WorldWideScience

Sample records for intermediate-level l2 learners

  1. Evaluating Bilingual and Monolingual Dictionaries for L2 Learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Alan

    1997-01-01

    A discussion of dictionaries and their use for second language (L2) learning suggests that lack of computerized modern language corpora can adversely affect bilingual dictionaries, commonly used by L2 learners, and shows how use of such corpora has benefitted two contemporary monolingual L2 learner dictionaries (1995 editions of the Longman…

  2. The Impact of Resilience on L2 Learners' Motivated Behaviour and Proficiency in L2 Learning

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    Kim, Tae-Young; Kim, Yoon-Kyoung

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study focused on the factors that constitute second language (L2) learners' resilience, and how these factors are related to L2 learning by investigating what relation resilience may have to motivated behaviour and proficiency in English learning. A total of 1620 secondary school learners of English participated in a questionnaire…

  3. The L2 Motivational Self System and L2 Achievement: A Study of Saudi EFL Learners

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    Moskovsky, Christo; Assulaimani, Turki; Racheva, Silvia; Harkins, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The research reported in this article explores the relationship between Dörnyei's (2005, 2009) Second Language Motivational Self System (L2MSS) and the L2 proficiency level of Saudi learners of English as a foreign language (EFL). Male and female participants (N = 360) responded to a questionnaire relating to the main components of L2MSS, the…

  4. Gaming as Extramural English L2 Learning and L2 Proficiency among Young Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylven, Liss Kerstin; Sundqvist, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Today, playing digital games is an important part of many young people's everyday lives. Claims have been made that certain games, in particular massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) provide L2 English learners with a linguistically rich and cognitively challenging virtual environment that may be conducive to L2 learning, as…

  5. Selective Listening in L2 Learners of French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Suzanne; Santos, Denise

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the issue raised in 2008 by Gillian Brown in her article "Selective listening" regarding whether nouns are "privileged" in memory over verbs during listening tasks, and whether attention to nouns, at least in the early stages of L2 learning, is a desirable strategy to be taught to learners, as Brown…

  6. Facebook Activities and the Investment of L2 Learners

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    Shafie, Latisha Asmaak; Yaacob, Aizan; Singh, Paramjit Kaur Karpal

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the investment of L2 learners in the English language on Facebook that they portrayed through their Facebook activities. It studied four informants consisted of diploma students in a Malaysian university. The study consisted of 14 weeks of online observation and semi-structured interviews. Data were collected from online…

  7. L2 learner age from a contextualised perspective

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    Jelena Mihaljeviđ Djigunoviđ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this qualitative study the author focuses on age effects on young learners’ L2 development by comparing the L2 learning processes of six young learners in an instructed setting: three who had started learning English as L2 at age 6/7 and three who had started at age 9/10. Both earlier and later young beginners were followed for three years (during their second, third and fourth year of learning English. The participants’ L2 development was measured through their oral output elicited by a two-part speaking task administered each year. Results of the analyses are interpreted taking into account each learners’ individual characteristics (learning ability, attitudes and motivation, self-concept and the characteristics of the context in which they were learning their L2 (attitudes of school staff and parents to early L2 learning, home support, in-class and out-of-class exposure to L2, socio-economic status. The findings show that earlier and later young beginners follow different trajectories in their L2 learning, which reflects different interactions which age enters into with the other variables.

  8. L1-L2 Transfer in the Narrative Styles of Chinese EFL Learners' Written Personal Narratives

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    Su, I-Ru; Chou, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Most of the research on second language (L2) narratives has focused on whether or how L2 learners carry their L1 narrative styles into L2 narration; few studies have explored whether L2 learners' knowledge of the L2 also in turn affects their L1 narrative performance. The present study attempted to probe the issue of cultural transfer in narrative…

  9. Blogging Identity: How L2 Learners Express Themselves

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    Kiyomi FUJII

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses language learning and identity, particularly pertaining to intermediate-advanced-level Japanese-language learners, focusing on their target language and identity expression through their interactions with peers and Japanese college students. When learners of Japanese express their identities while interacting with others in their target language, they feel a gap between the self-image they want to present, and the image they are capable of presenting in Japanese (Siegal, 1994, 1995, 1996. Along with adjusting their L1 and L2 usage depending on their interlocutor (Kurata 2007, learners also use different sentence-ending styles depending on the role they want to assume (Cook 2008. By conducting a case study, the present inquiry attempts to address how learners of Japanese express their identities through blog conversations, focusing on their language choice and expressions. Results suggest that participants use the formal endings for self-presentation and projection of their student and classmate identity. However, when expressing emotion some students preferred informal endings, or sentence-final particles.

  10. Investigating the Role of Multiple Intelligences in Determining Vocabulary Learning Strategies for L2 Learners

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    Sistani, Mahsa; Hashemian, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    This study, first, examined whether there was any relationship between Iranian L2 learners' vocabulary learning strategies (VLSs), on the one hand, and their multiple intelligences (MI) types, on the other hand. In so doing, it explored the extent to which MI would predict L2 learners' VLSs. To these ends, 40 L2 learners from Isfahan University of…

  11. Learner-Generated Noticing Behavior by Novice Learners: Tracing the Effects of Learners' L1 on Their Emerging L2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Sung

    2013-01-01

    This study examines novice learners' self-generated input noticing approaches and strategies. It is motivated by previous research on input enhancement which yielded insights that learners are naturally prone to notice certain aspects of L2 input on their own without any external means to channel their attention. Two L1 groups (Japanese and…

  12. Event-related brain potentials and second language learning: syntactic processing in late L2 learners at different L2 proficiency levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hell, J.G. van; Tokowicz, N.

    2010-01-01

    There are several major questions in the literature on late second language (L2) learning and processing. Some of these questions include: Can late L2 learners process an L2 in a native-like way? What is the nature of the differences in L2 processing among L2 learners at different levels of L2

  13. MANIPULATING L2 LEARNERS' ONLINE DICTIONARY USE AND ITS EFFECT ON L2 WORD RETENTION

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    Elke Peters

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effect of two enhancement techniques on L2 learners' look-up behaviour during a reading task and word retention afterwards amongst Flemish learners of German: a Vocabulary Test Announcement and Task-induced Word Relevance. Eighty-four participants were recruited for this study. They were randomly assigned to one of two groups: 1 not forewarned of an upcoming vocabulary test (incidental condition or 2 forewarned of a vocabulary test (intentional condition. Task-induced Word Relevance was operationalized by a reading comprehension task. The relevance factor comprised two levels: plus-relevant and minus-relevant target words. Plus-relevant words needed to be looked up and used receptively in order to answer the comprehension questions. In other words, the reading comprehension task could not be accomplished without knowing the meaning of the plus-relevant words. The minus-relevant target words, on the other hand, were not linked to the reading comprehension questions. Our findings show a significant effect of Test Announcement and Word Relevance on whether a target word is looked up. In addition, Word Relevance also affects the frequency of clicks on target words. Word retention is only influenced by Task-induced Word Relevance. The effect of Word Relevance is durable.

  14. Phonological Memory and the Acquisition of Grammar in Child L2 Learners

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    Verhagen, Josje; Leseman, Paul; Messer, Marielle

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies show that second language (L2) learners with large phonological memory spans outperform learners with smaller memory spans on tests of L2 grammar. The current study investigated the relationship between phonological memory and L2 grammar in more detail than has been done earlier. Specifically, we asked how phonological memory…

  15. Using Learner Corpora for L2 Lexicography: Information on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, we describe an on-going project of the corpus of EFL (English as a Foreign Language) learners in Japan and its application for pedagogical dictionary compilation. We especially focus on the learners' errors in verb collocation patterns and describe how the leamer's dictionary can benefit from the learners' ...

  16. Grapho-Morphological Awareness in Spanish L2 Reading: How Do Learners Use This Metalinguistic Skill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Nausica Marcos

    2012-01-01

    This paper contributes to the literature on the transferability of grapho-morphological awareness (GMA) for second language (L2) learners by analysing L2 learners' knowledge of morphology in reading. GMA helps readers to identify grammatical categories, infer meanings of unfamiliar words, and access stored lexical information. Previous research…

  17. Exploring Learner Factors in Second Language (L2) Incidental Vocabulary Acquisition through Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Aiping; Guo, Ying; Biales, Carrie; Olszewski, Arnold

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the predictive role of several learner factors in second language (L2) incidental vocabulary acquisition through reading: L2 proficiency, motivation, anxiety, and mastery of strategies. Participants were 129 English learners in a comprehensive university in China. Participants read two English texts and were given an…

  18. The Development of Individual Learners in an L2 Listening Strategies Course

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    Yeldham, Michael; Gruba, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the idiosyncratic development of second language (L2) learners in a listening strategies course. The progress of four Taiwanese EFL learners was examined longitudinally through a variety of quantitative and qualitative techniques as the learners participated in a course combining direct instruction of strategies with their…

  19. Learner Variables Important for Success in L2 Listening Comprehension in French Immersion Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergrift, Larry; Baker, Susan C.

    2018-01-01

    Listening comprehension, which is relatively straightforward for native language (L1) speakers, is often frustrating for second language (L2) learners. Listening comprehension is important to L2 acquisition, but little is known about the variables that influence the development of L2 listening skills. The goal of this study was to determine which…

  20. Seeking out Challenges to Develop L2 Self-Confidence: A Language Learner's Journey to Proficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwads, Emily; Roger, Peter Stewart

    2015-01-01

    As one constituent of second language (L2) motivation, L2 "self-­confidence" has been shown to be a significant predictor of language proficiency. More recently, L2 self-­confidence has been studied as part of the "willingness to communicate" (WTC) construct. Less is known, however, about the processes by which learners develop…

  1. The Impact of Word-Recognition Practice on the Development of the Listening Comprehension of Intermediate-Level EFL Learners

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    Hossein Navidinia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at examining the effect of word-recognition practice on EFL students’ listening comprehension. The participants consisted of 30 intermediate EFL learners studying in a language institute in Birjand City, Iran. They were assigned randomly to two equal groups, control and experimental. Before starting the experiment, the listening section of IELTS was given to all of the students as the pretest. Then, during the experiment, the experimental group was asked to transcribe the listening sections of their course book while in the control group, the students did not transcribe. After 25 sessions (2 hours each of instruction, another test of listening (IELTS proficiency test was given to both groups as the post-test. The results of the two tests were then analyzed and compared using one way ANCOVA test. The results indicated that the experimental group outperformed the control group (p<0.05. Therefore, it was concluded that word-recognition practice is an effective way for the improvement of EFL learners’ listening comprehension. The overall results of the study are discussed and the implications for further research and practitioners are made.

  2. Video Chat vs. Face-to-Face Recasts, Learners' Interpretations and L2 Development: A Case of Persian EFL Learners

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    Rassaei, Ehsan

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two modes of corrective feedback, namely, face-to-face recasts and computer-mediated recasts during video-conferencing on Iranian English as a foreign language (EFL) learners' second language (L2) development. Moreover, the accuracy of the learners' interpretations of recasts in the two modalities was…

  3. Learner Characteristics, Learner Achievement and Time Investment in Online Courses for Dutch L2 in Adult Education

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    De Paepe, Liesbeth; Zhu, Chang; Depryck, Koen

    2018-01-01

    For the growing group of adult migrants, flexible solutions for second language (L2) acquisition are increasingly important, while concerns about the efficacy of online language learning abound. This study on the L2 situation in Flanders has 4 key aims: analyzing adult learner profiles in fully online Dutch beginners' courses; comparing learner…

  4. L2 Learners' Recognition of Unfamiliar Idioms Composed of Familiar Words

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    Kim, Choonkyong

    2016-01-01

    Most second language (L2) learners are aware of the importance of vocabulary, and this awareness usually directs their attention to learning new words. By contrast, learners do not often recognise unfamiliar idioms if all the compositional parts look familiar to them such as "turn the corner" or "carry the day." College-level…

  5. Exploring Collaboratively Written L2 Texts among First-Year Learners of German in Google Docs

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    Abrams, Zsuzsanna

    2016-01-01

    Grounded in research on collaborative writing and computer-mediated writing the present study examines the computer-mediated collaborative writing process among first-year learners of German as a second language (L2) at a US university. The data come from 28 first-year learners of German at a US university, who wrote hypothesized endings to a…

  6. The Effect of Focus on Form and Task Complexity on L2 Learners' Oral Task Performance

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    Salimi, Asghar

    2015-01-01

    Second Language learners' oral task performance has been one of interesting and research generating areas of investigations in the field of second language acquisition specially, task-based language teaching and learning. The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of focus on form and task complexity on L2 learners' oral…

  7. Toward a Tripartite Model of L2 Reading Strategy Use, Motivations, and Learner Beliefs

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    Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Hiromori, Tomohito; Nakayama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The present study proposes a tripartite model of L2 reading strategy use, reading motivations, and general learner beliefs by examining the relationships among them in an L2 context. Reading strategy instruction was performed for 360 first-year university students enrolled in a reading-based course, in expectation of affecting their motivations…

  8. Cognitive Factors Contributing to Chinese EFL Learners' L2 Writing Performance in Timed Essay Writing

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    Lu, Yanbin

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated cognitive factors that might influence Chinese EFL learners' argumentative essay writing in English. The factors that were explored included English (L2) language proficiency, Chinese (L1) writing ability, genre knowledge, use of writing strategies, and working memory capacity in L1 and L2. Data were collected from 136…

  9. Word Boundaries in L2 Speech: Evidence from Polish Learners of English

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    Schwartz, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Acoustic and perceptual studies investgate B2-level Polish learners' acquisition of second language (L2) English word-boundaries involving word-initial vowels. In production, participants were less likely to produce glottalization of phrase-medial initial vowels in L2 English than in first language (L1) Polish. Perception studies employing word…

  10. L2 Acquisition of Prosodic Properties of Speech Rhythm: Evidence from L1 Mandarin and German Learners of English

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    Li, Aike; Post, Brechtje

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the development of speech rhythm in second language (L2) learners of typologically different first languages (L1s) at different levels of proficiency. An empirical investigation of durational variation in L2 English productions by L1 Mandarin learners and L1 German learners compared to native control values in English and the…

  11. The expression of Path in L2 Danish by German and Turkish learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Moiken

    2014-01-01

    Do language learners think in their first language (L1) when using their second language (L2)? This study explores the nature of crosslinguistic influence by investigating how German and Turkish learners of Danish express motion, paying special attention to the semantics of Path. We examined three...... aspects: overall Path frequency, Path complexity, and the subcomponents of Path. The presence of L1 influence in each aspect reflects how the interplay between form and meaning is carried over as a whole to the L2. In particular, we show how the selection of a specific Path meaning for expression in the L......2 has its root in the structural and semantic properties of the L1. This raises important questions regarding how form and meaning are organized in the learner's mind....

  12. Lexical knowledge of Serbian L1 English L2 learners: Reception vs. production

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    Danilović-Jeremić Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of lexical knowledge in a second/foreign language is often investigated by means of vocabulary size tests which assess two aspects of the learners' competence: reception and production. Estimates of these two dimensions, as well as the (potential gap between them, have important pedagogical implications in that they indicate the degree to which the learners can comprehend or use the language autonomously. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to explore the vocabulary size of three generations of B2-level L2 learners (CEFR, first-year students majoring in English at the Faculty of Philology and Arts in Kragujevac, Serbia, by means of Vocabulary Levels Tests (Laufer & Nation, 1999; Nation, 1990. The results of the statistical analyses show that the receptive vocabulary of Serbian L2 learners is much more developed than their productive vocabulary, and that the gap between lexical production and reception changes depending on the frequency of the lexemes and the proficiency level of L2 learners. The findings imply that, at the primary and secondary level of education, more attention should be paid to the development of productive lexical knowledge which is crucial not only for success in English degree courses but communication in English in general.

  13. Questioning English Standards: Learner Attitudes and L2 Choices in Norway

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    Rindal, Ulrikke

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates attitudes towards varieties of English among Norwegian adolescent learners and assesses the role of social evaluation for second language (L2) pronunciation choices by combining a verbal guise test with speaker commentary and reports of language choices. The results suggest that while American English is the most accessible…

  14. Spoken Language Activation Alters Subsequent Sign Language Activation in L2 Learners of American Sign Language

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    Williams, Joshua T.; Newman, Sharlene D.

    2017-01-01

    A large body of literature has characterized unimodal monolingual and bilingual lexicons and how neighborhood density affects lexical access; however there have been relatively fewer studies that generalize these findings to bimodal (M2) second language (L2) learners of sign languages. The goal of the current study was to investigate parallel…

  15. Negotiating Multiple Audiences of L2 Learners on Facebook: Navigating Parallel Realities

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    Shafie, Latisha Asmaak; Yaacob, Aizan; Singh, Paramjit Kaur A/P Karpal

    2016-01-01

    As social network sites have become popular with university students, it is easier to understand how students employ social network sites seamlessly in their academic and personal lives. L2 learners often employ Facebook to improve their English language proficiency by communicating with their native and non-native English speakers. Facebook is…

  16. Automatic detection of frequent pronunciation errors made by L2-learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Truong, K.P.; Neri, A.; Wet, F. de; Cucchiarini, C.; Strik, H.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present an acoustic-phonetic approach to automatic pronunciation error detection. Classifiers using techniques such as Linear Discriminant Analysis and Decision Trees were developed for three sounds that are frequently pronounced incorrectly by L2-learners of Dutch: /a/, /y/ and

  17. Measuring Group Work Dynamics and Its Relation with L2 Learners' Task Motivation and Language Production

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    Poupore, Glen

    2016-01-01

    While learners of a second language (L2) are increasingly interacting in small groups as part of a communicative methodological paradigm, very few studies have investigated the social dynamics that occur in such groups. The aim of this study is to introduce a group work dynamic measuring instrument and to investigate the relationship between group…

  18. Oral Computer-Mediated Interaction Between L2 Learners: It’s About Time!

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    Yanguas, Íñigo

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This study explores task-based, synchronous oral computer-mediated communication (CMC among intermediate-level learners of Spanish. In particular, this paper examines (a how learners in video and audio CMC groups negotiate for meaning during task-based interaction, (b possible differences between both oral CMC modes and traditional face-to-face (FTF communication, and (c how this oral computer mediated negotiation compares to that found in the text-based CMC literature. Fifteen learner-to-learner dyads were randomly assigned to an audio group, a video group, and a FTF control group to complete a jigsaw task that was seeded with 16 unknown lexical items. Experimental groups used Skype, free online communication software, to carry out the task. The transcripts of the conversations reveal that oral CMC groups do indeed negotiate for meaning in this multimedia context when non-understanding occurs between speakers. In addition, results showed differences in the way audio and video groups carry out these negotiations, which were mainly due to the lack of visual contact in the audio group. No differences were found between video and FTF groups. Furthermore, oral CMC turn-taking patterns were shown to be very similar to FTF patterns but opposite to those found in written synchronous CMC. Oral CMC interaction patterns are shown to be more versatile.

  19. The Effects of Planned Instruction on Iranian L2 Learners' Interlanguage Pragmatic Development

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    Maryam Esmaeili

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The most compelling evidence that instruction in L2pragmatics is necessary comes from learners whoselanguage proficiency is advanced but their communicative actsfrequently contain pragmatic errors. The current studyevaluated the impact of explicit instruction on EFL learner'sawareness and production of three speech acts of request,apology, and complaint. It also probed whether learners’language proficiency plays any role in incorporatingpragmatic instruction into the L2 classroom. The instructionlasted for about 12 weeks. Achievement in L2 pragmaticswas assessed based on a pretest-posttest plan usingMultiple-Choice Discourse Comprehension Test (MDCTand Written Discourse Completion Test (WDCT. Thesignificant gains made by the experimental groups receivinginstruction support the claim recently made by instructionalpragmatics that explicit instruction does facilitate thedevelopment of pragmatically appropriate use of language.Yet, learners’ level of language proficiency had no significantrole in the incorporation of the instruction. Furthertheoretical issues are also discussed.

  20. Reassembling Formal Features in Articles by L1 Persian Learners of L2 English

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    Marjansadat Momenzadeh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable debate over what the sources of morphological variation in second language acquisition are. From among various hypotheses put forth on the topic, the feature reassembly hypothesis (Lardiere, 2005 assumes that it is the reconfiguration of features in the L2 which causes variation between the performance of natives and non-natives. Acknowledged as one of the most difficult elements of English grammar to be acquired by learners, the article system was the focus of the present study which aimed at attending to the acquisition of that system by Persian learners. This descriptive piece of research focused on how the article system functions in English and Persian, the similarities found across the two languages and the possible sources of difficulty for Persian learners in using English articles as related to their L1. The participants included Persian learners at three levels of grammatical knowledge. A group of English native speakers also took part in the study. A grammaticality judgment test and a translation test were conducted to collect data. Comparisons were made among the four groups, using ANOVAs. Based on the results, it is argued that the observed pattern of article use among Persian speaking learners can be best accounted for by the feature reassembly hypothesis.

  1. How new L2 words (don't) become memories : Lexicalization in advanced L1 Dutch learners of L2 English as part of a longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, Merel

    It is an undisputed fact that learning – and remembering – new words is key in successful second language acquisition. And yet researching how vocabulary acquisition takes place is one of the most difficult endeavors in second language acquisition. We can test how many L2 words a learner knows, but

  2. Working Memory Effects on L1 and L2 Processing of Ambiguous Relative Clauses by Korean L2 Learners of English

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    Kim, Ji Hyon; Christianson, Kiel

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we report the results of two self-paced reading experiments that investigated working memory capacity effects on the processing of globally ambiguous relative clauses by advanced Korean second language (L2) learners of English. Consistent with previous monolingual literature on the processing of temporary ambiguity, we found that…

  3. L2 Learners' Assessments of Accentedness, Fluency, and Comprehensibility of Native and Nonnative German Speech

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    O'Brien, Mary Grantham

    2014-01-01

    In early stages of classroom language learning, many adult second language (L2) learners communicate primarily with one another, yet we know little about which speech stream characteristics learners tune into or the extent to which they understand this lingua franca communication. In the current study, 25 native English speakers learning German as…

  4. The Effect of Dynamic Assessment in Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication on Iranian EFL Learners' Listening Comprehension Ability at Upper-Intermediate Level

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    Heidar, Davood Mashhadi; Afghari, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present paper concentrates on a web-based inquiry in the synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) via Web 2.0 technologies of Talk and Write and Skype. It investigates EFL learners' socio-cognitive progress through dynamic assessment (DA), which follows Vygotsky's inclination for supportive interchange in the zone of proximal…

  5. Exploring the Effect of Teaching Test-Taking Strategies on Intermediate Level Learners on Reading Section of Ielts; Learners’ Attitude in Focus

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    Hooshang Khoshsima

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Language proficiency tests have become common instruments to judge people based on their performance. Thus, the scores on language proficiency tests, such as the International English Language Testing System (IELTS or Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL, play a crucial role in the test-takers’ lives. Because of increasing demands on the part of students to get a good score on these tests, test preparatory courses have emerged. These preparatory courses, characteristically short and limited in terms of time, equip IELTS candidates with the skills required for passing the test, called test-taking strategies. The present study explored the effect of strategy teaching- namely wash-back effect on reading section of academic IELTS on intermediate learners in Iran. Besides, learners’ attitude toward the strategy teaching was investigated as well. According to the descriptive statistics and t-test results, those learners who received strategy teaching outperformed those who had not received strategy teaching in reading section of IELTS.According to t-test results, there was a significant difference between the mean scores of the two groups since the p value was lower than .05 (p < .001.  Furthermore, the learners had positive attitudes toward receiving strategy teaching since there was a significant difference between the obtained mean score and the presupposed average because the p value was lower than .05.

  6. Listening is my bugbear: Why Iranian L2 learners keep underperforming in the listening module

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    Novid Armiun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper shares the results of a study into the way Iranian TEF or TEFAQ candidates treat the listening comprehension as a skill as well as their awareness and exploitation of metacognitive strategies while listening to an audio document. A Persian translation of the Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire (MALQ was used in addition to another questionnaire specifically developed for this research in order to gage how important candidates think listening in L2 is compared to the other skills, how much time they spent on practicing listening, and how often they take advantage of authentic documents to improve their listening. Not only did the results show an underestimation of the listening comprehension skill by the majority of Iranian L2 learners, but they also pointed to significant differences in the way men and women exercised their ears and treated the incoming audio stream. The paper concludes that learners’ awareness of listening strategies needs to be raised through classroom instruction and frequent exploitation of authentic documents outside the classroom setting should be encouraged.

  7. The Effects of Giving and Receiving Marginal L1 Glosses on L2 Vocabulary Learning by Upper Secondary Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samian, Hosein Vafadar; Foo, Thomas Chow Voon; Mohebbi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study that investigated the effect of giving and receiving marginal L1 glosses on L2 vocabulary learning. To that end, forty nine Iranian learners of English were assigned to three different experimental conditions including marginal L1 glosses Giver (n = 17), marginal L1 glosses Receiver (n = 17), and no…

  8. How new words (don't) become memories : Lexicalization in advanced L1 Dutch learners of L2 English

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, Merel

    It is an undisputed fact that learning – and remembering – new words is key in successful second language acquisition. And yet researching how vocabulary acquisition takes place is one of the most difficult endeavors in second language acquisition. We can test how many L2 words a learner knows, but

  9. An Empirical Study of the Effectiveness of Negotiation of Meaning in L2 Vocabulary Acquisition of Chinese Learners of English

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    Yi, Baoshu; Sun, Zhinong

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate whether or not negotiation of meaning is effective in L2 vocabulary acquisition of Chinese learners of English in the classroom setting. In the study there were two experimental groups (pre-modified input and negotiation of meaning) and two control groups (pre-modified input). The four groups were required to do a…

  10. Task-Based Language Teaching for Beginner-Level Learners of L2 French: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlam, Rosemary; Ellis, Rod

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of input-based tasks on the acquisition of vocabulary and grammar by beginner-level learners of L2 French and reported the introduction of task-based teaching as an innovation in a state secondary school. The experimental group (n = 19) completed a series of focused input-based language tasks, taught by their…

  11. A Process Model of L2 Learners' Motivation: From the Perspectives of General Tendency and Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiromori, Tomohito

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine a process model of L2 learners' motivation. To investigate the overall process of motivation, the motivation of 148 university students was analyzed. Data were collected on three variables from the pre-decisional phase of motivation (i.e., value, expectancy, and intention) and four variables from the…

  12. Engagement Portraits and (Socio)linguistic Performance: A Transversal and Longitudinal Study of Advanced L2 Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mougeon, Françoise; Rehner, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This study considers, both transversally and longitudinally, advanced second language (L2) learners' profile portraits, how these correlate with their sociolinguistic and linguistic performance, and how changes in these portraits over time connect to changes in sociolinguistic performance. The results show a strong correlation between high degrees…

  13. The Mother Tongue in the Foreign Language: An Account of Russian L2 Learners' Error Incidence on Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forteza Fernandez, Rafael Filiberto; Korneeva, Larisa I.

    2017-01-01

    Based on Selinker's hypothesis of five psycholinguistic processes shaping interlanguage (1972), the paper focuses attention on the Russian L2-learners' overreliance on the L1 as the main factor hindering their development. The research problem is, therefore, the high incidence of L1 transfer in the spoken and written English language output of…

  14. A Psychometric Study of Reading Processes in L2 Acquisition: Deploying Deep Processing to Push Learners' Discourse Towards Syntactic Processing-Based Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Carlos J.

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses reading processes and/or strategies needed to deploy deep processing that could push learners towards syntactic-based constructions in L2 classrooms. Research has found L2 acquisition to present varying degrees of success and/or fossilization (Bley-Vroman 1989, Birdsong 1992 and Sharwood Smith 1994). For example, learners have…

  15. Intermediate Levels of Visual Processing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakayama, Ken

    1998-01-01

    ...) surface representation, here we have shown that there is an intermediate level of visual processing, between the analysis of the image and higher order representations related to specific objects; (2...

  16. The Effects of Multimedia Task-Based Language Teaching on EFL Learners' Oral L2 Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    BavaHarji, Madhubala; Gheitanchian, Mehrnaz; Letchumanan, Krishnaveni

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of tasks, with varying levels of complexity, i.e. simple, + complex and ++ complex tasks on EFL learners' oral production in a multimedia task-based language teaching environment. 57 EFL adult learners carried out a total of 12 tasks, in sets of four tasks within three different themes and different levels of…

  17. Effects of Task Repetition on Learners' Attention Orientation in L2 Oral Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Junya

    2016-01-01

    Task repetition facilitates learners' performance, at least temporarily: Since learners are already familiar with the content of the task at the initial enactment, they are capable of focusing their attention on linguistic form during the following enactment. However, the analysis in previous studies treated various aspects of "form" as…

  18. An Investigation into the Modality Specificity of L2 Learners' STM Abilities in Learning Vocabulary via PDAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Khazaie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Parallel with the rapid growth of wireless technology and potentials of mobile learning for language teaching/learning, employing mobile devices in language learning seems indispensable. To this end, designing learning materials suitable for different types of mobile devices regarding dual coding (DCT and cognitive load (CLT theories seems inevitable. In this study, multimedia were employed for designing two types of learning materials. Since short-term memory plays an important role in language learning, learners’ visual and verbal short-term memories were taken into consideration, too. 161 L2 Learners aged 19 and 23 years old participated in the major phases of an experiment via personal digital assistant (PDA. Based on their scores on the English vocabulary recognition and recall (EVRR tests and the statistical analysis of the results, it was revealed that delivery of learning materials with pictorial and written annotations combined rather than delivery of learning materials without such annotations to learners with high-visual and high-verbal abilities, learners with high-visual but low-verbal ability, and learners with low-visual but high-verbal ability results in better vocabulary learning outcomes. However, this was not the case for learners with low-visual and low-verbal abilities. This study acknowledges the relation between STM and the relevant modalities of materials presentation.

  19. The acquisition of grammatical gender in L2 German by learners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study reported in this paper investigated the adult L2 acquisition of grammatical gender in German by first language (L1) speakers of Afrikaans, English and Italian, respectively. The aim of the study was to determine how similarities and differences between the L1 and L2 in terms of grammatical gender affect the ...

  20. The Role of L2 Learner Goal Differences in Task-Generated Oral Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Maad, Mohamed Ridha

    2016-01-01

    In light of the growing interest in the cognitive approach to task in second language (L2) research, comparatively little has been done to examine such effect over time and the role of individual differences (IDs). The present study was designed to verify some longitudinal evidence for the role of tasks in L2 production and whether IDs, in the…

  1. The acquisition of grammatical gender in L2 German by learners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    grammatical gender in German by first language (L1) speakers of Afrikaans, English ... feminine – and the target L2 has three genders – masculine, feminine and neuter ..... L1 transfer revisited: the L2 acquisition of telicity marking in English by.

  2. How L2-Learners' Brains React to Code-Switches: An ERP Study with Russian Learners of German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruigendijk, Esther; Hentschel, Gerd; Zeller, Jan Patrick

    2016-01-01

    This Event Related Potentials (ERP) study investigates auditory processing of sentences with so-called code-switches in Russian learners of German. It has often been argued that switching between two languages results in extra processing cost, although it is not completely clear yet what exactly causes these costs. ERP presents a good method to…

  3. Shaping Learner Contributions in an EFL Classroom: Implications for L2 Classroom Interactional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can Daskin, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interactional patterns for shaping learner contributions in an EFL classroom with reference to Walsh's classroom interactional competence (CIC). In doing so, an EFL class at an English preparatory school in a Turkish state university was both videotaped and audiotaped in the course of six classroom hours. Conversation…

  4. Lurking and L2 Learners on a Facebook Group: The Voices of the Invisibles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafie, Latisha Asmaak; Yaacob, Aizan; Singh, Paramjit Kaur Karpal

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative research investigates the practice of lurking among English as a second language (ESL) learners in a Facebook group discussion. Lurking is a term used to describe the activity of following and observing any online discussions or activities without contributing to the discussions. Lurkers are often accused of being invisible and…

  5. Cultural Conceptualisations in Learning English as an L2: Examples from Persian-Speaking Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, many studies of second language acquisition (SLA) were based on the assumption that learning a new language mainly involves learning a set of grammatical rules, lexical items, and certain new sounds and sound combinations. However, for many second language learners, learning a second language may involve contact and interactions…

  6. Communicative competence and personality dimensions in L1 and L2 learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, L.T.W.; Vermeer, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the relations between communicative competence and five dimensions of personality in 241 first and second language–learning children in The Netherlands. To determine the underlying communicative competence of the first and second language learners of

  7. Do Korean L2 learners have a "foreign accent" when they speak French? Production and perception experiments on rhythm and intonation

    OpenAIRE

    Grandon , Bénédicte; Yoo , Hiyon

    2014-01-01

    International audience; French and Korean are two languages with similar prosodic characteristics as far as rhythm and intonation are concerned. In this paper, we present the results of production and perception tests where we describe the prosodic characteristics of Korean L2 learners of French. Our aim is to analyze the impression of "foreign accent" for two prosodic components (intonation and rhythm) of speech produced by Korean L2 learners of French and the perception of this "accent" by ...

  8. Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words? Using Images to Create a Concreteness Effect for Abstract Words: Evidence from Beginning L2 Learners of Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Andrew; Pahom, Olga; Ramonda, Kris

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the lexical representation and recall of abstract words by beginning L2 learners of Spanish in the light of the predictions of the dual coding theory (Paivio 1971; Paivio and Desrochers 1980). Ninety-seven learners (forty-four males and fifty-three females) were randomly placed in the picture or non-picture group and taught…

  9. Teaching Cases to L2 German and Russian Learners: A Cognitive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysinger, Diana

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation offers a Cognitive Grammar-based approach to teaching cases to L2 German and Russian students and examines the impacts of various methods of case instruction in beginning German and Russian language classes. A CG-based explanation of cases was already proposed by some CG theorists (i.e., Langacker 1987, 1991; Smith 1987, Janda…

  10. Successful Learners of Irish as an L2: Motivation, Identity and Linguistic Mudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petit Kevin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a small-scale research conducted for a master’s thesis on the motivation to learn Irish on the part of university students and members of the Gaelic society An Cumann Gaelach. In the light of questionnaires’ results and interviews, the emphasis is placed on the links between motivation, identity, and potential key moments in learners’ lives. Using an AMTB-type questionnaire (n=45, the author puts to the test Dörnyei’s Motivational Self System theory (2005 in the context of the learning of Irish by looking at the correlation between the motivational intensity of 45 students and six variables (Ideal L2 Self, Ought to Self, Ideal L2 Community, Instrumentality, Parental encouragement, and Role of teachers. The notion of Ideal L2 Self, or the capacity to picture oneself speaking an L2 in the future, clearly appears to be strongly correlated with the respondents’ motivational intensity (r=.75 p<.01, in accordance with Dörnyei’s model. However results concerning extrinsic factors differ from previous research, putting forward distinctive features of the learning of minority languages. The second phase of the research looks at the language learning narratives of three An Cumann Gaelach’s members through the qualitative analysis of three interview transcripts. The results clearly show that time spent in Irish summer colleges are linguistic mudes (Pujolar and Puigdevall 2015, or key-moments, which triggered the interest in the language for the three students interviewed.

  11. On the Role of L1 Markedness and L2 Input Robustness in Determining Potentially Fossilizable Language Forms in Iranian EFL Learners' Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nushi, Musa

    2016-01-01

    Han's (2009, 2013) selective fossilization hypothesis (SFH) claims that L1 markedness and L2 input robustness determine the fossilizability (and learnability) of an L2 feature. To test the validity of the model, a pseudo-longitudinal study was designed in which the errors in the argumentative essays of 52 Iranian EFL learners were identified and…

  12. An Alternative to Language Learner Dependence on L2 Caption-Reading Input for Comprehension of Sitcoms in a Multimedia Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Most second/foreign language (L2) learners have difficulty understanding listening input because of its implicit and ephemeral nature, and they typically have better reading comprehension than listening comprehension skills. This study examines the effects of using an interactive advance-organizer activity on the DVD video comprehension of L2

  13. L1 Korean and L1 Mandarin L2 English Learners' Acquisition of the Count/Mass Distinction in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sea Hee; Ionin, Tania; Zhu, Yeqiu

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the second language (L2) acquisition of the English count/mass distinction by speakers of Korean and Mandarin Chinese, with a focus on the semantics of atomicity. It is hypothesized that L1-Korean and L1-Mandarin L2-English learners are influenced by atomicity in the use of the count/mass morphosyntax in English. This…

  14. Acquiring native-like intonation in Dutch and Spanish : Comparing the L1 and L2 of native speakers and second language learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Maastricht, L.J.; Swerts, M.G.J.; Krahmer, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    ACQUIRING NATIVE-LIKE INTONATION IN DUTCH AND SPANISH Comparing the L1 and L2 of native speakers and second language learners Introduction Learning more about the interaction between the native language (L1) and the target language (L2) has been the aim of many studies on second language acquisition

  15. The Effects of Cultural Familiarity and Question Preview Type on the Listening Comprehension of L2 Learners at the Secondary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen-Hong; Chen, Cai-Jun; Wu, Meng-Jie; Kuo, Ya-Chu; Tseng, Yun-Ting; Tsai, Shi-Yi; Shih, Hung-Chun

    2017-01-01

    We examined the effect of cultural familiarity and question-preview types on the listening comprehension of L2 learners. The results showed that the participants who received the full question-preview format scored higher than those receiving either the answer-option preview or question-stem preview, despite a statistically nonsignificant…

  16. The Secret Is in the Processing: A Study of Levels of Explicit Computerized Feedback in Heritage and L2 Learners of Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Celia Chomon

    2017-01-01

    The field of Instructed Second Language Acquisition (ISLA) has expressed interest in pursuing a research agenda that expands the current heritage language (HL) strand of research to investigate how this heterogeneous population re-learns their family language, and how this experience differs from that of second language (L2) learners. This…

  17. English Language Learners' Nonword Repetition Performance: The Influence of Age, L2 Vocabulary Size, Length of L2 Exposure, and L1 Phonology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Tamara Sorenson; Paradis, Johanne

    2016-02-01

    This study examined individual differences in English language learners' (ELLs) nonword repetition (NWR) accuracy, focusing on the effects of age, English vocabulary size, length of exposure to English, and first-language (L1) phonology. Participants were 75 typically developing ELLs (mean age 5;8 [years;months]) whose exposure to English began on average at age 4;4. Children spoke either a Chinese language or South Asian language as an L1 and were given English standardized tests for NWR and receptive vocabulary. Although the majority of ELLs scored within or above the monolingual normal range (71%), 29% scored below. Mixed logistic regression modeling revealed that a larger English vocabulary, longer English exposure, South Asian L1, and older age all had significant and positive effects on ELLs' NWR accuracy. Error analyses revealed the following L1 effect: onset consonants were produced more accurately than codas overall, but this effect was stronger for the Chinese group whose L1s have a more limited coda inventory compared with English. ELLs' NWR performance is influenced by a number of factors. Consideration of these factors is important in deciding whether monolingual norm referencing is appropriate for ELL children.

  18. The Interplay Among Academic Self-Concept, Self-Efficacy, Self-Regulation and Academic Achievement of Higher Education L2 Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Özkan KIRMIZI

    2015-01-01

    Self-concept, self efficacy, and self-regulation are three important factors that predict the success of L2 learners to a large extent. Therefore, the present study was designed to measure the academic self-concept, self efficacy, self-regulation level of higher education students in relation to academic achievement and self-evaluation and secondarily to investigate the correlation between academic self-concept, selfefficacy, and self-regulation. In the present study, academic self-concept wa...

  19. Analogy as a Tool for the Acquisition of English Verb Tenses among Low Proficiency L2 Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoke, Soo Kum; Hasan, Nor Haniza

    2014-01-01

    The teaching of English grammar to second language learners is usually a tedious, stressful and time consuming activity and even after all the effort, students have generally found these lessons boring and confusing. As such, innovative language instructors have been trying different approaches to the teaching of grammar in their classrooms. Using…

  20. Points of Transition: Understanding the Constructed Identities of L2 Learners/Users across Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adawu, Anthony; Martin-Beltran, Melinda

    2012-01-01

    Using sociocultural and poststructuralist theoretical lenses, this study examines the narrative construction of language-learner identity across time and space. We applied cross-narrative methodologies to analyze language-learning autobiographies and interview data from three English users who had recently transitioned to a U.S. context for…

  1. Refusal Strategies in L1 and L2: A Study of Persian-Speaking Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babai Shishavan, Homa; Sharifian, Farzad

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore pragmalinguistic strategies employed by a group of Iranian English language learners when making refusals to invitations, requests, offers and suggestions in their first (Persian) and second (English) languages. Data were collected from 86 participants through a Discourse Completion Test (DCT). The social…

  2. The acquisition of interlanguage morphology : a study into the role of morphology in the L2 learner's mental lexicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowie, Wander Marius

    1998-01-01

    Introduction 1.1 Morphology and second language learning If Dutch learners of English encounter a word like undoable, they may recognise it because they have seen it before and have remembered it. They may also fail to recognise it and guess the meaning of the word on the basis of the context. A

  3. Some Intermediate-Level Violin Concertos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Contends that many violin students attempt difficult concertos before they are technically or musically prepared. Identifies a variety of concertos at the intermediate and advanced intermediate-level for students to study and master before attempting the advanced works by Bach and Mozart. Includes concertos by Vivaldi, Leclair, Viotti, Haydn,…

  4. Understanding L2 motivation within a multilingual framework: A comparative analysis of Japanese language learners in Australia and South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    TOSHIYUKI NAKAMURA

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the motivational development of Japanese language learners in Australia and South Korea and their future self-images as bilingual or multilingual individuals. Initial motivation to study Japanese was generally linked to an interest in Japanese language and culture. However, visions of possible future careers became a more significant motivational factor as the students progressed in their studies. The study explores the impact of the students’ multilingual competencies, ...

  5. Crawlers, Footers and Runners : Language ideological attribution to adult language learners in a Dutch as an L2 classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spotti, Max

    2017-01-01

    This paper deals with a volunteer teacher teaching Dutch as an L2 to asylum seekers at a Red Cross asylum seeker centre in West Flanders, Belgium. More precisely, it investigates the practical professional knowledge of this volunteer teacher, taking a peek into her meta-pragmatic judgements about

  6. A Video-Based CALL Program for Proficient and Less-Proficient L2 Learners' Comprehension Ability, Incidental Vocabulary Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lu-Fang

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates first whether news video in a computer-assisted language learning (CALL) program can foster second language (L2) comprehension and incidental acquisition of adjectives, nouns, and verbs. Second, this study examines the relationship between the participants' vocabulary acquisition and their video comprehension. The…

  7. L2 Working Memory Capacity and L2 Reading Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Mike; Sawyer, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Examines the sensitivity of second-language (L2) working memory (ability to store and process information simultaneously) to differences in reading skills among advanced L2 learners. Subjects with larger L2 working memory capacities scored higher on measures of L2 reading skills, but no correlation was found between reading and passive short-term…

  8. COGNITIVE LINGUISTIC AND ESP: USING METAPHOR AS A USEFUL DEVICE FOR TEACHING L2 BUSINESS ENGLISH LEARNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Hendriyani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive Linguistics is language essentially and inherently symbolic in nature. It means that all linguistic expressions such as; words, phrases and sentences, utterances, signs or writting are symbols of concept in a speaker’s mind. Metaphor is a figure of speech in which a word or phrase is applied to an object or action that it does not literally denote in order to imply a resemblance. Many people have encountered them in literature and poetry, and most of us know that even when we talk casually, we may take advantage of such figurative language, perhaps especially when there are some evasive, hard-to-grasp emotions or thought that we want to communicate. We can find several metaphors in newspapers, literature or scientific articles, etc. Metaphor is a central issue in ESP teaching. The purposes of this paper are (1 to increase the students’ knowledge of technical and semi-technical business vocabulary. (2 to improve business reading fluency and (3 to enrich vocabulary in business texts or readings. Metaphor in a specific English language program can provide students with a useful device to raise awareness of key concepts, models and issues and to improve their reading in business. The term of Business English refers to a wide range of ESL (English for Specific Learning courses characterized by having sense of purpose, specific content and general. This frequent presence of metaphor in economic and business texts are for second language learners, to improve language learners’ specialized reading of business texts and to help them produce native-like discourse when they translate business texts.

  9. Treatment of low and intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehlein, G.

    1978-05-01

    The methods described of low and intermediate level waste treatment are based exclusively on operating experience gathered with the KfK facilities for waste management, the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK), the ALKEM fuel element fabrication plant, the MZFR, KNK and FR 2 reactors as well as at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center and at the state collecting depot of Baden-Wuerttemberg. The processing capacities and technical status are similar to that in 1976. With an annual throughput of 10000 m 3 of solid and liquid raw wastes, an aggregate activity of 85000 Ci, 500 kg of U and 2 kg of Pu, final waste in the amount of 500 m 3 was produced which was stored in the ASSE II salt mine. (orig.) [de

  10. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety.

  11. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva

    2013-08-01

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety

  12. L2 Selves, Emotions, and Motivated Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimouri, Yasser

    2017-01-01

    This study has aimed to investigate language learners' emotional experiences through the lens of L2 future self-guides. To that end, the L2 motivational self system was chosen as the theoretical framework to relate learners' emotions to their L2 selves. However, due to inconsistent results of past research concerning the motivational role of the…

  13. The management of intermediate level wastes in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.; Thegerstroem, C.

    1980-01-01

    A brief overview of current practices and research in Sweden on the management of intermediate level wastes is given. Intermediate level wastes include spent resins, filters and core components from the six power reactors in operation; radioactive wastes from nuclear fuel development at Studsvik and from non-nuclear applications are a minor contribution. (Auth.)

  14. Packaging and transport of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.J.S.; Streatfield, R.E.

    1987-02-01

    The paper presents an overview of Nirex proposals for the packaging and transport of low and intermediate-level radioactive waste, as well as the regulatory requirements which must be met in such operations. (author)

  15. Measurements of Development in L2 Written Production: The Case of L2 Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenying

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates measures for second language (L2) writing development. A T-unit, which has been found the most satisfactory unit of analysis for measuring L2 development in English, is extended to measure L2 Chinese writing development through a cross-sectional design in this study. Data were collected from three L2 Chinese learner groups…

  16. PNGMDR - Characterisation of intermediate-level long-lived wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    This document presents the status of the characterization of intermediate-level long-lived wastes which are warehoused on exploited EDF sites or which will be produced during the deconstruction of first-generation reactors. It addresses aspects related to characterisation and packaging of wastes produced before 2015. More specifically, it addresses aspects related to contamination and to activation. Contamination is assessed by measurements whereas activation assessment is based on numerical simulations associated with measurements performed during parcel production. After having mentioned the concerned reactors, the document presents the methodology adopted for these assessments, and reports the progress status of the characterization process for these intermediate-level long-lived wastes

  17. The effects of captioning texts and caption ordering on L2 listening comprehension and vocabulary learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Alikhani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effects of captioned texts on second/foreign (L2 listening comprehension and vocabulary gains using a computer multimedia program. Additionally, it explored the caption ordering effect (i.e. captions displayed during the first or second listening, and the interaction of captioning order with the L2 proficiency level of language learners in listening comprehension and vocabulary performance. To these ends, a computer software program was designed and 200 EFL learners (100 high-intermediate and 100 low-intermediate level students were asked to participate in the experiment. They were randomly assigned into four groups: captioned (listening to texts twice with captions, noncaptioned (listening to texts twice without captions, first captioned (listening to texts first with captions and then without captions, and second captioned (listening to texts first without captions and then with captions groups. They listened to four audio texts (i.e. short stories twice and took the listening and vocabulary tests, administered through the software. Results from t-tests and two-way ANOVAs showed that the captioned stories were more effective than the non-captioned ones. Moreover, the caption ordering had no significant effect on the participants' L2 listening comprehension and vocabulary performance. Finally, L2 proficiency level differences did not affect performance derived from caption ordering.

  18. Mitigation of Disagreement in Peer Review among L2 Learners and Native Speakers in a College Writing Class (Mitigación del Impacto de las Opiniones de Desacuerdo en el Proceso de Revisión por Pares entre Estudiantes de una Segunda Lengua y Hablantes Nativos en una Clase de Escritura a Nivel Universitario)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Katherine O'Donnell

    2015-01-01

    Peer review is now a commonplace practice in process-oriented writing instruction. A crucial aspect of peer review is assessing another classmate's work, which encompasses the act of disagreement. Given its prevalence in the classroom, it is necessary to analyze how L2 learners mitigate disagreement in the context of peer review with other L2

  19. CONDITIONING OF INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL WASTE AT FORSCHUNGSZENTRUM JUELICH GMBH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbach, H.

    2003-01-01

    This contribution to the group of low-level, intermediate, mixed and hazardous waste describes the conditioning of intermediate-level mixed waste (dose rate above 10 mSv/h at the surface) from Research Centre Juelich (FZJ). Conditioning of the waste by supercompaction is performed at Research Centre Karlsruhe (FZK). The waste described is radioactive waste arising from research at Juelich. This waste includes specimens and objects from irradiation experiments in the research reactors Merlin (FRJ-1) and Dido (FRJ-2) at FZJ. In principle, radioactive waste at Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH is differentiated by the surface dose rate at the waste package. Up to a surface dose rate of 10 mSv/h, the waste is regarded as low-level. The radioactive waste described here has a surface dose rate above 10 mSv/h. Waste up to 10 mSv/h is conditioned at the Juelich site according to different conditioning methods. The intermediate-level waste can only be conditioned by supercompaction in the processing facility for intermediate-level waste from plant operation at Research Centre Karlsruhe. Research Centre Juelich also uses this waste cell to condition its intermediate-level waste from plant operation

  20. The Learner´s Mother Tongue in the L2 Learning-Teaching Symbiosis La lengua materna del estudiante en la simbiosis entre enseñanza y aprendizaje de una segunda lengua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Hitotuzi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper has a two-fold purpose. One is to review the stances of language-oriented theorists, who are practicing foreign/second-language teachers and learners from various parts of the world, regarding the long-standing controversy over whether or not the learner´s mother tongue plays a positive role in the foreign/second-language learning-teaching context. A second purpose is to offer, from a non-native-speaker L2-teacher standpoint, some suggestions on when and how learners´ native language can be capitalised on in the process of learning another language. This implies that the learner´s mother tongue can be a valuable tool at the disposal of foreign/second-language teachers in their classrooms worldwide.El presente artículo tiene dos propósitos. Uno es examinar las posturas de expertos en el área del lenguaje, docentes de lengua extranjera o segunda lengua y aprendices de varias partes del mundo en relación con la controversia que ha existido desde hace mucho tiempo respecto a si la lengua materna del estudiante desempeña o no un papel positivo en el contexto de la enseñanza y aprendizaje de una lengua extranjera o de una segunda lengua. Un segundo objetivo es ofrecer desde un punto de vista de un profesor no nativo de segunda lengua, algunas sugerencias sobre cuándo y cómo la lengua materna de los aprendices puede ser una ventaja en el proceso de aprendizaje de otra lengua. Esto implica que la lengua materna del aprendiz puede ser un instrumento valioso a disposición de profesores de lengua extranjera o segunda lengua de todo el mundo, en sus aulas de clase.

  1. Intermediate-Level Knowledge in Child-Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barendregt, Wolmet; Torgersson, Olof; Eriksson, Eva

    2017-01-01

    Based on an analysis of all papers at IDC from 2003 to 2016 this paper urges the Child-Computer Interaction (CCI) field to start formulating intermediate-level knowledge, in the form of e.g. strong concepts. Our analysis showed that 40% of all papers at the Interaction Design and Children...... conference presents the design of an artefact accompanied by an evaluation (to which we will refer as 'artefact-centered' papers). While exploring the design space in the form of artefacts is important and valuable, it can be argued that those artefact-centered papers generally make a smaller contribution...... to the field as a whole, which is also visible in the number of citations to such papers in comparison to the number of citations to other kinds of papers. As a first step towards more intermediate-level knowledge, we have thus attempted to formulate and ground three suggestions for strong concepts in CCI...

  2. DISPOSAL OF LOW AND INTERMEDIATE LEVEL WASTE IN HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint Nős

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available There are two operating facilities for management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Hungary. Experience with radioactive waste has a relatively long history and from its legacy some problems are to be solved, like the question of the historical waste in the Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility (RWTDF. Beside the legacy problems the current waste arising from the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP has to be dealt with a safe and economically optimized way.

  3. Containers for packaging of solid and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive wastes are generated at all stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and also from the medical, industrial and research applications of radiation. These wastes can potentially present risks to health and the environment if they are not managed adequately. Their effective management will require the wastes to be safely stored, transported and ultimately disposed of. The waste container, which may be defined as any vessel, drum or box, made from metals, concrete, polymers or composite materials, in which the waste form is placed for interim storage, for transport and/or for final disposal, is an integral part of the whole package for the management of low and intermediate level wastes. It has key roles to play in several stages of the waste management process, starting from the storage of raw wastes and ending with the disposal of conditioned wastes. This report provides an overview of the various roles that a container may play and the factors that are important in each of these roles. This report has two main objectives. The first is to review the main requirements for the design of waste containers. The second is to provide advice on the design, fabrication and handling of different types of containers used in the management of low and intermediate level radioactive solid wastes. Recommendations for design and testing are given, based on the extensive experience available worldwide in waste management. This report is not intended to have any regulatory status or objectives. 56 refs, 16 figs, 10 tabs

  4. Operating safety requirements for the intermediate level liquid waste system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    The operation of the Intermediate Level Liquid Waste (ILW) System, which is described in the Final Safety Analysis, consists of two types of operations, namely: (1) the operation of a tank farm which involves the storage and transportation through pipelines of various radioactive liquids; and (2) concentration of the radioactive liquids by evaporation including rejection of the decontaminated condensate to the Waste Treatment Plant and retention of the concentrate. The following safety requirements in regard to these operations are presented: safety limits and limiting control settings; limiting conditions for operation; and surveillance requirements. Staffing requirements, reporting requirements, and steps to be taken in the event of an abnormal occurrence are also described

  5. Low- and intermediate-level waste management practices in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesworth, D.H.

    1982-05-01

    Low- and intermediate-level wastes arise in Canada from the operation of nuclear power stations, nuclear research establishments, nuclear fuel and radioisotope production facilities, as well as from many medical, research and industrial organizations. Essentially all of the solid radioactive wastas are stored in a retrievable fashion at five waste management areas from which a portion is expected to be transferred to future disposal facilities. Waste processing for volume reduction and stabilization is becoming an increasingly important part of low-level waste management because of the advantages it provides for both interim storage currently, and permanent disposal in the future

  6. Design of a store for encapsulated intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, A.I.; Robinson, G.; Price, M.S.T.

    1989-01-01

    The design of a new store for cemented intermediate level radioactive waste produced in unshielded 500 litre drums from the Winfrith Radwaste Treatment Plant is described. The store design has had to take account of local site constraints and disposal uncertainties. As a result, an innovative above ground storage tube design using interlocking, commercially available, concrete pipe rings has been selected. Other special features are that the store is easily capable of being extended whilst in service and is simple and cheap to decommission. A quality assessment facility for the drummed waste is an integral part of the store complex. (author)

  7. Low and intermediate level waste repositories: public involvement aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Vinicius V.M.; Mourao, Rogerio P.; Fleming, Peter M.; Soares, Wellington A.; Braga, Leticia T.P.; Santos, Rosana A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The nuclear energy acceptance creates several problems, and one of the most important is the disposal of the radioactive waste. International experiences show that not only environmental, radiological and technical questions have to be analyzed, but the public opinion about the project must be considered. The objective of this article is to summarize some public involvement aspects associated with low and intermediate level waste repositories. Experiences from USA, Canada, South Africa, Ukraine and other countries are studied and show the importance of the population in the site selection process for a repository. (author)

  8. Experimental study on intermediate level radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagakura, Tadashi; Abe, Hirotoshi; Okazawa, Takao; Hattori, Seiichi; Maki, Yasuro

    1977-01-01

    In the disposal of intermediate level radioactive wastes, multilayer package will be adopted. The multilayer package consists of cement-solidified waste and a container such as a drum - can with concrete liner or a concrete container. So, on the waste to be cement-solidified in such container, experimental study was carried out as follows. (1) Cement-solidification method. (2) Mechanical behaviour of cement-solidified waste. The mechanical behaviour of the containers was studied by the finite element method and experiment, and the function of pressure-balancing valves was also studied. The following data on processing intermediate level radioactive wastes were obtained. (1) In the case of cement-solidified waste, the data to select the suitable solidifying material and the standard mixing proportion were determined. (2) The basic data concerning the uniaxial compressive strength of cement-solidified waste, the mechanical behaviour of cement-solidified waste packed in a drum under high hydrostatic pressure, the shock response of cement-solidified waste at the time of falling and so on were obtained. (3) The pressure-balancing valves worked at about 0.5 Kg/cm 2 pressure difference inside and outside a container, and the deformation of a drum cover was 10 to 13 mm. In case of the pressure difference less than 0,5 Kg/cm 2 , the valves shut, and water flow did occur. (auth.)

  9. Treatment of low- and intermediate-level liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This report aims at giving the reader details of the experience gained in the treatment of both low- and intermediate-level radioactive liquid wastes. The treatment comprises those operations to remove radioactivity from the wastes and those that change only its chemical composition, so as to permit its discharge. Considerable experience has been accumulated in the satisfactory treatment of such wastes. Although there are no universally accepted definitions for low- and intermediate-level liquid radioactive wastes, the IAEA classification (see section 3.2) is used in this report. The two categories differ from one another in the fact that for low-level liquids the actual radiation does not require shielding during normal handling of the wastes. Liquid wastes which are not considered in this report are those from mining and milling operations and the high-level liquid wastes resulting from fuel reprocessing. These are referred to in separate IAEA reports. Likewise, wastes from decommissioning operations are not within the scope of this report. Apart from the description of existing methods and facilities, this report is intended to provide advice to the reader for the selection of appropriate solutions to waste management problems. In addition, new and promising techniques which are either being investigated or being considered for the future are discussed

  10. Low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing in plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauchyn, V.; Khvedchyn, I.; Van Oost, G.

    2013-01-01

    Methods of low and intermediate level radioactive waste processing comprise: cementation, bituminization, curing in polymer matrices, combustion and pyrolysis. All these methods are limited in their application in the field of chemical, morphological, and aggregate composition of material to be processed. The thermal plasma method is one of the universal methods of RAW processing. The use of electric-arc plasma with mean temperatures 2000 - 8000 K can effectively carry out the destruction of organic compounds into atoms and ions with very high speeds and high degree of conversion. Destruction of complex substances without oxygen leads to a decrease of the volume of exhaust gases and dimension of gas cleaning system. This paper presents the plasma reactor for thermal processing of low and intermediate level radioactive waste of mixed morphology. The equipment realizes plasma-pyrolytic conversion of wastes and results in a conditioned product in a single stage. As a result, the volume of conditioned waste is significantly reduced (more than 10 times). Waste is converted into an environmentally friendly form that suits long-term storage. The leaching rate of macro-components from the vitrified compound is less than 1.10 -7 g/(cm 2 .day). (authors)

  11. Low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes, L.C.; Ortiz, J.R.; Sanchez, S.

    2002-01-01

    Currently, it is necessary to establish, in a few years, a definitive repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste in order to satisfy the necessities of Mexico for the next 50 years. Consequently, it is required to estimate the volumes of the radioactive waste generated annually, the stored volumes to-date and their projection to medium-term. On this subject, the annual average production of low and intermediate level radioactive waste from the electricity production by means of nuclear power reactors is 250 m 3 /y which consist of humid and dry solid waste from the 2 units of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant having a re-use efficiency of effluents of 95%. On the other hand, the applications in medicine, industry and research generate 20 m 3 /y of solid waste, 280 m 3 /y of liquid waste and approximately 10 m 3 /y from 300 spent sealed radioactive sources. The estimation of the total volume of these waste to the year 2035 is 17500 m 3 corresponding to the 46% of the volume generated by the operation and maintenance of the 2 units of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant, 34% to the decommissioning of these 2 units at the end of their useful life and 20% to the waste generated by applications in medicine, industry and research. (author)

  12. Treatment of low- and intermediate-level solid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    One of the essential aims in the waste management is to reduce as much as possible the waste volumes to be stored or disposed of, and to concentrate and immobilize as much as possible the radioactivity contained in the waste. This document describes the treatment of low- and intermediate-level solid waste prior to its conditioning for storage and disposal. This report aims primarily at compiling the experience gained in treating low- and intermediate-active solid wastes, one of the major waste sources in nuclear technology. Apart from the description of existing facilities and demonstrated handling schemes, this report provides the reader with the basis for a judgement that facilitates the selection of appropriate solutions for a given solid-waste management problem. It thus aims at providing guidelines in the particular field and indicates new promising approaches that are actually under investigation and development

  13. Concrete conditioners for low-intermediate level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehl, J.L.; Lorentz, R.G.; Franzen, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    The conditioning of low-intermediate level radioactive waste disposal, in Brazil, with concrete packages designed in such way that, in spite of being destined to receive compacted materials in long term sub-surface disposal, they may also be able to attend other storage or disposal necessities, is analysed. A design of a reinforced concrete package with a net volume of 360 l and, with compatible diameter to contain compacted 200 l drums, was developed. A study on compactation of 200 l steel packages is done. A pressure of 30.000 KN for compacting these 200 l drums was adapted, and two series of tests to verify the pressure volume reduction ratio and, the final dimensions and density of the compacted elements, was executed. (Author) [pt

  14. Conditioning of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle, together with the use of separated radioisotopes, in many endeavours generates a variety of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. These waste materials contain quantities of radionuclides sufficient to present potential health risks to people if the wastes are not adequately managed, but usually insufficient quantities to require heat removal. Adequate management involves a series of steps which lead from the arising of the wastes to their safe disposal, steps which may include collection, segregation, treatment, volume reduction, conditioning, transport, interim storage and disposal. Each step is defined by the need to accommodate to the preceding one and to facilitate the ones that follow. This technical report describes primarily the technologies available for the conditioning steps (i.e., immobilization and packaging) and relates them to the other steps. In broad terms, the purpose of conditioning is to convert the wastes into packages that are suitable for transport, storage and disposal

  15. Management for low and intermediate level wastes in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, H.R.

    1986-01-01

    A research and demonstration project was developed, to offer management options for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The project considered: the experience of other countries; the laws and regulations according to internationally accepted standards; criteria and recommendations; the technical, socio-political realities, and the expectation of our countrie related to the nuclear power plants. Preliminary guidelines for waste acceptance critetia were established. The solution for shallow land burial was a multibarrier system. Since, there is no final decision about the repository localization it was decided that the waste produced by nuclear power plants will be kept on-site and those from medicine, agriculture, industry and research are sent to the IPEN/CNEN-SP for treatment and temporary storage. (Author/M.C.K.) [pt

  16. Treatment and immobilization of intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, R.E.; Greenhalgh, W.O.; Partridge, J.A.; Richardson, G.L.

    1977-01-01

    This paper discusses a new program underway to develop and demonstrate treatment and immobilization technologies for intermediate level wastes (ILW) generated in the nuclear fuel cycle. Initial work has defined the sources, quantities and types of wastes which comprise ILW. Laboratory studies are underway to define treatment technologies for liquid ILW which contains volatile contaminants and to define immobilization parameters for the residues resulting from treatment of ILW. Immobilization agents initially being evaluated for the various residues include cement, urea-formaldehyde, and bitumen although other immobilization agents will be studied. The program also includes development of acceptable test procedures for the final immobilized products as well as development of proposed criteria for storage, transportation, and disposal of the immobilized ILW. 20 figures, 10 tables

  17. Colloids related to low level and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, J.D.F.; Russell, P.J.; Avery, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive research investigation has been undertaken to improve the understanding of the potential role of colloids in the context of disposal and storage of low level and intermediate level waste immobilized in cement. Several topics have been investigated which include: (a) the study of the formation and characteristics of colloids in cement leachates; (b) the effects of the near-field aqueous chemistry on the characteristics of colloids in repository environments; (c) colloid sorption behaviour; (d) interactions of near-field materials with leachates; (e) characteristics of near-field materials in EC repository simulation tests; and (f) colloid migration behaviour. These experimental investigations should provide data and a basis for the development of transport models and leaching mechanisms, and thus relate directly to the part of the Task 3 programme concerned with migration and retention of radionuclides in the near field. 114 Figs.; 39 Tabs.; 12 Refs

  18. Reinforced concrete in the intermediable-level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffo, Gustavo

    2009-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is responsible for developing the nuclear waste disposal management programme. This programme contemplates the design and construction of a facility for the final disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The proposed model is a near-surface monolithic repository similar to those in operation in El Cabril, Spain. The design of this type of repository is based on the use of multiple, independent and redundant barriers and the model foresees a period of 300 years of institutional post-closure control. Since the vault and cover are major components of the engineered barriers, the durability of these concrete structures is an important aspect for the facility integrity. This work presents laboratory investigations performed on the corrosion susceptibility of steel rebars embedded in two different types of high performance reinforced concretes, recently developed by the National Institute of Industrial Technology (Argentine). Concretes were made with cement with Blast Furnace Slag (CAH) and Silica Fume cement (CAH + SF). The aim of this work is to predict the service life of the intermediate level radioactive waste disposal vaults from data obtained from electrochemical techniques. Besides, the diffusion coefficients of aggressive species, such as chloride and carbon dioxide, were also determined. On the other hand, data obtained with corrosion sensors embedded in a vault prototype is also included. These sensors allow on-line measurements of several parameters related to the corrosion process such as rebar corrosion potential and corrosion current density; incoming oxygen flow that reaches the metal surface; concrete electrical resistivity; chloride concentration and internal concrete temperature. All the information obtained from both, laboratory tests and sensors will be used for the final design of the container in order to achieve a service life more or equal than the foreseen durability for this type of

  19. Geological evaluation of spent fuel storage and low-intermediate level radwaste disposal in the site of NPP candidate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sucipta; Yatim, S.; Martono, H.; Pudyo, A.

    1997-01-01

    Based on the consideration of techno-economy and environmental safety, the radioactive waste treatment installation (RWI), interim storage of spen fuel (ISSF) and low-intermediate level disposal shall be sited in the surrounding of NPP area. The land suitability of NPP's site candidate at Muria Peninsula as spent fuel storage and low-intermediate level radwaste disposal need to be studied. Site selection was conducted by overlay method and scoring method, and based on safety criteria which include geological and environmental aspects. Land evaluation by overlay method has given result a potential site which have highest suitable land at surrounding of borehole L-15 about 17.5 hectares. Land evaluation by scoring method has given result two land suitability classes, i.e. moderate suitability class (includes 14 borehole) and high suitability class, include borehole L-2, L-14 and L-15 (author)

  20. Semantic Categorization of Placement Verbs in L1 and L2 Danish and Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadierno, Teresa; Ibarretxe-Antuñano, Iraide; Hijazo-Gascón, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates semantic categorization of the meaning of placement verbs by Danish and Spanish native speakers and two groups of intermediate second language (L2) learners (Danish learners of L2 Spanish and Spanish learners of L2 Danish). Participants described 31 video clips picturing different types of placement events. Cluster analyses…

  1. Vocabulary Acquisition in L2: Does CALL Really Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averianova, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Language competence in various communicative activities in L2 largely depends on the learners' size of vocabulary. The target vocabulary of adult L2 learners should be between 2,000 high frequency words (a critical threshold) and 10,000 word families (for comprehension of university texts). For a TOEIC test, the threshold is estimated to be…

  2. Bituminization of low- and intermediate-level radioactive concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breza, M.; Krejci, F.; Timulak, J.; Tibensky, L.

    1985-01-01

    The results and experiences are summed up from the research and development of the technology of bituminization of low- and intermediate-level radioactive concentrates generated in the operation of nuclear power plants with WWER-440 reactors. The experiments took place on a pilot plant bituminization line with various model solutions at an evaporator capacity of 70, 100 and 140 litres per hour. The composition of the solutions changed in dependence on the knowledge of the composition of actual concentrates in the V-1 nuclear power plant at Jaslovske Bohunice. The following factors were studied in the concentrate: the effect of its pH, its borate content and content of metal carbonates, the content of organic acid salts, the content of detergents, etc., on the process of bituminization. Physico-chemical conditions are described under which the operation of the evaporator was fail-safe and filling of the bituminization product with salts homogeneous. A low water content of up to 1% was achieved. The properties of the bituminization product were negatively affected by a high level of heavy metal oxides, surfactants, oxalates and citrates. In order to improve the properties of the product it will be necessary to replace bitumen emulsion Silembit-60 used as reinforcement matrix, by a different type of bitumen. (Z.M.)

  3. Korean working towards low and intermediate level waste volume reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung-Jae Song; Jong-Kil Park

    2001-01-01

    The safe management of radioactive waste is a national task required for sustainable generation of nuclear power and for energy self-reliance. This paper describes the results, efforts, and prospects for the safe management of radioactive wastes having been performed by the Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC) of the Korean Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO). Firstly, KEPCO's efforts and results for waste volume reduction are summarized to show how the number of waste drums generated per reactor-year could be reduced by about 60% during the last 10 years. Secondly, a new treatment technology, a technology for low and intermediate level waste (LILW) vitrification, was introduced to prospect how the technology reduces the waste volume and increases the inherent safety for LILW disposal. It is expected that the vitrification technology will contribute not only to reduce LILW volume to around 1/14 ∼ 1/32 but also to change the 'Not In My Back Yard' (NIMBY) syndrome to the 'Please In My Front Yard' (PIMFY) attitude of local communities/residents for LILW disposal. (author)

  4. Improved cement solidification of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Cementation was the first and is still the most widely applied technique for the conditioning of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. Compared with other solidification techniques, cementation is relatively simple and inexpensive. However, the quality of the final cemented waste forms depends very much on the composition of the waste and the type of cement used. Different kinds of cement are used for different kinds of waste and the compatibility of a specific waste with a specific cement type should always be carefully evaluated. Cementation technology is continuously being developed in order to improve the characteristics of cemented waste in accordance with the increasing requirements for quality of the final solidified waste. Various kinds of additives and chemicals are used to improve the cemented waste forms in order to meet all safety requirements. This report is meant mainly for engineers and designers, to provide an explanation of the chemistry of cementation systems and to facilitate the choice of solidification agents and processing equipment. It reviews recent developments in cementation technology for improving the quality of cemented waste forms and provides a brief description of the various cement solidification processes in use. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. Low and intermediate level disposal in Spain (El Cabril Facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuloaga, P.

    1997-01-01

    El Cabril disposal facility is located in Southern Spain and was commissioned in October 1992. The main objective of this facility is the disposal of all low- and intermediate-level waste produced in Spain in a disposal system (Figure 1) consisting of concrete overpacks placed in concrete vaults. A drain control system exists in inspection galleries constructed beneath the disposal vaults. The facility also includes : 1) A treatment and conditioning shop (with incineration, non-NPP wastes segregation and conditioning, drum transfer into overpacks, supercompaction, liquid waste collection, and grout preparation and injection) 2) A waste form characterisation laboratory with means for non-destructive radiological characterisation and for destructive tests on the waste forms (specimens extractions, unskinning of drums, mechanical strength, leaching tests on specimens and full size packages) 3) A fabrication shop for overpacks construction 4) Auxiliary systems and buildings in support of operation, maintenance and surveillance of the facility. The paper deals with the design, the operating experience of the facility, the waste packages characterisation and acceptance practice and the reception and transport of the wastes from the producers to facilities. (author). 11 figs

  6. Treatment and immobilization of intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lerch, R.E.; Greenhalgh, W.O.; Partridge, J.A.; Richardson, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    A new program underway at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) to develop and demonstrate treatment and immobilization technologies for intermediate-level wastes (ILW) generated in the nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. ILW are defined as those liquid and solid radioactive wastes, other than high-level wastes and fuel cladding hulls, that in packaged form have radiation dose readings greater than 200 millirem/hr at the packaged surface and 10 millirem/hr at three feet from the surface. The IAEA value of 10 4 Ci/m 3 for ILW defines the upper limit. For comparative purposes, reference is also made to certain aspects of low-level radioactive wastes (LLW). Initial work has defined the sources, quantities and types of wastes which comprise ILW. Because of the wide differences in composition (e.g., acids, salt solutions, resins and zeolites, HEPA filters, etc.) the wastes may require different treatments, particularly those wastes containing volatile contaminants. The various types of ILW have been grouped into categories amenable to similar treatment. Laboratory studies are underway to define treatment technologies for liquid ILW which contain volatile contaminants and to define immobilization parameters for the residues resulting from treatment of ILW. Immobilization agents initially being evaluated for the various residues include cement, urea-formaldehyde, and bitumen although other immobilization agents will be studied. The program also includes development of acceptable test procedures for the final immobilized products as well as development of proposed criteria for storage, transportation, and disposal of the immobilized ILW

  7. Acceptability of a low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeleznik, N.; Polic, M.

    2000-01-01

    Siting of a radioactive waste repository, even for the waste of low and intermediate level (LILW) radioactivity, presents a great problem in almost every country that produces such waste. The main problem is not a technical one, but socio-psychological, namely the acceptability of this kind of repository. In general, people are opposed to any such kind of facility in their vicinity (NIMBY). In this study we try to establish the factors that influence people's behavior regarding the construction of a radioactive waste repository in their local community, with the use of Ajzen's model of planned behavior. Two different scenarios about the construction of a radioactive waste repository in their community, together with a set of questions were presented to participants from different schools. Data from the survey were analysed by multivariate methods, and a model of relevant behaviour was proposed. From the results it can be seen that different approaches to local community participation in site selection process slightly influence people's attitudes towards the LILW repository, while significant differences in answers were found in the responses which depend on participants' knowledge. Therefore the RAO Agency will further intensify preparation of the relevant communication plan and start with its implementation to support LILW repository site selection process, which will also include educational programme. (author)

  8. Colloids related to low level and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsay, J.D.F.; Russell, P.J.; Avery, R.G.

    1991-03-01

    A comprehensive investigation has been undertaken to improve the understanding of the potential role of colloids in the context of disposal and storage of low and intermediate level waste immobilised in cement. Several topics have been investigated using a wide range of advanced physico-chemical and analytical techniques. These include: (a) the study of formation and characteristics of colloids in cement leachates, (b) the effects of the near-field aqueous chemistry on the characteristics of colloids in repository environments, (c) colloid sorption behaviour, (d) interactions of near-field materials with leachates, and (e) preliminary assessment of colloid migration behaviour. It has been shown that the generation of colloids in cement leachates can arise from a process of nucleation and growth leading to an amorphous phase which is predominantly calcium silicate hydrate. Such colloidal material has a capacity for association with polyvalent rare earths and actinides and these may be significant in the source term and processes involving radionuclide retention in the near field. It has also been shown that the near-field aqueous chemistry (pH, Ca 2+ concentration) has a marked effect on colloid behaviour (deposition and stability). A mechanistic approach to predict colloid sorption affinity has been developed which highlights the importance of colloid characteristics and the nature of the ionic species. (author)

  9. Disposal of high level and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flowers, R.H.

    1991-01-01

    The waste products from the nuclear industry are relatively small in volume. Apart from a few minor gaseous and liquid waste streams, containing readily dispersible elements of low radiotoxicity, all these products are processed into stable solid packages for disposal in underground repositories. Because the volumes are small, and because radioactive wastes are latecomers on the industrial scene, a whole new industry with a world-wide technological infrastructure has grown up alongside the nuclear power industry to carry out the waste processing and disposal to very high standards. Some of the technical approaches used, and the Regulatory controls which have been developed, will undoubtedly find application in the future to the management of non-radioactive toxic wastes. The repository site outlined would contain even high-level radioactive wastes and spent fuels being contained without significant radiation dose rates to the public. Water pathway dose rates are likely to be lowest for vitrified high-level wastes with spent PWR fuel and intermediate level wastes being somewhat higher. (author)

  10. Transfer of L1 Visual Word Recognition Strategies during Early Stages of L2 Learning: Evidence from Hebrew Learners Whose First Language Is Either Semitic or Indo-European

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Tal; Degani, Tamar; Peleg, Orna

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined visual word recognition processes in Hebrew (a Semitic language) among beginning learners whose first language (L1) was either Semitic (Arabic) or Indo-European (e.g. English). To examine if learners, like native Hebrew speakers, exhibit morphological sensitivity to root and word-pattern morphemes, learners made an…

  11. Management of low- and intermediate level waste in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Jan

    1999-01-01

    This presentation describes how the management of radioactive waste is organised in Sweden, where Swedish law places the responsibility for such management with the waste generators. The four nuclear utilities have formed a joint company, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., SKB, to handle the nuclear waste. The Swedish waste management system includes a final repository for short-lived low level waste (LLW) and intermediate level waste (ILW) and an interim storage facility for spent nuclear fuel and long-lived waste. Some very low-level, short-lived waste is disposed of in shallow-land repositories at the nuclear power stations. The final repository is situated in underground rock caverns close to the Forsmark nuclear power plant. The rock caverns have been excavated to a depth of more than 50 m beneath the Baltic Sea floor. LLW is compacted into bales or packaged in metal drums or cases that can be transported in standard freight containers. Radioactive materials used in other sectors such as hospitals are collected and packaged at Studsvik and later deposited in the deep repository. ILW is mixed with cement or bitumen and cast in cement or steel boxes or metal drums. The final repository has different chambers for different kinds of waste. The environmental impact of the repository is negligible. Because Sweden's nuclear power plants and the SKB facilities all are located on the coast, all the waste transport can be conducted by sea. The costs of managing and disposing of Sweden's nuclear waste are small compared to the price of electricity

  12. Treatment and conditioning of metallic intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidar, Per; Larsson, Arne; Huutoniemi, Tommi; Blank, Eva; Elfwing, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    In 2011 SKB started an R and D program for evaluating different disposal concepts for LL-LILW. The purpose was to develop alternative repository concepts and conditioning methods for LL-LILW and to evaluate and compare them from a range of parameters. The goal is to present a comparison between identified repository concepts by 2013. The material should be of such a quality that SKB can make decisions of which concepts that are to be further investigated in a safety analysis. As a part of the R and D program for the LL-LILW disposal facility, Studsvik was assigned to investigate whether melting of metallic LL-LILW is technically feasible and, if so, what the requirements are to build and operate such a facility. Specific concern was given to the following metallic components: - Core components and reactor internals from both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). - Reactor pressure vessels from PWRs. The paper presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the Studsvik authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is presented in the paper, considering cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radio-logical risks associated with operation and the benefits to disposal and long term safety. Studsvik also investigated alternative techniques for embedding of metallic ILW components. Embedding of radioactive metallic ILW components protects the component from corrosion and leakage of radionuclides from repository to biosphere can thereby be both delayed and decreased. Conditioning by embedding has

  13. PL2 production of english word-final consonants: the role of orthography and learner profile variables Produção de consoantes finais do inglês como L2: o papel da ortografia e de variáveis relacionadas ao perfil do aprendiz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Silveira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates some factors affecting the acquisition of second language (L2 phonology by learners with considerable exposure to the target language in an L2 context. More specifically, the purpose of the study is two-fold: (a to investigate the extent to which participants resort to phonological processes resulting from the transfer of L1 sound-spelling correspondence into the L2 when pronouncing English word-final consonants; and (b to examine the relationship between rate of transfer and learner profile factors, namely proficiency level, length of residence in the L2 country, age of arrival in the L2 country, education, chronological age, use of English with native speakers, attendance in EFL courses, and formal education. The investigation involved 31 Brazilian speakers living in the United States with diverse profiles. Data were collected using a questionnaire to elicit the participants' profiles, a sentence-reading test (pronunciation measure, and an oral picture-description test (L2 proficiency measure. The results indicate that even in an L2 context, the transfer of L1 sound-spelling correspondence to the production of L2 word-final consonants is frequent. The findings also reveal that extensive exposure to rich L2 input leads to the development of proficiency and improves production of L2 word-final consonants.O presente estudo examina fatores que afetam a produção de consoantes em segunda língua (L2 por aprendizes que foram consideravelmente expostos à língua-alvo em um contexto de L2. Um dos objetivos do presente estudo foi investigar com que frequência os participantes utilizam processos fonológicos que resultam da transferência da correspondência entre ortografia e som da língua materna (L1 para a L2, quando produzem consoantes da língua inglesa em posição de final de palavra. O segundo objetivo consistiu em examinar o relacionamento entre índice de transferência grafo-fonológica e fatores ligados ao

  14. Investigating L2 Performance in Text Chat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Shannon; Smith, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the linguistic complexity and lexical diversity of both overt and covert L2 output produced during synchronous written computer-mediated communication, also referred to as chat. Video enhanced chatscripts produced by university learners of German (N = 23) engaged in dyadic task-based chat interaction were coded and analyzed for…

  15. Lexical representation of novel L2 contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes-Harb, Rachel; Masuda, Kyoko

    2005-04-01

    There is much interest among psychologists and linguists in the influence of the native language sound system on the acquisition of second languages (Best, 1995; Flege, 1995). Most studies of second language (L2) speech focus on how learners perceive and produce L2 sounds, but we know of only two that have considered how novel sound contrasts are encoded in learners' lexical representations of L2 words (Pallier et al., 2001; Ota et al., 2002). In this study we investigated how native speakers of English encode Japanese consonant quantity contrasts in their developing Japanese lexicons at different stages of acquisition (Japanese contrasts singleton versus geminate consonants but English does not). Monolingual English speakers, native English speakers learning Japanese for one year, and native speakers of Japanese were taught a set of Japanese nonwords containing singleton and geminate consonants. Subjects then performed memory tasks eliciting perception and production data to determine whether they encoded the Japanese consonant quantity contrast lexically. Overall accuracy in these tasks was a function of Japanese language experience, and acoustic analysis of the production data revealed non-native-like patterns of differentiation of singleton and geminate consonants among the L2 learners of Japanese. Implications for theories of L2 speech are discussed.

  16. Low- and intermediate-level waste repository-induced effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leupin, O.X.; Marschall, P.; Johnson, L.; Cloet, V.; Schneider, J. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Smith, P. [Safety Assessment Management Ltd, Henley-On-Thames, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Savage, D. [Savage Earth Associates Ltd, Bournemouth, Dorset (United Kingdom); Senger, R. [Intera Inc., Ennetbaden (Switzerland)

    2016-10-15

    This status report aims at describing and assessing the interactions of the radioactive waste emplaced in a low- and intermediate level waste (L/ILW) repository with the engineered materials and the Opalinus Clay host rock. The Opalinus Clay has a thickness of about 100 m in the proposed siting regions. Among other things the results are used to steer the RD and D programme of NAGRA. The repository-induced effects considered in this report are of the following broad types: - Thermal effects: i.e. effects arising principally from the heat generated by the waste and the setting of cement. - Rock-mechanical effects: i.e. effects arising from the mechanical disturbance to the rock caused by the excavation of the emplacement caverns and other underground structures. - Hydraulic and gas-related effects: i.e. the effects of repository resaturation and of gas generation, e.g. due to the corrosion of metals within the repository, on the host rock and engineered barriers. - Chemical effects: i.e. chemical interactions between the waste, the engineered materials and the host rock. Deep geological repositories are designed to avoid or mitigate the impact of potentially detrimental repository-induced effects on long-term safety. For the repository under consideration in the present report, an assessment of those repository-induced effects that remain shows that detrimental chemical and mechanical impacts are largely confined to the rock adjacent to the excavations, thermal impacts are minimal and gas effects can be mitigated by appropriate design measures to reduce gas production and provide pathways for gas transport that limit gas pressure build-up (engineered gas transport system, or EGTS). Specific measures that are part of the current reference design are discussed in relation to their significance with respect to repository-induced effects. The disposal system described in this report provides a system of passive barriers with multiple safety functions. The disposal

  17. Low- and intermediate-level waste repository-induced effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leupin, O.X.; Marschall, P.; Johnson, L.; Cloet, V.; Schneider, J.; Smith, P.; Savage, D.; Senger, R.

    2016-10-01

    This status report aims at describing and assessing the interactions of the radioactive waste emplaced in a low- and intermediate level waste (L/ILW) repository with the engineered materials and the Opalinus Clay host rock. The Opalinus Clay has a thickness of about 100 m in the proposed siting regions. Among other things the results are used to steer the RD and D programme of NAGRA. The repository-induced effects considered in this report are of the following broad types: - Thermal effects: i.e. effects arising principally from the heat generated by the waste and the setting of cement. - Rock-mechanical effects: i.e. effects arising from the mechanical disturbance to the rock caused by the excavation of the emplacement caverns and other underground structures. - Hydraulic and gas-related effects: i.e. the effects of repository resaturation and of gas generation, e.g. due to the corrosion of metals within the repository, on the host rock and engineered barriers. - Chemical effects: i.e. chemical interactions between the waste, the engineered materials and the host rock. Deep geological repositories are designed to avoid or mitigate the impact of potentially detrimental repository-induced effects on long-term safety. For the repository under consideration in the present report, an assessment of those repository-induced effects that remain shows that detrimental chemical and mechanical impacts are largely confined to the rock adjacent to the excavations, thermal impacts are minimal and gas effects can be mitigated by appropriate design measures to reduce gas production and provide pathways for gas transport that limit gas pressure build-up (engineered gas transport system, or EGTS). Specific measures that are part of the current reference design are discussed in relation to their significance with respect to repository-induced effects. The disposal system described in this report provides a system of passive barriers with multiple safety functions. The disposal

  18. Radiological protection and the selection of management strategies for intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.D.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the steps involved in selecting management systems and an overall management strategy for intermediate level solid radioactive wastes. The radiological protection inputs to intermediate level waste management decisions are discussed, together with the results of preliminary radiological assessments of disposal options. Areas where further work is required are identified. (author)

  19. Learner Beliefs about Sociolinguistic Competence: A Qualitative Case Study of Four University Second Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinsuk; Rehner, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the beliefs about second language (L2) sociolinguistic competence of four university-level advanced L2 learners. It places particular emphasis on 1) how these university learners conceptualized L2 sociolinguistic competence; 2) how they thought about two different language learning contexts (viz., the L2 classroom versus…

  20. Digital Game-Based Learning (DGBL) in the L2 Classroom: The Impact of the UN's Off-the-Shelf Videogame, Food Force, on Learner Affect and Vocabulary Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitosugi, Claire Ikumi; Schmidt, Matthew; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-method study explored the impact of "Food Force (FF)", a UN-sponsored off-the-shelf videogame, on learner affect and vocabulary learning and retention in a Japanese as a second/foreign language classroom. The videogame was integrated into an existing curriculum and two studies were performed. In Study 1 (n = 9), new vocabulary…

  1. Status and advice of the low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal sites in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng Keyan; Lu Caixia

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of nuclear power industry in China, as well as the decommissioning of the nuclear facilities, and the process of radioactive waste management, a mount of the low and intermediate level radioactive solid wastes will increase rapidly. How to dispose the low and intermediate level radioactive solid wastes, that not only related to Chinese nuclear energy and nuclear technology with sustainable development, but also related to the public health, environment safety. According to Chinese « long-term development plan of nuclear power (2005- 2020) », when construct the nuclear power, should simultaneous consider the sites that dispose the low and intermediate level radioactive waste, In order to adapt to the needs that dispose the increasing low and intermediate level radioactive waste with development of nuclear power. In the future, all countries are facing the enormous challenge of nuclear waste disposal. (authors)

  2. On the effect of self-motivation instruction on the language learners belief on autonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Taher Alavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zoltán Dörnyei (2005 proposed a new form of motivation which is aiming at equipping the learners with a lifelong approach to motivation which is self-induced by the learner and it is not needed for any extrinsic mediation, having understood how to keep yourself motivated. This study was an attempt to find out the effect of self-motivation strategies instruction on the learners belief on learner autonomy in L2 learning. To find out the possible effect of our independent variable we selected one intermediate level class in grade 2 (25 male in high school out of the whole population of high school students in west Azerbaijan, Iran via availability sampling. Having ensured for the homogeneity of the class members’ English proficiency through Nelson test, we gave them a questionnaire on the learner’s belief on autonomy in learning L2 to answer. Then within two months, in a separate class the students were given instructions on how to employ self-motivation strategies while learning English. After two months of instruction, they were given the same questionnaire again to get to know the possible effect of our independent variable. Having analyzed the obtained data in SPSS software, the results showed that our hypothesis was rejected and our null hypothesis was verified.

  3. Factors Affecting the Use of Self-Regulated L2 Learning Strategies in Turkish FLE Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Dinçay; Dündar, Sinem

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the overall self-regulated L2 learning strategy use of L2 learners depending upon the Strategic Self-Regulation (S[superscript 2]R) Model proposed by Oxford (2011), and to examine the relationships between their reported self-regulated L2 strategy use and their personality traits, identity, beliefs about L2 learning,…

  4. Neural changes underlying early stages of L2 vocabulary acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, He; Holcomb, Phillip J; Midgley, Katherine J

    2016-11-01

    Research has shown neural changes following second language (L2) acquisition after weeks or months of instruction. But are such changes detectable even earlier than previously shown? The present study examines the electrophysiological changes underlying the earliest stages of second language vocabulary acquisition by recording event-related potentials (ERPs) within the first week of learning. Adult native English speakers with no previous Spanish experience completed less than four hours of Spanish vocabulary training, with pre- and post-training ERPs recorded to a backward translation task. Results indicate that beginning L2 learners show rapid neural changes following learning, manifested in changes to the N400 - an ERP component sensitive to lexicosemantic processing and degree of L2 proficiency. Specifically, learners in early stages of L2 acquisition show growth in N400 amplitude to L2 words following learning as well as a backward translation N400 priming effect that was absent pre-training. These results were shown within days of minimal L2 training, suggesting that the neural changes captured during adult second language acquisition are more rapid than previously shown. Such findings are consistent with models of early stages of bilingualism in adult learners of L2 ( e.g. Kroll and Stewart's RHM) and reinforce the use of ERP measures to assess L2 learning.

  5. Speaking out on Behalf of the Voiceless Learners: Written Corrective Feedback for English Language Learners in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Majid; Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad; Mohebbi, Hassan; Masjedlou, Ali Panahi

    2017-01-01

    To date, L2 researchers have studied the effect of feedback on improving L2 learners' writing from different perspectives. However, there are a lot of aspects which are not comprehensively researched yet, such as L2 learners' and teachers' perceptions and practices about feedback. To close the gap, this study investigates language learners'…

  6. Assessing Input Enhancement as Positive Factor and Its Impact on L2 Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Seyyed Fariborz Pishdadi; Nasab, Mahdiyeh Seyed Beheshti

    2015-01-01

    Input enhancement's role to promote learners' awareness in L2 contexts has caused a tremendous amount of research. Conspicuously, by regarding all aspects of input enhancement, the study aimed to find out how differently many kinds of input enhancement factors such as bolding, underlining, and capitalizing impact on L2 learners' vocabulary…

  7. Feasibility of large volume casting cementation process for intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhuying; Chen Baisong; Zeng Jishu; Yu Chengze

    1988-01-01

    The recent tendency of radioactive waste treatment and disposal both in China and abroad is reviewed. The feasibility of the large volume casting cementation process for treating and disposing the intermediate level radioactive waste from spent fuel reprocessing plant in shallow land is assessed on the basis of the analyses of the experimental results (such as formulation study, solidified radioactive waste properties measurement ect.). It can be concluded large volume casting cementation process is a promising, safe and economic process. It is feasible to dispose the intermediate level radioactive waste from reprocessing plant it the disposal site chosen has resonable geological and geographical conditions and some additional effective protection means are taken

  8. Application of remote sensing technique to site selection for low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhangru; Jin Yuanxin; Liu Yuemiao; Hou Dewen

    2001-01-01

    Based on the relative criteria of selection of disposal site for low and intermediate level radioactive waste, the social-economic conditions, landform, morphologic properties, regional geological stability, hydrogeological and engineering geological characters of adjacent area of Anhui, Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces were investigated. The geological interpretation of thematic mapper images, field reconnaissance and data analysis were conducted during the research work. The results show that three areas in the west part of Zhejiang Province were recommended as potential site for disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste. They are Bajiaotang area, Tiebanchong area and Changxing-Guangde-Anji nabes

  9. Brazilian low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal and environmental conservation areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uemura, George; Cuccia, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive waste should be disposed off in proper disposal facilities. These facilities must include unoccupied areas as protection barriers, also called buffer zone. Besides that, Brazilian environmental laws require that certain enterprises must preserve part of their area for environmental conservation. The future Brazilian low and intermediate level waste repository (RBMN) might be classified as such enterprise. This paper presents and discusses the main Brazilian legal framework concerning different types of conservation areas that are allowed and which of them could be applied to the buffer zones of RBMN. The possibility of creating a plant repository in the buffer zone is also discussed. (author)

  10. AERE contracts with DoE on the treatment and disposal of intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, B.A.

    1984-06-01

    This document reports work carried out in 1983/84 under 10 contracts between DoE and AERE on the treatment and disposal of intermediate level wastes. Individual summaries are provided for each contract report within the document, under the headings: comparative evaluation of α and βγ irradiated medium level waste forms; modelling and characterisation of intermediate level waste forms based on polymers; optimisation of processing parameters for polymer and bitumen modified cements; ceramic waste forms; radionuclide release during leaching; ion exchange processes; electrical processes for the treatment of medium active liquid wastes; fast reactor fuel element cladding; dissolver residues; flowsheeting/systems study. (U.K.)

  11. Policy and technical considerations for intermediate-level and low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    This section has addressed issues, topics, and considerations related to low-level and intermediate-level wastes that are basic to developing and establishing environmental radiation protection criteria for radioactive wastes. Applicability of criteria, criteria considerations for sites, control of radiological impact to the population, and long-term considerations are discussed

  12. Natural analogue study for low-and-intermediate level radioactive waste shallow burial disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Cunli; Fan Zhiwen; Huang Yawen; Cui Anxi; Liu Xiuzheng; Zhang Jinshen

    1995-01-01

    The paper makes a comparison of low-and-intermediate level radioactive waste shallow burial disposal with Chinese ancient tombs in respects of siting, engineering structures, design principle and construction procedures. Results showed that Chinese ancient tombs are very good analogue for low-and-intermediate level radioactive waste shallow burial disposal. Long-term preservation of ancient tombs and buried objects demonstrated that low-and-intermediate level radioactive waste shallow burial disposal would be safe if suitable sites were selected, reasonable engineering structures and good backfill materials were adopted, and scientific construction procedures were followed. The paper reports for the first time the testing results of certain ancient tomb backfill materials. The results indicated that the materials have so low a permeability as 1.5 x 10 -8 cm/s , and strong adsorption to radionuclides Co and Cs with the distribution coefficients of 1.4 x 10 4 mL/g and 2.1 x 10 4 mL/g, and the retardation factors of 4.4 x 10 4 and 7.7 x 10 4 respectively. Good performance of these materials is important assurance of long-term preservation of the ancient tombs. These materials may be considered to be used as backfill materials in low-and-intermediate level radioactive shallow burial disposal. (4 figs., 10 tabs.)

  13. Norwegian work on establishing a combined storage and disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Atomic Energy Agency WATRP Review Team.

    1995-12-01

    The IAEA has, through its Waste Management Assessment and Technical Review Programme (WATRP), evaluated policies and facilities related to management of radioactive waste in Norway. It is concluded that the Himdalen site, in combination with the chosen engineering concept, can be suitable for the storage and disposal of the relatively small amounts of Norwegian low and intermediate level waste

  14. Central repository for low- and intermediate-level waste (ALMA) conceptual design, siting and safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjellbert, N.; Haeggblom, H.; Cederstroem, M.; Lundgren, T.

    1980-07-01

    A generic design, siting and safety study of a proposed repository for low- and intermediate-level waste has been made. Special emphasis has been placed on safety characterostics. The conceptual design and the generic site, on which the study is based, are realistically chosen in accordance with present construction techniques and the existing geohydrological conditions in Sweden. (Auth.)

  15. Establishing managerial requirements for low-and intermediate-level waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, C. W.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, H. T.; Park, W. J.; Suk, T. W.; Park, S. H.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews basic considerations for establishing managerial requirements on the domestic low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste repository and presents the corresponding draft requirements. The draft emphasizes their close linking with the related regulations, standards and safety assessment for the repository. It also proposes a desirable direction towards harmonizing together with the existing waste acceptance requirements for the repository

  16. Progress on the national low level radioactive waste repository and national intermediate level waste store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, C.

    2003-01-01

    The Australian Government is committed to establishing two purpose-built facilities for the management of Australia's radioactive waste; the national repository for disposal of low level and short-lived intermediate level ('low level') waste, and the national store for storage of long-lived intermediate level ('intermediate level') waste. It is strongly in the interests of public security and safety to secure radioactive waste by disposal or storage in facilities specially designed for this purpose. The current arrangements where waste is stored under ad hoc arrangements at hundreds of sites around Australia does not represent international best practice in radioactive waste management. Environmental approval has been obtained for the national repository to be located at Site 40a, 20 km east of Woomera in South Australia, and licences are currently being sought from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) to site, construct and operate the facility. The national repository may be operating in 2004 subject to obtaining the required licences. The national store will be located on Australian Government land and house intermediate level waste produced by Australian Government departments and agencies. The national store will not be located in South Australia. Short-listing of potentially suitable sites is expected to be completed soon

  17. Assessment of Student Achievement: Evaluation of Student Achievement at the Intermediate Level. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlstrom, M.; And Others

    Evaluation and assessment procedures of Ontario, Canada principals and teachers at the Intermediate level (grades 7 and 8) were examined. Extensive questionnaires were returned by 134 principals and 225 teachers divided across the subject areas of English, Mathematics, Science, Languages, History, Home Economics or Shop, Arts, and Physical…

  18. Conditioning of intermediate-level waste at Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumbach, H.

    2003-01-01

    This contribution to the group of low-level, intermediate, mixed and hazardous waste describes the conditioning of intermediate-level mixed waste (dose rate above 10 mSv/h at the surface) from Research Centre Juelich (FZJ). Conditioning of the waste by supercompaction is performed at Research Centre Karlsruhe (FZK). The waste described is radioactive waste arising from research at Juelich. This waste includes specimens and objects from irradiation experiments in the research reactors Merlin (FRJ-1) and Dido (FRJ-2) at FZJ. In principle, radioactive waste at Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH is differentiated by the surface dose rate at the waste package. Up to a surface dose rate of 10 mSv/h, the waste is regarded as low-level. The radioactive waste described here has a surface dose rate above 10 mSv/h. Waste up to 10 mSv/h is conditioned at the Juelich site according to different conditioning methods. The intermediate-level waste can only be conditioned by supercompaction in the processing facility for intermediate-level waste from plant operation at Research Centre Karlsruhe. Research Centre Juelich also uses this waste cell to condition its intermediate-level waste from plant operation. (orig.)

  19. The influence of organic materials on the near field of an intermediate level radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, J.D.

    1988-01-01

    The influence of organic materials which are present in some intermediate level wastes on the chemistry of the near field of a radioactive waste repository is discussed. Particular attention is given to the possible formation of water soluble complexing agents as a result of the radiation field and chemical conditions. The present state of the research is reviewed. (author)

  20. Comparative estimates of risks arising from storage of intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, D.

    1986-04-01

    Estimates are presented of risks arising from accidents occuring during storage of nine types of conditioned intermediate level waste. Additional data are introduced relating to the risks from accidents affecting raw waste, and to risks associated with the occupational doses received during normal operation of a waste store. Risks in all three categories are shown to be extremely small. (author)

  1. AERE contracts with DoE on the treatment and disposal of intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, B.A.

    1984-11-01

    Reports are presented on work on the following topics concerned with the treatment and disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes: comparative evaluation of α and β γ irradiated medium level waste forms; modelling and characterisation of intermediate level waste forms based on polymers; optimisation of processing parameters for polymer and bitumen modified cements; α damage in non-reference waste form matrix materials; leaching mechanisms and modelling; inorganic ion exchange treatment of medium active effluents; electrical processes for the treatment of medium active liquid waste; fast reactor fuel element cladding; dissolver residues; effects of radiation on the properties of cemented MTR waste forms; equilibrium leach testing of cemented MTR waste forms; radiolytic oxidation of radionuclides; immobilisation of liquid organic waste; quality control, non-conformances and corrective action. (U.K.)

  2. An updated overview of low and intermediate level waste disposal facilities around the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuccia, Valeria; Uemura, George; Ferreira, Vinicius Verna M.; Tello, Cledola Cassia O. de; Malta, Ricardo Scott V.

    2011-01-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive waste should be disposed off in proper disposal facilities. Some countries already have these facilities and others are planning theirs. Information about disposal facilities around the world is useful and necessary; however, data on this matter are usually scattered in official reports per country. In order to allow an easier access to this information, this paper aims to provide an overview of disposal facilities for low and intermediate level radioactive waste around the world, as updated as possible. Also, characteristics of the facilities are provided, when possible. Considering that the main source of radioactive waste are the activities of nuclear reactors in research or power generation, the paper will also provide a summarized overview of these reactors around the world, updated until April, 2011. This data collection may be an important tool for researchers, and other professionals in this field. Also, it might provide an overview about the final disposal of radioactive waste. (author)

  3. Disposal Options for Low and Intermediate-Level Radioactive Waste: Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdellatif, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the status of current disposal options for Low and Intermediate- Level Radioactive Waste (LILRW) generated in different countries and outlines the potential for future disposal option/s of these wastes in Egypt. Since approaches used in other countries may provide useful lessons for managing Egyptian radioactive wastes. This study was based on data for19 countries repositories and we focused on 6 countries, which considered as leaders in the field of disposal of rad waste. Several countries have plans for repositories which are sufficiently advanced that it was based on their own of their extensive experience with nuclear power generation and with constructing and operating LLRW disposal facilities. On the other hand, our programme for site selection and host rock characterization for low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal is under study. We are preparing our criteria for selecting a national repository for LIL rad waste.

  4. Aube storage centre for short-lived low- and intermediate-level wastes. Annual report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    The National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), was established by the December 1991 Waste Act as a public body in charge of the long-term management of all radioactive waste, under the supervision of the Ministry of Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and the Sea (formerly the Ministry of Industry and the Ministry of Environment), and the Ministry of Research. The Andra operates two storage centers in the Aube region (France): the center for short-lived low- and intermediate-level wastes, and the center for very-low-level radioactive wastes. This document is the 2009 activity report of the center for short-lived low- and intermediate-level wastes. It presents a review of the activities of the center: presentation of the installations, safety and radiation protection, events or incidents, environmental monitoring, wastes management, public information, opinion of the Health and safety Committee (CHSCT)

  5. Aube storage center for short-lived low- and intermediate-level wastes. Annual report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    The National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), was established by the December 1991 Waste Act as a public body in charge of the long-term management of all radioactive waste, under the supervision of the Ministry of Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and the Sea (formerly the Ministry of Industry and the Ministry of Environment), and the Ministry of Research. The Andra operates two storage centers in the Aube region (France): the center for short-lived low- and intermediate-level wastes, and the center for very-low-level radioactive wastes. This document is the 2008 activity report of the center for short-lived low- and intermediate-level wastes. It presents a review of the activities of the center: presentation of the installations, safety and radiation protection, events or incidents, environmental monitoring, wastes management, public information

  6. Aube storage center for short-lived low- and intermediate-level wastes. Annual report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-06-01

    The National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra), was established by the December 1991 Waste Act as a public body in charge of the long-term management of all radioactive waste, under the supervision of the Ministry of Ecology, Energy, Sustainable Development and the Sea (formerly the Ministry of Industry and the Ministry of Environment), and the Ministry of Research. The Andra operates two storage centers in the Aube region (France): the center for short-lived low- and intermediate-level wastes, and the center for very-low-level radioactive wastes. This document is the 2010 activity report of the center for short-lived low- and intermediate-level wastes. It presents a review of the activities of the center: presentation of the installations, safety and radiation protection, events or incidents, environmental monitoring, wastes management, public information, recommendations of the Health and safety Committee (CHSCT)

  7. International co-ordinated research project on low and intermediate level waste package performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dayal, R.

    2001-01-01

    As part of IAEA's mandate to facilitate the transfer and exchange of information amongst Member States, the Agency is currently coordinating an international R and D project, involving 12 developed and developing countries, on Performance of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages under Disposal Conditions. This paper will review the current status of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and summarize the key findings of the work completed to date within the context of the CRP in the participating Member States. (author)

  8. Types of organic materials present in BNFL intermediate level waste streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, P.

    1988-01-01

    This presentation lists the constituents present in BNFL intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The inorganic and organic components are listed and there is a detailed analysis of the plutonium contaminated materials in terms of proportion of combustible and non-combustible content, up to the year 2000. A description of the Waste Treatment Complex at Sellafield is presented. The research programme for leach testing, sorption and solubility testing and decomposition of organic matter was outlined. (U.K.)

  9. Characterisation of long-lived low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the Nordic Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broden, K.; Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K.; Carlsson, T.; Viitanen, P.; Walderhaug, T.; Sneve, M.; Hornkjoel, S.; Backe, S.

    1997-11-01

    The present report is final report from a study on characterisation of radioactive waters in the Nordic countries. The study has mainly been focused on long-lived low and intermediate level radioactive waste. Methods to measure or estimate the activity content and the general composition are discussed. Recommendations are given regarding characterisation of waste under treatment and characterisation of already produced waste packages. (au)

  10. Characterisation of long-lived low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in the Nordic Countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broden, K. [Studsvik RadWaste AB, (El Salvador); Carugati, S.; Brodersen, K. [Forskningscenter Risoe, (Denmark); Carlsson, T.; Viitanen, P. [VVT, (Finland); Walderhaug, T. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Institute (Iceland); Sneve, M.; Hornkjoel, S. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Backe, S. [Institute for Energy Technology (Norway)

    1997-11-01

    The present report is final report from a study on characterisation of radioactive waters in the Nordic countries. The study has mainly been focused on long-lived low and intermediate level radioactive waste. Methods to measure or estimate the activity content and the general composition are discussed. Recommendations are given regarding characterisation of waste under treatment and characterisation of already produced waste packages. (au).

  11. Disposal approach for long-lived low and intermediate-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin Beak; Park, Joo Wan; Kim, Chang Lak

    2005-01-01

    There certainly exists the radioactive inventory that exceeds the waste acceptance criteria for final disposal of the low and intermediate-level radioactive waste. In this paper, current disposal status of the long-lived radioactive waste in several nations are summarized and the basic procedures for disposal approach are suggested. With this suggestion, intensive discussion and research activities can hopefully be launched to set down the possible resolutions to dispose of the long-lived radioactive waste

  12. The duration of the institutional controls on the low and intermediate level waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jie; Li Yang; Liu Yafang; Lian Bing; Zhao Yangjun; Chen Hailong; Gu Zhijie

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate institutional controls are put in place prior to repository closure. Such controls can guarantee the long term safety of the repository. Today there is no clear standard on how to determine the institutional control period. This paper tries to give possible factors and activities of the institutional controls on the low and intermediate level waste repositories, and makes some suggestions on the institutional controls in our country. (authors)

  13. Storage for low-level and intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this report was to assess whether three nominated sites in Norway for underground storage of low-level and intermediate-level radioactive wastes would comply with safety standards and applicable laws and regulations. The site selection criteria are described and the report evaluates the technical, environmental and socio-economic suitability of the different sites. The site selection process eliminated two of the nominated sites, whereas one site was singled out. 28 refs., 14 figs., 10 tabs

  14. Removal of radioruthenium from alkaline intermediate level radioactive waste solution : a laboratory investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, S.K.; Theyyunni, T.K.

    1994-01-01

    Various methods were investigated in the laboratory for the removal of radioruthenium from alkaline intermediate level radioactive waste solutions of reprocessing plant origin. The methods included batch equilibration with different ion exchangers and sorbents, column testing and chemical precipitation. A column method using zinc-activated carbon mixture and a chemical precipitation method using ferrous salt along with sodium sulphite were found to be promising for plant scale application. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Estimation of the conditioning and storage costs of low- and intermediate-level solid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Moro, A.; Panciatici, G.

    1977-01-01

    The conditioning and storage costs of low- and intermediate-level solid radioactive wastes are analyzed. The cost of direct labour is assumed as the reference cost for their computation and the storage cost is considered as resulting from the contract cost ''una tantum'' and from the leasing cost. As an example, the cost trends are reported, relevant to the solution adopted at CAMEN (conditioning in concrete containers and storage on concrete open-air bed)

  16. Cement-based processes for the immobilization of intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.J.; Lee, D.J.; Price, M.S.T.; Smith, D.L.G.

    1985-01-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the use of cement-based materials for the immobilisation of intermediate level wastes. Various cementitious materials are surveyed and the use of blast furnace slag is shown to be advantageous. The properties of cemented wastes are surveyed both during processing and as solid products. The application of Winfrith Cementation Laboratory technology to plant and flowsheet development for Winfrith Reactor sludge immobilisation is described. (author)

  17. Engineering design study for storage and disposal of intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, J R; Hackney, S; Richardson, J A; Heafield, W

    1982-11-01

    A conceptual design study is presented which covers both the storage and disposal of intermediate level waste; repositories in several rock formations are considered at a 300m depth. A total system is proposed including an engineered trench for ..beta gamma.. waste, emplacement systems and off site transportation. Safety during the emplacement phase and the radiological effects of human intrusion and geological catastrophies are considered.

  18. L1/L2 Differences in the Acquisition of Form-Meaning Pairings in a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of L1/L2 form-meaning differences in the domain of aspect to investigate whether L2 learners are able to acquire properties of the L2 that are different from the L1. Oral data were collected from English- and German-speaking university learners of French L2 (n = 75) at two different levels of proficiency. The results…

  19. Transport, handling, and interim storage of intermediate-level transuranic waste at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, J.C.; Snyder, A.M.

    1977-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory stores transuranic (TRU)-contaminated waste emitting significant amounts of beta-gamma radiation. This material is referred to as intermediate-level TRU waste. The Energy Research and Development Administration requires that this waste be stored retrievably during the interim before a Federal repository becomes operational. Waste form and packaging criteria for the eventual storage of this waste at a Federal repository, i.e., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), have been tentatively established. The packaging and storage techniques now in use at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are compatible with these criteria and also meet the requirement that the waste containers remain in a readily-retrievable, contamination-free condition during the interim storage period. The Intermediate Level Transuranic Storage Facility (ILTSF) provides below-grade storage in steel pipe vaults for intermediate-level TRU waste prior to shipment to the WIPP. Designated waste generating facilities, operated for the Energy Research and Development Administration, use a variety of packaging and transportation methods to deliver this waste to the ILTSF. Transfer of the waste containers to the ILTSF storage vaults is accomplished using handling methods compatible with these waste packaging and transport methods

  20. COMPUTING THE VOCABULARY DEMANDS OF L2 READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Cobb

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic computing can make two important contributions to second language (L2 reading instruction. One is to resolve longstanding research issues that are based on an insufficiency of data for the researcher, and the other is to resolve related pedagogical problems based on insufficiency of input for the learner. The research section of the paper addresses the question of whether reading alone can give learners enough vocabulary to read. When the computer’s ability to process large amounts of both learner and linguistic data is applied to this question, it becomes clear that, for the vast majority of L2 learners, free or wide reading alone is not a sufficient source of vocabulary knowledge for reading. But computer processing also points to solutions to this problem. Through its ability to reorganize and link documents, the networked computer can increase the supply of vocabulary input that is available to the learner. The development section of the paper elaborates a principled role for computing in L2 reading pedagogy, with examples, in two broad areas, computer-based text design and computational enrichment of undesigned texts.

  1. L2 Processing of Plural Inflection in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yoonsang

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates (1) whether late second language (L2) learners can attain native-like knowledge of English plural inflection even when their first language (L1) lacks an equivalent and (2) whether they construct hierarchically structured representations during online sentence processing like native speakers. In a self-paced reading task,…

  2. Evidence from adult L1 Afrikaans L2 French

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    results of this study show that a large number of the L2 learners had indeed acquired ... position in V2-languages (such as German) and in third position in non-V2 ... L1, allows construction types x and y but he will have no problem acquiring .... Modern Foreign Languages at Stellenbosch University at the time of testing.

  3. Unconscious Motivation. Part II: Implicit Attitudes and L2 Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hoorie, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the attitudinal/motivational predictors of second language (L2) academic achievement. Young adult learners of English as a foreign language (N = 311) completed several self-report measures and the Single-Target Implicit Association Test. Examination of the motivational profiles of high and low achievers revealed that…

  4. Memorization versus Semantic Mapping in L2 Vocabulary Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoii, Roya; Sharififar, Samira

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of two cognitive strategies, rote memorization and semantic mapping, on L2 vocabulary acquisition. Thirty-eight intermediate female EFL learners divided into two experimental groups participated in this study. Each experimental group used one of the strategies for vocabulary acquisition. After the four-month…

  5. Task type and incidental L2 vocabulary learning: Repetition versus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effect of task type on incidental L2 vocabulary learning. The different tasks investigated in this study differed in terms of repetition of encounters and task involvement load. In a within-subjects design, 72 Iranian learners of English practised 18 target words in three exercise conditions: three ...

  6. The Effect of Conversation Engagement on L2 Learning Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenxue

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews patterns of interaction (i.e. learner role relationships) in peer communicative tasks, and uses data collected from different tasks to explain what happens in peer interaction and its impact on the learning opportunities interlocutors create for each other. It proposes that, with L2 peer interaction gaining popularity in…

  7. Automated Scoring of L2 Spoken English with Random Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuichiro; Abe, Mariko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to assess second language (L2) spoken English using automated scoring techniques. Automated scoring aims to classify a large set of learners' oral performance data into a small number of discrete oral proficiency levels. In automated scoring, objectively measurable features such as the frequencies of lexical and…

  8. Developing Intentionality and L2 Classroom Task-Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelma, Juup

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends work on "intentionality", from philosophy, psychology and education to an exploration of learners' meaning-making in L2 classroom task-engagement. The paper draws on both phenomenological and folk-psychological perspectives on intentionality, and employs John R. Searle's intrinsic (mental) and derived (observable)…

  9. Teaching L2 Pragmatics: Opportunities for Continuing Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vellenga, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    Teaching L2 pragmatics is often not covered in teacher education programs, and is an excellent area for continuing professional development. As part of a larger project on instructed interlanguage pragmatics, volunteer instructor participants were asked to teach a series of lessons on pragmatics to university-aged (19-23) ESL learners in ESL and…

  10. A dynamic usage based perspective on L2 writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verspoor, M.H.; Schmid, M.S.; Xu, X.

    The goal of this study was to explore the contribution that a dynamic usage based (DUB) perspective can bring to the establishment of objective measures to assess L2 learners' written texts and at the same time to gain insight into the dynamic process of language development. Four hundred and thirty

  11. Unconscious motivation. Part II: Implicit attitudes and L2 achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H. Al-Hoorie

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the attitudinal/motivational predictors of second language (L2 academic achievement. Young adult learners of English as a foreign language (N = 311 completed several self-report measures and the Single-Target Implicit Association Test. Examination of the motivational profiles of high and low achievers revealed that attachment to the L1 community and the ought-to L2 self were negatively associated with achievement, while explicit attitudes toward the L2 course and implicit attitudes toward L2 speakers were positively associated with it. The relationship between implicit attitudes and achievement could not be explained either by social desirability or by other cognitive confounds, and remained significant after controlling for explicit self-report measures. Explicit–implicit congruence also revealed a similar pattern, in that congruent learners were more open to the L2 community and obtained higher achievement. The results also showed that neither the ideal L2 self nor intended effort had any association with actual L2 achievement, and that intended effort was particularly prone to social desirability biases. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  12. Project Guarantee 1985. Repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste: construction and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    A constructional engineering project study aimed at clarification of the feasibility of a repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (type B repository) has been carried out; the study is based on a model data-set derived from the geological, rock mechanical and topographical characterictics of one of Nagra's planned exploration areas. Final storage is effected in subterranean rock caverns accessed by horizontal tunnel. The reception area also is sited below the surface. Storage is conceived in such a way that, after closure of the repository, maintenance and supervision can be dispensed with and a guarantee of high long-term safety can nevertheless be provided. The envisaged repository consists of an entry tunnel for road vehicles and a reception area with a series of caverns for receiving waste, for additional technical facilities and for the production of the concrete back-fill material. The connecting tunnel is serviced by a tunnel railway and the actual repository area consists of several storage caverns. The repository is intended to accomodate a total of 200'000 m3 of solidified low- and intermediate-level waste. Valanginian marl is assumed as the host rock, although it would also be basically possible to house the proposed installations in other host rocks. The excavated material will total around 1'000'000 m3. The construction time for the whole installation is estimated as about 7 years and a working team of around 30 people will be required for the estimated 60-year operational duration. The project described in the present report justifies the conclusion that construction of a repository for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste is feasible with present-day technology. This conclusion takes into consideration quantitative and operational constraints as well as geological and hydrogeological data relevant to constructional engineering. The latter are derived from a model data-set based on a specific locality

  13. Neuroscience Intermediate-Level Care Units Staffed by Intensivists: Clinical Outcomes and Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyeremanteng, Kwadwo; Hendin, Ariel; Bhardwaj, Kalpana; Thavorn, Kednapa; Neilipovitz, Dave; Kubelik, Dalibour; D'Egidio, Gianni; Stotts, Grant; Rosenberg, Erin

    2017-01-01

    With an aging population and increasing numbers of intensive care unit admissions, novel ways of providing quality care at reduced cost are required. Closed neurointensive care units improve outcomes for patients with critical neurological conditions, including decreased mortality and length of stay (LOS). Small studies have demonstrated the safety of intermediate-level units for selected patient populations. However, few studies analyze both cost and safety outcomes of these units. This retrospective study assessed clinical and cost-related outcomes in an intermediate-level neurosciences acute care unit (NACU) before and after the addition of an intensivist to the unit's care team. Starting in October 2011, an intensivist-led model was adopted in a 16-bed NACU unit, including daytime coverage by a dedicated intensivist. Data were obtained from all patients admitted 1 year prior to and 2 years after this intervention. Primary outcomes were LOS and hospital costs. Safety outcomes included mortality and readmissions. Descriptive and analytic statistics were calculated. Individual and total patient costs were calculated based on per-day NACU and ward cost estimates and significance measured using bootstrapping. A total of 2931 patients were included over the study period. Patients were on average 59.5 years and 53% male. The most common reasons for admission were central nervous system (CNS) tumor (27.6%), ischemic stroke (27%), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (11%). Following the introduction of an intensivist, there was a significant reduction in NACU and hospital LOS, by 1 day and 3 days, respectively. There were no differences in readmissions or mortality. Adding an intensivist produced an individual cost savings of US$963 in NACU and US$2687 per patient total hospital stay. An intensivist-led model of intermediate-level neurointensive care staffed by intensivists is safe, decreases LOS, and produces cost savings in a system increasingly strained to provide quality

  14. Modeling and Analysis on Radiological Safety Assessment of Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jung, Jong Tae; Kang, Chul Hyung (and others)

    2008-04-15

    Modeling study and analysis for technical support for the safety and performance assessment of the low- and intermediate level (LILW) repository partially needed for radiological environmental impact reporting which is essential for the licenses for construction and operation of LILW has been fulfilled. Throughout this study such essential area for technical support for safety and performance assessment of the LILW repository and its licensing as gas generation and migration in and around the repository, risk analysis and environmental impact during transportation of LILW, biosphere modeling and assessment for the flux-to-dose conversion factors for human exposure as well as regional and global groundwater modeling and analysis has been carried out.

  15. Environmental effects of disposal of intermediate-level wastes by shale fracturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weeren, H.O.

    1978-01-01

    Shale fracturing is a process currently being used at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the permanent disposal of locally generated, intermediate-level waste solutions. In this process, the waste is mixed with a solids blend of cement and other additives; the resulting grout is then injected into an impermeable shale formation at a depth of 700 to 1000 ft. A few hours after completion of the injection, the grout sets and the radioactive waste are fixed in the shale formation. An analysis of environmental effects of normal operation and possible accident situations is discussed

  16. Modeling and Analysis on Radiological Safety Assessment of Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Youn Myoung; Jung, Jong Tae; Kang, Chul Hyung

    2008-04-01

    Modeling study and analysis for technical support for the safety and performance assessment of the low- and intermediate level (LILW) repository partially needed for radiological environmental impact reporting which is essential for the licenses for construction and operation of LILW has been fulfilled. Throughout this study such essential area for technical support for safety and performance assessment of the LILW repository and its licensing as gas generation and migration in and around the repository, risk analysis and environmental impact during transportation of LILW, biosphere modeling and assessment for the flux-to-dose conversion factors for human exposure as well as regional and global groundwater modeling and analysis has been carried out

  17. Study of Radiation Shielding Analysis for Low-Intermediate Level Waste Transport Ship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dohyung; Lee, Unjang; Song, Yangsoo; Kim, Sukhoon; Ko, Jaehoon [Korea Nuclear Engineering and Service Corporation, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In Korea, it is planed to transport Low-Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (LILW) from each nuclear power plant site to Kyongju LILW repository after 2009. Transport through the sea using ship is one of the most prospective ways of LILW transport for current situation in Korea. There are domestic and international regulations for radiation dose limit for radioactive material transport. In this article, radiation shielding analysis for LILW transport ship is performed using 3-D computer simulation code, MCNP. As a result, the thickness and materials for radiation shielding walls next to cargo in the LILW transport ship are determined.

  18. International co-ordinated research project on low and intermediate level waste package performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayal, R. [International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    As part of IAEA's mandate to facilitate the transfer and exchange of information amongst Member States, the Agency is currently coordinating an international R and D project, involving 12 developed and developing countries, on Performance of Low and Intermediate Level Waste Packages under Disposal Conditions. This paper will review the current status of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and summarize the key findings of the work completed to date within the context of the CRP in the participating Member States. (author)

  19. Good Old-Fashioned Artificial Consciousness and the Intermediate Level Fallacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Manzotti

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been considerable interest and effort to the possibility to design and implement conscious robots, i.e., the chance that robots may have subjective experiences. Typical approaches as the global workspace, information integration, enaction, cognitive mechanisms, embodiment, i.e., the Good Old-Fashioned Artificial Consciousness, henceforth, GOFAC, share the same conceptual framework. In this paper, we discuss GOFAC's basic tenets and their implication for AI and Robotics. In particular, we point out the intermediate level fallacy as the central issue affecting GOFAC. Finally, we outline a possible alternative conceptual framework toward robot consciousness.

  20. Investigations on cement/polymer Waste packages containing intermediate level waste and organic exchange resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ELsourougy, M R; Zaki, A A; Aly, H F [Atomic energy authority, hot laboratory center, Cairo, (Egypt); Khalil, M Y [Nuclear engineering department, Alexandria university. Alexandria, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    Polymers can be added to cements to improve its nuclear waste immobilization properties. This trend in cementation processes is attracting attention and requiring through investigations. In this work, polymers of different kinds were added to ordinary portland cement for the purpose of solidifying intermediate level liquid wastes and organic ion exchange resins. Epoxy polymer such as Kemapoxy-150 reduced the leaching rate of cesium compared to cement alone. Latex to cement ratio less than 4% caused an increase in leaching rate of cesium. When cesium was absorbed to an organic resin its leachability was improved. 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Influence of time dependent effects on the disposal environments of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    Reviews are presented firstly of potential events and processes which may affect the evolution of the disposal environments of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes in Britain and secondly of previous studies carried out worldwide in the field of time dependent effects. From the latter review available methodologies for incorporating time dependence into radiological assessments are identified. Finally, proposals are presented for the design and development of a time dependent effects model, based on the existing far field state model (FFSM) developed for ONWI in USA. (author)

  2. Investigations on cement/polymer Waste packages containing intermediate level waste and organic exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELsourougy, M.R.; Zaki, A.A.; Aly, H.F.; Khalil, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Polymers can be added to cements to improve its nuclear waste immobilization properties. This trend in cementation processes is attracting attention and requiring through investigations. In this work, polymers of different kinds were added to ordinary portland cement for the purpose of solidifying intermediate level liquid wastes and organic ion exchange resins. Epoxy polymer such as Kemapoxy-150 reduced the leaching rate of cesium compared to cement alone. Latex to cement ratio less than 4% caused an increase in leaching rate of cesium. When cesium was absorbed to an organic resin its leachability was improved. 5 figs., 4 tabs

  3. Management of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes with regard to their chemical toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    A preliminary overview is provided of management options for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) with regard to its chemical toxicity. In particular, the following issues are identified and described associated with the management and safe disposal of chemically toxic materials in LILW: the origin and characteristics; the regulatory approaches; the pre-disposal management; the disposal; the safety assessment. Also included are: regulatory framework for chemically toxic low level wastes in the USA; pre-disposal processing options for LILW containing chemically toxic components; example treatment technologies for LILW containing chemically toxic components and safety assessment case studies for Germany, Belgium, France and Sweden

  4. Radiochemical methodologies applied to analytical characterization of low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Roberto Pellacani G.; Júnior, Aluísio Souza R.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Temba, Eliane S.C.; Oliveira, Thiago C. de; Amaral, Ângela M.; Franco, Milton B.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to present radiochemical methodologies developed at CDTN/CNEN in order to answer a program for isotopic inventory of radioactive wastes from Brazilian Nuclear Power Plants. In this program some radionuclides, 3 H, 14 C, 55 Fe, 59 Ni, 63 Ni, 90 Sr, 93 Zr, 94 Nb, 99 Tc, 129 I, 235 U, 238 U, 238 Pu, 239 + 240 Pu, 241 Pu, 242 Pu, 241 Am, 242 Cm e 243 + 244 Cm, were determined in Low Level Wastes (LLW) and Intermediate Level Wastes (ILW) and a protocol of analytical methodologies based on radiochemical separation steps and spectrometric and nuclear techniques was established. (author)

  5. The principles of design of a shallow disposal site for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper addresses the principles of design of a shallow disposal site for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The objective of the author is to review the need for shallow land disposal facilities in the UK and to propose design principles which will protect the public and operatives from excessive risk. It is not the intent of the author to present a detailed design of facility which will meet the design standards proposed although such a design is feasible and within the scope of currently available technology. The principles and standards proposed in this paper are not necessarily those of PPC Consultant Services Ltd. or NEI Waste Technologies Ltd. (author)

  6. Predicting the Proficiency Level of Language Learners Using Lexical Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Scott A.; Salsbury, Tom; McNamara, Danielle S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how second language (L2) texts written by learners at various proficiency levels can be classified using computational indices that characterize lexical competence. For this study, 100 writing samples taken from 100 L2 learners were analyzed using lexical indices reported by the computational tool Coh-Metrix. The L2 writing…

  7. Licence applications for low and intermediate level waste predisposal facilities: A manual for operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-07-01

    This publication covers all predisposal waste management facilities and practices for receipt, pretreatment (sorting, segregation, characterization), treatment, conditioning, internal relocation and storage of low and intermediate level radioactive waste, including disused sealed radioactive sources. The publication contains an Annex presenting the example of a safety assessment for a small radioactive waste storage facility. Facilities dealing with both short lived and long lived low and intermediate level waste generated from nuclear applications and from operation of small nuclear research reactors are included in the scope. Processing and storage facilities for high activity disused sealed sources and sealed sources containing long lived radionuclides are also covered. The publication does not cover facilities processing or storing radioactive waste from nuclear power plants or any other industrial scale nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Disposal facilities are excluded from the scope of this publication. Authorization process can be implemented in several stages, which may start at the site planning and the feasibility study stage and will continue through preliminary design, final design, commissioning, operation and decommissioning stages. This publication covers primarily the authorization needed to take the facility into operation

  8. Corrosion of steel drums containing simulated radioactive waste of low and intermediate level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, S.B.; Schulz Rodríguez, F.; Duffó, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    Ion-exchange resins are frequently used during the operation of nuclear power plants and constitute radioactive waste of low and intermediate level. For the final disposal inside the repository the resins are immobilized by cementation and placed inside steel drums. The eventful contamination of the resins with aggressive species may cause corrosion problems to the drums. In order to assess the incidence of this phenomenon and to estimate the lifespan of the steel drums, in the present work, the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins contaminated with different aggressive species was studied. The aggressive species studied were chloride ions (main ionic species of concern) and sulphate ions (produced during radiolysis of the cationic exchange-resins after cementation). The corrosion rate of the steel was monitored over a time period of 900 days and a chemical and morphological analysis of the corrosion products formed on the steel in each condition was performed. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years (foreseen durability of the Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste facility in Argentina), it was found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. (author)

  9. Practices and developments in the management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultgren, Aa.

    1983-06-01

    In the Swedish nuclear power program ten reactors are in operation and two more under construction. About 100000 m 3 of low and intermediate level radioactive waste will be produced from the operation of these reactors until the year 2010 and about 150000 m 3 from their decommissioning. All burnable radioactive wastes are sent to the Studsvik incineration plant for incineration. Spent resins are incorporated into cement or bitumen. The volume of non-combustible solid waste is reduced by compaction where possible. At the Studsvik research centre a substantial program for improved management of accumulated and future radioactive waste is at the beginning of its implementation. This includes advanced treatment and intermediate storage in a rock cavity. An R and D program on volume reduction of spent resins has reached the point of process verification and equipment design. All low and intermediate radioactive waste will be disposed in a rock cavity planned for commissioning by 1988. The paper reviews actual management experience and development efforts for low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Sweden. Contribution to the Seminar on the Management of Radioactive Waste, Taipei, Taiwan, 25-26 June, 1983. (Author)

  10. Projection to 2035 for the radioactive wastes of low and intermediate level in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paredes G, L.C.; Sanchez U, S.

    2004-01-01

    It is necessary to establish in few years a definitive warehouse for the radioactive waste of low and intermediate level, generated in the country and to satisfy the necessities of their confinement in the next ones 50 to 80 years. Therefore, it is required to be considered those volumes produced annually, those stored at the present and those estimated to medium and long term. The results of the simulation of 4 cases are presented, considering the operation from the 2 nuclear power reactors to 40 and 60 years, the use of the technology of current treatment and the use of super compaction of solids, as well as the importance in the taking of decision of the methodology for the dismantlement of each reactor to the finish of their useful life. At the moment the Nuclear Power Plant of Laguna Verde, produces an average of 250 m 3 /year of radioactive waste of low and intermediate level, constituted by solid dry wastes, humid solids and liquids. In the last 3 years, the power plant has reached an effectiveness of re utilization of effluents of 95%. On the other hand, in Mexico the non energetic applications of the radioisotopes, produce annually of the order of 20 m 3 /year of solid wastes, 280 m 3 /year of liquid wastes and 300 worn out radioactive sources. (Author)

  11. Generation, transport and conduct of radioactive wastes of low and intermediate level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizcano, D.; Jimenez, J.

    2005-01-01

    The technological development of the last decades produced an increment in the application of the radiations in different human activities. The effect of it has been it the production of radioactive wastes of all the levels. In Mexico, some of the stages of the administration of the waste of low and intermediate level have not been completely resolved, as the case of the treatment and the final storage. In this work aspects of the generation, the transport and the administration of radioactive waste of low and intermediate level produced in the non energy applications from the radioactive materials to national level, indicating the generated average quantities, transported and tried annually by the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ). The main generators of wastes in Mexico, classified according to the activity in which the radioactive materials are used its are listed. Some of the main processes of treatment of radioactive wastes broadly applied in the world and those that are used at the moment in our country are also presented. (Author)

  12. PIC-container for containment and disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Kunio; Shinji, Yoshimasa; Maki, Yasuro; Ishizaki, Kanjiro; Minegishi, Keiichi; Sudoh, Giichi.

    1981-03-01

    Steel fiber reinforced polymer-impregnated concrete (SFPIC) has been investigated for low and intermediate level radioactive waste containers. The present study has been carried out by the following stages. A) Preliminary evaluation: 60 L size container for cold and hot tests. B) Evaluation of size effect: 200 L size container for cold tests. The 60 L and 200 L containers were designed as pressure-container (without equalizer) for 500 kg/cm 2 and 700 kg/cm 2 . Polymerization of impregnated methylmethacrylate monomer for stage-A and B were performed by 60 Co-γ ray radiation and thermal catalytic polymerization, respectively. Under the loading of 500 kg/cm 2 and 700 kg/cm 2 -outside hydraulic pressure, these containers were kept in their good condition. The observed maximum strains were about 1380 x 10 -6 and 3950 x 10 -6 at the outside central position of container body for circumferential direction of the 60 L and 200 L container, respectively. An accelerated leaching test was performed by charging the concentrate of the liquid radioactive waste from JMTR in JAERI into the container. Although they were immersed in deionized water for 400 days, nuclides were not leached from the container. From results of various tests, it was evaluated that the SFPIC-container was suitable for containment and disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. There was not any great difference between the two size containers for the physical and chemical properties except in their preparation process. (author)

  13. Progress in Low and Intermediate Level Operational Waste Characterization and Preparation for Disposal at Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskas, P.; Adomaitis, J. E.; Ragaisis, V.

    2003-01-01

    In Lithuania about 70-80% of all electricity is generated at a single power station, Ignalina NPP, which has two RBMK-1500 type reactors. Units 1 and 2 will be closed by 2005 and 2010, respectively, taking into account the conditions of the long-term substantial financial assistance rendered by the European Union, G-7 countries and other states as well as international institutions. The Government approved the Strategy on Radioactive Waste Management. Objectives of this strategy are to develop the radioactive waste management infrastructure based on modern technologies and provide for the set of practical actions that shall bring management of radioactive waste in Lithuania in compliance with radioactive waste management principles of IAEA and with good practices in force in European Union Member States. SKB-SWECO International-Westinghouse Atom Joint Venture with participation of Lithuanian Energy Institute has prepared a reference design of a near surface repository for short-lived low and intermediate level waste. This reference design is applicable to the needs in Lithuania, considering its hydro-geological, climatic and other environmental conditions and is able to cover the expected needs in Lithuania for at least thirty years ahead. Development of waste acceptance criteria is in practice an iterative process concerning characterization of existing waste, repository development, safety and environmental impact assessment etc. This paper describes the position in Lithuania with regard to the long-term management of low and intermediate level waste in the absence of finalized waste acceptance criteria and a near surface repository

  14. Technical factors in the site selection for a radioactive wastes storage of low and intermediate level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badillo A, V. E.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Palacios H, J. C.

    2009-10-01

    The storage on surface or near surface it is viable for wastes of low and intermediate level which contain radio nuclides of short half life that would decay at insignificant levels of radioactivity in some decades and also radio nuclides of long half life but in very low concentrations. The sites selection, for the construction of radioactive waste storages, that present an appropriate stability at long term, a foreseeable behavior to future and a capacity to fulfill other operational requirements, is one of the great tasks that confront the waste disposal agencies. In the selection of potential sites for the construction of a radioactive wastes storage of low and intermediate level, several basic judgments should be satisfied that concern to physiography, climatology, geologic, geo-hydrology, tectonic and seismic aspects; as well as factors like the population density, socioeconomic develops and existent infrastructure. the necessary technician-scientific investigations for the selection of a site for the construction of radioactive waste storages are presented in this work and they are compared with the pre-selection factors realized in specify areas in previous studies in different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  15. The packaging and transport of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grover, J.R.; Price, M.S.T.

    1985-01-01

    Up to the present time, the majority of the radioactive waste which has been transported in the United Kingdom has been low level waste for disposal in the trenches of the shallow burial site operated by British Nuclear Fuels plc at Drigg and also the packaged waste destined for sea disposal in the annual operation. However, the main bulk of the low and intermediate level wastes which have been generated over the last quarter century remain in store at the various nuclear sites where it originated. Before significant packaging and transport of intermediate level wastes takes place it is desirable to examine the sources and types of wastes, the immobilisation and packaging processes and plants, the transport, and the problems of handling of packages at future land repositories. Optimisation of the packaging and transport must take account of both the upstream and downstream con=straints as well as the implications of complying with both the IAEA Transport Regulations and radiological protection guidelines. Packages for sea disposal must in addition comply with the requirements of the London Dumping Convention and the NEA guidelines. (author)

  16. Progress on the national low level radioactive waste repository and national intermediate level waste store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, C.

    2001-01-01

    Over the last few years, significant progress has been made towards siting national, purpose-built facilities for Australian radioactive waste. In 2001, after an eight year search, a preferred site and two alternatives were identified in central-north South Australia for a near-surface repository for Australian low level (low level and short-lived intermediate level) radioactive waste. Site 52a at Everts Field West on the Woomera Prohibited Area was selected as the preferred site as it performs best against the selection criteria, particularly with respect to geology, ground water, transport and security. Two alternative sites, Site 45a and Site 40a, east of the Woomera-Roxby Downs Road, were also found to be highly suitable for the siting of the national repository. A project has commenced to site a national store for intermediate (long-lived intermediate level) radioactive waste on Commonwealth land for waste produced by Commonwealth agencies. Public input has been sought on relevant selection criteria

  17. Studies concerning the degradation of concrete vaults for intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffo, Gustavo S.; Arva, Esteban A; Giordano, Celia M.; Lafont, Claudio J.

    2007-01-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) is the responsible for developing a management nuclear waste disposal programme. This programme contemplates the design and construction of a facility for the final disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The proposed model is the near-surface monolithic repository similar to those in operation in El Cabril, Spain. The design of this type of repository is based on the use of multiple, independent and redundant barriers. Since the vault and cover are major components of the engineered barriers, the durability of this concrete structures is an important aspect for the facilities integrity. This work presents a laboratory and field investigation performed for the last 6 years on reinforced concrete specimens, in order to predict the service life of the intermediate level radioactive waste disposal vaults from data obtained from electrochemical techniques. On the other hand, the development of sensors that allow on-line measurements of rebar corrosion potential and corrosion current density; incoming oxygen flow that reaches the metal surface; concrete electrical resistivity and chloride concentration is shown. Those sensors, properly embedded in a new full scale vault (nowadays in construction), will allow the monitoring of the corrosion process of the steel rebars embedded in the structure. All the information obtained from the sensors will be used for the final design of the container in order to achieve a service life more or equal than the foreseen durability for this type of facilities. (author) [es

  18. Development of agency guidance for nuclear industry submissions for conditioning intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The project was carried out by RM Consultants with the overall intention of providing the Environment Agency with a sound basis on which to develop guidance on the conditioning of intermediate level waste (ILW). Waste producers are currently in the process of retrieving and conditioning many of its ILW waste streams. This is at a time where the nature and timing of any future disposal route for these wastes is uncertain. The Agency is concerned that decisions taken on how ILW should be conditioned take into account matters of interest to the Agency, such as the future disposability of wastes, the production of secondary wastes and releases to the environment. This study provides information on the arrangements by which waste producers' proposals for the conditioning of intermediate level waste are assessed, and on the Agency's role in liaising with the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate, waste producers and Nirex. The report makes recommendations on the content and handling of waste producers' proposals in order that the Agency can satisfy itself that the environmental impact of waste conditioning and the disposability of the resultant waste packages is addressed in a timely and consistent manner

  19. Strategy for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radwastes in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.F.

    The intent of the strategy described is to optimize both safety and cost of disposal by classifying waste segments according to hazardous lifetime and to match these to two or more selected disposl concepts graded according to containment and isolation capabilities. The bulk of low- and intermediate-level radwastes arising in Canada are a relatively short-lived hazard requiring isolation for no more than a few hundred years. Burial of this segment at tens-of-metres in quatenary deposits has been proposed as a concept worth evaluating. It is expected that part of the low- and intermediate-level radwastes will be potentially hazardous for geological time periods. Once methods of isolation for long-lived fuel wastes have been identified, these could be utilized for wastes requiring isolation for longer than a few hundred years. Disposal of a hard-rock vault is being evaluated as a reference concept and costs are presented. It is proposed that waste classification may consider more than two categories to further reduce costs and to better accommodate the radiological character of wastes. The overall disposal strategy should be flexible enough to account for present waste management practices and anticipated future needs

  20. Immobilization of low and intermediate level radioactive liquid wastes using some industrial by-product materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami, N.M.; EI-Dessouky, M.I.; Abou EI-Nour, F.H.; Abdel-Khalik, M.

    2006-01-01

    Immobilization of low and intermediate level.radioactive liquid wastes in different matrices: ordinary Portland cement and cement mixed with some industrial byproduct: by-pass kiln cement dust, blast furnace slag and ceramic sludge was studied. The effect of these industrial by-product materials on the compressive strength, water immersion, radiation effect and teachability were investigated. The obtained results showed that, these industrial by-product improve the cement pastes where they increase the compressive strength, decrease the leaching rate for radioactive cesium-137 and cobalt-60 ions through the solidified waste forms and increase resistance for y-radiation. It is found that, solidified waste forms of intermediate level liquid waste (ILLW) had high compressive strength values more than those obtained from low level liquid waste (LLLW). The compressive strength increased after immersion in different leachant for one and three months for samples with LLLW higher than those obtained for ILLW. The cumulative fractions released of cesium-137 and cobalt-60 of solidified waste forms of LLLW was lower than those obtained for ILLW

  1. Accounting for L2 learners’ errors in word stress placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Herlina Karjo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress placement in English words is governed by highly complicated rules. Thus, assigning stress correctly in English words has been a challenging task for L2 learners, especially Indonesian learners since their L1 does not recognize such stress system. This study explores the production of English word stress by 30 university students. The method used for this study is immediate repetition task. Participants are instructed to identify the stress placement of 80 English words which are auditorily presented as stimuli and immediately repeat the words with correct stress placement. The objectives of this study are to find out whether English word stress placement is problematic for L2 learners and to investigate the phonological factors which account for these problems. Research reveals that L2 learners have different ability in producing the stress, but three-syllable words are more problematic than two-syllable words. Moreover, misplacement of stress is caused by, among others, the influence of vowel lenght and vowel height.

  2. The Role of Cognitive and Affective Factors in Measures of L2 Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihi, Reza

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the direct and/or indirect effects of some cognitive (working memory capacity) and affective (writing anxiety and writing self-efficacy) variables on the complexity, accuracy, and fluency (CAF) of second language (L2) learners' writings. To achieve this goal, 232 upper-intermediate English learners performed an automated…

  3. Listening Strategies of L2 Learners with Varied Test Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna Ching-Shyang

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the strategies that EFL students used and how they adjusted these strategies in response to various listening test tasks. The test tasks involved four forms of listening support: previewing questions, repeated input, background information preparation, and vocabulary instruction. Twenty-two participants were enlisted and…

  4. Learner attitudes of L2-engaged extensivewatching versus extensive reading

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, Thomas; Ishimaki, Kensaku

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the need to aid low-proficiency English users to increase their knowledgeof vocabulary, this preliminary study measures the success of digital-flashcard usersby comparing their vocabulary test scores to those of non-users in the same class.Thirty-two, low-level, first year students in Tamagawa University’s English as aLingua Franca program were asked to use Quizlet? to prepare for tests that wouldrecycle fill-in-the-blank contents from the flashcards available on this Web 2.0appli...

  5. Input frequencies in processing of verbal morphology in L1 and L2: Evidence from Russian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Chernigovskaya

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we take a usage-based perspective on the analysis of data from the acquisition of verbal morphology by Norwegian adult learners of L2 Russian, as compared to children acquiring Russian as an L1. According to the usage-based theories, language learning is input-driven and frequency of occurrence of grammatical structures and lexical items in the input plays a key role in this process. We have analysed to what extent the acquisition and processing of Russian verbal morphology by children and adult L2 learners is dependent on the input factors, in particular on type and token frequencies. Our analysis of the L2 input based on the written material used in the instruction shows a different distribution of frequencies as compared to the target language at large. The results of the tests that elicited present tense forms of verbs belonging to four different inflectional classes (-AJ-, -A-, -I-, and -OVA- have demonstrated that for both Russian children and L2 learners type frequency appears to be an important factor, influencing both correct stem recognition and generalisations. The results have also demonstrated token frequency effects. For L2 learners we observed also effects of formal instruction and greater reliance on morphological cues. In spite of the fact that L2 learners did not match completely any of the child groups, there are many similarities between L1 and L2 morphological processing, the main one being the role of frequency.

  6. Assessment of the radiological impact of disposal of low and intermediate level wastes on the seabed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobbs, S.F.; Delow, C.E.; Hill, M.D.

    1984-03-01

    This report describes progress in the development of models for use in a radiological assessment of the disposal of low and intermediate level waste on the ocean floor. In particular the report describes the waste package model, the ocean dispersion model and the sedimentation model. Five types of waste package have been identified and models have been developed for them. A flow pattern for the Atlantic Ocean has been derived from the existing distribution of temperature and salinity in the Atlantic Ocean. However a number of discrepancies between the calculated and predicted pattern were found; the model has been extended to include all the world's oceans to correct this. The sedimentation model describes two types of scavenging particles in the water column, a well mixed benthic boundary layer and the top two metres of the bed sediments. Good agreement with the GESAMP ocean model results has been found. (author)

  7. Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Environmental and Safety Assessment Activities in Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marc, D.; Loose, A.; Urbanc, J.

    1998-01-01

    The protection of the environment is one of the main concerns in the management of radioactive waste, especially in repository planning. In different stages of repository lifetime the environmental assessment has different functions: it can be used as a decision making process and as a planning, communication and management tool. Safety assessment as a procedure for evaluating the performance of a disposal system, and its potential radiological impact on human health and environment, is also required. Following the international recommendations and Slovene legislation, a presentation is given of the role and importance of the environmental and safety assessment activities in the early stages following concept development and site selection for a low- and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) repository in Slovenia. As a case study, a short overview is also given of the preliminary safety assessment that has been carried out in the analysis of possibilities for long-lived LILW disposal in Slovenia. (author)

  8. Radiochemical methodologies applied to analytical characterization of low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Roberto Pellacani G.; Júnior, Aluísio Souza R.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Temba, Eliane S.C.; Oliveira, Thiago C. de; Amaral, Ângela M.; Franco, Milton B., E-mail: rpgm@cdtn.br, E-mail: reisas@cdtn.br, E-mail: gfk@cdtn.br, E-mail: esct@cdtn.br, E-mail: tco@cdtn.br, E-mail: ama@cdtn.br, E-mail: francom@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this work is to present radiochemical methodologies developed at CDTN/CNEN in order to answer a program for isotopic inventory of radioactive wastes from Brazilian Nuclear Power Plants. In this program some radionuclides, {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 55}Fe, {sup 59}Ni, {sup 63}Ni, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 93}Zr, {sup 94}Nb, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}+{sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm e {sup 243}+{sup 244}Cm, were determined in Low Level Wastes (LLW) and Intermediate Level Wastes (ILW) and a protocol of analytical methodologies based on radiochemical separation steps and spectrometric and nuclear techniques was established. (author)

  9. Surface-type repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste in the Republic of Croatia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucar-Dragicevic, S.; Zarkovic, V.; Subasic, D.

    1995-01-01

    The low-level intermediate-level (LL/IL) radioactive waste repository siting and construction project is one of the activities related to establishing the rad waste management system in the Republic of Croatia. The repository project design is one in an array of project activities which also include the site selection procedure and public attitude issues. The prepared design documentation gives technical, safety and financial background relevant for making a final decision on the waste disposal type, and it includes the technological, mechanical, civil and financial documentation on the preliminary/basic design level. During the last few years, the preliminary design has been prepared and safety assessment conducted for the tunnel-type LL/IL rad waste repository. As the surface-type repository is one of alternatives for final disposal the design documentation for that repository type was prepared during 1994. (author)

  10. The disposal of intermediate-level radioactive liquid waste by hydraulic fracturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruilin, Chen; Hanchen, Zhou; Yuzhu, Gao; Wen, Qiao; Wentao, Wang [Beijing Inst. of Nuclear Engineering (China)

    1994-12-31

    The hydraulic fracturing process is characterized by combination of the treatment with the disposal of ILLW (intermediate-level liquid waste). It is of cement solidification in deep geology stratum. First of all, it is necessary to select a suitable disposal site with detailed information on geology and hydrogeology. The process has such advantages as simple, low cost, large capacity of disposal, safe and reliable in technology. It is an attractive process of ILLW. Since 1980`s, the research and the concept design of the hydraulic fracturing process have been initiated for disposal of ILLW. It is demonstrated by the field tests. The authors considered that the geological structure near Sichuan Nuclear Fuel Plant fits the disposal of ILLW by the hydraulic fracturing process.

  11. Feasibility study for the disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chales Suarez, G.; Peralta Vital, J.L.; Gil Castillo, R.; Franklin Saburido, R.; Rodriquez Reyes, A.; Castillo Gomez, R.

    1998-01-01

    The perspective of completing and operating the Juragua Nuclear Power Station and the development of nuclear applications justifies the need to establish an appropriate low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal system in Cuba. The design of one option which is consonant with the characteristics of this country is presented in the form of a feasibility study. The study discusses the characteristics of the wastes, the design of the repository, the packaging of the radioactive wastes as well as the siting, conditioning and performance assessment in a preliminary stage. International practice and experience have been considered, as well as the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency [1-4] in the preparation of this study. (author)

  12. The management of intermediate-level radioactive wastes arising from reprocessing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsden, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel results in the generation of radioactive wastes in the form of liquids, gases and solids. This paper outlines the principles and major elements of the waste management systems currently in use or under development for the category of waste known as intermediate-level wastes. To enable implementation of an optimized waste management system, engineering process evaluations, development and design in the following areas are required: The definition of cost effective options taking account of constraints which may arise from other operations in the overall system, e.g. from transport requirements or from criteria derived from environmental impact assessments of alternative disposal routes; Plant and equipment development to enable acceptable system and active plant operations on an industrial scale; Safety and reliability studies to ensure adequate protection of both the general public and plant operators during all stages of the waste management system including disposal

  13. The disposal of intermediate-level radioactive liquid waste by hydraulic fracturing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Ruilin; Zhou Hanchen; Gao Yuzhu; Qiao Wen; Wang Wentao

    1993-01-01

    The hydraulic fracturing process is characterized by combination of the treatment with the disposal of ILLW (intermediate-level liquid waste). It is of cement solidification in deep geology stratum. First of all, it is necessary to select a suitable disposal site with detailed information on geology and hydrogeology. The process has such advantages as simple, low cost, large capacity of disposal, safe and reliable in technology. It is an attractive process of ILLW. Since 1980's, the research and the concept design of the hydraulic fracturing process have been initiated for disposal of ILLW. It is demonstrated by the field tests. The authors considered that the geological structure near Sichuan Nuclear Fuel Plant fits the disposal of ILLW by the hydraulic fracturing process

  14. The transport implications of regional policies for the disposal of intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, I.A.

    1985-09-01

    This report aims to evaluate transport parameters and logistics associated with the disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes, as generated by CEGB, SSEB, UKAEA and BNFL. The assumed power scenario is DoE Scheme 3, which approximates to a moderate power generation scenario, with a 15 GWe PWR programme commissioned between 1991 and 2010, existing Magnox and AGR stations are assumed to have a 30 year lifespan. Three transport options are again assumed, namely; road, rail and a hybrid system, as is consistent with previous studies. These three options will be used in investigating regional policies of disposal, initially at the national level and then progressively disaggregating to a system of three regional depositories serving their respective catchment areas. (author)

  15. Mechanical properties of ductile cast iron and cast steel for intermediate level waste transport containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, I.L.S.; Sievwright, R.W.T.; Egid, B.; Ajayi, F.; Donelan, P.

    1994-01-01

    UK Nirex Ltd is developing Type B re-usable shielded transport containers (RSTCs) in a range of shielding thicknesses to transport intermediate level radioactive waste (ILW) to a deep repository. The designs are of an essentially monolithic construction and rely principally on the plastic flow of their material to absorb the energies involved in impact events. Nirex has investigated the feasibility of manufacturing the RSTCs from ductile cast iron (DCI) or cast steel instead of from forgings, since this would bring advantages of reduced manufacturing time and costs. However, cast materials are perceived to lack toughness and ductility and it is necessary to show that sufficient fracture toughness can be obtained to preclude brittle failure modes, particularly at low temperatures. The mechanical testing carried out as part of that programme is described. It shows how the measured properties have been used to demonstrate avoidance of brittle fracture and provide input to computer modelling of the drop tests. (author)

  16. Strategic review on management and disposal of low- and intermediate-level solid radwastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xuequn

    1993-01-01

    An overview on the actual status of solid low- and intermediate-level wastes (L/ILW) management in China is described. Some of the main problems at present are analysed. The strategies on management and disposal of the wastes are discussed in light of systematology. A large amount of solid L/ILW and distilled residual solution to be solidified have been accumulated during the past 30 years development of nuclear industry in China. These wastes, containing fission products, activated products, and uranium and transuranium elements respectively, mainly come from nuclear reactors, spent fuel reprocessing plants, and nuclear fuel fabrication plants. In the century, solid L/ILW and solidified wastes are produced mainly by nuclear industry; but in the next century, solid wastes will be steadily produced mainly from nuclear power plants

  17. OPG's deep geologic repository for low and intermediate level waste - recent progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, F.K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a status report on Canada's first project to build a permanent repository for the long-term management of radioactive waste. Ontario Power Generation has initiated a project to construct a deep geologic repository for low- and intermediate-level waste at the Bruce Nuclear Site, at a depth in the range of 600 to 800 m in an Ordovician-age argillaceous limestone formation. The project is currently undergoing an Environmental Assessment and consulting companies in the areas of environmental assessment, geoscientific site characterization, engineering and safety assessment have been hired and technical studies are underway. Seismic surveys and borehole drilling will be initiated in the fall of 2006. The next major milestone for the project is the submission of the Environmental Assessment report, currently scheduled for December 2008. (author)

  18. Future extension of the Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste (SFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Jan

    2006-01-01

    The existing Swedish repository for low and intermediate level waste (SFR) is licensed for disposal of short-lived waste originated from operation and maintenance of Swedish nuclear power plants. The repository is foreseen to be extended to accommodate short-lived waste from the future decommissioning of the Nuclear Power Plants. Long-lived waste from operation, maintenance and eventually decommissioning will be stored some years before disposal in a geological repository. This repository can be build either as a further extension of the SFR facility or as a separate repository. This paper discusses the strategy of a step-wise extended repository where the extensions are performed during operation of the existing parts of the repository. It describes the process for licensing new parts of the repository (and re-license of the existing parts). (author)

  19. Experience from developed and licensing an underground repository for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebel, K.; Richter, D.

    1988-01-01

    In the German Democratic Republic an abandoned salt mine was selected and reconstructed to serve as a central repository for low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants and radioisotope production and application from all over the country. The decision to establish such a repository was based on safety and technical-economic studies performed in the 1960s. The repository is owned by the main waste producer, the nuclear plant utility. It was designed, constructed and commissioned during 1972-1978. The licensing steps included a site licence (1972), a construction licence (1974), a comissioning licence and a continuous operation licence (1979). The paper reviews the overall choice of the disposal option, the responsibilities in radioactive waste management, the licensing and surveillance activities, the methods for transport and disposal, and the waste acceptance criteria established for the repository. (author)

  20. Performance analysis of a repository for low and intermediate level reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieno, T.; Nordman, H.; Vuori, S.; Peltonen, E.

    1987-01-01

    In Finland, utilities producing nuclear energy are responsible for the management of the radioactive waste, including final disposal. As regards low and intermediate level waste, the approach has been adopted to employ the power plant sites for locations of repositories. The repositories will be excavated at the depth of about 50 to 125 m in the bedrock of the two Finnish nuclear power plant sites, Loviisa and Olkiluoto. The performance analysis presented in this paper has been carried out for the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) of the Olkiluoto repository. A flexible model has been developed to estimate the release of radionuclides from waste packages and their subsequent transport through the engineered barriers in the repository. Gradual degradation of the engineered barriers is accounted for by altering parameters at fixed time points. Safety margins of the disposal concept have been evaluated by including disturbed evolution scenarios in the analysis. 13 references, 10 figures, 2 tables

  1. AERE contracts with DOE on the treatment and disposal of Intermediate Level Wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, B.A.

    1985-07-01

    Individual summaries are provided for each contract report, under the titles: comparative evaluation of α and βγ irradiated medium level waste forms; modelling and characterisation of intermediate level waste forms based on polymers; optimisation of processing parameters for polymer and bitumen modified cements; α damage in non-reference matrix materials; leaching mechanisms and modelling; inorganic ion exchange treatment of medium active effluents; electrical processes for the treatment of medium active liquid waste; fast reactor fuel element cladding; dissolver residues; effects of radiation on the properties of cemented MTR waste forms; equilibrium leach testing of cemented MTR waste forms; radiolytic oxidation of radionuclides; immobilisation of liquid organic wastes; quality control, non-conformances and corrective action; application of gel processes in the treatment of actinide-containing liquid wastes; the role of colloids in the release of radionuclides from nuclear waste. (author)

  2. Chemical conditions in the repository for low- and intermediate-level reactor waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snellman, M.; Uotila, H.

    1984-01-01

    The chemical conditions in the proposed repositories for low- and intermediate-level reactor waste at Haestholmen (IVO) and Olkiluoto (TVO) have been discussed with respect to materials introduced into the repository, their possible long-term changes and interaction with groundwater flowing into the repository. The main possible groundwater-rock interactions have been discussed, as well as the role of micro-organisms, organic acids and colloids in the estimation of the barrier integrity. Experimental and theoretical studies have been performed on the basis of the natural groundwater compositions expected at the repository sites. Main emphasis is put on the chemical parameters which might influence the integrity of the different barriers in the repository as well as on the parameters which might effect the release and transport of radionuclides from the repository

  3. A methodology for assessing social considerations in transport of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allsop, R.E.; Banister, D.J.; Holden, D.J.; Bird, J.; Downe, H.E.

    1986-05-01

    A methodology is proposed for taking into account non-radiological social aspects of the transport of low and intermediate level radioactive waste when considering the location of disposal facilities and the transport of waste to such facilities from the sites where it arises. As part of a data acquisition programme, an attitudinal survey of a sample of people unconnected with any suggested site or transport route is proposed in order to estimate levels of concern felt by people of different kinds about waste transport. Probabilities of accident occurrence during transport by road and rail are also discussed, and the limited extent of quantified information about consequences of accidents is reviewed. The scope for malicious interference with consignments of waste in transit is considered. (author)

  4. Predisposal Management of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide regulatory bodies and the operators that generate and manage radioactive waste with recommendations on how to meet the principles and requirements established for the predisposal management of low and intermediate level waste. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Protection of human health and the environment; 3. Roles and responsibilities; 4. General safety considerations; 5. Safety features for the predisposal management of LILW; 6. Record keeping and reporting; 7. Safety assessment; 8. Quality assurance; Annex I: Nature and sources of LILW from nuclear facilities; Annex II: Development of specifications for waste packages; Annex III: Site conditions, processes and events for consideration in a safety assessment (external natural phenomena); Annex IV: Site conditions, processes and events for consideration in a safety assessment (external human induced phenomena); Annex V: Postulated initiating events for consideration in a safety assessment (internal phenomena).

  5. Scientific and technical basis for the near surface disposal of low and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the scientific and technical basis for the disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste in near surface repositories. The focus is on basic principles, approaches, methodologies and technical criteria that can be used to develop and assess the performance of a disposal facility, and for building confidence in repository safety. This includes consideration of the multiple barrier concept, the performance of engineered barriers, the role of natural barriers and the development of a safety case. The emphasis is on defining the conditions relevant to the containment of the radionuclides in the repository and the processes that may affect the integrity of the engineered barriers. Both generic and specific data requirements for repository development and the assurance of safety are addressed. A large number of bibliographical references are given to support the information provided in this report

  6. Cost Considerations and Financing Mechanisms for the Disposal of Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    The overall objective of this publication is to provide Member States who are currently planning or preparing new near surface repositories for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW), guidance on cost considerations and funding mechanisms for the repositories' entire life cycle. The report focuses on both technical and non-technical factors affecting repository costs. It considers the major cost elements that comprise a cost evaluation for a disposal facility for LILW and identifies those factors which may result in major uncertainties in an overall cost estimate. In particular, the report lists the basic disposal options and summarizes the legal basis and infrastructure requirements for establishing an effective financing system. It further includes the cost estimation methodology, considers the major cost categories and discusses factors to be considered when planning the financing mechanism, and describes relevant financing schemes

  7. The European Communities' research programme on management of low and intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, R.; Cecille, L.

    1989-01-01

    In the European Communities' third R and D programme on Management and Disposal of Radioactive Wastes a large number of projects have been commissioned to develop treatment and conditioning processes for low and intermediate level wastes and to qualify the conditioned waste forms. The paper presents the main objectives of this research and summarizes some of the more important studies. In liquid waste treatment, the research includes processes to separate actinides by new extractive methods and application of selective inorganic ion exchangers as well as electrochemically controlled ion exchange processes and a series of purification methods involving membrane techniques. The most important issue of solid waste management in the programme is the treatment and conditioning of plutonium containing wastes, for which a strategic study had been commissioned to optimize the choice between different treatment and conditioning options. Processes being studied include two advanced decontamination techniques and a variety of conditioning methods for incinerator ash and fuel element hulls. Another task of the programme is devoted to the qualification of waste forms. This comprises the characterization of the most common low and intermediate level waste products with respect to leaching, waste form stability, radiation resistance and compatibility with the respective disposal environments. In the course of the programme, the development of methods for quality assurance and in particular quality control has become an important issue: the control of the nuclide inventory, of the chemical composition of the wastes and of the correct operation of treatment and conditioning processes is being investigated in special laboratories. (author). 21 refs, 4 tabs

  8. Divide and conquer: intermediate levels of population fragmentation maximize cultural accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derex, Maxime; Perreault, Charles; Boyd, Robert

    2018-04-05

    Identifying the determinants of cumulative cultural evolution is a key issue in the interdisciplinary field of cultural evolution. A widely held view is that large and well-connected social networks facilitate cumulative cultural evolution because they promote the spread of useful cultural traits and prevent the loss of cultural knowledge through factors such as drift. This view stems from models that focus on the transmission of cultural information, without considering how new cultural traits actually arise. In this paper, we review the literature from various fields that suggest that, under some circumstances, increased connectedness can decrease cultural diversity and reduce innovation rates. Incorporating this idea into an agent-based model, we explore the effect of population fragmentation on cumulative culture and show that, for a given population size, there exists an intermediate level of population fragmentation that maximizes the rate of cumulative cultural evolution. This result is explained by the fact that fully connected, non-fragmented populations are able to maintain complex cultural traits but produce insufficient variation and so lack the cultural diversity required to produce highly complex cultural traits. Conversely, highly fragmented populations produce a variety of cultural traits but cannot maintain complex ones. In populations with intermediate levels of fragmentation, cultural loss and cultural diversity are balanced in a way that maximizes cultural complexity. Our results suggest that population structure needs to be taken into account when investigating the relationship between demography and cumulative culture.This article is part of the theme issue 'Bridging cultural gaps: interdisciplinary studies in human cultural evolution'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  9. Trauma surgeon becomes consultant: evaluation of a protocol for management of intermediate-level trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, Sara C; Delemos, David; Christopher, Daniel; Frost, Mary; Wesson, David E; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi

    2014-01-01

    At our level 1 pediatric trauma center, 9-54 intermediate-level ("level 2") trauma activations are received per month. Previously, the surgery team was required to respond to and assume responsibility for all patients who had "level 2" trauma activations. In 8/2011, we implemented a protocol where the emergency room (ER) physician primarily manages these patients with trauma consultation for surgical evaluation or admission. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the effects of the new protocol to ensure that patient safety and quality of care were maintained. We compared outcomes of patients treated PRE-implementation (10/2010-7/2011) and POST-implementation (9/2011-5/2012), including surgeon consultation rate, utilization of imaging and laboratory testing, ER length of stay, admission rate, and missed injuries or readmissions. Statistical analysis included chi-square and Student's t-test. We identified 472 patients: 179 in the PRE and 293 in the POST period. The populations had similar baseline clinical characteristics. The surgical consultation rate in the POST period was only 42%, with no missed injuries or readmissions. The ER length of stay did not change. However, in the POST period there were significant decreases in the admission rate (73% to 44%) and the mean number of CT scans (1.4 to 1), radiographs (2.4 to 1.7), and laboratory tests (5.1 to 3.3) ordered in the emergency room (all p<0.001). Intermediate-level pediatric trauma patients can be efficiently and safely managed by pediatric emergency room physicians, with surgical consultation only as needed. The protocol change improved resource utilization by decreasing testing and admissions and streamlining resident utilization in an era of reduced duty hours. © 2014.

  10. Young Scientists Explore Animals. Book 2--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of animals. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each student. A…

  11. Young Scientists Explore the World Around Them. Book 1--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of scientists. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each student. A…

  12. Young Scientists Explore Nature. Book 10--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of nature. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each student. A…

  13. Young Scientists Explore the Moon. Book 3--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of the moon. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each student. A…

  14. Young Scientists Explore Inner & Outer Space. Book 6--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of space (inner and outer). Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for…

  15. Young Scientists Explore the Weather. Book 5--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of the weather. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each student.…

  16. Young Scientists Explore the World of Water. Book 9--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of water. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each student. A…

  17. Young Scientists Explore Rocks & Minerals. Book 11--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of rocks and minerals. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each…

  18. Young Scientists Explore Light & Color. Book 12--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of light and color. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each…

  19. Young Scientists Explore Electricity & Magnetism. Book 7--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of electricity and magnetism. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for…

  20. Young Scientists Explore the Five Senses. Book 4--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of the five senses. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each…

  1. Becoming a Japanese Language Learner, User, and Teacher: Revelations From Life History Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, William S.

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses how Sarah Lamond, a Japanese language teacher in Sydney, Australia has juggled three of her identities: second language (L2) learner, L2 user, and L2 teacher. Data come from four interviews used to create an edited life history. These data are used to draw attention to the relationship between L2 learner and language user.…

  2. Listening Strategies in the L2 Classroom: More Practice, Less Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte-de-Hanna, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    This paper looks at the history of listening strategies development from the first studies on strategies used by L2 learners to the most current studies specific to L2 listening, and how this theory can be incorporated into classroom teaching that fosters practice, not testing. This paper also examines the type of needs analysis and diagnostic…

  3. The Status of the Auxiliary "Do" in L1 and L2 English Negative Clauses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Susana

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of whether negative sentences containing auxiliary "do" in L1 and L2 English share the same underlying syntactic representation. To this end, I compare the negative sentences produced by 77 bilingual (Spanish/Basque) L2 learners of English with the corresponding data available for L1 acquirers reported on in Schutze…

  4. Applying Cognitive Linguistics to Instructed L2 Learning: The English Modals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrea; Mueller, Charles M.; Ho, Vu

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a quasi-experimental effects-of-instruction study examining the efficacy of applying a Cognitive Linguistic (CL) approach to L2 learning of the semantics of English modals. In spite of their frequency in typical input, modal verbs present L2 learners with difficulties, party due to their inherent…

  5. Russian Speakers' L2 Chinese Acquisition of "Wh"-Topicalization at the Syntax-Discourse Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugarova, Esuna

    2014-01-01

    In recent second language (L2) research it has been proposed that unlike linguistic phenomena pertaining to internal interfaces, those at external interfaces pose greater difficulty to adult L2 learners and may not be fully acquired. It has further been pointed out that such problematic acquisition at the interface level should not be attributed…

  6. Concurrent Data Elicitation Procedures, Processes, and the Early Stages of L2 Learning: A Critical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leow, Ronald P.; Grey, Sarah; Marijuan, Silvia; Moorman, Colleen

    2014-01-01

    Given the current methodological interest in eliciting direct data on the cognitive processes L2 learners employ as they interact with L2 data during the early stages of the learning process, this article takes a critical and comparative look at three concurrent data elicitation procedures currently employed in the SLA literature: Think aloud (TA)…

  7. The Use of Conjunctions in Cognitively Simple versus Complex Oral L2 Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Marije C.

    2013-01-01

    The present study explores the use of conjunctions in simple versus complex argumentative tasks performed by second language (L2) learners as a specific measure for the amount of reasoning involved in task performance. The Cognition Hypothesis (Robinson, 2005) states that an increase in cognitive task complexity promotes improvements in L2

  8. Literary Language in Development of L2 Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is believed that language in daily communication rather than literary language should be the target of learning in L2 education. This is mainly because literary language is said to be uncommon in life. This paper reports on a study in which some Hong Kong ESL learners’ English proficiency was re-examined through literary texts. These learners had reached intermediate or advanced levels of English prior to the study and were generally competent in daily English. However, many of them encountered difficulty in understanding literary language. Their proficiency in general English test could not match their performances in understanding literary works. The findings reveal that learners who are strong in general proficiency may not be good in understanding literary language. Lack of literary language in the curriculum results in a false and distorted picture about the learners’ proficiency. Literary language helps upgrade L2 learners’ real proficiency in the target language.

  9. Reading in L2 (English) and L1 (Persian): An Investigation into Reverse Transfer of Reading Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Seyed Hassan

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of reading strategies instruction in L2 (English) on raising reading strategies awareness and use and reading ability of Iranian EFL learners in L2 (English) and L1 (Persian) as a result of transfer of reading strategies from L2 to L1. To this purpose, 120 students of intermediate and advanced English proficiency…

  10. The Role of L1 Conceptual and Linguistic Knowledge and Frequency in the Acquisition of L2 Metaphorical Expressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, Ebru

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how figurative language is processed by learners of a second language (L2). With an experiment testing L2 comprehension of figurative expressions in three categories, each combining shared and unshared first language (L1) and L2 lexical representations and conceptual representations in a different way, the study…

  11. Multiple Grammars and the Logic of Learnability in L2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom W Roeper

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to enhance the technical description of multi-lingual speakers in terms of a theoryof Multiple Grammars where more than one language utilizes a grammar. The challenge of V2 and itsimplications for interfaces from the perspective of the L2 learner is the focus. A number of constructionsare considered including: Quotation, Topicaliation, Empty subjects and Objects, Expletives, and Subject-auxiliary inversoni.

  12. Acquisition of L2 Japanese Geminates: Training with Waveform Displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi-Saigo, Miki; Hardison, Debra M.

    2009-01-01

    The value of waveform displays as visual feedback was explored in a training study involving perception and production of L2 Japanese by beginning-level L1 English learners. A pretest-posttest design compared auditory-visual (AV) and auditory-only (A-only) Web-based training. Stimuli were singleton and geminate /t,k,s/ followed by /a,u/ in two…

  13. An Approach to Integration: The Integration of Language and Content to Promote L2 Learner Autonomy at the College Level (Un Acercamiento a la Integración: El Aprendizaje Integrado de Lengua y Contenidos para Promover la Autonomía del Estudiante de Lengua Extranjera en la Universidad)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva Parera, Pablo M.; Núñez Delgado, María Pilar

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the preliminary findings of an action research on the effects of autonomy on a group of university students at the post-graduate level taking their first Spanish course through the Content and Language Learning (CLIL) methodology. The participants, whose Spanish was at the low/mid intermediate level (ACTFL, 2012), were exposed…

  14. Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuels, High and Intermediate Level Wastes: A Continuous Challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otton, C.; Blachet, L.

    2009-01-01

    For more than 45 years TN International has been involved in the radioactive materials transportation field. Since the beginning the used nuclear fuel transportation has been its core business. During all these years TN International, now part of AREVA, has been able to anticipate and fulfil the needs for new transport or storage casks design to fit the nuclear industry evolutions. A whole fleet of casks able to transport all the materials of the nuclear fuel cycle has been developed. In this presentation we will focus on the casks for the spent fuel, high level waste and intermediate level waste transportation. Answering to the constant evolution of the nuclear industry transport needs is a challenge that TN International faces routinely. Concerning the spent nuclear fuel transportation, TN International has developed in the early 80's a fleet of TN12 type casks fitted with several types of baskets able to safely transport all the spent fuel from the nuclear power plant or the research laboratories to AREVA La Hague plant. The current challenge is the design of a new transport cask generation taking into account the needs of the industry for the next 30 years. The replacement of the TN12 cask generation is to be scheduled as the regulations have changed and the fuel characteristics have evolved. The new generation of casks will take into account all the technical evolutions made during the TN12 thirty years of use. MOX spent fuel has now its dedicated cask: the TN112 which certificate of approval has been obtained in July 2008. This cask is able to transport 12 MOX spent fuel elements with a short cooling time. The first loading of the cask has been performed in 2008 in the EDF nuclear power plant of Saint-Laurent-des-Eaux. Concerning the high level waste such as the La Hague vitrified residues a whole fleet of casks has been developed such as the TN 28 VT dedicated to transport, the TN81 and TN85 dedicated to transport and storage. These casks have permitted the

  15. Exploring the Effect of Teaching Test-Taking Strategies on Intermediate Level Learners on Reading Section of IELTS; Learners' Attitude in Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshsima, Hooshang; Saed, Amin; Mousaei, Fatemeh

    2018-01-01

    Language proficiency tests have become common instruments to judge people based on their performance. Thus, the scores on language proficiency tests, such as the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) or Teaching English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), play a crucial role in the test-takers' lives. Because of increasing demands on…

  16. Prestudy of final disposal of long-lived low and intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiborgh, M [ed.; Kemakta Konsult AB., Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-01-01

    The repository for long-lived low and intermediate level waste, SFL 3-5, is foreseen to be located adjacent to the deep repository for spent encapsulated fuel, SFL 2. The SFL 3-5 repository comprises of three repository parts which will be used for the different categories of waste. In this report the work performed within a pre-study of the SFL 3-5 repository concept is summarised. The aim was to make a first preliminary and simplified assessment of the near-field as a barrier to radionuclide dispersion. A major task has been to compile information on the waste foreseen to be disposed of in SFL 3-5. The waste comprises of; low and intermediate level waste from Studsvik, operational waste from the central interim storage for spent fuel, CLAB, and the encapsulation plant, decommissioning waste from these facilities, and core components and internal parts from the reactors. The total waste volume has been estimated to about 25000 m{sup 3}. The total activity content at repository closure is estimated to be about 1 {center_dot}10{sup 17} Bq in SFL 3-5. At repository closure the short-lived radionuclides, for example Co-60 and Fe-55, have decayed considerably and the activity is dominated by nickel isotopes in the metallic waste from the reactors, to be disposed of in SFL 5. However, other radionuclides may be more or equally important from a safety point of view, e.g cesium-isotopes and actinides which are found in largest amounts in the SFL 3 waste. A first evaluation of the long term performance or the SFL 3-5 repository has been made. A systematic methodology for scenario formulation was tested. The near-field release of contaminants was calculated for a selected number of radionuclides and chemo-toxic elements. The radionuclide release calculations revealed that Cs-137 and Ni-63 would dominate the annual release from all repository parts during the first 1000 years after repository closure and that Ni-59 would dominate at longer times.

  17. Prestudy of final disposal of long-lived low and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiborgh, M.

    1995-01-01

    The repository for long-lived low and intermediate level waste, SFL 3-5, is foreseen to be located adjacent to the deep repository for spent encapsulated fuel, SFL 2. The SFL 3-5 repository comprises of three repository parts which will be used for the different categories of waste. In this report the work performed within a pre-study of the SFL 3-5 repository concept is summarised. The aim was to make a first preliminary and simplified assessment of the near-field as a barrier to radionuclide dispersion. A major task has been to compile information on the waste foreseen to be disposed of in SFL 3-5. The waste comprises of; low and intermediate level waste from Studsvik, operational waste from the central interim storage for spent fuel, CLAB, and the encapsulation plant, decommissioning waste from these facilities, and core components and internal parts from the reactors. The total waste volume has been estimated to about 25000 m 3 . The total activity content at repository closure is estimated to be about 1 ·10 17 Bq in SFL 3-5. At repository closure the short-lived radionuclides, for example Co-60 and Fe-55, have decayed considerably and the activity is dominated by nickel isotopes in the metallic waste from the reactors, to be disposed of in SFL 5. However, other radionuclides may be more or equally important from a safety point of view, e.g cesium-isotopes and actinides which are found in largest amounts in the SFL 3 waste. A first evaluation of the long term performance or the SFL 3-5 repository has been made. A systematic methodology for scenario formulation was tested. The near-field release of contaminants was calculated for a selected number of radionuclides and chemo-toxic elements. The radionuclide release calculations revealed that Cs-137 and Ni-63 would dominate the annual release from all repository parts during the first 1000 years after repository closure and that Ni-59 would dominate at longer times

  18. L2 listening at work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Charlotte

    This dissertation on adult second language (L2) learning investigates individual learners’ experiences with listening in Danish as an L2 in everyday situations at work. More specifically, the study explores when international employees, who work at international companies in Denmark with English...... as a corporate language, listen in Danish at work, how they handle these situations, what problems they experience, and why some situations are more difficult to listen in than others. The study makes use of qualitative research methods and theoretical aspects from psycholinguistic approaches as well as socially...

  19. The Relationship among Iranian EFL Learners' Self-Efficacy, Autonomy and Listening Comprehension Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Haleh Mojarrabi; Saeidi, Mahnaz

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interrelationships among EFL learners' self-efficacy, autonomy and listening comprehension ability. Ninety female learners of intermediate level participated in the study. They were between 16 and 24 years old. In order to obtain the required data on the three variables (i.e., self-efficacy, autonomy, and listening…

  20. A Survey of Iranian EFL Teachers' and Learners' Perceptions toward Authentic Listening Materials at University Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhafarghandi, Amir Mahdavi; Barekat, Behzad; Homaei, Sepideh

    2014-01-01

    This study intends to deal with attitudes of teachers and learners toward authentic listening materials at pre-intermediate level. Studies have indicated the positive effect of authentic listening materials on motivation and listening comprehension ability in learners of English as a foreign language (Nuttall, 1996; Peacock, 1997; Miller, 2005;…

  1. Evaluation of low and intermediate level radioactive solidified waste forms and packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    Evaluation of low and intermediate level radioactive waste forms and packages with respect to compliance with quality and safety requirements for transport, interim storage and disposal has become a very important part of the radioactive waste management strategy in many countries. The evaluation of waste forms and packages provides precise basic data for regulatory bodies to establish safety requirements, and implement quality control and quality assurance procedures for radioactive waste management programmes. The requirements depend very much upon the disposal option selected, treatment technology used, waste form characteristics, package quality and other factors. The regulatory requirements can also influence the methodology of waste form/package evaluation together with selection and analysis of data for quality control and safety assurance. A coordinated research programme started at the end of 1985 and brought together 12 participants from 11 countries. The results of the programme and each particular project were discussed at three Research Coordination Meetings held in Cairo, Egypt, in May, 1986; in Beijing, China, in April, 1998; and at Harwell Laboratory, United Kingdom, in November, 1989. This document summarises the salient features and results achieved during the four year investigation and a recommendation for future work in this area. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums containing cemented intermediate level nuclear wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffó, Gustavo S.; Farina, Silvia B.; Schulz, Fátima M.; Marotta, Francesca

    2010-10-01

    Cementation processes are used as immobilization techniques for low or intermediate level radioactive waste for economical and safety reasons and for being a simple operation. In particular, ion-exchange resins commonly used for purification of radioactive liquid waste from nuclear reactors are immobilized before being stored to improve the leach resistance of the waste matrix and to maintain mechanical stability. Combustible solid radioactive waste can be incinerated and the resulting ashes can also be immobilized before storage. The immobilized resins and ashes are then contained in steel drums that may undergo corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The work described in this paper was aimed at evaluating the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins and incineration ashes containing different concentrations of aggressive species (mostly chloride and sulphate ions). A special type of specimen was designed to simulate the cemented waste in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion current density of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 1 year. The results show the deleterious effect of chloride on the expected lifespan of the waste containers.

  3. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums to be used as containers for intermediate level nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, S.; Schulz Rodriguez, F.; Duffó, G.

    2013-07-01

    The present work is a study of the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins contaminated with different types and concentrations of aggressive species. A special type of specimen was manufactured to simulate the cemented ion-exchange resins in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 900 days. The aggressive species studied were chloride ions (the main ionic species of concern) and sulphate ions (produced during radiolysis of the cationic exchange-resins after cementation). The work was complemented with an analysis of the corrosion products formed on the steel in each condition, as well as the morphology of the corrosion products. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drumscontaining the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years (foreseen durability of the Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste facility in Argentina) , it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums.

  4. Canadian experiences in characterizing two low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste management sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heystee, R.J.; Rao, P.K.M.

    1984-02-01

    Low-level waste (LLW) and intermediate-level reactor waste (ILW) arise in Canada from the operation of nuclear power reactors for the generation of electricity and from the operation of reactors for nuclear research and development as well as for the production of separated radioisotopes. The majority of this waste is currently being safely managed at two sites in the Province of Ontario: (1) Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories, and (2) Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Power Development Radioactive Waste Operations Site 2. Although these storage facilities can safely manage the waste for a long period of time, there are advantages in disposal of the LLW and ILW. The design of the disposal facilities and the assessment of long-term performance will require that the hydrologic and geologic data be gathered for a potential disposal site. Past site characterization programs at the two aforementioned waste storage sites have produced information which will be useful to future disposal studies in similar geologic materials. The assessment of long-term performance will require that predictions be made regarding the potential subsurface migration of radionuclides. However there still remain many uncertainties regarding the chemical and physical processes which affect radionuclide mobility and concentrations, in particular hydrodynamic dispersion, geochemical reactions, and transport through fractured media. These uncertainties have to be borne in mind when conducting the performance assessments and adequate conservatism must be included to account for the uncertainties. (author)

  5. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums containing cemented intermediate level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffo, Gustavo S.; Farina, Silvia B.; Schulz, Fatima M.; Marotta, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Cementation processes are used as immobilization techniques for low or intermediate level radioactive waste for economical and safety reasons and for being a simple operation. In particular, ion-exchange resins commonly used for purification of radioactive liquid waste from nuclear reactors are immobilized before being stored to improve the leach resistance of the waste matrix and to maintain mechanical stability. Combustible solid radioactive waste can be incinerated and the resulting ashes can also be immobilized before storage. The immobilized resins and ashes are then contained in steel drums that may undergo corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The work described in this paper was aimed at evaluating the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins and incineration ashes containing different concentrations of aggressive species (mostly chloride and sulphate ions). A special type of specimen was designed to simulate the cemented waste in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion current density of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 1 year. The results show the deleterious effect of chloride on the expected lifespan of the waste containers.

  6. Questionnaire established for the Brazilian inventory of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marumo, Julio T.; Silva, Fabio; Pinto, Antonio Juscelino; Taveira, Gerson L.S.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), an institute of Brazilian National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), is responsible for the technical coordination of the Brazilian Repository Project (RBMN), for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Wastes. To establish the inventory of the low and intermediate radioactive level waste to be disposed in the national Repository, a questionnaire was elaborated to be filled on line, via WEB, exclusively to registered users, which involved CNEN's institutes, ELETRONUCLEAR, INB and CTMSP. Based on all standardized information received from questionnaires, an easy use database to inventory the radioactive waste was created in Microsoft Access® that supported the calculation of the volume of radioactive waste treated and non-treated, stored and generated presently in Brazil. In addition, from this database it will be possible to establish some disposal procedures and the necessary area of construction. The objective of this work is to present this database and some general information about the radwastes in Brazil. (author)

  7. Questionnaire established for the Brazilian inventory of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marumo, Julio T., E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Fabio; Pinto, Antonio Juscelino, E-mail: silvaf@cdtn.br, E-mail: ajp@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Taveira, Gerson L.S., E-mail: gersonluizst@gmail.com [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica de Minas Gerais (CEFET-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Engenharia de Producao Civil

    2015-07-01

    The Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), an institute of Brazilian National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), is responsible for the technical coordination of the Brazilian Repository Project (RBMN), for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Wastes. To establish the inventory of the low and intermediate radioactive level waste to be disposed in the national Repository, a questionnaire was elaborated to be filled on line, via WEB, exclusively to registered users, which involved CNEN's institutes, ELETRONUCLEAR, INB and CTMSP. Based on all standardized information received from questionnaires, an easy use database to inventory the radioactive waste was created in Microsoft Access® that supported the calculation of the volume of radioactive waste treated and non-treated, stored and generated presently in Brazil. In addition, from this database it will be possible to establish some disposal procedures and the necessary area of construction. The objective of this work is to present this database and some general information about the radwastes in Brazil. (author)

  8. An assessment of filter aids and filter cloths in the dewatering of intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knibbs, R.H.; Hudson, B.C.; Blackwell, J.C.W.

    1984-12-01

    This report considers a range of filter cloths and precoat materials intended for use in dewatering intermediate level radioactive wastes, and their interaction when used on a rotary drum vacuum filter. The report outlines the advantages and disadvantages of various grades and types of precoat and shows that grades with permeabilities in the intermediate range, 3 to 4 x 10 -12 m 2 , give satisfactory filtrate quality together with ease of operation. The work on filter cloths shows that: radiation damage is not a limiting factor as regards operational life for any of the cloths examined; polyester-based cloths are unsuitable due to their poor resistance to alkali attack; polyamide cloths are satisfactory; and stainless steel Dutch weave cloths are satisfactory and have the added advantage of high strength. The report also briefly considers the radiation resistance of two elastomeric membranes used on the 'epidermal' filter and shows that the natural latex rubber membrane is considerably more resistant to radiation than the silicone rubber membrane and has an estimated operational life of at least 1200 hours when dewatering Magnox silo sludge or α-contaminated alumino ferric flocs. (author)

  9. Long-lived high and intermediate level radioactive wastes: defining the context, stakes and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The French law from December 30, 1991 has defined an ambitious 15 years program of researches in order to explore the different possible paths for the long-term management of long-lived high and intermediate level radioactive wastes. The law foresees also that at the end of the 15 years research program, a project of law will be prepared by the French government and transmitted to the European parliament in 2006. A public debate has been organized and emceed in 2005 in order dialogue with the general public and to gather its questions, remarks and fears. In the framework of their contribution to this debate, the ministries of industry and environment have prepared this document which answers some key questions about radioactive waste management: where do wastes come from, what are the risks, how are they managed today in France and in foreign countries, what are the results of the researches carried out during 15 years, what are the advantages and drawbacks of each waste management solution considered, what is the perspective of application of each solution, what is the position of experts, what will be the decision process. This synthetic document supplies some reference marks to better understand these different points. Some pedagogical files about radioactivity, fuel cycle, and nuclear industry activities are attached to the document. (J.S.)

  10. Environmental assessment for OPG's deep geologic repository for low and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barker, D.; Rawlings, M.; Beal, A.

    2011-01-01

    The environmental assessment process for the Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) Project was initiated very early in the planning stages. Feasibility studies were initiated in 2003, after Ontario Power Generation (OPG) and the Municipality of Kincardine signed a Memorandum of Understanding agreeing to assess options for long-term management of low and intermediate level waste (L and ILW) options at the Bruce nuclear site. The location of the DGR, in the Municipality of Kincardine, is based on a willing and informed host community. The preferred approach, the DGR at the Bruce nuclear site, was advanced based on results of feasibility studies which looked at a number of options for long-term management of L&ILW and support from the local community and their elected representatives. The federal environmental assessment of the project was initiated following the signing of a Host Community Agreement and completion of a telephone poll, the results of which indicated that the majority of Municipality of Kincardine residents support the project. The environmental assessment began in 2006 as a comprehensive study and was ultimately referred to a joint review panel process in 2009. The environmental assessment considers the potential near-term effects of the construction and operations of the proposed project. Because of the nature of the project, the assessment of effects also considers long-term effects extending out to the million year time-frame, including effects of climate change, glaciations and seismic activity. (author)

  11. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums to be used as containers for intermediate level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, S.; Schulz Rodriguez, F.; Duffo, G.

    2013-01-01

    The present work is a study of the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins contaminated with different types and concentrations of aggressive species. A special type of specimen was manufactured to simulate the cemented ion-exchange resins in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 900 days. The aggressive species studied were chloride ions (the main ionic species of concern) and sulphate ions (produced during radiolysis of the cationic exchange-resins after cementation). The work was complemented with an analysis of the corrosion products formed on the steel in each condition, as well as the morphology of the corrosion products. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years (foreseen durability of the Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste facility in Argentina), it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. (authors)

  12. Development of the remediation strategy for the Dounreay intermediate level waste shaft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWhirter, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    The development of Fast Reactor Technology within the United Kingdom began in the mid 1950's and continued until 1994. It was concentrated at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority site at Dounreay on the north coast of Scotland. During the construction of the site's low level liquid effluent discharge facility, a vertical access shaft was constructed which, when the discharge facility was completed, was sealed at the seaward end and allowed to fill naturally with water. It was then licensed by the Scottish Office Environmental Department as a disposal facility for what is now categorized as Intermediate Level Waste (ILW). Waste was disposed of to this facility from 1959 until 1977 when a hydrogen explosion in the air space above the shaft took place causing damage to the head works. Since that time UKAEA has maintained the shaft in a state of care and maintenance pending a decision on its long term future. During 1996 and 1997 detailed option studies were carried out which demonstrated that retrieval of the waste from the shaft and its subsequent above ground repackaging, conditioning and storage, represented the Best Practicable Environmental Option and UKAEA made this recommendation to the UK Government in November 1997. This recommendation was accepted by Government and, as a result, the present project to retrieve material has now begun. This paper describes the history of the facility, the options explored and the decision process by which the final strategy was determined. (author)

  13. The disposal of low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes: the Billingham anhydrite mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This document explains the role of NIREX (Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive) in planning for the safe disposal of low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes and outlines the plans for the investigation and possible development of a deep repository at ICI's disused anhydrite mine, Billingham. The site is conveniently located and the geology is well understood. The existing workings are known to have a long history of stability and of particular importance, very little water is present. The next step is for NIREX to undertake site investigations and assess in detail the site's suitability. On the basis of this assessment NIREX will either confirm its interest in the site or reject it as unsuitable. If the site proves to be adequate for the development of a deep repository then NIREX will seek the necessary planning approvals and authorisations for such a development. Converting the mine into a repository would involve construction of some new buildings at the surface although little or no new excavation work would be necessary. As far as possible existing road and rail networks would be used. In designing and operating any repository the safety of the public and the work-force will be of paramount importance. (author)

  14. Disposal of low- and intermediate-level solid radioactive wastes in rock cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This Guidebook summarizes the factors to be considered and the activities to be undertaken in the overall planning and development of a disposal system for solid or solidified low- and intermediate-level wastes in rock cavities. Aspects related to repository site selection, design, construction, operation, shutdown, surveillance, regulation and safety assessment are discussed here in general terms. They will be covered in greater technical detail in a separate document. This report considers the emplacement of wastes in categories II, III, IV and V, as defined in Table 3.1, in different kinds of cavities located at various depths from just below the surface to deep continental rock. The choice of the type of cavity and its depth and of the disposal site itself is related to the radiological protection requirements for the wastes concerned. The repositories considered include natural caves and abandoned mines as well as specially excavated cavities in various geological formations. Consideration is also given to hydrogeological, environmental and societal factors. The guidelines given in the report are made sufficiently general to cover a broad variety of different circumstances. Consequently, the practical application of these guidelines needs a case-by-case consideration which takes into account the local conditions, e.g. natural circumstances, the characteristics of the wastes and national and international regulations and practices

  15. Advances in technologies for the treatment of low and intermediate level radioactive liquid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In recent years the authorized maximum limits for radioactive discharges into the environment have been reduced considerably, and this, together with the requirement to minimize the volume of waste for storage or disposal and to declassify some wastes from intermediate to low level or to non-radioactive wastes, has initiated studies of ways in which improvements can be made to existing decontamination processes and also to the development of new processes. This work has led to the use of more specific precipitants and to the establishment of ion exchange treatment and evaporation techniques. Additionally, the use of combinations of some existing processes or of an existing process with a new technique such as membrane filtration is becoming current practice. New biotechnological, solvent extraction and electrochemical methods are being examined and have been proven at laboratory scale to be useful for radioactive liquid waste treatment. In this report an attempt has been made to review the current research and development of mature and advanced technologies for the treatment of low and intermediate level radioactive liquid wastes, both aqueous and non-aqueous. Non-aqueous radioactive liquid wastes or organic liquid wastes typically consist of oils, reprocessing solvents, scintillation liquids and organic cleaning products. A brief state of the art of existing processes and their application is followed by the review of advances in technologies, covering chemical, physical and biological processes. 213 refs, 33 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Siting Criteria for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Disposal in Egypt (Proposal approach)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdellatif, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of radioactive waste disposal is to isolate waste from the surrounding media so that it does not result in undue radiation exposure to humans and the environment. The required degree of isolation can be obtained by implementing various disposal methods and suitable criteria. Near surface disposal method has been practiced for some decades, with a wide variation in sites, types and amounts of wastes, and facility designs employed. Experience has shown that the effective and safe isolation of waste depends on the performance of the overall disposal system, which is formed by three major components or barriers: the site, the disposal facility and the waste form. The site selection process for low-level and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility addressed a wide range of public health, safety, environmental, social and economic factors. Establishing site criteria is the first step in the sitting process to identify a site that is capable of protecting public health, safety and the environment. This paper is concerning a proposal approach for the primary criteria for near surface disposal facility that could be applicable in Egypt.

  17. Study of the impact behaviour of packages containing intermediate level radioactive waste coming from nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, D.; Lund, J.S.; Meredith, P.; Walker, P.; Wells, D.A.; Jowett, J.; Kinsella, K.

    1989-01-01

    The following describes primarily an experimental study into the benefits, for impact resistance, to be gained by incorporating a welded lid into the design of the cement filled drum type of intermediate level waste package. Tests on packages which were not provided with a lid showed that matrix material began to be expelled from drop heights of about 16m. This damage threshold was similar for packages composed of both high and low strength matrix. Above the damage threshold, however, the rate of increase of expelled mass with drop height was greater for the packages filled with a low strength matrix. Similar tests were conducted with specimens to which a lid had been attached by welding. Even from the greatest drop height available at the test facility (28m) only one package showed a significant amount of drum tearing but even then little matrix was lost. The benefits of incorporating a welded lid into package design were thus clearly established. Simple calculations were performed to predict the local deformations and deceleration/time histories of the packages. By optimisation of the impact resistive stress used in the computer model, final knockback areas were predicted to an accuracy of 30%. The average deceleration predicted for four of the six tests for which deceleration histories were available were also within 30% of measured values

  18. Feasibility study on vitrification of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste from pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.K.; Song, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    In order to obtain annual generation volume and composition data for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW), characteristics and generation trends for each waste which was produced at nuclear power plants (NPPs) in Korea were investigated. Of the three different types of melters, the platinum crucible was found to be most suitable for the performance of vitrification experiments and hence, was used to help better understand the optimal waste contents in borosilicate glass waste forms with respect to waste types. After the performance of vitrification experiments, compressive strength tests showed that the final waste glass product, containing up to 40 vol% of ashy pyrolyzed/oxidized at 400--800 C, showed good mechanical stability and homogeneity in the glass matrix. Economical assessment was performed with some considerations given for equipment having already been adopted for LILW treatment in Korea for four treatment strategies with melters selected from a technical assessment. For each strategy, the capital and the operation cost were estimated, and the disposal volume was calculated with reasonably estimated volume reduction factors with regard to waste type and treatment concept

  19. Storage and final disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste materials in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plecas, I.

    1997-01-01

    As of the end of 1995, 18 countries in Europe had electricity-generating nuclear power reactors in operation or under construction. There are currently 217 operating units, with a total capacity of about 165 GW e. In addition, there are 26 units under construction, which would bring the total electrical generating capacity to about 190 GW e.The management of radioactive waste is not a new concept. It has been safely practised for low and intermediate level wastes for almost 40 years. Today, after decades of research, development and industrial applications, it can be stated confidently that safe technological solutions for radioactive waste management exist. However, waste disposal as a whole waste management system is no longer a matter for scientists but requires co-operation with politicians, licensing authorities, industry and ultimately general public. The goal is unique: the protection of human health and the global environment against possible short term and (very) long term effects of radioactive materials. Disposal of waste materials in a repository without the intention of retrieval, whereas storage, as previously discussed, is done with the intention that the waste will be retrieved at a later time. If disposed waste is abandoned, the repository site is not abandoned, but surveillance should not be necessary beyond some expected period of institutional control. (author)

  20. Iranian Language Teachers’ and Students’ Perspectives on Top Notch Series (2nd edition at Intermediate Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Azadsarv

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As the means of transferring knowledge between teachers and students, coursebooks play a significant role in educational practices all over the world. Evaluation of coursebooks is also of great significance as it manages to a better understanding of the nature of a specific teaching/learning situation. The present study is an attempt to evaluateTop Notch coursebook from both Iranian EFL learners’ and teachers’ perspectives. One hundred students and 20 teachers participated in this study. Sixty four of the students and nine of the teachers were male and 36 of the students and 11 of the teachers were female. The range of teachers' experience of teaching the coursebook was between 2-4 years and the range of students' experience of studying the coursebook was between 1-3 years. The data collection took place in three language institutes of Gilan and Mazandaran provinces. The coursebook, evaluated based on modified version of Cunningsworth's (1995 checklist, was the intermediate level of Top Notch. It was evaluated by both students and teachers based on administering written questionnaires. In order to triangulate the gathered data, 25 percent of the teachers and 10 percent of the students attended an interview session. Data analysis indicated that strengths of Top Notch from teachers' perspective are grammar, visuals, supplementary materials and culture and from students' point of view are content, grammar, phonology and visuals.

  1. Solidification of intermediate level liquid waste - ILLW, CEMEX waste form qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Andrea, V.; Guerra, M.; Pancotti, F.; Maio, V.

    2015-01-01

    In the Sogin EUREX Facility about 125 m 3 of intermediate level radioactive waste and about 113 m 3 of low level radioactive waste, produced during the re-processing of MTR and CANDU fuel, are stored. Solidification of these wastes is planned in order to fulfill the specific requirements established by the Safety Authority, taking into account the criteria set up in a Technical Guide on the issue of radioactive waste management. The design of a cementation plant (CEMEX) of all liquid radioactive wastes is currently ongoing. The process requires that the liquid waste is neutralized with NaOH (NaOH 19 M) and metered into 440 liter drum together with the cement, while the mixture is stirred by a lost paddle ('in drum mixing process'). The qualification of the Waste Form consists of all the activities demonstrating that the final cemented product has the minimum requirements (mechanical, chemical and physical characteristics) compliant with all the subsequent management phases: long-term interim storage, transport and long-term disposal of the waste. All tests performed to qualify the conditioning process for immobilizing first extraction cycle (MTR and CANDU) and second extraction cycle liquid wastes, gave results in compliance with the minimum requirements established for disposal

  2. The disposal of low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes: the Elstow Storage Depot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-10-01

    This document explains the role of NIREX (Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive) in planning for the safe disposal of low and intermediate-level radioactive wastes and outlines the plans for the investigation and possible development of a new shallow repository at the CEGB's Elstow Storage Depot, Bedfordshire. The site is conveniently located and is situated on a suitable geologic formation, the Oxford Clay. The next step is for NIREX to undertake site investigations and assess in detail the site's suitability. On the basis of this assessment NIREX will either confirm its interest in the site or reject it as unsuitable. If the site proves to be adequate for the development of a shallow repository then NIREX will seek the necessary planning approvals and authorisations for such a development. The development would involve the construction of new buildings and a programme of trench excavation, waste positioning and trench closure. Existing tenants at the Depot will be accommodated as far as possible. The existing road and rail networks would be used for delivering the packaged wastes. In designing and operating any repository the safety of the public and workforce, both now and in the future, will be of paramount importance. (author)

  3. An evaluation on the disposal alternatives for low- and intermediate- level radwaste (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hun Hwee; Han, Kyung Won; Hahn, Pil Soo; Lee, Han Soo; Cho, Won Jin; Lee, Jae Dwan; Park, Chung Kyun; Lee, Myung Joo; Choi, Heui Joo; Lee, Youn Myoung

    1988-02-01

    An evaluation on the radioactive waste disposal alternatives for the low-and intermediate level wastes being produced from nuclear power generation and radioisotope application was carried out in view of the radiological safety, socio-political aspects and repository construction economics. Three types of possible alternatives-sample shallow land disposal method, engineered shallow land disposal method and engineered rock cavern disposal method are investigated. The safety assessment consists of radiological dose calculation and nonradiological impacts which is expressed as total number of injuries and fatalities during construction, operation and transportation. The sociopolitical assessment is done in terms of site conditions including easiness for land acquisition, technical feasibility and public acceptance. The economic assessment is performed by cost comparison regarding land acquisition, construction, operation and closure for each alternatives. The evaluation shows that engineered rock cavern disposal method has remarkable favour in safety than others. And also an integrated evaluation using AHP results the engineered rock cavern disposal method as the most favorable option

  4. Aube's storage centre for low and intermediate level wastes: Annual report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    After a presentation of the ANDRA (the French national Agency for radioactive waste management), its missions, its facilities, and its financing, this report reviews the activity of its storage centre for low and intermediate level wastes located on the territory of three towns in the Aube district. It briefly describes the facilities, the different categories of liquid effluents and their associated networks. It indicates some important figures characterizing the centre's operation. It describes the main safety objectives, technical measures and results in terms of radioprotection. It reports the main events in the relationship with the safety authority. It also briefly describes the incidents and accidents which occurred in 2008. It presents and specifies some results of the numerous environmental analyses performed around the centre (radioactivity measurements in air, water, milk, mushrooms, fishes, and so on), comments the radiologic impact of releases, and actions to improve these results. It gives assessments of the amount of produced wastes and describes their processing and management. Information actions are presented and the CHSCT (Committee of hygiene, safety, and working conditions) are reported

  5. Prototype of thermal degradation for radioactive wastes of low and intermediate level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz A, L.V.; Pacheco S, J.O.; Pacheco P, M.; Monroy G, F.; Emeterio H, M.

    2005-01-01

    At the present time, the scientific, academic, industrial and technological activities, generate great quantity of radioactive wastes of low and intermediate level (DRNBI). For to assure an appropriate final disposal of these, it is intended their treatment and vitrification by means of thermal plasma. This alternative offers multiple advantages in an only process: elevated energy density (105W/cm 3 ), high enthalpy (1400 kJ/mol), elevated chemical reactivity, quick quenching (106K/s) and operation temperatures of 4000 to 15000K; this allows the treatment of a great diversity of waste. Those reactors are compact and they work to atmospheric pressure and reduced thermal inertia. This technology allows to degrade DRNBI and to contain them in a vitreous matrix by means of a system made up of a reactor, canyon of plasma, of monitoring, of washing of gases and of control. Besides the design and general characteristics of the Prototype of Thermal Degradation of DRNBI, they are reported in this work the advances achieved in the selection of the ceramic material for the vitrification. Their characterization was carried out by means of SEM and XRD. With the preliminary results it can discern that the material but appropriate to be used as vitreous matrix is a ceramic clay. With the development of the proposed technology and the material for the vitreous matrix, it will be to treat DRNBI. (Author)

  6. A successful case site selection for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Bongwoo

    2007-01-01

    Korea decided on Gyeongju-si as the site of low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility by referendum in November, 2005. Five success factors are considered; 1) the mayor and municipal assembly leaded the public opinion of inhabitants, 2) an invitation group was formed by citizen, social and religious group, 3) Gyeongju-si has operated the nuclear power plant since 20 years ago, and this radioactive waste disposal facility brings large financial support, 4) many kinds of public information means were used for invitation agreement and 5) the preconception, a nuclear facility is danger, was removed by visiting citizen, social group and local inhabitants at the nuclear power plant facility. Promotion process of the project, invitation process of Gyeongju-si and success factors, construction of an invitation promotion group and development of public information activities, publicity of financial effects and safety of radioactive waste disposal facility, increase of general acceptance among inhabitants by many kinds of public information means, and P.R. of safety of nuclear power plant facility by visiting leadership layers are reported. (S.Y.)

  7. Corrosion on reinforced concrete structures. An application for the intermediate level radioactive waste container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arva, Alejandro; Alvarez, Marta G.; Duffo, Gustavo S.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of steel reinforcement bars (rebars) for a high performance reinforced concrete made of sulfate resistant portland cement was evaluated from the rebars corrosion point of view. The results from the present work will be used to evaluate the materials properties to be used in the construction of the intermediate level radioactive waste disposal containers. The study is carried out evaluating the incidence of chloride and sulfate ions, as well as, concrete carbonation in the rebar corrosion process. The electrochemical parameters that characterize the corrosion process (corrosion potential [E corr ], polarisation resistance [Rp] and concrete electrical resistivity [ρ]) were monitored on specially designed reinforced concrete specimens. The results up to date (about 1000 days of exposure) reveal that the concrete under study provides to the steel reinforcement bars of a passive state against corrosion under the test conditions. An increasing tendency as a function of time of ρ is observed that corroborates the continuous curing process of concrete. The chloride and carbonation diffusion coefficients were also determined, and their values are comparable with those of high quality concrete. (author)

  8. Design perspectives for the low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Ki; Koh, Kwang Hoon; Lee, Sang Sun; Lee, Byung Sik; Choi, Gi Won

    2007-01-01

    The underground waste repository is located at Gyeongju and is designed for the disposal of all the Low- and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste(LILW). It is scheduled to commence operations in the beginning of 2009. The repository, with a disposal capacity of 800,000 drums, will be constructed in granite rock near the seashore at the Gyeongju site. The repository will be designed to be constructed in phases to reach its final capacity 800,000 drums. In the first phase of construction, the repository will have a capacity to store 100,000 drums. The repository will house all LILW generated in the Republic of Korea. The first phase of the repository design consists of an assess shaft, a construction tunnel, an operating tunnel, an unloading tunnel, and six(6) silos. The silos are located at 80 to 130 meters below Mean Sea level (MSL), in bedrock. Each silo is 24.8m in diameter and 52.4m in height. The silo will be reinforced with concrete lining for rock supports which will also act aas an engineered barrier in limiting radioactive nuclide release aft closure. After serving its intended function the repository will be filled and sealed. The primary objective of filling and sealing is to prevent ground water flow into the silo through the tunnel system and to prevent inadvertent intrusion into the repository after closure

  9. Disposal of low- and intermediate-level solid radioactive wastes in rock cavities. A guidebook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    This Guidebook summarizes the factors to be considered and the activities to be undertaken in the overall planning and development of a disposal system for solid or solidified low- and intermediate-level wastes in rock cavities. Aspects related to repository site selection, design, construction, operation, shutdown, surveillance, regulation and safety assessment are discussed here in general terms. They will be covered in greater technical detail in a separate document. This report considers the emplacement of wastes in categories II, III, IV and V, as defined in Table 3.1, in different kinds of cavities located at various depths from just below the surface to deep continental rock. The choice of the type of cavity and its depth and of the disposal site itself is related to the radiological protection requirements for the wastes concerned. The repositories considered include natural caves and abandoned mines as well as specially excavated cavities in various geological formations. Consideration is also given to hydrogeological, environmental and societal factors. The guidelines given in the report are made sufficiently general to cover a broad variety of different circumstances. Consequently, the practical application of these guidelines needs a case-by-case consideration which takes into account the local conditions, e.g. natural circumstances, the characteristics of the wastes and national and international regulations and practices.

  10. Advice concerning the advantages of a reference incinerator for low-level and intermediate-level radioactive waste processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luyten, G.B.

    1985-05-01

    In this report, an inventory is presented of new incinerators and flue gas filters used in low and intermediate-level radioactive waste combustion. It is argued that a 'reference equipment' for the combustion of solid and liquid low- and intermediate-level wastes best meets existing Dutch radiation protection standards. A cost-benefit analysis of such an equipment is given including annual costs of investment, capital and exploration. A separate combustion process of organic liquids and carrions is considered finally. (G.J.P.)

  11. Project Guarantee 1985. Final repository for low- and intermediate level radioactive wastes: Safety report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Storage of radioactive waste must delay the return of radionuclides to the biosphere for a long period of time and must maintain the release rates at a sufficiently low level for all time. This is achieved with the aid of a series of safety barriers which consist, on the one hand, of technical barriers in the repository and, on the other hand , of natural geological barriers as they occur at the repository location. In order to assess the efficiency of the barriers, the working methods of the technical barriers and the host rock must be understood. This understanding is transferred into quantitative models in order to calculate the safety of the repository. The individual barriers and the methods used to modelling their functions were described in volume NGB 85-07 of the Project Guarantee 1985 report series and the data necessary for modelling were given. The models and data are used in the safety analysis, the results of which are contained in the present report. Safety considerations show that models are available in Switzerland which allow, in principle, an assessment of the long-term behaviour of a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. The evaluation of earlier studies and experimental work, suitable laboratory measurements and results from field research enable compilation of a representative data-set so that the requirements for quantitative statements on safety of final disposal are met from this side also. The safety calculations show that the radiation doses calculated for a base case scenario with realistic/conservative parameter values are negligibly low. Also, radiation doses which are clearly under the protection standard of 10 mrem per year result for conservative values and the cumulation of several conservative assumptions. Even assuming exposure of the repository by erosion, a radiotoxicity of the soil formed results which is under natural values

  12. Development and evaluation of an intermediate-level elective course on medical Spanish for pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert

    The Spanish-speaking population in the United States is increasing rapidly, and there is a need for additional educational efforts, beyond teaching basic medical Spanish terminology, to increase the number of Spanish-speaking pharmacists able to provide culturally appropriate care to this patient population. This article describes the development and evaluation of an intermediate-level elective course where students integrated pharmacy practice skills with Spanish-language skills and cultural competency. Educational Activity and Setting: Medical Spanish for Pharmacists was developed as a two-credit elective course for pharmacy students in their third-professional-year who possessed a certain level of Spanish language competence. The course was designed so that students would combine patient care skills such as obtaining a medication list and providing patient education, and pharmacotherapy knowledge previously learned in the curriculum, along with Spanish-language skills, and apply them to simulated Spanish-speaking patients. Elements to promote cultural competency were integrated throughout the course through a variety of methods, including a service learning activity. Successful attainment of course goals and objectives were demonstrated through quizzes, assignments, examinations, and an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). Based on these course assessments, students performed well during both offerings of the course. While the class cohort size was small in the two offerings of the course, the Medical Spanish for Pharmacists elective may still serve as an example for other pharmacy programs as an innovative approach in combining Spanish language, specific pharmacy skills, cultural competency, and service learning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An Object-Oriented Python Implementation of an Intermediate-Level Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    The Neelin-Zeng Quasi-equilibrium Tropical Circulation Model (QTCM1) is a Fortran-based intermediate-level atmospheric model that includes simplified treatments of several physical processes, including a GCM-like convective scheme and a land-surface scheme with representations of different surface types, evaporation, and soil moisture. This model has been used in studies of the Madden-Julian oscillation, ENSO, and vegetation-atmosphere interaction effects on climate. Through the assumption of convective quasi-equilibrium in the troposphere, the QTCM1 is able to include full nonlinearity, resolve baroclinic disturbances, and generate a reasonable climatology, all at low computational cost. One year of simulation on a PC at 5.625 × 3.75 degree longitude-latitude resolution takes under three minutes of wall-clock time. The Python package qtcm implements the QTCM1 in a mixed-language environment that retains the speed of compiled Fortran while providing the benefits of Python's object-oriented framework and robust suite of utilities and datatypes. We describe key programming constructs used to create this modeling environment: the decomposition of model runs into Python objects, providing methods so visualization tools are attached to model runs, and the use of Python's mutable datatypes (lists and dictionaries) to implement the "run list" entity, which enables total runtime control of subroutine execution order and content. The result is an interactive modeling environment where the traditional sequence of "hypothesis → modeling → visualization and analysis" is opened up and made nonlinear and flexible. In this environment, science tasks such as parameter-space exploration and testing alternative parameterizations can be easily automated, without the need for multiple versions of the model code interacting with a bevy of makefiles and shell scripts. The environment also simplifies interfacing of the atmospheric model to other models (e.g., hydrologic models

  14. Intermediate levels of hippocampal activity appear optimal for associative memory formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is well established that hippocampal activity is positively related to effective associative memory formation. However, in biological systems often optimal levels of activity are contrasted by both sub- and supra-optimal levels. Sub-optimal levels of hippocampal activity are commonly attributed to unsuccessful memory formation, whereas the supra-optimal levels of hippocampal activity related to unsuccessful memory formation have been rarely studied. It is still unclear under what circumstances such supra-optimal levels of hippocampal activity occur. To clarify this issue, we aimed at creating a condition, in which supra-optimal hippocampal activity is associated with encoding failure. We assumed that such supra-optimal activity occurs when task-relevant information is embedded in task-irrelevant, distracting information, which can be considered as noise. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present fMRI study, we probed neural correlates of associative memory formation in a full-factorial design with associative memory (subsequently remembered versus forgotten and noise (induced by high versus low distraction as factors. Results showed that encoding failure was associated with supra-optimal activity in the high-distraction condition and with sub-optimal activity in the low distraction condition. Thus, we revealed evidence for a bell-shape function relating hippocampal activity with associative encoding success. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings indicate that intermediate levels of hippocampal activity are optimal while both too low and too high levels appear detrimental for associative memory formation. Supra-optimal levels of hippocampal activity seem to occur when task-irrelevant information is added to task-relevant signal. If such task-irrelevant noise is reduced adequately, hippocampal activity is lower and thus optimal for associative memory formation.

  15. Rapid L2 Word Learning through High Constraint Sentence Context: An Event-Related Potential Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoguo Chen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have found quantity of exposure, i.e., frequency of exposure (Horst et al., 1998; Webb, 2008; Pellicer-Sánchez and Schmitt, 2010, is important for second language (L2 contextual word learning. Besides this factor, context constraint and L2 proficiency level have also been found to affect contextual word learning (Pulido, 2003; Tekmen and Daloglu, 2006; Elgort et al., 2015; Ma et al., 2015. In the present study, we adopted the event-related potential (ERP technique and chose high constraint sentences as reading materials to further explore the effects of quantity of exposure and proficiency on L2 contextual word learning. Participants were Chinese learners of English with different English proficiency levels. For each novel word, there were four high constraint sentences with the critical word at the end of the sentence. Learners read sentences and made semantic relatedness judgment afterwards, with ERPs recorded. Results showed that in the high constraint condition where each pseudoword was embedded in four sentences with consistent meaning, N400 amplitude upon this pseudoword decreased significantly as learners read the first two sentences. High proficiency learners responded faster in the semantic relatedness judgment task. These results suggest that in high quality sentence contexts, L2 learners could rapidly acquire word meaning without multiple exposures, and L2 proficiency facilitated this learning process.

  16. The Role of Oral Language Skills in Reading and Listening Comprehension of Text: A Comparison of Monolingual (L1) and Bilingual (L2) Speakers of English Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayigit, Selma

    2014-01-01

    The study examined the role of oral language skills in reading comprehension and listening comprehension levels of 125 monolingual (L1) and bilingual (L2) English-speaking learners (M = 121.5 months, SD = 4.65) in England. All testing was conducted in English. The L1 learners outperformed their L2 peers on the measures of oral language and text…

  17. Current construction status of Korea Wolsong Nuclear Environment Management Center (low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Yasuo

    2010-01-01

    Through the RANDEC delegation tour to Korea in Nov. 2009, we have earned new information on recent development of the radioactive waste management in Korea. In this report, we will introduce such development in Korea, focusing on the current construction status of Korean LILW (low and intermediate level radioactive waste) disposal site, now called, Wolsong Nuclear Environment Management Center. (author)

  18. A review of DOE chemical and geochemical research programmes (for disposal of low and intermediate level waste)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, R.

    1987-01-01

    A study of 26 DOE sponsored research programmes has been carried out with respect to their coverage of various chemical and geochemical issues posed by the proposed disposal of low and intermediate level wastes in a land repository. The study also took into account various experimental programmes sponsored by NIREX and abroad. The findings of the study are reported here. (author)

  19. Action taken by ENRESA and the NPPs with a view to reducing the production of low and intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales, A.; Rojo, F.

    1996-01-01

    In those countries in which the responsibilities of the different organizations involved in the management of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (Regulatory Body, Agency, Facility Operators and Producers) are perfectly defined and a definitive Waste Disposal Facility is in operation, the next phase in order of importance consists of addressing a waste volume reduction policy aimed at optimizing storage capacity

  20. The influence of organic materials on the near field of an intermediate level waste radioactive waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, J.D.

    1988-02-01

    The influence of organic materials, which are present in some intermediate level wastes, on the chemistry of the near field of a radioactive waste repository is discussed. Particular attention is given to the possible formation of water soluble complexing agents formed as a result of the radiation field and chemical conditions. The present state of the research is reviewed. (author)

  1. The project for national disposal facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, A.; Boyanov, S.; Christoskova, M.; Ivanov, A.

    2006-01-01

    The State Enterprise Radioactive Waste is the responsible organisation in Bulgaria for the radioactive waste management and, in particular, for the establishment of the national disposal facility (NDF) for low and intermediate level short-lived radioactive waste (LIL RAW SL). According to the national strategy for the safe management of spent fuel and radioactive waste the NDF should be commissioned in 2015. NDF will accept two main waste streams - for disposal and for storage if the waste is not disposable. The major part of disposable waste is generated by Kozloduy NPP. The disposal facility will be a near surface module type engineered facility. Consecutive erection of new modules will be available in order to increase the capacity of the facility. The corrective measures are previewed to be applied if needed - upgrading of engineered barriers and/or retrieval of the waste. The active control after the facility is closed should be not more than 300 years. The safety of the facility is supposed to be based on the passive measures based on defense in deep consisting of physical barriers and administrative measures. A multi barrier approach will be applied. Presently the NDF project is at the first stage of the facility life cycle - the site selection. The siting process itself consists of four stages - elaboration of a concept for waste disposal and site selection planning, data collection and region analyses, characterization of the preferred sites-candidates and site confirmation. Up till now the work on the first two stages of the siting process had been done by the SE RAW. Geological site investigations have been carried out for more than two decades all over the territory of the country. The results of the investigations have been summarized and analysed thoroughly. More than 40 potential sites have been considered, after the preselection 12 sites have been selected as favourable and among them 5 are pointed out as acceptable. The ultimate decision for a site

  2. Development of geopolymers as candidate materials for low/intermediate level highly alkaline nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, D.S.; Vance, E.R.; Kiyama, S.; Aly, Z.; Yee, P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: Geopolymers have been studied for many years as a possible improvement on cement in respect of compressive strength, resistance to fire, heat and acidity, and as a medium for the encapsulation of hazardous or low/ intermediate level radioactive waste. They are made by adding aluminosilicates to concentrated alkali solutions and the application of heat at 0 Cfor subsequent polymerisation. In this work we studied them as suitable candidate materials to incorporate NaOH/NaA10 2 containing waste with low levels of Cs, Sr and Nd. Geopolymers were produced by incorporating the highly alkaline solution as part of the composition with added metakaolinite, fumed silica and extra NaOH, such that the overall geopolymer composition was of molar ratios Si/Al = 2 and Na/Al = 1. The simulated waste contained Na2SO 4 , therefore Ba(OH) 2 was also added to precipitate the SO 4 x 2 as BaSO 4 . Three geoplymers of the same composition containing simulated wastes were leach tested in triplicate after heating at 400 0 Cfor 1 h (to remove -98% of free and interstitial water) under the PCT-B test protocol at 90 0 Cfor 7 days and their results are listed in Table 1. The Cs, Sr and Nd normalised leach rates were low. The Na leach rate was ∼ 4 g/L thus passing the PCT-B test protocol value of 13.5 g/L for EA glass. The X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy showed that BaS04 did precipitate, however all the S did not appear to have precipitated. The ANSI/ANS-16.1-2003 test was carried out on the above geopolymer composition for 5 days. The ANSI Leachability Index D (diffusivity of 10''cm sec'') for the elements released are listed in Table 2. A Portland cement was also tested for comparison and the Leachability index values are 11, 8 and 10 for Al, Na and Ca respectively. Both passed the test protocol insofar as they were > 6. Geopolymers thus passing the tests for high level nuclear waste glass (PCT-B) and for low level nuclear waste (ANSI) show promising potential

  3. Deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste. Preliminary safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    A preliminary safety assessment has been performed of a deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste, SFL 3-5. The purpose of the study is to investigate the capacity of the facility to act as a barrier to the release of radionuclides and toxic pollutants, and to shed light on the importance of the location of the repository site. A safety assessment (SR 97) of a deep repository for spent fuel has been carried out at the same time. In SR 97, three hypothetical repository sites have been selected for study. These sites exhibit fairly different conditions in terms of hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and ecosystems. To make use of information and data from the SR 97 study, we have assumed that SFL 3-5 is co-sited with the deep repository for spent fuel. A conceivable alternative is to site SFL 3-5 as a completely separate repository. The focus of the SFL 3-5 study is a quantitative analysis of the environmental impact for a reference scenario, while other scenarios are discussed and analyzed in more general terms. Migration in the repository's near- and far-field has been taken into account in the reference scenario. Environmental impact on the three sites has also been calculated. The calculations are based on an updated forecast of the waste to be disposed of in SFL 3-5. The forecast includes radionuclide content, toxic metals and other substances that have a bearing on a safety assessment. The safety assessment shows how important the site is for safety. Two factors stand out as being particularly important: the water flow at the depth in the rock where the repository is built, and the ecosystem in the areas on the ground surface where releases may take place in the future. Another conclusion is that radionuclides that are highly mobile and long-lived, such as 36 Cl and 93 Mo , are important to take into consideration. Their being long-lived means that barriers and the ecosystems must be regarded with a very long time horizon

  4. Derivation of Waste Acceptance Criteria for Low and Intermediate Level Waste in Surface Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagner, L.; Voinis, S.

    2000-01-01

    In France, low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes are disposed in a near-surface facility, at Centre de l'Aube disposal facility. This facility, which was commissioned in 1992, has a disposal capacity of one million cubic meters, and will be operated up to about 2050. It took over the job from Centre de la Manche, which was commissioned in 1969 and shut down in 1994, after having received about 520,000 cubic meters of wastes. The Centre de l'Aube disposal facility is designed to receive a many types of waste produced by nuclear power plants, reprocessing, decommissioning, as well as by the industry, hospitals and armed forces. The limitation of radioactive transfer to man and the limitation of personnel exposure in all situations considered plausible require limiting the total activity of the waste disposed in the facility as well as the activity of each package. The paper presents how ANDRA has derived the activity-related acceptance criteria, based on the safety analysis. In the French methodology, activity is considered as end-point for deriving the concentration limits per package, whereas it is the starting point for deriving the total activity limits. For the concentration limits (called here LMA) the approach consists of five steps: the determination of radionuclides important for safety with regards to operational and long-term safety, the use of relevant safety scenarios as a tool to derive quantitative limits, the setting of dose constraint per situation associated with scenarios, the setting of contribution factor per radionuclide, and the calculation of concentration activity limits. An exhaustive survey has been performed and has shown that the totality of waste packages which should be delivered by waste generators are acceptable in terms of activity limits in the Centre de l'Aube. Examples of concentration activity limits derived from this methodology are presented. Furthermore those limits have been accepted by the French regulatory body and

  5. Alternative systems of covering the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste storage at Sallying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaconu, Daniela

    2003-01-01

    The current concept of managing the low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes produced during the operation of Cernavoda NPP provides their final disposal underground in the Sallying repository located within the NPP exclusion area. The safety requirements of the disposal imposed adopting of efficient natural and engineered systems to prevent population and environment exposure for at least 300 years time. Preliminary studies on the Sallying site showed that geological formations can prevent release radioisotopes in Eocene and Baramine aquifers both by their composition and structures. On the other hand investigation of the potential factors which could affect the long term stability of the repository showed that soil erosion due to climatic factors and soil degradation produced by animals burrowing underground drifts could rise the probability of environment contamination. These factors could enhance the escape of 14 C and 3 H radionuclides in the environment and a rise of water infiltration rate into the repository. A technical solution aiming at diminishing these effects specific to superficial or low-depth repositories appear to be a system of covering technical barriers as well as minimizing the effects of biointrusion. The paper analyses several geo textile membranes (polyesters and rubber) as well as soils compositions (loess, clay, sand, gravel) as technical a natural covering solutions. The studies and the experiments carried out led to the following four conclusions. 1. Without a multilayer covering system the saturation degree of the loess above the repository keeps low values varying between 20% and 25%. Although, the humidity increases considerably at the interface with the repository's concrete, so that within 0.5 m it reaches a saturation degree of 96%. The concrete block having a compact and fine structure directs laterally the water flow what entails a slight increase of humidity. 2. The capillary barriers keep the humidity in the upper part

  6. Assessment of the Biodegradability of Containers for Low and Intermediate Level Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zlobenko, B.P.

    2013-01-01

    Concrete and reinforced concrete are widely used as engineered barriers (containers) for radioactive waste disposal facilities due to their isolating ability, mechanical stability and low cost. Several types of protective reinforced concrete containers for low and intermediate level waste have been designed in Ukraine. Evaluation of these containers for microbial stability is required according to NRC of Ukraine Regulation No.306.608-96. The research was therefore aimed at studying the degradation of the cement material due to microbiological interaction and the possibility of biodegraded cement as an ideal environment for the growth of other microorganisms under waste disposal conditions to satisfy the regulatory requirements. Results from this study indicated that Aspergillus niger induced gluconic and oxalic acids that dissolve portlandite (with a low leaching of calcium) after one year of contact time. This resulted in an increase in porosity, loss in tensile strength biomechanically deteriorated and cracking. XRD analysis identified crystalline precipitates within the biomass on the concrete surface as calcium oxalate dehydrate (weddellite) and calcium oxalate monohydrate (whewellite). The mechanism regarding of the microbiological interaction on the concrete surface can be summarized as follows: Phase 1: Fungi accumulate on the surface of the concrete, thereby degrading the concrete surface by biochemical and biomechanical interactions. When this effect is in the presence of air with available carbon dioxide, the micro fungi reduces the pH of the concrete from >13 to 8.5. During this phase no accumulation were observed in sections where granite aggregates are present. Phase 2: After reducing the pH of the concrete paste during phase 1, and provided that sufficient nutrients, moisture and oxygen are present sulphur oxidizing bacteria start to accumulate on the concrete surface. The result form this study therefore concluded that fungal biogeochemical activity

  7. An Applied Study of the Storage for Old Intermediate Level Waste at the Studsvik Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjoeblom, Rolf; Lindskog, Staffan

    2004-02-01

    The Storage for Old Intermediate Level Waste (SOILW) at Studsvik has been used for interim storage of intermediate and high level radioactive waste from various activities at the Studsvik site including post irradiation investigations. The SOILW facility was in operation during the years 1961 - 1984. The waste was stored in tube positions in concrete blocks and in concrete vaults. In some instances, radioactive debris and liquid has contaminated the storage positions as well as the underlying ventilation space. The primary purpose of the present work is to improve and extend the present knowledge basis for cost estimates for decommissioning, with the ACSF facility as an example. The main objective has been to explore the possibilities to improve the reliability and accuracy of capital budgeting for decommissioning costs at SOILW. In this study, the present international status of decommissioning, planning and cost estimation has been compiled. The various relevant guidance documents of the IAEA are also compiled, and their emphasis on the necessity of radiological and other surveying as well as technical planning and method selection is reiterated. Cost calculation schemes for new plants and for decommissioning are compiled. It is emphasized that the calculations should be carried out differently at different stages. At the early stages of decommissioning, there should be more emphasis on comparison, and at later stages the emphasis should be more oriented towards summation. The error/uncertainty in a cost calculation is strongly dependent on the selection of methodology, which, in turn, is strongly dependent on the radiological condition. The magnitude of the level of uncertainty has been illustrated by the example of concrete surface removal, and advice is provided on how to identify alternative measures that will enable more sure decisions. An example is also given on a rather similar decontamination and dismantling involving highly contaminated tubes in a

  8. Deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste. Preliminary safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    A preliminary safety assessment has been performed of a deep repository for long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste, SFL 3-5. The purpose of the study is to investigate the capacity of the facility to act as a barrier to the release of radionuclides and toxic pollutants, and to shed light on the importance of the location of the repository site. A safety assessment (SR 97) of a deep repository for spent fuel has been carried out at the same time. In SR 97, three hypothetical repository sites have been selected for study. These sites exhibit fairly different conditions in terms of hydrogeology, hydrochemistry and ecosystems. To make use of information and data from the SR 97 study, we have assumed that SFL 3-5 is co-sited with the deep repository for spent fuel. A conceivable alternative is to site SFL 3-5 as a completely separate repository. The focus of the SFL 3-5 study is a quantitative analysis of the environmental impact for a reference scenario, while other scenarios are discussed and analyzed in more general terms. Migration in the repository's near- and far-field has been taken into account in the reference scenario. Environmental impact on the three sites has also been calculated. The calculations are based on an updated forecast of the waste to be disposed of in SFL 3-5. The forecast includes radionuclide content, toxic metals and other substances that have a bearing on a safety assessment. The safety assessment shows how important the site is for safety. Two factors stand out as being particularly important: the water flow at the depth in the rock where the repository is built, and the ecosystem in the areas on the ground surface where releases may take place in the future. Another conclusion is that radionuclides that are highly mobile and long-lived, such as {sup 36}Cl and {sup 93}Mo , are important to take into consideration. Their being long-lived means that barriers and the ecosystems must be regarded with a very long time horizon.

  9. English and Socio-Economic Disadvantage: Learner Voices from Rural Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, M. Obaidul; Baldauf, Richard B., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    L2 education research has shown immense interest in learners and their views of L2 learning. Nevertheless, the different directions of learner-focused research have been inadequate in highlighting learners' learning experiences in relation to their social backgrounds, particularly in the developing world. Drawing on the first author's PhD…

  10. Chinese Learners' Acquisition of English Verbs: A Corpus-Driven Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linxiao; Jo, Hie-myung

    2012-01-01

    Limited research has investigated advanced language learners' acquisition of English verbs. The current study examines and compares the acquisition pattern of English verbs among Chinese second language (L2) learners at both intermediate and advanced levels to answer the following questions: (1) Do L2 learners acquire regular verbs and irregular…

  11. Iranian EFL and Indian ESL College Students' Beliefs about Reading Strategies in L2 (Creencias de estudiantes universitarios iraníes EFL e hindúes ESL acerca de las estrategias de lectura en L2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbalaei, Alireza

    2010-01-01

    The notion of "learner beliefs" has garnered much attention in the field of second language acquisition. Although different studies have been conducted to study learners' beliefs about language learning, little research has looked into the issue of L2 readers' beliefs and their relations to reading strategies. This study investigated…

  12. Learning to perceive and recognize a second language: the L2LP model revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leussen, Jan-Willem; Escudero, Paola

    2015-01-01

    We present a test of a revised version of the Second Language Linguistic Perception (L2LP) model, a computational model of the acquisition of second language (L2) speech perception and recognition. The model draws on phonetic, phonological, and psycholinguistic constructs to explain a number of L2 learning scenarios. However, a recent computational implementation failed to validate a theoretical proposal for a learning scenario where the L2 has less phonemic categories than the native language (L1) along a given acoustic continuum. According to the L2LP, learners faced with this learning scenario must not only shift their old L1 phoneme boundaries but also reduce the number of categories employed in perception. Our proposed revision to L2LP successfully accounts for this updating in the number of perceptual categories as a process driven by the meaning of lexical items, rather than by the learners' awareness of the number and type of phonemes that are relevant in their new language, as the previous version of L2LP assumed. Results of our simulations show that meaning-driven learning correctly predicts the developmental path of L2 phoneme perception seen in empirical studies. Additionally, and to contribute to a long-standing debate in psycholinguistics, we test two versions of the model, with the stages of phonemic perception and lexical recognition being either sequential or interactive. Both versions succeed in learning to recognize minimal pairs in the new L2, but make diverging predictions on learners' resulting phonological representations. In sum, the proposed revision to the L2LP model contributes to our understanding of L2 acquisition, with implications for speech processing in general.

  13. L2 Learners’ Proficiency Development through Noticing Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Saber Alavi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This experimental study investigated the relationship between noticing of corrective feedback and L2 development considering the learners’ perspective on error correction. Specifically, it aimed to uncover the noticeability and effectiveness of recasts, prompts, a combination of the two, to determine a relationship between noticing of CF and learning of the past tense. The participants were four groups of college ESL learners (n = 40. Each group was assigned to a treatment condition, but the researcher taught the control group. CF was provided to learners in response to their mistakes in forming the past tense. While noticing of CF was assessed through immediate recall and questionnaire responses, learning outcomes were measured through picture description administered via pre-test, post-test, and delayed post-test design. Learner beliefs about CF were probed by means of a 40-item questionnaire. The results indicated that the noticeability of CF is dependent on the grammatical target it addresses and that the feedback techniques that push learners to self-correct alone or in combination with target exemplars are more effective in. In relation to the learning outcomes, the overall past tense accuracy increased more than that for questions, but there were no significant differences between the groups. Finally, in relation to the beliefs about CF, the participants’ responses centered on the importance of oral CF, recasts as CF technique, prompts as CF technique, and affective consequences of CF, two of which mediated the noticeability of the supplied CF, but none impacted the learning outcomes.

  14. Low and intermediate level waste repositories: Socioeconomic aspects and public involvement. Proceedings of a workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-06-01

    Waste management facilities are needed to protect the environment and improve public health for the long term future. One significant challenge is to inform the public on the relative hazards of radioactive waste compared to other hazards in our modern society and to get the acceptance of the appropriate members of the public for these necessary facilities. Over the entire life cycle of these facilities, the projects must be managed without expending a disproportionate share of the collective resources. Public involvement plays a key role and the sophisticated and extensive public education systems that exist provide a vital service to gain public acceptance. There is a full range of compensation and benefit programmes used as incentives for hosting a LILW facility. Even if exemptions exist the experience in most countries indicate the direct/indirect incentives as a necessary part of gaining public acceptance. The countries, regions and local communities have their own established processes to make public decisions. Each organization developing a site must select and implement the methods that are acceptable within their framework of laws and regulations. A three day workshop on socio-economic issues and public involvement practices and approaches for developing and operating repositories for low and intermediate level waste took place in the IAEA headquarters on 9-11 November 2005. The workshop provided a forum where experts from Member States shared their experiences in non-technical aspects of planning, licensing and operating LILW disposal facilities. Description of both principles and practices applied in particular countries provides a useful overview of potential approaches in application of non-technical issues during a repository lifecycle. Participants presented approaches and practices applied in their countries, established new contacts and were able to take advantage of activities and experiences from abroad. There were 25 interesting presentations

  15. Deletion of /T, D/ and the Acquisition of Linguistic Variation by Second Language Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jette G. Hansen

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated second language (L2) learners' acquisition of English /t, d/ deletion patterns in word-final consonant clusters, (a) focusing on how constraints such as grammatical conditioning and phonological environment affect deletion of /t, d/ in L2 acquisition and (b) determining the extent to which these L2 learners had acquired…

  16. The Effect of Different Modes of English Captioning on EFL Learners' General Listening Comprehension: Full Text vs. Keyword Captions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behroozizad, Sorayya; Majidi, Sudabeh

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of different modes of English captioning on EFL learners' general listening comprehension. To this end, forty-five intermediate-level learners were selected based on their scores on a standardized English proficiency test (PET) to carry out the study. Then, the selected participants were randomly assigned into…

  17. Holistic oil field value management: using system dynamics for 'intermediate level' and 'value-based' modelling in the oil industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corben, D.; Stevenson, R.; Wolstenholme, E.F.

    1999-01-01

    System dynamics has been seen primarily as a strategic tool, most effectively used at the highest level of strategy to identify robust policy interventions under a wide range of scenarios. However, an alternative, complementary and powerful role is emerging. This is at an 'intermediate level' in organisations to coordinate and integrate policies across the value chain. It is at this level where business value, as defined by the discounted value of future free cash flow, is both created and destroyed. This paper introduces the need for 'intermediate-level' and 'value-based' modelling and emphasises the natural role of system dynamics in supporting a methodology to fulfil the need. It describes the development of an approach and its application in the oil industry to coordinate the response of people and tools within operational, financial and commercial functions across the value chain to address a variety of problems and issues. (author)

  18. Geological factors of disposal site selection for low-and intermediate-level solid radwastes in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhangru

    1993-01-01

    For disposal of low- and intermediate-level solid radioactive wastes, shallow-ground disposal can provide adequate isolation of waste from human for a fairly long period of time. The objective of disposal site selection is to ensure that the natural properties of the site together with the engineered barrier site shall provide adequate isolation of radionuclides from the human beings and environment, so the whole disposal system can keep the radiological impact within an acceptable level. Since the early 1980's, complying with the national standards and the expert's conception as well as the related IAEA Criteria, geological selection of disposal sites for low-and intermediate-level solid radwastes has been carried out in East China, South China, Northwest China and Southwest China separately. Finally, 5 candidate sites were recommended to the CNNC

  19. Lexical Inferencing in Reading L2 Russian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, William J.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes how intermediate-level first language English readers of Russian as a second language deploy lexical inferencing and other strategies when reading informational texts. Fifth-semester students of Russian performed think-alouds while reading two texts; one written for the general adult reader, and the other meant for school-age…

  20. Assessment of studies and researches on warehousing - High-level and intermediate-level-long-lived radioactive wastes - December 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This large report first presents the approach adopted for the study and research on the warehousing of high-level and intermediate-level-long-lived radioactive wastes. It outlines how reversible storage and warehousing are complementary, discusses the lessons learned from researches performed by the CEA on long duration warehousing, presents the framework of studies and researches performed since 2006, and presents the scientific and technical content of studies and researches (warehousing need analysis, search for technical options providing complementarity with storage, extension or creation of warehousing installations). The second part addresses high-level and intermediate-level-long-lived radioactive waste parcels, indicates their origins and quantities. The third part proposes an analysis of warehousing capacities: existing capacities, French industrial experience in waste parcel warehousing, foreign experience in waste warehousing. The fourth part addresses reversible storage in deep geological formation: storage safety functions, storage reversibility, storage parcels, storage architecture, chronicle draft. The fifth part proposes an inventory of warehousing needs in terms of additional capacities for the both types of wastes (high-level, and intermediate-level-long-lived), and discusses warehousing functionalities and safety objectives. The sixth and seventh parts propose a detailed overview of design options for warehousing installations, respectively for high-level and for intermediate-level-long-lived waste parcels: main technical issues, feasibility studies of different concepts or architecture shapes, results of previous studies and introduction to studies performed since 2011, possible evolutions of the HA1, HA2 and MAVL concepts. The eighth chapter reports a phenomenological analysis of warehousing and the optimisation of material selection and construction arrangements. The last part discusses the application of researches to the extension of the

  1. Summary report of a seminar on geosphere modelling requirements of deep disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piper, D.; Paige, R.W.; Broyd, T.W.

    1989-02-01

    A seminar on the geosphere modelling requirements of deep disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive wastes was organised by WS Atkins Engineering Sciences as part of Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution's Radioactive Waste Assessment Programme. The objectives of the seminar were to review geosphere modelling capabilities and prioritise, if possible, any requirements for model development. Summaries of the presentations and subsequent discussions are given in this report. (author)

  2. Influence of syllable structure on L2 auditory word learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Megumi; Goya, Hideki

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the role of syllable structure in L2 auditory word learning. Based on research on cross-linguistic variation of speech perception and lexical memory, it was hypothesized that Japanese L1 learners of English would learn English words with an open-syllable structure without consonant clusters better than words with a closed-syllable structure and consonant clusters. Two groups of college students (Japanese group, N = 22; and native speakers of English, N = 21) learned paired English pseudowords and pictures. The pseudoword types differed in terms of the syllable structure and consonant clusters (congruent vs. incongruent) and the position of consonant clusters (coda vs. onset). Recall accuracy was higher for the pseudowords in the congruent type and the pseudowords with the coda-consonant clusters. The syllable structure effect was obtained from both participant groups, disconfirming the hypothesized cross-linguistic influence on L2 auditory word learning.

  3. Comprehensive development plans for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility in Korea and preliminary safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kang Il; Kim, Jin Hyeong; Kwon, Mi Jin; Jeong, Mi Seon; Hong, Sung Wook; Park, Jin Beak [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The disposal facility in Gyeongju is planning to dispose of 800,000 packages of low- and intermediate- level radioactive waste. This facility will be developed as a complex disposal facility that has various types of disposal facilities and accompanying management. In this study, based on the comprehensive development plan of the disposal facility, a preliminary post-closure safety assessment is performed to predict the phase development of the total capacity for the 800,000 packages to be disposed of at the site. The results for each scenario meet the performance target of the disposal facility. The assessment revealed that there is a significant impact of the inventory of intermediate-level radionuclide waste on the safety evaluation. Due to this finding, we introduce a disposal limit value for intermediate-level radioactive waste. With stepwise development of safety case, this development plan will increase the safety of disposal facilities by reducing uncertainties within the future development of the underground silo disposal facilities.

  4. Effects of Multimedia Instruction on L2 Acquisition of High-Level, Low-Frequency English Vocabulary Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Euna

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of multimedia enhancement in video form in addition to textual information on L2 vocabulary instruction for high-level, low-frequency English words among Korean learners of English. Although input-based incidental learning of L2 vocabulary through extensive reading has been conventionally believed to be…

  5. Is Less More? Effectiveness and Perceived Usefulness of Keyword and Full Captioned Video for L2 Listening Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero Perez, Maribel; Peters, Elke; Desmet, Piet

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold: we investigated (a) the effect of two types of captioned video (i.e., on-screen text in the same language as the video) on listening comprehension; (b) L2 learners' perception of the usefulness of captions while watching L2 video. The participants, 226 university-level students from a Flemish university, watched…

  6. "One Task Fits All"? The Roles of Task Complexity, Modality, and Working Memory Capacity in L2 Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalbidea, Janire

    2017-01-01

    The present study explores the independent and interactive effects of task complexity and task modality on linguistic dimensions of second language (L2) performance and investigates how these effects are modulated by individual differences in working memory capacity. Thirty-two intermediate learners of L2 Spanish completed less and more complex…

  7. The Effects and Perceptions of Trained Peer Feedback in L2 Speaking: Impact on Revision and Speaking Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-González, Eva; Castañeda, Martha E.

    2018-01-01

    The present study examined the impact of trained peer feedback on Spanish as a second language (L2) in terms of language performance, nature of feedback, and perceptions of peer feedback in speaking tasks. Participants in the study included 17 intermediate L2 Spanish learners enrolled in a conversation course that incorporated peer feedback…

  8. Personalized versus Normal Practice of L2 Speaking on Iranian EFL Learners’ Oral Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayda Rahmani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Personalized learning is a self-initiated, self-directed or self-prioritized pursuit which gives the learner a degree of choice about the process of learning i.e. what to learn, how to learn and when to learn. Of course personalized learning does not indicate unlimited choice; because, L2 learners will still have targets to be met. However, it provides learners with the opportunity to learn in ways that suit their individual learning styles. The L2 learner should have the opportunity to freely choose a series of activities, already predisposed by the teacher, to improve and develop L2 proficiency. This is because human beings have different ways to learn and process information; and, these different ways of learning are independent of each other. In other words, learning styles and techniques differ across individuals; thus, personalized learning provides L2 learners to freely choose the activities they enjoy the most. So it is a student-centered learning method in which the interests and the preferences of the learner is taken into account.The present study is an investigation of a personalized versus normal practice of L2 proficiency. For this purpose an OPT (Oxford Placement Test was given to a total of 80 Iranian EFL learners. Then, 40 of them who were considered as intermediate learners were selected for the purpose of the study. The participants were randomly divided into two groups i.e. an experimental group and a control group. Both groups were pretested prior to the study. Then, the experimental group received the treatment in the form of personalized learning (games-based learning, songs, music, stories, English tongue twisters and the materials that the subjects were most interested in for ten sessions while the control group received a normal practice of speaking proficiency (based on New Interchange course books. After ten sessions, both groups were post tested. Then the results of the posttests were subjects of statistical analysis

  9. Naming Abilities in Low-Proficiency Second Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodkin, Katy; Faust, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Difficulties in second language (L2) learning are often associated with recognizable learning difficulties in native language (L1), such as in dyslexia. However, some individuals have low L2 proficiency but intact L1 reading skills. These L2 learners experience frequent tip-of-the-tongue states while naming in L1, which indicates that they have a…

  10. Phonological and Executive Working Memory in L2 Task-Based Speech Planning and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zhisheng

    2016-01-01

    The present study sets out to explore the distinctive roles played by two working memory (WM) components in various aspects of L2 task-based speech planning and performance. A group of 40 post-intermediate proficiency level Chinese EFL learners took part in the empirical study. Following the tenets and basic principles of the…

  11. Effects of Audiovisual Media on L2 Listening Comprehension: A Preliminary Study in French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Shannon R.; Sturm, Jessica L.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether integrating online audiovisual materials into the listening instruction of L2 French learners would have a measurable impact on their listening comprehension development. Students from two intact sections of second-semester French were tested on their listening comprehension before and…

  12. Leveling L2 Texts through Readability: Combining Multilevel Linguistic Features with the CEFR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yao-Ting; Lin, Wei-Chun; Dyson, Scott Benjamin; Chang, Kuo-En; Chen, Yu-Chia

    2015-01-01

    Selecting appropriate texts for L2 (second/foreign language) learners is an important approach to enhancing motivation and, by extension, learning. There is currently no tool for classifying foreign language texts according to a language proficiency framework, which makes it difficult for students and educators to determine the precise…

  13. Lexical Difficulty--Using Elicited Imitation to Study Child L2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campfield, Dorota E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports a post-hoc analysis of the influence of lexical difficulty of cue sentences on performance in an elicited imitation (EI) task to assess oral production skills for 645 child L2 English learners in instructional settings. This formed part of a large-scale investigation into effectiveness of foreign language teaching in Polish…

  14. The Effect of Lexical Coverage and Dictionary Use on L2 Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, Caleb; Matsumoto, Yuko

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to further understand the role of lexical coverage on L2 reading comprehension. It examines test scores of learners at or near the 90-95% coverage level to determine if this coverage range allows for comprehension of authentic texts. The findings suggest that 92-93% may be a threshold mark at which understanding of a text…

  15. Breadth and Depth of Vocabulary Knowledge and Their Effects on L2 Vocabulary Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardakçi, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Breadth and depth of vocabulary knowledge have been studied from many different perspectives, but the related literature lacks serious studies dealing with their effects on vocabulary profiles of EFL learners. In this paper, with an aim to fill this gap, the relative effects of breadth and depth of vocabulary knowledge on L2 vocabulary profiles…

  16. On the Impact of L2 Speech Rhythm on Syntactic Ambiguity Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncaglia-Denissen, M. Paula; Schmidt-Kassow, Maren; Heine, Angela; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2015-01-01

    In an event-related potential (ERP) study we investigated the role of age of acquisition (AoA) on the use of second language rhythmic properties during syntactic ambiguity resolution. Syntactically ambiguous sentences embedded in rhythmically regular and irregular contexts were presented to Turkish early and late second language (L2) learners of…

  17. Exploring the Relationship between Reading Strategy Use and Multiple Intelligences among Successful L2 Readers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Azizullah; Rahimi Domakani, Masoud; Heidari, Najmeh

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, the multiple intelligences theory (MIT) proposed by Howard Gardner has renewed interest in learners' use of effective learning strategies and produced interesting results. This MIT-oriented study investigated the role of successful L2 readers' multiple intelligences in their effective use of reading strategies. To this end, a TOEFL…

  18. Partial Word Knowledge: Frontier Words in the L2 Mental Lexicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareva, Alla

    2012-01-01

    The study set out to examine the partial word knowledge of native speakers, L2 advanced, and intermediate learners of English with regard to four word features from Richards' (1976) taxonomy of aspects describing what knowing a word entails. To capture partial familiarity, the participants completed in writing a test containing low and mid…

  19. Gender Differences in Compulsory School Pupils' L2 Self-Concepts: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Alastair

    2009-01-01

    Drawing on personality psychology research, Dornyei and his colleagues have recently developed an approach to understanding L2 motivation that positions the learner's self-recognition as a potential communicator in another language at its core, thus marking a break from the established social psychology paradigm. In this article it is argued that,…

  20. On the L2 acquisition of Spanish-subject verb inversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerra Rivera, Alexia; Coopmans, Peter; Baauw, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the acquisition of Spanish subject-verb inversion in wh-questions by Dutch L2 learners. The optional or obligatory application of this rule in Spanish wh-questions depends on the argument versus adjunct status of the wh-element. In Dutch,subject-verb inversionis obligatory in

  1. Teaching, Learning, and Developing L2 French Sociolinguistic Competence: A Sociocultural Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Compernolle, Remi A.; Williams, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The study reported in this article investigates the development of sociolinguistic competence among second-year (US university-level) L2 learners of French who were given systematic instruction on sociolinguistic variation as part of their normal coursework. We focus on the variable use of the negative morpheme "ne" in verbal negation. Drawing…

  2. The Design of Morphological/Linguistic Data in L1 and L2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    learners' MA of an L1 or L2 can be measured (and, as an extension to this, that users' and .... and they could activate these strategies and skills when confronted with new .... cussion of a wide range of morphological phenomena in English.

  3. Using Songs to Enhance L2 Vocabulary Acquisition in Preschool Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, Yvette; Gómez Gracia, Remei

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at the effects of a teaching sequence of song-based activities on the L2 vocabulary acquisition of a group of five-year-old Spanish child EFL learners. Twenty-five preschool children received three 30-minute lessons organized around the presentation and practice of a well-known children's song. Vocabulary picture tests were…

  4. Meaning-focused vs Form-focused L2 Instruction: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KATEVG

    focus-on-meaning approach to English language instruction) compare with ... L2 use. Proponents of this view are concerned with the question of how this conversion ... processing, it may draw learners' attention to "notice" the form of the target ...

  5. Learning English with "The Sims": Exploiting Authentic Computer Simulation Games for L2 Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranalli, Jim

    2008-01-01

    With their realistic animation, complex scenarios and impressive interactivity, computer simulation games might be able to provide context-rich, cognitively engaging virtual environments for language learning. However, simulation games designed for L2 learners are in short supply. As an alternative, could games designed for the mass-market be…

  6. Roles of Position, Stress, and Proficiency in L2 Children's Spelling: A Developmental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Su Chin; Chen, Shu Hui

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the roles of phoneme position, stress, and proficiency in L2 spelling development by Taiwanese students learning English as a Foreign Language (EFL), an alphabetic writing system typologically different from the learners' L1 logographic system. Structured nonword spelling tests were administered to EFL sixth-graders with…

  7. Effects of Textual Enhancement and Input Enrichment on L2 Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassaei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Research on second language (L2) acquisition has recently sought to include formal instruction into second and foreign language classrooms in a more unobtrusive and implicit manner. Textual enhancement and input enrichment are two techniques which are aimed at drawing learners' attention to specific linguistic features in input and at the same…

  8. The Development of L2 Fluency during Study Abroad: A Cross-Language Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Silvio, Francesca; Diao, Wenhao; Donovan, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Examining speech samples from 75 American university students learning 1 of 3 languages (Mandarin, Russian, and Spanish), this article reports on a study of second language (L2) learners' oral fluency development and its relationship with their gains in holistic proficiency ratings during a semester abroad. In study abroad research, there is a…

  9. L1 influence in the L2 acquisition of isiXhosa verb placement by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1. Introduction. In second language (L2) acquisition research conducted within ..... versus Afrikaans-speaking beginner learners of isiXhosa, with regard to verb ..... Language contact within one home is also illustrated by the case of the four L1 ...

  10. Prediction of radionuclide inventory for the low-and intermediated-level radioactive waste disposal facility the radioactive waste classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kang Il; Jeong, Noh Gyeom; Moon, Young Pyo; Jeong, Mi Seon; Park, Jin Beak

    2016-01-01

    To meet nuclear regulatory requirements, more than 95% individual radionuclides in the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste inventory have to be identified. In this study, the radionuclide inventory has been estimated by taking the long-term radioactive waste generation, the development plan of disposal facility, and the new radioactive waste classification into account. The state of radioactive waste cumulated from 2014 was analyzed for various radioactive sources and future prospects for predicting the long-term radioactive waste generation. The predicted radionuclide inventory results are expected to contribute to secure the development of waste disposal facility and to deploy the safety case for its long-term safety assessment

  11. Performance of backfill materials in near surface disposal facilities for low and intermediate level radwaste. Appendix 4: China (a)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunli, G.; Yawen, H.; Zhiwen, F.; Anxi, C.; Xiuzhen, L.; Jinsheng, Z.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Backfill material is an important component of a multi-barriered disposal facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste. This appendix describes the work concerning 'performance study on engineering materials of shallow land disposal of low and intermediate level radwaste'. At the time of the CRP, China had planned to establish five regional disposal sites for low-and-intermediate level radioactive waste. According to the potential distribution of these sites, forty-three sampling points were selected through information survey and table discussion. After field survey and screening, eight of them were selected for further studies in laboratory. Basic physical and chemical properties of each sample were measured in laboratory. The results indicate that no one of the samples can individually function as the backfill material in a multi-barriered near surface facility. Then nine additives for adsorption modification were tested using a static method. Further adsorption tests were conducted: three additives screened out in previous experiment were evaluated using the static method. Results obtained show that the Kd values of mixtures of 90% NW-3 and 10% BC for Co-60, Cs-134 and Sr-85, compared with those of 100% NW-3, are 4.8, 4.6 and 4.7 times higher, respectively. Effects of contact time, pH of tracer solutions and radionuclide concentrations of tracer solutions on Kd values of three samples, NW-3, BC and 90% NW-3 with 10% BC, were also be evaluated using the static method. Column tests were performed to evaluate migration of Co-60, Cs-134 and Sr-85 in NW-3 columns with different densities. The column tests were carried out for 210 days. However, no breakthrough was obtained. Long term performance of backfill materials was assessed through natural analogue. We compared Chinese ancient tombs with near-surface low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) disposal facilities. Both were designed based upon multi-barrier principle. Then three

  12. Radioactive Operations Committee Review of the Intermediate-Level Waste Evaporator Facility, Building 2531 February 17, 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, B.; Brooksbank, R.E.

    1972-01-01

    A subcommittee of the Radioactive Operations Committee met with the Operators of the Intermediate Level Waste Evaporator Facility on February 17, 1972, to discuss the status of the facility and its operations since the review of October 7, 1970, and reported in ORNL-CF-70-11-12. This review was made to determine the status of the ILWEF since the last review, to discuss compliance with previously recommended changes, and to review any new items of safety significance. Several recommendations were made.

  13. Characterization of decontamination factors for evaporators used in the treatment of low and intermediate level liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rood, L.B.; Law, C.G. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Evaporator decontamination factors were studied as functions of boiloff rate, volume reduction, and feed pH. A bench-scale vertical tube evaporator operating on simulated intermediate level nuclear wastes was used. Decontamination factors were not found to be strong functions of volume reduction or boiloff below vapor velocities of 25 lb/ft 2 -hr. At higher vapor fluxes, splashing was encountered. Foaming occurred at a feed pH of 6 but not at higher values. The presence of radioisotopes in the feed had no effect on evaporator performance

  14. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility mixed waste container storage units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolte, E.P.; Spry, M.J.; Stanisich, S.N.

    1992-11-01

    This document describes the proposed plan for clean closure of the Intermediate-Level Transuranic Storage Facility mixed waste container storage units at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure requirements. Descriptions of the location, size, capacity, history, and current status of the units are included. The units will be closed by removing waste containers in storage, and decontamination structures and equipment that may have contacted waste. Sufficient sampling and documentation of all activities will be performed to demonstrate clean closure. A tentative schedule is provided in the form of a milestone chart

  15. A comparative study using liquid scintillation counting to determine 63Ni in low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier, Celine; Colin, Christele; Garcia, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    A comparative study using liquid scintillation counting was performed to measure 63 Ni in low and intermediate level radioactive waste. Three dimethylglyoxime (DMG)-based radiochemical procedures (solvent extraction, precipitation, extraction chromatography) were investigated, the solvent extraction method being considered as the reference method. Theoretical speciation calculations enabled to better understand the chemical reactions involved in the three protocols and to optimize them. In comparison to the method based on DMG precipitation, the method based on extraction chromatography allowed to achieve the best results in one single step in term of recovery yield and accuracy for various samples. (author)

  16. Reconnaissance survey of the intermediate-level liquid waste transfer line between X-10 and the hydrofracture site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguid, J.O.; Sealand, O.M.

    1975-08-01

    Two leakage points on an intermediate-level liquid waste line were located. The waste line is used periodically to transfer waste between X-10 and the hydrofracture site. The first leak occurred prior to this survey and had been repaired, but no contaminated soil had been removed. The second leak resulted in soil contamination that was more intense than at the first leak. Analyses of soil samples taken from both locations are given in this report. Groundwater data indicate the effectiveness of the removal of the contaminated material from leak two. 1 ref., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Reconnaissance survey of the intermediate level liquid waste transfer line between X-10 and the hydrofracture site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duguid, J.O.; Sealand, O.M.

    1975-08-01

    Two leakage points on an intermediate-level liquid waste line were located. The waste line is used periodically to transfer waste between X-10 and the hydrofracture site. The first leak had occurred prior to this survey and had been repaired. However, no contaminated soil had been removed. The second leak had not been discovered previously and soil contamination in this area was more intense than at the first leak. Analyses of soil samples taken from both locations are given in this report. Groundwater data that indicate the effectiveness of the removal of the contaminated material from leak two are presented. (U.S.)

  18. Cue Reliance in L2 Written Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechmann, Daniel; Kerz, Elma

    2014-01-01

    Second language learners reach expert levels in relative cue weighting only gradually. On the basis of ensemble machine learning models fit to naturalistic written productions of German advanced learners of English and expert writers, we set out to reverse engineer differences in the weighting of multiple cues in a clause linearization problem. We…

  19. Input Enhancement and L2 Question Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Lydia; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which form-focused instruction and corrective feedback (i.e., "input enhancement"), provided within a primarily communicative program, contribute to learners' accuracy in question formation. Study results are interpreted as evidence that input enhancement can bring about genuine changes in learners' interlanguage…

  20. The Relationship between Learner Autonomy and Vocabulary Learning Strategies in Iranian EFL Learners with Different Language Proficiency Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Azimi Mohammad Abadi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Vocabulary learning is incredibly noteworthy to English language acquisition. It is unfeasible for a learner to communicate without the required vocabulary. In high education levels, learners are habitually forced to become autonomous and make conscious effort to learn vocabulary outside of the classroom. Consequently, the autonomy of the learners plays an important role in developing and enhancing their vocabulary. Learner autonomy is a huge assistance for learners in vocabulary learning since it provides the learners with numerous diverse privileges such as independency from teacher. The researcher investigated whether there is any statistically significant relationship between learner autonomy and vocabulary learning strategies use in Iranian EFL learners with different language proficiency levels. To meet the above purpose, a total number of 190 male and female EFL learners participated in this study. The methodology underlying this study was quantitative (thorough the administration of two questionnaires and two language proficiency test – TOEFL for advanced group, and Nelson for intermediate level. The quantitative data was analyzed using a set of correlational analysis revealing a significant positive correlation between learner autonomy and vocabulary learning strategies use in high proficient group, and a significant positive relationship between these two constructs in low proficient group, however not as strong as in the advanced group.

  1. Current issues in the management of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from Ontario Hydro's CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasznai, J.P.; Vaughan, B.R.; Williamson, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear generating stations (NGSs) in Canada are operated by utilities in Ontario, Quebec, and New Brunswick. Ontario Hydro, with a committed nuclear program of 13,600 MW(electric) is the major producer of CANDU pressurized heavy-water reactor (PHWR) low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. All radioactive wastes with the exception of irradiated fuel are processed and retrievably stored at a centralized facility at the Bruce Nuclear Power Development site. Solid-waste classifications and annual production levels are given. Solid-waste management practices at the site as well as the physical, chemical, and radiochemical characteristics of the wastes are well documented. The paper summarizes types, current inventory, and estimated annual production rate of liquid waste. Operation of the tritium recovery facility at Darlington NGS, which removes tritium from heavy water and produces tritium gas in the process, gives rise to secondary streams of tritiated solid and liquid wastes, which will receive special treatment and packaging. In addition to the treatment of radioactive liquid wastes, there are a number of other important issues in low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste management that Ontario Hydro will be addressing over the next few years. The most pressing of these is the reduction of radioactive wastes through in-station material control, employee awareness, and improved waste characterization and segregation programs. Since Ontario Hydro intends to store retrievable wastes for > 50 yr, it is necessary to determine the behavior of wastes under long-term storage conditions

  2. Adapting the notion of natural (geological) barrier for final disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdun, I.; Marunteanu, C.; Andrei, V.

    2001-01-01

    According to the Minimum Disturbances Design (MDD) notion by Carl-Olof Morfeldt of Mineconsult, Sweden, any site selection, design and construction of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste repository should be based on a thorough knowledge of the geological environmental so that the implantation of the disposal facility induce no significant harmful consequences. This work presents the way in which the Romanian program of radioactive waste management was implemented for disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from Cernavoda NPP. Based on geological criteria of selection of lithologic, petrographic, tectonic, seismologic, hydrologic and geo-technic nature, 37 sites were analyzed from which 2 were retained and finally one, Saligny site, was chosen, as the most close to Cernavoda NPP. Also, public acceptance and transport connections were taken into consideration. SUTRA, SWMS-2D and CHAIN-2D codes were applied to analyze the safety and the geological barrier effects. The barrier consists in red clay, a smectitic mineralogic compound. The computation showed that in Saligny vault the maximal tritium extension is kept inside due to the red clay barrier. Geo-technical engineering works were conducted to improve the properties of the loess upper layer which resulted in lowering its sensitivity to moistening and erosion

  3. Project Guarantee 1985. Final repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes: The system of safety barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The safety barrier system for the type B repository for low- and intermediate-level waste is described. The barrier parameters which are relevant for safety analysis are quantified and associated error limits and data scatter are given. The aim of the report is to give a summary documentation of the safety analysis input data and their scientific background. For secure containment of radioactive waste safety barriers are used which effectively limit the release of radioactive material from the repository (release barriers) and effectively retard the entry of the original radioactive material into the biosphere (time barriers). In the case of low- and intermediate-level waste the technical safety barrier system comprises: waste solidification matrix (cement, bitumen and resin), immobilisation of the waste packages in containers using liquid cement, concrete repository containers, backfilling of remaining vacant storage space with special concrete, concrete lining of the repository caverns, sealing of access tunnels on final closure of the repository. Natural geological safety barriers - host rock and overlying formations - have the following important functions. Because of its stability, the host rock in the repository zone protects the technical safety barrier system from destruction caused by climatic effects and erosion for a sufficient length of time. It also provides for low water flow and favourable chemistry (reducing conditions)

  4. The role of oral corrective feedback in L2 Portuguese classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Battistelli Rauber

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Languages are generally acquired along with and for others, in varied environments which influence second language (L2 learning. One of the most important influences of the linguistic environment is that it provides learners with information about the incorrectness of their utterances (ORTEGA, 2009. This process is referred as Corrective Feedback (LYSTER; RANTA, 1997, RUSSEL; SPADA, 2006, which is a complex phenomenon that has different functions in formal L2 instruction. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the types of oral CF in L2 Portuguese classrooms and to analyze how learners responded to CF provided by their teachers. The data presented were obtained from the observation of lessons in an elementary and an intermediate group of a Portuguese course offered at a private American university. The results of this observational study show that elicitation, explicit correction and metalinguistic feedback are the main CF methods employed by the teachers.

  5. Limitations of the influence of English phonetics and phonology on L2 Spanish rhotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kevin Olsen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates L2 Spanish rhotic production in intermediate learners of Spanish, specifically addressing the duration of the influence of L1 English rhotic articulations and a phonetic environment involving English taps on the acquisition of Spanish taps and trills that Olsen (2012 found. Results from multiple linear regressions involving thirty-five students in Spanish foreign language classes show that the effect of English rhotic articulations evident in beginners has disappeared after four semesters of Spanish study. However, results from paired samples t-tests show that these more advanced learners produced accurate taps significantly more in words containing phonetic environments that produce taps in English. This effect is taken as evidence that L1 phonetic influences have a shorter duration on L2 production than do L1 phonological influences. These results provide insights into L2 rhotic acquisition which Spanish educators and students can use to formulate reasonable pronunciation expectations.

  6. Measurement methodology for fulfilling of waste acceptance criteria for low and intermediate level radioactive waste in storages - 59016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Langer, F.; Schultheis, R.

    2012-01-01

    Low and intermediate level radioactive waste must be sorted and treated before it can be sent to radioactive waste storage. The waste must fulfil an extensive amount of acceptance criteria (WAC) to guarantee a safe storage period. NUKEM Technologies has a broad experience with the building and management of radioactive waste treatment facilities and has developed methods and equipment to produce the waste packages and to gather all the required information. In this article we consider low and intermediate level radioactive waste excluding nuclear fuel material, even fresh fuel with low radiation. Only solid radioactive waste (RAW) will be considered. (Liquid RAW is usually processed and solidified before storage. Exception is the reprocessing of nuclear fuel.) Low and intermediate level radioactive waste has to be kept in storage facilities until isotopes are decayed sufficiently and the waste can be released. The storage has to fulfil certain conditions regarding the possible radiological impact and the possible chemical impact on the environment. With the inventory of nuclear waste characterised, the radiological impact can be estimated. RAW mainly originates from the operation of nuclear power plants. A small amount comes from reprocessing installations or from research entities. Chemical safety aspects are of qualitative nature, excluding substances in whole but not compared to limit values. Therefore they have minor influence on the storage conditions. Hereby corrosion and immobilisation of the waste play important roles. The storage concept assumes that the waste will be released if the radioactivity has decreased to an acceptable level. NUKEM Technologies has been specialised on collecting all data needed for the fulfilling of waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The classification as low or intermediate level waste is made on base of surface dose rate of the waste package as well as on the mass specific beta activity. Low level waste must not include isotopes

  7. L’ACQUISIZIONE DEI SEGNALI DISCORSIVI IN ITALIANO L2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Jafrancesco

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Il contributo presenta i risultati di una ricerca sull’acquisizione dei segnali discorsivi (SD in italiano L2, condotta su un corpus di parlato di studenti universitari in mobilità accademica, presenti nell’università di Firenze e inseriti in percorsi formativi di italiano L2 presso il Centro Linguistico di Ateneo. Il principale obiettivo dello studio è indagare l’italiano di stranieri relativamente a questo tratto specifico al fine di individuare eventuali sequenze acquisizionali, contribuendo a delineare lo sviluppo della competenza sociopragmatica degli apprendenti nei livelli di competenza proposti nel Quadro comune europeo di riferimento per le lingue (QCER Si analizza, in particolare, l’uso dei SD nel parlato dialogico degli informanti nei Livelli basico, indipendente e competente del QCER – con riferimento al modello tassonomico dei SD proposto da Bazzanella nella Grande grammatica italiana di consultazione (1995, integrato, in relazione allo specifico contesto, con nuove funzioni – evidenziando i principali macrofenomeni emersi, con l’intento inoltre di riflettere su come i dati dell’acquisizione dell’italiano L2 possono rappresentare un punto di riferimento per la definizione di percorsi formativi coerenti con i processi naturali di sviluppo della competenza.Acquisition of discourse markers in Italian L2The paper presents the results of a study on the acquisition of discourse markers (SD in Italian L2 students, conducted on a corpus of spoken language by university students at the University of Florence who attended Italian L2 language course at the University Language Center. The main objective of the study was to investigate the Italian of foreigners in relation to this specific trait in order to identify possible acquisitional sequences, helping shape the development of learners' socio-pragmatic competence levels proposed in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR. In particular, we

  8. 49 CFR Figure 2b to Subpart B of... - Example of an Intermediate Level Seating Area of a Multi-Level Car Complying With Window Location...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Example of an Intermediate Level Seating Area of a Multi-Level Car Complying With Window Location Requirements-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 2B Figure 2B to... Intermediate Level Seating Area of a Multi-Level Car Complying With Window Location Requirements—§§ 238.113 and...

  9. 49 CFR Figure 2a to Subpart B of... - Example of an Intermediate Level Seating Area of a Multi-Level Car Complying With Window Location...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Example of an Intermediate Level Seating Area of a Multi-Level Car Complying With Window Location Requirements-§§ 238.113 and 238.114 2A Figure 2A to... Intermediate Level Seating Area of a Multi-Level Car Complying With Window Location Requirements—§§ 238.113 and...

  10. Prediction and assessment of environmental impacts of Guangdong low-and-intermediate level radioactive waste disposal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yawen

    1996-01-01

    Guangdong Low-and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Site is located 5-7 km northeast to the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant. It is in a hilly area with strongly weathered light metamorphic quartz siltstone. The groundwater is 2 m below the repository bottom. The disposal unit is a U-shape concrete structure with drainage and water collecting system at the bottom. The designed cover is a multi-layer structure with functions of preventing from water infiltration, animal and plant intrusion. It is assumed that the engineered barriers would be effective to avoid waste immersion by surface water and groundwater within the first 100 years after closure. After 100 years, the engineered barriers would fail gradually. Radionuclides may release from the disposal unite. Some will enter the nearby stream, some will flow into the Daya Bay, and some will transport to groundwater through geologic media

  11. A preliminary assessment of polymer-modified cements for use in immobilisation of intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnay, S.G.; Dyson, J.R.

    1982-11-01

    A range of polymer-modified cements has been examined as candidate materials for the immobilisation of intermediate level radioactive waste. The waste streams studied were inactive simulates of real wastes and included ion-exchange resins, Magnox debris and dilute sludges. Preliminary experiments on the compatibility of the polymer-cement-waste combinations have been carried out and measurements of flexural strength before and after #betta#-irradiation to 10 9 rad and water immersion have been made. Soxhlet leach tests have been used to compare the leach rates of the different materials. From the results of these preliminary experiments, a limited number of polymer-modified cements have been suggested as suitable for more detailed study. (author)

  12. Inventories of organic materials and complexing agents in intermediate-level long-lived parcels (Report PNGMDR 2013-2015)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This report presents an inventory of organic materials and of complexing agents they may produce within parcels of alpha wastes which are to be produced or are being currently produced. The report proposes the results of campaigns of measurements of degassing, and comparison with results of modelling studies. The assessment of degassing rates of parcels of alpha wastes is completed by an assessment of hydrogen produced by radiolysis of interstitial water within the concrete container. Thus, after a presentation of the main parcels used by the CEA for intermediate-level long-lived wastes, and of an inventory of wastes containing organic materials, this report describes the consequences of radiolysis on polymers, and describes the objectives of R and D studies. It reports measurements and presents simulation tools for heterogeneous wastes, homogeneous wastes, production of water-soluble degradation products, and transfer and adsorption of these products in the storage site argillite

  13. A Study on Optimized Management Options for the Wolsong Low- and Intermediate - Level Waste Disposal Center in Korea - 13479

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, JooWan; Kim, DongSun; Choi, DongEun [Korea Radioactive Waste Management Corporation, Korea 89, Bukseongno, Gyeongju, 780-050 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    The safe and effective management of radioactive waste is a national task required for sustainable generation of nuclear power and for energy self-reliance in Korea. Currently, for permanent disposal of low- and intermediate-level waste (LILW), the Wolsong LILW Disposal Center (WLDC) is under construction. It will accommodate a total of 800,000 drums at the final stage after stepwise expansion. As an implementing strategy for cost-effective development of the WLDC, various disposal options suitable for waste classification schemes would be considered. It is also needed an optimized management of the WLDC by taking a countermeasure of volume reduction treatment. In this study, various management options to be applied to each waste class are analyzed in terms of its inventory and disposal cost. For the volume reduction and stabilization of waste, the vitrification and plasma melting methods are considered for combustible and incombustible waste, respectively. (authors)

  14. A survey of possible microbiological effects within shallow land disposal sites designed to accept intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rushbrook, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to assess the current knowledge on microbial activity that may occur within a shallow intermediate-level waste disposal trench. Relatively little published information exists that is directly based on intermediate radioactive wasteforms, but relevant work was identified from other scientific fields. The likely environmental conditions within a disposal trench and their influence on microbial activity are considered. Also discussed are specific microbiological effects on waste packagings, backfill materials and concrete structures. Overall, it is unlikely that there will be extensive activity within the trenches and little evidence exists to suggest microbiologically-enhanced radionuclide migration,. The quantitative effect of microbial action is not possible to ascertain from the literature, but the general impression is that it will be low. Physical or chemical degradation processes are likely to predominate over those of a microbiological nature. Areas where further research would be valuable are also recommended. (author)

  15. Hydration products and mechanical properties of hydroceramics solidified waste for simulated Non-alpha low and intermediate level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin; Hong Ming; Wang Junxia; Li Yuxiang; Teng Yuancheng; Wu Xiuling

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, simulated non-alpha low and intermediate level radioactive wastes was handled as curing object and that of 'alkali-slag-coal fly ash-metakaolin' hydroceramics waste forms were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis method. The hydration products were analyzed by X ray diffraction. The composition of hydrates and the compressive strength of waste forms were determined and measured. The results indicate that the main crystalline phase of hydration products were analcite when the temperature was 150 to 180 degree C and the salt content ratio was 0.10 to 0.30. Analcite diffraction peaks in hydration products is increasing when the temperature was raised and the reaction time prolonged. Strength test results show that the solidified waste forms have superior compressive strength. The compressive strength gradually decreased with the increase in salt content ratio in waste forms. (authors)

  16. Low- and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe, Denmark. Site studies. Report no. 5. Thise, Skive Municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravesen, P.; Nilsson, B.; Binderup, M.; Larsen, Tine; Schack Pedersen, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from Risoe (the nuclear reactor buildings, different types of material from the research periods and waste from hospitals and research institutes) have to be stored in a final disposal in Denmark for at least 300 years. In 2011, the results of the first analyses of 20 potential areas for siting a waste disposal were published. Of these potential areas, 6 specific sites were selected for further detailed studies. The site studies include information about geology, land use, nature preservation, archaeology, drinking water supply etc. The 5 municipalities with the 6 selected sites have been visited to obtain as much information about local conditions as possible. The present report describes the results for the area Thise, in the Municipality of Skive, northern Jutland. (LN)

  17. Low- and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe, Denmark. Site studies. Report no. 2. Roedbyhavn, Lolland Municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravesen, P.; Nilsson, B.; Binderup, M.; Larsen, Tine; Schack Pedersen, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from Risoe (the nuclear reactor buildings, different types of material from the research periods and waste from hospitals and research institutes) have to be stored in a final disposal in Denmark for at least 300 years. In 2011, the results of the first analyses of 20 potential areas for siting a waste disposal were published. Of these potential areas, 6 specific sites were selected for further detailed studies. The site studies include information about geology, land use, nature preservation, archaeology, drinking water supply etc. The 5 municipalities with the 6 selected sites have been visited to obtain as much information about local conditions as possible. The present report describes the results for the area at Roedbyhavn in the Municipality of Lolland, southern Denmark. (LN)

  18. Low- and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe, Denmark. Site studies. Report no. 3. Kertinge Mark, Kerteminde Municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravesen, P.; Nilsson, B.; Binderup, M.; Larsen, Tine; Schack Pedersen, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from Risoe (the nuclear reactor buildings, different types of material from the research periods and waste from hospitals and research institutes) have to be stored in a final disposal in Denmark for at least 300 years. In 2011, the results of the first analyses of 20 potential areas for siting a waste disposal were published. Of these potential areas, 6 specific sites were selected for further detailed studies. The site studies include information about geology, land use, nature preservation, archaeology, drinking water supply etc. The 5 municipalities with the 6 selected sites have been visited to obtain as much information about local conditions as possible. The present report describes the results for the area Kertinge Mark in the Municipality of Kerteminde, the island Funen. (LN)

  19. Low- and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe, Denmark. Site studies. Report no. 4. Hvidbjerg, Thyholm, Struer Municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravesen, P.; Nilsson, B.; Binderup, M.; Larsen, Tine; Schack Pedersen, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from Risoe (the nuclear reactor buildings, different types of material from the research periods and waste from hospitals and research institutes) have to be stored in a final disposal in Denmark for at least 300 years. In 2011, the results of the first analyses of 20 potential areas for siting a waste disposal were published. Of these potential areas, 6 specific sites were selected for further detailed studies. The site studies include information about geology, land use, nature preservation, archaeology, drinking water supply etc. The 5 municipalities with the 6 selected sites have been visited to obtain as much information about local conditions as possible. The present report describes the results for the area Hvidbjerg, Thyholm, in the Municipality of Struer, northern Jutland. (LN)

  20. Low- and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe, Denmark. Site studies. Report no. 6. Skive Vest, Skive Municipality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravesen, P.; Nilsson, B.; Binderup, M.; Larsen, Tine; Schack Pedersen, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from Risoe (the nuclear reactor buildings, different types of material from the research periods and waste from hospitals and research institutes) have to be stored in a final disposal in Denmark for at least 300 years. In 2011, the results of the first analyses of 20 potential areas for siting a waste disposal were published. Of these potential areas, 6 specific sites were selected for further detailed studies. The site studies include information about geology, land use, nature preservation, archaeology, drinking water supply etc. The 5 municipalities with the 6 selected sites have been visited to obtain as much information about local conditions as possible. The present report describes the results for the area Skive Vest, in the Municipality of Skive, northern Jutland. (LN)

  1. Low- and intermediate level radioactive waste from Risoe, Denmark. Site studies. Report no. 1. Oestermarie - Paradisbakkerne, Bornholm Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravesen, P.; Nilsson, B.; Binderup, M.; Larsen, Tine; Schack Pedersen, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    The low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes from Risoe (the nuclear reactor buildings, different types of material from the research periods and waste from hospitals and research institutes) have to be stored in a final disposal in Denmark for at least 300 years. In 2011, the results of the first analyses of 20 potential areas for siting a waste disposal were published. Of these potential areas, 6 specific sites were selected for further detailed studies. The site studies include information about geology, land use, nature preservation, archaeology, drinking water supply etc. The 5 municipalities with the 6 selected sites have been visited to obtain as much information about local conditions as possible. The present report describes the results for the area at Oestermarie-Paradisbakkerne in the region of Bornholm, East Denmark. (LN)

  2. [Supporting the intermediate level of health care in urban health areas in Kinshasa (1995-2005), DR Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbeva, Jean-Bosco Kahindo; Schirvel, Carole; Karemere, Hermès; Porignon, Denis

    2012-06-08

    As a result of the decentralization of health systems, some countries have introduced intermediate (provincial) levels in their public health system. This paper presents the results of a case study conducted in Kinshasa on health system decentralization. The study identified a shift from a focus on regulation compliance assessment to an emphasis on health system coordination and health district support. It also highlighted the emergence of a?managerial (as opposed to a bureaucratic) approach to health district support. The performance of health districts in terms of health care coverage and health service use were also found to have improved. The results highlight the importance of intermediate levels in?the health care system and the value of a more organic and managerial rationality in supporting health districts faced with the complexity of urban environments and the integration of specialized multi-partner programs and interventions.

  3. The impact of language co-activation on L1 and L2 speech fluency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Christopher; Sprenger, Simone A; Schmid, Monika S

    2015-10-01

    Fluent speech depends on the availability of well-established linguistic knowledge and routines for speech planning and articulation. A lack of speech fluency in late second-language (L2) learners may point to a deficiency of these representations, due to incomplete acquisition. Experiments on bilingual language processing have shown, however, that there are strong reasons to believe that multilingual speakers experience co-activation of the languages they speak. We have studied to what degree language co-activation affects fluency in the speech of bilinguals, comparing a monolingual German control group with two bilingual groups: 1) first-language (L1) attriters, who have fully acquired German before emigrating to an L2 English environment, and 2) immersed L2 learners of German (L1: English). We have analysed the temporal fluency and the incidence of disfluency markers (pauses, repetitions and self-corrections) in spontaneous film retellings. Our findings show that learners to speak more slowly than controls and attriters. Also, on each count, the speech of at least one of the bilingual groups contains more disfluency markers than the retellings of the control group. Generally speaking, both bilingual groups-learners and attriters-are equally (dis)fluent and significantly more disfluent than the monolingual speakers. Given that the L1 attriters are unaffected by incomplete acquisition, we interpret these findings as evidence for language competition during speech production. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. The Impacts of Emotional Intelligence Enhancement on Iranian Intermediate EFL Learners' Writing Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Mohammad Reza; Khoshsima, Hooshang; Zare-Behtash, Esmail

    2018-01-01

    The current study tried to empirically examine the influence of enhancing Emotional Intelligence on writing skill. The method of doing the study was giving an "Interchange Placement Test" to the university students who majored in English (EFL learners) in Iran. After selecting intermediate level students for participating in the study,…

  5. The Effects of Conceptual Metaphors on the Acquisition of Phrasal Verbs by Turkish EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Galip; Uner, Seda

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of conceptual metaphors on Turkish EFL learners' acquisition of phrasal verbs. The participants were 120 beginner, elementary, and pre-intermediate level students. The research follows a pre and post-test quasi-experimental research design. The students were assigned to proficiency levels according to their…

  6. Young Scientists Explore an Encyclopedia of Energy Activities. Book 8--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of energy. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each student. A…

  7. Theory of endogenous and exogenous motivation in L2 migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambon, Obadele Bakari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Implied in theories of Second Language Acquisition (SLA is the notion that language learning is analogous to obtaining or acquiring a possession – thus the use of the term ‘acquisition.’ While this interpretation has gone relatively unchallenged in the literature, this article introduces a new analogy whereby language learning is seen as analogous to a process of permanent or semi-permanent migration towards a new socio-linguistic L2 space. As such, a theory of endogenous and exogenous motivation is delineated, entailing a dynamic interplay between internal (primarily psychological and external (primarily sociological push-pull factors. Endogenous and exogenous push-pull factors, together with various other personal factors, contribute to learner decisions to migrate towards, move away from or remain inert with regard to the target language. Further, motivation is framed in the larger theoretical context of causation.

  8. Studies of Danish L2 learners’ vocabulary knowledge and the lexical richness of their written production in English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Birgit; Danelund, Lise

    2015-01-01

    A number of lexical studies report a strong correlation between L2 learners’ vocabulary size and depth and their writing skills. Three Danish empirical studies explore this relationship further by looking at the vocabulary knowledge of young upper-secondary school learners of English...... analysis of written essays from learners across two educational levels. All studies show a surprisingly low level of receptive and productive vocabulary knowledge for the pupils tested. Moreover, the lexical analyses of the texts reveal that the learners do not exploit the vocabulary resources they have...... in their written production. Even the high-level learners, who have more L2 vocabulary, are using a “playing-it-safe strategy”, relying on familiar high-frequent lexical items in their writing. The results are discussed in light of the meaning-based teaching approaches used in Danish EFL classrooms and the lack...

  9. The Changing Face of Motivation: A Study of Second Language Learners' Motivation over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Elizabeth; Storch, Neomy

    2011-01-01

    Motivation to learn a second language (L2) is considered a crucial individual factor in explaining success or lack thereof in second language learning. This study examined learners' motivation to learn Chinese as a second language (L2). The study was longitudinal and cross sectional. Interviews were conducted with learners at different year levels…

  10. Predictors of reading literacy for first and second language learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netten, A.R.; Droop, W.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2011-01-01

    In this study an attempt was made to construct a multi-factor model predicting the development of reading literacy in the upper grades of primary school in the Netherlands for subgroups of 729 first language (L1) learners and 93 second language (L2) learners. Following a longitudinal design, it was

  11. Communicating Grammatically: Evaluating a Learner Strategy Website for Spanish Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Andrew D.; Pinilla-Herrera, Angela; Thompson, Jonathan R.; Witzig, Lance E.

    2011-01-01

    After a brief introduction to language learner strategies and grammar strategies as a subcategory, it is pointed out that research on the use of grammar strategies by learners of a second language (L2) has been limited. The article then describes the construction of a website with strategies for learning and performing Spanish grammar, with a…

  12. Exploring the Mental Lexicon of the Multilingual: Vocabulary Size, Cognate Recognition and Lexical Access in the L1, L2 and L3

    OpenAIRE

    Szabo, Cz.

    2016-01-01

    Recent empirical findings in the field of Multilingualism have shown that the mental lexicon of a language learner does not consist of separate entities, but rather of an intertwined system where languages can interact with each other (e.g. Cenoz, 2013; Szubko-Sitarek, 2015). Accordingly, multilingual language learners have been considered differently to second language learners in a growing number of studies, however studies on the variation in learners’ vocabulary size both in the L2 and L3...

  13. Acquisition of speech rhythm in a second language by learners with rhythmically different native languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordin, Mikhail; Polyanskaya, Leona

    2015-08-01

    The development of speech rhythm in second language (L2) acquisition was investigated. Speech rhythm was defined as durational variability that can be captured by the interval-based rhythm metrics. These metrics were used to examine the differences in durational variability between proficiency levels in L2 English spoken by French and German learners. The results reveal that durational variability increased as L2 acquisition progressed in both groups of learners. This indicates that speech rhythm in L2 English develops from more syllable-timed toward more stress-timed patterns irrespective of whether the native language of the learner is rhythmically similar to or different from the target language. Although both groups showed similar development of speech rhythm in L2 acquisition, there were also differences: German learners achieved a degree of durational variability typical of the target language, while French learners exhibited lower variability than native British speakers, even at an advanced proficiency level.

  14. Learner's Passport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Jug

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available For the first time learner's passport was pre­ sented at the international conference on permanent education, taking place in Rome in December 1994. This document is not meant for students only but for the entire population. It should contain notes on any format education, additional education, working experiences, cultural activities, sport results, awards, prizes and recommen­ dations. The mission of learner's passport is to gather all documents in one place, a handy book­ let which gives one an overall view over his/her achievements. It should help personnel departments in choosing the right person for a certain job as well as indirectly stimul ate additional activities of the learner's passport holder.

  15. Acquisition of L2 Japanese Geminates: Training with Waveform Displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Motohashi-Saigo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The value of waveform displays as visual feedback was explored in a training study involving perception and production of L2 Japanese by beginning-level L1 English learners. A pretest-posttest design compared auditory-visual (AV and auditory-only (A-only Web-based training. Stimuli were singleton and geminate /t,k,s/ followed by /a,u/ in two conditions (isolated words, carrier sentences. Fillers with long vowels were included. Participants completed a forced-choice identification task involving minimal triplets: singletons, geminates, long vowels (e.g., sasu, sassu, saasu. Results revealed a significant improvement in geminate identification following training, especially for AV; b significant effect of geminate (lowest scores for /s/; c no significant effect of condition; and d no significant improvement for the control group. Most errors were misperceptions of geminates as long vowels. Test of generalization revealed 5% decline in accuracy for AV and 14% for A-only. Geminate production improved significantly (especially for AV based on rater judgments; improvement was greatest for /k/ and smallest for /s/. Most production errors involved substitution of a singleton for a geminate. Post-study interviews produced positive comments on Web-based training. Waveforms increased awareness of durational differences. Results support the effectiveness of auditory-visual input in L2 perception training with transfer to novel stimuli and improved production.

  16. Use of the mixture of clay and crushed rock as a backfill material for low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository. Appendix 10: Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, W.J.; Lee, J.O.; Hahn, P.S.; Chun, K.S.

    2001-01-01

    At the time of the CRP, a repository for low and intermediate level radioactive wastes arising from nuclear power plant operation and radioisotope application in the Republic of Korea was to be constructed in the bedrock below ground surface. As the intermediate level waste cavern would contain the major part of radionuclide inventory in the cavern, the radionuclide release from the intermediate level waste cavern was therefore important from the viewpoint of disposal facility performance. The then current design concept suggested that the intermediate level waste would be emplaced into the compartment made of reinforced concrete, and the space between the concrete wall and cavern surface would be backfilled with a clay-based material. As compacted clay-based materials have a low hydraulic conductivity and the hydraulic gradient in a disposal cavern was expected to be relatively low, molecular diffusion was considered to be the principal mechanism by which radionuclides would migrate through the backfill. The mixture of calcium bentonite and crushed rock was being suggested as a candidate backfill material. This appendix summarises the KAERI research activities on the evaluation of hydraulic conductivity, radionuclide diffusion coefficient, and mechanical properties of the candidate clay-based backfill material for the intermediate level waste cavern

  17. Modality-specific processing precedes amodal linguistic processing during L2 sign language acquisition: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joshua T; Darcy, Isabelle; Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-02-01

    The present study tracked activation pattern differences in response to sign language processing by late hearing second language learners of American Sign Language. Learners were scanned before the start of their language courses. They were scanned again after their first semester of instruction and their second, for a total of 10 months of instruction. The study aimed to characterize modality-specific to modality-general processing throughout the acquisition of sign language. Results indicated that before the acquisition of sign language, neural substrates related to modality-specific processing were present. After approximately 45 h of instruction, the learners transitioned into processing signs on a phonological basis (e.g., supramarginal gyrus, putamen). After one more semester of input, learners transitioned once more to a lexico-semantic processing stage (e.g., left inferior frontal gyrus) at which language control mechanisms (e.g., left caudate, cingulate gyrus) were activated. During these transitional steps right hemispheric recruitment was observed, with increasing left-lateralization, which is similar to other native signers and L2 learners of spoken language; however, specialization for sign language processing with activation in the inferior parietal lobule (i.e., angular gyrus), even for late learners, was observed. As such, the present study is the first to track L2 acquisition of sign language learners in order to characterize modality-independent and modality-specific mechanisms for bilingual language processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of radionuclide invention for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste by considering concentration limit of waste package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Kang Il; Kim, Min Seong; Jeong, Noh Gyeon; Park, Jin Beak [Korea Radioactive Waste Agency(KORAD), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The result of a preliminary safety assessment that was completed by applying the radionuclide inventory calculated on the basis of available data from radioactive waste generation agencies suggested that many difficulties are to be expected with regard to disposal safety and operation. Based on the results of the preliminary safety assessment of the entire disposal system, in this paper, a unit package exceeding the safety goal is selected that occupies a large proportion of radionuclides in intermediate-level radioactive waste. We introduce restrictions on the amount of radioactivity in a way that excludes the high surface dose rate of the package. The radioactivity limit for disposal will be used as the baseline data for establishing the acceptance criteria and the disposal criteria for each disposal facility to meet the safety standards. It is necessary to draw up a comprehensive safety development plan for the Gyeongju waste disposal facility that will contribute to the construction of a Safety Case for the safety optimization of radioactive waste disposal facilities.

  19. Siting history and current construction status of disposal facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Akihiro; Kikuchi, Saburo; Maruyama, Masakatsu

    2008-01-01

    Korean government decided disposal site for low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW), which is located at coastal area near the Wolsong nuclear power plants in Gyeong-Ju city in December. 2005, based on the result of votes of residents in four candidate sites. Since then, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP), which is the management company of the LILW disposal facility, has carried out the preparation for construction of disposal facility and its licensing process. At the first phase, 100 thousand drums in 200 liter are planned to be disposed of in the rock cavern type disposal facility located at the depth from 80m to 130m below the sea level, and finally 800 thousand drums in 200 liter are planned to be disposed of in the site. This report shows the history of siting for the LILW disposal, the outline of design of disposal facility and current status of its construction, based on the information which was obtained mainly during our visit to the disposal site in Korea. (author)

  20. Elaboration of a questionnaire for establishment of the Brazilian inventory of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calabria, Jaqueline A.A.; Silva, Fabio; Taddei, Maria Helena T.

    2013-01-01

    Since 2008, Brazilian Commission for Nuclear Energy, CNEN, has been working in the Project of Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Wastes, (RBMN Project) and the Centre for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN) is responsible for the technical coordination of this project. Among activities under development, the survey of National radwaste inventory must be firstly concluded since it is a requirement for the project cost estimation. Hence, an electronic questionnaire was created to collect all information necessary to obtain the volume of the treated and non-treated waste, presently stored in Brazil. This questionnaire was elaborated after survey of the possible characteristics of radioactive waste generated in nuclear and radioactive facilities and it will be available online only for registered users. The information gathered with this questionnaire was related only with the amount of radioactive waste and some generic characteristics, the isotopic inventory will be performed in future. The objective of this work is to present this form and its creation process. (author)

  1. A solubility-limited-source-term model for the geological disposal of cemented intermediate-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.C.; Hodgkinson, D.P.; Tasker, P.W.; Lever, D.A.; Windsor, M.E.; Grime, P.W.; Herbert, A.W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents and illustrates the use of a source-team model for an intermediate-level radioactive-waste repository. The model deals with the behaviour of long-lived nuclides after the initial containment period. The major processes occurring in the near-field are included, namely sorption, elemental solubility limits, chain decay and transport due to groundwater flow. The model is applied to a realistic example of ILW disposal. From this it is clear that some nuclides are present in sufficient quantities to reach their solubility limit even when the assumed sorption coefficients are large. For these nuclides the precise sorption coefficient is unimportant. It is also clear that some daughter products, in particular Pb-210, become significant. The toxicity of the repository porewater is calculated and it is shown that, although this toxicity is high compared to levels acceptable in drinking water, it is much lower than the toxicity of the waste itself. However, the near-field chemical environment is only one of a number of containment barriers. In addition, it has been shown that the rate at which radionuclides enter the rock surrounding the repository is very low. (author)

  2. OPG's long term management proposal for low and intermediate level radioactive waste: project description, operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witzke, P.

    2011-01-01

    Although the Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) is approximately 8 years away from being placed into service, it is time to start planning for operations. Ontario Power Generation's (OPG) Nuclear Waste Management Division (NWMD) has a systematic approach to preparing for operation of any new facility that is readily applicable to the DGR. The DGR Operational Readiness Plan has been benchmarked at similar facilities in North America and Europe. The operating vision is a living model, and is constantly being reviewed and refined to align with the detailed design of the DGR as it proceeds through its phases of development. Combined with 40 years of operating surface storage facilities for the storage of Low and Intermediate Level Waste (LILW), the DGR operating vision will enable NWMD to provide meaningful input during COMS (Constructability, Operability, Maintainability, and Safety) review in the DGR project detailed-design phase in 2011/2012. A Work Breakdown Structure has been used to communicate the detail of the operating vision, and also to estimate the costs of Operational Readiness and Operations during the lifetime of the facility. (author)

  3. Development of a computer code for low-and intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. W.; Kim, C. L.; Lee, E. Y.; Lee, Y. M.; Kang, C. H.; Zhou, W.; Kozak, M. W.

    2002-01-01

    A safety assessment code, called SAGE (Safety Assessment Groundwater Evaluation), has been developed to describe post-closure radionuclide releases and potential radiological doses for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) disposal in an engineered vault facility in Korea. The conceptual model implemented in the code is focused on the release of radionuclide from a gradually degrading engineered barrier system to an underlying unsaturated zone, thence to a saturated groundwater zone. The radionuclide transport equations are solved by spatially discretizing the disposal system into a series of compartments. Mass transfer between compartments is by diffusion/dispersion and advection. In all compartments, radionuclides are decayed either as a single-member chain or as multi-member chains. The biosphere is represented as a set of steady-state, radionuclide-specific pathway dose conversion factors that are multiplied by the appropriate release rate from the far field for each pathway. The code has the capability to treat input parameters either deterministically or probabilistically. Parameter input is achieved through a user-friendly Graphical User Interface. An application is presented, which is compared against safety assessment results from the other computer codes, to benchmark the reliability of system-level conceptual modeling of the code

  4. Concept and Idea-Project for Yugoslav Low and Intermediate level Radioactive Waste Materials Final Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peric, A.

    1997-01-01

    Encapsulation of rad waste in a mortar matrix and displacement of such solidified waste forms into the shallow land burial system, engineered trench system type is suggested concept for the final disposal of low and intermediate level rad waste. The mortar-rad waste mixtures are cured in containers of either concrete or metal for an appropriate period of time, after which solidified rad waste-mortar monoliths are then placed in the engineered trench system, parallelepiped honeycomb structure. Trench consists of vertical barrier-walls, bottom barrier-floors, surface barrier-caps and permeable-reactive walls. Surroundings of the trench consists of buffer barrier materials, mainly clay. Each segment of the trench is equipped with the independent drainage system, as a part of the main drainage. Encapsulation of each filled trench honeycomb segment is performed with concrete cap. Completed trench is covered with impermeable plastic foil and soil leaner, preferably clay. Paper presents an overview of the final disposal facility engineered trench system type. Advantages in comparison with other types of final disposal system are given. (author)

  5. A Python Implementation of an Intermediate-Level Tropical Circulation Model and Implications for How Modeling Science is Done

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. W. B.

    2015-12-01

    Historically, climate models have been developed incrementally and in compiled languages like Fortran. While the use of legacy compiledlanguages results in fast, time-tested code, the resulting model is limited in its modularity and cannot take advantage of functionalityavailable with modern computer languages. Here we describe an effort at using the open-source, object-oriented language Pythonto create more flexible climate models: the package qtcm, a Python implementation of the intermediate-level Neelin-Zeng Quasi-Equilibrium Tropical Circulation model (QTCM1) of the atmosphere. The qtcm package retains the core numerics of QTCM1, written in Fortran, to optimize model performance but uses Python structures and utilities to wrap the QTCM1 Fortran routines and manage model execution. The resulting "mixed language" modeling package allows order and choice of subroutine execution to be altered at run time, and model analysis and visualization to be integrated in interactively with model execution at run time. This flexibility facilitates more complex scientific analysis using less complex code than would be possible using traditional languages alone and provides tools to transform the traditional "formulate hypothesis → write and test code → run model → analyze results" sequence into a feedback loop that can be executed automatically by the computer.

  6. Risks assessment associated with the possibility of intrusion into the low and intermediate level waste disposal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didita, L.; Ilie, P.; Pavelescu, M.

    1997-01-01

    In post-closure performance assessment of low and intermediate level waste disposal facilities it is necessary to assess the individual risks associated with the possibility of intrusion into repository. Intruder induced disruptive events can potentially compromise the integrity of the disposal unit and result in exhumation of the waste and radionuclides migration into environment. In this way, the main routes of exposure are: -inhalation of radioactive materials by the intruder; - external gamma irradiation of the intruder, - long-term pathways resulting from the transfer of radioactive materials to the surface of the site. This paper describes the evaluation of conditional and absolute risks associated with each route of exposure as a function of time. To evaluate the risks, it is necessary to calculate the time-dependent activities of each nuclide considered. This is achieved by employing an analytic solution to the Bateman equation at specified times of evaluation. Conditional risks by inhalation, external exposure and long-term pathways and different modes of intrusion are evaluated on the basis of an annual probability of intrusion of unity. Absolute risks are calculated by scaling the user-supplied probabilities of intrusion at various times of evaluation. The evaluation of absolute risks by long-term exposure pathways involves an interpolation procedure in time. The calculations have been performed for the most important radionuclides present in low and intermediate wastes. (authors)

  7. Monitoring Programme of Radionuclide Migration Through Food Chains at Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste Repository in Trgoska Gora Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, A.; Lokner, V.; Kucar Dragicevic, S.; Subasic, D.; Barisic, D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Basic objective of the paper is to prepare a comprehensive programme of monitoring at the preferred site for low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository in the region of Trgovska Gora mountain. The programme is based on available information regarding hydrogeology, lithostratigraphy, tectonics, seismotectonics, geomorphology, meteorology, bioecology, demography and other site relevant disciplines. It is supposed to ensure (1) identification of the zero state at the broader region of the Trgovska gora mountain, and (2) to underline activities needed for monitoring of concentrations of expected radionuclides throughout possible pathways (particularly through food chains) that would migrate to the biosphere in the period after start of radioactive waste repository operation. Inventory of radionuclides contained in the radioactive waste to be disposed of at the site is naturally an important element of the programme structure. There should be identified those radionuclides which concentrations require to be monitored. Concentration measuring methods are proposed in the article. In addition, relevant aquatic and terrestrial organisms, serving as bioindicators, are identified. Types, quantities, frequency and methodology of sampling present an important part of the monitoring programme. Determination of monitoring sites for undertaking particular types of sampling (e.g. stream waters, stream sediment, detritus, ichtiofauna, groundwater, terrestrial organisms, honey, etc.), presenting an important aspect of a well-organised monitoring programme, is also included into this presentation. (author)

  8. Risk management in the project of implantation of the repository for low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borssatto, Maria de Fatima B.; Tello, Cledola Cassia O. de; Uemura, George

    2011-01-01

    Project RBMN is part of the Brazilian solution for the storage of radioactive waste generated by the activities of nuclear energy in Brazil. The aim of RBMN is to implement the National Repository to dispose the low and intermediate-level radioactive waste. Risk is a characteristic of all projects, and it is originated from uncertainties, assumptions and the environment of execution of the project. Risk management is the way to monitor systematically these uncertainties and a guaranty that the goals of the project will be attained. A specific methodology for the risk management of the Project RBMN is under development, which integrates models and processes for identification and analysis of risks, reactions, monitoring, control and planning of risk management. This methodology is fundamental and will be of primordial importance for future generations who will be responsible for the operation at final stages, closure and institutional control during the post-closure of the repository. It will provide greater safety to executed processes and safeguarding risks and specific solutions for this enterprise, guaranteeing the safety of the repository in its life cycle, which has a foreseen duration of at least three hundred years. The aim of this paper is to present the preliminary analysis of the opportunities, threats, strong points and weak points identified up to now, that will provide support to implement risk management procedures. The methodology will be based on the PMBOK R - Project Management Board of Knowledge - and will take into consideration the best practices for project management.(author)

  9. Elaboration of a questionnaire for establishment of the Brazilian inventory of low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabria, Jaqueline A.A.; Silva, Fabio, E-mail: jaalmeida@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvaf@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Taddei, Maria Helena T., E-mail: mhtaddei@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Marumo, Julio T., E-mail: jtmarumo@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Since 2008, Brazilian Commission for Nuclear Energy, CNEN, has been working in the Project of Repository for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Wastes, (RBMN Project) and the Centre for Development of Nuclear Technology (CDTN) is responsible for the technical coordination of this project. Among activities under development, the survey of National radwaste inventory must be firstly concluded since it is a requirement for the project cost estimation. Hence, an electronic questionnaire was created to collect all information necessary to obtain the volume of the treated and non-treated waste, presently stored in Brazil. This questionnaire was elaborated after survey of the possible characteristics of radioactive waste generated in nuclear and radioactive facilities and it will be available online only for registered users. The information gathered with this questionnaire was related only with the amount of radioactive waste and some generic characteristics, the isotopic inventory will be performed in future. The objective of this work is to present this form and its creation process. (author)

  10. Development of low-pH cements for immobilisation of intermediate level radioactive waste: achievements and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins de Freitas, Regeane; Al-Tabbaa, Abir [Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Although cementation is a widely recognized solidification/ stabilization process for immobilisation of Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (ILRW), the low resistance to hyper-alkaline pore waters compromises the effectiveness of the process when Portland Cement (PC) is employed. Moreover the manufacture of PC is responsible for significant CO{sub 2} emissions. In this context, low pH cements are environmentally more suitable and have emerged as a potential alternative for obtaining secure waste forms. This paper summarises the achievements on development of low-pH cements and the challenges of using these new materials for the ILRW immobilisation. The performance of waste forms is also discussed in terms of radionuclides release. Reactive magnesium oxide and magnesium phosphate cements are emphasised as they feature important advantages such as consumption of available constituents for controlling acid-base reactions, reduced permeability and higher density. Additionally, in order to identify new opportunities for study, the long-term modelling approach is also briefly discussed. (authors)

  11. Community dynamics in the siting process for a low to intermediate level nuclear waste facility in Kincardine, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Haydari, D.

    2007-01-01

    The use of nuclear technology to generate electricity inevitably produces waste that is detrimental to the environment and human health. Finding communities that will accept nuclear waste disposal facilities is extremely challenging. Furthermore, the siting of a nuclear waste disposal facility is more than a technological analysis, but a matter that includes a variety of social, ethical and political considerations. This study is aimed to assess the role of the place-based community, communities of interest and communities of identity involved in the voluntary siting process for a low to intermediate level nuclear waste disposal facility in Ontario. To accomplish this, a framework was developed and applied though a case study evaluation of the siting process for the Deep Geologic Repository in Kincardine, Ontario. The framework highlights four key procedural principles that were used to analyze the siting process: trust, public participation, equity and risk. The data revealed that the positions of the communities involved in the siting process varied depending on the meaningful fulfillment the four key procedural principles. (author)

  12. Experiments relating to hydrogen generated by corrosion processes associated with repositories for intermediate-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenk, R.

    1983-12-01

    Organic components in an intermediate level waste repository decompose under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions to produce carbon dioxide, which may lead to acid corrosion of metallic containers and hence to hydrogen production. The possibility of hydrogen production within the repository must be considered in determining the long term safety. Thermodynamic calculations show that only pure water is required to produce hydrogen with iron in a repository. The hydrogen evolution rate is thus the important parameter. However, the available kinetic data is insufficient and needs to be supplemented experimentally. Carbon steel specimens were immersed in water over which several gas mixtures containing nitrogen, oxygen and carbon dioxide were passed; the amount of hydrogen picked up by the gas stream was measured. 1.4 - 28 ml hydrogen per square meter per hour was evolved when the gas mixture contained 1 and 20 volume per cent carbon dioxide respectively. Hydrogen was also detected in natural CO 2 -free water when oxygen concentration cells are present. No hydrogen could be detected at pH 8.5 and above. The experiments were all carried out at 25 degrees C and atmospheric pressure and restricted to the carbonate system. Natural waters contain a mixture of salts; this may increase or reduce the hydrogen evolution rate. Higher temperatures and pressures, in particular a higher partial pressure of carbon dioxide, will probably lead to an increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. (author)

  13. OPG's deep geologic repository for low and intermediate level waste - public participation and aboriginal engagement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ontario Power Generation (OPG)'s Public Participation and Aboriginal Engagement Program for the proposed Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for low and intermediate level waste (L and ILW) began with the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in 2002 between OPG and the Municipality of Kincardine. The MOU set out the terms under which the two parties would jointly study the feasibility of different options for the long-term management of L and ILW at the Bruce nuclear site. A consultant, independent from both the Municipality of Kincardine and OPG, was retained to manage the assessment of options as well as a communication plan to ensure the public and Aboriginal peoples were kept apprised of all activities associated with the MOU. This early commitment to transparency and openness, with its ensuing opportunities for the public and Aboriginal peoples to become informed, ask questions, and engage in meaningful two-way dialogue about the early assessment of options, established the foundation and later became the hallmark of the DGR Project's Public Participation and Aboriginal Engagement program. This paper provides an overview of the development, nature and results of that program as it has evolved through the early investigative stages of options and through the environmental assessment and licencing process for the proposed DGR Project. (author)

  14. The OPG/Kincardine hosting agreement for a deep geologic repository for OPG's low- and intermediate-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellan, A.G.; Barker, D.E.

    2006-01-01

    A Hosting Agreement has been reached between Ontario Power Generation and the Municipality of Kincardine for the purpose of siting a long-term management facility for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste at the Western Waste Management Facility. Following an independent review of the feasibility of three options for a long-term facility at the site, including a review of the safety, geotechnical feasibility, social and economic effects and potential environmental effects, Kincardine passed a resolution indicating their preference for a Deep Geologic Repository. A Host Community Agreement has been negotiated based on this preference, and on information that had been gathered from municipal authorities at other locations that have hosted similar facilities. The Hosting Agreement includes financial compensation, totalling $35.7 million (Canadian 2004) to the Municipality of Kincardine and to four surrounding municipalities. The financial aspects include lump sum payments based on achieving specific project milestones as well as annual payments to each of the municipalities. The payments are indexed to inflation, and are also contingent on the municipalities acting reasonably and in good faith during the licencing process of the proposed facility. In addition to the fees, the Agreement includes provision for a Property Value Protection Plan that would provide residents with compensation in the event that there is depreciation in property value shown to directly result from a release from the proposed facility. New permanent OPG jobs supporting the project would be located at the site. OPG and Kincardine will support a centre of nuclear excellence. (author)

  15. Online Dutch L2 Learning in Adult Education: Educators' and Providers' Viewpoints on Needs, Advantages and Disadvantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paepe, Liesbeth; Zhu, Chang; Depryck, Koen

    2018-01-01

    This study critically addresses the assumptions made by educators and providers in the field of Dutch second language (L2) acquisition about the online learning of Dutch L2. These include assumptions about advantages and disadvantages of online language learning, such as flexibility, learner autonomy, enhanced opportunities for remediation and…

  16. L2 vs. L3 Initial State: A Comparative Study of the Acquisition of French DPs by Vietnamese Monolinguals and Cantonese-English Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yan-Kit Ingrid

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares the initial state of second language acquisition (L2A) and third language acquisition (L3A) from the generative linguistics perspective. We examine the acquisition of the Determiner Phrase (DP) by two groups of beginning French learners: an L2 group (native speakers of Vietnamese who do not speak any English) and an L3 group…

  17. Morphological Errors in Spanish Second Language Learners and Heritage Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrul, Silvina

    2011-01-01

    Morphological variability and the source of these errors have been intensely debated in SLA. A recurrent finding is that postpuberty second language (L2) learners often omit or use the wrong affix for nominal and verbal inflections in oral production but less so in written tasks. According to the missing surface inflection hypothesis, L2 learners…

  18. Language Learner Motivational Types: A Cluster Analysis Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papi, Mostafa; Teimouri, Yasser

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed to identify different second language (L2) learner motivational types drawing on the framework of the L2 motivational self system. A total of 1,278 secondary school students learning English in Iran completed a questionnaire survey. Cluster analysis yielded five different groups based on the strength of different variables within…

  19. Getting to Know L2 Poor Comprehenders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghi, Masoud; Mustapha, Ramlee; Maasum, Tengku Nor Rizan BT Tengku Mohamad

    2011-01-01

    Among the plethora of studies conducted thus far to explore the factors affecting EFL reading effectiveness, scant attention seems to be paid to the why of poor reading comprehension of most EFL learners. In this regard, the present article capitalized on qualitative research on a small scale, for the purpose of addressing the not-so-often debated…

  20. Second Language Learners' Use of Marginal Glosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    The use of marginal reading glosses by 18 second language (L2) learners is examined through a quantitative and qualitative analysis of audiotaped think-aloud protocols. How these readers interact with the glosses is identified and divided into five categories or gloss interactions. Examples from each are presented. The primary research question…

  1. Second Language Learners' Attitudes towards English Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weimin; Hu, Guiling

    2008-01-01

    This pilot project investigates second language (L2) learners' attitudes towards three varieties of English: American (AmE), British (BrE) and Australian (AuE). A 69-word passage spoken by a female speaker of each variety was used. Participants were 30 Chinese students pursuing Masters or Doctoral degrees in the United States, who listened to each…

  2. Attitudes, Motivations and Beliefs about L2 Reading in the Filipino Secondary School Classroom: A Mixed-methods Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Cirocki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is a two-part investigation. The first part focuses on ESL learners' attitudes and motivations for reading in the target language. The second part deals with ESL teachers' beliefs about motivating L2 learners to read. The study involved 100 ESL learners (N=100 and 30 teachers (N=30 from rural schools in Mindanao, the Philippines. All the participants were recruited through convenience sampling. In other words, participants were selected based on their convenient accessibility and proximity. The current study is a mixed-methods project. Both quantitative and qualitative methods were employed to collect different types of data. The instruments used were: a L2 reading attitude survey, a questionnaire dealing with motivations for L2 reading, a survey on beliefs about motivating L2 learners to read in English, a semi-structured interview and a L2-reading-lesson observation. The quantitative data were statistically analysed. Whenever appropriate, the data were presented in tables and on graphs. The qualitative data were analysed through thematic coding and used to support the quantitative data. The findings show that students have both positive and negative attitudes towards various aspects of L2 reading. They also have different levels of motivation for reading in English, with female participants having higher scores than male participants. The teachers, on the other hand, hold diverse beliefs about motivating learners to read in English. No significant correlation was found between teacher beliefs and students' motivations for reading in English. After the findings have been described, implications for teacher education and instructional practice are offered.

  3. IMPARARE L’ITALIANO L2 CON LE CANZONI. UN CONTRIBUTO DIDATTICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Mauroni

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Il presente contributo si inserisce nel filone degli studi che hanno messo in evidenza la potenziale ricchezza della canzone come strumento di facilitazione dell’apprendimento della L2, e come mezzo per l’approccio al testo letterario per studenti di italiano L1, additandone il carattere di attività particolarmente efficace e ‘consonante’ con una prospettiva umanistico-affettiva, comunicativa, nonché socio-costruttivista. In queste pagine sono presentate alcune attività didattiche (pensate ora per gli apprendenti di italiano L2, ora per gli studenti di italiano L1 formulate a partire da alcuni testi del cantautore Claudio Baglioni (Io sono qui, Le vie dei Colori, Bolero, Fammi andar via tratti dall’album Io sono qui, 1995, edizioni CBS. I testi qui didattizzati sono utilizzabili in diverse prospettive: grammaticale, lessicale, retorica, socio-culturale, ecc.; e per diversi livelli di competenza linguistica (L2: A1-C1; L1.     Learning italian l2 through song.  A didactic contribution   This article is part of a series of studies which focus on the potential richness of songs as tools for facilitating L2 learning, as well as being a way to approach literary texts for L1 Italian students, being a particularly effective activity from a humanistic-affective, communicative and socio-constructivist point of view.  A few didactic activities are presented (designed for L2 Italian learners, or for L1 Italian learners based on songs by Claudio Baglioni (Io sono qui, Le vie dei Colori, Bolero, Fammi andar via from the album Io sono qui, 1995, edizioni CBS.  The texts were adapted for diverse didactic uses: grammatical, lexical, rhetorical, socio-cultural, etc and for different levels of linguistic competence (L2: A1-C1, L1

  4. Suggestions of keeping L2 motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐斌

    2014-01-01

    How will we keep the motivation during the second language as long as we can, which confuses us, though what the L2 motivation is and how it is developed have been discussed by the psychologists, educators, etc. The aim of this passage is to clarify the basic content of motivation, including the definition, classification, importance, etc. how the current situation is in se-nior high students’English learning motivation, what should be done to keep such motivation. In the following part, it will be read that the introduction, the chapter stating the content and classification of (L 2) motivation, the chapter analyzing the necessity and state of L2 motivation at senor high, the chapter offering approach to keep that motivation, and the conclusion. All of them use the comparison, explanation and cites.

  5. A study on radiation shield design of storage facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste in Bangladesh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, JJahirul Haque

    2005-02-01

    Bangladesh has no nuclear power reactor but has only one 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor. The Bangladesh Atomic Energy commission (BAEC) operates a 3 MW TRIGA Mark-II Research Reactor and maintains not only the nuclear facilities at its Atomic Energy Research Establishment (AERE) at Savar (near Dhaka) but also the related radiation facilities the whole country. The main sources of radioactive wastes result from the use of sealed and unsealed radiation sources in medicine industry, research, agriculture, etc as well as from operation and maintenance of the nuclear facilities the whole country. As a result radioactive wastes are increasing day by day and these wastes are classified as low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) following the radiation safety philosophy of IAEA recommendations in Bangladesh. Radioactive waste is very sensitive issue to public and environment from the hazardous standpoint of ionizing radiation. Therefore, storage facility of LILW is very essential for safe radioactive waste management in Bangladesh and in parallel: this study is of a great importance due to new installation of this storage facility in future. The basic objective of this study is to recommend the radiation shield design parameters of the installation of storage facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste from the points of view of radiation safety and sensitivity analysis. The shield design of this installation has been carried out with the Monte Carlo Code MCNP4C and the point Kernel Code Micro Shield 5.05 respectively considering the ICRP-60 (1990) recommendations for occupational exposure limit (10 μ Sv/hr). For more safety purpose every equivalent dose rate at different positions of this installation is considered below 9 μ Sv/hr in this study. The radiation shield design parameters are recommended based on MCNP4C calculated results than those of Micro Shield due to more credible results and these parameters are: (I) 51 cm thickness of

  6. Estimation of expenses for low and intermediate level radioactive waste repository project in Croatia up to site license acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, A.; Lokner, V.; Subasic, D.

    2003-01-01

    The expenses needed for development of low- and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) repository project in Croatia include: (a) preliminary activities, (b) preparatory activities, and (c) preparing of environmental impact study. The first group of expenses are referring to the project leading activities, project plan updating, build-up of required infrastructure, preparing of licensing documentation, site investigations, data acquisition programme, pre-operational radio-ecological monitoring, modelling, safety analysis (first iteration) and public related activities. Preparatory activities are referring to purchasing of land for repository and preparatory activities for carrying out of on-site investigations, while third group of expenses are related to preparation and validation of Environmental impact study. It was found out that about 50 % of total expenses refer to build-up of infrastructure. Additional 25 % finances are related to radio-ecological monitoring, site investigations and development of calculations and models, while remaining 25 % of total estimated sum is expected to be spent for repository safety assessment, public relations, purchasing and preparing the on-site terrain for construction, etc. It was calculated 607 EUR per m3 of LILW to be needed up to site license acquisition. According to the world-wide practice, by extrapolating of additional expenses necessary for construction of the repository and acquisition of operational license, it comes out the cost of 1.723 EUR per m3 of LILW for shallow-ground and 2.412 EUR per m3 of LILW for tunnel repository. The estimated expenses for Croatia are within the span of expenses for the same purpose in the countries considered. Expected duration of the project performance up to acquisition of the site license is 4 years and 3 months. (author)

  7. Long-Term Performance of Silo Concrete in Low- and Intermediate-Level Waste (LILW) Disposal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hae Ryong; Kwon, Ki Jung; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Sung Bok; Jeong, Yi Yeong; Yoon, Eui Sik; Kim, Do Gyeum

    2012-01-01

    Concrete has been considered one of the engineered barriers in the geological disposal facility for low- and intermediate-level wastes (LILW). The concrete plays major role as structural support, groundwater infiltration barrier, and transport barrier of radionuclides dissolved from radioactive wastes. It also works as a chemical barrier due to its high pH condition. However, the performance of the concrete structure decrease over a period of time because of several physical and chemical processes. After a long period of time in the future, the concrete would lose its effectiveness as a barrier against groundwater inflow and the release of radionuclides. An subsurface environment below the frost depth should be favorable for concrete longevity as temperature and moisture variation should be minimal, significantly reducing the potential of cracking due to drying shrinkage and thermal expansion and contraction. Therefore, the concrete structures of LILW disposal facilities below groundwater table are expected to have relatively longer service life than those of near-surface or surface concrete structures. LILW in Korea is considered to be disposed of in the Wolsong LILW Disposal Center which is under construction in geological formation. 100,000 waste packages are expected to be disposed in the 6 concrete silos below EL -80m in the Wolsong LILW Disposal Center as first stage. The concrete silo has been considered the main engineered barrier which plays a role to inhibit water inflow and the release of radionuclides to the environments. Although a number of processes are responsible for the degradation of the silo concrete, it is concluded that a reinforcing steel corrosion cause the failure of the silo concrete. Therefore, a concrete silo failure time is calculated based on a corrosion initiation time which takes for chloride ions to penetrate through the concrete cover, and a corrosion propagation time. This paper aims to analyze the concrete failure time in the

  8. Hydrogeologic modelling in support of a proposed Deep Geologic Repository in Canada for low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykes, J.F.; Normani, S.D.; Yin, Y. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Sykes, E.A.; Jensen, M.R. [Nuclear Waste Management Organization, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Ontario Power Generation (OPG) has proposed the construction of a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for low and intermediate level radioactive waste at the Bruce site on the shore of Lake Huron near Tiverton, Ontario. The DGR is to be excavated at a depth of about 680 m within argillaceous limestones of Ordovician age. A saturated regional-scale and site-scale numerical modelling study has been completed in order to evaluate the safety of storing radioactive waste at the site and to better understand the geochemistry and hydrogeology of the formations surrounding the proposed DGR. This paper reported on the regional-scale base-case modelling and analysis of the measured pressure profile in deep boreholes at the DGR site. The numerical modelling study provided a framework to investigate the groundwater flow system as it relates to, and potentially affects, the safety and long-term performance of the DGR. A saturated groundwater flow model was also developed using FRAC3DVS-OPG. The objective of regional-scale groundwater modelling of the Paleozoic sedimentary sequence underlying southwestern Ontario was to provide a basis for the assembly and integration of site-specific geoscientific data and to explain the influence of parameter and scenario uncertainty on predicted long-term geosphere barrier performance. The base-case analysis showed that solute transport in the Ordovician and lower Silurian is diffusion dominant. For the base-case parameters, the estimated mean life expectancy for the proposed DGR is more than 8 million years. The possible presence of a gas phase in the rock between the Cambrian and the Niagaran was not considered in the analyses of this paper. 9 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  9. Treatment, conditioning and packaging for final disposal of low and intermediate level waste from Cernavoda: a techno-economic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suryanarayan, S.; Husain, A. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada); Fellingham, L.; Nesbitt, V. [Nuvia Ltd., Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Toro, L. [Mate-fin, Bucharest (Romania); Simionov, V.; Dumitrescu, D. [Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant, Cernavoda (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    National Nuclearelectrica Society (SNN) owns and operates two CANDU-6 plants at Cernavoda in Romania. Two additional units are expected to be built on the site in the future. Low and intermediate level short-lived radioactive wastes from Cernavoda are planned to be disposed off in a near-surface repository to be built at Saligny. The principal waste streams are IX resins, filters, compactable wastes, non-compactables, organic liquids and oil-solid mixtures. Their volumetric generation rates per reactor unit are estimated to be: IX resins (6 m{sup 3}/y), filters (2 m{sup 3}/y), compactables (23 m{sup 3}/y) and non-compactables (15 m{sup 3}/y). A techno-economic assessment of the available options for a facility to treat and condition Cernavoda's wastes for disposal was carried out in 2009 based on projected waste volumes from all four units. A large number of processes were first screened to identify viable options. They were further considered to develop overall processing options for each waste stream. These were then consolidated to obtain options for the entire plant by minimizing the number of unit operations required to process the various waste streams. A total of 9 plant options were developed for which detailed costing was undertaken. Based on a techno-economic assessment, two top ranking plant options were identified. Several scenarios were considered for implementing these options. Amongst them, a contractor run operation of a facility located on the Cernavoda site was considered to be more cost effective than operating the facility using SNN personnel. (author)

  10. Long-Term Performance of Silo Concrete in Low- and Intermediate-Level Waste (LILW) Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hae Ryong; Kwon, Ki Jung; Lee, Seung Hyun; Lee, Sung Bok; Jeong, Yi Yeong [Korea Radioactive-waste Management Corporation, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Eui Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Do Gyeum [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Concrete has been considered one of the engineered barriers in the geological disposal facility for low- and intermediate-level wastes (LILW). The concrete plays major role as structural support, groundwater infiltration barrier, and transport barrier of radionuclides dissolved from radioactive wastes. It also works as a chemical barrier due to its high pH condition. However, the performance of the concrete structure decrease over a period of time because of several physical and chemical processes. After a long period of time in the future, the concrete would lose its effectiveness as a barrier against groundwater inflow and the release of radionuclides. An subsurface environment below the frost depth should be favorable for concrete longevity as temperature and moisture variation should be minimal, significantly reducing the potential of cracking due to drying shrinkage and thermal expansion and contraction. Therefore, the concrete structures of LILW disposal facilities below groundwater table are expected to have relatively longer service life than those of near-surface or surface concrete structures. LILW in Korea is considered to be disposed of in the Wolsong LILW Disposal Center which is under construction in geological formation. 100,000 waste packages are expected to be disposed in the 6 concrete silos below EL -80m in the Wolsong LILW Disposal Center as first stage. The concrete silo has been considered the main engineered barrier which plays a role to inhibit water inflow and the release of radionuclides to the environments. Although a number of processes are responsible for the degradation of the silo concrete, it is concluded that a reinforcing steel corrosion cause the failure of the silo concrete. Therefore, a concrete silo failure time is calculated based on a corrosion initiation time which takes for chloride ions to penetrate through the concrete cover, and a corrosion propagation time. This paper aims to analyze the concrete failure time in the

  11. Applying multi-criteria analysis to radiation protection optimisation of low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pages, P.; Schneider, T.; Lombard, J.

    1991-01-01

    Introduction of ALARA principles in the field of radioactive waste management implies a definition of the main characteristics of the decisional framework. Specific aspects should be taken into account: long term effects, large uncertainties and/or probabilistic events, with particular attention to the public and the political authorities. Traditional cost-benefit analysis is not qualified to deal with these different dimensions of the risk. The aim of this paper is to describe the principles of multi-criteria analysis applied to low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal. Three categories of barriers can be distinguished acting at different protection levels: site characteristics, waste package and disposal system. A set of possible solutions can be identified, but the selection of the 'optimum' is not easy because of the diversity of the factors to be allowed for. For example, the following problem needs to be addressed: is it preferable to limit public radiation exposure several hundred years ahead or to reduce occupational exposure during the monitoring period of the disposal facility? An optimisation study is currently being performed on the various components of the structure, assuming given site and waste package characteristics. Four steps are distinguished: identification and analysis of options for the structure; selection and estimation of the qualitative and quantitative criteria; determination of the 'most interesting' solutions using multi-criteria analysis; sensitivity analysis and discussion on uncertainties related to the various assumptions. Based on the preliminary findings, the paper focuses on practical solutions to address the methodological issues raised in applying the optimisation procedures to radioactive waste management. (au)

  12. Immobilization of simulated low and intermediate level waste in alkali-activated slag-fly ash-metakaolin hydroceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jin, E-mail: wjin761026@163.com [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composite and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); Wang, Jun-xia; Zhang, Qin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); Li, Yu-xiang [State Key Laboratory Cultivation Base for Nonmetal Composite and Functional Materials, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest University of Science and Technology, Mianyang 621010, Sichuan (China)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Evaluation of the suitability of ASFMH for solidifying simulated S-LILW. • The introduction of S-LILW avails forming zeolitic phases of ASFMH waste forms. • The ASFMH waste forms have low leachability and high compressive strength. - Abstract: In the current study, the alkali-activated slag-fly ash-metakaolin hydroceramic (ASFMH) waste forms for immobilizing simulated low and intermediate level waste (S-LILW) were prepared by hydrothermal process. The crystalline phase compositions, morphology, compressive strength and aqueous stability of S-LILW ASFMH waste forms were investigated. The results showed that the main crystalline phases of S-LILW ASFMH waste forms were analcime and zeolite NaP1. The changes of Si/Al molar ratio (from 1.7 to 2.2) and Ca/Al molar ratio (from 0.15 to 0.35) had little effect on the phase compositions of S-LILW ASFMH waste forms. However, the hydrothermal temperature, time as well as the content of S-LILW (from 12.5 to 37.5 wt%) had a major impact on the phase compositions. The compressive strength of S-LILW ASFMH waste forms was not less than 20 MPa when the content of S-LILW reached 37.5 wt%. In addition, the aqueous stability testing was carried out using the standard MCC-1 static leach test method; the normalized elemental leach rates of Sr and Cs were fairly constant in a low value below 5 × 10{sup −4} g m{sup −2} d{sup −1} and 3 × 10{sup −4} g m{sup −2} d{sup −1} after 28 days, respectively. It is indicated that ASFMH waste form could be a potential host for safely immobilizing LILW.

  13. Maximum flood hazard assessment for OPG's deep geologic repository for low and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimmrichter, P.; McClintock, J.; Peng, J.; Leung, H.

    2011-01-01

    Ontario Power Generation (OPG) has entered a process to seek Environmental Assessment and licensing approvals to construct a Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for Low and Intermediate Level Radioactive Waste (L&ILW) near the existing Western Waste Management Facility (WWMF) at the Bruce nuclear site in the Municipality of Kincardine, Ontario. In support of the design of the proposed DGR project, maximum flood stages were estimated for potential flood hazard risks associated with coastal, riverine and direct precipitation flooding. The estimation of lake/coastal flooding for the Bruce nuclear site considered potential extreme water levels in Lake Huron, storm surge and seiche, wind waves, and tsunamis. The riverine flood hazard assessment considered the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) within the local watersheds, and within local drainage areas that will be directly impacted by the site development. A series of hydraulic models were developed, based on DGR project site grading and ditching, to assess the impact of a Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) occurring directly at the DGR site. Overall, this flood assessment concluded there is no potential for lake or riverine based flooding and the DGR area is not affected by tsunamis. However, it was also concluded from the results of this analysis that the PMF in proximity to the critical DGR operational areas and infrastructure would be higher than the proposed elevation of the entrance to the underground works. This paper provides an overview of the assessment of potential flood hazard risks associated with coastal, riverine and direct precipitation flooding that was completed for the DGR development. (author)

  14. L2 writing and L2 written feedback in upper secondary schools as experienced by teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Manousou, Angeliki

    2015-01-01

    L2 written feedback is a multi-faceted issue and this is the reason behind the big number of studies that have been conducted on it. However, the majority of studies deal with learners’ opinions of teachers’ feedback or several types of feedback and their advantages and disadvantages. There are no studies that could have addressed teachers’ opinions of their L2 written feedback. This study attempts to describe how L2 teachers view their written feedback on learners’ essays. ...

  15. Individual Differences in L2 Processing of Multi-word Phrases: Effects of Working Memory and Personality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerz, E.; Wiechmann, D.; Mitkov, R.

    2017-01-01

    There is an accumulating body of evidence that knowledge of the statistics of multiword phrases (MWP) facilitates native language learning and processing both in children and adults. However, less is known about whether adult second language (L2) learners are able to develop native-like sensitivity

  16. Cross-Linguistic Influence in Third Language Perception: L2 and L3 Perception of Japanese Contrasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the possible influence of language learners' second language (L2) on their perception of phonological contrasts in their third language (L3). Previous studies on Third Language Acquisition (TLA) suggest various factors as possible sources of cross-linguistic influence in the acquisition of an L3. This dissertation…

  17. Textual Enhancement and Simplified Input: Effects on L2 Comprehension and Acquisition of Non-Meaningful Grammatical Form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wynne

    2003-01-01

    The study set out to investigate how textual enhancement (TE) as a form of input enhancement and increasing the comprehensibility of input via simplified input (SI) might impact adult L2 French learners' acquisition of the past participle agreement in relative clauses and their comprehension of three texts in which the target forms were embedded.…

  18. Do Adult ESL Learners' and Their Teachers' Goals for Improving Grammar in Writing Correspond?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ally A.; Busch, Michael; Cumming, Alister

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has identified certain goals of adult second language (L2) learners and their teachers for writing instruction in English as a second language (ESL), yet questions remain as to whether students' and teachers' goals correspond in ways that achieve instructional objectives and facilitate L2 development. The present study compared L2

  19. L2 Chinese: Grammatical Development and Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    Two recent books (Jiang, 2014, "Advances in Chinese as a second language"; Wang, 2013, "Grammatical development of Chinese among non-native speakers") provide new resources for exploring the role of processing in acquiring Chinese as a second language (L2). This review article summarizes, assesses and compares some of the…

  20. A Brief Analysis of L2 Motivation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武曼

    2017-01-01

    Learning motivation is the motility to urge the student to be engaged in the studies activity. This thesis has introduced types of L2 learning motivation. Through the contrast and analysis about the positive motivation and negative motivation in prac?tical applications, this paper has indicated the unique of positive motivation and the defects of negative motivation, and make rea?sonable suggestions.

  1. MD2725: 16L2 aperture measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Mirarchi, Daniele; Rossi, Roberto; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2018-01-01

    Dumps induced by sudden increase of losses in the half-cell 16L2 have been a serious machine limitation during the 2017 run. The aim of this MD was to perform local aperture measurements in order to assess differences after the beam screen regeneration, compared to first measurements in 2017.

  2. A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in…

  3. The storage center of short life low and intermediate level radioactive wastes; Le centre de stockage des dechets de faible et moyenne activite a vie courte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    Situated at 50 km of Troyes, the Aube Center was opened in 1992 in order to take over from the Manche Center, for the surface storage of low life low and intermediate level radioactive wastes. It offers an answer to manage safely theses wastes at an industrial scale during 50 years. (A.L.B.)

  4. Air Writing as a Technique for the Acquisition of Sino-japanese Characters by Second Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This article calls attention to a facet of the expertise of second language (L2) learners of Japanese at the intersection of language, memory, gesture, and the psycholinguistics of a logographic writing system. Previous research has shown that adult L2 learners of Japanese living in Japan (similarly to native speakers of Japanese) often…

  5. Unpacking the Discrepancy between Learner and Teacher Beliefs: What Should Be the Role of Grammar in Language Classes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hos, Rabia; Kekec, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Learner and teacher beliefs play an important role in second language (L2) learning. Furthermore, the role of grammar instruction and error correction in the L2 classroom is a topic that is still debated in the literature. This study explored the beliefs of EFL learners and teachers regarding the controversial role of grammar instruction and error…

  6. Faithful Imitator, Legitimate Speaker, Playful Creator and Dialogical Communicator: Shift in English Learners' Identity Prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yihong

    2014-01-01

    This paper attempts to conceptualize identity prototypes regarding model L2 learners/users of English over the past 50 years, as embedded in research discourses. For a long time, the ideal learner was a "faithful imitator" whose L2 use and cultural conduct were strictly modeled on the native speaker (NS). With postcolonial changes around…

  7. An assessment of the possible fate of gas generated in a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leupin, O.X.; Cloet, V.; Marschall, P.; Schwyn, B.; Smith, P.; Zeyer, J.; Bernier-Latmani, R.; Papafotiou, A.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.

    2016-12-01

    The present study provides an assessment of reactions that result in a gas pressure reduction - also called gas sinks - in a generic deep geological repository for low- and intermediate-level waste in Opalinus Clay. Both chemical reactions and microbial activity may contribute to or reduce gas pressure build-up. A complete synopsis is given, comprising the current state of chemical, microbial and geoscientific understanding of gas generation and consumption in a L/ILW repository. The degradation of organic materials (by both microbial and chemical reactions) and the anoxic corrosion of metals will generate various gaseous products such as hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, hydrogen sulphide and ammonia. Some of these gas species are expected to further react with materials present at the point of origin. More particularly, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide are expected to react entirely with e.g. cement, water or iron. Thus, they do not contribute to a gas pressure build-up in the repository. The remaining gas species - mainly hydrogen, methane and small amounts of ammonia - are assumed not to react at the point of origin and can thus contribute to gas pressure build-up. Gas pressure build-up in the L/ILW emplacement caverns will result in gas migrating through the gas permeable seals and through the excavation-damaged zone to reach the operational and construction tunnels where microorganisms may utilise the gas and thus reduce gas pressure build-up. In order to allow bacteria to thrive over longer periods, the backfill material of the operational tunnel needs to have sufficient porosity and a pore water composition for favourable living conditions. Experimental findings at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory show that bacteria found in borehole water are efficient at oxidising hydrogen as long as sulphate is present in the borehole water. Examples from nature and engineered underground structures provide supporting evidence that these assumptions are

  8. Hydrogeologic modelling in support of a proposed deep geologic repository in Canada for low and intermediate level radioactive waste - 16264

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Jonathan F.; Normani, Stefano D.; Yin, Yong; Sykes, Eric A.; Jensen, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    A Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for Low and Intermediate Level radioactive waste has been proposed by Ontario Power Generation for the Bruce Nuclear Power Development site in Ontario, Canada. The DGR is to be constructed at a depth of about 680 m below ground surface within the argillaceous Ordovician limestone of the Cobourg Formation. This paper describes a regional-scale geologic conceptual model for the DGR site and analyzes flow system evolution using the FRAC3DVSOPG flow and transport model. This provides a framework for the assembly and integration of site-specific geo-scientific data that explains and illustrates the factors that influence the predicted long-term performance of the geosphere barrier. In the geologic framework of the Province of Ontario, the Bruce DGR is located at the eastern edge of the Michigan Basin. Borehole logs covering Southern Ontario combined with site specific data have been used to define the structural contours at the regional and site scale of the 31 sedimentary strata that may be present above the Precambrian crystalline basement rock. The regional-scale domain encompasses an 18.500 km 2 region extending from Lake Huron to Georgian Bay. The groundwater zone below the Devonian is characterized by units containing stagnant water having high concentrations of total dissolved solids that can exceed 300 g/l. The computational sequence involves the calculation of steady-state density independent flow that is used as the initial condition for the determination of pseudo-equilibrium for a density dependent flow system that has an initial TDS distribution developed from observed data. Long-term simulations that consider future glaciation scenarios include the impact of ice thickness and permafrost. The selection of the performance measure used to evaluate a groundwater system is important. The traditional metric of average water particle travel time is inappropriate for geologic units such as the Ordovician where solute transport is

  9. The hydrogeologic environment for a proposed deep geologic repository in Canada for low and intermediate level radioactive waste - 59285

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, Jonathan F.; Normani, Stefano D.; Yin, Yong; Jensen, Mark R.

    2012-01-01

    A Deep Geologic Repository (DGR) for low and intermediate level radioactive waste has been proposed by Ontario Power Generation for the Bruce nuclear site in Ontario, Canada. As proposed the DGR would be constructed at a depth of about 680 m below ground surface within the argillaceous Ordovician limestone of the Cobourg Formation. This paper describes the hydrogeology of the DGR site developed through both site characterization studies and regional-scale numerical modelling analysis. The analysis provides a framework for the assembly and integration of the site-specific geo-scientific data and examines the factors that influence the predicted long-term performance of the geosphere barrier. Flow system evolution was accomplished using both the density-dependent FRAC3DVS-OPG flow and transport model and the two-phase gas and water flow computational model TOUGH2-MP. In the geologic framework of the Province of Ontario, the DGR is located on the eastern flank of the Michigan Basin. Borehole logs covering Southern Ontario combined with site-specific data from 6 deep boreholes have been used to define the structural contours and hydrogeologic properties at the regional-scale of the modelled 31 sedimentary strata that may be partially present above the Precambrian crystalline basement rock. The regional-scale domain encompasses an approximately 18500 km 2 region extending from Lake Huron to Georgian Bay. The groundwater zone below the Devonian includes units containing stagnant water having high concentrations of total dissolved solids that can exceed 300 g/L. The Ordovician sediments are significantly under-pressured. The horizontal hydraulic conductivity for the Cobourg limestone is estimated to be 2x10 -14 m/s based on straddle-packer hydraulic tests. The low advective velocities in the Cobourg and other Ordovician units result in solute transport that is diffusion dominant with Peclet numbers less than 0:003 for a characteristic length of unity. Long

  10. An assessment of the possible fate of gas generated in a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leupin, O.X.; Cloet, V.; Marschall, P.; Schwyn, B. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Smith, P. [Safety Assessment Management Ltd, Henley-On-Thames, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Zeyer, J. [Swiss federal institute of technology (ETH), Zürich (Switzerland); Bernier-Latmani, R. [Swiss federal institute of technology (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Papafotiou, A. [Intera Inc., Ennetbaden (Switzerland); Stroes-Gascoyne, S. [University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5C5 (Canada)

    2016-12-15

    The present study provides an assessment of reactions that result in a gas pressure reduction - also called gas sinks - in a generic deep geological repository for low- and intermediate-level waste in Opalinus Clay. Both chemical reactions and microbial activity may contribute to or reduce gas pressure build-up. A complete synopsis is given, comprising the current state of chemical, microbial and geoscientific understanding of gas generation and consumption in a L/ILW repository. The degradation of organic materials (by both microbial and chemical reactions) and the anoxic corrosion of metals will generate various gaseous products such as hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, hydrogen sulphide and ammonia. Some of these gas species are expected to further react with materials present at the point of origin. More particularly, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide are expected to react entirely with e.g. cement, water or iron. Thus, they do not contribute to a gas pressure build-up in the repository. The remaining gas species - mainly hydrogen, methane and small amounts of ammonia - are assumed not to react at the point of origin and can thus contribute to gas pressure build-up. Gas pressure build-up in the L/ILW emplacement caverns will result in gas migrating through the gas permeable seals and through the excavation-damaged zone to reach the operational and construction tunnels where microorganisms may utilise the gas and thus reduce gas pressure build-up. In order to allow bacteria to thrive over longer periods, the backfill material of the operational tunnel needs to have sufficient porosity and a pore water composition for favourable living conditions. Experimental findings at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory show that bacteria found in borehole water are efficient at oxidising hydrogen as long as sulphate is present in the borehole water. Examples from nature and engineered underground structures provide supporting evidence that these assumptions are

  11. Long-term degradation of organic polymers under conditions found in deep repositories for low and intermediate-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warthmann, R.; Mosberger, L.; Baier, U.

    2013-06-01

    On behalf of Nagra, the Environmental Biotechnology Section of the Zürich University of Applied Sciences in Wädenswil investigated the potential for microbiological degradation of organic polymers under the conditions found in a deep geological repository for low- and intermediate-level waste (L/ILW). The existing scientific literature on the topic was analysed, some thermodynamic calculations carried out and input was elicited from internationally recognised experts in the field. The study was restricted to a few substances which, in terms of mass, are most significant in the Swiss L/ILW inventory; these are polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), other plastics and bitumen. There were no clear indications in the literature that the polymer structure of synthetic polymers is biodegraded under anoxic conditions. However, functional groups of ion exchangers and plasticizers in plastics are considered to be readily available and biodegradable. The greatest obstacle to biological degradation of synthetic polymers is depolymerisation to produce labile monomers. As energy is generally required for such breakdown, the chances of this process taking place outside the cells are very low. In so far as they are present, monomers are, in principle, anaerobically biodegradable. Thermodynamic considerations indicate that degradation of synthetic polymers under repository conditions is theoretically possible. However, the degradation of polystyrene is very close to thermodynamic equilibrium and the usable energy for microorganisms would barely be sufficient. Under high H2 partial pressures, it is predicted that there will be a thermodynamic inhibition of anaerobic degradation, as certain interim steps in degradation are endergonic. The starting conditions for microbial growth in a deep repository are unfavourable in terms of availability of water and prevailing pH values. Practically no known microorganisms can tolerate the combination of these conditions; most known

  12. Use of tactual materials on the achievement of content specific vocabulary and terminology acquisition within an intermediate level science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Brian H.

    In this quasi-experimental study, the researcher investigated the effectiveness of three tactual strategies and one non-tactual strategy of content specific vocabulary acquisition. Flash cards, task cards, and learning wheels served as the tactual strategies, and vocabulary review sheets served as a non-tactual strategy. The sample (n=85) consisted of all middle school students in a small high performing middle school located in the northern suburbs of New York City. All of the vocabulary words and terms came from the New York State Intermediate Level Science Core Curriculum. Pre-tests and post-tests were used to collect the data. A repeated measures ANOVA was conducted on the gain scores from each of the treatments. Multiple paired sample t-tests were conducted to analyze the results. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to determine if there was a variance between the academic achievement levels of the students, gender, and grade level for each of the treatments. All of the treatments significantly improved the science achievement of the students, but significance was found between them. Significance was found between the achievement groups with the above average students attaining a higher mean on the pre-test and post-test for each treatment, whereas the below average students had the lowest mean on both assessments. The sixth grade students showed significant improvement over the seventh grade students while using the flash cards (p=.004) and learning wheel (p=.007). During the learning wheel treatment, the males scored significantly better (p=.021) than the females on the pre-test and post-test. During the worksheet treatment, significance (p=.034) was found between gender and achievement group. The below average male students had the greatest gain from the pre-test to the post-test, but the post-test mean was still the lowest of the groups. Limitations, implications for future research and current practice are discussed. Key words are: flash cards, task cards

  13. The partnership experience on the disposal of low- and intermediate-level short-lived waste in Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preter, P. de; Cool, W.; Hooft, E.; Waffelaert, A.; Blommaert, J.; Draulans, J.

    2008-01-01

    With the governmental decision of January 16, 1998, the long-term storage option for the low- and intermediate-level short-lived waste (category A waste) was abandoned and ONDRAF/NIRAS was given the mission to further examine the options of deep and surface disposal, in order to prepare a federal decision on the technical option to be developed. ONDRAF/NIRAS was also asked to develop the methods and structures of interaction with the local stakeholders, and to limit its siting activities to nuclear and candidate municipalities. This brought ONDRAF/NIRAS to the concept of local partnerships with interested municipalities, and during the pre-project phase 1998-2006 partnerships were created with the municipalities of Dessel (STOLA-Dessel, 1999), Mol (MONA, 2000) and Fleurus-Farciennes (PaLoFF, 2003). On 23 June, 2006 the Belgian Government decided that category A waste will be disposed of in a near-surface repository on the territory of the Dessel municipality. This decision implies that ONDRAF/NIRAS, in further interaction with the local stakeholders, can start the preparation of a licence application. This decision was the endpoint of the pre-project phase (1998-2006) and was based on the final reports of the partnerships of Dessel (STOLA-Dessel, now STORA) and Mol (MONA), approved by their municipality councils, and on ONDRAF/NIRAS final report, confirming the feasibility of the proposed disposal systems. As the municipality council of Fleurus did not approve the final report of the partnership PaLoFF, ONDRAF/NIRAS did not submit this report to the responsible minister. The preceding positive local decision in both Dessel (May 2005) and Mol (July 2005), and both on the partnership and municipality council level, to accept, under certain conditions, a disposal facility on their territory was the result of a 6 years long process of discussions within the partnership of all aspects of the disposal system and its integration in the municipality. During these

  14. Concentration Limits in the Cement Based Swiss Repository for Long-lived, Intermediate-level Radioactive Wastes (LMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berner, Urs

    1999-12-01

    The Swiss repository concept for long-lived, intermediate-level radioactive wastes (LMA), in Swiss terminology) foresees cylindrical concrete silos surrounded by a ring of granulated bentonite to deposit the waste. As one of the possible options and similar to the repository for high level wastes, the silos will be located in a deep crystalline host rock. Solidified with concrete in steel drums, the waste is stacked into a silo and the silo is then backfilled with a porous mortar. To characterize the release of radionuclides from the repository, the safety assessment considers first the dissolution into the pore water of the concrete, and then diffusion through the outer bentonite ring into the deep crystalline groundwater. For 19 safety relevant radionuclides (isotopes of U, Th, Pa, Np, Pu, Am, Ni, Zr, Mo, Nb, Se, Sr, Ra, Tc, Sn, I, C, Cs, Cl) the report recommends maximum elemental concentrations to be expected in the cement pore water of the particularly considered repository. These limits will form the parameter base for subsequent release model chains. Concentration limits in a geochemical environment are usually obtained from thermodynamic equilibrium calculations performed with geochemical speciation codes. However, earlier studies revealed that this procedure does not always lead to reliable results. Main reasons for this are the complexity of the systems considered, as well as the lacking completeness of, and the uncertainty associated with the thermodynamic data. To improve the recommended maximum concentrations for a distinct repository design, this work includes additional design- and system-dependent criteria. The following processes, inventories and properties are considered in particular: a) recent experimental investigations, particularly from cement systems, b) thermodynamic model calculations when reliable data are available, c) total inventories of radionuclides, d) sorption- and co-precipitation processes, e) dilution with stable isotopes, f

  15. Chinese L1 children's English L2 verb morphology over time: individual variation in long-term outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Johanne; Tulpar, Yasemin; Arppe, Antti

    2016-05-01

    This study examined accuracy in production and grammaticality judgements of verb morphology by eighteen Chinese-speaking children learning English as a second language (L2) followed longitudinally from four to six years of exposure to English, and who began to learn English at age 4;2. Children's growth in accuracy with verb morphology reached a plateau by six years, where 11/18 children did not display native-speaker levels of accuracy for one or more morphemes. Variation in children's accuracy with verb morphology was predicted by their English vocabulary size and verbal short-term memories primarily, and quality and quantity of English input at home secondarily. This study shows that even very young L2 learners might not all catch up to native speakers in this time frame and that non-age factors play a role in determining individual variation in child L2 learners' long-term outcomes with English morphology.

  16. Development and implementation of a novel assay for L-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (L-2-HGDH) in cell lysates: L-2-HGDH deficiency in 15 patients with L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kranendijk, M; Salomons, G S; Gibson, K M

    2009-01-01

    L-2-hydroxyglutaric aciduria (L-2-HGA) is a rare inherited autosomal recessive neurometabolic disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding L-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase. An assay to evaluate L-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenase (L-2-HGDH) activity in fibroblast, lymphoblast and/or lymphoc...

  17. Effects of Dicto-Comp and Dictation on the Writing Skill of Female Adult Iranian EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adel, Rahil; Hashemian, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    This study was an attempt to clarify and remind L2 learners/teachers of 2 kinds of writing: dicto-comp and dictation. We explored the effect of controlled writing on the accuracy of the writing of adult Iranian EFL learners. Prior to the study, the homogeneity of 30 adult EFL learners was checked through an OPT test. Thirty participants were…

  18. Experimental and modelling investigations of the biogeochemistry of gas production from low and intermediate level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, Joe; Nykyri, Mikko; Helin, Mika; Hovi, Ulla; Sarlin, Tuija; Itaevaara, Merja

    2008-01-01

    The degradation of organic wastes and the corrosion of metallic wastes and steel containers in low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LLW/ILW) repositories are important processes that affect repository geochemistry and the speciation and transport of radionuclides. Gas is generated in association with these degradation processes and this has the potential to overpressure the repository, which can promote transport of groundwater and gas, and consequently radionuclide transport. Microbial activity plays an important role in organic degradation, corrosion and gas generation through the mediation of reduction-oxidation reactions. A large-scale gas generation experiment has been established at the LLW/ILW repository, Olkiluoto, Finland to examine gas generation from LLW in waste drums disposed of in the operational VLJ Repository (VLJ is a Finnish acronym which translates to 'reactor operating waste'). The experiment has monitored, for a period of 9 a, the rate and composition of gas generated, and the aqueous geochemistry and microbe populations present at various locations within the experiment. There is considerable heterogeneity within the experiment, such that pH is observed to vary from pH 5.5 to pH 10 between organic-rich waste and water associated with concrete. The heterogeneity results in competing anaerobic processes occurring together in the experiment but within different niches. Microbial activity initially dominant in organic waste has after 7 a reduced the alkalinity of the concrete influenced regions. The experiment has been modelled using a biogeochemical reaction-transport code (GRM) using a blind testing approach. Using independent data, the model was able to reproduce, within a factor of two, the rate of gas production. In addition, the model represented the main anaerobic microbial processes leading to methanogenesis and the observed spatial and temporal variations in aqueous and gaseous species. In order to model the experiment, its

  19. ASTER L2 Surface Reflectance SWIR and ASTER L2 Surface Reflectance VNIR V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ASTER L2 Surface Reflectance is a multi-file product that contains atmospherically corrected data for both the Visible Near-Infrared (VNIR) and Shortwave...

  20. Immunogenicity of an HPV-16 L2 DNA vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzeroth, Inga I.; Passmore, Jo-Ann S.; Shephard, Enid; Stewart, Debbie; Müller, Martin; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Rybicki, Edward P.; Kast, W. Martin

    2009-01-01

    The ability to elicit cross-neutralizing antibodies makes human papillomavirus (HPV) L2 capsid protein a possible HPV vaccine. We examined and compared the humoral response of mice immunised with a HPV-16 L2 DNA vaccine or with HPV-16 L2 protein. The L2 DNA vaccine elicited a non-neutralising antibody response unlike the L2 protein. L2 DNA vaccination suppressed the growth of L2-expressing C3 tumor cells, which is a T cell mediated effect, demonstrating that the lack of non-neutralizing antibody induction by L2 DNA was not caused by lack of T cell immunogenicity of the construct. PMID:19559114

  1. Corrosion behaviour of steel rebars embedded in a concrete designed for the construction of an intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz F.M.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The National Atomic Energy Commission of the Argentine Republic is developing a nuclear waste disposal management programme that contemplates the design and construction of a facility for the final disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The repository is based on the use of multiple, independent and redundant barriers. The major components are made in reinforced concrete so, the durability of these structures is an important aspect for the facility integrity. This work presents an investigation performed on an instrumented reinforced concrete prototype specifically designed for this purpose, to study the behaviour of an intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility from the rebar corrosion point of view. The information obtained will be used for the final design of the facility in order to guarantee a service life more or equal than the foreseen durability for this type of facilities.

  2. Project study for the final disposal of intermediate toxicity radioactive wastes (low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes) in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    The present report aimed to show variations in the construction- and operation-technical feasibility of a final repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes. This report represents the summary of a project study given under contract by Nagra with a view to informing a broader public of the technical conception of a final repository. Particular stress was laid on the treatment of the individual system elements of a repository concept during the construction, operation and sealing phases. The essential basis for the project study is the origin, composition and quantity of the wastes to be disposed. The final repository described in this report is foreseen for the reception of the following low- and intermediate-level solid radioactive wastes: wastes from the nuclear power plant operation; secondary wastes from the reprocessing of nuclear fuels; wastes from the decommissioning of nuclear power plants; wastes from research, medicine and industry

  3. An Investigation of the Differential Effects of Visual Input Enhancement on the Vocabulary Learning of Iranian EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhila Mohammadnia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of visual input enhancement on the vocabulary learning of Iranian EFL learners. One hundred and thirty-two EFL learners from elementary, intermediate and advanced proficiency levels were assigned to six groups, two groups at each proficiency level with one being an experimental and the other a control group. The study employed pretests, treatment reading texts, and posttests. T-test was used for the analysis of the data. The results revealed positive effects for visual input enhancement in the advanced level based on within group and between groups’ comparisons. However this positive effect was not found for the elementary and intermediate levels based on between groups’ comparisons. It was concluded that although visual input enhancement may have beneficial effects for elementary and intermediate levels, it is much more effective for the advanced EFL learners. This study may provide useful guiding principles for EFL teachers and syllabus designers.

  4. Orthogonal Multiwavelet Frames in L2Rd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhanwei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterize the orthogonal frames and orthogonal multiwavelet frames in L2Rd with matrix dilations of the form (Df(x=detAf(Ax, where A is an arbitrary expanding d×d matrix with integer coefficients. Firstly, through two arbitrarily multiwavelet frames, we give a simple construction of a pair of orthogonal multiwavelet frames. Then, by using the unitary extension principle, we present an algorithm for the construction of arbitrarily many orthogonal multiwavelet tight frames. Finally, we give a general construction algorithm for orthogonal multiwavelet tight frames from a scaling function.

  5. ECR heating in L-2M stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grebenshchikov, S.E.; Batanov, G.M.; Fedyanin, O.I.

    1995-01-01

    The first results of ECH experiments in the L-2M stellarator are presented. The main goal of the experiments is to investigate the physics of ECH and plasma confinement at very high values of the volume heating power density. A current free plasma is produced and heated by extraordinary waves at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency. The experimental results are compared with the numerical simulations of plasma confinement and heating processes based on neoclassical theory using the full matrix of transport coefficients and with LHD-scaling. 4 refs., 2 figs

  6. Learner Personas in CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heift, Trude

    2007-01-01

    In examining the titles of this year's conference presentations, the author noticed quite a few papers that focus on learner-specific issues, for instance, papers that address learning styles, learner needs, personality and learning, learner modeling and, more generally, pedagogical issues that deal with individual learner differences in…

  7. Seeing is Believing: Simulating Resource-Extraction Problems With Gams Ide and Microsoft Excel in an Intermediate-Level Natural-Resource Economics Course

    OpenAIRE

    Caplan, Arthur J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we provide several GAMS- and Excel-based resource-extraction models that can be used in an intermediate-level natural-resource economics course to numerically solve a host of exhaustible- and replenishable-resource problems, and thereby help verify the intuition and symbolic solutions provided in the textbook. The specific textbook from which the examples are drawn is Tietenberg (2003).

  8. Review of the microbiological, chemical and radiolytic degradation of organic material likely to be present in intermediate level and low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, B.F.; Rosevear, A.; Williams, S.J.

    1990-11-01

    A review has been made of the microbiological, chemical and radiolytic degradation of the solid organic materials likely to be present in intermediate-level and low-level radioactive wastes. Possible interactions between the three routes for degradation are also discussed. Attention is focussed on the generation of water-soluble degradation products which may form complexes with radioelements. The effects of complexation on radioelement solubility and sorption are considered. Recommendations are made for areas of further research. (author)

  9. L2 Word Recognition: Influence of L1 Orthography on Multi-syllabic Word Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Megumi

    2017-10-01

    L2 reading research suggests that L1 orthographic experience influences L2 word recognition. Nevertheless, the findings on multi-syllabic words in English are still limited despite the fact that a vast majority of words are multi-syllabic. The study investigated whether L1 orthography influences the recognition of multi-syllabic words, focusing on the position of an embedded word. The participants were Arabic ESL learners, Chinese ESL learners, and native speakers of English. The task was a word search task, in which the participants identified a target word embedded in a pseudoword at the initial, middle, or final position. The search accuracy and speed indicated that all groups showed a strong preference for the initial position. The accuracy data further indicated group differences. The Arabic group showed higher accuracy in the final than middle, while the Chinese group showed the opposite and the native speakers showed no difference between the two positions. The findings suggest that L2 multi-syllabic word recognition involves unique processes.

  10. Conditions for the test emplacement of intermediate-level radioactive wastes in chamber 8a of the 511 m level of the Asse Salt Mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The Gesellschaft fuer Strahlen- und Umweltforschung mbH (GSF) emplaces intermediate-level radioactive wastes which accumulate in an activity involving the use of radioactive materials that is licensed or reported in the Federal Republic of Germany or which are stored on an interim basis by the appropriate licensing or inspection agencies in chamber 8a of the 511 m level of the Asse Salt Mine in Remlingen near Wolfenbuettel in conjunction with an engineering test program. The type and form of the intermediate-level wastes must conform to certain conditions so that there are no hazards to personnel and the repository during transfer and subsequent storage. It is therefore necessary for the radioactive wastes to be treated and packaged before delivery in such a way that they satisfy the conditions presented in this document. The GSF shall inform the companies and organizations delivering wastes about its experiences with emplacement operations. The Conditions for the Test Emplacement of Intermediate-Level Radioactive Wastes in Chamber 8a of the 511 m Level of the Asse Salt Mine must be adapted to conform to the latest state of science and the art. The GSF must therefore reserve the right to modify the conditions, allowing for an appropriate transition period

  11. Assessment of site conditions for disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes: a case study in southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Shuping; Ma, Haiyi; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zhu, Xiaobin; Wang, Hua'an; Li, Xueshan; Hu, Xueling; Qin, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    Near surface disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes (LILW) requires evaluating the field conditions of the candidate site. However, assessment of the site conditions may be challenging due to the limited prior knowledge of some remote sites, and various multi-disciplinary data requirements at any given site. These situations arise in China as in the rest of the industrialized world, particularly since a regional strategy for LILW disposal has been implemented to protect humans and the environment. This paper presents a demonstration of the site assessment process through a case study focusing mainly on the geologic, hydrogeologic and geochemical characteristics of the candidate site. A joint on-site and laboratory investigation, supplemented by numerical modeling, was implemented in this assessment. Results indicate that no fault is present in the site area, although there are some minor joints and fractures, primarily showing a north-south trend. Most of the joints are filled with quartz deposits and would thus function hydraulically as impervious barriers. Investigation of local hydrologic boundaries has shown that the candidate site represents an essentially isolated hydrogeologic unit, and that little or no groundwater flow occurs across its boundaries on the north or east, or across the hilly areas to the south. Groundwater in the site area is recharged by precipitation and discharges primarily by evapo-transpiration and surface flow through a narrow outlet to the west. Groundwater flows slowly from the hilly area to the foot of the hills and discharges mainly into the inner brooks and marshes. Some groundwater circulates in deeper granite in a slower manner. The vadose zone in the site was investigated specially for their significant capability for restraining the transport of radionuclides. Results indicate that the vadose zone is up to 38m in thickness and is made up of alluvial clay soils and very highly weathered granite. The vadose

  12. Assessment of site conditions for disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes: A case study in southern China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Shuping; Ma, Haiyi; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zhu, Xiaobin; Wang, Hua'an; Li, Xueshan; Hu, Xueling; Qin, Jianbo

    2012-01-01

    Near surface disposal of low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes (LILW) requires evaluating the field conditions of the candidate site. However, assessment of the site conditions may be challenging due to the limited prior knowledge of some remote sites, and various multi-disciplinary data requirements at any given site. These situations arise in China as in the rest of the industrialized world, particularly since a regional strategy for LILW disposal has been implemented to protect humans and the environment. This paper presents a demonstration of the site assessment process through a case study focusing mainly on the geologic, hydrogeologic and geochemical characteristics of the candidate site. A joint on-site and laboratory investigation, supplemented by numerical modeling, was implemented in this assessment. Results indicate that no fault is present in the site area, although there are some minor joints and fractures, primarily showing a north–south trend. Most of the joints are filled with quartz deposits and would thus function hydraulically as impervious barriers. Investigation of local hydrologic boundaries has shown that the candidate site represents an essentially isolated hydrogeologic unit, and that little or no groundwater flow occurs across its boundaries on the north or east, or across the hilly areas to the south. Groundwater in the site area is recharged by precipitation and discharges primarily by evapo-transpiration and surface flow through a narrow outlet to the west. Groundwater flows slowly from the hilly area to the foot of the hills and discharges mainly into the inner brooks and marshes. Some groundwater circulates in deeper granite in a slower manner. The vadose zone in the site was investigated specially for their significant capability for restraining the transport of radionuclides. Results indicate that the vadose zone is up to 38 m in thickness and is made up of alluvial clay soils and very highly weathered granite. The vadose

  13. Working with language learner histories from three perspectives: Teachers, learners and researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mercer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in SLA, such as learner-centredness, social constructivism, the postmethod era, and complexity perspectives, have highlighted the need for more localized, situated understandings of teaching and learning and greater recognition of learner individuality and diversity. In this article, I suggest an effective way of meeting these needs is to employ learner histories. This powerful form of writing allows learners to use their L2 to engage in authentic, personally meaningful communication with others about their identities, experiences, perceptions and emotions related to their language learning histories. As a text type, they are able to facilitate a more holistic perspective of the learner’s life and reveal the unique interconnections that an individual makes across various domains. They also enable the situated, contextualised and dynamic nature of their learning experiences to become apparent and provide learners with a genuine, motivating purpose for writing. Exploring data generated in Austria with tertiary-level EFL learners, I seek to illustrate some of the rich potential of these text types from three perspectives, namely, those of the teacher, learner and researcher.

  14. Hacia un modelo de diccionario en línea para aprendices de español como LE/L2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp, Sven; Nomdedeu Rull, Antoni

    2018-01-01

    The existing learners’ dictionaries for L2 learners of Spanish suffer from various shortcomings. They do not take full advantage of the new technologies, lack lexicographical data adapted specifically to the target users’ mother tongue and native culture, provide only partial assistance to text...... reception and offer unsatisfactory solutions to text production. Based on the lexicographical function theory, this paper will outline a model of an online dictionary for adult L2 learners of Spanish. To that end, we will present a concept that includes the most important functions and the main content...

  15. Specific language impairment in a bilingual context : the acquisition of Dutch inflection by Turkish-Dutch learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orgassa, A.

    2009-01-01

    With the aim of specifying the relationship between SLI and L2 acquisition, production data of various groups of L1 and L2 learners with and without SLI were compared. The experiments centered on the application of morphosyntactic rules in Dutch that were considered vulnerable in SLI and L2

  16. Negative evidence in L2 acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Dahl

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the L2 acquisition of differences between Norwegian and English passives, and presents data to show that the acquisition of these differences by Norwegian L2 acquirers of English cannot be fully explained by positive evidence, cues, conservativism or economy. Rather, it is argued, it is natural to consider whether indirect negative evidence may facilitate acquisition by inferencing. The structures in focus are impersonal passive constructions with postverbal NPs and passive constructions with intransitive verbs. These sentences are ungrammatical in English. Chomsky (1981 proposes that this is a result of passive morphology absorbing objective case in English. There is no such case to be assigned to the postverbal NP in impersonal passives. In passive constructions with intransitive verbs, the verb does not assign objective case, so that there is no case for the passive morphology to absorb. Thus, impersonal passives have to be changed into personal passives, where the NP receives nominative case, and the objective case is free to go to the passive morphology. Intransitive verbs, however, cannot be used in the passive voice at all. Both the structures discussed in this article, i.e. are grammatical in Norwegian. However, the options available in English, viz. personal passives and active sentences, are equally possible. Åfarli (1992 therefore proposes that Norwegian has optional case absorption (passive morphology optionally absorbs case. On the basis on such observations, we may propose a parameter with the settings [+case absorption] for English, and [-case absorption], signifying optional case absorption, for Norwegian. This means that none of the structures that are grammatical in English can function as positive evidence for the [+case absorption] setting, since they are also grammatical in optional case absorption languages. The question is how this parameter is set.

  17. Further ahead a communication skills course for business English : learner's book

    CERN Document Server

    Jones-Macziola, Sarah

    1998-01-01

    Further Ahead is a Business English course at lower-intermediate level. To meet the demand for BEC Preliminary Exam we have added a CD-ROM to the Learner's Book that provides a walk and talk through the exam and practice material. Further Ahead Learner's Book is at the right language level for students who are preparing for BEC Preliminary. The Practice Test with answer key and audio has been specially written for this book by Tricia Aspinall and Jake Allsop, two very experienced test writers.

  18. Active Learning through Materials Development: A Project for the Advanced L2 Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Daly Thompson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Building on the notion of active learning, the assumption that students learn more when given opportunities to practice using their skills and to receive feedback on their performance, this article de-scribes a project undertaken in an Advanced (third-year Swahili course in which students were given the opportunity to develop L2 materials for computer-mediated peer instruction. The article exam-ines the goals, design and results of the project in light of the litera-ture on active learning and learner autonomy, and suggests how the project might be improved in order to serve as a model for other Ad-vanced L2 courses.

  19. Explicit Grammar Instruction in L2 Learners’Writing Development:Effective or Ineffective?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田秀峰

    2012-01-01

      It has long been in dispute about whether explicit grammar teaching is more effective in second language learning or implicit grammar teaching is. However, there are more than one factor to take into consideration while discussing which way is better for L2 learners. This short essay aims at depicting three respects concerning grammar teaching, namely learning context, language learners’beliefs and needs, and grammar instruction. When educators and practitioners try to adopt grammar instruction either implicitly or explicitly in L2 learners’writing development, they probably need to consider the above three factors and to find out the best way to produce more effective teaching results among their students

  20. The Comparative Effects of Comprehensible Input, Output and Corrective Feedback on the Receptive Acquisition of L2 Vocabulary Items

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nowbakht

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the comparative effects of comprehensible input, output and corrective feedback on the receptive acquisition of L2 vocabulary items were investigated. Two groups of beginning EFL learners participated in the study. The control group received comprehensible input only, while the experimental group received input and was required to produce written output. They also received corrective feedback on their lexical errors if any. This could result in the production of modified output. The results of the study indicated that (a the group which produced output and received feedback (if necessary outperformed the group which only received input in the post-test, (b within the experimental group, feedback played a greater role in learners’ better performance than output, (c also a positive correlation between the amount of feedback an individual learner received, and his overall performance in the post-test; and also between the amount of feedback given for a specific word and the correct responses given to its related item in the post-test was found.  The findings of this study provide evidence for the role of output production along with receiving corrective feedback in enhancing L2 processing by drawing further L2 learners’ attention to their output which in turn may result in improving their receptive acquisition of L2 words. Furthermore, as the results suggested, feedback made a more contribution to L2 development than output. Keywords: comprehensible input, output, interaction, corrective feedback, modified output, receptive vocabulary acquisition