Three specific geometries and loading situations, identified as Condition A, B and C have been evaluated; the results are presented and illustrate the variation in applied load as a function of an initial and final crack extension leading to instability

  18. Effect of microencapsulated phase change material in sandwich panels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castellon, Cecilia; Medrano, Marc; Roca, Joan; Cabeza, Luisa F. [GREA Innovacio Concurrent, Edifici CREA, Universitat de Lleida, Pere de Cabrera s/n, 25001 Lleida (Spain); Navarro, Maria E.; Fernandez, Ana I. [Departamento de Ciencias de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lazaro, Ana; Zalba, Belen [Instituto de Investigacion en Ingenieria de Aragon, I3A, Grupo de Ingenieria Termica y Sistemas Energeticos (GITSE), Dpto. Ingenieria Mecanica, Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, Universidad de Zaragoza, Campus Politecnico Rio Ebro, Edificio ' ' Agustin de Betancourt,' ' Maria de Luna s/n, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    Sandwich panels are a good option as building materials, as they offer excellent characteristics in a modular system. The goal of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of using the microencapsulated PCM (Micronal BASF) in sandwich panels to increase their thermal inertia and to reduce the energy demand of the final buildings. In this paper, to manufacture the sandwich panel with microencapsulated PCM three different methods were tested. In case 1, the PCM was added mixing the microencapsulated PCM with one of the components of the polyurethane. In the other two cases, the PCM was added either a step before (case 2) or a step after (case 3) to the addition of the polyurethane to the metal sheets. The results show that in case 1 the effect of PCM was overlapped by a possible increase in thermal conductivity, but an increase of thermal inertia was found in case 3. In case 2, different results were obtained due to the poor distribution of the PCM. Some samples showed the effect of the PCM (higher thermal inertia), and other samples results were similar to the conventional sandwich panel. In both cases (2 and 3), it is required to industrialize the process to improve the results. (author)

  19. Magnetism in rare-earth metals and rare-earth intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, B.; Nordstroem, L.; Eriksson, O.; Brooks, M.S.S.

    1991-01-01

    Some of out recent local spin density electronic structure calculations for a number of ferromagnetic rare-earth systems are reviewed. A simplified model of the level densities for rare-earth (R) transition metal (M) intermetallic compounds, R m M n , is used to describe in a simple way the main features of their basic electronic structure. Explicit calculations for LuFe 2 and RFe 2 (R=Gd-Yb) systems are presented, where a method to treat simultaneously the localized 4f and the conduction electron spin magnetism is introduced. Thereby it becomes possible to calculate the K RM exchange coupling constant. This method is also used to study theoretically the permanent magnet material Nd 2 Fe 14 B. The electronic structure of the anomalous ferromagnets CeFe 2 and CeCo 5 is discussed and an induced 4f itinerant magnetism is predicted. The γ-α transition in cerium metal is considered, and results from calculations including orbital polarization are presented, where a volume collapse of 10% is obtained. On one side of the transition the 4f electrons are calculated to be essentially non-bonding (localized) and on the other side they are found to contribute to the metallic bonding and this difference in behaviour gives rise to the volume collapse. Recent calculations by Wills, Eriksson and Boring for the crystal structure changes in cerium metal under high pressure are discussed. Their successful results imply an itinerant picture for the 4f electrons in α-cerium. Consequently this strongly supports the view that the γ-α phase transformation is caused by a Mott transition of the 4f electrons. (orig.)

  20. Spin polarization in rare earth intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steenwijk, F.J. van

    1976-01-01

    In this thesis the results of Moessbauer experiments performed on a series of intermetallic compounds of europium and gadolinium are reported. For each of these compounds the magnetic hyperfine field, the electric field gradient at the nuclear site and the isomer shift were determined. For most of the compounds the magnetic ordering temperature was also measured. For some of the europium compounds (e.g. EuAu 5 , EuAg 5 , and EuCu 5 ) it could be derived from the measurements that the easy direction of magnetization falls along the crystallographic c-axis. In a number of compounds (e.g. EuCu 5 , EuZn 5 , EuAu 2 and GdCu 5 ), the various contributions to the magnetic hyperfine field were disentangled by the investigation of suitable pseudobinary compounds that are dilute in Eu. The neighbour contribution Hsub(N) and the paramagnetic Curie temperature thetasub(p) were compared with each other in terms of the RKKY model for EuCu 5 and GdCu 5 . Since the correspondence was found to be poor it was concluded that the magnetic behaviour in these compounds cannot be described by a simple free electron picture as is the basis for the RKKY model