WorldWideScience

Sample records for intermediates reaction pathways

  1. Aspartate aminotransferase: the kinetic barriers facing the covalent intermediates on the reaction pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, J.F.; Julin, D.A.; McLeish, M.; Wiesinger, H.

    1986-01-01

    The intermediates, aldimine (A), quinonoid (Q) and ketimine (K), along the transaminase reaction coordinate were probed by isotope transfer and solvent exchange kinetics. Less than 0.003% of 3 H is transferred from C/sub α/[ 3 H]-aspartate to pyridoxamine phosphate in the cytoplasmic aspartate aminotransferase (cAATase) reaction implying either that Q does not exist as a kinetically competent intermediate or that there is a rapid exchange of isotope with solvent. The ratio of the rate constants for C/sub α/ hydrogen exchange vs keto acid product formation (k/sub exge//k/sub prod/) are 2.5 and 0.5 for the reactions of cAATase with C/sub α/ [ 2 H]-aspartate and mitochondrial (m) AATase with C/sub α/[ 2 H]-glutamate respectively. The latter reaction was also probed from the α-keto-glutarate side with carbonyl 0-18 enriched keto acid. This experiment gave k/sub exge//k/sub prod/ = 1.0 for oxygen-18 exchange in α-ketoglutarate versus amino acid formation. The two exchange experiments with mAATase are interpreted in terms of a model in which the rate constant for diffusion of water from the active site is comparable with those for product forming steps

  2. Roles of different initial Maillard intermediates and pathways in meat flavor formation for cysteine-xylose-glycine model reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Li; Xie, Jianchun; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Mengyao; Fan, Mengdie; Xiao, Qunfei; Liang, Jingjing; Chen, Feng

    2017-10-01

    To explore initial Maillard reaction pathways and mechanisms for maximal formation of meaty flavors in heated cysteine-xylose-glycine systems, model reactions with synthesized initial Maillard intermediates, Gly-Amadori, TTCA (2-threityl-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids) and Cys-Amadori, were investigated. Relative relativities were characterized by spectrophotometrically monitoring the development of colorless degradation intermediates and browning reaction products. Aroma compounds formed were determined by solid-phase microextraction combined with GC-MS and GC-olfactometry. Gly-Amadori showed the fastest reaction followed by Cys-Amadori then TTCA. Free glycine accelerated reaction of TTCA, whereas cysteine inhibited that of Gly-Amadori due to association forming relatively stable thiazolidines. Cys-Amadori/Gly had the highest reactivity in development of both meaty flavors and brown products. TTCA/Gly favored yielding meaty flavors, whereas Gly-Amadori/Cys favored generation of brown products. Conclusively, initial formation of TTCA and pathway involving TTCA with glycine were more applicable to efficiently produce processed-meat flavorings in a cysteine-xylose-glycine system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Lau, K.-C.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, S.-H.; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2008-01-01

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH 2 CHCH 2 , a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH 2 CHCH 2 radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH 2 CHCH 2 radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcal/mol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH 2 CHCH 2 radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C 3 H 4 O (acrolein)+H, C 2 H 4 +HCO (formyl radical), and H 2 CO (formaldehyde)+C 2 H 3 . A small signal from C 2 H 2 O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at m/e=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C 2 H 5 +CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the acrolein+H product channel is consistent with the relative barriers en route to

  4. Investigation of the O+allyl addition/elimination reaction pathways from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin L.; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2008-08-01

    These experiments study the preparation of and product channels resulting from OCH2CHCH2, a key radical intermediate in the O+allyl bimolecular reaction. The data include velocity map imaging and molecular beam scattering results to probe the photolytic generation of the radical intermediate and the subsequent pathways by which the radicals access the energetically allowed product channels of the bimolecular reaction. The photodissociation of epichlorohydrin at 193.3 nm produces chlorine atoms and c-OCH2CHCH2 radicals; these undergo a facile ring opening to the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate. State-selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection resolves the velocity distributions of ground and spin-orbit excited state chlorine independently, allowing for a more accurate determination of the internal energy distribution of the nascent radicals. We obtain good agreement detecting the velocity distributions of the Cl atoms with REMPI, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization at 13.8 eV, and electron bombardment ionization; all show a bimodal distribution of recoil kinetic energies. The dominant high recoil kinetic energy feature peaks near 33 kcal/mol. To elucidate the product channels resulting from the OCH2CHCH2 radical intermediate, the crossed laser-molecular beam experiment uses VUV photoionization and detects the velocity distribution of the possible products. The data identify the three dominant product channels as C3H4O (acrolein)+H, C2H4+HCO (formyl radical), and H2CO (formaldehyde)+C2H3. A small signal from C2H2O (ketene) product is also detected. The measured velocity distributions and relative signal intensities at m/e=27, 28, and 29 at two photoionization energies show that the most exothermic product channel, C2H5+CO, does not contribute significantly to the product branching. The higher internal energy onset of the acrolein+H product channel is consistent with the relative barriers en route to each of these product channels

  5. Reactions of stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereecken, Luc; Harder, Hartwig; Novelli, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Carbonyl oxides (Criegee intermediates) were proposed as key intermediates in the gas phase ozonolysis of alkenes in 1975 by Rudolf Criegee. Despite the importance of ozonolysis in atmospheric chemistry, direct observation of these intermediates remained elusive, with only indirect experimental evidence for their role in the oxidation of hydrocarbons, e.g. through scavenging experiments. Direct experimental observation of stabilized CI has only been achieved since 2008. Since then, a concerted effort using experimental and theoretical means is in motion to characterize the chemistry and kinetics of these reactive intermediates. We present the results of theoretical investigations of the chemistry of Criegee intermediates with a series of coreactants which may be of importance in the atmosphere, in experimental setups, or both. This includes the CI+CI cross-reaction, which proceeds with a rate coefficient near the collision limit and can be important in experimental conditions. The CI + alkene reactions show strong dependence of the rate coefficient depending on the coreactants, but is generally found to be rather slow. The CI + ozone reaction is sufficiently fast to occur both in experiment and the free troposphere, and acts as a sink for CI. The reaction of CI with hydroperoxides, ROOH, is complex, and leads both to the formation of oligomers, as to the formation of reactive etheroxides, with a moderately fast rate coefficient. The importance of these reactions is placed in the context of the reaction conditions in different atmospheric environments ranging from unpolluted to highly polluted.

  6. Novel pathway of SO2 oxidation in the atmosphere: reactions with monoterpene ozonolysis intermediates and secondary organic aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jianhuai; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2018-04-01

    Ozonolysis of monoterpenes is an important source of atmospheric biogenic secondary organic aerosol (BSOA). While enhanced BSOA formation has been associated with sulfate-rich conditions, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this work, the interactions between SO2 and reactive intermediates from monoterpene ozonolysis were investigated under different humidity conditions (10 % vs. 50 %). Chamber experiments were conducted with ozonolysis of α-pinene or limonene in the presence of SO2. Limonene SOA formation was enhanced in the presence of SO2, while no significant changes in SOA yields were observed during α-pinene ozonolysis. Under dry conditions, SO2 primarily reacted with stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) produced from ozonolysis, but at 50 % RH heterogeneous uptake of SO2 onto organic aerosol was found to be the dominant sink of SO2, likely owing to reactions between SO2 and organic peroxides. This SO2 loss mechanism to organic peroxides in SOA has not previously been identified in experimental chamber studies. Organosulfates were detected and identified using an electrospray ionization-ion mobility spectrometry-high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ESI-IMS-TOF) when SO2 was present in the experiments. Our results demonstrate the synergistic effects between BSOA formation and SO2 oxidation through sCI chemistry and SO2 uptake onto organic aerosol and illustrate the importance of considering the chemistry of organic and sulfur-containing compounds holistically to properly account for their reactive sinks.

  7. Photonuclear reactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    The dominant feature of photonuclear reactions at intermediate energies is the excitation of the δ resonance and one can therefore use such reactions to study the dynamics of δ propagation in a nucleus. Following an introductory section the author comments on photoabsorption on a single nucleon in Section II. A review of the δ-n Greens function and of the photonuclear amplitude is given in Section III. Results for photoabsorption on 4 He are shown in Section IV and compared with the data. Coherent π 0 photoproduction is discussed in Section V and calculations for 12 C are compared to recent measurements. (Auth.)

  8. On intermediate structures in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, I.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptions of the nuclear reaction theory are reinvestigated on the basis of the continuum shell model. The correlation of the resonance states via the continuum can lead to intermediate structures in the cross section. (Auth.)

  9. Synthesized TiO{sub 2}/ZSM-5 composites used for the photocatalytic degradation of azo dye: Intermediates, reaction pathway, mechanism and bio-toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Kefu; Hu, Xin-Yan [College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Chen, Bor-Yann; Hsueh, Chung-Chuan [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National I-Lan University, I-Lan, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Qian [Department of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, Jiajie; Lin, Yu-Jung [College of the Environment and Ecology, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Chang, Chang-Tang, E-mail: ctchang73222@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Engineering, National I-Lan University, I-Lan, Taiwan (China)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • The major photo-catalytic degradation pathway of azo-dye was elaborated according to the identification of by-products from GC–MS and IC analysis. • Comparative assessment on characteristics of abiotic and biotic dye decolorization was analyzed. • EDTA (hole scavengers) and t-BuOH (radical scavengers) were used to determine the main active oxidative species in the system. • The toxicity effects of degradation intermediates of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) on the cellular respiratory activity were assessed. - Abstract: In this study, a one-step solid dispersion method was used to synthesize titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2})/Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 (ZSM-5) composites with substantially reduced time and energy consumption. A degradation efficiency of more than 95% was achieved within 10 min using 50% PTZ (synthesized TiO{sub 2}/ZSM-5 composites with TiO{sub 2} contents of 50 wt% loaded on ZSM-5) at pH 7 and 25 °C. The possible degradation pathway of azo-dye Reactive Black 5 (RB5) was investigated using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and ion chromatography (IC). The bonds between the N atoms and naphthalene groups are likely attacked first and cleaved by hydroxyl radicals, ultimately resulting in the decolorization and mineralization of the azo dye. A comparative assessment of the characteristics of abiotic and biotic dye decolorization was completed. In addition, the toxicity effects of the degradation intermediates of azo-dye RB5 on cellular respiratory activity were analyzed. The bio-toxicity results showed that the decay rate constants of CO{sub 2} production from the azo-dye RB5 samples at different degradation times increased initially and subsequently decreased, indicating that intermediates of higher toxicity could adhere to the catalyst surface and gradually destroyed by further photocatalytic oxidation. Additionally, EDTA (hole scavengers) and t-BuOH (radical scavengers) were used to detect the main active oxidative species in the system

  10. Transfer and breakup reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stokstad, R.G.

    1986-04-01

    The origin of the quasi-elastic peak in peripheral heavy-ion reactions is discussed in terms of inelastic scattering and transfer reactions to unbound states of the primary projectile-like fragment. The situation is analogous to the use of reverse kinematics in fusion reactions, a technique in which the object of study is moving with nearly the beam velocity. It appears that several important features of the quasi-elastic peak may be explained by this approach. Projectile-breakup reactions have attractive features for the study of nuclear structure. They may also be used to determine the partition of excitation energy in peripheral reactions. At intermediate energies, neutron-pickup reactions leading to four-body final states become important. Examples of experiments are presented that illustrate these points. 15 refs., 14 figs

  11. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.; Boissevain, J.; Fowler, M.M.; Gavron, A.; Jacak, B.V.; Lysaght, P.S.; Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Hansen, L.F.; Lanier, R.G.; Massoletti, D.J.; Namboodiri, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Sangster, T.C.; Struble, G.L.; Webb, M.L.; Chan, Y.D.; Dacai, A.; Harmon, A.; Leyba, J.; Pouliot, J.; Stokstad, R.G.; Hansen, O.; Levine, M.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Trautmann, W.; Dichter, B.; Kaufman, S.; Videbaek, F.; Fraenkel, Z.; Mamane, G.; Cebra, D.; Westfall, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50-100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: The reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicty of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. (orig.)

  12. Fission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmy, J.B.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Blaich, T.

    1989-01-01

    A systematic study of reaction mechanisms at intermediate energies (50--100 MeV/A) has been performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's BeValac using medium weight projectiles on medium and heavy element targets. A gas and plastic phoswich detector system was employed which gave large geometric coverage and a wide dynamic response. The particles identified with the gas detectors could be characterized into three components - intermediate mass fragments (IMF), fission fragments (FF) and heavy residues (HR). Major observed features are: the reaction yields are similar in the 50 to 100 MeV/A range, central collisions have high multiplicity of IMF's with broad angular correlations consistent with a large participant region, effects of final state Coulomb interactions are observed and give information on the size and temporal behavior of the source, true fission yields are dependent on target fissility and correlated with relatively peripheral collisions. Analysis of fission and evaporation yields implies limiting conditions for which fission decay remains a viable deexcitation channel. 7 figs

  13. Explorations into Chemical Reactions and Biochemical Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasteiger, Johann

    2016-12-01

    A brief overview of the work in the research group of the present author on extracting knowledge from chemical reaction data is presented. Methods have been developed to calculate physicochemical effects at the reaction site. It is shown that these physicochemical effects can quite favourably be used to derive equations for the calculation of data on gas phase reactions and on reactions in solution such as aqueous acidity of alcohols or carboxylic acids or the hydrolysis of amides. Furthermore, it is shown that these physicochemical effects are quite effective for assigning reactions into reaction classes that correspond to chemical knowledge. Biochemical reactions constitute a particularly interesting and challenging task for increasing our understanding of living species. The BioPath.Database is a rich source of information on biochemical reactions and has been used for a variety of applications of chemical, biological, or medicinal interests. Thus, it was shown that biochemical reactions can be assigned by the physicochemical effects into classes that correspond to the classification of enzymes by the EC numbers. Furthermore, 3D models of reaction intermediates can be used for searching for novel enzyme inhibitors. It was shown in a combined application of chemoinformatics and bioinformatics that essential pathways of diseases can be uncovered. Furthermore, a study showed that bacterial flavor-forming pathways can be discovered. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ying; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N 2 and H 2 O within ∼10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N 2 and H 2 O productions

  15. Multistage reaction pathways in detonating high explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States); Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Nomura, Ken-ichi; Vashishta, Priya [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Computer Science, and Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States)

    2014-11-17

    Atomistic mechanisms underlying the reaction time and intermediate reaction products of detonating high explosives far from equilibrium have been elusive. This is because detonation is one of the hardest multiscale physics problems, in which diverse length and time scales play important roles. Here, large spatiotemporal-scale reactive molecular dynamics simulations validated by quantum molecular dynamics simulations reveal a two-stage reaction mechanism during the detonation of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine crystal. Rapid production of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O within ∼10 ps is followed by delayed production of CO molecules beyond ns. We found that further decomposition towards the final products is inhibited by the formation of large metastable carbon- and oxygen-rich clusters with fractal geometry. In addition, we found distinct unimolecular and intermolecular reaction pathways, respectively, for the rapid N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O productions.

  16. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  17. Greigite: a true intermediate on the polysulfide pathway to pyrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benning Liane G

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The formation of pyrite (FeS2 from iron monosulfide precursors in anoxic sediments has been suggested to proceed via mackinawite (FeS and greigite (Fe3S4. Despite decades of research, the mechanisms of pyrite formation are not sufficiently understood because solid and dissolved intermediates are oxygen-sensitive and poorly crystalline and therefore notoriously difficult to characterize and quantify. In this study, hydrothermal synchrotron-based energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (ED-XRD methods were used to investigate in situ and in real-time the transformation of mackinawite to greigite and pyrite via the polysulfide pathway. The rate of formation and disappearance of specific Bragg peaks during the reaction and the changes in morphology of the solid phases as observed with high resolution microscopy were used to derive kinetic parameters and to determine the mechanisms of the reaction from mackinawite to greigite and pyrite. The results clearly show that greigite is formed as an intermediate on the pathway from mackinawite to pyrite. The kinetics of the transformation of mackinawite to greigite and pyrite follow a zero-order rate law indicating a solid-state mechanism. The morphology of greigite and pyrite crystals formed under hydrothermal conditions supports this conclusion and furthermore implies growth of greigite and pyrite by oriented aggregation of nanoparticulate mackinawite and greigite, respectively. The activation enthalpies and entropies of the transformation of mackinawite to greigite, and of greigite to pyrite were determined from the temperature dependence of the rate constants according to the Eyring equation. Although the activation enthalpies are uncharacteristic of a solid-state mechanism, the activation entropies indicate a large increase of order in the transition state, commensurate with a solid-state mechanism.

  18. Breakup reactions at intermediate and high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shotter, A.C.; Bice, A.N.

    1981-01-01

    Having considered some general aspects of peripheral break-up reactions involving heavy ions for the incident energy range 10-2000 MeV/A, specific experiments carried out at Berkeley in 1980 in the energy range 10-20 MeV/A are discussed. These indicate that sequential break-up processes from non-sequential inelastic processes both play significant roles in the mechanism. (UK)

  19. (p,n) reaction at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, C.D.

    1979-01-01

    The use of the (p,n) reaction in exploring effective interactions is reviewed. Some recent data on self-conjugate nuclei taken at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) are presented, and the differences between low- and high-energy data are emphasized. Experimental problems and techniques used are briefly described. It is concluded that forward-angle (p,n) spectra at energies greater than 100 MeV are dominated by Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions, while Fermi transitions (IAS transitions) dominate near 45 MeV. Prominent GT transitions are expected from a pion-exchange interaction, and it is expected that OPEP is the dominant component of the interaction in the energy range of 100 to 200 MeV. 27 figures, 2 tables

  20. Structure Sensitivity in Pt Nanoparticle Catalysts for Hydrogenation of 1,3-Butadiene: In Situ Study of Reaction Intermediates Using SFG Vibrational Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Michalak, William D.; Krier, James M.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2013-01-01

    hydrogenation and the nanoparticle size affects the kinetic preference for the two pathways. The reaction pathway through the metallocycle intermediate on the small nanoparticles is likely due to the presence of low-coordinated sites. © 2012 American Chemical

  1. Nucleon charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alford, W.P.; Spicer, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    An historical review of the development of ideas pertaining to Gamow-Teller giant resonances is given, and a description of the emergence of techniques for the study of charge exchange reactions - particularly the technical advances which yielded the recent volume of new date. The present status of charge exchange reactions is reviewed and assessed. Evidence is presented from the 14 C(p,n) reaction for the dominance of the spin-isospin component of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in intermediate energy reactions. In (p,n) reactions the Gamow-Teller giant resonance dominates the spectra, with higher multipoles contributing. By contrast, in (n,p) reactions in the heavier nuclei, the Gamow-Teller transitions are substantially Pauli-blocked and the spin dipole resonance dominates, with contributions from higher multipoles. Discussions of the multipole decomposition process, used to obtain from the data the contributions of the different multipoles, and the contributions of the multipoles, are given

  2. Reaction Intermediate Analogues as Bisubstrate Inhibitors of Pantothenate Synthetase

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Zhixiang; Yin, Wei; Martinelli, Leonardo K.; Evans, Joanna; Chen, Jinglei; Yu, Yang; Wilson, Daniel J.; Mizrahi, Valerie; Qiao, Chunhua; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis of pantothenate, the core of coenzyme A (CoA), has been considered an attractive target for the development of antimicrobial agents since this pathway is essential in prokaryotes, but absent in mammals. Pantothenate synthetase, encoded by the gene panC, catalyzes the final condensation of pantoic acid with β–alanine to afford pantothenate via an intermediate pantoyl adenylate. We describe the synthesis and biochemical characterization of five PanC inhibitors that mimic the in...

  3. Intermediate energy heavy ion reactions. A program for CELSIUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobsson, B.

    1986-02-01

    The accelerator system under construction in Uppsala with the ECR-source + the K equals 200 synchrocyclotron + the CELSIUS synchrotron ring for storage, cooling and acceleration opens up possibilities for a very fruitful heavy ion physics program. Some recently obtained results and some recent ideas on intermediate energy reactions are discussed and speculations are made about some experiments where the unconventional qualities of CELSIUS beams could be utilized. (author)

  4. Nucleon charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alford, W.P. [Western Ontario Univ., London, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics]|[TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Spicer, B.M. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    An historical review of the development of ideas pertaining to Gamow-Teller giant resonances is given, and a description of the emergence of techniques for the study of charge exchange reactions - particularly the technical advances which yielded the recent volume of new date. The present status of charge exchange reactions is reviewed and assessed. Evidence is presented from the {sup 14}C(p,n) reaction for the dominance of the spin-isospin component of the nucleon-nucleon interaction in intermediate energy reactions. In (p,n) reactions the Gamow-Teller giant resonance dominates the spectra, with higher multipoles contributing. By contrast, in (n,p) reactions in the heavier nuclei, the Gamow-Teller transitions are substantially Pauli-blocked and the spin dipole resonance dominates, with contributions from higher multipoles. Discussions of the multipole decomposition process, used to obtain from the data the contributions of the different multipoles, and the contributions of the multipoles, are given. 226 refs., 19 figs.

  5. A few aspects of intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guet, C.

    1982-10-01

    Some aspects of reactions induced by intermediate energy heavy ions, with a special emphasis of 85 MeV/nucleon 12 C data, are discussed and compared to low energy and relativistic energy features. Transition from mean field to independant nucleon picture is advocated by an increase of nuclear transparency illuminated by reaction cross section estimations. Projectile-like fragment distributions, while demonstrating a typical high energy fragmentation behaviour, exhibit low energy regime distortions. Light fragments, associated to large parallel momentum transfer may result from total explosion. Proton emission is investigated and discussed in terms of opposite models such as thermal equilibrium and nucleon-nucleon scattering. First pion production data are well explained by single nucleon-nucleon inelastic scattering

  6. Macroscopic/microscopic simulation of nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, D.; Van Lauwe, A.; Durand, D.

    2003-01-01

    An event generator, HIPSE (Heavy-Ion Phase-Space Exploration), dedicated to the description of nuclear collisions in the intermediate energy range is presented. The model simulates events for reactions close to the fusion barrier (5-10 MeV/A) up to higher energy (100 MeV/A) and it gives access to the phase-space explored during the collision. The development of HIPSE has been largely influenced by experimental observations. We have separated the reaction into 4 steps: contact, fragment formation, chemical freeze-out, and in-flight deexcitation. HIPSE will be useful for a study of various mechanisms such as neck fragmentation or multi-fragmentation

  7. (γ,2n) reactions in complexe nuclei at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro Filho, J. de D.

    1976-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Method has been used in the intranuclear cascade model for the calculation of the cross sections of the (γ,2n) reactions in complex nuclei 9 Be, 12 C, 16 O, 59 Co, 103 Rh, 127 I, 197 Au and 209 Bi at intermediate energies (200MeV-1000MeV). The initial photon-interaction via the photomesonic and quasi-deuteron mechanisms have been taken into account. The nuclear model used was a degenerate Fermi gas of nucleons, and the Pauli exclusion principle was considered in all secondary interactions. To improve accuracy in the results of the calculations, 30000 cascades have been followed for each target nucleus at a given incident photon energy. The probabilities of the various (γ,2n) reactions, as well as the correspondent cross section obtained, are summarized in tables and graphs. New data on the cross sections of the 59 Co (γ,2n) and 209 Bi (γ,2n) reactions at photon energies between 300 MeV and 1000MeV are also reported. These measurements were obtained with the Bremsstrahlung beams of the Frascati 1 GeV Electron Synchrotron. A comparison between all existing data in the literature on the (γ,2n) reaction cross sections and the estimates by the Monte Carlo Method, is presented. (Author) [pt

  8. Serpentinization reaction pathways: implications for modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janecky, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental seawater-peridotite reaction pathways to form serpentinites at 300/sup 0/C, 500 bars, can be accurately modeled using the EQ3/6 codes in conjunction with thermodynamic and kinetic data from the literature and unpublished compilations. These models provide both confirmation of experimental interpretations and more detailed insight into hydrothermal reaction processes within the oceanic crust. The accuracy of these models depends on careful evaluation of the aqueous speciation model, use of mineral compositions that closely reproduce compositions in the experiments, and definition of realistic reactive components in terms of composition, thermodynamic data, and reaction rates.

  9. Photocatalytic degradation of paracetamol: intermediates and total reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moctezuma, Edgar; Leyva, Elisa; Aguilar, Claudia A; Luna, Raúl A; Montalvo, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    The advanced oxidation of paracetamol (PAM) promoted by TiO(2)/UV system in aqueous medium was investigated. Monitoring this reaction by HPLC and TOC, it was demonstrated that while oxidation of paracetamol is quite efficient under these conditions, its mineralization is not complete. HPLC indicated the formation of hydroquinone, benzoquinone, p-aminophenol and p-nitrophenol in the reaction mixtures. Further evidence of p-nitrophenol formation was obtained following the reaction by UV-vis spectroscopy. Continuous monitoring by IR spectroscopy demonstrated the breaking of the aromatic amide present in PAM and subsequent formation of several aromatic intermediate compounds such as p-aminophenol and p-nitrophenol. These aromatic compounds were eventually converted into trans-unsaturated carboxylic acids. Based on these experimental results, an alternative deacylation mechanism for the photocatalytic oxidation of paracetamol is proposed. Our studies also demonstrated IR spectroscopy to be a useful technique to investigate oxidative mechanisms of pharmaceutical compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying Reaction Pathways and their Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maronsson, Jon Bergmann

    Finding the mechanisms and estimating the rate of chemical reactions is an essential part of modern research of atomic scale systems. In this thesis, the application of well established methods for reaction rates and paths to important systems for hydrogen storage is considered before developing...... extensions to further identify the reaction environment for a more accurate rate. Complex borohydrides are materials of high hydrogen storage capacity and high thermodynamic stability (too high for hydrogen storage). In an effort to gain insight into the structural transitions of two such materials, Ca(BH4......-interstitial defects. In good agreement with the experiments, C3-type rotations activate at lower temperature than C2-type rotations. In order to investigate the environment of reaction pathways, a method for finding the ridge between first order saddle points on a multidimensional surface was developed...

  11. Chemically activated formation of organic acids in reactions of the Criegee intermediate with aldehydes and ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalan, Amrit; Allen, Joshua W; Green, William H

    2013-10-21

    Reactions of the Criegee intermediate (CI, ˙CH2OO˙) are important in atmospheric ozonolysis models. In this work, we compute the rates for reactions between ˙CH2OO˙ and HCHO, CH3CHO and CH3COCH3 leading to the formation of secondary ozonides (SOZ) and organic acids. Relative to infinitely separated reactants, the SOZ in all three cases is found to be 48-51 kcal mol(-1) lower in energy, formed via 1,3-cycloaddition of ˙CH2OO˙ across the C=O bond. The lowest energy pathway found for SOZ decomposition is intramolecular disproportionation of the singlet biradical intermediate formed from cleavage of the O-O bond to form hydroxyalkyl esters. These hydroxyalkyl esters undergo concerted decomposition providing a low energy pathway from SOZ to acids. Geometries and frequencies of all stationary points were obtained using the B3LYP/MG3S DFT model chemistry, and energies were refined using RCCSD(T)-F12a/cc-pVTZ-F12 single-point calculations. RRKM calculations were used to obtain microcanonical rate coefficients (k(E)) and the reservoir state method was used to obtain temperature and pressure dependent rate coefficients (k(T, P)) and product branching ratios. At atmospheric pressure, the yield of collisionally stabilized SOZ was found to increase in the order HCHO reactions were found to be the most sensitive parameters determining SOZ and organic acid yield.

  12. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding ‘greener’ sources of commodity chemicals and fuels.

  13. Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, S. P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications to reactions leading to NOx and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  14. Central collisions in intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The critical collisions in intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions are examined from both a microscopic and macroscopic viewpoint. In the microscopic description the proper tool is the extended TDHF approximation involving both the mean field and the particle collisions. To understand the underlying physics, the effect of the mean field and the effect of particle collisions are studied separately. It is found that th sudden increase in the density of the overlapping region can cause the volcano effect, leading to the complete disintegration of one of the nuclei. The self-consistent mean field also gives rise to the bunching instability when the two Fermi spheres of the colliding nucleons separate. The collision between nucleons, on the other hand, leads to irreversible dissipation, thermalization, and the possibility of a hydrodynamical description of the dynamics. Next is studied the dynamics of central collisions using the hydrodynamical description for many combinations of targets and projectiles at different energies. The formation of shock waves, sidesplash, and the complete disintegration of the whole nucleus are examined. Nuclear viscosity is found to affect the angular distribution of the reaction products and also the maximum compression ratio achieved during the collision. 28 references

  15. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  16. Kinetic and reaction pathways of methanol oxidation on platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, R.W.; McCready, D.F.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol oxidation kinetics were measured on Pt wires in a flow reactor at pressures between 30 and 130 Pa. The kinetics were measured as a function of oxygen-to-methanol equivalence ratio phi and wire temperature. In methanol-lean feeds (phi 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were the only products; in methanol-rich feeds (phi > 1), CO, H 2 , H 2 CO, CO 2 , and H 2 O were observed. Experiments with 18 O 2 showed that the principal methanol oxidation pathway does not involve C-O bond dissociation. However, the 18 O 2 experiments, together with other features of the methanol oxidation data, also provided evidence for a minor oxidation pathway (accounting for less than 1% of the product CO 2 ) which proceeds through a carbon intermediate. A mathematical model is presented which describes the principal CH 3 OH oxidation pathway as a series reaction involving adsorbed H 2 CO and CO intermediates. Consistent with experimental results, the model predicts that inhibition by adsorbed CO should be weaker for CH 3 OH and H 2 CO oxidation than for CO oxidation. 34 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  17. Pathways of the Maillard reaction under physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Christian; Glomb, Marcus A

    2016-08-01

    Initially investigated as a color formation process in thermally treated foods, nowadays, the relevance of the Maillard reaction in vivo is generally accepted. Many chronic and age-related diseases such as diabetes, uremia, atherosclerosis, cataractogenesis and Alzheimer's disease are associated with Maillard derived advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) and α-dicarbonyl compounds as their most important precursors in terms of reactivity and abundance. However, the situation in vivo is very challenging, because Maillard chemistry is paralleled by enzymatic reactions which can lead to both, increases and decreases in certain AGEs. In addition, mechanistic findings established under the harsh conditions of food processing might not be valid under physiological conditions. The present review critically discusses the relevant α-dicarbonyl compounds as central intermediates of AGE formation in vivo with a special focus on fragmentation pathways leading to formation of amide-AGEs.

  18. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer in Chemical Reactions: A Mechanistic Tool for NMR Detection and Characterization of Transient Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokesh, N; Seegerer, Andreas; Hioe, Johnny; Gschwind, Ruth M

    2018-02-07

    The low sensitivity of NMR and transient key intermediates below detection limit are the central problems studying reaction mechanisms by NMR. Sensitivity can be enhanced by hyperpolarization techniques such as dynamic nuclear polarization or the incorporation/interaction of special hyperpolarized molecules. However, all of these techniques require special equipment, are restricted to selective reactions, or undesirably influence the reaction pathways. Here, we apply the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) technique for the first time to NMR detect and characterize previously unobserved transient reaction intermediates in organocatalysis. The higher sensitivity of CEST and chemical equilibria present in the reaction pathway are exploited to access population and kinetics information on low populated intermediates. The potential of the method is demonstrated on the proline-catalyzed enamine formation for unprecedented in situ detection of a DPU stabilized zwitterionic iminium species, the elusive key intermediate between enamine and oxazolidinones. The quantitative analysis of CEST data at 250 K revealed the population ratio of [Z-iminium]/[exo-oxazolidinone] 0.02, relative free energy +8.1 kJ/mol (calculated +7.3 kJ/mol), and free energy barrier of +45.9 kJ/mol (ΔG ⧧ calc. (268 K) = +42.2 kJ/mol) for Z-iminium → exo-oxazolidinone. The findings underpin the iminium ion participation in enamine formation pathway corroborating our earlier theoretical prediction and help in better understanding. The reliability of CEST is validated using 1D EXSY-build-up techniques at low temperature (213 K). The CEST method thus serves as a new tool for mechanistic investigations in organocatalysis to access key information, such as chemical shifts, populations, and reaction kinetics of intermediates below the standard NMR detection limit.

  19. Photo-fenton degradation of diclofenac: identification of main intermediates and degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Estrada, Leónidas A; Malato, Sixto; Gernjak, Wolfgang; Agüera, Ana; Thurman, E Michael; Ferrer, Imma; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R

    2005-11-01

    In recent years, the presence of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment has been of growing interest. These new contaminants are important because many of them are not degraded under the typical biological treatments applied in the wastewater treatment plants and represent a continuous input into the environment. Thus, compounds such as diclofenac are present in surface waters in all Europe and a crucial need for more enhanced technologies that can reduce its presence in the environment has become evident. In this sense, advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) represent a good choice for the treatment of hazardous nonbiodegradable pollutants. This work deals with the solar photodegradation of diclofenac, an antiinflammatory drug, in aqueous solutions by photo-Fenton reaction. A pilot-scale facility using a compound parabolic collector (CPC) reactor was used for this study. Results obtained show rapid and complete oxidation of diclofenac after 60 min, and total mineralization (disappearance of dissolved organic carbon, DOC) after 100 min of exposure to sunlight. Although diclofenac precipitates during the process at low pH, its degradation takes place in the homogeneous phase governed by a precipitation-redissolution-degradation process. Establishment of the reaction pathway was made possible by a thorough analysis of the reaction mixture identifying the main intermediate products generated. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/ MS) and liquid chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOF-MS) were used to identify 18 intermediates, in two tentative degradation routes. The main one was based on the initial hydroxylation of the phenylacetic acid moiety in the C-4 position and subsequent formation of a quinone imine derivative that was the starting point for further multistep degradation involving hydroxylation, decarboxylation, and oxidation reactions. An alternative route was based on the transient preservation of the biphenyl amino moiety

  20. Coat Protein Mutations That Alter the Flux of Morphogenetic Intermediates through the ϕX174 Early Assembly Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Brody J; Li, Shuaizhi; Roznowski, Aaron P; Perez, Alexis R; Villarreal, Rodrigo H; Johnson, Curtis J; Hardy, Margaret; Tuckerman, Edward C; Burch, April D; Fane, Bentley A

    2017-12-15

    Two scaffolding proteins orchestrate ϕX174 morphogenesis. The internal scaffolding protein B mediates the formation of pentameric assembly intermediates, whereas the external scaffolding protein D organizes 12 of these intermediates into procapsids. Aromatic amino acid side chains mediate most coat-internal scaffolding protein interactions. One residue in the internal scaffolding protein and three in the coat protein constitute the core of the B protein binding cleft. The three coat gene codons were randomized separately to ascertain the chemical requirements of the encoded amino acids and the morphogenetic consequences of mutation. The resulting mutants exhibited a wide range of recessive phenotypes, which could generally be explained within a structural context. Mutants with phenylalanine, tyrosine, and methionine substitutions were phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type. However, tryptophan substitutions were detrimental at two sites. Charged residues were poorly tolerated, conferring extreme temperature-sensitive and lethal phenotypes. Eighteen lethal and conditional lethal mutants were genetically and biochemically characterized. The primary defect associated with the missense substitutions ranged from inefficient internal scaffolding protein B binding to faulty procapsid elongation reactions mediated by external scaffolding protein D. Elevating B protein concentrations above wild-type levels via exogenous, cloned-gene expression compensated for inefficient B protein binding, as did suppressing mutations within gene B. Similarly, elevating D protein concentrations above wild-type levels or compensatory mutations within gene D suppressed faulty elongation. Some of the parental mutations were pleiotropic, affecting multiple morphogenetic reactions. This progressively reduced the flux of intermediates through the pathway. Accordingly, multiple mechanisms, which may be unrelated, could restore viability. IMPORTANCE Genetic analyses have been

  1. Criegee Intermediates: What Direct Production and Detection Can Teach Us About Reactions of Carbonyl Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taatjes, Craig A.

    2017-05-01

    The carbonyl oxide intermediates in the ozonolysis of alkenes, often known as Criegee intermediates, are potentially important reactants in Earth's atmosphere. For decades, careful analysis of ozonolysis systems was employed to derive an understanding of the formation and reactions of these species. Recently it has proved possible to synthesize at least some of these intermediates separately from ozonolysis, and hence to measure their reaction kinetics directly. Direct measurements have allowed new or more detailed understanding of each type of gas-phase reaction that carbonyl oxides undergo, often acting as a complement to highly detailed ozonolysis experiments. Moreover, the use of direct characterization methods to validate increasingly accurate theoretical investigations can enhance their impact well beyond the set of specific reactions that have been measured. Reactions that initiate particles or fuel their growth could be a new frontier for direct measurements of Criegee intermediate chemistry.

  2. Photofragment imaging study of the CH2CCH2OH radical intermediate of the OH +allene reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Arjun S.; Justine Bell, M.; Lau, Kai-Chung; Butler, Laurie J.

    2007-10-01

    These velocity map imaging experiments characterize the photolytic generation of one of the two radical intermediates formed when OH reacts via an addition mechanism with allene. The CH2CCH2OH radical intermediate is generated photolytically from the photodissociation of 2-chloro-2-propen-1-ol at 193nm. Detecting the Cl atoms using [2+1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization evidences an isotropic angular distribution for the Cl +CH2CCH2OH photofragments, a spin-orbit branching ratio for Cl(P1/22):Cl(P3/22) of 0.28, and a bimodal recoil kinetic energy distribution. Conservation of momentum and energy allows us to determine from this data the internal energy distribution of the nascent CH2CCH2OH radical cofragment. To assess the possible subsequent decomposition pathways of this highly vibrationally excited radical intermediate, we include electronic structure calculations at the G3//B3LYP level of theory. They predict the isomerization and dissociation transition states en route from the initial CH2CCH2OH radical intermediate to the three most important product channels for the OH +allene reaction expected from this radical intermediate: formaldehyde+C2H3, H +acrolein, and ethene+CHO. We also calculate the intermediates and transition states en route from the other radical adduct, formed by addition of the OH to the center carbon of allene, to the ketene+CH3 product channel. We compare our results to a previous theoretical study of the O +allyl reaction conducted at the CBS-QB3 level of theory, as the two reactions include several common intermediates.

  3. Photofragment imaging study of the CH2CCH2OH radical intermediate of the OH+allene reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, Arjun S.; Justine Bell, M.; Lau, K.-C.; Butler, Laurie J.

    2007-01-01

    These velocity map imaging experiments characterize the photolytic generation of one of the two radical intermediates formed when OH reacts via an addition mechanism with allene. The CH 2 CCH 2 OH radical intermediate is generated photolytically from the photodissociation of 2-chloro-2-propen-1-ol at 193 nm. Detecting the Cl atoms using [2+1] resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization evidences an isotropic angular distribution for the Cl+CH 2 CCH 2 OH photofragments, a spin-orbit branching ratio for Cl( 2 P 1/2 ):Cl( 2 P 3/2 ) of 0.28, and a bimodal recoil kinetic energy distribution. Conservation of momentum and energy allows us to determine from this data the internal energy distribution of the nascent CH 2 CCH 2 OH radical cofragment. To assess the possible subsequent decomposition pathways of this highly vibrationally excited radical intermediate, we include electronic structure calculations at the G3//B3LYP level of theory. They predict the isomerization and dissociation transition states en route from the initial CH 2 CCH 2 OH radical intermediate to the three most important product channels for the OH+allene reaction expected from this radical intermediate: formaldehyde+C 2 H 3 , H+acrolein, and ethene+CHO. We also calculate the intermediates and transition states en route from the other radical adduct, formed by addition of the OH to the center carbon of allene, to the ketene+CH 3 product channel. We compare our results to a previous theoretical study of the O+allyl reaction conducted at the CBS-QB3 level of theory, as the two reactions include several common intermediates

  4. Comparative TEA for Indirect Liquefaction Pathways to Distillate-Range Fuels via Oxygenated Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Eric; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Talmadge, Michael; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan; Gray, Michael; Dagle, Robert; Padmaperuma, Asanga; Gerber, Mark; Sahir, Asad; Tao, Ling; Zhang, Yanan

    2017-03-03

    This paper presents a comparative techno-economic analysis of five conversion pathways from biomass to gasoline-, jet-, and diesel-range hydrocarbons via indirect liquefaction with specific focus on pathways utilizing oxygenated intermediates (derived either via thermochemical or biochemical conversion steps). The four emerging pathways of interest are compared with one conventional pathway (Fischer-Tropsch) for the production of the hydrocarbon blendstocks. The processing steps of the four emerging pathways include: biomass-to-syngas via indirect gasification, gas cleanup, conversion of syngas to alcohols/oxygenates, followed by conversion of alcohols/oxygenates to hydrocarbon blendstocks via dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation. We show that the emerging pathways via oxygenated intermediates have the potential to be cost competitive with the conventional Fischer-Tropsch process. The evaluated pathways and the benchmark process generally exhibit similar fuel yields and carbon conversion efficiencies. The resulting minimum fuel selling prices are comparable to the benchmark at approximately $3.60 per gallon-gasoline equivalent, with potential for two new pathways to be more economically competitive. Additionally, the coproduct values can play an important role in the economics of the processes with oxygenated intermediates derived via syngas fermentation. Major cost drivers for the integrated processes are tied to achievable fuel yields and conversion efficiency of the intermediate steps, i.e., the production of oxygenates/alcohols from syngas and the conversion of oxygenates/alcohols to hydrocarbon fuels.

  5. Gamow Teller strength from charge exchange reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeusser, O.

    1989-07-01

    Detailed studies of the spin-isospin structure of nuclear excitations are possible at TRIUMF's medium resolution spectrometer using the (n,p), ( p → , p →/ ) and (p,n) reactions. We discuss here results on isospin symmetry of inelastic nucleon scattering reactions populating isospin triads in A=6 and A=12 nuclei. The β + Gamow Teller strength function from (n,p) reactions on (sd) and (fp) shell targets is found to be substantially quenched compared to current nuclear structure models using the free-nucleon axial-vector coupling constant. (Author) 22 refs., 3 figs

  6. Role of compound nuclei in intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-05-01

    Hot compound nuclei are frequently produced in intermediate-energy reactions through a variety of processes. Their decay is shown to be an important and at times dominant source of complex fragments, high energy-gamma rays, and even pions

  7. Compound nuclei, binary decay, and multifragmentation in intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, L.G.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1988-07-01

    Hot compound nuclei, frequently produced in intermediate-energy reactions through a variety of processes, are shown to be an important and at times dominant source of complex fragments. 13 refs., 12 figs

  8. Needs for experiment and theory in intermediate energy reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blann, M.

    1991-01-01

    We summarize several reasons intermediate energy data are needed in both basic and applied science. The status of the data base at energies up to 2 GeV is cursorily reviewed. Experimental excitation functions, single and double differential cross sections are compared with predictions of the nuclear model code ALICE. The strengths and weaknesses of the code to reproduce data are summarized. Opinions are given as to areas where data are too few or totally lacking, yet are needed for the verification of models and theories. (author). 25 refs, 22 figs

  9. Organotrichlorogermane synthesis by the reaction of elemental germanium, tetrachlorogermane and organic chloride via dichlorogermylene intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Masaki; Asano, Takuya; Suzuki, Eiichi

    2004-08-07

    Organotrichlorogermanes were synthesized by the reaction of elemental germanium, tetrachlorogermane and organic chlorides, methyl, propyl, isopropyl and allyl chlorides. Dichlorogermylene formed by the reaction of elemental germanium with tetrachlorogermane was the reaction intermediate, which was inserted into the carbon-chlorine bond of the organic chloride to give organotrichlorogermane. When isopropyl or allyl chloride was used as an organic chloride, organotrichlorogermane was formed also in the absence of tetrachlorogermane. These chlorides were converted to hydrogen chloride, which subsequently reacted with elemental germanium to give the dichlorogermylene intermediate. The reaction of elemental germanium, tetrachlorogermane and organic chlorides provides a simple and easy method for synthesizing organotrichlorogermanes, and all the raw materials are easily available.

  10. Angular evolution of peripheral heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumenfeld, Y.; Chomaz, P.; Frascaria, N.; Garron, J.P.; Jacmart, J.C; Roynette, J.C

    1985-01-01

    Energy spectra and angular distributions of projectile-like fragments have been measured in the vicinity of the grazing angle for the 40 Ar+ 40 Ca and 40 Ar+ 208 Pb reactions at 44MeV/nucleon. Measurements of the 40 Ar+ 40 Ca system at 27MeV/nucleon and 20 Ne+ 208 Pb reaction at 44MeV/nucleon at one angle have also been performed. For fragments with charge and mass close to the projectile numerous deviations from the standard fragmentation model have been observed including rapidly changing shapes of the angular distributions with the fragment mass. Moreover the isotopic distributions and mean fragment velocities are strongly dependent on detection angle. A surface transfer reaction component dominant at the grazing angle can be separated from a second component which cannot be entirely accounted for by a simple fragmentation mechanism

  11. L-myo-inosose-1 as a probable intermediate in the reaction catalyzed by myo-inositol oxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naber, N.I.; Swan, J.S.; Hamilton, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    In previous investigations, it was necessary to have Fe(II) and cysteine present in order to assay the catalytic activity of purified hog kidney myo-inositol oxygenase. In the present study it was found that, if this purified nonheme iron enzyme is slowly frozen in solution with glutathione and stored at -20 degrees C, it is fully active in the absence of activators if catalase is present to remove adventitious H 2 O 2 . With this simpler assay system it was possible to clarify the effects of several variables on the enzymic reaction. Thus, the maximum velocity is pH-dependent with a maximum around pH 9.5, but the apparent Km for myo-inositol (air atmosphere) remains constant at 5.0 mM throughout a broad pH range. The enzyme is quite specific for its substrate myo-inositol, is very sensitive to oxidants and reductants, but is not affected by a variety of complexing agents, nucleotides, sulfhydryl reagents, etc. In other experiments it was found that L-myo-inosose-1, a potential intermediate in the enzymic reaction, is a potent competitive inhibitor (Ki = 62 microM), while other inososes and a solution thought to contain D-glucodialdehyde, another potential intermediate, are weak inhibitors. Also, both a kinetic deuterium isotope effect (kH/kD = 2.1) and a tritium isotope effect (kH/kT = 7.5) are observed for the enzymic reaction when [1-2H]- and [1-3H]-myo-inositol are used as reactants. These latter results are considered strong evidence that the oxygenase reaction proceeds by a pathway involving L-myo-inosose-1 as an intermediate rather than by an alternative pathway that would have D-glucodialdehyde as the intermediate

  12. Elimination of intermediate species in multiscale stochastic reaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cappelletti, Daniele; Wiuf, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    such as the substrate-enzyme complex in the Michaelis-Menten mechanism. Such species are virtually in all real-world networks, they are typically short-lived, degraded at a fast rate and hard to observe experimentally. We provide conditions under which the Markov process of a multiscale reaction network...

  13. INTERMEDIATE STAGES OF REACTIONS FORMING CARBIDES OF TITANIUM, ZIRCONIUM, VANADIUM, NIOBIUM, AND TANTALIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    intermediate and final products, and also during the calculation of approximate heat values of their formation, the passage of the reaction is confirmed...for obtaining TiC, and ZrC through the stage of intermediate oxides Ti2O3, Ti3O5, TiO and Zr2O3, ZrO, respectively and also for the reaction of...forming carbides of V (from V2O3 + 5C), of Nb and Ta (from Nb2O5 + 7C and Ta205 + 7C) through the stage of intermediate oxides VO, V4O and TaO2, Ta4O. The

  14. Temperature-scan cryocrystallography reveals reaction intermediates in bacteriophytochrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaojing; Ren, Zhong; Kuk, Jane; Moffat, Keith (UC)

    2012-03-27

    Light is a fundamental signal that regulates important physiological processes such as development and circadian rhythm in living organisms. Phytochromes form a major family of photoreceptors responsible for red light perception in plants, fungi and bacteria. They undergo reversible photoconversion between red-absorbing (Pr) and far-red-absorbing (Pfr) states, thereby ultimately converting a light signal into a distinct biological signal that mediates subsequent cellular responses. Several structures of microbial phytochromes have been determined in their dark-adapted Pr or Pfr states. However, the structural nature of initial photochemical events has not been characterized by crystallography. Here we report the crystal structures of three intermediates in the photoreaction of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophytochrome (PaBphP). We used cryotrapping crystallography to capture intermediates, and followed structural changes by scanning the temperature at which the photoreaction proceeded. Light-induced conformational changes in PaBphP originate in ring D of the biliverdin (BV) chromophore, and E-to-Z isomerization about the C{sub 15} = C{sub 16} double bond between rings C and D is the initial photochemical event. As the chromophore relaxes, the twist of the C{sub 15} methine bridge about its two dihedral angles is reversed. Structural changes extend further to rings B and A, and to the surrounding protein regions. These data indicate that absorption of a photon by the Pfr state of PaBphP converts a light signal into a structural signal via twisting and untwisting of the methine bridges in the linear tetrapyrrole within the confined protein cavity.

  15. Aligning Metabolic Pathways Exploiting Binary Relation of Reactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Huang

    Full Text Available Metabolic pathway alignment has been widely used to find one-to-one and/or one-to-many reaction mappings to identify the alternative pathways that have similar functions through different sets of reactions, which has important applications in reconstructing phylogeny and understanding metabolic functions. The existing alignment methods exhaustively search reaction sets, which may become infeasible for large pathways. To address this problem, we present an effective alignment method for accurately extracting reaction mappings between two metabolic pathways. We show that connected relation between reactions can be formalized as binary relation of reactions in metabolic pathways, and the multiplications of zero-one matrices for binary relations of reactions can be accomplished in finite steps. By utilizing the multiplications of zero-one matrices for binary relation of reactions, we efficiently obtain reaction sets in a small number of steps without exhaustive search, and accurately uncover biologically relevant reaction mappings. Furthermore, we introduce a measure of topological similarity of nodes (reactions by comparing the structural similarity of the k-neighborhood subgraphs of the nodes in aligning metabolic pathways. We employ this similarity metric to improve the accuracy of the alignments. The experimental results on the KEGG database show that when compared with other state-of-the-art methods, in most cases, our method obtains better performance in the node correctness and edge correctness, and the number of the edges of the largest common connected subgraph for one-to-one reaction mappings, and the number of correct one-to-many reaction mappings. Our method is scalable in finding more reaction mappings with better biological relevance in large metabolic pathways.

  16. Density Functional Theory Study of Competitive Reaction Pathways of Ti+ with Fluorinated Acetone in the Gas Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Kiryong; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the doublet and quartet potential energy surfaces associated with the gas-phase reaction between Ti + and CF 3 COCH 3 for two plausible reaction pathways, TiF 2 + and TiO + formation pathways by using the density functional theory (DFT) method. The molecular structures of intermediates and transition states involved in these reaction pathways are optimized at the DFT level by using the PBE0 functional. All transition states are identified by using the intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) method, and the resulting reaction coordinates describe how Ti + activates CF 3 COCH 3 and produces TiF 2 + and TiO + as products. On the basis of presented results, we propose the most favorable reaction pathway in the reaction between Ti + and CF 3 COCH 3

  17. Photonucleon reactions in 40Ca at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, J.-O.; Bulow, B.; Jonsson, G.G.; Lindgren, K.

    1976-01-01

    The yields of the reactions 40 Ca(γ,n) 39 Ca* and 40 Ca(γ,p) 39 K* to the first three excited states have been measured for bremsstrahlung with end-point energies in the region 100-750 MeV. The C 2 S values for the first excited state were deduced from the pion photoproduction contribution to the measured yields. (Auth.)

  18. dd →3 Hen Reaction at Intermediate Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladygina, N. B.

    2012-01-01

    The dd → 3 Hen reaction is considered at the energies between 200 and 520 MeV. The Alt-Grassberger-Sandhas equations are iterated up to the lowest order terms over the nucleon-nucleon t-matrix. The parameterized 3He wave function including five components is used. The angular dependence of the differential cross section and energy dependence of tensor analyzing power T 20 at the zero scattering angle are presented in comparison with the experimental data. (author)

  19. Manganese-Oxygen Intermediates in O-O Bond Activation and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Derek B; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A

    2017-11-21

    Biological systems capitalize on the redox versatility of manganese to perform reactions involving dioxygen and its derivatives superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and water. The reactions of manganese enzymes influence both human health and the global energy cycle. Important examples include the detoxification of reactive oxygen species by manganese superoxide dismutase, biosynthesis by manganese ribonucleotide reductase and manganese lipoxygenase, and water splitting by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. Although these enzymes perform very different reactions and employ structurally distinct active sites, manganese intermediates with peroxo, hydroxo, and oxo ligation are commonly proposed in catalytic mechanisms. These intermediates are also postulated in mechanisms of synthetic manganese oxidation catalysts, which are of interest due to the earth abundance of manganese. In this Account, we describe our recent efforts toward understanding O-O bond activation pathways of Mn III -peroxo adducts and hydrogen-atom transfer reactivity of Mn IV -oxo and Mn III -hydroxo complexes. In biological and synthetic catalysts, peroxomanganese intermediates are commonly proposed to decay by either Mn-O or O-O cleavage pathways, although it is often unclear how the local coordination environment influences the decay mechanism. To address this matter, we generated a variety of Mn III -peroxo adducts with varied ligand environments. Using parallel-mode EPR and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption techniques, the decay pathway of one Mn III -peroxo complex bearing a bulky macrocylic ligand was investigated. Unlike many Mn III -peroxo model complexes that decay to oxo-bridged-Mn III Mn IV dimers, decay of this Mn III -peroxo adduct yielded mononuclear Mn III -hydroxo and Mn IV -oxo products, potentially resulting from O-O bond activation of the Mn III -peroxo unit. These results highlight the role of ligand sterics in promoting the formation of mononuclear products and mark an important

  20. On light cluster production in nucleon induced reactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, D.; Blideanu, V.; Durand, D.

    2004-09-01

    A dynamical model dedicated to nucleon induced reaction between 30-150 MeV is presented. It considers different stages of the reaction: the approaching phase, the in-medium nucleon-nucleon collisions, the cluster formation and the secondary de-excitation process. The notions of influence area and phase-space exploration during the reaction are introduced. The importance of the geometry of the reaction and of the conservation laws are underlined. The model is able to globally reproduce the absolute cross sections for the emission of neutron and light charged particles for proton and neutron induced reactions on heavy and intermediate mass targets ( 56 Fe and 208 Pb). (authors)

  1. Why do alpha-beta parallel proteins, like flavodoxins, form misfolded off-pathway intermediates?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nabuurs, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    The question: “Why do α-β parallel proteins, like flavodoxins, form misfolded off-pathway
    intermediates?" is the main subject of this thesis. A. vinelandii apoflavodoxin is chosen as protein
    of interest as it is a representative of α-β parallel proteins, which are widely prevalent in

  2. Structure Sensitivity in Pt Nanoparticle Catalysts for Hydrogenation of 1,3-Butadiene: In Situ Study of Reaction Intermediates Using SFG Vibrational Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Michalak, William D.

    2013-01-31

    The product selectivity during 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation on monodisperse, colloidally synthesized, Pt nanoparticles was studied under reaction conditions with kinetic measurements and in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. SFG was performed with the capping ligands intact in order to maintain nanoparticle size by reduced sintering. Four products are formed at 75 C: 1-butene, cis-2-butene, trans-2-butene, and n-butane. Ensembles of Pt nanoparticles with average diameters of 0.9 and 1.8 nm exhibit a ∼30% and ∼20% increase in the full hydrogenation products, respectively, as compared to Pt nanoparticles with average diameters of 4.6 and 6.7 nm. Methyl and methylene vibrational stretches of reaction intermediates observed under working conditions using SFG were used to correlate the stable reaction intermediates with the product distribution. Kinetic and SFG results correlate with previous DFT predictions for two parallel reaction pathways of 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation. Hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene can initiate with H-addition at internal or terminal carbons leading to the formation of 1-buten-4-yl radical (metallocycle) and 2-buten-1-yl radical intermediates, respectively. Small (0.9 and 1.8 nm) nanoparticles exhibited vibrational resonances originating from both intermediates, while the large (4.6 and 6.7 nm) particles exhibited vibrational resonances originating predominately from the 2-buten-1-yl radical. This suggests each reaction pathway competes for partial and full hydrogenation and the nanoparticle size affects the kinetic preference for the two pathways. The reaction pathway through the metallocycle intermediate on the small nanoparticles is likely due to the presence of low-coordinated sites. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Reactions and reaction intermediates on iron surfaces--1. Methanol, ethanol, and isopropanol on Fe(100). 2. Hydrocarbons and carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benziger, J.B.; Madix, R.J.

    1980-09-01

    Temperature-programed desorption and ESCA showed that the alcohols formed alkoxy intermediates on Fe(100) surfaces at room temperature, but that the methoxy and ethoxy species were much more stable than the isopropoxy intermediate. The alkoxy species reacted above 400/sup 0/K by decomposing into carbon monoxide and hydrogen, hydrogenation to alcohol, and scission of C-C and C-O bonds with hydrogenation of the hydrocarbon fragments. Ethylene, acetylene, and cis-2-butene formed stable, unidentified surface species. Methyl chloride formed stable surface methyl groups which decomposed into hydrogen and surface carbide at 475/sup 0/K. Formic and acetic acids yielded stable carboxylate intermediates which decomposed above 490/sup 0/K to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. The studies suggested that the alkoxy surface species may be important intermediates in the Fischer-Tropsch reaction on iron.

  4. On the chemistry of ethanol on basic oxides: revising mechanisms and intermediates in the Lebedev and Guerbet reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieregato, Alessandro; Velasquez Ochoa, Juliana; Bandinelli, Claudia; Fornasari, Giuseppe; Cavani, Fabrizio; Mella, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A common way to convert ethanol into chemicals is by upgrading it over oxide catalysts with basic features; this method makes it possible to obtain important chemicals such as 1-butanol (Guerbet reaction) and 1,3-butadiene (Lebedev reaction). Despite their long history in chemistry, the details of the close inter-relationship of these reactions have yet to be discussed properly. Our present study focuses on reactivity tests, in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy, MS analysis, and theoretical modeling. We used MgO as a reference catalyst with pure basic features to explore ethanol conversion from its very early stages. Based on the obtained results, we formulate a new mechanistic theory able to explain not only our results but also most of the scientific literature on Lebedev and Guerbet chemistry. This provides a rational description of the intermediates shared by the two reaction pathways as well as an innovative perspective on the catalyst requirements to direct the reaction pathway toward 1-butanol or butadiene. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Bacillus anthracis o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA synthetase: reaction kinetics and a novel inhibitor mimicking its reaction intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yang; Suk, Dae-Hwan; Cai, Feng; Crich, David; Mesecar, Andrew D

    2008-11-25

    o-Succinylbenzoyl-CoA (OSB-CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.26) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of o-succinylbenzoate (OSB) and CoA to form OSB-CoA, the fourth step of the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway in Bacillus anthracis. Gene knockout studies have highlighted this enzyme as a potential target for the discovery of new antibiotics. Here we report the first studies on the kinetic mechanism of B. anthracis OSB-CoA synthetase, classifying it as an ordered bi uni uni bi ping-pong mechanism. Through a series of pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetic studies in conjunction with direct binding studies, it is demonstrated that CoA, the last substrate to bind, strongly activates the first half-reaction after the first round of turnover. The activation of the first half-reaction is most likely achieved by CoA stabilizing conformations of the enzyme in the "F" form, which slowly isomerize back to the E form. Thus, the kinetic mechanism of OSB-CoA synthetase may be more accurately described as an ordered bi uni uni bi iso ping-pong mechanism. The substrate specificity of OSB-CoA synthetase was probed using a series of OSB analogues with alterations in the carboxylate groups. OSB-CoA shows a strong preference for OSB over all of the analogues tested as none were active except 4-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-oxobutyric acid which exhibited a 100-fold decrease in k(cat)/K(m). On the basis of an understanding of OSB-CoA synthetase's kinetic mechanism and substrate specificity, a reaction intermediate analogue of OSB-AMP, 5'-O-{N-[2-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-oxobutyl}adenosine sulfonamide (TFMP-butyl-AMS), was designed and synthesized. This inhibitor was found to be an uncompetitive inhibitor to CoA and a mixed-type inhibitor to ATP and OSB with low micromolar inhibition constants. Collectively, these results should serve as an important forerunner to more detailed and extensive inhibitor design studies aimed at developing lead compounds against the OSB-CoA synthetase

  6. Bacillus anthracis o-succinylbenzoyl-CoA synthetase: reaction kinetics and a novel inhibitor mimicking its reaction intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yang; Suk, Dae-Hwan; Cai, Feng; Crich, David; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01

    O-succinylbenzoyl-CoA (OSB-CoA) synthetase (EC 6.2.1.26) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of o-succinylbenzoate (OSB) and CoA to form OSB-CoA, the fourth step of the menaquinone biosynthetic pathway in Bacillus anthracis. Gene knockout studies have highlighted this enzyme as a potential target for the discovery of new antibiotics. Here we report the first studies on the kinetic mechanism of B. anthracis OSB-CoA synthetase, classifying it as an ordered Bi Uni Uni Bi ping-pong mechanism. Through a series of pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetic studies in conjunction with direct-binding studies, it is demonstrated that CoA, the last substrate to bind, strongly activates the first half-reaction after the first round of turnover. The activation of the first-half reaction is most likely achieved by CoA stabilizing conformations of the enzyme in the ‘F’ form, which slowly isomerize back to the E form. Thus, the kinetic mechanism of OSB-CoA synthetase may be more accurately described as an ordered Bi Uni Uni Bi Iso ping-pong mechanism. The substrate specificity of OSB-CoA synthetase was probed using a series of OSB analogs with alterations in the carboxylate groups. OSB-CoA shows a strong preference for OSB over all of the analogs tested as none were active except 4-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-4-oxobutyric acid which exhibited a 100-fold decrease in kcat/Km. Based on an understanding of OSB-CoA synthetase’s kinetic mechanism and substrate specificity, a reaction intermediate analog of OSB-AMP, 5’-O-(N-(2-trifluoromethylphenyl)-4-oxobutyl) adenosine sulfonamide (TFMP-butyl-AMS), was designed and synthesized. This inhibitor was found to be an uncompetitive inhibitor to CoA and a mixed-type inhibitor to ATP and OSB with low micromolar inhibition constants. Collectively, these results should serve as an important forerunner to more detailed and extensive inhibitor design studies aimed at developing lead compounds against the OSB-CoA synthetase class of

  7. Stepwise radical cation Diels-Alder reaction via multiple pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Ryo; Okada, Yohei; Chiba, Kazuhiro

    2018-01-01

    Herein we disclose the radical cation Diels-Alder reaction of aryl vinyl ethers by electrocatalysis, which is triggered by an oxidative SET process. The reaction clearly proceeds in a stepwise fashion, which is a rare mechanism in this class. We also found that two distinctive pathways, including "direct" and "indirect", are possible to construct the Diels-Alder adduct.

  8. Fragment mass distribution of proton-induced spallation reaction with intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Sheng; Ye Yanlin; Xu Chuncheng; Chen Tao; Sobolevsky, N.M.

    2000-01-01

    The test of part benchmark of SHIELD code is finished. The fragment cross section and mass distribution and excitation function of the residual nuclei from proton-induced spallation reaction on thin Pb target with intermediate energy have been calculated by SHIELD code. And the results are in good agreement with measured data. The fragment mass distribution of the residual nuclei from proton-induced spallation reaction on thick Pb target with incident energy 1.6 GeV have been simulated

  9. Ketene as a Reaction Intermediate in the Carbonylation of Dimethyl Ether to Methyl Acetate over Mordenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Dominik Bjørn; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Temel, Burcin

    2015-01-01

    Unprecedented insight into the carbonylation of dimethyl ether over Mordenite is provided through the identification of ketene (CH2CO) as a reaction intermediate. The formation of ketene is predicted by detailed DFT calculations and verified experimentally by the observation of doubly deuterated ...

  10. [Intermediate energy studies of polarization transfer, polarized deuteron scattering, and (p,π+-) reactions: Rapporteur's report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    An overview of intermediate energy (80 to 1000 MeV) study contributions to the International Polarization Symposium in Osaka, Japan, August 1985 is presented in this report. Contributions fall into three categories: polarization transfer, polarized deuteron scattering and polarized (p,π +- ) reactions

  11. Angular dependences of the tensor analyzing powers in the dd→3Hen reaction at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladygin, V.P.; Ladygina, N.B.

    2002-01-01

    The tensor analyzing powers A yy , A xx , and A xz in the dd→ 3 Hen reaction at intermediate energies are considered in the framework of the one-nucleon-exchange approximation. Their strong sensitivity to the 3 He and deuteron spin structure at short distances is shown

  12. Combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical reaction pathway calculation for aromatic hydroxylation by p-hydroxybenzoate-3-hydroxylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, L.; Mulholland, A.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Vervoort, J.

    1999-01-01

    The reaction pathway for the aromatic 3-hydroxylation of p-hydroxybenzoate by the reactive C4a-hydroperoxyflavin cofactor intermediate in p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH) has been investigated by a combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) method. A structural model for the

  13. Oxidative degradation of atenolol by heat-activated persulfate: Kinetics, degradation pathways and distribution of transformation intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Dong; Peng, Jianbiao; Zhou, Xiaohuan; Qian, Li; Wang, Mengjie; Zhai, Li; Gao, Shixiang

    2018-05-17

    Atenolol (ATL) has been widely detected in wastewater and aquatic environment. Although satisfactory removal of ATL from wastewater could be achieved, the mineralization ratio is usually low, which may result in the accumulation of its transformation products in the effluent and cause additional ecological risk to the environment. The aim of this study is to explore the effectiveness of heat activated persulfate (PS) in the removal of ATL from wastewater. Influencing factors including temperature, PS dosage, solution pH, existence of NO 3 - , Cl - , HCO 3 - and Suwannee river fulvic acid (SRFA) were examined. Complete removal of ATL was achieved within 40 min at pH 7.0 and 70 °C by using 0.5 mM PS. Inhibitive effects of HCO 3 - and FA had been observed on ATL oxidation, which was increased with the increase of their concentration. Sulfate radical (SO 4 - ) was determined as the main reactive species by quenching experiment. Eight intermediates produced in ATL degradation were identified, and four degradation pathways were proposed based on the analysis of mass spectrum and frontier electron densities. The distribution of major intermediates was influenced by reaction temperature. Hydroxylation intermediates and deamidation intermediate were the most prominent at 50 °C and 60 °C, respectively. All intermediates were completely degraded in 40 min except P134 at 70 °C. Effective removal of TOC (74.12%) was achieved with 0.5 mM PS, pH 7.0 and 70 °C after 240 min. The results proved that heat activation of PS is a promising method to remove organic pollutants in wastewater. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hydrozirconation of lithium alkynylselenolate anions. Generation and reactions of alpha-zirconated vinyl selenide intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabdoub; Begnini; Guerrero; Baroni

    2000-01-14

    Lithium alkynylselenolate anions react completely with 1.0 equiv of Cp(2)Zr(H)Cl in THF at room temperature to give exclusively the alpha-zirconated vinylselenolate intermediates 23-27, which by treatment with an alkyl halide afforded the alpha-zirconated vinyl alkylselenide intermediates 29-33. Reaction of 29-33 with butyltellurenyl bromide results in the formation of ketene telluro(seleno) acetals 35-39 with total control of the regio- and stereochemistry. The synthetic utility of the ketene telluro(seleno) acetals obtained here was demonstrated by reaction of 36 with butyllithium. This promotes the exclusive and stereospecific removal of the tellurium moiety and enables formation of the corresponding selenium-containing allylic alcohol of type 44, alpha-(alkylseleno)-alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde 45, ester 46, or carboxylic acid 47, after reaction with different types of electrophiles.

  15. A paradigm shift for radical SAM reactions: The organometallic intermediate Ω is central to catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, Amanda S; Yang, Hao; McDaniel, Elizabeth C; Kathiresan, Venkatesan; Impano, Stella; Pagnier, Adrien; Watts, Hope; Denler, Carly; Vagstad, Anna; Piel, Jörn; Duschene, Kaitlin S; Shepard, Eric M; Shields, Thomas P; Scott, Lincoln G; Lilla, Edward A; Yokoyama, Kenichi; Broderick, William E; Hoffman, Brian M; Broderick, Joan B

    2018-06-28

    Radical S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) en-zymes comprise a vast superfamily catalyzing diverse reactions essential to all life through ho-molytic SAM cleavage to liberate the highly-reactive 5-deoxyadenosyl radical (5-dAdo•). Our recent observation of a catalytically compe-tent organometallic intermediate Ω that forms dur-ing reaction of the radical SAM (RS) enzyme py-ruvate formate-lyase activating-enzyme (PFL-AE) was therefore quite surprising, and led to the question of its broad relevance in the superfamily. We now show that Ω in PFL-AE forms as an in-termediate under a variety of mixing order condi-tions, suggesting it is central to catalysis in this enzyme. We further demonstrate that Ω forms in a suite of RS enzymes chosen to span the totality of superfamily reaction types, implicating Ω as essential in catalysis across the RS superfamily. Finally, EPR and electron nuclear double reso-nance spectroscopy establish that Ω involves an Fe-C5 bond between 5-dAdo• and the [4Fe-4S] cluster. An analogous organometallic bond is found in the well-known adenosylcobalamin (co-enzyme B12) cofactor used to initiate radical reac-tions via a 5'-dAdo• intermediate. Generation of a 5'-dAdo• intermediate via homolytic metal-carbon bond cleavage thus appears to be similar for Ω and coenzyme B12. However coenzyme B12 is involved in enzymes catalyzing of only a small number (~12) of distinct reactions, while the RS superfamily has more than 100,000 distinct se-quences and over 80 reaction types character-ized to date. The appearance of Ω across the RS superfamily therefore dramatically enlarges the sphere of bio-organometallic chemistry in Nature.

  16. The role of phosphate in a multistep enzymatic reaction: reactions of the substrate and intermediate in pieces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodar, Svetlana A; Allen, C Leigh; Gulick, Andrew M; Murkin, Andrew S

    2015-02-25

    Several mechanistically unrelated enzymes utilize the binding energy of their substrate's nonreacting phosphoryl group to accelerate catalysis. Evidence for the involvement of the phosphodianion in transition state formation has come from reactions of the substrate in pieces, in which reaction of a truncated substrate lacking its phosphorylmethyl group is activated by inorganic phosphite. What has remained unknown until now is how the phosphodianion group influences the reaction energetics at different points along the reaction coordinate. 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate (DXP) reductoisomerase (DXR), which catalyzes the isomerization of DXP to 2-C-methyl-D-erythrose 4-phosphate (MEsP) and subsequent NADPH-dependent reduction, presents a unique opportunity to address this concern. Previously, we have reported the effect of covalently linked phosphate on the energetics of DXP turnover. Through the use of chemically synthesized MEsP and its phosphate-truncated analogue, 2-C-methyl-D-glyceraldehyde, the current study revealed a loss of 6.1 kcal/mol of kinetic barrier stabilization upon truncation, of which 4.4 kcal/mol was regained in the presence of phosphite dianion. The activating effect of phosphite was accompanied by apparent tightening of its interactions within the active site at the intermediate stage of the reaction, suggesting a role of the phosphodianion in disfavoring intermediate release and in modulation of the on-enzyme isomerization equilibrium. The results of kinetic isotope effect and structural studies indicate rate limitation by physical steps when the covalent linkage is severed. These striking differences in the energetics of the natural reaction and the reactions in pieces provide a deeper insight into the contribution of enzyme-phosphodianion interactions to the reaction coordinate.

  17. Kynurenine pathway metabolites and enzymes involved in redox reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Esquivel, D; Ramírez-Ortega, D; Pineda, B; Castro, N; Ríos, C; Pérez de la Cruz, V

    2017-01-01

    Oxido-reduction reactions are a fundamental part of the life due to support many vital biological processes as cellular respiration and glucose oxidation. In the redox reactions, one substance transfers one or more electrons to another substance. An important electron carrier is the coenzyme NAD + , which is involved in many metabolic pathways. De novo biosynthesis of NAD + is through the kynurenine pathway, the major route of tryptophan catabolism, which is sensitive to redox environment and produces metabolites with redox capacity, able to alter biological functions that are controlled by redox-responsive signaling pathways. Kynurenine pathway metabolites have been implicated in the physiology process and in the physiopathology of many diseases; processes that also share others factors as dysregulation of calcium homeostasis, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, inflammation and cell death, which impact the redox environment. This review examines in detail the available evidence in which kynurenine pathway metabolites participate in redox reactions and their effect on cellular redox homeostasis, since the knowledge of the main factors and mechanisms that lead to cell death in many neurodegenative disorders and other pathologies, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and kynurenines imbalance, will allow to develop therapies using them as targets. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. On light cluster production in nucleon induced reactions at intermediate energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, D.; Blideanu, V.; Durand, D

    2004-09-01

    A dynamical model dedicated to nucleon induced reaction between 30-150 MeV is presented. It considers different stages of the reaction: the approaching phase, the in-medium nucleon-nucleon collisions, the cluster formation and the secondary de-excitation process. The notions of influence area and phase-space exploration during the reaction are introduced. The importance of the geometry of the reaction and of the conservation laws are underlined. The model is able to globally reproduce the absolute cross sections for the emission of neutron and light charged particles for proton and neutron induced reactions on heavy and intermediate mass targets ({sup 56}Fe and {sup 208}Pb). (authors)

  19. Adsorption and Photocatalytic Decomposition of the β-Blocker Metoprolol in Aqueous Titanium Dioxide Suspensions: Kinetics, Intermediates, and Degradation Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violette Romero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the photocatalytic degradation of the β-blocker metoprolol (MET using TiO2 suspended as catalyst. A series of photoexperiments were carried out by a UV lamp, emitting in the 250–400 nm range, providing information about the absorption of radiation in the photoreactor wall. The influence of the radiation wavelength on the MET photooxidation rate was investigated using a filter cutting out wavelengths shorter than 280 nm. Effects of photolysis and adsorption at different initial pH were studied to evaluate noncatalytic degradation for this pharmaceutical. MET adsorption onto titania was fitted to two-parameter Langmuir isotherm. From adsorption results it appears that the photocatalytic degradation can occur mainly on the surface of TiO2. MET removed by photocatalysis was 100% conditions within 300 min, while only 26% was achieved by photolysis at the same time. TiO2 photocatalysis degradation of MET in the first stage of the reaction followed approximately a pseudo-first-order model. The major reaction intermediates were identified by LC/MS analysis such as 3-(propan-2-ylaminopropane-1,2-diol or 3-aminoprop-1-en-2-ol. Based on the identified intermediates, a photocatalytic degradation pathway was proposed, including the cleavage of side chain and the hydroxylation addition to the parent compounds.

  20. The Intermediate Velocity Source in the 40Ca + 197Au Reaction at 35 AMeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planeta, R.; Sosin, Z.; Hachaj, P.

    2001-01-01

    The creation of hot Ca-like fragments and the emission of intermediate velocity particles was studied in the 40 Ca+ 197 Au reaction at 35 AMeV. For peripheral collisions the primary projectile-like fragment was reconstructed using the AMPHORA 4π detector system. The particle distributions are compared with the predictions of a Monte Carlo code which calculates the nucleon transfer and clustering probabilities according to the system density of states. The velocity distributions of charged particles projected on the beam direction can be explained if emissions from the hot projectile-like fragment and the target-like fragment are supplemented by an emission from an intermediate velocity source located between them. The properties of the intermediate velocity source are properly described, including the 2 D/ 3 T/ 3 He effect. (author)

  1. An intermediate state of T7 RNA polymerase provides another pathway of nucleotide selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhan-Feng; Liu Yu-Ru; Wang Peng-Ye; Xie Ping

    2017-01-01

    Phage T7 RNA polymerase is a single-subunit transcription enzyme, transcribing template DNA to RNA. Nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) selection and translocation are two critical steps of the transcription elongation. Here, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we found that between pre- and post-translocation states of T7 RNA polymerase an intermediate state exists, where the O helix C-terminal residue tyrosine 639, which plays important roles in translocation, locates between its pre- and post-translocation positions and the side chain of the next template DNA nucleotide has moved into the active site. NTP selection in this intermediate state was studied, revealing that the selection in the intermediate state can be achieved relying on the effect of Watson–Crick interaction between NTP and template DNA nucleotide, effect of stability of the components near the active site such as the nascent DNA–RNA hybrid and role of tyrosine 639. This indicates that another NTP-selection pathway can also exist besides the main pathway where NTP selection begins at the post-translocation state upon the entry of NTP. (paper)

  2. Photocatalytic mineralization of codeine by UV-A/TiO{sub 2}—Kinetics, intermediates, and pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Chin-Sheng [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Cheng-Fang, E-mail: cflin@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hong, Pui-Kwan Andy [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Codeine was completely removed in 30 min under irradiated UV-A/TiO{sub 2}. • Codeine was mineralized in 90 min with near complete N conversion to NH{sub 4}{sup +} and NO{sub 3}{sup −}. • Morphine was authenticated and four others were identified as intermediates. • Degradation proceeded via ipso-substitution and hydroxylation of the aromatic ring. - Abstract: This study investigated the photocatalytic degradation of codeine by UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2}. The degradation kinetics was determined under varied conditions including the TiO{sub 2} loading, codeine concentration, and pH. Codeine and several reaction intermediates including morphine were identified and tracked during degradation using HPLC/MS–MS technique, along with TOC and IC measurements. Specifically, removal of 100 μg/L of spike codeine was complete in 3 min by contact with a 0.1 g/L suspension of TiO{sub 2} under UV irradiation at pH 7. The degradation kinetics of codeine was first-order with respect to both the catalyst TiO{sub 2} and the reactant codeine, with enhanced reaction rates with increasing pH up to pH 9. Mineralization of codeine was possible upon prolonged contact; near complete mineralization of 10 mg/L of codeine was achieved in 90 min with 0.1 g/L TiO{sub 2} under irradiation at pH 5, during which the organic nitrogen was converted to NH{sub 3}-N (74%) and NO{sub 3}-N (22%). Based on the identified intermediates, two degradation pathways were proposed of which one involved ipso-substitution followed by cleavage of the aromatic ring and another involved repeated hydroxylation of the codeine molecule followed by its fragmentation.

  3. Isovector couplings for nucleon charge-exchange reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, W.G.; Nakayama, K.; Franey, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The isovector parts of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction are studied by examination of the reaction /sup 14/C(p,n) at intermediate energies near zero momentum transfer with use of recently developed G-matrix and free--t-matrix interactions. The spin-independent coupling (V/sub tau/) exhibits a strong energy and density dependence which, in the case of the G matrix based on the Bonn potential, significantly improves the agreement between calculated values of chemical bondV/sub σ//sub tau//V/sub tau/chemical bond 2 at q = 0 and those recently extracted from the reaction /sup 14/C

  4. Degradation of ibuprofen by hydrodynamic cavitation: Reaction pathways and effect of operational parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musmarra, Dino; Prisciandaro, Marina; Capocelli, Mauro; Karatza, Despina; Iovino, Pasquale; Canzano, Silvana; Lancia, Amedeo

    2016-03-01

    Ibuprofen (IBP) is an anti-inflammatory drug whose residues can be found worldwide in natural water bodies resulting in harmful effects to aquatic species even at low concentrations. This paper deals with the degradation of IBP in water by hydrodynamic cavitation in a convergent-divergent nozzle. Over 60% of ibuprofen was degraded in 60 min with an electrical energy per order (EEO) of 10.77 kWh m(-3) at an initial concentration of 200 μg L(-1) and a relative inlet pressure pin=0.35 MPa. Five intermediates generated from different hydroxylation reactions were identified; the potential mechanisms of degradation were sketched and discussed. The reaction pathways recognized are in line with the relevant literature, both experimental and theoretical. By varying the pressure upstream the constriction, different degradation rates were observed. This effect was discussed according to a numerical simulation of the hydroxyl radical production identifying a clear correspondence between the maximum kinetic constant kOH and the maximum calculated OH production. Furthermore, in the investigated experimental conditions, the pH parameter was found not to affect the extent of degradation; this peculiar feature agrees with a recently published kinetic insight and has been explained in the light of the intermediates of the different reaction pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, S., E-mail: rajagopalan78@hotmail.com [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Materials Science Group (India); Asthalter, T., E-mail: t.asthalter@web.de [Universität Stuttgart, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Germany); Rabe, V.; Laschat, S. [Universität Stuttgart, Institute of Organic Chemistry (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) in pyridine solution, Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe{sub 3}(μ{sub 3}-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe{sup (III)}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub 2}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup +} and Fe{sup (II)}(C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N){sub 4}(O{sub 2}CCH{sub 3}){sub 2}, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  6. Structural Analysis of Substrate, Reaction Intermediate, and Product Binding in Haemophilus influenzae Biotin Carboxylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Tyler C.; Pakhomova, Svetlana; Neau, David B.; Bonnot, Ross; Waldrop, Grover L.

    2015-01-01

    Acetyl-CoA carboxylase catalyzes the first and regulated step in fatty acid synthesis. In most Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, the enzyme is composed of three proteins: biotin carboxylase, a biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP), and carboxyltransferase. The reaction mechanism involves two half-reactions with biotin carboxylase catalyzing the ATP-dependent carboxylation of biotin-BCCP in the first reaction. In the second reaction, carboxyltransferase catalyzes the transfer of the carboxyl group from biotin-BCCP to acetyl-CoA to form malonyl-CoA. In this report, high-resolution crystal structures of biotin carboxylase from Haemophilus influenzae were determined with bicarbonate, the ATP analogue AMPPCP; the carboxyphosphate intermediate analogues, phosphonoacetamide and phosphonoformate; the products ADP and phosphate; and the carboxybiotin analogue N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester. The structures have a common theme in that bicarbonate, phosphate, and the methyl ester of the carboxyl group of N1′-methoxycarbonyl biotin methyl ester all bound in the same pocket in the active site of biotin carboxylase and as such utilize the same set of amino acids for binding. This finding suggests a catalytic mechanism for biotin carboxylase in which the binding pocket that binds tetrahedral phosphate also accommodates and stabilizes a tetrahedral dianionic transition state resulting from direct transfer of CO2 from the carboxyphosphate intermediate to biotin. PMID:26020841

  7. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-01-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  8. Inclusive quasielastic neutrino reactions in 12C and 16O at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.K.; Oset, E.

    1993-01-01

    Inclusive quasielastic neutrino (antineutrino) reactions on 12 C and 16 O at intermediate energies (50< E<400 MeV) are studied to investigate the effects of the nuclear medium on the total cross section and the energy spectrum of the outgoing leptons. The calculations are done in the local density approximation and various nuclear effects like Pauli blocking, Fermi motion, and strong-interaction renormalizations due to the presence of nucleons are taken into account. The corrections due to Coulomb effects are included which have been hitherto neglected in inclusive reactions. The results presented here are applicable to the inclusive reactions with neutrino beams planned to look for neutrino oscillations in the Los Alamos experiments or the experiments with underground detectors looking for atmospheric or solar flare neutrinos

  9. Progress in applyiong the FKK multistep reaction theory to intermediate-energy data evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1994-01-01

    Recent developments to the physics modeling in the FKK-GNASH code system are reviewed. We describe modifications to include a linking of multistep direct and multistep compound processes, which are important when the incident energy is less than about 30 MeV. A model for multiple preequilibrium emission is given, and compared with experimental measurements of proton reactions on 90 Zr at 160 MeV. We also give some preliminary observations concerning FKK calculations which use both normal and non-normal DWBA matrix elements. We describe the application of the FKK-GNASH code to a range of nuclear data applications, including intermediate energy reactions of importance in the accelerator transmutation of waste, and fast neutron and proton cancer radiation treatment. We outline areas where further work is needed for the accurate modeling of nuclear reactions using the FKK theory

  10. Reaction pathways of the dissociation of methylal: A DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, H -M; Beaud, P; Gerber, T; Mischler, B; Radi, P P; Tzannis, A -P [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Schemata for modelling combustion processes do not yet include reaction rates for oxygenated fuels like methylal (DMM) which is considered as an additive or replacement for diesel due to its low sooting propensity. Density functional theory (DFT) studies of the possible reaction pathways for different dissociation steps of methylal are presented. Cleavage of a hydrogen bond to the methoxy group or the central carbon atom were simulated at the BLYP/6-311++G{sup **} level of theory. The results are compared to the experiment when dissociating and/or ionising DMM with femtosecond pulses. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 ref.

  11. Formation of Reactive Intermediates, Color, and Antioxidant Activity in the Maillard Reaction of Maltose in Comparison to d-Glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanzler, Clemens; Schestkowa, Helena; Haase, Paul T; Kroh, Lothar W

    2017-10-11

    In this study, the Maillard reaction of maltose and d-glucose in the presence of l-alanine was investigated in aqueous solution at 130 °C and pH 5. The reactivity of both carbohydrates was compared in regards of their degradation, browning, and antioxidant activity. In order to identify relevant differences in the reaction pathways, the concentrations of selected intermediates such as 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds, furans, furanones, and pyranones were determined. It was found, that the degradation of maltose predominantly yields 1,2-dicarbonyls that still carry a glucosyl moiety and thus subsequent reactions to HMF, furfural, and 2-acetylfuran are favored due to the elimination of d-glucose, which is an excellent leaving group in aqueous solution. Consequently, higher amounts of these heterocycles are formed from maltose. 3-deoxyglucosone and 3-deoxygalactosone represent the only relevant C 6 -1,2-dicarbonyls in maltose incubations and are produced in nearly equimolar amounts during the first 60 min of heating as byproducts of the HMF formation.

  12. Photocatalytic degradation of metoprolol tartrate in suspensions of two TiO2-based photocatalysts with different surface area. Identification of intermediates and proposal of degradation pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramović, Biljana; Kler, Sanja; Šojić, Daniela; Laušević, Mila; Radović, Tanja; Vione, Davide

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Kinetics and efficiency of photocatalytic degradation of the β 1 -blocker metoprolol tartrate (MET). ► Two TiO 2 specimens employed. ► Faster degradation of MET, but slower mineralization, obtained with the TiO 2 specimen having lower surface area. ► Photocatalytic transformation pathways of MET including mineralization. - Abstract: This study investigates the efficiency of the photocatalytic degradation of metoprolol tartrate (MET), a widely used β 1 -blocker, in TiO 2 suspensions of Wackherr's “Oxyde de titane standard” and Degussa P25. The study encompasses transformation kinetics and efficiency, identification of intermediates and reaction pathways. In the investigated range of initial concentrations (0.01–0.1 mM), the photocatalytic degradation of MET in the first stage of the reaction followed approximately a pseudo-first order kinetics. The TiO 2 Wackherr induced a significantly faster MET degradation compared to TiO 2 Degussa P25 when relatively high substrate concentrations were used. By examining the effect of ethanol as a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals (·OH), it was shown that the reaction with ·OH played the main role in the photocatalytic degradation of MET. After 240 min of irradiation the reaction intermediates were almost completely mineralized to CO 2 and H 2 O, while the nitrogen was predominantly present as NH 4 + . Reaction intermediates were studied in detail and a number of them were identified using LC–MS/MS (ESI+), which allowed the proposal of a tentative pathway for the photocatalytic transformation of MET as a function of the TiO 2 specimen.

  13. Photocatalytic degradation of metoprolol tartrate in suspensions of two TiO{sub 2}-based photocatalysts with different surface area. Identification of intermediates and proposal of degradation pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramovic, Biljana, E-mail: biljana.abramovic@dh.uns.ac.rs [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Kler, Sanja, E-mail: sanja.kler@dh.uns.ac.rs [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Sojic, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.sojic@dh.uns.ac.rs [Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Environmental Protection, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg D. Obradovica 3, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Lausevic, Mila, E-mail: milal@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Radovic, Tanja, E-mail: tradovic@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia); Vione, Davide, E-mail: davide.vione@unito.it [Dipartimento di Chimica Analitica, Universita di Torino, Via Pietro Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2011-12-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinetics and efficiency of photocatalytic degradation of the {beta}{sub 1}-blocker metoprolol tartrate (MET). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two TiO{sub 2} specimens employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Faster degradation of MET, but slower mineralization, obtained with the TiO{sub 2} specimen having lower surface area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic transformation pathways of MET including mineralization. - Abstract: This study investigates the efficiency of the photocatalytic degradation of metoprolol tartrate (MET), a widely used {beta}{sub 1}-blocker, in TiO{sub 2} suspensions of Wackherr's 'Oxyde de titane standard' and Degussa P25. The study encompasses transformation kinetics and efficiency, identification of intermediates and reaction pathways. In the investigated range of initial concentrations (0.01-0.1 mM), the photocatalytic degradation of MET in the first stage of the reaction followed approximately a pseudo-first order kinetics. The TiO{sub 2} Wackherr induced a significantly faster MET degradation compared to TiO{sub 2} Degussa P25 when relatively high substrate concentrations were used. By examining the effect of ethanol as a scavenger of hydroxyl radicals ({center_dot}OH), it was shown that the reaction with {center_dot}OH played the main role in the photocatalytic degradation of MET. After 240 min of irradiation the reaction intermediates were almost completely mineralized to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, while the nitrogen was predominantly present as NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Reaction intermediates were studied in detail and a number of them were identified using LC-MS/MS (ESI+), which allowed the proposal of a tentative pathway for the photocatalytic transformation of MET as a function of the TiO{sub 2} specimen.

  14. Broadband Microwave Study of Reaction Intermediates and Products Through the Pyrolysis of Oxygenated Biofuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, Chamara; Hernandez-Castillo, Alicia O.; Fritz, Sean; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2017-06-01

    The rapidly growing list of potential plant-derived biofuels creates a challenge for the scientific community to provide a molecular-scale understanding of their combustion. Development of accurate combustion models rests on a foundation of experimental data on the kinetics and product branching ratios of their individual reaction steps. Therefore, new spectroscopic tools are necessary to selectively detect and characterize fuel components and reactive intermediates generated by pyrolysis and combustion. Substituted furans, including furanic ethers, are considered second-generation biofuel candidates. Following the work of the Ellison group, an 8-18 GHz microwave study was carried out on the unimolecular and bimolecular decomposition of the smallest furanic ether, 2-methoxy furan, and it`s pyrolysis intermediate, the 2-furanyloxy radical, formed in a high-temperature pyrolysis source coupled to a supersonic expansion. Details of the experimental setup and analysis of the spectrum of the radical will be discussed.

  15. Comparative techno-economic analysis and process design for indirect liquefaction pathways to distillate-range fuels via biomass-derived oxygenated intermediates upgrading: Liquid Transportation Fuel Production via Biomass-derived Oxygenated Intermediates Upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Eric C. D. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Talmadge, Michael [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Jones, Susanne [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Gray, Michel [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Dagle, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Padmaperuma, Asanga [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Gerber, Mark [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Sahir, Asad H. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Tao, Ling [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Zhang, Yanan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA

    2016-09-27

    This paper presents a comparative techno-economic analysis (TEA) of five conversion pathways from biomass to gasoline-, jet-, and diesel-range hydrocarbons via indirect liquefaction with specific focus on pathways utilizing oxygenated intermediates. The four emerging pathways of interest are compared with one conventional pathway (Fischer-Tropsch) for the production of the hydrocarbon blendstocks. The processing steps of the four emerging pathways include: biomass to syngas via indirect gasification, gas cleanup, conversion of syngas to alcohols/oxygenates followed by conversion of alcohols/oxygenates to hydrocarbon blendstocks via dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation. Conversion of biomass-derived syngas to oxygenated intermediates occurs via three different pathways, producing: 1) mixed alcohols over a MoS2 catalyst, 2) mixed oxygenates (a mixture of C2+ oxygenated compounds, predominantly ethanol, acetic acid, acetaldehyde, ethyl acetate) using an Rh-based catalyst, and 3) ethanol from syngas fermentation. This is followed by the conversion of oxygenates/alcohols to fuel-range olefins in two approaches: 1) mixed alcohols/ethanol to 1-butanol rich mixture via Guerbet reaction, followed by alcohol dehydration, oligomerization, and hydrogenation, and 2) mixed oxygenates/ethanol to isobutene rich mixture and followed by oligomerization and hydrogenation. The design features a processing capacity of 2,000 tonnes/day (2,205 short tons) of dry biomass. The minimum fuel selling prices (MFSPs) for the four developing pathways range from $3.40 to $5.04 per gasoline-gallon equivalent (GGE), in 2011 US dollars. Sensitivity studies show that MFSPs can be improved with co-product credits and are comparable to the commercial Fischer-Tropsch benchmark ($3.58/GGE). Overall, this comparative TEA study documents potential economics for the developmental biofuel pathways via mixed oxygenates.

  16. Reaction pathways for catalytic gas-phase oxidation of glycerol over mixed metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suprun, W.; Glaeser, R.; Papp, H. [Leipzig Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology

    2011-07-01

    Glycerol as a main by-product from bio-diesel manufacture is a cheap raw material with large potential for chemical or biochemical transformations to value-added C3-chemicals. One possible way of glycerol utilization involves its catalytic oxidation to acrylic acid as an alternative to petrochemical routes. However, this catalytic conversion exhibits various problems such as harsh reaction conditions, severe catalyst coking and large amounts of undesired by-products. In this study, the reaction pathways for gas-phase conversion of glycerol over transition metal oxides (Mo, V und W) supported on TiO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2} were investigated by two methods: (i) steady state experiments of glycerol oxidation and possible reactions intermediates, i.e., acrolein, 3-hydroxy propionaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and (ii) temperature-programmed surface reaction (TPSR) studies of glycerol conversion in the presence and in the absence of gas-phase oxygen. It is shown that the supported W-, V and Mo-oxides possess an ability to catalyze the oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid. These investigations allowed us to gain a deeper insight into the reaction mechanism. Thus, based on the obtained results, three possible reactions pathways for the selective oxidation of glycerol to acrylic acid on the transition metal-containing catalysts are proposed. The major pathways in presence of molecular oxygen are a fast successive destructive oxidation of glycerol to CO{sub x} and the dehydration of glycerol to acrolein which is a rate-limiting step. (orig.)

  17. 27Al MAS NMR spectroscopic identification of reaction intermediates in the carbothermal reduction and nitridation of alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Woo-Sik; Chae, Seen-Ae

    2010-01-01

    The reaction intermediates in the carbothermal reduction and nitridation (CRN) reaction of γ-Al 2 O 3 were identified by 27 Al magic-angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. This identification ruled out the possibility of a reaction mechanism involving the gaseous reaction intermediates. In the CRN reaction of γ-Al 2 O 3 , AlO 4 units were converted to AlN stepwise via AlN x O 4-x (x = 1, 2, 3) intermediates, while AlO 6 units were more slowly converted to AlN than AlO 4 units and the NMR peaks of partially nitridated AlO 6 units were not detected. The NMR peak intensities of partially nitridated AlO 4 units became weaker with increasing reaction temperature.

  18. Calculation for fission decay from heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaich, T.; Begemann-Blaich, M.; Fowler, M.M.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Britt, H.C.; Fields, D.J.; Hansen, L.F.; Namboodiri, M.N.; Sangster, T.C.; Fraenkel, Z.

    1992-01-01

    A detailed deexcitation calculation is presented for target residues resulting from intermediate-energy heavy ion reactions. The model involves an intranuclear cascade, subsequent fast nucleon emission, and final decay by statistical evaporation including fission. Results are compared to data from bombardments with Fe and Nb projectiles on targets of Ta, Au, and Th at 100 MeV/nucleon. The majority of observable features are reproduced with this simple approach, making obvious the need for involving new physical phenomena associated with multifragmentation or other collective dissipation mechanisms

  19. Reaction-transport simulations of non-oxidative methane conversion with continuous hydrogen removal: Homogeneous-heterogeneous methane reaction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lin; Borry, Richard W.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2000-01-01

    Detailed kinetic-transport models were used to explore thermodynamic and kinetic barriers in the non-oxidative conversion of CH4 via homogeneous and homogeneous-heterogeneous pathways and the effects of continuous hydrogen removal and of catalytic sites on attainable yields of useful C2-C10 products. The homogeneous kinetic model combines separately developed models for low-conversion pyrolysis and for chain growth to form large aromatics and carbon. The H2 formed in the reaction decreases CH4 pyrolysis rates and equilibrium conversions and it favors the formation of lighter products. The removal of H2 along tubular reactors with permeable walls increases reaction rates and equilibrium CH4 conversions. C2-C10 yields reach values greater than 90 percent at intermediate values of dimensionless transport rates (delta=1-10), defined as the ratio hydrogen transport and methane conversion rates. Homogeneous reactions require impractical residence times, even with H2 removal, because of slow initiation and chain transfer rates. The introduction of heterogeneous chain initiation pathways using surface sites that form methyl radicals eliminates the induction period without influencing the homogeneous product distribution. Methane conversion, however, occurs predominately in the chain transfer regime, within which individual transfer steps and the formation of C2 intermediates become limited by thermodynamic constraints. Catalytic sites alone cannot overcome these constraints. Catalytic membrane reactors with continuous H2 removal remove these thermodynamic obstacles and decrease the required residence time. Reaction rates become limited by homogeneous reactions of C2 products to form C6+ aromatics. Higher delta values lead to subsequent conversion of the desired C2-C10 products to larger polynuclear aromatics. We conclude that catalytic methane pyrolysis at the low temperatures required for restricted chain growth and the elimination of thermodynamics constraints via

  20. Reaction of iminopropadienones with amines--formation of zwitterionic intermediates, ketenes, and ketenimines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veedu, Rakesh Naduvile; Kokas, Okanya J; Couturier-Tamburelli, Isabelle; Koch, Rainer; Aycard, Jean-Pierre; Borget, Fabien; Wentrup, Curt

    2008-10-09

    Five aryliminopropadienones 4a- d have been synthesized by flash vacuum thermolysis (FVT) by using two different precursors in each case. These compounds were deposited at 50 K at a pressure of ca. 10(-6) mbar together with three different nucleophiles, namely, trimethylamine (TMA), dimethylamine (DMA), and diethylamine (DEA), in order to study their reactions as neat solids during warm-up by FTIR spectroscopy. The reaction with TMA showed that a zwitterionic species (5 and/or 6) was formed in all the cases. With DMA and DEA, an alpha-oxoketenimine and/or an imidoylketene (7 and 8 or 9 and 10) was formed as the final product. In addition, several bands were observed, which can be assigned to zwitterionic intermediates (11 or 12). Optimized structures and vibrational spectra for all products were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level of theory by using the polarizable continuum model (epsilon = 5).

  1. Specialized reactions: reactions at intermediate energies: Baryon--nucleus collisions, 150 MeV--1 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igo, G.

    1974-01-01

    The high energy collision approximation proposed by Glauber to describe experimental data at the upper end of the intermediate range is reviewed. Some aspects of the model which limit its validity are outlined. Elastic scattering of protons from light nuclei is discussed in the framework of the Glauber model. For data in the energy region near 200 MeV, the plane wave impulse approximation (PWIA) and the distorted wave impulse approximation (DWIA) are applied. Quasielastic scattering is treated by considering (p,p') and (p,2p) reactions with light nuclei. A short discussion of the high resolution spectrometer facility at LAMPF and the SPES 1 facility at Saturne is given. (46 figures, 3 tables, 102 references) (U.S.)

  2. Multifragmentation in intermediate energy 129Xe-induced heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso, Kin.

    1996-05-01

    The 129 Xe-induced reactions on nat Cu, 89 Y, 165 Ho, and 197 Au at bombarding energies of E/A = 40 ampersand 60 MeV have been studied theoretically and experimentally in order to establish the underlying mechanism of multifragmentation at intermediate energy heavy-Ion collisions. Nuclear disks formed in central heavy-ion collisions, as simulated by means of Boltzmann-like kinetic equations, break up into several fragments due to a new kind of Rayleigh-like surface instability. A sheet of liquid, stable in the limit of non-interacting surfaces, is shown to become unstable due to surface-surface interactions. The onset of this instability is determined analytically. A thin bubble behaves like a sheet and is susceptible to the surface instability through the crispation mode. The Coulomb effects associated with the depletion of charges in the central cavity of nuclear bubbles are investigated. The onset of Coulomb instability is demonstrated for perturbations of the radial mode. Experimental intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for the 129 Xe-induced reactions are shown to be binomial at each transverse energy. From these distributions, independent of the specific target, an elementary binary decay probability p can be extracted that has a thermal dependence. Thus it is inferred that multifragmentation is reducible to a combination of nearly independent emission processes. If sequential decay is assumed, the increase of p with transverse energy implies a contraction of the emission time scale. The sensitivity of p to the lower Z threshold in the definition of intermediate-mass-fragments points to a physical Poisson simulations of the particle multiplicities show that the weak auto-correlation between the fragment multiplicity and the transverse energy does not distort a Poisson distribution into a binomial distribution. The effect of device efficiency on the experimental results has also been studied

  3. Multifragmentation in intermediate energy 129Xe-induced heavy-ion reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tso, Kin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The 129Xe-induced reactions on natCu, 89Y, 165Ho, and 197Au at bombarding energies of E/A = 40 & 60 MeV have been studied theoretically and experimentally in order to establish the underlying mechanism of multifragmentation at intermediate energy heavy-Ion collisions. Nuclear disks formed in central heavy-ion collisions, as simulated by means of Boltzmann-like kinetic equations, break up into several fragments due to a new kind of Rayleigh-like surface instability. A sheet of liquid, stable in the limit of non-interacting surfaces, is shown to become unstable due to surface-surface interactions. The onset of this instability is determined analytically. A thin bubble behaves like a sheet and is susceptible to the surface instability through the crispation mode. The Coulomb effects associated with the depletion of charges in the central cavity of nuclear bubbles are investigated. The onset of Coulomb instability is demonstrated for perturbations of the radial mode. Experimental intermediate-mass-fragment multiplicity distributions for the 129Xe-induced reactions are shown to be binomial at each transverse energy. From these distributions, independent of the specific target, an elementary binary decay probability p can be extracted that has a thermal dependence. Thus it is inferred that multifragmentation is reducible to a combination of nearly independent emission processes. If sequential decay is assumed, the increase of p with transverse energy implies a contraction of the emission time scale. The sensitivity of p to the lower Z threshold in the definition of intermediate-mass-fragments points to a physical Poisson simulations of the particle multiplicities show that the weak auto-correlation between the fragment multiplicity and the transverse energy does not distort a Poisson distribution into a binomial distribution. The effect of device efficiency on the experimental results has also been studied.

  4. Delineating neurotrophin-3 dependent signaling pathways underlying sympathetic axon growth along intermediate targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Austin B; Suo, Dong; Park, Juyeon; Deppmann, Christopher D

    2017-07-01

    Postganglionic sympathetic neurons detect vascular derived neurotrophin 3 (NT3) via the axonally expressed receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkA, to promote chemo-attraction along intermediate targets. Once axons arrive to their final target, a structurally related neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor (NGF), also acts through TrkA to promote final target innervation. Does TrkA signal differently at these different locales? We previously found that Coronin-1 is upregulated in sympathetic neurons upon exposure to NGF, thereby endowing the NGF-TrkA complex with new signaling capabilities (i.e. calcium signaling), which dampens axon growth and branching. Based on the notion that axons do not express functional levels of Coronin-1 prior to final target innervation, we developed an in vitro model for axon growth and branching along intermediate targets using Coro1a -/- neurons grown in NT3. We found that, similar to NGF-TrkA, NT3-TrkA is capable of inducing MAPK and PI3K in the presence or absence of Coronin-1. However, unlike NGF, NT3 does not induce calcium release from intracellular stores. Using a combination of pharmacology, knockout neurons and in vitro functional assays, we suggest that the NT3-TrkA complex uses Ras/MAPK and/or PI3K-AKT signaling to induce axon growth and inhibit axon branching along intermediate targets. However, in the presence of Coronin-1, these signaling pathways lose their ability to impact NT3 dependent axon growth or branching. This is consistent with a role for Coronin-1 as a molecular switch for axon behavior and suggests that Coronin-1 suppresses NT3 dependent axon behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Combustion modeling and kinetic rate calculations for a stoichiometric cyclohexane flame. 1. Major reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongzhi R; Huynh, Lam K; Kungwan, Nawee; Yang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shaowen

    2007-05-17

    The Utah Surrogate Mechanism was extended in order to model a stoichiometric premixed cyclohexane flame (P = 30 Torr). Generic rates were assigned to reaction classes of hydrogen abstraction, beta scission, and isomerization, and the resulting mechanism was found to be adequate in describing the combustion chemistry of cyclohexane. Satisfactory results were obtained in comparison with the experimental data of oxygen, major products and important intermediates, which include major soot precursors of C2-C5 unsaturated species. Measured concentrations of immediate products of fuel decomposition were also successfully reproduced. For example, the maximum concentrations of benzene and 1,3-butadiene, two major fuel decomposition products via competing pathways, were predicted within 10% of the measured values. Ring-opening reactions compete with those of cascading dehydrogenation for the decomposition of the conjugate cyclohexyl radical. The major ring-opening pathways produce 1-buten-4-yl radical, molecular ethylene, and 1,3-butadiene. The butadiene species is formed via beta scission after a 1-4 internal hydrogen migration of 1-hexen-6-yl radical. Cascading dehydrogenation also makes an important contribution to the fuel decomposition and provides the exclusive formation pathway of benzene. Benzene formation routes via combination of C2-C4 hydrocarbon fragments were found to be insignificant under current flame conditions, inferred by the later concentration peak of fulvene, in comparison with benzene, because the analogous species series for benzene formation via dehydrogenation was found to be precursors with regard to parent species of fulvene.

  6. Fenton degradation of Cartap hydrochloride: identification of the main intermediates and the degradation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kaixun; Ming, Cuixiang; Dai, Youzhi; Honore Ake, Kouassi Marius

    2015-01-01

    The advanced oxidation of Cartap hydrochloride (Cartap) promoted by the Fenton system in an aqueous medium was investigated. Based on total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand and high-performance liquid chromatography, the oxidation of Cartap is quite efficient by the Fenton system. Its long chain is easily destroyed, but the reaction does not proceed to complete mineralization. Ion chromatography detection indicated the formation of acetic acid, propionic acid, formic acid, nitrous acid and sulfuric acid in the reaction mixtures. Further evidence of nitrogen monoxide and sulfur dioxide formation was obtained by using a flue gas analyzer. Monitoring by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer demonstrated the formation of oxalic acid, ethanol, carbon dioxide, and L-alanine ethylamide. Based on these experimental results, plausible degradation pathways for Cartap mineralization in an aqueous medium by the Fenton system are proposed.

  7. Reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate by persulfate activated with zero-valent iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huanxuan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wan, Jinquan, E-mail: ppjqwan@scut.edu.cn [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ma, Yongwen [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China); State Key Lab Pulp and Paper Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wang, Yan [School of Environment and Energy, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); The Key Lab of Pollution Control and Ecosystem Restoration in Industry Clusters, Ministry of Education, China, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated reaction pathway and oxidation mechanisms of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) by persulfate (PS) activated with zero-valent iron (ZVI). The DBP degradation was studied at three pH values (acidic, neutral and basic) in the presence of different organic scavengers. Using a chemical probe method, both sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}·{sup −}) and hydroxyl radical (·OH) were found to be primary oxidants at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0, respectively while ·OH was the major specie to oxidize DBP at pH 11.0. A similar result was found in an experiment of Electron Spin Resonance spin-trapping where in addition to ·OH, superoxide radical (O{sub 2}·{sup −}) was detected at pH 11.0. The transformation of degradation products including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), phthalic anhydride, and acetophenone exhibited diverse variation during the reaction processes. The phthalic anhydride concentration appeared to be maximum at all pHs. Another eleven intermediate products were also found at pH 3.0 by GC–MS and HPLC analysis, and their degradation mechanisms and pathways were proposed. It was suggested that dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation and hydrogen extraction were the dominant degradation mechanisms of DBP at pH 3.0. - Highlights: • Both SO{sub 4}{sup −}· and ·OH were found to be the major active species at pH 3.0 and pH 7.0. • ·OH and ·O2– were the primary oxidants pH 11.0. • The intermediate products were investigated as well as the degradation pathway. • Dealkylation, hydroxylation, decarboxylation, H-extraction were the major mechanisms.

  8. Intermediate and high energy nuclear reactions at the hadronic structural level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowinski, B [Institute of Physics, Warsaw, University of Technology, Poland, Institute of Atomic Energy, Swierk, (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Form tens of MeV to several hundred of GeV is stretched out quite a large interval of energy when the interaction between hadrons (for instance, pion/nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus reactions) can be described by the considerably simplified way with still acceptable accuracy. This happens because in this energy region hadrons (i.e. pions, nucleons etc.) remain quasiparticles of nuclear matter mostly without revealing any internal structure, their de Broglie`s wavelength is much shorter as compared to the average intranuclear nucleon`s distance, and the energy transfers in the reaction are, on the average, significantly greater than the binding energy of nucleons inside nuclei. Consequently an approach to the analysis of these phenomena based on simple geometric and probabilistic considerations is justifiable, especially for many practical purposes, in particular, for shielding and dosimetric estimations, material behaviour prediction, as well as for the approximate evaluation of electronuclear breeding effects in different composites of target materials, for nuclear passivation problems and so on. In this work basic physical reasons of such a simplified picture of intermediate and high energy nuclear reactions are presented. The most usual phenomenological models of hadronic multiple emission/production and recent results of the cascade evaporation type models, are also discussed. 2 figs.

  9. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M.

    1992-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of σ(700)-meson exchange in γγ→ππ processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the γΝ-Δ transition; pion photoproduction and the γΝ-Δ amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson's theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p(rvec γ, π o ) reaction; multipole analyses and photo-decay couplings at intermediate energies; compton scattering off the proton; connections between compton scattering and pion photoproduction in the delta region; single-pion electroproduction and the transverse one-half and scalar helicity transition form factors; relativistic effects, QCD mixing angles, and Ν → Νγ and Δ → γΝ transition form factors; electroproduction studies of the Ν → Δ transition at bates and CEBAF

  10. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M. [eds.

    1992-10-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of {sigma}(700)-meson exchange in {gamma}{gamma}{yields}{pi}{pi} processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the {gamma}{Nu}-{Delta} transition; pion photoproduction and the {gamma}{Nu}-{Delta} amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson`s theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p({rvec {gamma}}, {pi}{sup o}) reaction; multipole analyses and photo-decay couplings at intermediate energies; compton scattering off the proton; connections between compton scattering and pion photoproduction in the delta region; single-pion electroproduction and the transverse one-half and scalar helicity transition form factors; relativistic effects, QCD mixing angles, and {Nu} {yields} {Nu}{gamma} and {Delta} {yields} {gamma}{Nu} transition form factors; electroproduction studies of the {Nu} {yields} {Delta} transition at bates and CEBAF.

  11. Flavin-N5 Covalent Intermediate in a Nonredox Dehalogenation Reaction Catalyzed by an Atypical Flavoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yumin; Kizjakina, Karina; Campbell, Ashley C; Korasick, David A; Tanner, John J; Sobrado, Pablo

    2018-01-04

    The flavin-dependent enzyme 2-haloacrylate hydratase (2-HAH) catalyzes the conversion of 2-chloroacrylate, a major component in the manufacture of acrylic polymers, to pyruvate. The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized. 2-HAH was shown to be monomeric in solution and contained a non-covalent, yet tightly bound, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Although the catalyzed reaction was redox-neutral, 2-HAH was active only in the reduced state. A covalent flavin-substrate intermediate, consistent with the flavin-acrylate iminium ion, was trapped with cyanoborohydride and characterized by mass spectrometry. Small-angle X-ray scattering was consistent with 2-HAH belonging to the succinate dehydrogenase/fumarate reductase family of flavoproteins. These studies establish 2-HAH as a novel noncanonical flavoenzyme. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Confirmation of the reaction pathway for obtaining 1-(stearamidoethyl-2-hepta-decyl-2-i midazoline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ružić Nenad Lj.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available 2-lmidazolines are components of many products, used in industry and households. 1-(Stearamidoethyl-2-heptadecyl-2-imidazoline is a surface active compound, which after quaternization with dimethyl sulfate, is used in lubricants, detergents, shampoos, softeners and cosmetics products. Due to its importance, it was essential to establish the exact reaction pathway for obtaining this compound. Diethylene triamine and stearic acid were used as the starting components. Using titrimetric analysis, and IR and 1H NMR spectros-copic analysis, as well as UV-Vis spectrophotometry it was established that the main intermediate was the 1,3-diamide bis(stearamidoethylamine. Earlier investigations conducted by some authors, using exclusively titrimetric analysis, showed that the main intermediate was the 1,2-diamide. In this paper it was proved that the assumption of these authors that salicylaldehiyde would react only with the primary and not the secondary amine groups was wrong. 1,2-Diamide is the main product of the hydrolysis of 1-(stearamido-ethyl-2-heptadecyl-2-imidazoline. It was shown, in this paper that the reaction of diethylene triamine with stearic acid in xylene at the reflux temperature, yields the salt of 1-(stearamidoethyl-2-heptadecyl-2-imidazoline and stearic acid.

  13. Reaction Pathways in Catechol/Primary Amine Mixtures: A Window on Crosslinking Chemistry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Yang

    Full Text Available Catechol chemistry is used as a crosslinking tool abundantly in both natural organisms (e.g. mussels, sandcastle worms and synthetic systems to achieve the desired mechanical properties. Despite this abundance and success, the crosslinking chemistry is still poorly understood. In this study, to simplify the system, yet to capture the essential chemistry, model compounds 4-methyl catechol and propylamine are used. The reaction of 4-methyl catechol (2 mM with propylamine (6 mM is carried out in the presence of NaIO4 (2 mM in 10 mM Na2CO3 aqueous solution. A variety of spectroscopic/spectrometric and chromatographic methods such as 1H NMR, LC-MS, and UV-VIS are used to track the reaction and identify the products/intermediates. It is found that the crosslinking chemistry of a catechol and an amine is both fast and complicated. Within five minutes, more than 60 products are formed. These products encompass 19 different masses ranging from molecular weight of 179 to 704. By combining time-dependent data, it is inferred that the dominant reaction pathways: the majority is formed via aryloxyl-phenol coupling and Michael-type addition, whereas a small fraction of products is formed via Schiff base reactions.

  14. Electrophilic properties of patulin. Adduct structures and reaction pathways with 4-bromothiophenol and other model nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliege, R; Metzler, M

    2000-05-01

    The mycotoxin patulin (PAT) is believed to exert its cytotoxic and chromosome-damaging effects by forming covalent adducts with essential cellular thiols. Since the chemical structures of such adducts are unknown to date, we have studied the reaction of PAT and its O-acetylated derivative with the monofunctional thiol model compound 4-bromothiophenol (BTP), which was chosen due to analytical advantages. By means of analytical and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography, 16 adducts of PAT and 3 adducts of acetyl-PAT were isolated and their chemical structures elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR, IR, and UV spectroscopy. Time course studies and analysis of daughter product formation from isolated intermediate adducts led to a detailed scheme for the reaction of PAT with BTP. The structures of adducts of PAT formed with other model nucleophiles, e. g., the aliphatic thiol 2-mercaptoethanol and the aromatic amine 4-bromoaniline, were also elucidated and found to corroborate the reaction scheme. In addition, one further reaction pathway was observed with 2-mercaptoethanol, which appears to be independent from those found for BTP. Our study with model nucleophiles provides insights into the electrophilic reactivity of PAT and proved to be useful for the structure elucidation of PAT adducts with biological nucleophiles of toxicological relevance, as will be reported by Fliege and Metzler [(2000) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 13, 373-381].

  15. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijuan Qu

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters.

  16. Rapid Removal of Tetrabromobisphenol A by Ozonation in Water: Oxidation Products, Reaction Pathways and Toxicity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinghao; Huang, Qingguo; Lu, Junhe; Wang, Liansheng; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-01-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is one of the most widely used brominated flame retardants and has attracted more and more attention. In this work, the parent TBBPA with an initial concentration of 100 mg/L was completely removed after 6 min of ozonation at pH 8.0, and alkaline conditions favored a more rapid removal than acidic and neutral conditions. The presence of typical anions and humic acid did not significantly affect the degradation of TBBPA. The quenching test using isopropanol indicated that direct ozone oxidation played a dominant role during this process. Seventeen reaction intermediates and products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Notably, the generation of 2,4,6-tribromophenol was first observed in the degradation process of TBBPA. The evolution of reaction products showed that ozonation is an efficient treatment for removal of both TBBPA and intermediates. Sequential transformation of organic bromine to bromide and bromate was confirmed by ion chromatography analysis. Two primary reaction pathways that involve cleavage of central carbon atom and benzene ring cleavage concomitant with debromination were thus proposed and further justified by calculations of frontier electron densities. Furthermore, the total organic carbon data suggested a low mineralization rate, even after the complete removal of TBBPA. Meanwhile, the acute aqueous toxicity of reaction solutions to Photobacterium Phosphoreum and Daphnia magna was rapidly decreased during ozonation. In addition, no obvious difference in the attenuation of TBBPA was found by ozone oxidation using different water matrices, and the effectiveness in natural waters further demonstrates that ozonation can be adopted as a promising technique to treat TBBPA-contaminated waters. PMID:26430733

  17. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Characterization of Peroxidase-Like π-Cation Radical Pinch-Porphyrin-Iron(III Reaction Intermediate Models of Peroxidase Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Hernández Anzaldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectroscopic and kinetic characterization of two intermediates from the H2O2 oxidation of three dimethyl ester [(proto, (meso, (deuteroporphyrinato (picdien]Fe(III complexes ([FePPPic], [FeMPPic] and [FeDPPic], respectively pinch-porphyrin peroxidase enzyme models, with s = 5/2 and 3/2 Fe(III quantum mixed spin (qms ground states is described herein. The kinetic study by UV/Vis at λmax = 465 nm showed two different types of kinetics during the oxidation process in the guaiacol test for peroxidases (1–3 + guaiacol + H2O2 → oxidation guaiacol products. The first intermediate was observed during the first 24 s of the reaction. When the reaction conditions were changed to higher concentration of pinch-porphyrins and hydrogen peroxide only one type of kinetics was observed. Next, the reaction was performed only between pinch-porphyrins-Fe(III and H2O2, resulting in only two types of kinetics that were developed during the first 0–4 s. After this time a self-oxidation process was observed. Our hypotheses state that the formation of the π-cation radicals, reaction intermediates of the pinch-porphyrin-Fe(III family with the ligand picdien [N,N’-bis-pyridin-2-ylmethyl-propane-1,3-diamine], occurred with unique kinetics that are different from the overall process and was involved in the oxidation pathway. UV-Vis, 1H-NMR and ESR spectra confirmed the formation of such intermediates. The results in this paper highlight the link between different spectroscopic techniques that positively depict the kinetic traits of artificial compounds with enzyme-like activity.

  18. Macromolecular crowding compacts unfolded apoflavodoxin and causes severe aggregation of the off-pathway intermediate during apoflavodoxin folding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, R.; Westphal, A.H.; Huberts, D.; Nabuurs, S.M.; Lindhoud, S.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Mierlo, van C.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    To understand how proteins fold in vivo, it is important to investigate the effects of macromolecular crowding on protein folding. Here, the influence of crowding on in vitro apoflavodoxin folding, which involves a relatively stable off-pathway intermediate with molten globule characteristics, is

  19. Intermediates detected by visible spectroscopy during the reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin: the effect of nitrite concentration and diphosphoglycerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagababu, Enika; Ramasamy, Somasundaram; Rifkind, Joseph M

    2007-10-16

    The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin (deoxyHb) results in the reduction of nitrite to NO, which binds unreacted deoxyHb forming Fe(II)-nitrosylhemoglobin (Hb(II)NO). The tight binding of NO to deoxyHb is, however, inconsistent with reports implicating this reaction with hypoxic vasodilation. This dilemma is resolved by the demonstration that metastable intermediates are formed in the course of the reaction of nitrite with deoxyHb. The level of intermediates is quantitated by the excess deoxyHb consumed over the concentrations of the final products formed. The dominant intermediate has a spectrum that does not correspond to that of Hb(III)NO formed when NO reacts with methemoglobin (MetHb), but is similar to metHb resulting in the spectroscopic determinations of elevated levels of metHb. It is a delocalized species involving the heme iron, the NO, and perhaps the beta-93 thiol. The putative role for red cell reacted nitrite on vasodilation is associated with reactions involving the intermediate. (1) The intermediate is less stable with a 10-fold excess of nitrite and is not detected with a 100-fold excess of nitrite. This observation is attributed to the reaction of nitrite with the intermediate producing N2O3. (2) The release of NO quantitated by the formation of Hb(II)NO is regulated by changes in the distal heme pocket as shown by the 4.5-fold decrease in the rate constant in the presence of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. The regulated release of NO or N2O3 as well as the formation of the S-nitroso derivative of hemoglobin, which has also been reported to be formed from the intermediates generated during nitrite reduction, should be associated with any hypoxic vasodilation attributed to the RBC.

  20. Quantum Chemical Investigation of the Transition States and Intermediates for the Reaction of the Nitrosonium Ion with the Pentaammineazidocobalt(III) Ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzinger, François P

    2016-12-19

    The water exchange reaction on Co(NH 3 ) 5 OH 2 3+ was investigated with various density functionals and basis sets. A Gibbs activation energy (ΔG ⧧ ) agreeing with experiment was obtained with the long-range-corrected functionals ωB97X-D3 and LC-BOP-LRD, SMD hydration, and modified Karlsruhe def2-TZVP basis sets. This computational technique was then applied to the reaction of NO + with Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 3 2+ . All of the possible pathways were investigated, NO + attack at the terminal N of Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 3 2+ via the E and the Z isomers of the transition states, and NO + attack at the bound N of azide, also via both isomers. The most favorable pathway proceeds via the attack at the bound N via the Z isomer. This leads to the intermediate with an oxatetrazole ligand bound to Co(III) at the N in the 3-position, Co(NH 3 ) 5 (cycl-N 4 O) 3+ , which undergoes N 2 elimination to yield the Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 2 O 3+ intermediate. The subsequent substitution of N 2 O by water follows the I d mechanism with retention of the configuration. No evidence for the existence of the square-pyramidal pentacoordinated intermediate Co(NH 3 ) 5 3+ was found. All of the investigated intermediates, Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 2 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 [E-N(N 2 )(NO)] 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 (E-ON 4 ) 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 ON 2 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 (cycl-N 4 O) 3+ , and Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 2 O 3+ , exhibit short lifetimes of less than ∼60 μs and react via the I d mechanism.

  1. Phenomena and significance of intermediate spillover in electrocatalysis of oxygen and hydrogen electrode reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakšić Jelena M.

    2012-01-01

    conductivity and non-exchanged initial pure mono-bronze spillover and catalytic properties. The underpotential spillover double layer (DL charging and discharging properties of the primary oxide (M-OH, interrelated with the interactive self-catalytic effect of dipole-oriented water molecules, has also been proved and pointed out as the phenomenological appearance and aspect of the interactive spillover featuring intermediates. In fact, phenomenological aspects of spillover for the main reacting intermediate species in oxygen and hydrogen electrode reactions along with earned and withdrawn theoretical knowledge represent the basic concepts and aims of the present study.

  2. The extended sum-rule model view of light and intermediate mass fragment emission in nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brancus, I.M.; Rebel, H.; Wentz, J.; Corcalciuc, V.

    1989-11-01

    The original sum-rule model worked out by Wilczynski et al. and successfully used for a global description of complete and incomplete fusion reactions has been extended by a term accounting for dissipative processes of the dinuclear system on its way to fusion. When applying to light and heavy ion collisions with various targets at energies in the transitional region, the new term proves to be rather essential for reproducing the element distributions of the fragments emitted from rather asymmetric systems. (orig.) [de

  3. Laccase-catalyzed removal of the antimicrobials chlorophene and dichlorophen from water: Reaction kinetics, pathway and toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Huanhuan; Peng, Jianbiao; Li, Jianhua; Mao, Liang; Wang, Zunyao; Gao, Shixiang

    2016-11-05

    As active agents in cleaning and disinfecting products, antimicrobials have been widely spread in the environment and have drawn extensive attention as potential threats to the ecological system and human health. In this study, the laccase-catalyzed removal of two emerging antimicrobials, chlorophene (CP) and dichlorophen (DCP), was investigated under simulated environmental conditions. Intrinsic reaction kinetics showed that the removal of CP and DCP followed second-order reaction kinetics, first-order with respect to both the enzyme and the substrate concentration. It was also found that fulvic acid could suppress the transformation of CP and DCP by reversing the oxidation reactions through its action as a scavenger of the free radical intermediates produced from reactions between laccase and the substrates. Several reaction products were identified by a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and detailed reaction pathways were proposed. For both CP and DCP, direct polymerization was the principal pathway, and the coupling patterns were further corroborated based on molecular modeling. The nucleophilic substitution of chlorine by the hydroxyl group was observed, and further oxidation products capable of coupling with each other were also found. Additionally, toxicity evaluation tests using Scenedesmus obliquus confirmed that the toxicity of CP and DCP was effectively eliminated during the reaction processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Trapping and Characterization of a Reaction Intermediate in Carbapenem Hydrolysis by B. cereus Metallo-β-lactamase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tioni, Mariana F.; Llarrull, Leticia I.; Poeylaut-Palena, Andrés A.; Martí, Marcelo A.; Saggu, Miguel; Periyannan, Gopal R.; Mata, Ernesto G.; Bennett, Brian; Murgida, Daniel H.; Vila, Alejandro J.

    2009-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases hydrolyze most β-lactam antibiotics. The lack of a successful inhibitor for them is related to the previous failure to characterize a reaction intermediate with a clinically useful substrate. Stopped-flow experiments together with rapid freeze-quench EPR and Raman spectroscopies were used to characterize the reaction of Co(II)-BcII with imipenem. These studies show that Co(II)-BcII is able to hydrolyze imipenem both in the mono- and dinuclear forms. In contrast to the situation met for penicillin, the species that accumulates during turnover is an enzyme-intermediate adduct in which the β-lactam bond has already been cleaved. This intermediate is a metal-bound anionic species, with a novel resonant structure, that is stabilized by the metal ion at the DCH or Zn2 site. This species has been characterized based on its spectroscopic features. This represents a novel, previously unforeseen intermediate, that is related to the chemical nature of carbapenems, as confirmed by the finding of a similar intermediate for meropenem. Since carbapenems are the only substrates cleaved by B1, B2 and B3 lactamases, the identification of this intermediate could be exploited as a first step towards the design of transition state based inhibitors for all three classes of metallo-β-lactamases. PMID:18980308

  5. Reaction of H2 with O2 in Excited Electronic States: Reaction Pathways and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelevkin, Alexey V; Loukhovitski, Boris I; Sharipov, Alexander S

    2017-12-21

    Comprehensive quantum chemical analysis with the use of the multireference state-averaged complete active space self-consistent field approach was carried out to study the reactions of H 2 with O 2 in a 1 Δ g , b 1 Σ g + , c 1 Σ u - , and A' 3 Δ u electronically excited states. The energetically favorable reaction pathways and possible intersystem crossings have been revealed. The energy barriers were refined employing the extended multiconfiguration quasi-degenerate second-order perturbation theory. It has been shown that the interaction of O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) and O 2 (A' 3 Δ u ) with H 2 occurs through the H-abstraction process with relatively low activation barriers that resulted in the formation of the HO 2 molecule in A″ and A' electronic states, respectively. Meanwhile, molecular oxygen in singlet sigma states (b 1 Σ g + and c 1 Σ u - ) was proved to be nonreactive with respect to the molecular hydrogen. Appropriate rate constants for revealed reaction and quenching channels have been estimated using variational transition-state theory including corrections for the tunneling effect, possible nonadiabatic transitions, and anharmonicity of vibrations for transition states and reactants. It was demonstrated that the calculated reaction rate constant for the H 2 + O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) process is in reasonable agreement with known experimental data. The Arrhenius approximations for these processes have been proposed for the temperature range T = 300-3000 K.

  6. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformation through different reaction pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of organic micropollutants occurs via different reaction pathways. Compound specific isotope analysis is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. We propose a mechanism-based modeling approach that provides a quantitative framework ...

  7. Developmentally programmed DNA deletion in Tetrahymena thermophila by a transposition-like reaction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveliev, S V; Cox, M M

    1996-01-01

    We provide a molecular description of key intermediates in the deletion of two internal eliminated sequences (IES elements), the M and R regions, during macronuclear development in Tetrahymena thermophila. Using a variety of PCR-based methods in vivo, double-strand breaks are detected that are generated by hydrolytic cleavage and correspond closely to the observed chromosomal junctions left behind in the macronuclei. The breaks exhibit a temporal and structural relationship to the deletion reaction that provides strong evidence that they are intermediates in the deletion pathway. Breaks in the individual strands are staggered by 4 bp, producing a four nucleotide 5' extension. Evidence is presented that breaks do not occur simultaneously at both ends. The results are most consistent with a deletion mechanism featuring initiation by double-strand cleavage at one end of the deleted element, followed by transesterification to generate the macronuclear junction on one DNA strand. An adenosine residue is found at all the nucleophilic 3' ends used in the postulated transesterification step. Evidence for the transesterification step is provided by detection of a 3' hydroxyl that would be liberated by such a step at a deletion boundary where no other DNA strand ends are detected. Images PMID:8654384

  8. Angular dependences of the tensor analyzing powers in the dd -> sup 3 Hen reaction at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Ladygin, V P

    2002-01-01

    The tensor analyzing powers A sub y sub y , A sub x sub x , and A sub x sub z in the dd -> sup 3 Hen reaction at intermediate energies are considered in the framework of the one-nucleon-exchange approximation. Their strong sensitivity to the sup 3 He and deuteron spin structure at short distances is shown

  9. Angular dependences of the tensor analyzing powers in the dd → 3Hen reaction at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladygin, V.P.; Ladygina, N.B.; )

    2002-01-01

    The tensor analyzing powers A yy , A xx , and A xz in the dd → 3 Hen reaction at intermediate energies are considered in the framework of the one-nucleon-exchange approximation. Their strong sensitivity to the 3 He and deuteron spin structure at short distances is shown [ru

  10. Imaging and Quantitation of a Succession of Transient Intermediates Reveal the Reversible Self-Assembly Pathway of a Simple Icosahedral Virus Capsid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, María; Fuertes, Miguel Ángel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Carrillo, Pablo J P; Rodríguez-Huete, Alicia; Mateu, Mauricio G

    2016-11-30

    Understanding the fundamental principles underlying supramolecular self-assembly may facilitate many developments, from novel antivirals to self-organized nanodevices. Icosahedral virus particles constitute paradigms to study self-assembly using a combination of theory and experiment. Unfortunately, assembly pathways of the structurally simplest virus capsids, those more accessible to detailed theoretical studies, have been difficult to study experimentally. We have enabled the in vitro self-assembly under close to physiological conditions of one of the simplest virus particles known, the minute virus of mice (MVM) capsid, and experimentally analyzed its pathways of assembly and disassembly. A combination of electron microscopy and high-resolution atomic force microscopy was used to structurally characterize and quantify a succession of transient assembly and disassembly intermediates. The results provided an experiment-based model for the reversible self-assembly pathway of a most simple (T = 1) icosahedral protein shell. During assembly, trimeric capsid building blocks are sequentially added to the growing capsid, with pentamers of building blocks and incomplete capsids missing one building block as conspicuous intermediates. This study provided experimental verification of many features of self-assembly of a simple T = 1 capsid predicted by molecular dynamics simulations. It also demonstrated atomic force microscopy imaging and automated analysis, in combination with electron microscopy, as a powerful single-particle approach to characterize at high resolution and quantify transient intermediates during supramolecular self-assembly/disassembly reactions. Finally, the efficient in vitro self-assembly achieved for the oncotropic, cell nucleus-targeted MVM capsid may facilitate its development as a drug-encapsidating nanoparticle for anticancer targeted drug delivery.

  11. Transient intermediates are populated in the folding pathways of single-domain two-state folding protein L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Hiranmay; Reddy, Govardhan

    2018-04-01

    Small single-domain globular proteins, which are believed to be dominantly two-state folders, played an important role in elucidating various aspects of the protein folding mechanism. However, recent single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments [H. Y. Aviram et al. J. Chem. Phys. 148, 123303 (2018)] on a single-domain two-state folding protein L showed evidence for the population of an intermediate state and it was suggested that in this state, a β-hairpin present near the C-terminal of the native protein state is unfolded. We performed molecular dynamics simulations using a coarse-grained self-organized-polymer model with side chains to study the folding pathways of protein L. In agreement with the experiments, an intermediate is populated in the simulation folding pathways where the C-terminal β-hairpin detaches from the rest of the protein structure. The lifetime of this intermediate structure increased with the decrease in temperature. In low temperature conditions, we also observed a second intermediate state, which is globular with a significant fraction of the native-like tertiary contacts satisfying the features of a dry molten globule.

  12. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of reactive intermediates in photochemical and transition metal-assisted oxidation, decarboxylation and alkyl transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraher, Jack McCaslin

    Reactive species like high-valent metal-oxo complexes and carbon and oxygen centered radicals are important intermediates in enzymatic systems, atmospheric chemistry, and industrial processes. Understanding the pathways by which these intermediates form, their relative reactivity, and their fate after reactions is of the utmost importance. Herein are described the mechanistic detail for the generation of several reactive intermediates, synthesis of precursors, characterization of precursors, and methods to direct the chemistry to more desirable outcomes yielding 'greener' sources of commodity chemicals and fuels. High-valent Chromium from Hydroperoxido-Chromium(III). The decomposition of pentaaquahydroperoxido chromium(III) ion (hereafter Cr aqOOH2+) in acidic aqueous solutions is kinetically complex and generates mixtures of products (Craq3+, HCrO 4-, H2O2, and O2). The yield of high-valent chromium products (known carcinogens) increased from a few percent at pH 1 to 70 % at pH 5.5 (near biological pH). Yields of H 2O2 increased with acid concentration. The reproducibility of the kinetic data was poor, but became simplified in the presence of H2O2 or 2,2‧-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) dianion (ABTS2-). Both are capable of scavenging strongly oxidizing intermediates). The observed rate constants (pH 1, [O2] ≤ 0.03 mM) in the presence of these scavengers are independent of [scavenger] and within the error are the same (k,ABTS2- = (4.9 +/- 0.2) x 10-4 s-1 and kH2O2 = (5.3 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 s-1); indicating involvement of the scavengers in post-rate determining steps. In the presence of either scavenger, decomposition of CrOOH2+ obeyed a two-term rate law, k obs / s-1 = (6.7 +/- 0.7) x 10-4 + (7.6 +/- 1.1) x 10-4 [H+]. Effect of [H+] on the kinetics and the product distribution, cleaner kinetics in the presence of scavengers, and independence of kobs on [scavenger] suggest a dual-pathway mechanism for the decay of Craq OOH2+. The H+-catalyzed path

  13. Nitric oxide formation from the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit hemoglobin at intermediate oxygen saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank Bo

    2008-01-01

    The nitrite reductase activity of deoxyhemoglobin has received much recent interest because the nitric oxide produced in this reaction may participate in blood flow regulation during hypoxia. The present study used spectral deconvolution to characterize the reaction of nitrite with carp and rabbit...... hemoglobin at different constant oxygen tensions that generate the full range of physiological relevant oxygen saturations. Carp is a hypoxia-tolerant species with very high hemoglobin oxygen affinity, and the high R-state character and low redox potential of the hemoglobin is hypothesized to promote...... NO generation from nitrite. The reaction of nitrite with deoxyhemoglobin leads to a 1 : 1 formation of nitrosylhemoglobin and methemoglobin in both species. At intermediate oxygen saturations, the reaction with deoxyhemoglobin is clearly favored over that with oxyhemoglobin, and the oxyhemoglobin reaction...

  14. Photodegradation of lambda-cyhalothrin and cypermethrin in aqueous solution as affected by humic acid and/or copper: intermediates and degradation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jimin; Wang, Pingli; Liu, Jun; Lv, Xiaomeng; Jiang, Deli; Sun, Cheng

    2011-11-01

    The influence of coexisting humic acids (HA) or Cu²⁺ on the photodegradation of pesticides lambda-cyhalothrin (λ-CHT) and cypermethrin (CPM) in aqueous solution was studied under xenon lamp irradiation. The removal efficiency of pesticides λ-CHT and CPM were enhanced in the presence of either Cu²⁺ or HA but restrained in the presence of both Cu²⁺ and HA. The photodegradation of λ-CHT and CPM followed first-order reaction kinetics. The photodegradation intermediates of λ-CHT and CPM were determined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Possible photodegradation pathways included decarboxylation, ester bond cleavage, dechlorination, and phenyl group removal. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  15. Insights into the carboxyltransferase reaction of pyruvate carboxylase from the structures of bound product and intermediate analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzan, Adam D.; St. Maurice, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) is a biotin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the MgATP- and bicarbonate-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in central metabolism. The carboxyltransferase (CT) domain of PC catalyzes the transfer of a carboxyl group from carboxybiotin to the accepting substrate, pyruvate. It has been hypothesized that the reactive enolpyruvate intermediate is stabilized through a bidentate interaction with the metal ion in the CT domain active site. Whereas bidentate ligands are commonly observed in enzymes catalyzing reactions proceeding through an enolpyruvate intermediate, no bidentate interaction has yet been observed in the CT domain of PC. Here, we report three X-ray crystal structures of the Rhizobium etli PC CT domain with the bound inhibitors oxalate, 3-hydroxypyruvate, and 3-bromopyruvate. Oxalate, a stereoelectronic mimic of the enolpyruvate intermediate, does not interact directly with the metal ion. Instead, oxalate is buried in a pocket formed by several positively charged amino acid residues and the metal ion. Furthermore, both 3-hydroxypyruvate and 3-bromopyruvate, analogs of the reaction product oxaloacetate, bind in an identical manner to oxalate suggesting that the substrate maintains its orientation in the active site throughout catalysis. Together, these structures indicate that the substrates, products and intermediates in the PC-catalyzed reaction are not oriented in the active site as previously assumed. The absence of a bidentate interaction with the active site metal appears to be a unique mechanistic feature among the small group of biotin-dependent enzymes that act on α-keto acid substrates. PMID:24157795

  16. Inhibition of the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway; detection of intermediates by UPLC-MS/MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henneman, Linda; van Cruchten, Arno G.; Kulik, Willem; Waterham, Hans R.

    2011-01-01

    The isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway provides the cell with a variety of compounds which are involved in multiple cellular processes. Inhibition of this pathway with statins and bisphosphonates is widely applied in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and metabolic bone disease, respectively. In

  17. A mechanistic study on the reaction pathways leading to benzene and naphthalene in cellulose vapor phase cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norinaga, Koyo; Yang, Huamei; Tanaka, Ryota; Appari, Srinivas; Iwanaga, Keita; Takashima, Yuka; Kudo, Shinji; Shoji, Tetsuya; Hayashi, Jun-ichiro

    2014-01-01

    The reaction pathways leading to aromatic hydrocarbons such as benzene and naphthalene in gas-phase reactions of multi-component mixtures derived from cellulose fast pyrolysis were studied both experimentally and numerically. A two-stage tubular reactor was used for evaluating the reaction kinetics of secondary vapor phase cracking of the nascent pyrolysates at temperature ranging from 400 to 900 °C, residence time from 0.2 to 4.3 s, and at 241 kPa. The products of alkyne and diene were identified from the primary pyrolysis of cellulose even at low temperature range 500–600 °C. These products include acetylene, propyne, propadiene, vinylacetylene, and cyclopentadiene. Experiments were also numerically validated by a detailed chemical kinetic model consisting of more than 8000 elementary step-like reactions with over 500 chemical species. Acceptable capabilities of the kinetic model in predicting concentration profiles of the products enabled us to assess reaction pathways leading to benzene and naphthalene via the alkyne and diene from primary pyrolysates of cellulose. C 3 alkyne and diene are primary precursors of benzene at 650 °C, while combination of ethylene and vinylacetylene produces benzene dominantly at 850 °C. Cyclopentadiene is a prominent precursor of naphthalene. Combination of acetylene with propyne or allyl radical leads to the formation of cyclopentadiene. Furan and acrolein are likely important alkyne precursors in cellulose pyrolysis at low temperature, whereas dehydrogenations of olefins are major route to alkyne at high temperatures. - Highlights: • Analytical pyrolysis experiments provided data for kinetic modeling. • Detailed chemical kinetic model was used and evaluated. • Alkyne and diene were important intermediates for aromatic hydrocarbon formation. • Reaction pathways leading to aromatic hydrocarbons were proposed

  18. Crystalline state photoreactions direct observation of reaction processes and metastable intermediates

    CERN Document Server

    Ohashi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Offering some 300 references, this book focuses on chemical reactions in the crystalline state. The reactions span many fields in inorganic and organic chemistry, making this a useful resource for inorganic, organic and physical chemists and graduate students.

  19. Identification and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for macrophages at intermediate stages in the tumoricidal activation pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paulnock, D.M.; Lambert, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Macrophage activation for tumor cell killing is a multistep pathway in which responsive macrophages interact sequentially with priming and triggering stimuli in the acquisition of full tumoricidal activity. A number of mediators have been identified which have activating capability, including in particular IFN-gamma and bacterial LPS. Although the synergistic functional response of normal macrophages to sequential incubation with these activation signals has been well-established, characterization of the intermediate stages in the activation pathway has been difficult. We have developed a model system for examination of various aspects of macrophage activation, through the use of the murine macrophage tumor cell line, RAW 264.7. These cells, like normal macrophages, exhibit a strict requirement for interaction with both IFN-gamma and LPS in the development of tumor cytolytic activity. In addition, these cells can be stably primed by the administration of gamma-radiation. In the studies reported here, we have used RAW 264.7 cells treated with IFN-gamma alone or with IFN-gamma plus LPS to stimulate the production of rat mAb probes recognizing cell surface changes occurring during the activation process. In this way we have identified three Ag associated with intermediate stages of the activation process. One Ag, TM-1, is expressed on RAW 264.7 cells primed by IFN-gamma or gamma-radiation. This surface Ag thus identifies cells at the primed cell intermediate stage of the tumoricidal activation pathway regardless of the mechanism of activation. A second Ag, TM-2, is expressed on IFN-treated RAW 264.7 cells but not on RAW 264.7 cells primed with gamma-radiation alone. Expression of this Ag can be induced by treatment of irradiated cells with IFN-gamma, but is not induced by IFN-gamma treatment of a noncytolytic cell line, WEHI-3

  20. On the characterization of intermediates in the isodesmic aggregation pathway of hen lysozyme at alkaline pH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar Ravi

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation leading to formation of amyloid fibrils is a symptom of several diseases like Alzheimer's, type 2 diabetes and so on. Elucidating the poorly understood mechanism of such phenomena entails the difficult task of characterizing the species involved at each of the multiple steps in the aggregation pathway. It was previously shown by us that spontaneous aggregation of hen-eggwhite lysozyme (HEWL at room temperature in pH 12.2 is a good model to study aggregation. Here in this paper we investigate the growth kinetics, structure, function and dynamics of multiple intermediate species populating the aggregation pathway of HEWL at pH 12.2. The different intermediates were isolated by varying the HEWL monomer concentration in the 300 nM-0.12 mM range. The intermediates were characterized using techniques like steady-state and nanosecond time-resolved fluorescence, atomic force microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Growth kinetics of non-fibrillar HEWL aggregates were fitted to the von Bertalanffy equation to yield a HEWL concentration independent rate constant (k = (6.6 ± 0.6 × 10(-5 s(-1. Our results reveal stepwise changes in size, molecular packing and enzymatic activity among growing HEWL aggregates consistent with an isodesmic aggregation model. Formation of disulphide bonds that crosslink the monomers in the aggregate appear as a unique feature of this aggregation. AFM images of multiple amyloid fibrils emanating radially from amorphous aggregates directly confirmed that on-pathway fibril formation was feasible under isodesmic polymerization. The isolated HEWL aggregates are revealed as polycationic protein nanoparticles that are robust at neutral pH with ability to take up non-polar molecules like ANS.

  1. Unexpected Reaction Pathway for butyrylcholinesterase-catalyzed inactivation of “hunger hormone” ghrelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jianzhuang; Yuan, Yaxia; Zheng, Fang; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2016-02-01

    Extensive computational modeling and simulations have been carried out, in the present study, to uncover the fundamental reaction pathway for butyrylcholinesterase (BChE)-catalyzed hydrolysis of ghrelin, demonstrating that the acylation process of BChE-catalyzed hydrolysis of ghrelin follows an unprecedented single-step reaction pathway and the single-step acylation process is rate-determining. The free energy barrier (18.8 kcal/mol) calculated for the rate-determining step is reasonably close to the experimentally-derived free energy barrier (~19.4 kcal/mol), suggesting that the obtained mechanistic insights are reasonable. The single-step reaction pathway for the acylation is remarkably different from the well-known two-step acylation reaction pathway for numerous ester hydrolysis reactions catalyzed by a serine esterase. This is the first time demonstrating that a single-step reaction pathway is possible for an ester hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by a serine esterase and, therefore, one no longer can simply assume that the acylation process must follow the well-known two-step reaction pathway.

  2. Homoaromatics as intermediates in the substitution reactions of 1,2,4,5-tetrazines with ammonia and hydrazine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Counotte-Potman, A.D.

    1981-01-01

    This thesis describes some nucleophilic substitution reactions between the red 1,2,4,5-tetrazines and hydrazine-hydrate or ammonia. Special attention was paid to the occurrence of the Ssub(N) (ANRORC) mechanism in these substitution reactions. This mechanism comprises a sequence of reactions, involving the Addition of a Nucleopile to a heteroaromatic species, followed by a Ring-Opening and Ring Closure reaction to the substitution product. 3-Alkyl(aryl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazines were found to undergo a Chichibabin hydrazination into 6-hydrazino-3-alkyl(aryl)-1,2,4,5-tetrazines on treatment with hydrazine-hydrate. The first step in this reaction sequence was the formation of a homoaromatic sigma-adduct. Subsequently an open-chain intermediate was observed by NMR, on raising the temperature. Finally the hydrazino compound is formed by ring closure. This reaction sequence can be considered as an Ssub(N)(ANRORC) process. With 15 N-labelled hydrazine, only part of the label was found to be built in the 1,2,4,5-tetrazine ring of the 6-hydrazino compounds. This is the first example of a reaction in which both the hydrazino compound with the 15 N-label in the ring and with the 15 N-label in the exocyclic hydrazino group are formed according to the Ssub(N)(ANRORC) mechanism. (Auth.)

  3. Modeling of catalytically active metal complex species and intermediates in reactions of organic halides electroreduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytvynenko, Anton S; Kolotilov, Sergey V; Kiskin, Mikhail A; Eremenko, Igor L; Novotortsev, Vladimir M

    2015-02-28

    The results of quantum chemical modeling of organic and metal-containing intermediates that occur in electrocatalytic dehalogenation reactions of organic chlorides are presented. Modeling of processes that take place in successive steps of the electrochemical reduction of representative C1 and C2 chlorides - CHCl3 and Freon R113 (1,1,2-trifluoro-1,2,2-trichloroethane) - was carried out by density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2). It was found that taking solvation into account using an implicit solvent model (conductor-like screening model, COSMO) or considering explicit solvent molecules gave similar results. In addition to modeling of simple non-catalytic dehalogenation, processes with a number of complexes and their reduced forms, some of which were catalytically active, were investigated by DFT. Complexes M(L1)2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, L1H = Schiff base from 2-pyridinecarbaldehyde and the hydrazide of 4-pyridinecarboxylic acid), Ni(L2) (H2L2 is the Schiff base from salicylaldehyde and 1,2-ethylenediamine, known as salen) and Co(L3)2Cl2, representing a fragment of a redox-active coordination polymer [Co(L3)Cl2]n (L3 is the dithioamide of 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid), were considered. Gradual changes in electronic structure in a series of compounds M(L1)2 were observed, and correlations between [M(L1)2](0) spin-up and spin-down LUMO energies and the relative energies of the corresponding high-spin and low-spin reduced forms, as well as the shape of the orbitals, were proposed. These results can be helpful for determination of the nature of redox-processes in similar systems by DFT. No specific covalent interactions between [M(L1)2](-) and the R113 molecule (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Zn) were found, which indicates that M(L1)2 electrocatalysts act rather like electron transfer mediators via outer-shell electron transfer. A relaxed surface scan of the adducts {M(L1)2·R113}(-) (M = Ni or Co) versus the distance between the

  4. Dealkylation of alkylbenzenes: a significant pathway in the toluene, o-, m-, p-xylene + OH reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Jun; Volkamer, Rainer; Molina, Mario J

    2009-09-03

    The OH-radical initiated oxidation of a series of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzene, toluene, o-, m-, and p-xylene) in the presence of oxygen and NO(x) was investigated in a flowtube coupled with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS). OH-radical addition to the aromatic ring--the major reaction pathway--has previously been shown to have a particular sensitivity to experimental conditions. This is the first flowtube study that demonstrates the atmospheric relevance of product yields from the OH-addition channel on the millisecond time scale (35-75 ms); the phenol yield from benzene and cresol yields from toluene are found to be 51.0 +/- 4.3% and 17.7 +/- 2.1%, in excellent agreement with previous studies under close to atmospheric conditions. We further report unambiguous experimental evidence that dealkylation is a novel and significant pathway for toluene and o-, m-, and p-xylene oxidation. At 150 Torr of O2 partial pressure, toluene is found to dealkylate with a yield of 5.4 +/- 1.2% phenol; similarly, m-, o-, and p-xylene dealkylate with yields of 11.2 +/- 3.8%, 4.5 +/- 3.2%, and 4.3 +/- 3.1% cresol, respectively. A dealkylation mechanism via OH-addition in the ipso position is feasible (DeltaH = -9 kcal/mol for phenol formation from toluene) but does not lend itself easily to explain the significant isomer effect observed among xylenes; instead an alternative mechanism is presented that can explain this isomer effect and forms phenol and likely epoxide type products with identical m/z (indistinguishable in our CIMS analysis) via a carbene-type intermediate. Dealkylation adds to the atmospheric production of phenol- and likely epoxide-type products, with aldehydes as expected co-products, and helps improve the carbon balance in the initial stages of aromatic oxidation.

  5. One-step simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry-FTIR microspectroscopy to quickly detect continuous pathways in the solid-state glucose/asparagine Maillard reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Deng-Fwu; Hsieh, Tzu-Feng; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2013-01-01

    The stepwise reaction pathway of the solid-state Maillard reaction between glucose (Glc) and asparagine (Asn) was investigated using simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)-FTIR microspectroscopy. The color change and FTIR spectra of Glc-Asn physical mixtures (molar ratio = 1:1) preheated to different temperatures followed by cooling were also examined. The successive reaction products such as Schiff base intermediate, Amadori product, and decarboxylated Amadori product in the solid-state Glc-Asn Maillard reaction were first simultaneously evidenced by this unique DSC-FTIR microspectroscopy. The color changed from white to yellow-brown to dark brown, and appearance of new IR peaks confirmed the formation of Maillard reaction products. The present study clearly indicates that this unique DSC-FTIR technique not only accelerates but also detects precursors and products of the Maillard reaction in real time.

  6. Reaction between peroxynitrite and boronates: EPR spin-trapping, HPLC analyses, and quantum mechanical study of the free radical pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Adam; Zielonka, Jacek; Lopez, Marcos; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka; Joseph, Joy; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    Recently we showed that peroxynitrite (ONOO−) reacts directly and rapidly with aromatic and aliphatic boronic acids (k ≈ 106 M−1s−1). Product analyses and substrate consumption data indicated that ONOO− reacts stoichiometrically with boronates, yielding the corresponding phenols as the major product (~85–90%), and the remaining products (10–15%) were proposed to originate from free radical intermediates (phenyl and phenoxyl radicals). Here we investigated in detail the minor, free radical pathway of boronate reaction with ONOO−. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique was used to characterize the free radical intermediates formed from the reaction between boronates and ONOO−. Using 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) and 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps, phenyl radicals were trapped and detected. Although phenoxyl radicals were not detected, the positive effects of molecular oxygen, and inhibitory effects of hydrogen atom donors (acetonitrile, and 2-propanol) and general radical scavengers (GSH, NADH, ascorbic acid and tyrosine) on the formation of phenoxyl radical-derived nitrated product, suggest that phenoxyl radical was formed as the secondary species. We propose that the initial step of the reaction involves the addition of ONOO− to the boron atom in boronates. The anionic intermediate undergoes both heterolytic (major pathway) and homolytic (minor pathway) cleavage of the peroxy (O-O) bond to form phenol and nitrite as a major product (via a non-radical mechanism), or a radical pair PhB(OH)2O•−…•NO2 as a minor product. It is conceivable that phenyl radicals are formed by the fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion. According to the DFT quantum mechanical calculations, the energy barrier for the dissociation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion to form phenyl radicals is only a few kcal/mol, suggesting rapid and spontaneous fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion

  7. Status of experimental data of proton-induced reactions for intermediate-energy nuclear data evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Yukinobu; Kawano, Toshihiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Yamano, Naoki; Fukahori, Tokio

    1998-11-01

    The present status of experimental data of proton-induced reactions is reviewed, with particular attention to total reaction cross section, elastic and inelastic scattering cross section, double-differential particle production cross section, isotope production cross section, and activation cross section. (author)

  8. Secondary Interactions Arrest the Hemiaminal Intermediate To Invert the Modus Operandi of Schiff Base Reaction: A Route to Benzoxazinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ketan; Deshmukh, Satej S; Bodkhe, Dnyaneshwar; Mane, Manoj; Vanka, Kumar; Shinde, Dinesh; Rajamohanan, Pattuparambil R; Nandi, Shyamapada; Vaidhyanathan, Ramanathan; Chikkali, Samir H

    2017-04-21

    Discovered by Hugo Schiff, condensation between amine and aldehyde represents one of the most ubiquitous reactions in chemistry. This classical reaction is widely used to manufacture pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals. However, the rapid and reversible formation of Schiff base prohibits formation of alternative products, of which benzoxazinones are an important class. Therefore, manipulating the reactivity of two partners to invert the course of this reaction is an elusive target. Presented here is a synthetic strategy that regulates the sequence of Schiff base reaction via weak secondary interactions. Guided by the computational models, reaction between 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluoro-benzaldehyde with 2-amino-6-methylbenzoic acid revealed quantitative (99%) formation of 5-methyl-2-(perfluorophenyl)-1,2-dihydro-4H-benzo[d][1,3]oxazin-4-one (15). Electron donating and electron withdrawing ortho-substituents on 2-aminobenzoic acid resulted in the production of benzoxazinones 9-36. The mode of action was tracked using low temperature NMR, UV-vis spectroscopy, and isotopic ( 18 O) labeling experiments. These spectroscopic mechanistic investigations revealed that the hemiaminal intermediate is arrested by the hydrogen-bonding motif to yield benzoxazinone. Thus, the mechanistic investigations and DFT calculations categorically rule out the possibility of in situ imine formation followed by ring-closing, but support instead hydrogen-bond assisted ring-closing to prodrugs. This unprecedented reaction represents an interesting and competitive alternative to metal catalyzed and classical methods of preparing benzoxazinone.

  9. II. The intermediate velocity source in the 40Ca+40Ca reaction at Elab=35 AMeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sosin, Z.; Planeta, R.; Ciszek, T.

    2001-01-01

    The shape of the velocity distributions of charged particles projected on the beam direction can be explained if emissions from the hot projectile-like fragment and the target-like fragment are supplemented by an emission from an intermediate velocity source located between them. The creation of this source is predicted by a two-stage reaction model where, in the second stage, some of the nucleons identified in the first stage as participants form a group of clusters located in the region between the colliding nuclei. The cluster coalescence process is governed on the average by the maximum value of entropy, although its fluctuations are also significant. The properties of the intermediate velocity source are precisely described, including the isotopic composition of the emitted particles. (orig.)

  10. Structure and Functional Analysis of ClbQ, an Unusual Intermediate-Releasing Thioesterase from the Colibactin Biosynthetic Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guntaka, Naga Sandhya; Healy, Alan R.; Crawford, Jason M.; Herzon, Seth B.; Bruner, Steven D. (Yale); (Florida); (Yale-MED)

    2017-09-08

    Colibactin is a genotoxic hybrid nonribosomal peptide/polyketide secondary metabolite produced by various pathogenic and probiotic bacteria residing in the human gut. The presence of colibactin metabolites has been correlated to colorectal cancer formation in several studies. The specific function of many gene products in the colibactin gene cluster can be predicted. However, the role of ClbQ, a type II editing thioesterase, has not been established. The importance of ClbQ has been demonstrated by genetic deletions that abolish colibactin cytotoxic activity, and recent studies suggest an atypical role in releasing pathway intermediates from the assembly line. Here we report the 2.0 Å crystal structure and biochemical characterization of ClbQ. Our data reveal that ClbQ exhibits greater catalytic efficiency toward acyl-thioester substrates as compared to precolibactin intermediates and does not discriminate among carrier proteins. Cyclized pyridone-containing colibactins, which are off-pathway derivatives, are not viable substrates for ClbQ, while linear precursors are, supporting a role of ClbQ in facilitating the promiscuous off-loading of premature precolibactin metabolites and novel insights into colibactin biosynthesis.

  11. Structure and Functional Analysis of ClbQ, an Unusual Intermediate-Releasing Thioesterase from the Colibactin Biosynthetic Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guntaka, Naga Sandhya; Healy, Alan R; Crawford, Jason M; Herzon, Seth B; Bruner, Steven D

    2017-10-20

    Colibactin is a genotoxic hybrid nonribosomal peptide/polyketide secondary metabolite produced by various pathogenic and probiotic bacteria residing in the human gut. The presence of colibactin metabolites has been correlated to colorectal cancer formation in several studies. The specific function of many gene products in the colibactin gene cluster can be predicted. However, the role of ClbQ, a type II editing thioesterase, has not been established. The importance of ClbQ has been demonstrated by genetic deletions that abolish colibactin cytotoxic activity, and recent studies suggest an atypical role in releasing pathway intermediates from the assembly line. Here we report the 2.0 Å crystal structure and biochemical characterization of ClbQ. Our data reveal that ClbQ exhibits greater catalytic efficiency toward acyl-thioester substrates as compared to precolibactin intermediates and does not discriminate among carrier proteins. Cyclized pyridone-containing colibactins, which are off-pathway derivatives, are not viable substrates for ClbQ, while linear precursors are, supporting a role of ClbQ in facilitating the promiscuous off-loading of premature precolibactin metabolites and novel insights into colibactin biosynthesis.

  12. NO-oxygen scavenger or reaction intermediate in the decomposition of N2O?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Jana; Sobalík, Zdeněk

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 111, 3-4 (2006), s. 195-202 ISSN 1011-372X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1ET400400413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : 15N2 18O and 15N2 18 O + 14N 16O decomposition * role of NOx intermediates * Fe-zeolites Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.772, year: 2006

  13. Coincidence measurements of intermediate mass fragments produced in /sup 32/S-induced reactions on Ag at E/A = 22.5 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, D.J.; Lynch, W.G.; Nayak, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    Single- and two-particle inclusive cross sections for the production of light nuclei and intermediate mass fragments, 3< or =Z< or =24, were measured at angles well beyond the grazing angle for /sup 32/S-induced reactions on Ag at 720 MeV. Information about fragment multiplicities and reaction dynamics was extracted from measurements of light particles, intermediate mass fragments, and targetlike residues in coincidence with intermediate mass fragments. Incomplete linear momentum transfer and non-compound-particle emission are important features of collisions producing intermediate mass fragments. About half of the incident kinetic energy in these collisions is converted into internal excitation. The mean multiplicity of intermediate mass fragments is of the order of 1. Particle correlations are strongly enhanced in the plane which contains the intermediate mass fragment and the beam axis

  14. The decay of hot nuclei formed in La-induced reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libby, B.; Mignerey, A.C.; Madani, H.; Marchetti, A.A.; Colonna, M.; DiToro, M.

    1992-01-01

    The decay of hot nuclei formed in lanthanum-induced reactions utilizing inverse kinematics has been studied from E/A = 35 to 55 MeV. At each bombarding energy studied, the probability for the multiple emission of complex fragments has been found to be independent of target. Global features (total charge, source velocity) of the reaction La + Al at E/A = 45 MeV have been reproduced by coupling a dynamical model to study the collision stage of the reaction to a statistical model of nuclear decay

  15. Does shoe heel design influence ground reaction forces and knee moments during maximum lunges in elite and intermediate badminton players?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Kai Lam

    Full Text Available Lunge is one frequently executed movement in badminton and involves a unique sagittal footstrike angle of more than 40 degrees at initial ground contact compared with other manoeuvres. This study examined if the shoe heel curvature design of a badminton shoe would influence shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments during lunge.Eleven elite and fifteen intermediate players performed five left-forward maximum lunge trials with Rounded Heel Shoe (RHS, Flattened Heel Shoe (FHS, and Standard Heel Shoes (SHS. Shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments were measured by using synchronized force platform and motion analysis system. A 2 (Group x 3 (Shoe ANOVA with repeated measures was performed to determine the effects of different shoes and different playing levels, as well as the interaction of two factors on all variables.Shoe effect indicated that players demonstrated lower maximum vertical loading rate in RHS than the other two shoes (P < 0.05. Group effect revealed that elite players exhibited larger footstrike angle, faster approaching speed, lower peak horizontal force and horizontal loading rates but higher vertical loading rates and larger peak knee flexion and extension moments (P < 0.05. Analysis of Interactions of Group x Shoe for maximum and mean vertical loading rates (P < 0.05 indicated that elite players exhibited lower left maximum and mean vertical loading rates in RHS compared to FHS (P < 0.01, while the intermediate group did not show any Shoe effect on vertical loading rates.These findings indicate that shoe heel curvature would play some role in altering ground reaction force impact during badminton lunge. The differences in impact loads and knee moments between elite and intermediate players may be useful in optimizing footwear design and training strategy to minimize the potential risks for impact related injuries in badminton.

  16. Intermediate energy charge-exchange reactions induced by polarized 3He

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, B.T.

    1998-01-01

    Spin polarization transfer is proven to be very useful in obtaining detailed information of the continuum nuclear responses. The data, taken for the (vector p,vector n) reactions, have enabled us to separate the response into the spin longitudinal and transverse components. These partial nuclear responses have been successfully used to make critical tests of nuclear structure models. In the present paper, we first summarize the results of the data and the theoretical analyses made so far. We then discuss information obtainable from the ( 3 vector He,vector t) reaction, emphasizing on the differences and similarities in comparison with the (vector p,vector n) reaction. The results of numerical calculations made for ( 3 vector He,vector t) reactions based on the microscopic distorted wave impulse approximation will also be reported. (orig.)

  17. Enzyme sequence similarity improves the reaction alignment method for cross-species pathway comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovacik, Meric A. [Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Androulakis, Ioannis P., E-mail: yannis@rci.rutgers.edu [Chemical and Biochemical Engineering Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Biomedical Engineering Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Pathway-based information has become an important source of information for both establishing evolutionary relationships and understanding the mode of action of a chemical or pharmaceutical among species. Cross-species comparison of pathways can address two broad questions: comparison in order to inform evolutionary relationships and to extrapolate species differences used in a number of different applications including drug and toxicity testing. Cross-species comparison of metabolic pathways is complex as there are multiple features of a pathway that can be modeled and compared. Among the various methods that have been proposed, reaction alignment has emerged as the most successful at predicting phylogenetic relationships based on NCBI taxonomy. We propose an improvement of the reaction alignment method by accounting for sequence similarity in addition to reaction alignment method. Using nine species, including human and some model organisms and test species, we evaluate the standard and improved comparison methods by analyzing glycolysis and citrate cycle pathways conservation. In addition, we demonstrate how organism comparison can be conducted by accounting for the cumulative information retrieved from nine pathways in central metabolism as well as a more complete study involving 36 pathways common in all nine species. Our results indicate that reaction alignment with enzyme sequence similarity results in a more accurate representation of pathway specific cross-species similarities and differences based on NCBI taxonomy.

  18. Enzyme sequence similarity improves the reaction alignment method for cross-species pathway comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovacik, Meric A.; Androulakis, Ioannis P.

    2013-01-01

    Pathway-based information has become an important source of information for both establishing evolutionary relationships and understanding the mode of action of a chemical or pharmaceutical among species. Cross-species comparison of pathways can address two broad questions: comparison in order to inform evolutionary relationships and to extrapolate species differences used in a number of different applications including drug and toxicity testing. Cross-species comparison of metabolic pathways is complex as there are multiple features of a pathway that can be modeled and compared. Among the various methods that have been proposed, reaction alignment has emerged as the most successful at predicting phylogenetic relationships based on NCBI taxonomy. We propose an improvement of the reaction alignment method by accounting for sequence similarity in addition to reaction alignment method. Using nine species, including human and some model organisms and test species, we evaluate the standard and improved comparison methods by analyzing glycolysis and citrate cycle pathways conservation. In addition, we demonstrate how organism comparison can be conducted by accounting for the cumulative information retrieved from nine pathways in central metabolism as well as a more complete study involving 36 pathways common in all nine species. Our results indicate that reaction alignment with enzyme sequence similarity results in a more accurate representation of pathway specific cross-species similarities and differences based on NCBI taxonomy

  19. Recoil properties of radionuclides formed in photospallation reactions on complex nuclei at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haba, Hiromitsu; Oura, Yasuji; Shibata, Seiichi; Furukawa, Michiaki; Fujiwara, Ichiro

    2001-01-01

    A short review is given on our studies of recoil properties of radionuclides formed in photospallation reactions induced by bremsstrahlung of end-point energies (E 0 ) from 600 to 1100 MeV, in which the thick-target thick-catcher method was employed. The measurements have been successful on 14, 24, 26, 31, 21 and 20 nuclides from nat V, nat Cu, 93 Nb, nat Ag, nat Ta, and 197 Au, respectively. Reflecting the resonance character in a photonuclear reaction, the mean ranges FW and BW in the forward and backward directions, respectively, are E 0 -independent at the studied energies and classified into two groups accounting for the (γ, xn) (x ≥ 1) and (γ, xnyp) (x, y ≥ 1) processes. The forward-to-backward ratios (F/B) are independent of the mass difference (ΔA) between a product (A p ) and a target (A t ) and also of A t . The kinematic properties of the product nuclei were analyzed by the two-step vector velocity model. The forward velocity ν after the first step of photon-reaction is quite different from that of proton-reaction at proton energies of E p ≤ 3 GeV, though the difference disappears at higher energies. On the other hand, the mean kinetic energy T of the residual nucleus in the second step is almost equal to that of proton-reaction irrespective of E p . A comparison with T values calculated by the PICA (Photon-Induced Intranuclear Cascade Analysis) code at E 0 =400 MeV was also performed. It was found that although the code well reproduces the experimental results of nat V and nat Cu, the same calculation for heavier targets gives T values lower than the experimental results, indicating some nuclear-structure effect, such as a medium effect notably at A t ≥ 100. An average kinetic energy carried off by the emitted particles ε s =T/(ΔA/A t ) of both photon- and proton-reactions seem to increase with an increase of A t up to around A t =100, and become almost constant at larger A t , implying some change in the nuclear structure effect in this

  20. Parallel proton transfer pathways in aqueous acid-base reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, M.J.; Bakker, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    We study the mechanism of proton transfer (PT) between the photoacid 8-hydroxy-1,3, 6-pyrenetrisulfonic acid (HPTS) and the base chloroacetate in aqueous solution. We investigate both proton and deuteron transfer reactions in solutions with base concentrations ranging from 0.25M to 4M. Using

  1. Analysis of acyl CoA ester intermediates of the mevalonate pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seker, Tamay; Møller, Kasper; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    The mevalonate pathway plays an important role in providing the cell with a number of essential precursors for the synthesis of biomass constituents. With respect to their chemical structure, the metabolites of this pathway can be divided into two groups: acyl esters [acetoacetyl CoA, acetyl Co......A, hydroxymethylglutaryl (HMG) CoA] and phosphorylated metabolites (isopentenyl pyrophosphate, dimethylallyl pyrophosphate, geranyl pyrophosphate, farnesyl pyrophosphate). In this study, we developed a method for the precise analysis of the intracellular concentration of acetoacetyl CoA, acetyl CoA and HMG CoA; and we...... used this method for quantification of these metabolites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both during batch growth on glucose and on galactose and in glucose-limited chemostat cultures operated at three different dilution rates. The level of the metabolites changed depending on the growth phase...

  2. Mechanisms for the inversion of chirality: Global reaction route mapping of stereochemical pathways in a probable chiral extraterrestrial molecule, 2-aminopropionitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Ramanpreet; Vikas

    2015-01-01

    2-Aminopropionitrile (APN), a probable candidate as a chiral astrophysical molecule, is a precursor to amino-acid alanine. Stereochemical pathways in 2-APN are explored using Global Reaction Route Mapping (GRRM) method employing high-level quantum-mechanical computations. Besides predicting the conventional mechanism for chiral inversion that proceeds through an achiral intermediate, a counterintuitive flipping mechanism is revealed for 2-APN through chiral intermediates explored using the GRRM. The feasibility of the proposed stereochemical pathways, in terms of the Gibbs free-energy change, is analyzed at the temperature conditions akin to the interstellar medium. Notably, the stereoinversion in 2-APN is observed to be more feasible than the dissociation of 2-APN and intermediates involved along the stereochemical pathways, and the flipping barrier is observed to be as low as 3.68 kJ/mol along one of the pathways. The pathways proposed for the inversion of chirality in 2-APN may provide significant insight into the extraterrestrial origin of life

  3. Chemical Conversion Pathways and Kinetic Modeling for the OH-Initiated Reaction of Triclosan in Gas-Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available As a widely used antimicrobial additive in daily consumption, attention has been paid to the degradation and conversion of triclosan for a long time. The quantum chemistry calculation and the canonical variational transition state theory are employed to investigate the mechanism and kinetic property. Besides addition and abstraction, oxidation pathways and further conversion pathways are also considered. The OH radicals could degrade triclosan to phenols, aldehydes, and other easily degradable substances. The conversion mechanisms of triclosan to the polychlorinated dibenzopdioxin and furan (PCDD/Fs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs are clearly illustrated and the toxicity would be strengthened in such pathways. Single radical and diradical pathways are compared to study the conversion mechanism of dichlorodibenzo dioxin (DCDD. Furthermore, thermochemistry is discussed in detail. Kinetic property is calculated and the consequent ratio of kadd/ktotal and kabs/ktotal at 298.15 K are 0.955 and 0.045, respectively. Thus, the OH radical addition reactions are predominant, the substitute position of OH radical on triclosan is very important to generate PCDD and furan, and biradical is also a vital intermediate to produce dioxin.

  4. Chemical conversion pathways and kinetic modeling for the OH-initiated reaction of triclosan in gas-phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Zhang, Chenxi; Sun, Xiaomin; Kang, Lingyan; Zhao, Yan

    2015-04-10

    As a widely used antimicrobial additive in daily consumption, attention has been paid to the degradation and conversion of triclosan for a long time. The quantum chemistry calculation and the canonical variational transition state theory are employed to investigate the mechanism and kinetic property. Besides addition and abstraction, oxidation pathways and further conversion pathways are also considered. The OH radicals could degrade triclosan to phenols, aldehydes, and other easily degradable substances. The conversion mechanisms of triclosan to the polychlorinated dibenzopdioxin and furan (PCDD/Fs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are clearly illustrated and the toxicity would be strengthened in such pathways. Single radical and diradical pathways are compared to study the conversion mechanism of dichlorodibenzo dioxin (DCDD). Furthermore, thermochemistry is discussed in detail. Kinetic property is calculated and the consequent ratio of k add/k total and k abs/k total at 298.15 K are 0.955 and 0.045, respectively. Thus, the OH radical addition reactions are predominant, the substitute position of OH radical on triclosan is very important to generate PCDD and furan, and biradical is also a vital intermediate to produce dioxin.

  5. A kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction is proposed based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. Special attention was paid to reactants, intermediates and end products: -fructose, N-(1-deoxy--fructos-1-yl)-glycine (DFG), 1-deoxy-2,3-hexodiulose and

  6. Role of the reaction intermediates in determining PHIP (parahydrogen induced polarization) effect in the hydrogenation of acetylene dicarboxylic acid with the complex [Rh (dppb)]+ (dppb: 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reineri, F.; Aime, S.; Gobetto, R.; Nervi, C.

    2014-01-01

    This study deals with the parahydrogenation of the symmetric substrate acetylene dicarboxylic acid catalyzed by a Rh(I) complex bearing the chelating diphosphine dppb (1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane). The two magnetically equivalent protons of the product yield a hyperpolarized emission signal in the 1 H-NMR spectrum. Their polarization intensity varies upon changing the reaction solvent from methanol to acetone. A detailed analysis of the hydrogenation pathway is carried out by means of density functional theory calculations to assess the structure of hydrogenation intermediates and their stability in the two solvents. The observed polarization effects have been accounted on the basis of the obtained structures. Insights into the lifetime of a short-lived reaction intermediate are also obtained

  7. Nucleon charge exchange reaction and antiproton elastic scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronenfeld, J.

    1985-02-01

    This work treats the medium energy nuclear (p,n) charge exchange reaction to analog states and the low energy elastic scattering of antiprotons and investigates the central aspects of a microscopic theory based on multiple-scattering series which are pertinent to these reactions. A two-step term of the Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA) in treating the (p,n) reaction, was included. For the very absorptive p-bar interaction with nuclei we conjecture that a partial infinite summation, constituing a renormalization of the single scattering term of the optical potential series provides the dominant feature of this interaction. In this work the excitation of analog states is calculated and it was found that the (p,n) reaction is described fairly well by the DWIA. In the first part of the work the (p,n) reaction in the energy range 100-200 MeV was treated. The DWIA calculations were based on eikonalization. In the second part of the work the p-barA interaction with the selfconsistent scheme mentioned above, for scattering energies 30-120 MeV, was examined. (author)

  8. Experimental determination of the effective nucleon-nucleon interaction for p-nucleus reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClelland, J.B.; Aas, B.; Azizi, A.

    1982-01-01

    A complete measurement of the polarization transfer observables has been made for the first time in the (p,p') reaction at intermediate energies. Measurements are reported for the 12 C(p,p') 12 C reaction to the 1 + , T = 0(12.71 MeV) and 1 + , T = 1(15.11 MeV) states at 500 MeV at laboratory scattering angles of 3.5 0 , 5.5 0 , 7.5 0 , and 12.0 0 . Linear combinations of these observables are shown to exhibit a very selective dependence on the isoscalar and isovector spin-dependent components of the nucleon-nucleon interaction. To the extent of the validity of the single collision approximation, these amplitudes are compared directly to the free nucleon-nucleon amplitudes at small momentum transfers

  9. Intermediate resonance excitation in the {gamma}p->p{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrens, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Altieri, S. [INFN, Sezione di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Universita di Pavia, I-27100 Pavia (Italy); Annand, J.R.M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)] (and others)

    2005-09-29

    The helicity dependence of the total cross section for the {gamma}->p->->p{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} reaction has been measured for the first time at incident photon energies from 400 to 800 MeV. The measurement, performed at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI accelerator in Mainz, used the large acceptance detector DAPHNE and a longitudinally polarized frozen-spin target. This channel is found to be excited predominantly when the photon and proton have a parallel spin orientation, most likely due to the intermediate production of the D{sub 13}(1520) resonance. However, the contribution of the antiparallel spin configuration, arising from other reaction mechanisms, is also not negligible. This result gives important new information to resolve the existing model discrepancies in the identification of the nucleon resonances contributing to this channel.

  10. Subcritical hydrothermal conversion of organic wastes and biomass. Reaction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Amadeus Castro Vega

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal conversion is a procedure which emulates organic matter’s natural conversion into bio-crude having physical and chemical properties analogous to petroleum. The artificial transformation of biomass requi- res previous knowledge of the main reaction routes and product availability. The main component of biomass (depolymerisation by hydrolysis is presented in hydrothermal cellulose conversion, producing oligosaccharides which exhibit dehydration and retro-aldol condensation reactions for transforming into furfurals and carboxylic acids. Other biomass components (such as lignin, proteins, and fat esters present both hydrolysis and pyrolysis reaction routes. As long as biomass mainly contains carbohydrates, subcritical hydrothermal conversion products and their wastes will be fundamentally analogous to those displaying cellulose. These substances have added- value by far surpassing raw material’s acquisition cost. When the main hydrothermal conversion products’ O/C, H/C molar ratios as reported in literature are plotted, an evolutionary tralectory for conversion products appears to be closely or even overlapped with fossil fuels’ geological evolution.

  11. Tetracycline degradation by ozonation in the aqueous phase: Proposed degradation intermediates and pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M. Hammad; Bae, Hyokwan; Jung, Jin-Young

    2010-01-01

    During the ozonation of tetracycline (TC) in aqueous media at pHs 2.2 and 7.0, the effects of pH variations, protonation and dissociation of functional groups and variation in free radical exposure were investigated to elucidate the transformation pathway. Liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry detected around 15 ozonation products, and uncovered their production and subsequent degradation patterns. During ozonation at pH 2.2, the TC degradation pathway was proposed on the basis of the structure, ozonation chemistry and mass spectrometry data of TC. Ozonation of TC at the C11a-C12 and C2-C3 double bonds, aromatic ring and amino group generated products of m/z 461, 477, 509 and 416, respectively. Further ozonation at the above mentioned sites gave products of m/z 432, 480, 448, 525 and 496. The removal of TOC reached a maximum of ∼40% after 2 h of ozonation, while TC was completely removed within 4-6 min at both pHs. The low TOC removal efficiency might be due to the generation of recalcitrant products and the low ozone supply for high TC concentration. Ozonation decreased the acute toxicity of TC faster at pH 7.0 than pH 2.2, but the maximum decrease was only about 40% at both pHs after 2 h of ozonation. In this study, attempts were made to understand the correlation between the transformation products, pathway, acute toxicity and quantity of residual organics in solution. Overall, ozonation was found to be a promising process for removing TC and the products initially generated.

  12. Emission of high-energy, light particles from intermediate-energy heavy-ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.B.; Auble, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    One of the early surprises in examining reaction products from heavy ion reactions at 10 MeV/nucleon and above was the large yield of light particles emitted and the high energies to which the spectra of these particles extended. The interpretation of the origin of the high energy light ions has evolved from a picture of projectile excitation and subsequent evaporation to one of pre-equilibrium (or nonequilibrium) emission. The time scale for particle emission has thus moved from one that occurs following the initial collision to one that occurs at the very early stages of the collision. Research at ORNL on this phenomenon is reviewed

  13. The (3He,t) and (d,2He)reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brockstedt, A.

    1987-09-01

    The ( 3 He,t) reaction has been studied at 0.6-2.3 GeV at small scattering angles, 0-7 degrees, on various nuclei ( 12 C, 13 C, 26 Mg, 40 Ca, 48 Ca, 54 Fe, 90 Zr, 159 Tb, 208 Pb) including a proton target. The reaction is a single-step reaction and selects the spin-isospin channel. Angular distributions for low-lying states in 12 N are well described by DWIA calculations. From 13 C to 13 N transitions the ratio J στ /J τ , at momentum transfer, q, close to zero, is derived. The ratio remains roughly constant in the region 300 - 700 MeV/nucleon. The position of the quasi-free peak is shifted compared with free nucleon-nucleon scattering. The shift is towards higher excitation energies at q approx 1.4 fm -1 , and towards lower excitation energies at q approx 2.5 fm -1 . The p( 3 He,t)Δ ++ reaction is analysed as one-pion exchange and the ( 3 He,t) form factor is extracted. The shape and position of the Δ resonance seem to be independent of target mass for the targets studied. Compared with the p to Δ ++ transition the position is shifted towards lower excitation energy in nuclei. The (d,2p[ 1 S 0 ]) reaction, with the two protons in an 1 S 0 state labelled 2 He, is studied at 0.65 and 2.0 GeV at small angles, 0-4 degrees, on some of the targets used in the ( 3 He,t) experiment (p, 12 C, 40 Ca, 54 Fe). This reaction is also a one-step reaction that can be used for studies of spin-isospin excitations. Cross sections and tensor analysing powers are determined for the p(d, 2 He)n reaction. These results are compared with PWIA calculations. The Δ resonance in carbon is also here shifted down in excitation energy compared with the proton target. (author)

  14. Permanganate oxidation of α-amino acids: kinetic correlations for the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Benito, Joaquin F

    2011-09-08

    The reactions of permanganate ion with seven α-amino acids in aqueous KH(2)PO(4)/K(2)HPO(4) buffers have been followed spectrophotometrically at two different wavelengths: 526 nm (decay of MnO(4)(-)) and 418 nm (formation of colloidal MnO(2)). All of the reactions studied were autocatalyzed by colloidal MnO(2), with the contribution of the autocatalytic reaction pathway decreasing in the order glycine > l-threonine > l-alanine > l-glutamic acid > l-leucine > l-isoleucine > l-valine. The rate constants corresponding to the nonautocatalytic and autocatalytic pathways were obtained by means of either a differential rate law or an integrated one, the latter requiring the use of an iterative method for its implementation. The activation parameters for the two pathways were determined and analyzed to obtain statistically significant correlations for the series of reactions studied. The activation enthalpy of the nonautocatalytic pathway showed a strong, positive dependence on the standard Gibbs energy for the dissociation of the protonated amino group of the α-amino acid. Linear enthalpy-entropy correlations were found for both pathways, leading to isokinetic temperatures of 370 ± 21 K (nonautocatalytic) and 364 ± 28 K (autocatalytic). Mechanisms in agreement with the experimental data are proposed for the two reaction pathways.

  15. On the deduction of chemical reaction pathways from measurements of time series of concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilov, Michael; Arkin, Adam; Ross, John

    2001-03-01

    We discuss the deduction of reaction pathways in complex chemical systems from measurements of time series of chemical concentrations of reacting species. First we review a technique called correlation metric construction (CMC) and show the construction of a reaction pathway from measurements on a part of glycolysis. Then we present two new improved methods for the analysis of time series of concentrations, entropy metric construction (EMC), and entropy reduction method (ERM), and illustrate (EMC) with calculations on a model reaction system. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  16. Does shoe heel design influence ground reaction forces and knee moments during maximum lunges in elite and intermediate badminton players?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wing-Kai; Ryue, Jaejin; Lee, Ki-Kwang; Park, Sang-Kyoon; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Ryu, Jiseon

    2017-01-01

    Lunge is one frequently executed movement in badminton and involves a unique sagittal footstrike angle of more than 40 degrees at initial ground contact compared with other manoeuvres. This study examined if the shoe heel curvature design of a badminton shoe would influence shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments during lunge. Eleven elite and fifteen intermediate players performed five left-forward maximum lunge trials with Rounded Heel Shoe (RHS), Flattened Heel Shoe (FHS), and Standard Heel Shoes (SHS). Shoe-ground kinematics, ground reaction forces, and knee moments were measured by using synchronized force platform and motion analysis system. A 2 (Group) x 3 (Shoe) ANOVA with repeated measures was performed to determine the effects of different shoes and different playing levels, as well as the interaction of two factors on all variables. Shoe effect indicated that players demonstrated lower maximum vertical loading rate in RHS than the other two shoes (P badminton lunge. The differences in impact loads and knee moments between elite and intermediate players may be useful in optimizing footwear design and training strategy to minimize the potential risks for impact related injuries in badminton.

  17. The transverse momenta in the exclusive reactions at intermediate energies a parameter to mesure the transversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armenise, N.; Fogli Muciaccia, M.T.; Nuzzo, S.

    1977-01-01

    The definition of a parameter usefull to measure the transversity is given. Some reactions at 9GeV/c are examined and the channels are selected looking at the behaviour of global transverse momenta of the event. A few comparisons with other variables, used to select the channels characterized by different production processes are reported

  18. Crystal structure of a trapped phosphate intermediate in vanadium apochloroperoxidase catalyzing a dephosphorylation reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Macedo-Ribeiro, S.; Renirie, R.; Wever, R.; Messerschmidt, A.

    2008-01-01

    The crystal structure of the apo form of vanadium chloroperoxidase from Curvularia inaequalis reacted with para-nitrophenylphosphate was determined at a resolution of 1.5 Å. The aim of this study was to solve structural details of the dephosphorylation reaction catalyzed by this enzyme. Since the

  19. The (γ, p) reaction in 30Si, 68Zn and 130Te at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulow, B.; Johnsson, B.; Nilsson, M.

    1977-01-01

    The yields of (γ, p) reactions on 30 Si, 68 Zn and 130 Te have been measured as a function of the bremsstrahlung end-point energy, Esub(γ, max), in the energy range 75-800 MeV, using the activation method. Cross sections have been deduced and are compared to results obtained using a semiempirical model. (Auth.)

  20. Electrophilic aromatic substitution over zeolites generates Wheland-type reaction intermediates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chowdhury, Abhishek Dutta; Houben, Klaartje; Whiting, Gareth T.; Chung, Sangho; Baldus, Marc; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2018-01-01

    The synthesis of many industrial bulk and fine chemicals frequently involves electrophilic aromatic substitution (SEAr) reactions. The most widely practiced example of the SEAr mechanism is the zeolite-catalysed ethylation of benzene, using ethylene as an alkylating agent. However, the current

  1. Effects of reaction-kinetic parameters on modeling reaction pathways in GaN MOVPE growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Zuo, Ran; Zhang, Guoyi

    2017-11-01

    In the modeling of the reaction-transport process in GaN MOVPE growth, the selections of kinetic parameters (activation energy Ea and pre-exponential factor A) for gas reactions are quite uncertain, which cause uncertainties in both gas reaction path and growth rate. In this study, numerical modeling of the reaction-transport process for GaN MOVPE growth in a vertical rotating disk reactor is conducted with varying kinetic parameters for main reaction paths. By comparisons of the molar concentrations of major Ga-containing species and the growth rates, the effects of kinetic parameters on gas reaction paths are determined. The results show that, depending on the values of the kinetic parameters, the gas reaction path may be dominated either by adduct/amide formation path, or by TMG pyrolysis path, or by both. Although the reaction path varies with different kinetic parameters, the predicted growth rates change only slightly because the total transport rate of Ga-containing species to the substrate changes slightly with reaction paths. This explains why previous authors using different chemical models predicted growth rates close to the experiment values. By varying the pre-exponential factor for the amide trimerization, it is found that the more trimers are formed, the lower the growth rates are than the experimental value, which indicates that trimers are poor growth precursors, because of thermal diffusion effect caused by high temperature gradient. The effective order for the contribution of major species to growth rate is found as: pyrolysis species > amides > trimers. The study also shows that radical reactions have little effect on gas reaction path because of the generation and depletion of H radicals in the chain reactions when NH2 is considered as the end species.

  2. Photo- and radiation chemical studies of intermediates involved in excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of the most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. The authors research, which has utilized the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: i) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; ii) the control of the quantum yields of formation of redox products; iii) the mechanism by which reduced species interact with water to yield H 2 homogeneously and heterogeneously. EDTA is among the most popular sacrificial electron donors used in model systems. Its role is to scavenge the oxidized form of the photosensitizer in order to prevent its rapid reaction with the reduced form of the electron relay species that results from the electron-transfer quenching of the excited photosensitizer. In systems involving MV 2+ , the radicals resulting from the oxidation of EDTA can eventually lead to the generation of a second equivalent of MV + ; the reducing agent is believed to be a radical localized on the carbon atom alpha to the carboxylate group. The reaction of radiolytically-generated OH/H with EDTA produces this radical directly via H-abstraction or indirectly via deprotonation of the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen radical site in the oxidized amine moiety; it reduces MV 2+ with rate constants of 2.8 x 10 9 , 7.6 x 10 9 , and 8.5 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 at pH 12.5, 8.3, and 4.7, respectively. Degradative decarboxylation of EDTA-radicals and their back electron-transfer reactions are enhanced in acidic solution causing the yield of MV + to be severely diminished

  3. Hydrogen/Oxygen Reactions at High Pressures and Intermediate Temperatures: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    A series of experimental and numerical investigations into hydrogen oxidation at high pressures and intermediate temperatures has been conducted. The experiments were carried out in a high pressure laminar flow reactor at 50 bar pressure and a temperature range of 600–900 K. The equivalence ratio......, the mechanism is used to simulate published data on ignition delay time and laminar burning velocity of hydrogen. The flow reactor results show that at reducing, stoichiometric, and oxidizing conditions, conversion starts at temperatures of 750–775 K, 800–825 K, and 800–825 K, respectively. In oxygen atmosphere......, ignition occurs at the temperature of 775–800 K. In general, the present model provides a good agreement with the measurements in the flow reactor and with recent data on laminar burning velocity and ignition delay time....

  4. The role of collision terms for nucleon emission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.; Scheuter, F.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.

    1984-01-01

    A semi-classical description of heavy ion collisions is developed with a particular attention to the nucleon flux from one partner through the other one. The phase-space extension of the nucleons is explicitly treated by means of the Wigner transform of the density matrix. Its dynamical evolution is obtained by solving the Landau-Vlasov equation, where collision terms are explicitely introduced. As a matter of fact, the experimental nucleon spectra usually described by a thermal source with an intermediate velocity (around vsub(beam)/2) are interpreted in our framework by the coexistence of one-and two-body dissipation. Multi-differential cross-sections d 2 σ/dEdΩ are computed for the 12 C(86MeV/u) + 12 C system and are compared with the experimental data. Comparisons are also given for the 16 O (20 MeV/u) + 197 Au system

  5. Semi-classical approaches for the proton emission in intermediate energy heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, C.; Scheuter, F.; Remaud, B.; Sebille, F.

    1984-05-01

    Semi-classical approaches are proposed to study the transition between the one- and two-body processes in intermediate energy heavy ion collisions. The Landau-Vlasov equation is used as a transport equation for nucleons in the nuclear matter. We apply our formalism to the fast proton ejection. On the one hand, the effects of the nucleon-nucleon collisions are studied for the particles which travel through the nucleus cores. On the other hand, the inertial emission turns out to be an important proton emission mechanism. Our results conflict the interpretation of the proton spectra in terms of moving sources. Reasonable agreements with the experimental data are found without reference to any thermal equilibrium

  6. Angular distributions of intermediate mass fragments emitted in 30 MeV/u 40Ar induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Quanbu; Zhu Yongtai; Xu Hushan; Wei Zhiyong; Lu Jun; Zhang Yuhu; Wang Qi; Li Songlin; Wu Zhongli

    1999-01-01

    The angular distributions of intermediate mass fragments with charge numbers from 3 to 24 emitted in 30 MeV/u 40 Ar + 58,64 Ni and 115 In reactions over an angular range of 5 degree-140 degree have been measured. In different angular region an exponential distribution function dσ/dΩ = N exp(-θ/α) was used to fit the measured angular distributions. The decay factor α which can be connected with the interaction time τ and the factor N which is related to the intensity of the emission sources have been extracted. The relationship of α(Z) and N(Z) with Z for different reaction systems and different angular regions has been discussed. The different behavior of dσ/dΩ, α(Z), and N(Z) for the three studied reaction systems exists mainly in the middle and backward angular regions. The dependencies of angular distributions on isospin and the size of reaction systems have also been discussed

  7. Neutron-proton bremsstrahlung from intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions as a probe of the nuclear symmetry energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yong, G.-C.; Li Baoan; Chen Liewen

    2008-01-01

    Hard photons from neutron-proton bremsstrahlung in intermediate energy heavy-ion reactions are examined as a potential probe of the nuclear symmetry energy within a transport model. Effects of the symmetry energy on the yields and spectra of hard photons are found to be generally smaller than those due to the currently existing uncertainties of both the in-medium nucleon-nucleon cross sections and the photon production probability in the elementary process pn→pnγ. Very interestingly, nevertheless, the ratio of hard photon spectra R 1/2 (γ) from two reactions using isotopes of the same element is not only approximately independent of these uncertainties but also quite sensitive to the symmetry energy. For the head-on reactions of 132 Sn + 124 Sn and 112 Sn + 112 Sn at E beam /A=50 MeV, for example, the R 1/2 (γ) displays a rise up to 15% when the symmetry energy is reduced by about 20% at ρ=1.3ρ 0 which is the maximum density reached in these reactions

  8. A method for integrating and ranking the evidence for biochemical pathways by mining reactions from text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Makoto; Ohta, Tomoko; Rak, Rafal; Rowley, Andrew; Kell, Douglas B.; Pyysalo, Sampo; Ananiadou, Sophia

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: To create, verify and maintain pathway models, curators must discover and assess knowledge distributed over the vast body of biological literature. Methods supporting these tasks must understand both the pathway model representations and the natural language in the literature. These methods should identify and order documents by relevance to any given pathway reaction. No existing system has addressed all aspects of this challenge. Method: We present novel methods for associating pathway model reactions with relevant publications. Our approach extracts the reactions directly from the models and then turns them into queries for three text mining-based MEDLINE literature search systems. These queries are executed, and the resulting documents are combined and ranked according to their relevance to the reactions of interest. We manually annotate document-reaction pairs with the relevance of the document to the reaction and use this annotation to study several ranking methods, using various heuristic and machine-learning approaches. Results: Our evaluation shows that the annotated document-reaction pairs can be used to create a rule-based document ranking system, and that machine learning can be used to rank documents by their relevance to pathway reactions. We find that a Support Vector Machine-based system outperforms several baselines and matches the performance of the rule-based system. The success of the query extraction and ranking methods are used to update our existing pathway search system, PathText. Availability: An online demonstration of PathText 2 and the annotated corpus are available for research purposes at http://www.nactem.ac.uk/pathtext2/. Contact: makoto.miwa@manchester.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23813008

  9. Analysis for mass distribution of proton-induced reactions in intermediate energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao Yu Heng

    2002-01-01

    The mass and charge distribution of residual products produced in the spallation reactions needs to be studied, because it can provide useful information for the disposal of nuclear waste and residual radioactivity generated by the spallation neutron target system. In present work, the Many State Dynamical Model (MSDM) is based on the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM). The authors use it to investigate the mass distribution of Nb, Au and Pb proton-induced reactions in energy range from 100 MeV to 3 GeV. The agreement between the MSDM simulations and the measured data is good in this energy range, and deviations mainly show up in the mass range of 90 - 150 for the high energy proton incident upon Au and Pb

  10. Intermediate-scale sodium-concrete reaction tests with basalt and limestone concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassberger, J.A.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1981-01-01

    Ten tests were performed to investigate the chemical reactions and rate and extent of attack between sodium and basalt and limestone concretes. Test temperatures ranged from 510 to 870 0 C (950 to 1600 0 F) and test times from 2 to 24 hours. Sodium hydroxide was added to some of the tests to assess the impact of a sodium hydroxide-aided reaction on the overall penetration characteristics. Data suggest that the sodium penetration of concrete surfaces is limited. Penetration of basalt concrete in the presence of sodium hydroxide is shown to be less severe than attack by the metallic sodium alone. Presence of sodium hydroxide changes the characteristics of sodium penetration of limestone concrete, but no major differences in bulk penetration were observed as compared to penetration by metallic sodium

  11. Multiple scattering theory and applications for intermediate energy reactions of nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludeking, L.D.

    1979-01-01

    Interactions of two composite clusters are treated in a multiple scattering framework whereby many-particle operators are decomposed into a systematic and finite series such that there is an ordered sequestering according to particle rank. Thus, an N-body operator is written as the superposition of all distinct groupings of interactions that occur between particle pairs, triplets, quartets, etc., such that all groupings contain at least one particle from each of the composite systems. It is demonstrated how the transition operator, a reaction operator, and an optical potential may be described in this context. The general structure of such decompositions is shown, and the connection to the standard multiple-scattering prescriptions, delineated. The direct reaction amplitude for stripping and pickup is described, and the two potential formula of Gell-Mann and Goldberger is derived. The multiple scattering formalism for direct reactions is constructed in the eikonal approximation. The sensitivity of the transition cross section to the target density and nucleon-nucleon density correlations are examined in this framework. The limitations of the zero-range approximation to the deuteron vertex function are examined by comparison with the finite-range vertex function at a range of energies. 25 figures, 5 tables

  12. The Photoconversion of Phytochrome Includes an Unproductive Shunt Reaction Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrke, David; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Michael, Norbert; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2018-03-05

    Phytochromes are modular bimodal photoswitches that control gene expression for morphogenetic processes in plants. These functions are triggered by photoinduced conversions between the inactive and active states of the photosensory module, denoted as Pr and Pfr, respectively. In the present time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopic study of bacterial representatives of this photoreceptor family, we demonstrate that these phototransformations do not represent linear processes but include a branching reaction back to the initial state, prior to (de)activation of the output module. Thus, only a fraction of the photoreceptors undergoing the phototransformations can initiate the downstream signaling process, consistent with phytochrome's function as a sensor for more durable changes of light conditions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Primary photodissociation pathways of epichlorohydrin and analysis of the C-C bond fission channels from an O(3P)+allyl radical intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Alligood, Bridget W.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2010-01-01

    This study initially characterizes the primary photodissociation processes of epichlorohydrin, c-(H 2 COCH)CH 2 Cl. The three dominant photoproduct channels analyzed are c-(H 2 COCH)CH 2 +Cl, c-(H 2 COCH)+CH 2 Cl, and C 3 H 4 O+HCl. In the second channel, the c-(H 2 COCH) photofission product is a higher energy intermediate on C 2 H 3 O global potential energy surface and has a small isomerization barrier to vinoxy. The resulting highly vibrationally excited vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass corresponding to ketene, H 2 CCO. The final primary photodissociation pathway HCl+C 3 H 4 O evidences a recoil kinetic energy distribution similar to that of four-center HCl elimination in chlorinated alkenes, so is assigned to production of c-(H 2 COC)=CH 2 ; the epoxide product is formed with enough vibrational energy to isomerize to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C 3 H 5 O radical produced from C-Cl bond photofission. When the epoxide radical photoproduct undergoes facile ring opening, it is the radical intermediate formed in the O( 3 P)+allyl bimolecular reaction when the O atom adds to an end C atom. We focus on the HCO+C 2 H 4 and H 2 CO+C 2 H 3 product channels from this radical intermediate in this report. Analysis of the velocity distribution of the momentum-matched signals from the HCO+C 2 H 4 products at m/e=29 and 28 shows that the dissociation of the radical intermediate imparts a high relative kinetic energy, peaking near 20 kcal/mol, between the products. Similarly, the energy imparted to relative kinetic energy in the H 2 CO+C 2 H 3 product channel of the O( 3 P)+allyl radical intermediate also peaks at high-recoil kinetic energies, near 18 kcal/mol. The strongly forward-backward peaked angular distributions and the high kinetic energy release result from tangential recoil during the dissociation of highly rotationally excited nascent radicals formed photolytically in this experiment

  14. Primary photodissociation pathways of epichlorohydrin and analysis of the C-C bond fission channels from an O(3P)+allyl radical intermediate

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Alligood, Bridget W.; Butler, Laurie J.; Lee, Shih-Huang; Lin, Jim-Min, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    This study initially characterizes the primary photodissociation processes of epichlorohydrin, c-(H2COCH)CH2Cl. The three dominant photoproduct channels analyzed are c-(H2COCH)CH2+Cl, c-(H2COCH)+CH2Cl, and C3H4O+HCl. In the second channel, the c-(H2COCH) photofission product is a higher energy intermediate on C2H3O global potential energy surface and has a small isomerization barrier to vinoxy. The resulting highly vibrationally excited vinoxy radicals likely dissociate to give the observed signal at the mass corresponding to ketene, H2CCO. The final primary photodissociation pathway HCl+C3H4O evidences a recoil kinetic energy distribution similar to that of four-center HCl elimination in chlorinated alkenes, so is assigned to production of c-(H2COC)=CH2; the epoxide product is formed with enough vibrational energy to isomerize to acrolein and dissociate. The paper then analyzes the dynamics of the C3H5O radical produced from C-Cl bond photofission. When the epoxide radical photoproduct undergoes facile ring opening, it is the radical intermediate formed in the O(P3)+allyl bimolecular reaction when the O atom adds to an end C atom. We focus on the HCO+C2H4 and H2CO+C2H3 product channels from this radical intermediate in this report. Analysis of the velocity distribution of the momentum-matched signals from the HCO+C2H4 products at m/e=29 and 28 shows that the dissociation of the radical intermediate imparts a high relative kinetic energy, peaking near 20 kcal/mol, between the products. Similarly, the energy imparted to relative kinetic energy in the H2CO+C2H3 product channel of the O(P3)+allyl radical intermediate also peaks at high-recoil kinetic energies, near 18 kcal/mol. The strongly forward-backward peaked angular distributions and the high kinetic energy release result from tangential recoil during the dissociation of highly rotationally excited nascent radicals formed photolytically in this experiment. The data also reveal substantial branching to an HCCH+H3

  15. The concern of emergence of multi-station reaction pathways that might make stepwise the mechanism of the 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions of azides and alkynes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtat, Bita; Siadati, Seyyed Amir; Khalilzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Zareyee, Daryoush

    2018-03-01

    After hot debates on the concerted or stepwise nature of the mechanism of the catalyst-free 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions (DC)s, nowadays, it is being believed that for the reaction of each dipole and dipolarophile, there is a possibility that the reaction mechanism becomes stepwise, intermediates emerge, and the reaction becomes non-stereospecific. Yield of even minimal amounts of unwanted side products or stereoisomers as impurities could bring many troubles like difficult purification steps. In this project, we have made attempts to study all probable reaction channels of the azide cycloadditions with two functionalized alkynes, in order to answer this question: "is there any possibility that intermediates evolve in the catalyst-free click 1,3-DC reaction of azide-alkynes?". During the calculations, several multi-station reaction pathways supporting the stepwise and concerted mechanisms were detected. Also, the born-oppenheimer molecular dynamic (BOMD) simulation was used to find trustable geometries which could be emerged during the reaction coordinate.

  16. Investigation of incomplete linear momentum transfer in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leray, S.

    1986-07-01

    At intermediate energies, heavy ion central collisions lead to the incomplete fusion of the incident nuclei while part of the initial linear momentum is carried away by fast light particles. Experiments were performed with 30 MeV per nucleon neon and 20, 35 and 44 MeV per nucleon argon projectiles bombarding heavy targets. Results obtained with 30 MeV per nucleon neon and 20 MeV per nucleon argon beams are in good agreement with an empirical law established with lighter projectiles. On the contrary, 35 and 44 MeV per nucleon argon projectiles do not follow the same law and fission fragments progressively disappear. A simple model explains the evolution of the amount of transferred linear momentum versus incident energy. The disappearance of the fusion products of the composite system observed with argon projectiles beyond 35 MeV per nucleon is explained by a limitation of the excitation energy per nucleon which can be deposited in a nucleus. The limit is evaluated from nucleon binding energy in nuclei and probability to emit clusters and is in good agreement with experimental data. Because of the coupling between intrinsic motion of nucleons and relative motion of nuclei, some nucleons have a kinetic energy high enough to be emitted: a theoretical model is proposed which rather well fits the data concerning fast nucleons but cannot explain the measured amounts of transferred linear momentum. This is attributed to the existence of other mechanisms [fr

  17. Workshop on hadron structure from photo-reactions at intermediate energies: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nathan, A.M.; Sandorfi, A.M. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The proton compton effect: Recent measurements of the electric and magnetic polorizabilities of the proton; experiments on the electric polarizability of the neutron; chiral symmetry and nucleon polarizabilities; chiral model predictions for electromagnetic polarizabilities of the nucleon, a consumer report; the polarizabilities of bound nucleons; nucleon polarizability in free space and in nuclear matter; mechanisms of photon scattering on nucleons at intermediate energies; pion polarizabilities in chiral perturbation theory; pion polarizabilities and the shielding of [sigma](700)-meson exchange in [gamma][gamma][yields][pi][pi] processes; pion and kaon polarizabilities in the quark confinement model; radiative pion photoproduction and pion polarizabilities; pion and sigma polarizabilities and radiative transitions; the quadrupole amplitude in the [gamma][Nu]-[Delta] transition; pion photoproduction and the [gamma][Nu]-[Delta] amplitudes; effective- lagrangians, Watson's theorem, and the E2/M1 mixing ratio in the excitation of the delta resonance; new measurements of the p([rvec [gamma

  18. Dilepton spectroscopy at intermediate energies; the carbon - carbon reaction at 1 GeV/A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prunet, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Physics context of this work is heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies where di-electron provide informations on the produced hot and dense nuclear matter. The experiment is performed by the DiLepton Spectrometer (DLS) Collaboration at the Lawrence Berkeley's Bevalac. After a description of the apparatus, we review the whole program and the main results so far obtained: first evidence of a significant di-electron signal at energies above 1 GeV/A; improvement of the understanding of di-electron production (electromagnetic decays of hadrons, π + π - annihilation and hadronic Bremsstrahlung). The results of p-p, p-d reactions from 1 to 4.9 GeV/A show that hadronic Bremsstrahlung (pp, pn) should be reformulated. Our analysis, optimized on the reaction Carbon-Carbon at 1 GeV/A, has been applied to α-Ca and d-Ca. We have developed two main aspects: improvement of the time resolution (500 ps) in order to eliminate all of the protons. Improvement of the space resolution (300 μ) for better mass resolution, in particular in the ρ region. We obtain the cross section of di-electron production as a function of mass, transverse momentum and rapidity from the C-C, α-Ca and d-Ca reactions at 1 GeV/A. We also compare the cross section for all of the measured systems at 1 GeV/A, including Ca-Ca, and we show a (ApAt) α dependence with α ≅ 1.1. A study of the associated multiplicity has also been performed. Nevertheless, the limited acceptance of the DLS and its poor mass resolution to identify the ρ, ω vector mesons, do not allow to conclude on hadron behaviour in nuclear matter. This point is one of the main goal of the HADES project at GSI (Darmstadt), which we give a brief description of the main features. (authors). 60 refs

  19. Intermediate- and high-energy reactions of uranium with neon and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGaughey, P.L.

    1982-11-01

    Target fragment production from the interactions of 1.0, 3.0, 4.8, and 12 GeV 12 C and 5.0, 8.0, 20, and 42 GeV 20 Ne with uranium has been measured using off-line gamma-ray spectroscopic techniques. The experimental charge and mass yield distributions are generally consistent with the concepts of limiting fragmentation and factorization at energies of 3.0 GeV and above. The total projectile kinetic energy was found to be the relevant scaling parameter for the comparison of reactions induced by projectiles of different sizes. Light fragments with mass number less than 60 were found to violate limiting fragmentation, and had excitation functions that were strongly increasing with projectile energy until 8.0 to 12.0 GeV. With the 1.0 GeV 12 C beam the pattern of mass yields was quite different from that of all the other reactions, with the normal peak in the fission mass region (80 < A < 145), but with much lower yields below mass number 60 and between mass numbers 145 and 210, indicating that these fragments are formed primarily in very energetic reactions in which large excitation energies are transferred to and significant amounts of mass are removed from the target nucleus. Theoretical predictions of the intra-nuclear cascade, nuclear fireball, and nuclear firestreak models are compared with the experimental results. The intra-nuclear cascade and nuclear firestreak models are both able to predict the general shapes of the experimental distributions, with the exception of the yields for the lightest fragments

  20. De-excitation gamma-ray technique for improved resolution in intermediate energy photonuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzin, A.; Thompson, M.N.; Rassool, R.; Adler, J.O.; Fissum, K.; Issaksson, L.; Ruijter, H.; Schroeder, B.; Annand, J.R.M.; McGeorge, J.C.; Crawford, G.I.; Gregel, J.

    1997-01-01

    The 12 C (γ,p) reaction was studied. The experiment was done at the MAX Laboratory of Lund University, using tagged photons with energy between 50 and 70 MeV and natural carbon targets. It has been possible to detect γ-ray emitted from the residual nucleus, in coincidence with photoprotons leading to the excited residual state. The 200 KeV gamma-ray resolution permitted the identification of the residual states and allowed off-line cuts to be made in order to identify the excitation region in 11 B from what particular de-excitation gamma-ray were seen. 9 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  1. Contributions to the study of nuclear reactions mechanism induced by heavy ions on intermediate mass nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avrigeanu, M.

    1982-01-01

    A detailed analysis is presented, based on Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations of the γ-ray excitation functions measured in the sup(74,76)Ge ( 12 C, xn) and sup(72,73)Ge ( 16 O,xnyp) reactions. The most usual quantities provided by the in beam γ-ray measurements such as the cross sections for the population of the final states as well as the decay scheme and the degree of alignment of these states mainly offer the means of testing models of both the reaction mechanism and nuclear properties of high excitation energies, since they concentrate information on the whole reaction process. Experimental information on sup(85,86)Sr and sup(85,86)Y, γ-decay scheme and the excitation functions for the population of the final states were obtained by sub(74,76)Ge ( 12 C,αn), n = 2-4, sup(74,76)Ge ( 14 N,xn) n = 3-5, sup(72,73)Ge ( 16 O,xnyp), x = 1-3, y=1 reactions at incident energies between 35 and 60 MW. Statistical model calculations in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism have been compared with the experimental γ-ray excitation functions. The competitive emission of neutrons, protons, alpha particles and gamma rays from the compound nucleus has been considered in the calculations. The calculations describe satisfactorily the total cross sections for the population of the 2n, 3n and 4n channels for 12 C + sup(74,76)Ge and 2n, np, 3n and 2np channels for 16 O + 72 Ge. The calculations are sensitive to the characteristics of the excited levels (such as spin values) but htis this sensitivity could be exploited with some reliability only if one makes use of a rather complete level scheme in the calculations. In the case of 2n, np, 3n and 2 np channels for 16 O+ 73 Ge one concludes on the reliability of consideration some structural aspects in the calculations

  2. RuO4-mediated oxidation of secondary amines 2. imines as main reaction intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florea Cristina A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidation by RuO4 (generated in situ from RuO2 and NaIO4 of secondary amines such as Bn–NH–CH2R (1; R=H, Me gave complex reaction mixtures, but mainly amides. In the presence of cyanide, the leading products were α-aminonitriles. Comparison of the oxidation products of 1 with those from the corresponding imines PhCH=N–CH2R and Bn–N=CH–R showed that formation of the indicated imines is the first main step in the oxidation of 1. A detailed mechanism is proposed.

  3. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas [UC Irvine, 2212 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Goulding, Celia W., E-mail: celia.goulding@uci.edu [UC Irvine, 2212 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); UC Irvine, 2302 Natural Sciences I, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The crystal structures of Y. pestis RipA mutants were determined to provide insights into the CoA transferase reaction pathway. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenylalanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully

  4. Structural snapshots along the reaction pathway of Yersinia pestis RipA, a putative butyryl-CoA transferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Rodrigo; Lan, Benson; Latif, Yama; Chim, Nicholas; Goulding, Celia W.

    2014-01-01

    The crystal structures of Y. pestis RipA mutants were determined to provide insights into the CoA transferase reaction pathway. Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague, is able to survive in both extracellular and intracellular environments within the human host, although its intracellular survival within macrophages is poorly understood. A novel Y. pestis three-gene rip (required for intracellular proliferation) operon, and in particular ripA, has been shown to be essential for survival and replication in interferon γ-induced macrophages. RipA was previously characterized as a putative butyryl-CoA transferase proposed to yield butyrate, a known anti-inflammatory shown to lower macrophage-produced NO levels. RipA belongs to the family I CoA transferases, which share structural homology, a conserved catalytic glutamate which forms a covalent CoA-thioester intermediate and a flexible loop adjacent to the active site known as the G(V/I)G loop. Here, functional and structural analyses of several RipA mutants are presented in an effort to dissect the CoA transferase mechanism of RipA. In particular, E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants show increased butyryl-CoA transferase activities when compared with wild-type RipA. Furthermore, the X-ray crystal structures of E61V, M31G and F60M RipA mutants, when compared with the wild-type RipA structure, reveal important conformational changes orchestrated by a conserved acyl-group binding-pocket phenylalanine, Phe85, and the G(V/I)G loop. Binary structures of M31G RipA and F60M RipA with two distinct CoA substrate conformations are also presented. Taken together, these data provide CoA transferase reaction snapshots of an open apo RipA, a closed glutamyl-anhydride intermediate and an open CoA-thioester intermediate. Furthermore, biochemical analyses support essential roles for both the catalytic glutamate and the flexible G(V/I)G loop along the reaction pathway, although further research is required to fully

  5. Catecholase activity of dicopper(II)-bispidine complexes: stabilities and structures of intermediates, kinetics and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Karin; Comba, Peter; Daubinet, André; Fuchs, Alexander; Wadepohl, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    A mechanism for the oxidation of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol (dtbc) with dioxygen to the corresponding quinone (dtbq), catalyzed by bispidine-dicopper complexes (bispidines are various mono- and dinucleating derivatives of 3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane with bis-tertiary-amine-bispyridyl or bis-tertiary-amine-trispyridyl donor sets), is proposed on the basis of (1) the stoichiometry of the reaction as well as the stabilities and structures [X-ray, density functional theory (B3LYP, TZV)] of the bispidine-dicopper(II)-3,4,5,6-tetrachlorcatechol intermediates, (2) formation kinetics and structures (molecular mechanics, MOMEC) of the end-on peroxo-dicopper(II) complexes and (3) kinetics of the stoichiometric (anaerobic) and catalytic (aerobic) copper-complex-assisted oxidation of dtbc. This involves (1) the oxidation of the dicopper(I) complexes with dioxygen to the corresponding end-on peroxo-dicopper(II) complexes, (2) coordination of dtbc as a bridging ligand upon liberation of H(2)O(2) and (3) intramolecular electron transfer to produce dtbq, which is liberated, and the dicopper(I) catalyst. Although the bispidine complexes have reactivities comparable to those of recently published catalysts with macrocyclic ligands, which seem to reproduce the enzyme-catalyzed process in various reaction sequences, a strikingly different oxidation mechanism is derived from the bispidine-dicopper-catalyzed reaction.

  6. Parameterization of α-nucleus total reaction cross section at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvi, M A; Abdulmomen, M A

    2008-01-01

    Applying a Coulomb correction factor to the Glauber model we have derived a closed expression for α-nucleus total reaction cross section, σ R . Under the approximation of rigid projectile model, the elastic S-matrix element S el (b) is evaluated from the phenomenological N-α amplitude and a Gaussian fit to the Helm's model form factor. Excellent agreements with the experimental data have been achieved by performing two-parameter fits to the α-nucleus σ R data in the energy range about 75 to 193 MeV. One of the parameters was found to be energy independent while the other, as expected, shows the energy dependence similar to that of N-α total cross section.

  7. Reaction of iminopropadienones with amines: mechanistic explanations of zwitterionic intermediate, ketene and ketenimine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Rainer; Finnerty, Justin J; Bruhn, Torsten; Borget, Fabien; Wentrup, Curt

    2008-09-25

    The complex reaction of thermally generated iminopropadienones with amines in the gas phase and upon matrix deposition and its varying product composition is investigated using density functional theory. In the high energy gas phase addition a single amine molecule reacts readily with iminopropadienone with the decisive step being a 1,3-hydrogen shift and activation barriers of at least 100 kJ/mol. In accordance with the experiment, the formation of ketenes is favored. In the condensed phase of an amine matrix, the utilization of amine dimers both as reagents and as explicit solvents lowers the activation energy required to a feasible 20-30 kJ/mol and predicts ketenimines as the main products, as observed experimentally.

  8. Analyzing powers in the dd→3Hen(3Hp) reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladygin, V. P.; Kiselev, A. S.; Kurilkin, A. K.; Vasiliev, T. A.; Isupov, A. Yu.; Ladygina, N. B.; Malakhov, A. I.; Reznikov, S. G.; Uesaka, T.; Saito, T.; Hatano, M.; Kato, H.; Sakoda, S.; Uchigashima, N.; Yako, K.; Janek, M.; Maeda, Y.; Nishikawa, J.; Ohnishi, T.; Sakamoto, N.

    2008-01-01

    Data for the deuteron analyzing powers in the dd→ 3 Hen( 3 Hp) reactions obtained at 140-270 MeV are discussed. The observed negative sign of the tensor analyzing powers A yy , A xx and A xz at small angles clearly demonstrate the sensitivity to the ratio of the D and S state components of the 3 He wave function. The behavior of the tensor analyzing powers at backward angles is sensitive to the short-range spin structure of the deuteron. However, the one-nucleon exchange calculations using standard 3 He and deuteron wave functions fail to reproduce the strong variation of the tensor analyzing powers as a function of angle in the cms. Sensitivity to relativistic effects is also discussed

  9. Salient features of heavy ion reactions in the intermediate energy region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobsson, B.

    1987-01-01

    In this lecture the attention is focused on the most central and therefore generally also the most violent collisions. It is necessary to remember that the non-participating volumes could be very different for symmetric and asymmetric reactions. The onset of the multifragmentation channel or rather the cease of the fusion process is the first topic to be discussed. This question is directly related to the limitation in energy and momentum transfer and thus to the question about nuclear transparency. Exclusive data on multifragmentation on an event-by-event basis, which may help the model constructors, is presented as the second topic. In lecture the onset of fragmentation, fragment sizes in multifragmentation processes, the origin of light particle correlations and emission of pions and kaons close to the threshold are discussed

  10. Intermediate behaviour of reaction mechanisms in 27Al + 63Cu collisions at 13.4 MeV/nucleon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougault, R.

    1983-09-01

    This experiment aimed to investigate the nuclear reaction mechanisms in the energy transition region between 10 and 20 MeV/Nucleon. So, collisions between 27 Al (projectile) and 63 Cu (target) were studied for a bombarding energy of 13.4 MeV/nucleon. For that purpose, projectile-like fragments were detected at the grazing angle (thetasub(g)) for that system by a spectrometer and an E-ΔE telescope. A second telescope was set at various angles for light particle detection; both inclusive and coincident measurements were performed. Isotope production at angle thetasub(g) cannot be clearly explained neither by inelastic transfers nor by ''cold'' projectile fragmentation. This production seems rather to occur through an intermediate process where the Al nucleus is slowed down, and excited, and then dissociates. Moreover, kinematical correlations between fragments show evidence for a mechanism where the projectile is splitted after picking up some nucleons to the target. Finally, light particles are shown to araise essentially from a fusion-like system thermalized at T=3,5 MeV; such a temperature may be considered as an intermediate value [fr

  11. Extending the Kawai-Kerman-McVoy Statistical Theory of Nuclear Reactions to Intermediate Structure via Doorways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbanas, Goran; Bertulani, C.A.; Dean, D.J.; Kerman, A.K.; Roche, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Kawai, Kerman, and McVoy have shown that a statistical treatment of many open channels that are coupled by direct reactions leads to modifications of the Hauser- Feshbach expression for energy-averaged cross section (Ann. of Phys. 75 (1973) 156). The energy averaging interval for this cross section is on the order of the width of single particle resonances, 1MeV, revealing only a gross structure in the cross section. When the energy-averaging interval is decreased down to a width of a doorway state 0.1 MeV, a so-called intermediate structure may be observed in cross sections. We extend the Kawai-Kerman-McVoy theory into the intermediate structure by leveraging a theory of doorway states developed by Feshbach, Kerman, and Lemmer (Ann. of Phys. 42 (1967) 230). As a byproduct of the extension, an alternative derivation of the central result of the Kawai-Kerman-McVoy theory is suggested. We quantify the effect of the approximations used in derivation by performing numerical computations for a large set of compound nuclear states.

  12. Metabolic control analysis of biochemical pathways based on a thermokinetic description of reaction rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bredal

    1997-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis is a powerful technique for the evaluation of flux control within biochemical pathways. Its foundation is the elasticity coefficients and the flux control coefficients (FCCs). On the basis of a thermokinetic description of reaction rates it is here shown...... that the elasticity coefficients can be calculated directly from the pool levels of metabolites at steady state. The only requirement is that one thermodynamic parameter be known, namely the reaction affinity at the intercept of the tangent in the inflection point of the curve of reaction rate against reaction...... of the thermokinetic description of reaction rates to include the influence of effecters. Here the reaction rate is written as a linear function of the logarithm of the metabolite concentrations. With this type of rate function it is shown that the approach of Delgado and Liao [Biochem. J. (1992) 282, 919-927] can...

  13. Fluid flow pathways through the oceanic crust: reaction permeability and isotopic tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaig, Andrew; Castelain, Teddy; Klein, Frieder

    2013-04-01

    It is generally assumed that the dominant means of creating permeability in ocean floor hydrothermal systems is fracturing, induced either by cooling or by tectonic stress. Here we show textural evidence that metamorphic reactions can create a hierarchy of permeable pathways through gabbroic rocks similar to a fracture hierarchy. Isotopic microsampling shows that just as with fractures, most flow occurs through the larger channelways, and that even at the microscale, flow can be extremely heterogeneous with alteration affecting only certain minerals in the framework, leaving others untouched. Reaction permeability is created in three ways; dissolution creating open porosity, microcracking due to volume increase reactions involving olivine, and expansion of water due to rapid heating in dyke margins, particularly when intruded into brecciated rocks. Our data comes from IODP Hole U1309D, which was drilled to 1400 mbsf in the footwall of the Atlantis Massif detachment fault at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge 30°N. The core is composed of gabbroic rocks interlayered with olivine rich troctolites, with several basalt/diabase sills in the top 130 m. The dominant alteration occurred in the greenschist facies, at depths at least 1 km below seafloor, and decreases in intensity downhole. Whole rock oxygen isotope values range from +5.5 permil to +1.5 permil, indicating variable degrees of interaction with seawater at temperatures generally > 250 °C. Gabbroic rocks and diabases exhibit a range of Sr isotope ratios from MORB values (0.70261) to intermediate ratios (0.70429). Microsampling shows that amphiboles are often more radiogenic than coexisting plagioclase and can sometimes be isotopically altered in the same rock as completely unaltered primary minerals. Large (10 cm) amphibole-filled vugs show values ranging up to 0.708, close to seawater. In some cases however the secondary minerals are virtually unaltered indicating low fluid fluxes in pervasive alteration. SEM textures in

  14. Novel Fragmentation Pathways of Anionic Adducts of Steroids Formed by Electrospray Anion Attachment Involving Regioselective Attachment, Regiospecific Decompositions, Charge-Induced Pathways, and Ion-Dipole Complex Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rannulu, Nalaka S.; Cole, Richard B.

    2012-09-01

    The analysis of several bifunctional neutral steroids, 5-α-pregnane diol (5-α-pregnane-3α-20βdiol), estradiol (3,17α-dihydroxy-1,3,5(10)-estratriene), progesterone (4-pregnene-3,20-dione), lupeol (3β-hydroxy-20(29)-lupene), pregnenolone (5-pregnen-3β-ol-20-one), and pregnenolone acetate (5-pregnen-3β-ol-20-one acetate) was accomplished by negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) employing adduct formation with various anions: fluoride, bicarbonate, acetate, and chloride. Fluoride yielded higher abundances of anionic adducts and more substantial abundances of deprotonated molecules compared with other investigated anions. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) of precursor [M + anion]- adducts of these steroids revealed that fluoride adduct [M + F]- precursors first lose HF to produce [M - H]- and then undergo consecutive decompositions to yield higher abundances of structurally-informative product ions than the other tested anions. In addition to charge-remote fragmentations, the majority of CID pathways of estradiol are deduced to occur via charge-induced fragmentation. Most interestingly, certain anions exhibit preferential attachment to a specific site on these bifunctional steroid molecules, which we are calling "regioselective anion attachment." Regioselective anion attachment is evidenced by subsequent regiospecific decomposition. Regioselective attachment of fluoride (and acetate) anions to low (and moderate) acidity functional groups of pregnenolone, respectively, is demonstrated using deuterated compounds. Moreover, the formation of unique intermediate ion-dipole complexes leading to novel fragmentation pathways of fluoride adducts of pregnenolone acetate, and bicarbonate adducts of d4-pregnenolone, are also discussed.

  15. Approach to photocatalysis at the molecular level. Design of photocatalysts, detection of intermediate species, and reaction mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anpo, Masakazu [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Osaka Prefecture, Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-08-01

    The characterization of the Cu{sup +}/ZSM-5 catalysts prepared via reduction of ion-exchanged Cu{sup 2+}/ZSM-5 samples and highly dispersed Ti-oxide catalysts anchored on Vycor glass has been undertaken by in-situ photoluminescence, EPR, XAFS (XANES and FT-EXAFS), and FT-IR spectroscopy. UV-irradiation of the Cu{sup +}/ZSM-5 catalyst in the presence of NO leads to the direct photocatalytic decomposition of NO into N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} at normal temperatures. UV-irradiation of the highly dispersed anchored Ti-oxide catalyst in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O also leads to the evolution of CH{sub 4}, CO, and CH{sub 3}OH at normal temperatures. The clarification of the coordination structure of the active surface sites and the direct detection of the reaction precursors and intermediate species in these photocatalytic systems contributed significantly in characterizing the molecular scale reaction mechanisms. Based on these results, the design of highly concentrated and efficient photocatalysts has successfully been achieved by application of the sol-gel method

  16. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Department of Physical Chemistry, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C., E-mail: chemmcl@emory.edu [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-28

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH{sub 2}OO and anti/syn-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH{sub 2}OO and anti-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH{sub 3}C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C–H bonds. For syn-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH{sub 3} group by the terminal O atom producing CH{sub 2}C(H)O–OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH{sub 2}OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction.

  17. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia; Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH 2 OO and anti/syn-CH 3 C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH 2 OO and anti-CH 3 C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH 3 C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C–H bonds. For syn-CH 3 C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH 3 group by the terminal O atom producing CH 2 C(H)O–OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH 2 OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction

  18. Origin and pathways of Winter Intermediate Water in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea using observations and numerical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juza, Mélanie; Renault, Lionel; Ruiz, Simon; Tintoré, Joaquin

    2013-12-01

    The study of water masses worldwide (their formation, spreading, mixing, and impact on general circulation) is essential for a better understanding of the ocean circulation and variability. In this paper, the formation and main pathways of Winter Intermediate Water (WIW) in the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea (NWMED) are investigated during the winter-spring 2011 using observations and numerical simulation. The main results show that the WIW, formed along the continental shelves of the Gulf of Lion and Balearic Sea, circulates southward following five preferential pathways depending on the WIW formation site location and the oceanic conditions. WIW joins the northeastern part of the Balearic Sea, or flows along the continental shelves until joining the Balearic Current (maximum of 0.33 Sv in early-April) or further south until the Ibiza Channel entrance. Two additional trajectories, contributing to water mass exchanges with the southern part of the Western Mediterranean Sea, bring the WIW through the Ibiza and Mallorca Channels (maxima of 0.26 Sv in late-March and 0.1 Sv in early-April, respectively). The circulation of WIW over the NWMED at 50-200 m depth, its mixing and spreading over the Western Mediterranean Sea (reaching the south of the Balearic Islands, the Algero-Provencal basin, the Ligurian and the Alboran Seas) suggest that the WIW may have an impact on the ocean circulation by eddy blocking effect, exchange of water masses between north and south subbasins of Western Mediterranean Sea through the Ibiza Channel or modification of the ocean stratification.

  19. Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Kinetics, reaction pathways, and formation of brominated by-products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Yuefei [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Kong, Deyang [Nanjing Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection of PRC, Nanjing 210042 (China); Lu, Junhe, E-mail: jhlu@njau.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China); Jin, Hao; Kang, Fuxing; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhou, Quansuo [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095 (China)

    2016-08-05

    Highlights: • Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A. • Phenolic moiety was the reactive site for sulfate radical attack. • Pathways include β-scission, oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. • Brominated disinfection by-products were found during TBBPA degradation. • Humic acid inhibited TBBPA degradation but promoted DBPs formation. - Abstract: Degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a flame retardant widely spread in the environment, in Co(II) catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation process was systematically explored. The second-order-rate constant for reaction of sulfate radical (SO{sub 4}{sup ·−}) with TBBPA was determined to be 5.27 × 10{sup 10} M{sup −1} s{sup −1}. Apparently, degradation of TBBPA showed first-order kinetics to the concentrations of both Co(II) and PMS. The presence of humic acid (HA) and bicarbonate inhibited TBBPA degradation, most likely due to their competition for SO{sub 4}{sup ·−}. Degradation of TBBPA was initiated by an electron abstraction from one of the phenolic rings. Detailed transformation pathways were proposed, including β-scission of isopropyl bridge, phenolic ring oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. Further oxidative degradation of intermediates in Co(II)/PMS process yielded brominated disinfection by-products (Br-DBPs) such as bromoform and brominated acetic acids. Evolution profile of Br-DBPs showed an initially increasing and then decreasing pattern with maximum concentrations occurring around 6–10 h. The presence of HA enhanced the formation of Br-DBPs significantly. These findings reveal potentially important, but previously unrecognized, formation of Br-DBPs during sulfate radical-based oxidation of bromide-containing organic compounds that may pose toxicological risks to human health.

  20. A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in…

  1. Study of the optimal reaction conditions for assay of the mouse alternative complement pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, H. van; Rademaker, P.M.; Klerx, J.P.A.M.; Willers, J.M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The optimal reaction conditions for hemolytic assay of alternative complement pathway activity in mouse serum were investigated. A microtiter system was used, in which a number of 7.5×106 rabbit erythrocytes per test well appeared to be optimal. Rabbit erythrocytes were superior as target cells over

  2. Catalytic Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis Oil : Model Studies on Reaction Pathways for the Carbohydrate Fraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildschut, J.; Arentz, J.; Rasrendra, C. B.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oil can be upgraded by a catalytic hydrotreatment (250-400 degrees C, 100-200 bar) using heterogeneous catalysts such as Ru/C to hydrocarbon-like products that can serve as liquid transportation fuels. Insight into the complex reaction pathways of the various component fractions

  3. Supercritical carbon dioxide versus toluene as reaction media in silica functionalisation: Synthesis and characterisation of bonded aminopropyl silica intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashu-Arrah, Benjamin A; Glennon, Jeremy D

    2017-06-09

    This research reports supercritical carbon dioxide versus toluene as reaction media in silica functionalisation for use in liquid chromatography. Bonded aminopropyl silica (APS) intermediates were prepared when porous silica particles (Exsil-pure, 3μm) were reacted with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (3-APTES) or N,N-dimethylaminopropyltrimethoxysilane (DMAPTMS) using supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO 2 ) and toluene as reaction media. Covalent bonding to silica was confirmed using elemental microanalysis (CHN), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), zeta potential (ξ), diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform (DRIFT) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS NMR) spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that under sc-CO 2 conditions of 100°C/414bar in a substantial reduced time of 3h, the surface coverage of APS (evaluated from%C obtained from elemental analysis) prepared with APTES (%C: 8.03, 5.26μmol/m -2 ) or DMAPTES (%C: 5.12, 4.58μmol/m 2 ) is somewhat higher when compared to organic based reactions under reflux in toluene at a temperature of 110°C in 24h with APTES (%C: 7.33, 4.71μmol/m 2 ) and DMAPTMS (%C: 4.93, 4.38μmol/m 2 ). Zeta potential measurements revealed a change in electrostatic surface charge from negative values for bare Exsil-pure silica to positive for functionalised APS materials indicating successful immobilization of the aminosilane onto the surface of silica. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathways for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such parameters as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. For some dynamics methods, global potential energy surfaces are required. In this case, it is necessary to obtain the energy at a complete sampling of all the possible arrangements of the nuclei, which are energetically accessible, and then a fitting function must be obtained to interpolate between the computed points. In other cases, characterization of the stationary points and the reaction pathway connecting them is sufficient. These properties may be readily obtained using analytical derivative methods. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method to obtain accurate energetics, gives usefull results for a number of chemically important systems. The talk will focus on a number of applications including global potential energy surfaces, H + O2, H + N2, O(3p) + H2, and reaction pathways for complex reactions, including reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion.

  5. Bridge mediated two-electron transfer reactions: Analysis of stepwise and concerted pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, E.G.; May, V.

    2004-01-01

    A theory of nonadiabatic donor (D)-acceptor (A) two-electron transfer (TET) mediated by a single regular bridge (B) is developed. The presence of different intermediate two-electron states connecting the reactant state D -- BA with the product state DBA -- results in complex multiexponential kinetics. The conditions are discussed at which a reduction to two-exponential as well as single-exponential kinetics becomes possible. For the latter case the rate K TET is calculated, which describes the bridge-mediated reaction as an effective two-electron D-A transfer. In the limit of small populations of the intermediate TET states D - B - A, DB -- A, D - BA - , and DB - A - , K TET is obtained as a sum of the rates K TET (step) and K TET (sup) . The first rate describes stepwise TET originated by transitions of a single electron. It starts at D -- BA and reaches DBA -- via the intermediate state D - BA - . These transitions cover contributions from sequential as well as superexchange reactions all including reduced bridge states. In contrast, a specific two-electron superexchange mechanism from D -- BA to DBA -- defines K TET (sup) . An analytic dependence of K TET (step) and K TET (sup) on the number of bridging units is presented and different regimes of D-A TET are studied

  6. RhoA/ROCK Signaling Pathway Mediates Shuanghuanglian Injection-Induced Pseudo-allergic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jiayin; Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Yushi; Li, Chunying; Yi, Yan; Pan, Chen; Tian, Jingzhuo; Yang, Yifei; Cui, Hongyu; Wang, Lianmei; Liu, Suyan; Liu, Jing; Deng, Nuo; Liang, Aihua

    2018-01-01

    Background: Shuanghuanglian injection (SHLI) is a famous Chinese medicine used as an intravenous preparation for the treatment of acute respiratory tract infections. In the recent years, the immediate hypersensitivity reactions induced by SHLI have attracted broad attention. However, the mechanism involved in these reactions has not yet been elucidated. The present study aims to explore the characteristics of the immediate hypersensitivity reactions induced by SHLI and deciphers the role of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway in these reactions. Methods: SHLI-immunized mice or naive mice were intravenously injected (i.v.) with SHLI (600 mg/kg) once, and vascular leakage in the ears was evaluated. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis test was conducted using sera collected from SHLI-immunized mice. Naive mice were administered (i.v.) with a single dose of 150, 300, or 600 mg/kg of SHLI, and vascular leakage, histamine release, and histopathological alterations in the ears, lungs, and intestines were tested. In vitro , human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayer was incubated with SHLI (0.05, 0.1, or 0.15 mg/mL), and the changes in endothelial permeability and cytoskeleton were observed. Western blot analysis was performed and ROCK inhibitor was employed to investigate the contribution of the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway in SHLI-induced hypersensitivity reactions, both in HUVECs and in mice. Results: Our results indicate that SHLI was able to cause immediate dose-dependent vascular leakage, edema, and exudates in the ears, lungs, and intestines, and histamine release in mice. These were pseudo-allergic reactions, as SHLI-specific IgE was not elicited during sensitization. In addition, SHLI induced reorganization of actin cytoskeleton and disrupted the endothelial barrier. The administration of SHLI directly activated the RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway both in HUVECs and in the ears, lungs, and intestines of mice. Fasudil hydrochloride, a ROCK inhibitor, ameliorated the

  7. An unexpected reaction pathway in the synthesis of the ABCE framework of strychnine-type alkaloids - A multidisciplinary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šoral, Michal; Markus, Jozef; Doháňošová, Jana; Šoralová, Stanislava; Dvoranová, Dana; Chyba, Andrej; Moncol, Ján; Berkeš, Dušan; Liptaj, Tibor

    2017-01-01

    Acid-catalyzed cyclization of spirocyclic 1‧-benzyl-2‧-(prop-2-en-1-yl)spiro[indole-3,3‧-pyrrolidine]-5‧-one (1) was performed. The pentacyclic product of Povarov-like imino-Diels-Alder reaction was isolated in high yield instead of expected tetracyclic aza-Prins intermediate. The unusual exotic alkaloid-type structure of the resulting molecule 2 was unambiguously confirmed by a detailed NMR analysis using a set of 2D NMR spectra including an INADEQUATE experiment. The relative configuration of 2 was predicted from the synthesis mechanism and DFT geometry calculations and independently confirmed using NOESY and residual dipolar coupling (RDC) assisted NMR analysis in stretched crosslinked polystyrene gels. The reversibility of the cycloaddition in aprotic solvents was observed. A new reaction pathway yielding a rare 6-5-5-5 tetracyclic spiroindoline 3 was suggested. The relative configuration within the tetracyclic framework was ultimately proved using Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of compound 4.

  8. Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isied, Stephan S.

    2003-03-11

    The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

  9. Synthesis and reactions of deuterated 2-(alkylimino)-3-nitrosooxazolidines, 3-alkly-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-nitrosoureas, and related compounds as possible intermediates in the aqueous decomposition of 3-alkyl-1-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosoureas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lown, J.W.; Chauhan, S.M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Decomposition of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea-α-d 2 (CCNU-α-d 2 ) (7) in pH 7.2 phosphate buffer or of CINO-α-d 2 (9) or CHNU-α-d 2 (8) with the addition of chloride ion gives rise to the same spectrum of products, including deuterium-free acetaldehyde (29), a mixture of the two deuterio-2-chloroethanols, 2-hydroxy-2,2-dideuterioethyl cyclohexyl carbamates, and vinyl chloride containing one deuterium (i.e., opposite the results obtained in the corresponding reaction of BCNU-α-d 4 ). The products were identified and the number and position of the deuterium labels determined by GC/MS. The results are interpreted in terms of two decomposition pathways for CCNU. The first decomposition pathway operating for CCNU is via an intermediate-2-chloroethanediazohydroxide or the equivalent 2-chloroethyl cation in agreement with the results of other workers. The second pathway may involve reversible conversion of CCNU-α-d 2 (7) to CINO-α-d 2 (9) and then ring opening of the latter to CHNU-α-d 2 (8). Independent decomposition of 8 provides evidence for its conversion to a 1.1-dideuterio-2-hydroxyethanediazohydroxide (41) leading to the isolated carbamates 36 and 44. The intermediacy of species 41 may account for the formation of 2-hydroxyethylated nucleosides observed when (2-chloroethyl)nitrosoureas react with DNA. An alternative ring-opening reaction of 9 leads to a 2-hydroxydiazoethyl cyclohexylcarbamate species (37), elimination of which and attack by halide ion may account for the vinyl halide species formed. Further evidence in support of these competing pathways employing additional specifically deuterated intermediates is described and discussed

  10. Exploring the Reaction Pathways of Bioglycerol Hydrodeoxygenation to Propene over Molybdena-Based Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharopoulou, Vasiliki; Vasiliadou, Efterpi S; Lemonidou, Angeliki A

    2018-01-10

    The one-step reaction of glycerol with hydrogen to form propene selectively is a particularly challenging catalytic pathway that has not yet been explored thoroughly. Molybdena-based catalysts are active and selective to C-O bond scission; propene is the only product in the gas phase under the standard reaction conditions, and further hydrogenation to propane is impeded. Within this context, this work focuses on the exploration of the reaction pathways and the investigation of various parameters that affect the catalytic performance, such as the role of hydrogen on the product distribution and the effect of the catalyst pretreatment step. Under a hydrogen atmosphere, propene is produced primarily via 2-propenol, whereas under an inert atmosphere propanal and glycerol dissociation products are formed mainly. The reaction most likely proceeds through a reverse Mars-van Krevelen mechanism as partially reduced Mo species drive the reaction to the formation of the desired product. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Role of the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates with peroxy radicals in particle formation and growth in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yue; Wingen, Lisa M; Perraud, Véronique; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-05-21

    Ozonolysis of alkenes is an important source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in the atmosphere. However, the mechanisms by which stabilized Criegee intermediates (SCI) react to form and grow the particles, and in particular the contributions from oligomers, are not well understood. In this study, ozonolysis of trans-3-hexene (C6H12), as a proxy for small alkenes, was investigated with an emphasis on the mechanisms of particle formation and growth. Ozonolysis experiments were carried out both in static Teflon chambers (18-20 min reaction times) and in a glass flow reactor (24 s reaction time) in the absence and presence of OH or SCI scavengers, and under different relative humidity (RH) conditions. The chemical composition of polydisperse and size-selected SOA particles was probed using different mass spectrometric techniques and infrared spectroscopy. Oligomers having SCI as the chain unit are found to be the dominant components of such SOA particles. The formation mechanism for these oligomers suggested by our results follows the sequential addition of SCI to organic peroxy (RO2) radicals, in agreement with previous studies by Moortgat and coworkers. Smaller particles are shown to have a relatively greater contribution from longer oligomers. Higher O/C ratios are observed in smaller particles and are similar to those of oligomers resulting from RO2 + nSCI, supporting a significant role for longer oligomers in particle nucleation and early growth. Under atmospherically relevant RH of 30-80%, water vapor suppresses oligomer formation through scavenging SCI, but also enhances particle nucleation. Under humid conditions, or in the presence of formic or hydrochloric acid as SCI scavengers, peroxyhemiacetals are formed by the acid-catalyzed particle phase reaction between oligomers from RO2 + nSCI and a trans-3-hexene derived carbonyl product. In contrast to the ozonolysis of trans-3-hexene, oligomerization involving RO2 + nSCI does not appear to be prevalent in the

  12. Computed Potential Energy Surfaces and Minimum Energy Pathway for Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Stephen P.; Langhoff, S. R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Computed potential energy surfaces are often required for computation of such observables as rate constants as a function of temperature, product branching ratios, and other detailed properties. We have found that computation of the stationary points/reaction pathways using CASSCF/derivative methods, followed by use of the internally contracted CI method with the Dunning correlation consistent basis sets to obtain accurate energetics, gives useful results for a number of chemically important systems. Applications to complex reactions leading to NO and soot formation in hydrocarbon combustion are discussed.

  13. The role of grain boundaries and transient porosity increase as fluid pathways for reaction front propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Laura; John, Timm; Geisler, Thorsten; Putnis, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    The pseudomorphic replacement of Carrara marble by calcium phosphates was studied as a model system to examine the influence of different fluid pathways for reaction front propagation induced by fluid-rock interaction. In this model system, the grain boundaries present in the rock and the transient porosity structures developing throughout the replacement reaction enable the reaction front to progress further into the rock as well as to the center of each single grain until complete transformation. Hydrothermal treatment of the marble using phosphate bearing solutions at temperature levels of 150° C and 200° C for different durations lead to the formation of two product phases which were identified as hydroxyapatite [Ca5(PO4)3OH] as well as β-tricalcium phosphate [β-Ca3(PO4)2] (β-TCP). The formation of β-TCP was probably favored by the presence of ~0.6wt.% of Mg in the parent phase. Completely transformed single grains show a distinctive zoning, both in composition and texture. Whereas areas next to the grain boundary consist of nearly pure hydroxyapatite and show a coarse porosity, areas close to the center of the single grains show a high amount of β-TCP and a very fine porous microstructure. If F was added as an additional solution component, the formation of β-TCP was avoided and up to 3wt.% of F were incorporated into the product apatite. The use of the isotope 18O as a chronometer for the replacement reaction makes it possible to reconstruct the chronological development of the calcium phosphate reaction front. Raman analysis revealed that the incorporation of 18O in the PO4 tetrahedron of hydroxyapatite results in the development of distinct profiles in the calcium phosphate reaction front perpendicular to the grain boundaries of the marble. Through the use of the 18O chronometer, it is possible to estimate and compare the time effectiveness of the different fluid pathways in this model system. The results show that the grain boundaries serve as a

  14. Reaction pathways of model compounds of biomass-derived oxygenates on Fe/Ni bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiting; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-10-01

    Controlling the activity and selectivity of converting biomass-derivatives to fuels and valuable chemicals is critical for the utilization of biomass feedstocks. There are primarily three classes of non-food competing biomass, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In the current work, glycolaldehyde, furfural and acetaldehyde are studied as model compounds of the three classes of biomass-derivatives. Monometallic Ni(111) and monolayer (ML) Fe/Ni(111) bimetallic surfaces are studied for the reaction pathways of the three biomass surrogates. The ML Fe/Ni(111) surface is identified as an efficient surface for the conversion of biomass-derivatives from the combined results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments. A correlation is also established between the optimized adsorption geometry and experimental reaction pathways. These results should provide helpful insights in catalyst design for the upgrading and conversion of biomass.

  15. Catalytic Hydrotreatment of Fast Pyrolysis Oil: Model Studies on Reaction Pathways for the Carbohydrate Fraction

    OpenAIRE

    Wildschut, J.; Arentz, J.; Rasrendra, C. B.; Venderbosch, R. H.; Heeres, H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis oil can be upgraded by a catalytic hydrotreatment (250-400 degrees C, 100-200 bar) using heterogeneous catalysts such as Ru/C to hydrocarbon-like products that can serve as liquid transportation fuels. Insight into the complex reaction pathways of the various component fractions during hydrotreatment is desirable to reduce the formation of by-products such as char and gaseous components. This paper deals with the catalytic hydrotreatment of representative model components for t...

  16. A computational study of a recreated G protein-GEF reaction intermediate competent for nucleotide exchange: fate of the Mg ion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mériam Ben Hamida-Rebaï

    Full Text Available Small G-proteins of the superfamily Ras function as molecular switches, interacting with different cellular partners according to their activation state. G-protein activation involves the dissociation of bound GDP and its replacement by GTP, in an exchange reaction that is accelerated and regulated in the cell by guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs. Large conformational changes accompany the exchange reaction, and our understanding of the mechanism is correspondingly incomplete. However, much knowledge has been derived from structural studies of blocked or inactive mutant GEFs, which presumably closely represent intermediates in the exchange reaction and yet which are by design incompetent for carrying out the nucleotide exchange reaction. In this study we have used comparative modelling to recreate an exchange-competent form of a late, pre-GDP-ejection intermediate species in Arf1, a well-characterized small G-protein. We extensively characterized three distinct models of this intermediate using molecular dynamics simulations, allowing us to address ambiguities related to the mutant structural studies. We observed in particular the unfavorable nature of Mg2+ associated forms of the complex and the establishment of closer Arf1-GEF contacts in its absence. The results of this study shed light on GEF-mediated activation of this small G protein and on predicting the fate of the Mg ion at a critical point in the exchange reaction. The structural models themselves furnish additional targets for interfacial inhibitor design, a promising direction for exploring potentially druggable targets with high biological specificity.

  17. A novel microfluidic rapid freeze-quench device for trapping reactions intermediates for high field EPR analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Royi; Yadid, Itamar; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2013-05-01

    Rapid freeze quench electron paramagnetic resonance (RFQ)-EPR is a method for trapping short lived intermediates in chemical reactions and subjecting them to EPR spectroscopy investigation for their characterization. Two (or more) reacting components are mixed at room temperature and after some delay the mixture is sprayed into a cold trap and transferred into the EPR tube. A major caveat in using commercial RFQ-EPR for high field EPR applications is the relatively large amount of sample needed for each time point, a major part of which is wasted as the dead volume of the instrument. The small sample volume (∼2μl) needed for high field EPR spectrometers, such as W-band (∼3.5T, 95GHz), that use cavities calls for the development of a microfluidic based RFQ-EPR apparatus. This is particularly important for biological applications because of the difficulties often encountered in producing large amounts of intrinsically paramagnetic proteins and spin labeled nucleic acid and proteins. Here we describe a dedicated microfluidic based RFQ-EPR apparatus suitable for small volume samples in the range of a few μl. The device is based on a previously published microfluidic mixer and features a new ejection mechanism and a novel cold trap that allows collection of a series of different time points in one continuous experiment. The reduction of a nitroxide radical with dithionite, employing the signal of Mn(2+) as an internal standard was used to demonstrate the performance of the microfluidic RFQ apparatus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Emsission of intermediate mass fragments in the p(1.9 GeV)+natNI reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubak, A.

    2004-06-01

    The emission of the intermediate mass fragments (IMFs; 2 ≤ Z ≤ 14) produced in the interaction of 1.9 GeV protons with nickel ( nat Ni) has been a subject of interest of the present study. Energy spectra of isotopically and elementally identified ejectiles have been measured at angles 15 and 120 with the respect to the beam direction. The identification of the emitted IMFs has been performed by means of the Bragg curve spectroscopy and the time-of-flight technique (TOF). The Bragg curve detectors (BCDs) were employed for the charge identification, whereas the TOF method combined with the BCD, for the mass identification. The main task of the present PhD thesis was to built appropriate data acquisition system, to perform the experiment on the internal beam of the COSY accelerator, to propose the methodology of the off-line analysis of the data, to apply it to the event-by-event stored data, and to perform the phenomenological analysis of the obtained data. The results, experimental procedures, and different techniques of the element and isotope identification by means of the BCD + TOF are presented. The determination of the power law parameter τ characterizing the mass and charge distributions of the reaction products is discussed. Various methods of the nuclear matter temperature determination, the comparison between nuclear matter thermometers, and the discussion of the obtained results, shown in the energy-temperature diagram (the so called caloric curve), are presented as well. The results suggest two different mechanisms of the IMFs production: from the equilibrated (IMFs measured at 120 ), and non-equilibrated (IMFs measured at 15 ) state of the nucleus. (orig.)

  19. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformation through different reaction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The degradation of organic micropollutants occurs via different reaction pathways. Compound specific isotope analysis is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. We propose a mechanism-based modeling approach that provides a quantitative framework to simultaneously evaluate concentration as well as bulk and position-specific multi-element isotope evolution during the transformation of organic micropollutants. The model explicitly simulates position-specific isotopologues for those atoms that experience isotope effects and, thereby, provides a mechanistic description of isotope fractionation occurring at different molecular positions. To demonstrate specific features of the modeling approach, we simulated the degradation of three selected organic micropollutants: dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model accurately reproduces the multi-element isotope data observed in previous experimental studies. Furthermore, it precisely captures the dual element isotope trends characteristic of different reaction pathways as well as their range of variation consistent with observed bulk isotope fractionation. It was also possible to directly validate the model capability to predict the evolution of position-specific isotope ratios with available experimental data. Therefore, the approach is useful both for a mechanism-based evaluation of experimental results and as a tool to explore transformation pathways in scenarios for which position-specific isotope data are not yet available. - Highlights: • Mechanism-based, position-specific isotope modeling of micropollutants degradation. • Simultaneous description of concentration and primary and secondary isotope effects. • Key features of the model are demonstrated with three illustrative examples. • Model as a tool to explore reaction mechanisms and to design experiments. - We propose a modeling approach incorporating mechanistic information and

  20. Exploration of the Singlet O2 Oxidation of 8-Oxoguanine by Guided-Ion Beam Scattering and Density Functional Theory: Changes of Reaction Intermediates, Energetics, and Kinetics upon Protonation/Deprotonation and Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Lu, Wenchao; Liu, Jianbo

    2017-02-09

    8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) is one of the most common DNA lesions resulting from reactive oxygen species and ionizing radiation, and is involved in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and cell death. Notably, 8-oxodGuo is more reactive toward singlet (a 1 Δ g ) O 2 than the undamaged guanosine, and the lesions arising from the secondary oxidation of 8-oxodGuo are more mutagenic. Herein the 1 O 2 oxidation of free base 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) was investigated at different initial conditions including protonated [8-oxoG + H] + , deprotonated [8-oxoG - H] - , and their monohydrates. Experiment was carried out on a guided-ion beam scattering tandem mass spectrometer. Measurements include the effects of collision energy (E col ) on reaction cross sections over a center-of-mass E col range from 0.1 to 0.5 eV. The aim of this study is to quantitatively probe the sensitivity of the early stage of 8-oxoG oxidation to ionization and hydration. Density functional theory and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations were performed to identify the intermediates and the products along reaction pathways and locate accessible reaction potential energy surfaces, and to rationalize reaction outcomes from energetic and kinetic points of view. No product was observed for the reaction of [8-oxoG + H] + ·W 0,1 (W = H 2 O) because insurmountable barriers block the addition of 1 O 2 to reactant ions. Neither was [8-oxoG - H] - reactive with 1 O 2 , in this case due to the rapid decay of transient intermediates to starting reactants. However, the nonreactivity of [8-oxoG - H] - was inverted by hydration; as a result, 4,5-dioxetane of [8-oxoG - H] - was captured as the main oxidation product. Reaction cross section for [8-oxoG - H] - ·W + 1 O 2 decreases with increasing E col and becomes negligible above 0.3 eV, indicating that the reaction is exothermic and has no barriers above reactants. The contrasting oxidation behaviors of [8-oxoG + H] + ·W 0,1 and [8-oxoG - H] - ·W 0

  1. Effects of Water Molecule on CO Oxidation by OH: Reaction Pathways, Kinetic Barriers, and Rate Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linyao; Yang, Li; Zhao, Yijun; Zhang, Jiaxu; Feng, Dongdong; Sun, Shaozeng

    2017-07-06

    The water dilute oxy-fuel combustion is a clean combustion technology for near-zero emission power; and the presence of water molecule could have both kinetic and dynamic effects on combustion reactions. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H, one of the most important elementary reactions, has been investigated by extensive electronic structure calculations. And the effects of a single water molecule on CO oxidation have been studied by considering the preformed OH(H 2 O) complex reacts with CO. The results show little change in the reaction pathways, but the additional water molecule actually increases the vibrationally adiabatic energy barriers (V a G ). Further thermal rate constant calculations in the temperature range of 200 to 2000 K demonstrate that the total low-pressure limit rate constant for the water assisted OH(H 2 O) + CO → CO 2 + H 2 O + H reaction is 1-2 orders lower than that of the water unassisted one, which is consistent with the change of V a G . Therefore, the hydrated radical OH(H 2 O) would actually slow down the oxidation of CO. Meanwhile, comparisons show that the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVDZ method gives a much better estimation in energy and thus is recommended to be employed for direct dynamics simulations.

  2. Cross-Aldol Reaction of Activated Carbonyls with Nitrosocarbonyl Intermediates: Stereoselective Synthesis toward α-Hydroxy-β-amino Esters and Amides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallik, Sumitava; Bhajammanavar, Vinod; Ramakrishna, Isai; Baidya, Mahiuddin

    2017-07-21

    A practical and flexible strategy toward α-hydroxy-β-amino esters and amides, which are important biological motifs, based on an organocatalytic cross-aldol reaction of in situ-generated nitrosocarbonyl intermediates followed by hydrogenation is presented. The protocol features operational simplicity, high yields, a wide substrate scope, and high regio- and diastereoselectivity profiles. The utility of this method was showcased through the synthesis of bestatin analogues and indole formation.

  3. Detection of Reaction Intermediates in Mg2+-Dependent DNA Synthesis and RNA Degradation by Time-Resolved X-Ray Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, Nadine L; Gao, Yang; Wu, Jinjun; Yang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Structures of enzyme-substrate/product complexes have been studied for over four decades but have been limited to either before or after a chemical reaction. Recently using in crystallo catalysis combined with X-ray diffraction, we have discovered that many enzymatic reactions in nucleic acid metabolism require additional metal ion cofactors that are not present in the substrate or product state. By controlling metal ions essential for catalysis, the in crystallo approach has revealed unprecedented details of reaction intermediates. Here we present protocols used for successful studies of Mg 2+ -dependent DNA polymerases and ribonucleases that are applicable to analyses of a variety of metal ion-dependent reactions. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Competing retention pathways of uranium upon reaction with Fe(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Michael S.; Lezama-Pacheco, Juan S.; Jones, Morris E.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Cerrato, José M.; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott

    2014-10-01

    Biogeochemical retention processes, including adsorption, reductive precipitation, and incorporation into host minerals, are important in contaminant transport, remediation, and geologic deposition of uranium. Recent work has shown that U can become incorporated into iron (hydr)oxide minerals, with a key pathway arising from Fe(II)-induced transformation of ferrihydrite, (Fe(OH)3·nH2O) to goethite (α-FeO(OH)); this is a possible U retention mechanism in soils and sediments. Several key questions, however, remain unanswered regarding U incorporation into iron (hydr)oxides and this pathway's contribution to U retention, including: (i) the competitiveness of U incorporation versus reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2; (ii) the oxidation state of incorporated U; (iii) the effects of uranyl aqueous speciation on U incorporation; and, (iv) the mechanism of U incorporation. Here we use a series of batch reactions conducted at pH ∼7, [U(VI)] from 1 to 170 μM, [Fe(II)] from 0 to 3 mM, and [Ca] at 0 or 4 mM coupled with spectroscopic examination of reaction products of Fe(II)-induced ferrihydrite transformation to address these outstanding questions. Uranium retention pathways were identified and quantified using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of EXAFS spectra showed that 14-89% of total U was incorporated into goethite, upon reaction with Fe(II) and ferrihydrite. Uranium incorporation was a particularly dominant retention pathway at U concentrations ⩽50 μM when either uranyl-carbonato or calcium-uranyl-carbonato complexes were dominant, accounting for 64-89% of total U. With increasing U(VI) and Fe(II) concentrations, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) became more prevalent, but U incorporation remained a functioning retention pathway. These findings highlight the potential importance of U(V) incorporation within iron

  5. An Alternative Reaction Pathway for Iridium Catalyzed Water Oxidation Driven by CAN

    KAUST Repository

    Bucci, Alberto

    2016-06-10

    The generation of solar fuels by means of a photosynthetic apparatus strongly relies on the development of an efficient water oxidation catalyst (WOC). Cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) is the most commonly used sacrificial oxidant to explore the potentiality of WOCs. It is usually assumed that CAN has the unique role to oxidatively energize WOCs, making them capable to offer a low energy reaction pathway to transform H2O to O2. Herein we show that CAN might have a much more relevant and direct role in WO, mainly related to the capture and liberation of O–O containing molecular moieties.

  6. An Alternative Reaction Pathway for Iridium Catalyzed Water Oxidation Driven by CAN

    KAUST Repository

    Bucci, Alberto; Menendez Rodriguez, Gabriel; Bellachioma, Gianfranco; Zuccaccia, Cristiano; Poater, Albert; Cavallo, Luigi; Macchioni, Alceo

    2016-01-01

    The generation of solar fuels by means of a photosynthetic apparatus strongly relies on the development of an efficient water oxidation catalyst (WOC). Cerium ammonium nitrate (CAN) is the most commonly used sacrificial oxidant to explore the potentiality of WOCs. It is usually assumed that CAN has the unique role to oxidatively energize WOCs, making them capable to offer a low energy reaction pathway to transform H2O to O2. Herein we show that CAN might have a much more relevant and direct role in WO, mainly related to the capture and liberation of O–O containing molecular moieties.

  7. Reaction pathways of photoexcited retinal in proteorhodopsin studied by pump-dump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupenyan, Alisa; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; Arents, Jos C; van Grondelle, Rienk; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Groot, Marie Louise

    2009-12-17

    Proteorhodopsin (pR) is a membrane-embedded proton pump from the microbial rhodopsin family. Light absorption by its retinal chromophore initiates a photocycle, driven by trans/cis isomerization on the femtosecond to picosecond time scales. Here, we report a study on the photoisomerization dynamics of the retinal chromophore of pR, using dispersed ultrafast pump-dump-probe spectroscopy. The application of a pump pulse initiates the photocycle, and with an appropriately tuned dump pulse applied at a time delay after the dump, the molecules in the initial stages of the photochemical process can be de-excited and driven back to the ground state. In this way, we were able to resolve an intermediate on the electronic ground state that represents chromophores that are unsuccessful in isomerization. In particular, the fractions of molecules that undergo slow isomerization (20 ps) have a high probability to enter this state rather than the isomerized K-state. On the ground state reaction surface, return to the stable ground state conformation via a structural or vibrational relaxation occurs in 2-3 ps. Inclusion of this intermediate in the kinetic scheme led to more consistent spectra of the retinal-excited state, and to a more accurate estimation of the quantum yield of isomerization (Phi = 0.4 at pH 6).

  8. Vapor-Phase Hydrodeoxygenation of Guaiacol to Aromatics over Pt/HBeta: Identification of the Role of Acid Sites and Metal Sites on the Reaction Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Lei [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 P.R. China; Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Peng, Bo [Institute for Integrated Catalysis, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Zhu, Xinli [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 P.R. China

    2018-02-05

    Hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol, a phenolic compound derived from lignin fraction of biomass, over a Pt/HBeta catalyst at 350 °C and atmospheric pressure produces benzene, toluene, xylenes, and C9+ aromatics with yield of 42%, 29%, 12%, and 5%, respectively. Reaction pathways for conversion of two functional groups (hydroxyl and methoxyl) over the bifunctional catalyst were studied. Both guaiacol and intermediate products (catechol and cyclopentanone) were fed onto zeolite HBeta and Pt/SiO2 to identify the individual role of acid site and metal site. Acid sites (mainly Brønsted acid site, BAS) catalyze transalkylation and dehydroxylation reactions in sequence, producing phenol, cresols and xylenols as the major products at high conversion. Pt sites catalyze demethylation reaction resulting in catechol as the primary product, which can either be deoxygenated to phenol followed by phenol to benzene, or decarbonylated to cyclopentanone and further to butane. The close proximity of Pt and BAS in bifunctional Pt/HBeta enables both transalkylation and deoxygenation reactions with inhibited demethylation and decarbonylation reactions, producing aromatics as major final products with a total yield > 85%. Both activity and stability of bifunctional Pt/HBeta during hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol is improved compared to HBeta and Pt/SiO2. The addition of water to the feed further improves the activity and stability via hydrolysis of O-CH3 bond of guaiacol on BAS and removing coke around Pt.

  9. Heterogeneous reaction of particulate chlorpyrifos with NO3 radicals: Products, pathways, and kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nana; Zhang, Peng; Yang, Bo; Shu, Jinian; Wang, Youfeng; Sun, Wanqi

    2014-08-01

    Chlorpyrifos is a typical chlorinated organophosphorus pesticide. The heterogeneous reaction of chlorpyrifos particles with NO3 radicals was investigated using a vacuum ultraviolet photoionization aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (VUV-ATOFMS) and a real-time atmospheric gas analysis mass spectrometer. Chlorpyrifos oxon, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol, O,O-diethyl O-hydrogen phosphorothioate, O,O-diethyl ester thiophosphoric acid, diethyl hydrogen phosphate and a phosphinyl disulfide compound were identified as the main degradation products. The heterogeneous reaction pathways were proposed and their kinetic processes were investigated via a mixed-phase relative rate method. The observed effective rate constant is 3.4 ± 0.2 × 10-12 cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  10. Elementary steps and reaction pathways in the aqueous phase alkylation of phenol with ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckstein, Sebastian; Hintermeier, Peter H.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Liu, Yue; Baráth, Eszter; Lercher, Johannes A.

    2017-08-01

    The hydronium ion normalized reaction rate in aqueous phase alkylation of phenol with ethanol on H-MFI zeolites increases with decreasing concentration of acid sites. Higher rates are caused by higher concentrations of phenol in the zeolite pores, as the concentration of hydronium ions generated by zeolite Brønsted acid sites decreases. Considering the different concentrations of reacting species it is shown that the intrinsic rate constant for alkylation is independent of the concentration of hydronium ions in the zeolite pores. Alkylation at the aromatic ring of phenol and of toluene as well as O-alkylation of phenol have the same activation energy, 104 ± 5 kJ/mol. This is energetic barrier to form the ethyl carbenium ion from ethanol associated to the hydronium ion. Thus, in both the reaction pathways the catalyst involves a carbenium ion, which forms a bond to a nucleophilic oxygen (ether formation) or carbon (alkylation).

  11. Reaction pathways for reduction of nitrate ions on platinum, rhodium, and platinum-rhodium alloy electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, M.C.P.M. da; De Souza, J.P.I.; Nart, F.C.

    2000-01-01

    The reduction of nitrate ions on platinum, rhodium, and platinum-rhodium alloy electrodes has been investigated using differential electrochemical mass spectrometry and in situ FTIR measurements. For 3 M HNO 3 concentration it has been found that nitrate starts the reduction with partial N-O bond dissociation and N-N bond formation generating NO and N 2 O. At potentials lower than 0.2 V the reaction proceeds forming dissolved NH 4 + . For potentials lower than 0 V the reduction continues via a multiple pathway reaction leading to the nonselective production of N 2 , NH 2 OH, and N 2 H 2 . On the alloyed electrodes, the production of NO and N 2 O has been observed in both cathodic and anodic scans, while on pure platinum and rhodium electrodes the reaction has been observed only during the cathodic scan. Contrasting with the pure platinum and rhodium alloys, where the N-O bond break starts forming NO and N 2 O, on the alloys HNO 2 has been observed as the first reaction step. For alloys with higher rhodium composition, like Pt 75 Rh 25 , no N 2 has been detected for potentials lower than 0 V

  12. Heme-bound nitroxyl, hydroxylamine, and ammonia ligands as intermediates in the reaction cycle of cytochrome c nitrite reductase: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Dmytro; Plog, Matthias; Neese, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we consider, in detail, the second half-cycle of the six-electron nitrite reduction mechanism catalyzed by cytochrome c nitrite reductase. In total, three electrons and four protons must be provided to reach the final product, ammonia, starting from the HNO intermediate. According to our results, the first event in this half-cycle is the reduction of the HNO intermediate, which is accomplished by two PCET reactions. Two isomeric radical intermediates, HNOH(•) and H2NO(•), are formed. Both intermediates are readily transformed into hydroxylamine, most likely through intramolecular proton transfer from either Arg114 or His277. An extra proton must enter the active site of the enzyme to initiate heterolytic cleavage of the N-O bond. As a result of N-O bond cleavage, the H2N(+) intermediate is formed. The latter readily picks up an electron, forming H2N(+•), which in turn reacts with Tyr218. Interestingly, evidence for Tyr218 activity was provided by the mutational studies of Lukat (Biochemistry 47:2080, 2008), but this has never been observed in the initial stages of the overall reduction process. According to our results, an intramolecular reaction with Tyr218 in the final step of the nitrite reduction process leads directly to the final product, ammonia. Dissociation of the final product proceeds concomitantly with a change in spin state, which was also observed in the resonance Raman investigations of Martins et al. (J Phys Chem B 114:5563, 2010).

  13. Molecular weight growth in Titan's atmosphere: branching pathways for the reaction of 1-propynyl radical (H3CC≡C˙) with small alkenes and alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Benjamin B; Savee, John D; Trevitt, Adam J; Osborn, David L; Wilson, Kevin R

    2015-08-28

    The reaction of small hydrocarbon radicals (i.e.˙CN, ˙C2H) with trace alkenes and alkynes is believed to play an important role in molecular weight growth and ultimately the formation of Titan's characteristic haze. Current photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere largely assume hydrogen atom abstraction or unimolecular hydrogen elimination reactions dominate the mechanism, in contrast to recent experiments that reveal significant alkyl radical loss pathways during reaction of ethynyl radical (˙C2H) with alkenes and alkynes. In this study, the trend is explored for the case of a larger ethynyl radical analogue, the 1-propynyl radical (H3CC[triple bond, length as m-dash]C˙), a likely product from the high-energy photolysis of propyne in Titan's atmosphere. Using synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet photoionization mass spectrometry, product branching ratios are measured for the reactions of 1-propynyl radical with a suite of small alkenes (ethylene and propene) and alkynes (acetylene and d4-propyne) at 4 Torr and 300 K. Reactions of 1-propynyl radical with acetylene and ethylene form single products, identified as penta-1,3-diyne and pent-1-en-3-yne, respectively. These products form by hydrogen atom loss from the radical-adduct intermediates. The reactions of 1-propynyl radical with d4-propyne and propene form products from both hydrogen atom and methyl loss, (-H = 27%, -CH3 = 73%) and (-H = 14%, -CH3 = 86%), respectively. Together, these results indicate that reactions of ethynyl radical analogues with alkenes and alkynes form significant quantities of products by alkyl loss channels, suggesting that current photochemical models of Titan over predict both hydrogen atom production as well as the efficiency of molecular weight growth in these reactions.

  14. Quantifying Fenton reaction pathways driven by self-generated H2O2 on pyrite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Lozano, C.; Davila, A. F.; Losa-Adams, E.; Fairén, A. G.; Gago-Duport, L.

    2017-03-01

    Oxidation of pyrite (FeS2) plays a significant role in the redox cycling of iron and sulfur on Earth and is the primary cause of acid mine drainage (AMD). It has been established that this process involves multi-step electron-transfer reactions between surface defects and adsorbed O2 and H2O, releasing sulfoxy species (e.g., S2O32-, SO42-) and ferrous iron (Fe2+) to the solution and also producing intermediate by-products, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species (ROS), however, our understanding of the kinetics of these transient species is still limited. We investigated the kinetics of H2O2 formation in aqueous suspensions of FeS2 microparticles by monitoring, in real time, the H2O2 and dissolved O2 concentration under oxic and anoxic conditions using amperometric microsensors. Additional spectroscopic and structural analyses were done to track the dependencies between the process of FeS2 dissolution and the degradation of H2O2 through the Fenton reaction. Based on our experimental results, we built a kinetic model which explains the observed trend of H2O2, showing that FeS2 dissolution can act as a natural Fenton reagent, influencing the oxidation of third-party species during the long term evolution of geochemical systems, even in oxygen-limited environments.

  15. Reaction pathway towards formation of cobalt single chain magnets and nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, G.; Desilva, Rohini M.; Palshin, V. [Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States); Desilva, N. [Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Palmer, G. [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Rice University, MS 140, 6100 Main street, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Kumar, Challa S.S.R., E-mail: ckumar1@lsu.ed [Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, LA 70806 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    With the advent of molecular magnets the quest for suitable high density magnetic storage materials has fuelled further research in this area. Here in this report, we present a detailed mechanistic investigation of thermal decomposition of cyclopentadienyl cobalt [CoCp(CO){sub 2}] precursor where Cp is the cyclopentadienyl moiety. The reaction revealed the formation of cobalt nanoparticles (Co-NPs) through an isolable reaction intermediate characterized as a Single Chain Magnet (SCM), [Co(Cp){sub 2}]{sub 2}CoCl{sub 4} (1). The SQUID magnetic measurements showed the presence of very strong antiferromagnetic interactions between Co{sup 2+} ions. The zero-field cooled (ZFC) and field cooled (FC) magnetization curves branch out below 5 K and there is evidence for frequency dependent complex susceptibility along with a maximum observed around 2.5 K. The optical studies indicated that the Co{sup 2+} d-d transition is influenced by the polarity of the solvents. The cobalt nanoparticles (Co-NPs) were obtained, either directly from 1 or from its precursor. They are spherical in shape with a mean size 15 nm, have fcc crystal structure and were found to be ferromagnetic at room temperature.

  16. Possible reaction pathways of the lincomycin molecule according to the DFT calculation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Bahar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human-used antibiotics are eliminated from the body with little or no transformation at all. Traces of eliminated antibiotics enter the receiving environment directly since they cannot be treated in prevalent wastewater treatment facilities. Thus, wastewaters containing traces of antibiotics have to be treated accordingly. Lincomycin is subsequently isolated from Streptomyces lincolnensis. Lincomycin and its derivatives are antibiotics exhibiting biological activity against Gram-positive bacteria, and are natural antibiotics in the environment as pollutants. This study aims to predict the degradation mechanism of lincomycin molecule in the gaseous phase and aqueous media. Probable reaction path of lincomycin molecule with OH radicals was analyzed. Optimized geometry was calculated via Gauss View 5. Subsequently, the lowest energy status was determined through geometric optimization via Gaussian 09 program. Aiming to determine the intermediates in photocatalytic degradation mechanism of lincomycin, geometric optimization of the molecule was realized through DFT method. Activation energy for the probable reaction path was calculated, and their most stable state from the thermodynamic perspective determined for the gaseous phase and aqueous media. Impact of water solvent was investigated using the conductor-like screening solvation model (COSMO. The predicted mechanism was confirmed by comparison with experimental results on simple structures reported in literature.

  17. Conferring specificity in redox pathways by enzymatic thiol/disulfide exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Luis Eduardo S; de Oliveira, Marcos Antonio; Tairum, Carlos A; da Silva Neto, José Freire

    2016-01-01

    Thiol-disulfide exchange reactions are highly reversible, displaying nucleophilic substitutions mechanism (S(N)2 type). For aliphatic, low molecular thiols, these reactions are slow, but can attain million times faster rates in enzymatic processes. Thioredoxin (Trx) proteins were the first enzymes described to accelerate thiol-disulfide exchange reactions and their high reactivity is related to the high nucleophilicity of the attacking thiol. Substrate specificity in Trx is achieved by several factors, including polar, hydrophobic, and topological interactions through a groove in the active site. Glutaredoxin (Grx) enzymes also contain the Trx fold, but they do not share amino acid sequence similarity with Trx. A conserved glutathione binding site is a typical feature of Grx that can reduce substrates by two mechanisms (mono and dithiol). The high reactivity of Grx enzymes is related to the very acid pK(a) values of reactive Cys that plays roles as good leaving groups. Therefore, although distinct oxidoreductases catalyze similar thiol–disulfide exchange reactions, their enzymatic mechanisms vary. PDI and DsbA are two other oxidoreductases, but they are involved in disulfide bond formation, instead of disulfide reduction, which is related to the oxidative environment where they are found. PDI enzymes and DsbC are endowed with disulfide isomerase activity, which is related with their tetra-domain architecture. As illustrative description of specificity in thiol-disulfide exchange, redox aspects of transcription activation in bacteria, yeast, and mammals are presented in an evolutionary perspective. Therefore, thiol-disulfide exchange reactions play important roles in conferring specificity to pathways, a required feature for signaling.

  18. Mechanism of ({sup 14}N, {sup 12}B) reactions at intermediate energy leading to large spin-polarization of {sup 12}B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsuoka, Shin-ichi [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Research Center for Nuclear Physics; Shimoda, Tadashi; Miyatake, Hiroari [and others

    1996-05-01

    To study mechanisms of the ({sup 14}N, {sup 12}B) reactions at intermediate energies, double differential cross section and nuclear spin-polarization of the {sup 12}B projectile-like fragments have been measured as a function of longitudinal momentum in the angular range of 0deg - 9deg. Large spin-polarization of the reaction products {sup 12}B has been observed in the {sup 9}Be({sup 14}N, {sup 12}B) reaction at 39.3 MeV/u. The momentum distributions at forward angles exhibit characteristic features which can not be understood by the current projectile fragmentation picture. It is shown that by assuming the existence of direct two-proton transfer process in addition to the fragmentation process, both the cross section and polarization of {sup 12}B fragments are successfully explained. The target and incident energy dependence of the momentum distribution are also explained reasonably. (author)

  19. Computational Chemical Kinetics for the Reaction of Criegee Intermediate CH2OO with HNO3 and Its Catalytic Conversion to OH and HCO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, P; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Lin, M C

    2017-05-25

    The kinetics and mechanisms for the reaction of the Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO with HNO 3 and the unimolecular decomposition of its reaction product CH 2 (O)NO 3 are important in atmospheric chemistry. The potential-energy profile of the reactions predicted with the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ method shows that the initial association yields a prereaction complex that isomerizes by H migration to yield excited intermediate nitrooxymethyl hydroperoxide NO 3 CH 2 OOH* with internal energy ∼44 kcal mol -1 . A fragmentation of this excited intermediate produces CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH with its transition state located 5.0 kcal mol -1 below that of the reactants. Further decomposition of CH 2 (O)NO 3 produces HCO + HNO 3 , forming a catalytic cycle for destruction of CH 2 OO by HNO 3 . The rate coefficients and product-branching ratios were calculated in the temperature range 250-700 K at pressure 20-760 Torr (N 2 ) using the variational-transition-state and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) theories. The predicted total rate coefficient for reaction CH 2 OO + HNO 3 at 295 K, 5.1 × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 , agrees satisfactorily with the experimental value, (5.4 ± 1.0) × 10 -10 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . The predicted branching ratios at 295 K are 0.21 for the formation of NO 3 CH 2 OOH and 0.79 for CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH at a pressure of 40 Torr (N 2 ), and 0.79 for the formation of NO 3 CH 2 OOH and 0.21 for CH 2 (O)NO 3 + OH at 760 Torr (N 2 ). This new catalytic conversion of CH 2 OO to HCO + OH by HNO 3 might have significant impact on atmospheric chemistry.

  20. NMR studies of stock process water and reaction pathways in hydrothermal carbonization of furfural residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Yue

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC is a valuable approach to convert furfural residue (FR into carbon material. The prepared biochars are usually characterized comprehensively, while the stock process water still remains to be studied in detail. Herein, a NMR study of the main components in stock process water generated at different HTC reaction conditions was reported. Various qualitative and quantitative NMR techniques (1H and 13C NMR, 1H–1H COSY and 1H13C HSQC etc. especially 1D selective gradient total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY NMR were strategically applied in the analysis of HTC stock process water. Without separation and purification, it was demonstrated that the main detectable compounds are 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, formic acid, methanol, acetic acid, levulinic acid, glycerol, hydroxyacetone and acetaldehyde in this complicate mixture. Furthermore, the relationship between the concentration of major products and the reaction conditions (180–240 °C at 8 h, and 1–24 h at 240 °C was established. Finally, reasonable reaction pathways for hydrothermal conversion of FR were proposed based on this result and our previously obtained characteristics of biochars. The routine and challenging NMR methods utilized here would be an alternative other than HPLC or GC for biomass conversion research and can be extended to more studies. Keywords: NMR, Hydrothermal carbonization, Furfural residue, Stock process water

  1. Reaction pathways of producing and losing particles in atmospheric pressure methane nanosecond pulsed needle-plane discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuefeng; Wang, Chao; Li, Li; Wang, Lijuan; Pan, Jie

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a two-dimensional fluid model is built up to numerically investigate the reaction pathways of producing and losing particles in atmospheric pressure methane nanosecond pulsed needle-plane discharge plasma. The calculation results indicate that the electron collisions with CH4 are the key pathways to produce the neutral particles CH2 and CH as well as the charged particles e and CH3+. CH3, H2, H, C2H2, and C2H4 primarily result from the reactions between the neutral particles and CH4. The charge transfer reactions are the significant pathways to produce CH4+, C2H2+, and C2H4+. As to the neutral species CH and H and the charged species CH3+, the reactions between themselves and CH4 contribute to substantial losses of these particles. The ways responsible for losing CH3, H2, C2H2, and C2H4 are CH3 + H → CH4, H2 + CH → CH2 + H, CH4+ + C2H2 → C2H2+ + CH4, and CH4+ + C2H4 → C2H4+ + CH4, respectively. Both electrons and C2H4+ are consumed by the dissociative electron-ion recombination reactions. The essential reaction pathways of losing CH4+ and C2H2+ are the charge transfer reactions.

  2. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformations through different reaction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Organic compounds are produced in vast quantities for industrial and agricultural use, as well as for human and animal healthcare [1]. These chemicals and their metabolites are frequently detected at trace levels in fresh water environments where they undergo degradation via different reaction pathways. Compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. Recent advances in analytical techniques have promoted the fast development and implementation of multi-element CSIA. However, quantitative frameworks to evaluate multi-element stable isotope data and incorporating mechanistic information on the degradation processes [2,3] are still lacking. In this study we propose a mechanism-based modeling approach to simultaneously evaluate concentration as well as bulk and position-specific multi-element isotope evolution during the transformation of organic micropollutants. The model explicitly simulates position-specific isotopologues for those atoms that experience isotope effects and, thereby, provides a mechanistic description of isotope fractionation occurring at different molecular positions. We validate the proposed approach with the concentration and multi-element isotope data of three selected organic micropollutants: dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model precisely captures the dual element isotope trends characteristic of different reaction pathways and their range of variation consistent with observed multi-element (C, N) bulk isotope fractionation. The proposed approach can also be used as a tool to explore transformation pathways in scenarios for which position-specific isotope data are not yet available. [1] Schwarzenbach, R.P., Egli, T., Hofstetter, T.B., von Gunten, U., Wehrli, B., 2010. Global Water Pollution and Human Health. Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. doi:10.1146/annurev-environ-100809-125342. [2] Jin, B., Haderlein, S.B., Rolle, M

  3. Isolation and Characterization of Well-Defined Silica-Supported Azametallacyclopentane: A Key Intermediate in Catalytic Hydroaminoalkylation Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Bilel

    2015-09-25

    Intermolecular catalytic hydroaminoalkylation of unactivated alkene occurs with silica-supported azazirconacyclopropane [[TRIPLE BOND]Si[BOND]O[BOND]Zr(HNMe2)(η2-NMeCH2)(NMe2)]. Mechanistic studies were conducted using surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) concepts to identify the key surface intermediates. The azametallacyclopentene intermediate {[TRIPLE BOND]Si[BOND]O[BOND]Zr(HNMe2)[η2-NMeCH2CH(Me)CH2](NMe2)} was isolated after treating with 1-propylene and characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, 1H 13C HETCOR, DARR SS-NMR and DQ TQ SS-NMR. The regeneration of the catalyst was conducted by dimethylamine protonolysis to yield the pure amine.

  4. Isolation and Characterization of Well-Defined Silica-Supported Azametallacyclopentane: A Key Intermediate in Catalytic Hydroaminoalkylation Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Bilel; Pelletier, Jé ré mie D. A.; El Eter, Mohamad; Chen, Yin; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Intermolecular catalytic hydroaminoalkylation of unactivated alkene occurs with silica-supported azazirconacyclopropane [[TRIPLE BOND]Si[BOND]O[BOND]Zr(HNMe2)(η2-NMeCH2)(NMe2)]. Mechanistic studies were conducted using surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC) concepts to identify the key surface intermediates. The azametallacyclopentene intermediate {[TRIPLE BOND]Si[BOND]O[BOND]Zr(HNMe2)[η2-NMeCH2CH(Me)CH2](NMe2)} was isolated after treating with 1-propylene and characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, 1H 13C HETCOR, DARR SS-NMR and DQ TQ SS-NMR. The regeneration of the catalyst was conducted by dimethylamine protonolysis to yield the pure amine.

  5. A STUDY OF INTERMEDIATES INVOLVED IN THE FOLDING PATHWAY FOR RECOMBINANT HUMAN MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR (M-CSF) - EVIDENCE FOR 2 DISTINCT FOLDING PATHWAYS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WILKINS, JA; CONE, J; RANDHAWA, ZI; WOOD, D; WARREN, MK; WITKOWSKA, HE

    The folding pathway for a 150-amino acid recombinant form of the dimeric cytokine human macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) has been studied. All 14 cysteine residues in the biologically active homodimer are involved in disulfide linkages. The structural characteristics of folding

  6. Intermediate nuclear structure for 2ν2β decay of 48Ca studied by (p, n) and (n, p) reactions at 300 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, H.; Yako, K.

    2009-01-01

    The two neutrino double beta (2ν2β) decay proceeds through a sequence of Gamow-Teller (GT) transitions, namely from the parent nucleus to the intermediate nucleus and then from the intermediate nucleus to the final daughter nucleus. The nuclear matrix element M 2ν for the 2ν2β - decay thus consists of the 2β - decay matrix elements for the parent nucleus decay and the 2β - decay matrix elements for the intermediate nucleus decay. These 2β - decay matrix elements can be studied experimentally through the (p, n) reaction for the parent nucleus decay and the (n, p) reaction for the intermediate nucleus decay. The 2ν2β-decay nucleus, 4 8C a is studied. The charge exchange (p, n) and (n, p) measurements at 300 MeV were performed using the neutron time-of-flight facility and the (n,p) facility, respectively, at RCNP. The (p, n) measurement on 4 8C a and the (n,p) measurement on 4 8T i provided us, for the first time, reliable B(GT - ) and B(GT + ) strength distributions up to high excitation energy of 30 MeV of the intermediate nucleus 4 8S c. The multipole decomposition analysis was applied to the angular distributions of the cross section spectra to extract the ΔL = 0 components, which are used to deduce B(GT ± ). Figure shows the double differential cross Nb sections for 4 8C a(p, n)4 8S c (left panel) and 4 8T i(n,p)4 8S c (right panel) reactions. The histograms show the results of the multi-pole decomposition analyses. It is very surprising to find sizable amount of ΔL = 0 yield, i.e. B(GT + ) strength in the highly excited energy region (> 10 MeV). The obtained B(GT ± ) distribution in 4 8S c as well as corresponding nuclear matrix elements M 2ν are compared with theoretical shell model calculation. In this talk, new results will be presented and their implication to the nuclear matrix elements for the 2ν2β-decay will be discussed (author)

  7. Hydrogen oxidation mechanisms on Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia anodes: Separation of reaction pathways by geometry variation of pattern electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, M. C.; Fleig, J.; Bram, M.; Opitz, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    Nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrodes are affecting the overall performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in general and strongly contribute to the cell resistance in case of novel metal supported SOFCs in particular. The electrochemical fuel conversion mechanisms in these electrodes are, however, still only partly understood. In this study, micro-structured Ni thin film electrodes on YSZ with 15 different geometries are utilized to investigate reaction pathways for the hydrogen electro-oxidation at Ni/YSZ anodes. From electrodes with constant area but varying triple phase boundary (TPB) length a contribution to the electro-catalytic activity is found that does not depend on the TPB length. This additional activity could clearly be attributed to a yet unknown reaction pathway scaling with the electrode area. It is shown that this area related pathway has significantly different electrochemical behavior compared to the TPB pathway regarding its thermal activation, sulfur poisoning behavior, and H2/H2O partial pressure dependence. Moreover, possible reaction mechanisms of this reaction pathway are discussed, identifying either a pathway based on hydrogen diffusion through Ni with water release at the TPB or a path with oxygen diffusion through Ni to be a very likely explanation for the experimental results.

  8. Advances in heterocycle synthesis via [3+m]-cycloaddition reactions involving an azaoxyallyl cation as the key intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Jun; Cao, Xia; Cheng, Xiao

    2018-05-17

    Heterocyclic compounds are widely found in many natural isolates and medicinally relevant compounds, as well as some fine chemicals. The development of general and efficient methods for the construction of heterocyclic compounds is one of the most important tasks in synthetic organic chemistry. Along these lines, [3+m]-cycloaddition reactions involving in situ generated azaoxyallyl cations as the 3-atom units have emerged as a powerful method for the synthesis of nitrogen-containing heterocycles. In this feature article, we highlight recent advances in this rapidly growing area, mainly focusing on the reaction design as well as the reaction mechanism.

  9. The major/minor concept: dependence of the selectivity of homogeneously catalyzed reactions on reactivity ratio and concentration ratio of the intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Thomas; Dai, Zhenya; Drexler, Hans-Joachim; Hapke, Marko; Preetz, Angelika; Heller, Detlef

    2008-07-07

    The homogeneously catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of prochiral olefins with cationic Rh(I) complexes is one of the best-understood selection processes. For some of the catalyst/substrate complexes, experimental proof points out the validation of the major/minor principle; the concentration-deficient minor substrate complex, which has very high reactivity, yields the excess enantiomer. As exemplified by the reaction system of [Rh(dipamp)(MeOH)2]+/methyl (Z)-alpha-acetamidocinnamate (dipamp=1,2-bis((o-methoxyphenyl)phenylphosphino)ethane), all six of the characteristic reaction rate constants have been previously identified. Recently, it was found that the major substrate complex can also yield the major enantiomer (lock-and-key principle). The differential equation system that results from the reaction sequence can be solved numerically for different hydrogen partial pressures by including the known equilibrium constants. The result displays the concentration-time dependence of all species that exist in the catalytic cycle. On the basis of the known constants as well as further experimental evidence, this work focuses on the examination of all principal possibilities resulting from the reaction sequence and leading to different results for the stereochemical outcome. From the simulation, the following conclusions can be drawn: 1) When an intermediate has extreme reactivity, its stationary concentration can become so small that it can no longer be the source of product selectivity; 2) in principle, the major/minor and lock-and-key principles can coexist depending on the applied pressure; 3) thermodynamically determined intermediate ratios can be completely converted under reaction conditions for a selection process; and 4) the increase in enantioselectivity with increasing hydrogen partial pressure, a phenomenon that is experimentally proven but theoretically far from being well-understood, can be explained by applying both the lock-and-key as well as the major

  10. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Hydrocarbons via Indirect Liquefaction. Thermochemical Research Pathway to High-Octane Gasoline Blendstock Through Methanol/Dimethyl Ether Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, E. C. D.; Talmadge, M.; Dutta, A.; Hensley, J.; Schaidle, J.; Biddy, M.; Humbird, D.; Snowden-Swan, L. J.; Ross, J.; Sexton, D.; Yap, R.; Lukas, J.

    2015-03-01

    This report was developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) efforts to enable the development of technologies for the production of infrastructure-compatible, cost-competitive liquid hydrocarbon fuels from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research funded by BETO is designed to advance the state of technology of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. It is expected that these research improvements will be made within the 2022 timeframe. As part of their involvement in this research and development effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models and techno-economic analysis models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high-octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction of biomass. The processing steps of this pathway include the conversion of biomass to synthesis gas or syngas via indirect gasification, gas cleanup, catalytic conversion of syngas to methanol intermediate, methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME), and catalytic conversion of DME to high-octane, gasoline-range hydrocarbon blendstock product. The conversion process configuration leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by BETO and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via reforming of tars and other hydrocarbons is one of the key technology advancements realized as part of this prior research and 2012 demonstrations. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area for the downstream utilization of clean biomass-derived syngas for the production of high-octane hydrocarbon products through methanol and DME intermediates. In this process, methanol undergoes dehydration to

  11. Direct Kinetic Evidence for the Formation of an Acylpyridinium Intermediate in Synthetic p-Nitrophenyl Esterase-Catalyzed Hydrolysis Reactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Guang-Jia

    1996-01-01

    .... The deacylation rate was also found to exhibit a maximum for the same substrate 2 (n=6). These results are similar to those previously reported with cholesterol esterase as catalyst for the same hydrolysis reaction...

  12. Intermediate energy nuclear physics (Task C) and charge exchange reactions (Task W). Technical progress report, October 1, 1985-October 1, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraushaar, J.J.

    1986-10-01

    This report describes the experimental work in intermediate energy research carried out over the past year at the University of Colorado. The experimental program is very broad in nature, ranging from investigations in pion-nucleus interactions, nucleon charge exchange, inelastic electron scattering, and nucleon transfer reactions. The experiments were largely carried out at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility, but important programs were conducted at the Tri-University Meson Facility at the University of British Columbia, the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility and Netherlands Institute for Nuclear Physics Research (NIKHEF-K)

  13. Search for ternary fragmentation in the reaction 856 MeV 98Mo + 51V: Kinematic probing of intermediate-mass-fragment emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardaci, Emanuele; Kaplan, Morton; Parker, Winifred E.; Moses, David J.; Boger, J.T.; Gilfoyle, G.T.; McMahan, M.A.; Montoya, M.

    2000-05-01

    A new technique has been applied to coincidence measurements between fission fragments (FF) and intermediate mass fragments (IMF) emitted from the composite system 149 65 Tb at an excitation energy of 224 MeV. The method permits simultaneous observation of IMF emissions along and normal to the FF separation axes. For the integrated total of 0.10 +-0.02 IMF emitted per fission, we find no significant correlation with FF direction, suggesting that IMFs associated with fission reactions are predominantly emitted from the system prior to fission

  14. Modeling reaction histories to study chemical pathways in condensed phase detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott Stewart, D.; Hernández, Alberto; Lee, Kibaek

    2016-01-01

    The estimation of pressure and temperature histories, which are required to understand chemical pathways in condensed phase explosives during detonation, is discussed. We argue that estimates made from continuum models, calibrated by macroscopic experiments, are essential to inform modern, atomistic-based reactive chemistry simulations at detonation pressures and temperatures. We present easy to implement methods for general equation of state and arbitrarily complex chemical reaction schemes that can be used to compute reactive flow histories for the constant volume, the energy process, and the expansion process on the Rayleigh line of a steady Chapman-Jouguet detonation. A brief review of state-of-the-art of two-component reactive flow models is given that highlights the Ignition and Growth model of Lee and Tarver [Phys. Fluids 23, 2362 (1980)] and the Wide-Ranging Equation of State model of Wescott, Stewart, and Davis [J. Appl. Phys. 98, 053514 (2005)]. We discuss evidence from experiments and reactive molecular dynamic simulations that motivate models that have several components, instead of the two that have traditionally been used to describe the results of macroscopic detonation experiments. We present simplified examples of a formulation for a hypothetical explosive that uses simple (ideal) equation of state forms and detailed comparisons. Then, we estimate pathways computed from two-component models of real explosive materials that have been calibrated with macroscopic experiments.

  15. Synthetic Control of Kinetic Reaction Pathway and Cationic Ordering in High-Ni Layered Oxide Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dawei [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, State Key Laboratory Physical Chemistry Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 China; Kou, Ronghui [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Ren, Yang [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Sun, Cheng-Jun [X-Ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Zhao, Hu [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Zhang, Ming-Jian [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Guangdong 518055 P. R. China; Li, Yan [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Huq, Ashifia [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 USA; Ko, J. Y. Peter [The Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 USA; Pan, Feng [School of Advanced Materials, Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School, Shenzhen Guangdong 518055 P. R. China; Sun, Yang-Kook [Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 South Korea; Yang, Yong [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, State Key Laboratory Physical Chemistry Solid Surfaces, Department of Chemistry, Xiamen University, Xiamen Fujian 361005 China; Amine, Khalil [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Bai, Jianming [National Synchrotron Light Source II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA; Chen, Zonghai [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL 60439 USA; Wang, Feng [Sustainable Energy Technologies Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton NY 11973 USA

    2017-08-25

    Nickel-rich layered transition metal oxides, LiNi1-x(MnCo)(x)O-2 (1-x >= 0.5), are appealing candidates for cathodes in next-generation lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) for electric vehicles and other large-scale applications, due to their high capacity and low cost. However, synthetic control of the structural ordering in such a complex quaternary system has been a great challenge, especially in the presence of high Ni content. Herein, synthesis reactions for preparing layered LiNi0.7Mn0.15Co0.15O2 (NMC71515) by solid-state methods are investigated through a combination of time-resolved in situ high-energy X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy measurements. The real-time observation reveals a strong temperature dependence of the kinetics of cationic ordering in NMC71515 as a result of thermal-driven oxidation of transition metals and lithium/oxygen loss that concomitantly occur during heat treatment. Through synthetic control of the kinetic reaction pathway, a layered NMC71515 with low cationic disordering and a high reversible capacity is prepared in air. The findings may help to pave the way for designing high-Ni layered oxide cathodes for LIBs.

  16. Theoretical study of intermediate-mass fragments in proton-nucleus reactions at 200 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabra, Mohammad S. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, USRA Space Science Department, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2017-03-15

    We have analyzed energy spectra, angular distributions, and mass and charge distributions of intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs) from the interaction of {sup 27}Al, {sup 59}Co, and {sup 197}Au with 200 MeV protons. Calculations within the modified statistical model with final-state interaction were performed using SAPTON code. Within the experimental uncertainty and constraint, SAPTON shows good agreement with the data, and suggests that the IMFs are produced after the intra-nuclear cascade stage, and during the surface coalescence, as well as the evaporation/fission stages. (orig.)

  17. Electrode Reaction Pathway in Oxide Anode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyuan

    the electrolyte to change 3PB kinetics. Compared to Ni, Co doping activates the bulk oxygen more significantly, promoting the reaction at 2PB. The active surface reaction zone is found to be enlarged by the electrolyte with high oxygen activity (SSZ vs. YSZ) when charge transfer is one of the RDS. Due to the larger exchange current for charge transfer in 3PB with SSZ electrolyte, the adsorption gradient zone is broadened, leading to enhanced surface reaction kinetics. The potential application of such finding is demonstrated on SSZ/YSZ/SSZ sandwich, showing largely improved electrode performance, opening a wide door for the utilization of electrolytes that are too expensive, fragile or instable to be used before. The bulk path way in 2PB reaction can be affected by overpotential in terms of local vacancy concentration, built-in electrical field and stability. It is proven that an uneven distribution of lattice oxygen is established under operation conditions with overpotential by both qualitative analysis and analytic solution. An electrostatic field force is present besides the concentration gradient in the anode lattice to control the motion of oxygen ions. Compared to the usual estimation based on chemical diffusion mechanism, the real deviation of ionic defects concentration under polarization from the equilibrium state near electrode/electrolyte interface is smaller with the built-in electrical field. The overpotential is demonstrated to be able to open up or shut down the bulk pathway depending on the ionic defects of electrodes. The analysis on the bulk pathway in terms of local charged species and various potentials provides new insight in anion diffusion and electrode stability.

  18. Automated pathway and reaction prediction facilitates in silico identification of unknown metabolites in human cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quell, Jan D; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Colombo, Marco; Krumsiek, Jan; Evans, Anne M; Mohney, Robert; Salomaa, Veikko; de Faire, Ulf; Groop, Leif C; Agakov, Felix; Looker, Helen C; McKeigue, Paul; Colhoun, Helen M; Kastenmüller, Gabi

    2017-12-15

    Identification of metabolites in non-targeted metabolomics continues to be a bottleneck in metabolomics studies in large human cohorts. Unidentified metabolites frequently emerge in the results of association studies linking metabolite levels to, for example, clinical phenotypes. For further analyses these unknown metabolites must be identified. Current approaches utilize chemical information, such as spectral details and fragmentation characteristics to determine components of unknown metabolites. Here, we propose a systems biology model exploiting the internal correlation structure of metabolite levels in combination with existing biochemical and genetic information to characterize properties of unknown molecules. Levels of 758 metabolites (439 known, 319 unknown) in human blood samples of 2279 subjects were measured using a non-targeted metabolomics platform (LC-MS and GC-MS). We reconstructed the structure of biochemical pathways that are imprinted in these metabolomics data by building an empirical network model based on 1040 significant partial correlations between metabolites. We further added associations of these metabolites to 134 genes from genome-wide association studies as well as reactions and functional relations to genes from the public database Recon 2 to the network model. From the local neighborhood in the network, we were able to predict the pathway annotation of 180 unknown metabolites. Furthermore, we classified 100 pairs of known and unknown and 45 pairs of unknown metabolites to 21 types of reactions based on their mass differences. As a proof of concept, we then looked further into the special case of predicted dehydrogenation reactions leading us to the selection of 39 candidate molecules for 5 unknown metabolites. Finally, we could verify 2 of those candidates by applying LC-MS analyses of commercially available candidate substances. The formerly unknown metabolites X-13891 and X-13069 were shown to be 2-dodecendioic acid and 9

  19. A Western blot-based investigation of the yeast secretory pathway designed for an intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-Degrenier, Jennifer K

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in two distinct steps of protein secretion were differentiated using a genetic reporter designed specifically to identify defects in the first step of the pathway, the insertion of proteins into the endoplasmic reticulum (Vallen, 2002). We have developed two versions of a Western blotting assay that serves as a second way of distinguishing the two secretory mutants, which we pair with the genetic assay in a 3-wk laboratory module. A quiz administered before and after students participated in the lab activities revealed significant postlab gains in their understanding of the secretory pathway and experimental techniques used to study it. A second survey administered at the end of the lab module assessed student perceptions of the efficacy of the lab activities; the results of this survey indicated that the experiments were successful in meeting a set of educational goals defined by the instructor.

  20. Reaction pathways of biomass-derived oxygenates on noble metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Jesse R.

    As the global demand for energy continues to rise, the environmental concerns associated with increased fossil fuel consumption have motivated the use of biomass as an alternative, carbon-renewable energy feedstock. Controlling reactive chemistry of the sugars that comprise biomass through the use of catalysis becomes essential in effectively producing green fuels and value-added chemicals. Recent work on biomass conversion catalysts have demonstrated the efficacy of noble metal catalyst systems for the reforming of biomass to hydrogen fuel, and the hydrodeoxygenation of biomass-derived compounds to value-added chemicals. In particular, Pt and Pd surfaces have shown considerable promise as reforming catalysts in preliminary aqueous phase reforming studies. It becomes important to understand the mechanisms by which these molecules react on the catalyst surfaces in order to determine structure-activity relationships and bond scission energetics as to provide a framework for engineering more active and selective catalysts. Fundamental surface science techniques provide the tools to do this; however, work in this field has been so far limited to simple model molecules like ethanol and ethylene glycol. Herein, temperature programmed desorption and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy are utilized in an ultra-high vacuum surface science study of the biomass-derived sugar glucose on Pt and Pd single crystal catalysts. Overall, it was determined that the aldehyde function of a ring-open glucose molecule plays an integral part in the initial bonding and reforming reaction pathway, pointing to the use of aldoses glycolaldehyde and glyceraldehyde as the most appropriate model compounds for future studies. Furthermore, the addition of adatom Zn to a Pt(111) surface was found to significantly decrease the C-H and C-C bond scission activity in aldehyde containing compounds, resulting in a preferred deoxygenation pathway in opposition to the decarbonylation pathway

  1. Degradation of γ-HCH spiked soil using stabilized Pd/Fe0 bimetallic nanoparticles: Pathways, kinetics and effect of reaction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Ritu; Misra, Virendra; Mudiam, Mohana Krishna Reddy; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Singh, Rana Pratap

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This study explores the potential of CMC-Pd/nFe 0 to degrade γ-HCH in spiked soil. ► Sorption–desorption characteristics and partitioning of γ-HCH is investigated. ► Three degradation pathways has been proposed and discussed. ► γ-HCH degradation mechanism and kinetics is elucidated. ► Activation energy reveals that γ-HCH degradation is a surface mediated reaction. - Abstract: This study investigates the degradation pathway of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH) in spiked soil using carboxymethyl cellulose stabilized Pd/Fe 0 bimetallic nanoparticles (CMC-Pd/nFe 0 ). GC–MS analysis of γ-HCH degradation products showed the formation of pentachlorocyclohexene, tri- and di-chlorobenzene as intermediate products while benzene was formed as the most stable end product. On the basis of identified intermediates and final products, degradation pathway of γ-HCH has been proposed. Batch studies showed complete γ-HCH degradation at a loading of 0.20 g/L CMC-Pd/nFe 0 within 6 h of incubation. The surface area normalized rate constant (k SA ) was found to be 7.6 × 10 −2 L min −1 m −2 . CMC-Pd/nFe 0 displayed ∼7-fold greater efficiency for γ-HCH degradation in comparison to Fe 0 nanoparticles (nFe 0 ), synthesized without CMC and Pd. Further studies showed that increase in CMC-Pd/nFe 0 loading and reaction temperature facilitates γ-HCH degradation, whereas a declining trend in degradation was noticed with the increase in pH, initial γ-HCH concentration and in the presence of cations. The data on activation energy (33.7 kJ/mol) suggests that γ-HCH degradation is a surface mediated reaction. The significance of the study with respect to remediation of γ-HCH contaminated soil using CMC-Pd/nFe 0 has been discussed.

  2. Pump-shaped dump optimal control reveals the nuclear reaction pathway of isomerization of a photoexcited cyanine dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzek, Benjamin; Brüggemann, Ben; Pascher, Torbjörn; Yartsev, Arkady

    2007-10-31

    Using optimal control as a spectroscopic tool we decipher the details of the molecular dynamics of the essential multidimensional excited-state photoisomerization - a fundamental chemical reaction of key importance in biology. Two distinct nuclear motions are identified in addition to the overall bond-twisting motion: Initially, the reaction is dominated by motion perpendicular to the torsion coordinate. At later times, a second optically active vibration drives the system along the reaction path to the bottom of the excited-state potential. The time scales of the wavepacket motion on a different part of the excited-state potential are detailed by pump-shaped dump optimal control. This technique offers new means to control a chemical reaction far from the Franck-Condon point of absorption and to map details of excited-state reaction pathways revealing unique insights into the underlying reaction mechanism.

  3. Peripheral heavy-ion induced reactions at intermediate energies 20MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrette, J.; Berthier, B.; Chavez, E.

    1984-03-01

    Inclusive energy spectra and angular distributions of projectile like fragments in reactions induced by a 44 MeV/nucleon 40 Ar beam bombarding 27 Al and sup(nat)Ti targets show many of the features of high energy fragmentation. However, several aspects such as energy dissipation and production of fragments heavier than the projectile are reminiscent of a low energy behaviour

  4. Kinetics of the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways: influences of pH and reactant initial concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A previously proposed kinetic model for the glucose/glycine Maillard reaction pathways has been validated by changing the initial pH (4.8, 5.5, 6.0, 6.8 and 7.5) of the reaction and reactant initial concentrations (1:2 and 2:1 molar ratios were compared to the 1:1 ratio). The model consists of 10

  5. Pathways for the reaction of the butadiene radical cation, [C{sub 4}H{sub 6}]{sup {sm{underscore}bullet}+}, with ethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, M.; Schaefer, H.F. III

    1999-11-04

    The Diels-Alder (DA) reaction, a [4+2] cycloaddition used to build six membered rings, is one of the most valuable cycloadditions in organic chemistry. In cases where the ene does not add to the diene (even with the help of Lewis acids which may reduce the electron density of one reactant by complexation) one electron oxidation (by an oxidizing agent or by photoinduced electron transfer (PET)) may accelerate the reaction. Reaction pathways for the addition of ethylene, 1, to butadiene radical cation, 2, involving H-shifts have been investigated at the coupled cluster UCCSD(T)/DZP//UMP2(fc)/DZP + ZPE level of theory. Activation energies are relatively low for [1,2]- (10.0 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-4/20) and [1,5]-hydrogen shifts (7.7 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-4/26) but are relatively high for [1,4]-(33.8 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-4/14) and [1,3]-H shifts (e.g., 42.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-12/13; 57.2 kcal mol{sup {minus}1}, TS-16/21). Several rearrangement reactions have been found to occur below the energy limit of separated 1 + 2. The cyclopentenyl cation, [C{sub 5}{sub 7}]{sup +}, 18, experimentally observed as reaction product of the butadiene radical cation, 2, and ethylene, 1, in the gas phase may origin from various reaction pathways. The following reaction sequence has been identified as the lowest in energy path from 1 + 2 to 18 with all relative energies ({Delta}E{degree}) of transition structures below that of 1 + 2: (a) ethylene adds to the butadiene radical cation to form an open-chain distonic intermediate, that undergoes a [1,5]-H shift to the 1,4-hexadiene radical cation; (b) intramolecular [2+1] cycloaddition to methyl-cyclopenta-1,3-diyl intermediates, which can interconvert through a bicyclo[2.1.0]pentane radical cation; (c) [1,2]-H shift to the 3-methyl cyclopentene radical cation; (d) methyl radical loss to give cyclopenten-3-yl cation. Along this reaction pathway, {Delta}H{sup 298} is below that of 1 + 2; max. ({Delta}G{sup 298} by

  6. The most prevalent genetic cause of ALS-FTD, C9orf72 synergizes the toxicity of ATXN2 intermediate polyglutamine repeats through the autophagy pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciura, Sorana; Sellier, Chantal; Campanari, Maria-Letizia; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas; Kabashi, Edor

    2016-08-02

    The most common genetic cause for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD) is repeat expansion of a hexanucleotide sequence (GGGGCC) within the C9orf72 genomic sequence. To elucidate the functional role of C9orf72 in disease pathogenesis, we identified certain molecular interactors of this factor. We determined that C9orf72 exists in a complex with SMCR8 and WDR41 and that this complex acts as a GDP/GTP exchange factor for RAB8 and RAB39, 2 RAB GTPases involved in macroautophagy/autophagy. Consequently, C9orf72 depletion in neuronal cultures leads to accumulation of unresolved aggregates of SQSTM1/p62 and phosphorylated TARDBP/TDP-43. However, C9orf72 reduction does not lead to major neuronal toxicity, suggesting that a second stress may be required to induce neuronal cell death. An intermediate size of polyglutamine repeats within ATXN2 is an important genetic modifier of ALS-FTD. We found that coexpression of intermediate polyglutamine repeats (30Q) of ATXN2 combined with C9orf72 depletion increases the aggregation of ATXN2 and neuronal toxicity. These results were confirmed in zebrafish embryos where partial C9orf72 knockdown along with intermediate (but not normal) repeat expansions in ATXN2 causes locomotion deficits and abnormal axonal projections from spinal motor neurons. These results demonstrate that C9orf72 plays an important role in the autophagy pathway while genetically interacting with another major genetic risk factor, ATXN2, to contribute to ALS-FTD pathogenesis.

  7. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to High Octane Gasoline: Thermochemical Research Pathway with Indirect Gasification and Methanol Intermediate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Talmadge, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Dutta, Abhijit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hensley, Jesse [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schaidle, Josh [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Biddy, Mary J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Humbird, David [DWH Process Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ross, Jeff [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sexton, Danielle [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Yap, Raymond [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Lukas, John [Harris Group, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) promotes research for enabling cost-competitive liquid fuels production from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The research is geared to advance the state of technology (SOT) of biomass feedstock supply and logistics, conversion, and overall system sustainability. As part of their involvement in this program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) investigate the economics of conversion pathways through the development of conceptual biorefinery process models. This report describes in detail one potential conversion process for the production of high octane gasoline blendstock via indirect liquefaction (IDL). The steps involve the conversion of biomass to syngas via indirect gasification followed by gas cleanup and catalytic syngas conversion to a methanol intermediate; methanol is then further catalytically converted to high octane hydrocarbons. The conversion process model leverages technologies previously advanced by research funded by the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) and demonstrated in 2012 with the production of mixed alcohols from biomass. Biomass-derived syngas cleanup via tar and hydrocarbons reforming was one of the key technology advancements as part of that research. The process described in this report evaluates a new technology area with downstream utilization of clean biomass-syngas for the production of high octane hydrocarbon products through a methanol intermediate, i.e., dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether (DME) which subsequently undergoes homologation to high octane hydrocarbon products.

  8. Nucleon-induced reactions at intermediate energies: new data at 96 MeV and theoretical status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blideanu, V.; Lecolley, F.R.; Lecolley, J.F.; Lefort, T.; Marie, N.; Ban, G.; Louvel, M. [Caen Univ., Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, ENSICAEN, IN2P3-CNRS ISMRA, 14 (France); Atac, A.; Bergenwall, B.; Blomgren, J.; Dangtip, S.; Hildebrand, A.; Hohansson, C.; Klug, J.; Nilsson, L.; Ollson, N.; Pomp, S.; Tippawan, U.; Osterlund, M. [Uppsala Univ., Nykoeping (Sweden). Dept. of Neutron Research; Tippawan, U. [Chiang Mai University, Fast Neutron Research Facility (Thailand); Elmgren, K.; Olsson, N. [Swedish Defense Research Agency, Stokholm (Sweden); Eudes, Ph.; Guertin, A.; Haddad, F.; Kirchner, T.; Lebrun, C.; Riviere, G. [Nantes Univ., Subatech, 44 (France); Foucher, Y. [CEA Saclay, Dept. d' Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules de Physique Nucleaire et de l' Instrumentation Associee, 91- Gif sur Yvette (France); Jonsson, O.; Prokofiev, A.V.; Renberg, P.U. [Uppsala Univ., Svedberg Laboratory (Sweden); Kerveno, M.; Stuttge, L. [IReS, Strasbourg (France); Le Brun, Ch. [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, 38 - Grenoble (France); Nadel-Turonski, P. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Sciences; Slypen, I. [Universite Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2004-04-01

    Double-differential cross sections for light charged particle production (up to A = 4) were measured in 96 MeV neutron-induced reactions, at TSL laboratory cyclotron in Uppsala (Sweden). Measurements for three targets, Fe, Pb, and U, were performed using two independent devices, SCANDAL and MEDLEY. The data were recorded with low energy thresholds and for a wide annular range (20 - 160 degrees). The normalization procedure used to extract the cross sections is based on the np elastic scattering reaction that we measured and for which we present experimental results. A good control of the systematic uncertainties affecting the results is achieved. Calculations using the exciton model are reported. Two different theoretical approaches proposed to improve its predictive power regarding the complex particle emission are tested. The capabilities of each approach is illustrated by comparison with the 96 MeV data that we measured, and with other experimental results available in the literature. (authors)

  9. Spectral studies of intermediate species formed in one-electron reactions of bovine liver catalase at room and low temperatures. A comparison with peroxidase reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metodiewa, D.; Dunford, H.B.

    1992-01-01

    The reactions of native bovine catalase with superoxide and solvated electrons have been investigated using three different methods for generating these reducing substrates: γ-radiolysis of oxygenated or deaerated buffer solutions in the presence of an OH radical scavenger; either xanthine or acetaldehyde with xanthine oxidase; and low-temperature (77 K) γ-radiolysis of buffered ethylene glycol/water solutions with subsequent annealing of samples at 183 K. (Author)

  10. Reactivity of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in the Diels-Alder Cycloaddition Reaction: Distortion-Interaction Analysis along the Reaction Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingzi; Osuna, Sílvia; Garcia-Borràs, Marc; Qi, Xiaotian; Liu, Song; Houk, Kendall N; Lan, Yu

    2016-08-26

    Diels-Alder cycloaddition is one of the most powerful tools for the functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Density functional theory at the B3-LYP level of theory has been used to investigate the reactivity of different-diameter SWCNTs (4-9,5) in Diels-Alder reactions with 1,3-butadiene; the reactivity was found to decrease with increasing SWCNT diameter. Distortion/interaction analysis along the whole reaction pathway was found to be a better way to explore the reactivity of this type of reaction. The difference in interaction energy along the reaction pathway is larger than that of the corresponding distortion energy. However, the distortion energy plots for these reactions show the same trend. Therefore, the formation of the transition state can be determined from the interaction energy. A lower interaction energy leads to an earlier transition state, which indicates a lower activation energy. The computational results also indicate that the original distortion of the SWCNTs leads to an increase in the reactivity of the SWCNTs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Stabilization of the second oxyanion intermediate by 1,4-dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-coenzyme A synthase of the menaquinone pathway: spectroscopic evidence of the involvement of a conserved aspartic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minjiao; Jiang, Ming; Sun, Yueru; Guo, Zu-Feng; Guo, Zhihong

    2011-07-05

    1,4-Dihydroxy-2-naphthoyl-coenzyme A (DHNA-CoA) synthase, or MenB, catalyzes an intramolecular Claisen condensation involving two oxyanion intermediates in the biosynthetic pathway of menaquinone, an essential respiration electron transporter in many microorganisms. Here we report the finding that the DHNA-CoA product and its analogues bind and inhibit the synthase from Escherichia coli with significant ultraviolet--visible spectral changes, which are similar to the changes induced by deprotonation of the free inhibitors in a basic solution. Dissection of the structure--affinity relationships of the inhibitors identifies the hydroxyl groups at positions 1 (C1-OH) and 4 (C4-OH) of DHNA-CoA or their equivalents as the dominant and minor sites, respectively, for the enzyme--ligand interaction that polarizes or deprotonates the bound ligands to cause the observed spectral changes. In the meantime, spectroscopic studies with active site mutants indicate that C4-OH of the enzyme-bound DHNA-CoA interacts with conserved polar residues Arg-91, Tyr-97, and Tyr-258 likely through a hydrogen bonding network that also includes Ser-161. In addition, site-directed mutation of the conserved Asp-163 to alanine causes a complete loss of the ligand binding ability of the protein, suggesting that the Asp-163 side chain is most likely hydrogen-bonded to C1-OH of DHNA-CoA to provide the dominant polarizing effect. Moreover, this mutation also completely eliminates the enzyme activity, strongly supporting the possibility that the Asp-163 side chain provides a strong stabilizing hydrogen bond to the tetrahedral oxyanion, which takes a position similar to that of C1-OH of the enzyme-bound DHNA-CoA and is the second high-energy intermediate in the intracellular Claisen condensation reaction. Interestingly, both Arg-91 and Tyr-97 are located in a disordered loop forming part of the active site of all available DHNA-CoA synthase structures. Their involvement in the interaction with the small

  12. Study of nuclear isovector spin responses from polarization transfer in (p,n) reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, Tomotsugu

    1997-01-01

    We have measured a complete set of polarization transfer observables has been measured for quasi-free (p vector, n vector) reactions on 2 H, 6 Li, 12 C, 40 Ca, and 208 Pb at a bombarding energy of 346MeV and a laboratory scattering angle of 22deg (q=1.7 fm -1 ). The polarization transfer observables for all five targets are remarkably similar. These polarization observables yield separated spin-longitudinal (σ·q) and spin-transverse (σxq) nuclear responses. These results are compared to the spin-transverse responses measured in deep-inelastic electron scattering as well as to nuclear responses based on the random phase approximation. Such a comparison reveals an enhancement in the (p vector, n vector) spin-transverse channel, which masks the effect of pionic correlations in the response ratio. Second, the double differential cross sections at θ lab between 0deg and 12.3deg and the polarization transfer D NN at 0deg for the 90 Zr(p,n) reaction are measured at a bombarding energy of 295MeV. The Gamow-Teller(GT) strength B(GT) in the continuum deduced from the L=0 cross section is compared both with the perturbative calculation by Bertsch and Hamamoto and with the second-order random phase approximation calculation by Drozdz et al. The sum of B(GT) values up to 50MeV excitation becomes S β- =28.0±1.6 after subtracting the contribution of the isovector spin-monopole strength. This S β- value of 28.0±1.6 corresponds to about (93±5)% of the minimum value of the sum-rule 3(N-Z)=30. Last, first measurements of D NN (0deg) for (p vector, n vector) reactions at 295MeV yield large negative values up to 50MeV excitation for the 6 Li, 11 B, 12 C, 13 C(p vector, n vector) reactions. DWIA calculations using the Franey and Love (FL) 270MeV interaction reproduce differential cross sections and D NN (0deg) values, while the FL 325MeV interaction yield D NN (0deg) values less negative than the experimental values. (J.P.N.)

  13. Reaction-mechanism evolution for the system 20Ne + 60Ni at intermediate energies: from massive transfer to fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreozzi, F.; Brondi, A.; D'Onofrio, A.; LaRana, G.; Moro, R.; Perillo, E.; Romano, M.; Terrasi, F.; Dayras, R.; Dumont, H.; Gadi, F.; Gomez del Campo, J.

    1993-01-01

    Mass and charge distributions for heavy residues in the reaction 20 Ne + 60 Ni at 50 MeV/nucleon were measured by in-beam and off-line γ-ray spectrometry. The stacked foil method was used to obtain information about the distribution of the velocity component parallel to the beam direction for target-like residues. The comparison of the data to the predictions of a participant-spectator model indicates that an 8% width for the dissipated energy distribution accounts for the observed projected ranges. (orig.)

  14. Development and implementation of a critical pathway for prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Keun Jo [Presbyterian Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Myeong Goo [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Beong Gyu [Wonkwang Health Science College, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a critical pathway (CP) for the prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography. The CP was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary group is Seoul National University Hospital. The CP was applied to CT patients. Patients who underwent CT scanning were included in the CP group from March in 2004. The satisfaction of the patients with CP was compared with non-CP groups. We also investigated the degree of satisfaction among the radiological technologists and nurses. The degree of patient satisfaction with the care process increased patient information (24%), prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%), pre-cognitive effect of adverse reactions to contrast media (39%) and information degree of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%). This CP program can be used as one of the patient care tools for reducing the adverse reactions to contrast media and increasing the efficiency of care process in CT examination settings.

  15. Development and implementation of a critical pathway for prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Keun Jo; Kweon, Dae Cheol; Kim, Myeong Goo; Yoo, Beong Gyu

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a critical pathway (CP) for the prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media for computed tomography. The CP was developed and implemented by a multidisciplinary group is Seoul National University Hospital. The CP was applied to CT patients. Patients who underwent CT scanning were included in the CP group from March in 2004. The satisfaction of the patients with CP was compared with non-CP groups. We also investigated the degree of satisfaction among the radiological technologists and nurses. The degree of patient satisfaction with the care process increased patient information (24%), prevention of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%), pre-cognitive effect of adverse reactions to contrast media (39%) and information degree of adverse reactions to contrast media (19%). This CP program can be used as one of the patient care tools for reducing the adverse reactions to contrast media and increasing the efficiency of care process in CT examination settings

  16. Electro-oxidation of methanol on gold in alkaline media: Adsorption characteristics of reaction intermediates studied using time resolved electro-chemical impedance and surface plasmon resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiongbon, K. A.; Roy, D.

    2005-12-01

    Electro-catalytic oxidation of methanol is the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells. We have studied the adsorption characteristics of the intermediate reactants of this multistep reaction on a gold film electrode in alkaline solutions by combining surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements with Fourier transform electro-chemical impedance spectroscopy (FT-EIS). Methanol oxidation in this system shows no significant effects of "site poisoning" by chemisorbed CO. Our results suggest that OH - chemisorbed onto Au acts as a stabilizing agent for the surface species of electro-active methanol. Double layer charging/discharging and adsorption/desorption of OH - show more pronounced effects than adsorption/oxidation of methanol in controlling the surface charge density of the Au substrate. These effects are manifested in both the EIS and the SPR data, and serve as key indicators of the surface reaction kinetics. The data presented here describe the important role of adsorbed OH - in electro-catalysis of methanol on Au, and demonstrate how SPR and FT-EIS can be combined for quantitative probing of catalytically active metal-solution interfaces.

  17. Enhanced production of resveratrol derivatives in tobacco plants by improving the metabolic flux of intermediates in the phenylpropanoid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yu Jeong; An, Chul Han; Woo, Su Gyeong; Park, Ji Hye; Lee, Ki-Won; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Rim, Yeonggil; Jeong, Hyung Jae; Ryu, Young Bae; Kim, Cha Young

    2016-09-01

    The biosynthesis of flavonoids such as anthocyanin and stilbenes has attracted increasing attention because of their potential health benefits. Anthocyanins and stilbenes share common phenylpropanoid precursor pathways. We previously reported that the overexpression of sweetpotato IbMYB1a induced anthocyanin pigmentation in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. In the present study, transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum SR1) plants (STS-OX and ROST-OX) expressing the RpSTS gene encoding stilbene synthase from rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L. cv. Jangyeop) and the RpSTS and VrROMT genes encoding resveratrol O-methyltransferase from frost grape (Vitis riparia) were generated under the control of 35S promoter. Phenotypic alterations in floral organs, such as a reduction in floral pigments and male sterility, were observed in STS-OX transgenic tobacco plants. However, we failed to obtain STS-OX and ROST-OX plants with high levels of resveratrol compounds. Therefore, to improve the production of resveratrol derivatives in plants, we cross-pollinated flowers of STS-OX or ROST-OX and IbMYB1a-OX transgenic lines (SM and RSM). Phenotypic changes in vegetative and reproductive development of SM and RSM plants were observed. Furthermore, by HPLC and LC-MS analyses, we found enhanced production of resveratrol derivatives such as piceid, piceid methyl ether, resveratrol methyl ether O-hexoside, and 5-methyl resveratrol-3,4'-O-β-D-diglucopyranoside in SM and RSM cross-pollinated lines. Here, total contents of trans- and cis-piceids ranged from approximately 104-240 µg/g fresh weight in SM (F2). Collectively, we suggest that coexpression of RpSTS and IbMYB1a via cross-pollination can induce enhanced production of resveratrol compounds in plants by increasing metabolic flux into stilbenoid biosynthesis.

  18. Computer-assisted study on the reaction between pyruvate and ylide in the pathway leading to lactyl-ThDP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Omar; Jaña, Gonzalo; Delgado, Eduardo J

    2012-08-01

    In this study the formation of the lactyl-thiamin diphosphate intermediate (L-ThDP) is addressed using density functional theory calculations at X3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) level of theory. The study includes potential energy surface scans, transition state search, and intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations. Reactivity is analyzed in terms of Fukui functions. The results allow to conclude that the reaction leading to the formation of L-ThDP occurs via a concerted mechanism, and during the nucleophilic attack on the pyruvate molecule, the ylide is in its AP form. The calculated activation barrier for the reaction is 19.2 kcal/mol, in agreement with the experimental reported value.

  19. Multipulse spectroscopy on the wild-type and YM210W Bacterial Reaction Centre uncovers a new intermediate state in the special pair excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Stuart, T. A.; van Grondelle, R.

    2009-06-01

    The Bacterial Reaction Centre (BRC) has a complex electronic excited state, P ∗, that evolves into subsequent charge separated product states P +H - and P +B -. Pump-dump-probe spectroscopy on the wild-type BRC and on YM210W, a mutant with a stabilized, long-lived P ∗ excited state, has uncovered a new charge-separated state in both BRC's. When P ∗ is dumped, a fraction of its population is transferred to this state that has a strong Stark shift in the accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B M) region which serves as a signature for P + and a lifetime highly comparable to the slow phase of P ∗ decay. This lead us propose this intermediate to be P +/P -.

  20. A low stringency polymerase chain reaction approach to the identification of Biomphalaria glabrata and B. tenagophila, intermediate snail hosts of Schistosoma mansoni in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teofânia HDA Vidigal

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The low stringency-polymerase chain reaction (LS-PCR with a pair of specific primers for the amplification of the 18S rRNA gene was evaluated as a means of differentiating between the two Schistosoma mansoni intermediate host species in Brazil: Biomphalaria glabrata and B. tenagophila. Individual snails obtained from different states of Brazil were used and the amplification patterns obtained showed a high degree of genetic variability in these species. Nevertheless, 4 and 3 clearly defined specific diagnostic bands was observed in individuals from B. glabrata and B. tenagophila respectively. The detection of snail specific diagnostic bands suggests the possibility of reliable species differentiation at the DNA level using LS-PCR.

  1. A study of the nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross section of stable systems at intermediate energies: An application to 12C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Liyuan; Song, Yushou; Hou, Yingwei; Liu, Huilan; Li, Hui

    2018-07-01

    A semi-microscopic analytical expression of the nucleus-nucleus total reaction cross section (σR) was proposed based on the strong absorption model. It is suitable for stable nuclei at intermediate energies. The matter density distributions of nuclei and the nucleon-nucleon total cross section were both considered. Particularly, the Fermi motion effect of the nucleons in a nucleus was also taken into account. The parametrization of σR was applied to the colliding systems including 12C. The experimental data at energies from 30 to 1000 MeV/nucleon were well reproduced, according to which an approach of deriving σR without adjustable parameters was developed. The necessity of considering the Fermi motion effect in the parametrization was discussed.

  2. Study of the intermediate-energy nucleon-nucleus reactions in terms of the quantum molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Satoshi; Niita, Koji; Maruyama, Toshiki; Fukahori, Tokio; Takada, Hiroshi; Iwamoto, Akira

    1995-01-01

    The double-differential (p,xp') and (p,xn) reaction cross sections of 58 Ni and 90 Zr in the energy range from 120 to 200 MeV have been studied in terms of the Quantum Molecular Dynamics. It was found that the present calculation could give a quantitative explanation of experimentally observed values of both channels simultaneously without adjusting any parameter, showing the usefulness of the QMD approach to study the pre-equilibrium process in this energy region. Comparisons were also made with prediction of other theories such as Antisymmetrized Molecular Dynamics (AMD) and semiclassical distorted wave theory. Effect of the anti-symmetrization, which is in AMD but not in QMD, was found surprisingly small, being the result of QMD even slightly better. At the same time, it was found that the present calculation does not give the quasi-free peak of the 1-step cross sections similar to the semiclassical model, due probably to different treatment of the refraction and acceleration effects caused by the mean field. (author)

  3. MRE: a web tool to suggest foreign enzymes for the biosynthesis pathway design with competing endogenous reactions in mind

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki; Alazmi, Meshari; Cui, Xuefeng; Gao, Xin

    2016-01-01

    To rationally design a productive heterologous biosynthesis system, it is essential to consider the suitability of foreign reactions for the specific endogenous metabolic infrastructure of a host. We developed a novel web server, called MRE, which, for a given pair of starting and desired compounds in a given chassis organism, ranks biosynthesis routes from the perspective of the integration of new reactions into the endogenous metabolic system. For each promising heterologous biosynthesis pathway, MRE suggests actual enzymes for foreign metabolic reactions and generates information on competing endogenous reactions for the consumption of metabolites. These unique, chassis-centered features distinguish MRE from existing pathway design tools and allow synthetic biologists to evaluate the design of their biosynthesis systems from a different angle. By using biosynthesis of a range of high-value natural products as a case study, we show that MRE is an effective tool to guide the design and optimization of heterologous biosynthesis pathways. The URL of MRE is http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/mre/.

  4. MRE: a web tool to suggest foreign enzymes for the biosynthesis pathway design with competing endogenous reactions in mind

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-29

    To rationally design a productive heterologous biosynthesis system, it is essential to consider the suitability of foreign reactions for the specific endogenous metabolic infrastructure of a host. We developed a novel web server, called MRE, which, for a given pair of starting and desired compounds in a given chassis organism, ranks biosynthesis routes from the perspective of the integration of new reactions into the endogenous metabolic system. For each promising heterologous biosynthesis pathway, MRE suggests actual enzymes for foreign metabolic reactions and generates information on competing endogenous reactions for the consumption of metabolites. These unique, chassis-centered features distinguish MRE from existing pathway design tools and allow synthetic biologists to evaluate the design of their biosynthesis systems from a different angle. By using biosynthesis of a range of high-value natural products as a case study, we show that MRE is an effective tool to guide the design and optimization of heterologous biosynthesis pathways. The URL of MRE is http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/mre/.

  5. Methane coupling reaction in an oxy-steam stream through an OH radical pathway by using supported alkali metal catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Yin

    2014-03-24

    A universal reaction mechanism involved in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is demonstrated under oxy-steam conditions using alkali-metal-based catalysts. Rigorous kinetic measurements indicated a reaction mechanism that is consistent with OH radical formation from a H 2O-O2 reaction followed by C-H activation in CH 4 with an OH radical. Thus, the presence of water enhances both the CH4 conversion rate and the C2 selectivity. This OH radical pathway that is selective for the OCM was observed for the catalyst without Mn, which suggests clearly that Mn is not the essential component in a selective OCM catalyst. The experiments with different catalyst compositions revealed that the OH.-mediated pathway proceeded in the presence of catalysts with different alkali metals (Na, K) and different oxo anions (W, Mo). This difference in catalytic activity for OH radical generation accounts for the different OCM selectivities. As a result, a high C2 yield is achievable by using Na2WO4/SiO2, which catalyzes the OH.-mediated pathway selectively. Make it methane: A universal reaction mechanism involved in the oxidative coupling of methane is demonstrated under oxy-stream conditions by using alkali-metal-based catalysts. Rigorous kinetic measurements indicated a reaction mechanism that is consistent with OH radical formation from an H2O-O2 reaction, followed by C-H activation in CH4 with an OH radical. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Gas-Phase Reaction Pathways and Rate Coefficients for the Dichlorosilane-Hydrogen and Trichlorosilane-Hydrogen Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Walch, Stephen P.

    2002-01-01

    As part of NASA Ames Research Center's Integrated Process Team on Device/Process Modeling and Nanotechnology our goal is to create/contribute to a gas-phase chemical database for use in modeling microelectronics devices. In particular, we use ab initio methods to determine chemical reaction pathways and to evaluate reaction rate coefficients. Our initial studies concern reactions involved in the dichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H2--H2) and trichlorosilane-hydrogen (SiCl2H-H2) systems. Reactant, saddle point (transition state), and product geometries and their vibrational harmonic frequencies are determined using the complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) electronic structure method with the correlation consistent polarized valence double-zeta basis set (cc-pVDZ). Reaction pathways are constructed by following the imaginary frequency mode of the saddle point to both the reactant and product. Accurate energetics are determined using the singles and doubles coupled-cluster method that includes a perturbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations (CCSD(T)) extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Using the data from the electronic structure calculations, reaction rate coefficients are obtained using conventional and variational transition state and RRKM theories.

  7. Theoretical investigation of the oxidation pathways of the Cl-initiated reaction of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weichao; Zhang, Dongju

    2012-12-01

    The mechanism and products of the reaction of 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232) with Cl atoms in the presence of O2 have been elucidated by performing high-level quantum chemistry calculations. The geometries of the reactants, intermediates, transition states, and products are optimized at the MP2(full)/6-311G(d, p) level, and their single-point energies are refined at the CCSD(T)/6-311 + G(d, p) level. The potential energy surface profiles have been constructed at the CCSD(T)/6-311 + G(d, p)//MP2(full)/6-311G(d, p) + 0.95 × ZPE level of theory, and the possible channels involved in the reaction are also discussed. The calculations indicate that the reaction predominantly proceeds via the addition of Cl atoms to the double bond rather than the direct abstraction of the H atoms in MBO232. The nascent adducts (CH3)2C(OH)CHCH2Cl (IM1) and (CH3)2C(OH)CHClCH2 (IM2) do not undergo subsequent isomerization and dissociation reactions, but rather react with O2. The theoretical results show that the major products are CH2ClCHO and CH3C(O)CH3 for the reaction of MBO232 + Cl in the presence of O2, which is in good agreement with the experimental finding.

  8. A novel tool for studying auxin-metabolism: the inhibition of grapevine indole-3-acetic acid-amido synthetases by a reaction intermediate analogue.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Böttcher

    Full Text Available An important process for the regulation of auxin levels in plants is the inactivation of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA by conjugation to amino acids. The conjugation reaction is catalysed by IAA-amido synthetases belonging to the family of GH3 proteins. Genetic approaches to study the biological significance of these enzymes have been hampered by large gene numbers and a high degree of functional redundancy. To overcome these difficulties a chemical approach based on the reaction mechanism of GH3 proteins was employed to design a small molecule inhibitor of IAA-amido synthetase activity. Adenosine-5'-[2-(1H-indol-3-ylethyl]phosphate (AIEP mimics the adenylated intermediate of the IAA-conjugation reaction and was therefore proposed to compete with the binding of MgATP and IAA in the initial stages of catalysis. Two grapevine IAA-amido synthetases with different catalytic properties were chosen to test the inhibitory effects of AIEP in vitro. GH3-1 has previously been implicated in the grape berry ripening process and is restricted to two amino acid substrates, whereas GH3-6 conjugated IAA to 13 amino acids. AIEP is the most potent inhibitor of GH3 enzymes so far described and was shown to be competitive against MgATP and IAA binding to both enzymes with K(i-values 17-68-fold lower than the respective K(m-values. AIEP also exhibited in vivo activity in an ex planta test system using young grape berries. Exposure to 5-20 µM of the inhibitor led to decreased levels of the common conjugate IAA-Asp and reduced the accumulation of the corresponding Asp-conjugate upon treatment with a synthetic auxin. AIEP therefore represents a novel chemical probe with which to study IAA-amido synthetase function.

  9. Dexmedetomidine Inhibits Inflammatory Reaction in Lung Tissues of Septic Rats by Suppressing TLR4/NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqing Wu

    2013-01-01

    and 20 μg/kg significantly decreased mortality and pulmonary inflammation of septic rats, as well as suppressed CLP-induced elevation of TNF-α and IL-6 and inhibited TLR4/MyD88 expression and NF-κB activation. These results suggest that dexmedetomidine may decrease mortality and inhibit inflammatory reaction in lung tissues of septic rats by suppressing TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB pathway.

  10. Transformation of aminopyrine in the presence of free available chlorine: Kinetics, products, and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mei-Quan; Feng, Li; Zhang, Li-Qiu

    2017-03-01

    Aminopyrine (AMP) has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In this study, the transformation mechanism of AMP by free available chlorine (FAC) oxidation was investigated. The results showed that FAC reacted with AMP rapidly, and a 74% elimination was achieved for 1.30 μM AMP after 2 min at 14.08 μM FAC dose. AMP chlorination was strongly pH-dependent, and its reaction included second- and third-order kinetic processes. Three active FAC species, including chlorine monoxide (Cl 2 O), molecular chlorine (Cl 2 ), and hypochlorous acid (HOCl), were observed to contribute to AMP degradation. The intrinsic rate constants of each FAC species with neutral (AMP 0 ) and cation (AMP + ) species were obtained by kinetic fitting. Cl 2 O exhibited the highest reactivity with AMP 0 (k AMP0, Cl2O  = (4.33 ± 1.4) × 10 9  M -1 s -1 ). In addition, Cl 2 showed high reactivity (10 6 -10 7  M -1 s -1 ) in the presence of chloride, compared with HOCl (k AMP+, HOCl  = (5.73 ± 0.23) × 10 2  M -1 s -1 , k AMP0, HOCl  = (9.68 ± 0.96) × 10 2  M -1 s -1 ). At pH 6.15 and 14.08 μM FAC dose without chloride addition, the contribution of Cl 2 O reached to the maximum (33.3%), but in the whole pH range, HOCl was the main contributor (>66.6%) for AMP degradation. The significance of Cl 2 was noticeable in water containing chloride. Moreover, 11 transformation products were identified, and the main transformation pathways included pyrazole ring breakage, hydroxylation, dehydrogenation, and halogenation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A Networks Approach to Modeling Enzymatic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, P

    2016-01-01

    Modeling enzymatic reactions is a demanding task due to the complexity of the system, the many degrees of freedom involved and the complex, chemical, and conformational transitions associated with the reaction. Consequently, enzymatic reactions are not determined by precisely one reaction pathway. Hence, it is beneficial to obtain a comprehensive picture of possible reaction paths and competing mechanisms. By combining individually generated intermediate states and chemical transition steps a network of such pathways can be constructed. Transition networks are a discretized representation of a potential energy landscape consisting of a multitude of reaction pathways connecting the end states of the reaction. The graph structure of the network allows an easy identification of the energetically most favorable pathways as well as a number of alternative routes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Intermediate treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate treatments are those applied after a new stand is successfully established and before the final harvest. These include not only intermediate cuttings - primarily thinning - but also fertilization, irrigation, and protection of the stand from damaging agents.

  13. Formation and degradation pathways of intermediate products formed during the hydropyrolysis of glucose as a model substance for wet biomass in a tubular reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinag, A. [Department of Chemistry, Science Faculty, Ankara University, 06100 Besevler-Ankara (Turkey); Kruse, A.; Schwarzkopf, V. [Institut fuer Technische Chemie - CPV, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2003-12-10

    In this study, glucose as a model substance for cellulose is pyrolyzed in supercritical water. The experiments are conducted in a continuously operated tubular reactor. From the usage of model substances, key information on the degradation pathway of biomass in supercritical water can be obtained. With this knowledge, it is tried to optimize a new method for gasification of wet biomass considering high yields of hydrogen and methane and also the suppressing of tar and char formation. The gaseous products mainly contain hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane and a small amount of carbon monoxide. The effect of experimental conditions, such as pressure, temperature and reaction time, on the degradation of glucose is investigated in the experiments. The qualitative and quantitative composition of the gas and liquid phases formed are determined. The results show that only the amount of phenols increases with increasing temperature in the liquid phase. No complete gasification of glucose is achieved in the studied temperature range between 400 C and 500 C. The addition of alkali salts leads to a higher gas generation and to a decrease in carbon monoxide concentration via water-gas-shift reaction. A lower furfural concentration is obtained in the presence of KHCO{sub 3}. Furthermore, this study shows that there is a wide conformity between the results of real and model biomass. A simplified scheme for glucose degradation is also presented with the help of the results found. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Isolation of an oxomanganese(V) porphyrin intermediate in the reaction of a manganese(III) porphyrin complex and H2O2 in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Wonwoo; Kim, Inwoo; Lim, Mi Hee; Choi, Hye Jin; Lee, Je Seung; Jang, Ho G

    2002-05-03

    The reaction of [Mn(TF(4)TMAP)](CF(3)SO(3))(5) (TF(4)TMAP=meso-tetrakis(2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-N,N,N-trimethyl-4-aniliniumyl)porphinato dianion) with H(2)O(2) (2 equiv) at pH 10.5 and 0 degrees C yielded an oxomanganese(V) porphyrin complex 1 in aqueous solution, whereas an oxomanganese(IV) porphyrin complex 2 was generated in the reactions of tert-alkyl hydroperoxides such as tert-butyl hydroperoxide and 2-methyl-1-phenyl-2-propyl hydroperoxide. Complex 1 was capable of epoxidizing olefins and exchanging its oxygen with H(2) (18)O, whereas 2 did not epoxidize olefins. From the reactions of [Mn(TF(4)TMAP)](5+) with various oxidants in the pH range 3-11, the O-O bond cleavage of hydroperoxides was found to be sensitive to the hydroperoxide substituent and the pH of the reaction solution. Whereas the O-O bond of hydroperoxides containing an electron-donating tert-alkyl group is cleaved homolytically, an electron-withdrawing substituent such as an acyl group in m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid (m-CPBA) facilitates O-O bond heterolysis. The mechanism of the O-O bond cleavage of H(2)O(2) depends on the pH of the reaction solution: O-O bond homolysis prevails at low pH and O-O bond heterolysis becomes a predominant pathway at high pH. The effect of pH on (18)O incorporation from H(2) (18)O into oxygenated products was examined over a wide pH range, by carrying out the epoxidation of carbamazepine (CBZ) with [Mn(TF(4)TMAP)](5+) and KHSO(5) in buffered H(2) (18)O solutions. A high proportion of (18)O was incorporated into the CBZ-10,11-oxide product at all pH values but this proportion was not affected significantly by the pH of the reaction solution.

  15. Modeling position-specific isotope fractionation of organic micropollutants degradation via different reaction pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    : dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model successfully reproduces the multi-element isotope data, and precisely captures the dual element isotope trends, characterizing the different degradation pathways. Besides illustrating the model capability of mechanistic evaluation...

  16. Charting an Alternate Pathway to Reaction Orders and Rate Laws in Introductory Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Gregory T.; Criswell, Brett A.; McAllister, Nicole D.; Polizzi, Samuel J.; Moore, Lamesha A.; Pierre, Michelle S.

    2014-01-01

    Reaction kinetics is an axiomatic topic in chemistry that is often addressed as early as the high school course and serves as the foundation for more sophisticated conversations in college-level organic, physical, and biological chemistry courses. Despite the fundamental nature of reaction kinetics, students can struggle with transforming their…

  17. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometric investigations of [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds--Probing intermediates formed in the course of the nonenzymatic browning reaction of l-ascorbic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Anke; Trage, Claudia; Schwarz, Helmut; Kroh, Lothar W.

    2007-05-01

    A new method is presented which allows the simultaneous detection of various [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds generated in the course of the nonenzymatic browning reaction initiated by thermal treatment of l-ascorbic acid, namely: glyoxal, methylglyoxal, diacetyl, 3-deoxy-l-pentosone, and l-threosoneE 3-Deoxy-l-threosone was successfully identified as a new C4-[alpha]-dicarbonyl structure for the first time in the degradation of Vitamin C by application of this non-chromatographic mass spectrometric approach. Moreover, a more detailed elucidation of the mechanistic scenario with respect to the oxidative and nonoxidative pathways is presented by using dehydro-l-ascorbic acid and 2,3-diketo-l-gulonic acid instead of l-ascorbic acid as a starting material. Furthermore, the postulated pathways are corroborated with the aid of 13C-isotopic labeling studies. The investigations were extended to baby food, and the successful detection of [alpha]-dicarbonyl compounds characteristic for Vitamin C degradation proved the matrix tolerance of the introduced method.

  18. Bioelectrocatalytic dechlorination of trichloroacetic acid at gel-immobilized hemoglobin on multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified graphite electrode: Kinetic modeling and reaction pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qi; Yu, Jianming; Xu, Yinghua; Wang, Jiade; Ying, Le; Song, Xinxin; Zhou, Gendi; Chen, Jianmeng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The electrons transfer from enzyme in the electrode to COCs was the key step. ► The average current efficiency was influenced by pH and temperature of the systems. ► The most favourable degradation conditions for TCA were found to be pH 3 and 310 K. ► The activation energy of 26.2 kJ mol −1 was also calculated by the Arrhenius equation. ► Bioelectrocatalytic mechanism of TCA was verified by kinetic expressions. -- Abstract: In bioelectrochemically reductive dechlorination of chlorinated organic compounds (COCs), the electrons transfer from enzyme in the electrode to COCs was the key step, which determined the average current efficiency (CE) and was influenced by the pH and temperature of the systems. In this work, the effect of temperature (288–318 K) and pH (2–11) of the electrolyte on decholrination of trichloroacetic acid (TCA) was investigated in the sodium alginate/hemoglobin-multiwalled carbon nanotubes-graphite composite electrode (Hb/SA–MWCNT–GE). The results showed that the most favourable degradation conditions for TCA by Hb/SA–MWCNT–GE were found to be pH 3 and 310 K. By varying the pH of the systems, it was found that a proton accompanied with an electron transfer between the electrode and heme Fe(III)/Fe(II) of Hb during the reaction. Additionally, the activation energy of 26.2 kJ mol −1 was also calculated by the Arrhenius equation for the reaction. The total mass balance of the reactant and the products was in the range of 97–105% during the bioelectrochemically reductive reaction. The CE only decreased from 87% to 83% when the Hb/SA–MWCNT–GE was used 5 times. Based on the intermediates detected, a pathway was proposed for TCA degradation in which it underwent dechlorination process. The main degradation mechanism described by a parallel reaction rather than by a sequential reaction for dechlorination of TCA in Hb/SA–MWCNT–GE system was proposed. These data provided relevant information about the

  19. Hydride, hydrogen, proton, and electron affinities of imines and their reaction intermediates in acetonitrile and construction of thermodynamic characteristic graphs (TCGs) of imines as a "molecule ID card".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Qing; Liu, Qiao-Yun; Chen, Qiang; Mei, Lian-Rui

    2010-02-05

    A series of 61 imines with various typical structures were synthesized, and the thermodynamic affinities (defined as enthalpy changes or redox potentials in this work) of the imines to abstract hydride anions, hydrogen atoms, and electrons, the thermodynamic affinities of the radical anions of the imines to abstract hydrogen atoms and protons, and the thermodynamic affinities of the hydrogen adducts of the imines to abstract electrons in acetonitrile were determined by using titration calorimetry and electrochemical methods. The pure heterolytic and homolytic dissociation energies of the C=N pi-bond in the imines were estimated. The polarity of the C=N double bond in the imines was examined using a linear free-energy relationship. The idea of a thermodynamic characteristic graph (TCG) of imines as an efficient "Molecule ID Card" was introduced. The TCG can be used to quantitatively diagnose and predict the characteristic chemical properties of imines and their various reaction intermediates as well as the reduction mechanism of the imines. The information disclosed in this work could not only supply a gap of thermodynamics for the chemistry of imines but also strongly promote the fast development of the applications of imines.

  20. Study of nuclear reactions involving heavy nuclei and intermediate- and high-energy protons and an application in nuclear reactor physics (ADS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matuoka, Paula Fernanda Toledo

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, intermediate- and high-energy nuclear reactions involving heavy nuclei and protons were studied with the Monte Carlo CRISP (Rio - Ilheus - Sao Paulo Collaboration) model. The most relevant nuclear processes studied were intranuclear cascade and fission-evaporation competition. Preliminary studies showed fair agreement between CRISP model calculation and experimental data of multiplicity of evaporated neutrons (E 20 MeV) were emitted mostly in the intranuclear cascade stage, while evaporation presented larger neutron multiplicity. Fission cross section of 209 mb and spallation cross section of 1788 mb were calculated { both in agreement with experimental data. The fission process resulted in a symmetric mass distribution. Another Monte Carlo code, MCNP, was used for radiation transport in order to understand the role of a spallation neutron source in a ADS (Accelerator Driven System) nuclear reactor. Initially, a PWR reactor was simulated to study the isotopic compositions in spent nuclear fuel. As a rst attempt, a spallation neutron source was adapted to an industrial size nuclear reactor. The results showed no evidence of incineration of transuranic elements and modifications were suggested. (author)

  1. DFT study of benzyl alcohol/TiO2 interfacial surface complex: reaction pathway and mechanism of visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Gu, Feng Long; Kim, Minjae; Miao, Maosheng; Zhang, Rui-Qin

    2017-09-24

    We propose a new pathway for the adsorption of benzyl alcohol on the surface of TiO 2 and the formation of interfacial surface complex (ISC). The reaction free energies and reaction kinetics were thoroughly investigated by density functional calculations. The TiO 2 surfaces were modeled by clusters consisting of 4 Ti atoms and 18 O atoms passivated by H, OH group and H 2 O molecules. Compared with solid-state calculations utilizing the periodicity of the materials, such cluster modeling allows inclusion of the high-order correlation effects that seem to be essential for the adsorption of organic molecules onto solid surfaces. The effects of both acidity and solvation are included in our calculations, which demonstrate that the new pathway is competitive with a previous pathway. The electronic structure calculations based on the relaxed ISC structures reveal that the chemisorption of benzyl alcohol on the TiO 2 surface greatly alters the nature of the frontier molecular orbitals. The resulted reduced energy gap in ISC matches the energy of visible light, showing how the adsorption of benzyl alcohol sensitizes the TiO 2 surface. Graphical Abstract The chemisorption of benzyl alcohol on TiO 2 surface greatly alters the nature of the frontier molecular orbitals and the formed interfacial surface complex can be sensitized by visible light.

  2. Theoretical study on keto-enol tautomerisation of glutarimide for exploration of the isomerisation reaction pathway of glutamic acid in proteins using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Nakayoshi, Tomoki; Takahashi, Ohgi; Oda, Akifumi

    2017-03-01

    In order to elucidate the reason why glutamic acid residues have lesser racemisation reactivity than asparaginic acid, we investigated the racemisation energy barrier of piperidinedione, which is the presumed intermediate of the isomerisation reaction of L-Glu to D-Glu, by density functional theory calculations. In two-water-molecule-assisted racemisation, the activation barrier for keto-enol isomerisation was 28.1 kcal/mol. The result showed that the activation barrier for the racemisation of glutamic acid residues was not different from that for the racemisation of aspartic acid residues. Thus, glutamic acid residues can possibly cause the racemisation reaction if the cyclic intermediate stably exists.

  3. Oxidation of Tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate in aqueous solution by UV-activated peroxymonosulfate: Kinetics, water matrix effects, degradation products and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinxin; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ruijuan; Wang, Zunyao

    2017-10-01

    The feasibility of UV-activated peroxymonosulfate (PMS) technology for the degradation of Tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP) in an aqueous solution was investigated in this study. The conditions of [PMS] 0 : [TCEP] 0  = 20:1, T = 25 ± 2 °C and pH = 5.5 ± 0.5 cause a 94.6% removal of TCEP (1 mg L -1 ) after 30 min of Hg lamp irradiation. The effects of operating parameters (the oxidant doses, pH and presence of typical cations (Fe 3+ , Cu 2+ , Ni 2+ , NH 4 + ), anions (Cl - , HCO 3 - , NO 3 - , HPO 4 2- ) and humic acid (HA)) were evaluated. It was found that an increase of the PMS dose and the presence of Fe 3+ could accelerate the reaction, while the anions and HA inhibited the reaction. Meanwhile, TCEP removal in various water matrices was compared, and the order for TCEP removal was as follows: ultrapure water > tap water > synthetic water > secondary clarifier effluent > Jiuxiang river water. Twenty-two oxidation products were identified using an electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometer, and the degradation pathways mainly involved radicals' addition and CO bond cleavage. Furthermore, ECOSAR analysis revealed that the intermediate products during the TCEP oxidation process were generally not harmful to three typical aquatic species. Hence, UV/PMS can be used as an efficient technology to treat TCEP-containing water and wastewaters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Radical Rearrangement Chemistry in Ultraviolet Photodissociation of Iodotyrosine Systems: Insights from Metastable Dissociation, Infrared Ion Spectroscopy, and Reaction Pathway Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranka, Karnamohit; Zhao, Ning; Yu, Long; Stanton, John F; Polfer, Nicolas C

    2018-05-29

    We report on the ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) chemistry of protonated tyrosine, iodotyrosine, and diiodotyrosine. Distonic loss of the iodine creates a high-energy radical at the aromatic ring that engages in hydrogen/proton rearrangement chemistry. Based on UVPD kinetics measurements, the appearance of this radical is coincident with the UV irradiation pulse (8 ns). Conversely, sequential UVPD product ions exhibit metastable decay on ca. 100 ns timescales. Infrared ion spectroscopy is capable of confirming putative structures of the rearrangement products as proton transfers from the imine and β-carbon hydrogens. Potential energy surfaces for the various reaction pathways indicate that the rearrangement chemistry is highly complex, compatible with a cascade of rearrangements, and that there is no preferred rearrangement pathway even in small molecular systems like these. Graphical Abstract.

  5. Reaction progress pathways for glass and spent fuel under unsaturated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.; Finn, P.; Bourcier, W.; Stout, R.

    1994-10-01

    The source term for the release of radionuclides from a nuclear waste repository is the waste form. In order to assess the performance of the repository and the engineered barrier system (EBS) compared to regulations established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Environmental Protection Agency it is necessary (1) to use available data to place bounding limits on release rates from the EBS, and (2) to develop a mechanistic predictive model of the radionuclide release and validate the model against tests done under a variety of different potential reaction conditions. The problem with (1) is that there is little experience to use when evaluating waste form reaction under unsaturated conditions such that errors in applying expert judgment to the problem may be significant. The second approach, to test and model the waste form reaction, is a more defensible means of providing input to the prediction of radionuclide release. In this approach, information related to the source term has a technical basis and provides a starting point to make reasonable assumptions for long-term behavior. Key aspects of this approach are an understanding of the reaction progress mechanism and the ability to model the tests using a geochemical code such as EQ3/6. Current knowledge of glass, UO 2 , and spent fuel reactions under different conditions are described below

  6. Directing Reaction Pathways through Controlled Reactant Binding at Pd-TiO2 Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Bingwen; Nikolla, Eranda; Medlin, J Will

    2017-06-01

    Recent efforts to design selective catalysts for multi-step reactions, such as hydrodeoxygenation (HDO), have emphasized the preparation of active sites at the interface between two materials having different properties. However, achieving precise control over interfacial properties, and thus reaction selectivity, has remained a challenge. Here, we encapsulated Pd nanoparticles (NPs) with TiO 2 films of regulated porosity to gain a new level of control over catalyst performance, resulting in essentially 100 % HDO selectivity for two biomass-derived alcohols. This catalyst also showed exceptional reaction specificity in HDO of furfural and m-cresol. In addition to improving HDO activity by maximizing the interfacial contact between the metal and metal oxide sites, encapsulation by the nanoporous oxide film provided a significant selectivity boost by restricting the accessible conformations of aromatics on the surface. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Directing reaction pathways by catalyst active-site selection using self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Simon H; Schoenbaum, Carolyn A; Schwartz, Daniel K; Medlin, J Will

    2013-01-01

    One key route for controlling reaction selectivity in heterogeneous catalysis is to prepare catalysts that exhibit only specific types of sites required for desired product formation. Here we show that alkanethiolate self-assembled monolayers with varying surface densities can be used to tune selectivity to desired hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation products during the reaction of furfural on supported palladium catalysts. Vibrational spectroscopic studies demonstrate that the selectivity improvement is achieved by controlling the availability of specific sites for the hydrogenation of furfural on supported palladium catalysts through the selection of an appropriate alkanethiolate. Increasing self-assembled monolayer density by controlling the steric bulk of the organic tail ligand restricts adsorption on terrace sites and dramatically increases selectivity to desired products furfuryl alcohol and methylfuran. This technique of active-site selection simultaneously serves both to enhance selectivity and provide insight into the reaction mechanism.

  8. Hydrogeochemical Investigation of Recharge Pathways to Intermediate and Regional Groundwater in Canon de Valle and Technical Area 16, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Brendan W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-14

    In aquifers consisting of fractured or porous igneous rocks, as well as conglomerate and sandstone products of volcanic formations, silicate minerals actively dissolve and precipitate (Eby, 2004; Eriksson, 1985; Drever, 1982). Dissolution of hydrated volcanic glass is also known to influence the character of groundwater to which it is exposed (White et al., 1980). Hydrochemical evolution, within saturated zones of volcanic formations, is modeled here as a means to resolve the sources feeding a perched groundwater zone. By observation of solute mass balances in groundwater, together with rock chemistry, this study characterizes the chemical weathering processes active along recharge pathways in a mountain front system. Inverse mass balance modeling, which accounts for mass fluxes between solid phases and solution, is used to contrive sets of quantitative reactions that explain chemical variability of water between sampling points. Model results are used, together with chloride mass balance estimation, to evaluate subsurface mixing scenarios generated by further modeling. Final model simulations estimate contributions of mountain block and local recharge to various contaminated zones.

  9. Activation pathways taking place at molecular copper precatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ham, C.J.M.; Işık, F.; Verhoeven, T.W.G.M.; Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Hetterscheid, D.G.H.

    2017-01-01

    The activation processes of [CuII(bdmpza)2] in the water oxidation reaction were investigated using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. Two different paths wherein CuO is formed were distinguished. [CuII(bdmpza)2] can be oxidized at high potentials to form CuO, which was observed by a slight

  10. Modeling Ignition of a Heptane Isomer: Improved Thermodynamics, Reaction Pathways, Kinetic, and Rate Rule Optimizations for 2-Methylhexane

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Samah; Cai, Liming; Khaled, Fathi; Banyon, Colin; Wang, Zhandong; Rachidi, Mariam El; Pitsch, Heinz; Curran, Henry J.; Farooq, Aamir; Sarathy, Mani

    2016-01-01

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important to investigate the combustion behavior of real fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracies in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and the kinetic reaction mechanism for a gasoline surrogate component, 2-methylhexane, based on recently published thermodynamic group values and rate rules derived from quantum calculations and experiments. Alternative pathways for the isomerization of peroxy-alkylhydroperoxide (OOQOOH) radicals are also investigated. The effects of these updates are compared against new high-pressure shock tube and rapid compression machine ignition delay measurements. It is shown that rate constant modifications are required to improve agreement between kinetic modeling simulations and experimental data. We further demonstrate the ability to optimize the kinetic model using both manual and automated techniques for rate parameter tunings to improve agreement with the measured ignition delay time data. Finally, additional low temperature chain branching reaction pathways are shown to improve the model’s performance. The present approach to model development provides better performance across extended operating conditions while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  11. Modeling Ignition of a Heptane Isomer: Improved Thermodynamics, Reaction Pathways, Kinetic, and Rate Rule Optimizations for 2-Methylhexane

    KAUST Repository

    Mohamed, Samah

    2016-03-21

    Accurate chemical kinetic combustion models of lightly branched alkanes (e.g., 2-methylalkanes) are important to investigate the combustion behavior of real fuels. Improving the fidelity of existing kinetic models is a necessity, as new experiments and advanced theories show inaccuracies in certain portions of the models. This study focuses on updating thermodynamic data and the kinetic reaction mechanism for a gasoline surrogate component, 2-methylhexane, based on recently published thermodynamic group values and rate rules derived from quantum calculations and experiments. Alternative pathways for the isomerization of peroxy-alkylhydroperoxide (OOQOOH) radicals are also investigated. The effects of these updates are compared against new high-pressure shock tube and rapid compression machine ignition delay measurements. It is shown that rate constant modifications are required to improve agreement between kinetic modeling simulations and experimental data. We further demonstrate the ability to optimize the kinetic model using both manual and automated techniques for rate parameter tunings to improve agreement with the measured ignition delay time data. Finally, additional low temperature chain branching reaction pathways are shown to improve the model’s performance. The present approach to model development provides better performance across extended operating conditions while also strengthening the fundamental basis of the model.

  12. Oxidation of β-lactam antibiotics by peracetic acid: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kejia; Zhou, Xinyan; Du, Penghui; Zhang, Tuqiao; Cai, Meiquan; Sun, Peizhe; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2017-10-15

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a disinfection oxidant used in many industries including wastewater treatment. β-Lactams, a group of widely prescribed antibiotics, are frequently detected in wastewater effluents and surface waters. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven β-lactams (cefalexin (CFX), cefadroxil (CFR), cefapirin (CFP), cephalothin (CFT), ampicillin (AMP), amoxicillin (AMX) and penicillin G (PG)) toward PAA were investigated to elucidate the behavior of β-lactams during PAA oxidation processes. The reaction follows second-order kinetics and is much faster at pH 5 and 7 than at pH 9 due to speciation of PAA. Reactivity to PAA follows the order of CFR ∼ CFX > AMP ∼ AMX > CFT ∼ CFP ∼ PG and is related to β-lactam's nucleophilicity. The thioether sulfur of β-lactams is attacked by PAA to generate sulfoxide products. Presence of the phenylglycinyl amino group on β-lactams can significantly influence electron distribution and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) location and energy in ways that enhance the reactivity to PAA. Reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to accurately model the decay of β-lactams by PAA in surface water matrix and only slightly overestimate the decay in wastewater matrix. Results of this study indicate that the oxidative transformation of β-lactams by PAA can be expected under appropriate wastewater treatment conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Chloroacetone photodissociation at 193 nm and the subsequent dynamics of the CH3C(O)CH2 radical—an intermediate formed in the OH + allene reaction en route to CH3 + ketene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alligood, Bridget W.; FitzPatrick, Benjamin L.; Szpunar, David E.; Butler, Laurie J.

    2011-02-01

    We use a combination of crossed laser-molecular beam experiments and velocity map imaging experiments to investigate the primary photofission channels of chloroacetone at 193 nm; we also probe the dissociation dynamics of the nascent CH3C(O)CH2 radicals formed from C-Cl bond fission. In addition to the C-Cl bond fission primary photodissociation channel, the data evidence another photodissociation channel of the precursor, C-C bond fission to produce CH3CO and CH2Cl. The CH3C(O)CH2 radical formed from C-Cl bond fission is one of the intermediates in the OH + allene reaction en route to CH3 + ketene. The 193 nm photodissociation laser allows us to produce these CH3C(O)CH2 radicals with enough internal energy to span the dissociation barrier leading to the CH3 + ketene asymptote. Therefore, some of the vibrationally excited CH3C(O)CH2 radicals undergo subsequent dissociation to CH3 + ketene products; we are able to measure the velocities of these products using both the imaging and scattering apparatuses. The results rule out the presence of a significant contribution from a C-C bond photofission channel that produces CH3 and COCH2Cl fragments. The CH3C(O)CH2 radicals are formed with a considerable amount of energy partitioned into rotation; we use an impulsive model to explicitly characterize the internal energy distribution. The data are better fit by using the C-Cl bond fission transition state on the S1 surface of chloroacetone as the geometry at which the impulsive force acts, not the Franck-Condon geometry. Our data suggest that, even under atmospheric conditions, the reaction of OH with allene could produce a small branching to CH3 + ketene products, rather than solely producing inelastically stabilized adducts. This additional channel offers a different pathway for the OH-initiated oxidation of such unsaturated volatile organic compounds, those containing a C=C=C moiety, than is currently included in atmospheric models.

  14. Synthetic routes to some isotopically labelled intermediates for diterpenoid biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, R.M.; Godfrey, I.M.; Hogg, R.W.; Knox, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    The exo-15-hydrogen of ent-kaurene can be exchanged through a reversible ene reaction in a convenient and efficient procedure which has the potential for giving high specific activity 3 H-labelling. Copalol, the (Z)-double bond stereoisomer, and the allylic alcohol isomers ent-manool and ent-epimanool have been obtained through divergent synthetic pathways involving a 15,16-bisnor ketone intermediate. These pathways have also allowed the four compounds to be obtained with 14 C-labelling. A method, involving a Wittig reaction to form a vinyl bromide intermediate, has been developed for obtaining copalol, as the trityl ether derivative, with stereospecific isotopic labelling of one or the other of the hydrogens of the exocyclic methylene group. 27 refs., figs

  15. Reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    abp

    19 oct. 2017 ... Reaction to Mohamed Said Nakhli et al. concerning the article: "When the axillary block remains the only alternative in a 5 year old child". .... Bertini L1, Savoia G, De Nicola A, Ivani G, Gravino E, Albani A et al ... 2010;7(2):101-.

  16. Synergistic reaction between SO2 and NO2 on mineral oxides: a potential formation pathway of sulfate aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Ma, Qingxin; Liu, Yongchun; Ma, Jinzhu; He, Hong

    2012-02-07

    Sulfate is one of the most important aerosols in the atmosphere. A new sulfate formation pathway via synergistic reactions between SO(2) and NO(2) on mineral oxides was proposed. The heterogeneous reactions of SO(2) and NO(2) on CaO, α-Fe(2)O(3), ZnO, MgO, α-Al(2)O(3), TiO(2), and SiO(2) were investigated by in situ Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (in situ DRIFTS) at ambient temperature. Formation of sulfate from adsorbed SO(2) was promoted by the coexisting NO(2), while surface N(2)O(4) was observed as the crucial oxidant for the oxidation of surface sulfite. This process was significantly promoted by the presence of O(2). The synergistic effect between SO(2) and NO(2) was not observed on other mineral particles (such as CaCO(3) and CaSO(4)) probably due to the lack of the surface reactive oxygen sites. The synergistic reaction between SO(2) and NO(2) on mineral oxides resulted in the formation of internal mixtures of sulfate, nitrate, and mineral oxides. The change of mixture state will affect the physicochemical properties of atmospheric particles and therefore further influence their environmental and climate effects.

  17. Progranulin protects vascular endothelium against atherosclerotic inflammatory reaction via Akt/eNOS and nuclear factor-κB pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hwan-Jin; Jung, Tae Woo; Hong, Ho Cheol; Choi, Hae Yoon; Seo, Ji-A; Kim, Sin Gon; Kim, Nan Hee; Choi, Kyung Mook; Choi, Dong Seop; Baik, Sei Hyun; Yoo, Hye Jin

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, initiated by activation and dysfunction of the endothelium. Recently, progranulin has been regarded as an important modulator of inflammatory processes; however, the role for prgranulin in regulating inflammation in vascular endothelial cells has not been described. Signaling pathways mediated by progranulin were analyzed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) treated with progranulin. Progranulin significantly induced Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation in HUVECs, an effect that was blocked with Akt inhibitor. Furthermore, nitric oxide (NO) level, the end product of Akt/eNOS pathway, was significantly upregulated after progranulin treatment. Next, we showed that progranulin efficiently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling. LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκB and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) levels decreased after progranulin treatment. Also, progranulin blocked translocation of NF-κB from the cytosol to the nucleus. In addition, progranulin significantly reduced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by inhibiting binding of NF- κB to their promoter regions and blocked attachment of monocytes to HUVECs. Progranulin also significantly reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-α (TNF-α) and monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1), the crucial inflammatory molecules known to aggravate atherosclerosis. Progranulin efficiently inhibited LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling in endothelial cells through activation of the Akt/eNOS pathway and attenuation of the NF-κB pathway, suggesting its protective roles in vascular endothelium against inflammatory reaction underlying atherosclerosis.

  18. Progranulin protects vascular endothelium against atherosclerotic inflammatory reaction via Akt/eNOS and nuclear factor-κB pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwan-Jin Hwang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Atherosclerosis is considered a chronic inflammatory disease, initiated by activation and dysfunction of the endothelium. Recently, progranulin has been regarded as an important modulator of inflammatory processes; however, the role for prgranulin in regulating inflammation in vascular endothelial cells has not been described. METHOD AND RESULTS: Signaling pathways mediated by progranulin were analyzed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs treated with progranulin. Progranulin significantly induced Akt and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS phosphorylation in HUVECs, an effect that was blocked with Akt inhibitor. Furthermore, nitric oxide (NO level, the end product of Akt/eNOS pathway, was significantly upregulated after progranulin treatment. Next, we showed that progranulin efficiently inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling. LPS-induced phosphorylation of IκB and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB levels decreased after progranulin treatment. Also, progranulin blocked translocation of NF-κB from the cytosol to the nucleus. In addition, progranulin significantly reduced the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 by inhibiting binding of NF- κB to their promoter regions and blocked attachment of monocytes to HUVECs. Progranulin also significantly reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-α (TNF-α and monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1, the crucial inflammatory molecules known to aggravate atherosclerosis. CONCLUSION: Progranulin efficiently inhibited LPS-mediated pro-inflammatory signaling in endothelial cells through activation of the Akt/eNOS pathway and attenuation of the NF-κB pathway, suggesting its protective roles in vascular endothelium against inflammatory reaction underlying atherosclerosis.

  19. Impact of organic-mineral matter interactions on thermal reaction pathways for coal model compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Struss, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    Coal is a complex, heterogeneous solid that includes interdispersed mineral matter. However, knowledge of organic-mineral matter interactions is embryonic, and the impact of these interactions on coal pyrolysis and liquefaction is incomplete. Clay minerals, for example, are known to be effective catalysts for organic reactions. Furthermore, clays such as montmorillonite have been proposed to be key catalysts in the thermal alteration of lignin into vitrinite during the coalification process. Recent studies by Hatcher and coworkers on the evolution of coalified woods using microscopy and NMR have led them to propose selective, acid-catalyzed, solid state reaction chemistry to account for retained structural integrity in the wood. However, the chemical feasibility of such reactions in relevant solids is difficult to demonstrate. The authors have begun a model compound study to gain a better molecular level understanding of the effects in the solid state of organic-mineral matter interactions relevant to both coal formation and processing. To satisfy the need for model compounds that remain nonvolatile solids at temperatures ranging to 450 C, model compounds are employed that are chemically bound to the surface of a fumed silica (Si-O-C{sub aryl}linkage). The organic structures currently under investigation are phenethyl phenyl ether (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OC{sub 6}H{sub 5}) derivatives, which serve as models for {beta}-alkyl aryl ether units that are present in lignin and lignitic coals. The solid-state chemistry of these materials at 200--450 C in the presence of interdispersed acid catalysts such as small particle size silica-aluminas and montmorillonite clay will be reported. Initial focus will be on defining the potential impact of these interactions on coal pyrolysis and liquefaction.

  20. The role of reaction pathways and support interactions in the development of high activity hydrotreating catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsøe, Henrik; Hinnemann, Berit; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    structures may be present as single sulfide sheets. Thus, stacking is not an essential feature of Type II catalysts. The article illustrates how the new scientific insight has aided the introduction of the new high activity BRIM (TM) type catalysts for FCC pre-treatment and production of ultra low sulfur...... exhibiting a metallic character are observed to be involved in adsorption, hydrogenation and C-S bond cleavage. The insight is seen to provide a new framework for understanding the DDS and HYD pathways and the role of steric hindrance and poisons. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have illustrated...... how support interactions may influence the activity of sulfided catalysts. The brim sites and the tendency to form vacancies are seen to differ in types I and II Co-Mo-S. High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) studies show that the high activity Type II...

  1. Electrochemical degradation of sulfonamides at BDD electrode: Kinetics, reaction pathway and eco-toxicity evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabiańska, Aleksandra; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Stepnowski, Piotr [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Stolte, Stefan [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); UFT-Centre of Environmental Research and Sustainable Technology, University of Bremen, Leobener Straße UFT, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Siedlecka, Ewa Maria, E-mail: ewa.siedlecka@ug.edu.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, ul. Wita Stwosza 63, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • SNs were electrochemically oxidized at BDD in one compartment reactor. • The efficiency of SN degradation was the highest in effluents from municipal WWTP. • The electro-degradation SNs based on oxidation but reduction was also possible. • Electrochemical oxidation of SNs led in some cases to mixtures toxic to L. minor. - Abstract: The investigation dealt with electrochemical oxidation of five sulfonamides (SNs): sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfathiazole (STZ), sulfamerazine (SMR), sulfamethazine (SMN) and sulfadimethoxine (SDM) in aqueous solution at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. All studied sulfonamides were degraded according to a pseudo first order kinetics. The structure of SNs had no significant effect on the values of pseudo first order rate constants. Increased degradation efficiency was observed in higher temperature and in acidic pH. Due to the presence of chlorine and nitrate SNs were more effectively oxidized from municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents than from pure supporting electrolyte Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The intermediates identified by LC–MS and GC–MS analysis suggested that the hydroxyl radicals attack mainly the S-N bond, but also the aromatic ring systems (aniline, pyrimidine or triazole) of SNs. Finally, the toxicity of the SNs solutions and effluents after electrochemical treatment was assessed through the measurement of growth inhibition of green algae (Scenedesmus vacualatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor). Toxicity of SMR, STZ, SMN solutions before and after electrochemical oxidation and SDM solution after the process in L. minor test was observed. No significant toxicity of studied SNs was observed in algae test.

  2. Electrochemical degradation of sulfonamides at BDD electrode: Kinetics, reaction pathway and eco-toxicity evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabiańska, Aleksandra; Białk-Bielińska, Anna; Stepnowski, Piotr; Stolte, Stefan; Siedlecka, Ewa Maria

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • SNs were electrochemically oxidized at BDD in one compartment reactor. • The efficiency of SN degradation was the highest in effluents from municipal WWTP. • The electro-degradation SNs based on oxidation but reduction was also possible. • Electrochemical oxidation of SNs led in some cases to mixtures toxic to L. minor. - Abstract: The investigation dealt with electrochemical oxidation of five sulfonamides (SNs): sulfadiazine (SDZ), sulfathiazole (STZ), sulfamerazine (SMR), sulfamethazine (SMN) and sulfadimethoxine (SDM) in aqueous solution at boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. All studied sulfonamides were degraded according to a pseudo first order kinetics. The structure of SNs had no significant effect on the values of pseudo first order rate constants. Increased degradation efficiency was observed in higher temperature and in acidic pH. Due to the presence of chlorine and nitrate SNs were more effectively oxidized from municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents than from pure supporting electrolyte Na 2 SO 4 . The intermediates identified by LC–MS and GC–MS analysis suggested that the hydroxyl radicals attack mainly the S-N bond, but also the aromatic ring systems (aniline, pyrimidine or triazole) of SNs. Finally, the toxicity of the SNs solutions and effluents after electrochemical treatment was assessed through the measurement of growth inhibition of green algae (Scenedesmus vacualatus) and duckweed (Lemna minor). Toxicity of SMR, STZ, SMN solutions before and after electrochemical oxidation and SDM solution after the process in L. minor test was observed. No significant toxicity of studied SNs was observed in algae test

  3. A Pathway to Psychological Difficulty: Perceived Chronic Social Adversity and Its Symptomatic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Cody; Zhang, Jingqiu; Yang, Dong

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to predict and explain psychological maladjustment or difficulty. Specifically, we discuss the concept of perceived chronic social adversity, and we expect that such perceived chronic social adversity may potentially lead to chronic stress responses. Accordingly, we propose the symptomatic reactions of perceived chronic social adversity. We put forward a set of hypotheses regarding the relationships between perceived chronic social adversity and those chronic stress responses, and we further hypothesize a mediating role of individualized negative essentialism brought by perceived chronical social adversity. Resilience and individual differences in the ability to cope with perceived adversity are discussed. Future research and prevention need to pay more attention to effects of subjective personal experiences on psychological difficulty, focusing on the importance of exploring daily social experiences in improving cognitive construction processes and developing appropriate preventions.

  4. Kinetic and Reaction Pathway Analysis in the Application of Botulinum Toxin A for Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J. Lebeda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A relatively new approach in the treatment of specific wounds in animal models and in patients with type A botulinum toxin is the focus of this paper. The indications or conditions include traumatic wounds (experimental and clinical, surgical (incision wounds, and wounds such as fissures and ulcers that are signs/symptoms of disease or other processes. An objective was to conduct systematic literature searches and take note of the reactions involved in the healing process and identify corresponding pharmacokinetic data. From several case reports, we developed a qualitative model of how botulinum toxin disrupts the vicious cycle of muscle spasm, pain, inflammation, decreased blood flow, and ischemia. We transformed this model into a minimal kinetic scheme for healing chronic wounds. The model helped us to estimate the rate of decline of this toxin's therapeutic effect by calculating the rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms after a wound-healing treatment with this neurotoxin.

  5. A Pathway to Psychological Difficulty: Perceived Chronic Social Adversity and Its Symptomatic Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody Ding

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we attempt to predict and explain psychological maladjustment or difficulty. Specifically, we discuss the concept of perceived chronic social adversity, and we expect that such perceived chronic social adversity may potentially lead to chronic stress responses. Accordingly, we propose the symptomatic reactions of perceived chronic social adversity. We put forward a set of hypotheses regarding the relationships between perceived chronic social adversity and those chronic stress responses, and we further hypothesize a mediating role of individualized negative essentialism brought by perceived chronical social adversity. Resilience and individual differences in the ability to cope with perceived adversity are discussed. Future research and prevention need to pay more attention to effects of subjective personal experiences on psychological difficulty, focusing on the importance of exploring daily social experiences in improving cognitive construction processes and developing appropriate preventions.

  6. Effect of temperature on the reaction pathway of calcium carbonate formation via precursor phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purgstaller, Bettina; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Konrad, Florian; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    It has been earlier postulated that some biogenic and sedimentary calcium carbonate (CaCO3) minerals (e.g. calcite and aragonite) are secondary in origin and have originally formed via a metastable calcium carbonate precursor phase (e.g. amorphous CaCO3, [1-2]). Such formation pathways are likely affected by various physicochemical parameters including aqueous Mg and temperature. In an effort to improve our understanding on the formation mechanism of CaCO3 minerals, precipitation experiments were carried out by the addition of a 0.6 M (Ca,Mg)Cl2 solution at distinct Mg/Ca ratios (1/4 and 1/8) into a 1 M NaHCO3 solution under constant pH conditions(8.3 ±0.1). The formation of CaCO3 was systematically examined as a function of temperature (6, 12, 18 and 25 ±0.3° C). During the experimental runs mineral precipitation was monitored by in situ Raman spectroscopy as well as by continuous sampling and analyzing of precipitates and reactive solutions. The results revealed two pathways of CaCO3 formation depending on the initial Mg/Ca ratio and temperature: (i) In experiments with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1/4 at ≤ 12° C as well as in experiments with a Mg/Ca ratio of 1/8 at ≤ 18° C, ikaite (CaCO3 6H2O) acts as a precursor phase for aragonite formation. (ii) In contrast higher temperatures induced the formation of Mg-rich amorphous CaCO3 (Mg-ACC) which was subsequently transformed to Mg-rich calcite. In situ Raman spectra showed that the transformation of Mg-ACC to Mg-calcite occurs at a higher rate (˜ 8 min) compared to that of ikaite to aragonite (> 2 h). Thus, the formation of aragonite rather than of Mg-calcite occurs due to the slower release of Ca2+and CO32- ions into the Mg-rich reactive solution during retarded ikaite dissolution. This behavior is generally consistent with the observation that calcite precipitation is inhibited at elevated aqueous Mg/Ca ratios. [1] Addadi L., Raz S. and Weiner S. (2003) Advanced Materials 15, 959-970. [2] Rodriguez-Blanco J. D

  7. A critical assessment of theoretical methods for finding reaction pathways and transition states of surface processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimes, JirI; Michaelides, Angelos; Bowler, David R

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a variety of techniques for locating transition states on potential energy surfaces is evaluated within the density functional theory framework. Diffusion of a water molecule across NaCl(001) and HCl bond breaking on the same surface are treated as general test cases; the former is an example of a low barrier diffusion process and the latter an example of a relatively high barrier covalent bond rupture event. The methods considered include the nudged elastic band (NEB), Dewar, Healy and Stewart (DHS), dimer, constrained optimization (CO), activation-relaxation technique (ART) and one-side growing string (OGS) as well as novel combinations of the DHS with growing string (DHS + GS) and DHS plus climbing image (CI-DHS). A key conclusion to come from this study is that the NEB method is relatively fast, especially when just a single (climbing) image is used. Indeed, using more images represents an unnecessary computational burden for our set of processes. The dimer method exhibits variable performance; being poor for the water diffusion processes, which have small activation energies, but much more efficient for the HCl bond breaking process which has a higher barrier. When only a poor initial guess of the transition state geometry is available, the CI-DHS scheme is one of the most efficient techniques considered. And as a means to quickly establish an approximate minimum energy pathway the DHS + GS scheme offers some potential.

  8. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions, and novel technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Frank; Wunderlin, Pascal; Udert, Kai M.; Wells, George F.

    2012-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO) production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) or the reduction of nitrite (NO−2) to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO−2 to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO−2, NH2OH, and nitroxyl (HNO). Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build

  9. Nitric oxide and nitrous oxide turnover in natural and engineered microbial communities: biological pathways, chemical reactions and novel technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eSchreiber

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide (N2O is an environmentally important atmospheric trace gas because it is an effective greenhouse gas and it leads to ozone depletion through photo-chemical nitric oxide (NO production in the stratosphere. Mitigating its steady increase in atmospheric concentration requires an understanding of the mechanisms that lead to its formation in natural and engineered microbial communities. N2O is formed biologically from the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH or the reduction of nitrite (NO2- to NO and further to N2O. Our review of the biological pathways for N2O production shows that apparently all organisms and pathways known to be involved in the catabolic branch of microbial N-cycle have the potential to catalyze the reduction of NO2- to NO and the further reduction of NO to N2O, while N2O formation from NH2OH is only performed by ammonia oxidizing bacteria. In addition to biological pathways, we review important chemical reactions that can lead to NO and N2O formation due to the reactivity of NO2-, NH2OH and nitroxyl (HNO. Moreover, biological N2O formation is highly dynamic in response to N-imbalance imposed on a system. Thus, understanding NO formation and capturing the dynamics of NO and N2O build-up are key to understand mechanisms of N2O release. Here, we discuss novel technologies that allow experiments on NO and N2O formation at high temporal resolution, namely NO and N2O microelectrodes and the dynamic analysis of the isotopic signature of N2O with quantum cascade laser based absorption spectroscopy. In addition, we introduce other techniques that use the isotopic composition of N2O to distinguish production pathways and findings that were made with emerging molecular techniques in complex environments. Finally, we discuss how a combination of the presented tools might help to address important open questions on pathways and controls of nitrogen flow through complex microbial communities that eventually lead to N2O build-up.

  10. Reaction pathway of the degradation of the p-hydroxybenzoic acid by sulfate radical generated by ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criquet, Justine; Leitner, Nathalie Karpel Vel

    2015-01-01

    The degradation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) in aqueous solutions by ionizing radiation was studied. The phenolic pollutant was easily removed by the electron beam irradiation, as more than 80% of the initial 100 µM introduced was degraded for a dose of 600 Gy. It was shown that the addition of persulfate, producing the sulfate radical as additional reactive species, induced a change in the reaction pathway. LC–MS analyses were performed in order to identify the different by-products formed. In the absence of persulfate, the main by-product formed was 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, while in presence of persulfate, 1,4-benzoquinone was detected and the hydroxylated by-products were not present. A reaction pathway of HBA degradation by hydroxyl and sulfate radicals was proposed from the identification of the chemical structure of the different by-products detected. The influences of pH and dissolved oxygen were also studied. A high decline of HBA degradation was observed at pH 11 compared to pH 4.5, this decrease was minimized in the presence of persulfate. The dissolved oxygen concentration was found to be a limiting parameter of HBA degradation, however an excess of dissolved oxygen in solution did not improve the degradation to a large extent. - Highlights: • p-Hydroxybenzoic acid (HBA) is easily removed by e-beam irradiation. • The sulfate radicals formed from persulfate induce loss of the benzoic acid skeleton. • The dissolved oxygen concentration is a limiting parameter of the HBA degradation. • The effect of pH is minimized in presence of persulfate

  11. Intermediate structure and threshold phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel

    2004-01-01

    The Intermediate Structure, evidenced through microstructures of the neutron strength function, is reflected in open reaction channels as fluctuations in excitation function of nuclear threshold effects. The intermediate state supporting both neutron strength function and nuclear threshold effect is a micro-giant neutron threshold state. (author)

  12. Formation of nitrogen-containing compounds during microwave pyrolysis of microalgae: Product distribution and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Tahmasebi, Arash; Maliutina, Kristina; Yu, Jianglong

    2017-12-01

    The formation of nitrogen-containing compounds in bio-oil during microwave pyrolysis of Chlorella and Spirulina microalgae has been investigated in this study. Activated carbon (AC) and magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) were used as microwave receptors during microwave pyrolysis experiments. It has been found that the use of Fe 3 O 4 increased the total yield of bio-oil. The use of different microwave receptors did not seem to have affected the total yield of nitrogen-containing compounds in the bio-oil. However, Fe 3 O 4 promoted the formation of nitrogen-containing aliphatics, thereby reducing the formation of nitrogen-containing aromatics. The use of AC promoted the dehydration reactions during amino acid decomposition, thereby enhancing the formation of nitrogen-containing aromatics during pyrolysis. From the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis results, the major high-value nitrogen-containing compounds in the pyrolysis bio-oil of Chlorella and Spirulina were identified as indole and dodecamide. The formation mechanisms of nitrogen-containing compounds were proposed and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transformation products and reaction pathways of carbamazepine during photocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jelic, A.; Michael, I.; Achilleos, A.; Hapeshi, E.; Lambropoulou, D.; Perez, S.; Petrovic, M.; Fatta-Kassinos, D.; Barcelo, D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Degradation of CBZ during US, TiO 2 /UV and TiO 2 /UV/US processes has been evaluated. • The combined TiO 2 /UV/US oxidation resulted in significant enhancement of the CBZ degradation rate. • Transformation products were identified and the transformation pathways were proposed. • An acute toxicity test showed an increase in toxicity over the time-course of the studied processes. -- Abstract: This study examines the degradation of the antiepileptic carbamazepine (CBZ) by sonolysis, TiO 2 -based heterogeneous photocatalysis under UV-A and simulated solar irradiation, and by the combined use of UV-A and ultrasound irradiation (i.e. sonophotocatalysis) in demineralized water, ground water and effluent wastewater. The processes were compared with respect to substrate conversion rate and the extent of DOC reduction as a measure of mineralization. CBZ was degraded following a pseudo-first order kinetics. Sonophotocatalysis provided the highest rate of CBZ transformation over the time-course of the experiment while the degree of DOC removal in pure water was similar for all the studied treatments (around 40%), and always lower than CBZ conversion. This indicated that a considerable organic load remained in the treated solutions that could also be attributed to the presence of persistent oxidation products. UPLC–(+ESI)-QToF-MS was employed to determine major CBZ-related transformation products. Several recalcitrant hydroxy- and keto-derivatives of CBZ were tentatively identified. A Daphnia magna bioassay was used to evaluate the potential toxicity of the samples collected at different time points showing that the mixtures were highly toxic to D. magna

  14. Transformation products and reaction pathways of carbamazepine during photocatalytic and sonophotocatalytic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jelic, A. [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Michael, I.; Achilleos, A.; Hapeshi, E. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1 Panepistimiou Avenue, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas, International Water Research Centre, University of Cyprus, 1 Panepistimiou Avenue, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Lambropoulou, D. [Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124 (Greece); Perez, S., E-mail: spsqam@idaea.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA), Spanish Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034 Barcelona (Spain); Petrovic, M. [Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), H2O Building, Scientific and Technological Park of the University of Girona, 101-E-17003 Girona (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Passeig Lluis Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Fatta-Kassinos, D. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 1 Panepistimiou Avenue, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas, International Water Research Centre, University of Cyprus, 1 Panepistimiou Avenue, P.O. Box 20537, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Barcelo, D. [Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA), H2O Building, Scientific and Technological Park of the University of Girona, 101-E-17003 Girona (Spain); Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Passeig Lluis Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Degradation of CBZ during US, TiO{sub 2}/UV and TiO{sub 2}/UV/US processes has been evaluated. • The combined TiO{sub 2}/UV/US oxidation resulted in significant enhancement of the CBZ degradation rate. • Transformation products were identified and the transformation pathways were proposed. • An acute toxicity test showed an increase in toxicity over the time-course of the studied processes. -- Abstract: This study examines the degradation of the antiepileptic carbamazepine (CBZ) by sonolysis, TiO{sub 2}-based heterogeneous photocatalysis under UV-A and simulated solar irradiation, and by the combined use of UV-A and ultrasound irradiation (i.e. sonophotocatalysis) in demineralized water, ground water and effluent wastewater. The processes were compared with respect to substrate conversion rate and the extent of DOC reduction as a measure of mineralization. CBZ was degraded following a pseudo-first order kinetics. Sonophotocatalysis provided the highest rate of CBZ transformation over the time-course of the experiment while the degree of DOC removal in pure water was similar for all the studied treatments (around 40%), and always lower than CBZ conversion. This indicated that a considerable organic load remained in the treated solutions that could also be attributed to the presence of persistent oxidation products. UPLC–(+ESI)-QToF-MS was employed to determine major CBZ-related transformation products. Several recalcitrant hydroxy- and keto-derivatives of CBZ were tentatively identified. A Daphnia magna bioassay was used to evaluate the potential toxicity of the samples collected at different time points showing that the mixtures were highly toxic to D. magna.

  15. A thiamin-bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit induces large scale disorder-to-order transformations in the enzyme and reveals novel structural features in the covalently bound adduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Sax, Martin; Brunskill, Andrew; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Nemeria, Natalia; Zhang, Sheng; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2006-06-02

    The crystal structure of the E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) has been determined with phosphonolactylthiamin diphosphate (PLThDP) in its active site. PLThDP serves as a structural and electrostatic analogue of the natural intermediate alpha-lactylthiamin diphosphate (LThDP), in which the carboxylate from the natural substrate pyruvate is replaced by a phosphonate group. This represents the first example of an experimentally determined, three-dimensional structure of a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme containing a covalently bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue and should serve as a model for the corresponding intermediates in other ThDP-dependent decarboxylases. Regarding the PDHc-specific reaction, the presence of PLThDP induces large scale conformational changes in the enzyme. In conjunction with the E1-PLThDP and E1-ThDP structures, analysis of a H407A E1-PLThDP variant structure shows that an interaction between His-407 and PLThDP is essential for stabilization of two loop regions in the active site that are otherwise disordered in the absence of intermediate analogue. This ordering completes formation of the active site and creates a new ordered surface likely involved in interactions with the lipoyl domains of E2s within the PDHc complex. The tetrahedral intermediate analogue is tightly held in the active site through direct hydrogen bonds to residues His-407, Tyr-599, and His-640 and reveals a new, enzyme-induced, strain-related feature that appears to aid in the decarboxylation process. This feature is almost certainly present in all ThDP-dependent decarboxylases; thus its inclusion in our understanding of general thiamin catalysis is important.

  16. Reaction pathways of furfural, furfuryl alcohol and 2-methylfuran on Cu(111) and NiCu bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ke; Wan, Weiming; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is an important reaction for converting biomass-derived furfural to value-added 2-methylfuran, which is a promising fuel additive. In this work, the HDO of furfural to produce 2-methylfuran occurred on the NiCu bimetallic surfaces prepared on either Ni(111) or Cu(111). The reaction pathways of furfural were investigated on Cu(111) and Ni/Cu(111) surfaces using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) experiments. These studies provided mechanistic insights into the effects of bimetallic formation on enhancing the HDO activity. Specifically, furfural weakly adsorbed on Cu(111), while it strongly adsorbed on Ni/Cu(111) through an η2(C,O) configuration, which led to the HDO of furfural on Ni/Cu(111). The ability to dissociate H2 on Ni/Cu(111) is also an important factor for enhancing the HDO activity over Cu(111).

  17. Intermediate Fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This text and its connected exhibition are aiming to reflect both on the thoughts, the processes and the outcome of the design and production of the artefact ‘Intermediate Fragment’ and making as a contemporary architectural tool in general. Intermediate Fragment was made for the exhibition ‘Enga...... of realising an exhibition object was conceived, but expanded, refined and concretised through this process. The context of the work shown here is an interest in a tighter, deeper connection between experimentally obtained material knowledge and architectural design....

  18. Evidence for pion exchange currents in the analysis of the /sup 4/He(p,d)/sup 3/He reaction at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepard, J R; Rost, E; Smith, G R [Colorado Univ., Boulder (USA). Nuclear Physics Lab.

    1979-12-01

    Previous unsuccessful analyses of /sup 4/He(p,d)/sup 3/He at intermediate energies have employed densities based directly on the measured e/sup -/ + /sup 4/He elastic scattering. When the effects of pion exchange currents are removed, the resulting DWBA analysis is in qualitative agreement with the experimental data.

  19. Interaction between t-butyl hydroperoxide (I) and positive halogen compounds. part I. Intermediates in the reaction between I and CI2O

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, J. van; Schors, A.; Kooyman, E.C.

    1973-01-01

    “positive halogen” compounds were found to induce the decomposition of t-butyl hydroperoxide (I) in the dark. In this Cl2O proved to be particularly effective, liberating oxygen from I instantaneously at 0°. At temperature between −80° and −30°, two oxygen-rich intermediates could be observed with

  20. Contribution to the study of πN → π1π2N reactions with creation of an intermediate N*3/2(1236) isobar from 0.4 to 1.5 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlo, J.P.

    1976-01-01

    The one pion production reaction π + p → π + pπ 0 has been studied up to 1.5 GeV. The π 0 angular distribution measured by counter techniques has been compared to bubble chamber data. Angular distributions are interpreted in the hypothesis of formation of the intermediate N * 3/2 (1236) isobar. Angular distributions for isobar production and decay in one pion production reactions πN → π 1 N * (N * → π 2 N], are calculated in chapter II. π + p → π + pπ 0 experimental results are reported and analyzed in chapter III. An estimation of the pion-isobar partial wave amplitudes in reaction π + p → π 0 N *++ 3/2 (1236) has been tempted. Comparison with π + p phase shift analyses is made. Bubble chamber data for π - p → π - π + n channel are presented at the end of chapter III. (author) [fr

  1. Contribution to the study of πN→π1π2N reactions with creation of an intermediate N*sub(3/2) (1236) isobare from 0.4 to 1.5 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merlo, J.P.

    1976-10-01

    The one pion production reaction π + p→π + pπ 0 has been studied up to 1.5 GeV. The π 0 angular distribution measured by counter techniques has been compared to bubble chamber data. Angular distributions are interpreted in the hypothesis of formation of the intermediate N*sub(3/2) (1236) isobar. Angular distributions for isobar production and decay in one pion production reactions πN→π 1 N* (N*→π 2 N) are calculated. π + p→π + pπ 0 experimental results are reported and analyzed. An estimation of the pion-isobar partial wave amplitudes in reaction π + p→π 0 N*sub(3/2)sup(++) (1236) has been tempted. Comparison with π + p phase shift analyses is made. Bubble chamber data for π - p→π - π + n channel are presented [fr

  2. Measurements of activation reaction rates in transverse shielding concrete exposed to the secondary particle field produced by intermediate energy heavy ions on an iron target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, T.; Morev, M.N.; Iimoto, T.; Kosako, T.

    2012-01-01

    Reaction rate distributions were measured inside a 60-cm thick concrete pile placed at the lateral position of a thick (stopping length) iron target that was bombarded with heavy ions, 400 MeV/u C and 800 MeV/u Si. Foils of aluminum and gold, as well as gold, tungsten and manganese covered with cadmium were inserted at various locations in the concrete pile to serve as activation detectors. Features of reaction rate distribution, such as the shape of the reaction rate profile, contribution of the neutrons from intra-nuclear cascade and that from evaporation to the activation reactions are determined by the analysis of measured reaction rates. The measured reaction rates were compared with those calculated with radiation transport simulation codes, FLUKA and PHITS, to verify their capability to predict induced activity. The simulated reaction rates agree with the experimental results within a factor of three in general. However, systematic discrepancies between simulated reaction rates and measured reaction rates attributed to the neutron source terms are observed.

  3. The Azomethine Ylide Route to Amine C–H Functionalization: Redox-Versions of Classic Reactions and a Pathway to New Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Redox-neutral methods for the functionalization of amine α-C–H bonds are inherently efficient because they avoid external oxidants and reductants and often do not generate unwanted byproducts. However, most of the current methods for amine α-C–H bond functionalization are oxidative in nature. While the most efficient variants utilize atmospheric oxygen as the terminal oxidant, many such transformations require the use of expensive or toxic oxidants, often coupled with the need for transition metal catalysts. Redox-neutral amine α-functionalizations that involve intramolecular hydride transfer steps provide viable alternatives to certain oxidative reactions. These processes have been known for some time and are particularly well suited for tertiary amine substrates. A mechanistically distinct strategy for secondary amines has emerged only recently, despite sharing common features with a range of classic organic transformations. Among those are such widely used reactions as the Strecker, Mannich, Pictet–Spengler, and Kabachnik–Fields reactions, Friedel–Crafts alkylations, and iminium alkynylations. In these classic processes, condensation of a secondary amine with an aldehyde (or a ketone) typically leads to the formation of an intermediate iminium ion, which is subsequently attacked by a nucleophile. The corresponding redox-versions of these transformations utilize identical starting materials but incorporate an isomerization step that enables α-C–H bond functionalization. Intramolecular versions of these reactions include redox-neutral amine α-amination, α-oxygenation, and α-sulfenylation. In all cases, a reductive N-alkylation is effectively combined with an oxidative α-functionalization, generating water as the only byproduct. Reactions are promoted by simple carboxylic acids and in some cases require no additives. Azomethine ylides, dipolar species whose usage is predominantly in [3 + 2] cycloadditions and other pericyclic

  4. The azomethine ylide route to amine C-H functionalization: redox-versions of classic reactions and a pathway to new transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Daniel

    2015-02-17

    Conspectus Redox-neutral methods for the functionalization of amine α-C-H bonds are inherently efficient because they avoid external oxidants and reductants and often do not generate unwanted byproducts. However, most of the current methods for amine α-C-H bond functionalization are oxidative in nature. While the most efficient variants utilize atmospheric oxygen as the terminal oxidant, many such transformations require the use of expensive or toxic oxidants, often coupled with the need for transition metal catalysts. Redox-neutral amine α-functionalizations that involve intramolecular hydride transfer steps provide viable alternatives to certain oxidative reactions. These processes have been known for some time and are particularly well suited for tertiary amine substrates. A mechanistically distinct strategy for secondary amines has emerged only recently, despite sharing common features with a range of classic organic transformations. Among those are such widely used reactions as the Strecker, Mannich, Pictet-Spengler, and Kabachnik-Fields reactions, Friedel-Crafts alkylations, and iminium alkynylations. In these classic processes, condensation of a secondary amine with an aldehyde (or a ketone) typically leads to the formation of an intermediate iminium ion, which is subsequently attacked by a nucleophile. The corresponding redox-versions of these transformations utilize identical starting materials but incorporate an isomerization step that enables α-C-H bond functionalization. Intramolecular versions of these reactions include redox-neutral amine α-amination, α-oxygenation, and α-sulfenylation. In all cases, a reductive N-alkylation is effectively combined with an oxidative α-functionalization, generating water as the only byproduct. Reactions are promoted by simple carboxylic acids and in some cases require no additives. Azomethine ylides, dipolar species whose usage is predominantly in [3 + 2] cycloadditions and other pericyclic processes, have been

  5. Potential Impacts of two SO2 oxidation pathways on regional sulfate concentrations: acqueous-hase oxidation by NO2 and gas-phase oxidation by Stabilized Criegee Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    We examine the potential impacts of two additional sulfate production pathways using the Community Multiscale Air Quality modeling system. First we evaluate the impact of the aqueous-phase oxidation of S(IV) by nitrogen dioxide using two published rate constants, differing by 1-2...

  6. Role of Intermediate Filaments in Vesicular Traffic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Margiotta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are an important component of the cellular cytoskeleton. The first established role attributed to intermediate filaments was the mechanical support to cells. However, it is now clear that intermediate filaments have many different roles affecting a variety of other biological functions, such as the organization of microtubules and microfilaments, the regulation of nuclear structure and activity, the control of cell cycle and the regulation of signal transduction pathways. Furthermore, a number of intermediate filament proteins have been involved in the acquisition of tumorigenic properties. Over the last years, a strong involvement of intermediate filament proteins in the regulation of several aspects of intracellular trafficking has strongly emerged. Here, we review the functions of intermediate filaments proteins focusing mainly on the recent knowledge gained from the discovery that intermediate filaments associate with key proteins of the vesicular membrane transport machinery. In particular, we analyze the current understanding of the contribution of intermediate filaments to the endocytic pathway.

  7. Unraveling the structure and chemical mechanisms of highly oxygenated intermediates in oxidation of organic compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong

    2017-11-28

    Decades of research on the autooxidation of organic compounds have provided fundamental and practical insights into these processes; however, the structure of many key autooxidation intermediates and the reactions leading to their formation still remain unclear. This work provides additional experimental evidence that highly oxygenated intermediates with one or more hydroperoxy groups are prevalent in the autooxidation of various oxygenated (e.g., alcohol, aldehyde, keto compounds, ether, and ester) and nonoxygenated (e.g., normal alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) organic compounds. These findings improve our understanding of autooxidation reaction mechanisms that are routinely used to predict fuel ignition and oxidative stability of liquid hydrocarbons, while also providing insights relevant to the formation mechanisms of tropospheric aerosol building blocks. The direct observation of highly oxygenated intermediates for the autooxidation of alkanes at 500–600 K builds upon prior observations made in atmospheric conditions for the autooxidation of terpenes and other unsaturated hydrocarbons; it shows that highly oxygenated intermediates are stable at conditions above room temperature. These results further reveal that highly oxygenated intermediates are not only accessible by chemical activation but also by thermal activation. Theoretical calculations on H-atom migration reactions are presented to rationalize the relationship between the organic compound’s molecular structure (n-alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) and its propensity to produce highly oxygenated intermediates via extensive autooxidation of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radicals. Finally, detailed chemical kinetic simulations demonstrate the influence of these additional reaction pathways on the ignition of practical fuels.

  8. Unraveling the structure and chemical mechanisms of highly oxygenated intermediates in oxidation of organic compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M.; Chen, Bingjie; Moshammer, Kai; Mohamed, Samah; Wang, Heng; Sioud, Salim; Raji, Misjudeen; Kohse-Hö inghaus, Katharina; Hansen, Nils; Dagaut, Philippe; Leone, Stephen R.; Sarathy, Mani

    2017-01-01

    Decades of research on the autooxidation of organic compounds have provided fundamental and practical insights into these processes; however, the structure of many key autooxidation intermediates and the reactions leading to their formation still remain unclear. This work provides additional experimental evidence that highly oxygenated intermediates with one or more hydroperoxy groups are prevalent in the autooxidation of various oxygenated (e.g., alcohol, aldehyde, keto compounds, ether, and ester) and nonoxygenated (e.g., normal alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) organic compounds. These findings improve our understanding of autooxidation reaction mechanisms that are routinely used to predict fuel ignition and oxidative stability of liquid hydrocarbons, while also providing insights relevant to the formation mechanisms of tropospheric aerosol building blocks. The direct observation of highly oxygenated intermediates for the autooxidation of alkanes at 500–600 K builds upon prior observations made in atmospheric conditions for the autooxidation of terpenes and other unsaturated hydrocarbons; it shows that highly oxygenated intermediates are stable at conditions above room temperature. These results further reveal that highly oxygenated intermediates are not only accessible by chemical activation but also by thermal activation. Theoretical calculations on H-atom migration reactions are presented to rationalize the relationship between the organic compound’s molecular structure (n-alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) and its propensity to produce highly oxygenated intermediates via extensive autooxidation of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radicals. Finally, detailed chemical kinetic simulations demonstrate the influence of these additional reaction pathways on the ignition of practical fuels.

  9. Transformation of methylparaben during water chlorination: Effects of bromide and dissolved organic matter on reaction kinetics and transformation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoom, Hoonsik; Shin, Jaedon; Ra, Jiwoon; Son, Heejong; Ryu, Dongchoon; Kim, Changwon; Lee, Yunho

    2018-09-01

    The reaction kinetics, products, and pathways of methylparaben (MeP) during water chlorination with and without bromide (Br - ) were investigated to better understand the fate of parabens in chlorinated waters. During the chlorination of MeP-spiked waters without Br - , MeP was transformed into mono-Cl-MeP and di-Cl-MeP with apparent second-order rate constants (k app ) of 64M -1 s -1 and 243M -1 s -1 at pH7, respectively, while further chlorination of di-Cl-MeP was relatively slower (k app =1.3M -1 s -1 at pH7). With increasing Br - concentration, brominated MePs, such as mono-Br-MeP, Br-Cl-MeP, and di-Br-MeP, became major transformation products. The di-halogenated MePs (di-Cl-MeP, Br,Cl-MeP, and di-Br-MeP) showed relatively low reactivity to chlorine at pH7 (k app =1.3-4.6M -1 s -1 ) and bromine (k app =32-71M -1 s -1 ), which explains the observed high stability of di-halogenated MePs in chlorinated waters. With increasing pH from 7 to 8.5, the transformation of di-halogenated MePs was further slowed due to the decreasing reactivity of di-MePs to chlorine. The formation of the di-halogenated MePs and their further transformation become considerably faster at Br - concentrations higher than 0.5μM (40μg/L). Nonetheless, the accelerating effect of Br - diminishes in the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM) extract (Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA)) due to a more rapid consumption of bromine by DOM than chlorine. The effect of Br - on the fate of MeP was less in the tested real water matrices, possibly due to a more rapid bromine consumption by the real water DOM compared to SRHA. A kinetic model was developed based on the determined species-specific second-order rate constants for chlorination/bromination of MeP and its chlorinated and brominated MePs and the transformation pathway information, which could reasonably simulate the transformation of MePs during the chlorination of water in the presence of Br - and selected DOM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  10. Synthesis of novel synthetic intermediates from the reaction of benzimidazole and triazole carbenes with ketenimines and their application in the construction of spiro-pyrroles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Jun-Ming; Ma, Yang-Guang; Cheng, Ying

    2009-12-07

    2-(2-Alkoxycarbonyl-1-arylamino-1-propenyl)benzimidazolium and 5-(2-alkoxycarbonyl-1-arylamino-1-propenyl)triazolium salts were synthesized in good yields from the reaction of benzimidazole and triazole carbenes with ketenimines. Upon treatment with a base, both salts were converted into novel 1,3-dipoles which underwent [3+2] cycloaddition reactions with electron-deficient alkynes and allenes to produce benzimidazole-spiro-pyrroles or triazole-spiro-pyrroles. This work provides novel synthons for the construction of multifunctional spiro-pyrrole derivatives that are not easy accessible by other synthetic methods and are potentially amenable to further transformations.

  11. Formation of intermediate structures during the thermal transformation of lignin. 5. Contribution of the reactions of formation and recombination of paramagnetic centres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domburg, G E; Skripchenko, T N

    1982-01-01

    ESR spectra were determined for samples of softwood (spruce) lignin and hardwood (aspen or birch) lignin at 20-400 degrees C and after cooling to 20 degrees C. Results provide evidence for a change from low-temperature to high-temperature reactions at 300-350 degrees C (higher in hardwoods than softwoods) associated with increased formation and recombination of paramagnetic centres (free radicals). A scheme is presented for the sequence of reactions leading to charcoal formation over the temperature range 100-500 degrees C.

  12. Gold-catalyzed aerobic epoxidation of trans-stilbene in methylcyclohexane. Part II: Identification and quantification of a key reaction intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    Guillois, Kevin

    2013-03-01

    The gold-catalyzed aerobic oxidations of alkenes are thought to rely on the in situ synthesis of hydroperoxide species, which have however never been clearly identified. Here, we show direct experimental evidence for the presence of 1-methylcyclohexyl hydroperoxide in the aerobic co-oxidation of stilbene and methylcyclohexane catalyzed by the Au/SiO2-R972 optimized catalyst prepared in Part I. Determination of its response in gas chromatography, by triphenylphosphine titration followed by 31P NMR, allows to easily follow its concentration throughout the co-oxidation process and to clearly highlight the simultaneous existence of the methylcyclohexane autoxidation pathway and the stilbene epoxidation pathway. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Gold-catalyzed aerobic epoxidation of trans-stilbene in methylcyclohexane. Part II: Identification and quantification of a key reaction intermediate

    KAUST Repository

    Guillois, Kevin; Mangematin, Sté phane; Tuel, Alain; Caps, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    The gold-catalyzed aerobic oxidations of alkenes are thought to rely on the in situ synthesis of hydroperoxide species, which have however never been clearly identified. Here, we show direct experimental evidence for the presence of 1-methylcyclohexyl hydroperoxide in the aerobic co-oxidation of stilbene and methylcyclohexane catalyzed by the Au/SiO2-R972 optimized catalyst prepared in Part I. Determination of its response in gas chromatography, by triphenylphosphine titration followed by 31P NMR, allows to easily follow its concentration throughout the co-oxidation process and to clearly highlight the simultaneous existence of the methylcyclohexane autoxidation pathway and the stilbene epoxidation pathway. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Monitoring and Control of a Continuous Grignard Reaction for the Synthesis of an Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient Intermediate Using Inline NIR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera Padrell, Albert Emili; Nielsen, Jesper; Jønch Pedersen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    to the stoichiometric ratio, leading the path to full process automation. The feedback control loop relies on NIR transmission measurements performed in a flow cell where, in contrast to labor-intensive offline HPLC analytical methods, the whole reaction product can be scanned in real time without sample dilution...

  15. Degradation of sulfadimethoxine catalyzed by laccase with soybean meal extract as natural mediator: Mechanism and reaction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shangtao; Luo, Qi; Huang, Qingguo

    2017-08-01

    Natural laccase-mediator systems have been well recognized as an eco-friendly and energy-saving approach in environmental remediation, whose further application is however limited by the high cost of natural mediators and relatively long treatment time span. This study evaluated the water extract of soybean meal, a low-cost compound system, in mediating the laccase catalyzed degradation of a model contaminant of emerging concern, sulfadimethoxine (SDM), and demonstrated it as a promising alternative mediator for soil and water remediation. Removal of 73.3% and 65.6% was achieved in 9 h using soybean meal extract (SBE) as the mediating system for laccase-catalyzed degradation of sulfadimethoxine at the concentration of 1 ppm and 10 ppm, respectively. Further degradation of sulfadimethoxine was observed with multiple SBE additions. Using SBE as mediator increased the 9-h removal of SDM at 1 ppm initial concentration by 52.9%, 49.4%, and 36.3% in comparison to the system mediated by 1-Hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT), p-Coumaric acid (COU) and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS), respectively. With the detection of stable coupling products formed with radical scavenger (5,5-Dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide, DMPO), three phenolic compounds (vanillin, apocynin, and daidzein) in SBE were confirmed to serve as mediators for Trametes versicolor laccase. Reaction pathways were proposed based on the results of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. SO 2 excursion happened during SDM transformation, leading to elimination of antimicrobial activity. Therefore, as a natural, phenol rich, and affordable compound system, the future application of SBE in wastewater and soil remediation is worth exploring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intermediate uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate uveitis (IU is described as inflammation in the anterior vitreous, ciliary body and the peripheral retina. In the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN working group′s international workshop for reporting clinical data the consensus reached was that the term IU should be used for that subset of uveitis where the vitreous is the major site of the inflammation and if there is an associated infection (for example, Lyme disease or systemic disease (for example, sarcoidosis. The diagnostic term pars planitis should be used only for that subset of IU where there is snow bank or snowball formation occurring in the absence of an associated infection or systemic disease (that is, "idiopathic". This article discusses the clinical features, etiology, pathogenesis, investigations and treatment of IU.

  17. Gene expression of insulin signal-transduction pathway intermediates is lower in rats fed a beef tallow diet than in rats fed a safflower oil diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Y B; Nakajima, R; Matsuo, T; Inoue, T; Sekine, T; Komuro, M; Tamura, T; Tokuyama, K; Suzuki, M

    1996-09-01

    To elucidate the effects of dietary fatty acid composition on the insulin signaling pathway, we measured the gene expression of the earliest steps in the insulin action pathway in skeletal muscle of rats fed a safflower oil diet or a beef tallow diet. Rats were meal-fed an isoenergetic diet based on either safflower oil or beef tallow for 8 weeks. Both diets provided 45%, 35%, and 20% of energy as fat, carbohydrate, and protein, respectively. Insulin resistance, assessed from the diurnal rhythm of plasma glucose and insulin and the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), developed in rats fed a beef tallow diet. Body fat content was greater in rats fed a beef tallow diet versus a safflower oil diet. The level of insulin receptor mRNA, relative expression of the insulin receptor mRNA isoforms, and receptor protein were not affected by the composition of dietary fatty acids. The abundance of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase mRNA and protein was significantly lower in rats fed a beef tallow diet versus a safflower oil diet. We conclude that long-term feeding of a high-fat diet with saturated fatty acids induces decrease in IRS-1 and PI 3-kinase mRNA and protein levels, causing insulin resistance in skeletal muscle.

  18. A Trapped Covalent Intermediate of a Glycoside Hydrolase on the Pathway to Transglycosylation. Insights from Experiments and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, Lluís; Borodkin, Vladimir; Fang, Wenxia; Castro-López, Jorge; van Aalten, Daan M F; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Rovira, Carme

    2016-03-16

    The conversion of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) into transglycosylases (TGs), i.e., from enzymes that hydrolyze carbohydrates to enzymes that synthesize them, represents a promising solution for the large-scale synthesis of complex carbohydrates for biotechnological purposes. However, the lack of knowledge about the molecular details of transglycosylation hampers the rational design of TGs. Here we present the first crystallographic structure of a natural glycosyl-enzyme intermediate (GEI) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gas2 in complex with an acceptor substrate and demonstrate, by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics simulations, that it is tuned for transglycosylation (ΔG(⧧) = 12 kcal/mol). The 2-OH···nucleophile interaction is found to be essential for catalysis: its removal raises the free energy barrier significantly (11 and 16 kcal/mol for glycosylation and transglycosylation, respectively) and alters the conformational itinerary of the substrate (from (4)C1 → [(4)E](⧧) → (1,4)B/(4)E to (4)C1 → [(4)H3](⧧) → (4)C1). Our results suggest that changes in the interactions involving the 2-position could have an impact on the transglycosylation activity of several GHs.

  19. Kinetic study of photocatalytic degradation of carbamazepine, clofibric acid, iomeprol and iopromide assisted by different TiO2 materials--determination of intermediates and reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Tusnelda E; Frimmel, Fritz H

    2004-02-01

    The light-induced degradation of clofibric acid, carbamazepine, iomeprol and iopromide under simulated solar irradiation has been investigated in aqueous solutions suspended with different TiO2 materials (P25 and Hombikat UV100). Kinetic studies showed that P25 had a better photocatalytic activity for clofibric acid and carbamazepine than Hombikat UV100. For photocatalytic degradation of iomeprol Hombikat UV100 was more suitable than P25. The results can be explained by the higher adsorption capacity of Hombikat UV100 for iomeprol. The study also focuses on the identification and quantification of possible degradation products. The degradation process was monitored by determination of sum parameters and inorganic ions. In case of clofibric acid various aromatic and aliphatic degradation products have been identified and quantified. A possible multi-step degradation scheme for clofibric acid is proposed. This study proves the high potential of the photocatalytic oxidation process to transform and mineralize environmentally relevant pharmaceuticals and contrast media in water.

  20. Methane coupling reaction in an oxy-steam stream through an OH radical pathway by using supported alkali metal catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Yin; Li, Zhikao; Nourdine, Mohamed; Shahid, Salman; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    A universal reaction mechanism involved in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is demonstrated under oxy-steam conditions using alkali-metal-based catalysts. Rigorous kinetic measurements indicated a reaction mechanism that is consistent with OH

  1. Interference effects in inclusive charge-exchange p+p→n+X and n+p→p+X reactions at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gareev, F.A.; Ratis, Yu.L.; Korovin, P.P.; Strokovskij, E.A.; Vaagen, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    The formalism of Feynman diagrams to describe charge-exchange reactions p+p→n+X and n+p→p+X on a free proton target taking into account spectator and decay modes in the π+ρ+g'-model have used. It is shown that the interference between these modes depends on the set of vertex function parameters used. It is also shown that the constructive interference of the Δ + and Δ 0 -isobars is important. 22 refs.; 10 figs

  2. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, John Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2`-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol.

  3. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2'-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol

  4. [Intermediate energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes work in experimental Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics carried out between October 1, 1988 and October 1, 1989 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under grant DE-FG02-86ER-40269 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental program is very broadly based, including pion-nucleon studies at TRIUMF, inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/WNR. In addition, a number of other topics related to accelerator physics are described in this report

  5. Diversion of the melanin synthetic pathway by dopamine product scavengers: A quantum chemical modeling of the reaction mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Demissie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the stability and reactivity of the oxidation products as well as L-cysteine and N-acetylcysteine adducts of dopamine studied using quantum chemical calculations. The overall reactions studied were subdivided into four reaction channels. The first reaction channel is the oxidation of dopamine to form dopaminoquinone. The second reaction channel leads to melanin formation through subsequent reactions. The third and fourth reaction channels are reactions leading to the formation of dopaminoquinone adducts which are aimed to divert the synthesis of melanin. The results indicate that L-cysteine and N-acetylcysteine undergo chemical reactions mainly at C5 position of dopaminoquinone. The analyses of the thermodynamic energies indicate that L-cysteine and N-acetylcysteine covalently bind to dopaminoquinone by competing with the internal cyclization reaction of dopaminoquinone which leads to the synthesis of melanin. The analysis of the results, based on the reaction free energies, is also supported by the investigation of the natural bond orbitals of the reactants and products.

  6. Quantitative importance of the pentose phosphate pathway determined by incorporation of 13C from [2-13C]- and [3-13C]glucose into TCA cycle intermediates and neurotransmitter amino acids in functionally intact neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, Eva M F; Walls, Anne B; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2012-09-01

    The brain is highly susceptible to oxidative injury, and the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) has been shown to be affected by pathological conditions, such as Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury. While this pathway has been investigated in the intact brain and in astrocytes, little is known about the PPP in neurons. The activity of the PPP was quantified in cultured cerebral cortical and cerebellar neurons after incubation in the presence of [2-(13)C]glucose or [3-(13)C]glucose. The activity of the PPP was several fold lower than glycolysis in both types of neurons. While metabolism of (13)C-labeled glucose via the PPP does not appear to contribute to the production of releasable lactate, it contributes to labeling of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates and related amino acids. Based on glutamate isotopomers, it was calculated that PPP activity accounts for ~6% of glucose metabolism in cortical neurons and ~4% in cerebellar neurons. This is the first demonstration that pyruvate generated from glucose via the PPP contributes to the synthesis of acetyl CoA for oxidation in the TCA cycle. Moreover, the fact that (13)C labeling from glucose is incorporated into glutamate proves that both the oxidative and the nonoxidative stages of the PPP are active in neurons.

  7. Kinetics of a Criegee intermediate that would survive high humidity and may oxidize atmospheric SO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao-Li; Chao, Wen; Lin, Jim Jr-Min

    2015-09-01

    Criegee intermediates are thought to play a role in atmospheric chemistry, in particular, the oxidation of SO2, which produces SO3 and subsequently H2SO4, an important constituent of aerosols and acid rain. However, the impact of such oxidation reactions is affected by the reactions of Criegee intermediates with water vapor, because of high water concentrations in the troposphere. In this work, the kinetics of the reactions of dimethyl substituted Criegee intermediate (CH3)2COO with water vapor and with SO2 were directly measured via UV absorption of (CH3)2COO under near-atmospheric conditions. The results indicate that (i) the water reaction with (CH3)2COO is not fast enough (kH2O SO2 at a near-gas-kinetic-limit rate (kSO2 = 1.3 × 10(-10) cm(3) s(-1)). These observations imply a significant fraction of atmospheric (CH3)2COO may survive under humid conditions and react with SO2, very different from the case of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH2OO, in which the reaction with water dimer predominates in the CH2OO decay under typical tropospheric conditions. In addition, a significant pressure dependence was observed for the reaction of (CH3)2COO with SO2, suggesting the use of low pressure rate may underestimate the impact of this reaction. This work demonstrates that the reactivity of a Criegee intermediate toward water vapor strongly depends on its structure, which will influence the main decay pathways and steady-state concentrations for various Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere.

  8. Analyzing powers and isotope ratios for the natAg(rvec p, intermediate-mass fragment) reaction at 200 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renshaw, E.; Yennello, S.J.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Planeta, R.; Woo, L.W.; Viola, V.E.

    1991-01-01

    Analyzing powers and isotope ratios have been measured for ejectiles with Z≤7 emitted at forward angles in the 200-MeV rvec p+ nat Ag reaction. The observed analyzing powers are consistent with zero, and thus do not provide evidence for a significant contribution from cluster knockout, or similar direct formation mechanisms. Fragment kinetic-energy spectra above the Coulomb peak are compared with a coalescence calculation. The isotopic composition of the elemental kinetic-energy spectra is found to favor N/Z≥1 nuclei for fragment energies near the exit-channel Coulomb energy, whereas species with N/Z≤1 are more abundant in the high-energy spectral tails. This behavior is consistent with the predictions of an accreting source calculation

  9. Dynamic pathways to mediate reactions buried in thermal fluctuations. I. Time-dependent normal form theory for multidimensional Langevin equation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Shinnosuke; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki

    2009-12-14

    We present a novel theory which enables us to explore the mechanism of reaction selectivity and robust functions in complex systems persisting under thermal fluctuation. The theory constructs a nonlinear coordinate transformation so that the equation of motion for the new reaction coordinate is independent of the other nonreactive coordinates in the presence of thermal fluctuation. In this article we suppose that reacting systems subject to thermal noise are described by a multidimensional Langevin equation without a priori assumption for the form of potential. The reaction coordinate is composed not only of all the coordinates and velocities associated with the system (solute) but also of the random force exerted by the environment (solvent) with friction constants. The sign of the reaction coordinate at any instantaneous moment in the region of a saddle determines the fate of the reaction, i.e., whether the reaction will proceed through to the products or go back to the reactants. By assuming the statistical properties of the random force, one can know a priori a well-defined boundary of the reaction which separates the full position-velocity space in the saddle region into mainly reactive and mainly nonreactive regions even under thermal fluctuation. The analytical expression of the reaction coordinate provides the firm foundation on the mechanism of how and why reaction proceeds in thermal fluctuating environments.

  10. A New Bioinspired Perchlorate Reduction Catalyst with Significantly Enhanced Stability via Rational Tuning of Rhenium Coordination Chemistry and Heterogeneous Reaction Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinyong; Han, Mengwei; Wu, Dimao; Chen, Xi; Choe, Jong Kwon; Werth, Charles J; Strathmann, Timothy J

    2016-06-07

    Rapid reduction of aqueous ClO4(-) to Cl(-) by H2 has been realized by a heterogeneous Re(hoz)2-Pd/C catalyst integrating Re(O)(hoz)2Cl complex (hoz = oxazolinyl-phenolato bidentate ligand) and Pd nanoparticles on carbon support, but ClOx(-) intermediates formed during reactions with concentrated ClO4(-) promote irreversible Re complex decomposition and catalyst deactivation. The original catalyst design mimics the microbial ClO4(-) reductase, which integrates Mo(MGD)2 complex (MGD = molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide) for oxygen atom transfer (OAT). Perchlorate-reducing microorganisms employ a separate enzyme, chlorite dismutase, to prevent accumulation of the destructive ClO2(-) intermediate. The structural intricacy of MGD ligand and the two-enzyme mechanism for microbial ClO4(-) reduction inspired us to improve catalyst stability by rationally tuning Re ligand structure and adding a ClOx(-) scavenger. Two new Re complexes, Re(O)(htz)2Cl and Re(O)(hoz)(htz)Cl (htz = thiazolinyl-phenolato bidentate ligand), significantly mitigate Re complex decomposition by slightly lowering the OAT activity when immobilized in Pd/C. Further stability enhancement is then obtained by switching the nanoparticles from Pd to Rh, which exhibits high reactivity with ClOx(-) intermediates and thus prevents their deactivating reaction with the Re complex. Compared to Re(hoz)2-Pd/C, the new Re(hoz)(htz)-Rh/C catalyst exhibits similar ClO4(-) reduction activity but superior stability, evidenced by a decrease of Re leaching from 37% to 0.25% and stability of surface Re speciation following the treatment of a concentrated "challenge" solution containing 1000 ppm of ClO4(-). This work demonstrates the pivotal roles of coordination chemistry control and tuning of individual catalyst components for achieving both high activity and stability in environmental catalyst applications.

  11. Catalytic-site mapping of pyruvate formate lyase. Hypophosphite reaction on the acetyl-enzyme intermediate affords carbon-phosphorus bond synthesis (1-hydroxyethylphosphonate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaga, W; Frank, R; Knappe, J

    1988-12-15

    Pyruvate formate-lyase of Escherichia coli cells, a homodimeric protein of 2 x 85 kDa, is distinguished by the property of containing a stable organic free radical (g = 2.0037) in its resting state. The enzyme (E-SH) achieves pyruvate conversion to acetyl-CoA via two distinct half-reactions (E-SH + pyruvate in equilibrium E-S-acetyl + formate; E-S-acetyl + CoA in equilibrium E-SH + acetyl-CoA), the first of which has been proposed to involve reversible homolytic carbon-carbon bond cleavage [J. Knappe et al. (1984) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 81, 1332-1335]. Present studies identified Cys-419 as the covalent-catalytic cysteinyl residue via CNBr fragmentation of E-S-[14C]acetyl and radio-sequencing of the isolated peptide CB-Ac (amino acid residues 406-423). Reaction of the formate analogue hypophosphite with E-S-acetyl was investigated and found to produce 1-hydroxyethylphosphonate with a thioester linkage to the adjacent Cys-418. The structure was determined from the chymotryptic peptide CH-P (amino acid residues 415-425), using 31P-NMR spectroscopy (delta = 44 ppm) and by chemical characterisation through degradation into 1-hydroxyethylphosphonate with phosphodiesterase or bromine. This novel P-C-bond synthesis involves the enzyme-based free radical and is proposed to resemble the physiological C-C-bond synthesis (pyruvate production) from formate and E-S-acetyl. These findings are interpreted as proof of a radical mechanism for the action of pyruvate formate-lyase. The central Cys-418/Cys-419 pair of the active site shows a distinctive thiolate property even in the inactive (nonradical) form of the enzyme, as determined using an iodoacetate probe.

  12. (γ,n) reaction in nuclei of the 12<=A<=238 interval in the intermediate energy region (300 MeV-1000MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, J.B.

    1974-01-01

    The absolute cross section of the 12 C(γ,n) 11 C, 19 F(γ,n) 18 F, 23 Na(γ,n) 22 Na, 31 P(γ,n) 30 P, 52 Cr(γ,n) 51 Cr, 55 Mn(γ,n) 54 Mn, 59 Co(γ,n) 58 Co, 75 As(γ,n) 74 As, 103 Rh(γn) 102 Rh, 127 I(γ,n) 126 I, 197 Au(γ,n) 196 Au and 238 U(γ,n) 237 U reactions were determined, experimentally, in the energy range from 300 MeV to 1000 MeV, using Bremsstrahlung photons. The measured cross sections were compared with results estimated by Monte Carlo Method applied to intranuclear cascades initiated by phothons. A functional dependence between the average value of (γ,n) absolute cross section and the mass number, were established. The (γ,n) absolute cross sections from simple relations, which transparencies of complexe nuclei for mesons and nucleons photo produced were also determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  13. Reactions of carbonyl compounds with α,β-unsaturated nitriles as a convenient pathway to carbo- and heterocycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharanin, Yu A; Goncharenko, M P; Litvinov, Victor P

    1998-01-01

    Published data on the methods for synthesis of carbo- and heterocyclic compounds based on reactions of α,β-unsaturated nitriles with carbonyl compounds and activated phenols are surveyed. It is demonstrated that all these reactions occur via nucleophilic addition of the carbanion generated from a carbonyl compound to the double bond of an unsaturated nitrile (the Michael reaction). The main routes of transformation of the adducts into carbo- and heterocyclic compounds are considered. The methods for regioselective preparation of fused 4H-pyrans or 1,4-dihydropyridines by varying conditions of cyclisation of Michael adducts are discussed. The bibliography includes 249 references.

  14. Leading coordinate analysis of reaction pathways in proton chain transfer: Application to a two-proton transfer model for the green fluorescent protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Sufan; Smith, Sean C.

    2006-01-01

    The 'leading coordinate' approach to computing an approximate reaction pathway, with subsequent determination of the true minimum energy profile, is applied to a two-proton chain transfer model based on the chromophore and its surrounding moieties within the green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using an ab initio quantum chemical method, a number of different relaxed energy profiles are found for several plausible guesses at leading coordinates. The results obtained for different trial leading coordinates are rationalized through the calculation of a two-dimensional relaxed potential energy surface (PES) for the system. Analysis of the 2-D relaxed PES reveals that two of the trial pathways are entirely spurious, while two others contain useful information and can be used to furnish starting points for successful saddle-point searches. Implications for selection of trial leading coordinates in this class of proton chain transfer reactions are discussed, and a simple diagnostic function is proposed for revealing whether or not a relaxed pathway based on a trial leading coordinate is likely to furnish useful information

  15. Intramolecular charge transfer of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile probed by time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption: No evidence for two ICT states and a πσ* reaction intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariasse, Klaas A.; Druzhinin, Sergey I.; Senyushkina, Tamara; Kovalenko, Sergey A.

    2009-01-01

    For the double exponential fluorescence decays of the locally excited (LE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) in acetonitrile (MeCN) the same times τ 1 and τ 2 are observed. This means that the reversible LE ICT reaction, starting from the initially excited LE state, can be adequately described by a two state mechanism. The most important factor responsible for the sometimes experimentally observed differences in the nanosecond decay time, with τ 1 (LE) 1 (ICT), is photoproduct formation. By employing a global analysis of the LE and ICT fluorescence response functions with a time resolution of 0.5 ps/channel in 1200 channels reliable kinetic and thermodynamic data can be obtained. The arguments presented in the literature in favor of a πσ* state with a bent CN group as an intermediate in the ICT reaction of DMABN are discussed. From the appearance of an excited state absorption (ESA) band in the spectral region between 700 and 800 nm in MeCN for N,N-dimethylanilines with CN, Br, F, CF 3 , and C(=O)OC 2 H 2 p-substituents, it is concluded that this ESA band cannot be attributed to a πσ * state, as only the C-C≡N group can undergo the required 120 deg. bending.

  16. High-pressure vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of lignin-derived oxygenates to hydrocarbons by a PtMo bimetallic catalyst: Product selectivity, reaction pathway, and structural characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yohe, Sara L.; Choudhari, Harshavardhan J.; Mehta, Dhairya D.; Dietrich, Paul J.; Detwiler, Michael D.; Akatay, Cem M.; Stach, Eric A.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Delgass, W. Nicholas; Agrawal, Rakesh; Ribeiro, Fabio H.

    2016-12-01

    High-pressure, vapor-phase, hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions of dihydroeugenol (2-methoxy-4-propylphenol), as well as other phenolic, lignin-derived compounds, were investigated over a bimetallic platinum and molybdenum catalyst supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (5%Pt2.5%Mo/MWCNT). Hydrocarbons were obtained in 100% yield from dihydroeugenol, including 98% yield of the hydrocarbon propylcyclohexane. The final hydrocarbon distribution was shown to be a strong function of hydrogen partial pressure. Kinetic analysis showed three main dihydroeugenol reaction pathways: HDO, hydrogenation, and alkylation. The major pathway occurred via Pt catalyzed hydrogenation of the aromatic ring and methoxy group cleavage to form 4-propylcyclohexanol, then Mo catalyzed removal of the hydroxyl group by dehydration to form propylcyclohexene, followed by hydrogenation of propylcyclohexene on either the Pt or Mo to form the propylcyclohexane. Transalkylation by the methoxy group occurred as a minor side reaction. Catalyst characterization techniques including chemisorption, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were employed to characterize the catalyst structure. Catalyst components identified were Pt particles, bimetallic PtMo particles, a Mo carbide-like phase, and Mo oxide phases.

  17. Exploring possible reaction pathways for the o-atom transfer reactions to unsaturated substrates catalyzed by a [Ni-NO2 ] ↔ [Ni-NO] redox couple using DFT methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipis, Athanassios C

    2017-07-15

    The (nitro)(N-methyldithiocarbamato)(trimethylphospane)nickel(II), [Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] complex catalyses efficiently the O-atom transfer reactions to CO and acetylene. Energetically feasible sequence of elementary steps involved in the catalytic cycle of the air oxidation of CO and acetylene are proposed promoted by the Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] ↔ Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 ) redox couple using DFT methods both in vacuum and dichloromethane solutions. The catalytic air oxidation of HC≡CH involves formation of a five-member metallacycle intermediate, via a [3 + 2] cyclo-addition reaction of HC≡CH to the Ni-N = O moiety of the Ni(NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] complex, followed by a β H-atom migration toward the C α carbon atom of the coordinated acetylene and release of the oxidation product (ketene). The geometric and energetic reaction profile for the reversible [Ni( κN1-NO 2 )(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] ⇌ [Ni( κO,O2-ONO)(S 2 CNHMe)(PMe 3 )] linkage isomerization has also been modeled by DFT calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate. Study of intermediate reaction products; Decomposition thermique du nitrate d'uranyle hexahydrate etude des intermediaires de cette decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chottard, G [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1970-07-01

    The thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate has been carried but at constant pressure and constant rate of reaction. The following intermediary products have been shown to exist and isolated: UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.3H{sub 2}O; UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. 2H{sub 2}O; UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. H{sub 2}O; UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and UO{sub 3}. These products, together with the hexahydrate UO{sub 2} (NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O, have been studied by: - X-ray diffraction, using the Debye-Scherrer method.- infra-red spectrography: determination of the type of bonding for the water and the nitrate groups. - nuclear magnetic resonance: study of the mobility of water molecules. The main results concern: - the water molecule bonds in the series of hydrates with 6.3 and 2 H{sub 2}O. - isolation and characterization of uranyl nitrate monohydrate, together with the determination of its molecular structure. - the mobility of the water molecules in the series of the hydrates with 6.3 and 2 H{sub 2}O. An analysis is made of the complementary results given by infra-red spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance; they are interpreted for the whole of the hydrate series. [French] La decomposition thermique du nitrate d'uranyle hexahydrate a ete effectuee en operant a pression et vitesse de decomposition constantes. Les produits intermediaires suivants ont ete mis en evidence et isoles: UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, 3H{sub 2}O; UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, 2H{sub 2}O; UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2},H{sub 2}O; UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} et UO{sub 3}. Ces composes, ainsi que l'hexahydrate UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3} ){sub 2}, 6H{sub 2}O ont ete etudies par: - diffraction des rayons X, selon la methode Debye-Scherrer.- spectrographie infra-rouge: determination des modes de liaison de l'eau et des groupements nitrate. - resonance magnetique nucleaire: etude de la mobilite des molecules d'eau. Les principaux resultats portent sur: - les liaisons des molecules d'eau dans la

  19. Allowed energetic pathways for the three-body recombination reaction of nitrogen monoxide with the hydroxyl radical and their potential atmospheric implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca D´Ottone

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The OH initiated oxidation of nitric oxide (NO is an important atmospheric reaction being, during the day time, the main channel that leads to the formation of HONO a reservoir species for both OH and odd nitrogen. This work reports ab initio study of the Potential Energy Surface (PES of NO + OH using density functional theory calculations conducted at the B3LYP level of theory with a 6-311g (d,p basis set. We confirmed experimental observations pointing out that the main channel for this reaction is the formation the HONO. From the addition of OH to NO both cis and trans isomers of HONO were found to be the formed as stable intermediate, both having a negative enthalpy of formation relative to the reactants, the cis isomer being more stable than the trans one. The ab initio calculations were extended to include the hydrogen extraction mechanism with its respective transition state to investigate the potential existence of a reaction channel leading to the formation of NO2 + H, that was found not to be of significant interest.

  20. Dilepton spectroscopy at intermediate energies; the carbon - carbon reaction at 1 GeV/A; Spectroscopie des dileptons aux energies intermediaires; la reaction carbone - carbone A 1 GeV/A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prunet, M

    1995-06-01

    The Physics context of this work is heavy ion collisions at relativistic energies where di-electron provide informations on the produced hot and dense nuclear matter. The experiment is performed by the DiLepton Spectrometer (DLS) Collaboration at the Lawrence Berkeley`s Bevalac. After a description of the apparatus, we review the whole program and the main results so far obtained: first evidence of a significant di-electron signal at energies above 1 GeV/A; improvement of the understanding of di-electron production (electromagnetic decays of hadrons, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} annihilation and hadronic Bremsstrahlung). The results of p-p, p-d reactions from 1 to 4.9 GeV/A show that hadronic Bremsstrahlung (pp, pn) should be reformulated. Our analysis, optimized on the reaction Carbon-Carbon at 1 GeV/A, has been applied to {alpha}-Ca and d-Ca. We have developed two main aspects: improvement of the time resolution (500 ps) in order to eliminate all of the protons. Improvement of the space resolution (300 {mu}) for better mass resolution, in particular in the {rho} region. We obtain the cross section of di-electron production as a function of mass, transverse momentum and rapidity from the C-C, {alpha}-Ca and d-Ca reactions at 1 GeV/A. We also compare the cross section for all of the measured systems at 1 GeV/A, including Ca-Ca, and we show a (ApAt){sup {alpha}} dependence with {alpha} {approx_equal} 1.1. A study of the associated multiplicity has also been performed. Nevertheless, the limited acceptance of the DLS and its poor mass resolution to identify the {rho}, {omega} vector mesons, do not allow to conclude on hadron behaviour in nuclear matter. This point is one of the main goal of the HADES project at GSI (Darmstadt), which we give a brief description of the main features. (authors). 60 refs.

  1. Pathways for the OH + Br2 → HOBr + Br and HOBr + Br → HBr + BrO Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongyan; Qiu, Yudong; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-02-11

    The OH radical reaction with Br2 and the subsequent reaction HOBr + Br are of exceptional importance to atmospheric chemistry and environmental chemistry. The entrance complex, transition state, and exit complex for both reactions have been determined using the coupled-cluster method with single, double, and perturbative triple excitations CCSD(T) with correlation consistent basis sets up to size cc-pV5Z and cc-pV5Z-PP. Coupled cluster effects with full triples (CCSDT) and full quadruples (CCSDTQ) are explicitly investigated. Scalar relativistic effects, spin-orbit coupling, and zero-point vibrational energy corrections are evaluated. The results from the all-electron basis sets are compared with those from the effective core potential (ECP) pseudopotential (PP) basis sets. The results are consistent. The OH + Br2 reaction is predicted to be exothermic 4.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol, compared to experiment, 3.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol. The entrance complex HO···BrBr is bound by 2.2 ± 0.2 kcal/mol. The transition state lies similarly well below the reactants OH + Br2. The exit complex HOBr···Br is bound by 2.7 ± 0.6 kcal/mol relative to separated HOBr + Br. The endothermicity of the reaction HOBr + Br → HBr + BrO is 9.6 ± 0.7 kcal/mol, compared with experiment 8.7 ± 0.3 kcal/mol. For the more important reverse (exothermic) HBr + BrO reaction, the entrance complex BrO···HBr is bound by 1.8 ± 0.6 kcal/mol. The barrier for the HBr + BrO reaction is 6.8 ± 0.9 kcal/mol. The exit complex (Br···HOBr) for the HBr + BrO reaction is bound by 1.9 ± 0.2 kcal/mol with respect to the products HOBr + Br.

  2. An Intramolecular Heck reaction that Prefers a 5-endo- to a 6-exo-trig Cyclization Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vital, Paulo; Norrby, Per-Ola; Tanner, David Ackland

    2006-01-01

    A regioselective aromatic Claisen rearrangement was used to prepare 17a, the precursor of triflate 17e. The intramolecular Heck reaction of 17e is promoted only by bidentate phosphine ligands, giving exclusively and in excellent yield 20, the product of a 5-endo-trig cyclization, despite the poss......A regioselective aromatic Claisen rearrangement was used to prepare 17a, the precursor of triflate 17e. The intramolecular Heck reaction of 17e is promoted only by bidentate phosphine ligands, giving exclusively and in excellent yield 20, the product of a 5-endo-trig cyclization, despite...

  3. Reactions of ferrate(VI) with iodide and hypoiodous acid: kinetics, pathways, and implications for the fate of iodine during water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaedon; von Gunten, Urs; Reckhow, David A; Allard, Sebastien; Lee, Yunho

    2018-06-01

    Oxidative treatment of iodide-containing waters can form iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs) that are more toxic than the regulated DBPs. To better understand the fate of iodine during water treatment with ferrate(VI), kinetics, products, and stoichiometries for the reactions of ferrate(VI) with iodide (I - ) and hypoiodous acid (HOI) were determined. Ferrate(VI) showed considerable reactivities to both I - and HOI with higher reactivities at lower pH. Interestingly, the reaction of ferrate(VI) with HOI ( k = 6.0×10 3 M -1 s -1 at pH 9) was much faster than with I - ( k = 5.6×10 M -1 s -1 at pH 9). The main reaction pathway during treatment of I - -containing waters was the oxidation of I - to HOI and its further oxidation to IO 3 - by ferrate(VI). However, for pH > 9, the HOI disproportionation catalyzed by ferrate(VI) became an additional transformation pathway forming I - and IO 3 - . The reduction of HOI by hydrogen peroxide ( k = 2.0×10 8 M -1 s -1 for the reaction, HOI + HO 2 - → I - + O 2 + 2H + ), the latter being produced from ferrate(VI) decomposition, also contributes to the I - regeneration in the pH range 9 - 11. A kinetic model was developed that could well simulate the fate of iodine in the ferrate(VI)-I - system. Overall, due to a rapid oxidation of I - to IO 3 - with short-lifetimes of HOI, ferrate(VI) oxidation appears to be a promising option for I-DBP mitigation during treatment of I - -containing waters.

  4. Protective Effects of Maillard Reaction Products of Whey Protein Concentrate against Oxidative Stress through an Nrf2-Dependent Pathway in HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyo, Min Cheol; Yang, Sung-Yong; Chun, Su-Hyun; Oh, Nam Su; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-09-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC), which contains α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin, is utilized widely in the food industry. The Maillard reaction is a complex reaction that produces Maillard reaction products (MRPs), which are associated with the formation of antioxidant compounds. In this study, the hepatoprotection activity of MRPs of WPC against oxidative stress through the nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent antioxidant pathway in HepG2 cells was examined. Glucose-whey protein concentrate conjugate (Glc-WPC) was obtained from Maillard reaction between WPC and glucose. The fluorescence intensity of Glc-WPC increased after 7 d compared to native WPC, and resulted in loss of 48% of the free amino groups of WPC. The sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) patterns of Glc-WPC showed the presence of a high-molecular-weight portion. Treatment of HepG2 cells with Glc-WPC increased cell viability in the presence of oxidative stress, inhibited the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species by tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP), and increased the glutathione level. Nrf2 translocation and Nrf2, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)H)-quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NOQ1), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutamate-L-cysteine ligase (GCL)M and GCLC mRNA levels were increased by Glc-WPC. Also, Glc-WPC increased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). The results of this study demonstrate that Glc-WPC activates the Nrf2-dependent pathway through the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and JNK in HepG2 cells, and induces production of antioxidant enzymes and phase II enzymes.

  5. The deterioration of intermediate moisture foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruza, T. P.

    1971-01-01

    Deteriorative reactions are low and food quality high if intermediate moisture content of a food is held at a water activity of 0.6 to 0.75. Information is of interest to food processing and packaging industry.

  6. Use of ESI-MS to determine reaction pathway for hydrogen sulphide scavenging with 1,3,5-tri-(2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydro-s-triazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Henrik T; Søgaard, Erik G

    2012-01-01

    To study the reaction between hydrogen sulphide and 1,3,5-tri-(2-hydroxyethyl)-hexahydro-s-triazine, which is an often used hydrogen sulphide scavenger, electro spray ionisation mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) was used. The investigation was carried out in positive mode, and tandem mass spectrometry was used to investigate the nature of unknown peaks in the mass spectra. The reaction was found to proceed as expected from theory with the triazine reacting with hydrogen sulphide to form the corresponding thiadiazine. This species subsequently reacted with a second hydrogen sulphide molecule to form the dithiazine species, hereby confirming previously obtained results and showing the ability of the ESI-MS method for studying the scavenging reaction. The final theoretical product s-trithiane was not detected. Furthermore, fragmentation products of thiadiazine and dithiazine were detected in the solution, and possible pathways and structures were suggested to describe the observed fragments. In these, thiadiazine fragmented to 2-(methylidene amino)-ethanol and 2-(1,3-thiazetidin-3-yl)-ethanol and N-(2-hydroxyethyl)-N-(sulfanylmethyl)-ethaniminium, which underwent a further fragmentation to N-methyl-N-(2-oxoethyl)-methaniminium. Dithiazine fragmented to N-methyl-N-(2-oxoethyl)-methaniminium as well. The by-product from this reaction is methanedithiol, which was not detected due to its low polarity.

  7. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosynthetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  8. A new pathway for transmembrane electron transfer in photosyntetic reaction centers of Rhodobacter sphaeroides not involving the excited special pair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brederode, M.E.; Jones, M.R.; van Mourik, F.; van Stokkum, I.H.M.; van Grondelle, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is generally accepted that electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis is driven by the first singlet excited state of a special pair of bacteriochlorophylls (P*). We have examined the first steps of electron transfer in a mutant of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center in which charge

  9. Influence of Ligand Architecture in Tuning Reaction Bifurcation Pathways for Chlorite Oxidation by Non-Heme Iron Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barman, Prasenjit; Faponle, Abayomi S; Vardhaman, Anil Kumar; Angelone, Davide; Löhr, Anna-Maria; Browne, Wesley R; Comba, Peter; Sastri, Chivukula V; de Visser, Sam P

    2016-01-01

    Reaction bifurcation processes are often encountered in the oxidation of substrates by enzymes and generally lead to a mixture of products. One particular bifurcation process that is common in biology relates to electron transfer versus oxygen atom transfer by high-valent iron(IV)-oxo complexes,

  10. tRNAGlu increases the affinity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase for its inhibitor glutamyl-sulfamoyl-adenosine, an analogue of the aminoacylation reaction intermediate glutamyl-AMP: mechanistic and evolutionary implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Sébastien P; Kornblatt, Jack A; Barbeau, Xavier; Bonnaure, Guillaume; Lagüe, Patrick; Chênevert, Robert; Lapointe, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    For tRNA-dependent protein biosynthesis, amino acids are first activated by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) yielding the reaction intermediates aminoacyl-AMP (aa-AMP). Stable analogues of aa-AMP, such as aminoacyl-sulfamoyl-adenosines, inhibit their cognate aaRSs. Glutamyl-sulfamoyl-adenosine (Glu-AMS) is the best known inhibitor of Escherichia coli glutamyl-tRNA synthetase (GluRS). Thermodynamic parameters of the interactions between Glu-AMS and E. coli GluRS were measured in the presence and in the absence of tRNA by isothermal titration microcalorimetry. A significant entropic contribution for the interactions between Glu-AMS and GluRS in the absence of tRNA or in the presence of the cognate tRNAGlu or of the non-cognate tRNAPhe is indicated by the negative values of -TΔSb, and by the negative value of ΔCp. On the other hand, the large negative enthalpy is the dominant contribution to ΔGb in the absence of tRNA. The affinity of GluRS for Glu-AMS is not altered in the presence of the non-cognate tRNAPhe, but the dissociation constant Kd is decreased 50-fold in the presence of tRNAGlu; this result is consistent with molecular dynamics results indicating the presence of an H-bond between Glu-AMS and the 3'-OH oxygen of the 3'-terminal ribose of tRNAGlu in the Glu-AMS•GluRS•tRNAGlu complex. Glu-AMS being a very close structural analogue of Glu-AMP, its weak binding to free GluRS suggests that the unstable Glu-AMP reaction intermediate binds weakly to GluRS; these results could explain why all the known GluRSs evolved to activate glutamate only in the presence of tRNAGlu, the coupling of glutamate activation to its transfer to tRNA preventing unproductive cleavage of ATP.

  11. A board game to assist pharmacy students in learning metabolic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Tyler M

    2011-11-10

    To develop and evaluate a board game designed to increase students' enjoyment of learning metabolic pathways; their familiarity with pathway reactions, intermediates, and regulation; and, their understanding of how pathways relate to one another and to selected biological conditions. The board game, entitled Race to Glucose, was created as a team activity for first-year pharmacy students in the biochemistry curriculum. A majority of respondents agreed that the game was helpful for learning regulation, intermediates, and interpathway relationships but not for learning reactions, formation of energetic molecules, or relationships, to biological conditions. There was a significant increase in students' scores on game-related examination questions (68.8% pretest vs. 81.3% posttest), but the improvement was no greater than that for examination questions not related to the game (12.5% vs. 10.9%). First-year pharmacy students considered Race to Glucose to be an enjoyable and helpful tool for learning intermediates, regulation, and interpathway relationships.

  12. Evaluation of a setting reaction pathway in the novel composite TiHA-CSD bone cement by FT-Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, Czesława; Czechowska, Joanna; Ślósarczyk, Anna; Paszkiewicz, Zofia

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine a setting reaction pathway in a novel, surgically handy implant material, based on calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH) and titanium doped hydroxyapatite (TiHA). The previous studies confirmed superior biological properties of TiHA in comparison to the undoped hydroxyapatite (HA) what makes it highly attractive for future medical applications. In this study the three types of titanium modified HA powders: untreated, calcined at 800 °C, sintered at 1250 °C and CSH were used to produce bone cements. The Fourier Transform-InfraRed (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were applied to evaluate processes taking place during the setting of the studied materials. Our results undoubtedly confirmed that the reaction pathways and the phase compositions differed significantly for set cements and were dependent on the initial heat treatment of TiHA powder. Final materials were multiphase composites consisting of calcium sulfate dihydrate, bassanite, tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite and calcium titanate (perovskite). The FT-IR and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) measurements performed after the incubation of the cement samples in the simulated body fluid (SBF), indicate on high bioactive potential of the obtained bone cements.

  13. Theoretical study of the oxidation mechanisms of naphthalene initiated by hydroxyl radicals: the O2 addition reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroudi, A; Deleuze, M S; Canneaux, S

    2015-05-28

    Atmospheric oxidation of the naphthalene-OH adduct [C10H8OH]˙ (R1) by molecular oxygen in its triplet electronic ground state has been studied using density functional theory along with the B3LYP, ωB97XD, UM05-2x and UM06-2x exchange-correlation functionals. From a thermodynamic viewpoint, the most favourable process is O2 addition at the C2 position in syn mode, followed by O2 addition at the C2 position in anti mode, O2 addition at the C4 position in syn mode, and O2 addition at the C4 position in anti mode, as the second, third and fourth most favourable processes. The syn modes of addition at these positions are thermodynamically favoured over the anti ones by the formation of an intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxyl and peroxy substituents. Analysis of the computed structures, bond orders and free energy profiles demonstrate that the reaction steps involved in the oxidation of the naphthalene-OH adduct by O2 satisfy Hammond's principle. Kinetic rate constants and branching ratios under atmospheric pressure and in the fall-off regime have been supplied, using transition state and RRKM theories. By comparison with experiment, these data confirm the relevance of a two-step reaction mechanism. Whatever the addition mode, O2 addition in C4 position is kinetically favoured over O2 addition in C2 position, in contrast with the expectations drawn from thermodynamics and reaction energies. Under a kinetic control of the reaction, and in line with the computed reaction energy barriers, the most efficient process is O2 addition at the C4 position in syn mode, followed by O2 addition at the C2 position in syn mode, O2 addition at the C4 position in anti mode, and O2 addition at the C2 position in anti mode as the second, third and fourth most rapid processes. The computed branching ratios also indicate that the regioselectivity of the reaction decreases with increasing temperatures and decreasing pressures.

  14. Kinetic modelling of Amadori N-(1-deoxy-D-fructos-1-yl)-glycine degradation pathways. Part I - Reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.; Marcelis, A.T.M.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2003-01-01

    The fate of the Amadori compound N-(1-deoxy--fructos-1-yl)-glycine (DFG) was studied in aqueous model systems as a function of pH and temperature. The samples were heated at 100 and 120 °C with initial reaction pH of 5.5 and 6.8. Special attention was paid to the formation of the free amino acid,

  15. [Effects and mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction related to NASH and induced by activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhou; Chen, Xiaomei; Li, Fuqiang; Tang, Cuilan

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects and mechanisms of the inflammatory reaction related to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and induced by activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. A mouse model of NASH was established by feeding a high-fat and high-sugar diet.Activation of the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway was achieved by nicotine administration to the NASH modeled mice and normal controls. Liver biopsies were taken and the concentrations of cytokines were measured. Isolated liver primary Kupffer cells and RAw264.7 cells were cultured, pre-treated or not with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and exposed to nicotine, after which the supernatant concentrations of IL-6 and TNFa were determined by ELISA. The protein expression levels of phosphorylated (p)-NF-kB and I k B were detected in primary cultured Kupffer cells by western blotting. The mouse model of NASH was successfully established, as evidenced by findings from liver biopsy and serum liver function tests. The degree of liver inflammation in the NASH mice decreased after nicotine administration, and the level of serum TNFa also significantly decreased. The levels of serum TNFa were 21.95+/-0.8 pg/mL in nicotine-treated mice and 38.07+/-1.7 pg/mL in the non-nicotine-treated NASH mice (P less than 0.05). The nicotine treatment also significantly reduced the concentration of TNFa in the culture supernatants of Kupffer cells after LPS stimulation; moreover, the supernatant level of TNFa decreased significantly after the nicotine treatment (Pless than 0.05). LPS stimulation of the RAw264.7 cells led to an increased level ofp-NF-kB and a reduced level ofI-kB, suggesting that the NF-kB pathway had been activated; different doses of nicotine pre-treatment led to down-regulation of the p-NF-kB level and up-regulation of the I-kB level, both in dose-dependent manners. Activating the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway inhibits the NASH-related inflammatory reaction, and the mechanism for this inhibition

  16. Dissociation pathways of a single dimethyl disulfide on Cu(111): Reaction induced by simultaneous excitation of two vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motobayashi, Kenta, E-mail: kmotobayashi@cat.hokudai.ac.jp [Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Kim, Yousoo [Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Arafune, Ryuichi [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Ohara, Michiaki; Ueba, Hiromu; Kawai, Maki, E-mail: maki@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan)

    2014-05-21

    We present a novel reaction mechanism for a single adsorbed molecule that proceeds via simultaneous excitation of two different vibrational modes excited by inelastic tunneling electrons from a scanning tunneling microscope. Specifically, we analyze the dissociation of a single dimethyl disulfide (DMDS, (CH{sub 3}S){sub 2}) molecule on Cu(111) by using a versatile theoretical method, which permits us to simulate reaction rates as a function of sample bias voltage. The reaction is induced by the excitation of C-H stretch and S-S stretch modes by a two-electron process at low positive bias voltages. However, at increased voltages, the dissociation becomes a single-electron process that excites a combination mode of these stretches, where excitation of the C-H stretch is the energy source and excitation of the S-S stretch mode enhances the anharmonic coupling rate. A much smaller dissociation yield (few orders of magnitude) at negative bias voltages is understood in terms of the projected density of states of a single DMDS on Cu(111), which reflects resonant excitation through the molecular orbitals.

  17. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence

  18. Chemical pathways for the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Pederson, L.R.

    1997-09-01

    This report reviews chemical reactions leading to the formation of ammonia in Hanford wastes. The general features of the chemistry of the organic compounds in the Hanford wastes are briefly outlined. The radiolytic and thermal free radical reactions that are responsible for the initiation and propagation of the oxidative degradation reactions of the nitrogen-containing complexants, trisodium HEDTA and tetrasodium EDTA, are outlined. In addition, the roles played by three different ionic reaction pathways for the oxidation of the same compounds and their degradation products are described as a prelude to the discussion of the formation of ammonia. The reaction pathways postulated for its formation are based on tank observations, laboratory studies with simulated and actual wastes, and the review of the scientific literature. Ammonia derives from the reduction of nitrite ion (most important), from the conversion of organic nitrogen in the complexants and their degradation products, and from radiolytic reactions of nitrous oxide and nitrogen (least important). Reduction of nitrite ions is believed to be the most important source of ammonia. Whether by radiolytic or thermal routes, nitrite reduction reactions proceed through nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, the nitrosyl anion, and the hyponitrite anion. Nitrite ion is also converted into hydroxylamine, another important intermediate on the pathway to form ammonia. These reaction pathways additionally result in the formation of nitrous oxide and molecular nitrogen, whereas hydrogen formation is produced in a separate reaction sequence.

  19. [Polyketone Reaction in Biosynthetic Pathways of 2, 3, 5, 4'-Tetrahydroxy Stilhene-2-O-β-D-glucoside in Polygonum multiflorum by Biocatalysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Xia, Wan-xia; Shao, Li; Zhao, Shu-jin

    2015-10-01

    2, 3, 5, 4'-Tetrahydroxy stilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (THSG), the active ingredient of Polygonum multiflorum, its polyketone reaction in the biosynthesis pathways was studied by biocatalysis method. The substrates 4-coumaroyl-CoA and malonyl-CoA were catalyzed in vitro by the crude enzyme extracted from Polygonum multiflorum callus, then the products were verified by HPLC and LC-MS methods. And the crude enzyme was analyzed by ammonium sulfate precipitation method and SDS-PAGE. HPLC chromatogram showed the same retention time of both the product and resveratrol standards; LC-MS spectra showed that the m/z of product was 227, which was consistent with resveratrol standards under the mode of negative ion; Ammonium sulfate (AS) precipitation method showed AS of 40% - 70% had catalytic activity,and 50% - 60% was the optimum; SDS-PAGE showed protein bands were obviously different among different AS concentration between 20% - 80%, the protein band of 42 kDa was found in AS of 50% - 60%, which had the same molecular weight with stilbene synthase. The product of polyketone reaction in the biosynthesis of THSG is resveratrol rather than THSG, so it is speculated that THSG is the conversion product of resveratrol instead of the direct product of the polyketone reaction.

  20. Transesterification of Jatropha curcas oil glycerides: Theoretical and experimental studies of biodiesel reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neyda C. Om Tapanes; Donato A. Gomes Aranda; Jose W. de Mesquita Carneiro; Octavio A. Ceva Antunes [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil). Laboratorio GREENTEC

    2008-08-15

    Vegetal oil, also known as triglycerides, is a mixture of fatty acid triesters of glycerol. In the triglycerides alkyl chains of Jatropha curcas oil, predominate the palmitic, oleic and linoleic fatty acids. The process usually used to convert these triglycerides to biodiesel is called transesterification. The overall process is a sequence of three equivalent, consecutive and reversible reactions, in which di- and monoglycerides are formed as intermediates. Semi-empirical AM1 molecular orbital calculations were used to investigate the reaction pathways of base-catalyzed transesterification of glycerides of palmitic, oleic and linoleic acid. The most probable pathway and the rate determining-step of the reactions were estimated from the molecular orbital calculations. Our results suggest the formation of only one tetrahedral intermediate, which in a subsequent step rearranges to form the products. The rate determining-step is the break of this tetrahedral intermediate. 27 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Oxidation of fluoroquinolone antibiotics and structurally related amines by chlorine dioxide: Reaction kinetics, product and pathway evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; He, Yi-Liang; Huang, Ching-Hua

    2010-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are a group of widely prescribed antibiotics and have been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. The reaction kinetics and transformation of seven FQs (ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR), norfloxacin (NOR), ofloxacin (OFL), lomefloxacin (LOM), pipemidic acid (PIP) and flumequine (FLU)) and three structurally related amines (1-phenylpiperazine (PP), N-phenylmorpholine (PM) and 4-phenylpiperidine (PD)) toward chlorine dioxide (ClO(2)) were investigated to elucidate the behavior of FQs during ClO(2) disinfection processes. The reaction kinetics are highly pH-dependent, can be well described by a second-order kinetic model incorporating speciation of FQs, and follow the trend of OFL > ENR > CIP ∼ NOR ∼ LOM > > PIP in reactivity. Comparison among FQs and related amines and product characterization indicate that FQs' piperazine ring is the primary reactive center toward ClO(2). ClO(2) likely attacks FQ's piperazinyl N4 atom followed by concerted fragmentation involving piperazinyl N1 atom, leading to dealkylation, hydroxylation and intramolecular ring closure at the piperazine moiety. While FQs with tertiary N4 react faster with ClO(2) than FQs with secondary N4, the overall reactivity of the piperazine moiety also depends strongly on the quinolone ring through electronic effects. The reaction rate constants obtained in clean water matrix can be used to model the decay of CIP by ClO(2) in surface water samples, but overestimate the decay in wastewater samples. Overall, transformation of FQs, particularly for those with tertiary N4 amines, could be expected under typical ClO(2) disinfection conditions. However, the transformation may not eliminate antibacterial activity because of little destruction at the quinolone ring. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. MicroRNA-124-3p expression and its prospective functional pathways in hepatocellular carcinoma: A quantitative polymerase chain reaction, gene expression omnibus and bioinformatics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Rong-Quan; Yang, Xia; Liang, Liang; Chen, Gang; Ma, Jie

    2018-04-01

    The present study aimed to explore the potential clinical significance of microRNA (miR)-124-3p expression in the hepatocarcinogenesis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), as well as the potential target genes of functional HCC pathways. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to evaluate the expression of miR-124-3p in 101 HCC and adjacent non-cancerous tissue samples. Additionally, the association between miR-124-3p expression and clinical parameters was also analyzed. Differentially expressed genes identified following miR-124-3p transfection, the prospective target genes predicted in silico and the key genes of HCC obtained from Natural Language Processing (NLP) were integrated to obtain potential target genes of miR-124-3p in HCC. Relevant signaling pathways were assessed with protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment analysis, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and Protein Annotation Through Evolutionary Relationships (PANTHER) pathway enrichment analysis. miR-124-3p expression was significantly reduced in HCC tissues compared with expression in adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. In HCC, miR-124-3p was demonstrated to be associated with clinical stage. The mean survival time of the low miR-124-3p expression group was reduced compared with that of the high expression group. A total of 132 genes overlapped from differentially expressed genes, miR-124-3p predicted target genes and NLP identified genes. PPI network construction revealed a total of 109 nodes and 386 edges, and 20 key genes were identified. The major enriched terms of three GO categories included regulation of cell proliferation, positive regulation of cellular biosynthetic processes, cell leading edge, cytosol and cell projection, protein kinase activity, transcription activator activity and enzyme binding. KEGG analysis revealed pancreatic cancer, prostate cancer and non-small cell lung cancer as the

  3. Structures and reaction pathways of the molybdenum centres of sulfite-oxidizing enzymes by pulsed EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enemark, John H; Astashkin, Andrei V; Raitsimring, Arnold M

    2008-12-01

    SOEs (sulfite-oxidizing enzymes) are physiologically vital and occur in all forms of life. During the catalytic cycle, the five-co-ordinate square pyramidal oxo-molybdenum active site passes through the Mo(V) state, and intimate details of the structure can be obtained from variable frequency pulsed EPR spectroscopy through the hyperfine and nuclear quadrupole interactions of nearby magnetic nuclei. By employing variable spectrometer operational frequencies, it is possible to optimize the measurement conditions for difficult quadrupolar nuclei of interest (e.g. (17)O, (33)S, (35)Cl and (37)Cl) and to simplify the interpretation of the spectra. Isotopically labelled model Mo(V) compounds provide further insight into the electronic and geometric structures and chemical reactions of the enzymes. Recently, blocked forms of SOEs having co-ordinated sulfate, the reaction product, were detected using (33)S (I=3/2) labelling. This blocking of product release is a possible contributor to fatal human sulfite oxidase deficiency in young children.

  4. Coprecipitation of {sup 14}C and Sr with carbonate precipitates: The importance of reaction kinetics and recrystallization pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodkin, David J. [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Stewart, Douglas I. [School of Civil Engineering, University of Leeds (United Kingdom); Graham, James T. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom); Burke, Ian T., E-mail: I.T.Burke@leeds.ac.uk [School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    This study investigated the simultaneous removal of Sr{sup 2+} and {sup 14}CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} from pH > 12 Ca(OH){sub 2} solution by the precipitation of calcium carbonate. Initial Ca{sup 2+}:CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} ratios ranged from 10:1 to 10:100 (mM:mM). Maximum removal of {sup 14}C and Sr{sup 2+} both occurred in the system containing 10 mM Ca{sup 2+} and 1 mM CO{sub 3}{sup 2−} (99.7% and 98.6% removal respectively). A kinetic model is provided that describes {sup 14}C and Sr removal in terms of mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions. The removal of {sup 14}C was achieved during the depletion of the initial TIC in solution, and was subsequently significantly affected by recrystallization of the calcite precipitate from an elongate to isotropic morphology. This liberated > 46% of the {sup 14}C back to solution. Sr{sup 2+} removal occurred as Ca{sup 2+} became depleted in solution and was not significantly affected by the recrystallization process. The proposed reaction could form the basis for low cost remediation scheme for {sup 90}Sr and {sup 14}C in radioactively contaminated waters (<$0.25 reagent cost per m{sup 3} treated). - Highlights: • 99.7% of {sup 14}C and 98.6% of Sr removed from aqueous solution by CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. • Remobilization of {sup 14}C observed during calcium carbonate recrystallization. • Sr displayed variable distribution coefficient (possibly affected by Ca:Sr ratio). • Reagent cost of $0.22/m{sup 3} of treated groundwater.

  5. A study of fundamental reaction pathways for transition metal alkyl complexes. I. The reaction of a nickel methyl complex with alkynes. Ii. The mechanism of aldehyde formation in the reaction of a molybdenum hydride with molybdenum alkyls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huggins, John Mitchell [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1980-06-12

    I. This study reports the rapid reaction under mild conditions of internal or terminal alkynes with methyl (acetyl-acetonato) (triphenylphosphine) nickel (1) in either aromatic or ether solvents. In all cases vinylnickel products 2 are formed by insertion of the alkyne into the nickel=methyl bond. These complexes may be converted into a variety of organic products (e.g. alkenes, esters, vinyl halides) by treatment with appropriate reagents. Unsymmetrical alkynes give selectively the one regioisomer with the sterically largest substituent next to the nickel atom. In order to investigate the stereochemistry of the initial insertion, a x-ray diffraction study of the reaction of 1 with diphenylacetylene was carried out. This showed that the vinylnickel complex formed by overall trans insertion was the product of the reaction. Furthermore, subsequent slow isomerization of this complex, to a mixture of it and the corresponding cis isomer, demonstrated that this trans addition product is the kinetic product of the reaction. In studies with other alkynes, the product of trans addition was not always exclusively (or even predominantly) formed, but the ratio of the stereoisomers formed kinetically was substantially different from the thermodynamic ratio. Isotope labeling, added phosphine, and other experiments have allowed us to conclude that the mechanism of this reaction does involve initial cis addition. However, a coordinatively unsaturated vinylnickel complex is initially formed which can undergo rapid, phosphine-catalyzed cis-trans isomerization in competition with its conversion to the isolable phosphine-substituted kinetic reaction products. II. The reaction of CpMo(CO)3H (1a) with CpMo(CO)3R (2, R= CH3, C2H5) at 50°C in THF gives the aldehyde RCHO and the dimers [CpMo(CO)3]2 (3a) and [CpMo(CO)2]2 (4a). Labeling one of the reactants with a methylcyclopentadienyl ligand

  6. TLR4-HMGB1 signaling pathway affects the inflammatory reaction of autoimmune myositis by regulating MHC-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zemin; Zhang, Xiujuan; Peng, Anping; He, Min; Lei, Zhenhua; Wang, Yunxiu

    2016-12-01

    To analyze the effects of TLR4 on the expression of the HMGB1, MHC-I and downstream cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, and to investigate the biological role of the TLR4-HMGB1 signaling pathway in the development of the autoimmune myositis. We built mice models with experimental autoimmune myositis (EAM) and used the inverted screen experiment to measure their muscle endurance; we also examined inflammatory infiltration of muscle tissues after HE staining; and we assessed the expression of MHC-I using immunohistochemistry. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were extracted and flow cytometry was utilized to detect the effect of IFN-γ on the expression of MHC-I. Furthermore, PBMCs were treated with IFN-γ, anti-TLR4, anti-HMGB1 and anti-MHC-I. Real-time PCR and western blotting were employed to examine the expressions of TLR4, HMGB1 and MHC-I in different groups. The ELISA method was also utilized to detect the expression of the downstream cytokines TNF-α and IL-6. The expressions of TLR4, HMGB1 and MHC-I in muscle tissues from mice with EAM were significantly higher than those in the control group (all Pmyositis inflammation by regulating the expression of MHC-I and other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification and Spectroscopic Characterization of Nonheme Iron(III) Hypochlorite Intermediates**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draksharapu, Apparao; Angelone, Davide; Quesne, Matthew G; Padamati, Sandeep K; Gómez, Laura; Hage, Ronald; Costas, Miquel; Browne, Wesley R; de Visser, Sam P

    2015-01-01

    FeIII–hypohalite complexes have been implicated in a wide range of important enzyme-catalyzed halogenation reactions including the biosynthesis of natural products and antibiotics and post-translational modification of proteins. The absence of spectroscopic data on such species precludes their identification. Herein, we report the generation and spectroscopic characterization of nonheme FeIII–hypohalite intermediates of possible relevance to iron halogenases. We show that FeIII-OCl polypyridylamine complexes can be sufficiently stable at room temperature to be characterized by UV/Vis absorption, resonance Raman and EPR spectroscopies, and cryo-ESIMS. DFT methods rationalize the pathways to the formation of the FeIII-OCl, and ultimately FeIV=O, species and provide indirect evidence for a short-lived FeII-OCl intermediate. The species observed and the pathways involved offer insight into and, importantly, a spectroscopic database for the investigation of iron halogenases. PMID:25663379

  8. A Springloaded Metal-Ligand Mesocate Allows Access to Trapped Intermediates of Self-Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogie, Paul M; Holloway, Lauren R; Lyon, Yana; Onishi, Nicole C; Beran, Gregory J O; Julian, Ryan R; Hooley, Richard J

    2018-04-02

    A strained, "springloaded" Fe 2 L 3 iminopyridine mesocate shows highly variable reactivity upon postassembly reaction with competitive diamines. The strained assembly is reactive toward transimination in minutes at ambient temperature and allows observation of kinetically trapped intermediates in the self-assembly pathway. When diamines are used that can only form less favored cage products upon full equilibration, trapped ML 3 fragments with pendant, "hanging" NH 2 groups are selectively formed instead. Slight variations in diamine structure have large effects on the product outcome: less rigid diamines convert the mesocate to more favored self-assembled cage complexes under mild conditions and allow observation of heterocomplex intermediates in the displacement pathway. The mesocate allows control of equilibrium processes and direction of product outcomes via small, iterative changes in added subcomponent structure and provides a method of accessing metal-ligand cage structures not normally observed in multicomponent Fe-iminopyridine self-assembly.

  9. Degradation of a cationic dye (Rhodamine 6G) using hydrodynamic cavitation coupled with other oxidative agents: Reaction mechanism and pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajoriya, Sunil; Bargole, Swapnil; Saharan, Virendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, decolorization and mineralization of a cationic dye, Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G), has been carried out using hydrodynamic cavitation (HC). Two cavitating devices such as slit and circular venturi were used to generate cavitation in HC reactor. The process parameters such as initial dye concentration, solution pH, operating inlet pressure, and cavitation number were investigated in detail to evaluate their effects on the decolorization efficiency of Rh6G. Decolorization of Rh6G was marginally higher in the case of slit venturi as compared to circular venturi. The kinetic study showed that decolorization and mineralization of the dye fitted first-order kinetics. The loadings of H 2 O 2 and ozone have been optimized to intensify the decolorization and mineralization efficiency of Rh6G using HC. Nearly 54% decolorization of Rh6G was obtained using a combination of HC and H 2 O 2 at a dye to H 2 O 2 molar ratio of 1:30. The combination of HC with ozone resulted in 100% decolorization in almost 5-10min of processing time depending upon the initial dye concentration. To quantify the extent of mineralization, total organic carbon (TOC) analysis was also performed using various processes and almost 84% TOC removal was obtained using HC coupled with 3g/h of ozone. The degradation by-products formed during the complete degradation process were qualitatively identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and a detailed degradation pathway has been proposed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. One-step hydroprocessing of fatty acids into renewable aromatic hydrocarbons over Ni/HZSM-5: insights into the major reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shiyou; Lv, Pengmei; Wang, Jiayan; Fu, Junying; Fan, Pei; Yang, Lingmei; Yang, Gaixiu; Yuan, Zhenhong; Chen, Yong

    2017-01-25

    For high caloricity and stability in bio-aviation fuels, a certain content of aromatic hydrocarbons (AHCs, 8-25 wt%) is crucial. Fatty acids, obtained from waste or inedible oils, are a renewable and economic feedstock for AHC production. Considerable amounts of AHCs, up to 64.61 wt%, were produced through the one-step hydroprocessing of fatty acids over Ni/HZSM-5 catalysts. Hydrogenation, hydrocracking, and aromatization constituted the principal AHC formation processes. At a lower temperature, fatty acids were first hydrosaturated and then hydrodeoxygenated at metal sites to form long-chain hydrocarbons. Alternatively, the unsaturated fatty acids could be directly deoxygenated at acid sites without first being saturated. The long-chain hydrocarbons were cracked into gases such as ethane, propane, and C 6 -C 8 olefins over the catalysts' Brønsted acid sites; these underwent Diels-Alder reactions on the catalysts' Lewis acid sites to form AHCs. C 6 -C 8 olefins were determined as critical intermediates for AHC formation. As the Ni content in the catalyst increased, the Brønsted-acid site density was reduced due to coverage by the metal nanoparticles. Good performance was achieved with a loading of 10 wt% Ni, where the Ni nanoparticles exhibited a polyhedral morphology which exposed more active sites for aromatization.

  11. Formation of iodo-trihalomethanes, iodo-acetic acids, and iodo-acetamides during chloramination of iodide-containing waters: Factors influencing formation and reaction pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shaogang [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuang-qing Road, Beijing, 100085 (China); Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Food Safety and Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Chemistry and Engineering of Forest Products, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, 530006, Guangxi (China); Li, Zhenlin [Guangxi Colleges and Universities Key Laboratory of Food Safety and Pharmaceutical Analytical Chemistry, Guangxi Key Laboratory of Chemistry and Engineering of Forest Products, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi University for Nationalities, Nanning, 530006, Guangxi (China); Dong, Huiyu [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuang-qing Road, Beijing, 100085 (China); Goodman, Bernard A. [College of Physical Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory for Conservation and Utilization of Subtropical Agro-Bioresources, Guangxi University, Nanning, 520004, Guangxi (China); Qiang, Zhimin, E-mail: qiangz@rcees.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Drinking Water Science and Technology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuang-qing Road, Beijing, 100085 (China)

    2017-01-05

    This study investigated systematically the factors influencing the formation of iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs) during chloramination of I{sup −}-containing waters, including reaction time, NH{sub 2}Cl dose, I{sup −} concentration, pH, natural organic matter (NOM) concentration, Br{sup −}/I{sup −} molar ratio, and water matrix. Among the I-DBPs detected, iodoform (CHI{sub 3}), iodoacetic acid (IAA), diiodoacetic acid (DIAA), triiodoacetic acid (TIAA), and diiodoacetamide (DIAcAm) were the major species produced from reactions between reactive iodine species (HOI/I{sub 2}) and NOM. A kinetic model involving the reactions of NH{sub 2}Cl auto-decomposition, iodine species transformation and NOM consumption was developed, which could well describe NH{sub 2}Cl decay and HOI/I{sub 2} evolution. Higher concentrations of CHI{sub 3}, IAA, DIAA, TIAA, and DIAcAm were observed in chloramination than in chlorination, whereas IO{sub 3}{sup −} was only formed significantly in chlorination. Maximum formation of I-DBPs occurred at pH 8.0, but acidic conditions favored the formation of iodinated haloacetic acids and DIAcAm. Increasing Br{sup −}/I{sup −} molar ratio from 1 to 10 did not increase the total amount of I-DBPs, but produced more bromine-substituting species. In addition, chloramination of 18 model compounds indicated that low-SUVA{sub 254} (specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm) NOM generally favored the formation of I-DBPs compared to high-SUVA{sub 254} NOM. Finally, potential pathways for I-DBPs formation from chloramination of NOM were proposed.

  12. Intermediates and the folding of proteins L and G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-07-01

    We use a minimalist protein model, in combination with a sequence design strategy, to determine differences in primary structure for proteins L and G that are responsible for the two proteins folding through distinctly different folding mechanisms. We find that the folding of proteins L and G are consistent with a nucleation-condensation mechanism, each of which is described as helix-assisted {beta}-1 and {beta}-2 hairpin formation, respectively. We determine that the model for protein G exhibits an early intermediate that precedes the rate-limiting barrier of folding and which draws together misaligned secondary structure elements that are stabilized by hydrophobic core contacts involving the third {beta}-strand, and presages the later transition state in which the correct strand alignment of these same secondary structure elements is restored. Finally the validity of the targeted intermediate ensemble for protein G was analyzed by fitting the kinetic data to a two-step first order reversible reaction, proving that protein G folding involves an on-pathway early intermediate, and should be populated and therefore observable by experiment.

  13. Probing the Catalytic Mechanism of S-Ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS) with Catalytic Intermediates and Substrate Analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopishetty, Bhaskar; Zhu, Jinge; Rajan, Rakhi; Sobczak, Adam J.; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Bell, Charles E.; Pei, Dehua; (OSU); (FIU)

    2009-05-12

    S-Ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS) cleaves the thioether bond in S-ribosylhomocysteine (SRH) to produce homocysteine (Hcys) and 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), the precursor of the type II bacterial quorum sensing molecule (AI-2). The catalytic mechanism of LuxS comprises three distinct reaction steps. The first step involves carbonyl migration from the C1 carbon of ribose to C2 and the formation of a 2-ketone intermediate. The second step shifts the C=O group from the C2 to C3 position to produce a 3-ketone intermediate. In the final step, the 3-ketone intermediate undergoes a {beta}-elimination reaction resulting in the cleavage of the thioether bond. In this work, the 3-ketone intermediate was chemically synthesized and shown to be chemically and kinetically competent in the LuxS catalytic pathway. Substrate analogues halogenated at the C3 position of ribose were synthesized and reacted as time-dependent inhibitors of LuxS. The time dependence was caused by enzyme-catalyzed elimination of halide ions. Examination of the kinetics of halide release and decay of the 3-ketone intermediate catalyzed by wild-type and mutant LuxS enzymes revealed that Cys-84 is the general base responsible for proton abstraction in the three reaction steps, whereas Glu-57 likely facilitates substrate binding and proton transfer during catalysis.

  14. Synthesis and structures of six closely related N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]arylamides, together with an isolated reaction intermediate: order versus disorder, molecular conformations and hydrogen bonding in zero, one and two dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Belakavadi K; Yathirajan, Hemmige S; Rathore, Ravindranath S; Glidewell, Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Six closely related N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]arylamides have been synthesized and structurally characterized, together with a representative reaction intermediate. In each of N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]benzamide, C 20 H 16 ClNO 2 S, (I), N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]-4-phenylbenzamide, C 26 H 20 ClNO 2 S, (II), and 2-bromo-N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]benzamide, C 20 H 15 BrClNO 2 S, (III), the molecules are disordered over two sets of atomic sites, with occupancies of 0.894 (8) and 0.106 (8) in (I), 0.832 (5) and 0.168 (5) in (II), and 0.7006 (12) and 0.2994 (12) in (III). In each of N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]-2-iodobenzamide, C 20 H 15 ClINO 2 S, (IV), and N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]-2-methoxybenzamide, C 21 H 18 ClNO 3 S, (V), the molecules are fully ordered, but in N-[3-(2-chlorobenzoyl)-5-ethylthiophen-2-yl]-2,6-difluorobenzamide, C 20 H 14 ClF 2 NO 2 S, (VI), which crystallizes with Z' = 2 in the space group C2/c, one of the two independent molecules is fully ordered, while the other is disordered over two sets of atomic sites having occupancies of 0.916 (3) and 0.084 (3). All of the molecules in compounds (I)-(VI) exhibit an intramolecular N-H...O hydrogen bond. The molecules of (I) and (VI) are linked by C-H...O hydrogen bonds to form finite zero-dimensional dimers, which are cyclic in (I) and acyclic in (VI), those of (III) are linked by C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bonds to form simple chains, and those of (IV) and (V) are linked into different types of chains of rings, built in each case from a combination of C-H...O and C-H...π(arene) hydrogen bonds. Two C-H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules of (II) into sheets containing three types of ring. In benzotriazol-1-yl 3,4-dimethoxybenzoate, C 15 H 13 N 3 O 4 , (VII), the benzoate component is planar and makes a dihedral angle of 84.51 (6)° with the benzotriazole unit. Comparisons are made

  15. Prokaryotic Heme Biosynthesis: Multiple Pathways to a Common Essential Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Harry A; Dailey, Tamara A; Gerdes, Svetlana; Jahn, Dieter; Jahn, Martina; O'Brian, Mark R; Warren, Martin J

    2017-03-01

    The advent of heme during evolution allowed organisms possessing this compound to safely and efficiently carry out a variety of chemical reactions that otherwise were difficult or impossible. While it was long assumed that a single heme biosynthetic pathway existed in nature, over the past decade, it has become clear that there are three distinct pathways among prokaryotes, although all three pathways utilize a common initial core of three enzymes to produce the intermediate uroporphyrinogen III. The most ancient pathway and the only one found in the Archaea converts siroheme to protoheme via an oxygen-independent four-enzyme-step process. Bacteria utilize the initial core pathway but then add one additional common step to produce coproporphyrinogen III. Following this step, Gram-positive organisms oxidize coproporphyrinogen III to coproporphyrin III, insert iron to make coproheme, and finally decarboxylate coproheme to protoheme, whereas Gram-negative bacteria first decarboxylate coproporphyrinogen III to protoporphyrinogen IX and then oxidize this to protoporphyrin IX prior to metal insertion to make protoheme. In order to adapt to oxygen-deficient conditions, two steps in the bacterial pathways have multiple forms to accommodate oxidative reactions in an anaerobic environment. The regulation of these pathways reflects the diversity of bacterial metabolism. This diversity, along with the late recognition that three pathways exist, has significantly slowed advances in this field such that no single organism's heme synthesis pathway regulation is currently completely characterized. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. Pathways to diagnosis: a qualitative study of the experiences and emotional reactions of parents of children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, David; Harden, Jeni; Waugh, Norman; Noyes, Kathryn; Barnard, Katharine D; Stephen, John; Robertson, Kenneth J; Bath, Louise; Robertson, Linda; Lawton, Julia

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to explore from parents' perspectives the circumstances and events which led to their child being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The objective was to understand reasons for delays in seeking treatment and parents' emotional reactions to diagnosis so others can be better informed and supported in future. In-depth interviews with 54 parents of children (aged ≤12 yr) with T1D were conducted. Data analysis used an inductive, thematic approach. Parents described a 'prompt' and a 'delayed' pathway to their child being diagnosed. Parents who considered the diagnosis to be 'prompt' reported how they, or other people, had recognized their child had developed symptoms of T1D which resulted in a rapid presentation to health care professionals. In contrast, parents who perceived their child's diagnosis to be 'delayed' did not recognize signs of T1D and attributed their child's deteriorating health to other conditions, being out of routines and/or their stage of development. These parents often only sought medical help when symptoms became extreme. All parents were distressed by their child's diagnosis; however, parents in the 'delayed' pathway expressed unresolved feelings of guilt, particularly when their child was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis. Parents' and other people's knowledge about T1D can affect the duration between onset of their child's symptoms and diagnosis. Campaigns to raise awareness should ensure that parents are made aware of symptoms and that T1D can develop during childhood. Health care professionals could discuss with parents the events preceding their child's diagnosis to better determine their emotional support needs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Graph-representation of oxidative folding pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaján László

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of oxidative folding combines the formation of native disulfide bond with conformational folding resulting in the native three-dimensional fold. Oxidative folding pathways can be described in terms of disulfide intermediate species (DIS which can also be isolated and characterized. Each DIS corresponds to a family of folding states (conformations that the given DIS can adopt in three dimensions. Results The oxidative folding space can be represented as a network of DIS states interconnected by disulfide interchange reactions that can either create/abolish or rearrange disulfide bridges. We propose a simple 3D representation wherein the states having the same number of disulfide bridges are placed on separate planes. In this representation, the shuffling transitions are within the planes, and the redox edges connect adjacent planes. In a number of experimentally studied cases (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, insulin-like growth factor and epidermal growth factor, the observed intermediates appear as part of contiguous oxidative folding pathways. Conclusions Such networks can be used to visualize folding pathways in terms of the experimentally observed intermediates. A simple visualization template written for the Tulip package http://www.tulip-software.org/ can be obtained from V.A.

  18. A comparative study of nitrite reduction by synthetic and biogenic Fe(II-III) hydroxysalts green rusts: Evidence for hydroxyl-nitrite green rust formation as an intermediate reaction product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ona-Nguema, G.; Guerbois, D.; Morin, G.; Zhang, Y.; Noel, V.; Brest, J.

    2013-12-01

    -GR(Cl) led to the reduction of nitrite ions to ammonium, and that the production of ammonium depended on their Fe(II) content. XRD patterns indicated that both synthetic green rusts were fully oxidized into magnetite during the reaction with nitrite. For biogenic green rusts, the study revealed that both bio-GR(CO3)F and bio-GR(CO3)L were capable of reducing nitrite ions without ammonium production, suggesting the conversion of nitrite ions to nitrogen gas. Moreover, we provided evidence for the first time that the interactions of bio-GR(CO3)F with nitrite led to the formation of an hydroxy-nitrite green rust as a result of the incorporation of nitrite in the interlayer region of bio-GR(CO3)F; such an intercalation of nitrite ions was not observed in experiments with bio-GR(CO3)L. XRD analysis indicated that GR(NO2) was formed as an intermediate reaction product prior to the fully oxidation of GR to ferric oxyhydroxides. [1] Philips S., Laanbroek H. J. and Verstraete W. (2002). Rev. Environ. Sci. Biotechnol. 1, 115-141.

  19. Intermediality and media change

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This book is about intermediality as an approach to analysing and understanding media change. Intermediality and Media Change is critical of technological determinism that characterises 'new media discourse' about the ongoing digitalization, framed as a revolution and creating sharp contrasts between old and new media. Intermediality instead emphasises paying attention to continuities between media of all types and privileges a comparative perspective on technological changes in media over ti...

  20. Pyrite formation and mineral transformation pathways upon sulfidation of ferric hydroxides depend on mineral type and sulfide concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peiffer, Stefan; Behrends, Thilo; Hellige, Katrin; Larese-Casanova, Philip; Wan, Moli; Pollok, Kilian

    2015-01-01

    The reaction of ferric (hydr)oxides with dissolved sulfide does not lead to the instantaneous production of thermodynamically stable products but can induce a variety of mineral transformations including the formation of metastable intermediates. The importance of the various transformation pathways

  1. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  2. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities

  3. ESL intermediate/advanced writing

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz Page, Mary Ellen; Jaskiewicz, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Master ESL (English as a Second Language) Writing with the study guide designed for non-native speakers of English. Skill-building lessons relevant to today's topics help ESL students write complete sentences, paragraphs, and even multi-paragraph essays. It's perfect for classroom use or self-guided writing preparation.DETAILS- Intermediate drills for improving skills with parallel structure, mood, correct shifting errors & dangling participles- Advanced essay drills focusing on narrative, descriptive, process, reaction, comparison and contrast- Superb preparation for students taking the TOEFL

  4. Perspective: Spectroscopy and kinetics of small gaseous Criegee intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2015-01-01

    The Criegee intermediates, carbonyl oxides proposed by Criegee in 1949 as key intermediates in the ozonolysis of alkenes, play important roles in many aspects of atmospheric chemistry. Because direct detection of these gaseous intermediates was unavailable until recently, previous understanding of their reactions, derived from indirect experimental evidence, had great uncertainties. Recent laboratory detection of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH 2 OO and some larger members, produced from ultraviolet irradiation of corresponding diiodoalkanes in O 2 , with various methods such as photoionization, ultraviolet absorption, infrared absorption, and microwave spectroscopy opens a new door to improved understanding of the roles of these Criegee intermediates. Their structures and spectral parameters have been characterized; their significant zwitterionic nature is hence confirmed. CH 2 OO, along with other products, has also been detected directly with microwave spectroscopy in gaseous ozonolysis reactions of ethene. The detailed kinetics of the source reaction, CH 2 I + O 2 , which is critical to laboratory studies of CH 2 OO, are now understood satisfactorily. The kinetic investigations using direct detection identified some important atmospheric reactions, including reactions with NO 2 , SO 2 , water dimer, carboxylic acids, and carbonyl compounds. Efforts toward the characterization of larger Criegee intermediates and the investigation of related reactions are in progress. Some reactions of CH 3 CHOO are found to depend on conformation. This perspective examines progress toward the direct spectral characterization of Criegee intermediates and investigations of the associated reaction kinetics, and indicates some unresolved problems and prospective challenges for this exciting field of research

  5. DCEO Biotechnology: Tools To Design, Construct, Evaluate, and Optimize the Metabolic Pathway for Biosynthesis of Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xiulai; Gao, Cong; Guo, Liang

    2018-01-01

    , and pathway optimization at the systems level, offers a conceptual and technological framework to exploit potential pathways, modify existing pathways and create new pathways for the optimal production of desired chemicals. Here, we summarize recent progress of DCEO biotechnology and examples of its......Chemical synthesis is a well established route for producing many chemicals on a large scale, but some drawbacks still exist in this process, such as unstable intermediates, multistep reactions, complex process control, etc. Biobased production provides an attractive alternative to these challenges......, but how to make cells into efficient factories is challenging. As a key enabling technology to develop efficient cell factories, design-construction-evaluation-optimization (DCEO) biotechnology, which incorporates the concepts and techniques of pathway design, pathway construction, pathway evaluation...

  6. Nucleon induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuca, S.; Antalik, R.; Kristiak, J.

    1988-01-01

    The collection contains full texts of 37 contributions; all fall within the INIS Subject Scope. The topics treated include some unsolved problems of nuclear reactions and relevant problems of nuclear structure at low and intermediate energies. (Z.S.)

  7. Surface Interrogation Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy for a Photoelectrochemical Reaction: Water Oxidation on a Hematite Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Young; Ahn, Hyun S; Bard, Allen J

    2018-03-06

    To understand the pathway of a photoelectrochemical (PEC) reaction, quantitative knowledge of reaction intermediates is important. We describe here surface interrogation scanning electrochemical microscopy for this purpose (PEC SI-SECM), where a light pulse to a photoactive semiconductor film at a given potential generates intermediates that are then analyzed by a tip generated titrant at known times after the light pulse. The improvements were demonstrated for photoelectrochemical water oxidation (oxygen evolution) reaction on a hematite surface. The density of photoactive sites, proposed to be Fe 4+ species, on a hematite surface was successfully quantified, and the photoelectrochemical water oxidation reaction dynamics were elucidated by time-dependent redox titration experiments. The new configuration of PEC SI-SECM should find expanded usage to understand and investigate more complicated PEC reactions with other materials.

  8. Cluster Analysis of Time-Dependent Crystallographic Data: Direct Identification of Time-Independent Structural Intermediates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, Konstantin S.; Moffat, Keith

    2011-01-01

    The initial output of a time-resolved macromolecular crystallography experiment is a time-dependent series of difference electron density maps that displays the time-dependent changes in underlying structure as a reaction progresses. The goal is to interpret such data in terms of a small number of crystallographically refinable, time-independent structures, each associated with a reaction intermediate; to establish the pathways and rate coefficients by which these intermediates interconvert; and thereby to elucidate a chemical kinetic mechanism. One strategy toward achieving this goal is to use cluster analysis, a statistical method that groups objects based on their similarity. If the difference electron density at a particular voxel in the time-dependent difference electron density (TDED) maps is sensitive to the presence of one and only one intermediate, then its temporal evolution will exactly parallel the concentration profile of that intermediate with time. The rationale is therefore to cluster voxels with respect to the shapes of their TDEDs, so that each group or cluster of voxels corresponds to one structural intermediate. Clusters of voxels whose TDEDs reflect the presence of two or more specific intermediates can also be identified. From such groupings one can then infer the number of intermediates, obtain their time-independent difference density characteristics, and refine the structure of each intermediate. We review the principles of cluster analysis and clustering algorithms in a crystallographic context, and describe the application of the method to simulated and experimental time-resolved crystallographic data for the photocycle of photoactive yellow protein. PMID:21244840

  9. Anodic Cyclization Reactions and the Mechanistic Strategies That Enable Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ruozhu; Smith, Jake A; Moeller, Kevin D

    2017-09-19

    Oxidation reactions are powerful tools for synthesis because they allow us to reverse the polarity of electron-rich functional groups, generate highly reactive intermediates, and increase the functionality of molecules. For this reason, oxidation reactions have been and continue to be the subject of intense study. Central to these efforts is the development of mechanism-based strategies that allow us to think about the reactive intermediates that are frequently central to the success of the reactions and the mechanistic pathways that those intermediates trigger. For example, consider oxidative cyclization reactions that are triggered by the removal of an electron from an electron-rich olefin and lead to cyclic products that are functionalized for further elaboration. For these reactions to be successful, the radical cation intermediate must first be generated using conditions that limit its polymerization and then channeled down a productive desired pathway. Following the cyclization, a second oxidation step is necessary for product formation, after which the resulting cation must be quenched in a controlled fashion to avoid undesired elimination reactions. Problems can arise at any one or all of these steps, a fact that frequently complicates reaction optimization and can discourage the development of new transformations. Fortunately, anodic electrochemistry offers an outstanding opportunity to systematically probe the mechanism of oxidative cyclization reactions. The use of electrochemical methods allows for the generation of radical cations under neutral conditions in an environment that helps prevent polymerization of the intermediate. Once the intermediates have been generated, a series of "telltale indicators" can be used to diagnose which step in an oxidative cyclization is problematic for less successful transformation. A set of potential solutions to address each type of problem encountered has been developed. For example, problems with the initial

  10. Effects of urban air pollution on the inflammatory reaction: involvement of the chemokine pathways; Impact de la pollution atmospherique urbaine sur la reponse inflammatoire: implication des chimiokines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahy, O.

    2000-12-01

    Urban air pollution is both gaseous and particulate, and diesel exhausts are now the main source of particles. Diesel particles consist of a carbon core with multiple adsorbed organic compounds, among witch poly-aromatic hydrocarbons. These diesel particles and associated poly-aromatic hydrocarbons are likely to play a role in the recent increase in allergic diseases. In this study, we evaluated the effects of diesel organic extracts on the initiation and the orientation of the allergen-dependent inflammatory reaction by analyzing the dis-regulation of a family of mediators involved in cellular recruitment: the chemokines. We demonstrated that mononuclear cells and alveolar macrophages from normal subjects displayed a dis-regulation in pro-inflammatory chemokine expression and production (IL-8, MCP-1, RANTES) when exposed to diesel organic extracts. In addition we observed a synergy between the effects of diesel and allergen when cells from allergic patients were exposed to both simultaneously, leading to a strong over-production of chemokines, and to the increased capacity of recruiting effector cells such as neutrophils and eosinophils. The MAP kinase pathways seemed largely involved in the transduction of diesel and allergen stimulus, since a specific inhibition almost abolished the dis-regulation of chemokine production. Diesel and allergen also appeared to favour the establishment of a type 2 immune response (pro-allergenic), by preferentially recruiting Th2 lymphocytes via the dis-regulation of chemokine expression (MDC and IP-10). Finally, the humanized SCID mouse model grafted with autologous human skin allowed the in vivo evaluation of a local over-production of chemokine, by analyzing the cellular recruitment in the skin after intra-dermal injection of recombinant chemokines. This model appears useful for the study of the mechanisms of cellular recruitment by chemokines and the potential therapeutic approaches. In conclusion, our study underlines the

  11. Intermediates and Generic Convergence to Equilibria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcondes de Freitas, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Feliu, Elisenda

    2017-01-01

    Known graphical conditions for the generic and global convergence to equilibria of the dynamical system arising from a reaction network are shown to be invariant under the so-called successive removal of intermediates, a systematic procedure to simplify the network, making the graphical conditions...

  12. Complex Chemical Reaction Networks from Heuristics-Aided Quantum Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Galvin, Cooper J; Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-03-11

    While structures and reactivities of many small molecules can be computed efficiently and accurately using quantum chemical methods, heuristic approaches remain essential for modeling complex structures and large-scale chemical systems. Here, we present a heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology applicable to complex chemical reaction networks such as those arising in cell metabolism and prebiotic chemistry. Chemical heuristics offer an expedient way of traversing high-dimensional reactive potential energy surfaces and are combined here with quantum chemical structure optimizations, which yield the structures and energies of the reaction intermediates and products. Application of heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology to the formose reaction reproduces the experimentally observed reaction products, major reaction pathways, and autocatalytic cycles.

  13. an intermediate moisture meat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... traditional SM muscle without compromising quality. ... technique is intermediate moisture food processing. ... Traditionally, most tsire suya producers use ..... quality of Chinese purebred and European X Chinese crossbred ...

  14. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  15. Mapping Intermediality in Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Mapping Intermediality in Performance benadert het vraagstuk van intermedialiteit met betrekking tot performance (vooral theater) vanuit vijf verschillende invalshoeken: performativiteit en lichaam; tijd en ruimte; digitale cultuur en posthumanisme; netwerken; pedagogiek en praxis. In deze boeiende

  16. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  17. Bioorthogonal Cycloadditions with Sub-Millisecond Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Yujia; Pulcu, Gökçe Su; Bell, Nicholas A W; Bayley, Hagan

    2018-01-26

    Tetrazine- and sydnone-based click reactions have emerged as important bioconjugation strategies with fast kinetics and N 2 or CO 2 as the only byproduct. Mechanistic studies of these reactions have focused on the initial rate-determining cycloaddition steps. The subsequent N 2 or CO 2 release from the bicyclic intermediates has been approached mainly through computational studies, which have predicted lifetimes of femtoseconds. In the present study, bioorthogonal cycloadditions involving N 2 or CO 2 extrusion have been examined experimentally at the single-molecule level by using a protein nanoreactor. At the resolution of this approach, the reactions appeared to occur in a single step, which places an upper limit on the lifetimes of the intermediates of about 80 μs, which is consistent with the computational work. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Theoretical investigation of the gas-phase reactions of CrO(+) with ethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scupp, Thomas M; Dudley, Timothy J

    2010-01-21

    The potential energy surfaces associated with the reactions of chromium oxide cation (CrO(+)) with ethylene have been characterized using density functional, coupled-cluster, and multireference methods. Our calculations show that the most probable reaction involves the formation of acetaldehyde and Cr(+) via a hydride transfer involving the metal center. Our calculations support previous experimental hypotheses that a four-membered ring intermediate plays an important role in the reactivity of the system. We have also characterized a number of viable reaction pathways that lead to other products, including ethylene oxide. Due to the experimental observation that CrO(+) can activate carbon-carbon bonds, a reaction pathway involving C-C bond cleavage has also been characterized. Since many of the reactions involve a change in the spin state in going from reactants to products, locations of these spin surface crossings are presented and discussed. The applicability of methods based on Hartree-Fock orbitals is also discussed.

  19. Surface Intermediates on Metal Electrodes at High Temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse

    1997-01-01

    The mechanisms widely suggested for the O2-reduc-tion or H2-oxidation SOFC reactions involve inter-mediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In airat moderate temperatures (500øC) Pt in contact with YSZ...

  20. Surface intermediates on metal electrodes at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Jacobsen, Torben; Bay, Lasse

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms widely conceived for the O(2)-reduction or H(2)-oxidation reactions in SOFC's involve intermediate O/H species adsorbed on the electrode surface. The presence of these intermediates is investigated by linear sweep voltammetry. In air at moderate temperatures (500 degrees C) Pt...

  1. Engineering the spatial organization of metabolic pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Line; Maury, Jerome; Bach, Lars Stougaard

    One of the goals of metabolic engineering is to optimize the production of valuable metabolites in cell factories. In this context, modulating the gene expression and activity of enzymes are tools that have been extensively used. Another approach that is gaining interest is the engineering...... of the spatial organization of biosynthetic pathways. Several natural systems for ensuring optimal spatial arrangement of biosynthetic enzymes exist. Sequentially acting enzymes can for example be positioned in close proximity by attachment to cellular structures, up-concentration in membrane enclosed organelles...... or assembly into large complexes. The vision is that by positioning sequentially acting enzymes in close proximity, the cell can accelerate reaction rates and thereby prevent loss of intermediates through diffusion, degradation or competing pathways. The production of valuable metabolites in cell factories...

  2. [Therapy of intermediate uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doycheva, D; Deuter, C; Zierhut, M

    2014-12-01

    Intermediate uveitis is a form of intraocular inflammation in which the vitreous body is the major site of inflammation. Intermediate uveitis is primarily treated medicinally and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy. When recurrence of uveitis or side effects occur during corticosteroid therapy an immunosuppressive treatment is required. Cyclosporine A is the only immunosuppressive agent that is approved for therapy of uveitis in Germany; however, other immunosuppressive drugs have also been shown to be effective and well-tolerated in patients with intermediate uveitis. In severe therapy-refractory cases when conventional immunosuppressive therapy has failed, biologics can be used. In patients with unilateral uveitis or when the systemic therapy is contraindicated because of side effects, an intravitreal steroid treatment can be carried out. In certain cases a vitrectomy may be used.

  3. Excitation functions and yields of proton induced reactions at intermediate energies leading to important diagnostics radioisotopes of 52Fe, 77Br, 82Rb, 97Ru, 111In, 123I, 127Xe, 128Cs, 178Ta and 201Tl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rurarz, E.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes investigations of the excitation functions of the proton induced reactions on 14 targets (Mn, Co, Br, Rb, 99 Tc, 113 Cd, 114 Cd, Cd, I, Cs, Ta, 206,207,208 Pb) leading directly or indirectly to the formation of radionuclides 52 Fe, 77 Br, 82 Rb, 97 Ru, 111 In, 123 I, 127 Xe, 128 Cs, 178 Ta and 201 Tl frequently used in diagnostic procedures of nuclear medicine. The measurements of the excitation functions were made over a wide proton energy range from the reaction threshold up to 100 MeV using the stacked foil (or pellet) technique. Small energy steps were used to allow for accurate determination of the structure of excitation functions. For 97 Ru, 111 In and 127 Xe formation with protons, new reaction channels and targets were used and data concerning this method are published for the first time. The data for 52 Fe, 77 Br, 82 Rb, 123 I, 128 Cs and 201 Tl obtained in the present work for the E p =70-100 MeV region are also published for the first time. The measured excitation functions for the formation of desired (and undesired) radionuclides (altogether 28 excitation functions) are compared with the theoretical ones calculated on the basis of a hybrid model of nuclear reactions in the form of the Overlaid Alice computer code. In order to determine the contribution of the competitive reaction channels to the purity of the produced, desired radionuclide, the excitation functions of the accompanying reactions were also calculated. The 122 calculated excitation functions for the possible contaminant are given in the present work. The comparison of experimental excitation functions with the results of model calculations showed satisfactory agreement, especially if one considers, that no parameter adjustment for individual reaction products was undertaken. From the measured excitation functions the production yields for 28 radionuclides mentioned above have been determined (author). 262 refs, 65 figs, 34 tabs

  4. Mobile communication and intermediality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    communicative affordances of mobile devices in order to understand how people choose between them for different purposes. It is argued that mobile communication makes intermediality especially central, as the choice of medium is detached from the location of stationary media and begins to follow the user across......The article argues the importance of intermediality as a concept for research in mobile communication and media. The constant availability of several, partially overlapping channels for communication (texting, calls, email, Facebook, etc.) requires that we adopt an integrated view of the various...

  5. Money distribution with intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Teles, Caio Augusto Colnago

    2013-01-01

    This pap er analyzes the distribution of money holdings in a commo dity money search-based mo del with intermediation. Intro ducing heterogeneity of costs to the Kiyotaki e Wright ( 1989 ) mo del, Cavalcanti e Puzzello ( 2010) gives rise to a non-degenerated distribution of money. We extend further this mo del intro ducing intermediation in the trading pro cess. We show that the distribution of money matters for savings decisions. This gives rises to a xed p oint problem for the ...

  6. Enhanced performance of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway by manipulation of redox reactions relevant to IspC, IspG, and IspH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia; Yang, Liyang; Wang, Chonglong; Choi, Eui-Sung; Kim, Seon-Won

    2017-04-20

    The 2C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway is a carbon-efficient route for synthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP), the building blocks of isoprenoids. However, practical application of a native or recombinant MEP pathway for the mass production of isoprenoids in Escherichia coli has been unsatisfactory. In this study, the entire recombinant MEP pathway was established with plasmids and used for the production of an isoprenoid, protoilludene. E. coli harboring the recombinant MEP pathway plasmid (ME) and a protoilludene synthesis pathway plasmid (AO) produced 10.4mg/L of protoilludene after 48h of culture. To determine the rate-limiting gene on plasmid ME, each constituent gene of the MEP pathway was additionally overexpressed on the plasmid AO. The additional overexpression of IPP isomerase (IDI) enhanced protoilludene production to 67.4mg/L. Overexpression of the Fpr and FldA protein complex, which could mediate electron transfer from NADPH to Fe-S cluster proteins such as IspG and IspH of the MEP pathway, increased protoilludene production to 318.8mg/L. Given that it is required for IspC as well as IspG/H, the MEP pathway has high demand for NADPH. To increase the supply of NADPH, a NADH kinase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (tPos5p) that converts NADH to NADPH was introduced along with the deletion of a promiscuous NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase (YjgB) that consumes NADPH. This resulted in a protoilludene production of 512.7mg/L. The results indicate that IDI, Fpr-FldA redox proteins, and NADPH regenerators are key engineering points for boosting the metabolic flux toward a recombinant MEP pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Atmospheric fates of Criegee intermediates in the ozonolysis of isoprene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tran B; Tyndall, Geoffrey S; Crounse, John D; Teng, Alexander P; Bates, Kelvin H; Schwantes, Rebecca H; Coggon, Matthew M; Zhang, Li; Feiner, Philip; Milller, David O; Skog, Kate M; Rivera-Rios, Jean C; Dorris, Matthew; Olson, Kevin F; Koss, Abigail; Wild, Robert J; Brown, Steven S; Goldstein, Allen H; de Gouw, Joost A; Brune, William H; Keutsch, Frank N; Seinfeld, John H; Wennberg, Paul O

    2016-04-21

    We use a large laboratory, modeling, and field dataset to investigate the isoprene + O3 reaction, with the goal of better understanding the fates of the C1 and C4 Criegee intermediates in the atmosphere. Although ozonolysis can produce several distinct Criegee intermediates, the C1 stabilized Criegee (CH2OO, 61 ± 9%) is the only one observed to react bimolecularly. We suggest that the C4 Criegees have a low stabilization fraction and propose pathways for their decomposition. Both prompt and non-prompt reactions are important in the production of OH (28% ± 5%) and formaldehyde (81% ± 16%). The yields of unimolecular products (OH, formaldehyde, methacrolein (42 ± 6%) and methyl vinyl ketone (18 ± 6%)) are fairly insensitive to water, i.e., changes in yields in response to water vapor (≤4% absolute) are within the error of the analysis. We propose a comprehensive reaction mechanism that can be incorporated into atmospheric models, which reproduces laboratory data over a wide range of relative humidities. The mechanism proposes that CH2OO + H2O (k(H2O)∼ 1 × 10(-15) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1)) yields 73% hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HMHP), 6% formaldehyde + H2O2, and 21% formic acid + H2O; and CH2OO + (H2O)2 (k(H2O)2∼ 1 × 10(-12) cm(3) molec(-1) s(-1)) yields 40% HMHP, 6% formaldehyde + H2O2, and 54% formic acid + H2O. Competitive rate determinations (kSO2/k(H2O)n=1,2∼ 2.2 (±0.3) × 10(4)) and field observations suggest that water vapor is a sink for greater than 98% of CH2OO in a Southeastern US forest, even during pollution episodes ([SO2] ∼ 10 ppb). The importance of the CH2OO + (H2O)n reaction is demonstrated by high HMHP mixing ratios observed over the forest canopy. We find that CH2OO does not substantially affect the lifetime of SO2 or HCOOH in the Southeast US, e.g., CH2OO + SO2 reaction is a minor contribution (production by stabilized Criegees is likely unimportant in regions dominated by the reactivity of ozone with isoprene. In contrast

  8. Studies on the nature of intermediates in enzyme mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The reaction pathway followed by malate synthase has been studied by the double isotope fractionation method to determine whether the reaction is stepwise or concerted. A primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect ( D V/K) of 1.3 ± 0.1 has been found using [ 2 H 3 ]acetyl-CoA as substrate. The 13 C isotope effect at the aldehydic carbon of glyoxylate has also been measured. For this determination, the malate product was quantitatively transformed into a new sample of malate having the carbon of interest at C-4. This material was decarboxylated to produce the appropriate CO 2 for isotope ratio mass spectrometric analysis. If the essential Zn(II) ion of yeast aldolase interacts with the carbonyl groups of bound substrates, we can expect that these will be more reactive toward reduction by borohydrides than those free in solution. Tritiated sodium borohydride was therefore used to reduce the substrates of yeast aldolase in the presence and absence of enzyme, and the enantiomeric and diastereomeric ratios of the products were analyzed. Experiments were conducted in an effort to distinguish between endocyclic and exocyclic cleavage in the hydrolysis catalyzed by lysozyme. Tritiated sodium borohydride was used in an attempt to trap the putative oxocarbonium intermediate

  9. Sequential reduction–oxidation for photocatalytic degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Kinetics and intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yaoguang; Lou, Xiaoyi; Xiao, Dongxue; Xu, Lei; Wang, Zhaohui; Liu, Jianshe

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Sequential photocatalytic reduction–oxidation degradation of TBBPA was firstly examined. ► Different atmospheres were found to have significant effect on debromination reaction. ► A possible sequential photocatalytic reduction–oxidation pathway was proposed. - Abstract: C-Br bond cleavage is considered as a key step to reduce their toxicities and increase degradation rates for most brominated organic pollutants. Here a sequential reduction/oxidation strategy (i.e. debromination followed by photocatalytic oxidation) for photocatalytic degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), one of the most frequently used brominated flame retardants, was proposed on the basis of kinetic analysis and intermediates identification. The results demonstrated that the rates of debromination and even photodegradation of TBBPA strongly depended on the atmospheres, initial TBBPA concentrations, pH of the reaction solution, hydrogen donors, and electron acceptors. These kinetic data and byproducts identification obtained by GC–MS measurement indicated that reductive debromination reaction by photo-induced electrons dominated under N 2 -saturated condition, while oxidation reaction by photoexcited holes or hydroxyl radicals played a leading role when air was saturated. It also suggested that the reaction might be further optimized for pretreatment of TBBPA-contaminated wastewater by a two-stage reductive debromination/subsequent oxidative decomposition process in the UV-TiO 2 system by changing the reaction atmospheres.

  10. Curation and Computational Design of Bioenergy-Related Metabolic Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karp, Peter D. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-09-12

    Pathway Tools is a systems-biology software package written by SRI International (SRI) that produces Pathway/Genome Databases (PGDBs) for organisms with a sequenced genome. Pathway Tools also provides a wide range of capabilities for analyzing predicted metabolic networks and user-generated omics data. More than 5,000 academic, industrial, and government groups have licensed Pathway Tools. This user community includes researchers at all three DOE bioenergy centers, as well as academic and industrial metabolic engineering (ME) groups. An integral part of the Pathway Tools software is MetaCyc, a large, multiorganism database of metabolic pathways and enzymes that SRI and its academic collaborators manually curate. This project included two main goals: I. Enhance the MetaCyc content of bioenergy-related enzymes and pathways. II. Develop computational tools for engineering metabolic pathways that satisfy specified design goals, in particular for bioenergy-related pathways. In part I, SRI proposed to significantly expand the coverage of bioenergy-related metabolic information in MetaCyc, followed by the generation of organism-specific PGDBs for all energy-relevant organisms sequenced at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Part I objectives included: 1: Expand the content of MetaCyc to include bioenergy-related enzymes and pathways. 2: Enhance the Pathway Tools software to enable display of complex polymer degradation processes. 3: Create new PGDBs for the energy-related organisms sequenced by JGI, update existing PGDBs with new MetaCyc content, and make these data available to JBEI via the BioCyc website. In part II, SRI proposed to develop an efficient computational tool for the engineering of metabolic pathways. Part II objectives included: 4: Develop computational tools for generating metabolic pathways that satisfy specified design goals, enabling users to specify parameters such as starting and ending compounds, and preferred or disallowed intermediate compounds

  11. Visualization of the Diffusion Pathway of Protons in (NH4)2Si0.5Ti0.5P4O13 as an Electrolyte for Intermediate-Temperature Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunwen; Chen, Lanli; Shi, Siqi; Reeb, Berthold; López, Carlos Alberto; Alonso, José Antonio; Stimming, Ulrich

    2018-01-16

    We demonstrate that (NH 4 ) 2 Si 0.5 Ti 0.5 P 4 O 13 is an excellent proton conductor. The crystallographic information concerning the hydrogen positions is unraveled from neutron-powder-diffraction (NPD) data for the first time. This study shows that all the hydrogen atoms are connected though H bonds, establishing a two-dimensional path between the [(Si 0.5 Ti 0.5 )P 4 O 13 2- ] n layers for proton diffusion across the crystal structure by breaking and reconstructing intermediate H-O═P bonds. This transient species probably reduces the potential energy of the H jump from an ammonium unit to the next neighboring NH 4 + unit. Both theoretical and experimental results support an interstitial-proton-conduction mechanism. The proton conductivities of (NH 4 ) 2 Si 0.5 Ti 0.5 P 4 O 13 reach 0.0061 and 0.024 S cm -1 in humid air at 125 and 250 °C, respectively. This finding demonstrates that (NH 4 ) 2 Si 0.5 Ti 0.5 P 4 O 13 is a promising electrolyte material operating at 150-250 °C. This work opens up a new avenue for designing and fabricating high-performance inorganic electrolytes.

  12. Carbon monosulfide: a useful synthetic intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, M.P.

    1986-01-01

    The physical properties of carbon monosulfide, CS, are well documented. The molecule has been observed in interstellar space and is found to be a common intermediate in the thermal decomposition of carbon disulfide and other sulfur compounds. Interestingly enough, the chemistry of carbon monosulfide, a molecule that is isovalent with carbon monoxide, has received little attention. The explosive nature of the carbon monosulfide monomer, which hindered previous workers, was overcome by the development of special handling techniques. The ability to produce carbon monosulfide in gram quantities had lead to synthesis of novel compounds and to a more direct synthetic route for certain known compounds. Specifically, the following general reaction demonstrates the capabilities of carbon monosulfide on the synthetic scale. CS + RXY → RXC(S)Y;(X = N,S), (Y = H, Cl). Note: The initial product formed in the reaction can be an unstable intermediate

  13. Premeditation and Sensation Seeking Moderate the Reasoned Action and Social Reaction Pathways in the Prototype/Willingness Model of Alcohol Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Matthew Gregory; King, Kevin M

    2016-05-11

    Drinking can occur because of expectations to drink (reasoned pathway) or because of willingness to drink under certain circumstances (reactive pathway). These pathways are thought to be influenced by different cognitions such as alcohol-related attitudes, norms, or drinking prototypes (Gerrard et al., 2008). Impulsive traits reflect individual differences in the influence of reasoned or reactive factors, however little research has investigated whether impulsivity moderates the effects of cognitive factors predicting alcohol use. We tested whether differences in three impulsivity traits (premeditation, sensation seeking and negative urgency) moderated associations of reasoned (risk/disapproval attitudes and social norms) and reactive (prototype) pathway variables on expectation/willingness to drink and recent alcohol use. We collected data from n = 409 college students; the sample was 67% female, 43% Asian American, with Mdnage = 19. Hypotheses were tested using multiple regression. Premeditation and sensation seeking moderated reasoned variable effects on expectation and drinking. Among those low on premeditation, risk attitudes were most associated with drinking expectation, with alcohol prototypes most related to recent drinking. These effects declined at higher premeditation levels. Among those high on sensation seeking, risk attitudes were most associated with expectation and drinking, declining at lower sensation seeking levels. There was little evidence of moderation predicting drinking willingness. Findings imply personality differences may explain association strength between reasoned but not reactive risk behavior pathways with alcohol outcomes. They have ramifications for personalized prevention programs to reduce drinking through cognition change, as alcohol-related cognition influence may differ depending on personality characteristics.

  14. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.A.; Ashenfelter, J.; Axani, S.N.; Babu, K.; Backhouse, C.; Band, H.R.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barros, N.; Bernstein, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bishai, M.; Blucher, E.; Bouffard, J.; Bowden, N.; Brice, S.; Bryan, C.; Camilleri, L.; Cao, J.; Carlson, J.; Carr, R.E.; Chatterjee, A.; Chen, M.; Chen, S.; Chiu, M.; Church, E.D.; Collar, J.I.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.R.; Cooper, R.L.; Cowen, D.; Davoudiasl, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Dean, D.J.; Deichert, G.; Descamps, F.; DeYoung, T.; Diwan, M.V.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolinski, M.J.; Dolph, J.; Donnelly, B.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dytman, S.; Efremenko, Y.; Everett, L.L.; Fava, A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fleming, B.; Friedland, A.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gaisser, T.K.; Galeazzi, M.; Galehouse, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garvey, G.T.; Gautam, S.; Gilje, K.E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goodman, M.C.; Gordon, H.; Gramellini, E.; Green, M.P.; Guglielmi, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Heeger, K.M.; Herman, M.; Hill, R.; Holin, A.; Huber, P.; Jaffe, D.E.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kaufman, L.J.; Kayser, B.; Kettell, S.H.; Kirby, B.J.; Klein, J.R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kriske, R.M.; Lane, C.E.; Langford, T.J.; Lankford, A.; Lau, K.; Learned, J.G.; Ling, J.; Link, J.M.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lokajicek, M.; Louis, W.C.; Luk, K.; Lykken, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D.M.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCluskey, E.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Mills, G.; Mocioiu, I.; Monreal, B.; Mooney, M.R.; Morfin, J.G.; Mumm, P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nelson, J.K.; Nessi, M.; Norcini, D.; Nova, F.; Nygren, D.R.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Palamara, O.; Parsa, Z.; Patterson, R.; Paul, P.; Pocar, A.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Rameika, R.; Ranucci, G.; Ray, H.; Reyna, D.; Rich, G.C.; Rodrigues, P.; Romero, E.Romero; Rosero, R.; Rountree, S.D.; Rybolt, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Santucci, G.; Schmitz, D.; Scholberg, K.; Seckel, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Smy, M.B.; Soderberg, M.; Sonzogni, A.; Sousa, A.B.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.M.; Stewart, J.; Strait, J.B.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Szelc, A.M.; Tayloe, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Toups, M.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Van de Water, R.G.; Vogelaar, R.B.; Weber, M.; Weng, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; White, B.R.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.W.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Wilson, P.; Winklehner, D.; Winn, D.R.; Worcester, E.; Yang, L.; Yeh, M.; Yokley, Z.W.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  15. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  16. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Alonso, J. R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ankowski, A. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Asaadi, J. A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Ashenfelter, J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Axani, S. N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Babu, K [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Backhouse, C. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Band, H. R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Barbeau, P. S. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Barros, N. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Betancourt, M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bishai, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blucher, E. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Bouffard, J. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brice, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bryan, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Camilleri, L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cao, J. [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Carlson, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carr, R. E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Chatterjee, A. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Chen, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chen, S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Chiu, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Church, E. D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Collar, J. I. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Collin, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Convery, M. R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cooper, R. L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Cowen, D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Davoudiasl, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gouvea, A. D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dean, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Descamps, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeYoung, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Diwan, M. V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Djurcic, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dolinski, M. J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolph, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Donnelly, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Dwyer, D. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dytman, S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Efremenko, Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Everett, L. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fava, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Fleming, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Friedland, A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fujikawa, B. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gaisser, T. K. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Galeazzi, M. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States); Galehouse, DC [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garvey, G. T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautam, S. [Tribhuvan Univ., Kirtipur (Nepal); Gilje, K. E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gonzalez-Garcia, M. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Goodman, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gordon, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gramellini, E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Green, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guglielmi, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Hackenburg, R. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hackenburg, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Halzen, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Han, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harris, D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Heeger, K. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Herman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Holin, A. [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Huber, P. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Jaffe, D. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Johnson, R. A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Joshi, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karagiorgi, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kaufman, L. J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Kayser, B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kettell, S. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kirby, B. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Klein, J. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Kolomensky, Y. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kriske, R. M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Lane, C. E. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Langford, T. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Lankford, A. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lau, K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ling, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Link, J. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Lissauer, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littenberg, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littlejohn, B. R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lockwitz, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lokajicek, M. [Inst. of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Louis, W. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luk, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lykken, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Marciano, W. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maricic, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Caicedo, D. A. M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mauger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mavrokoridis, K. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); McCluskey, E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); McKeen, D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); McKeown, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Mills, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocioiu, I. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Monreal, B. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mooney, M. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morfin, J. G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mumm, P. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Napolitano, J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nelson, J. K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Nessi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Norcini, D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Nova, F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Nygren, D. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Gann, GDO [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Palamara, O. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Parsa, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Patterson, R. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Paul, P. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Pocar, A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Qian, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Rameika, R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ranucci, G. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Milano (Italy); Ray, H. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Reyna, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rich, G. C. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Rodrigues, P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Romero, E. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rosero, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rountree, S. D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Rybolt, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sanchez, M. C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Santucci, G. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Schmitz, D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Scholberg, K. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Seckel, D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Shaevitz, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Shrock, R. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Smy, M. B. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Soderberg, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sonzogni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sousa, A. B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); John, J. M. S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Stewart, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Strait, J. B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Sullivan, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Svoboda, R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Szelc, A. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Tayloe, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Thomson, M. A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Toups, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Vacheret, A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Vagins, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Water, R. G. V. D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogelaar, R. B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Weber, M. [Bern (Switzerland); Weng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wetstein, M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); White, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitehead, L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Whittington, D. W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Wilking, M. J. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Wilson, R. J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Wilson, P. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Winklehner, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Winn, D. R. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States); Worcester, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Yeh, M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yokley, Z. W. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yoo, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yu, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Zhang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-03

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  17. The evolutionary pathway from anoxygenic to oxygenic photosynthesis examined by comparison of the properties of photosystem II and bacterial reaction centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J P; Williams, J C

    2011-01-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, such as purple bacteria, cyanobacteria, and plants, light is captured and converted into energy to create energy-rich compounds. The primary process of energy conversion involves the transfer of electrons from an excited donor molecule to a series of electron acceptors in pigment-protein complexes. Two of these complexes, the bacterial reaction center and photosystem II, are evolutionarily related and structurally similar. However, only photosystem II is capable of performing the unique reaction of water oxidation. An understanding of the evolutionary process that lead to the development of oxygenic photosynthesis can be found by comparison of these two complexes. In this review, we summarize how insight is being gained by examination of the differences in critical functional properties of these complexes and by experimental efforts to alter pigment-protein interactions of the bacterial reaction center in order to enable it to perform reactions, such as amino acid and metal oxidation, observable in photosystem II.

  18. A New Pathway to 3-Hetaryl-2-oxo-2H-chromenes: On the Proposed Mechanisms for the Reaction of 3-Carbamoyl-2-iminochromenes with Dinucleophiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaroslav V. Bilokin

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The present account summarizes the author's studies to elucidate the mechanisms of the recently reported rearrangements resulting from inter- and/or intramolecular reactions of 2-imino-2H-chromene-3-carboxamides with different dinucleophiles.

  19. Infrared Spectra and Structures of SiH{sub 2}-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2} and CH{sub 2}=CH-SiH{sub 3} Intermediates Prepared in Reactions of Laser-ablated Silicon Atoms with Ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Han-Gook [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Andrews, Lester [University of Virginia, Charlottesville (United States)

    2016-03-15

    SiH{sub 2}-(CH{sub 2}){sub 2} and CH{sub 2}=CH-SiH{sub 3} were observed in the matrix IR spectra following reactions of laser-ablated Si atoms with ethane on the basis of correlation with computed frequencies. Evidently photon energy is required for the formation of the cyclic Si compound. These Si complexes are similar to the primary products in the previous studies of group 4 metals, in line with the previous results that s{sup 2}p{sup 2} and s{sup 2}d{sup 2} electronic configurations yield similar products. The relatively long C–C bond in the cyclic Si product reflects the structural strain, and the short C-Si and C-C bonds of CH{sub 3}CH=SiH{sub 2} and CH{sub 2}=CH-SiH{sub 3} show that they are true double bonds in line with the natural bond orders. Reactions of transition-metal atoms with small alkanes and halomethanes have been studied in a series of recent investigations. High oxidation-state products (methylidenes and methylidynes) along with insertion complexes were identified in the matrix spectra. It is interesting whether or not Si, a group 14 metalloid, undergoes similar reactions with larger hydrocarbons to provide higher oxidation-state compounds.

  20. One-Pot Conversion of Carbohydrates into Furan Derivatives via Furfural and 5-Hydroxylmethylfurfural as Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Zehui

    2016-08-23

    Recently, there