WorldWideScience

Sample records for intermediate state theory

  1. ΔΔ intermediate state in 1S0NN scattering from effective field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    We examine the role of the ΔΔ intermediate state in NN scattering in the 1 S 0 channel. The computation is performed at lowest order in an effective-field theory involving local four-fermion operators and one-pion exchange using dimensional regularization with minimal subtraction (MS). As first discussed by Weinberg, in the theory with only nucleons, the large-scattering length in this channel requires a small scale for the local N 4 operators. When Δ close-quote s are included (but without pions) a large-scattering length can be obtained from operators with a scale √(2M N (M Δ -M N )), but fine-tuning is required. The coefficients of the contact terms involving the Δ fields are not uniquely determined but for reasonable values one finds that, in general, NN scattering computed in the theory with Δ close-quote s looks like that computed in the theory without Δ close-quote s. The leading effect of the Δ close-quote s is to change the coefficients of the four-nucleon contact terms between the theories with and without Δ close-quote s. Further, the decoupling of the Δ close-quote s in the limit of large mass and strong coupling is clearly demonstrated. When pions are included, the typical scale for the contact terms is ∼100MeV, both with and without Δ close-quote s and is not set by √(2M N (M Δ -M N )). For reasonable values of contact terms that reproduce the scattering length and effective range (at lowest order) the phase shift is not well reproduced over a larger momentum range as is found in the theory without Δ close-quote s at lowest order. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. Antibonding intermediate state in the theory of vibrational excitation of diatomic molecules by slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskii, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    An exactly solvable model is constructed for the description of the processes that take place when a slow electron collides with a diatomic molecule (vibrational excitation, associative detachment, and dissociative attachment). As a particular model of the variant, the case of an antibonding (virtual) state of an intermediate state is considered, and a term of this state is parametrized in a very simple manner. The vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment are calculated for a system corresponding to the HCl molecule. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experiment

  3. Assigning values to intermediate health states for cost-utility analysis: theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B J

    1996-01-01

    Cost-utility analysis (CUA) was developed to guide the allocation of health care resources under a budget constraint. As the generally stated goal of CUA is to maximize aggregate health benefits, the philosophical underpinning of this method is classic utilitarianism. Utilitarianism has been criticized as a basis for social choice because of its emphasis on the net sum of benefits without regard to the distribution of benefits. For example, it has been argued that absolute priority should be given to the worst off when making social choices affecting basic needs. Application of classic utilitarianism requires use of strength-of-preference utilities, assessed under conditions of certainty, to assign quality-adjustment factors to intermediate health states. The two methods commonly used to measure strength-of-preference utility, categorical scaling and time tradeoff, produce rankings that systematically give priority to those who are better off. Alternatively, von Neumann-Morgenstern utilities, assessed under conditions of uncertainty, could be used to assign values to intermediate health states. The theoretical basis for this would be Harsanyi's proposal that social choice be made under the hypothetical assumption that one had an equal chance of being anyone in society. If this proposal is accepted, as well as the expected-utility axioms applied to both individual choice and social choice, the preferred societal arrangement is that with the highest expected von Neumann-Morgenstern utility. In the presence of risk aversion, this will give some priority to the worst-off relative to classic utilitarianism. Another approach is to raise the values obtained by time-tradeoff assessments to a power a between 0 and 1. This would explicitly give priority to the worst off, with the degree of priority increasing as a decreases. Results could be presented over a range of a. The results of CUA would then provide useful information to those holding a range of philosophical points

  4. The intermediate state in Patd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) Jesus had assumed. (concerning the 'intermediate state') as existing, anything which does not exist. Three basic things about the intermediate state emerge from the parable: (a) Jesus recognizes that at the moment of death, in ipso articulo.

  5. Higher order antibunching in intermediate states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Amit; Sharma, Navneet K.; Pathak, Anirban

    2008-01-01

    Since the introduction of binomial state as an intermediate state, different intermediate states have been proposed. Different nonclassical effects have also been reported in these intermediate states. But till now higher order antibunching is predicted in only one type of intermediate state, which is known as shadowed negative binomial state. Recently we have shown that the higher order antibunching is not a rare phenomenon [P. Gupta, P. Pandey, A. Pathak, J. Phys. B 39 (2006) 1137]. To establish our earlier claim further, here we have shown that the higher order antibunching can be seen in different intermediate states, such as binomial state, reciprocal binomial state, hypergeometric state, generalized binomial state, negative binomial state and photon added coherent state. We have studied the possibility of observing the higher order subpoissonian photon statistics in different limits of intermediate states. The effects of different control parameters on the depth of non classicality have also been studied in this connection and it has been shown that the depth of nonclassicality can be tuned by controlling various physical parameters

  6. About the investigation of the ultrasonic absorption in intermediate states of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepelev, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    Investigation of intermediate state in the bulk of superconductors are surveyed. Consideration is given to a previous attempt of eliminating edge effects in the ultrasonic investigation of intermediate states of pure gallium and molybdenum;it is demonstrated that those results are in strong contradiction with Landau's intermediate-state theory

  7. The intermediate state in Paul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. L. Fryer

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available The point of view taken in this paper is that the apostle Paul envisions, between death and the resurrection of the body at the Parousia, an interim period during which the disembodied soul is in the immediate presence of Christ, though in a state of 'nakedness'. The background of Paul's view lies neither in contemporary Hellenistic religious-philosophical speculations nor in 'late-Judaism'. Two crucial 'forces' in particular moulded his perspective, viz the teachings of Jesus and His own rapture to 'Paradise'.

  8. Intermediate spectral theory and quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Cesar R

    2008-01-01

    The spectral theory of linear operators plays a key role in the mathematical formulation of quantum theory. Furthermore, such a rigorous mathematical foundation leads to a more profound insight into the nature of quantum mechanics. This textbook provides a concise and comprehensible introduction to the spectral theory of (unbounded) self-adjoint operators and its application in quantum dynamics. The book places emphasis on the symbiotic relationship of these two domains by (1) presenting the basic mathematics of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics of one particle, i.e., developing the spectral theory of self-adjoint operators in infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces from the beginning, and (2) giving an overview of many of the basic functional aspects of quantum theory, from its physical principles to the mathematical models. The book is intended for graduate (or advanced undergraduate) students and researchers interested in mathematical physics. It starts with linear operator theory, spectral questions and self-...

  9. Magnetic excitations in intermediate valence semiconductors with singlet ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikoin, K.A.; Mishchenko, A.S.

    1994-01-01

    The explanation of the origin inelastic peaks in magnetic neutron scattering spectra of the mixed-valent semiconductor SmB 6 is proposed. It is shown that the excitonic theory of intermediate valence state not only gives the value of the peak frequency but also explains the unusual angular dependence of intensity of inelastic magnetic scattering and describes the dispersion of magnetic excitations in good agreement with experiment

  10. q-Gamow states for intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plastino, A. [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Rocca, M.C., E-mail: mariocarlosrocca@gmail.com [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ferri, G.L. [Fac. de C. Exactas, National University La Pampa, Peru y Uruguay, Santa Rosa, La Pampa (Argentina); Zamora, D.J. [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    In a recent paper Plastino and Rocca (2016) [18] we have demonstrated the possible existence of Tsallis' q-Gamow states. Now, accelerators' experimental evidence for Tsallis' distributions has been ascertained only at very high energies. Here, instead, we develop a different set of q-Gamow states for which the associated q-Breit–Wigner distribution could easily be found at intermediate energies, for which accelerators are available at many locations. In this context, it should be strongly emphasized Vignat and Plastino (2009) [2] that, empirically, one never exactly and unambiguously “detects” pure Gaussians, but rather q-Gaussians. A prediction is made via Eq. (3.4).

  11. Intermediate state trapping of a voltage sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacroix, Jérôme J; Pless, Stephan Alexander; Maragliano, Luca

    2012-01-01

    Voltage sensor domains (VSDs) regulate ion channels and enzymes by undergoing conformational changes depending on membrane electrical signals. The molecular mechanisms underlying the VSD transitions are not fully understood. Here, we show that some mutations of I241 in the S1 segment of the Shaker...... Kv channel positively shift the voltage dependence of the VSD movement and alter the functional coupling between VSD and pore domains. Among the I241 mutants, I241W immobilized the VSD movement during activation and deactivation, approximately halfway between the resting and active states......, and drastically shifted the voltage activation of the ionic conductance. This phenotype, which is consistent with a stabilization of an intermediate VSD conformation by the I241W mutation, was diminished by the charge-conserving R2K mutation but not by the charge-neutralizing R2Q mutation. Interestingly, most...

  12. Variational Transition State Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truhlar, Donald G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-09-29

    This is the final report on a project involving the development and applications of variational transition state theory. This project involved the development of variational transition state theory for gas-phase reactions, including optimized multidimensional tunneling contributions and the application of this theory to gas-phase reactions with a special emphasis on developing reaction rate theory in directions that are important for applications to combustion. The development of variational transition state theory with optimized multidimensional tunneling as a useful computational tool for combustion kinetics involved eight objectives.

  13. On the Use of Writing Assignments in Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patrick B.

    2009-01-01

    A typical writing assignment in upper level required courses is a term paper. However many economics majors, particularly those in business schools, need to develop skill at writing shorter pieces. In this paper I describe numerous examples of shorter writing assignments that I have incorporated into an Intermediate Microeconomic Theory course.…

  14. A critique on the theory of financial intermediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wensveen, D.M.N.; Scholtens, Bert

    This comment discusses the review by Franklin Alien and Anthony Santomero of the theory of financial intermediation in the 20th anniversary special issue of the Journal of Banking and Finance. We do not fully agree with their view that risk management is only of recent importance to the financial

  15. On the oscillation of ultrasound absorption in the intermediate-state superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepelev, A.G.; Filimonov, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    The correlation between theory and experiment for the phenomenon of oscillations of ultrasound absorption in the pure superconductor intermediate state is analyzed. High-frequency sound (lambdasub(s) [ru

  16. Learning to Argue with Intermediate Macro Theory: A Semester-Long Team Writing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Georg; Wolfe, Marketa Halova

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe their experience with integrating a semester-long economic analysis project into an intermediate macroeconomic theory course. Students work in teams of "economic advisors" to write a series of nested reports that analyze the current state of the economy, and propose and evaluate policies for a decision-maker. The…

  17. Intermediates, Catalysts, Persistence, and Boundary Steady States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcondes de Freitas, Michael; Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    networks without breaking known necessary or sufficient conditions for persistence, by iteratively removing socalled intermediates and catalysts from the network. The procedures are easy to apply and, in many cases, lead to highly simplified network structures, such as monomolecular networks. For specific...

  18. Needs for experiment and theory in intermediate energy reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blann, M.

    1991-01-01

    We summarize several reasons intermediate energy data are needed in both basic and applied science. The status of the data base at energies up to 2 GeV is cursorily reviewed. Experimental excitation functions, single and double differential cross sections are compared with predictions of the nuclear model code ALICE. The strengths and weaknesses of the code to reproduce data are summarized. Opinions are given as to areas where data are too few or totally lacking, yet are needed for the verification of models and theories. (author). 25 refs, 22 figs

  19. Solid state theory

    CERN Document Server

    Harrison, Walter A

    2011-01-01

    ""A well-written text . . . should find a wide readership, especially among graduate students."" - Dr. J. I. Pankove, RCA.The field of solid state theory, including crystallography, semi-conductor physics, and various applications in chemistry and electrical engineering, is highly relevant to many areas of modern science and industry. Professor Harrison's well-known text offers an excellent one-year graduate course in this active and important area of research. While presenting a broad overview of the fundamental concepts and methods of solid state physics, including the basic quantum theory o

  20. Variational transition state theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    This project is concerned with the development and applications of generalized transition state theory and multidimensional tunneling approximations to chemical reaction rates. They have developed and implemented several practical versions of variational transition state theory (VTST), namely canonical variational theory (CVT), improved canonical variational theory (ICVT), and microcanonical variational theory (μVT). They have also developed and implemented several accurate multidimensional semiclassical tunneling approximations, the most accurate of which are the small-curvature semiclassical adiabatic (SCSA), large-curvature version-3 (LC3), and least-action (LA) approximations. They have applied the methods to thermal rate constants, using transmission coefficients based on ground-state tunneling, and they have also presented and applied adiabatic and diabatic extensions to calculated rate constants for vibrationally excited reactants. Their general goal is to develop accurate methods for calculating chemical reaction rate constants that remain practical even for reasonably complicated molecules. The approximations mentioned above yield rate constants for systems whose potential energy surface is known or assumed. Thus a second, equally important aspect of their work is the determination or modeling, semi-empirically and/or from electronic structure calculations, of potential energy surfaces

  1. Boomerang RG flows in M-theory with intermediate scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.; Rosen, Christopher; Sosa-Rodriguez, Omar

    2017-07-01

    We construct novel RG flows of D=11 supergravity that asymptotically approach AdS 4 × S 7 in the UV with deformations that break spatial translations in the dual field theory. In the IR the solutions return to exactly the same AdS 4 × S 7 vacuum, with a renormalisation of relative length scales, and hence we refer to the flows as `boomerang RG flows'. For sufficiently large deformations, on the way to the IR the solutions also approach two distinct intermediate scaling regimes, each with hyperscaling violation. The first regime is Lorentz invariant with dynamical exponent z = 1 while the second has z = 5/2. Neither ofthe two intermediatescaling regimesare associatedwith exact hyperscaling violation solutions of D = 11 supergravity. The RG flow solutions are constructed using the four dimensional N = 2 STU gauged supergravity theory with vanishing gauge fields, but non-vanishing scalar and pseudoscalar fields. In the ABJM dual field theory the flows are driven by spatially modulated deformation parameters for scalar and fermion bilinear operators.

  2. About the structure of quantum intermediate state of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledenev, O.P.

    2008-01-01

    The calculation of spatial structure of a quantum intermediate state in Type I superconductors is completed. Theoretical model of thermodynamics of considered state was proposed by Andreev. It is shown, that in a quantum case, the period of structure appears significantly smaller and has different dependence on both the magnetic field and temperature than in the classical intermediate Landau state. The decrease of thickness of normal layers results in increase of characteristic distance between the quantum Andreev levels of electronic excitations, and the transition to the quantum intermediate from classical state is realized at higher temperatures ∼1 K, than it was supposed in previous works. The comparison of calculation data with experimental results, for example using the sample of mono-crystal gallium, is conducted

  3. Intermediate states in quantum cryptography and Bell inequalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechmann-Pasquinucci, H.; Gisin, N.

    2003-01-01

    Intermediate states are known from intercept/resend eavesdropping in the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) quantum cryptographic protocol. But they also play fundamental roles in the optimal eavesdropping strategy on the BB84 protocol and in the CHSH (Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt) inequality. We generalize the intermediate states to an arbitrary dimension and consider intercept/resend eavesdropping, optimal eavesdropping on the generalized BB84 protocol and present a generalized Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality for two entangled qudits based on these states

  4. ''Super-radiant'' states in intermediate energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, N.

    1994-01-01

    A ''super-radiant'' state emerges when, under certain conditions, one or a few ''internal'' states acquire a large collective decay width due to the coupling to one or a few ''external'' decay channels. The rest of the internal states are ''stripped'' of their decay width and become long lived quasistationary states. The essentials of such mechanism and its possible role in intermediate energy nuclear physics are discussed in this work

  5. Correction: MAXI J1543-564 in hard intermediate state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennea, J. A.; Motta, S.; Curran, P.; Krimm, P. A. Evans. H. A.; Romano, P.; Mangano, V.; Yamaoka, K.; Negoro, H.

    2011-09-01

    A correction to Kennea et al. (ATEL #3662): With a measured photon index of ~2.7, the Swift/XRT spectrum of MAXI J1543-564 is currently consistent with the source being in the hard intermediate state, or under the Remillard and McClintock (2006) definition, the steep power-law state. We apologize for this error, and thank Tomaso Belloni for bringing it to our attention.

  6. Deep Learning in Intermediate Microeconomics: Using Scaffolding Assignments to Teach Theory and Promote Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gareth P.; Bean, John C.; Peterson, Dean J.

    2013-01-01

    Intermediate microeconomics is typically viewed as a theory and tools course that relies on algorithmic problems to help students learn and apply economic theory. However, the authors' assessment research suggests that algorithmic problems by themselves do not encourage students to think about where the theory comes from, why the theory is…

  7. Variational transition-state theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhlar, D.G.; Garrett, B.C.

    1980-01-01

    A general introduction to and some results from studies of a procedure called variational transition-state theory are presented. A fundamental assumption of this theory is that the net rate of forward reaction at equilibrium equals the equilibrium flux in the product direction through the transition state where the transition state is a surface in phase space dividing reactants from products. Classical generalized-transition-state-theory calculations for nine collinear systems are compared to classical trajectory calculations. This new technique should provide useful insight into the successes and failures of the conventional theory and useful quantitative estimates of possible errors on the predictions of conventional transition-state theory. This should also contribute to a more accurate theory now available for the practical calculations of chemical reaction rates and thermochemical and structural interpretations of rate processes

  8. Direct, coherent and incoherent intermediate state tunneling and scanning tunnel microscopy (STM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbritter, J.

    1997-01-01

    Theory and experiment in tunneling are still qualitative in nature, which hold true also for the latest developments in direct-, resonant-, coherent- and incoherent-tunneling. Those tunnel processes have recently branched out of the field of ''solid state tunnel junctions'' into the fields of scanning tunnel microscopy (STM), single electron tunneling (SET) and semiconducting resonant tunnel structures (RTS). All these fields have promoted the understanding of tunneling in different ways reaching from the effect of coherence, of incoherence and of charging in tunneling, to spin flip or inelastic effects. STM allows not only the accurate measurements of the tunnel current and its voltage dependence but, more importantly, the easy quantification via the (quantum) tunnel channel conductance and the distance dependence. This new degree of freedom entering exponentially the tunnel current allows an unique identification of individual tunnel channels and their quantification. In STM measurements large tunnel currents are observed for large distances d > 1 nm explainable by intermediate state tunneling. Direct tunneling with its reduced tunnel time and reduced off-site Coulomb charging bridges distances below 1 nm, only. The effective charge transfer process with its larger off-site and on-site charging at intermediate states dominates tunnel transfer in STM, biology and chemistry over distances in the nm-range. Intermediates state tunneling becomes variable range hopping conduction for distances larger than d > 2 nm, for larger densities of intermediate states n 1 (ε) and for larger temperatures T or voltages U, still allowing high resolution imaging

  9. Polarization control of intermediate state absorption in resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Shuwu; Yao, Yunhua; Jia, Tianqing; Ding, Jingxin; Zhang, Shian; Sun, Zhenrong; Huang, Yunxia

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the control of the intermediate state absorption in an (n + m) resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process by the polarization-modulated femtosecond laser pulse. An analytical solution of the intermediate state absorption in a resonance-mediated multi-photon absorption process is obtained based on the time-dependent perturbation theory. Our theoretical results show that the control efficiency of the intermediate state absorption by the polarization modulation is independent of the laser intensity when the transition from the intermediate state to the final state is coupled by the single-photon absorption, but will be affected by the laser intensity when this transition is coupled by the non-resonant multi-photon absorption. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed via a two-photon fluorescence control in (2 + 1) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of Coumarin 480 dye and a single-photon fluorescence control in (1 + 2) resonance-mediated three-photon absorption of IR 125 dye. (paper)

  10. A Theory of Liquidity and Regulation of Financial Intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuel Farhi; Mikhail Golosov; Aleh Tsyvinski

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies a mechanism design model of financial intermediation. There are two informational frictions: agents receive unobservable shocks and can participate in markets by engaging in trades unobservable to intermediaries. Without regulations, intermediaries provide no risk sharing because of an externality arising from arbitrage opportunities. We identify a simple regulation -- a liquidity requirement -- that corrects such an externality by affecting the interest rate on the markets...

  11. Isobaric intermediate states in proton-nucleus elastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, J.P.; Lazard, C.; Lombard, R.J.

    1981-05-01

    The effects of the propagation of isobaric nucleon states in the intermediate steps of the multiple scattering have been studied with application on the proton- 4 He elastic scattering at 1 GeV. The calculations are performed in the Glauber model and results are given for the differential cross section, the polarization and the spin rotation parameter. In our conclusions we stress the large cancellations observed between terms of various orders and the great sensitivity of the effects to the nucleon-nucleon amplitudes

  12. Steady states in conformal theories

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    A novel conjecture regarding the steady state behavior of conformal field theories placed between two heat baths will be presented. Some verification of the conjecture will be provided in the context of fluid dynamics and holography.

  13. Necessity of intermediate mass scales in grand unified theories with spontaneously broken CP invariance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senjanovic, G.

    1982-07-01

    It is demonstrated that the spontaneous breakdown of CP invariance in grand unified theories requires the presence of intermediate mass scales. The simplest realization is provided by weakly broken left-right symmetry in the context of SU(2)sub(L) x SU(2)sub(R) x U(1)sub(B-L) model embedded in grand unified theories. (author)

  14. Intermediate Nucleation State of GaN Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, L. X.; Xie, M. H.; Tong, S. Y.

    2001-03-01

    Homoexpitaxial nucleation of GaN during molecular-beam epitaxy is followed by scanning tunneling microcopy (STM). We observe a metastable nucleation state, which manifests as “ghost” islands in STM images. These “ghost” islands can be irreversibly driven into normal islands by continuous STM imaging. It is further established that the “ghost” island formation is related to the presence of excess Ga atoms on the surface: Normal islands are only seen under the N-rich or stoichiometric flux condition, whereas “ghost” islands are observed under Ga-rich conditions. For intermediate excess-Ga coverages, both normal and “ghost” islands are present, however, they show distinctly different sizes, suggesting different nucleation states for the two. A growth model is proposed to account for the formation of metastable, “ghost” islands. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation is carried out and main features of the surface are reproduced. We acknowledge financial support from HK RGC under grant Nos. 7396/00P, 7142/99P, and 7121/00P.

  15. Extending the Kawai-Kerman-McVoy Statistical Theory of Nuclear Reactions to Intermediate Structure via Doorways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbanas, Goran; Bertulani, C.A.; Dean, D.J.; Kerman, A.K.; Roche, K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Kawai, Kerman, and McVoy have shown that a statistical treatment of many open channels that are coupled by direct reactions leads to modifications of the Hauser- Feshbach expression for energy-averaged cross section (Ann. of Phys. 75 (1973) 156). The energy averaging interval for this cross section is on the order of the width of single particle resonances, 1MeV, revealing only a gross structure in the cross section. When the energy-averaging interval is decreased down to a width of a doorway state 0.1 MeV, a so-called intermediate structure may be observed in cross sections. We extend the Kawai-Kerman-McVoy theory into the intermediate structure by leveraging a theory of doorway states developed by Feshbach, Kerman, and Lemmer (Ann. of Phys. 42 (1967) 230). As a byproduct of the extension, an alternative derivation of the central result of the Kawai-Kerman-McVoy theory is suggested. We quantify the effect of the approximations used in derivation by performing numerical computations for a large set of compound nuclear states.

  16. Optical model theory of elastic electron- and positron-atom scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joachain, C.J.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that the basic idea of the optical model theory is to enable analysis of the elastic scattering of a particle from a complex target by replacing the complicated interactions between the beam and the target by an optical potential, or pseudopotential, in which the incident particle moves. Once the optical potential is determined the original many-body elastic scattering problem reduces to a one-body situation. The resulting optical potential is, however, a very complicated operator, and the formal expressions obtained from first principles for the optical potential can only be evaluated approximately in a few simple cases, such as high energy elastic hadron-nucleus scattering, for the the optical potential can be expressed in terms of two-body hadron-nucleon amplitudes, and the non-relativistic elastic scattering of fast charged particles by atoms. The elastic scattering of an electron or positron by a neutral atom at intermediate energies is here considered. Exchange effects between the projectile and the atomic electrons are considered; also absorption and polarisation effects. Applications of the full-wave optical model have so far only been made to the elastic scattering of fast electrons and positrons by atomic H, He, Ne, and Ar. Agreements of the optical model results with absolute measurements of differential cross sections for electron scattering are very good, an agreement that improves as the energy increases, but deteriorates quickly as the incident energy becomes lower than 50 eV for atomic H or 100 eV for He. For more complex atoms the optical model calculations also appear very encouraging. With regard to positron-atom elastic scattering the optical model results for positron-He scattering differ markedly at small angles from the corresponding electron-He values. It would be interesting to have experimental angular distributions of positron-atom elastic scattering in order to check predictions of the optical model theory. (U.K.)

  17. Solid State Theory An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Rössler, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Solid-State Theory - An Introduction is a textbook for graduate students of physics and material sciences. It stands in the tradition of older textbooks on this subject but takes up new developments in theoretical concepts and materials which are connected with such path breaking discoveries as the Quantum-Hall Effects, the high-Tc superconductors, and the low-dimensional systems realized in solids. Thus besides providing the fundamental concepts to describe the physics of electrons and ions of which the solid consists, including their interactions and the interaction with light, the book casts a bridge to the experimental facts and opens the view into current research fields.

  18. Exploring the chemical kinetics of partially oxidized intermediates by combining experiments, theory, and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyermann, Karlheinz; Mauß, Fabian; Olzmann, Matthias; Welz, Oliver; Zeuch, Thomas

    2017-07-19

    Partially oxidized intermediates play a central role in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. In this perspective, we focus on the chemical kinetics of alkoxy radicals, peroxy radicals, and Criegee intermediates, which are key species in both combustion and atmospheric environments. These reactive intermediates feature a broad spectrum of chemical diversity. Their reactivity is central to our understanding of how volatile organic compounds are degraded in the atmosphere and converted into secondary organic aerosol. Moreover, they sensitively determine ignition timing in internal combustion engines. The intention of this perspective article is to provide the reader with information about the general mechanisms of reactions initiated by addition of atomic and molecular oxygen to alkyl radicals and ozone to alkenes. We will focus on critical branching points in the subsequent reaction mechanisms and discuss them from a consistent point of view. As a first example of our integrated approach, we will show how experiment, theory, and kinetic modeling have been successfully combined in the first infrared detection of Criegee intermediates during the gas phase ozonolysis. As a second example, we will examine the ignition timing of n-heptane/air mixtures at low and intermediate temperatures. Here, we present a reduced, fuel size independent kinetic model of the complex chemistry initiated by peroxy radicals that has been successfully applied to simulate standard n-heptane combustion experiments.

  19. Switching between dynamic states in intermediate-length Josephson junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pagano, S.; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Parmentier, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    The appearance of zero-field steps (ZFS’s) in the current-voltage characteristics of intermediate-length overlap-geometry Josephson tunnel junctions described by a perturbed sine-Gordon equation (PSGE) is associated with the growth of parametrically excited instabilities of the McCumber backgroun...

  20. Ultrasonic attenuation in the superconducting and intermediate states of pure and doped type I superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhuri, K.D.; Singh, R.

    1982-01-01

    The attenuation of longitudinal ultrasonic waves has been measured in single crystals of indium (99.999%), indium doped with 0.003 at % of tin, and indium doped with 0.002 at % of bismuth in the intermediate and superconducting states over the frequency range 10--30 MHz. For the bismuth-doped indium specimen, measurements were taken for three different physical states, i.e., for three different dislocation densities, and for the indium and the tin-doped indium specimens, measurements were for one-physical state. For a particular measurement, the same physical state was maintained both in the intermediate and superconducting states. A temperature-dependent oscillatory behavior of the ultrasonic attenuation was observed in the intermediate state in all the three specimens, but in the superconducting state the oscillatory behavior was observed only in the bismuth-doped specimen. Two phases have been identified in the superconducting layers of the intermediate state and there is only one phase in the superconducting state of the bismuth-doped sample. The origin of the two phases in the intermediate state and that of the single phase in the superconducting state of the bismuth-doped sample are discussed. A qualitative explanation is presented for the occurrence of oscillatory attenuation in the intermediate state irrespective of the nature of the dopant and the selective occurrence of oscillatory attenuation in the superconducting state due to the nature of the dopant

  1. Self-consistent field theory for the interactions between keratin intermediate filaments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinshina, Anna; Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Warren, Patrick B; Noro, Massimo G

    2013-01-01

    Keratins are important structural proteins found in skin, hair and nails. Keratin Intermediate Filaments are major components of corneocytes, nonviable horny cells of the Stratum Corneum, the outermost layer of skin. It is considered that interactions between unstructured domains of Keratin Intermediate Filaments are the key factor in maintaining the elasticity of the skin. We have developed a model for the interactions between keratin intermediate filaments based on self-consistent field theory. The intermediate filaments are represented by charged surfaces, and the disordered terminal domains of the keratins are represented by charged heteropolymers grafted to these surfaces. We estimate the system is close to a charge compensation point where the heteropolymer grafting density is matched to the surface charge density. Using a protein model with amino acid resolution for the terminal domains, we find that the terminal chains can mediate a weak attraction between the keratin surfaces. The origin of the attraction is a combination of bridging and electrostatics. The attraction disappears when the system moves away from the charge compensation point, or when excess small ions and/or NMF-representing free amino acids are added. These results are in concordance with experimental observations, and support the idea that the interaction between keratin filaments, and ultimately in part the elastic properties of the keratin-containing tissue, is controlled by a combination of the physico-chemical properties of the disordered terminal domains and the composition of the medium in the inter-filament region

  2. Continuous Flow-Resonance Raman Spectroscopy of an Intermediate Redox State of Cytochrome-C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forster, M.; Hester, R. E.; Cartling, B.

    1982-01-01

    An intermediate redox state of cytochrome c at alkaline pH, generated upon rapid reduction by sodium dithionite, has been observed by resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopy in combination with the continuous flow technique. The RR spectrum of the intermediate state is reported for excitation both...... in the (alpha, beta) and the Soret optical absorption band. The spectra of the intermediate state are more like those of the stable reduced form than those of the stable oxidized form. For excitation of 514.5 nm, the most prominent indication of an intermediate state is the wave-number shift of one RR band from...... 1,562 cm-1 in the stable oxidized state through 1,535 cm-1 in the intermediate state to 1,544 cm-1 in the stable reduced state. For excitation at 413.1 nm, a band, present at 1,542 cm-1 in the stable reduced state but not present in the stable oxidized state, is absent in the intermediate state. We...

  3. Role of interference of states of intermediate nuclei in exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyaeva, T.L.; Zelenskaya, N.S.; Teplov, I.B.

    1982-01-01

    Role of interference of intermediate nucleus states for exchange processes in reactions with alpha particles on 11 B, 7 Li and 6 Li light nuclei was investigated when considering exactly the process dynamics in the method of distorted waves with a finite interaction radius. The process dynamics, in particular, the overlapping degree of wave functions of bound states and interaction potentials, affects considerably the reaction cross section in the rections with alpha particles on nuclei of 1p shell. If in the reaction selection rules permit the excitation of components of intermediate system states with maximum values of #betta# 1 and #betta# 2 orbital moments at the given N 1 and N 2 , the contribution of such components to the cross section will be determining. When components of intermediate system states with maximum #betta# 1 (or #betta# 2 ) are forbidden with selection rules, several intermediate states can have approximately similar overlapping integrals

  4. The influence of the anisotropic stress state on the intermediate strain properties of granular material

    KAUST Repository

    Goudarzy, M.; Kö nig, D.; Santamarina, Carlos; Schanz, T.

    2017-01-01

    This paper shows the effect of anisotropic stress state on intermediate strain properties of cylindrical samples containing spherical glass particles. Tests were carried out with the modified resonant column device available at Ruhr

  5. V-T theory for the self-intermediate scattering function in a monatomic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Duane C; Chisolm, Eric D; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia

    2017-02-08

    In V-T theory the atomic motion is harmonic vibrations in a liquid-specific potential energy valley, plus transits, which move the system rapidly among the multitude of such valleys. In its first application to the self intermediate scattering function (SISF), V-T theory produced an accurate account of molecular dynamics (MD) data at all wave numbers q and time t. Recently, analysis of the mean square displacement (MSD) resolved a crossover behavior that was not observed in the SISF study. Our purpose here is to apply the more accurate MSD calibration to the SISF, and assess the results. We derive and discuss the theoretical equations for vibrational and transit contributions to the SISF. The time evolution is divided into three successive intervals: the vibrational interval when the vibrational contribution alone accurately accounts for the MD data; the crossover when the vibrational contribution saturates and the transit contribution becomes resolved; and the diffusive interval when the transit contribution alone accurately accounts for the MD data. The resulting theoretical error is extremely small at all q and t. V-T theory is compared to mode-coupling theories for the MSD and SISF, and to recent developments in Brownian motion experiments and theory.

  6. V-T theory for the self-intermediate scattering function in a monatomic liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Duane C; Chisolm, Eric D; De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia

    2017-01-01

    In V-T theory the atomic motion is harmonic vibrations in a liquid-specific potential energy valley, plus transits, which move the system rapidly among the multitude of such valleys. In its first application to the self intermediate scattering function (SISF), V-T theory produced an accurate account of molecular dynamics (MD) data at all wave numbers q and time t . Recently, analysis of the mean square displacement (MSD) resolved a crossover behavior that was not observed in the SISF study. Our purpose here is to apply the more accurate MSD calibration to the SISF, and assess the results. We derive and discuss the theoretical equations for vibrational and transit contributions to the SISF. The time evolution is divided into three successive intervals: the vibrational interval when the vibrational contribution alone accurately accounts for the MD data; the crossover when the vibrational contribution saturates and the transit contribution becomes resolved; and the diffusive interval when the transit contribution alone accurately accounts for the MD data. The resulting theoretical error is extremely small at all q and t . V-T theory is compared to mode-coupling theories for the MSD and SISF, and to recent developments in Brownian motion experiments and theory. (paper)

  7. Evidence for an intermediate conformational state of LacY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaoxu; Guan, Lan; Zhou, Yonggang; Hong, Wen-Xu; Zhang, Qinghai; Kaback, H Ronald

    2012-03-20

    LacY mutant Cys154 → Gly exhibits a periplasmic-closed crystal structure identical to the WT, but is periplasmic-open in the membrane. The mutant hardly catalyzes transport, but binds galactosides from either side of the membrane with the same affinity and is resistant to site-directed proteolysis relative to the pseudo-WT. Site-directed alkylation was also applied to 11 single-Cys mutants in Cys154 → Gly LacY in right-side-out membrane vesicles or after solubilization and purification in dodecyl-β-D-maltopyranoside (DDM). Unlike the pseudo-WT, Cys replacements on the periplasmic side of the Cys154 → Gly mutant label rapidly in the membrane without sugar, but labeling decreases markedly after the mutant proteins are purified. Thus, Cys154 → Gly LacY likely favors a higher-energy intermediate periplasmic-open conformation in situ, but collapses to a lower-energy periplasmic-closed conformation in DDM after purification. Notably, branched-chain or neopentyl glycol maltoside detergents stabilize Cys154 → Gly LacY in the membrane-embedded form.

  8. Measuring the Impact of Financial Intermediation: Linking Contract Theory to Econometric Policy Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Robert M; Urzua, Sergio S

    2009-09-01

    We study the impact that financial intermediation can have on productivity through the alleviation of credit constraints in occupation choice and/or an improved allocation of risk, using both static and dynamic structural models as well as reduced form OLS and IV regressions. Our goal in this paper is to bring these two strands of the literature together. Even though, under certain assumptions, IV regressions can recover accurately the true model-generated local average treatment effect, these are quantitatively different, in order of magnitude and even sign, from other policy impact parameters (e.g., ATE and TT). We also show that laying out clearly alternative models can guide the search for instruments. On the other hand adding more margins of decision, i.e., occupation choice and intermediation jointly, or adding more periods with promised utilities as key state variables, as in optimal multi-period contracts, can cause the misinterpretation of IV as the causal effect of interest.

  9. On negative norm states in supersymmetric theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellwanger, U.

    1983-01-01

    We study the effective kinetic energy of scalar fields for two classes of supersymmetric theories. In theories with very large VEVs of scalar fields, as proposed by Witten, the use of the renormalization group improved effective action prevents the appearance of negative norm states. For simpler theories a general criterium for the absence of negative norm states is given, which is violated in a model with O(N)-symmetry proposed recently. (orig.)

  10. Retention of intermediate polarization states in ferroelectric materials enabling memories for multi-bit data storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Dong; Asadi, Kamal; Blom, Paul W. M.; Leeuw, Dago M. de, E-mail: deleeuw@mpip-mainz.mpg.de [Max-Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Katsouras, Ilias [Holst Centre, High Tech Campus 31, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Groen, Wilhelm A. [Holst Centre, High Tech Campus 31, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1 2629 HS, Delft (Netherlands)

    2016-06-06

    A homogeneous ferroelectric single crystal exhibits only two remanent polarization states that are stable over time, whereas intermediate, or unsaturated, polarization states are thermodynamically instable. Commonly used ferroelectric materials however, are inhomogeneous polycrystalline thin films or ceramics. To investigate the stability of intermediate polarization states, formed upon incomplete, or partial, switching, we have systematically studied their retention in capacitors comprising two classic ferroelectric materials, viz. random copolymer of vinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene, P(VDF-TrFE), and Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3}. Each experiment started from a discharged and electrically depolarized ferroelectric capacitor. Voltage pulses were applied to set the given polarization states. The retention was measured as a function of time at various temperatures. The intermediate polarization states are stable over time, up to the Curie temperature. We argue that the remarkable stability originates from the coexistence of effectively independent domains, with different values of polarization and coercive field. A domain growth model is derived quantitatively describing deterministic switching between the intermediate polarization states. We show that by using well-defined voltage pulses, the polarization can be set to any arbitrary value, allowing arithmetic programming. The feasibility of arithmetic programming along with the inherent stability of intermediate polarization states makes ferroelectric materials ideal candidates for multibit data storage.

  11. Retention of intermediate polarization states in ferroelectric materials enabling memories for multi-bit data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong; Katsouras, Ilias; Asadi, Kamal; Groen, Wilhelm A.; Blom, Paul W. M.; de Leeuw, Dago M.

    2016-06-01

    A homogeneous ferroelectric single crystal exhibits only two remanent polarization states that are stable over time, whereas intermediate, or unsaturated, polarization states are thermodynamically instable. Commonly used ferroelectric materials however, are inhomogeneous polycrystalline thin films or ceramics. To investigate the stability of intermediate polarization states, formed upon incomplete, or partial, switching, we have systematically studied their retention in capacitors comprising two classic ferroelectric materials, viz. random copolymer of vinylidene fluoride with trifluoroethylene, P(VDF-TrFE), and Pb(Zr,Ti)O3. Each experiment started from a discharged and electrically depolarized ferroelectric capacitor. Voltage pulses were applied to set the given polarization states. The retention was measured as a function of time at various temperatures. The intermediate polarization states are stable over time, up to the Curie temperature. We argue that the remarkable stability originates from the coexistence of effectively independent domains, with different values of polarization and coercive field. A domain growth model is derived quantitatively describing deterministic switching between the intermediate polarization states. We show that by using well-defined voltage pulses, the polarization can be set to any arbitrary value, allowing arithmetic programming. The feasibility of arithmetic programming along with the inherent stability of intermediate polarization states makes ferroelectric materials ideal candidates for multibit data storage.

  12. Progress in applyiong the FKK multistep reaction theory to intermediate-energy data evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadwick, M.B.; Young, P.G.

    1994-01-01

    Recent developments to the physics modeling in the FKK-GNASH code system are reviewed. We describe modifications to include a linking of multistep direct and multistep compound processes, which are important when the incident energy is less than about 30 MeV. A model for multiple preequilibrium emission is given, and compared with experimental measurements of proton reactions on 90 Zr at 160 MeV. We also give some preliminary observations concerning FKK calculations which use both normal and non-normal DWBA matrix elements. We describe the application of the FKK-GNASH code to a range of nuclear data applications, including intermediate energy reactions of importance in the accelerator transmutation of waste, and fast neutron and proton cancer radiation treatment. We outline areas where further work is needed for the accurate modeling of nuclear reactions using the FKK theory

  13. Intermediate Radical Termination Theory in Elucidation of RAFT Kinetics and Comparison to Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Baqeri-Jagharq

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In current work a comprehensive mechanism based on intermediate radical termination theory is assumed for RAFT polymerization of styrene over cumyl dithiobenzoate as RAFT agent. Rate constants for addition (ka and fragmentation reactions (kf are set to 6×106 and 5×104 respectively, which lead to an equilibrium constant value of K = ka/kf = 1.2 x 102. Moment equations method was used to model this mechanism and the results were compared to experimental data to verify modeling. The effects of changing RAFT agent concentration on conversion, molecular weight and polydispersity index of the final product were investigated through the modeling. According to the results, the likelihood of living polymerization increases with raising RAFT agent concentration which leads to linearity of conversion and molecular weight curves and therefore lowering the polydispersity index and narrowing the molecular weight distribution.

  14. AC susceptibility of thin Pb films in intermediate and mixed state

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janů, Zdeněk; Švindrych, Zdeněk; Truněček, O.; Kúš, P.; Plecenik, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 471, 23-24 (2011), s. 1647-1650 ISSN 0921-4534 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME10069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : intermediate state * mixed state * AC susceptibility Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.014, year: 2011

  15. Observation of an intermediate state in psi (3684) radiative cascade decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanenbaum, W.; Whitaker, J.S.; Abrams, G.S.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Chinowsky, W.; Feldman, G.J.; Friedberg, C.E.; Fryberger, D.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hartill, D.L.; Jean-Marie, B.; Kadyk, J.A.; Larsen, R.R.; Litke, A.M.; Luke, D.; Lulu, B.A.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.L.; Morehouse, C.C.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Pierre, F.M.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Sadoulet, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Trilling, G.H.; Vannucci, F.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Wiss, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    We present evidence for the existence of an intermediate state observed in the decay sequence psi(3684) → psi(3095)γγ. The mass of the state is either 3500+-10 or 3270+-10 MeV. The branching fraction of the sequence is (3.6+-0.7)%

  16. On the Generation of Intermediate Number Squeezed State of the Quantized Radiation Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseia, B.; de Lima, A. F.; Bagnato, V. S.

    Recently, a new state of the quantized radiation field — the intermediate number squeezed state (INSS) — has been introduced in the literature: it interpolates between the number state |n> and the squeezed state |z, α>=Ŝ(z)|α>, and exhibits interesting nonclassical properties as antibunching, sub-Poissonian statistics and squeezing. Here we introduce a slight modification in the previous definition allowing us a proposal to generate the INSS. Nonclassical properties using a new set of parameters are also studied.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime components reveal kinetic intermediate states upon equilibrium denaturation of carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtseva, Elena V; Lashchuk, Olesya O; Gerasimova, Marina A; Melnik, Tatiana N; Nagibina, Galina S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2017-12-21

    In most cases, intermediate states of multistage folding proteins are not 'visible' under equilibrium conditions but are revealed in kinetic experiments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used in equilibrium denaturation studies. The technique allows for detecting changes in the conformation and environment of tryptophan residues in different structural elements of carbonic anhydrase II which in its turn has made it possible to study the intermediate states of carbonic anhydrase II under equilibrium conditions. The results of equilibrium and kinetic experiments using wild-type bovine carbonic anhydrase II and its mutant form with the substitution of leucine for alanine at position 139 (L139A) were compared. The obtained lifetime components of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence allowed for revealing that, the same as in kinetic experiments, under equilibrium conditions the unfolding of carbonic anhydrase II ensues through formation of intermediate states.

  18. Discrete state perturbation theory via Green's functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubinson, W.

    1975-01-01

    The exposition of stationary-state perturbation theory via the Green's function method in Goldberger and Watson's Collision Theory is reworked in a way that makes explicit its mathematical basis. It is stressed that the theory consists of the construction of, and manipulations on, a mathematical identity. The perturbation series fall out of the identity almost immediately. The logical status of the method is commented on

  19. The Theory of the Legal State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Du Plessis

    1981-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, which has not been published before, the late Prof. du Plessis lays bare the philosophical roots of the liberal-democratic state, or the legal state, as he preferred to call it. After a recapitulative version of the theory of the legal state, het indicates the origin of this form in Greek philosophy and in Medieval thought. The stress, however, is on the Modem Era, in which he distinuishes two main periods in the development of the theory of the legal state:the jusnaturalistic period and thepositivistic or formal period.He argues that positivism has destroyed the original ideal o f individual freedom in facts by regarding justice as a purely formal matter susceptible to any content. All guarantees for individual freedom which rested on a universal normative system fe ll away. The state defines its own competence and limits itself to legal forms in all its activities. The legal state thus merely becomes the state, any state as determined by fixed rules o f its own making to which it binds itselfin all its functioning. Law sinks to a mere form in which the juristic personality of the state manifests its supremacy, and from this there is only one step to the concept that the state is identical with law, so that any state necessarily is a legal state, and any state action which is formally correct, is legal. The article concludes with a brief representation o f the author’s own political and legal vision.

  20. Excited-state density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harbola, Manoj K; Hemanadhan, M; Shamim, Md; Samal, P

    2012-01-01

    Starting with a brief introduction to excited-state density functional theory, we present our method of constructing modified local density approximated (MLDA) energy functionals for the excited states. We show that these functionals give accurate results for kinetic energy and exchange energy compared to the ground state LDA functionals. Further, with the inclusion of GGA correction, highly accurate total energies for excited states are obtained. We conclude with a brief discussion on the further direction of research that include the construction of correlation energy functional and exchange potential for excited states.

  1. Bimetric Theory of Fractional Quantum Hall States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey Gromov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a bimetric low-energy effective theory of fractional quantum Hall (FQH states that describes the topological properties and a gapped collective excitation, known as the Girvin-Macdonald-Platzman (GMP mode. The theory consists of a topological Chern-Simons action, coupled to a symmetric rank-2 tensor, and an action à la bimetric gravity, describing the gapped dynamics of a spin-2 mode. The theory is formulated in curved ambient space and is spatially covariant, which allows us to restrict the form of the effective action and the values of phenomenological coefficients. Using bimetric theory, we calculate the projected static structure factor up to the k^{6} order in the momentum expansion. To provide further support for the theory, we derive the long-wave limit of the GMP algebra, the dispersion relation of the GMP mode, and the Hall viscosity of FQH states. The particle-hole (PH transformation of the theory takes a very simple form, making the duality between FQH states and their PH conjugates manifest. We also comment on the possible applications to fractional Chern insulators, where closely related structures arise. It is shown that the familiar FQH observables acquire a curious geometric interpretation within the bimetric formalism.

  2. Bimetric Theory of Fractional Quantum Hall States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromov, Andrey; Son, Dam Thanh

    2017-10-01

    We present a bimetric low-energy effective theory of fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states that describes the topological properties and a gapped collective excitation, known as the Girvin-Macdonald-Platzman (GMP) mode. The theory consists of a topological Chern-Simons action, coupled to a symmetric rank-2 tensor, and an action à la bimetric gravity, describing the gapped dynamics of a spin-2 mode. The theory is formulated in curved ambient space and is spatially covariant, which allows us to restrict the form of the effective action and the values of phenomenological coefficients. Using bimetric theory, we calculate the projected static structure factor up to the k6 order in the momentum expansion. To provide further support for the theory, we derive the long-wave limit of the GMP algebra, the dispersion relation of the GMP mode, and the Hall viscosity of FQH states. The particle-hole (PH) transformation of the theory takes a very simple form, making the duality between FQH states and their PH conjugates manifest. We also comment on the possible applications to fractional Chern insulators, where closely related structures arise. It is shown that the familiar FQH observables acquire a curious geometric interpretation within the bimetric formalism.

  3. Thermal Conductivity of Superconductors in the Intermediate State: Size Effect in a Longitudinal Lamellar Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, J.M.; Rinderer, L.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of type I superconductors has been measured in a well-defined, optically controlled intermediate-state configuration the so-called longitudinal lamellar structure (LLS). A regular arrangement of alternating normal and superconducting lamellas is obtained in an elongated plate by applying the magnetic field obliquely (following Sharvin) and decreasing it from the critical values. The heat current is set parallel to the lamellas. Due to the peculiar reflection law governing the quasiparticle reflections at a normal-superconductor interphase boundary, the thermal conductivity of the LLS is reduced when the electronic mean free path is larger than or comparable to the width of the lamellas. As first pointed out by Andreev, the reflection occurs with vecotr-momentum conservation, and only the quasiparticles moving nearly parallel to the lamellas can transport heat efficiently. The corresponding reduction of the thermal conductivity is a size effect.Systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of the LLS in high-purity lead and tin are interpreted in terms of the size-effect model. The parameters of the model were experimentally determined in a preliminary study, to enable an unambiguous comparison with the theory. In particular, the geometrical aspects of the structures were studied using a magnetooptical technique. Interesting results on the characteristics of the LLS were obtained. The thermal conductivity data on lead essentially confirm the size-effect description. In tin heat transport by the lamellas of both types takes place, the heat carriers being the electrons (T > or approx. = 1.6 K). The discrepancy between the predictions of the size-effect model and the observed values in tin are attributed to an oversimplified calculation of the contribution of the superconducting lamellas to the conductivity

  4. An intermediate state of T7 RNA polymerase provides another pathway of nucleotide selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhan-Feng; Liu Yu-Ru; Wang Peng-Ye; Xie Ping

    2017-01-01

    Phage T7 RNA polymerase is a single-subunit transcription enzyme, transcribing template DNA to RNA. Nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) selection and translocation are two critical steps of the transcription elongation. Here, using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we found that between pre- and post-translocation states of T7 RNA polymerase an intermediate state exists, where the O helix C-terminal residue tyrosine 639, which plays important roles in translocation, locates between its pre- and post-translocation positions and the side chain of the next template DNA nucleotide has moved into the active site. NTP selection in this intermediate state was studied, revealing that the selection in the intermediate state can be achieved relying on the effect of Watson–Crick interaction between NTP and template DNA nucleotide, effect of stability of the components near the active site such as the nascent DNA–RNA hybrid and role of tyrosine 639. This indicates that another NTP-selection pathway can also exist besides the main pathway where NTP selection begins at the post-translocation state upon the entry of NTP. (paper)

  5. Transition state theory for enzyme kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-01

    This article is an essay that discusses the concepts underlying the application of modern transition state theory to reactions in enzymes. Issues covered include the potential of mean force, the quantization of vibrations, the free energy of activation, and transmission coefficients to account for nonequilibrium effect, recrossing, and tunneling. PMID:26008760

  6. Instanton bound states in ABJM theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsuda, Yasuyuki [DESY Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Moriyama, Sanefumi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Kobayashi Maskawa Inst. and Graduate School of Mathematics; Okuyama, Kazumi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-06-15

    The partition function of the ABJM theory receives non-perturbative corrections due to instanton effects. We study these non-perturbative corrections, including bound states of worldsheet instantons and membrane instantons, in the Fermi-gas approach. We require that the total non-perturbative correction should be always finite for arbitrary Chern-Simons level. This finiteness is realized quite non-trivially because each bound state contribution naively diverges at some levels. The poles of each contribution should be canceled out in total. We use this pole cancellation mechanism to find unknown bound state corrections from known ones. We conjecture a general expression of the bound state contribution. Summing up all the bound state contributions, we find that the effect of bound states is simply incorporated into the worldsheet instanton correction by a redefinition of the chemical potential in the Fermi-gas system. Analytic expressions of the 3- and 4-membrane instanton corrections are also proposed.

  7. The structure of nuclear states at low, intermediate and high excitation energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soloviev, V.G.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that within the model based on the quasiparticle-phonon interaction one can obtain the description of few-quasiparticle components of nuclear states at low, intermediate and high excitation energies. For the low-lying states the energy of each level is calculated. The few-quasiparticle components at intermediate and high excitation energies are represented to be averaged in certain energy intervals and their characteri stics are given as the corresponding strength functions. The fragmentation of single-particle states in deformed nuclei is studied. It is shown that in the distribution of the single-particle strength alongside with a large maximum there appear local maxima and the distribution itself has a long tail. The dependence of neutron strength functions on the excitation energy is investigated for the transfer reaction of the type (d,p) and (d,t). The s,- p,- and d-wave neutron strength functions are calculated at the neutron binding energy Bn. A satisfactory agreement with experiment is obtained. The energies and Elambda-strength functions for giant multipole resonances in deformed nuclei are calculated. The energies of giant quadrupole and octupole resonances are calculated. Their widths and fine structure are being studied. It is stated that to study the structure of highly excited states it is necessary to find the values of many-quasiparticle components of the wave functions. The ways of experimental determination of these components based on the study of γ-transitions between highly excited states are discussed

  8. Matrix product states for lattice field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banuls, M.C.; Cirac, J.I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (MPQ), Garching (Germany); Cichy, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Saito, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences

    2013-10-15

    The term Tensor Network States (TNS) refers to a number of families of states that represent different ansaetze for the efficient description of the state of a quantum many-body system. Matrix Product States (MPS) are one particular case of TNS, and have become the most precise tool for the numerical study of one dimensional quantum many-body systems, as the basis of the Density Matrix Renormalization Group method. Lattice Gauge Theories (LGT), in their Hamiltonian version, offer a challenging scenario for these techniques. While the dimensions and sizes of the systems amenable to TNS studies are still far from those achievable by 4-dimensional LGT tools, Tensor Networks can be readily used for problems which more standard techniques, such as Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations, cannot easily tackle. Examples of such problems are the presence of a chemical potential or out-of-equilibrium dynamics. We have explored the performance of Matrix Product States in the case of the Schwinger model, as a widely used testbench for lattice techniques. Using finite-size, open boundary MPS, we are able to determine the low energy states of the model in a fully non-perturbativemanner. The precision achieved by the method allows for accurate finite size and continuum limit extrapolations of the ground state energy, but also of the chiral condensate and the mass gaps, thus showing the feasibility of these techniques for gauge theory problems.

  9. A unified theory of quasibound states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt A. Moyer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We report a formalism for the study of quasibound states, defined here broadly as those states having a connectedness to true bound states through the variation of some physical parameter. The theory admits quasibound states with real energies (stationary quasibound states and quantum resonances within the same framework, and makes a clean distinction between these states and those of the associated continuum. The approach taken here builds on our earlier work by clarifying several crucial points and extending the formalism to encompass a variety of continuous spectra, including those with degeneracies. The theory is illustrated by examining several cases pertinent to applications widely discussed in the literature. The related issue of observing stationary quasibound states also is addressed. We argue that the Adiabatic Theorem of quantum mechanics not only establishes the criteria necessary for their detection, but also engenders a method for assigning to them a level width that is sufficiently distinct from that of quantum resonances so as to allow the two to be differentiated experimentally.

  10. Excited state conformational dynamics in carotenoids: dark intermediates and excitation energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Warren F; Bishop, Michael M; Roscioli, Jerome D; Ghosh, Soumen; Frank, Harry A

    2015-04-15

    A consideration of the excited state potential energy surfaces of carotenoids develops a new hypothesis for the nature of the conformational motions that follow optical preparation of the S2 (1(1)Bu(+)) state. After an initial displacement from the Franck-Condon geometry along bond length alternation coordinates, it is suggested that carotenoids pass over a transition-state barrier leading to twisted conformations. This hypothesis leads to assignments for several dark intermediate states encountered in femtosecond spectroscopic studies. The Sx state is assigned to the structure reached upon the onset of torsional motions near the transition state barrier that divides planar and twisted structures on the S2 state potential energy surface. The X state, detected recently in two-dimensional electronic spectra, corresponds to a twisted structure well past the barrier and approaching the S2 state torsional minimum. Lastly, the S(∗) state is assigned to a low lying S1 state structure with intramolecular charge transfer character (ICT) and a pyramidal conformation. It follows that the bent and twisted structures of carotenoids that are found in photosynthetic light-harvesting proteins yield excited-state structures that favor the development of an ICT character and optimized energy transfer yields to (bacterio)chlorophyll acceptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. AC susceptibility of thin Pb films in intermediate and mixed state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janu, Zdenek, E-mail: janu@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics of the AS CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Svindrych, Zdenek [Institute of Physics of the AS CR, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Trunecek, Otakar [Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Ke Karlovu 3, CZ-121 16 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Kus, Peter; Plecenik, Andrej [Komenius University in Bratislava, Faculty of Mathematics, Physics, and Informatics, Mlynska dolina, 842 48 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia)

    2011-12-15

    Thickness dependent transition in AC susceptibility between intermediate and mixed state in type-I superconducting films. The temperature induced crossover between reversible and irreversible behavior was observed in the thicker film. The temperature dependence of the AC susceptibility in mixed state follows prediction of model based on Bean critical state. The temperature dependence of the harmonics of the complex AC susceptibility in the intermediate state is explained. Thin films of type I superconductors of a thickness comparable or less than a flux penetration length behave like type II superconductors in a mixed state. With decreasing film thickness normal domains carrying a magnetic flux get smaller with smaller number of flux quanta per domain and finally transform into single quantum flux lines, i.e. quantum vortices similar to those found in type II superconductors. We give an evidence of this behavior from the measurements of the nonlinear response of a total magnetic moment to an applied AC magnetic field, directly from the temperature dependence of an AC susceptibility.

  12. Mode coupling theory analysis of electrolyte solutions: Time dependent diffusion, intermediate scattering function, and ion solvation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Susmita; Yashonath, Subramanian; Bagchi, Biman

    2015-03-28

    A self-consistent mode coupling theory (MCT) with microscopic inputs of equilibrium pair correlation functions is developed to analyze electrolyte dynamics. We apply the theory to calculate concentration dependence of (i) time dependent ion diffusion, (ii) intermediate scattering function of the constituent ions, and (iii) ion solvation dynamics in electrolyte solution. Brownian dynamics with implicit water molecules and molecular dynamics method with explicit water are used to check the theoretical predictions. The time dependence of ionic self-diffusion coefficient and the corresponding intermediate scattering function evaluated from our MCT approach show quantitative agreement with early experimental and present Brownian dynamic simulation results. With increasing concentration, the dispersion of electrolyte friction is found to occur at increasingly higher frequency, due to the faster relaxation of the ion atmosphere. The wave number dependence of intermediate scattering function, F(k, t), exhibits markedly different relaxation dynamics at different length scales. At small wave numbers, we find the emergence of a step-like relaxation, indicating the presence of both fast and slow time scales in the system. Such behavior allows an intriguing analogy with temperature dependent relaxation dynamics of supercooled liquids. We find that solvation dynamics of a tagged ion exhibits a power law decay at long times-the decay can also be fitted to a stretched exponential form. The emergence of the power law in solvation dynamics has been tested by carrying out long Brownian dynamics simulations with varying ionic concentrations. The solvation time correlation and ion-ion intermediate scattering function indeed exhibit highly interesting, non-trivial dynamical behavior at intermediate to longer times that require further experimental and theoretical studies.

  13. Closed form bound-state perturbation theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ollie J. Rose

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available The perturbed Schrödinger eigenvalue problem for bound states is cast into integral form using Green's Functions. A systematic algorithm is developed and applied to the resulting equation giving rise to approximate solutions expressed as functions of the given perturbation parameter. As a by-product, convergence radii for the traditional Rayleigh-Schrödinger and Brillouin-Wigner perturbation theories emerge in a natural way.

  14. A phenomenological theory of the pseudogap state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, T.M.; Yang Kaiyu; Zhang Fuchun

    2007-01-01

    An ansatz is proposed for the coherent part of the single particle Green's function in a doped resonant valence bond (RVB) state by analogy with the form derived by Konik and coworkers for an array of 2-leg Hubbard ladders near half-filling. The parameters of the RVB state are taken from the renormalized mean field theory of Zhang and coworkers for underdoped cuprates. The ansatz shows good agreement with recent angle resolved photoemission on underdoped cuprates and resolves an apparent disagreement with the Luttinger sum rule

  15. The Evolution of Macroeconomic Theory and Implications for Teaching Intermediate Macroeconomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froyen, Richard T.

    1996-01-01

    Traces the development of macroeconomic theory from John Maynard Keynes to modern endogenous growth theory. Maintains that a combination of interest in growth theory and related policy questions will play a prominent role in macroeconomics in the future. Recommends narrowing the gap between graduate school and undergraduate economics instruction.…

  16. On the structure of intermediate state created by the direct current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, Ya.S.; Frolov, V.A.

    1974-01-01

    Observations were made of the structure of an intermediate state formed at the destruction of superconductivity of a cylindrical tin sample by an electric current through it. For this purpose, there was determined the nature of the dependence of the magnetic permeability averaged over a section normal with the sample axis on the position of this section relative to the axis. the quantity actually measured was the inductance of a short (0.5 mm) superconductive probe coil embracing the sample and moving along the axis of the latter. In order the inductance were representatative of the magnetic permeability in the depth of a thick (5 mm in diameter) sample, measurements were made with a direct current by means of the device specially designed for this purpose; the operating principle and method for checking of this device being briefly described in the paper. The curves of oscillations of the inductance of the probe with the latter being moved along the sample suggested a conclusion that the structure of the intermediate state had a periodic nature (of the London type) with a period of 1.3 mm. The reduction of the oscillation amplitude and the increase of their average level while an increase of the current passing through the sample above the critical value (at constant temperature) indicated the reduction of the diameter of the core, being in the intermediate state, and an increase of the thickness of a normal layer. Measurements were made at temperatures (13-17)x10 -3 deg K below Tsub(k) with a current of 2-3 A in the sample

  17. Spectro-Timing Study of GX 339-4 in a Hard Intermediate State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, F.; Grinberg, V.; Tomsick, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observations of a hard intermediate state of the transient black hole GX 339-4 taken in 2015 January. With the source softening significantly over the course of the 1.3 day long observation we split the data into 21 sub-sets and find...... that the spectrum of all of them can be well described by a power-law continuum with an additional relativistically blurred reflection component. The photon index increases from ∼1.69 to ∼1.77 over the course of the observation. The accretion disk is truncated at around nine gravitational radii in all spectra. We...

  18. Spin tests for intermediate states in radiative psi'(3684) decay chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, P.K.; Hey, A.J.G.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of the multiple angular-correlation functions for the sequential decays psi'(1 - ) → γ + chi, chi → M anti M, where M is a spinless meson, and psi'(1 - ) → γ 1 + chi, chi → γ 2 + psi, psi (1 - ) → l anti l, when the psi' is formed in e + e - collisions, shows that these can unambiguously distinguish between the spin assignments s/sub chi/ = 0, 1 or 2 for the intermediate states occurring in these decays, as well as determine the multipole amplitudes contributing to the radiative transitions. No dynamical assumptions are made beyond the conservation of angular momentum and parity; recoils are fully taken into account

  19. Curriculum Theory and the Welfare State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Justice

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available How do states make citizens? The question is as old as states themselves. Surprisingly, however, the approaches to answering it have emerged as a form of parallel play, uncoordinated (and poorly understood across fields. This essay attempts to reconcile disparate realms of social research that address the question. The first, curriculum theory, grows out of educational research that for a century has focused almost exclusively on schools, schooling, and intentional settings for academic knowledge transmission. The second realm draws primarily on research from psychology, sociology, and political science to look empirically for effects of exposure to particular kinds of social phenomena. These include, but are not exclusive to, public institutions and policies. This essay begins by developing a mainstream conception of curriculum theory. It then compares and contrasts social science traditions that engage questions related to the state’s role in civic identity formation. Finally, it offers a case study on New York City’s controversial policing strategy known as Stop, Question, and Frisk, exploring how curriculum theory (developed in the context of mass schooling can be a useful framework for understanding the educational features of a distinct social policy.

  20. State-selective charge transfer and excitation in ion-ion interactions at intermediate and high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samanta, R; Purkait, M

    2012-01-01

    Boundary Corrected Continuum Intermediate State (BCCIS) approximation and Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) methods are applied to calculate the charge transfer and excitation cross sections for ion-ion collisions.

  1. Saudi Intermediate School EFL Teachers' Views in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia of the Multiple Intelligences Theory as an Inclusive Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentab, Mohammad Yousef

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the researcher attempted to shed light on Saudi intermediate school EFL teachers' views of the multiple intelligences theory as an inclusive pedagogy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of multiple intelligences on Saudi intermediate students' learning of EFL. The study also tried to illustrate the main…

  2. On intermediate structures in heavy ion reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, I.

    1977-01-01

    The conceptions of the nuclear reaction theory are reinvestigated on the basis of the continuum shell model. The correlation of the resonance states via the continuum can lead to intermediate structures in the cross section. (Auth.)

  3. What is the Role of Legal Systems in Financial Intermediation? Theory and Evidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bottazzi, L.; Da Rin, M.; Hellmann, T.

    2008-01-01

    We develop a theory and empirical test of how the legal system affects the relationship between venture capitalists and entrepreneurs. The theory uses a double moral hazard framework to show how optimal contracts and investor actions depend on the quality of the legal system. The empirical evidence

  4. Analysis of the Intermediate-State Contributions to Neutrinoless Double β− Decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhani Hyvärinen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive analysis of the structure of the nuclear matrix elements (NMEs of neutrinoless double beta-minus (0νβ-β- decays to the 0+ ground and first excited states is performed in terms of the contributing multipole states in the intermediate nuclei of 0νβ-β- transitions. We concentrate on the transitions mediated by the light (l-NMEs Majorana neutrinos. As nuclear model we use the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA with a realistic two-nucleon interaction based on the Bonn one-boson-exchange G matrix. In the computations we include the appropriate short-range correlations, nucleon form factors, and higher-order nucleonic weak currents and restore the isospin symmetry by the isoscalar-isovector decomposition of the particle-particle proton-neutron interaction parameter gpp.

  5. Kinetics of disorder-to-fcc phase transition via an intermediate bcc state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yongsheng; Nie Huifen; Bansil, Rama; Steinhart, Milos; Bang, Joona; Lodge, Timothy P.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering measurements reveal that a long-lived intermediate bcc state forms when a poly(styrene-b-isoprene) diblock copolymer solution in an isoprene selective solvent is rapidly cooled from the disordered micellar fluid at high temperature to an equilibrium fcc state. The kinetics of the epitaxial growth of the [111] fcc peak from the [110] bcc peak was obtained by fitting the scattering data to a simple model of the transformation. The growth of the [111] fcc peak agrees with the Avrami model of nucleation and growth kinetics with an exponent n=1.4, as does the initial decay of the [110] bcc peak, with an exponent n=1.3. The data were also found to be in good agreement with the Cahn model of grain boundary nucleation and growth

  6. State-Dependence of the Climate Sensitivity in Earth System Models of Intermediate Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Patrik L.; Stocker, Thomas F.

    2017-10-01

    Growing evidence from general circulation models (GCMs) indicates that the equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) depends on the magnitude of forcing, which is commonly referred to as state-dependence. We present a comprehensive assessment of ECS state-dependence in Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) by analyzing millennial simulations with sustained 2×CO2 and 4×CO2 forcings. We compare different extrapolation methods and show that ECS is smaller in the higher-forcing scenario in 12 out of 15 EMICs, in contrast to the opposite behavior reported from GCMs. In one such EMIC, the Bern3D-LPX model, this state-dependence is mainly due to the weakening sea ice-albedo feedback in the Southern Ocean, which depends on model configuration. Due to ocean-mixing adjustments, state-dependence is only detected hundreds of years after the abrupt forcing, highlighting the need for long model integrations. Adjustments to feedback parametrizations of EMICs may be necessary if GCM intercomparisons confirm an opposite state-dependence.

  7. Intermediate-energy nuclear theory. Final report, July 1, 1976-August 31, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, R.A.

    1985-02-01

    We summarize the research accomplishments of the Texas A and M Medium-Energy Theory Group which was funded by the Department of Energy from July 1976 through August 1984. Our research was mainly in the area of nucleon-nucleon and NNπ theory and data analysis, although some effort was also devoted to the elementary-particle aspects of these hadrons in order to better understand the NN force. Publications and reports are listed

  8. The influence of the anisotropic stress state on the intermediate strain properties of granular material

    KAUST Repository

    Goudarzy, M.

    2017-07-20

    This paper shows the effect of anisotropic stress state on intermediate strain properties of cylindrical samples containing spherical glass particles. Tests were carried out with the modified resonant column device available at Ruhr-Universität Bochum. Dry samples were subjected to two anisotropic stress states: (a) cell pressure, σ′h, constant and vertical stress, σ′v, increased (stress state GB-I) and (b) σ′v/σ′h equal to 2 (stress state GB-II). The experimental results revealed that the effect of stress state GB-II on the modulus and damping ratio was more significant and obvious than stress state GB-I. The effect of the anisotropic stress state was explained through the impact of confining pressure and anisotropic stress components on the stiffness and damping ratio. The results showed that: (a) G(γ) increased, η(γ) decreased and their strain non-linearity decreased with an increase in the confining pressure component σ′vσ′h; (b) G(γ) decreased, η(γ) increased and their strain non-linearity increased with an increase in the anisotropic stress component, σ′v/σ′h. The analysis of results revealed that reference shear strain was also affected by anisotropic stress state. Therefore, an empirical relationship was developed to predict the reference shear strain, as a function of confining pressure and anisotropic stress components. Additionally, the damping ratio was written as a function of the minimum damping ratio and the reference shear strain.

  9. Dual process theory and intermediate effect: are faculty and residents' performance on multiple-choice, licensing exam questions different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ting; Durning, Steven J; Artino, Anthony R; van der Vleuten, Cees; Holmboe, Eric; Lipner, Rebecca; Schuwirth, Lambert

    2015-04-01

    Clinical reasoning is essential for the practice of medicine. Dual process theory conceptualizes reasoning as falling into two general categories: nonanalytic reasoning (pattern recognition) and analytic reasoning (active comparing and contrasting of alternatives). The debate continues regarding how expert performance develops and how individuals make the best use of analytic and nonanalytic processes. Several investigators have identified the unexpected finding that intermediates tend to perform better on licensing examination items than experts, which has been termed the "intermediate effect." We explored differences between faculty and residents on multiple-choice questions (MCQs) using dual process measures (both reading and answering times) to inform this ongoing debate. Faculty (board-certified internists; experts) and residents (internal medicine interns; intermediates) answered live licensing examination MCQs (U.S. Medical Licensing Examination Step 2 Clinical Knowledge and American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination) while being timed. We conducted repeated analysis of variance to compare the 2 groups on average reading time, answering time, and accuracy on various types of items. Faculty and residents did not differ significantly in reading time [F (1,35) = 0.01, p = 0.93], answering time [F (1,35) = 0.60, p = 0.44], or accuracy [F (1,35) = 0.24, p = 0.63] regardless of easy or hard items. Dual process theory was not evidenced in this study. However, this lack of difference between faculty and residents may have been affected by the small sample size of participants and MCQs may not reflect how physicians made decisions in actual practice setting. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  10. The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis XVI. Kinetic Relationships of the Intermediates in Steady State Photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, A. A.; Kawaguchi, S.; Hayes, P.; Calvin, M.

    1952-06-05

    A kinetic study of the accumulation of C{sup 14} in the intermediates of steady state photosynthesis in C{sup 14}O{sub 2} provides information regarding the sequence of reactions involved. The work described applied the radio-chromatographic technique for analysis of the labeled early products. The simultaneous carboxylation reaction resulting in malic acid as well as phosphoglycerate is demonstrated in experiments at high light intensity. A comparison of radioactivities in a number of phosphorylated sugars as a function of time reveals concurrent synthesis of fructose and sedoheptulose phosphates followed by that of ribulose phosphates and later by that of glucose phosphates. The possibility that the cleavage of C{sub 4} compounds to C{sub 2} carbon dioxide acceptors may involve C{sub 7} and C{sub 5} sugars and evidence for this mechanism is presented.

  11. Intermediate-energy nuclear theory. Progress report, July 1, 1977--June 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, R.A.

    1978-03-01

    The research reported has centered on the nucleon-nucleon interaction at medium energies, with especial emphasis on the reaction NN → NNπ up to 800 MeV. Elastic NN scattering near the pion production threshold was also investigated, both through phase-shift analysis of data and theoretical interpretation of the intermediate-range force. The quasi-elastic amplitude N anti N → ππ for 4m/sub pi/ 2 less than or equal to t less than or equal to 50m/sub pi/ 2 was studied because of its bearing on the NN problem; a simple but useful model was developed. Finally, work on the pion-photoproduction reaction γN → πΔ was completed, and the close correspondence with the amplitude NN → NNπ exploited. A list of publications is included

  12. Uses of solid state analogies in elementary particle theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, P.W.

    1976-01-01

    The solid state background of some of the modern ideas of field theory is reviewed, and additional examples of model situations in solid state or many-body theory which may have relevance to fundamental theories of elementary particles are adduced

  13. Anyonic states in Chern-Simons theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, K.; Lim-Lombridas, E.

    1994-01-01

    We discuss the canonical quantization of Chern-Simons theory in 2+1 dimensions, minimally coupled to a Dirac spinor field, first in the temporal gauge and then in the Coulomb gauge. In our temporal gauge formulation, Gauss's law and the gauge condition A 0 =0 are implemented by embedding the formulation in an appropriate physical subspace. We construct a Fock space of charged particle states that satisfy Gauss's law, and show that they obey fermion, not fractional statistics. The gauge-invariant spinor field that creates these charged states from the vacuum obeys the anticommutation rules that generally apply to spinor fields. The Hamiltonian, when described in the representation in which the charged fermions are the propagating particle excitations that obey Gauss's law, contains an interaction between charge and transverse current densities. We observe that the implementation of Gauss's law and the gauge condition does not require us to use fields with graded commutator algebras or particle excitations with fractional statistics. In our Coulomb gauge formulation, we implement Gauss's law and the gauge condition ∂ l A l =0 by the Dirac-Bergmann procedure. In this formulation, the constrained gauge fields become functionals of the spinor fields, and are not independent degrees of freedom. The formulation in the Coulomb gauge confirms the results we obtained in the temporal gauge: The ''Dirac-Bergmann'' anticommutation rule for the charged spinor fiels ψ and ψ degree that have both been constrained to obey Gauss's law is precisely identical to the canonical spinor anticommutation rule that generates standard fermion statistics. And we also show that the Hamiltonians for charged particle states in our temporal and Coulomb gauge formulations are identical, once Gauss's law has been implemented in both cases

  14. Information Theoretic Characterization of Physical Theories with Projective State Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaopo, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Probabilistic theories are a natural framework to investigate the foundations of quantum theory and possible alternative or deeper theories. In a generic probabilistic theory, states of a physical system are represented as vectors of outcomes probabilities and state spaces are convex cones. In this picture the physics of a given theory is related to the geometric shape of the cone of states. In quantum theory, for instance, the shape of the cone of states corresponds to a projective space over complex numbers. In this paper we investigate geometric constraints on the state space of a generic theory imposed by the following information theoretic requirements: every non completely mixed state of a system is perfectly distinguishable from some other state in a single shot measurement; information capacity of physical systems is conserved under making mixtures of states. These assumptions guarantee that a generic physical system satisfies a natural principle asserting that the more a state of the system is mixed the less information can be stored in the system using that state as logical value. We show that all theories satisfying the above assumptions are such that the shape of their cones of states is that of a projective space over a generic field of numbers. Remarkably, these theories constitute generalizations of quantum theory where superposition principle holds with coefficients pertaining to a generic field of numbers in place of complex numbers. If the field of numbers is trivial and contains only one element we obtain classical theory. This result tells that superposition principle is quite common among probabilistic theories while its absence gives evidence of either classical theory or an implausible theory.

  15. Warfarin traps human vitamin K epoxide reductase in an intermediate state during electron transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Guomin; Cui, Weidong; Zhang, Hao; Zhou, Fengbo; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qian; Yang, Yihu; Li, Shuang; Bowman, Gregory R.; Sadler, J. Evan; Gross, Michael L.; Li, Weikai

    2017-01-01

    Although warfarin is the most widely used anticoagulant worldwide, the mechanism by which warfarin inhibits its target, human vitamin K epoxide reductase (hVKOR), remains unclear. Here we show that warfarin blocks a dynamic electron-transfer process in hVKOR. A major fraction of cellular hVKOR is at an intermediate redox state of this process containing a Cys51-Cys132 disulfide, a characteristic accommodated by a four-transmembrane-helix structure of hVKOR. Warfarin selectively inhibits this major cellular form of hVKOR, whereas disruption of the Cys51-Cys132 disulfide impairs warfarin binding and causes warfarin resistance. Relying on binding interactions identified by cysteine alkylation footprinting and mass spectrometry coupled with mutagenesis analysis, we are able to conduct structure simulations to reveal a closed warfarin-binding pocket stabilized by the Cys51-Cys132 linkage. Understanding the selective warfarin inhibition of a specific redox state of hVKOR should enable the rational design of drugs that exploit the redox chemistry and associated conformational changes in hVKOR. PMID:27918545

  16. Theory of Nonlinear Dispersive Waves and Selection of the Ground State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soffer, A.; Weinstein, M.I.

    2005-01-01

    A theory of time-dependent nonlinear dispersive equations of the Schroedinger or Gross-Pitaevskii and Hartree type is developed. The short, intermediate and large time behavior is found, by deriving nonlinear master equations (NLME), governing the evolution of the mode powers, and by a novel multitime scale analysis of these equations. The scattering theory is developed and coherent resonance phenomena and associated lifetimes are derived. Applications include Bose-Einstein condensate large time dynamics and nonlinear optical systems. The theory reveals a nonlinear transition phenomenon, 'selection of the ground state', and NLME predicts the decay of excited state, with half its energy transferred to the ground state and half to radiation modes. Our results predict the recent experimental observations of Mandelik et al. in nonlinear optical waveguides

  17. Transient intermediates are populated in the folding pathways of single-domain two-state folding protein L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Hiranmay; Reddy, Govardhan

    2018-04-01

    Small single-domain globular proteins, which are believed to be dominantly two-state folders, played an important role in elucidating various aspects of the protein folding mechanism. However, recent single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments [H. Y. Aviram et al. J. Chem. Phys. 148, 123303 (2018)] on a single-domain two-state folding protein L showed evidence for the population of an intermediate state and it was suggested that in this state, a β-hairpin present near the C-terminal of the native protein state is unfolded. We performed molecular dynamics simulations using a coarse-grained self-organized-polymer model with side chains to study the folding pathways of protein L. In agreement with the experiments, an intermediate is populated in the simulation folding pathways where the C-terminal β-hairpin detaches from the rest of the protein structure. The lifetime of this intermediate structure increased with the decrease in temperature. In low temperature conditions, we also observed a second intermediate state, which is globular with a significant fraction of the native-like tertiary contacts satisfying the features of a dry molten globule.

  18. The structure of states and maps in quantum theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 73; Issue 3. The structure of states and maps in quantum theory. Sudhavathani Simon S P ... The structure of statistical state spaces in the classical and quantum theories are compared in an interesting and novel manner. Quantum state spaces and maps on them ...

  19. Boundary states in c=-2 logarithmic conformal field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bredthauer, Andreas; Flohr, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Starting from first principles, a constructive method is presented to obtain boundary states in conformal field theory. It is demonstrated that this method is well suited to compute the boundary states of logarithmic conformal field theories. By studying the logarithmic conformal field theory with central charge c=-2 in detail, we show that our method leads to consistent results. In particular, it allows to define boundary states corresponding to both, indecomposable representations as well as their irreducible subrepresentations

  20. Intermediate accelerated solutions as generic late-time attractors in a modified Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cid, Antonella [Grupo de Cosmología y Gravitación GCG-UBB and Departamento de Física, Universidad del Bío-Bío, Casilla 5-C, Concepción (Chile); Leon, Genly [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Casilla 4950, Valparaíso (Chile); Leyva, Yoelsy, E-mail: acidm@ubiobio.cl, E-mail: genly.leon@ucv.cl, E-mail: yoelsy.leyva@uta.cl [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile)

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we investigate the evolution of a Jordan-Brans-Dicke scalar field, Φ, with a power-law potential in the presence of a second scalar field, φ, with an exponential potential, in both the Jordan and the Einstein frames. We present the relation of our model with the induced gravity model with power-law potential and the integrability of this kind of models is discussed when the quintessence field φ is massless, and has a small velocity. The fact that for some fine-tuned values of the parameters we may get some integrable cosmological models, makes our choice of potentials very interesting. We prove that in Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory, the de Sitter solution is not a natural attractor. Instead, we show that the attractor in the Jordan frame corresponds to an ''intermediate accelerated'' solution of the form a(t) ≅ e{sup α{sub 1} t{sup p{sup {sub 1}}}}, as t → ∞ where α{sub 1} > 0 and 0 < p{sub 1} < 1, for a wide range of parameters. Furthermore, when we work in the Einstein frame we get that the attractor is also an ''intermediate accelerated'' solution of the form a(t) ≅ e{sup α{sub 2} tp{sub 2}} as t → ∞ where α{sub 2} > 0 and 0intermediate solutions are of saddle type. These results were proved using the center manifold theorem, which is not based on linear approximation. Finally, we present a specific elaboration of our extension of the induced gravity model in the Jordan frame, which corresponds to a particular choice of a linear potential of Φ. The dynamical system is then reduced to a two dimensional one, and the late-time attractor is linked with the exact solution found for the induced gravity model. In this example the ''intermediate accelerated

  1. Intermediate accelerated solutions as generic late-time attractors in a modified Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cid, Antonella; Leon, Genly; Leyva, Yoelsy

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the evolution of a Jordan-Brans-Dicke scalar field, Φ, with a power-law potential in the presence of a second scalar field, φ, with an exponential potential, in both the Jordan and the Einstein frames. We present the relation of our model with the induced gravity model with power-law potential and the integrability of this kind of models is discussed when the quintessence field φ is massless, and has a small velocity. The fact that for some fine-tuned values of the parameters we may get some integrable cosmological models, makes our choice of potentials very interesting. We prove that in Jordan-Brans-Dicke theory, the de Sitter solution is not a natural attractor. Instead, we show that the attractor in the Jordan frame corresponds to an ''intermediate accelerated'' solution of the form a(t) ≅ e α 1  t p 1 , as t → ∞ where α 1  > 0 and 0 < p 1  < 1, for a wide range of parameters. Furthermore, when we work in the Einstein frame we get that the attractor is also an ''intermediate accelerated'' solution of the form a(t) ≅ e α 2  tp 2 as t → ∞ where α 2  > 0 and 0

    intermediate solutions are of saddle type. These results were proved using the center manifold theorem, which is not based on linear approximation. Finally, we present a specific elaboration of our extension of the induced gravity model in the Jordan frame, which corresponds to a particular choice of a linear potential of Φ. The dynamical system is then reduced to a two dimensional one, and the late-time attractor is linked with the exact solution found for the induced gravity model. In this example the ''intermediate accelerated'' solution does not exist, and the attractor

  2. State-of-the-art Theory Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, S.

    1983-01-01

    Nonlinear failure detection and isolation (FDI), robust FDI, coordinate controller, detector, estimator, and isolator, AI/modern systems theory, sensor fusion, and man-machine interaction are addressed.

  3. Hydrogen-bonded intermediates and transition states during spontaneous and acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of the carcinogen (+)-anti-BPDE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenik, Mark C; Rodriguez, Jorge H

    2014-07-07

    Understanding mechanisms of (+)-anti-BPDE detoxification is crucial for combating its mutagenic and potent carcinogenic action. However, energetic-structural correlations of reaction intermediates and transition states during detoxification via hydrolysis are poorly understood. To gain mechanistic insight we have computationally characterized intermediate and transition species associated with spontaneous and general-acid catalyzed hydrolysis of (+)-anti-BPDE. We studied the role of cacodylic acid as a proton donor in the rate limiting step. The computed activation energy (ΔG‡) is in agreement with the experimental value for hydrolysis in a sodium cacodylate buffer. Both types of, spontaneous and acid catalyzed, BPDE hydrolysis can proceed through low-entropy hydrogen bonded intermediates prior to formation of transition states whose energies determine reaction activation barriers and rates.

  4. Theory of inelastic ion-atom scattering at low and intermediate energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, G. B.; Garcia, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are presented of inelastic energy loss and ionization phenomena associated with Ar(+)-Ar collisions at small distances of closest approach and for laboratory collision energies ranging from several keV to several hundred keV. Outer-shell excitations are handled statistically; inner-shell excitations are calculated from the viewpoint of quasidiabatic molecular orbital promotion. Auger electron yield, average state of ionization, and average inelastic energy loss are calculated per collision as a function of distance of closest approach of the collision partners for several laboratory collision energies. Average charge-state probabilities per collision partner are calculated as a function of the average inelastic energy loss per atom. It is shown that the structure in the data is due to the underlying structure in the inner-shell independent-electron quasimolecular promotion probabilities.

  5. Microscopic theory for nucleon-nucleus optical potential in intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Guozhu; Cai Chonghai

    1984-01-01

    Based on the scattering theory of KMT and FGH we calculate the nucleon-nucleus optical potentials of 4 He, 16 O and 40 Ca from the Paris N-N potential given by M. Lacombe et al. The real part Vsub(R)(r) of our optential has the form of Woods-Saxon when the kinetic energy E of the incident nucleon is low. The depth of Vsub(R)(r) will decrease as E increases, and it turns into positive in the interior of nucleus when E approx.= 300 MeV. The repulsive effect in the interior of nucleus increases rapidly as E increases even more, butthere always exists some attractive effect at the surface of nucleus. Therefore, Vsub(R)(r) has generally the wine-bottle bottom shape. We also calculate the quatity Jv/N = (4π/N)∫sub(0)sub(infinity)Vsub(R)(r)r 2 dr. Our results are basically in acordance with those of M.Jaminon et al's relativistic Hatree calculation as well as the experimental results. In this work we also calculate the imaginary part of optical potential and its variation with the kinetic energy of the incident nucleon

  6. The impact of intermediate wet states on two-phase flow in porous media, studied by network modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeiland, Linda Kaada

    2006-04-15

    Reservoir wettability is a measure of a rocks preference for the oil and/or the brine phase. Wettability has a dominant impact on fluid movements in porous media, hence oil displacement in reservoir rocks. Understanding the local wettability and the effect of wettability on the fluid movements are therefore of interest in relation to oil recovery processes. Contrary to the earlier believed homogenous wetted cases where the porous media was strongly oil-wet for carbonate reservoirs or strongly water-wet for clastic reservoirs, it is now believed that most reservoir rocks experience some kind of intermediate wet state. Since wettability affects oil recovery, different classes of intermediate wettability are expected to have different impacts on the fluid flow processes. The major subject treated in this thesis is how different intermediate wet states affect fluid flow parameters which are important for the oil recovery. This is done by use of a capillary dominated network model of two-phase flow, where the network is based on a model of reconstructed sandstone. The existence of different intermediate wet classes is argued in Paper I, while Paper II, III and IV analyse the effect different intermediate wet classes have on wettability indices, residual oil saturation, capillary pressure and relative permeability (author)

  7. Vibrational nonadiabaticity and tunneling effects in transition state theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The usual quantum mechanical derivation of transition state theory is a statistical one (a quasi-equilibrium is assumed) or dynamical. The typical dynamical one defines a set of internal states and assumes vibrational adiabaticity. Effects of nonadiabaticity before and after the transition state are included in the present derivation, assuming a classical treatment of the reaction coordinate. The relation to a dynamical derivation of classical mechanical transition state theory is described, and tunneling effects are considered

  8. Structure of a low-population intermediate state in the release of an enzyme product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, Alfonso; Aprile, Francesco A; Dhulesia, Anne; Dobson, Christopher M; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-01-09

    Enzymes can increase the rate of biomolecular reactions by several orders of magnitude. Although the steps of substrate capture and product release are essential in the enzymatic process, complete atomic-level descriptions of these steps are difficult to obtain because of the transient nature of the intermediate conformations, which makes them largely inaccessible to standard structure determination methods. We describe here the determination of the structure of a low-population intermediate in the product release process by human lysozyme through a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. We validate this structure by rationally designing two mutations, the first engineered to destabilise the intermediate and the second to stabilise it, thus slowing down or speeding up, respectively, product release. These results illustrate how product release by an enzyme can be facilitated by the presence of a metastable intermediate with transient weak interactions between the enzyme and product.

  9. A Quantum Version of Wigner's Transition State Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, R.; Waalkens, H.; Wiggins, S.

    A quantum version of a recent realization of Wigner's transition state theory in phase space is presented. The theory developed builds on a quantum normal form which locally decouples the quantum dynamics near the transition state to any desired order in (h) over bar. This leads to an explicit

  10. A Quantum Version of Wigner’s Transition State Theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schubert, R.; Waalkens, H.; Wiggins, S.

    2009-01-01

    A quantum version of a recent realization of Wigner’s transition state theory in phase space is presented. The theory developed builds on a quantum normal form which locally decouples the quantum dynamics near the transition state to any desired order in ħ. This leads to an explicit algorithm to

  11. The spectra of supersymmetric states in string theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, M.C.N.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis we study the spectra of supersymmetric states in string theory compactifications with eight and sixteen supercharges, with special focus placed on the quantum states of black holes and the phenomenon of wall-crossing in these theories. A self-contained introduction to the relevant

  12. Spectro-Timing Study of GX 339-4 in a Hard Intermediate State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, F.; Grinberg, V.; Tomsick, J. A.; Bachetti, M.; Boggs, S. E.; Brightman, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Ghandi, P.; Zhang, William W.

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array observations of a hard intermediate state of the transient black hole GX 339-4 taken in 2015 January. With the source softening significantly over the course of the 1.3 day long observation we split the data into 21 sub-sets and find that the spectrum of all of them can be well described by a power-law continuum with an additional relativistically blurred reflection component. The photon index increases from approx. 1.69 to approx. 1.77 over the course of the observation. The accretion disk is truncated at around nine gravitational radii in all spectra. We also perform timing analysis on the same 21 individual data sets, and find a strong type-C quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO), which increases in frequency from approx. 0.68 to approx. 1.05 Hz with time. The frequency change is well correlated with the softening of the spectrum. We discuss possible scenarios for the production of the QPO and calculate predicted inner radii in the relativistic precession model as well as the global disk mode oscillations model. We find discrepancies with respect to the observed values in both models unless we allow for a black hole mass of approx. 100 Mass compared to the Sun, which is highly unlikely. We discuss possible systematic uncertainties, in particular with the measurement of the inner accretion disk radius in the relativistic reflection model. We conclude that the combination of observed QPO frequencies and inner accretion disk radii, as obtained from spectral fitting, is difficult to reconcile with current models.

  13. The Theory of Effectiveness of the State: Institutional Aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolesnichenko Irina M.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to one of the most urgent problems of modern economic theory and practice — effectiveness of the state. The aim of the paper is a comprehensive analysis of institutional aspects of the formation of a new economic theory of effectiveness of the state. To achieve this aim, the author first summarizes the evolution and theoretical and methodological characteristics of the economic theories of the state paying a special attention to the essence of the concept of “state” and focusing on “effectiveness of the state” as a major category of the new economic theory. Then he proceeds to institutional aspects of effectiveness of the state considering it as a specific organization and system of institutions of power and control; defines components of effectiveness of the state generalizing the existing methodological approaches and most importantly — the modern criteria for assessing the effectiveness of the state.

  14. Quantifying the limits of transition state theory in enzymatic catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinovjev, Kirill; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2017-11-21

    While being one of the most popular reaction rate theories, the applicability of transition state theory to the study of enzymatic reactions has been often challenged. The complex dynamic nature of the protein environment raised the question about the validity of the nonrecrossing hypothesis, a cornerstone in this theory. We present a computational strategy to quantify the error associated to transition state theory from the number of recrossings observed at the equicommittor, which is the best possible dividing surface. Application of a direct multidimensional transition state optimization to the hydride transfer step in human dihydrofolate reductase shows that both the participation of the protein degrees of freedom in the reaction coordinate and the error associated to the nonrecrossing hypothesis are small. Thus, the use of transition state theory, even with simplified reaction coordinates, provides a good theoretical framework for the study of enzymatic catalysis. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  15. Massive states in chiral perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, S [Saha Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta (India)

    1995-08-01

    It is shown that the chiral nonanalytic terms generated by {Delta}{sub 33} resonance in the nucleon self-energy is reproduced in chiral perturbation theory by perturbing appropriate local operators contained in the pion-nucleon effective Lagrangian itself. (orig.)

  16. Quantum theory of the solid state part B

    CERN Document Server

    Callaway, Joseph

    1974-01-01

    Quantum Theory of the Solid State, Part B describes the concepts and methods of the central problems of the quantum theory of solids. This book discusses the developed machinery applied to impurities, disordered systems, effects of external fields, transport phenomena, and superconductivity. The representation theory, low field diamagnetic susceptibility, electron-phonon interaction, and Landau theory of fermi liquids are also deliberated. This text concludes with an introduction to many-body theory and some applications. This publication is a suitable textbook for students who have completed

  17. Theory for the mixed-valence state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    A theory is presented which explains why mixed-valence compounds behave as two component Fermi liquids, and why TmSe orders magnetically while the other known mixed-valence compounds do not. The variation of Tsub(N) and the field Hsub(T) to obtain ferromagnetic alignment with changing Tm 2+ /Tm 3+ ratio is quantitatively explained. For Tm 2+ concentration > = 0.3, TmSe is predicted to order ferromagnetically

  18. Thermodynamic Properties from Corresponding States Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jørgen

    1980-01-01

    A corresponding states approach has been applied to the two-constant equations of state by Wilson, Soave, Peng—Robinson, Hamam et al., Lu et al., Simonet—Behar, and Chaudron et al. in order to obtain the equivalent shape-factor correlations. The correlations derived are compared with the Leach...

  19. The structure of states and maps in quantum theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In classical theory, the statistical state space of a two-state system is a closed line segment ... state space of of a d-level quantum system has such a simple geometry as that of a sphere. ..... positive map cannot represent any physical process.

  20. A Theory of the Origin of the State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Suggests that states evolve in response to ecological or social circumscription, or resource concentration. When dense populations develop, fighting over land forces loser into political subordination or incorporation. This modification of coercive theories explain lack of state in Amazon basin and origin of Inca, Maya, Hwang Valley states.…

  1. [The effect of hyperthyroidism on the cognition processes and the state of the glial intermediate filaments in the rat brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedzvets'kyĭ, V S; Nerush, P O

    2010-01-01

    The effects of hyperthyreosis on oxidative stress, state of glial intermediate filaments and memory were investigated. We observed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation products into both hippocampus and cortex and memory worsening. The changes of GFAP polypeptides was observed in hippocampus and cortex. In group of rats with hyperthyreosis, the content of GFAP in both soluble and filamentous fractions was increased in hippocampus. This data shows, that glial cytoskeleton is reconstructed under thyroid hormone effects.

  2. Solid State Physics Introduction to the Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, James D

    2007-01-01

    Learning Solid State Physics involves a certain degree of maturity, since it involves tying together diverse concepts from many areas of physics. The objective is to understand, in a basic way, how solid materials behave. To do this one needs both a good physical and mathematical background. One definition of Solid State Physics is it is the study of the physical (e.g. the electrical, dielectric, magnetic, elastic, and thermal) properties of solids in terms of basic physical laws. In one sense, Solid State Physics is more like chemistry than some other branches of physics because it focuses on common properties of large classes of materials. It is typical that Solid State Physics emphasizes how physics properties link to electronic structure. We have retained the term Solid State Physics, even though Condensed Matter Physics is more commonly used. Condensed Matter Physics includes liquids and non-crystalline solids such as glass, which we shall not discuss in detail. Modern Solid State Physics came of age in ...

  3. Quantum theory of the solid state

    CERN Document Server

    Callaway, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    This new edition presents a comprehensive, up-to-date survey of the concepts and methods in contemporary condensed matter physics, emphasizing topics that can be treated by quantum mechanical methods. The book features tutorial discussions of a number of current research topics.Also included are updated treatments of topics that have developed significantly within the past several years, such as superconductivity, magnetic impurities in metals, methods for electronic structure calculations, magnetic ordering in insulators and metals, and linear response theory. Advanced level graduate students

  4. A steady state theory for processive cellulases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruys-Bagger, Nicolaj; Olsen, Jens Elmerdahl; Præstgaard, Eigil

    2013-01-01

    coefficient’, which represents the probability of the enzyme dissociating from the substrate strand before completing n sequential catalytic steps, where n is the mean processivity number measured experimentally. Typical processive cellulases have high substrate affinity, and therefore this probability is low....... This has significant kinetic implications, for example the maximal specific rate (Vmax/E0) for processive cellulases is much lower than the catalytic rate constant (kcat). We discuss how relationships based on this theory may be used in both comparative and mechanistic analyses of cellulases....

  5. Libertarian Punishment Theory: Working for, and Donating to, the State

    OpenAIRE

    Walter Block

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we assume the contours of the libertarian philosophy, its view toward the unjustified state, and, also, the punishment theory of this perspective. We address the narrow question of what punishment is justified for partaking in statist activities.

  6. Reassessment of fission fragment angular distributions from continuum states in the context of transition-state theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaz, L.C.; Alexander, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Fission angular distributions have been studied for years and have been treated as classic examples of transition-state theory. Early work involving composite nuclei of relatively low excitation energy Esup(*) ( 2 0 (K 2 0 = Psub(eff)T/(h/2π) 2 ) are presented along with comparissons of Psub(eff) to moments of inertia for saddle-point nuclei from the rotating liquid drop model. This model gives an excellent guide for the intermediate spin zone (30 < or approx. I < or approx. 65), while strong shell and/or pairing effects are evident for excitations less than < or approx. 35 MeV. Observations of strong anisotropies for very high-spin systems signal the demise of certain approximations commonly made in the theory, and suggestions are made toward this end. (orig.)

  7. Variational Approach in the Theory of Liquid-Crystal State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevorkyan, E. V.

    2018-03-01

    The variational calculus by Leonhard Euler is the basis for modern mathematics and theoretical physics. The efficiency of variational approach in statistical theory of liquid-crystal state and in general case in condensed state theory is shown. The developed approach in particular allows us to introduce correctly effective pair interactions and optimize the simple models of liquid crystals with help of realistic intermolecular potentials.

  8. State vector reduction - 1: Dynamical reduction theories; changing quantum theory so the statevector represents reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.; Pearle, P.

    1991-02-01

    The propositions, that what we see around us is real and that reality should be represented by the statevector, conflict with quantum theory. In quantum theory, the statevector can readily become a sum of states of comparable norm, each state representing a different reality. In this paper we present the Continuous Spontaneous Localization (CSL) theory, in which a modified Schroedinger equation, while scarcely affecting the dynamics of a microscopic system, rapidly ''reduces'' the statevector of a macroscopic system to a state appropriate for representing individual reality. (author). Refs

  9. Radio Detections During Two State Transitions of the Intermediate-Mass Black Hole HLX-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Natalie; Cseh, David; Lenc, Emil; Godet, Olivier; Barret, Didier; Corbel, Stephane; Farrell, Sean; Fender, Robert; Gehrels, Neil; Heywood, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Relativistic jets are streams of plasma moving at appreciable fractions of the speed of light. They have been observed from stellar-mass black holes (approx. 3 to 20 solar masses) as well as supermassive black holes (approx.. 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 9) Solar Mass) found in the centers of most galaxies. Jets should also be produced by intermediate-mass black holes (approx. 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 5) Solar Mass), although evidence for this third class of black hole has, until recently, been weak. We report the detection of transient radio emission at the location of the intermediate-mass black hole candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1, which is consistent with a discrete jet ejection event. These observations also allow us to refine the mass estimate of the black hole to be between approx. 9 × 10(exp 3) Solar Mass and approx. 9 × 10(exp 4) Solar Mass.

  10. Scattering theory methods for bound state problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raphael, R.B.; Tobocman, W.

    1978-01-01

    For the analysis of the properties of a bound state system one may use in place of the Schroedinger equation the Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation for the wave function or the LS equation for the reactance operator. Use of the LS equation for the reactance operator constrains the solution to have correct asymptotic behaviour, so this approach would appear to be desirable when the bound state wave function is to be used to calculate particle transfer form factors. The Schroedinger equation based N-level analysis of the s-wave bound states of a square well is compared to the ones based on the LS equation. It is found that the LS equation methods work better than the Schroedinger equation method. The method that uses the LS equation for the wave function gives the best results for the wave functions while the method that uses the LS equation for the reactance operator gives the best results for the binding energies. The accuracy of the reactance operator based method is remarkably insensitive to changes in the oscillator constant used for the harmonic oscillator function basis set. It is also remarkably insensitive to the number of nodes in the bound state wave function. (Auth.)

  11. Is the ground state of Yang-Mills theory Coulombic?

    OpenAIRE

    Heinzl, Thomas; Ilderton, Anton; Langfeld, Kurt; Lavelle, Martin; Lutz, Wolfgang; McMullan, David

    2008-01-01

    We study trial states modelling the heavy quark-antiquark ground state in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. A state describing the flux tube between quarks as a thin string of glue is found to be a poor description of the continuum ground state; the infinitesimal thickness of the string leads to UV artifacts which suppress the overlap with the ground state. Contrastingly, a state which surrounds the quarks with non-abelian Coulomb fields is found to have a good overlap with the ground state for all ch...

  12. Anti-correlated Soft Lags in the Intermediate State of Black Hole Source GX 339-4

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram, K.; Rao, A. R.; Choi, C. S.

    2010-01-01

    We report the few hundred second anti-correlated soft lags between soft and hard energy bands in the source GX 339-4 using RXTE observations. In one observation, anti-correlated soft lags were observed using the ISGRI/INTEGRAL hard energy band and the PCA/RXTE soft energy band light curves. The lags were observed when the source was in hard and soft intermediate states, i.e., in a steep power-law state.We found that the temporal and spectral properties were changed during the lag timescale. T...

  13. Theory of heavy quark-antiquark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shifman, M.A.

    1981-01-01

    A brief review of data on Q anti Q quark-antiquark states is presented. Masses and leptonic widths of Q anti Q levels on the basis of QCD sum rules are determined. Spin effects in Q anti Q interactions are discussed. Hadronic transitions between quarkonium levels and the processes of tau/psi→γ + light hadrons, Y→γ + light hadrons are considered [ru

  14. Three-body forces in nuclear matter from intermediate Δ-states in three-nucleon clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, T.; Smulter, L.E.W.; Green, A.M.

    1976-10-01

    The three-body force contribution in nuclear matter is treated as a three-nucleon cluster, in which one of the nucleons becomes, in an intermediate state, a Δ(1236). All exchange diagrams are calculated and found to significantly reduce the energy per particle from the direct graph. This is contrary to earlier estimates of the exchanges, using more approximate approaches. The resulting attractive contribution is rather small, -1.1 MeV at ksub(F)=1.4 fm -1 , but the roughly linear density dependence has a crucial effect on the saturation properties. The sensitivity of the results to the correlations used, and to the two-body force spin structure, is displayed. The energy per particle from clusters with three intermediate Δ's is also estimated. (author)

  15. A conformal field theory description of fractional quantum Hall states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardonne, E.

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis, we give a description of fractional quantum Hall states in terms of conformal field theory (CFT). As was known for a long time, the Laughlin states could be written in terms of correlators of chiral vertex operators of a c=1 CFT. It was shown by G. Moore and N. Read that more general

  16. ANTI-CORRELATED SOFT LAGS IN THE INTERMEDIATE STATE OF BLACK HOLE SOURCE GX 339-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriram, K.; Choi, C. S.; Rao, A. R.

    2010-01-01

    We report the few hundred second anti-correlated soft lags between soft and hard energy bands in the source GX 339-4 using RXTE observations. In one observation, anti-correlated soft lags were observed using the ISGRI/INTEGRAL hard energy band and the PCA/RXTE soft energy band light curves. The lags were observed when the source was in hard and soft intermediate states, i.e., in a steep power-law state. We found that the temporal and spectral properties were changed during the lag timescale. The anti-correlated soft lags are associated with spectral variability during which the geometry of the accretion disk is changed. The observed temporal and spectral variations are explained using the framework of truncated disk geometry. We found that during the lag timescale, the centroid frequency of quasi-periodic oscillation is decreased, the soft flux is decreased along with an increase in the hard flux, and the power-law index steepens together with a decrease in the disk normalization parameter. We argue that these changes could be explained if we assume that the hot corona condenses and forms a disk in the inner region of the accretion disk. The overall spectral and temporal changes support the truncated geometry of the accretion disk in the steep power-law state or in the intermediate state.

  17. Quasi-degenerate perturbation theory using matrix product states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Alavi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we generalize the recently proposed matrix product state perturbation theory (MPSPT) for calculating energies of excited states using quasi-degenerate (QD) perturbation theory. Our formulation uses the Kirtman-Certain-Hirschfelder canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory, which gives Hermitian effective Hamiltonians at each order, and also allows one to make use of Wigner’s 2n + 1 rule. Further, our formulation satisfies Granovsky’s requirement of model space invariance which is important for obtaining smooth potential energy curves. Thus, when we use MPSPT with the Dyall Hamiltonian, we obtain a model space invariant version of quasi-degenerate n-electron valence state perturbation theory (NEVPT), a property that the usual formulation of QD-NEVPT2 based on a multipartitioning technique lacked. We use our method on the benchmark problems of bond breaking of LiF which shows ionic to covalent curve crossing and the twist around the double bond of ethylene where significant valence-Rydberg mixing occurs in the excited states. In accordance with our previous work, we find that multi-reference linearized coupled cluster theory is more accurate than other multi-reference theories of similar cost

  18. Quasi-degenerate perturbation theory using matrix product states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Sandeep, E-mail: sanshar@gmail.com; Jeanmairet, Guillaume [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstraße 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Alavi, Ali, E-mail: a.alavi@fkf.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Heisenbergstraße 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-21

    In this work, we generalize the recently proposed matrix product state perturbation theory (MPSPT) for calculating energies of excited states using quasi-degenerate (QD) perturbation theory. Our formulation uses the Kirtman-Certain-Hirschfelder canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory, which gives Hermitian effective Hamiltonians at each order, and also allows one to make use of Wigner’s 2n + 1 rule. Further, our formulation satisfies Granovsky’s requirement of model space invariance which is important for obtaining smooth potential energy curves. Thus, when we use MPSPT with the Dyall Hamiltonian, we obtain a model space invariant version of quasi-degenerate n-electron valence state perturbation theory (NEVPT), a property that the usual formulation of QD-NEVPT2 based on a multipartitioning technique lacked. We use our method on the benchmark problems of bond breaking of LiF which shows ionic to covalent curve crossing and the twist around the double bond of ethylene where significant valence-Rydberg mixing occurs in the excited states. In accordance with our previous work, we find that multi-reference linearized coupled cluster theory is more accurate than other multi-reference theories of similar cost.

  19. Quasi-degenerate perturbation theory using matrix product states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Alavi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we generalize the recently proposed matrix product state perturbation theory (MPSPT) for calculating energies of excited states using quasi-degenerate (QD) perturbation theory. Our formulation uses the Kirtman-Certain-Hirschfelder canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory, which gives Hermitian effective Hamiltonians at each order, and also allows one to make use of Wigner's 2n + 1 rule. Further, our formulation satisfies Granovsky's requirement of model space invariance which is important for obtaining smooth potential energy curves. Thus, when we use MPSPT with the Dyall Hamiltonian, we obtain a model space invariant version of quasi-degenerate n-electron valence state perturbation theory (NEVPT), a property that the usual formulation of QD-NEVPT2 based on a multipartitioning technique lacked. We use our method on the benchmark problems of bond breaking of LiF which shows ionic to covalent curve crossing and the twist around the double bond of ethylene where significant valence-Rydberg mixing occurs in the excited states. In accordance with our previous work, we find that multi-reference linearized coupled cluster theory is more accurate than other multi-reference theories of similar cost.

  20. Toward a Definition of Complexity for Quantum Field Theory States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Shira; Heller, Michal P; Marrochio, Hugo; Pastawski, Fernando

    2018-03-23

    We investigate notions of complexity of states in continuous many-body quantum systems. We focus on Gaussian states which include ground states of free quantum field theories and their approximations encountered in the context of the continuous version of the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz. Our proposal for quantifying state complexity is based on the Fubini-Study metric. It leads to counting the number of applications of each gate (infinitesimal generator) in the transformation, subject to a state-dependent metric. We minimize the defined complexity with respect to momentum-preserving quadratic generators which form su(1,1) algebras. On the manifold of Gaussian states generated by these operations, the Fubini-Study metric factorizes into hyperbolic planes with minimal complexity circuits reducing to known geodesics. Despite working with quantum field theories far outside the regime where Einstein gravity duals exist, we find striking similarities between our results and those of holographic complexity proposals.

  1. Toward a Definition of Complexity for Quantum Field Theory States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Shira; Heller, Michal P.; Marrochio, Hugo; Pastawski, Fernando

    2018-03-01

    We investigate notions of complexity of states in continuous many-body quantum systems. We focus on Gaussian states which include ground states of free quantum field theories and their approximations encountered in the context of the continuous version of the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz. Our proposal for quantifying state complexity is based on the Fubini-Study metric. It leads to counting the number of applications of each gate (infinitesimal generator) in the transformation, subject to a state-dependent metric. We minimize the defined complexity with respect to momentum-preserving quadratic generators which form s u (1 ,1 ) algebras. On the manifold of Gaussian states generated by these operations, the Fubini-Study metric factorizes into hyperbolic planes with minimal complexity circuits reducing to known geodesics. Despite working with quantum field theories far outside the regime where Einstein gravity duals exist, we find striking similarities between our results and those of holographic complexity proposals.

  2. State variable theories based on Hart's formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korhonen, M.A.; Hannula, S.P.; Li, C.Y.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper a review of the development of a state variable theory for nonelastic deformation is given. The physical and phenomenological basis of the theory and the constitutive equations describing macroplastic, microplastic, anelastic and grain boundary sliding enhanced deformation are presented. The experimental and analytical evaluation of different parameters in the constitutive equations are described in detail followed by a review of the extensive experimental work on different materials. The technological aspects of the state variable approach are highlighted by examples of the simulative and predictive capabilities of the theory. Finally, a discussion of general capabilities, limitations and future developments of the theory and particularly the possible extensions to cover an even wider range of deformation or deformation-related phenomena is presented.

  3. Anatomy of zero-norm states in string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.-T.; Lee, J.-C.; Yi Yang

    2005-01-01

    We calculate and identify the counterparts of zero-norm states in the old covariant first quantized (OCFQ) spectrum of open bosonic string in two other quantization schemes of string theory, namely, the light-cone Del Giudice-Di Vecchia-Fubine zero-norm states and the off-shell Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin (BRST) zero-norm states (with ghost) in the Witten string field theory (WSFT). In particular, special attention is paid to the interparticle zero-norm states in all quantization schemes. For the case of the off-shell BRST zero-norm states, we impose the no-ghost conditions and recover exactly two types of on-shell zero-norm states in the OCFQ string spectrum for the first few low-lying mass levels. We then show that off-shell gauge transformations of WSFT are identical to the on-shell stringy gauge symmetries generated by two types of zero-norm states in the generalized massive σ-model approach of string theory. The high-energy limit of these stringy gauge symmetries was recently used to calculate the proportionality constants, conjectured by Gross, among high-energy scattering amplitudes of different string states. Based on these zero-norm state calculations, we have thus related gauge symmetry of WSFT to the high-energy stringy symmetry of Gross

  4. Is the ground state of Yang-Mills theory Coulombic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzl, T.; Ilderton, A.; Langfeld, K.; Lavelle, M.; Lutz, W.; McMullan, D.

    2008-08-01

    We study trial states modelling the heavy quark-antiquark ground state in SU(2) Yang-Mills theory. A state describing the flux tube between quarks as a thin string of glue is found to be a poor description of the continuum ground state; the infinitesimal thickness of the string leads to UV artifacts which suppress the overlap with the ground state. Contrastingly, a state which surrounds the quarks with non-Abelian Coulomb fields is found to have a good overlap with the ground state for all charge separations. In fact, the overlap increases as the lattice regulator is removed. This opens up the possibility that the Coulomb state is the true ground state in the continuum limit.

  5. Intermediate phases in the hydrogen disproportionated state of NdFeB-type powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, G.; Chapman, J. N.; Brown, D. N.; Harris, I. R.

    2001-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies have been carried out on partially disproportionated NdFeB-type alloys. A new intermediate magnetic (NIM) phase has been identified. Moreover, the lamella structure which subsequently develops from the tetragonal NIM phase comprises a tetragonal NdFe-containing (IL) phase and α-Fe. The experimental data show strong evidence of a well-defined crystallographic relation between both the NIM and lamella phases and between the IL phase and α-Fe. These observations give insight into how crystallographic texture, and hence anisotropy, can be developed in NdFeB-type powders processed by the hydrogenation, disproportionation, desorption, and recombination route. copyright 2001 American Institute of Physics

  6. Orthorhombic Intermediate State in the Zinc Blende to Rocksalt Transformation Path of SiC at High Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catti, Michele

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of the B3/B1 phase transition of SiC has been investigated by periodic LCAO-DFT least-enthalpy calculations. A new transformation pathway, based on a Pmm2 orthorhombic intermediate state with two SiC units per cell, is found to be energetically favored over the traditional R3m mechanism. The computed activation enthalpy is 0.75eV/SiC unit at the predicted transition pressure of 92GPa (B3LYP functional). Activation enthalpy and activation volume vs pressure are analyzed to characterize the kinetic aspects of the transformation

  7. [Artificial Cysteine Bridges on the Surface of Green Fluorescent Protein Affect Hydration of Its Transition and Intermediate States].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, T N; Nagibina, G S; Surin, A K; Glukhova, K A; Melnik, B S

    2018-01-01

    Studying the effect of cysteine bridges on different energy levels of multistage folding proteins will enable a better understanding of the process of folding and functioning of globular proteins. In particular, it will create prospects for directed change in the stability and rate of protein folding. In this work, using the method of differential scanning microcalorimetry, we have studied the effect of three cysteine bridges introduced in different structural elements of the green fluorescent protein on the denaturation enthalpies, activation energies, and heat-capacity increments when this protein passes from native to intermediate and transition states. The studies have allowed us to confirm that, with this protein denaturation, the process hardly damages the structure initially, but then changes occur in the protein structure in the region of 4-6 beta sheets. The cysteine bridge introduced in this region decreases the hydration of the second transition state and increases the hydration of the second intermediate state during the thermal denaturation of the green fluorescent protein.

  8. Twisted boundary states in c=1 coset conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2003-01-01

    We study the mutual consistency of twisted boundary conditions in the coset conformal field theory G/H. We calculate the overlap of the twisted boundary states of G/H with the untwisted ones, and show that the twisted boundary states are consistently defined in the charge-conjugation modular invariant. The overlap of the twisted boundary states is expressed by the branching functions of a twisted affine Lie algebra. As a check of our argument, we study the diagonal coset theory so(2n) 1 +so(2n) 1 /so(2n) 2 , which is equivalent to the orbifold S 1 /Z 2 at a particular radius. We construct the boundary states twisted by the automorphisms of the unextended Dynkin diagram of so(2n), and show their mutual consistency by identifying their counterpart in the orbifold. For the triality of so(8), the twisted states of the coset theory correspond to neither the Neumann nor the Dirichlet boundary states of the orbifold and yield conformal boundary states that preserve only the Virasoro algebra. (author)

  9. A plane-wave final-state theory of ATI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parker, J.S.; Clark, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    A Fermi Golden Rule calculation of ionization cross-sections provides us with the simplest example of a plane-wave final-state theory. In this method the final (unbound) state is modeled as a plane wave, an approximation that generally gives best results in the high energy limit in which the affect of the atomic potential on the final state can be neglected. A cross-section is then calculated from the matrix element connecting the bound initial state with the final state. The idea of generalizing this method to model transitions among unbound states is credited to L.V. Keldysh, and a number of related formalisms have been proposed that are consistent with the general features of experimental data. Here we describe a plane-wave final-state model of ATI that is in the spirit of these theories, but differs significantly in its implementation and predictions. We will present a comparison of the predictions of the plane-wave model with those of a full numerical integration of the time-dependent Schrodinger equation for atomic hydrogen in a radiation field. The theory and the numerical integration give good qualitative agreement in their predictions of photoelectron spectra over about 14 orders of magnitude

  10. Observer dependence of quantum states in relativistic quantum field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malin, S.

    1982-01-01

    Quantum states can be understood as either (i) describing quantum systems or (ii) representing observers' knowledge about quantum systems. These different meanings are shown to imply different transformation properties in relativistic field theories. The rules for the reduction of quantum states and the transformation properties of quantum states under Lorentz transformations are derived for case (ii). The results obtained are applied to a quantum system recently presented and analyzed by Aharonov and Albert. It is shown that the present results, combined with Aharonov and Albert's, amount to a proof of Bohr's view that quantum states represent observers' knowledge about quantum systems

  11. The atmospheric impacts of monoterpene ozonolysis on global stabilised Criegee intermediate budgets and SO2 oxidation: experiment, theory and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Newland

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The gas-phase reaction of alkenes with ozone is known to produce stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCIs. These biradical/zwitterionic species have the potential to act as atmospheric oxidants for trace pollutants such as SO2, enhancing the formation of sulfate aerosol with impacts on air quality and health, radiative transfer and climate. However, the importance of this chemistry is uncertain as a consequence of limited understanding of the abundance and atmospheric fate of SCIs. In this work we apply experimental, theoretical and numerical modelling methods to quantify the atmospheric impacts, abundance and fate of the structurally diverse SCIs derived from the ozonolysis of monoterpenes, the second most abundant group of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere. We have investigated the removal of SO2 by SCIs formed from the ozonolysis of three atmospherically important monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene in the presence of varying amounts of water vapour in large-scale simulation chamber experiments that are representative of boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on water vapour concentration, but this dependence is not linear across the range of [H2O] explored. At low [H2O] a strong dependence of SO2 removal on [H2O] is observed, while at higher [H2O] this dependence becomes much weaker. This is interpreted as being caused by the production of a variety of structurally (and hence chemically different SCIs in each of the systems studied, which displayed different rates of reaction with water and of unimolecular rearrangement or decomposition. The determined rate constants, k(SCI+H2O, for those SCIs that react primarily with H2O range from 4 to 310  ×  10−15 cm3 s−1. For those SCIs that predominantly react unimolecularly, determined rates range from 130 to 240 s−1. These values are in line with previous results for the (analogous stereo-specific SCI system of syn-/anti-CH3

  12. The atmospheric impacts of monoterpene ozonolysis on global stabilised Criegee intermediate budgets and SO2 oxidation: experiment, theory and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newland, Mike J.; Rickard, Andrew R.; Sherwen, Tomás; Evans, Mathew J.; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William J.

    2018-05-01

    The gas-phase reaction of alkenes with ozone is known to produce stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCIs). These biradical/zwitterionic species have the potential to act as atmospheric oxidants for trace pollutants such as SO2, enhancing the formation of sulfate aerosol with impacts on air quality and health, radiative transfer and climate. However, the importance of this chemistry is uncertain as a consequence of limited understanding of the abundance and atmospheric fate of SCIs. In this work we apply experimental, theoretical and numerical modelling methods to quantify the atmospheric impacts, abundance and fate of the structurally diverse SCIs derived from the ozonolysis of monoterpenes, the second most abundant group of unsaturated hydrocarbons in the atmosphere. We have investigated the removal of SO2 by SCIs formed from the ozonolysis of three atmospherically important monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene) in the presence of varying amounts of water vapour in large-scale simulation chamber experiments that are representative of boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on water vapour concentration, but this dependence is not linear across the range of [H2O] explored. At low [H2O] a strong dependence of SO2 removal on [H2O] is observed, while at higher [H2O] this dependence becomes much weaker. This is interpreted as being caused by the production of a variety of structurally (and hence chemically) different SCIs in each of the systems studied, which displayed different rates of reaction with water and of unimolecular rearrangement or decomposition. The determined rate constants, k(SCI+H2O), for those SCIs that react primarily with H2O range from 4 to 310 × 10-15 cm3 s-1. For those SCIs that predominantly react unimolecularly, determined rates range from 130 to 240 s-1. These values are in line with previous results for the (analogous) stereo-specific SCI system of syn-/anti-CH3CHOO. The experimental results are

  13. Multipulse spectroscopy on the wild-type and YM210W Bacterial Reaction Centre uncovers a new intermediate state in the special pair excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Stuart, T. A.; van Grondelle, R.

    2009-06-01

    The Bacterial Reaction Centre (BRC) has a complex electronic excited state, P ∗, that evolves into subsequent charge separated product states P +H - and P +B -. Pump-dump-probe spectroscopy on the wild-type BRC and on YM210W, a mutant with a stabilized, long-lived P ∗ excited state, has uncovered a new charge-separated state in both BRC's. When P ∗ is dumped, a fraction of its population is transferred to this state that has a strong Stark shift in the accessory bacteriochlorophyll (B M) region which serves as a signature for P + and a lifetime highly comparable to the slow phase of P ∗ decay. This lead us propose this intermediate to be P +/P -.

  14. 1/4 BPS States and Non-Perturbative Couplings in N=4 String Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Lerche, W.

    1999-01-01

    We compute certain 2K+4-point one-loop couplings in the type IIA string compactified on K3 x T^2, which are related a topological index on this manifold. Their special feature is that they are sensitive to only short and intermediate BPS multiplets. The couplings derive from underlying prepotentials of the form G(T,U)=d^{2K}V ln[chi10(T,U,V)], where chi10(T,U,V) is the helicity partition function of 1/4 BPS states. In the dual heterotic string on T^6, the amplitudes describe non-perturbative gravitational corrections due to bound states of fivebrane instantons with heterotic world-sheet instantons. We argue, as a consequence, that our results give information about instanton configurations in six dimensional Sp(2k) gauge theories on T^6.

  15. Possible States Theory and the Occurrence of Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, S.

    2010-01-01

    Possible states theory is an original alternative to the major schools of thought, relativity and quantum mechanics. It begins with the observation that for every object there exists a collection of past, future and possible interactions with other objects. The members of the collection are called the possible states. space-time is excluded as an ordering principle. Cosmologically, the theory suggests that we live in a permanent now, a complex present where everything that can happen, does and it all happens at once. It envisions a sea of interactions, in constant motion, where the arrow of change can point in any direction. The formalism is finite and discrete. The dimensionality of an interaction is a variable and must be a positive integer. A vector space can be defined. Statistics analogous to mass and energy can be developed. The theory produces experimentally verifiable predictions. It is broadly consistent with quantum theory. The phenomena of classical physics can be accounted for as a special case of the propagation of change in low coherence states. The theory offers a basis for technological development. The advantage is the ability to cause change which is nonlocal and unconstrained by conservation laws. Moreover, it allows the creation of technology that has some of the properties we associate with sentience.

  16. Structural Insights of the Cysteine Protease Heynein from Induction and Characterization of Non-native Intermediate States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basant K. Patel

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteases are vital to cell physiology and many plants secrete these proteases for defense purposes. Many recent studies have reported unusually high stabilities for several plant cysteine proteases which possibly enable these proteases to function under adverse environmental conditions. Here, we have examined the conformational features of a new plant cysteine protease heynein using spectroscopic tools to understand the basis for its robust functional stability. The studies revealed structural integrity over a wide range of pH (2.5-12.0, temperature (65 oC and urea (8M. However, at pH 2.0, the protein gets acid-unfolded (UA -state with exposed hydrophobic patches, which upon addition of more protons (pH 0.5 or anions (0.5 M KCl and 0.2 M Na2 SO4 yields conformationally distinct refolded intermediates respectively termed: A-, I 1 - and I 2 -states. Strikingly, a high methanol level drives the UA -state into a predominantly -sheet rich conformation (O-state. We observed three-state unfolding kinetics of the I 2 -state by urea, possibly suggesting presence of two domains in the heynein molecule.

  17. Crystalline state photoreactions direct observation of reaction processes and metastable intermediates

    CERN Document Server

    Ohashi, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Offering some 300 references, this book focuses on chemical reactions in the crystalline state. The reactions span many fields in inorganic and organic chemistry, making this a useful resource for inorganic, organic and physical chemists and graduate students.

  18. Multi-state model for studying an intermediate event using time-dependent covariates: application to breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Hirmer, Carolina; Schumacher, Martin

    2013-06-20

    The aim of this article is to propose several methods that allow to investigate how and whether the shape of the hazard ratio after an intermediate event depends on the waiting time to occurrence of this event and/or the sojourn time in this state. A simple multi-state model, the illness-death model, is used as a framework to investigate the occurrence of this intermediate event. Several approaches are shown and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. All these approaches are based on Cox regression. As different time-scales are used, these models go beyond Markov models. Different estimation methods for the transition hazards are presented. Additionally, time-varying covariates are included into the model using an approach based on fractional polynomials. The different methods of this article are then applied to a dataset consisting of four studies conducted by the German Breast Cancer Study Group (GBSG). The occurrence of the first isolated locoregional recurrence (ILRR) is studied. The results contribute to the debate on the role of the ILRR with respect to the course of the breast cancer disease and the resulting prognosis. We have investigated different modelling strategies for the transition hazard after ILRR or in general after an intermediate event. Including time-dependent structures altered the resulting hazard functions considerably and it was shown that this time-dependent structure has to be taken into account in the case of our breast cancer dataset. The results indicate that an early recurrence increases the risk of death. A late ILRR increases the hazard function much less and after the successful removal of the second tumour the risk of death is almost the same as before the recurrence. With respect to distant disease, the appearance of the ILRR only slightly increases the risk of death if the recurrence was treated successfully. It is important to realize that there are several modelling strategies for the intermediate event and that

  19. Indirect contributions to electron-impact ionization of Li+ (1 s 2 s S31 ) ions: Role of intermediate double-K -vacancy states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, A.; Borovik, A.; Huber, K.; Schippers, S.; Fursa, D. V.; Bray, I.

    2018-02-01

    Fine details of the cross section for electron-impact ionization of metastable two-electron Li+(1 s 2 s S31) ions are scrutinized by both experiment and theory. Beyond direct knockoff ionization, indirect ionization mechanisms proceeding via formation of intermediate double-K-vacancy (hollow) states either in a Li+ ion or in a neutral lithium atom and subsequent emission of one or two electrons, respectively, can contribute to the net production of Li2 + ions. The partial cross sections for such contributions are less than 4% of the total single-ionization cross section. The characteristic steps, resonances, and interference phenomena in the indirect ionization contribution are measured with an experimental energy spread of less than 0.9 eV and with a statistical relative uncertainty of the order of 1.7%, requiring a level of statistical uncertainty in the total single-ionization cross section of better than 0.05%. The measurements are accompanied by convergent-close-coupling calculations performed on a fine energy grid. Theory and experiment are in remarkable agreement concerning the fine details of the ionization cross section. Comparison with previous R-matrix results is less favorable.

  20. Complexity Leadership Theory: A United States Marine Corps Historical Overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    DD-MM-YYYY) 23-04-2017 2. REPORT TYPE Master’s Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) JUN 2016 – MAY 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Complexity...Monograph Title : Complexity Leadership Theory : A United States Marine Corps Historical Overlay Approved by...General Ridgway’s Success in Korea.” Master’s thesis , United States Army Command and General Staff College, 2010. Diana, Gabriel. “Vision, Education

  1. Theory of ground state factorization in quantum cooperative systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampaolo, Salvatore M; Adesso, Gerardo; Illuminati, Fabrizio

    2008-05-16

    We introduce a general analytic approach to the study of factorization points and factorized ground states in quantum cooperative systems. The method allows us to determine rigorously the existence, location, and exact form of separable ground states in a large variety of, generally nonexactly solvable, spin models belonging to different universality classes. The theory applies to translationally invariant systems, irrespective of spatial dimensionality, and for spin-spin interactions of arbitrary range.

  2. Characterization of particle states in relativistic classical quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, L.P.; Rabin, Y.

    1977-02-01

    Classical and quantum relativistic mechanics are studied. The notion of a ''particle'' is defined in the classical case and the interpretation of mechanics in space-time is clarified. These notions are carried over to the quantum theory, as much as possible. The relation between the results of Feyman's path integral approach and the theory of Horwitz and Piron is discussed. The ''particle'' interpretation is shown to imply an asymptotic condition for scattering. A general method of constructing the dynamical mass spectrum of composite ''particle'' states is discussed. An interference experiment is proposed to affirm the interpretation and applicability of Stueckelberg type wave functions for actual physical phenomena. Some discussion of the relation of this relativistic quantum theory to Feynman's approach to quantum field theory is also given

  3. Libertarian Punishment Theory: Working for, and Donating to, the State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Block

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we assume the contours of the libertarian philosophy, its view toward the unjustified state, and, also, the punishment theory of this perspective. We address the narrow question of what punishment is justified for partaking in statist activities.

  4. Improved Fluid Perturbation Theory: Equation of state for Fluid Xenon

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qiong; Liu, Hai-Feng; Zhang, Gong-Mu; Zhao, Yan-Hong; Tian, Ming-Feng; Song, Hai-Feng

    2016-01-01

    The traditional fluid perturbation theory is improved by taking electronic excitations and ionizations into account, in the framework of average ion spheres. It is applied to calculate the equation of state for fluid Xenon, which turns out in good agreement with the available shock data.

  5. Subjective Expected Utility Theory without States of the World

    OpenAIRE

    Edi Karni

    2005-01-01

    This paper develops an axiomatic theory of decision making under uncertainty that dispenses with the state space. The results are subjective expected utility models with unique, action-dependent, subjective probabilities, and a utility function defined over wealth-effect pairs that is unique up to positive linear transformation.

  6. Bound states in quantum field theory and coherent states: A fresh look

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, S.P.

    1986-09-01

    We consider here bound state equations in quantum field theory where the state explicitly includes radiation quanta as constituents with the number of such quanta not fixed. The fully interacting system is dealt with through equal time commutators/anticommutators of field operators. The multiparticle channel for the radiation field is approximated through coherent state representations. (author)

  7. Rydberg energies using excited state density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.-L.; Wu Qin; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2008-01-01

    We utilize excited state density functional theory (eDFT) to study Rydberg states in atoms. We show both analytically and numerically that semilocal functionals can give quite reasonable Rydberg energies from eDFT, even in cases where time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) fails catastrophically. We trace these findings to the fact that in eDFT the Kohn-Sham potential for each state is computed using the appropriate excited state density. Unlike the ground state potential, which typically falls off exponentially, the sequence of excited state potentials has a component that falls off polynomially with distance, leading to a Rydberg-type series. We also address the rigorous basis of eDFT for these systems. Perdew and Levy have shown using the constrained search formalism that every stationary density corresponds, in principle, to an exact stationary state of the full many-body Hamiltonian. In the present context, this means that the excited state DFT solutions are rigorous as long as they deliver the minimum noninteracting kinetic energy for the given density. We use optimized effective potential techniques to show that, in some cases, the eDFT Rydberg solutions appear to deliver the minimum kinetic energy because the associated density is not pure state v-representable. We thus find that eDFT plays a complementary role to constrained DFT: The former works only if the excited state density is not the ground state of some potential while the latter applies only when the density is a ground state density.

  8. Equation of states and phonons at high pressure of intermediate valence compound TmTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, Prafulla K.; Sanyal, Sankar P.

    1997-01-01

    The study of equation of states and pressure dependence of the phonon frequencies of the compound TmTe have been performed by using a simple interatomic potential approach in the frame work of rigid ion model. The compressibility study confirms that below 2 GPa the valence of the Tm is 2+ while there is a valence transition from Tm 2+ to Tm 3+ above 2 GPa. The phonon frequencies of TmTe increases as pressure is increased. (author)

  9. Present state of the theory of a MHD-dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soward, A M; Roberts, P H

    1976-01-01

    A review is given of the state of the theory of a MHD-dynamo, that is, the theory of self-excited magnetic fields in homogeneous moving liquids. A description is given of two basic approaches-the turbulent dynamos of Steinbeck, Krause and Redler and the high-conductivity dynamo of Braginski, and a look is also taken at the relation between these dynamos. Finally a look is taken at the results of recent studies of the total problem of a MHD-dynamo, that is, at the results of recent attempts to solve the electro- and hydrodynamic equations and to obtain self-excited fields. 6 figs., 122 ref. (SJR)

  10. Thermodynamic approach to the inelastic state variable theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashner, P.A.

    1978-06-01

    A continuum model is proposed as a theoretical foundation for the inelastic state variable theory of Hart. The model is based on the existence of a free energy function and the assumption that a strained material element recalls two other local configurations which are, in some specified manner, descriptive of prior deformation. A precise formulation of these material hypotheses within the classical thermodynamical framework leads to the recovery of a generalized elastic law and the specification of evolutionary laws for the remembered configurations which are frame invariant and formally valid for finite strains. Moreover, the precise structure of Hart's theory is recovered when strains are assumed to be small

  11. Inequivalent coherent state representations in group field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegeles, Alexander; Oriti, Daniele; Tomlin, Casey

    2018-06-01

    In this paper we propose an algebraic formulation of group field theory and consider non-Fock representations based on coherent states. We show that we can construct representations with an infinite number of degrees of freedom on compact manifolds. We also show that these representations break translation symmetry. Since such representations can be regarded as quantum gravitational systems with an infinite number of fundamental pre-geometric building blocks, they may be more suitable for the description of effective geometrical phases of the theory.

  12. Intermediate treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Jones; Wayne D. Shepperd

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate treatments are those applied after a new stand is successfully established and before the final harvest. These include not only intermediate cuttings - primarily thinning - but also fertilization, irrigation, and protection of the stand from damaging agents.

  13. Mid-infrared picosecond pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe experiments to resolve a ground-state intermediate in cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; Clark, Ian P; Towrie, Michael; van Thor, Jasper J

    2009-12-24

    Multipulse picosecond mid-infrared spectroscopy has been used to study photochemical reactions of the cyanobacterial phytochrome photoreceptor Cph1. Different photophysical schemes have been discussed in the literature to describe the pathways after photoexcitation, particularly, to identify reaction phases that are linked to photoisomerisation and electronic decay in the 1566-1772 cm(-1) region that probes C=C and C=O stretching modes of the tetrapyrrole chromophore. Here, multipulse spectroscopy is employed, where, compared to conventional visible pump-mid-infrared probe spectroscopy, an additional visible pulse is incorporated that interacts with populations that are evolving on the excited- and ground-state potential energy surfaces. The time delays between the pump and the dump pulse are chosen such that the dump pulse interacts with different phases in the reaction process. The pump and dump pulses are at the same wavelength, 640 nm, and are resonant with the Pr ground state as well as with the excited state and intermediates. Because the dump pulse additionally pumps the remaining, partially recovered, and partially oriented ground-state population, theory is developed for estimating the fraction of excited-state molecules. The calculations take into account the model-dependent ground-state recovery fraction, the angular dependence of the population transfer resulting from the finite bleach that occurs with linearly polarized intense femtosecond optical excitation, and the partially oriented population for the dump field. Distinct differences between the results from the experiments that use a 1 or a 14 ps dump time favor a branching evolution from S1 to an excited state or reconfigured chromophore and to a newly identified ground-state intermediate (GSI). Optical dumping at 1 ps shows the instantaneous induced absorption of a delocalized C=C stretching mode at 1608 cm(-1), where the increased cross section is associated with the electronic ground-state

  14. Magneto-optical study of the intermediate state in type-I superconductors: Effects of sample shape and applied current

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoberg, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    The magnetic flux structures in the intermediate state of bulk, pinning-free Type-I superconductors are studied using a high resolution magneto-optical imaging technique. Unlike most previous studies, this work focuses on the pattern formation of the coexisting normal and superconducting phases in the intermediate state. The influence of various parameters such as sample shape, structure defects (pinning) and applied current are discussed in relation to two distinct topologies: flux tubes (closed topology) and laminar (open topology). Imaging and magnetization measurements performed on samples of different shapes (cones, hemispheres and slabs), show that contrary to previous beliefs, the tubular structure is the equilibrium topology, but it is unstable toward defects and flux motion. Moreover, the application of current into a sample with the geometric barrier can replace an established laminar structure with flux tubes. At very high currents, however, there exists a laminar 'stripe pattern.' Quantitative analysis of the mean tube diameter is shown to be in good agreement with the prediction proposed by Goren and Tinkham. This is the first time that this model has been confirmed experimentally. Further research into the flux tube phase shows a direct correlation with the current loop model proposed in the 1990's by Goldstein, Jackson and Dorsey. There also appears a range of flux tube density that results in a suprafroth structure, a well-formed polygonal mesh, which behaves according to the physics of foams, following standard statistical laws such as von Neumann and Lewis. The reaction of flux structures to a fast-ramped magnetic field was also studied. This provided an alignment of the structure not normally observed at slow ramp rates.

  15. Dual process theory and intermediate effect: are faculty and residents' performance on multiple-choice, licensing exam questions different?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, T.; Durning, S.J.; Artino, A.R.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der; Holmboe, E.; Lipner, R.; Schuwirth, L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical reasoning is essential for the practice of medicine. Dual process theory conceptualizes reasoning as falling into two general categories: nonanalytic reasoning (pattern recognition) and analytic reasoning (active comparing and contrasting of alternatives). The debate continues

  16. Photo- and radiation chemical studies of intermediates involved in excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.Z.

    1985-01-01

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of the most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. The authors research, which has utilized the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: i) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; ii) the control of the quantum yields of formation of redox products; iii) the mechanism by which reduced species interact with water to yield H 2 homogeneously and heterogeneously. EDTA is among the most popular sacrificial electron donors used in model systems. Its role is to scavenge the oxidized form of the photosensitizer in order to prevent its rapid reaction with the reduced form of the electron relay species that results from the electron-transfer quenching of the excited photosensitizer. In systems involving MV 2+ , the radicals resulting from the oxidation of EDTA can eventually lead to the generation of a second equivalent of MV + ; the reducing agent is believed to be a radical localized on the carbon atom alpha to the carboxylate group. The reaction of radiolytically-generated OH/H with EDTA produces this radical directly via H-abstraction or indirectly via deprotonation of the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen radical site in the oxidized amine moiety; it reduces MV 2+ with rate constants of 2.8 x 10 9 , 7.6 x 10 9 , and 8.5 x 10 6 M -1 s -1 at pH 12.5, 8.3, and 4.7, respectively. Degradative decarboxylation of EDTA-radicals and their back electron-transfer reactions are enhanced in acidic solution causing the yield of MV + to be severely diminished

  17. Multiconfiguration Pair-Density Functional Theory Outperforms Kohn-Sham Density Functional Theory and Multireference Perturbation Theory for Ground-State and Excited-State Charge Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Hoyer, Chad E; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-08-11

    The correct description of charge transfer in ground and excited states is very important for molecular interactions, photochemistry, electrochemistry, and charge transport, but it is very challenging for Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT). KS-DFT exchange-correlation functionals without nonlocal exchange fail to describe both ground- and excited-state charge transfer properly. We have recently proposed a theory called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), which is based on a combination of multiconfiguration wave function theory with a new type of density functional called an on-top density functional. Here we have used MC-PDFT to study challenging ground- and excited-state charge-transfer processes by using on-top density functionals obtained by translating KS exchange-correlation functionals. For ground-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT performs better than either the PBE exchange-correlation functional or CASPT2 wave function theory. For excited-state charge transfer, MC-PDFT (unlike KS-DFT) shows qualitatively correct behavior at long-range with great improvement in predicted excitation energies.

  18. Knot theory and a physical state of quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liko, Tomas; Kauffman, Louis H

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the theory of knots, and describe how knot invariants arise naturally in gravitational physics. The focus of this review is to delineate the relationship between knot theory and the loop representation of non-perturbative canonical quantum general relativity (loop quantum gravity). This leads naturally to a discussion of the Kodama wavefunction, a state which is conjectured to be the ground state of the gravitational field with positive cosmological constant. This review can serve as a self-contained introduction to loop quantum gravity and related areas. Our intent is to make the paper accessible to a wider audience that may include topologists, knot theorists, and other persons innocent of the physical background to this approach to quantum gravity. (topical review)

  19. Coherent states field theory in supramolecular polymer physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, Glenn H.; Delaney, Kris T.

    2018-05-01

    In 1970, Edwards and Freed presented an elegant representation of interacting branched polymers that resembles the coherent states (CS) formulation of second-quantized field theory. This CS polymer field theory has been largely overlooked during the intervening period in favor of more conventional "auxiliary field" (AF) interacting polymer representations that form the basis of modern self-consistent field theory (SCFT) and field-theoretic simulation approaches. Here we argue that the CS representation provides a simpler and computationally more efficient framework than the AF approach for broad classes of reversibly bonding polymers encountered in supramolecular polymer science. The CS formalism is reviewed, initially for a simple homopolymer solution, and then extended to supramolecular polymers capable of forming reversible linkages and networks. In the context of the Edwards model of a non-reacting homopolymer solution and one and two-component models of telechelic reacting polymers, we discuss the structure of CS mean-field theory, including the equivalence to SCFT, and show how weak-amplitude expansions (random phase approximations) can be readily developed without explicit enumeration of all reaction products in a mixture. We further illustrate how to analyze CS field theories beyond SCFT at the level of Gaussian field fluctuations and provide a perspective on direct numerical simulations using a recently developed complex Langevin technique.

  20. Surface hopping, transition state theory and decoherence. I. Scattering theory and time-reversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amber; Herman, Michael F; Ouyang, Wenjun; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-10-07

    We provide an in-depth investigation of transmission coefficients as computed using the augmented-fewest switches surface hopping algorithm in the low energy regime. Empirically, microscopic reversibility is shown to hold approximately. Furthermore, we show that, in some circumstances, including decoherence on top of surface hopping calculations can help recover (as opposed to destroy) oscillations in the transmission coefficient as a function of energy; these oscillations can be studied analytically with semiclassical scattering theory. Finally, in the spirit of transition state theory, we also show that transmission coefficients can be calculated rather accurately starting from the curve crossing point and running trajectories forwards and backwards.

  1. Series expansions of the density of states in SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denbleyker, A.; Du, Daping; Liu, Yuzhi; Meurice, Y.; Velytsky, A.

    2008-01-01

    We calculate numerically the density of states n(S) for SU(2) lattice gauge theory on L 4 lattices [S is the Wilson's action and n(S) measures the relative number of ways S can be obtained]. Small volume dependences are resolved for small values of S. We compare ln(n(S)) with weak and strong coupling expansions. Intermediate order expansions show a good overlap for values of S corresponding to the crossover. We relate the convergence of these expansions to those of the average plaquette. We show that, when known logarithmic singularities are subtracted from ln(n(S)), expansions in Legendre polynomials appear to converge and could be suitable to determine the Fisher's zeros of the partition function.

  2. Schistosomiasis mansoni in Bananal (State of São Paulo, Brazil: II. Intermediate hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Manuel Santana Teles

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available We conducted monthly snail captures in Bananal, State of São Paulo, Brazil, between March 1998 and February 2001, to identify Schistosoma mansoni vectors, estimate seasonal population changes, and delimit foci. We also evaluated the impact of improvements in city water supply and basic sanitation facilities. We identified 28,651 vector specimens, 28,438 as Biomphalaria tenagophila, 49 of them (0.2% infected with S. mansoni, and 213 as B. straminea, none of the latter infected. Vectors predominated in water bodies having some vegetation along their banks. Neither population density nor local vegetation could be linked to vector infection. We found the first infected snails in 1998 (from March to May. Further captures of infected snails ocurred, without exception, from July to December, when rainfall was least. Irrespective of season, overall temperature ranged from 16.5ºC to 21ºC; pH values, from 6.0 to 6.8. Neither factor was associated with snail population density. Frequent contact of people with the river result from wading across it, extracting sand from its bottom, fishing, washing animals, etc. Despite a marked reduction in contamination, cercaria shedding persists. Whatever the location along its urban course, contact with river Bananal, particularly of the unprotected skin, entails risks of infection.

  3. Optimal state estimation theory applied to safeguards accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, D.H.; Morrison, G.W.

    1977-01-01

    This paper presents a unified theory for the application of modern state estimation techniques to nuclear material accountability. First a summary of the current MUF/LEMUF approach is detailed. It is shown that when inventory measurement error is large in comparison to transfer measurement error, improved estimates of the losses can be achieved using the cumulative summation technique. However, the optimal estimator is shown to be the Kalman filter. An enhancement of the retrospective estimation of losses can be achieved using linear smoothing. State space models are developed for a mixed oxide fuel fabrication facility and examples are presented

  4. Bound-state perturbation theory and annihilation effects in positronium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasabadi, A.; Repko, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    Working in Coulomb gauge and using the lowest-order equation proposed by Barbieri and Remiddi it is calculated, in the one-loop order of perturbation theory, the decay rate and the energy shift of the ground states of parapositronium and orthopositronium, respectively. Our result for the decay rate agrees with that of Harris and Brown. For contribution of one-photon-annihilation channel to the energy shift, it is confirmed the result of Karplus and Klein. These results are derived completely within the bound-state formalism and avoid the necessity of performing on-mass-shell wave function and vertex renormalization subtractions

  5. Reversible Photoinduced Reductive Elimination of H2 from the Nitrogenase Dihydride State, the E(4)(4H) Janus Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukoyanov, Dmitriy; Khadka, Nimesh; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Dean, Dennis R; Seefeldt, Lance C; Hoffman, Brian M

    2016-02-03

    We recently demonstrated that N2 reduction by nitrogenase involves the obligatory release of one H2 per N2 reduced. These studies focus on the E4(4H) "Janus intermediate", which has accumulated four reducing equivalents as two [Fe-H-Fe] bridging hydrides. E4(4H) is poised to bind and reduce N2 through reductive elimination (re) of the two hydrides as H2, coupled to the binding/reduction of N2. To obtain atomic-level details of the re activation process, we carried out in situ 450 nm photolysis of E4(4H) in an EPR cavity at temperatures below 20 K. ENDOR and EPR measurements show that photolysis generates a new FeMo-co state, denoted E4(2H)*, through the photoinduced re of the two bridging hydrides of E4(4H) as H2. During cryoannealing at temperatures above 175 K, E4(2H)* reverts to E4(4H) through the oxidative addition (oa) of the H2. The photolysis quantum yield is temperature invariant at liquid helium temperatures and shows a rather large kinetic isotope effect, KIE = 10. These observations imply that photoinduced release of H2 involves a barrier to the combination of the two nascent H atoms, in contrast to a barrierless process for monometallic inorganic complexes, and further suggest that H2 formation involves nuclear tunneling through that barrier. The oa recombination of E4(2H)* with the liberated H2 offers compelling evidence for the Janus intermediate as the point at which H2 is necessarily lost during N2 reduction; this mechanistically coupled loss must be gated by N2 addition that drives the re/oa equilibrium toward reductive elimination of H2 with N2 binding/reduction.

  6. The molecular electron density distribution meeting place of X-ray diffraction and quantum chemistry intermediate - between theory and experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feil, D.; Feil, Dirk

    1992-01-01

    Quantum chemistry and the concepts used daily in chemistry are increasingly growing apart. Among the concepts that are able to bridge the gap between theory and experimental practice, electron density distribution has an important place. The study of this distribution has led to new developments in

  7. Peculiarities of the intermediate valence state of Ce in CeM2Si2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni) compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koterlyn, M.; Shcherba, I.; Yasnitskii, R.; Koterlyn, G.

    2007-01-01

    The results of thermoelectric power and the electrical resistivity measurements connected with the intermediate valence (IV) of Ce are presented for the compounds CeM 2 Si 2 (M = Fe, Co, Ni) in the temperature range of 4-800 K. It is shown that CeM 2 Si 2 are Kondo-lattices with the coherence scale T coh ∼ 60-80 K and the so-called single-site Kondo temperature T K ∼ 10 3 K. On the example of CeNi 2 Si 2 we have studied the changes in the structure of density of f states (f-DOS) near the Fermi energy caused by atomic substitutions. The results of structural, transport, magnetic, and Ce L III X-ray absorption spectra measurements in the series Ce 1-x La x Ni 2 Si 2 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.6), Ce(Ni 1-y Cu y ) 2 Si 2 (0 ≤ y ≤ 0.6) and CeNi 2 (Si 1-z Ge z ) 2 (0 ≤ z ≤ 0.5) are presented. We found that the IV state of Ce in the CeM 2 Si 2 is an evidence of possible opening a wide pseudogap Δ ∼ kT K within the f-DOS structure slightly above the Fermi energy

  8. Nuts and Bolts of the Ion Band State Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Scott R.

    2005-12-01

    The nuts and bolts of our ion band state theory of low energy nuclear reactions (LENR's) in palladium-deuteride (PdD) and palladium-hydride (PdH) are the electrons that hold together or tear apart the bonds (or lack of bonds) between deuterons (d's) or protons (p's) and the host material. In PdDx and PdHx, this bonding is strongly correlated with loading. In ambient loading conditions (x ≲ 0.6), bonding inhibits ion band state occupation. As x → 1, slight increases and decreases in loading can induce "vibrations" (which have conventionally been thought to occur from phonons) that can induce potential losses or increases of p/d. Naive assumptions about phonons fail to include these losses and increases. These effects can occur because neither H or D has core electrons and because in either PdD or PdH, the electrons near the Fermi energy have negligible overlap with the nucleus of either D or H. In the past, implicitly, we have used these facts to justify our ion band state theory. Here, we present a more formal justification, based on the relationship between H(D) ion band states (IBS's) and H(D) phonons that includes a microscopic picture that explains why occupation of IBS's can occur in PdD and PdH and how this can lead to nuclear reactions.

  9. Theory of quasiparticle surface states in semiconductor surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybertsen, M.S.; Louie, S.G.

    1988-01-01

    A first-principles theory of the quasiparticle surface-state energies on semiconductor surfaces is developed. The surface properties are calculated using a repeated-slab geometry. Many-body effects due to the electron-electron interaction are represented by the electron self-energy operator including the full surface Green's function and local fields and dynamical screening effects in the Coulomb interaction. Calculated surface-state energies for the prototypical Si(111):As and Ge(111):As surfaces are presented. The calculated energies and dispersions for the occupied surface states (resonances) are in excellent agreement with recent angle-resolved photoemission data. Predictions are made for the position of empty surface states on both surfaces which may be experimentally accessible. The resulting surface state gap at Gamma-bar for Si(111):As agrees with recent scanning-tunneling-spectroscopy measurements. Comparison of the present results to eigenvalues from the local-density-functional calculation reveals substantial corrections for the gaps between empty and occupied surface states. This correction is found to depend on the character of the surface states involved

  10. Toward a theory of leadership and state building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myerson, Roger B

    2011-12-27

    We present a theory of the state based on political leadership and reputational equilibria. A political leader first needs a reputation for reliably rewarding loyal supporters. Reputational expectations between political leaders and their supporters become the fundamental political laws on which the enforcement of all other constitutional laws may be based. Successful democratic development requires a plentiful supply of leaders who have good reputations for using public funds responsibly to serve the public at large and not just giving jobs to their active supporters. It is argued that decentralized democracy may be the best way to improve the chances for successful democracy.

  11. Asymptotic states and infrared divergences in gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, D.R.

    1981-01-01

    The gauge theories, Gravity and QCD are shown to be infrared finite to a non-trival order by a generalization of the coherent state approach. The asymptotic Hamiltonian operator is used, along with a mathematical theorem by Magnus, to specify a S-operator and to show cancellation of infrared divergences at the amplitude level. This procedure is exemplified in Gravity to third order and applied to QCD for leading order divergences to fifth order in the coupling constant. Dimensional regularization is used to isolate the infrared singularities in QCD. The sections on Gravity include a derivation of the infrared structure of the propagators for a massive particle and the graviton

  12. Solid state theory. An introduction. 2. rev. and ext. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessler, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Solid-State Theory - An Introduction is a textbook for graduate students of physics and material sciences. It stands in the tradition of older textbooks on this subject but takes up new developments in theoretical concepts and materials which are connected with such path breaking discoveries as the Quantum-Hall Effects, the high-Tc superconductors, and the low-dimensional systems realized in solids. Thus besides providing the fundamental concepts to describe the physics of electrons and ions of which the solid consists, including their interactions and the interaction with light, the book casts a bridge to the experimental facts and opens the view into current research fields. (orig.)

  13. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Department of Physical Chemistry, Hanoi University of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C., E-mail: chemmcl@emory.edu [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2015-03-28

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH{sub 2}OO and anti/syn-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH{sub 2}OO and anti-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH{sub 3}C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C–H bonds. For syn-CH{sub 3}C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH{sub 3} group by the terminal O atom producing CH{sub 2}C(H)O–OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH{sub 2}OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction.

  14. A novel and facile decay path of Criegee intermediates by intramolecular insertion reactions via roaming transition states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Trong-Nghia; Putikam, Raghunath; Lin, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    We have discovered a new and highly competitive product channel in the unimolecular decay process for small Criegee intermediates, CH 2 OO and anti/syn-CH 3 C(H)OO, occurring by intramolecular insertion reactions via a roaming-like transition state (TS) based on quantum-chemical calculations. Our results show that in the decomposition of CH 2 OO and anti-CH 3 C(H)OO, the predominant paths directly produce cis-HC(O)OH and syn-CH 3 C(O)OH acids with >110 kcal/mol exothermicities via loose roaming-like insertion TSs involving the terminal O atom and the neighboring C–H bonds. For syn-CH 3 C(H)OO, the major decomposition channel occurs by abstraction of a H atom from the CH 3 group by the terminal O atom producing CH 2 C(H)O–OH. At 298 K, the intramolecular insertion process in CH 2 OO was found to be 600 times faster than the commonly assumed ring-closing reaction

  15. Intermediate magnetization state and competing orders in Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borzi, R. A.; Gómez Albarracín, F. A.; Rosales, H. D.; Rossini, G. L.; Steppke, A.; Prabhakaran, D.; Mackenzie, A. P.; Cabra, D. C.; Grigera, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the frustrated magnetic materials, spin-ice stands out as a particularly interesting system. Residual entropy, freezing and glassiness, Kasteleyn transitions and fractionalization of excitations in three dimensions all stem from a simple classical Hamiltonian. But is the usual spin-ice Hamiltonian a correct description of the experimental systems? Here we address this issue by measuring magnetic susceptibility in the two most studied spin-ice compounds, Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7, using a vector magnet. Using these results, and guided by a theoretical analysis of possible distortions to the pyrochlore lattice, we construct an effective Hamiltonian and explore it using Monte Carlo simulations. We show how this Hamiltonian reproduces the experimental results, including the formation of a phase of intermediate polarization, and gives important information about the possible ground state of real spin-ice systems. Our work suggests an unusual situation in which distortions might contribute to the preservation rather than relief of the effects of frustration. PMID:27558021

  16. Molecular Switch for Sub-Diffraction Laser Lithography by Photoenol Intermediate-State Cis-Trans Isomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Patrick; Zieger, Markus M; Richter, Benjamin; Quick, Alexander S; Fischer, Joachim; Mueller, Jonathan B; Zhou, Lu; Nienhaus, Gerd Ulrich; Bastmeyer, Martin; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Wegener, Martin

    2017-06-27

    Recent developments in stimulated-emission depletion (STED) microscopy have led to a step change in the achievable resolution and allowed breaking the diffraction limit by large factors. The core principle is based on a reversible molecular switch, allowing for light-triggered activation and deactivation in combination with a laser focus that incorporates a point or line of zero intensity. In the past years, the concept has been transferred from microscopy to maskless laser lithography, namely direct laser writing (DLW), in order to overcome the diffraction limit for optical lithography. Herein, we propose and experimentally introduce a system that realizes such a molecular switch for lithography. Specifically, the population of intermediate-state photoenol isomers of α-methyl benzaldehydes generated by two-photon absorption at 700 nm fundamental wavelength can be reversibly depleted by simultaneous irradiation at 440 nm, suppressing the subsequent Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction which constitutes the chemical core of the writing process. We demonstrate the potential of the proposed mechanism for STED-inspired DLW by covalently functionalizing the surface of glass substrates via the photoenol-driven STED-inspired process exploiting reversible photoenol activation with a polymerization initiator. Subsequently, macromolecules are grown from the functionalized areas and the spatially coded glass slides are characterized by atomic-force microscopy. Our approach allows lines with a full-width-at-half-maximum of down to 60 nm and line gratings with a lateral resolution of 100 nm to be written, both surpassing the diffraction limit.

  17. Connections on the state-space over conformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, K.; Sonoda, H.; Zwiebach, B.

    1994-01-01

    Motivated by the problem of background independence of closed string field theory we study geometry on the infinite vector bundle of local fields over the space of conformal field theories (CFTs). With any connection we can associate an excluded domain D for the integral of marginal operators, and an operator one-form ω μ . The pair (D, ω μ ) determines the covariant derivative of any correlator of local fields. We obtain interesting classes of connections in which ω μ 's can be written in terms of CFT data. For these connections we compute their curvatures in terms of four-point correlators, D, and ω μ . Among these connections three are of particular interest. A flat, metric compatible connection Γ, and connections c and c with non-vanishing curvature, with the latter metric compatible. The flat connection cannot be used to do parallel transport over a finite distance. Parallel transport with either c or c, however, allows us to construct a CFT in the state-space of another CFT a finite distance away. The construction is given in the form of perturbation theory manifestly free of divergences. (orig.)

  18. Electron-deuteron deep-inelastic scattering with spectator nucleon tagging and final-state interactions at intermediate x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikman, M.; Weiss, C.

    2018-03-01

    We consider electron-deuteron deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) with detection of a proton in the nuclear fragmentation region ("spectator tagging") as a method for extracting the free neutron structure functions and studying their nuclear modifications. Such measurements could be performed at a future electron-ion collider (EIC) with suitable forward detectors. The measured proton recoil momentum (≲100 MeV in the deuteron rest frame) specifies the deuteron configuration during the high-energy process and permits a controlled theoretical treatment of nuclear effects. Nuclear and nucleonic structure are separated using methods of light-front quantum mechanics. The impulse approximation to the tagged DIS cross section contains the free neutron pole, which can be reached by on-shell extrapolation in the recoil momentum. Final-state interactions (FSIs) distort the recoil momentum distribution away from the pole. In the intermediate-x region 0.1 rest frame momenta ≲1 GeV , target fragmentation region). We construct a schematic model describing this effect, using final-state hadron distributions measured in nucleon DIS experiments and low-energy hadron scattering amplitudes. We investigate the magnitude of FSIs, their dependence on the recoil momentum (angular dependence, forward/backward regions), their analytic properties, and their effect on the on-shell extrapolation. We comment on the prospects for neutron structure extraction in tagged DIS with an EIC. We discuss possible extensions of the FSI model to other kinematic regions (large/small x ). In tagged DIS at x ≪0.1 FSIs resulting from diffractive scattering on the nucleons become important and require separate treatment.

  19. GRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF LAFFER'S THEORY FOR EUROPEAN UNION MEMBER STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LILIANA BUNESCU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Most times the current situation of one or another country depends on the historical development of own tax system. A practical question of any governance is to determine the optimal taxation rate level, bringing to the state the highest tax revenues. A good place to start is with what is popularly known as the Laffer curve. This paper aims to determine in graphical terms the level where European economies ranks by using Laffer curve based on the data series provided by the European Commission and the World Bank. Graphical analysis of Laffer's theory can emphasize only the positioning on one or another side of point for maximum tax revenues, a position that can influence fiscal policy decisions. Conclusions at European Union level are simple. Value of taxation rate for fiscal optimal point varies from one Member State to another, from 48.9% in Denmark to 28% in Romania, with an average of 37.1% for the EU-27.

  20. Solving Witten's string field theory using the butterfly state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    We solve the equation of motion of Witten's cubic open string field theory in a series expansion using the regulated butterfly state. The expansion parameter is given by the regularization parameter of the butterfly state, which can be taken to be arbitrarily small. Unlike the case of level truncation, the equation of motion can be solved for an arbitrary component of the Fock space up to a positive power of the expansion parameter. The energy density of the solution is well defined and remains finite even in the singular butterfly limit, and it gives approximately 68% of the D25-brane tension for the solution at the leading order. Moreover, it simultaneously solves the equation of motion of vacuum string field theory, providing support for the conjecture at this order. We further improve our ansatz by taking into account next-to-leading terms, and find two numerical solutions which give approximately 88% and 109%, respectively, of the D25-brane tension for the energy density. These values are interestingly close to those by level truncation at level 2 without gauge fixing studied by Rastelli and Zwiebach and by Ellwood and Taylor

  1. Theory of even-parity states and two-photon spectra of conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, P. C. M.; Hayden, G. W.; Soos, Z. G.

    1991-04-01

    The two-photon absorption (TPA) spectrum of interacting π electrons in conjugated polymers is shown to be qualitatively different from any single-particle description, including the Hartree-Fock limit. Alternating transfer integrals t(1+/-δ) along the backbone lead to a weak TPA below the one-photon gap Eg for arbitrarily weak correlations at δ=0, for intermediate correlations at δ=0.07 in polyenes, and for strong correlations at any δtheory to Eg in the limit of strong correlations in Hubbard models and is around 1.5Eg for Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) parameters. The PPP model, which accounts for one- and two-photon excitations of finite polyenes, is extended to even-parity states in polydiacetylenes (PDA's), polyacetylene (PA), and polysilanes (PS's). Previous experimental data for PDA and PS support both the strong TPA above Eg and weak TPA slightly below Eg for δ=0.15 in PDA and above Eg for δ~0.3 in PS. The strong TPA expected around 1.5Eg in isolated PA strands shifts to ~Eg due to interchain π-electron dispersion forces. TPA intensities in correlated states are shown to reflect both ionicity and mean-square charge separation. The even-parity states of conjugated polymers, like those of polyenes, show qualitatively different features associated with electron-electron correlations.

  2. Transition-state theory predicts clogging at the microscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laar, T. Van De; Klooster, S. Ten; Schroën, K.; Sprakel, J.

    2016-06-01

    Clogging is one of the main failure mechanisms encountered in industrial processes such as membrane filtration. Our understanding of the factors that govern the build-up of fouling layers and the emergence of clogs is largely incomplete, so that prevention of clogging remains an immense and costly challenge. In this paper we use a microfluidic model combined with quantitative real-time imaging to explore the influence of pore geometry and particle interactions on suspension clogging in constrictions, two crucial factors which remain relatively unexplored. We find a distinct dependence of the clogging rate on the entrance angle to a membrane pore which we explain quantitatively by deriving a model, based on transition-state theory, which describes the effect of viscous forces on the rate with which particles accumulate at the channel walls. With the same model we can also predict the effect of the particle interaction potential on the clogging rate. In both cases we find excellent agreement between our experimental data and theory. A better understanding of these clogging mechanisms and the influence of design parameters could form a stepping stone to delay or prevent clogging by rational membrane design.

  3. Representation of coherent states in many-boson theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakarchuk, I.A.

    1978-01-01

    Solution of the Bloch equation for the density matrix of the system of interacting Bose particles in the coherent states representation is obtained. The matrix of the thermodynamical potential functional is represented in the form of the functional series over the eigen-values of the annihilation operator and the coefficient functions are the matrix elements of cluster operators. A simple functional integration in the partition sum leads to the well-known quantum virial expansions and the standard perturbation theory series. Possibilities of application of the expressions obtained to the investigation of the lambda-transition in the liquid He 4 and the generalization to the case of the many-fermion system is discussed

  4. Far from the intermediate nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, K.; Wagner, G.J.; Gregoire, C.; Campi, X.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Platchkov, S.; Mayer, B.; Abgrall, Y.; Bohigas, O.; Grange, P.; Signarbieux, C.

    1988-01-01

    Pairing correlations in nuclear physics; the BCS state and quasi-particles; the layer model; collision effects on nuclear dynamics; the theory of cluster formation (application to nucleus fragmentation); short range correlations (few-particle systems); deuterium electron scattering; dibaryonic resonances; traditional and exotic hadron probes of nuclear structure; spectral fluctuations and chaotic motion; corrections to the intermediate nuclear field (nonrelativistic and other effects); and heavy nuclei splitting and nuclear superfluidity are introduced [fr

  5. Conformal blocks related to the R-R states in the c^=1 superconformal field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadasz, Leszek; Jaskólski, Zbigniew; Suchanek, Paulina

    2008-01-01

    We derive an explicit form of the family of four-point Neveu-Schwarz blocks with c^=1, external weights Δi=(1)/(8) and arbitrary intermediate weight Δ. The derivation is based on analytic properties of correlation functions of Ramond fields in the free superscalar theory.

  6. A Relation Between Topological Quantum Field Theory and the Kodama State

    OpenAIRE

    Oda, Ichiro

    2003-01-01

    We study a relation between topological quantum field theory and the Kodama (Chern-Simons) state. It is shown that the Kodama (Chern-Simons) state describes a topological state with unbroken diffeomorphism invariance in Yang-Mills theory and Einstein's general relativity in four dimensions. We give a clear explanation of "why" such a topological state exists.

  7. Hepatitis A vaccination coverage among adults 18–49 years traveling to a country of high or intermediate endemicity, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng-jun; Byrd, Kathy K.; Murphy, Trudy V.

    2018-01-01

    Background Since 1996, hepatitis A vaccine (HepA) has been recommended for adults at increased risk for infection including travelers to high or intermediate hepatitis A endemic countries. In 2009, travel outside the United States and Canada was the most common exposure nationally reported for persons with hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. Objective To assess HepA vaccination coverage among adults 18–49 years traveling to a country of high or intermediate endemicity in the United States. Methods We analyzed data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), to determine self-reported HepA vaccination coverage (≥1 dose) and series completion (≥2 dose) among persons 18–49 years who traveled, since 1995, to a country of high or intermediate HAV endemicity. Multivariable logistic regression and predictive marginal analyses were conducted to identify factors independently associated with HepA vaccine receipt. Results In 2010, approximately 36.6% of adults 18–49 years reported traveling to high or intermediate hepatitis A endemic countries; among this group unadjusted HepA vaccination coverage was 26.6% compared to 12.7% among non-travelers (P-values hepatitis A endemicity was associated with higher likelihood of HepA vaccination in 2010 among adults 18–49 years, self-reported HepA vaccination coverage was low among adult travelers to these areas. Healthcare providers should ask their patients’ upcoming travel plans and recommend and offer travel related vaccinations to their patients. PMID:23523408

  8. Non-existence of natural states for Abelian Chern-Simons theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio; Murro, Simone; Schenkel, Alexander

    2017-06-01

    We give an elementary proof that Abelian Chern-Simons theory, described as a functor from oriented surfaces to C∗-algebras, does not admit a natural state. Non-existence of natural states is thus not only a phenomenon of quantum field theories on Lorentzian manifolds, but also of topological quantum field theories formulated in the algebraic approach.

  9. Quantum scattering theory of a single-photon Fock state in three-dimensional spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingfeng; Zhou, Ming; Yu, Zongfu

    2016-09-15

    A quantum scattering theory is developed for Fock states scattered by two-level systems in three-dimensional free space. It is built upon the one-dimensional scattering theory developed in waveguide quantum electrodynamics. The theory fully quantizes the incident light as Fock states and uses a non-perturbative method to calculate the scattering matrix.

  10. Theory of the l-state population of Rydberg states formed in ion-solid collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemmler, J.; Burgdoerfer, J.; Reinhold, C.O.

    1991-01-01

    The experimentally observed high-l-state population of ions excited in ion-solid interactions differs sharply from l-state populations produced in ion-atom collisions. We have studied the population dynamics of electronic excitation and transport within the framework of a classical transport theory for O 2+ (2-MeV/u) ions traversing C foils. The resulting delayed-photon-emission intensities are found to be in very good agreement with experiment. Initial phase-space conditions have been obtained from both classical-trajectory Monte Carlo calculations and random initial distributions. We find evidence that the very-high-l-state populations produced in ion-solid collisions are the result of a diffusion to high-l states under the influence of multiple scattering in the bulk of the solid

  11. Intermediate Fragment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse Aagaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This text and its connected exhibition are aiming to reflect both on the thoughts, the processes and the outcome of the design and production of the artefact ‘Intermediate Fragment’ and making as a contemporary architectural tool in general. Intermediate Fragment was made for the exhibition ‘Enga...... of realising an exhibition object was conceived, but expanded, refined and concretised through this process. The context of the work shown here is an interest in a tighter, deeper connection between experimentally obtained material knowledge and architectural design....

  12. Hepatitis B vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥18 years traveling to a country of high or intermediate endemicity, United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng-Jun; O'Halloran, Alissa C; Williams, Walter W; Nelson, Noele P

    2018-04-28

    Persons from the United States who travel to developing countries are at substantial risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Hepatitis B vaccine has been recommended for adults at increased risk for infection, including travelers to high or intermediate hepatitis B endemic countries. To assess hepatitis B vaccination coverage among adults ≥18 years traveling to a country of high or intermediate endemicity from the United States. Data from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were analyzed to determine hepatitis B vaccination coverage (≥1 dose) and series completion (≥3 doses) among persons aged ≥18 years who reported traveling to a country of high or intermediate hepatitis B endemicity. Multivariable logistic regression and predictive marginal analyses were conducted to identify factors independently associated with hepatitis B vaccination. In 2015, hepatitis B vaccination coverage (≥1 dose) among adults aged ≥18 years who reported traveling to high or intermediate hepatitis B endemic countries was 38.6%, significantly higher compared with 25.9% among non-travelers. Series completion (≥3 doses) was 31.7% and 21.2%, respectively (P travel status was significantly associated with hepatitis B vaccination coverage and series completion. Other characteristics independently associated with vaccination (≥1 dose, and ≥3 doses) among travelers included age, race/ethnicity, educational level, duration of US residence, number of physician contacts in the past year, status of ever being tested for HIV, and healthcare personnel status. Although travel to a country of high or intermediate hepatitis B endemicity was associated with higher likelihood of hepatitis B vaccination, hepatitis B vaccination coverage was low among adult travelers to these areas. Healthcare providers should ask their patients about travel plans and recommend and offer travel related vaccinations to their patients or refer them to alternate sites for vaccination

  13. Hepatitis B vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥ 18 years traveling to a country of high or intermediate endemicity, United States, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng-Jun; O'Halloran, Alissa C; Williams, Walter W; Nelson, Noele P

    2018-04-25

    Persons from the United States who travel to developing countries are at substantial risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Hepatitis B vaccine has been recommended for adults at increased risk for infection, including travelers to high or intermediate hepatitis B endemic countries. To assess hepatitis B vaccination coverage among adults ≥ 18 years traveling to a country of high or intermediate endemicity from the United States. Data from the 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were analyzed to determine hepatitis B vaccination coverage (≥1 dose) and series completion (≥3 doses) among persons aged ≥ 18 years who reported traveling to a country of high or intermediate hepatitis B endemicity. Multivariable logistic regression and predictive marginal analyses were conducted to identify factors independently associated with hepatitis B vaccination. In 2015, hepatitis B vaccination coverage (≥1 dose) among adults aged ≥ 18 years who reported traveling to high or intermediate hepatitis B endemic countries was 38.6%, significantly higher compared with 25.9% among non-travelers. Series completion (≥3 doses) was 31.7% and 21.2%, respectively (P travel status was significantly associated with hepatitis B vaccination coverage and series completion. Other characteristics independently associated with vaccination (≥1 dose, and ≥ 3 doses) among travelers included age, race/ethnicity, educational level, duration of U.S. residence, number of physician contacts in the past year, status of ever being tested for HIV, and healthcare personnel status. Although travel to a country of high or intermediate hepatitis B endemicity was associated with higher likelihood of hepatitis B vaccination, hepatitis B vaccination coverage was low among adult travelers to these areas. Healthcare providers should ask their patients about travel plans and recommend and offer travel related vaccinations to their patients or refer them to alternate

  14. Theory of two-photon absorption by exciton states in cubic semiconductors with degenerate valence bands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Ai Viet; Nguyen Toan Thang.

    1987-06-01

    The coefficient of the absorption of two polarized photons is calculated for direct band gap semiconductors with degenerate valence bands. Wannier-Mott exciton states are included in both the intermediate and final states. Numerical calculations are performed for ZnSe and are compared with Sondergeld's experimental and theoretical results. (author). 11 refs, 2 tabs

  15. Sleep-Wake State Tradeoffs, Impulsivity and Life History Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alissa A. Miller

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary ecological theory predicts that sleep-wake state tradeoffs may be related to local environmental conditions and should therefore correlate to alterations in behavioral life history strategies. It was predicted that firefighters who slept more and reported better quality sleep on average would exhibit lower impulsivity inclinations related to slower life history trajectories. UPPS impulsivity scores and self-reported sleep averages were analyzed and indicated a negative association between sleep variables and urgency and a positive association with premeditation. Perseverance, and in some cases premeditation, however, disclosed an unpredicted marginally significant positive association between increased and emergency nighttime waking-related sleep deprivation. Sensation seeking was not associated with sleep variables, but was strongly associated with number of biological children. This research contributes to understanding the implications of human sleep across ecological and behavioral contexts and implies further research is necessary for constructing evolutionarily oriented measures of impulsivity inclination and its meaning in the context of life history strategies.

  16. Unfolding Simulations of Holomyoglobin from Four Mammals: Identification of Intermediates and β-Sheet Formation from Partially Unfolded States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2013-01-01

    simulations of holoMb and the first comparative study of unfolding of protein orthologs from different species (sperm whale, pig, horse, and harbor seal). We also provide new interpretations of experimental mean molecular ellipticities of myoglobin intermediates, notably correcting for random coil and number...... of helices in intermediates. The simulated holoproteins at 310 K displayed structures and dynamics in agreement with crystal structures (Rg ,1.48–1.51 nm, helicity ,75%). At 400 K, heme was not lost, but some helix loss was observed in pig and horse, suggesting that these helices are less stable......Myoglobin (Mb) is a centrally important, widely studied mammalian protein. While much work has investigated multi-step unfolding of apoMb using acid or denaturant, holomyoglobin unfolding is poorly understood despite its biological relevance. We present here the first systematic unfolding...

  17. Matrix elements of intraband transitions in quantum dot intermediate band solar cells: the influence of quantum dot presence on the extended-state electron wave-functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Tomohiro; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The intraband transitions which are essential for quantum dot intermediate band solar cells (QD IBSCs) are theoretically investigated by estimating the matrix elements from a ground bound state, which is often regarded as an intermediate band (IB), to conduction band (CB) states for a structure with a quantum dot (QD) embedded in a matrix (a QD/matrix structure). We have found that the QD pushes away the electron envelope functions (probability densities) from the QD region in almost all quantum states above the matrix CB minimum. As a result, the matrix elements of the intraband transitions in the QD/matrix structure are largely reduced, compared to those calculated assuming the envelope functions of free electrons (i.e., plane-wave envelope functions) in a matrix structure as the final states of the intraband transitions. The result indicates the strong influence of the QD itself on the intraband transitions from the IB to the CB states in QD IBSC devices. This work will help in better understanding the problem of the intraband transitions and give new insight, that is, engineering of quantum states is indispensable for the realization of QD IBSCs with high solar energy conversion efficiencies. (paper)

  18. Traffic Flow Theory - A State-of-the-Art Report: Revised Monograph on Traffic Flow Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-04-13

    This publication is an update and expansion of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Special Report 165, "Traffic Flow Theory," published in 1975. This updating was undertaken on recommendation of the TRB's Committee on Traffic Flow Theory and Char...

  19. Control of concerted two bond versus single bond dissociation in CH3Co(CO)4 via an intermediate state using pump-dump laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, David; González, Leticia

    2007-10-01

    Wavepacket propagations on ab initio multiconfigurational two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for CH3Co(CO)4 indicate that after irradiation to the lowest first and second electronic excited states, concerted dissociation of CH3 and the axial CO ligand takes place. We employ a pump-dump sequence of pulses with appropriate frequencies and time delays to achieve the selective breakage of a single bond by controlling the dissociation angle. The pump and dump pulse sequence exploits the unbound surface where dissociation occurs in a counterintuitive fashion; stretching of one bond in an intermediate state enhances the single dissociation of the other bond.

  20. Control of concerted two bond versus single bond dissociation in CH(3)Co(CO)(4) via an intermediate state using pump-dump laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosek, David; González, Leticia

    2007-10-07

    Wavepacket propagations on ab initio multiconfigurational two-dimensional potential energy surfaces for CH(3)Co(CO)(4) indicate that after irradiation to the lowest first and second electronic excited states, concerted dissociation of CH(3) and the axial CO ligand takes place. We employ a pump-dump sequence of pulses with appropriate frequencies and time delays to achieve the selective breakage of a single bond by controlling the dissociation angle. The pump and dump pulse sequence exploits the unbound surface where dissociation occurs in a counterintuitive fashion; stretching of one bond in an intermediate state enhances the single dissociation of the other bond.

  1. Intermediate structure and threshold phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel

    2004-01-01

    The Intermediate Structure, evidenced through microstructures of the neutron strength function, is reflected in open reaction channels as fluctuations in excitation function of nuclear threshold effects. The intermediate state supporting both neutron strength function and nuclear threshold effect is a micro-giant neutron threshold state. (author)

  2. Search for intermediate vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, D.B.; Rubbia, C.; van der Meer, S.

    1982-01-01

    Over the past 15 years a new class of unified theories has been developed to describe the forces acting between elementary particles. The most successful of the new theories establishes a link between electromagnetism and the weak force. A crucial prediction of this unified electroweak theory is the existence of three massive particles called intermediate vector bosons. If these intermediate vector bosons exist and if they have properties attributed to them by electroweak theory, they should soon be detected, as the world's first particle accelerator with enough energy to create such particles has recently been completed at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva. The accelerator has been converted to a colliding beam machine in which protons and antiprotons collide head on. According to electroweak theory, intermediate vector bosons can be created in proton-antiproton collisions. (SC)

  3. Current state of the Uranium dioxide sintering theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.; Devyatko, Y.; Tenishev, A.; Khlunov, A.; Khomyakov, O.

    2011-01-01

    The basic approaches to the description of the ceramics sintering phenomenon are considered. It is established that diffusive sintering models incorrectly describe an intermediate stage of this process. The physical model of sintering, considering the substance plastic flow of pressing under the influence of internal stress forces and capillary forces, as the basic mechanism defining the shrinkage of sintering oxide nuclear fuel, is offered. (authors)

  4. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.A.; Ashenfelter, J.; Axani, S.N.; Babu, K.; Backhouse, C.; Band, H.R.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barros, N.; Bernstein, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bishai, M.; Blucher, E.; Bouffard, J.; Bowden, N.; Brice, S.; Bryan, C.; Camilleri, L.; Cao, J.; Carlson, J.; Carr, R.E.; Chatterjee, A.; Chen, M.; Chen, S.; Chiu, M.; Church, E.D.; Collar, J.I.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.R.; Cooper, R.L.; Cowen, D.; Davoudiasl, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Dean, D.J.; Deichert, G.; Descamps, F.; DeYoung, T.; Diwan, M.V.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolinski, M.J.; Dolph, J.; Donnelly, B.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dytman, S.; Efremenko, Y.; Everett, L.L.; Fava, A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fleming, B.; Friedland, A.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gaisser, T.K.; Galeazzi, M.; Galehouse, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garvey, G.T.; Gautam, S.; Gilje, K.E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goodman, M.C.; Gordon, H.; Gramellini, E.; Green, M.P.; Guglielmi, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Heeger, K.M.; Herman, M.; Hill, R.; Holin, A.; Huber, P.; Jaffe, D.E.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kaufman, L.J.; Kayser, B.; Kettell, S.H.; Kirby, B.J.; Klein, J.R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kriske, R.M.; Lane, C.E.; Langford, T.J.; Lankford, A.; Lau, K.; Learned, J.G.; Ling, J.; Link, J.M.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lokajicek, M.; Louis, W.C.; Luk, K.; Lykken, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D.M.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCluskey, E.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Mills, G.; Mocioiu, I.; Monreal, B.; Mooney, M.R.; Morfin, J.G.; Mumm, P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nelson, J.K.; Nessi, M.; Norcini, D.; Nova, F.; Nygren, D.R.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Palamara, O.; Parsa, Z.; Patterson, R.; Paul, P.; Pocar, A.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Rameika, R.; Ranucci, G.; Ray, H.; Reyna, D.; Rich, G.C.; Rodrigues, P.; Romero, E.Romero; Rosero, R.; Rountree, S.D.; Rybolt, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Santucci, G.; Schmitz, D.; Scholberg, K.; Seckel, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Smy, M.B.; Soderberg, M.; Sonzogni, A.; Sousa, A.B.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.M.; Stewart, J.; Strait, J.B.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Szelc, A.M.; Tayloe, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Toups, M.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Van de Water, R.G.; Vogelaar, R.B.; Weber, M.; Weng, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; White, B.R.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.W.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Wilson, P.; Winklehner, D.; Winn, D.R.; Worcester, E.; Yang, L.; Yeh, M.; Yokley, Z.W.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  5. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  6. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Alonso, J. R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ankowski, A. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Asaadi, J. A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Ashenfelter, J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Axani, S. N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Babu, K [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Backhouse, C. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Band, H. R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Barbeau, P. S. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Barros, N. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Betancourt, M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bishai, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blucher, E. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Bouffard, J. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brice, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bryan, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Camilleri, L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cao, J. [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Carlson, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carr, R. E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Chatterjee, A. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Chen, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chen, S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Chiu, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Church, E. D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Collar, J. I. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Collin, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Convery, M. R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cooper, R. L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Cowen, D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Davoudiasl, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gouvea, A. D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dean, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Descamps, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeYoung, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Diwan, M. V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Djurcic, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dolinski, M. J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolph, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Donnelly, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Dwyer, D. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dytman, S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Efremenko, Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Everett, L. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fava, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Fleming, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Friedland, A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fujikawa, B. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gaisser, T. K. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Galeazzi, M. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States); Galehouse, DC [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garvey, G. T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautam, S. [Tribhuvan Univ., Kirtipur (Nepal); Gilje, K. E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gonzalez-Garcia, M. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Goodman, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gordon, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gramellini, E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Green, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guglielmi, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Hackenburg, R. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hackenburg, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Halzen, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Han, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harris, D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Heeger, K. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Herman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Holin, A. [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Huber, P. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Jaffe, D. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Johnson, R. A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Joshi, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karagiorgi, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kaufman, L. J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Kayser, B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kettell, S. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kirby, B. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Klein, J. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Kolomensky, Y. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kriske, R. M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Lane, C. E. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Langford, T. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Lankford, A. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lau, K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ling, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Link, J. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Lissauer, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littenberg, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littlejohn, B. R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lockwitz, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lokajicek, M. [Inst. of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Louis, W. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luk, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lykken, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Marciano, W. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maricic, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Caicedo, D. A. M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mauger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mavrokoridis, K. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); McCluskey, E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); McKeen, D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); McKeown, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Mills, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocioiu, I. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Monreal, B. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mooney, M. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morfin, J. G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mumm, P. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Napolitano, J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nelson, J. K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Nessi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Norcini, D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Nova, F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Nygren, D. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Gann, GDO [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Palamara, O. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Parsa, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Patterson, R. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Paul, P. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Pocar, A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Qian, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Rameika, R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ranucci, G. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Milano (Italy); Ray, H. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Reyna, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rich, G. C. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Rodrigues, P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Romero, E. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rosero, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rountree, S. D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Rybolt, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sanchez, M. C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Santucci, G. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Schmitz, D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Scholberg, K. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Seckel, D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Shaevitz, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Shrock, R. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Smy, M. B. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Soderberg, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sonzogni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sousa, A. B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); John, J. M. S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Stewart, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Strait, J. B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Sullivan, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Svoboda, R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Szelc, A. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Tayloe, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Thomson, M. A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Toups, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Vacheret, A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Vagins, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Water, R. G. V. D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogelaar, R. B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Weber, M. [Bern (Switzerland); Weng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wetstein, M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); White, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitehead, L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Whittington, D. W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Wilking, M. J. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Wilson, R. J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Wilson, P. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Winklehner, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Winn, D. R. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States); Worcester, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Yeh, M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yokley, Z. W. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yoo, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yu, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Zhang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-03

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  7. On the Nature of the Intermediates and the Role of Chloride Ions in Pd-Catalyzed Allylic Alkylations: Added Insight from Density Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Peter; Ahlquist, Mårten Sten Gösta; Tanner, David Ackland

    2008-01-01

    The reactivity of intermediates in palladium-catalyzed allylic alkylation was investigated using DFT (B3LYP) calculations including a PB-SCRF solvation model. In the presence of both phosphine and chloride ligands, the allyl intermediate is in equilibrium between a cationic eta(3)-allylPd complex...

  8. Haag-Ruelle scattering theory as a scattering theory in different spaces of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshmanenko, V.D.

    1979-01-01

    The aim of the paper is the extraction of the abstract content from the Haag-Ruelle theory, i.e. to find out the total mathematical scheme of the theory without the account of physical axiomatics. It is shown that the Haag-Ruelle scattering theory may be naturally included into the scheme of the abstract theory of scattering with the pair of spaces, the wave operators being determined by the method of bilinear functionals. A number of trivial features of the scattering operator is found in the abstract theory. The concrete prospects of the application of the data obtained are outlined in the problem of the scattering of the field quantum theory

  9. Hepatitis A vaccination coverage among adults 18-49 years traveling to a country of high or intermediate endemicity, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng-Jun; Byrd, Kathy K; Murphy, Trudy V

    2013-05-01

    Since 1996, hepatitis A vaccine (HepA) has been recommended for adults at increased risk for infection including travelers to high or intermediate hepatitis A endemic countries. In 2009, travel outside the United States and Canada was the most common exposure nationally reported for persons with hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection. To assess HepA vaccination coverage among adults 18-49 years traveling to a country of high or intermediate endemicity in the United States. We analyzed data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), to determine self-reported HepA vaccination coverage (≥1 dose) and series completion (≥2 dose) among persons 18-49 years who traveled, since 1995, to a country of high or intermediate HAV endemicity. Multivariable logistic regression and predictive marginal analyses were conducted to identify factors independently associated with HepA vaccine receipt. In 2010, approximately 36.6% of adults 18-49 years reported traveling to high or intermediate hepatitis A endemic countries; among this group unadjusted HepA vaccination coverage was 26.6% compared to 12.7% among non-travelers (P-valuestravel status was an independent predictor of HepA coverage and series completion (both P-valuestravelers, HepA coverage and series completion (≥2 doses) were higher for travelers 18-25 years (prevalence ratios 2.3, 2.8, respectively, P-valuestravelers 26-39 years (prevalence ratios 1.5, 1.5, respectively, P-valuetravelers 40-49 years. Other characteristics independently associated with a higher likelihood of HepA receipt among travelers included Asian race/ethnicity, male sex, never having been married, having a high school or higher education, living in the western United States, having greater number of physician contacts or receipt of influenza vaccination in the previous year. HepB vaccination was excluded from the model because of the significant correlation between receipt of HepA vaccination and HepB vaccination could distort the model

  10. The MHD intermediate shock interaction with an intermediate wave: Are intermediate shocks physical?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    Contrary to the usual belief that MHD intermediate shocks are extraneous, the authors have recently shown by numerical solutions of dissipative MHD equations that intermediate shocks are admissible and can be formed through nonlinear steepening from a continuous wave. In this paper, he clarifies the differences between the conventional view and the results by studying the interaction of an MHD intermediate shock with an intermediate wave. The study reaffirms his results. In addition, the study shows that there exists a larger class of shocklike solutions in the time-dependent dissiaptive MHD equations than are given by the MHD Rankine-Hugoniot relations. it also suggests a mechanism for forming rotational discontinuities through the interaction of an intermediate shock with an intermediate wave. The results are of importance not only to the MHD shock theory but also to studies such as magnetic field reconnection models

  11. Quantum field theory and the internal states of elementary particles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Greben, JM

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new application of quantum field theory is developed that gives a description of the internal dynamics of dressed elementary particles and predicts their masses. The fermionic and bosonic quantum fields are treated as interdependent fields...

  12. Phenomenological Theory for Pseudogap States in High Tc Cuprate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Fuchun

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudogap phase in the underdoped region of high-Tc cuprate is one of the challenging issues in condensed matter physics. In this talk, I will describe a phenomenological theory for this phase, based on analogies to the approach to Mott localization at weak coupling in lower dimensional systems. I will make comparisons of the theory to a series of the experiments, including angle resolved photoemission spectroscope, scanning tunneling microscope.

  13. Entitlement theory of justice and end-state fairness in the allocation of goods

    OpenAIRE

    Ju, Biung-Ghi; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.

    2016-01-01

    Robert Nozick allegedly introduced his liberal theory of private ownership as an objection to theories of end-state justice. Nevertheless, we show that, in a stylized framework for the allocation of goods in joint ventures, both approaches can be seen as complementary. More precisely, in such a context, self-ownership (the basis for Nozick's entitlement theory of justice) followed by voluntary transfer (Nozick's principle of just transfer) can lead to end-state fairness (as well as Pareto eff...

  14. Quantum Chemical Investigation of the Transition States and Intermediates for the Reaction of the Nitrosonium Ion with the Pentaammineazidocobalt(III) Ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzinger, François P

    2016-12-19

    The water exchange reaction on Co(NH 3 ) 5 OH 2 3+ was investigated with various density functionals and basis sets. A Gibbs activation energy (ΔG ⧧ ) agreeing with experiment was obtained with the long-range-corrected functionals ωB97X-D3 and LC-BOP-LRD, SMD hydration, and modified Karlsruhe def2-TZVP basis sets. This computational technique was then applied to the reaction of NO + with Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 3 2+ . All of the possible pathways were investigated, NO + attack at the terminal N of Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 3 2+ via the E and the Z isomers of the transition states, and NO + attack at the bound N of azide, also via both isomers. The most favorable pathway proceeds via the attack at the bound N via the Z isomer. This leads to the intermediate with an oxatetrazole ligand bound to Co(III) at the N in the 3-position, Co(NH 3 ) 5 (cycl-N 4 O) 3+ , which undergoes N 2 elimination to yield the Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 2 O 3+ intermediate. The subsequent substitution of N 2 O by water follows the I d mechanism with retention of the configuration. No evidence for the existence of the square-pyramidal pentacoordinated intermediate Co(NH 3 ) 5 3+ was found. All of the investigated intermediates, Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 2 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 [E-N(N 2 )(NO)] 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 (E-ON 4 ) 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 ON 2 3+ , Co(NH 3 ) 5 (cycl-N 4 O) 3+ , and Co(NH 3 ) 5 N 2 O 3+ , exhibit short lifetimes of less than ∼60 μs and react via the I d mechanism.

  15. Intermediality: Bridge to Critical Media Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailliotet, Ann Watts; Semali, Ladislaus; Rodenberg, Rita K.; Giles, Jackie K.; Macaul, Sherry L.

    2000-01-01

    Defines "intermediality" as the ability to critically read and write with and across varied symbol systems. Relates it to critical media literacy. Offers rationales for teaching critical media literacy in general, and intermedial instruction in particular. Identifies seven guiding intermedial elements: theory, texts, processes, contexts,…

  16. Intermediate uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu B

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate uveitis (IU is described as inflammation in the anterior vitreous, ciliary body and the peripheral retina. In the Standardization of Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN working group′s international workshop for reporting clinical data the consensus reached was that the term IU should be used for that subset of uveitis where the vitreous is the major site of the inflammation and if there is an associated infection (for example, Lyme disease or systemic disease (for example, sarcoidosis. The diagnostic term pars planitis should be used only for that subset of IU where there is snow bank or snowball formation occurring in the absence of an associated infection or systemic disease (that is, "idiopathic". This article discusses the clinical features, etiology, pathogenesis, investigations and treatment of IU.

  17. Adaptive Disturbance Tracking Theory with State Estimation and State Feedback for Region II Control of Large Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Mark J.; Thapa Magar, Kaman S.; Frost, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    A theory called Adaptive Disturbance Tracking Control (ADTC) is introduced and used to track the Tip Speed Ratio (TSR) of 5 MW Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT). Since ADTC theory requires wind speed information, a wind disturbance generator model is combined with lower order plant model to estimate the wind speed as well as partial states of the wind turbine. In this paper, we present a proof of stability and convergence of ADTC theory with lower order estimator and show that the state feedback can be adaptive.

  18. Primate theory of mind: a state of the art review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byrnit, Jill

    2006-01-01

    -cognitive evner og siden Premack & Woodruff (1978) for første gang introducerede begrebet "theory of mind", er der blevet foretaget mange laboratorie-forsøg om mennesker og andre primaters evne til at attribuere mentale tilstande til andre. I nærværende artikel er størstedelen af disse forsøg med andre primater...

  19. Benchmarks for electronically excited states: Time-dependent density functional theory and density functional theory based multireference configuration interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva-Junior, Mario R.; Schreiber, Marko; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and DFT-based multireference configuration interaction (DFT/MRCI) calculations are reported for a recently proposed benchmark set of 28 medium-sized organic molecules. Vertical excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state dipole...

  20. On the ground state of Yang-Mills theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakry, Ahmed S.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The ground state overlap for sets of meson potential trial states is measured. → Non-uniform gluonic distributions are probed via Wilson loop operator. → The locally UV-regulated flux-tube operators can optimize the ground state overlap. - Abstract: We investigate the overlap of the ground state meson potential with sets of mesonic-trial wave functions corresponding to different gluonic distributions. We probe the transverse structure of the flux tube through the creation of non-uniform smearing profiles for the string of glue connecting two color sources in Wilson loop operator. The non-uniformly UV-regulated flux-tube operators are found to optimize the overlap with the ground state and display interesting features in the ground state overlap.

  1. What Should Be the Roles of Conscious States and Brain States in Theories of Mental Activity?**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulany, Donelson E.

    2011-01-01

    Answers to the title’s question have been influenced by a history in which an early science of consciousness was rejected by behaviourists on the argument that this entails commitment to ontological dualism and “free will” in the sense of indeterminism. This is, however, a confusion of theoretical assertions with metaphysical assertions. Nevertheless, a legacy within computational and information-processing views of mind rejects or de-emphasises a role for consciousness. This paper sketches a mentalistic metatheory in which conscious states are the sole carriers of symbolic representations, and thus have a central role in the explanation of mental activity and action-while specifying determinism and materialism as useful working assumptions. A mentalistic theory of causal learning, experimentally examined with phenomenal reports, is followed by examination of these questions: Are there common roles for phenomenal reports and brain imaging? Is there defensible evidence for unconscious brain states carrying symbolic representations? Are there interesting dissociations within consciousness? PMID:21694964

  2. On the ground state of Yang-Mills theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bakry, Ahmed S.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the overlap of the ground state meson potential with sets of mesonic-trial wave functions corresponding to different gluonic distributions. We probe the transverse structure of the flux tube through the creation of non-uniform smearing profiles for the string of glue connecting two color sources in Wilson loop operator. The non-uniformly UV-regulated flux-tube operators are found to optimize the overlap with the ground state and display interesting features in the ground state ...

  3. Theory of Multipartite Entanglement for X-States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Greenberger-Horne- Zeilinger (GHZ) state [9] and we explain below an approximation that reduces their density matrix to an X-state for all times. X-states...Blatt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 130506 (2011). [9] D. Bouwmeester, J.-W. Pan, M. Daniell, H. Weinfurter, and A. Zeilinger , Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 1345...Gasparoni, R. Ursin, G. Weihs, and A. Zeilinger , Nature (2003). [88] R. Dong, M. Lassen, J. Heersink, C. Marquardt, R. Filip, G. Leuchs, and U. L. Andersen

  4. STATE AND ECONOMY IN BOURGEOISIES ECONOMIC THEORIES: A CRITICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Hernández-Pérez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of state-economy relationship has been present throughout the history of bourgeois economic thought. In the bourgeois liberal tradition the distinction between civil society and state has been presented as total and necessary, reserving to the first one the monopoly of economic activity, based on the principle of self-regulating market. From Keynes bourgeois economists were divided into two sides, one side those who still deny the state capacity to intervene right in the economy, and the other those who recognize the need for their participation. This paper proposes a critical approach to the major bourgeois theoretical positions on the relationship state-economy. 

  5. Theories of the nuclear ground state beyond Hartree-Fock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogny, D.

    1979-01-01

    Intensive efforts have been invested toward defining a microscopic approach, simple enough to render feasible systematic calculations of nuclear structure and of the some time sufficiently rich in information as to serve for updating traditional microscopic approaches to the collective excitations. Our starting point is the mean field approximation with density dependent effective forces. To describe the collective excitations we use the two well known extensions based on the H.F. theory namely the random phase approximation and the adiabatic approximation to the time dependent Hartree-Fock theory. The purpose of this paper is to show what sort of calculations can be effectively carried out in the frame of such fully self consistent approaches. (KBE) 891 KBE/KBE 892 ARA

  6. The construction of optimal stated choice experiments theory and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Street, Deborah J

    2007-01-01

    The most comprehensive and applied discussion of stated choice experiment constructions available The Construction of Optimal Stated Choice Experiments provides an accessible introduction to the construction methods needed to create the best possible designs for use in modeling decision-making. Many aspects of the design of a generic stated choice experiment are independent of its area of application, and until now there has been no single book describing these constructions. This book begins with a brief description of the various areas where stated choice experiments are applicable, including marketing and health economics, transportation, environmental resource economics, and public welfare analysis. The authors focus on recent research results on the construction of optimal and near-optimal choice experiments and conclude with guidelines and insight on how to properly implement these results. Features of the book include: Construction of generic stated choice experiments for the estimation of main effects...

  7. On the ground state of Yang-Mills theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakry, Ahmed S.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the overlap of the ground state meson potential with sets of mesonic-trial wave functions corresponding to different gluonic distributions. We probe the transverse structure of the flux tube through the creation of non-uniform smearing profiles for the string of glue connecting two color sources in Wilson loop operator. The non-uniformly UV-regulated flux-tube operators are found to optimize the overlap with the ground state and display interesting features in the ground state overlap.

  8. Theory and practice of dressed coherent states in circuit QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, Frank [Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, Campus E 2.6, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Govia, Luke C.G. [Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, Campus E 2.6, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Department of Physics, McGill University, Montreal (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    In the dispersive regime of qubit-cavity coupling, classical cavity drive populates the cavity, but leaves the qubit state unaffected. However, the dispersive Hamiltonian is derived after both a frame transformation and an approximation. Therefore, to connect to external experimental devices, the inverse frame transformation from the dispersive frame back to the lab frame is necessary. We show that in the lab frame the system is best described by an entangled state known as the dressed coherent state, and thus even in the dispersive regime, entanglement is generated between the qubit and the cavity. Also, we show that further qubit evolution depends on both the amplitude and phase of the dressed coherent state. This provides a limitation to readout in the dispersive regime. We show that only in the limit of infinite measurement time is this protocol QND, as the formation of a dressed coherent state in the qubit-cavity system applies an effective rotation to the qubit state. We show how this rotation can be corrected by a unitary operation, leading to improved qubit initialization by measurement and unitary feedback.

  9. Solid-State Physics Introduction to the Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Patterson, James

    2010-01-01

    Learning Solid State Physics involves a certain degree of maturity, since it involves tying together diverse concepts from many areas of physics. The objective is to understand, in a basic way, how solid materials behave. To do this one needs both a good physical and mathematical background. One definition of Solid State Physics is it is the study of the physical (e.g. the electrical, dielectric, magnetic, elastic, and thermal) properties of solids in terms of basic physical laws. In one sense, Solid State Physics is more like chemistry than some other branches of physics because it focuses on common properties of large classes of materials. It is typical that Solid State Physics emphasizes how physics properties link to electronic structure. We have retained the term Solid Modern solid state physics came of age in the late thirties and forties and is now is part of condensed matter physics which includes liquids, soft materials, and non-crystalline solids. This solid state/condensed matter physics book begin...

  10. Equilibrium states and the ergodic theory of Anosov diffeomorphisms

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    For this printing of R. Bowen's book, J.-R. Chazottes has retyped it in TeX for easier reading, thereby correcting typos and bibliographic details. From the Preface by D. Ruelle: "Rufus Bowen has left us a masterpiece of mathematical exposition... Here a number of results which were new at the time are presented in such a clear and lucid style that Bowen's monograph immediately became a classic. More than thirty years later, many new results have been proved in this area, but the volume is as useful as ever because it remains the best introduction to the basics of the ergodic theory of hyperbolic systems."

  11. Theory of constraints: A state-of-art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Orouji

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory of constraints (TOC is a management tool, which considers any manageable system as being limited in reaching more of its objectives by some constraints. According to TOC, there is always, at least, one single constraint, and TOC implements a concentrating process to detect the constraint and restructure the remaining of the organization around it. This paper presents an overview of different perspectives of TOC and its implementation in different industries such as project management, quality management, outsourcing, product mix, make-to-buy, accounting, banking and health care, etc. The results indicate that the method has been extensively implemented in different areas of accounting.

  12. Study in stationary state of the subcriticality of intermediate configurations of core in the reloading process of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.L.; Montes, J.L.; Perusquia, R.; Ortiz, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this work is carried out the simulation in three dimensions with the COREMASTER-PRESTO code, of the behavior of the reactor core in different stages of the change process of fuel assemblies. To carry out the simulation, this code requires of a database of nuclear parameters that includes those that can associate to the areas of an assemblies that they don't contain fuel and in its place there is moderator. These nuclear parameters are calculated with the AURORA-HELIOS-ZENITH-TABGEN system. One of the approaches that were carried out consisted on designing a 'water assemble', that is to say, an axial arrangement of 25 'water cells'. To obtain the appropriate 'water cell' its were carried out some selective test cases, since it presents in two cases the necessity to find an enough minimum value of fissile material for the correct execution of HELIOS, firstly, and later on COREMASTER-PRESTO. In the first case, the situation is solved when placing symmetrically 6 bars with natural uranium in the lateral areas of the cell; with that which the value of k inf of 0.1592 is obtained in the calculations with the HELIOS code in the cold condition to zero power (CZP), and 0% of vacuums. For the second case the cell includes symmetrically 28 bars with natural uranium, and the k inf value is 0.45290. These values are the maximum through the life of the 'cell.' As part of the activities that are developed during the fuel substitution, this the one of evaluating the subcriticality of the core each determined number of substitution movements. The obtained results when evaluating the k-effective in cold condition, in 5 different intermediate core configurations, as the loading process of the fuel advances are presented. To make the evaluation with CM-PRESTO in each configuration it was proceeded to complete the rest of the 444 assemblies with the one denominated 'water assemble'. In all the evaluated cases the subcriticality of the core was demonstrated in cold condition and with

  13. Should we give up on the State? Feminist theory, African gender ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transitional Justice, scholars have examined in very thoughtful ways the relationship of feminism and feminist theory to the field of transitional justice and post-conflict. This article examines some of this work and suggests ways that we might build on these insights by working more with feminist theories of the state, feminist ...

  14. Particle transport methods for LWR dosimetry developed by the Penn State transport theory group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghighat, A.; Petrovic, B.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reviews advanced particle transport theory methods developed by the Penn State Transport Theory Group (PSTTG) over the past several years. These methods have been developed in response to increasing needs for accuracy of results and for three-dimensional modeling of nuclear systems

  15. A Personal Narrative: The Synergistic Leadership Theory as It Applies to the Leadership of a Principal of a Rural Intermediate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Karlis R.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this narrative study was two-fold. First, the researcher, an African American male principal in a rural, high minority, intermediate school, used to reflect on strategies implemented to enhance the learning environment that subsequently increased student achievement. Second, determined through the study was how personal leadership…

  16. Construction of spaces of kinematic quantum states for field theories via projective techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okołów, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    We present a method of constructing a space of quantum states for a field theory: given phase space of a theory, we define a family of physical systems each possessing a finite number of degrees of freedom, next we define a space of quantum states for each finite system, finally using projective techniques we organize all these spaces into a space of quantum states which corresponds to the original phase space. This construction is kinematic in this sense that it bases merely on the structure of the phase space of a theory and does not take into account possible constraints on the space. The construction is a generalization of a construction by Kijowski—the latter one is limited to theories of linear phase spaces, while the former one is free of this limitation. The method presented in this paper enables to construct a space of quantum states for the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity. (paper)

  17. Bound state quantum field theory application to atoms and ions

    CERN Document Server

    Sapirstein, Jonathan

    2019-01-01

    Two aspects of the book should appeal to a wide audience. One aspect would be the comprehensive coverage on the latest updates and developments this book provides, besides Bethe and Salpeter's handbook on hydrogen and helium, which is still widely regarded as useful. The other aspect would be that a major part of the book uses “effective field theory”, a way of including quantum electrodynamics (QED) that starts with the familiar Schrödinger equation, and then adds perturbing operators derived in a rather simple manner that incorporates QED. Effective field theory is used in a number of fields including particle physics and nuclear physics, and readership is targeted at these communities too.Additionally, students using this book in conjunction with Peskin's textbook could learn to carry out fairly sophisticated calculations in QED in order to learn the technique, as this book comes with practical calculations.Also included is a very clear exposition of the Bethe–Salpeter equation, which is simply either ...

  18. Usefulness of bound-state approximations in reaction theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adhikari, S.K.

    1981-01-01

    A bound-state approximation when applied to certain operators, such as the many-body resolvent operator for a two-body fragmentation channel, in many-body scattering equations, reduces such equations to equivalent two-body scattering equations which are supposed to provide a good description of the underlying physical process. In this paper we test several variants of bound-state approximations in the soluble three-boson Amado model and find that such approximations lead to weak and unacceptable kernels for the equivalent two-body scattering equations and hence to a poor description of the underlying many-body process

  19. Composite fermion theory for bosonic quantum Hall states on lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, G; Cooper, N R

    2009-09-04

    We study the ground states of the Bose-Hubbard model in a uniform magnetic field, motivated by the physics of cold atomic gases on lattices at high vortex density. Mapping the bosons to composite fermions (CF) leads to the prediction of quantum Hall fluids that have no counterpart in the continuum. We construct trial states for these phases and test numerically the predictions of the CF model. We establish the existence of strongly correlated phases beyond those in the continuum limit and provide evidence for a wider scope of the composite fermion approach beyond its application to the lowest Landau level.

  20. Kohn-Sham Theory for Ground-State Ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ullrich, C. A.; Kohn, W.

    2001-01-01

    An electron density distribution n(r) which can be represented by that of a single-determinant ground state of noninteracting electrons in an external potential v(r) is called pure-state v -representable (P-VR). Most physical electronic systems are P-VR. Systems which require a weighted sum of several such determinants to represent their density are called ensemble v -representable (E-VR). This paper develops formal Kohn-Sham equations for E-VR physical systems, using the appropriate coupling constant integration. It also derives local density- and generalized gradient approximations, and conditions and corrections specific to ensembles

  1. Contemporary prophetic preaching theory in the United States of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article two homileticians – one from the United States of America (USA) and one from South Africa (SA) − enter into a dialog regarding how the task of prophetic preaching today might be revived, reframed and redefined in light of the Reformation principle of the viva vox Evangelii [living voice of the gospel].

  2. ANDRA's Centre de l'Aube: Design, construction, operation of a state of the art surface disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potier, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The ANDRA's Centre de I'Aube disposal facility for low and intermediate level radioactive waste may be considered as a state-of-the-art repository. Since its implementation in the early nineties, the French facility has been used as a model by many countries worldwide for the surface disposal of radioactive waste. The disposal concept developed by ANDRA, the French Radioactive Waste Management Agency, consists of a multiple-barrier system designed to isolate radioactivity and provide protection to the public and to the environment. Waste operations at ANDRA's Centre de I'Aube are largely automated to ensure better protection to site workers. The paper reviews all aspects of the repository implementation: siting, design, construction, operation and future closure, and environmental monitoring. (author)

  3. Differential cross sections for intermediate-energy electron scattering from α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol: Excitation of electronic-states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Thorn, P. A.; Pettifer, Z. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Limão-Vieira, P. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Duflot, D. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR CNRS 8523, Université Lille, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Hubin-Franskin, M.-J.; Delwiche, J. [Départment de Chimie, Université de Liège, Institut de Chimie-Bât. B6C, B-4000 Liège 1 (Belgium); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); and others

    2014-07-14

    We report on measurements of differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of Rydberg electronic-states in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). The energy range of these experiments was 20–50 eV, while the scattered electron was detected in the 10°–90° angular range. There are currently no other experimental data or theoretical computations against which we can directly compare the present measured results. Nonetheless, we are able to compare our THFA DCSs with earlier cross section measurements for Rydberg-state electronic excitation for tetrahydrofuran, a similar cyclic ether, from Do et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144302 (2011)]. In addition, “rotationally averaged” elastic DCSs, calculated using our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction approach are also reported. Those latter results give integral cross sections consistent with the optical theorem, and supercede those from the only previous study of Milosavljević et al. [Eur. Phys. J. D 40, 107 (2006)].

  4. Theory of minimum dissipation of energy for the steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.K.

    1992-02-01

    The magnetic configuration of an inductively driven steady-state plasma bounded by a surface (or two adjacent surfaces) on which B·n = 0 is force-free: ∇xB = 2αB, where α is a constant, in time and in space. α is the ratio of the Poynting flux to the magnetic helicity flux at the boundary. It is also the ratio of the dissipative rates of the magnetic energy to the magnetic helicity in the plasma. The spatial extent of the configuration is noninfinitesimal. This global constraint is a result of the requirement that, for a steady-state plasma, the rate of change of the vector potential, ∂A/∂t, is constant in time and uniform in space

  5. Theory of Spin States of Quantum Dot Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, I. V.; Reinecke, T. L.; Scheibner, M.; Stinaff, E. A.; Bracker, A. S.; Doty, M. F.; Gammon, D.; Korenev, V. L.

    2007-04-01

    The photoluminescence spectrum of an asymmetric pair of coupled InAs quantum dots in an applied electric field shows a rich pattern of level anticrossings, crossings and fine structure that can be understood as a superposition of charge and spin configurations. We present a theoretical model that provides a description of the energy positions and intensities of the optical transitions in exciton, biexciton and charged exciton states of coupled quantum dots molecules.

  6. Theory of Magnetic Edge States in Chiral Graphene Nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaz, Rodrigo; Yazyev, Oleg; Louie, Steven

    2011-03-01

    Using a model Hamiltonian approach including electron Coulomb interactions, we systematically investigate the electronic structure and magnetic properties of chiral graphene nanoribbons. We show that the presence of magnetic edge states is an intrinsic feature of any smooth graphene nanoribbons with chiral edges, and discover a number of structure-property relations. Specifically, we describe how the edge-state energy gap, zone-boundary edge-state energy splitting, and magnetic moment per edge length depend on the nanoribbon width and chiral angle. The role of environmental screening effects is also studied. Our results address a recent experimental observation of signatures of magnetic ordering at smooth edges of chiral graphene nanoribbons and provide an avenue towards tuning their properties via the structural and environmental degrees of freedom. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR10-1006184, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and the ONR MURI program. RBC acknowledges financial support from Brazilian agencies CNPq, FAPERJ and INCT-Nanomateriais de Carbono.

  7. Solid state nuclear track detection : theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhagwat, A.M.

    1993-01-01

    Solid state nuclear track detection (SSNTD) technique is simple and inexpensive in nature. The two main steps involved in SSNTD are the formation of latent tracks and their subsequent development (visualisation) by chemical or other means. These are discussed in detail. Applications of SSNTD in the fields of nuclear physics, dosimetry, biology and for determination of contents of an element and its spatial distribution are described. The monograph is intended to serve both beginners and specialists. It also gives a list of simple experiments that can be conveniently introduced at the undergraduate/postgraduate level. (M.G.B.). 20 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Classical open-string field theory: A∞-algebra, renormalization group and boundary states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsu, Toshio

    2002-01-01

    We investigate classical bosonic open-string field theory from the perspective of the Wilson renormalization group of world-sheet theory. The microscopic action is identified with Witten's covariant cubic action and the short-distance cut-off scale is introduced by length of open-string strip which appears in the Schwinger representation of open-string propagator. Classical open-string field theory in the title means open-string field theory governed by a classical part of the low energy action. It is obtained by integrating out suitable tree interactions of open-strings and is of non-polynomial type. We study this theory by using the BV formalism. It turns out to be deeply related with deformation theory of A ∞ -algebra. We introduce renormalization group equation of this theory and discuss it from several aspects. It is also discussed that this theory is interpreted as a boundary open-string field theory. Closed-string BRST charge and boundary states of closed-string field theory in the presence of open-string field play important roles

  9. Cluster expansion of the wavefunction. Calculation of electron correlations in ground and excited states by SAC and SAC CI theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuji, H.

    1979-01-01

    The SAC and SAC CI theories are formulated for actual calculations of singlet ground states and their excited states of arbitrary spin multiplicity. Approximations are considered for the variational methods since time-consuming terms are involved. The results of test calculations for singlet states have shown, with much smaller numbers of variables (sizes of the matrices involved), excellent agreement with the full CI and close-to-full CI results. This shows the utility of the SAC theory for ground states and especially of the SAC CI theory for excited states, since the slow convergence of the CI theory is much more critical for excited states than for ground states. (Auth.)

  10. Local density approximation for exchange in excited-state density functional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Harbola, Manoj K.; Samal, Prasanjit

    2004-01-01

    Local density approximation for the exchange energy is made for treatment of excited-states in density-functional theory. It is shown that taking care of the state-dependence of the LDA exchange energy functional leads to accurate excitation energies.

  11. On the symmetry algebra of the discrete states in d<2 closed string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panda, S.; Roy, S.

    1993-01-01

    The symmetry charges associated with the Lian-Zuckerman states for d<2 closed string theory are constructed. Unlike in the open string case, it is shown here that the symmetry charges commute among themselves and act trivially on all the physical states. (author). 19 refs

  12. A Discussion of Change Theory, System Theory, and State Designed Standards and Accountability Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeal, Larry; Christy, W. Keith

    This brief paper is a presentation that preceeded another case of considering the ongoing dialogue on the advantages and disadvantages of centralized and decentralized school-improvement processes. It attempts to raise a number of questions about the relationship between state-designed standards and accountability initiatives and change and…

  13. Quantization of Space-like States in Lorentz-Violating Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colladay, Don

    2018-01-01

    Lorentz violation frequently induces modified dispersion relations that can yield space-like states that impede the standard quantization procedures. In certain cases, an extended Hamiltonian formalism can be used to define observer-covariant normalization factors for field expansions and phase space integrals. These factors extend the theory to include non-concordant frames in which there are negative-energy states. This formalism provides a rigorous way to quantize certain theories containing space-like states and allows for the consistent computation of Cherenkov radiation rates in arbitrary frames and avoids singular expressions.

  14. Advantages of a multi-state approach in surgical research: how intermediate events and risk factor profile affect the prognosis of a patient with locally advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, G; Ettrich, T J; Kremer, M; Kornmann, M; Henne-Bruns, D; Eikema, D A; Schlattmann, P; de Wreede, L C

    2018-02-13

    Standard survival analysis fails to give insight into what happens to a patient after a first outcome event (like first relapse of a disease). Multi-state models are a useful tool for analyzing survival data when different treatments and results (intermediate events) can occur. Aim of this study was to implement a multi-state model on data of patients with rectal cancer to illustrate the advantages of multi-state analysis in comparison to standard survival analysis. We re-analyzed data from the RCT FOGT-2 study by using a multi-state model. Based on the results we defined a high and low risk reference patient. Using dynamic prediction, we estimated how the survival probability changes as more information about the clinical history of the patient becomes available. A patient with stage UICC IIIc (vs UICC II) has a higher risk to develop distant metastasis (DM) or both DM and local recurrence (LR) if he/she discontinues chemotherapy within 6 months or between 6 and 12 months, as well as after the completion of 12 months CTx with HR 3.55 (p = 0.026), 5.33 (p = 0.001) and 3.37 (p start of CTx, whereas for a low risk patient this is 79%. After the development of DM 1 year later, the high risk patient has an estimated 5-year survival probability of 11% and the low risk patient one of 21%. Multi-state models help to gain additional insight into the complex events after start of treatment. Dynamic prediction shows how survival probabilities change by progression of the clinical history.

  15. Equation of state experiments and theory relevant to planetary modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, M.; Graboske, H.C. Jr.; Nellis, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    In recent years there have been a number of static and shockwave experiments on the properties of planetary materials. The highest pressure measurements, and the ones most relevant to planetary modelling, have been obtained by shock compression. Of particular interest to the Jovian group are results for H 2 , H 2 O, CH 4 and NH 3 . Although the properties of metallic hydrogen have not been measured, they have been the subject of extensive calculations. In addition recent shock wave experiments on iron report to have detected melting under Earth core conditions. From this data theoretical models have been developed for computing the equations of state of materials used in planetary studies. A compelling feature that has followed from the use of improved material properties is a simplification in the planetary models. (author)

  16. On the theory of direct reactions with many particle final states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trautmann, D.; Baur, G.

    1977-01-01

    We study the theory of direct reactions with many particle final states. First, we concentrate on the DWBA formulation of the break-up of deuterons on heavy nuclei below the Coulomb barrier. Because there are no free parameters, this permits a clean test of the theory by comparing it to the experimental data. The agreement is very good. The theory is applied to the break-up of antideuteronic atoms. Then the effect of virtual deuteron break-up on Rutherford scattering is studied. It is small, but it seems to be measurable. Also the deuteron break-up above the Coulomb barrier can be well explained theoretically. In this context, small effects are studied briefly. A semiclassical theory of the break-up process is given, which results in an intuitive picture and a fast computational method. Our theory lends itself in a natural way to the study of stripping reactions to unbound states. The relation of stripping into the continuum to elastic scattering of the transferred particle on the same target nucleus is explained. Then the connection of stripping to bound and unbound states is established. Finally various examples of stripping of uncharged and charged particles into the continuum are given to illustrate the theory. Resonance wave functions describing the transferred particle are discussed. In a conclusion an outlook for possible future developments of experiment and theory is given. (author)

  17. Bulk Renormalization Group Flows and Boundary States in Conformal Field Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Cardy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We propose using smeared boundary states $e^{-\\tau H}|\\cal B\\rangle$ as variational approximations to the ground state of a conformal field theory deformed by relevant bulk operators. This is motivated by recent studies of quantum quenches in CFTs and of the entanglement spectrum in massive theories. It gives a simple criterion for choosing which boundary state should correspond to which combination of bulk operators, and leads to a rudimentary phase diagram of the theory in the vicinity of the RG fixed point corresponding to the CFT, as well as rigorous upper bounds on the universal amplitude of the free energy. In the case of the 2d minimal models explicit formulae are available. As a side result we show that the matrix elements of bulk operators between smeared Ishibashi states are simply given by the fusion rules of the CFT.

  18. Conformal blocks related to the R-R states in the c-circumflex=1 superconformal field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadasz, Leszek; Suchanek, Paulina; Jaskolski, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    We derive an explicit form of the family of four-point Neveu-Schwarz blocks with c-circumflex=1, external weights Δ i =(1/8) and arbitrary intermediate weight Δ. The derivation is based on analytic properties of correlation functions of Ramond fields in the free superscalar theory

  19. Kinetics of Hydrogen Radical Reactions with Toluene Including Chemical Activation Theory Employing System-Specific Quantum RRK Theory Calibrated by Variational Transition State Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zheng, Jingjing; Truhlar, Donald G

    2016-03-02

    Pressure-dependent reactions are ubiquitous in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. We employ a new calibration procedure for quantum Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel (QRRK) unimolecular rate theory within a chemical activation mechanism to calculate the pressure-falloff effect of a radical association with an aromatic ring. The new theoretical framework is applied to the reaction of H with toluene, which is a prototypical reaction in the combustion chemistry of aromatic hydrocarbons present in most fuels. Both the hydrogen abstraction reactions and the hydrogen addition reactions are calculated. Our system-specific (SS) QRRK approach is adjusted with SS parameters to agree with multistructural canonical variational transition state theory with multidimensional tunneling (MS-CVT/SCT) at the high-pressure limit. The new method avoids the need for the usual empirical estimations of the QRRK parameters, and it eliminates the need for variational transition state theory calculations as a function of energy, although in this first application we do validate the falloff curves by comparing SS-QRRK results without tunneling to multistructural microcanonical variational transition state theory (MS-μVT) rate constants without tunneling. At low temperatures, the two approaches agree well with each other, but at high temperatures, SS-QRRK tends to overestimate falloff slightly. We also show that the variational effect is important in computing the energy-resolved rate constants. Multiple-structure anharmonicity, torsional-potential anharmonicity, and high-frequency-mode vibrational anharmonicity are all included in the rate computations, and torsional anharmonicity effects on the density of states are investigated. Branching fractions, which are both temperature- and pressure-dependent (and for which only limited data is available from experiment), are predicted as a function of pressure.

  20. Effective SU(2) theory for the pseudogap state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, X.; Kloss, T.; Pépin, C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper exposes in a detailed manner the recent findings about the SU(2) scenario for the underdoped phase of the cuprate superconductors. The SU(2) symmetry is formulated as a rotation between the d -wave superconducting (SC) phase and a d -wave charge order. We define the operators responsible for the SU(2) rotations and we derive the nonlinear σ model associated with it. In this framework, we demonstrate that SU(2) fluctuations are massless in finite portions of the Brillouin zone corresponding to the antinodal regions (0 ,π ) and (π ,0 ). We argue that the presence of SU(2) fluctuations in the antinodal region leads to the opening of Fermi arcs around the Fermi surface and to the formation of the pseudogap. Moreover, we show that SU(2) fluctuations lead, in turn, to the emergence of a finite momentum SC order—or pair density wave (PDW)—and more importantly to a new kind of excitonic particle-hole pairs liquid, the resonant excitonic state (RES), which is made of patches of preformed particle-hole pairs with multiple momenta. When the RES liquid becomes critical, we demonstrate that electronic scattering through the critical modes leads to anomalous transport properties. This new finding can account for the strange metal (SM) phase at finite temperature, on the right-hand side of the SC dome, shedding light on another notoriously mysterious part of the phase diagram of the cuprates.

  1. Pump-dump-probe and pump-repump-probe ultrafast spectroscopy resolves cross section of an early ground state intermediate and stimulated emission in the photoreactions of the Pr ground state of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Ann E; Lincoln, Craig N; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; van Thor, Jasper J

    2012-01-26

    The primary photoreactions of the red absorbing ground state (Pr) of the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 from Synechocystis PCC 6803 involve C15═C16 Z-E photoisomerization of its phycocyanobilin chromophore. The first observable product intermediate in pump-probe measurements of the photocycle, "Lumi-R", is formed with picosecond kinetics and involves excited state decay reactions that have 3 and 14 ps time constants. Here, we have studied the photochemical formation of the Lumi-R intermediate using multipulse picosecond visible spectroscopy. Pump-dump-probe (PDP) and pump-repump-probe (PRP) experiments were carried out by employing two femtosecond visible pulses with 1, 14, and 160 ps delays, together with a broadband dispersive visible probe. The time delays between the two excitation pulses have been selected to allow interaction with the dominant (3 and 14 ps) kinetic phases of Lumi-R formation. The frequency dependence of the PDP and PRP amplitudes was investigated at 620, 640, 660, and 680 nm, covering excited state absorption (λ(max) = 620 nm), ground state absorption (λ(max) = 660 nm), and stimulated emission (λ(max) = 680 nm) cross sections. Experimental double difference transient absorbance signals (ΔΔOD), from the PDP and PRP measurements, required corrections to remove contributions from ground state repumping. The sensitivity of the resulting ΔΔOD signals was systematically investigated for possible connectivity schemes and photochemical parameters. When applying a homogeneous (sequentially decaying) connectivity scheme in both the 3 and 14 ps kinetic phases, evidence for repumping of an intermediate that has an electronic ground state configuration (GSI) is taken from the dump-induced S1 formation with 620, 640, and 660 nm wavelengths and 1 and 14 ps repump delays. Evidence for repumping a GSI is also seen, for the same excitation wavelengths, when imposing a target connectivity scheme proposed in the literature for the 1 ps repump delay. In

  2. Universality of State-Independent Violation of Correlation Inequalities for Noncontextual Theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badziag, Piotr; Bengtsson, Ingemar; Cabello, Adan; Pitowsky, Itamar

    2009-01-01

    We show that the state-independent violation of inequalities for noncontextual hidden variable theories introduced in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 210401 (2008)] is universal, i.e., occurs for any quantum mechanical system in which noncontextuality is meaningful. We describe a method to obtain state-independent violations for any system of dimension d≥3. This universality proves that, according to quantum mechanics, there are no 'classical' states.

  3. State of Theory and Computer Simulations of Radiation Effects in Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrales, Louis R.; Weber, William J.

    2003-01-01

    This article presents opinions based on the presentations and discussions at a Workshop on Theory and Computer Simulations of Radiation Effects in Ceramics held in August 2002 at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA, USA. The workshop was focused on the current state-of-the-art of theory, modeling and simulation of radiation effects in oxide ceramics, directions for future breakthroughs, and creating a close integration with experiment

  4. Fundamental constants and tests of theory in Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D; Mohr, Peter J; Tan, Joseph N; Wundt, Benedikt J

    2008-04-25

    A comparison of precision frequency measurements to quantum electrodynamics (QED) predictions for Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions can yield information on values of fundamental constants and test theory. With the results of a calculation of a key QED contribution reported here, the uncertainty in the theory of the energy levels is reduced to a level where such a comparison can yield an improved value of the Rydberg constant.

  5. Fundamental Constants and Tests of Theory in Rydberg States of Hydrogenlike Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jentschura, Ulrich D.; Mohr, Peter J.; Tan, Joseph N.; Wundt, Benedikt J.

    2008-01-01

    A comparison of precision frequency measurements to quantum electrodynamics (QED) predictions for Rydberg states of hydrogenlike ions can yield information on values of fundamental constants and test theory. With the results of a calculation of a key QED contribution reported here, the uncertainty in the theory of the energy levels is reduced to a level where such a comparison can yield an improved value of the Rydberg constant

  6. Correlations of zero-entropy critical states in the XXZ model: integrability and Luttinger theory far from the ground state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vlijm, I. S. Eliëns, J. -S. Caux

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Pumping a finite energy density into a quantum system typically leads to `melted' states characterized by exponentially-decaying correlations, as is the case for finite-temperature equilibrium situations. An important exception to this rule are states which, while being at high energy, maintain a low entropy. Such states can interestingly still display features of quantum criticality, especially in one dimension. Here, we consider high-energy states in anisotropic Heisenberg quantum spin chains obtained by splitting the ground state's magnon Fermi sea into separate pieces. Using methods based on integrability, we provide a detailed study of static and dynamical spin-spin correlations. These carry distinctive signatures of the Fermi sea splittings, which would be observable in eventual experimental realizations. Going further, we employ a multi-component Tomonaga-Luttinger model in order to predict the asymptotics of static correlations. For this effective field theory, we fix all universal exponents from energetics, and all non-universal correlation prefactors using finite-size scaling of matrix elements. The correlations obtained directly from integrability and those emerging from the Luttinger field theory description are shown to be in extremely good correspondence, as expected, for the large distance asymptotics, but surprisingly also for the short distance behavior. Finally, we discuss the description of dynamical correlations from a mobile impurity model, and clarify the relation of the effective field theory parameters to the Bethe Ansatz solution.

  7. Hypnosis, suggestions, and altered states of consciousness: experimental evaluation of the new cognitive-behavioral theory and the traditional trance-state theory of "hypnosis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, T X; Wilson, S C

    1977-10-07

    Sixty-six subjects were tested on a new scale for evaluating "hypnotic-like" experiences (The Creative Imagination Scale), which includes ten standardized test-suggestions (e.g. suggestions for arm heaviness, finger anesthesia, time distortion, and age regression). The subjects were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups (Think-With Instructions, trance induction, and Control), with 22 subjects to each group. The new Cognitive-Behavioral Theory predicted that subjects exposed to preliminary instructions designed to demonstrate how to think and imagine along with the suggested themes (Think-With Instructions) would be more responsive to test-suggestions for anesthesia, time distortion, age regression, and so on, than subjects exposed to a trance-induction procedure. On the other hand, the traditional Trance State Theory predicted that a trance induction would be more effective than Think-With Instructions in enhancing responses to such suggestions. Subjects exposed to the Think-With Instructions obtained significantly higher scores on the test-suggestions than those exposed either to the traditional trance-induction procedure or to the control treatment. Scores of subjects who received the trance-induction procedure were not significantly different from those of the subjects who received the control treatment. The results thus supported the new Cognitive-Behavioral Theory and contradicted the traditional Trance State Theory of hypnosis. Two recent experiments, by De Stefano and by Katz, confirmed the above experimental results and offered further support for the Cognitive-Behavioral Theory. In both recent experiments, subjects randomly assigned to a "Think-With Instructions" treatment were more responsive to test-suggestions than those randomly assigned to a traditional trance-induction treatment.

  8. Thermal isomerization of azobenzenes: on the performance of Eyring transition state theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietze, Clemens; Titov, Evgenii; Lindner, Steven; Saalfrank, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The thermal Z\\to E (back-)isomerization of azobenzenes is a prototypical reaction occurring in molecular switches. It has been studied for decades, yet its kinetics is not fully understood. In this paper, quantum chemical calculations are performed to model the kinetics of an experimental benchmark system, where a modified azobenzene (AzoBiPyB) is embedded in a metal-organic framework (MOF). The molecule can be switched thermally from cis to trans, under solvent-free conditions. We critically test the validity of Eyring transition state theory for this reaction. As previously found for other azobenzenes (albeit in solution), good agreement between theory and experiment emerges for activation energies and activation free energies, already at a comparatively simple level of theory, B3LYP/6-31G* including dispersion corrections. However, theoretical Arrhenius prefactors and activation entropies are in qualitiative disagreement with experiment. Several factors are discussed that may have an influence on activation entropies, among them dynamical and geometric constraints (imposed by the MOF). For a simpler model—Z\\to E isomerization in azobenzene—a systematic test of quantum chemical methods from both density functional theory and wavefunction theory is carried out in the context of Eyring theory. Also, the effect of anharmonicities on activation entropies is discussed for this model system. Our work highlights capabilities and shortcomings of Eyring transition state theory and quantum chemical methods, when applied for the Z\\to E (back-)isomerization of azobenzenes under solvent-free conditions.

  9. Self-knowledge and attribution of mental states in Theory of Mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skidelsky, Liza

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Many philosophers consider that self-knowledge reflects the particularity that we can know what we think, believe, desire, in a different way in which we know the mental states of other people. This is the claim of an asymmetry between first and third person. Several approaches han been offered in the epistemological literature in order to account for this asymmetry. Nonetheless, unlike the expected compatibility between adjacent fields, the literature related to the attribution and self-attribution of mental states or, in general, what is called Theory of Mind, does not seem either to preserve this asymmetry or the attempt to preserve it undermines the fundamental role of the different Theory of Mind proposals. This paper will show this in two parts. Firstly, it addresses how the asymmetry thesis han been defended in the epistemological literature. The aim of this section is to offer a geography of the different approaches. Secondly, two proposals in Theory of Mind, the theory theory and simulation theory, will be evaluated in order to show why they do not account for the asymmetry thesis, and some of the consequences that would be gather from the attempt to conciliate these Theory of Mind proposals with the epistemological approaches that defend the asymmetry thesis will be analized.

  10. State-Space Geometry, Statistical Fluctuations, and Black Holes in String Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Bellucci

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the state-space geometry of various extremal and nonextremal black holes in string theory. From the notion of the intrinsic geometry, we offer a state-space perspective to the black hole vacuum fluctuations. For a given black hole entropy, we explicate the intrinsic geometric meaning of the statistical fluctuations, local and global stability conditions, and long range statistical correlations. We provide a set of physical motivations pertaining to the extremal and nonextremal black holes, namely, the meaning of the chemical geometry and physics of correlation. We illustrate the state-space configurations for general charge extremal black holes. In sequel, we extend our analysis for various possible charge and anticharge nonextremal black holes. From the perspective of statistical fluctuation theory, we offer general remarks, future directions, and open issues towards the intrinsic geometric understanding of the vacuum fluctuations and black holes in string theory.

  11. [Intermediate energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes work in experimental Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics carried out between October 1, 1988 and October 1, 1989 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under grant DE-FG02-86ER-40269 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental program is very broadly based, including pion-nucleon studies at TRIUMF, inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/WNR. In addition, a number of other topics related to accelerator physics are described in this report

  12. A finite state, finite memory minimum principle, part 2. [a discussion of game theory, signaling, stochastic processes, and control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, N. R., Jr.; Athans, M.

    1975-01-01

    The development of the theory of the finite - state, finite - memory (FSFM) stochastic control problem is discussed. The sufficiency of the FSFM minimum principle (which is in general only a necessary condition) was investigated. By introducing the notion of a signaling strategy as defined in the literature on games, conditions under which the FSFM minimum principle is sufficient were determined. This result explicitly interconnects the information structure of the FSFM problem with its optimality conditions. The min-H algorithm for the FSFM problem was studied. It is demonstrated that a version of the algorithm always converges to a particular type of local minimum termed a person - by - person extremal.

  13. Three-charge black holes and quarter BPS states in Little String Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giveon, Amit [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University,Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Harvey, Jeffrey; Kutasov, David; Lee, Sungjay [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, The University of Chicago,5620 S. Ellis Av., Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2015-12-22

    We show that the system of k NS5-branes wrapping T{sup 4}×S{sup 1} has non-trivial vacuum structure. Different vacua have different spectra of 1/4 BPS states that carry momentum and winding around the S{sup 1}. In one vacuum, such states are described by black holes; in another, they can be thought of as perturbative BPS states in Double Scaled Little String Theory. In general, both kinds of states are present. We compute the degeneracy of perturbative BPS states exactly, and show that it differs from that of the corresponding black holes. We comment on the implication of our results to the black hole microstate program, UV/IR mixing in Little String Theory, string thermodynamics, the string/black hole transition, and other issues.

  14. Evidence for the epistemic view of quantum states: A toy theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spekkens, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    We present a toy theory that is based on a simple principle: the number of questions about the physical state of a system that are answered must always be equal to the number that are unanswered in a state of maximal knowledge. Many quantum phenomena are found to have analogues within this toy theory. These include the noncommutativity of measurements, interference, the multiplicity of convex decompositions of a mixed state, the impossibility of discriminating nonorthogonal states, the impossibility of a universal state inverter, the distinction between bipartite and tripartite entanglement, the monogamy of pure entanglement, no cloning, no broadcasting, remote steering, teleportation, entanglement swapping, dense coding, mutually unbiased bases, and many others. The diversity and quality of these analogies is taken as evidence for the view that quantum states are states of incomplete knowledge rather than states of reality. A consideration of the phenomena that the toy theory fails to reproduce, notably, violations of Bell inequalities and the existence of a Kochen-Specker theorem, provides clues for how to proceed with this research program

  15. Correlated Default and Financial Intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory Phelan

    2015-01-01

    Financial intermediation naturally arises when knowledge about the aggregate state is valuable for managing investments and lenders cannot easily observe the aggregate state. I show this using a costly enforcement model in which lenders need ex-post incentives to enforce payments from defaulted loans and borrowers' payoffs are correlated. When projects have correlated outcomes, learning the state of one project (via enforcement) provides information about the states of other projects. A large...

  16. The intermediate state in Patd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Again, there exists in these writings a great variety of speculations pertaining to the interim ..... to 'remember' him, that is, at the resurrection (Ellis 1974: 268; Gelden- huys 1951: 611). ...... Word pictures in the New Testament. Vol 2, The Gospel ...

  17. Theory of warm ionized gases: equation of state and kinetic Schottky anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capolupo, A; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

    2013-10-01

    Based on accurate Lennard-Jones-type interaction potentials, we derive a closed set of state equations for the description of warm atomic gases in the presence of ionization processes. The specific heat is predicted to exhibit peaks in correspondence to single and multiple ionizations. Such kinetic analog in atomic gases of the Schottky anomaly in solids is enhanced at intermediate and low atomic densities. The case of adiabatic compression of noble gases is analyzed in detail and the implications on sonoluminescence are discussed. In particular, the predicted plasma electron density in a sonoluminescent bubble turns out to be in good agreement with the value measured in recent experiments.

  18. Microscopic theory of warm ionized gases: equation of state and kinetic Schottky anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capolupo, A; Giampaolo, S M; Illuminati, F

    2013-01-01

    Based on accurate Lennard-Jones type interaction potentials, we derive a closed set of state equations for the description of warm atomic gases in the presence of ionization processes. The specific heat is predicted to exhibit peaks in correspondence to single and multiple ionizations. Such kinetic analogue in atomic gases of the Schottky anomaly in solids is enhanced at intermediate and low atomic densities. The case of adiabatic compression of noble gases is analyzed in detail and the implications on sonoluminescence are discussed.

  19. Fermionic Spinon Theory of Square Lattice Spin Liquids near the Néel State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Thomson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum fluctuations of the Néel state of the square lattice antiferromagnet are usually described by a CP^{1} theory of bosonic spinons coupled to a U(1 gauge field, and with a global SU(2 spin rotation symmetry. Such a theory also has a confining phase with valence bond solid (VBS order, and upon including spin-singlet charge-2 Higgs fields, deconfined phases with Z_{2} topological order possibly intertwined with discrete broken global symmetries. We present dual theories of the same phases starting from a mean-field theory of fermionic spinons moving in π flux in each square lattice plaquette. Fluctuations about this π-flux state are described by (2+1-dimensional quantum chromodynamics (QCD_{3} with a SU(2 gauge group and N_{f}=2 flavors of massless Dirac fermions. It has recently been argued by Wang et al. [Deconfined Quantum Critical Points: Symmetries and Dualities, Phys. Rev. X 7, 031051 (2017.PRXHAE2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.7.031051] that this QCD_{3} theory describes the Néel-VBS quantum phase transition. We introduce adjoint Higgs fields in QCD_{3} and obtain fermionic dual descriptions of the phases with Z_{2} topological order obtained earlier using the bosonic CP^{1} theory. We also present a fermionic spinon derivation of the monopole Berry phases in the U(1 gauge theory of the VBS state. The global phase diagram of these phases contains multicritical points, and our results imply new boson-fermion dualities between critical gauge theories of these points.

  20. Coherent states with classical motion: from an analytic method complementary to group theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    From the motivation of Schroedinger, that of finding states which follow the motion which a classical particle would have in a given potential, we discuss generalizations of the coherent states of the harmonic oscillator. We focus on a method which is the analytic complement to the group theory point of view. It uses a minimum uncertainty formalism as its basis. We discuss the properties and time evolution of these states, always keeping in mind the desire to find quantum states which follow the classical motion

  1. France's State of the Art Distributed Optical Fibre Sensors Qualified for the Monitoring of the French Underground Repository for High Level and Intermediate Level Long Lived Radioactive Wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delepine-Lesoille, Sylvie; Girard, Sylvain; Landolt, Marcel; Bertrand, Johan; Planes, Isabelle; Boukenter, Aziz; Marin, Emmanuel; Humbert, Georges; Leparmentier, Stéphanie; Auguste, Jean-Louis; Ouerdane, Youcef

    2017-06-13

    This paper presents the state of the art distributed sensing systems, based on optical fibres, developed and qualified for the French Cigéo project, the underground repository for high level and intermediate level long-lived radioactive wastes. Four main parameters, namely strain, temperature, radiation and hydrogen concentration are currently investigated by optical fibre sensors, as well as the tolerances of selected technologies to the unique constraints of the Cigéo's severe environment. Using fluorine-doped silica optical fibre surrounded by a carbon layer and polyimide coating, it is possible to exploit its Raman, Brillouin and Rayleigh scattering signatures to achieve the distributed sensing of the temperature and the strain inside the repository cells of radioactive wastes. Regarding the dose measurement, promising solutions are proposed based on Radiation Induced Attenuation (RIA) responses of sensitive fibres such as the P-doped ones. While for hydrogen measurements, the potential of specialty optical fibres with Pd particles embedded in their silica matrix is currently studied for this gas monitoring through its impact on the fibre Brillouin signature evolution.

  2. Advantages of a multi-state approach in surgical research: how intermediate events and risk factor profile affect the prognosis of a patient with locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Manzini

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Standard survival analysis fails to give insight into what happens to a patient after a first outcome event (like first relapse of a disease. Multi-state models are a useful tool for analyzing survival data when different treatments and results (intermediate events can occur. Aim of this study was to implement a multi-state model on data of patients with rectal cancer to illustrate the advantages of multi-state analysis in comparison to standard survival analysis. Methods We re-analyzed data from the RCT FOGT-2 study by using a multi-state model. Based on the results we defined a high and low risk reference patient. Using dynamic prediction, we estimated how the survival probability changes as more information about the clinical history of the patient becomes available. Results A patient with stage UICC IIIc (vs UICC II has a higher risk to develop distant metastasis (DM or both DM and local recurrence (LR if he/she discontinues chemotherapy within 6 months or between 6 and 12 months, as well as after the completion of 12 months CTx with HR 3.55 (p = 0.026, 5.33 (p = 0.001 and 3.37 (p < 0.001, respectively. He/she also has a higher risk to die after the development of DM (HR 1.72, p = 0.023. Anterior resection vs. abdominoperineal amputation means 63% risk reduction to develop DM or both DM and LR (HR 0.37, p = 0.003 after discontinuation of chemotherapy between 6 and 12 months. After development of LR, a woman has a 4.62 times higher risk to die (p = 0.006. A high risk reference patient has an estimated 43% 5-year survival probability at start of CTx, whereas for a low risk patient this is 79%. After the development of DM 1 year later, the high risk patient has an estimated 5-year survival probability of 11% and the low risk patient one of 21%. Conclusions Multi-state models help to gain additional insight into the complex events after start of treatment. Dynamic prediction shows how survival

  3. Exceptional thermodynamics. The equation of state of G{sub 2} gauge theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Mattia [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Caselle, Michele [Torino Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica Teorica; INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy); Panero, Marco [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Teorica; Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain); Pellegrini, Roberto [Swansea Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    2014-10-15

    We present a lattice study of the equation of state in Yang-Mills theory based on the exceptional G{sub 2} gauge group. As is well-known, at zero temperature this theory shares many qualitative features with real-world QCD, including the absence of colored states in the spectrum and dynamical string breaking at large distances. In agreement with previous works, we show that at finite temperature this theory features a first-order deconfining phase transition, whose nature can be studied by a semi-classical computation. We also show that the equilibrium thermodynamic observables in the deconfined phase bear striking quantitative similarities with those found in SU(N) gauge theories: in particular, these quantities exhibit nearly perfect proportionality to the number of gluon degrees of freedom, and the trace anomaly reveals a characteristic quadratic dependence on the temperature, also observed in SU(N) Yang-Mills theories (both in four and in three spacetime dimensions). We compare our lattice data with analytical predictions from effective models, and discuss their implications for the deconfinement mechanism and high-temperature properties of strongly interacting, non-supersymmetric gauge theories. Our results give strong evidence for the conjecture that the thermal deconfining transition is governed by a universal mechanism, common to all simple gauge groups.

  4. Exceptional thermodynamics. The equation of state of G2 gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Mattia; Panero, Marco; Pellegrini, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    We present a lattice study of the equation of state in Yang-Mills theory based on the exceptional G 2 gauge group. As is well-known, at zero temperature this theory shares many qualitative features with real-world QCD, including the absence of colored states in the spectrum and dynamical string breaking at large distances. In agreement with previous works, we show that at finite temperature this theory features a first-order deconfining phase transition, whose nature can be studied by a semi-classical computation. We also show that the equilibrium thermodynamic observables in the deconfined phase bear striking quantitative similarities with those found in SU(N) gauge theories: in particular, these quantities exhibit nearly perfect proportionality to the number of gluon degrees of freedom, and the trace anomaly reveals a characteristic quadratic dependence on the temperature, also observed in SU(N) Yang-Mills theories (both in four and in three spacetime dimensions). We compare our lattice data with analytical predictions from effective models, and discuss their implications for the deconfinement mechanism and high-temperature properties of strongly interacting, non-supersymmetric gauge theories. Our results give strong evidence for the conjecture that the thermal deconfining transition is governed by a universal mechanism, common to all simple gauge groups.

  5. Malthus’s theory on population as a basis for criticism of the interventionist state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dokić Marko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Going by ideological debates concerning (unjustifiable state intervention, protection of individual liberty, and the question of state's role, this article analyses Malthus's theory on population. It states a thesis that theory on population leads Malthus toward the idea of a minimal state and represents a basis for criticism of an interventionist state and its paternalistic role. The article consists of an introduction, four sections and a conclusion. The introduction cites goals of the work and gives basic notes on Malthus's theory on population and its socio-historical context. Special consideration is paid on reasons that lead to desertion of his ideas with a special focus on changes within liberal ideology, that lead to dissociation from classical liberalism and a merging of liberalism with socialism. The first part examines basic principles of Malthus's theory on population - primarily the idea that the population multiply faster than the food supply, and that population, when unchecked, increases in geometrical ratio, while subsistence increases only in arithmetical ratio. Afterwards, this Malthus's idea is linked to the status of the poor, and is concluded that the state intervention is useless, being that the troubles this part of the population faces are a consequence of their own actions. Therefore, the role of the state should not be care for the poor. In the second part positive and preventive checks to population are examined. Preventive checks are further analyzed because Malthus gives them more importance. The third, central part, is dedicated to Malthus's criticism of the Poor Laws and, within it, his opposition to the state's intervention is further analyzed. According to Malthus, laws that are passed in order to improve the status of the poor have an opposite effect. Even though their aim is to decrease poverty, they increase it. Their tendency is to lead to an increase in population, without the simultaneous increase in food

  6. Classical generalized transition-state theory. Application to a collinear reaction with two saddle points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.; Grev, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Accurate classical dynamical fixed-energy reaction probabilities and fixed-temperature rate constants are calculated for the collinear reaction H + FH on a low-barrier model potential energy surface. The calculations cover energies from 0.1 to 100 kcal/mol above threshold and temperatures of 100 to 10,000 K. The accurate results are used to test five approximate theories: conventional transition-state theory (TST), canonical variational theory (CVT), improved canonical variational theory (ICVT), microcanonical variational theory (μVT), and the unified statistical model (US). The first four of these theories involve a single dividing surface in phase space, and the US theory involves three dividing surfaces. The tests are particularly interesting because the potential energy surface has two identical saddle points. At temperatures from 100 to 2000 K, the μVt is the most accurate theory, with errors in the range 11 to 14%; for temperatures from 2000 to 10,000 K, the US theory is the most successful, with errors in the range 3 to 14%. Over the whole range, a factor of 100 in temperature, both theories have errors of 35% or less. Even TST has errors of 47% or less over the whole factor-of-100 temperature range. Although the US model should become exact at threshold for this system, it already underestimates the reaction probability by a factor of 0.64 at 0.1 kcal/mol above threshold. TST and μVT agree with each other within 12% up to an energy 13 kcal/mol above the saddle point energy. 3 figures, 2 tables

  7. Combining symmetry collective states with coupled-cluster theory: Lessons from the Agassi model Hamiltonian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Matthew R.; Dukelsky, Jorge; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2017-06-01

    The failures of single-reference coupled-cluster theory for strongly correlated many-body systems is flagged at the mean-field level by the spontaneous breaking of one or more physical symmetries of the Hamiltonian. Restoring the symmetry of the mean-field determinant by projection reveals that coupled-cluster theory fails because it factorizes high-order excitation amplitudes incorrectly. However, symmetry-projected mean-field wave functions do not account sufficiently for dynamic (or weak) correlation. Here we pursue a merger of symmetry projection and coupled-cluster theory, following previous work along these lines that utilized the simple Lipkin model system as a test bed [J. Chem. Phys. 146, 054110 (2017), 10.1063/1.4974989]. We generalize the concept of a symmetry-projected mean-field wave function to the concept of a symmetry projected state, in which the factorization of high-order excitation amplitudes in terms of low-order ones is guided by symmetry projection and is not exponential, and combine them with coupled-cluster theory in order to model the ground state of the Agassi Hamiltonian. This model has two separate channels of correlation and two separate physical symmetries which are broken under strong correlation. We show how the combination of symmetry collective states and coupled-cluster theory is effective in obtaining correlation energies and order parameters of the Agassi model throughout its phase diagram.

  8. Regularities of intermediate adsorption complex relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manukova, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental data, characterizing the regularities of intermediate adsorption complex relaxation in the polycrystalline Mo-N 2 system at 77 K are given. The method of molecular beam has been used in the investigation. The analytical expressions of change regularity in the relaxation process of full and specific rates - of transition from intermediate state into ''non-reversible'', of desorption into the gas phase and accumUlation of the particles in the intermediate state are obtained

  9. On bound states of photons in noncommutative U(1) gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatollahi, A.H.; Jafari, A.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the possibility that photons of noncommutative U(1) gauge theory can make bound states. Using the potential model, developed based on the constituent gluon picture of QCD glue-balls, arguments are presented in favor of the existence of these bound states. The basic ingredient of the potential model is that the self-interacting massless gauge particles may get mass by the inclusion of non-perturbative effects. (orig.)

  10. Search for intermediate vector bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klajn, D.B.; Rubbia, K.; Meer, S.

    1983-01-01

    Problem of registration and search for intermediate vector bosons is discussed. According to weak-current theory there are three intermediate vector bosons with +1(W + )-1(W - ) and zero (Z 0 ) electric charges. It was suggested to conduct the investigation into particles in 1976 by cline, Rubbia and Makintair using proton-antiproton beams. Major difficulties of the experiment are related to the necessity of formation of sufficient amount of antiparticles and the method of antiproton beam ''cooling'' for the purpose of reduction of its random movements. The stochastic method was suggested by van der Meer in 1968 as one of possible cooling methods. Several large detectors were designed for searching intermediate vector bosons

  11. Theory and computation of triply excited resonances: Application to states of He-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolaides, C.A.; Piangos, N.A.; Komninos, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Autoionizing multiply excited states offer unusual challenges to the theory of electronic structure and spectra because of the presence of strong electron correlations, of their occasional weak binding, of their proximity to more than one threshold, and of their degeneracy with many continua. Here we discuss a theory that addresses these difficulties in conjunction with the computation of their wave functions and intrinsic properties. Emphasis is given on the justification of the possible presence of self-consistently obtained open-channel-like (OCL) correlating configurations in the square-integrable representation of such states and on their effect on the energy E and the width Γ. Application of the theory has allowed the prediction of two hitherto unknown He - triply excited resonances, the 2s2p 2 2 P (E=59.71 eV, above the He ground state, Γ=79 meV) and the 2p 3 2 Do (E=59.46 eV, Γ=282 meV) (1 a.u.=27.2116 eV). These resonances are above the singly excited states of He and are embedded in its doubly excited spectrum. The relatively broad 2p 3 2 Do state interacts strongly with the He 2s2p 3 Po εd continuum. The effect of this interaction has been studied in terms of the coupling with fixed core scattering states as well as with a self-consistently computed OCL bound configuration

  12. Comparison of 3D Classical Trajectory and Transition-State Theory Reaction Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppl, G. W.; Karplus, Martin

    1970-10-01

    Although there is excellent agreement for a system such as H+H{sub 2} --> H{sub 2}+H, in which both the potential and the particle masses are symmetric, significant deviations occur for more asymmetric reactions. A detailed analysis show that the calculated differences are from the violation of two assumptions of transition-state theory.

  13. On the vacuum states for non-commutative gauge theory TH1"-->

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goursac, A.; Wallet, J.-C.; Wulkenhaar, R.

    2008-07-01

    Candidates for renormalizable gauge theory models on Moyal spaces constructed recently have non-trivial vacua. We show that these models support vacuum states that are invariant under both global rotations and symplectic isomorphisms which form a global symmetry group for the action. We compute the explicit expression in position space for these vacuum configurations in two and four dimensions.

  14. Wigner's dynamical transition state theory in phase space : classical and quantum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waalkens, Holger; Schubert, Roman; Wiggins, Stephen

    We develop Wigner's approach to a dynamical transition state theory in phase space in both the classical and quantum mechanical settings. The key to our development is the construction of a normal form for describing the dynamics in the neighbourhood of a specific type of saddle point that governs

  15. Critical rationalism and the state of unawareness in managers¿ theories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faran, D.; Faran, D.; Wijnhoven, Alphonsus B.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    This essay highlights the state of unawareness to which the theories held by managers are susceptible. The essay opens up the question whether the critical rationalist approach, which specifically addresses the unawareness problem in science, is indeed inadequate for organizations as commonly

  16. Durkheim's and Weber's notions of the State in Marxist political theory: similarities and differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Alejandra Inda

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is a contribution to the comparatively scarce literature on how Durkheim and Weber - those canonical sociological theorists - conceived of the State. I shall examine just what relation each of their conceptions has to Marxist theory, and ask to what degree they coincide or diverge.    

  17. Theory of Mind: Children's Understanding of Mental States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracho, Olivia N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than three decades, theory of mind (ToM) has been one of the leading and prevalent issues in developmental psychology. ToM is the ability to ascribe mental states (e.g. beliefs, intents, desires, pretending, knowledge) to oneself and others as well as to recognise that others have beliefs, desires, and intentions that differ from…

  18. Situational State Balances and Participation Motivation in Youth Sport: A Reversal Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sit, Cindy H. P.; Lindner, Koenraad J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Reversal theory (Apter, 1982, 1989, ) is one of the motivational frameworks which attempts to examine human subjective experiences and behaviours. There are four dyads of metamotivational states (telic-paratelic, conformist-negativistic, autic-alloic, and mastery-sympathy) and individuals may prefer to be in one rather than the other…

  19. Estimation and asymptotic theory for transition probabilities in Markov Renewal Multi–state models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitoni, C.; Verduijn, M.; Putter, H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss estimation of transition probabilities for semi–Markov multi–state models. Non–parametric and semi–parametric estimators of the transition probabilities for a large class of models (forward going models) are proposed. Large sample theory is derived using the functional

  20. An Application of Durkheim's Theory of Suicide to Prison Suicide Rates in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaro, Christine; Lester, David

    2005-01-01

    E. Durkheim (1897) suggested that the societal rate of suicide might be explained by societal factors, such as marriage, divorce, and birth rates. The current study examined male prison suicide rates and suicide rates for men in the total population in the United States and found that variables based on Durkheim's theory of suicide explained…

  1. White noise theory of robust nonlinear filtering with correlated state and observation noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Karandikar, Rajeeva

    1992-01-01

    In the direct white noise theory of nonlinear filtering, the state process is still modeled as a Markov process satisfying an Ito stochastic differential equation, while a finitely additive white noise is used to model the observation noise. In the present work, this asymmetry is removed by modeling

  2. White noise theory of robust nonlinear filtering with correlated state and observation noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagchi, Arunabha; Karandikar, Rajeeva

    1994-01-01

    In the existing `direct¿ white noise theory of nonlinear filtering, the state process is still modelled as a Markov process satisfying an Itô stochastic differential equation, while a `finitely additive¿ white noise is used to model the observation noise. We remove this asymmetry by modelling the

  3. Electron scattering from sodium at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitroy, J.; McCarthy, I.E.

    1986-10-01

    A comprehensive comparison is made between theoretical calculations and experimental data for intermediate energy (≥ 10 eV) electron scattering from sodium vapour. The theoretical predictions of coupled-channels calculations (including one, two or four channels) do not agree with experimental values of the differential cross sections for elastic scattering or the resonant 3s to 3p excitation. Increasingly-more-sophisticated calculations, incorporating electron correlations in the target states, and also including core-excited states in the close-coupling expansion, are done at a few selected energies in an attempt to isolate the cause of the discrepancies between theory and experiment. It is found that these more-sophisticated calculations give essentially the same results as the two- and four-channel calculations using Hartree-Fock wavefunctions. Comparison of the sodium high-energy elastic differential cross sections with those of neon suggests that the sodium differential cross section experiments may suffer from systematic errors. There is also disagreement, at the higher energies, between theoretical values for the scattering parameters and those that are derived from laser-excited superelastic scattering and electron photon coincidence experiments. When allowance is made for the finite acceptance angle of the electron spectrometers used in the experiments by convoluting the theory with a function representing the distribution of electrons entering the electron spectrometer it is found that the magnitudes of the differences between theory and experiment are reduced

  4. Abnormal cerebral functional connectivity in esophageal cancer patients with theory of mind deficits in resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yin; Xiang, JianBo; Qian, Nong; Sun, SuPing; Hu, LiJun; Yuan, YongGui

    2015-01-01

    To explore the function of the default mode network (DMN) in the psychopathological mechanisms of theory of mind deficits in patients with an esophageal cancer concomitant with depression in resting the state. Twenty-five cases of esophageal cancer with theory of mind deficits (test group) that meet the diagnostic criteria of esophageal cancer and neuropsychological tests, including Beck depression inventory, reading the mind in the eyes, and Faux pas, were included, Another 25 cases of esophageal cancer patients but without theory of mind deficits (control group) were enrolled. Each patient completed a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. The functional connectivity intensities within the cerebral regions in the DMN of all the enrolled patients were analyzed. The results of each group were compared. The functional connectivity of the bilateral prefrontal central region with the precuneus, bilateral posterior cingulate gyrus and bilateral ventral anterior cingulate gyrus in the patients of the test group were all reduced significantly (P theory of mind deficits. The theory of mind deficits might have an important function in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer.

  5. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold C. Steinacker

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  6. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinacker, Harold C., E-mail: harold.steinacker@univie.ac.at

    2016-09-15

    Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  7. General Theory of Decoy-State Quantum Cryptography with Dark Count Rate Fluctuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiang, Gao; Shi-Hai, Sun; Lin-Mei, Liang

    2009-01-01

    The existing theory of decoy-state quantum cryptography assumes that the dark count rate is a constant, but in practice there exists fluctuation. We develop a new scheme of the decoy state, achieve a more practical key generation rate in the presence of fluctuation of the dark count rate, and compare the result with the result of the decoy-state without fluctuation. It is found that the key generation rate and maximal secure distance will be decreased under the influence of the fluctuation of the dark count rate

  8. Magnetic edge states in MoS2 characterized using density-functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Hinnemann, B.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2009-01-01

    It is known that the edges of a two-dimensional slab of insulating MoS2 exhibit one-dimensional metallic edge states, the so-called "brim states." Here, we find from density-functional theory calculations that several edge structures, which are relevant for the hydrodesulfurization process......, are magnetic. The magnetism is an edge phenomenon associated with certain metallic edge states. Interestingly, we find that among the two low-index edges, only the S edge displays magnetism under hydrodesulfurization conditions. In addition, the implications of this on the catalytic activity are investigated...

  9. Molecular-state close-coupling theory including continuum states. I. Derivation of close-coupled equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorson, W.R.; Bandarage, G.

    1988-01-01

    We formulate a close-coupling theory of slow ion-atom collisions based on molecular (adiabatic) electronic states, and including the electronic continuum. The continuum is represented by packet states spanning it locally and constructed explicitly from exact continuum states. Particular attention is given to two fundamental questions: (1) Unbound electrons can escape from the local region spanned by the packet states. We derive close-coupled integral equations correctly including the escape effects; the ''propagator'' generated by these integral equations does not conserve probability within the close-coupled basis. Previous molecular-state formulations including the continuum give no account of escape effects. (2) Nonadiabatic couplings of adiabatic continuum states with the same energy are singular, reflecting the fact that an adiabatic description of continuum behavior is not valid outside a local region. We treat these singularities explicitly and show that an accurate representation of nonadiabatic couplings within the local region spanned by a set of packet states is well behaved. Hence an adiabatic basis-set description can be used to describe close coupling to the continuum in a local ''interaction region,'' provided the effects of escape are included. In principle, the formulation developed here can be extended to a large class of model problems involving many-electron systems and including models for Penning ionization and collisional detachment processes

  10. Triplet state photochemistry and the three-state crossing of acetophenone within time-dependent density-functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huix-Rotllant, Miquel, E-mail: miquel.huix@gmail.com; Ferré, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.ferre@univ-amu.fr [Institut de Chimie Radicalaire (UMR-7273), Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France)

    2014-04-07

    Even though time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) works generally well for describing excited states energies and properties in the Franck-Condon region, it can dramatically fail in predicting photochemistry, notably when electronic state crossings occur. Here, we assess the ability of TDDFT to describe the photochemistry of an important class of triplet sensitizers, namely, aromatic ketones. We take acetophenone as a test molecule, for which accurate ab initio results exist in the literature. Triplet acetophenone is generated thanks to an exotic three-state crossing involving one singlet and two triplets states (i.e., a simultaneous intersystem crossing and triplet conical intersection), thus being a stringent test for approximate TDDFT. We show that most exchange-correlation functionals can only give a semi-qualitative picture of the overall photochemistry, in which the three-state crossing is rather represented as a triplet conical intersection separated from the intersystem crossing. The best result overall is given by the double hybrid functional mPW2PLYP, which is even able to reproduce quantitatively the three-state crossing region. We rationalize this results by noting that double hybrid functionals include a larger portion of double excitation character to the excited states.

  11. Quantum resource theory of non-stabilizer states in the one-shot regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Dang, Hoan; Gour, Gilad; Sanders, Barry

    Universal quantum computing is known to be impossible using only stabilizer states and stabilizer operations. However, addition of non-stabilizer states (also known as magic states) to quantum circuits enables us to achieve universality. The resource theory of non-stablizer states aims at quantifying the usefulness of non-stabilizer states. Here, we focus on a fundamental question in this resource theory in the so called single-shot regime: Given two resource states, is there a free quantum channel that will (approximately or exactly) convert one to the other?. To provide an answer, we phrase the question as a semidefinite program with constraints on the Choi matrix of the corresponding channel. Then, we use the semidefinite version of the Farkas lemma to derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for the conversion between two arbitrary resource states via a free quantum channel. BCS appreciates financial support from Alberta Innovates, NSERC, China's 1000 Talent Plan and the Institute for Quantum Information and Matter.

  12. Restructuring Consciousness –the Psychedelic State in Light of Integrated Information Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Robert Gallimore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The psychological state elicited by the classic psychedelics drugs, such as LSD and psilocybin, is one of the most fascinating and yet least understood states of consciousness. However, with the advent of modern functional neuroimaging techniques, the effect of these drugs on neural activity is now being revealed, although many of the varied phenomenological features of the psychedelic state remain challenging to explain. Integrated information theory (IIT is one of the foremost contemporary theories of consciousness, providing a mathematical formalization of both the quantity and quality of conscious experience. This theory can be applied to all known states of consciousness, including the psychedelic state. Using the results of functional neuroimaging data on the psychedelic state, the effects of psychedelic drugs on both the level and structure of consciousness can be explained in terms of the conceptual framework of IIT. This new IIT-based model of the psychedelic state provides an explanation for many of its phenomenological features, including unconstrained cognition, alterations in the structure and meaning of concepts and a sense of expanded awareness. This model also suggests that whilst cognitive flexibility, creativity, and imagination are enhanced during the psychedelic state, this occurs at the expense of cause-effect information, as well as degrading the brain’s ability to organize, categorize, and differentiate the constituents of conscious experience. Furthermore, the model generates specific predictions that can be tested using a combination of functional imaging techniques, as has been applied to the study of levels of consciousness during anesthesia and following brain injury.

  13. BCS wave function, matrix product states, and the Ising conformal field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Sebastián; Rodríguez-Laguna, Javier; Sierra, Germán

    2017-11-01

    We present a characterization of the many-body lattice wave functions obtained from the conformal blocks (CBs) of the Ising conformal field theory (CFT). The formalism is interpreted as a matrix product state using continuous ancillary degrees of freedom. We provide analytic and numerical evidence that the resulting states can be written as BCS states. We give a complete proof that the translationally invariant 1D configurations have a BCS form and we find suitable parent Hamiltonians. In particular, we prove that the ground state of the finite-size critical Ising transverse field (ITF) Hamiltonian can be obtained with this construction. Finally, we study 2D configurations using an operator product expansion (OPE) approximation. We associate these states to the weak pairing phase of the p +i p superconductor via the scaling of the pairing function and the entanglement spectrum.

  14. Theoretical Study of the Charge-Transfer State Separation within Marcus Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volpi, Riccardo; Nassau, Racine; Nørby, Morten Steen

    2016-01-01

    We study, within Marcus theory, the possibility of the charge-transfer (CT) state splitting at organic interfaces and a subsequent transport of the free charge carriers to the electrodes. As a case study we analyze model anthracene-C60 interfaces. Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations on the cold...... CT state were performed at a range of applied electric fields, and with the fields applied at a range of angles to the interface to simulate the action of the electric field in a bulk heterojunction (BHJ) interface. The results show that the inclusion of polarization in our model increases CT state...... dissociation and charge collection. The effect of the electric field on CT state splitting and free charge carrier conduction is analyzed in detail with and without polarization. Also, depending on the relative orientation of the anthracene and C60 molecules at the interface, CT state splitting shows different...

  15. Decay of hollow states in time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Wismarsche Str. 43-45, Universitaet Rostock, Rostock-18051 (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Hollow or multiply excited states are inaccessible in time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using adiabatic Kohn-Sham potentials. We determine the exact Kohn Sham (KS) potential for doubly excited states in an exactly solvable model Helium atom. The exact single-particle density corresponds to the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose origin is traced back to phase of the exact KS orbital. The potential controls the barrier height and width in order for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as the doubly excited state in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. Instead, adiabatic KS potentials only show direct photoionization but no autoionization. A frequency-dependent linear response kernel would be necessary in order to capture the decay of autoionizing states.

  16. Application of a Resource Theory for Magic States to Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Mark; Campbell, Earl

    2017-03-03

    Motivated by their necessity for most fault-tolerant quantum computation schemes, we formulate a resource theory for magic states. First, we show that robustness of magic is a well-behaved magic monotone that operationally quantifies the classical simulation overhead for a Gottesman-Knill-type scheme using ancillary magic states. Our framework subsequently finds immediate application in the task of synthesizing non-Clifford gates using magic states. When magic states are interspersed with Clifford gates, Pauli measurements, and stabilizer ancillas-the most general synthesis scenario-then the class of synthesizable unitaries is hard to characterize. Our techniques can place nontrivial lower bounds on the number of magic states required for implementing a given target unitary. Guided by these results, we have found new and optimal examples of such synthesis.

  17. Theory of mind in the wild: toward tackling the challenges of everyday mental state reasoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie E Wertz

    Full Text Available A complete understanding of the cognitive systems underwriting theory of mind (ToM abilities requires articulating how mental state representations are generated and processed in everyday situations. Individuals rarely announce their intentions prior to acting, and actions are often consistent with multiple mental states. In order for ToM to operate effectively in such situations, mental state representations should be generated in response to certain actions, even when those actions occur in the presence of mental state content derived from other aspects of the situation. Results from three experiments with preschool children and adults demonstrate that mental state information is indeed generated based on an approach action cue in situations that contain competing mental state information. Further, the frequency with which participants produced or endorsed explanations that include mental states about an approached object decreased when the competing mental state information about a different object was made explicit. This set of experiments provides some of the first steps toward identifying the observable action cues that are used to generate mental state representations in everyday situations and offers insight into how both young children and adults processes multiple mental state representations.

  18. A universal nonlinear relation among boundary states in closed string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishimoto, Isao; Matsuo, Yutaka; Watanabe, Eitoku

    2004-01-01

    We show that the boundary states satisfy a nonlinear relation (the idempotency equation) with respect to the star product of closed string field theory. This relation is universal in the sense that various D-branes, including the infinitesimally deformed ones, satisfy the same equation, including the coefficient. This paper generalizes our analysis [hep-th/0306189] in the following senses. (1) We present a background-independent formulation based on conformal field theory. It illuminates the geometric nature of the relation and allows us to more systematically analyze the variations around the D-brane background. (2) We show that the Witten-type star product satisfies a similar relation but with a more divergent coefficient. (3) We determine the coefficient of the relation analytically. The result shows that the α parameter can be formally factored out, and the relation becomes universal. We present a conjecture on vacuum theory based on this computation. (author)

  19. Axially symmetric stationary black-hole states of the Einstein gravitational theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhardt, R [Chile Univ., Santiago. Departamento de Fisica

    1976-01-01

    Some aspects of the theory of black-hole states of the Einstein gravitational theory are reviewed in this paper. First explicit vacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations are searched for when the space-time admits 2 isometries (axially symmetric and stationary), which could be considered as candidates for black holes. Then the Liapounov stability of these solutions is studied. A generalization of the Ernst potential is introduced for solutions of Einstein's vacuum field equations with axial symmetry only, and this allows to construct a dynamical system. Using the theory of ''multiple integrals in the calculus of variations'' it is possible to show that the weakest casuality condition (chronology) is a necessary condition for the Liapounov stability. Finally, it is shown that the Kerr solution is Liapounov stable under a given topology.

  20. Extended multi-configuration quasi-degenerate perturbation theory: the new approach to multi-state multi-reference perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granovsky, Alexander A

    2011-06-07

    The distinctive desirable features, both mathematically and physically meaningful, for all partially contracted multi-state multi-reference perturbation theories (MS-MR-PT) are explicitly formulated. The original approach to MS-MR-PT theory, called extended multi-configuration quasi-degenerate perturbation theory (XMCQDPT), having most, if not all, of the desirable properties is introduced. The new method is applied at the second order of perturbation theory (XMCQDPT2) to the 1(1)A(')-2(1)A(') conical intersection in allene molecule, the avoided crossing in LiF molecule, and the 1(1)A(1) to 2(1)A(1) electronic transition in cis-1,3-butadiene. The new theory has several advantages compared to those of well-established approaches, such as second order multi-configuration quasi-degenerate perturbation theory and multi-state-second order complete active space perturbation theory. The analysis of the prevalent approaches to the MS-MR-PT theory performed within the framework of the XMCQDPT theory unveils the origin of their common inherent problems. We describe the efficient implementation strategy that makes XMCQDPT2 an especially useful general-purpose tool in the high-level modeling of small to large molecular systems. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  1. Meteorological perspective on intermediate range atmospheric dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Hoven, I.

    1981-01-01

    The intermediate range of atmospheric transport and diffusion is defined as those dispersion processes which take place at downwind distances of 10 to 100 kilometers from pollutant sources. Meteorologists often define this range as the mesoscale. It is the range of distances where certain environmental assessments are of concern such as the determination of significant deterioration of visibility, the effect of effluent releases from tall stacks, and the effect of pollutant sources in rural settings upon the more distant urban centers. Atmospheric diffusion theory is based on steady state conditions and spatial homogeniety. Techniques must be developed to measure the inhomogenieties, models must be devised to account for the complexities, and a data base consisting of appropriate measured meteorological parameters concurrent with tracer gas concentrations should be collected

  2. Elevated temperature inelastic analysis of metallic media under time varying loads using state variable theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, V.; Mukherjee, S.

    1977-01-01

    In the present paper a general time-dependent inelastic analysis procedure for three-dimensional bodies subjected to arbitrary time varying mechanical and thermal loads using these state variable theories is presented. For the purpose of illustrations, the problems of hollow spheres, cylinders and solid circular shafts subjected to various combinations of internal and external pressures, axial force (or constraint) and torque are analyzed using the proposed solution procedure. Various cyclic thermal and mechanical loading histories with rectangular or sawtooth type waves with or without hold-time are considered. Numerical results for these geometrical shapes for various such loading histories are presented using Hart's theory (Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology 1976). The calculations are performed for nickel in the temperature range of 25 0 C to 400 0 C. For integrating forward in time, a method of solving a stiff system of ordinary differential equations is employed which corrects the step size and order of the method automatically. The limit loads for hollow spheres and cylinders are calculated using the proposed method and Hart's theory, and comparisons are made against the known theoretical results. The numerical results for other loading histories are discussed in the context of Hart's state variable type constitutive relations. The significance of phenomena such as strain rate sensitivity, Bauschinger's effect, crep recovery, history dependence and material softening with regard to these multiaxial problems are discussed in the context of Hart's theory

  3. Some exact computations on the twisted butterfly state in string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okawa, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    The twisted butterfly state solves the equation of motion of vacuum string field theory in the singular limit. The finiteness of the energy density of the solution is an important issue, but possible conformal anomaly resulting from the twisting has prevented us from addressing this problem. We present a description of the twisted regulated butterfly state in terms of a conformal field theory with a vanishing central charge which consists of the ordinary bc ghosts and a matter system with c=26. Various quantities relevant to vacuum string field theory are computed exactly using this description. We find that the energy density of the solution can be finite in the limit, but the finiteness depends on the sub leading structure of vacuum string field theory. We further argue, contrary to our previous expectation, that contributions from sub leading terms in the kinetic term to the energy density can be of the same order as the contribution from the leading term which consists of the midpoint ghost insertion. (author)

  4. Stochastic theory of nonequilibrium steady states and its applications. Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xuejuan; Qian Hong; Qian Min

    2012-01-01

    The concepts of equilibrium and nonequilibrium steady states are introduced in the present review as mathematical concepts associated with stationary Markov processes. For both discrete stochastic systems with master equations and continuous diffusion processes with Fokker–Planck equations, the nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) is characterized in terms of several key notions which are originated from nonequilibrium physics: time irreversibility, breakdown of detailed balance, free energy dissipation, and positive entropy production rate. After presenting this NESS theory in pedagogically accessible mathematical terms that require only a minimal amount of prerequisites in nonlinear differential equations and the theory of probability, it is applied, in Part I, to two widely studied problems: the stochastic resonance (also known as coherent resonance) and molecular motors (also known as Brownian ratchet). Although both areas have advanced rapidly on their own with a vast amount of literature, the theory of NESS provides them with a unifying mathematical foundation. Part II of this review contains applications of the NESS theory to processes from cellular biochemistry, ranging from enzyme catalyzed reactions, kinetic proofreading, to zeroth-order ultrasensitivity.

  5. Physical states at the tachyonic vacuum of open string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giusto, S.; Imbimbo, C.

    2004-01-01

    We illustrate a method for computing the number of physical states of open string theory at the stable tachyonic vacuum in level truncation approximation. The method is based on the analysis of the gauge-fixed open string field theory quadratic action that includes Fadeev-Popov ghost string fields. Computations up to level 9 in the scalar sector are consistent with Sen's conjecture about the absence of physical open string states at the tachyonic vacuum. We also derive a long exact cohomology sequence that relates relative and absolute cohomologies of the BRS operator at the non-perturbative vacuum. We use this exact result in conjunction with our numerical findings to conclude that the higher ghost number non-perturbative BRS cohomologies are non-empty

  6. Initial states in integrable quantum field theory quenches from an integral equation hierarchy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.X. Horváth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of determining the initial state of integrable quantum field theory quenches in terms of the post-quench eigenstates. The corresponding overlaps are a fundamental input to most exact methods to treat integrable quantum quenches. We construct and examine an infinite integral equation hierarchy based on the form factor bootstrap, proposed earlier as a set of conditions determining the overlaps. Using quenches of the mass and interaction in Sinh-Gordon theory as a concrete example, we present theoretical arguments that the state has the squeezed coherent form expected for integrable quenches, and supporting an Ansatz for the solution of the hierarchy. Moreover we also develop an iterative method to solve numerically the lowest equation of the hierarchy. The iterative solution along with extensive numerical checks performed using the next equation of the hierarchy provides a strong numerical evidence that the proposed Ansatz gives a very good approximation for the solution.

  7. Initial states in integrable quantum field theory quenches from an integral equation hierarchy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horváth, D.X., E-mail: esoxluciuslinne@gmail.com [MTA-BME “Momentum” Statistical Field Theory Research Group, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Theoretical Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Sotiriadis, S., E-mail: sotiriad@sissa.it [SISSA and INFN, Via Bonomea 265, 34136 Trieste (Italy); Takács, G., E-mail: takacsg@eik.bme.hu [MTA-BME “Momentum” Statistical Field Theory Research Group, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary); Department of Theoretical Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budafoki út 8, 1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-01-15

    We consider the problem of determining the initial state of integrable quantum field theory quenches in terms of the post-quench eigenstates. The corresponding overlaps are a fundamental input to most exact methods to treat integrable quantum quenches. We construct and examine an infinite integral equation hierarchy based on the form factor bootstrap, proposed earlier as a set of conditions determining the overlaps. Using quenches of the mass and interaction in Sinh-Gordon theory as a concrete example, we present theoretical arguments that the state has the squeezed coherent form expected for integrable quenches, and supporting an Ansatz for the solution of the hierarchy. Moreover we also develop an iterative method to solve numerically the lowest equation of the hierarchy. The iterative solution along with extensive numerical checks performed using the next equation of the hierarchy provides a strong numerical evidence that the proposed Ansatz gives a very good approximation for the solution.

  8. Borders amidst power, State and mass media, from a critical theory standpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ortiz Marín

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A conception of the power, from the glance of the Critical Theory that it allows to understand the woven complex that links the relations of power to most of the human activities. This paper also approaches to the State as a regulating element of the different forces from institutional character, that they operate in its interior like structures of power and the function as that the massive mass media in the complexity of the modern societies act.

  9. Hadronic equation of state in the statistical bootstrap model and linear graph theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fre, P.; Page, R.

    1976-01-01

    Taking a statistical mechanical point og view, the statistical bootstrap model is discussed and, from a critical analysis of the bootstrap volume comcept, it is reached a physical ipothesis, which leads immediately to the hadronic equation of state provided by the bootstrap integral equation. In this context also the connection between the statistical bootstrap and the linear graph theory approach to interacting gases is analyzed

  10. The electromagnetic virtual cloud of the ground-state hydrogen atom - a quantum field theory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radozycki, T.

    1990-01-01

    The properties of the virtual cloud around the hydrogen atom in the ground state are studied with the use of quantum field theory methods. The relativistic expression for the electromagnetic energy density around the atom, with the electron spin taken into account, is obtained. The distribution of the angular momentum contained in the cloud and the self-interaction kernel for the electrons bound in atom are also investigated. (author)

  11. Relative entropy of excited states in conformal field theories of arbitrary dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sárosi, Gábor [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussels and International Solvay Institutes,Pleinlaan 2, Brussels, B-1050 (Belgium); David Rittenhouse Laboratory, University of Pennsylvania,Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Ugajin, Tomonori [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Extending our previous work, we study the relative entropy between the reduced density matrices obtained from globally excited states in conformal field theories of arbitrary dimensions. We find a general formula in the small subsystem size limit. When one of the states is the vacuum of the CFT, our result matches with the holographic entanglement entropy computations in the corresponding bulk geometries, including AdS black branes. We also discuss the first asymmetric part of the relative entropy and comment on some implications of the results on the distinguishability of black hole microstates in AdS/CFT.

  12. Variational transition-state theory. Progress report, February 1981-January 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhlar, D.G.

    1983-01-01

    During the past two years we have extended the variational transition-state theory in several ways. Especially notable is that we have developed several new methods for calculating tunneling probabilities, including two general techniques applicable to systems with small and large reaction-path curvature. We have tested these methods successfully against accurate quantal calculations, and we have applied them to real systems in three dimensions. We have also developed general algorithms for variational transition state theory calculations on polyatomic systems and we have applied these to the combustion reaction OH + H 2 → H 2 O + H. We have developed and successfully applied a statistical-diabatic theory for state-selected rates. We made a totally ab initio prediction of an absolute chemical reaction rate, for the reaction Mu + H 2 → MuH + H, using an accurate potential energy surface and ethods that we had demonstrated to be reliable by tests against accurate quantal collinear results. This prediction has now been confirmed by unpublished experiments; I believe that this is the first reliable ab initio prediction of a chemical rection rate prior to its measurement. In the rest of this technical progress report we give further details of these and other studies we have carried out in the last two years under this contract

  13. Use of digital control theory state space formalism for feedback at SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himel, T.; Hendrickson, L.; Rouse, F.; Shoaee, H.

    1991-05-01

    The algorithms used in the database-driven SLC fast-feedback system are based on the state space formalism of digital control theory. These are implemented as a set of matrix equations which use a Kalman filter to estimate a vector of states from a vector of measurements, and then apply a gain matrix to determine the actuator settings from the state vector. The matrices used in the calculation are derived offline using Linear Quadratic Gaussian minimization. For a given noise spectrum, this procedure minimizes the rms of the states (e.g., the position or energy of the beam). The offline program also allows simulation of the loop's response to arbitrary inputs, and calculates its frequency response. 3 refs., 3 figs

  14. Role of the metal oxidation state in the SNS-Cr catalyst for ethylene trimerization: Isolation of Di- and trivalent cationic intermediates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jabri, A.; Temple, C.N.; Crewdson, P.; Gambarotta, S.; Korobkov, I.V.; Duchateau, R.

    2006-01-01

    The reaction of the highly selective [CySCH2CH2N(H)CH2CH2SCy]CrCl3 catalyst precursor with alkyl aluminum activators was examined with the aim of isolating reactive intermediates. Reaction with Me3Al afforded a cationic trivalent chromium alkyl species

  15. Full-potential multiple scattering theory with space-filling cells for bound and continuum states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatada, Keisuke; Hayakawa, Kuniko; Benfatto, Maurizio; Natoli, Calogero R

    2010-05-12

    We present a rigorous derivation of a real-space full-potential multiple scattering theory (FP-MST) that is free from the drawbacks that up to now have impaired its development (in particular the need to expand cell shape functions in spherical harmonics and rectangular matrices), valid both for continuum and bound states, under conditions for space partitioning that are not excessively restrictive and easily implemented. In this connection we give a new scheme to generate local basis functions for the truncated potential cells that is simple, fast, efficient, valid for any shape of the cell and reduces to the minimum the number of spherical harmonics in the expansion of the scattering wavefunction. The method also avoids the need for saturating 'internal sums' due to the re-expansion of the spherical Hankel functions around another point in space (usually another cell center). Thus this approach provides a straightforward extension of MST in the muffin-tin (MT) approximation, with only one truncation parameter given by the classical relation l(max) = kR(b), where k is the electron wavevector (either in the excited or ground state of the system under consideration) and R(b) is the radius of the bounding sphere of the scattering cell. Moreover, the scattering path operator of the theory can be found in terms of an absolutely convergent procedure in the l(max) --> ∞ limit. Consequently, this feature provides a firm ground for the use of FP-MST as a viable method for electronic structure calculations and makes possible the computation of x-ray spectroscopies, notably photo-electron diffraction, absorption and anomalous scattering among others, with the ease and versatility of the corresponding MT theory. Some numerical applications of the theory are presented, both for continuum and bound states.

  16. Mode-mode coupling theory of itinerant electron antiferromagnetism in superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Yukinobu; Miyake, Kazumasa

    2012-01-01

    It has been considered since the first discovery of a high-T c cuprate that an antiferromagnetic (AF) state and a superconducting (SC) state are separated in it. However, it is very intriguing that the coexistence of the AF and SC states has recently been observed in HgBa 2 Ca 4 Cu 5 O 12+ (Hg-1245). Moreover, it is very novel that this coexistence of these two states appears if the SC-transition temperature T c is higher than the AF-transition temperature T N . The mode-mode coupling theory can provide a clear elucidation of this novel phenomenon. A key point of this theory is that the AF susceptibility consists of the random-phase-approximation (RPA) term and the mode-mode coupling one. The RPA term works to make a positive contribution to the emergence of the antiferromagnetic critical point (AF-CP). In contrast, the mode-mode coupling term works to make a negative contribution to the emergence of the AF-CP. However, the growth of the SC-gap function in the d x 2 -y 2 -wave SC state works to suppress the negative contribution of the mode-mode coupling term to the emergence of the AF-CP. Moreover, the effect of SC fluctuations near the SC-transition temperature T c suppresses the mode-mode coupling term of the AF susceptibility that works to hinder the AF ordering. For these two reasons, there is a possibility that the d x 2 -y 2 -wave SC state is likely to promote the emergence of the AF-CP. Namely, the appearance of the above-mentioned novel coexistence of the AF and SC states observed in Hg-1245 can be explained qualitatively on the basis of this idea.

  17. Solid state silicon based condenser microphone for hearing aid, has transducer chip and IC chip between intermediate chip and openings on both sides of intermediate chip, to allow sound towards diaphragm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    towards diaphragm. Surface of the chip (2) has electrical conductors (14) to connect chip with IC chip (3). USE - For use in miniature electroacoustic devices such as hearing aid. ADVANTAGE - Since sound inlet is covered by filter, dust, moisture and other impurities do not obstruct interior and sound...... inlet of microphone. External electrical connection can be made economically reliable and the thermal stress is avoided with the small size solid state silicon based condenser microphone....

  18. Merging Psychophysical and Psychometric Theory to Estimate Global Visual State Measures from Forced-Choices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massof, Robert W; Schmidt, Karen M; Laby, Daniel M; Kirschen, David; Meadows, David

    2013-01-01

    Visual acuity, a forced-choice psychophysical measure of visual spatial resolution, is the sine qua non of clinical visual impairment testing in ophthalmology and optometry patients with visual system disorders ranging from refractive error to retinal, optic nerve, or central visual system pathology. Visual acuity measures are standardized against a norm, but it is well known that visual acuity depends on a variety of stimulus parameters, including contrast and exposure duration. This paper asks if it is possible to estimate a single global visual state measure from visual acuity measures as a function of stimulus parameters that can represent the patient's overall visual health state with a single variable. Psychophysical theory (at the sensory level) and psychometric theory (at the decision level) are merged to identify the conditions that must be satisfied to derive a global visual state measure from parameterised visual acuity measures. A global visual state measurement model is developed and tested with forced-choice visual acuity measures from 116 subjects with no visual impairments and 560 subjects with uncorrected refractive error. The results are in agreement with the expectations of the model

  19. Zero-norm states and high-energy symmetries of string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.-T.; Lee, J.-C.

    2004-01-01

    We derive stringy Ward identities from the decoupling of two types of zero-norm states in the old covariant first quantized (OCFQ) spectrum of open bosonic string. These Ward identities are valid to all energy α' and all loop orders χ in string perturbation theory. The high-energy limit α'→∞ of these stringy Ward identities can then be used to fix the proportionality constants between scattering amplitudes of different string states algebraically without referring to Gross and Mende's saddle point calculation of high-energy string-loop amplitudes. As examples, all Ward identities for the mass level M 2 =4,6 are derived, their high-energy limits are calculated and the proportionality constants between scattering amplitudes of different string states are determined. In addition to those identified before, we discover some new nonzero components of high-energy amplitudes not found previously by Gross and Manes. These components are essential to preserve massive gauge invariances or decouple massive zero-norm states of string theory. A set of massive scattering amplitudes and their high-energy limits are calculated explicitly for each mass level M 2 =4,6 to justify our results

  20. Multi-hadron-state contamination in nucleon observables from chiral perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bär, Oliver

    2018-03-01

    Multi-particle states with additional pions are expected to be a non-negligible source of the excited-state contamination in lattice simulations at the physical point. It is shown that baryon chiral perturbation theory (ChPT) can be employed to calculate the contamination due to two-particle nucleon-pion states in various nucleon observables. Results to leading order are presented for the nucleon axial, tensor and scalar charge and three Mellin moments of parton distribution functions: the average quark momentum fraction, the helicity and the transversity moment. Taking into account experimental and phenomenological results for the charges and moments the impact of the nucleon-pionstates on lattice estimates for these observables can be estimated. The nucleon-pion-state contribution leads to an overestimation of all charges and moments obtained with the plateau method. The overestimation is at the 5-10% level for source-sink separations of about 2 fm. Existing lattice data is not in conflict with the ChPT predictions, but the comparison suggests that significantly larger source-sink separations are needed to compute the charges and moments with few-percent precision. Talk given at the 35th International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory, 18 - 24 June 2017, Granada, Spain.

  1. Decay of autoionizing states in time-dependent density functional and reduced density matrix functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Varun; Brics, Martins; Bauer, Dieter [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Autoionizing states are inaccessible to time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) using known, adiabatic Kohn-Sham (KS) potentials. We determine the exact KS potential for a numerically exactly solvable model Helium atom interacting with a laser field that is populating an autoionizing state. The exact single-particle density of the population in the autoionizing state corresponds to that of the energetically lowest quasi-stationary state in the exact KS potential. We describe how this exact potential controls the decay by a barrier whose height and width allows for the density to tunnel out and decay with the same rate as in the ab initio time-dependent Schroedinger calculation. However, devising a useful exchange-correlation potential that is capable of governing such a scenario in general and in more complex systems is hopeless. As an improvement over TDDFT, time-dependent reduced density matrix functional theory has been proposed. We are able to obtain for the above described autoionization process the exact time-dependent natural orbitals (i.e., the eigenfunctions of the exact, time-dependent one-body reduced density matrix) and study the potentials that appear in the equations of motion for the natural orbitals and the structure of the two-body density matrix expanded in them.

  2. PADÉ APPROXIMANTS FOR THE EQUATION OF STATE FOR RELATIVISTIC HYDRODYNAMICS BY KINETIC THEORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Shang-Hsi; Yang, Jaw-Yen, E-mail: shanghsi@gmail.com [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10764, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-20

    A two-point Padé approximant (TPPA) algorithm is developed for the equation of state (EOS) for relativistic hydrodynamic systems, which are described by the classical Maxwell–Boltzmann statistics and the semiclassical Fermi–Dirac statistics with complete degeneracy. The underlying rational function is determined by the ratios of the macroscopic state variables with various orders of accuracy taken at the extreme relativistic limits. The nonunique TPPAs are validated by Taub's inequality for the consistency of the kinetic theory and the special theory of relativity. The proposed TPPA is utilized in deriving the EOS of the dilute gas and in calculating the specific heat capacity, the adiabatic index function, and the isentropic sound speed of the ideal gas. Some general guidelines are provided for the application of an arbitrary accuracy requirement. The superiority of the proposed TPPA is manifested in manipulating the constituent polynomials of the approximants, which avoids the arithmetic complexity of struggling with the modified Bessel functions and the hyperbolic trigonometric functions arising from the relativistic kinetic theory.

  3. Priors on the effective dark energy equation of state in scalar-tensor theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveri, Marco; Bull, Philip; Silvestri, Alessandra; Pogosian, Levon

    2017-10-01

    Constraining the dark energy (DE) equation of state, wDE, is one of the primary science goals of ongoing and future cosmological surveys. In practice, with imperfect data and incomplete redshift coverage, this requires making assumptions about the evolution of wDE with redshift z . These assumptions can be manifested in a choice of a specific parametric form, which can potentially bias the outcome, or else one can reconstruct wDE(z ) nonparametrically, by specifying a prior covariance matrix that correlates values of wDE at different redshifts. In this work, we derive the theoretical prior covariance for the effective DE equation of state predicted by general scalar-tensor theories with second order equations of motion (Horndeski theories). This is achieved by generating a large ensemble of possible scalar-tensor theories using a Monte Carlo methodology, including the application of physical viability conditions. We also separately consider the special subcase of the minimally coupled scalar field, or quintessence. The prior shows a preference for tracking behaviors in the most general case. Given the covariance matrix, theoretical priors on parameters of any specific parametrization of wDE(z ) can also be readily derived by projection.

  4. Unambiguous state discrimination of two density matrices in quantum information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynal, P.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum state discrimination is a fundamental task in quantum information theory. The signals are usually nonorthogonal quantum states, which implies that they can not be perfectly distinguished. One possible discrimination strategy is the so-called Unambiguous State Discrimination (USD) where the states are successfully identified with non-unit probability, but without error. The optimal USD measurement has been extensively studied in the case of pure states, especially for any pair of pure states. Recently, the problem of unambiguously discriminating mixed quantum states has attracted much attention. In the case of a pair of generic mixed states, no complete solution is known. In this thesis, we first present reduction theorems for optimal unambiguous discrimination of two generic density matrices. We show that this problem can be reduced to that of two density matrices that have the same rank r in a 2r-dimensional Hilbert space. These reduction theorems also allow us to reduce USD problems to simpler ones for which the solution might be known. As an application, we consider the unambiguous comparison of n linearly independent pure states with a simple symmetry. Moreover, lower bounds on the optimal failure probability have been derived. For two mixed states they are given in terms of the fidelity. Here we give tighter bounds as well as necessary and sufficient conditions for two mixed states to reach these bounds. We also construct the corresponding optimal measurement. With this result, we provide analytical solutions for unambiguously discriminating a class of generic mixed states. This goes beyond known results which are all reducible to some pure state case. We however show that examples exist where the bounds cannot be reached. Next, we derive properties on the rank and the spectrum of an optimal USD measurement. This finally leads to a second class of exact solutions. Indeed we present the optimal failure probability as well as the optimal measurement for

  5. Intermediality and media change

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This book is about intermediality as an approach to analysing and understanding media change. Intermediality and Media Change is critical of technological determinism that characterises 'new media discourse' about the ongoing digitalization, framed as a revolution and creating sharp contrasts between old and new media. Intermediality instead emphasises paying attention to continuities between media of all types and privileges a comparative perspective on technological changes in media over ti...

  6. Unitary group adapted state specific multireference perturbation theory: Formulation and pilot applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Avijit; Sen, Sangita; Samanta, Pradipta Kumar; Mukherjee, Debashis

    2015-04-05

    We present here a comprehensive account of the formulation and pilot applications of the second-order perturbative analogue of the recently proposed unitary group adapted state-specific multireference coupled cluster theory (UGA-SSMRCC), which we call as the UGA-SSMRPT2. We also discuss the essential similarities and differences between the UGA-SSMRPT2 and the allied SA-SSMRPT2. Our theory, like its parent UGA-SSMRCC formalism, is size-extensive. However, because of the noninvariance of the theory with respect to the transformation among the active orbitals, it requires the use of localized orbitals to ensure size-consistency. We have demonstrated the performance of the formalism with a set of pilot applications, exploring (a) the accuracy of the potential energy surface (PES) of a set of small prototypical difficult molecules in their various low-lying states, using natural, pseudocanonical and localized orbitals and compared the respective nonparallelity errors (NPE) and the mean average deviations (MAD) vis-a-vis the full CI results with the same basis; (b) the efficacy of localized active orbitals to ensure and demonstrate manifest size-consistency with respect to fragmentation. We found that natural orbitals lead to the best overall PES, as evidenced by the NPE and MAD values. The MRMP2 results for individual states and of the MCQDPT2 for multiple states displaying avoided curve crossings are uniformly poorer as compared with the UGA-SSMRPT2 results. The striking aspect of the size-consistency check is the complete insensitivity of the sum of fragment energies with given fragment spin-multiplicities, which are obtained as the asymptotic limit of super-molecules with different coupled spins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Classical model of intermediate statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaniadakis, G.

    1994-01-01

    In this work we present a classical kinetic model of intermediate statistics. In the case of Brownian particles we show that the Fermi-Dirac (FD) and Bose-Einstein (BE) distributions can be obtained, just as the Maxwell-Boltzmann (MD) distribution, as steady states of a classical kinetic equation that intrinsically takes into account an exclusion-inclusion principle. In our model the intermediate statistics are obtained as steady states of a system of coupled nonlinear kinetic equations, where the coupling constants are the transmutational potentials η κκ' . We show that, besides the FD-BE intermediate statistics extensively studied from the quantum point of view, we can also study the MB-FD and MB-BE ones. Moreover, our model allows us to treat the three-state mixing FD-MB-BE intermediate statistics. For boson and fermion mixing in a D-dimensional space, we obtain a family of FD-BE intermediate statistics by varying the transmutational potential η BF . This family contains, as a particular case when η BF =0, the quantum statistics recently proposed by L. Wu, Z. Wu, and J. Sun [Phys. Lett. A 170, 280 (1992)]. When we consider the two-dimensional FD-BE statistics, we derive an analytic expression of the fraction of fermions. When the temperature T→∞, the system is composed by an equal number of bosons and fermions, regardless of the value of η BF . On the contrary, when T=0, η BF becomes important and, according to its value, the system can be completely bosonic or fermionic, or composed both by bosons and fermions

  8. Single-particle energies and density of states in density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aggelen, H.; Chan, G. K.-L.

    2015-07-01

    Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) is commonly used as the foundation to obtain neutral excited states and transition weights in DFT, but does not allow direct access to density of states and single-particle energies, i.e. ionisation energies and electron affinities. Here we show that by extending TD-DFT to a superfluid formulation, which involves operators that break particle-number symmetry, we can obtain the density of states and single-particle energies from the poles of an appropriate superfluid response function. The standard Kohn- Sham eigenvalues emerge as the adiabatic limit of the superfluid response under the assumption that the exchange- correlation functional has no dependence on the superfluid density. The Kohn- Sham eigenvalues can thus be interpreted as approximations to the ionisation energies and electron affinities. Beyond this approximation, the formalism provides an incentive for creating a new class of density functionals specifically targeted at accurate single-particle eigenvalues and bandgaps.

  9. Mozart versus new age music: relaxation states, stress, and ABC relaxation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonathan C; Joyce, Carol A

    2004-01-01

    Smith's (2001) Attentional Behavioral Cognitive (ABC) relaxation theory proposes that all approaches to relaxation (including music) have the potential for evoking one or more of 15 factor-analytically derived relaxation states, or "R-States" (Sleepiness, Disengagement, Rested / Refreshed, Energized, Physical Relaxation, At Ease/Peace, Joy, Mental Quiet, Childlike Innocence, Thankfulness and Love, Mystery, Awe and Wonder, Prayerfulness, Timeless/Boundless/Infinite, and Aware). The present study investigated R-States and stress symptom-patterns associated with listening to Mozart versus New Age music. Students (N = 63) were divided into three relaxation groups based on previously determined preferences. Fourteen listened to a 28-minute tape recording of Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik and 14 listened to a 28-minute tape of Steven Halpern's New Age Serenity Suite. Others (n = 35) did not want music and instead chose a set of popular recreational magazines. Participants engaged in their relaxation activity at home for three consecutive days for 28 minutes a session. Before and after each session, each person completed the Smith Relaxation States Inventory (Smith, 2001), a comprehensive questionnaire tapping 15 R-States as well as the stress states of somatic stress, worry, and negative emotion. Results revealed no differences at Session 1. At Session 2, those who listened to Mozart reported higher levels of At Ease/Peace and lower levels of Negative Emotion. Pronounced differences emerged at Session 3. Mozart listeners uniquely reported substantially higher levels of Mental Quiet, Awe and Wonder, and Mystery. Mozart listeners reported higher levels, and New Age listeners slightly elevated levels, of At Ease/Peace and Rested/Refreshed. Both Mozart and New Age listeners reported higher levels of Thankfulness and Love. In summary, those who listened to Mozart's Eine Kleine Nachtmusik reported more psychological relaxation and less stress than either those who listened to

  10. Assessing the optimism-pessimism debate: Nuclear proliferation, nuclear risks, and theories of state action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Nathan Edward

    2001-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the current debate in international relations literature over the risks associated with the proliferation of nuclear weapons. On this subject, IR scholars are divided into roughly two schools: proliferation 'optimists,' who argue that proliferation can be beneficial and that its associated hazards are at least surmountable, and proliferation 'pessimists,' who believe the opposite. This debate centers upon a theoretical disagreement about how best to explain and predict the behavior of states. Optimists generally ground their arguments on rational deterrence theory and maintain that nuclear weapons can actually increase stability among states, while pessimists often ground their arguments on 'organization theory,' which contends that organizational, bureaucratic, and other factors prevent states from acting rationally. A major difficulty with the proliferation debate, however, is that both sides tend to advance their respective theoretical positions without adequately supporting them with solid empirical evidence. This dissertation detailed analyses of the nuclear programs in the United States, Russia, China, India, and Pakistan to determine whether countries with nuclear weapons have adequate controls over their nuclear arsenals and tissue material stockpiles (such as highly enriched uranium and plutonium). These case studies identify the strengths and weaknesses of different systems of nuclear controls and help predict what types of controls proliferating states are likely to employ. On the basis of the evidence gathered from these cases, this dissertation concludes that a further spread of nuclear weapons would tend to have seriously negative effects on international stability by increasing risks of accidental, unauthorized, or inadvertent use of nuclear weapons and risks of thefts of fissile materials for use in nuclear or radiological devices by aspiring nuclear states or terrorist groups. (author)

  11. Theoretical equation of state for classical fluids. I. Test by perturbation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil-Villegas, A.; Chavez, M.; Del Rio, F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper shows how to construct the theoretical equation of state (TEOS) of a classical simple fluid. The theory relies on the mean collisional diameter and range, and maps the thermodynamical properties of the fluid into those of an equivalent square-well (ESW) fluid of appropriate depth ε , diameter σ and range R. It is shown that the ESW has the same pressure as the fluid of interest. Hence the THEOS of any simple fluid takes the form of a SW EOS of the given ε , σ and R. The theory is applied to a Lennard-Jones (LJ) system in a first-order perturbation. The mapping equation have a physical solution for densities where the SW EOS is accurate; the resulting LJ TEOS agrees very well with the results of computer simulations, and compares favorably with the recent TEOS developed by Song and Mason. (Author). 17 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab

  12. Axially symmetric stationary black-hole states of the Einstein gravitational theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinhardt, R.

    1976-01-01

    Some aspects of the thepry of black-hole states of the Einstein gravitational theory are reviewed in this paper. First explicit vacuum solutions of Einstein's field equations are searched for when the space-time admits 2 isometries (axially symmetric and stationary), which could be considered as candidates for black holes. Then the Liapounov stability of these solutions is studied. A generalization of the Ernst potential is introduced for solutions of Einstein's vacuum field equations with axial symmetry only, and this allows to construct a dynamical system. Using the theory of ''multiple integrals in the calculus of variations'' it is possible to show that the weakest casuality condition (chronology) is a necessary condition for the Liapounov stability. Finally, it is shown that the Kerr solution is Liapounov stable under a given topology

  13. New integrable model of quantum field theory in the state space with indefinite metric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhankov, V.G.; Pashaev, O.K.

    1981-01-01

    The system of coupled nonlinear Schroedinger eqs. (NLS) with noncompact internal symmetry group U(p, q) is considered. It describes in quasiclassical limit the system of two ''coloured'' Bose-gases with point-like interaction. The structure of tran-sition matrix is studied via the spectral transform (ST) (in-verse method). The Poisson brackets of the elements of this matrix and integrals of motion it generates are found. The theory under consideration may be put in the corresponding quantum field theory in the state vector space with indefinite metric. The so-called R matrix (Faddeev) and commutation relations for the transition matrix elements are also obtained, which implies the model to be investigated with the help of the quantum version of ST

  14. Inhomogeneous ordered states and translational nature of the gauge group in the Landau continuum theory: II. Applications of the general theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braginsky, A. Ya.

    2007-01-01

    A group theory approach to description of phase transitions to an inhomogeneous ordered state, proposed in the preceding paper, is applied to two problems. First, a theory of the state of a liquid-crystalline smectic type-A phase under the action of uniaxial pressure is developed. Second, a model of strengthening in quasicrystals is constructed. According to the proposed approach, the so-called elastic dislocations always appear during the phase transitions in an inhomogeneous deformed state in addition to static dislocations, which are caused by peculiarities of the crystal growth or by other features in the prehistory of a sample. The density of static dislocations weakly depends on the external factors, whereas the density of elastic dislocations depends on the state. An analogy between the proposed theory of the inhomogeneous ordered state and the quantum-field theory of interaction between material fields is considered. On this basis, the phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau equation for the superconducting state is derived using the principle of locality of the transformation properties of the superconducting order parameter with respect to temporal translations

  15. Multireference Density Functional Theory with Generalized Auxiliary Systems for Ground and Excited States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zehua; Zhang, Du; Jin, Ye; Yang, Yang; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao

    2017-09-21

    To describe static correlation, we develop a new approach to density functional theory (DFT), which uses a generalized auxiliary system that is of a different symmetry, such as particle number or spin, from that of the physical system. The total energy of the physical system consists of two parts: the energy of the auxiliary system, which is determined with a chosen density functional approximation (DFA), and the excitation energy from an approximate linear response theory that restores the symmetry to that of the physical system, thus rigorously leading to a multideterminant description of the physical system. The electron density of the physical system is different from that of the auxiliary system and is uniquely determined from the functional derivative of the total energy with respect to the external potential. Our energy functional is thus an implicit functional of the physical system density, but an explicit functional of the auxiliary system density. We show that the total energy minimum and stationary states, describing the ground and excited states of the physical system, can be obtained by a self-consistent optimization with respect to the explicit variable, the generalized Kohn-Sham noninteracting density matrix. We have developed the generalized optimized effective potential method for the self-consistent optimization. Among options of the auxiliary system and the associated linear response theory, reformulated versions of the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory (SF-TDDFT) are selected for illustration of principle. Numerical results show that our multireference DFT successfully describes static correlation in bond dissociation and double bond rotation.

  16. Energy Minimization of Discrete Protein Titration State Models Using Graph Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvine, Emilie; Monson, Kyle; Jurrus, Elizabeth; Star, Keith; Baker, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    There are several applications in computational biophysics which require the optimization of discrete interacting states; e.g., amino acid titration states, ligand oxidation states, or discrete rotamer angles. Such optimization can be very time-consuming as it scales exponentially in the number of sites to be optimized. In this paper, we describe a new polynomial-time algorithm for optimization of discrete states in macromolecular systems. This algorithm was adapted from image processing and uses techniques from discrete mathematics and graph theory to restate the optimization problem in terms of “maximum flow-minimum cut” graph analysis. The interaction energy graph, a graph in which vertices (amino acids) and edges (interactions) are weighted with their respective energies, is transformed into a flow network in which the value of the minimum cut in the network equals the minimum free energy of the protein, and the cut itself encodes the state that achieves the minimum free energy. Because of its deterministic nature and polynomial-time performance, this algorithm has the potential to allow for the ionization state of larger proteins to be discovered. PMID:27089174

  17. Energy Minimization of Discrete Protein Titration State Models Using Graph Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvine, Emilie; Monson, Kyle; Jurrus, Elizabeth; Star, Keith; Baker, Nathan A

    2016-08-25

    There are several applications in computational biophysics that require the optimization of discrete interacting states, for example, amino acid titration states, ligand oxidation states, or discrete rotamer angles. Such optimization can be very time-consuming as it scales exponentially in the number of sites to be optimized. In this paper, we describe a new polynomial time algorithm for optimization of discrete states in macromolecular systems. This algorithm was adapted from image processing and uses techniques from discrete mathematics and graph theory to restate the optimization problem in terms of "maximum flow-minimum cut" graph analysis. The interaction energy graph, a graph in which vertices (amino acids) and edges (interactions) are weighted with their respective energies, is transformed into a flow network in which the value of the minimum cut in the network equals the minimum free energy of the protein and the cut itself encodes the state that achieves the minimum free energy. Because of its deterministic nature and polynomial time performance, this algorithm has the potential to allow for the ionization state of larger proteins to be discovered.

  18. Using corresponding state theory to obtain intermolecular potentials to calculate pure liquid shock Hugoniots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobbs, M.L.

    1997-12-01

    Determination of product species, equations-of-state (EOS) and thermochemical properties of high explosives and pyrotechnics remains a major unsolved problem. Although, empirical EOS models may be calibrated to replicate detonation conditions within experimental variability (5--10%), different states, e.g. expansion, may produce significant discrepancy with data if the basic form of the EOS model is incorrect. A more physically realistic EOS model based on intermolecular potentials, such as the Jacobs Cowperthwaite Zwisler (JCZ3) EOS, is needed to predict detonation states as well as expanded states. Predictive capability for any EOS requires a large species data base composed of a wide variety of elements. Unfortunately, only 20 species have known JCZ3 molecular force constants. Of these 20 species, only 10 have been adequately compared to experimental data such as molecular scattering or shock Hugoniot data. Since data in the strongly repulsive region of the molecular potential is limited, alternative methods must be found to deduce force constants for a larger number of species. The objective of the present study is to determine JCZ3 product species force constants by using a corresponding states theory. Intermolecular potential parameters were obtained for a variety of gas species using a simple corresponding states technique with critical volume and critical temperature. A more complex, four parameter corresponding state method with shape and polarity corrections was also used to obtain intermolecular potential parameters. Both corresponding state methods were used to predict shock Hugoniot data obtained from pure liquids. The simple corresponding state method is shown to give adequate agreement with shock Hugoniot data.

  19. Decoupling of degenerate positive-norm states in Witten's string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, Hsien-Chung; Lee, Jen-Chi

    2003-01-01

    We show that the degenerate positive-norm physical propagating fields of the open bosonic string can be gauged to the higher rank fields at the same mass level. As a result, their scattering amplitudes can be determined from those of the higher spin fields. This phenomenon arises from the existence of two types of zero-norm states with the same Young representations as those of the degenerate positive-norm states in the old covariant first quantized (OCFQ) spectrum. This is demonstrated by using the lowest order gauge transformation of Witten's string field theory (WSFT) up to the fourth massive level (spin-five), and is found to be consistent with conformal field theory calculation based on the first quantized generalized sigma-model approach. In particular, on-shell conditions of zero-norm states in the OCFQ stringy gauge transformation are found to correspond, in a one-to-one manner, to the background ghost fields in off-shell gauge transformation of WSFT. The implication of decoupling of scalar modes on Sen's conjectures is also briefly discussed

  20. Relativistic dynamics of quasistable states. I. Perturbation theory for the Poincare group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickramasekara, S.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a theory of resonances by combining the S-matrix approach with the Bakamjian-Thomas (BT) construction. Characterization of resonances by the poles of the S-matrix has many advantages. Foremost among them is perhaps the gauge invariance of the definitions of resonance mass and width, a problem with which some definitions based on field theoretical approaches suffer. The BT construction provides a general framework for constructing Poincare generators for an interacting quantum system. While much of what we develop here can be cast in the language of quantum field theory, in the spirit of BT construction, which does not assume the existence of local field mediating interactions, we will work at the fundamental level of an interacting Poincare algebra. Our construction shows that a subset of this Poincare algebra integrates to a representation of the semigroup of causal transformations of relativistic space-time. These representations are characterized by the spin and S-matrix complex pole position of the resonance. The state vectors that transform under these representations also show an exact exponential decay, the signature of a decaying state. In this sense, the semigroup representations developed here tie together resonances and decaying states into a single theoretical description.

  1. Parent-child picture-book reading, mothers' mental state language and children's theory of mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, Juan E; Clemente, Rosa A; Villanueva, Lidon; Rieffe, Carolien

    2005-08-01

    This study focuses on parent-child book reading and its connection to the development of a theory of mind. First, parents were asked to report about frequency of parent-child storybook reading at home. Second, mothers were asked to read four picture-books to thirty-four children between 4;0 and 5;0. Both frequency of parent-child storybook reading at home, and mother's use of mental state terms in picture-books reading tasks were significantly associated with success on false belief tasks, after partialling out a number of potential mediators such as age of children, verbal IQ, paternal education, and words used by mothers in joint picture-book reading. Among the different mental state references (cognitive terms, desires, emotions and perceptions), it was found that the frequency and variety of cognitive terms, but also the frequency of emotional terms correlated positively with children's false belief performance. Relationships between mental state language and theory of mind are discussed.

  2. Using Social Network Theory to Influence the Development of State and Local Primary Prevention Capacity-Building Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook-Craig, Patricia G.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the role that social network theory and social network analysis has played in assessing and developing effective primary prevention networks across a southeastern state. In 2004 the state began an effort to develop a strategic plan for the primary prevention of violence working with local communities across the state. The…

  3. The Evolution of the Theory and Practice of State Regulation of Addictive Goods Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Yuryevich Skokov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the evolution of state regulation of the market of addictive goods and services in the context of the periodization of ideas about the role of the state in the economy in general, in historical and economic era, in the formation of the species of addictive goods markets. In the age of mercantilism the sphere of regulation of addictive goods markets was not the subject of attention of economists, but in practice there is an idea of the need for state protectionism. During its criticism in the framework of the theory of physiocrats and in the beginning of the classical school, alcohol products become a subject of research of economists, as the major source of budgetary funds. The abolition of serfdom, the development of private industrial activity, changing the farming tax system to the excise tax, indicate the penetration of traditional liberal principles in domestic economy in the field of addictive goods. The German historical schools focused on the active role of the state with respect to national peculiarities of the economy, found support and development in the works of Russian scientists that support the alcohol and tobacco monopoly. In the Soviet period the principles of Marxist political economy were formed on the basis of total nationalization of production and distribution of allowed addictive goods. The margin school is characterized by psychological interpretation of economic processes in the field of addictive goods under the conditions of perfect competition, in particular the role of consumers in the pricing. In the period of theoretical struggle of monetarism against keynesianism, which coincided with the drug boom, there were areas of economics of crime and punishment, drugs. In the neoliberalism period the antiprohibitionist movement was formed in the field of addictive goods. Changing some postulates of neoclassical economics by neo-institutional economic theory contributed to the development of empirical

  4. Experimental and theoretical examples of the value and limitations of transition state theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golden, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    Value and limitations of transition-state theory (TST) are reviewed. TST analyses of the temperature dependence of the ''direct'' reactions CH 3 + CH 3 CHO → CH 4 + CH 3 CO (1) and O + CH 4 → OH + CH 3 (2) are presented in detail, and other examples of TST usefulness are recalled. Limitations are discussed for bimolecular processes in terms of ''complex'' vs ''direct'' mechanisms. The reaction OH + CO → CO 2 + H is discussed in this context. Limitations for unimolecular processes seem to arise only for simple bond fission processes, and recent advances are noted. 2 figures, 5 tables

  5. Decoherence and thermalization of a pure quantum state in quantum field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Alexandre; Serreau, Julien

    2010-06-11

    We study the real-time evolution of a self-interacting O(N) scalar field initially prepared in a pure, coherent quantum state. We present a complete solution of the nonequilibrium quantum dynamics from a 1/N expansion of the two-particle-irreducible effective action at next-to-leading order, which includes scattering and memory effects. We demonstrate that, restricting one's attention (or ability to measure) to a subset of the infinite hierarchy of correlation functions, one observes an effective loss of purity or coherence and, on longer time scales, thermalization. We point out that the physics of decoherence is well described by classical statistical field theory.

  6. Experimental and theoretical examples of the value and limitations of transition state theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    Value and limitations of transition-state theory (TST) are reviewed. TST analyses of the temperature dependence of the 'direct' reactions CH3 + CH3CHO yields CH4 + CH3CO(1) and O + CH4 yields OH + CH3(2) are presented in detail, and other examples of TST usefulness are recalled. Limitations are discussed for bimolecular processes in terms of 'complex' vs. 'direct' mechanisms. The reaction OH + CO yields CO2 + H is discussed in this context. Limitations for unimolecular processes seem to arise only for simple bond fission processes, and recent advances are noted.

  7. Variational transition state theory for multidimensional activated rate processes in the presence of anisotropic friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezhkovskii, Alexander M.; Frishman, Anatoli M.; Pollak, Eli

    1994-09-01

    Variational transition state theory (VTST) is applied to the study of the activated escape of a particle trapped in a multidimensional potential well and coupled to a heat bath. Special attention is given to the dependence of the rate constant on the friction coefficients in the case of anisotropic friction. It is demonstrated explicitly that both the traditional as well as the nontraditional scenarios for the particle escape are recovered uniformly within the framework of VTST. Effects such as saddle point avoidance and friction dependence of the activation energy are derived from VTST using optimized planar dividing surfaces.

  8. Dimension shifting operators and null states in 2D conformally invariant field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervais, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    We discuss the existence and properties of differential operators which transform covariant operators into covariant operators of different weights in two-dimensional conformally invariant field theories. We relate them to null states and the vanishing of the Kac determinant in representations of the conformal algebra, and to the existence of differential equations for Green functions of covariant operators. In this framework, we rederive the essential features of our earlier work on dual models with shifted intercept, which in euclidean space-time gives explicit solutions of the conformal bootstrap equations where all operators are marginal. (orig.)

  9. Prediction of the state diagram of starch water mixtures using the Flory--Huggins free volume theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.; Meinders, M.B.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we analyse the phase and state transitions of starch and other glucose homopolymers and oligomers using the free volume extension of the Flory–Huggins theory by Vrentas and Vrentas, combined with the Couchman–Karasz theory for the glass transition. Using scaling relations of model

  10. Action-State Orientation and the Theory of Planned Behavior: A Study of Job Search in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhaoli; Wanberg, Connie; Niu, Xiongying; Xie, Yizhong

    2006-01-01

    Job search is an important element of people's careers and is especially critical for unemployed individuals. The current study surveyed a sample of 328 unemployed job seekers in China to test hypotheses related to the theory of planned behavior and action-state orientation theory. Results of the three-wave longitudinal study demonstrated that the…

  11. Accurate Ground-State Energies of Solids and Molecules from Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Thomas; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that ground-state energies approaching chemical accuracy can be obtained by combining the adiabatic-connection fluctuation-dissipation theorem with time-dependent densityfunctional theory. The key ingredient is a renormalization scheme, which eliminates the divergence...

  12. Modern Fluid Dynamics Intermediate Theory and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinstreuer, Clement

    2010-01-01

    Features pedagogical elements that include consistent 50/50 physics-mathematics approach when introducing material, illustrating concepts, showing flow visualizations, and solving problems. This title intends to help serious undergraduate student solve basic fluid dynamics problems independently, and suggest system design improvements

  13. Intermediate energy nucleon-deuteron scattering theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Sloan's conclusion (1969) that terms of the multiple-scattering series beyond single scattering contribute only to S- and P-wave amplitudes in an S-wave separable model is examined. A comparison of experiments with the calculation at 146 MeV shows that the conclusion is valid in nucleon-deuteron scattering applications.

  14. Semiclassical theory of the tunneling anomaly in partially spin-polarized compressible quantum Hall states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Debanjan; Skinner, Brian; Lee, Patrick A.

    2018-05-01

    Electron tunneling into a system with strong interactions is known to exhibit an anomaly, in which the tunneling conductance vanishes continuously at low energy due to many-body interactions. Recent measurements have probed this anomaly in a quantum Hall bilayer of the half-filled Landau level, and shown that the anomaly apparently gets stronger as the half-filled Landau level is increasingly spin polarized. Motivated by this result, we construct a semiclassical hydrodynamic theory of the tunneling anomaly in terms of the charge-spreading action associated with tunneling between two copies of the Halperin-Lee-Read state with partial spin polarization. This theory is complementary to our recent work (D. Chowdhury, B. Skinner, and P. A. Lee, arXiv:1709.06091) where the electron spectral function was computed directly using an instanton-based approach. Our results show that the experimental observation cannot be understood within conventional theories of the tunneling anomaly, in which the spreading of the injected charge is driven by the mean-field Coulomb energy. However, we identify a qualitatively new regime, in which the mean-field Coulomb energy is effectively quenched and the tunneling anomaly is dominated by the finite compressibility of the composite Fermion liquid.

  15. Stochastic theory of nonequilibrium steady states. Part II: Applications in chemical biophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Hao; Qian Min; Qian Hong

    2012-01-01

    The mathematical theory of nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) has a natural application in open biochemical systems which have sustained source(s) and sink(s) in terms of a difference in their chemical potentials. After a brief introduction in Section , in Part II of this review, we present the widely studied biochemical enzyme kinetics, the workhorse of biochemical dynamic modeling, in terms of the theory of NESS (Section ). We then show that several phenomena in enzyme kinetics, including a newly discovered activation–inhibition switching (Section ) and the well-known non-Michaelis–Menten-cooperativity (Section ) and kinetic proofreading (Section ), are all consequences of the NESS of driven biochemical systems with associated cycle fluxes. Section is focused on nonlinear and nonequilibrium systems of biochemical reactions. We use the phosphorylation–dephosphorylation cycle (PdPC), one of the most important biochemical signaling networks, as an example (Section ). It starts with a brief introduction of the Delbrück–Gillespie process approach to mesoscopic biochemical kinetics (Sections ). We shall discuss the zeroth-order ultrasensitivity of PdPC in terms of a new concept — the temporal cooperativity (Sections ), as well as PdPC with feedback which leads to biochemical nonlinear bistability (Section ). Also, both are nonequilibrium phenomena. PdPC with a nonlinear feedback is kinetically isomorphic to a self-regulating gene expression network, hence the theory of NESS discussed here could have wide applications to many other biochemical systems.

  16. Relative entropy of excited states in two dimensional conformal field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sárosi, Gábor [Department of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Physics, Budapest University of Technology,Budapest, H-1521 (Hungary); Ugajin, Tomonori [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California,Santa Barbara,CA 93106 (United States)

    2016-07-21

    We study the relative entropy and the trace square distance, both of which measure the distance between reduced density matrices of two excited states in two dimensional conformal field theories. We find a general formula for the relative entropy between two primary states with the same conformal dimension in the limit of a single small interval and find that in this case the relative entropy is proportional to the trace square distance. We check our general formulae by calculating the relative entropy between two generalized free fields and the trace square distance between the spin and disorder operators of the critical Ising model. We also give the leading term of the relative entropy in the small interval expansion when the two operators have different conformal dimensions. This turns out to be universal when the CFT has no primaires lighter than the stress tensor. The result reproduces the previously known special cases.

  17. Transition state theory approach to polymer escape from a one dimensional potential well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ikonen, Timo; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Jónsson, Hannes

    2015-06-14

    The rate of escape of an ideal bead-spring polymer in a symmetric double-well potential is calculated using transition state theory (TST) and the results compared with direct dynamical simulations. The minimum energy path of the transitions becomes flat and the dynamics diffusive for long polymers making the Kramers-Langer estimate poor. However, TST with dynamical corrections based on short time trajectories started at the transition state gives rate constant estimates that agree within a factor of two with the molecular dynamics simulations over a wide range of bead coupling constants and polymer lengths. The computational effort required by the TST approach does not depend on the escape rate and is much smaller than that required by molecular dynamics simulations.

  18. The theory and experiment of solute migration caused by excited state absorptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Jin; Ying-Lin, Song; Yu-Xiao, Wang; Min, Shui; Chang-Wei, Li; Jun-Yi, Yang; Xue-Ru, Zhang; Kun, Yang

    2010-01-01

    Nonsymmetrical transition from reverse-saturable absorption (RSA) to saturable absorption (SA) caused by excited state absorption induced mass transport of the CuPcTs dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide is observed in an open aperture Z-scan experiment with a 21-ps laser pulse. The nonsymmetrical transition from RSA to SA is ascribed neither to saturation of excited state absorption nor to thermal induced mass transport, the so-called Soret effect. In our consideration, strong nonlinear absorption causes the rapid accumulation of the non-uniform kinetic energy of the solute molecules. The non-uniform kinetic field in turn causes the migration of the solute molecules. Additionally, an energy-gradient-induced mass transport theory is presented to interpret the experimental results, and the theoretical calculations are also taken to fit our experimental results. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  19. Life politics, nature and the state: Giddens' sociological theory and The Politics of Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Charles; Jacobson, Brynna

    2013-03-01

    Anthony Giddens' The Politics of Climate Change represents a significant shift in the way in which he addresses ecological politics. In this book, he rejects the relevance of environmentalism and demarcates climate-change policy from life politics. Giddens addresses climate change in the technocratic mode of simple rather than reflexive modernization. However, Giddens' earlier sociological theory provides the basis for a more reflexive understanding of climate change. Climate change instantiates how, in high modernity, the existential contradiction of the human relationship with nature returns in new form, expressed in life politics and entangled with the structural contradictions of the capitalist state. The interlinking of existential and structural contradiction is manifested in the tension between life politics and the capitalist nation-state. This tension is key for understanding the failures so far of policy responses to climate change. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2013.

  20. Entanglement spectrum and boundary theories with projected entangled-pair states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirac, Ignacio [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Poilblanc, Didier [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, C.N.R.S. and Universite de Toulouse, Toulouse (France); Schuch, Norbert [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Verstraete, Frank [Vienna Univ. (Austria)

    2012-07-01

    In many physical scenarios, close relations between the bulk properties of quantum systems and theories associated to their boundaries have been observed. In this work, we provide an exact duality mapping between the bulk of a quantum spin system and its boundary using Projected Entangled Pair States (PEPS). This duality associates to every region a Hamiltonian on its boundary, in such a way that the entanglement spectrum of the bulk corresponds to the excitation spectrum of the boundary Hamiltonian. We study various models and find that a gapped bulk phase with local order corresponds to a boundary Hamiltonian with local interactions, whereas critical behavior in the bulk is reflected on a diverging interaction length of the boundary Hamiltonian. Furthermore, topologically ordered states yield non-local Hamiltonians. As our duality also associates a boundary operator to any operator in the bulk, it in fact provides a full holographic framework for the study of quantum many-body systems via their boundary.

  1. Can quantum transition state theory be defined as an exact t = 0+ limit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seogjoo; Voth, Gregory A.

    2016-02-01

    The definition of the classical transition state theory (TST) as a t → 0+ limit of the flux-side time correlation function relies on the assumption that simultaneous measurement of population and flux is a well defined physical process. However, the noncommutativity of the two measurements in quantum mechanics makes the extension of such a concept to the quantum regime impossible. For this reason, quantum TST (QTST) has been generally accepted as any kind of quantum rate theory reproducing the TST in the classical limit, and there has been a broad consensus that no unique QTST retaining all the properties of TST can be defined. Contrary to this widely held view, Hele and Althorpe (HA) [J. Chem. Phys. 138, 084108 (2013)] recently suggested that a true QTST can be defined as the exact t → 0+ limit of a certain kind of quantum flux-side time correlation function and that it is equivalent to the ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) TST. This work seeks to question and clarify certain assumptions underlying these suggestions and their implications. First, the time correlation function used by HA as a starting expression is not related to the kinetic rate constant by virtue of linear response theory, which is the first important step in relating a t = 0+ limit to a physically measurable rate. Second, a theoretical analysis calls into question a key step in HA's proof which appears not to rely on an exact quantum mechanical identity. The correction of this makes the true t = 0+ limit of HA's QTST different from the RPMD-TST rate expression, but rather equal to the well-known path integral quantum transition state theory rate expression for the case of centroid dividing surface. An alternative quantum rate expression is then formulated starting from the linear response theory and by applying a recently developed formalism of real time dynamics of imaginary time path integrals [S. Jang, A. V. Sinitskiy, and G. A. Voth, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 154103 (2014)]. It is shown

  2. Conversations about mental states and theory of mind development during middle childhood: A training study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Federica; Lecce, Serena; Banerjee, Robin

    2016-09-01

    Despite 30years of productive research on theory of mind (ToM), we still know relatively little about variables that influence ToM development during middle childhood. Recent experimental studies have shown that conversations about the mind affect ToM abilities, but they have not explored the mechanisms underlying this developmental effect. In the current study, we examined two potential mechanisms through which conversations about mental states are likely to influence ToM: an increased frequency of references to mental states when explaining behavior and an increased accuracy of mental-state attributions. To this aim, we conducted a training study in which 101 children were assigned to either an intervention condition or a control condition. The conversation-based intervention was made up of four sessions scheduled over 2weeks. Children completed a battery of assessments before and after the intervention as well as 2months later. The groups were equivalent at Time 1 (T1) for age, family affluence, vocabulary, and executive functions. The ToM group showed an improvement in ToM skills (as evaluated on both the practiced tasks and a transfer task). Mediation analyses demonstrated that the accuracy of mental-state attributions, but not the mere frequency of mental-state references, mediated the positive effect of conversations about the mind on ToM development. Our results indicate that conversational experience can enhance mental-state reasoning not by simply drawing children's attention to mental states but rather by scaffolding a mature understanding of social situations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Extending unified-theory-of-reinforcement neural networks to steady-state operant behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvin, Olivia L; McDowell, J J

    2016-06-01

    The unified theory of reinforcement has been used to develop models of behavior over the last 20 years (Donahoe et al., 1993). Previous research has focused on the theory's concordance with the respondent behavior of humans and animals. In this experiment, neural networks were developed from the theory to extend the unified theory of reinforcement to operant behavior on single-alternative variable-interval schedules. This area of operant research was selected because previously developed neural networks could be applied to it without significant alteration. Previous research with humans and animals indicates that the pattern of their steady-state behavior is hyperbolic when plotted against the obtained rate of reinforcement (Herrnstein, 1970). A genetic algorithm was used in the first part of the experiment to determine parameter values for the neural networks, because values that were used in previous research did not result in a hyperbolic pattern of behavior. After finding these parameters, hyperbolic and other similar functions were fitted to the behavior produced by the neural networks. The form of the neural network's behavior was best described by an exponentiated hyperbola (McDowell, 1986; McLean and White, 1983; Wearden, 1981), which was derived from the generalized matching law (Baum, 1974). In post-hoc analyses the addition of a baseline rate of behavior significantly improved the fit of the exponentiated hyperbola and removed systematic residuals. The form of this function was consistent with human and animal behavior, but the estimated parameter values were not. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting behavioural responses to novel organisms: state-dependent detection theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimmer, Pete C; Ehlman, Sean M; Sih, Andrew

    2017-01-25

    Human activity alters natural habitats for many species. Understanding variation in animals' behavioural responses to these changing environments is critical. We show how signal detection theory can be used within a wider framework of state-dependent modelling to predict behavioural responses to a major environmental change: novel, exotic species. We allow thresholds for action to be a function of reserves, and demonstrate how optimal thresholds can be calculated. We term this framework 'state-dependent detection theory' (SDDT). We focus on behavioural and fitness outcomes when animals continue to use formerly adaptive thresholds following environmental change. In a simple example, we show that exposure to novel animals which appear dangerous-but are actually safe-(e.g. ecotourists) can have catastrophic consequences for 'prey' (organisms that respond as if the new organisms are predators), significantly increasing mortality even when the novel species is not predatory. SDDT also reveals that the effect on reproduction can be greater than the effect on lifespan. We investigate factors that influence the effect of novel organisms, and address the potential for behavioural adjustments (via evolution or learning) to recover otherwise reduced fitness. Although effects of environmental change are often difficult to predict, we suggest that SDDT provides a useful route ahead. © 2017 The Author(s).

  5. Barrierless association of CF2 and dissociation of C2F4 by variational transition-state theory and system-specific quantum Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Junwei Lucas; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Bond dissociation is a fundamental chemical reaction, and the first principles modeling of the kinetics of dissociation reactions with a monotonically increasing potential energy along the dissociation coordinate presents a challenge not only for modern electronic structure methods but also for kinetics theory. In this work, we use multifaceted variable-reaction-coordinate variational transition-state theory (VRC-VTST) to compute the high-pressure limit dissociation rate constant of tetrafluoroethylene (C2F4), in which the potential energies are computed by direct dynamics with the M08-HX exchange correlation functional. To treat the pressure dependence of the unimolecular rate constants, we use the recently developed system-specific quantum Rice–Ramsperger–Kassel theory. The calculations are carried out by direct dynamics using an exchange correlation functional validated against calculations that go beyond coupled-cluster theory with single, double, and triple excitations. Our computed dissociation rate constants agree well with the recent experimental measurements. PMID:27834727

  6. Exploration of the Singlet O2 Oxidation of 8-Oxoguanine by Guided-Ion Beam Scattering and Density Functional Theory: Changes of Reaction Intermediates, Energetics, and Kinetics upon Protonation/Deprotonation and Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Lu, Wenchao; Liu, Jianbo

    2017-02-09

    8-Oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) is one of the most common DNA lesions resulting from reactive oxygen species and ionizing radiation, and is involved in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and cell death. Notably, 8-oxodGuo is more reactive toward singlet (a 1 Δ g ) O 2 than the undamaged guanosine, and the lesions arising from the secondary oxidation of 8-oxodGuo are more mutagenic. Herein the 1 O 2 oxidation of free base 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) was investigated at different initial conditions including protonated [8-oxoG + H] + , deprotonated [8-oxoG - H] - , and their monohydrates. Experiment was carried out on a guided-ion beam scattering tandem mass spectrometer. Measurements include the effects of collision energy (E col ) on reaction cross sections over a center-of-mass E col range from 0.1 to 0.5 eV. The aim of this study is to quantitatively probe the sensitivity of the early stage of 8-oxoG oxidation to ionization and hydration. Density functional theory and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus calculations were performed to identify the intermediates and the products along reaction pathways and locate accessible reaction potential energy surfaces, and to rationalize reaction outcomes from energetic and kinetic points of view. No product was observed for the reaction of [8-oxoG + H] + ·W 0,1 (W = H 2 O) because insurmountable barriers block the addition of 1 O 2 to reactant ions. Neither was [8-oxoG - H] - reactive with 1 O 2 , in this case due to the rapid decay of transient intermediates to starting reactants. However, the nonreactivity of [8-oxoG - H] - was inverted by hydration; as a result, 4,5-dioxetane of [8-oxoG - H] - was captured as the main oxidation product. Reaction cross section for [8-oxoG - H] - ·W + 1 O 2 decreases with increasing E col and becomes negligible above 0.3 eV, indicating that the reaction is exothermic and has no barriers above reactants. The contrasting oxidation behaviors of [8-oxoG + H] + ·W 0,1 and [8-oxoG - H] - ·W 0

  7. The Wertheim integral equation theory with the ideal chain approximation and a dimer equation of state: Generalization to mixtures of hard-sphere chain fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, J.; Sandler, S.I.

    1995-01-01

    We have extended the Wertheim integral equation theory to mixtures of hard spheres with two attraction sites in order to model homonuclear hard-sphere chain fluids, and then solved these equations with the polymer-Percus--Yevick closure and the ideal chain approximation to obtain the average intermolecular and overall radial distribution functions. We obtain explicit expressions for the contact values of these distribution functions and a set of one-dimensional integral equations from which the distribution functions can be calculated without iteration or numerical Fourier transformation. We compare the resulting predictions for the distribution functions with Monte Carlo simulation results we report here for five selected binary mixtures. It is found that the accuracy of the prediction of the structure is the best for dimer mixtures and declines with increasing chain length and chain-length asymmetry. For the equation of state, we have extended the dimer version of the thermodynamic perturbation theory to the hard-sphere chain mixture by introducing the dimer mixture as an intermediate reference system. The Helmholtz free energy of chain fluids is then expressed in terms of the free energy of the hard-sphere mixture and the contact values of the correlation functions of monomer and dimer mixtures. We compared with the simulation results, the resulting equation of state is found to be the most accurate among existing theories with a relative average error of 1.79% for 4-mer/8-mer mixtures, which is the worst case studied in this work. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  8. Designing molecular complexes using free-energy derivatives from liquid-state integral equation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrugalla, Florian; Kast, Stefan M

    2016-01-01

    Complex formation between molecules in solution is the key process by which molecular interactions are translated into functional systems. These processes are governed by the binding or free energy of association which depends on both direct molecular interactions and the solvation contribution. A design goal frequently addressed in pharmaceutical sciences is the optimization of chemical properties of the complex partners in the sense of minimizing their binding free energy with respect to a change in chemical structure. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-state theory in the form of the solute–solute equation of the reference interaction site model provides all necessary information for such a task with high efficiency. In particular, computing derivatives of the potential of mean force (PMF), which defines the free-energy surface of complex formation, with respect to potential parameters can be viewed as a means to define a direction in chemical space toward better binders. We illustrate the methodology in the benchmark case of alkali ion binding to the crown ether 18-crown-6 in aqueous solution. In order to examine the validity of the underlying solute–solute theory, we first compare PMFs computed by different approaches, including explicit free-energy molecular dynamics simulations as a reference. Predictions of an optimally binding ion radius based on free-energy derivatives are then shown to yield consistent results for different ion parameter sets and to compare well with earlier, orders-of-magnitude more costly explicit simulation results. This proof-of-principle study, therefore, demonstrates the potential of liquid-state theory for molecular design problems. (paper)

  9. State of the science: does the theory of maternal role attainment apply to African American motherhood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquier, Katherine Ferrell

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the current state of knowledge of the theory of maternal role attainment (MRA) and its relevance in describing African American motherhood. EBSCOhost Research Databases that included PubMed, CINAHL plus, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, SCOPUS, and Web of Science were searched for journal articles that examined maternal identity and MRA. Keyword searches included maternal identity, maternal role attainment, becoming a mother, prenatal attachment, maternal-fetal attachment, and maternal-infant attachment. Inclusion criteria for this review were published journal articles of studies conducted in the United States, with a clear delineation of the theoretical framework of MRA. Journal articles that measured MRA among women with depression or medically fragile infants were excluded. Two hundred and twelve studies were reviewed; 25 studies, published between 1975 and 2007, met the inclusion criteria. Nine articles described the theory of MRA, 11 articles measured variables thought to influence MRA, and 6 articles described maternal-fetal attachment, a construct of MRA. Studies were reviewed, categorized, and analyzed to determine current knowledge of how the theory of MRA describes African American motherhood. Categories included studies describing the theoretical framework of maternal identity and MRA, studies measuring key variables thought to impact MRA, and studies measuring maternal-fetal attachment and maternal-infant attachment. The studies were limited by homogenous samples of upper-middle-class white women and low-income, single, African American adolescents. Study results of MRA cannot be generalized to African American women. Further research is essential to identify attributes influencing MRA, specifically among larger samples of African American women with demographics similar to that of the white populations that have been included in studies thus far. © 2013 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  10. Landau-like theory for universality of critical exponents in quasistationary states of isolated mean-field systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Shun; Yamaguchi, Yoshiyuki Y

    2015-06-01

    An external force dynamically drives an isolated mean-field Hamiltonian system to a long-lasting quasistationary state, whose lifetime increases with population of the system. For second order phase transitions in quasistationary states, two nonclassical critical exponents have been reported individually by using a linear and a nonlinear response theories in a toy model. We provide a simple way to compute the critical exponents all at once, which is an analog of the Landau theory. The present theory extends the universality class of the nonclassical exponents to spatially periodic one-dimensional systems and shows that the exponents satisfy a classical scaling relation inevitably by using a key scaling of momentum.

  11. Einstein's steady-state theory: an abandoned model of the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Raifeartaigh, Cormac; McCann, Brendan; Nahm, Werner; Mitton, Simon

    2014-09-01

    We present a translation and analysis of an unpublished manuscript by Albert Einstein in which he attempted to construct a `steady-state' model of the universe. The manuscript, which appears to have been written in early 1931, demonstrates that Einstein once explored a cosmic model in which the mean density of matter in an expanding universe is maintained constant by the continuous formation of matter from empty space. This model is very different to previously known Einsteinian models of the cosmos (both static and dynamic) but anticipates the later steady-state cosmology of Hoyle, Bondi and Gold in some ways. We find that Einstein's steady-state model contains a fundamental flaw and suggest that it was abandoned for this reason. We also suggest that he declined to explore a more sophisticated version because he found such theories rather contrived. The manuscript is of historical interest because it reveals that Einstein debated between steady-state and evolving models of the cosmos decades before a similar debate took place in the cosmological community.

  12. Scattering Properties of Ground-State 23Na Vapor Using Generalized Scattering Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harazneh, A. A.; Sandouqa, A. S.; Joudeh, B. R.; Ghassib, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    The scattering properties of ground-state 23Na vapor are investigated within the framework of the Galitskii-Migdal-Feynman formalism. Viewed as a generalized scattering theory, this formalism is used to calculate the medium phase shifts. The scattering properties of the system—the total, viscosity, spin-exchange, and average cross sections—are then computed using these phase shifts according to standard recipes. The total cross section is found to exhibit the Ramsauer-Townsend effect as well as resonance peaks. These peaks are caused by the large difference between the potentials for electronic spin-singlet and spin-triplet states. They represent quasi-bound states in the system. The results obtained for the complex spin-exchange cross sections are particularly highlighted because of their importance in the spectroscopy of the Na2 dimer. So are the results for the scattering lengths pertaining to both singlet and triplet states. Wherever possible, comparison is made with other published results.

  13. Frenkel-Charge-Transfer exciton intermixing theory for molecular crystals with two isolated Frenkel exciton states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarev, Igor; Popescu, Adrian

    We develop an analytical theory for the intra-intermolecular exciton intermixing in periodic 1D chains of planar organic molecules with two isolated low-lying Frenkel exciton states, typical of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and other transition metal phthalocyanine molecules. We formulate the Hamiltonian and use the exact Bogoliubov diagonalization procedure to derive the eigen energy spectrum for the two lowest intramolecular Frenkel excitons coupled to the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) exciton state. By comparing our theoretical spectrum with available experimental CuPc absorption data, we obtain the parameters of the Frenkel-CT exciton intermixing in CuPc thin films. The two Frenkel exciton states here are spaced apart by 0.26 eV, and the charge transfer exciton state is 50 meV above the lowest Frenkel exciton. Both Frenkel excitons are strongly mixed with the CT exciton, showing the coupling constant 0.17 eV in agreement with earlier electron transport experiments. Our results can be used for the proper interpretation of the physical properties of crystalline phthalocyanines. DOE-DE-SC0007117 (I.B.), UNC-GA ROI Grant (A.P.).

  14. State-specific Multi-reference Perturbation Theories with Relaxed Coefficients: Molecular Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debashis Mukherjee

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We present in this paper two new versions of Rayleigh-Schr¨odinger (RS and the Brillouin-Wigner (BW state-specific multi-reference perturbative theories (SSMRPT which stem from our state-specific multi-reference coupled-cluster formalism (SS-MRCC, developed with a complete active space (CAS. They are manifestly sizeextensive and are designed to avoid intruders. The combining coefficients cμ for the model functions φμ are completely relaxed and are obtained by diagonalizing an effective operator in the model space, one root of which is the target eigenvalue of interest. By invoking suitable partitioning of the hamiltonian, very convenient perturbative versions of the formalism in both the RS and the BW forms are developed for the second order energy. The unperturbed hamiltonians for these theories can be chosen to be of both Mφller-Plesset (MP and Epstein-Nesbet (EN type. However, we choose the corresponding Fock operator fμ for each model function φμ, whose diagonal elements are used to define the unperturbed hamiltonian in the MP partition. In the EN partition, we additionally include all the diagonal direct and exchange ladders. Our SS-MRPT thus utilizes a multi-partitioning strategy. Illustrative numerical applications are presented for potential energy surfaces (PES of the ground (1Σ+ and the first delta (1Δ states of CH+ which possess pronounced multi-reference character. Comparison of the results with the corresponding full CI values indicates the efficacy of our formalisms.

  15. Generalized transition state theory. Quantum effects for collinear reactions of hydrogen molecules and isotopically substituted hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, B.C.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1979-01-01

    Canonical variational transition state theory, microcanonical variational transition state theory, and Miller's unified statistical theory were used in an attempt to correct two major deficiencies of the conventional transition state theory. These are: (1) the necessity of extra assumptions to include quantum mechanical tunneling effects and (2) the fundamental assumption that trajectories crossing a dividing surface in phase space proceed directly to products. The accuracy of these approximate methods were tested by performing calculations for several collinear reactions of hydrogen, deuterium, chlorine, or iodine, with five isotopes of hydrogen molecules and comparison of these results with those from accurate quantitative calculations of the reaction probabilities as functions of energy and of the thermal rate constants as functions of temperature. 49 references, 28 figures, 17 tables

  16. an intermediate moisture meat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-04

    Jul 4, 2008 ... traditional SM muscle without compromising quality. ... technique is intermediate moisture food processing. ... Traditionally, most tsire suya producers use ..... quality of Chinese purebred and European X Chinese crossbred ...

  17. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...

  18. Mapping Intermediality in Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2010-01-01

    Mapping Intermediality in Performance benadert het vraagstuk van intermedialiteit met betrekking tot performance (vooral theater) vanuit vijf verschillende invalshoeken: performativiteit en lichaam; tijd en ruimte; digitale cultuur en posthumanisme; netwerken; pedagogiek en praxis. In deze boeiende

  19. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  20. Hot metastable state of abnormal matter in relativistic nuclear field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glendenning, N.K.

    1987-01-01

    Because of their non-linearity, the field equations of relativistic nuclear field theory admit of additional solutions besides the normal state of matter. One of these is a finite-temperature abnormal phase. Over a narrow range in temperature, matter can exist in the abnormal phase at zero pressure. This is a hot metastable state, for which there is a barrier against decay, because the field configuration is different than in the normal state, the baryon masses are far removed from their vacuum masses, there is an abundance of pairs also far removed from their vacuum masses, and a correspondingly high entropy. The abundance of baryon-antibaryon pairs is the glue that holds this matter together. The signals associated with this novel state are quite unusual. A fragment of such matter will cool by emitting a spectrum of black-body radiation, consisting principally of photons, lepton pairs and pions, rather than by baryon emission, because the latter are far removed from their vacuum masses. If produced at the upper end of its temperature range, a large fraction of the original energy, more than half in the examples studied here, is radiated in this way. The baryons and light elements produced in the eventual decay, after the abnormal matter has cooled to a domain where its pressure becomes positive, will account for only a fraction of the original energy. The energy domain of this state depends sensitively on the coupling constants, and within a reasonable range as determined by nuclear matter properties, can lie in the range of GeV to tens of GeV per nucleon. (orig.)

  1. Electronic states of aryl radical functionalized graphenes: Density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-06-01

    Functionalized graphenes are known as a high-performance molecular device. In the present study, the structures and electronic states of the aryl radical functionalized graphene have been investigated by the density functional theory (DFT) method to elucidate the effects of functionalization on the electronic states of graphene (GR). Also, the mechanism of aryl radical reaction with GR was investigated. The benzene, biphenyl, p-terphenyl, and p-quaterphenyl radicals [denoted by (Bz) n (n = 1-4), where n means numbers of benzene rings in aryl radical] were examined as aryl radicals. The DFT calculation of GR-(Bz) n (n = 1-4) showed that the aryl radical binds to the carbon atom of GR, and a C-C single bond was formed. The binding energies of aryl radicals to GR were calculated to be ca. 6.0 kcal mol-1 at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. It was found that the activation barrier exists in the aryl radical addition: the barrier heights were calculated to be 10.0 kcal mol-1. The electronic states of GR-(Bz) n were examined on the basis of theoretical results.

  2. Family, state, class and solidarity: re-conceptualising intergenerational solidarity through the grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Virpi; Conlon, Catherine; Scharf, Thomas; Carney, Gemma

    2013-09-01

    The relationship between class and intergenerational solidarities in the public and private spheres calls for further conceptual and theoretical development. This article discusses the findings from the first wave of a qualitative longitudinal study entitled Changing Generations , conducted in Ireland in 2011-2012, comprising 100 in-depth interviews with men and women across the age and socioeconomic spectrums. Constructivist grounded theory analysis of the data gives rise to the following postulates: (1) intergenerational solidarity at the family level is strongly contoured by socioeconomic status (SES); (2) intergenerational solidarity evolves as family generations observe each others' practices and adjust their expectations accordingly; (3) intergenerational solidarity within families is also shaped by the public sphere (the welfare state) that generates varying expectations and levels of solidarity regarding State supports for different age groups, again largely dependent on SES; (4) the liberal welfare state context, especially at a time of economic crisis, enhances the significance of intergenerational solidarity within families. We conclude by calling for research that is attuned to age/generation, gender and class, and how these operate across the family and societal levels.

  3. Atypical frontal-posterior synchronization of Theory of Mind regions in autism during mental state attribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kana, Rajesh K; Keller, Timothy A; Cherkassky, Vladimir L; Minshew, Nancy J; Just, Marcel Adam

    2009-01-01

    This study used fMRI to investigate the functioning of the Theory of Mind (ToM) cortical network in autism during the viewing of animations that in some conditions entailed the attribution of a mental state to animated geometric figures. At the cortical level, mentalizing (attribution of metal states) is underpinned by the coordination and integration of the components of the ToM network, which include the medial frontal gyrus, the anterior paracingulate, and the right temporoparietal junction. The pivotal new finding was a functional underconnectivity (a lower degree of synchronization) in autism, especially in the connections between frontal and posterior areas during the attribution of mental states. In addition, the frontal ToM regions activated less in participants with autism relative to control participants. In the autism group, an independent psychometric assessment of ToM ability and the activation in the right temporoparietal junction were reliably correlated. The results together provide new evidence for the biological basis of atypical processing of ToM in autism, implicating the underconnectivity between frontal regions and more posterior areas.

  4. Theory of long-range interactions for Rydberg states attached to hyperfine-split cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robicheaux, F.; Booth, D. W.; Saffman, M.

    2018-02-01

    The theory is developed for one- and two-atom interactions when the atom has a Rydberg electron attached to a hyperfine-split core state. This situation is relevant for some of the rare-earth and alkaline-earth atoms that have been proposed for experiments on Rydberg-Rydberg interactions. For the rare-earth atoms, the core electrons can have a very substantial total angular momentum J and a nonzero nuclear spin I . In the alkaline-earth atoms there is a single (s ) core electron whose spin can couple to a nonzero nuclear spin for odd isotopes. The resulting hyperfine splitting of the core state can lead to substantial mixing between the Rydberg series attached to different thresholds. Compared to the unperturbed Rydberg series of the alkali-metal atoms, the series perturbations and near degeneracies from the different parity states could lead to qualitatively different behavior for single-atom Rydberg properties (polarizability, Zeeman mixing and splitting, etc.) as well as Rydberg-Rydberg interactions (C5 and C6 matrices).

  5. Intermediate valence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunnarsson, O.; Schoenhammer, K.

    1987-01-01

    Spectroscopic properties of intermediate valence compounds are studied using the Anderson model. Due to the large orbital and spin degeneracy N/sub f/ of the 4f-level, 1/N/sub f/ can be treated as a small parameter. This approach provides exact T = 0 results for the Anderson impurity model in the limit N/sub f/ → ∞, and by adding 1/N/sub f/ corrections some properties can be calculated accurately even for N/sub f/ = 1 or 2. In particular valence photoemission and resonance photoemission spectroscopies are studied. A comparison of theoretical and experimental spectra provides an estimate of the parameters in the model. Core level photoemission spectra provide estimates of the coupling between the f-level and the conduction states and of the f-level occupancy. With these parameters the model gives a fair description of other electron spectroscopies. For typical parameters the model predicts two structures in the f-spectrum, namely one structure at the f-level and one at the Fermi energy. The resonance photoemission calculation gives a photon energy dependence for these two peaks in fair agreement with experiment. The peak at the Fermi energy is partly due to a narrow Kondo resonance, resulting from many-body effects and the presence of a continuous, partly filled conduction band. This resonance is related to a large density of low-lying excitations, which explains the large susceptibility and specific heat observed for these systems at low temperatures. 38 references, 11 figures, 2 tables

  6. 42 CFR 54.12 - Treatment of intermediate organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Treatment of intermediate organizations. 54.12... intermediate organizations. If a nongovernmental organization (referred to here as an “intermediate organization”), acting under a contract or other agreement with the Federal Government or a State or local...

  7. Variational estimate of the vacuum state of the SU(2) lattice gauge theory with a disordered trial wave function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heys, D.W.; Stump, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The variational principle is used to estimate the ground state of the Kogut-Susskind Hamiltonian of the SU(2) lattice gauge theory, with a trial wave function for which the magnetic fields on different plaquettes are uncorrelated. This trial function describes a disordered state. The energy expectation value is evaluated by a Monte Carlo method. The variational results are compared to similar results for a related Abelian gauge theory. Also, the expectation value of the Wilson loop operator is computed for the trial state, and the resulting estimate of the string tension is compared to the prediction of asymptotic freedom

  8. Rate constants of chemical reactions from semiclassical transition state theory in full and one dimension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Samuel M., E-mail: samuel.greene@chem.ox.ac.uk; Shan, Xiao, E-mail: xiao.shan@chem.ox.ac.uk; Clary, David C., E-mail: david.clary@chem.ox.ac.u [Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-28

    Semiclassical Transition State Theory (SCTST), a method for calculating rate constants of chemical reactions, offers gains in computational efficiency relative to more accurate quantum scattering methods. In full-dimensional (FD) SCTST, reaction probabilities are calculated from third and fourth potential derivatives along all vibrational degrees of freedom. However, the computational cost of FD SCTST scales unfavorably with system size, which prohibits its application to larger systems. In this study, the accuracy and efficiency of 1-D SCTST, in which only third and fourth derivatives along the reaction mode are used, are investigated in comparison to those of FD SCTST. Potential derivatives are obtained from numerical ab initio Hessian matrix calculations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level of theory, and Richardson extrapolation is applied to improve the accuracy of these derivatives. Reaction barriers are calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level. Results from FD SCTST agree with results from previous theoretical and experimental studies when Richardson extrapolation is applied. Results from our implementation of 1-D SCTST, which uses only 4 single-point MP2/cc-pVTZ energy calculations in addition to those for conventional TST, agree with FD results to within a factor of 5 at 250 K. This degree of agreement and the efficiency of the 1-D method suggest its potential as a means of approximating rate constants for systems too large for existing quantum scattering methods.

  9. Ground-state properties of rare-earth metals: an evaluation of density-functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Söderlind, Per; Turchi, P E A; Landa, A; Lordi, V

    2014-01-01

    The rare-earth metals have important technological applications due to their magnetic properties, but are scarce and expensive. Development of high-performance magnetic materials with less rare-earth content is desired, but theoretical modeling is hampered by complexities of the rare earths electronic structure. The existence of correlated (atomic-like) 4f electrons in the vicinity of the valence band makes any first-principles theory challenging. Here, we apply and evaluate the efficacy of density-functional theory for the series of lanthanides (rare earths), investigating the influence of the electron exchange and correlation functional, spin-orbit interaction, and orbital polarization. As a reference, the results are compared with those of the so-called ‘standard model’ of the lanthanides in which electrons are constrained to occupy 4f core states with no hybridization with the valence electrons. Some comparisons are also made with models designed for strong electron correlations. Our results suggest that spin–orbit coupling and orbital polarization are important, particularly for the magnitude of the magnetic moments, and that calculated equilibrium volumes, bulk moduli, and magnetic moments show correct trends overall. However, the precision of the calculated properties is not at the level of that found for simpler metals in the Periodic Table of Elements, and the electronic structures do not accurately reproduce x-ray photoemission spectra. (paper)

  10. Continuum theory of the mixed-state and surface Joule effects in type-II superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocquet, T.; Mathieu, P.; Simon, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A phenomenological theory of vortex motion, where the mixed state is regarded as a continuum, has been proposed by two of the authors in a short previous letter. Its outlines are recalled in this paper with further comments and arguments; in particular the basic equations and their implications are discussed at some length. This theory leads to a model of pinning, from which we argue that critical currents I c , in soft type-II samples of standard bulk homogeneity, should be governed essentially by surface defects. I c is interpreted as a physically well-defined part of the total transport current I, which is flowing over a small depth close to the surface. Thus, on the scale of an ordinary sample, this part of the transport current is superficial, the remaining part I-I c being uniformly distributed over the cross section. Coherently, an analysis of the dissipation in such samples predicts that the part VI c of the total Joule effect VI must arise as surface heat sources, while the Joule effect V(I-I c ), usually associated with the steady viscous flow of vortices, is uniformly distributed in the bulk. As a proof, we present a method, using second-sound acoustics, to detect and separate surface and volume heat sources. Experimental results give clear evidence of a surface Joule effect, and support the validity of our model of surface pinning in soft materials

  11. Role of Electronic Structure In Ion Band State Theory of Low Energy Nuclear Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Scott

    2004-03-01

    The Nuts and Bolts of our Ion Band State (IBS) theory of low energy nuclear reactions (LENR's) in palladium-deuteride (PdD) and palladium-hydride (PdH) are the electrons that hold together or tear apart the bonds (or lack of bonds) between deuterons (d's) or protons (p's) and the host material. In PdDx and PdH_x, this bonding is strongly correlated with loading: in ambient loading conditions (x< 0. 6), the bonding in hibits IBS occupation. As x arrow 1, slight increases and decreases in loading can lead to vibrations (which have conventionally been thought to occur from phonons) that can induce potential losses or increases of p/d. Naive assumptions about phonons fail to include these losses and increases. These effects can occur because neither H or D has core electrons and because in either PdD or PdH, the electrons near the Fermi Energy have negligible overlap with the nucleus of either D or H. I use these ideas to develop a formal justification, based on a generalization of conventional band theory (Scott Chubb, "Semi-Classical Conduction of Charged and Neutral Particles in Finite Lattices," 2004 March Meeting."), for the idea that occupation of IBS's can occur and that this can lead to nuclear reactions.

  12. Dynamic state estimation based on Poisson spike trains—towards a theory of optimal encoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susemihl, Alex; Opper, Manfred; Meir, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Neurons in the nervous system convey information to higher brain regions by the generation of spike trains. An important question in the field of computational neuroscience is how these sensory neurons encode environmental information in a way which may be simply analyzed by subsequent systems. Many aspects of the form and function of the nervous system have been understood using the concepts of optimal population coding. Most studies, however, have neglected the aspect of temporal coding. Here we address this shortcoming through a filtering theory of inhomogeneous Poisson processes. We derive exact relations for the minimal mean squared error of the optimal Bayesian filter and, by optimizing the encoder, obtain optimal codes for populations of neurons. We also show that a class of non-Markovian, smooth stimuli are amenable to the same treatment, and provide results for the filtering and prediction error which hold for a general class of stochastic processes. This sets a sound mathematical framework for a population coding theory that takes temporal aspects into account. It also formalizes a number of studies which discussed temporal aspects of coding using time-window paradigms, by stating them in terms of correlation times and firing rates. We propose that this kind of analysis allows for a systematic study of temporal coding and will bring further insights into the nature of the neural code. (paper)

  13. Theory of steady state plasma flow and confinement in a periodic magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.G.

    1981-02-01

    The steady flow of plasmas through spatially periodic magnetic fields is examined, and a theoretical model is developed for the case of axisymmetric geometry. The externally applied magnetic fields can be cusps or mirrors joined end to end; electrons are then localised by these fields because of their small Larmor radius, while the ions can traverse the magnetic mirrors. The properties of the model equations are studied and dimensionless parameters which appear are interpreted. Numerical methods used in steady flow applications are reviewed, and some techniques of solution for the model equations are discussed. A solution method involving numerical integration of time-dependent equations is described, which approaches the steady state asymptotically; results from this method are presented and compared with the results from perturbation theory. (author)

  14. Exact spinor-scalar bound states in a quantum field theory with scalar interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shpytko, Volodymyr; Darewych, Jurij

    2001-01-01

    We study two-particle systems in a model quantum field theory in which scalar particles and spinor particles interact via a mediating scalar field. The Lagrangian of the model is reformulated by using covariant Green's functions to solve for the mediating field in terms of the particle fields. This results in a Hamiltonian in which the mediating-field propagator appears directly in the interaction term. It is shown that exact two-particle eigenstates of the Hamiltonian can be determined. The resulting relativistic fermion-boson equation is shown to have Dirac and Klein-Gordon one-particle limits. Analytical solutions for the bound state energy spectrum are obtained for the case of massless mediating fields

  15. Theory and state-of-the-art technology of software reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzudo, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Norio

    1999-11-01

    Since FY 1997 , the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been conducting a project , Study on Reliability of Digital I and C Systems. As part of the project , the methodologies and tools to improve software reliability were reviewed in order to examine the theory and the state-of-the-art technology in this field. It is surmised, as results from the review, that computerized software design and implementation tool (CASE tool), algebraic analysis to ensure the consistency between software requirement framework and its detailed design specification, and efficient test method using the internal information of the software (white-box test) at the validation phase just before the completion of the development will play a key role to enhance software reliability in the future. (author)

  16. Density of states calculations and multiple-scattering theory for photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, A.

    1994-05-01

    The density of states for a finite or an infinite cluster of scatterers in the case of both, electrons and photons, can be represented in a general form as the sum over all Krein-Friedel contributions of individual scatterers and a contribution due to the presence of multiple scatterers. The latter is given by the sum over all periodic orbits between different scatterers. General three dimensional multiple-scattering theory for electromagnetic waves in the presence of scatterers of arbitrary shape is presented. Vector structure constants are calculated and general rules for obtaining them from known scalar structure constants are given. The KKR equations for photons are explicitly written down. (author). 22 refs., 2 figs

  17. Surface hopping, transition state theory, and decoherence. II. Thermal rate constants and detailed balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Amber; Subotnik, Joseph E., E-mail: subotnik@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, 231 South 34th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    We investigate a simple approach to compute a non-adiabatic thermal rate constant using the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) dynamics. We study the effects of both decoherence (using our augmented-FSSH (A-FSSH) algorithm) and forbidden hops over a large range of parameters, including high and low friction regimes, and weak and strong electronic coupling regimes. Furthermore, when possible, we benchmark our results against exact hierarchy equations of motion results, where we usually find a maximum error of roughly a factor of two (at reasonably large temperatures). In agreement with Hammes-Schiffer and Tully, we find that a merger of transition state theory and surface hopping can be both accurate and efficient when performed correctly. We further show that detailed balance is followed approximately by A-FSSH dynamics.

  18. The Influence of Preprocessing Steps on Graph Theory Measures Derived from Resting State fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargouri, Fatma; Kallel, Fathi; Delphine, Sebastien; Ben Hamida, Ahmed; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Valabregue, Romain

    2018-01-01

    Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) is an imaging technique that allows the spontaneous activity of the brain to be measured. Measures of functional connectivity highly depend on the quality of the BOLD signal data processing. In this study, our aim was to study the influence of preprocessing steps and their order of application on small-world topology and their efficiency in resting state fMRI data analysis using graph theory. We applied the most standard preprocessing steps: slice-timing, realign, smoothing, filtering, and the tCompCor method. In particular, we were interested in how preprocessing can retain the small-world economic properties and how to maximize the local and global efficiency of a network while minimizing the cost. Tests that we conducted in 54 healthy subjects showed that the choice and ordering of preprocessing steps impacted the graph measures. We found that the csr (where we applied realignment, smoothing, and tCompCor as a final step) and the scr (where we applied realignment, tCompCor and smoothing as a final step) strategies had the highest mean values of global efficiency (eg) . Furthermore, we found that the fscr strategy (where we applied realignment, tCompCor, smoothing, and filtering as a final step), had the highest mean local efficiency (el) values. These results confirm that the graph theory measures of functional connectivity depend on the ordering of the processing steps, with the best results being obtained using smoothing and tCompCor as the final steps for global efficiency with additional filtering for local efficiency.

  19. Equation of state for sub-stoichiometric urania using significant structures theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    The Significant Structures Theory (SST) by Eyring was successfully used to predict the equation of state in the liquid range for a variety of materials, including UO 2 . However, all these applications assumed that the liquid evaporates congruently i.e. the composition of the vapor phase is identical to that of the condensed phase. In this paper, an attempt is made to apply SST to non-congruently evaporating materials, using hypo-stoichiometric urania as an example. To this end, additional hypotheses to those of the original SST must be made. In the SST, it is assumed that the partition function of the liquid can be expressed by suitably combining that of 'solidlike molecules', and of 'gaslike molecules'. In the present work, starting from the fact that non-stoichiometry of solid urania is connected with lattice defects (e.g. oxygen interstitials or oxygen vacancies), it is assumed that a simple oxygen defect model can be extrapolated into the liquid state. Thus, the solidlike partition function includes a defect term, which determines the O/U; the defect concentration depends on the absolute activity of oxygen. The gaslike partition function allows for UO(g) and UO 2 (g), the ratio depending also on the oxygen activity. The parameters of the theory are selected such as to obtain agreement with experimental data at the melting point. The physical requirement that the difference between liquid and gas disappears at the critical temperature necessitates an adjustment of the solidlike partition function at high temperatures. (orig.) [de

  20. The Influence of Preprocessing Steps on Graph Theory Measures Derived from Resting State fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Gargouri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI is an imaging technique that allows the spontaneous activity of the brain to be measured. Measures of functional connectivity highly depend on the quality of the BOLD signal data processing. In this study, our aim was to study the influence of preprocessing steps and their order of application on small-world topology and their efficiency in resting state fMRI data analysis using graph theory. We applied the most standard preprocessing steps: slice-timing, realign, smoothing, filtering, and the tCompCor method. In particular, we were interested in how preprocessing can retain the small-world economic properties and how to maximize the local and global efficiency of a network while minimizing the cost. Tests that we conducted in 54 healthy subjects showed that the choice and ordering of preprocessing steps impacted the graph measures. We found that the csr (where we applied realignment, smoothing, and tCompCor as a final step and the scr (where we applied realignment, tCompCor and smoothing as a final step strategies had the highest mean values of global efficiency (eg. Furthermore, we found that the fscr strategy (where we applied realignment, tCompCor, smoothing, and filtering as a final step, had the highest mean local efficiency (el values. These results confirm that the graph theory measures of functional connectivity depend on the ordering of the processing steps, with the best results being obtained using smoothing and tCompCor as the final steps for global efficiency with additional filtering for local efficiency.

  1. The Influence of Preprocessing Steps on Graph Theory Measures Derived from Resting State fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargouri, Fatma; Kallel, Fathi; Delphine, Sebastien; Ben Hamida, Ahmed; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Valabregue, Romain

    2018-01-01

    Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) is an imaging technique that allows the spontaneous activity of the brain to be measured. Measures of functional connectivity highly depend on the quality of the BOLD signal data processing. In this study, our aim was to study the influence of preprocessing steps and their order of application on small-world topology and their efficiency in resting state fMRI data analysis using graph theory. We applied the most standard preprocessing steps: slice-timing, realign, smoothing, filtering, and the tCompCor method. In particular, we were interested in how preprocessing can retain the small-world economic properties and how to maximize the local and global efficiency of a network while minimizing the cost. Tests that we conducted in 54 healthy subjects showed that the choice and ordering of preprocessing steps impacted the graph measures. We found that the csr (where we applied realignment, smoothing, and tCompCor as a final step) and the scr (where we applied realignment, tCompCor and smoothing as a final step) strategies had the highest mean values of global efficiency (eg). Furthermore, we found that the fscr strategy (where we applied realignment, tCompCor, smoothing, and filtering as a final step), had the highest mean local efficiency (el) values. These results confirm that the graph theory measures of functional connectivity depend on the ordering of the processing steps, with the best results being obtained using smoothing and tCompCor as the final steps for global efficiency with additional filtering for local efficiency. PMID:29497372

  2. On selection rules and inelastic electron scattering at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuroh, K.

    1986-12-01

    Correlation effects are included in the Bethe-Born theory for the generalized oscillator strength of inelastic scattering of electrons on atoms. The formulation is such as to allow for the calculation of relative line strengths of multiplets. It is used to analyze line strengths of the 4d → 4f transition in La 3+ and Ce 4+ within LS-coupling. The analysis indicates that only singlet states of the intermediate 4d 9 4f configuration are allowed. Calculated line strengths are compared with a recent core electron energy loss spectra of metallic La and tetravalent CeO 2 and there is an overall qualitative agreement between theory and experiment. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs, 2 tabs

  3. Quantifying confidence in density functional theory predictions of magnetic ground states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houchins, Gregory; Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian

    2017-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) simulations, at the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) level, are being routinely used for material discovery based on high-throughput descriptor-based searches. The success of descriptor-based material design relies on eliminating bad candidates and keeping good candidates for further investigation. While DFT has been widely successfully for the former, oftentimes good candidates are lost due to the uncertainty associated with the DFT-predicted material properties. Uncertainty associated with DFT predictions has gained prominence and has led to the development of exchange correlation functionals that have built-in error estimation capability. In this work, we demonstrate the use of built-in error estimation capabilities within the BEEF-vdW exchange correlation functional for quantifying the uncertainty associated with the magnetic ground state of solids. We demonstrate this approach by calculating the uncertainty estimate for the energy difference between the different magnetic states of solids and compare them against a range of GGA exchange correlation functionals as is done in many first-principles calculations of materials. We show that this estimate reasonably bounds the range of values obtained with the different GGA functionals. The estimate is determined as a postprocessing step and thus provides a computationally robust and systematic approach to estimating uncertainty associated with predictions of magnetic ground states. We define a confidence value (c-value) that incorporates all calculated magnetic states in order to quantify the concurrence of the prediction at the GGA level and argue that predictions of magnetic ground states from GGA level DFT is incomplete without an accompanying c-value. We demonstrate the utility of this method using a case study of Li-ion and Na-ion cathode materials and the c-value metric correctly identifies that GGA-level DFT will have low predictability for NaFePO4F . Further, there

  4. Electronically excited and ionized states in condensed phase: Theory and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadybekov, Arman

    Predictive modeling of chemical processes in silico is a goal of XXI century. While robust and accurate methods exist for ground-state properties, reliable methods for excited states are still lacking and require further development. Electronically exited states are formed by interactions of matter with light and are responsible for key processes in solar energy harvesting, vision, artificial sensors, and photovoltaic applications. The greatest challenge to overcome on our way to a quantitative description of light-induced processes is accurate inclusion of the effect of the environment on excited states. All above mentioned processes occur in solution or solid state. Yet, there are few methodologies to study excited states in condensed phase. Application of highly accurate and robust methods, such as equation-of-motion coupled-cluster theory EOM-CC, is limited by a high computational cost and scaling precluding full quantum mechanical treatment of the entire system. In this thesis we present successful application of the EOM-CC family of methods to studies of excited states in liquid phase and build hierarchy of models for inclusion of the solvent effects. In the first part of the thesis we show that a simple gasphase model is sufficient to quantitatively analyze excited states in liquid benzene, while the latter part emphasizes the importance of explicit treatment of the solvent molecules in the case of glycine in water solution. In chapter 2, we use a simple dimer model to describe exciton formation in liquid and solid benzene. We show that sampling of dimer structures extracted from the liquid benzene is sufficient to correctly predict exited-state properties of the liquid. Our calculations explain experimentally observed features, which helped to understand the mechanism of the excimer formation in liquid benzene. Furthermore, we shed light on the difference between dimer configurations in the first solvation shell of liquid benzene and in unit cell of solid

  5. Identifying patients with Alzheimer's disease using resting-state fMRI and graph theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaee, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Ata; Babajani-Feremi, Abbas

    2015-11-01

    Study of brain network on the basis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has provided promising results to investigate changes in connectivity among different brain regions because of diseases. Graph theory can efficiently characterize different aspects of the brain network by calculating measures of integration and segregation. In this study, we combine graph theoretical approaches with advanced machine learning methods to study functional brain network alteration in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Support vector machine (SVM) was used to explore the ability of graph measures in diagnosis of AD. We applied our method on the resting-state fMRI data of twenty patients with AD and twenty age and gender matched healthy subjects. The data were preprocessed and each subject's graph was constructed by parcellation of the whole brain into 90 distinct regions using the automated anatomical labeling (AAL) atlas. The graph measures were then calculated and used as the discriminating features. Extracted network-based features were fed to different feature selection algorithms to choose most significant features. In addition to the machine learning approach, statistical analysis was performed on connectivity matrices to find altered connectivity patterns in patients with AD. Using the selected features, we were able to accurately classify patients with AD from healthy subjects with accuracy of 100%. Results of this study show that pattern recognition and graph of brain network, on the basis of the resting state fMRI data, can efficiently assist in the diagnosis of AD. Classification based on the resting-state fMRI can be used as a non-invasive and automatic tool to diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. All rights reserved.

  6. Mother and Infant Talk about Mental States: Systemic Emergence of Psychological Lexicon and Theory of Mind Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollo, D.; Buttiglieri, F.

    In recent years, a number of studies that have examined how social experiences are related to children's theory of mind development, have found that: (1) the frequency of mothers' mental state utterances used in mother-child picture-book reading, is correlated with children's theory of mind abilities; (2) mothers' use of cognitive terms is related more strongly to children's theory of mind performances than the mothers' references to other mental states, such as desires or emotions (Adrian, Clemente, Villanueva, Rieffe, 2005; Ruffman, Slade, Crowe, 2002; Taumoepeau, Ruffman, 2006; Dunn, 2002). Despite the evidence for the role of mothers' language, there is disagreement over how exactly it improves children's theory of mind development. In short, mentalistic comments contain distinctive words, grammatical constructions and pragmatic features. The question is, however, which factor is critical (de Rosnay, Pons, Harris, Morrell, 2004). The present study addresses this issue and focuses on relationship between mothers' mental state terms and children's performances in theory of mind tasks (emotion understanding and false belief tasks). Mothers were asked to read some pictures to 10 children between 3;0 and 5;0. Among the different mental state references (perceptual, emotional, volitional, cognitive, moral and communicative), it was found that the frequency and variety of mothers' mental state words were significantly associated with children's mental lexicon. In addition, emotional terms correlated positively with children's false belief performance. Kind of emotional words that are used by the mothers with reference to the Italian language will be discussed.

  7. State of the evidence regarding behavior change theories and strategies in nutrition counseling to facilitate health and food behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahn, Joanne M; Reeves, Rebecca S; Keim, Kathryn S; Laquatra, Ida; Kellogg, Molly; Jortberg, Bonnie; Clark, Nicole A

    2010-06-01

    Behavior change theories and models, validated within the field of dietetics, offer systematic explanations for nutrition-related behavior change. They are integral to the nutrition care process, guiding nutrition assessment, intervention, and outcome evaluation. The American Dietetic Association Evidence Analysis Library Nutrition Counseling Workgroup conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature related to behavior change theories and strategies used in nutrition counseling. Two hundred fourteen articles were reviewed between July 2007 and March 2008, and 87 studies met the inclusion criteria. The workgroup systematically evaluated these articles and formulated conclusion statements and grades based upon the available evidence. Strong evidence exists to support the use of a combination of behavioral theory and cognitive behavioral theory, the foundation for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), in facilitating modification of targeted dietary habits, weight, and cardiovascular and diabetes risk factors. Evidence is particularly strong in patients with type 2 diabetes receiving intensive, intermediate-duration (6 to 12 months) CBT, and long-term (>12 months duration) CBT targeting prevention or delay in onset of type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Few studies have assessed the application of the transtheoretical model on nutrition-related behavior change. Little research was available documenting the effectiveness of nutrition counseling utilizing social cognitive theory. Motivational interviewing was shown to be a highly effective counseling strategy, particularly when combined with CBT. Strong evidence substantiates the effectiveness of self-monitoring and meal replacements and/or structured meal plans. Compelling evidence exists to demonstrate that financial reward strategies are not effective. Goal setting, problem solving, and social support are effective strategies, but additional research is needed in more diverse populations. Routine documentation

  8. Formation, structure, and stability of MHD intermediate shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    Contrary to the usual belief that MHD intermediate shocks are extraneous, the author has recently shown by numerical solutions of dissipative MHD equations that intermediate shocks are admissible and can be formed through nonlinear wave steepening from continuous waves. In this paper, the formation, structure and stability of intermediate shocks in dissipative MHD are considered in detail. The differences between the conventional theory and his are pointed out and clarified. He shows that all four types of intermediate shocks can be formed from smooth waves. He also shows that there are free parameters in the structure of the intermediate shocks, and that these parameters are related to the shock stability. In addition, he shows that a rotational discontinuity can not exist with finite width, indicate how this is related to the existence of time-dependent intermediate shocks, and show why the conventional theory is not a good approximation to dissipative MHD solutions whenever there is rotation in magnetic field

  9. A Cross-Cultural Assessment of Three Theories of Pro-Environmental Behavior: A Comparison between Business Students of Chile and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordano, Mark; Welcomer, Stephanie; Scherer, Robert F.; Pradenas, Lorena; Parada, Victor

    2011-01-01

    We surveyed business students in the United States (n = 256) and Chile (n = 310) to compare three theories of pro-environmental behavior.We examined Ajzen and Fishbein's theory of reasoned action, Schawartz's norm activation theory, and the values-beliefs-norms theory created by Stern, Dietz, Abel, Guagnano, and Kalof. We produced reliable…

  10. An investigation of one- versus two-dimensional semiclassical transition state theory for H atom abstraction and exchange reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Samuel M; Shan, Xiao; Clary, David C

    2016-02-28

    We investigate which terms in Reduced-Dimensionality Semiclassical Transition State Theory (RD SCTST) contribute most significantly in rate constant calculations of hydrogen extraction and exchange reactions of hydrocarbons. We also investigate the importance of deep tunneling corrections to the theory. In addition, we introduce a novel formulation of the theory in Jacobi coordinates. For the reactions of H atoms with methane, ethane, and cyclopropane, we find that a one-dimensional (1-D) version of the theory without deep tunneling corrections compares well with 2-D SCTST results and accurate quantum scattering results. For the "heavy-light-heavy" H atom exchange reaction between CH3 and CH4, deep tunneling corrections are needed to yield 1-D results that compare well with 2-D results. The finding that accurate rate constants can be obtained from derivatives of the potential along only one dimension further validates RD SCTST as a computationally efficient yet accurate rate constant theory.

  11. THE ROLE OF THE STATE IN ADAM SMITH’S THOUGHT SYSTEM AND MODERN PUBLIC FINANCE THEORY: A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan YAY

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available What are the main functions of the state? Which functions must be fulfilled by the state, which functions must be not? How should the state fulfill these responsibilities? What must be the main principles of the state, related to public expenditures, taxation and debt policies? In this paper, the place of the role and functions of the state in Adam Smith’s thought system will be discussed. In this context, especially the related parts of the Wealth of Nations and Lectures on Jurisprudence will be focused on and evaluated in the light of contemporary public finance theory

  12. Evidence of oxygen vacancy and possible intermediate gap state in layered α-MoO{sub 3} single-crystal nanobelts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.Z., E-mail: tcccz@shu.edu.cn; Li, Y.; Tang, X.D.

    2016-01-15

    Multilayered meso-structured MoO{sub 3} nanobelts have been synthesized by thermally oxidizing a molybdenum chip in a reduced oxygen atmosphere, with a view to disclosing the existence of oxygen vacancy and understanding the mechanism behind the influence of oxygen vacancy on the electronic structure of molybdenum oxides. Based on the measurements from X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), it is found that the as-grown sample is single-crystal α-MoO{sub 3} with a (001) preferred orientation, which shows an irregular belt-like morphology being composed of some ~20 nm single-crystal thin layers. The present sample includes a lot of oxygen vacancies in the lattice, as evidenced by the considerably reduced coordination number of the central Mo atoms from X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) as well as the red shift of the main Raman peaks. The existence of the oxygen vacancies are further tested by the photoluminescence (PL) results as the main emission peak shows an obvious red shift with the corresponding optical band gap reduced to 2.3 eV. Very importantly, an extra emission positioned at 738 nm (1.68 eV) is believed to originate from the recombination of the electrons from the intermediate band (IB) to the valence band (VB), and the formation of the IB in the gap is also caused by oxygen-ion vacancies.

  13. [Therapy of intermediate uveitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doycheva, D; Deuter, C; Zierhut, M

    2014-12-01

    Intermediate uveitis is a form of intraocular inflammation in which the vitreous body is the major site of inflammation. Intermediate uveitis is primarily treated medicinally and systemic corticosteroids are the mainstay of therapy. When recurrence of uveitis or side effects occur during corticosteroid therapy an immunosuppressive treatment is required. Cyclosporine A is the only immunosuppressive agent that is approved for therapy of uveitis in Germany; however, other immunosuppressive drugs have also been shown to be effective and well-tolerated in patients with intermediate uveitis. In severe therapy-refractory cases when conventional immunosuppressive therapy has failed, biologics can be used. In patients with unilateral uveitis or when the systemic therapy is contraindicated because of side effects, an intravitreal steroid treatment can be carried out. In certain cases a vitrectomy may be used.

  14. A harmonic transition state theory model for defect initiation in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delph, T J; Cao, P; Park, H S; Zimmerman, J A

    2013-01-01

    We outline here a model for the initiation of defects in crystals based upon harmonic transition state theory (hTST). This model combines a previously developed model for zero-temperature defect initiation with a multi-dimensional hTST model that is capable of accurately predicting the effects of temperature and loading rate upon defect initiation. The model has several features that set it apart from previous efforts along these lines, most notably a straightforward method of determining the energy barrier between adjacent equilibrium states that does not depend upon a priori information concerning the nature of the defect. We apply the model to two examples, triaxial stretching of a perfect fcc crystal and nanoindentation of a gold substrate. Very good agreement is found between the predictions of the model and independent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Among other things, the model predicts a strong dependence of the defect initiation behavior upon the loading parameter. A very attractive feature of this model is that it is valid for arbitrarily slow loading rates, in particular loading rates achievable in the laboratory, and suffers from none of the limitations in this regard inherent in MD simulations. (paper)

  15. Predicting behavioural responses to novel organisms: state-dependent detection theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sih, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Human activity alters natural habitats for many species. Understanding variation in animals' behavioural responses to these changing environments is critical. We show how signal detection theory can be used within a wider framework of state-dependent modelling to predict behavioural responses to a major environmental change: novel, exotic species. We allow thresholds for action to be a function of reserves, and demonstrate how optimal thresholds can be calculated. We term this framework ‘state-dependent detection theory’ (SDDT). We focus on behavioural and fitness outcomes when animals continue to use formerly adaptive thresholds following environmental change. In a simple example, we show that exposure to novel animals which appear dangerous—but are actually safe—(e.g. ecotourists) can have catastrophic consequences for ‘prey’ (organisms that respond as if the new organisms are predators), significantly increasing mortality even when the novel species is not predatory. SDDT also reveals that the effect on reproduction can be greater than the effect on lifespan. We investigate factors that influence the effect of novel organisms, and address the potential for behavioural adjustments (via evolution or learning) to recover otherwise reduced fitness. Although effects of environmental change are often difficult to predict, we suggest that SDDT provides a useful route ahead. PMID:28100814

  16. Hartree–Fock many-body perturbation theory for nuclear ground-states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Tichai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the order-by-order convergence behavior of many-body perturbation theory (MBPT as a simple and efficient tool to approximate the ground-state energy of closed-shell nuclei. To address the convergence properties directly, we explore perturbative corrections up to 30th order and highlight the role of the partitioning for convergence. The use of a simple Hartree–Fock solution for the unperturbed basis leads to a convergent MBPT series for soft interactions, in contrast to the divergent MBPT series obtained with a harmonic oscillator basis. For larger model spaces and heavier nuclei, where a direct high-order MBPT calculation is not feasible, we perform third-order calculations and compare to advanced ab initio coupled-cluster results for the same interactions and model spaces. We demonstrate that third-order MBPT provides ground-state energies for nuclei up into the tin isotopic chain in excellent agreement with the best available coupled-cluster calculations at a fraction of the computational cost.

  17. Hartree–Fock many-body perturbation theory for nuclear ground-states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tichai, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.tichai@physik.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Langhammer, Joachim [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Binder, Sven [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Roth, Robert, E-mail: robert.roth@physik.tu-darmstadt.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Technische Universität Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-05-10

    We investigate the order-by-order convergence behavior of many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) as a simple and efficient tool to approximate the ground-state energy of closed-shell nuclei. To address the convergence properties directly, we explore perturbative corrections up to 30th order and highlight the role of the partitioning for convergence. The use of a simple Hartree–Fock solution for the unperturbed basis leads to a convergent MBPT series for soft interactions, in contrast to the divergent MBPT series obtained with a harmonic oscillator basis. For larger model spaces and heavier nuclei, where a direct high-order MBPT calculation is not feasible, we perform third-order calculations and compare to advanced ab initio coupled-cluster results for the same interactions and model spaces. We demonstrate that third-order MBPT provides ground-state energies for nuclei up into the tin isotopic chain in excellent agreement with the best available coupled-cluster calculations at a fraction of the computational cost.

  18. Variational theory of valence fluctuations: Ground states and quasiparticle excitations of the Anderson lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandow, B. H.

    1986-01-01

    A variational study of ground states of the orbitally nondegenerate Anderson lattice model, using a wave function with one variational parameter per Bloch state k, has been extended to deal with essentially metallic systems having a nonintegral number of electrons per site. Quasiparticle excitations are obtained by direct appeal to Landau's original definition for interacting Fermi liquids, scrEqp(k,σ)=δEtotal/δn qp(k,σ). This approach provides a simple and explicit realization of the Luttinger picture of a periodic Fermi liquid. A close correspondence is maintained between the ``interacting'' (U=∞) system and the corresponding ``noninteracting'' (U=0) case, i.e., ordinary band theory; the result can be described as a renormalized band or renormalized hybridization theory. The occupation-number distribution for the conduction orbitals displays a finite discontinuity at the Fermi surface. If the d-f hybridization is nonzero throughout the Brillouin zone, the quasiparticle spectrum will always exhibit a gap, although this gap becomes exponentially small (i.e., of order TK) in the Kondo-lattice regime. In the ``ionic'' case with precisely two electrons per site, such a system may therefore exhibit an insulating (semiconducting) gap. The quasiparticle state density exhibits a prominent spike on each side of the spectral gap, just as in the elementary hybridization model (the U=0 case). For the metallic case, with a nonintegral number of electrons per site, the Fermi level falls within one of the two sharp density peaks. The effective mass at the Fermi surface tends to be very large; enhancements by a factor >~102 are quite feasible. The foregoing variational theory has also been refined by means of a trial wave function having two variational parameters per Bloch state k. The above qualitative features are all retained, with some quantitative differences, but there are also some qualitatively new features. The most interesting of these is the appearance, within

  19. Mobile communication and intermediality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    communicative affordances of mobile devices in order to understand how people choose between them for different purposes. It is argued that mobile communication makes intermediality especially central, as the choice of medium is detached from the location of stationary media and begins to follow the user across......The article argues the importance of intermediality as a concept for research in mobile communication and media. The constant availability of several, partially overlapping channels for communication (texting, calls, email, Facebook, etc.) requires that we adopt an integrated view of the various...

  20. Money distribution with intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Teles, Caio Augusto Colnago

    2013-01-01

    This pap er analyzes the distribution of money holdings in a commo dity money search-based mo del with intermediation. Intro ducing heterogeneity of costs to the Kiyotaki e Wright ( 1989 ) mo del, Cavalcanti e Puzzello ( 2010) gives rise to a non-degenerated distribution of money. We extend further this mo del intro ducing intermediation in the trading pro cess. We show that the distribution of money matters for savings decisions. This gives rises to a xed p oint problem for the ...

  1. Intramolecular charge transfer of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile probed by time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption: No evidence for two ICT states and a πσ* reaction intermediate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariasse, Klaas A.; Druzhinin, Sergey I.; Senyushkina, Tamara; Kovalenko, Sergey A.

    2009-01-01

    For the double exponential fluorescence decays of the locally excited (LE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) in acetonitrile (MeCN) the same times τ 1 and τ 2 are observed. This means that the reversible LE ICT reaction, starting from the initially excited LE state, can be adequately described by a two state mechanism. The most important factor responsible for the sometimes experimentally observed differences in the nanosecond decay time, with τ 1 (LE) 1 (ICT), is photoproduct formation. By employing a global analysis of the LE and ICT fluorescence response functions with a time resolution of 0.5 ps/channel in 1200 channels reliable kinetic and thermodynamic data can be obtained. The arguments presented in the literature in favor of a πσ* state with a bent CN group as an intermediate in the ICT reaction of DMABN are discussed. From the appearance of an excited state absorption (ESA) band in the spectral region between 700 and 800 nm in MeCN for N,N-dimethylanilines with CN, Br, F, CF 3 , and C(=O)OC 2 H 2 p-substituents, it is concluded that this ESA band cannot be attributed to a πσ * state, as only the C-C≡N group can undergo the required 120 deg. bending.

  2. Solid state NMR, basic theory and recent progress for quadrupole nuclei with half-integer spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieter, F.

    1998-01-01

    This review describes the basic theory and some recently developed techniques for the study of quadrupole nuclei with half integer spins in powder materials. The latter is connected to the introduction of the double rotation (DOR) by A. Samoson et al. (1) and to the introduction of the multiple quantum magic-angle spinning (MQ MAS) technique by L. Frydman et. al. (2). For integer spins, especially the solid-state deuterium magnetic resonance, we refer to the review of G.L. Hoatson and R.L. Vold: '' 2 H-NMR Spectroscopy of Solids and Liquid Crystals'' (3). For single crystals we refer to O. Kanert and M. Mehring: ''Static quadrupole effects in disordered cubic solids''(4) and we would like also to mention the ''classic'' review of M.H. Cohen and F. Reif: ''Quadrupole effects in NMR studies of solids'' (5). Some more recent reviews in the field under study are D. Freude and J. Haase ''Quadrupole effects in solid-state NMR'' (6). Ch. Jager: ''Satellite Transition Spectroscopy of Quadrupolar Nuclei'' (7) and B.F. Chmelka and J.W. Zwanziger: ''Solid State NMR Line Narrowing Methods for Quadrupolar Nuclei - Double Rotation and Dynamic-Angle Spinning'' (8). A survey of nuclear quadrupole frequency data published before the end of 1982 is given by H. Chihara and N. Nakamura in Landolt-Bornstein, Vol. 20 (9). Values of the chemical shift of quadrupole nuclei in solids can be found in books such as ''Multinuclear NMR'' edited by J. Mason (10). In section 9 of ref (6) some electric field gradient and chemical shift data published from 1983 to 1992 for the most studied quadrupole nuclei sup 27 Al, sup 23 Na, and sup 17 O are given

  3. ((F, D1), D3) bound state, S-duality and noncommutative open string/Yang-Mills theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, J.X.; Roy, S.; Singh, H.

    2000-01-01

    We study decoupling limits and S-dualities for noncommutative open string/Yang-Mills theory in a gravity setup by considering an SL(2,Z) invariant supergravity solution of the form ((F, D1), D3) bound state of type IIB string theory. This configuration can be regarded as D3-branes with both electric and magnetic fields turned on along one of the spatial directions of the brane and preserves half of the space-time supersymmetries of the string theory. Our study indicates that there exists a decoupling limit for which the resulting theory is an open string theory defined in a geometry with noncommutativity in both space-time and space-space directions. We study S-duality of this noncommutative open string (NCOS) and find that the same decoupling limit in the S-dual description gives rise to a space-space noncommutative Yang-Mills theory (NCYM). We also discuss independently the decoupling limit for NCYM in this D3 brane background. Here we find that S-duality of NCYM theory does not always give a NCOS theory. Instead, it can give an ordinary Yang-Mills with a singular metric and an infinitely large coupling. We also find that the open string coupling relation between the two S-duality related theories is modified such that S-duality of a strongly coupled open-string/Yang-Mills theory does not necessarily give a weakly coupled theory. The relevant gravity dual descriptions of NCOS/NCYM are also given. (author)

  4. Financial Intermediation and the Nigerian Economy: A Time Series ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and cointegration analysis based on Engle Granger cointegration theory and error correction methodology, we tested both short and long run relationships between financial intermediation and economic growth in Nigeria. The result revealed that a long–run relationship exists between financial intermediation and growth ...

  5. Theory of novel normal and superconducting states in doped oxide high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhumanov, S.

    2001-10-01

    A consistent and complete theory of the novel normal and superconducting (SC) states of doped high-T c superconductors (HTSC) is developed by combining the continuum model of carrier self-trapping, the tight-binding model and the novel Fermi-Bose-liquid (FBL) model. The ground-state energy of carriers in lightly doped HTSC is calculated within the continuum model and adiabatic approximation using the variational method. The destruction of the long-range antiferromagnetic (AF) order at low doping x≥ x cl ≅0.015, the formation of the in-gap states or bands and novel (bi)polaronic insulating phases at x c2 ≅0.06-0.08, and the new metal- insulator transition at x≅x c2 in HTSC are studied within the continuum model of impurity (defect) centers and large (bi)polarons by using the appropriate tight-binding approximations. It is found that the three-dimensional (3d) large (bi)polarons are formed at ε ∞ /ε 0 ≤0.1 and become itinerant when the (bi)polaronic insulator-to-(bi)polaronic metal transitions occur at x x c2 . We show that the novel pseudogapped metallic and SC states in HTSC are formed at x c2 ≤x≤x p ≅0.20-0.24. We demonstrate that the large polaronic and small BCS-like pairing pseudogaps opening in the excitation spectrum of underdoped (x c2 BCS =0.125), optimally doped (x BCS o ≅0.20) and overdoped (x>x o ) HTSC above T c are unrelated to superconductivity and they are responsible for the observed anomalous optical, transport, magnetic and other properties of these HTSC. We develop the original two-stage FBL model of novel superconductivity describing the combined novel BCS-like pairing scenario of fermions and true superfluid (SF) condensation scenario of composite bosons (i.e. bipolarons and cooperons) in any Fermi-systems, where the SF condensate gap Δ B and the BCS-like pairing pseudogap Δ F have different origins. The pair and single particle condensations of attracting 3d and two- dimensional (2d) composite bosons are responsible for

  6. Generalized global symmetries in states with dynamical defects: The case of the transverse sound in field theory and holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Poovuttikul, Napat

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we show how states with conserved numbers of dynamical defects (strings, domain walls, etc.) can be understood as possessing generalized global symmetries even when the microscopic origins of these symmetries are unknown. Using this philosophy, we build an effective theory of a 2 +1 -dimensional fluid state with two perpendicular sets of immersed elastic line defects. When the number of defects is independently conserved in each set, then the state possesses two one-form symmetries. Normally, such viscoelastic states are described as fluids coupled to Goldstone bosons associated with spontaneous breaking of translational symmetry caused by the underlying microscopic structure—the principle feature of which is a transverse sound mode. At the linear, nondissipative level, we verify that our theory, based entirely on symmetry principles, is equivalent to a viscoelastic theory. We then build a simple holographic dual of such a state containing dynamical gravity and two two-form gauge fields, and use it to study its hydrodynamic and higher-energy spectral properties characterized by nonhydrodynamic, gapped modes. Based on the holographic analysis of transverse two-point functions, we study consistency between low-energy predictions of the bulk theory and the effective boundary theory. Various new features of the holographic dictionary are explained in theories with higher-form symmetries, such as the mixed-boundary-condition modification of the quasinormal mode prescription that depends on the running coupling of the boundary double-trace deformations. Furthermore, we examine details of low- and high-energy parts of the spectrum that depend on temperature, line defect densities and the renormalization group scale.

  7. Cord blood mesenchymal stem cells propel human dendritic cells to an intermediate maturation state and boost interleukin-12 production by mature dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk, L.C.J. van den; Roelofs, H.; Huijs, T.; Siebers-Vermeulen, K.G.C.; Raymakers, R.A.P.; Kogler, G.; Figdor, C.G.; Torensma, R.

    2009-01-01

    Pathogen-derived entities force the tissue-resident dendritic cells (DCs) towards a mature state, followed by migration to the draining lymph node to present antigens to T cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modulate the differentiation, maturation and function of DCs. In umbilical cord

  8. Simplifying biochemical models with intermediate species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    techniques, we study systematically the effects of intermediate, or transient, species in biochemical systems and provide a simple, yet rigorous mathematical classification of all models obtained from a core model by including intermediates. Main examples include enzymatic and post-translational modification...... systems, where intermediates often are considered insignificant and neglected in a model, or they are not included because we are unaware of their existence. All possible models obtained from the core model are classified into a finite number of classes. Each class is defined by a mathematically simple...... canonical model that characterizes crucial dynamical properties, such as mono- and multistationarity and stability of steady states, of all models in the class. We show that if the core model does not have conservation laws, then the introduction of intermediates does not change the steady...

  9. Detectable states, cycle fluxes, and motility scaling of molecular motor kinesin: An integrative kinetic graph theory analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jie

    2017-12-01

    The process by which a kinesin motor couples its ATPase activity with concerted mechanical hand-over-hand steps is a foremost topic of molecular motor physics. Two major routes toward elucidating kinesin mechanisms are the motility performance characterization of velocity and run length, and single-molecular state detection experiments. However, these two sets of experimental approaches are largely uncoupled to date. Here, we introduce an integrative motility state analysis based on a theorized kinetic graph theory for kinesin, which, on one hand, is validated by a wealth of accumulated motility data, and, on the other hand, allows for rigorous quantification of state occurrences and chemomechanical cycling probabilities. An interesting linear scaling for kinesin motility performance across species is discussed as well. An integrative kinetic graph theory analysis provides a powerful tool to bridge motility and state characterization experiments, so as to forge a unified effort for the elucidation of the working mechanisms of molecular motors.

  10. Local causal structures, Hadamard states and the principle of local covariance in quantum field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio [Erwin Schroedinger Institut fuer Mathematische Physik, Wien (Austria); Pinamonti, Nicola [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Porrmann, Martin [KwaZulu-Natal Univ. (South Africa). Quantum Research Group, School of Physics; National Institute for Theoretical Physics, Durban (South Africa)

    2010-01-15

    In the framework of the algebraic formulation, we discuss and analyse some new features of the local structure of a real scalar quantum field theory in a strongly causal spacetime. In particular we use the properties of the exponential map to set up a local version of a bulk-to-boundary correspondence. The bulk is a suitable subset of a geodesic neighbourhood of any but fixed point p of the underlying background, while the boundary is a part of the future light cone having p as its own tip. In this regime, we provide a novel notion for the extended *-algebra of Wick polynomials on the said cone and, on the one hand, we prove that it contains the information of the bulk counterpart via an injective *-homomorphism while, on the other hand, we associate to it a distinguished state whose pull-back in the bulk is of Hadamard form. The main advantage of this point of view arises if one uses the universal properties of the exponential map and of the light cone in order to show that, for any two given backgrounds M and M{sup '} and for any two subsets of geodesic neighbourhoods of two arbitrary points, it is possible to engineer the above procedure such that the boundary extended algebras are related via a restriction homomorphism. This allows for the pull-back of boundary states in both spacetimes and, thus, to set up a machinery which permits the comparison of expectation values of local field observables in M and M{sup '}. (orig.)

  11. Local causal structures, Hadamard states and the principle of local covariance in quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio; Pinamonti, Nicola

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of the algebraic formulation, we discuss and analyse some new features of the local structure of a real scalar quantum field theory in a strongly causal spacetime. In particular we use the properties of the exponential map to set up a local version of a bulk-to-boundary correspondence. The bulk is a suitable subset of a geodesic neighbourhood of any but fixed point p of the underlying background, while the boundary is a part of the future light cone having p as its own tip. In this regime, we provide a novel notion for the extended *-algebra of Wick polynomials on the said cone and, on the one hand, we prove that it contains the information of the bulk counterpart via an injective *-homomorphism while, on the other hand, we associate to it a distinguished state whose pull-back in the bulk is of Hadamard form. The main advantage of this point of view arises if one uses the universal properties of the exponential map and of the light cone in order to show that, for any two given backgrounds M and M ' and for any two subsets of geodesic neighbourhoods of two arbitrary points, it is possible to engineer the above procedure such that the boundary extended algebras are related via a restriction homomorphism. This allows for the pull-back of boundary states in both spacetimes and, thus, to set up a machinery which permits the comparison of expectation values of local field observables in M and M ' . (orig.)

  12. Adjoint sensitivity theory for steady-state ground-water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-11-01

    In this study, adjoint sensitivity theory is developed for equations of two-dimensional steady-state flow in a confined aquifer. Both the primary flow equation and the adjoint sensitivity equation are solved using the Galerkin finite element method. The developed computer code is used to investigate the regional flow parameters of the Leadville Formation of the Paradox Basin in Utah and the Wolcamp carbonate/sandstone aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin in the Texas Panhandle. Two performance measures are evaluated, local heads and velocity in the vicinity of potential high-level nuclear waste repositories. The results illustrate the sensitivity of calculated local heads to the boundary conditions. Local velocity-related performance measures are more sensitive to hydraulic conductivities. The uncertainty in the performance measure is a function of the parameter sensitivity, parameter variance and the correlation between parameters. Given a parameter covariance matrix, the uncertainty of the performance measure can be calculated. Although no results are presented here, the implications of uncertainty calculations for the two studies are discussed. 18 references, 25 figures

  13. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-15

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  14. Reallocation of water in the state of New Mexico based on cooperative game theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhi Rad, M.

    2011-12-01

    Water allocation models often aim to maximize net benefits in the river basin based on the water rights, thus there is no motivation to use water efficiently by the users with lower marginal value for water. Water markets not only could help increase the net benefits over the basin but also will encourage the stakeholders to save the water and use it in transfer markets and increase their income. This issue can be viewed as a game in which stakeholders can play non-cooperatively and try to increase their own benefits using the amount of water assigned to them or they could cooperate and make coalitions in order to increase the total benefits in the coalition and the whole basin. The aim of this study is to reallocate the water based on cooperation among different stakeholders, namely agricultural, municipal and industrial and environmental, in the Upper Rio Grande river basin in the state of New Mexico in order to increase efficiency, sustainability and equity of water distribution in the basin using different game theory schemes such as Nucleolus and the Shapley Value.

  15. Dynamical mean-field theory and path integral renormalisation group calculations of strongly correlated electronic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilmann, D.B.

    2007-02-01

    The two-plane HUBBARD model, which is a model for some electronic properties of undoped YBCO superconductors as well as displays a MOTT metal-to-insulator transition and a metal-to-band insulator transition, is studied within Dynamical Mean-Field Theory using HIRSCH-FYE Monte Carlo. In order to find the different transitions and distinguish the types of insulator, we calculate the single-particle spectral densities, the self-energies and the optical conductivities. We conclude that there is a continuous transition from MOTT to band insulator. In the second part, ground state properties of a diagonally disordered HUBBARD model is studied using a generalisation of Path Integral Renormalisation Group, a variational method which can also determine low-lying excitations. In particular, the distribution of antiferromagnetic properties is investigated. We conclude that antiferromagnetism breaks down in a percolation-type transition at a critical disorder, which is not changed appreciably by the inclusion of correlation effects, when compared to earlier studies. Electronic and excitation properties at the system sizes considered turn out to primarily depend on the geometry. (orig.)

  16. Theory of steady-state plane tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyuregyan, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of band-to-band and trap-assisted tunneling on the properties of steady-state plane ionization waves in p + -n-n + structures is theoretically analyzed. It is shown that such tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves do not differ in a qualitative sense from ordinary impact ionization waves propagating due to the avalanche multiplication of uniformly distributed seed electrons and holes. The quantitative differences of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves from impact ionization waves are reduced to a slightly different relation between the wave velocity u and the maximum field strength E M at the front. It is shown that disregarding impact ionization does not exclude the possibility of the existence of tunneling-assisted ionization waves; however, their structure radically changes, and their velocity strongly decreases for the same E M . A comparison of the dependences u(E M ) for various ionization-wave types makes it possible to determine the conditions under which one of them is dominant. In conclusion, unresolved problems concerning the theory of tunneling-assisted impact ionization waves are discussed and the directions of further studies are outlined

  17. Equation of state of neutron-rich nuclear matter from chiral effective field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Norbert; Strohmeier, Susanne [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Based on chiral effective field theory, the equation of state of neutron-rich nuclear matter is investigated systematically. The contributing diagrams include one- and two-pion exchange together with three-body terms arising from virtual Δ(1232)-isobar excitations. The proper expansion of the energy per particle, anti E(k{sub f},δ) = anti E{sub n}(k{sub f}) + δB{sub 1}(k{sub f}) + δ{sup 5/3}B{sub 5/3}(k{sub f}) + δ{sup 2}B{sub 2}(k{sub f}) +.., for the system with neutron density ρ{sub n} = k{sub f}{sup 3}(1-δ)/3π{sup 2} and proton density ρ{sub p} = k{sub f}{sup 3}δ/3π{sup 2} is performed analytically for the various interaction contributions. One observes essential structural differences to the commonly used quadratic approximation. The density dependent coefficient B{sub 1}(k{sub f}) turns out to be unrelated to the isospin-asymmetry of nuclear matter. The coefficient B{sub 5/3}(k{sub f}) of the non-analytical δ{sup 5/3}-term receives contributions from the proton kinetic energy and from the one- and two-pion exchange interactions. The physical consequences for neutron star matter are studied.

  18. Balance of power theory meets Al Qaeda : dynamics of non-state actor balancing in postinternational politics

    OpenAIRE

    Denk, Aytaç

    2008-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of International Relations, Bilkent University, 2008. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2008. Includes bibliographical references leaves 196-207. The bulk of studies on the balance of power, which constitutes balance of power theory, suggest that only states are involved in balance of power dynamics. This thesis maintains that exclusion of non-state actors (NSAs) from balance of power dynamics constitutes a significant gap in balance of power t...

  19. The light bound states of N=1 supersymmetric SU(3) Yang-Mills theory on the lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajid; Bergner, Georg; Gerber, Henning; Giudice, Pietro; Montvay, Istvan; Münster, Gernot; Piemonte, Stefano; Scior, Philipp

    2018-03-01

    In this article we summarise our results from numerical simulations of N=1 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with gauge group SU(3). We use the formulation of Curci and Veneziano with clover-improved Wilson fermions. The masses of various bound states have been obtained at different values of the gluino mass and gauge coupling. Extrapolations to the limit of vanishing gluino mass indicate that the bound states form mass-degenerate supermultiplets.

  20. Communication: Extended multi-state complete active space second-order perturbation theory: Energy and nuclear gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozaki, Toru; Győrffy, Werner; Celani, Paolo; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2011-08-01

    The extended multireference quasi-degenerate perturbation theory, proposed by Granovsky [J. Chem. Phys. 134, 214113 (2011)], is combined with internally contracted multi-state complete active space second-order perturbation theory (XMS-CASPT2). The first-order wavefunction is expanded in terms of the union of internally contracted basis functions generated from all the reference functions, which guarantees invariance of the theory with respect to unitary rotations of the reference functions. The method yields improved potentials in the vicinity of avoided crossings and conical intersections. The theory for computing nuclear energy gradients for MS-CASPT2 and XMS-CASPT2 is also presented and the first implementation of these gradient methods is reported. A number of illustrative applications of the new methods are presented.

  1. State space approach for the vibration of nanobeams based on the nonlocal thermoelasticity theory without energy dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenkour, A. M.; Alnefaie, K. A.; Abu-Hamdeh, N. H.; Aljinaid, A. A.; Aifanti, E. C. [King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Abouelregal, A. E. [Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt)

    2015-07-15

    In this article, an Euler-Bernoulli beam model based upon nonlocal thermoelasticity theory without energy dissipation is used to study the vibration of a nanobeam subjected to ramp-type heating. Classical continuum theory is inherently size independent, while nonlocal elasticity exhibits size dependence. Among other things, this leads to a new expression for the effective nonlocal bending moment as contrasted to its classical counterpart. The thermal problem is addressed in the context of the Green-Naghdi (GN) theory of heat transport without energy dissipation. The governing partial differential equations are solved in the Laplace transform domain by the state space approach of modern control theory. Inverse of Laplace transforms are computed numerically using Fourier expansion techniques. The effects of nonlocality and ramping time parameters on the lateral vibration, temperature, displacement and bending moment are discussed.

  2. General study of ground states in gauged N=2 supergravity theories with symmetric scalar manifolds in 5 dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oegetbil, O.

    2007-01-01

    After reviewing the existing results we give an extensive analysis of the critical points of the potentials of the gauged N=2 Yang-Mills/Einstein supergravity theories coupled to tensor multiplets and hypermultiplets. Our analysis includes all the possible gaugings of all N=2 Maxwell-Einstein supergravity theories whose scalar manifolds are symmetric spaces. In general, the scalar potential gets contributions from R-symmetry gauging, tensor couplings, and hypercouplings. We show that the coupling of a hypermultiplet into a theory whose potential has a nonzero value at its critical point, and gauging a compact subgroup of the hyperscalar isometry group will only rescale the value of the potential at the critical point by a positive factor, and therefore will not change the nature of an existing critical point. However this is not the case for noncompact SO(1,1) gaugings. An SO(1,1) gauging of the hyperisometry will generally lead to de Sitter vacua, which is analogous to the ground states found by simultaneously gauging SO(1,1) symmetry of the real scalar manifold with U(1) R in earlier literature. SO(m,1) gaugings with m>1, which give contributions to the scalar potential only in the magical Jordan family theories, on the other hand, do not lead to de Sitter vacua. Anti-de Sitter vacua are generically obtained when the U(1) R symmetry is gauged. We also show that it is possible to embed certain generic Jordan family theories into the magical Jordan family preserving the nature of the ground states. However the magical Jordan family theories have additional ground states which are not found in the generic Jordan family theories

  3. Development and Application of Single-Referenced Perturbation and Coupled-Cluster Theories for Excited Electronic States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Recent work on the development of single-reference perturbation theories for the study of excited electronic states will be discussed. The utility of these methods will be demonstrated by comparison to linear-response coupled-cluster excitation energies. Results for some halogen molecules of interest in stratospheric chemistry will be presented.

  4. How Do Use and Comprehension of Mental-State Language Relate to Theory of Mind in Middle Childhood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazzani, Ilaria; Ornaghi, Veronica

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between mental-state language and theory of mind in primary school children. The participants were 110 primary school students (mean age = 9 years and 7 months; SD = 12.7 months). They were evenly divided by gender and belonged to two age groups (8- and 10-year-olds). Linguistic, metacognitive and cognitive…

  5. Gender, Language, and Social Influence: A Test of Expectation States, Role Congruity, and Self-Categorization Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Scott A.; Palomares, Nicholas A.; Anderson, Grace L.; Bondad-Brown, Beverly

    2009-01-01

    This study compares self-categorization, expectation states, and role congruity theories' explanations for female influence. Male and female participants (N = 267) listened to a recording of a female speaker who used either tentative or assertive language under conditions that led participants to categorize her as a woman or as college-educated.…

  6. Theory and Applications of Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy to Biomembrane Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaolin

    Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is one of the premiere biophysical methods that can be applied for addressing the structure and dynamics of biomolecules, including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. It illustrates the general problem of determining the average biomolecular structure, including the motional mean-square amplitudes and rates of the fluctuations. Lineshape and relaxtion studies give us a view into the molecular properties under different environments. To help the understanding of NMR theory, both lineshape and relaxation experiments are conducted with hexamethylbezene (HMB). This chemical compound with a simple structure serves as a perfect test molecule. Because of its highly symmetric structure, its motions are not very difficult to understand. The results for HMB set benchmarks for other more complicated systems like membrane proteins. After accumulating a large data set on HMB, we also proceed to develop a completely new method of data analysis, which yields the spectral densities in a body-fixed frame revealing internal motions of the system. Among the possible applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we study the light activation mechanism of visual rhodopsin in lipid membranes. As a prototype of G-protein-coupled receptors, which are a large class of membrane proteins, the cofactor isomerization is triggered by photon absorption, and the local structural change is then propagated to a large-scale conformational change of the protein. Facilitation of the binding of transducin then passes along the visual signal to downstream effector proteins like transducin. To study this process, we introduce 2H labels into the rhodopsin chromophore retinal and the C-terminal peptide of transducin to probe the local structure and dynamics of these two hotspots of the rhodopsin activation process. In addition to the examination of local sites with solid-state 2H NMR spectroscopy, wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) provides us the chance of

  7. Intermediate energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Fukahori, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    1998-01-01

    Subgroup 13 (SG13) on Intermediate Energy Nuclear data was formed by NEA Nuclear Science Committee to solve common problems of these types of data for nuclear applications. An overview is presented in this final report of the present activities of SG13, including data needs, high-priority nuclear data request list (nuclides), compilation of experimental data, specialists meetings and benchmarks, data formats and data libraries. Some important accomplishments are summarized, and recommendations are presented. (R.P.)

  8. Resonance Raman study on photoreduction of cytochrome c oxidase: distinction of cytochromes a and a3 in the intermediate oxidation states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, T; Yoshikawa, S; Kitagawa, T

    1985-12-17

    Occurrence of photoreduction of bovine cytochrome c oxidase was confirmed with the difference absorption spectra and oxygen consumption measurements for the enzyme irradiated with laser light at 406.7, 441.6, and 590 nm. The resonance Raman spectra were obtained under the same experimental conditions as those adopted for the measurements of oxygen consumption and difference absorption spectra. The photoreduction was more effective upon irradiation at shorter wavelengths and was irreversible under anaerobic conditions. However, upon aeration into the cell, the original oxidized form was restored. It was found that aerobic laser irradiation produces a photo steady state of the catalytic dioxygen reduction and that the Raman scattering from this photo steady state probes cytochrome a2+ and cytochrome a3(3)+ separately upon excitations at 441.6 and 406.7 nm, respectively. The enzyme was apparently protected from the photoreduction in the spinning cell with the spinning speed between 1 and 1500 rpm. These results were explained satisfactorily with the reported rate constant for the electron transfer from cytochrome a to cytochrome a3 (0.58 s-1) and a comparable photoreduction rate of cytochrome a. The anaerobic photoreduction did give Raman lines at 1666 and 214 cm-1, which are characteristic of the ferrous high-spin cytochrome a3(2)+, but they were absent under aerobic photoreduction. The formyl CH = O stretching mode of the a3 heme was observed at 1671 cm-1 for a2+a3(2)+CO but at 1664 cm-1 for a2+a3(2)+CN-, indicating that the CH = O stretching frequency reflects the pi back-donation to the axial ligand similar to the oxidation state marker line (v4).

  9. Calculation of the Aqueous Thermodynamic Properties of Citric Acid Cycle Intermediates and Precursors and the Estimation of High Temperature and Pressure Equation of State Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell Schulte

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The citric acid cycle (CAC is the central pathway of energy transfer for many organisms, and understanding the origin of this pathway may provide insight into the origins of metabolism. In order to assess the thermodynamics of this key pathway for microorganisms that inhabit a wide variety of environments, especially those found in high temperature environments, we have calculated the properties and parameters for the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state for the major components of the CAC. While a significant amount of data is not available for many of the constituents of this fundamental pathway, methods exist that allow estimation of these missing data.

  10. Quantum theory of the electron behaviour in solid states and its application to the theory of superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangelov, J.

    1993-01-01

    A physical model of an electron describing the classical Lorentz's electron (LE), nonrelativistic quantum Schroedinger's electron (SE) and relativistic quantum Dirac's electron (DE) has been discovered in order to describe the processes in metals, alloys and chemical compounds. As a result of the new point of view proposed the physical meaning of the basic electron parameters as the classical radius of LE, its self energy and rest mass, proper mechanical moment (MCHM) and frequency of de Broglie's pilot wave and causes for stability of Schroedinger's package of waves and SE's extraordinary behaviour has been discovered. A new physical interpretation of collectivized valence electrons behaviour in solid state has been established. On this basis the real processes ensuring energetically the superconductivity state has been described. All auxiliary processes increasing all superconductivity parameters have been calculated. It is pointed out that the basic parameters of electron-phonon system, electron-phonon interaction and the polarization ability of the crystal lattice structure have to be calculated also. (orig.)

  11. The spectral distribution of intermediate L-K molecular-orbital radiation in symmetric heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinig, K.-H.; Jager, H.-U.; Richter, H.; Woittennek, H.; Frank, W.; Gippener, P.; Kaun, K.-H.; Manfrass, P.

    1977-01-01

    Two distinct x-ray continua C1 and C2 above the characteristic lines are observed in high-energy collisions between atoms with atomic numbers of 28 to 57. This structure is explained by a superposition of K molecular-orbital (KMO) radiation and of an intermediate L-K molecular-orbital (ILKMO) radiation of high intensity which is due to 2psigma vacancies. In the framework of the dynamical theory of intermediate molecular phenomena and using a scaling of the H 2 + correlation diagram with screened state-dependent charges good agreement between the shapes of the measured and calculated spectra is obtained. (author)

  12. A Unification between Dynamical System Theory and Thermodynamics Involving an Energy, Mass, and Entropy State Space Formalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wassim M. Haddad

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we combine the two universalisms of thermodynamics and dynamical systems theory to develop a dynamical system formalism for classical thermodynamics. Specifically, using a compartmental dynamical system energy flow model involving heat flow, work energy, and chemical reactions, we develop a state-space dynamical system model that captures the key aspects of thermodynamics, including its fundamental laws. In addition, we show that our thermodynamically consistent dynamical system model is globally semistable with system states converging to a state of temperature equipartition. Furthermore, in the presence of chemical reactions, we use the law of mass-action and the notion of chemical potential to show that the dynamic system states converge to a state of temperature equipartition and zero affinity corresponding to a state of chemical equilibrium.

  13. Ground-state densities from the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle and from density-functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvaal, Simen; Helgaker, Trygve

    2015-11-14

    The relationship between the densities of ground-state wave functions (i.e., the minimizers of the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle) and the ground-state densities in density-functional theory (i.e., the minimizers of the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle) is studied within the framework of convex conjugation, in a generic setting covering molecular systems, solid-state systems, and more. Having introduced admissible density functionals as functionals that produce the exact ground-state energy for a given external potential by minimizing over densities in the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle, necessary and sufficient conditions on such functionals are established to ensure that the Rayleigh-Ritz ground-state densities and the Hohenberg-Kohn ground-state densities are identical. We apply the results to molecular systems in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. For any given potential v ∈ L(3/2)(ℝ(3)) + L(∞)(ℝ(3)), we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the mixed ground-state densities of the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle and the mixed ground-state densities of the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle when the Lieb density-matrix constrained-search universal density functional is taken as the admissible functional. A similar one-to-one correspondence is established between the pure ground-state densities of the Rayleigh-Ritz variation principle and the pure ground-state densities obtained using the Hohenberg-Kohn variation principle with the Levy-Lieb pure-state constrained-search functional. In other words, all physical ground-state densities (pure or mixed) are recovered with these functionals and no false densities (i.e., minimizing densities that are not physical) exist. The importance of topology (i.e., choice of Banach space of densities and potentials) is emphasized and illustrated. The relevance of these results for current-density-functional theory is examined.

  14. Excited states of ReO4-: A comprehensive time-dependent relativistic density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenhua; Ma, Jianyi; Peng, Daoling; Zou, Wenli; Liu, Wenjian; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-02-01

    The perrhenate anion, ReO4-, is taken as a showcase of heavy transition metal complexes, to examine the performance of time-dependent relativistic density functional linear response theory for electronic excitations, which is based on a newly proposed exact two-component Hamiltonian resulting from the symmetrized elimination of the small component. In total 30 scalar and 63 spinor excited states are investigated and the results are grossly in good agreement with those by the singles and doubles coupled-cluster linear response theory. It is found that only a few scalar states of 3T1 and 3T2 symmetries are split significantly by the spin-orbit coupling, whereas only those excited states involving the Rydberg-type virtual orbital are affected by the solvent effects. The nature of the optical absorption spectra is also highlighted.

  15. Excited states of ReO4-: A comprehensive time-dependent relativistic density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenhua; Ma Jianyi; Peng Daoling; Zou Wenli; Liu Wenjian; Staemmler, Volker

    2009-01-01

    The perrhenate anion, ReO 4 - , is taken as a showcase of heavy transition metal complexes, to examine the performance of time-dependent relativistic density functional linear response theory for electronic excitations, which is based on a newly proposed exact two-component Hamiltonian resulting from the symmetrized elimination of the small component. In total 30 scalar and 63 spinor excited states are investigated and the results are grossly in good agreement with those by the singles and doubles coupled-cluster linear response theory. It is found that only a few scalar states of 3 T 1 and 3 T 2 symmetries are split significantly by the spin-orbit coupling, whereas only those excited states involving the Rydberg-type virtual orbital are affected by the solvent effects. The nature of the optical absorption spectra is also highlighted

  16. Gravity currents in rotating channels. Part 1. Steady-state theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, J. N.; Linden, P. F.

    2002-04-01

    A theory is developed for the speed and structure of steady-state non-dissipative gravity currents in rotating channels. The theory is an extension of that of Benjamin (1968) for non-rotating gravity currents, and in a similar way makes use of the steady-state and perfect-fluid (incompressible, inviscid and immiscible) approximations, and supposes the existence of a hydrostatic ‘control point’ in the current some distance away from the nose. The model allows for fully non-hydrostatic and ageostrophic motion in a control volume V ahead of the control point, with the solution being determined by the requirements, consistent with the perfect-fluid approximation, of energy and momentum conservation in V, as expressed by Bernoulli's theorem and a generalized flow-force balance. The governing parameter in the problem, which expresses the strength of the background rotation, is the ratio W = B/R, where B is the channel width and R = (g[prime prime or minute]H)1/2/f is the internal Rossby radius of deformation based on the total depth of the ambient fluid H. Analytic solutions are determined for the particular case of zero front-relative flow within the gravity current. For each value of W there is a unique non-dissipative two-layer solution, and a non-dissipative one-layer solution which is specified by the value of the wall-depth h0. In the two-layer case, the non-dimensional propagation speed c = cf(g[prime prime or minute]H)[minus sign]1/2 increases smoothly from the non-rotating value of 0.5 as W increases, asymptoting to unity for W [rightward arrow] [infty infinity]. The gravity current separates from the left-hand wall of the channel at W = 0.67 and thereafter has decreasing width. The depth of the current at the right-hand wall, h0, increases, reaching the full depth at W = 1.90, after which point the interface outcrops on both the upper and lower boundaries, with the distance over which the interface slopes being 0.881R. In the one-layer case, the wall

  17. Report on the state of research in the 5-dimensional projective unified field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmutzer, Ernst

    2009-01-01

    The author presents a historical sketch of the projective relativity theory before and (with new qualitative arguments) after World War II. Then he treats the development of his Projective Unified Field Theory since 1957 up till now with applications to a closed cosmological model, with the result of a vanishing big bang and satisfying numerical cosmological parameters in good agreement with the experiments. (orig.)

  18. State Education as High-Yield Investment: Human Capital Theory in European Policy Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Human Capital Theory has been an increasingly important phenomenon in economic thought over the last 50 years. The central role it affords to education has become even more marked in recent years as the concept of the "knowledge economy" has become a global concern. In this paper, the prevalence of Human Capital Theory within European…

  19. Resonance scattering by auroral N2+: steady state theory and observations from Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Jokiaho

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of auroral energy input at high latitudes often depend on observations of emissions from the first negative band of ionised nitrogen. However, these emissions are affected by solar resonance scattering, which makes photometric and spectrographic measurements difficult to interpret. This work is a statistical study from Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway, during the solar minimum between January and March 2007, providing a good coverage in shadow height position and precipitation conditions. The High Throughput Imaging Echelle Spectrograph (HiTIES measured three bands of N2+ 1N (0,1, (1,2 and (2,3, and one N2 2P band (0,3 in the magnetic zenith. The brightness ratios of the N2+ bands are compared with a theoretical treatment with excellent results. Balance equations for all important vibrational levels of the three lowest electronic states of the N2+ molecule are solved for steady-state, and the results combined with ion chemistry modelling. Brightnesses of the (0,1, (1,2 and (2,3 bands of N2+ 1N are calculated for a range of auroral electron energies, and different values of shadow heights. It is shown that in sunlit aurora, the brightness of the (0,1 band is enhanced, with the scattered contribution increasing with decreasing energy of precipitation (10-fold enhancements for energies of 100 eV. The higher vibrational bands are enhanced even more significantly. In sunlit aurora the observed 1N (1,2/(0,1 and (2,3/(0,1 ratios increase as a function of decreasing precipitation energy, as predicted by theory. In non-sunlit aurora the N2+ species have a constant proportionality to neutral N2. The ratio of 2P(0,3/1N(0,1 in the morning hours shows a pronounced decrease, indicating enhancement of N2+ 1N emission. Finally we study the relationship of all emissions and their ratios to rotational temperatures. A clear effect is observed on rotational development of the bands. It is possible that greatly enhanced rotational temperatures may be a

  20. Wigner's dynamical transition state theory in phase space: classical and quantum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waalkens, Holger; Schubert, Roman; Wiggins, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    We develop Wigner's approach to a dynamical transition state theory in phase space in both the classical and quantum mechanical settings. The key to our development is the construction of a normal form for describing the dynamics in the neighbourhood of a specific type of saddle point that governs the evolution from reactants to products in high dimensional systems. In the classical case this is the standard Poincaré–Birkhoff normal form. In the quantum case we develop a normal form based on the Weyl calculus and an explicit algorithm for computing this quantum normal form. The classical normal form allows us to discover and compute the phase space structures that govern classical reaction dynamics. From this knowledge we are able to provide a direct construction of an energy dependent dividing surface in phase space having the properties that trajectories do not locally 're-cross' the surface and the directional flux across the surface is minimal. Using this, we are able to give a formula for the directional flux through the dividing surface that goes beyond the harmonic approximation. We relate this construction to the flux–flux autocorrelation function which is a standard ingredient in the expression for the reaction rate in the chemistry community. We also give a classical mechanical interpretation of the activated complex as a normally hyperbolic invariant manifold (NHIM), and further describe the structure of the NHIM. The quantum normal form provides us with an efficient algorithm to compute quantum reaction rates and we relate this algorithm to the quantum version of the flux–flux autocorrelation function formalism. The significance of the classical phase space structures for the quantum mechanics of reactions is elucidated by studying the phase space distribution of scattering states. The quantum normal form also provides an efficient way of computing Gamov–Siegert resonances. We relate these resonances to the lifetimes of the quantum activated