WorldWideScience

Sample records for intermediate mass young

  1. Intermediate-mass Elements in Young Supernova Remnants Reveal Neutron Star Kicks by Asymmetric Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Morii, Mikio; Janka, Hans-Thomas; Wongwathanarat, Annop; Nakamura, Ko; Kotake, Kei; Mori, Koji; Müller, Ewald; Takiwaki, Tomoya; Tanaka, Masaomi; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2018-03-01

    The birth properties of neutron stars (NSs) yield important information about the still-debated physical processes that trigger the explosion as well as on intrinsic neutron-star physics. These properties include the high space velocities of young neutron stars with average values of several 100 km s‑1, with an underlying “kick” mechanism that is not fully clarified. There are two competing possibilities that could accelerate NSs during their birth: anisotropic ejection of either stellar debris or neutrinos. Here we present new evidence from X-ray measurements that chemical elements between silicon and calcium in six young gaseous supernova remnants are preferentially expelled opposite to the direction of neutron star motion. There is no correlation between the kick velocities and magnetic field strengths of these neutron stars. Our results support a hydrodynamic origin of neutron-star kicks connected to asymmetric explosive mass ejection, and they conflict with neutron-star acceleration scenarios that invoke anisotropic neutrino emission caused by particle and nuclear physics in combination with very strong neutron-star magnetic fields.

  2. A YOUNG MASSIVE STELLAR POPULATION AROUND THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE ESO 243-49 HLX-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, S. A.; Servillat, M.; Pforr, J.; Maraston, C.; Maccarone, T. J.; Knigge, C.; Godet, O.; Webb, N. A.; Barret, D.; Belmont, R.; Gosling, A. J.; Wiersema, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope and simultaneous Swift X-ray Telescope observations of the strongest candidate intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) ESO 243-49 HLX-1. Fitting the spectral energy distribution from X-ray to near-infrared wavelengths showed that the broadband spectrum is not consistent with simple and irradiated disk models, but is well described by a model comprised of an irradiated accretion disk plus a ∼10 6 M ☉ stellar population. The age of the population cannot be uniquely constrained, with both young and old stellar populations allowed. However, the old solution requires excessive disk reprocessing and an extremely small disk, so we favor the young solution (∼13 Myr). In addition, the presence of dust lanes and the lack of any nuclear activity from X-ray observations of the host galaxy suggest that a gas-rich minor merger may have taken place less than ∼200 Myr ago. Such a merger event would explain the presence of the IMBH and the young stellar population.

  3. The structure of protoplanetary disks surrounding three young intermediate mass stars: I. Resolving the disk rotation in the [OI] 6300 Å line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Plas, G.; van den Ancker, M.E.; Fedele, D.; Acke, B.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; Bouwman, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present high-spectral-resolution, optical spectra of three young, intermediate-mass stars, in all of which we spectrally resolve the 6300 Å [OI] emission line. Two of these have a double-peaked line-profile. We attempt to fit these data using a simple model of [OI] emission, which is generated by

  4. Researchers Resolve Intermediate Mass Black Hole Mystery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    New research, funded by the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Advanced Physical and Chemical Research, NASA and the University of Tokyo, solved the mystery of how a black hole, with the mass more than several hundreds times larger than that of our Sun, could be formed in the nearby starburst galaxy, M82. Recent observations of the Chandra X-ray observatory (Matsumoto et al., 2001 ApJ 547, L25) indicate the presence of an unusually bright source in the star cluster MGG11 in the starburst galaxy M82. The properties of the X-ray source are best explained by a black hole with a mass of about a thousand times the mass of the Sun, placing it intermediate between the relatively small (stellar mass) black holes in the Milky way Galaxy and the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of galaxies. For comparison, stellar-mass black holes are only a few times more massive than the Sun, whereas the black hole in the center of the Milky-way Galaxy is more than a few million times more massive than the Sun. An international team of researchers, using the world's fastest computer, the GRAPE-6 system in Japan, were engaged in a series of simulations of star clusters that resembled MGG11. They used the GRAPE-6 to perform simulations with two independently developed computer programs (Starlab and NBODY4 developed by Sverre Aarseth in Cambridge), both of which give the same qualitative result. The simulations ware initiated by high resolution observations of the star cluster MGG11 by McCrady et al (2003, ApJ 596, 240) using the Hubble Space Telescope and Keck, and by Harashima et al (2001) using the giant Subaru telescope. M82 Chandra X-ray image of the central region of the starburst galaxy M82. The GRAPE's detailed, star-by-star simulations represent the state of the art in cluster modeling. For the first time using the GRAPE, researchers perform simulations of the evolution of young and dense star clusters with up to 600000 stars; they calculate the

  5. Neutrino mass as the probe of intermediate mass scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senjanovic, G.

    1980-01-01

    A discussion of the calculability of neutrino mass is presented. The possibility of neutrinos being either Dirac or Majorana particles is analyzed in detail. Arguments are offered in favor of the Majorana case: the smallness of neutrino mass is linked to the maximality of parity violation in weak interactions. It is shown how the measured value of neutrino mass would probe the existence of an intermediate mass scale, presumably in the TeV region, at which parity is supposed to become a good symmetry. Experimental consequences of the proposed scheme are discussed, in particular the neutrino-less double ..beta.. decay, where observation would provide a crucial test of the model, and rare muon decays such as ..mu.. ..-->.. e..gamma.. and ..mu.. ..-->.. ee anti e. Finally, the embedding of this model in an O(10) grand unified theory is analyzed, with the emphasis on the implications for intermediate mass scales that it offers. It is concluded that the proposed scheme provides a distinct and testable alternative for understanding the smallness of neutrino mass. 4 figures.

  6. Initial mass function of intermediate-mass black hole seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, A.; Salvadori, S.; Yue, B.; Schleicher, D.

    2014-09-01

    We study the initial mass function (IMF) and hosting halo properties of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs, 104-6 M⊙) formed inside metal-free, UV-illuminated atomic-cooling haloes (virial temperature Tvir ≥ 104 K) either via the direct collapse of the gas or via an intermediate supermassive star (SMS) stage. These IMBHs have been recently advocated as the seeds of the supermassive black holes observed at z ≈ 6. We achieve this goal in three steps: (a) we derive the gas accretion rate for a proto-SMS to undergo General Relativity instability and produce a direct collapse black hole (DCBH) or to enter the zero-age main sequence and later collapse into an IMBH; (b) we use merger-tree simulations to select atomic-cooling haloes in which either a DCBH or SMS can form and grow, accounting for metal enrichment and major mergers that halt the growth of the proto-SMS by gas fragmentation. We derive the properties of the hosting haloes and the mass distribution of black holes at this stage, and dub it the `birth mass function'; (c) we follow the further growth of the DCBH by accreting the leftover gas in the parent halo and compute the final IMBH mass. We consider two extreme cases in which minihaloes (Tvir populate haloes (a) of mass 7.5 < log (Mh/ M⊙) < 8, (b) in the redshift range 8 < z < 17, (c) with IMBH in the mass range 4.75 < (log M•/ M⊙) < 6.25.

  7. Intermediate mass fragments emission in binary fragmentation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, C.; Bhattacharya, S.

    1991-01-01

    Intermediate mass fragments emission in intermediate-energy nucleus-nucleus collisions has been studied in the framework of a generalized model where the fragments are assumed to be emitted from binary fissionlike decay of the fully equilibrated compound nucleus. The present formulation, with a schematic exit channel shape configuration and simple rotating liquid-drop nuclear potential, has been found to explain most of the intermediate mass fragments emission cross sections reasonably well without incorporating any free parameters in the calculation

  8. Mechanism of intermediate mass fragment emission at low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhara, A.K.; Bhattacharya, C.; Bhattacharya, S.; Krishan, K.

    1993-01-01

    The study of the dynamics of intermediate mass fragment emission in fusion-fission processes has been carried out. The average kinetic energies and relative yield ratio of different fragments are calculated and compared with experimental values

  9. A multistep evaporation model for intermediate mass fragment emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, A.J.; Grotowski, K.; Kozik, T.; Rebel, H.

    1988-11-01

    A multistep evaporation model for intermediate mass fragment emission in heavy ion reactions is described. It applies the canonical transition-state method for the determination of the probability for disintegration of a fused system. The energy and angular momentum relations at the saddle and scission points are calculated on the basis of the finite range liquid drop model. The derivation of the total kinetic energy release uses the concept of amplifying modes which is equivalent to that of shape fluctuations at the ridge point. The model reproduces fairly well the mass and angular distributions and the energy spectra of intermediate mass fragments yields from inclusive and coincidence experiments. (orig.) [de

  10. Mechanism for the Suppression of Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Dokuchaev, V. I.; Eroshenko, Yu. N.; Rubin, S. G.; Samarchenko, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    A model for the formation of supermassive primordial black holes in galactic nuclei with the simultaneous suppression of the formation of intermediate-mass black holes is presented. A bimodal mass function for black holes formed through phase transitions in a model with a "Mexican hat" potential has been found. The classical motion of the phase of a complex scalar field during inflation has been taken into account. Possible observational manifestations of primordial black holes in galaxies an...

  11. Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Stroeer, A. S.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100-450 solar Mass and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88 + 88 solar Mass , for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc(exp 3) per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

  12. Heterophobia: Subverting Heterosexual Hegemony through Intermedial Applied Performance for Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    This article responds to intermediality through a case study of an intermedial applied performance for young people. "Heterophobia," a hybrid fusion of live performance, digital technology, social media and urban street art, aimed to challenge homophobia in schools and online. Intermediality was used as a tool to enhance young people's…

  13. Age and mass of the star cluster around the intermediate-mass black hole HLX-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    We propose to study the optical counterpart of the intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) HLX-1, about 3 years after its last X-ray outburst. Previous HST observations taken at epochs closer to an outburst show a variable near-UV/blue component, plus a constant red/near-IR component. The redder component probably comes from an old stellar population around the black hole; the bluer component may be a combination of emission from an irradiated accretion disk, and from a young stellar population. Their relative contributions and the age of the stellar population(s) are still subject of debate. By re-observing the system when the irradiated component is minimal, we will determine whether the near-UV/blue optical emission has declined even further and whether the red/near-IR optical emission has stayed approximately constant. This will tell us whether the optical counterpart is a massive star cluster, and place a strong upper limit to the young stellar population around the IMBH. Having determined the constant contribution of the stellar emission, we will then insert it into broad-band models of the emission in outburst, and obtain a better estimate of the accretion disk parameters, constraining formation and evolution scenarios for the IMBH. We will use the same set of filters as in previous HST observations, for direct comparison of brightness and colors: F140LP (ACS SBC); F300X, F336W, F390W, F555W, F621M, F775W (WFC3 UVIS); F105W, F160W (WFC3 IR). We request a total of 7 orbits.

  14. Intermediate Mass Black Holes: Their Motion and Associated Energetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sivaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a lot of current astrophysical evidence and interest in intermediate mass black holes (IMBH, ranging from a few hundred to several thousand solar masses. The active galaxy M82 and the globular cluster G1 in M31, for example, are known to host such objects. Here, we discuss several aspects of IMBH such as their expected luminosity, spectral nature of radiation, and associated jets. We also discuss possible scenarios for their formation including the effects of dynamical friction, and gravitational radiation. We also consider their formation in the early universe and also discuss the possibility of supermassive black holes forming from mergers of several IMBH and compare the relevant time scales involved with other scenarios.

  15. Tidal disruption of white dwarfs by intermediate mass black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bode T.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Modeling ultra-close encounters between a white dwarf and a spinning, intermediate mass black hole requires a full general relativistic treatment of gravity. This paper summarizes results from such a study. Our results show that the disruption process and prompt accretion of the debris strongly depend on the magnitude and orientation of the black hole spin. On the other hand, the late-time accretion onto the black hole follows the same decay, Ṁ ∝  t−5/3, estimated from Newtonian gravity disruption studies. The spectrum of the fallback material peaks in the soft X-rays and sustains Eddington luminosity for 1–3 yrs after the disruption. The orientation of the black hole spin has also a profound effect on how the outflowing debris obscures the central region. The disruption produces a burst of gravitational radiation with characteristic frequencies of ∼3.2 Hz and strain amplitudes of ∼10−18 for galactic intermediate mass black holes.

  16. Strong nuclear enhancement in intermediate mass Drell-Yan production

    CERN Document Server

    Jian Wei Qiu

    2002-01-01

    We calculate nuclear effect in Drell-Yan massive lepton-pair production in terms of parton multiple scattering in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). We present the nuclear modification to inclusive Drell-Yan cross sections d sigma /dQ/sup 2/ in terms of multiparton correlation functions. By extracting the size of the correlation functions from measured Drell-Yan transverse momentum broadening in nuclear media, we determine the nuclear modification at O( alpha /sub s//Q/sup 2/). We find that the nuclear modification strongly enhances the inclusive Drell-Yan cross section in the intermediate mass region (IMR): 1.5

  17. Characterizing Intermediate-Mass, Pre-Main-Sequence Stars via X-Ray Emision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haze Nunez, Evan; Povich, Matthew Samuel; Binder, Breanna Arlene; Broos, Patrick; Townsley, Leisa K.

    2018-01-01

    The X-ray emission from intermediate-mass, pre-main-sequence stars (IMPS) can provide useful constraints on the ages of very young (${Project. The Carina massive star-forming complex is of special interest due to the wide variation of star formation stages within the region. Candidate IMPS were identified using infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) models. X-ray properties, including thermal plasma temperatures and absorption-corrected fluxes, were derived from XSPEC fits performed using absorption ($N_{H}$) constrained by the extinction values returned by the infrared SED fits. We find that IMPS have systematically higher X-ray luminosities compared to their lower-mass cousins, the TTauri stars.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant CAREER-1454334 and by NASA through Chandra Award 18200040.

  18. Fresh and healthy? Well-being, health and performance of young employees with intermediate education.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, J.; Brenninkmeijer, V.; Blonk, R.W.B.; Koppes, L.L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to gain more insight into the well-being, health and performance of young intermediate educated employees. First, employees with low education (9 years or less), intermediate education (10-14 years of education), and high education (15 years or more) are

  19. Fresh and healthy?: Well-being, health and performance of young employees with intermediate education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkermans, J.; Brenninkmeijer, V.; Blonk, R.W.B.; Koppes, L.L.J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to gain more insight into the well-being, health and performance of young intermediate educated employees. First, employees with low education (9 years or less), intermediate education (10-14 years of education), and high education (15 years or more) are

  20. X-ray Emission Properties of Intermediate-Mass, Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Binder, Breanna; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.

    2017-08-01

    Intermediate-mass (2-8 M⊙) main-sequence stars with A to mid-B spectral types occupy an X-ray "desert" of weak intrinsic emission between low- and high-mass stars. Lacking the wind-shock driven emission of massive, O and early B stars or the convectively-driven magnetic reconnection flaring activity of later-type stars, X-ray detections of (non-peculiar) main-sequence AB stars are typically ascribed to the presence of unresolved, lower-mass binary companions. There is mounting evidence, however, that intermediate-mass, pre-main sequence stars (IMPS) with GK spectral types produce intrinsic X-ray emission that rapidly decays with time following the development of a radiative zone as IMPS approach the ZAMS as AB stars. This suggests that X-ray emission from IMPS may be a more luminous analog of the well-studied coronal X-ray emission from lower-mass, T Tauri stars. Statistical studies of young IMPS have been hampered by their scarcety in nearby, unobscured star-forming regions. We present the first results from a spectral-fitting study to measure absorption-corrected X-ray luminosities and plasma temperatures for hundreds of candidate X-ray emitting IMPS found in the MYStIX and MAGiX surveys of massive Galactic star forming regions. Candidate IMPS are placed on the HR diagram via a novel infrared spectral energy distribution modeling technique designed for highly-obscured, young massive star-forming regions. The rapid decay of X-ray emission from these objects has the potential to provide an independent chronometer to constrain star formation rates, and may produce an age-dependent bias in the relationship between the stellar X-ray luminosity function and mass function in distant (>2 kpc) regions observed with relatively shallow X-ray observations.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant CAREER-1454334 and by NASA through Chandra Award 18200040.

  1. Investigating young children's learning of mass measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Jill; McDonough, Andrea; Ferguson, Sarah

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports results of a design experiment regarding young children's concepts of mass measurement. The research built on an earlier study in which a framework of "growth points" in early mathematics learning and a related, task-based, one-to-one interview to assess children's understanding of the measurement of mass were developed. Prompted by the results and recommendations from the earlier study, five lessons were developed that offered rich learning experiences regarding concepts of mass. The 119 Year 1 and 2 children participating in the study were interviewed using the same protocol before and after the teaching period. The assessment data showed that the majority of these children moved from using nonstandard units to using standard units and instruments for measuring mass. The findings from this study challenge the traditional approach of using informal units for an extended period before the introduction of standard units.

  2. Intermediate coupling vibrational descriptions of odd mass gold isotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Vieu, C; Paar, V

    1976-01-01

    The theoretical analysis of /sup 193-195/Au levels is semi qualitatively performed in the frame of the intermediate coupling vibrational models of Kisslinger-Sorensen and Alaga. From the comparison between the experimental data and the corresponding predictions of the two models, conclusions are drawn on the influence of the clusters and broken pairs.

  3. Mass models of NGC 6624 without an intermediate-mass black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieles, Mark; Balbinot, Eduardo; Yaaqib, Rashid I. S. M.; Hénault-Brunet, Vincent; Zocchi, Alice; Peuten, Miklos; Jonker, Peter G.

    2018-02-01

    An intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) was recently reported to reside in the centre of the Galactic globular cluster (GC) NGC 6624, based on timing observations of a millisecond pulsar (MSP) located near the cluster centre in projection. We present dynamical models with multiple mass components of NGC 6624 - without an IMBH - which successfully describe the surface brightness profile and proper motion kinematics from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the stellar-mass function at different distances from the cluster centre. The maximum line-of-sight acceleration at the position of the MSP accommodates the inferred acceleration of the MSP, as derived from its first period derivative. With discrete realizations of the models we show that the higher-order period derivatives - which were previously used to derive the IMBH mass - are due to passing stars and stellar remnants, as previously shown analytically in literature. We conclude that there is no need for an IMBH to explain the timing observations of this MSP.

  4. Radio Detections During Two State Transitions of the Intermediate-Mass Black Hole HLX-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Natalie; Cseh, David; Lenc, Emil; Godet, Olivier; Barret, Didier; Corbel, Stephane; Farrell, Sean; Fender, Robert; Gehrels, Neil; Heywood, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Relativistic jets are streams of plasma moving at appreciable fractions of the speed of light. They have been observed from stellar-mass black holes (approx. 3 to 20 solar masses) as well as supermassive black holes (approx.. 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 9) Solar Mass) found in the centers of most galaxies. Jets should also be produced by intermediate-mass black holes (approx. 10(exp 2) to 10(exp 5) Solar Mass), although evidence for this third class of black hole has, until recently, been weak. We report the detection of transient radio emission at the location of the intermediate-mass black hole candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1, which is consistent with a discrete jet ejection event. These observations also allow us to refine the mass estimate of the black hole to be between approx. 9 × 10(exp 3) Solar Mass and approx. 9 × 10(exp 4) Solar Mass.

  5. Gravitational Waves and Intermediate-mass Black Hole Retention in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragione, Giacomo; Ginsburg, Idan; Kocsis, Bence

    2018-04-01

    The recent discovery of gravitational waves (GWs) has opened new horizons for physics. Current and upcoming missions, such as LIGO, VIRGO, KAGRA, and LISA, promise to shed light on black holes of every size from stellar mass (SBH) sizes up to supermassive black holes. The intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) family has not been detected beyond any reasonable doubt. Recent analyses suggest observational evidence for the presence of IMBHs in the centers of two Galactic globular clusters (GCs). In this paper, we investigate the possibility that GCs were born with a central IMBH, which undergoes repeated merger events with SBHs in the cluster core. By means of a semi-analytical method, we follow the evolution of the primordial cluster population in the galactic potential and the mergers of the binary IMBH-SBH systems. Our models predict ≈1000 IMBHs within 1 kpc from the galactic center and show that the IMBH-SBH merger rate density changes from { \\mathcal R }≈ 1000 Gpc‑3 yr‑1 beyond z ≈ 2 to { \\mathcal R }≈ 1{--}10 Gpc‑3 yr‑1 at z ≈ 0. The rates at low redshifts may be significantly higher if young massive star clusters host IMBHs. The merger rates are dominated by IMBHs with masses between 103 and 104 M ⊙. Currently, there are no LIGO/VIRGO upper limits for GW sources in this mass range, but our results show that at design sensitivity, these instruments will detect IMBH-SBH mergers in the coming years. LISA and the Einstein Telescope will be best suited to detect these events. The inspirals of IMBH-SBH systems may also generate an unresolved GW background.

  6. Radio detections during two state transitions of the intermediate-mass black hole HLX-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Natalie; Cseh, David; Lenc, Emil; Godet, Olivier; Barret, Didier; Corbel, Stephane; Farrell, Sean; Fender, Robert; Gehrels, Neil; Heywood, Ian

    2012-08-03

    Relativistic jets are streams of plasma moving at appreciable fractions of the speed of light. They have been observed from stellar-mass black holes (~3 to 20 solar masses, M(⊙)) as well as supermassive black holes (~10(6) to 10(9) M(⊙)) found in the centers of most galaxies. Jets should also be produced by intermediate-mass black holes (~10(2) to 10(5) M(⊙)), although evidence for this third class of black hole has, until recently, been weak. We report the detection of transient radio emission at the location of the intermediate-mass black hole candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1, which is consistent with a discrete jet ejection event. These observations also allow us to refine the mass estimate of the black hole to be between ~9 × 10(3) M(⊙) and ~9 × 10(4) M(⊙).

  7. Constraining the Population of Small Close-in Planets Around Evolved Intermediate Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Amber; Johnson, John Asher

    2018-01-01

    Intermediate mass stars ( > 1.3 M_Sun) have high occurrence rates of Jupiter mass planets in predominately long period orbits (~1.0 AU). There is a prominent planet gap, known as the ‘Planet Desert’, for low mass planets (Super-Earth, Neptune) < 0.5 AU from subgiants, the evolved counterpart to intermediate mass stars. Thus far, using current radial velocity methods, we have not been able to detect short period planets around subgiants due to noise from p-mode oscillations perhaps mimicking radial velocity signals (~5 m/s) in this planetary regime. Here we present techniques and preliminary results with regards to finding low mass, short period planets around subgiants and its implications for the Planet Desert.

  8. The measurement of intermediate mass fragments in the fermi energy domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolf, G.

    1987-01-01

    Intermediate mass fragments in the Fermi energy domain were studied at GANIL via the Kr84 + Au reaction at 44 MeV/u. The Erel* quantity is used to study correlations between fragments. Fast-fast coincidences; fast-slow coincidences; slow-slow coincidences; and light particles are considered. Reaction mechanisms are discussed. Only qualitative analysis results are available, but they suggest that the quantitative results will be very instructive: light particle spectra will deliver source parameters (velocity, total charge, excitation energy and temperature); the multiplicity of intermediate mass fragments will be deduced from the triple coincidences between modules of XYZt detector

  9. An intermediate-mass black hole in the centre of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kızıltan, Bülent; Baumgardt, Holger; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-02-08

    Intermediate-mass black holes should help us to understand the evolutionary connection between stellar-mass and super-massive black holes. However, the existence of intermediate-mass black holes is still uncertain, and their formation process is therefore unknown. It has long been suspected that black holes with masses 100 to 10,000 times that of the Sun should form and reside in dense stellar systems. Therefore, dedicated observational campaigns have targeted globular clusters for many decades, searching for signatures of these elusive objects. All candidate signatures appear radio-dim and do not have the X-ray to radio flux ratios required for accreting black holes. Based on the lack of an electromagnetic counterpart, upper limits of 2,060 and 470 solar masses have been placed on the mass of a putative black hole in 47 Tucanae (NGC 104) from radio and X-ray observations, respectively. Here we show there is evidence for a central black hole in 47 Tucanae with a mass of solar masses when the dynamical state of the globular cluster is probed with pulsars. The existence of an intermediate-mass black hole in the centre of one of the densest clusters with no detectable electromagnetic counterpart suggests that the black hole is not accreting at a sufficient rate to make it electromagnetically bright and therefore, contrary to expectations, is gas-starved. This intermediate-mass black hole might be a member of an electromagnetically invisible population of black holes that grow into supermassive black holes in galaxies.

  10. Excitation of high frequency voices from intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals with large eccentricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wen-Biao; Cao, Zhoujian; Hu, Yi-Ming

    2017-11-01

    The coalescence of a stellar-mass compact object together with an intermediate-mass black hole, also known as an intermediate-mass-ratio inspiral, is usually not expected to be a viable gravitational wave source for the current ground-based gravitational wave detectors, due to the generally lower frequency of such a source. In this paper, we adopt the effective-one-body formalism as the equation of motion, and obtain the accurately calculated gravitational waveforms by solving the Teukolsky equation using the frequency-domain method. We point out that high frequency modes of gravitational waves can be excited by large eccentricities of intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals. These high frequency modes can extend to more than 10 Hz, and enter the designed sensitive band of Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. We propose that such kinds of highly eccentric intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals could be feasible sources and potentially observable by the ground-based gravitational wave detectors, like the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo.

  11. THE DISCOVERY OF THE YOUNGEST MOLECULAR OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS PROTOSTELLAR CORE, MMS-6/OMC-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Ho, Paul T. P.

    2012-01-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution HCN (4-3) and CO (3-2) observations made with the Submillimeter Array, toward an extremely young intermediate-mass protostellar core, MMS 6-main, located in the Orion Molecular Cloud 3 region (OMC-3). We have successfully imaged a compact molecular outflow lobe (≈1000 AU) associated with MMS 6-main, which is also the smallest molecular outflow ever found in the intermediate-mass protostellar cores. The dynamical timescale of this outflow is estimated to be ≤100 yr. The line width dramatically increases downstream at the end of the molecular outflow (Δv ∼ 25 km s –1 ) and clearly shows the bow-shock-type velocity structure. The estimated outflow mass (≈10 –4 M ☉ ) and outflow size are approximately two to four orders and one to three orders of magnitude smaller, respectively, while the outflow force (≈10 –4 M ☉ km s –1 yr –1 ) is similar, compared to the other molecular outflows studied in OMC-2/3. These results show that MMS 6-main is a protostellar core at the earliest evolutionary stage, most likely shortly after the second core formation.

  12. Search for intermediate mass black hole binaries in the first observing run of Advanced LIGO

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barish, B. C.; Berger, B. K.; Billingsley, G.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.

    2017-01-01

    During their first observational run, the two Advanced LIGO detectors attained an unprecedented sensitivity, resulting in the first direct detections of gravitational-wave signals produced by stellar-mass binary black hole systems. This paper reports on an all-sky search for gravitational waves (GWs) from merging intermediate mass black hole binaries (IMBHBs). The combined results from two independent search techniques were used in this study: the first employs a matched-filter algorithm that...

  13. Measuring Intermediate-Mass Black-Hole Binaries with Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitch, John; Pürrer, Michael; Mandel, Ilya

    2015-10-02

    We perform a systematic study to explore the accuracy with which the parameters of intermediate-mass black-hole binary systems can be measured from their gravitational wave (GW) signatures using second-generation GW detectors. We make use of the most recent reduced-order models containing inspiral, merger, and ringdown signals of aligned-spin effective-one-body waveforms to significantly speed up the calculations. We explore the phenomenology of the measurement accuracies for binaries with total masses between 50M(⊙) and 500M(⊙) and mass ratios between 0.1 and 1. We find that (i) at total masses below ∼200M(⊙), where the signal-to-noise ratio is dominated by the inspiral portion of the signal, the chirp mass parameter can be accurately measured; (ii) at higher masses, the information content is dominated by the ringdown, and total mass is measured more accurately; (iii) the mass of the lower-mass companion is poorly estimated, especially at high total mass and more extreme mass ratios; and (iv) spin cannot be accurately measured for our injection set with nonspinning components. Most importantly, we find that for binaries with nonspinning components at all values of the mass ratio in the considered range and at a network signal-to-noise ratio of 15, analyzed with spin-aligned templates, the presence of an intermediate-mass black hole with mass >100M(⊙) can be confirmed with 95% confidence in any binary that includes a component with a mass of 130M(⊙) or greater.

  14. Measuring the accreting stellar and intermediate mass black hole populations in the Galaxy and Local Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grindlay, J.; Barret, D.; Belloni, T.; Corbel, S.; Kaaret, P.; Allen, B.; Bazzano, A.; Berger, E.; Bignami, G.; Caraveo, P.; De Luca, A.; Fabbiano, P.; Finger, M.; Feroci, M.; Hong, J.; Jernigan, G.; van der Klis, M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kutyrev, A.; Loeb, A.; Paizis, A.; Pareschi, G.; Skinner, G.; Di Stefano, R.; Ubertini, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    The population of stellar black holes (SBHs) in the Galaxy and galaxies generally is poorly known in both number and distribution. SBHs are the fossil record of the massive stars in galaxy evolution and may have produced some (if not all) of the intermediate mass (≳100M⊙) black holes (IMBHs) and, in

  15. The 90-110 mu m dust feature in low to intermediate mass protostars : Calcite?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chiavassa, A; Ceccarelli, C; Tielens, AGGM; Caux, E; Maret, S

    We present ISO spectra between 60 and 180 mum of 32 protostars of low to intermediate mass. About half of the spectra present a dust feature between similar to90 and similar to110 mum. We describe the observational characteristics of this feature, which seems to be due to one single carrier. In

  16. The Metallicity Evolution of Low Mass Galaxies: New Contraints at Intermediate Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Alaina; Martin, Crystal L.; Finlator, Kristian; Dressler, Alan

    2013-01-01

    We present abundance measurements from 26 emission-line-selected galaxies at z approx. 0.6-0.7. By reaching stellar masses as low as 10(exp 8) M stellar mass, these observations provide the first measurement of the intermediate-redshift mass-metallicity (MZ) relation below 10(exp 9)M stellar mass. For the portion of our sample above M is greater than 10(exp 9)M (8/26 galaxies), we find good agreement with previous measurements of the intermediate-redshift MZ relation. Compared to the local relation, we measure an evolution that corresponds to a 0.12 dex decrease in oxygen abundances at intermediate redshifts. This result confirms the trend that metallicity evolution becomes more significant toward lower stellar masses, in keeping with a downsizing scenario where low-mass galaxies evolve onto the local MZ relation at later cosmic times. We show that these galaxies follow the local fundamental metallicity relation, where objects with higher specific (mass-normalized) star formation rates (SFRs) have lower metallicities. Furthermore, we show that the galaxies in our sample lie on an extrapolation of the SFR-M* relation (the star-forming main sequence). Leveraging the MZ relation and star-forming main sequence (and combining our data with higher-mass measurements from the literature), we test models that assume an equilibrium between mass inflow, outflow, and star formation.We find that outflows are required to describe the data. By comparing different outflow prescriptions, we show that momentum, driven winds can describe the MZ relation; however, this model underpredicts the amount of star formation in low-mass galaxies. This disagreement may indicate that preventive feedback from gas heating has been overestimated, or it may signify a more fundamental deviation from the equilibrium assumption.

  17. Detection of late intermediates in virus capsid assembly by charge detection mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Elizabeth E; Keifer, David Z; Selzer, Lisa; Lee, Lye Siang; Contino, Nathan C; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Zlotnick, Adam; Jarrold, Martin F

    2014-03-05

    The assembly of hundreds of identical proteins into an icosahedral virus capsid is a remarkable feat of molecular engineering. How this occurs is poorly understood. Key intermediates have been anticipated at the end of the assembly reaction, but it has not been possible to detect them. In this work we have used charge detection mass spectrometry to identify trapped intermediates from late in the assembly of the hepatitis B virus T = 4 capsid, a complex of 120 protein dimers. Prominent intermediates are found with 104/105, 110/111, and 117/118 dimers. Cryo-EM observations indicate the intermediates are incomplete capsids and, hence, on the assembly pathway. On the basis of their stability and kinetic accessibility we have proposed plausible structures. The prominent trapped intermediate with 104 dimers is attributed to an icosahedron missing two neighboring facets, the 111-dimer species is assigned to an icosahedron missing a single facet, and the intermediate with 117 dimers is assigned to a capsid missing a ring of three dimers in the center of a facet.

  18. Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Energetics of Intermediates that Guide Polyproline Folding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liuqing; Holliday, Alison E.; Glover, Matthew S.; Ewing, Michael A.; Russell, David H.; Clemmer, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Proline favors trans-configured peptide bonds in native proteins. Although cis/ trans configurations vary for non-native and unstructured states, solvent also influences these preferences. Water induces the all- cis right-handed polyproline-I (PPI) helix of polyproline to fold into the all- trans left-handed polyproline-II (PPII) helix. Our recent work has shown that this occurs via a sequential mechanism involving six resolved intermediates [Shi, L., Holliday, A.E., Shi, H., Zhu, F., Ewing, M.A., Russell, D.H., Clemmer, D.E.: Characterizing intermediates along the transition from PPI to PPII using ion mobility-mass spectrometry. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 136, 12702-12711 (2014)]. Here, we use ion mobility-mass spectrometry to make the first detailed thermodynamic measurements of the folding intermediates, which inform us about how and why this transition occurs. It appears that early intermediates are energetically favorable because of the hydration of the peptide backbone, whereas late intermediates are enthalpically unfavorable. However, folding continues, as the entropy of the system increases upon successive formation of each new structure. When PPII is immersed in 1-propanol, the PPII→PPI transition occurs, but this reaction occurs through a very different mechanism. Early on, the PPII population splits onto multiple pathways that eventually converge through a late intermediate that continues on to the folded PPI helix. Nearly every step is endothermic. Folding results from a stepwise increase in the disorder of the system, allowing a wide-scale search for a critical late intermediate. Overall, the data presented here allow us to establish the first experimentally determined energy surface for biopolymer folding as a function of solution environment.

  19. A prevalence of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in the cores of intermediate-mass stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stello, Dennis; Cantiello, Matteo; Fuller, Jim; Huber, Daniel; García, Rafael A; Bedding, Timothy R; Bildsten, Lars; Aguirre, Victor Silva

    2016-01-21

    Magnetic fields play a part in almost all stages of stellar evolution. Most low-mass stars, including the Sun, show surface fields that are generated by dynamo processes in their convective envelopes. Intermediate-mass stars do not have deep convective envelopes, although 10 per cent exhibit strong surface fields that are presumed to be residuals from the star formation process. These stars do have convective cores that might produce internal magnetic fields, and these fields might survive into later stages of stellar evolution, but information has been limited by our inability to measure the fields below the stellar surface. Here we report the strength of dipolar oscillation modes for a sample of 3,600 red giant stars. About 20 per cent of our sample show mode suppression, by strong magnetic fields in the cores, but this fraction is a strong function of mass. Strong core fields occur only in red giants heavier than 1.1 solar masses, and the occurrence rate is at least 50 per cent for intermediate-mass stars (1.6-2.0 solar masses), indicating that powerful dynamos were very common in the previously convective cores of these stars.

  20. Detection of abundant solid methanol toward young low mass stars

    OpenAIRE

    Pontoppidan, K. M.; Dartois, E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Thi, W. -F.; d'Hendecourt, L.

    2003-01-01

    We present detections of the absorption band at 3.53 micron due to solid methanol toward three low-mass young stellar objects located in the Serpens and Chameleon molecular cloud complexes. The sources were observed as part of a large spectroscopic survey of ~40 protostars. This is the first detection of solid methanol in the vicinity of low mass (M

  1. Ultra-luminous X-ray sources and intermediate-mass black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cseh, David

    2012-01-01

    More than ten years ago, the discovery of Ultra-luminous X-ray sources (ULXs) has opened up an entirely new field in astrophysics. Many ideas were developed to explain the nature of these sources, like their emission mechanism, mass, and origin, without any strong conclusions. Their discovery boosted the fields of X-ray binaries, accretion physics, stellar evolution, cosmology, black hole formation and growth, due to the concept of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). Since their discovery is related to the domain of X-ray astrophysics, there have been very few studies made in other wavelengths. This thesis focuses on the multiwavelength nature of Ultra-luminous X-ray sources and intermediate-mass black holes from various aspects, which help to overcome some difficulties we face today. First, I investigated the accretion signatures of a putative intermediate-mass black hole in a particular globular cluster. To this purpose, I characterized the nature of the innermost X-ray sources in the cluster. Then I calculated an upper limit on the mass of the black hole by studying possible accretion efficiencies and rates based on the dedicated X-ray and radio observations. The accreting properties of the source was described with standard spherical accretion and in the context of inefficient accretion. Secondly, I attempted to dynamically measure the mass of the black hole in a particular ULX via optical spectroscopy. I discovered that a certain emission line has a broad component that markedly shifts in wavelength. I investigated the possibility whether this line originates in the accretion disk, and thus might trace the orbital motion of the binary system. I also characterized the parameters of the binary system, such as the mass function, possible orbital separation, the size of the line-emitting region, and an upper limit on the mass of the black hole. Then I studied the environment of a number of ULXs that are associated with large-scale optical and radio nebulae. I

  2. Parasites favour intermediate nestling mass and brood size in cliff swallows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Charles R; Brown, Mary Bomberger

    2018-02-01

    A challenge of life-history theory is to explain why animal body size does not continue to increase, given various advantages of larger size. In birds, body size of nestlings and the number of nestlings produced (brood size) have occasionally been shown to be constrained by higher predation on larger nestlings and those from larger broods. Parasites also are known to have strong effects on life-history traits in birds, but whether parasitism can be a driver for stabilizing selection on nestling body size or brood size is unknown. We studied patterns of first-year survival in cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) in western Nebraska in relation to brood size and nestling body mass in nests under natural conditions and in those in which hematophagous ectoparasites had been removed by fumigation. Birds from parasitized nests showed highest first-year survival at the most common, intermediate brood-size and nestling-mass categories, but cliff swallows from nonparasitized nests had highest survival at the heaviest nestling masses and no relationship with brood size. A survival analysis suggested stabilizing selection on brood size and nestling mass in the presence (but not in the absence) of parasites. Parasites apparently favour intermediate offspring size and number in cliff swallows and produce the observed distributions of these traits, although the mechanisms are unclear. Our results emphasize the importance of parasites in life-history evolution. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  3. Blueberry Galaxies: The Lowest Mass Young Starbursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Wang, Junxian

    2017-09-01

    Searching for extreme emission line galaxies allows us to find low-mass metal-poor galaxies that are good analogs of high redshift Lyα emitting galaxies. These low-mass extreme emission line galaxies are also potential Lyman-continuum leakers. Finding them at very low redshifts (z≲ 0.05) allows us to be sensitive to even lower stellar masses and metallicities. We report on a sample of extreme emission line galaxies at z≲ 0.05 (blueberry galaxies). We selected them from SDSS broadband images on the basis of their broadband colors and studied their properties with MMT spectroscopy. From the entire SDSS DR12 photometric catalog, we found 51 photometric candidates. We spectroscopically confirm 40 as blueberry galaxies. (An additional seven candidates are contaminants, and four remain without spectra.) These blueberries are dwarf starburst galaxies with very small sizes (<1 kpc) and very high ionization ([O III]/[O II] ˜ 10-60). They also have some of the lowest stellar masses ({log}(M/{M}⊙ )˜ 6.5{--}7.5) and lowest metallicities (7.1< 12+{log}({{O}}/{{H}})< 7.8) of starburst galaxies. Thus, they are small counterparts to green pea galaxies and high redshift Lyα emitting galaxies.

  4. Role of nuclear reactions on stellar evolution of intermediate-mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, H.; Jones, S.; Fischer, T.; Martínez-Pinedo, G.

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of intermediate-mass stars (8 - 12 solar masses) represents one of the most challenging subjects in nuclear astrophysics. Their final fate is highly uncertain and strongly model dependent. They can become white dwarfs, they can undergo electron-capture or core-collapse supernovae or they might even proceed towards explosive oxygen burning and a subsequent thermonuclear explosion. We believe that an accurate description of nuclear reactions is crucial for the determination of the pre-supernova structure of these stars. We argue that due to the possible development of an oxygen-deflagration, a hydrodynamic description has to be used. We implement a nuclear reaction network with ∼200 nuclear species into the implicit hydrodynamic code AGILE. The reaction network considers all relevant nuclear electron captures and beta-decays. For selected relevant nuclear species, we include a set of updated reaction rates, for which we discuss the role for the evolution of the stellar core, at the example of selected stellar models. We find that the final fate of these intermediate-mass stars depends sensitively on the density threshold for weak processes that deleptonize the core.

  5. On the infant weight loss of low- to intermediate-mass star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, C.; Kroupa, P.; Nürnberger, D. E. A.; Sterzik, M. F.

    2007-04-01

    Star clusters are born in a highly compact configuration, typically with radii of less than about 1 pc roughly independently of mass. Since the star formation efficiency is less than 50 per cent by observation and because the residual gas is removed from the embedded cluster, the cluster must expand. In the process of doing so it only retains a fraction fst of its stars. To date there are no observational constraints for fst, although N-body calculations by Kroupa, Aarseth & Hurley suggest it to be about 20-30 per cent for Orion-type clusters. Here we use the data compiled by Testi et al., Testi, Palla & Natta and Testi, Palla & Natta for clusters around young Ae/Be stars and by de Wit et al. and de Wit et al. around young O stars and the study of de Zeeuw et al. of OB associations and combine these measurements with the expected number of stars in clusters with primary Ae/Be and O stars, respectively, using the empirical correlation between maximal stellar mass and star cluster mass of Weidner & Kroupa. We find that fst < 50 per cent with a decrease to higher cluster masses/more massive primaries. The interpretation would be that cluster formation is very disruptive. It appears that clusters with a birth stellar mass in the range 10-103Msolar keep at most 50 per cent of their stars.

  6. Physical properties of low-mass star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts (z <1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego, J.; Rodríguez-Muñoz, L.; Pacifici, C.; Tresse, L.; Charlot, S.; Gil de Paz, A.; Barro, G.; Villar, V.

    2015-05-01

    In this poster we present the physical properties of a sample of low-mass star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts (zstructures that hierarchical models predict to form first in the Universe (Dekel & Silk 1986) and that are responsible for the reionization process (Bouwens et al. 2012); and (2) the way or epoch they form and how they evolve are still open questions of modern astrophysics. We selected the sample on the CDFS field. Photometry (40 bands, from UV to far-IR) and preliminary photometric redshifts and stellar masses were obtained from RAINBOW database (Pérez-González et al. 2008). Morphology fom Griffith et al. (2012). Main selection was done by stellar mass, selecting those galaxies with stellar mass M_*MOS spectroscopy with the VIMOS spectrograph at VLT. The average spectrum is characterized by a faint, blue and flat continuum and strong emission lines, revealing that the systems are dominated by an undergoing star formation burst. SFRs and stellar masses are consistent with the SF main-squence over a 2 dex range. More massive objects show higher SFRs than low-mass objects, following the SF main sequence. Distant dwarfs and BCDs follow the overall star-forming sequence in the excitation-luminosity diagram, populating the high excitation, low metallicity and high strength region.

  7. Intermediate-mass-ratio black-hole binaries: numerical relativity meets perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lousto, Carlos O; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Zlochower, Yosef; Campanelli, Manuela

    2010-05-28

    We study black-hole binaries in the intermediate-mass-ratio regime 0.01≲q≲0.1 with a new technique that makes use of nonlinear numerical trajectories and efficient perturbative evolutions to compute waveforms at large radii for the leading and nonleading (ℓ, m) modes. As a proof-of-concept, we compute waveforms for q=1/10. We discuss applications of these techniques for LIGO and VIRGO data analysis and the possibility that our technique can be extended to produce accurate waveform templates from a modest number of fully nonlinear numerical simulations.

  8. Determination of Protein Folding Intermediate Structures Consistent with Data from Oxidative Footprinting Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinkel, Florian; Gsponer, Jörg

    2016-01-29

    The mapping of folding landscapes remains an important challenge in protein chemistry. Pulsed oxidative labeling of exposed residues and their detection via mass spectrometry provide new means of taking time-resolved "snapshots" of the structural changes that occur during protein folding. However, such experiments have been so far only interpreted qualitatively. Here, we report the detailed structural interpretation of mass spectrometry data from fast photochemical oxidation of proteins (FPOP) experiments at atomic resolution in a biased molecular dynamics approach. We are able to calculate structures of the early folding intermediate of the model system barstar that are fully consistent with FPOP data and Φ values. Furthermore, structures calculated with both FPOP data and Φ values are significantly less compact and have fewer helical residues than intermediate structures calculated with Φ values only. This improves the agreement with the experimental β-Tanford value and CD measurements. The restraints that we introduce facilitate the structural interpretation of FPOP data and provide new means for refined structure calculations of transiently sampled states on protein folding landscapes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evidence for an Intermediate Mass Black Hole in NGC 5408 X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    intermediate mass black hole.

  10. Rotational periods of solar-mass young stars in Orion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marilli, E.; Frasca, A.; Covino, E.; Alcalá, J.M.; Catalano, S.; Fernández, M.; Arellano Ferro, A.; Rubio Herrera, E.A.; Spezzi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Context: The evolution of the angular momentum in young low-mass stars is still a debated issue. The stars presented here were discovered as X-ray sources in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) of the Orion complex and subsequently optically identified thanks to both low and high resolution

  11. Understanding the environment around the intermediate mass black hole candidate ESO 243-49 HLX-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, N. A.; Guérou, A.; Ciambur, B.; Detoeuf, A.; Coriat, M.; Godet, O.; Barret, D.; Combes, F.; Contini, T.; Graham, Alister W.; Maccarone, T. J.; Mrkalj, M.; Servillat, M.; Schroetter, I.; Wiersema, K.

    2017-06-01

    Aims: ESO 243-49 HLX-1, otherwise known as HLX-1, is an intermediate mass black hole (IMBH) candidate located 8'' (3.7 Kpc) from the centre of the edge-on S0 galaxy ESO 243-49. How the black hole came to be associated with this galaxy, and the nature of the environment in which it resides, remain unclear. Using multi-wavelength observations we aim to investigate the nature of the medium surrounding HLX-1, search for evidence of past mergers with ESO 243-49 and constrain parameters of the galaxy, including the mass of the expected central supermassive black hole, essential for future modelling of the interaction of the IMBH and ESO 243-49. Methods: We have reduced and analysed integral field unit observations of ESO 243-49 that were taken with the MUSE instrument on the VLT. Using complementary multi-wavelength data, including X-shooter, HST, Swift, Chandra and ATCA data, we have further examined the vicinity of HLX-1. We additionally examined the nature of the host galaxy and estimate the mass of the central supermassive black hole in ESO 243-49 using (black hole mass)-(host spheroid) scaling relations and the fundamental plane of black hole activity. Results: No evidence for a recent minor-merger that could result in the presence of the IMBH is discerned, but the data are compatible with a scenario in which minor mergers may have occurred in the history of ESO 243-49. The MUSE data reveal a rapidly rotating disc in the centre of the galaxy, around the supermassive black hole. The mass of the supermassive black hole at the centre of ESO 243-49 is estimated to be 0.5-23 × 107M⊙. Studying the spectra of HLX-1, that were taken in the low and hard state, we determine Hα flux variability to be at least a factor 6, compared to observations taken during the high and soft state. This Hα flux variability over one year indicates that the line originates close to the intermediate mass black hole, excluding the possibility that the line emanates from a surrounding nebula

  12. X-Ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei with Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, G. C.; Mathur, S.; Griffiths, R. E.; Rao, A. R.

    2008-12-01

    We present a systematic X-ray study of eight active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with intermediate-mass black holes (MBH ~ 8-95 × 104 M⊙) based on 12 XMM-Newton observations. The sample includes the two prototype AGNs in this class—NGC 4395 and POX 52 and six other AGNs discovered with the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey. These AGNs show some of the strongest X-ray variability, with the normalized excess variances being the largest and the power density break timescales being the shortest observed among radio-quiet AGNs. The excess-variance-luminosity correlation appears to depend on both the BH mass and the Eddington luminosity ratio. The break timescale-black hole mass relations for AGN with IMBHs are consistent with that observed for massive AGNs. We find that the FWHM of the Hβ/Hα line is uncorrelated with the BH mass, but shows strong anticorrelation with the Eddington luminosity ratio. Four AGNs show clear evidence for soft X-ray excess emission (kTin ~ 150-200 eV). X-ray spectra of three other AGNs are consistent with the presence of the soft excess emission. NGC 4395 with lowest L/LEdd lacks the soft excess emission. Evidently small black mass is not the primary driver of strong soft X-ray excess emission from AGNs. The X-ray spectral properties and optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions of these AGNs are similar to those of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The observed X-ray/UV properties of AGNs with IMBHs are consistent with these AGNs being low-mass extensions of more massive AGNs, those with high Eddington luminosity ratio looking more like narrow-line Seyfert 1 s and those with low L/LEdd looking more like broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  13. EVIDENCE FOR AN INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE IN NGC 5408 X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohmayer, Tod E.; Mushotzky, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    We report the discovery with XMM-Newton of correlated spectral and timing behavior in the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) NGC 5408 X-1. An ∼100 ks pointing with XMM/Newton obtained in 2008 January reveals a strong 10 mHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the >1 keV flux, as well as flat-topped, band-limited noise breaking to a power law. The energy spectrum is again dominated by two components, a 0.16 keV thermal disk and a power law with an index of ∼2.5. These new measurements, combined with results from our previous 2006 January pointing in which we first detected QPOs, show for the first time in a ULX a pattern of spectral and temporal correlations strongly analogous to that seen in Galactic black hole (BH) sources, but at much higher X-ray luminosity and longer characteristic timescales. We find that the QPO frequency is proportional to the inferred disk flux, while the QPO and broadband noise amplitude (rms) are inversely proportional to the disk flux. Assuming that QPO frequency scales inversely with the BH mass at a given power-law spectral index we derive mass estimates using the observed QPO frequency-spectral index relations from five stellar-mass BH systems with dynamical mass constraints. The results from all sources are consistent with a mass range for NGC 5408 X-1 from 1000 to 9000 M sun . We argue that these are conservative limits, and a more likely range is from 2000 to 5000 M sun . Moreover, the recent relation from Gierlinski et al. that relates the BH mass to the strength of variability at high frequencies (above the break in the power spectrum) is also indicative of such a high mass for NGC 5408 X-1. Importantly, none of the above estimates appears consistent with a BH mass less than ∼1000 M sun for NGC 5408 X-1. We argue that these new findings strongly support the conclusion that NGC 5408 X-1 harbors an intermediate-mass BH.

  14. Intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals in the Einstein Telescope. II. Parameter estimation errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huerta, E. A.; Gair, Jonathan R.

    2011-01-01

    We explore the precision with which the Einstein Telescope will be able to measure the parameters of intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals, i.e., the inspirals of stellar mass compact objects into intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs). We calculate the parameter estimation errors using the Fisher Matrix formalism and present results of Monte Carlo simulations of these errors over choices for the extrinsic parameters of the source. These results are obtained using two different models for the gravitational waveform which were introduced in paper I of this series. These two waveform models include the inspiral, merger, and ringdown phases in a consistent way. One of the models, based on the transition scheme of Ori and Thorne [A. Ori and K. S. Thorne, Phys. Rev. D 62, 124022 (2000).], is valid for IMBHs of arbitrary spin; whereas, the second model, based on the effective-one-body approach, has been developed to cross-check our results in the nonspinning limit. In paper I of this series, we demonstrated the excellent agreement in both phase and amplitude between these two models for nonspinning black holes, and that their predictions for signal-to-noise ratios are consistent to within 10%. We now use these waveform models to estimate parameter estimation errors for binary systems with masses 1.4M · +100M · , 10M · +100M · , 1.4M · +500M · , and 10M · +500M · and various choices for the spin of the central IMBH. Assuming a detector network of three Einstein Telescopes, the analysis shows that for a 10M · compact object inspiralling into a 100M · IMBH with spin q=0.3, detected with a signal-to-noise ratio of 30, we should be able to determine the compact object and IMBH masses, and the IMBH spin magnitude to fractional accuracies of ∼10 -3 , ∼10 -3.5 , and ∼10 -3 , respectively. We also expect to determine the location of the source in the sky and the luminosity distance to within ∼0.003 steradians and ∼10%, respectively. We also compute results for

  15. Intermediate-mass Higgs boson and isosinglet neutral heavy lepton signals at hadron supercolliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, G.

    1992-01-01

    The signals for the Standard Model intermediate-mass Higgs boson and isosinglet neutral heavy leptons at the forthcoming hadron supercolliders-the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are studied. The author studies inclusive production of the Standard Model Higgs boson in the intermediate-mass region (M W approx-lt m H approx-lt 2M Z ) and its subsequent decay into two on- or off-shell W bosons that decay leptonically. Backgrounds from continuum W pair production and top quark pair production with semileptonic decays are investigated. The author concludes the Higgs boson signal may be observed via the decay H → W*W* → (ell bar v ell ) (bar ell' v' ell ) at the SSC for 145 GeV H approx-lt 2M Z and at the LHC for 150 GeV H approx-lt 2M Z if m t > 150 GeV. The author analyzes the search and discovery potential of isosinglet neutral heavy leptons (NHLs) produced via real or virtual W decay at pp supercolliders. The author considers the signal resulting from the leptonic decay of the NHL, and the two major backgrounds-continuum WZ, Wγ production and t bar tj production, where j is a hadronic jet. The decay patterns of NHL depend on its mass M N , and different search strategies are needed for the two mass regions M N W and M N > M Z . The author finds for m t ≥ 150 (200) GeV the signal is observable for M N ≤ 60 (70) GeV in the mass-region M N W , and up to M N ≅ 110 GeV for M N > M W , at both SSC and LHC. It is shown the non-observance of the signal (with a 4σ statistical significance) in the region M N W could put upper limits on the NHL coupling constants that would be an improvement over the limits obtainable from the CERN Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP I)

  16. Evidence from K2 for Rapid Rotation in the Descendant of an Intermediate-mass Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, J. J.; Kawaler, Steven D.; Romero, A. D.; Kepler, S. O.; Tremblay, P.-E.; Bell, Keaton J.; Dunlap, B. H.; Montgomery, M. H.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Clemens, J. C.; Dennihy, E.; Redfield, S.

    2017-05-01

    Using patterns in the oscillation frequencies of a white dwarf observed by K2, we have measured the fastest rotation rate (1.13 ± 0.02 hr) of any isolated pulsating white dwarf known to date. Balmer-line fits to follow-up spectroscopy from the SOAR telescope show that the star (SDSSJ0837+1856, EPIC 211914185) is a 13,590+/- 340 K, 0.87 ± 0.03 M ⊙ white dwarf. This is the highest mass measured for any pulsating white dwarf with known rotation, suggesting a possible link between high mass and fast rotation. If it is the product of single-star evolution, its progenitor was a roughly 4.0 M ⊙ main-sequence B star; we know very little about the angular momentum evolution of such intermediate-mass stars. We explore the possibility that this rapidly rotating white dwarf is the byproduct of a binary merger, which we conclude is unlikely given the pulsation periods observed.

  17. NO EVIDENCE FOR INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLES IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS: STRONG CONSTRAINTS FROM THE JVLA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Seth, Anil C.; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2012-01-01

    With a goal of searching for accreting intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), we report the results of ultra-deep Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of the cores of three Galactic globular clusters: M15, M19, and M22. We reach rms noise levels of 1.5-2.1 μJy beam –1 at an average frequency of 6 GHz. No sources are observed at the center of any of the clusters. For a conservative set of assumptions about the properties of the accretion, we set 3σ upper limits on IMBHs from 360 to 980 M ☉ . These limits are among the most stringent obtained for any globular cluster. They add to a growing body of work that suggests either (1) IMBHs ∼> 1000 M ☉ are rare in globular clusters or (2) when present, IMBHs accrete in an extraordinarily inefficient manner.

  18. No Evidence for Intermediate-mass Black Holes in Globular Clusters: Strong Constraints from the JVLA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strader, Jay; Chomiuk, Laura; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Miller-Jones, James C. A.; Seth, Anil C.; Heinke, Craig O.; Sivakoff, Gregory R.

    2012-05-01

    With a goal of searching for accreting intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs), we report the results of ultra-deep Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of the cores of three Galactic globular clusters: M15, M19, and M22. We reach rms noise levels of 1.5-2.1 μJy beam-1 at an average frequency of 6 GHz. No sources are observed at the center of any of the clusters. For a conservative set of assumptions about the properties of the accretion, we set 3σ upper limits on IMBHs from 360 to 980 M ⊙. These limits are among the most stringent obtained for any globular cluster. They add to a growing body of work that suggests either (1) IMBHs >~ 1000 M ⊙ are rare in globular clusters or (2) when present, IMBHs accrete in an extraordinarily inefficient manner.

  19. Probing Intermediate Mass Higgs Interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Éboli, Oscar J P; Lietti, S M; Novaes, S F

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the potentiality of the CERN Large Hadron Collider to probe the Higgs boson couplings to the electroweak gauge bosons. We parametrize the possible deviations of these couplings due to new physics in a model independent way, using the most general dimension--six effective lagrangian where the SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y is realized linearly. For intermediate Higgs masses, the decay channel into two photons is the most important one for Higgs searches at the LHC. We study the effects of these new interactions on the Higgs production mechanism and its subsequent decay into two photons. We show that the LHC will be sensitive to new physics scales beyond the present limits extracted from the LEP and Tevatron physics.

  20. L1188: A Promising Candidate for Cloud–Cloud Collisions Triggering the Formation of Low- and Intermediate-mass Stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yan; Fang, Min; Mao, Ruiqing; Zhang, Shaobo; Wang, Yuan; Su, Yang; Chen, Xuepeng; Yang, Ji; Wang, Hongchi; Lu, Dengrong, E-mail: ygong@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory and Key Laboratory of Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, 210008 Nanjing (China)

    2017-01-20

    We present a new large-scale (2° × 2°) simultaneous {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O (J = 1–0) mapping of L1188 with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m telescope. Our observations have revealed that L1188 consists of two nearly orthogonal filamentary molecular clouds at two clearly separated velocities. Toward the intersection showing large velocity spreads, we find several bridging features connecting the two clouds in velocity, and an open arc structure that exhibits high excitation temperatures, enhanced {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO emission, and broad {sup 12}CO line wings. This agrees with the scenario that the two clouds are colliding with each other. The distribution of young stellar object (YSO) candidates implies an enhancement of star formation in the intersection of the two clouds. We suggest that a cloud–cloud collision happened in L1188 about 1 Myr ago, possibly triggering the formation of low- and intermediate-mass YSOs in the intersection.

  1. Intermediate-mass single stars and accreting white dwarfs as sources of neutron-rich isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iben, I. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    During the most luminous portion of the asymptotic giant-branch phase, models of intermediate-mass stars first become carbon stars and then produce s-process isotopes in the solar-system distribution. Recent observations of the optically most luminous carbon stars in the Magellanic Clouds introduce the possibility that real intermediate-mass stars lose their hydrogen-rich envelopes during the asymptotic giant-branch phase before they have made s-process isotopes both in large quantities and in the solar system distribution. This encourages a search for alternate sources of these isotopes. A promising site for the production of some neutron-rich isotopes isthe convective helium-carbon region that appears in accreting white dwarfs during helium shell flashes. For appropriate accretion rates, overlap of matter in successive convective zones may lead to an exponential distribution of exposures. Further, because of a small entropy barrier between the convective shell and the hydrogen-rich envelope, protons enter the shell and provide a source of neutrons that, for appropriate accretion rates, is repetitive in strength and either dominates or is complementary to the 22 Ne(α,n) 25 Mg source. This permits an estimate of the distribution of neutron-rich isotopes that is formed after many flashes. The distribution, in most instances, tends to be weighted more toward heavier elements than is the case when 22 Ne(α, n) 25 Mg is the sole source of neutrons. Hence, accreting white dwarfs cannot be major contributors to the enrichment of the interstellar medium in most s-process isotopes. Considerable effort should be devoted toward demonstrating whether or not the bolometrically most lumious asymptotic giant branch stars in local systems obey M/sub BOL/ /sup min/ -6.5, then either the source of most Galactic s-process isotopes is as yet unknown, or the rate of the 22 Ne(α, n) 25 Mg reaction has been underestimated

  2. Mass “Non-communication” of the Young

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MarijaBoranijašević

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The authors in the paper analyze the phenomenon of excessive presence of the mass communication media, television in the first place, and the modern computer technology in the lives of young people, as well as the issue whether this fact influences the reduction of interpersonal communication of the young. The goal of the research was to determine to which extent the newest technological achievements are present in the lives of the young in Serbia and how often they use them as media in the process of communication with their peers, and whether this kind of mediated communication consequently leads to the reduction of interpersonal communication face-to-face, which as an ultimate result can have alienation of an individual in the modern world as a widely spread phenomenon of the present.

  3. A Tidal Disruption Event in a Nearby Galaxy Hosting an Intermediate Mass Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, D; Cenko, S. B.; Covino, S.; Troja, E.; Pursimo, T.; Cheung, C. C.; Fox, O.; Kutyrev, A.; Campana, S.; Fugazza, D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We report the serendipitous discovery of a bright point source flare in the Abell cluster A1795 with archival EUVE and Chandra observations. Assuming the EUVE emission is associated with the Chandra source, the X-ray 0.5-7 kiloelectronvolt flux declined by a factor of approximately 2300 over a time span of 6 years, following a power-law decay with index approximately equal to 2.44 plus or minus 0.40. The Chandra data alone vary by a factor of approximately 20. The spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a constant temperature of kiloteslas approximately equal to 0.09 kiloelectronvolts (approximately equal to 10 (sup 6) Kelvin). The flare is spatially coincident with the nuclear region of a faint, inactive galaxy with a photometric redshift consistent at the 1 sigma level with the cluster (redshift = 0.062476).We argue that these properties are indicative of a tidal disruption of a star by a black hole (BH) with log(M (sub BH) / M (sub 1 solar mass)) approximately equal to 5.5 plus or minus 0.5. If so, such a discovery indicates that tidal disruption flares may be used to probe BHs in the intermediate mass range, which are very difficult to study by other means.

  4. Constructing effective one-body dynamics with numerical energy flux for intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Wenbiao; Cao Zhoujian

    2011-01-01

    A new scheme for computing dynamical evolutions and gravitational radiations for intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals (IMRIs) based on an effective one-body (EOB) dynamics plus Teukolsky perturbation theory is built in this paper. In the EOB framework, the dynamic essentially affects the resulted gravitational waveform for a binary compact star system. This dynamic includes two parts. One is the conservative part, which comes from effective one-body reduction. The other part is the gravitational backreaction, which contributes to the shrinking process of the inspiral of a binary compact star system. Previous works used an analytical waveform to construct this backreaction term. Since the analytical form is based on post-Newtonian expansion, the consistency of this term is always checked by numerical energy flux. Here, we directly use numerical energy flux by solving the Teukolsky equation via the frequency-domain method to construct this backreaction term. The conservative correction to the leading order terms in mass-ratio is included in the deformed-Kerr metric and the EOB Hamiltonian. We try to use this method to simulate not only quasicircular adiabatic inspiral, but also the nonadiabatic plunge phase. For several different spinning black holes, we demonstrate and compare the resulted dynamical evolutions and gravitational waveforms.

  5. Jetted tidal disruptions of stars as a flag of intermediate mass black holes at high redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-11-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) of stars by single or binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) brighten galactic nuclei and reveal a population of otherwise dormant black holes. Adopting event rates from the literature, we aim to establish general trends in the redshift evolution of the TDE number counts and their observable signals. We pay particular attention to (I) jetted TDEs whose luminosity is boosted by relativistic beaming and (II) TDEs around binary black holes. We show that the brightest (jetted) TDEs are expected to be produced by massive black hole binaries if the occupancy of intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) in low-mass galaxies is high. The same binary population will also provide gravitational wave sources for the evolved Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. In addition, we find that the shape of the X-ray luminosity function of TDEs strongly depends on the occupancy of IMBHs and could be used to constrain scenarios of SMBH formation. Finally, we make predictions for the expected number of TDEs observed by future X-ray telescopes finding that a 50 times more sensitive instrument than the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on board the Swift satellite is expected to trigger ˜10 times more events than BAT, while 6-20 TDEs are expected in each deep field observed by a telescope 50 times more sensitive than the Chandra X-ray Observatory if the occupation fraction of IMBHs is high. Because of their long decay times, high-redshift TDEs can be mistaken for fixed point sources in deep field surveys and targeted observations of the same deep field with year-long intervals could reveal TDEs.

  6. Evolving ONe WD+He star systems to intermediate-mass binary pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Wang, B.; Chen, W.; Zuo, Z.; Han, Z.

    2018-03-01

    It has been suggested that accretion-induced collapse (AIC) is a non-negligible path for the formation of the observed neutron stars (NSs). An ONe white dwarf (WD) that accretes material from a He star may experience AIC process and eventually produce intermediate-mass binary pulsars (IMBPs), named as the ONe WD+He star scenario. Note that previous studies can only account for part of the observed IMBPs with short orbital periods. In this work, we investigate the evolution of about 900 ONe WD+He star binaries to explore the distribution of IMBPs. We found that the ONe WD+He star scenario could form IMBPs including pulsars with 5-340 ms spin periods and 0.75-1.38 M_{⊙} WD companions, in which the orbital periods range from 0.04 to 900 d. Compared with the 20 observed IMBPs, this scenario can cover the parameters of 13 sources in the final orbital period-WD mass plane and the Corbet diagram, most of which has short orbital periods. We found that the ONe WD+He star scenario can explain almost all the observed IMBPs with short orbital periods. This work can well match the observed parameters of PSR J1802-2124 (one of the two precisely observed IMBPs), providing a possible evolutional path for its formation. We also speculate that the compact companion of HD 49798 (a hydrogen depleted sdO6 star) may be not a NS based on the present work.

  7. INTERMEDIATE-MASS HOT CORES AT {approx}500 AU: DISKS OR OUTFLOWS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, Aina; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB-Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell 2, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalunya (Spain); Fuente, Asuncion; Alonso-Albi, Tomas [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional, P.O. Box 112, 28803 Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Fontani, Francesco; Sanchez-Monge, Alvaro [Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, INAF, Largo E. Fermi 5, 50125 Firenze (Italy); Boissier, Jeremie [Istituto di Radioastronomia, INAF, Via Gobetti 101, Bologna (Italy); Pietu, Vincent; Neri, Roberto [IRAM, 300 Rue de la piscine, 38406 Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Busquet, Gemma [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Area di Recerca di Tor Vergata, Via Fosso Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy); Estalella, Robert [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia (IEEC-UB), Institut Ciencies Cosmos, Universitat Barcelona, Marti Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Zapata, Luis A. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Zhang, Qizhou; Ho, Paul T. P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Audard, Marc, E-mail: palau@ieec.uab.es [Geneva Observatory, University of Geneva, Ch. des Maillettes 51, 1290 Versoix (Switzerland)

    2011-12-20

    Observations with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer in the most extended configuration toward two intermediate-mass star-forming regions, IRAS 22198+6336 and AFGL 5142, reveal the presence of several complex organic molecules at {approx}500 AU scales, confirming the presence of hot cores in both regions. The hot cores are not rich in CN-bearing molecules, as often seen in massive hot cores, and are mainly traced by CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH, (CH{sub 2}OH){sub 2}, CH{sub 3}COCH{sub 3}, and CH{sub 3}OH, with, additionally, CH{sub 3}CHO, CH{sub 3}OD, and HCOOD for IRAS 22198+6336, and C{sub 6}H and O{sup 13}CS for AFGL 5142. The emission of complex molecules is resolved down to sizes of {approx}300 and {approx}600 AU, for IRAS 22198+6336 and AFGL 5142, respectively, and most likely is tracing protostellar disks rather than flattened envelopes or toroids as is usually found. This is especially clear for the case of IRAS 22198+6336, where we detect a velocity gradient for all the mapped molecules perpendicular to the most chemically rich outflow of the region, yielding a dynamic mass {approx}> 4 M{sub Sun }. As for AFGL 5142, the hot core emission is resolved into two elongated cores separated {approx}1800 AU. A detailed comparison of the complex molecule peaks to the new CO (2-1) data and H{sub 2}O maser data from the literature suggests also that for AFGL 5142 the complex molecules are mainly associated with disks, except for a faint and extended molecular emission found to the west, which is possibly produced in the interface between one of the outflows and the dense surrounding gas.

  8. Clinical impact of body mass index on prostate biopsy in patients with intermediate PSA levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekita, Nobuyuki; Chin, Kensei; Fujimura, Masaaki; Mikami, Kazuo; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Kamijima, Shuichi

    2008-01-01

    From April 2005 to September 2007, 480 patients underwent transrectal prostate biopsy at our institution. The clinical data including age, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, prostate volume and body mass index (BMI) were obtained, and the cancer detection rates and pathological findings were evaluated in 305 cases with a PSA concentration of 4.0 to 10.0 ng/ml. Prostate volume was calculated from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. The 305 patients were categorized according to their BMI into three groups (normal, less than 22 kg/m 2 ; overweight, 22-25 kg/m 2 ; and obese, more than 25 kg/m 2 ). Cancer detection rates and histopathologic findings were compared between the groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was also performed. Prostate cancer was detected in 127 patients. No significant differences in BMI were observed between biopsy-positive and biopsy-negative cases (p=0.965), and the detection rates of prostate cancer observed in the three groups were not significantly different. There was a significant association between BMI and the findings of high Gleason score (more than 4+3) (p=0.048). BMI was not a contributory factor of prostate cancer detection for cases with intermediate PSA levels; however, patients with high BMI may have high-grade malignancy features. (author)

  9. Ab initio results for intermediate-mass, open-shell nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert B.; Dytrych, Tomas; Launey, Kristina D.; Draayer, Jerry P.

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical understanding of nuclei in the intermediate-mass region is vital to astrophysical models, especially for nucleosynthesis. Here, we employ the ab initio symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM) in an effort to push first-principle calculations across the sd-shell region. The ab initio SA-NCSM's advantages come from its ability to control the growth of model spaces by including only physically relevant subspaces, which allows us to explore ultra-large model spaces beyond the reach of other methods. We report on calculations for 19Ne and 20Ne up through 13 harmonic oscillator shells using realistic interactions and discuss the underlying structure as well as implications for various astrophysical reactions. This work was supported by the U.S. NSF (OCI-0904874 and ACI -1516338) and the U.S. DOE (DE-SC0005248), and also benefitted from the Blue Waters sustained-petascale computing project and high performance computing resources provided by LSU.

  10. Prompt emission from tidal disruptions of white dwarfs by intermediate mass black holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laguna P.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a qualitative picture of prompt emission from tidal disruptions of white dwarfs (WD by intermediate mass black holes (IMBH. The smaller size of an IMBH compared to a supermassive black hole and a smaller tidal radius of a WD disruption lead to a very fast event with high peak luminosity. Magnetic field is generated in situ following the tidal disruption, which leads to effective accretion. Since large-scale magnetic field is also produced, geometrically thick super-Eddington inflow leads to a relativistic jet. The dense jet possesses a photosphere, which emits quasi-thermal radiation in soft X-rays. The source can be classified as a long low-luminosity gamma-ray burst (ll-GRB. Tidal compression of a WD causes nuclear ignition, which is observable as an accompanying supernova. We suggest that GRB060218 and SN2006aj is such a pair of ll-GRB and supernova. We argue that in a flux-limited sample the disruptions of WDs by IMBHs are more frequent then the disruptions of other stars by IMBHs.

  11. Searching for Intermediate Mass Black Holes in Ultraluminous X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritze, Hannah; Wright, Simon; Kilgard, Roy

    2018-01-01

    X-ray observations of nearby galaxies provide one of the best laboratories in the universe for studying two exotic classes of object: black holes and neutron stars. These observations allow us to study the dramatic effect such objects have on their surroundings, as well as the high-energy physics involved in their emission. We conduct a volume-limited archival survey of X-ray sources in all galaxies observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory within 15 Mpc, and identify a set of ultraluminous X-ray sources for detailed spectral analysis. We perform this analysis with the aim of searching for signatures of spectral state transitions and super-Eddington accretion that could indicate the presence of an Intermediate Mass Black Hole (IMBH) binary system. Here, we identify 43 potential IMBH sources that have signatures of super-Eddington accretion. We plan to follow up this initial selection with a multiwavelength analysis of these sources, in order to place further constraints on their nature and surrounding environment.

  12. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aasi, J.; Agathos, M.; Beker, M.G.; Bertolini, A.; Bulten, H.J.; Del Pozzo, W.; Jonker, R.; Meidam, J.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; LIGO Sci, Collaboration; Virgo, Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as

  13. Simultaneous determination of the intermediates of the citric acid cycle by gas chromatography--mass fragmentography using deuterated internal standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, C.R.; Pollitt, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    Current developments in the use of gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy in studying the intermediates in the Krebs tricarboxylic acid cycle are outlined. The methods developed make use of deuterated internal standards and multiple-ion monitoring to obtain sensitivity comparable to that of the better fluorimetric enzymatic assays. The problems still remaining are indicated

  14. From Stars to Superplanets: The Low-Mass Initial Mass Function in the Young Cluster IC 348

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Najita, Joan R; Tiede, Glenn P; Carr, John S

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the low-mass population of the young cluster IC 348 down to the deuterium-burning limit, a fiducial boundary between brown dwarf and planetary mass objects, using a new and innovative...

  15. Urinary calcium, sodium, and bone mass of young females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matkovic, V; Ilich, J Z; Andon, M B; Hsieh, L C; Tzagournis, M A; Lagger, B J; Goel, P K

    1995-08-01

    Calcium is an important determinant of peak bone mass in young adults because of its influence on skeletal development during growth. Attainment of maximum peak bone mass requires optimal positive balance between calcium intake and obligatory losses of calcium, primarily in urine and feces. Urinary excretion is an important determinant of calcium retention in the body. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of various nutrients on urinary calcium excretion, and to assess their impact on bone mass of young females, aged 8-13 y, during early puberty. The study was conducted in 381 healthy white females in pubertal stage 2. From each participant we collected basic anthropometric measurements, a 3-d food record, blood, a 24-h urine sample, and bone mass measurements of the total body and forearm by dual X-ray absorptiometry. Urinary sodium was found to be one of the most important determinants of urinary calcium excretion: [urinary calcium (mmol/d) = 0.01154 x urinary sodium (mmol/d) + 0.823], whereas calcium intake had relatively little impact: [urinary calcium (mmol/d) = 0.02252 x calcium intake (mmol/d) + 1.5261]. Urinary calcium was much higher at a calcium intake of approximately 37.5 mmol/d (1500 mg/d), supporting the notion that calcium is a threshold nutrient. Calcium intake had a significant positive influence on the bone mineral content and density of the whole body and radius shaft whereas urinary calcium had a negative influence, presumably by reducing calcium accretion into the skeleton.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Measuring the masses of Intermediate Polars with NuSTAR: V709 Cas, NY Lup and V1223 Sgr

    OpenAIRE

    Shaw, A. W.; Heinke, C. O.; Mukai, K.; Sivakoff, G. R.; Tomsick, J. A.; Rana, V.

    2018-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of intermediate polars can be modelled to give a direct measurement of white dwarf mass. Here we fit accretion column models to NuSTAR spectra of three intermediate polars; V709 Cas, NY Lup and V1223 Sgr in order to determine their masses. From fits to 3-78 keV spectra, we find masses of $M_{\\rm WD}=0.88^{+0.05}_{-0.04}M_{\\odot}$, $1.16^{+0.04}_{-0.02}M_{\\odot}$ and $0.75\\pm0.02M_{\\odot}$ for V709 Cas, NY Lup and V1223 Sgr, respectively. Our measurements are generally in agr...

  17. The impact of body mass index on treatment outcomes for patients with low-intermediate risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamoah, Kosj; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M.; Jeffers, Abra; Malkowicz, Bruce; Spangler, Elaine; Park, Jong Y.; Whittemore, Alice; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the relationship between preoperative body mass index and need for adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) following radical prostatectomy. The goal of this study was to evaluate the utility of body mass index in predicting adverse clinical outcomes which require adjuvant RT among men with organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa). We used a prospective cohort of 1,170 low-intermediate PCa risk men who underwent radical prostatectomy and evaluated the effect of body mass index on adverse pathologic features and freedom from biochemical failure (FFbF). Clinical and pathologic variables were compared across the body mass index groups using an analysis of variance model for continuous variables or χ 2 for categorical variables. Factors related to adverse pathologic features were examined using logistic regression models. Time to biochemical recurrence was compared across the groups using a log-rank survivorship analysis. Multivariable analysis predicting biochemical recurrence was conducted with a Cox proportional hazards model. Patients with elevated body mass index (defined as body mass index ≥25 kg/m 2 ) had greater extraprostatic extension (p = 0.004), and positive surgical margins (p = 0.01). Elevated body mass index did not correlate with preoperative risk groupings (p = 0.94). However, when compared with non-obese patients (body mass index <30 kg/m 2 ), obese patients (body mass index ≥30 kg/m 2 ) were much more likely to have higher rate of adverse pathologic features (p = 0.006). In patients with low- and intermediate- risk disease, obesity was strongly associated with rate of pathologic upgrading of tumors (p = 0.01 and p = 0.02), respectively. After controlling for known preoperative risk factors, body mass index was independently associated with ≥2 adverse pathologic features (p = 0.002), an indicator for adjuvant RT as well as FFbF (p = 0.001). Body mass index of ≥30 kg/m 2 is independently associated with adverse pathologic features

  18. MEASURING TINY MASS ACCRETION RATES ONTO YOUNG BROWN DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herczeg, Gregory J.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2009-01-01

    We present low-resolution Keck I/LRIS spectra spanning from 3200 to 9000 A of nine young brown dwarfs and three low-mass stars in the TW Hya Association and in Upper Sco. The optical spectral types of the brown dwarfs range from M5.5 to M8.75, though two have near-IR spectral types of early L dwarfs. We report new accretion rates derived from excess Balmer continuum emission for the low-mass stars TW Hya and Hen 3-600A and the brown dwarfs 2MASS J12073347-3932540, UScoCTIO 128, SSSPM J1102-3431, USco J160606.29-233513.3, DENIS-P J160603.9-205644, and Oph J162225-240515B, and upper limits on accretion for the low-mass star Hen 3-600B and the brown dwarfs UScoCTIO 112, Oph J162225-240515A, and USco J160723.82-221102.0. For the six brown dwarfs in our sample that are faintest at short wavelengths, the accretion luminosity or upper limit is measurable only when the image is binned over large wavelength intervals. This method extends our sensitivity to accretion rate down to ∼10 -13 M sun yr -1 for brown dwarfs. Since the ability to measure an accretion rate from excess Balmer continuum emission depends on the contrast between excess continuum emission and the underlying photosphere, for objects with earlier spectral types the upper limit on accretion rate is much higher. Absolute uncertainties in our accretion rate measurements of ∼3-5 include uncertainty in accretion models, brown dwarf masses, and distance. The accretion rate of 2 x 10 -12 M sun yr -1 onto 2MASS J12073347-3932540 is within 15% of two previous measurements, despite large changes in the Hα flux.

  19. Observing the linked depletion of dust and CO gas at 0.1–10 au in disks of intermediate-mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzatti, A.; Garufi, A.; Kama, M.; Benisty, M.; Brittain, S.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Rayner, J.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the discovery of correlations between dust and CO gas tracers of the 0.1–10 au region in planet-forming disks around young intermediate-mass stars. The abundance of refractory elements on stellar photospheres decreases as the location of hot CO gas emission recedes to larger disk radii, and as the near-infrared excess emission from hot dust in the inner disk decreases. The linked behavior between these observables demonstrates that the recession of infrared CO emission to larger disk radii traces an inner disk region where dust is being depleted. We also find that Herbig disk cavities have either low ( 5–10%) or high ( 20–35%) near-infrared excess, a dichotomy that has not been captured by the classic definition of “pre-transitional” disks.

  20. Search for gravitational wave ringdowns from perturbed intermediate mass black holes in LIGO-Virgo data from 2005-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency $50\\le f_{0}/\\mathrm{Hz} \\le 2000$ and decay timescale $0.0001\\lesssim \\tau/\\mathrm{s} \\lesssim 0.1$ characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant ...

  1. Observation of the intermediates of in-source aldolization reaction in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry analysis of heteroaromatic aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Kezhi; Zhang, Xiaoping; Bai, Xingfeng; Lv, Huiqing; Li, Zuguang; Lee, Maw-Rong

    2015-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analyses of 2-(1,2,4-triazole-1-yl)-6-methyl-3- quinolinecarboxaldehyde were carried out by using an ion trap mass spectrometer in a positive-ion mode. Interestingly, several unusual [M + 15](+), [M + 33](+), and [M + 47](+) ions were observed with a high abundance in the ESI-MS spectrum when methanol was used as the ESI solvent. However, only the protonated molecule was obtained with acetonitrile as the ESI solvent. These unusual ions have been proposed as the intermediates of an aldolization reaction occurring in the ESI source, which have been validated by a tandem mass spectrometry experiment, high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis, and theoretical calculations. A full understanding of this reaction can contribute to the avoidance of analysis errors in the ESI-MS analysis of unknown heteroaromatic aldehydes.

  2. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF INTERMEDIATE-MASS STAR MEMBERS OF THE M6 (NGC 6405) OPEN CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kılıçoğlu, T.; Albayrak, B. [Ankara University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy and Space Sciences, 06100, Tandoğan, Ankara (Turkey); Monier, R. [LESIA, UMR 8109, Observatoire de Paris Meudon, Place J. Janssen, Meudon (France); Richer, J. [Département de physique, Université de Montréal, 2900, Boulevard Edouard-Montpetit, Montréal QC, H3C 3J7 (Canada); Fossati, L., E-mail: tkilicoglu@ankara.edu.tr, E-mail: balbayrak@ankara.edu.tr, E-mail: Richard.Monier@obspm.fr, E-mail: Jacques.Richer@umontreal.ca, E-mail: lfossati@astro.uni-bonn.de [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie der Universität Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121, Bonn (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    We present here the first abundance analysis of 44 late B-, A-, and F-type members of the young open cluster M6 (NGC 6405, age about 75 Myr). Low- and medium-resolution spectra, covering the 4500–5840 Å wavelength range, were obtained using the FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph attached to the ESO Very Large Telescopes. We determined the atmospheric parameters using calibrations of the Geneva photometry and by adjusting the H{sub β} profiles to synthetic ones. The abundances of up to 20 chemical elements, from helium to mercury, were derived for 19 late B, 16 A, and 9 F stars by iteratively adjusting synthetic spectra to the observations. We also derived a mean cluster metallicity of [Fe/H] = 0.07 ± 0.03 dex from the iron abundances of the F-type stars. We find that for most chemical elements, the normal late B- and A-type stars exhibit larger star-to-star abundance variations than the F-type stars probably because of the faster rotation of the B and A stars. The abundances of C, O, Mg, Si, and Sc appear to be anticorrelated with that of Fe, while the opposite holds for the abundances of Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Y, and Ba as expected if radiative diffusion is efficient in the envelopes of these stars. In the course of this analysis, we discovered five new peculiar stars: one mild Am, one Am, and one Fm star (HD 318091, CD-32 13109, GSC 07380-01211, CP1), one HgMn star (HD 318126, CP3), and one He-weak P-rich (HD 318101, CP4) star. We also discovered a new spectroscopic binary, most likely a SB2. We performed a detailed modeling of HD 318101, the new He-weak P-rich CP star, using the Montréal stellar evolution code XEVOL which self-consistently treats all particle transport processes. Although the overall abundance pattern of this star is properly reproduced, we find that detailed abundances (in particular the high P excess) resisted modeling attempts even when a range of turbulence profiles and mass-loss rates were considered. Solutions are proposed which are

  3. Chemical Composition of Intermediate-mass Star Members of the M6 (NGC 6405) Open Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıçoğlu, T.; Monier, R.; Richer, J.; Fossati, L.; Albayrak, B.

    2016-03-01

    We present here the first abundance analysis of 44 late B-, A-, and F-type members of the young open cluster M6 (NGC 6405, age about 75 Myr). Low- and medium-resolution spectra, covering the 4500-5840 Å wavelength range, were obtained using the FLAMES/GIRAFFE spectrograph attached to the ESO Very Large Telescopes. We determined the atmospheric parameters using calibrations of the Geneva photometry and by adjusting the Hβ profiles to synthetic ones. The abundances of up to 20 chemical elements, from helium to mercury, were derived for 19 late B, 16 A, and 9 F stars by iteratively adjusting synthetic spectra to the observations. We also derived a mean cluster metallicity of [Fe/H] = 0.07 ± 0.03 dex from the iron abundances of the F-type stars. We find that for most chemical elements, the normal late B- and A-type stars exhibit larger star-to-star abundance variations than the F-type stars probably because of the faster rotation of the B and A stars. The abundances of C, O, Mg, Si, and Sc appear to be anticorrelated with that of Fe, while the opposite holds for the abundances of Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Ni, Y, and Ba as expected if radiative diffusion is efficient in the envelopes of these stars. In the course of this analysis, we discovered five new peculiar stars: one mild Am, one Am, and one Fm star (HD 318091, CD-32 13109, GSC 07380-01211, CP1), one HgMn star (HD 318126, CP3), and one He-weak P-rich (HD 318101, CP4) star. We also discovered a new spectroscopic binary, most likely a SB2. We performed a detailed modeling of HD 318101, the new He-weak P-rich CP star, using the Montréal stellar evolution code XEVOL which self-consistently treats all particle transport processes. Although the overall abundance pattern of this star is properly reproduced, we find that detailed abundances (in particular the high P excess) resisted modeling attempts even when a range of turbulence profiles and mass-loss rates were considered. Solutions are proposed which are still under

  4. Maser Emission Associated with Young High Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Khaled Abdalla Edris

    In this work the maser emission has been used to study the very early stage evolution of the young stars. The maser emission of OH molecule was searched for towards a sample of high mass protostellar objects using the Nançay and GBT telescopes. The sample of objects searched was selected to contain very young forming high mass stars. The results of this survey have been compared with previous H2O and CH3OH masers observations. Then MERLIN has been used to map the OH as well as H2O and CH3OH masers towards one of these sources in high angular resolution. The survey detected OH maser emission towards 63 objects with 37 new detections. There are 56 star forming regions and 7 OH/IR candidates. The detection of OH masers towards 26% of a sample of 217 sources should remove any doubt about the existence of OH maser emission towards these objects of this early evolutionary stage. Nearly half of the detected sources have OH fluxes rates and velocity range support the spatial association of OH and class II CH3OH masers as suggested by Caswell et al. [1995] and modelled by Cragg et al. [2002]. IRAS20126+4104 was mapped in the OH, water and methanol masers using MERLIN. The 1665-MHz OH, 22-GHz H2O and 6.7-GHz CH3OH masers are detected and all originate very close to the central source. The OH and methanol masers appear to trace part of the circumstellar disk around the central source. The positions and velocities of the OH masers are consistent with Keplerian rotation around a central mass of ˜5Msun. The water masers are offset from the OH and CH3OH masers and have significantly changed since they were last observed, but still appear to be associated outflow from the source. All the OH masers components are circular polarized, in some cases reaching 100 percent while some OH components also have low levels of linear polarization. We identified one Zeeman pair and the splitting of this pair indicate the presence of a magnetic field of strength ˜11 mG within ˜0.5" (850 AU

  5. Mass media interventions for preventing smoking in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Kristin V; Ameer, Faisal; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Hnin, Khin; van Agteren, Joseph Em; Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Brinn, Malcolm P; Esterman, Adrian J; Chang, Anne B; Smith, Brian J

    2017-06-02

    Mass media interventions can be used as a way of delivering preventive health messages. They have the potential to reach and modify the knowledge, attitudes and behaviour of a large proportion of the community. To assess the effects of mass media interventions on preventing smoking in young people, and whether it can reduce smoking uptake among youth (under 25 years), improve smoking attitudes, intentions and knowledge, improve self-efficacy/self-esteem, and improve perceptions about smoking, including the choice to follow positive role models. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register, with additional searches of MEDLINE and Embase in June 2016. This is an update of a review first published in 1998. Randomized trials, controlled trials without randomization and interrupted time-series studies that assessed the effect of mass media campaigns (defined as channels of communication such as television, radio, newspapers, social media, billboards, posters, leaflets or booklets intended to reach large numbers of people and which are not dependent on person-to-person contact) in influencing the smoking behaviour (either objective or self-reported) of young people under the age of 25 years. We define smoking behaviour as the presence or absence of tobacco smoking or other tobacco use, or both, and the frequency of tobacco use. Eligible comparators included education or no intervention. Two review authors independently extracted information relating to the characteristics and the content of media interventions, participants, outcomes, methods of the study and risks of bias. We combined studies using qualitative narrative synthesis. We assessed the risks of bias for each study using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool, alongside additional domains to account for the nature of the intervention. We assessed the quality of evidence contributing to outcomes using GRADE. We identified eight eligible studies reporting information about mass media smoking

  6. Programming of intermediate metabolism in young lambs affected by late gestational maternal undernourishment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Sanne; Nielsen, Mette Olaf; Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff

    2007-01-01

    Effects of moderate maternal undernourishment during late gestation on the intermediary metabolism and maturational changes in young lambs were investigated. 20 twin-bearing sheep, bred to two different rams, were randomly allocated the last 6 wk of gestation to either a NORM diet [barley, protein...... wk) programming effects of late prenatal malnutrition on the glucose-insulin homeostasis and metabolism were manifested: LOW lambs had less insulin-secretory capacity, but this was apparently compensated for by increased target tissue sensitivity for insulin, and adipose lipolytic capacity increased...... during fasting. Thereby, glucose may be spared throguh increased lipid oxidationn, but overall energetic efficiency is apparently deteriorated rather than improved....

  7. Search for Gravitational Wave Ringdowns from Perturbed Intermediate Mass Black Holes in LIGO-Virgo Data from 2005-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Camp, J. B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.

    2014-01-01

    We report results from a search for gravitational waves produced by perturbed intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in data collected by LIGO and Virgo between 2005 and 2010. The search was sensitive to astrophysical sources that produced damped sinusoid gravitational wave signals, also known as ringdowns, with frequency 50 less than or equal to italic f0/Hz less than or equal to 2000 and decay timescale 0.0001 approximately less than t/s approximately less than 0.1 characteristic of those produced in mergers of IMBH pairs. No significant gravitational wave candidate was detected. We report upper limits on the astrophysical coalescence rates of IMBHs with total binary mass 50 less than or equal to M/solar mass less than or equal to 450 and component mass ratios of either 1:1 or 4:1. For systems with total mass 100 less than or equal to M/solar mass 150, we report a 90%-confidence upper limit on the rate of binary IMBH mergers with non-spinning and equal mass components of 6:9 x 10(exp 8) Mpc(exp -3)yr(exp -1). We also report a rate upper limit for ringdown waveforms from perturbed IMBHs, radiating 1% of their mass as gravitational waves in the fundamental, l=m=2, oscillation mode, that is nearly three orders of magnitude more stringent than previous results.

  8. Interferometric diameters of five evolved intermediate-mass planet-hosting stars measured with PAVO at the CHARA Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, T. R.; Huber, D.; Mann, A. W.; Casagrande, L.; Grunblatt, S. K.; Justesen, A. B.; Silva Aguirre, V.; Bedding, T. R.; Ireland, M. J.; Schaefer, G. H.; Tuthill, P. G.

    2018-04-01

    Debate over the planet occurrence rates around intermediate-mass stars has hinged on the accurate determination of masses of evolved stars, and has been exacerbated by a paucity of reliable, directly-measured fundamental properties for these stars. We present long-baseline optical interferometry of five evolved intermediate-mass (˜ 1.5 M⊙) planet-hosting stars using the PAVO beam combiner at the CHARA Array, which we combine with bolometric flux measurements and parallaxes to determine their radii and effective temperatures. We measured the radii and effective temperatures of 6 Lyncis (5.12±0.16 R⊙, 4949±58 K), 24 Sextantis (5.49±0.18 R⊙, 4908±65 K), κ Coronae Borealis (4.77±0.07 R⊙, 4870±47 K), HR 6817 (4.45±0.08 R⊙, 5013±59 K), and HR 8641 (4.91±0.12 R⊙, 4950±68 K). We find disagreements of typically 15 % in angular diameter and ˜ 200 K in temperature compared to interferometric measurements in the literature, yet good agreement with spectroscopic and photometric temperatures, concluding that the previous interferometric measurements may have been affected by systematic errors exceeding their formal uncertainties. Modelling based on BaSTI isochrones using various sets of asteroseismic, spectroscopic, and interferometric constraints tends to favour slightly (˜ 15 %) lower masses than generally reported in the literature.

  9. Planck intermediate results: III. the relation between galaxy cluster mass and Sunyaev-Zeldovich signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, J.G.; Bucher, M.; Cardoso, J.-F.

    2013-01-01

    on hydrostatic X-ray mass-proxy relations. We verify that our SZ effect measurements are in excellent agreement with previous determinations from Planck data. For the present sample, the hydrostatic X-ray masses at R500 are on average ~ 20 percent larger than the corresponding weak lensing masses, which......We examine the relation between the galaxy cluster mass M and Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect signal DA2 Y500 for a sample of 19 objects for which weak lensing (WL) mass measurements obtained from Subaru Telescope data are available in the literature. Hydrostatic X-ray masses are derived from XMM......-Newton archive data, and the SZ effect signal is measured from Planck all-sky survey data. We find an MWL-D A2 Y500 relation that is consistent in slope and normalisation with previous determinations using weak lensing masses; however, there is a normalisation offset with respect to previous measures based...

  10. Discoveries of high-frequency QPOs from intermediate-mass black holes with XMM, RXTE and NICER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranga Reddy Pasham, Deeraj; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Steiner, James F.

    2017-08-01

    Stable, twin-peak X-ray quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs; frequency range of 100-450 Hz) in a 3:2 frequency ratio have been observed from a sample of stellar-mass black holes (e.g., Belloni et al. 2012). These frequencies scale inversely with the black hole mass as expected from general relativistic motion near a black hole. Under the black hole unification paradigm, it has been argued that intermediate-mass black holes (IMBH) should also exhibit the 3:2 ratio high-frequency QPOs, but at frequencies lower than stellar-mass black holes. Thence, such QPOs will provide an accurate measurement of IMBH masses (Abramowicz et al. 2004).Combining all the entire archival RXTE/PCA observations of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) M82 X-1, we discovered stable, twin-peak X-ray QPOs at 3.3 and 5 Hz (3:2 frequency ratio). Scaling these frequencies to the oscillations of the stellar-mass black holes of known mass implies that M82 X-1's black hole is 428+-105 solar masses (Pasham, Strohmayer & Mushotzky 2014). We discovered similar 3:2 frequency ratio QPOs from another ULX NGC 1313 X-1 (0.30 and 0.45 Hz). These frequencies imply a black hole mass of 5000+-1300 solar masses in NGC 1313 X-1 (Pasham et al. 2015b). In addition to these results I will discuss some early results from NICER observations of ULXs.

  11. Abundances in Planetary Nebulae: an Autopsy of Low and Intermediate Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, James Francis

    In this work we report on the results of synthetic thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch models (TP-AGB) and compare the results to the abundance ratios in a sample of planetary nebulae. We use updated the input parameters for mass-loss, the stellar luminosity, and dredge-up. We calculated models with masses between 0.8 solar masses and 8 solar masses. We also calculated models with (Fe/H) between -2.5 and 0.3. The effect of the first, second, and third dredge-up as well as hot-bottom burning are reported on. The analysis of a sample of Galactic bulge and disk planetary nebulae is also reported on.

  12. Evolution, Nucleosynthesis, and Yields of AGB Stars at Different Metallicities. III. Intermediate-mass Models, Revised Low-mass Models, and the ph-FRUITY Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristallo, S.; Straniero, O.; Piersanti, L.; Gobrecht, D.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new set of models for intermediate-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars (4.0, 5.0, and 6.0 M⊙) at different metallicities (-2.15 ≤ [Fe/H] ≤ +0.15). This set integrates the existing models for low-mass AGB stars (1.3 ≤ M/M⊙ ≤ 3.0) already included in the FRUITY database. We describe the physical and chemical evolution of the computed models from the main sequence up to the end of the AGB phase. Due to less efficient third dredge up episodes, models with large core masses show modest surface enhancements. This effect is due to the fact that the interpulse phases are short and, therefore, thermal pulses (TPs) are weak. Moreover, the high temperature at the base of the convective envelope prevents it from deeply penetrating the underlying radiative layers. Depending on the initial stellar mass, the heavy element nucleosynthesis is dominated by different neutron sources. In particular, the s-process distributions of the more massive models are dominated by the 22Ne(α,n)25Mg reaction, which is efficiently activated during TPs. At low metallicities, our models undergo hot bottom burning and hot third dredge up. We compare our theoretical final core masses to available white dwarf observations. Moreover, we quantify the influence intermediate-mass models have on the carbon star luminosity function. Finally, we present the upgrade of the FRUITY web interface, which now also includes the physical quantities of the TP-AGB phase for all of the models included in the database (ph-FRUITY).

  13. Prospects for detection of intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters using integrated-light spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vita, R.; Trenti, M.; Bianchini, P.; Askar, A.; Giersz, M.; van de Ven, G.

    2017-06-01

    The detection of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) in Galactic globular clusters (GCs) has so far been controversial. In order to characterize the effectiveness of integrated-light spectroscopy through integral field units, we analyse realistic mock data generated from state-of-the-art Monte Carlo simulations of GCs with a central IMBH, considering different setups and conditions varying IMBH mass, cluster distance and accuracy in determination of the centre. The mock observations are modelled with isotropic Jeans models to assess the success rate in identifying the IMBH presence, which we find to be primarily dependent on IMBH mass. However, even for an IMBH of considerable mass (3 per cent of the total GC mass), the analysis does not yield conclusive results in one out of five cases, because of shot noise due to bright stars close to the IMBH line of sight. This stochastic variability in the modelling outcome grows with decreasing BH mass, with approximately three failures out of four for IMBHs with 0.1 per cent of total GC mass. Finally, we find that our analysis is generally unable to exclude at 68 per cent confidence an IMBH with mass of 103 M⊙ in snapshots without a central BH. Interestingly, our results are not sensitive to GC distance within 5-20 kpc, nor to misidentification of the GC centre by less than 2 arcsec (<20 per cent of the core radius). These findings highlight the value of ground-based integral field spectroscopy for large GC surveys, where systematic failures can be accounted for, but stress the importance of discrete kinematic measurements that are less affected by stochasticity induced by bright stars.

  14. Signal and background in NLO QCD for the search of the intermediate mass Higgs boson at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, B.

    1993-01-01

    The signal and background for the search of the Standard Model Higgs boson in the intermediate mass range 80 GeV H Z is studied based on calculations of the cross sections in next-to-leading order QCD perturbation theory for the production of the Higgs boson via gluon-gluon fusion and for the hadronic two-photon production. The method of Monte-Carlo integration allows the application of realistic cuts (p T , rapidity, photon isolation) to the cross section. Results are given for the K-factors of the signal and the background. It turns out that the NLO corrections improve the situation for a Higgs boson mass in the range of 80--120 GeV. Furthermore, the influence of a cut on the transverse momentum of the additional jet produced in the processes gg → Hg, gq → Hq, q bar q → Hg is compared to a similar cut for the background

  15. Intermediate and Long-term Outcomes of Giant Fibroadenoma Excision in Adolescent and Young Adult Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerrato, Felecia E; Pruthi, Sandhya; Boughey, Judy C; Simmons, Patricia S; Salje, Barbara; Nuzzi, Laura C; Lemaine, Valerie; Labow, Brian I

    2015-01-01

    Giant fibroadenomas (5 cm or greater) are benign breast masses that often present in adolescence and require surgical excision. Long-term outcomes, recurrence rates, and the need for additional reconstructive surgery in this population are unknown. Patients aged 11-25 years whose pathology reports indicated the presence of a giant fibroadenoma were eligible for this study. Medical records were reviewed for presentation, treatment, and outcomes. A subset of patients completed an investigator-designed long-term outcome survey to measure additional outcomes and the desire or need for subsequent reconstructive surgery. Forty-six patients with at least one giant fibroadenoma (mean size 7.4 ± 2.8 cm) were identified. Most patients underwent excision with a periaroeolar incision (n = 31), and an enucleation technique (n = 41), and four patients underwent immediate breast reconstruction. Thirty-three patients had complete medical records with a mean follow-up time of 2.2 ± 4.1 years and no complaints of asymmetry, additional breast deformities, or reconstructive surgery procedures documented. In addition, nine patients completed the investigator-designed survey with a mean follow-up time of 10.1 ± 8.7 years (range 1.5-27.0). Three of these patients reported postoperative breast asymmetry and the desire to pursue reconstructive surgery. Aesthetic outcomes of giant fibroadenoma excision may be satisfactory for many patients without immediate reconstruction, but for others, the need for reconstructive surgery may arise during development. Providers should address this potential need prior to discussing treatment options and during postoperative follow-up. Caution should be exercised before recommending immediate reconstruction. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Analysis for mass distribution of proton-induced reactions in intermediate energy range

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao Yu Heng

    2002-01-01

    The mass and charge distribution of residual products produced in the spallation reactions needs to be studied, because it can provide useful information for the disposal of nuclear waste and residual radioactivity generated by the spallation neutron target system. In present work, the Many State Dynamical Model (MSDM) is based on the Cascade-Exciton Model (CEM). The authors use it to investigate the mass distribution of Nb, Au and Pb proton-induced reactions in energy range from 100 MeV to 3 GeV. The agreement between the MSDM simulations and the measured data is good in this energy range, and deviations mainly show up in the mass range of 90 - 150 for the high energy proton incident upon Au and Pb

  17. Search for intermediate mass black hole binaries in the first observing run of Advanced LIGO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Afrough, M.; Agarwal, B.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Allen, B.; Allen, G; Allocca, A.; Almoubayyed, H.; Altin, P. A.; Amato, A.; Ananyeva, A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Antier, S.; Appert, S.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; AultONeal, K.; Avila-Alvarez, A.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Bae, S.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Banagiri, S.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bawaj, M.; Bazzan, M.; Becsy, B.; Beer, C.; Bejger, M.; Belahcene, I.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Bell, A. S.; Berger, B. K.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Billman, C. R.; Birch, D J; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackman, J.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bode, N.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bohe, A.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Broida, J. E.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Brunett, S.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cabero, M.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Canepa, M.; Canizares, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, H.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Carney, M. F.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chatterjee, D.; Cheeseboro, B. D.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, H. -P.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Chmiel, T.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, A. J. K.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, A. K. W.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Ciolfi, R.; Cirelli, C. E.; Cirone, A.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Cocchieri, C.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L. R.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conti, L.; Cooper, S. J.; Corban, P.; Corbitt, T. R.; Corley, K. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Covas, P. B.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cullen, T. J.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, Laura; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dasgupta, A.; Costa, C. F. Da Silva; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Davis, D.; Daw, E. J.; Day, B.; De, S.; Debra, D.; Deelman, E; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Devenson, J.; Devine, R. C.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M. Di; Di Girolamo, T.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Renzo, F.; Doctor, Z.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Dorrington, I.; Douglas, R.; Alvarez, M. Dovale; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Duncan, J.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Eisenstein, R. A.; Essick, R. C.; Etienne, Z. B.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Fauchon-Jones, E. J.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Feicht, J.; Fejer, M. M.; Fernandez-Galiana, A.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fong, H.; Forsyth, P. W. F.; Forsyth, S. S.; Fournier, J. -D.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fries, E. M.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H.; Gabel, M.; Gadre, B. U.; Gaebel, S. M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Ganija, M. R.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gaudio, S.; Gaur, G.; Gayathri, V.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, D.J.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghonge, S.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glover, L.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gomes, A.S.P.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Grado, A.; Graef, C.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Gruning, P.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hannuksela, O. A.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Henry, J.A.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Horst, C.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Intini, G.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Junker, J.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Karvinen, K. S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katolik, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kawabe, K.; Kefelian, F.; Keitel, D.; Kemball, A. J.; Kennedy, R.E.; Kent, C.; Key, J. S.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J. C.; Kim, W.; Kim, S.W.; Kim, Y.M.; Kimbrell, S. J.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kirchhoff, R.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koch, P.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kraemer, H.C.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, S.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Kwang-Cheol, S.; Lackey, B. D.; Lai, K. H.; Landry, M.; Lang, R. N.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lanza, R. K.; Lartaux-Vollard, A.; Lasky, P. D.; Laxen, M.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, W. H.; Lee, K.; Lehmann, J.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Liu, J.; Lockerbie, N. A.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lumaca, D.; Lundgren, A. P.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; Macfoy, S.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Hernandez, I. Magana; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Zertuche, L. Magana; Magee, R. M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Man, N.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markakis, C.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Mastrogiovanni, S.; Matas, A.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mayani, R.; Mazumder, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McCuller, L.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McRae, T.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Mejuto-Villa, E.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Metzdorff, R.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, A. L.; Miller, A.; Miller, B. B.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minazzoli, O.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Muniz, E. A. M.; Murray, P.G.; Napier, K.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Nelemans, G.; Nelson, T. J. N.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Nery, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newport, J. M.; Newton, G.; Ng, K. K. Y.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nichols, D.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Noack, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; Ormiston, R.; Ortega, L. F.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pace, A. E.; Page, J.; Page, M. A.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pang, B.; Pang, P. T. H.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Castro-Perez, J.; Perreca, A.; Perri, L. M.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Porter, E. K.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Pratt, J. W. W.; Predoi, V.; Prestegard, T.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Qiu, S.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajan, C.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramirez, K. E.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Read, J.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Ricker, P. M.; Rieger, S.; Riles, K.; Rizzo, M.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romel, C. L.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Ross, M. P.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Rynge, M.; Sachdev, Perminder S; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Sakellariadou, M.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sampson, L. M.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Scheuer, J.; Schmidt, E.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schulte, B. W.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwalbe, S. G.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Seidel, E.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shaffer, T. J.; Shah, A.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shao, L.P.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sieniawska, M.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, B.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sonnenberg, J. A.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Spencer, A. P.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Stratta, G.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sunil, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tapai, M.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, J. A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Toland, K.; Tonelli, M.; Tornasi, Z.; Torrie, C. I.; Toyra, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Trinastic, J.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tsang, K. W.; Tse, M.; Tso, R.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ueno, K.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahi, K.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Varma, V.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Venugopalan, G.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Viets, A. D.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walet, R.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, Y. -F.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Watchi, J.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Wen, L.; Wessel, E. K.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; Whiting, B. F.; Whittle, C.; Williams, D.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Woehler, J.; Wofford, J.; Wong, G.W.K.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, D.S.; Wu, G.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zelenova, T.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, Y. -H.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zweizig, J.

    2017-01-01

    During their first observational run, the two Advanced LIGO detectors attained an unprecedented sensitivity, resulting in the first direct detections of gravitational-wave signals produced by stellar-mass binary black hole systems. This paper reports on an all-sky search for gravitational waves

  18. Modified viscosity in accretion disks. Application to Galactic black hole binaries, intermediate mass black holes, and active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzędzielski, Mikołaj; Janiuk, Agnieszka; Czerny, Bożena; Wu, Qingwen

    2017-07-01

    Aims: Black holes (BHs) surrounded by accretion disks are present in the Universe at different scales of masses, from microquasars up to the active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Since the work of Shakura & Sunyaev (1973, A&A, 24, 337) and their α-disk model, various prescriptions for the heat-production rate are used to describe the accretion process. The current picture remains ad hoc due the complexity of the magnetic field action. In addition, accretion disks at high Eddington rates can be radiation-pressure dominated and, according to some of the heating prescriptions, thermally unstable. The observational verification of their resulting variability patterns may shed light on both the role of radiation pressure and magnetic fields in the accretion process. Methods: We compute the structure and time evolution of an accretion disk, using the code GLADIS (which models the global accretion disk instability). We supplement this model with a modified viscosity prescription, which can to some extent describe the magnetisation of the disk. We study the results for a large grid of models, to cover the whole parameter space, and we derive conclusions separately for different scales of black hole masses, which are characteristic for various types of cosmic sources. We show the dependencies between the flare or outburst duration, its amplitude, and period, on the accretion rate and viscosity scaling. Results: We present the results for the three grids of models, designed for different black hole systems (X-ray binaries, intermediate mass black holes, and galaxy centres). We show that if the heating rate in the accretion disk grows more rapidly with the total pressure and temperature, the instability results in longer and sharper flares. In general, we confirm that the disks around the supermassive black holes are more radiation-pressure dominated and present relatively brighter bursts. Our method can also be used as an independent tool for the black hole mass determination

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF A SAMPLE OF INTERMEDIATE-TYPE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. HOST BULGE PROPERTIES AND BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez, Erika; Cruz-Gonzalez, Irene; Martinez, Benoni; Jimenez-Bailon, Elena [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Mendez-Abreu, Jairo; Lopez-Martin, Luis [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Fuentes-Carrera, Isaura [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM-IPN), U.P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Chavushyan, Vahram [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Apdo. Postal 51-216, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Leon-Tavares, Jonathan, E-mail: erika@astro.unam.mx [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Metsaehovintie 114, 02540 Kylmaelae (Finland)

    2013-02-15

    We present a study of the host bulge properties and their relations with the black hole mass for a sample of 10 intermediate-type active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Our sample consists mainly of early-type spirals, four of them hosting a bar. For 70{sup +10} {sub -17}% of the galaxies, we have been able to determine the type of the bulge, and find that these objects probably harbor a pseudobulge or a combination of classical bulge/pseudobulge, suggesting that pseudobulges might be frequent in intermediate-type AGNs. In our sample, 50% {+-} 14% of the objects show double-peaked emission lines. Therefore, narrow double-peaked emission lines seem to be frequent in galaxies harboring a pseudobulge or a combination of classical bulge/pseudobulge. Depending on the bulge type, we estimated the black hole mass using the corresponding M {sub BH}-{sigma}* relation and found them within a range of 5.69 {+-} 0.21 < log M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} < 8.09 {+-} 0.24. Comparing these M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} values with masses derived from the FWHM of H{beta} and the continuum luminosity at 5100 A from their SDSS-DR7 spectra (M {sub BH}), we find that 8 out of 10 (80{sup +7} {sub -17}%) galaxies have black hole masses that are compatible within a factor of 3. This result would support that M {sub BH} and M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} are the same for intermediate-type AGNs, as has been found for type 1 AGNs. However, when the type of the bulge is taken into account, only three out of the seven (43{sup +18} {sub -15}%) objects of the sample have their M {sup {sigma}}*{sub BH} and M {sub BH} compatible within 3{sigma} errors. We also find that estimations based on the M {sub BH}-{sigma}* relation for pseudobulges are not compatible in 50% {+-} 20% of the objects.

  20. A new direction for dark matter research: intermediate-mass compact halo objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapline, George F.; Frampton, Paul H.

    2016-11-01

    The failure to find evidence for elementary particles that could serve as the constituents of dark matter brings to mind suggestions that dark matter might consist of massive compact objects (MACHOs). In particular, it has recently been argued that MACHOs with masses > 15Msolar may have been prolifically produced at the onset of the big bang. Although a variety of astrophysical signatures for primordial MACHOs with masses in this range have been discussed in the literature, we favor a strategy that uses the potential for magnification of stars outside our galaxy due to gravitational microlensing of these stars by MACHOs in the halo of our galaxy. We point out that the effect of the motion of the Earth on the shape of the micro-lensing brightening curves provides a promising approach to testing over the course of next several years the hypothesis that dark matter consists of massive compact objects.

  1. Influence of mass asymmetry in fusion cross section of intermediate weight ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjos, R.M. dos.

    1987-01-01

    The mass asymmetry degree effect on fusion, was investigated for different systems involving nucleus A projectie , A target ≤ 40, populating a compound nucleus. The following systems were studied: ( 19 F + 19 F), ( 12 C + 26 Mg) and ( 19 F + 12 C, 16 O, 27 Al, 40 Ca) in the energy range of 32 ≤ E lab ≤ 72 MeV and angular range 6 0 ≤ Θ lab ≤ 28 0 . The experimental method employed the time of flight technique, of the evaporation residuals. Analysis of excitation function indicate different behavior for symmetric and asymmetric systems suggesting that the presence of other more competitive processes is more pronounced in asymmetric entrance channels at high energies. These behaviors indicate that mass asymmetry is an important point in complete and incomplete fusion processes. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  2. Wandering off the centre: a characterization of the random motion of intermediate-mass black holes in star clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vita, Ruggero; Trenti, Michele; MacLeod, Morgan

    2018-04-01

    Despite recent observational efforts, unequivocal signs for the presence of intermediate-mass black holes (IMBHs) in globular clusters (GCs) have not been found yet. Especially when the presence of IMBHs is constrained through dynamical modelling of stellar kinematics, it is fundamental to account for the displacement that the IMBH might have with respect to the GC centre. In this paper, we analyse the IMBH wandering around the stellar density centre using a set of realistic direct N-body simulations of star cluster evolution. Guided by the simulation results, we develop a basic yet accurate model that can be used to estimate the average IMBH radial displacement (〈rbh〉) in terms of structural quantities as the core radius (rc), mass (Mc), and velocity dispersion (σc), in addition to the average stellar mass (mc) and the IMBH mass (Mbh). The model can be expressed by the equation /r_c=A(m_c/M_bh)^α [σ _c^2r_c/(GM_c)]^β, in which the free parameters A, α, and β are calculated through comparison with the numerical results on the IMBH displacement. The model is then applied to Galactic GCs, finding that for an IMBH mass equal to 0.1 per cent of the GC mass, the typical expected displacement of a putative IMBH is around 1 arcsec for most Galactic GCs, but IMBHs can wander to larger angular distances in some objects, including a prediction of a 2.5 arcsec displacement for NGC 5139 (ω Cen), and >10 arcsec for NGC5053, NGC6366, and ARP2.

  3. Stellar Masses in the Mysterious Young Triple Star System AS 205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encalada, Frankie; Rosero, Viviana A.; Prato, Lisa A.; Bruhns, Sara

    2015-01-01

    The lack of accurate absolute mass measurements for young, low-mass pre-main sequence stars is problematic for the calibration of stellar evolutionary track models. An on-going program to increase the sample of young star masses begins with mass ratio measurements in spectroscopic binaries. By the end of its 5-year duration, the GAIA all-sky mission will provide new astrometric measurements for young spectroscopic binaries down to separations of tens of microarcseconds, yielding absolute masses for double-lined systems. We obtain mass ratios by taking high-resolution spectra of young double-lined spectroscopic binaries over a few epochs to construct a radial velocity versus phase diagram. For the young spectroscopic binary AS 205B, using eight of our own spectra supplied by the CSHELL instrument on the IRTF at Mauna Kea, plus one from the literature, we estimate a period of approximately 140 days, an eccentricity of 0.7, and a mass-ratio of 0.5. This spectroscopic system comprises the secondary in a 1.4'' visual binary in which both the A and B components are surrounded by optically thick, actively accreting disks, making AS 205B a member of that rare class of young spectroscopic binaries with a primordial circumbinary disk.

  4. Hunting for the intermediate-mass Higgs boson in a hadron collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunion, J.F.; Kalyniak, P.; Soldate, M.; Galison, P.

    1985-01-01

    We examine the feasibility of identifying in a hadron machine the standard, neutral Higgs boson, produced in association with a W, when the mass of the Higgs is between approximately 100 GeV and 2m/sub W/. The production cross section is calculated with quasirealistic cuts imposed under the assumption that the Higgs decays into tt-bar. Possible backgrounds arising from the continuum production of tt-bar, tb-bar, or t-barb accompanied by a W are computed as well

  5. Regional regularities for the even-even nuclei in intermediate mass region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varshney, Mani; Singh, M.; Gupta, D.K.; Singh, Yuvraj; Gupta, K.K.; Bihari, Chhail; Sharma, Aparna; Varshney, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    With the development of experimental techniques more and more nuclear data are accumulated and compiled for over five decades. The proton neutron interaction has been considered the key ingredient in the development of collectivity and ultimately the deformation in atomic nuclei. The purpose of the present study is to analyze the growth of R4/2 in different mass regions. The rate of growth regions in regions having proton number Z = 38, 54, 60 and 76 with changing neutron number where the interaction between particle - particle, particle - hole and hole - hole

  6. Palpable discrete breast masses in young women: Two of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the upper outer quadrant (60.3%) and in the right breast. All were solid. The sizes of the masses were categorised into three groups: 5 cm. Two-thirds of the masses (65.5%) measured between 2 and 5 cm and only 15.5% >5 cm. Histological examination showed most masses (89.6%) to be benign.

  7. Measurement of Fragment Mass Distributions in Neutron-induced Fission of 238U and 232Th at Intermediate Energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simutkin, V.D.

    2008-01-01

    Conceptual analysis of accelerator-driven systems assumes extensive use of nuclear data on neutron-induced reactions at intermediate energies. In particular, information about the fission fragment yields from the 238 U(n,f) and 232 Th(n,f) reactions is of particular interest at neutron energies from 10 to 200 MeV. However, there is a lack of such data for both 238 U and 232 Th. Up to now, the intermediate energy measurements have been performed for 238 U only, and there are no data for the 232 Th(n,f) reaction. The aim of the work is to provide such data. Fission fragment mass distributions for the 232 Th(n,f) and 238 U(n,f) reactions have been measured for the incident neutron energies 32.8 MeV, 45.3 MeV and 59.9 MeV. The experiments have been performed at the neutron beam facility of the Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium. A multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber has been used as a fission fragment detector. The data obtained have been interpreted in terms of the multimodal random neck-rupture model (MMRNRM). (authors)

  8. Fission of intermediate mass nuclei by bremsstrahlung photons in the energy range 0.8-1.8 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, D.A. de.

    1983-01-01

    The fission of intermediate mass nuclei in the Al-Ta internal induced by bremsstrahlung photons of maximum energies between 0,8 to 1,8 GeV is studied. Thin targets of Nd and Sm and dense targets of Al,Ti,Co,Zr,Nb,Ag,In and Ta are utilized, and all the aspects related with the fission fragment absorption by the targets themselves are considered. The samples are exposed in th 2,5 GeV Electron Synchrotron at Bonn University. Muscovite mica, CR-39 and makrofol are used as fission fragments detectors. Fission cross sections and nuclear fissionabilities of the studied elements are estimated. (L.C.) [pt

  9. THE M BH-L SPHEROID RELATION AT HIGH AND LOW MASSES, THE QUADRATIC GROWTH OF BLACK HOLES, AND INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graham, Alister W.; Scott, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    From a sample of 72 galaxies with reliable supermassive black hole masses M bh , we derive the M bh -(host spheroid luminosity, L) relation for (1) the subsample of 24 core-Sérsic galaxies with partially depleted cores, and (2) the remaining subsample of 48 Sérsic galaxies. Using K s -band Two Micron All Sky Survey data, we find the near-linear relation M bh ∝L 1.10±0.20 K s for the core-Sérsic spheroids thought to be built in additive dry merger events, while we find the relation M bh ∝L 2.73±0.55 K s for the Sérsic spheroids built from gas-rich processes. After converting literature B-band disk galaxy magnitudes into inclination- and dust-corrected bulge magnitudes, via a useful new equation presented herein, we obtain a similar result. Unlike with the M bh -(velocity dispersion) diagram, which is also updated here using the same galaxy sample, it remains unknown whether barred and non-barred Sérsic galaxies are offset from each other in the M bh -L diagram. While black hole feedback has typically been invoked to explain what was previously thought to be a nearly constant M bh /M Spheroid mass ratio of ∼0.2%, we advocate that the near-linear M bh -L and M bh -M Spheroid relations observed at high masses may have instead arisen largely from the additive dry merging of galaxies. We argue that feedback results in a dramatically different scaling relation, such that black hole mass scales roughly quadratically with the spheroid mass in Sérsic galaxies. We therefore introduce a revised cold-gas 'quasar' mode feeding equation for semi-analytical models to reflect what we dub the quadratic growth of black holes in Sérsic galaxies built amidst gas-rich processes. Finally, we use our new Sérsic M bh -L equations to predict the masses of candidate intermediate mass black holes in almost 50 low-luminosity spheroids containing active galactic nuclei, finding many masses between that of stellar mass black holes and supermassive black holes.

  10. Analysis of triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and TATP synthetic intermediates by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigman, Michael E; Clark, C Douglas; Caiano, Tara; Mullen, Rebecca

    2008-01-01

    The explosive triacetone triperoxide (TATP) has been analyzed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) on a linear quadrupole instrument, giving a 62.5 ng limit of detection in full scan positive ion mode. In the ESI interface with no applied fragmentor voltage the m/z 245 [TATP + Na](+) ion was observed along with m/z 215 [TATP + Na - C(2)H(6)](+) and 81 [(CH(3))(2)CO + Na](+). When TATP was ionized by ESI with an applied fragmentor voltage of 75 V, ions at m/z 141 [C(4)H(6)O(4) + Na](+) and 172 [C(5)H(9)O(5) + Na](+) were also observed. When the precipitates formed in the synthesis of TATP were analyzed before the reaction was complete, a new series of ions was observed in which the ions were separated by 74 m/z units, with ions occurring at m/z 205, 279, 353, 427, 501, 575, 649 and 723. The series of evenly spaced ions is accounted for as oligomeric acetone carbonyl oxides terminated as hydroperoxides, [HOOC(CH(3))(2){OOC(CH(3))(2)}(n)OOH + Na](+) (n = 1, 2 ... 8). The ESI-MS spectra for this homologous series of oligoperoxides have previously been observed from the ozonolysis of tetramethylethylene at low temperatures. Precipitates from the incomplete reaction mixture, under an applied fragmentor voltage of 100 V in ESI, produced an additional ion observed at m/z 99 [C(2)H(4)O(3) + Na](+), and a set of ions separated by 74 m/z units occurring at m/z 173, 247, 321, 395, 469 and 543, proposed to correspond to [CH(3)CO{OOC(CH(3))(2)}(n)OOH + Na](+) (n = 1,2 ... 5). Support for the assigned structures was obtained through the analysis of both protiated and perdeuterated TATP samples. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Determinants of bone mass and bone geometry in adolescent and young adult women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, A.F.M.; Hoorneman, G.; Väänänen, K.; Charles, P.; Ando, S.; Maggiolini, M.; Charzewska, J.; Rotily, M.; Deloraine, A.; Heikkinen, J.; Juvin, R.; Schaafsma, G.

    2000-01-01

    Bone mass and bone geometry are considered to have independent effects on bone strength. The purpose of this study was to obtain data on bone mass and geometry in young female populations and how they are influenced by body size and lifestyle factors. In a cross-sectional, observational study in six

  12. PERCENT FAT MASS AND BODY MASS INDEX AS CARDIORESPIRATORY FITNESS PREDICTORS IN YOUNG ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Dewi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe present study aimed to analyze the association between body fatness measures, i.e. body mass index (BMI and percent fat mass (% FM with cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF in young adults. Seventy five undergraduate students aged 19-21 years were included in this cross sectional study. Body composition was assessed by tetra polar Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis method, and CRF was determined as VO2 max level by conducting Balke test and flexibility by sit-and-reach test. Regression tests were performed to assess the associations between the body fatness measures and CRF. The mean (SD % FM and BMI were 25.6 (8.3 % and 22.4 (4.2 kg/m2, respectively. Both BMI and % FM were inversely associated with VO2 max and flexibility. The associations of % FM with each CRF measure were stronger (% FM-VO2 max: R2=0.45, p<0.0001; % FM-flexibility: R2=0.16, p<0.0001 than those of BMI (BMI-VO2 max: R2= 0.12, p=0.002; BMI-flexibility: R2=0.07, p<0.0001. Including gender as a variable predictor greatly improved almost all associations. We suggest that %FM is a better predictor for VO2max than BMI. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relationships of body fatness measures adjusted for potential confounding factors with CRF measures other than VO2 max.Keywords: body mass index, cardiorespiratory fitness, percent fat massABSTRAKPenelitian ini bertujuan untuk menentukan hubungan antara persentase lemak tubuh (PLT dan indeks massa tubuh (IMT dengan kebugaran kardiorespiratorik (KKR pada dewasa muda. Penelitian menggunakan desain potong lintang dengan melibatkan 75 orang mahasiswa usia 19-21 tahun. PLT ditentukan dengan metode tetra polar Bioelectrical Impedance dan KKR ditentukan dengan VO2max berdasarkan uji Balke dan fleksibilitas dengan uji sit-and-reach. Hubungan antara PLT dan IMT dengan KKR dianalisis dengan uji regresi. Rata-rata (standar deviasi dari PLT dan IMT berturut-turut adalah 25,6 (8,3% dan 22,4 (4,2 kg/m2. Baik PLT maupun IMT berbanding

  13. Rapid quantification of metabolic intermediates in blood by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to investigate congenital lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Minzhi; Cai, Yanna; Fang, Xiefan; Liu, Li

    2016-10-26

    A novel liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method has been established to quantify metabolic intermediates, including lactate (Lac), pyruvate (Pyr), acetoacetate (ACAC) and 3-hydroxybutyrate (3-HB) in blood. Samples were deproteinized with methanol-acetonitrile solution, and analytes were separated on an adamantyl group-bonded reverse phase column and detected in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Total analysis time was 4 min per sample. Method validation results displayed that limits of quantification were 10.0 μmol L -1 for Lac and Pyr, and 5.0 μmol L -1 for ACAC and 3-HB. The within- and between-run coefficients of variation were in the range of 1.2-6.4% for all analytes. The recoveries were ranged from 95.6 to 111.5%. The reference values of analytes were determined for the pediatric population. Duo to instability of Lac, Pyr and ACAC in vitro, a comprehensive stability assay was performed to determine optimal conditions for sample collection, pretreatment and storage. Results showed that precipitation of protein in blood at bedside combined with low storage temperature could effectively preserve the integrity of Lac, Pyr and 3-HB, but the precipitated protein accelerated degradation of ACAC. Isolation of supernatant fluid slowed degradation of ACAC. Supernatant samples could store at -20 °C for 10 days. The use of plasma or serum to determine these intermediates was not recommended. In this study, 450 samples from patients were analyzed, and 7 patients were diagnosed as congenital lactic acidosis. With the advantages of rapid, accurate and reliable, this method is very suitable for congenital lactic acidosis screening and researches related to energy metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Emsission of intermediate mass fragments in the p(1.9 GeV)+natNI reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bubak, A.

    2004-06-01

    The emission of the intermediate mass fragments (IMFs; 2 ≤ Z ≤ 14) produced in the interaction of 1.9 GeV protons with nickel ( nat Ni) has been a subject of interest of the present study. Energy spectra of isotopically and elementally identified ejectiles have been measured at angles 15 and 120 with the respect to the beam direction. The identification of the emitted IMFs has been performed by means of the Bragg curve spectroscopy and the time-of-flight technique (TOF). The Bragg curve detectors (BCDs) were employed for the charge identification, whereas the TOF method combined with the BCD, for the mass identification. The main task of the present PhD thesis was to built appropriate data acquisition system, to perform the experiment on the internal beam of the COSY accelerator, to propose the methodology of the off-line analysis of the data, to apply it to the event-by-event stored data, and to perform the phenomenological analysis of the obtained data. The results, experimental procedures, and different techniques of the element and isotope identification by means of the BCD + TOF are presented. The determination of the power law parameter τ characterizing the mass and charge distributions of the reaction products is discussed. Various methods of the nuclear matter temperature determination, the comparison between nuclear matter thermometers, and the discussion of the obtained results, shown in the energy-temperature diagram (the so called caloric curve), are presented as well. The results suggest two different mechanisms of the IMFs production: from the equilibrated (IMFs measured at 120 ), and non-equilibrated (IMFs measured at 15 ) state of the nucleus. (orig.)

  15. Does Explosive Nuclear Burning Occur in Tidal Disruption Events of White Dwarfs by Intermediate-mass Black Holes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanikawa, Ataru; Sato, Yushi; Hachisu, Izumi [Department of Earth Science and Astronomy, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken’ichi; Maeda, Keiichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Nakasato, Naohito, E-mail: tanikawa@ea.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Aizu, Tsuruga Ikki-machi Aizu-Wakamatsu, Fukushima 965-8580 (Japan)

    2017-04-20

    We investigate nucleosynthesis in tidal disruption events (TDEs) of white dwarfs (WDs) by intermediate-mass black holes. We consider various types of WDs with different masses and compositions by means of three-dimensional (3D) smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations. We model these WDs with different numbers of SPH particles, N , from a few 10{sup 4} to a few 10{sup 7} in order to check mass resolution convergence, where SPH simulations with N > 10{sup 7} (or a space resolution of several 10{sup 6} cm) have unprecedentedly high resolution in this kind of simulation. We find that nuclear reactions become less active with increasing N and that these nuclear reactions are excited by spurious heating due to low resolution. Moreover, we find no shock wave generation. In order to investigate the reason for the absence of a shock wave, we additionally perform one-dimensional (1D) SPH and mesh-based simulations with a space resolution ranging from 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 7} cm, using a characteristic flow structure extracted from the 3D SPH simulations. We find shock waves in these 1D high-resolution simulations, one of which triggers a detonation wave. However, we must be careful of the fact that, if the shock wave emerged in an outer region, it could not trigger the detonation wave due to low density. Note that the 1D initial conditions lack accuracy to precisely determine where a shock wave emerges. We need to perform 3D simulations with ≲10{sup 6} cm space resolution in order to conclude that WD TDEs become optical transients powered by radioactive nuclei.

  16. Intermediate mass dimuon events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moser, H.-G.

    1985-01-01

    We report the observation of 67 dimuon events at the CERN p anti p collider with the UA1 detector. The events will be interpreted in terms of the Drell-Yan mechanism, J/PSI and UPSILON decays and heavy flavour production. (author)

  17. 2MASS J11151597+1937266: A Young, Dusty, Isolated, Planetary-mass Object with a Potential Wide Stellar Companion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissen, Christopher A.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Bardalez Gagliuffi, Daniella C.; Hardegree-Ullman, Kevin K.; Gagné, Jonathan; Schmidt, Sarah J.; West, Andrew A.

    2018-01-01

    We present 2MASS J11151597+1937266, a recently identified low-surface-gravity L dwarf, classified as an L2γ based on Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical spectroscopy. We confirm this spectral type with near-infrared spectroscopy, which provides further evidence that 2MASS J11151597+1937266 is a low-surface-gravity L dwarf. This object also shows significant excess mid-infrared flux, indicative of circumstellar material; and its strong Hα emission (EWHα = 560 ± 82 Å) is an indicator of enhanced magnetic activity or weak accretion. Comparison of its spectral energy distribution to model photospheres yields an effective temperature of {1724}-38+184 {{K}}. We also provide a revised distance estimate of 37 ± 6 pc using a spectral type–luminosity relationship for low-surface-gravity objects. The three-dimensional galactic velocities and positions of 2MASS J11151597+1937266 do not match any known young association or moving group. Assuming a probable age in the range of 5–45 Myr, the model-dependent estimated mass of this object is between 7 and 21 M Jup, making it a potentially isolated planetary-mass object. We also identify a candidate co-moving, young stellar companion, 2MASS J11131089+2110086.

  18. Angular distributions of intermediate mass fragments emitted in 30 MeV/u 40Ar induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Quanbu; Zhu Yongtai; Xu Hushan; Wei Zhiyong; Lu Jun; Zhang Yuhu; Wang Qi; Li Songlin; Wu Zhongli

    1999-01-01

    The angular distributions of intermediate mass fragments with charge numbers from 3 to 24 emitted in 30 MeV/u 40 Ar + 58,64 Ni and 115 In reactions over an angular range of 5 degree-140 degree have been measured. In different angular region an exponential distribution function dσ/dΩ = N exp(-θ/α) was used to fit the measured angular distributions. The decay factor α which can be connected with the interaction time τ and the factor N which is related to the intensity of the emission sources have been extracted. The relationship of α(Z) and N(Z) with Z for different reaction systems and different angular regions has been discussed. The different behavior of dσ/dΩ, α(Z), and N(Z) for the three studied reaction systems exists mainly in the middle and backward angular regions. The dependencies of angular distributions on isospin and the size of reaction systems have also been discussed

  19. Multiplicity correlations of intermediate-mass fragments with pions and fast protons in 12C + 197AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turzo, K.; Begemann-Blaich, M.L.; Auger, G.

    2003-12-01

    Low-energy π + (E π 12 C+ 197 Au collisions at incident energies from 300 to 1800 MeV per nucleon were detected with the Si-Si(Li)-CsI(Tl) calibration telescopes of the INDRA multidetector. The inclusive angular distributions are approximately isotropic, consistent with multiple rescattering in the target spectator. The multiplicity correlations of the low-energy pions and of energetic protons (E p >or ≤ 150 MeV) with intermediate-mass fragments were determined from the measured coincidence data. The deduced correlation functions 1 + R ∼ 1.3 for inclusive event samples reflect the strong correlations evident from the common impact-parameter dependence of the considered multiplicities. For narrow impact-parameter bins (based on charged-particle multiplicity), the correlation functions are close to unity and do not indicate strong additional correlations. Only for pions at high particle multiplicities (central collisions) a weak anticorrelation is observed, probably due to a limited competition between these emissions. Overall, the results are consistent with the equilibrium assumption made in statistical multifragmentation scenarios. Predictions obtained with intranuclear cascade models coupled to the statistical multifragmentation model are in good agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  20. Magnetized Converging Flows toward the Hot Core in the Intermediate/High-mass Star-forming Region NGC 6334 V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juárez, Carmen; Girart, Josep M. [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai, (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Carrer de Can Magrans, S/N, E-08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia (Spain); Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Palau, Aina; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, P.O. Box 3-72, 58090, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Liu, Hauyu Baobab [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei, 10617, Taiwan (China); Zhang, Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Qiu, Keping, E-mail: juarez@ice.cat [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 163 Xianlin Avenue, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2017-07-20

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 345 GHz toward the intermediate/high-mass cluster-forming region NGC 6334 V. From the dust emission we spatially resolve three dense condensations, the brightest one presenting the typical chemistry of a hot core. The magnetic field (derived from the dust polarized emission) shows a bimodal converging pattern toward the hot core. The molecular emission traces two filamentary structures at two different velocities, separated by 2 km s{sup −1}, converging to the hot core and following the magnetic field distribution. We compare the velocity field and the magnetic field derived from the SMA observations with magnetohydrodynamic simulations of star-forming regions dominated by gravity. This comparison allows us to show how the gas falls in from the larger-scale extended dense core (∼0.1 pc) of NGC 6334 V toward the higher-density hot core region (∼0.02 pc) through two distinctive converging flows dragging the magnetic field, whose strength seems to have been overcome by gravity.

  1. Magnetized Converging Flows toward the Hot Core in the Intermediate/High-mass Star-forming Region NGC 6334 V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juárez, Carmen; Girart, Josep M.; Zamora-Avilés, Manuel; Palau, Aina; Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Tang, Ya-Wen; Koch, Patrick M.; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Zhang, Qizhou; Qiu, Keping

    2017-01-01

    We present Submillimeter Array (SMA) observations at 345 GHz toward the intermediate/high-mass cluster-forming region NGC 6334 V. From the dust emission we spatially resolve three dense condensations, the brightest one presenting the typical chemistry of a hot core. The magnetic field (derived from the dust polarized emission) shows a bimodal converging pattern toward the hot core. The molecular emission traces two filamentary structures at two different velocities, separated by 2 km s −1 , converging to the hot core and following the magnetic field distribution. We compare the velocity field and the magnetic field derived from the SMA observations with magnetohydrodynamic simulations of star-forming regions dominated by gravity. This comparison allows us to show how the gas falls in from the larger-scale extended dense core (∼0.1 pc) of NGC 6334 V toward the higher-density hot core region (∼0.02 pc) through two distinctive converging flows dragging the magnetic field, whose strength seems to have been overcome by gravity.

  2. Peak muscle mass in young men and sarcopenia in the ageing male

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Nielsen, T L; Brixen, K

    2015-01-01

    -based reference data on lean body mass (LBM) in young men during the time of peak levels of GH/IGF-1 and testosterone and further to apply the reference data on a population-based sample of men aged 60-74 years to estimate the prevalence of sarcopenia. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional, population-based single...... of sarcopenia in men. INTRODUCTION: The ageing population increases the prevalence of sarcopenia. Estimation of normative data on muscle mass in young men during the peak of anabolic hormones is necessary for the diagnosis of sarcopenia in ageing males. The purposes of this study were to provide population...

  3. Assessing the fundamental limits of multiple star formation: An imaging search for the lowest mass stellar companions to intermediate-mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchene, Gaspard; Tzern Oon, Jner; Kantorski, Patrick; De Rosa, Robert J.; Thomas, Sandrine; Patience, Jennifer; Pueyo, Laurent; Nielsen, Eric L.; Konopacky, Quinn M.

    2017-01-01

    Stellar binaries are a common byproduct of star formation and therefore inform us on the processes of collapse and fragmentation of prestellar cores. While multiplicity surveys generally reveal an extensive diversity of multiple systems, with broad ranges of semi-major axis, mass ratio and eccentricities, one remarkable feature that was identified in the last two decades is the so-called brown dwarf desert, i.e., the apparent paucity of (non-planetary) substellar companions to solar-type stars. This "desert" was primarily identified among spectroscopic binaries but also appears to be a significant feature of wider, visual binaries. The physical origin of this feature has not been fully accounted for but is likely established during the formation of the systems. One way to shed new light on this question is to study the frequency of low-mass stellar companions to intermediate-mass star (late-B type, or 3-5 Msun), as those form through a similar, albeit scaled-up, mechanism as solar-type stars. Here we present preliminary results from two adaptive-optics based surveys to search for such multiple systems. Specifically, we are using the new ShaneAO system on the Lick3m telescope (~100 stars observed to date) and the Gemini Planet Imager (45 stars observed). We are targeting stars located both in open clusters and scattered in the Galactic field to search for potential evidence of dynamic evolution. To identify candidate low-mass companions as close in to target stars, we use advanced point spread function (PSF) subtraction algorithms, specifically implementations of the LOCI and KLIP algorithms. In the case of the ShaneAO observations, which do not allow for field rotation, we use LOCI in combination with Reference Differential Imaging (ADI), using our library of science images as input for PSF subtraction. In this contribution, we will discuss the potential of ShaneAO to reveal faint, subarcsecond companions in this context and present candidate companions from both

  4. Mass Ejection from Old and Young Stars and the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Para poder explicar: 1) la enorme cantidad de perdida de masa y la baja velocidad asint5tica de las estrellas gigantes de o, y 2) los flujos de masa observados en protoestrellas, se sugiere un modelo para Ia perdida de masa, en donde se usa un flujo de ondas de Alfvencomo un mecanismo de aceleraci6n para los vientos de estrellas de tipo y vientos en protoestrellas. Se estudian los mecanismos de disipaci5n de las ondas de Alfven: los amortiguamientos no lineal, de superficie reso- nante y turbulento. En nuestro modelo se usa una divergente A(r) = A(R0) (r/r0)5 (donde A(r) es el area a una distancia radial r, y (A(r)/r2)max/(A(ro)/r02 - 10). Tambien se sugiere un modelo para una de hoyo coronal en el Sol. Se muestra que para satisfacer los datos observacionales en el Sol, tomando en cuenta la deposici6n del momento de las ondas de Alfven sobre el viento, se necesita: (a) una divergencia lenta en un hoyo coronal hasta una altura de 0.01 - 0.1 R seguido de (b) una divergencia rap ida de hasta una altura aproximada de 1 R . ABSTRACT: In order to explain (1) a large mass-loss rate and a small asymptotic flow speed of late-type giant stars and (2) the observed protostellar mass outflows, we suggest a model for mass loss, where we use a flux of Alfven waves as a mechanism of acceleration for late-type giant star winds and protostellar winds. We study the Alfven wave dissipation mechanisms: nonlinear damping, resonant surface damping, and turbulent damping. In our model we use a diverging geometry A(r) = A(r0) (r I r )S (where A(r) is the cross sectional area of the geometry at a radial distance r, and(A(r) I r2)max/(A(r0)/r02) = 10). We also suggest a model for a coronal hole geometry in the sun. We show that in order to satisfy the observational data of the sun, taking into account Alfven wave momentum deposition in the wind, we need: (a) a slow divergence in a coronal hole up t6 a height of 0.01 - 0.1 followed by (b) a rapid divergence up to a height of

  5. Rapidly Growing Thyroid Mass in an Immunocompromised Young Male Adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 20-year-old man diagnosed with a myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, admitted to our hospital due to pancytopenia and fever of undetermined origin after myelosuppression with chemotherapy. Disseminated aspergillosis (DIA was suspected when he developed skin and lung involvement. A rapidly growing mass was detected on the left neck area, during hospitalization. A thyroid ultrasound reported a 3.7×2.5×2.9 cm oval heterogeneous structure, suggestive of an abscess versus a hematoma. Fine needle aspiration of the thyroid revealed invasion of aspergillosis. Fungal thyroiditis is a rare occurrence. Thyroid fungal infection is difficult to diagnose; for this reason it is rarely diagnosed antemortem. To our knowledge, this is the 10th case reported in the literature in an adult where the diagnosis of fungal invasion to the thyroid was able to be corroborated antemortem by fine needle aspiration biopsy.

  6. The central dynamics of M3, M13, and M92: stringent limits on the masses of intermediate-mass black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamann, S.; Wisotzki, L.; Roth, M. M.; Gerssen, J.; Husser, T.-O.; Sandin, C.; Weilbacher, P.

    2014-06-01

    We used the PMAS integral field spectrograph to obtain large sets of radial velocities in the central regions of three northern Galactic globular clusters: M3, M13, and M92. By applying the novel technique of crowded field 3D spectroscopy, we measured radial velocities for about 80 stars within the central ~10″ of each cluster. These are by far the largest spectroscopic datasets obtained in the innermost parts of these clusters up to now. To obtain kinematical data across the whole extent of the clusters, we complement our data with measurements available in the literature. We combine our velocity measurements with surface brightness profiles to analyse the internal dynamics of each cluster using spherical Jeans models, and investigate whether our data provide evidence for an intermediate-mass black hole in any of the clusters. The surface brightness profiles reveal that all three clusters are consistent with a core profile, although shallow cusps cannot be excluded. We find that spherical Jeans models with a constant mass-to-light ratio provide a good overall representation of the kinematical data. A massive black hole is required in none of the three clusters to explain the observed kinematics. Our 1σ (3σ) upper limits are 5300 M⊙ (12 000 M⊙) for M3, 8600 M⊙ (13 000 M⊙) for M13, and 980 M⊙ (2700 M⊙) for M92. A puzzling circumstance is the existence of several potential high velocity stars in M3 and M13, as their presence can account for the majority of the discrepancies that we find in our mass limits compared to M92. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano-Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.orgTables D.1 to D.6 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  7. Use of the suprapatellar approach in intramedullary nailing of a multi-fragmentary dislocated tibia fracture with a hypermobile intermediate fragment in a young patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Haubruck

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of an adolescent female patient who suffered from first grade open multi-fragment fracture of the tibia (AO42-C2 with a large hypermobile intermediate fragment is presented in this case report. Intramedullary nailing of the tibia remains the treatment of choice despite a high risk of malformation and anterior knee pain especially in multi-fragment fractures. Here the suprapatellar approach as a semiextended nailing technique seems favorable. The specialty in our case was an early change of procedures necessary due to persistent swelling during external fixation based on the hypermobile intermediate fragment. Decision in favor of this surgical technique was conducted in order to achieve beneficial alignment and union while protecting the softtissue despite the hypermobile intermediate fragment and decrease the risk of anterior knee pain. In our case we achieved successful alignment and proper bone healing without any signs of anterior knee pain or limitations in the range of motion of the knee. With this report we would like to recommend the suprapatellar approach as a favorable alternative in intramedullary nailing in this type of fracture also in young patients.

  8. Constraints on the spin evolution of young planetary-mass companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Marta L.; Benneke, Björn; Knutson, Heather A.; Batygin, Konstantin; Bowler, Brendan P.

    2018-02-01

    Surveys of young star-forming regions have discovered a growing population of planetary-mass (regulating rotation rates are independent of formation mechanism. We find that rotation rates for both populations are well below their break-up velocities and do not evolve significantly during the first few hundred million years after the end of accretion. This suggests that rotation rates are set during the late stages of accretion, possibly by interactions with a circumplanetary disk. This result has important implications for our understanding of the processes regulating the angular momentum evolution of young planetary-mass objects, and of the physics of gas accretion and disk coupling in the planetary-mass regime.

  9. The low-mass content of the massive young star cluster RCW 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mužić, Koraljka; Schödel, Rainer; Scholz, Alexander; Geers, Vincent C.; Jayawardhana, Ray; Ascenso, Joana; Cieza, Lucas A.

    2017-11-01

    RCW 38 is a deeply embedded young (˜1 Myr), massive star cluster located at a distance of 1.7 kpc. Twice as dense as the Orion nebula cluster, orders of magnitude denser than other nearby star-forming regions and rich in massive stars, RCW 38 is an ideal place to look for potential differences in brown dwarf formation efficiency as a function of environment. We present deep, high-resolution adaptive optics data of the central ˜0.5 × 0.5 pc2 obtained with NACO at the Very Large Telescope. Through comparison with evolutionary models, we determine masses and extinction for ˜480 candidate members, and derive the first initial mass function (IMF) of the cluster extending into the substellar regime. Representing the IMF as a set of power laws in the form dN/dM ∝ M-α, we derive the slope α = 1.60 ± 0.13 for the mass range 0.5-20 M⊙,which is shallower than the Salpeter slope, but in agreement with results in several other young massive clusters. At the low-mass side, we find α = 0.71 ± 0.11 for masses between 0.02 and 0.5 M⊙, or α = 0.81 ± 0.08 for masses between 0.02 and 1 M⊙. Our result is in agreement with the values found in other young star-forming regions, revealing no evidence that a combination of high stellar densities and the presence of numerous massive stars affects the formation efficiency of brown dwarfs and very-low-mass stars. We estimate that the Milky Way galaxy contains between 25 and 100 billion brown dwarfs (with masses >0.03 M⊙).

  10. Criteria for the safe avoidance of needle sampling in young women with solid breast masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, A.J., E-mail: anthony.maxwell@rbh.nhs.u [Bolton Breast Unit, Royal Bolton Hospital, Bolton BL4 0JR (United Kingdom); Pearson, J.M. [Bolton Breast Unit, Royal Bolton Hospital, Bolton BL4 0JR (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Aim: To establish clinical and ultrasonic criteria by which needle sampling can be safely avoided in young women with solid breast masses. Materials and methods: The databases of a large hospital were searched for breast cancers, phyllodes tumours, and papillomas diagnosed in women below the age of 30 years. In addition, the clinical and sonographic findings in female patients less than 25 years of age presenting with a solid breast mass over a 1-year period were reviewed. Results: Nine women with breast cancer, seven with phyllodes, and six with papillomas were found. No delayed diagnoses in those who had ultrasound would have been made if the following criteria had been applied to avoid needle sampling: age less than 25 years; no known risk factors for breast malignancy; mass not rapidly enlarging; smooth discrete mobile mass on clinical examination, or lesion impalpable; well-defined homogeneously isoechoic or mildly hypoechoic solid mass; less than 3 cm in greatest dimension; ovoid shape, aligned parallel to the skin surface; smooth or gently lobulated contour (two or three lobulations only; no microlobulation); thin echogenic pseudocapsule; no calcification; no acoustic shadowing. Needle sampling could have been safely avoided in approximately two-thirds of the women reviewed below the age of 25 with a solid breast mass. Conclusion: Application of the proposed criteria would spare a significant number of young women unnecessary needle sampling.

  11. Medical Advice for Sick-reported Students (MASS in intermediate vocational education schools: design of a controlled before-and-after study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelon K Van der Vlis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background School absenteeism, including medical absenteeism, is associated with early school dropout and may result in physical, mental, social and work-related problems in later life. Especially at intermediate vocational education schools, high rates of medical absenteeism are found. In 2012 the Dutch intervention ‘Medical Advice for Sick-reported Students’ (MASS, previously developed for pre-vocational secondary education, was adjusted for intermediate vocational education schools. The aim of the study outlined in this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the MASS intervention at intermediate vocational education schools in terms of reducing students’ medical absenteeism and early dropping out of school. Additionally, the extent to which biopsychosocial and other factors moderate the effectiveness of the intervention will be assessed. Methods A controlled before-and-after study will be conducted within Intermediate Vocational Education schools. Schools are allocated to be an intervention or control school based on whether the schools have implemented the MASS intervention (intervention schools or not (control schools. Intervention schools apply the MASS intervention consisting of active support for students with medical absenteeism provided by the school including a consultation with the Youth Health Care (YHC professional if needed. Control schools provide care as usual. Data will be collected by questionnaires among students in both groups meeting the criteria for extensive medical absenteeism (i.e. ‘reported sick four times in 12 school weeks or for more than six consecutive school days’ at baseline and at 6 months follow-up. Additionally, in the intervention group a questionnaire is completed after each consultation with a YHC professional, by both the student and the YHC professional. Primary outcome measures are duration and cumulative incidence of absenteeism and academic performances. Secondary outcome

  12. Medical Advice for Sick-reported Students (MASS) in intermediate vocational education schools: design of a controlled before-and-after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Vlis, Madelon K; Lugtenberg, Marjolein; Vanneste, Yvonne T M; Berends, Wenda; Mulder, Wico; Bannink, Rienke; Van Grieken, Amy; Raat, Hein; de Kroon, Marlou L A

    2017-06-29

    School absenteeism, including medical absenteeism, is associated with early school dropout and may result in physical, mental, social and work-related problems in later life. Especially at intermediate vocational education schools, high rates of medical absenteeism are found. In 2012 the Dutch intervention 'Medical Advice for Sick-reported Students' (MASS), previously developed for pre-vocational secondary education, was adjusted for intermediate vocational education schools. The aim of the study outlined in this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the MASS intervention at intermediate vocational education schools in terms of reducing students' medical absenteeism and early dropping out of school. Additionally, the extent to which biopsychosocial and other factors moderate the effectiveness of the intervention will be assessed. A controlled before-and-after study will be conducted within Intermediate Vocational Education schools. Schools are allocated to be an intervention or control school based on whether the schools have implemented the MASS intervention (intervention schools) or not (control schools). Intervention schools apply the MASS intervention consisting of active support for students with medical absenteeism provided by the school including a consultation with the Youth Health Care (YHC) professional if needed. Control schools provide care as usual. Data will be collected by questionnaires among students in both groups meeting the criteria for extensive medical absenteeism (i.e. 'reported sick four times in 12 school weeks or for more than six consecutive school days' at baseline and at 6 months follow-up). Additionally, in the intervention group a questionnaire is completed after each consultation with a YHC professional, by both the student and the YHC professional. Primary outcome measures are duration and cumulative incidence of absenteeism and academic performances. Secondary outcome measures are biopsychosocial outcomes of the students. It

  13. Sensitivity of gravitational wave searches to the full signal of intermediate-mass black hole binaries during the first observing run of Advanced LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón Bustillo, Juan; Salemi, Francesco; Dal Canton, Tito; Jani, Karan P.

    2018-01-01

    The sensitivity of gravitational wave searches for binary black holes is estimated via the injection and posterior recovery of simulated gravitational wave signals in the detector data streams. When a search reports no detections, the estimated sensitivity is then used to place upper limits on the coalescence rate of the target source. In order to obtain correct sensitivity and rate estimates, the injected waveforms must be faithful representations of the real signals. Up to date, however, injected waveforms have neglected radiation modes of order higher than the quadrupole, potentially biasing sensitivity and coalescence rate estimates. In particular, higher-order modes are known to have a large impact in the gravitational waves emitted by intermediate-mass black holes binaries. In this work, we evaluate the impact of this approximation in the context of two search algorithms run by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration in their search for intermediate-mass black hole binaries in the O1 LIGO Science Run data: a matched filter-based pipeline and a coherent unmodeled one. To this end, we estimate the sensitivity of both searches to simulated signals for nonspinning binaries including and omitting higher-order modes. We find that omission of higher-order modes leads to biases in the sensitivity estimates which depend on the masses of the binary, the search algorithm, and the required level of significance for detection. In addition, we compare the sensitivity of the two search algorithms across the studied parameter space. We conclude that the most recent LIGO-Virgo upper limits on the rate of coalescence of intermediate-mass black hole binaries are conservative for the case of highly asymmetric binaries. However, the tightest upper limits, placed for nearly equal-mass sources, remain unchanged due to the small contribution of higher modes to the corresponding sources.

  14. Body mass index and subjective well-being in young adults: a twin population study

    OpenAIRE

    Linna, Milla S; Kaprio, Jaakko; Raevuori, Anu; Sihvola, Elina; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Rissanen, Aila

    2013-01-01

    Background Body mass index (BMI) is associated with subjective well-being. Higher BMI is believed to be related with lower well-being. However, the association may not be linear. Therefore, we investigated whether a nonlinear (U-shaped) trend would better describe this relationship, and whether eating disorders might account for the association in young adults. Methods FinnTwin16 study evaluated multiple measures of subjective well-being, including life satisfaction, General Health Questionna...

  15. Low bone mass in behaviorally HIV-infected young men on antiretroviral therapy: adolescent trials network (ATN) study 021B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peak bone mass is achieved in adolescence/early adulthood and is the key determinant of bone mass in adulthood. We evaluated the association of bone mass with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) during this critical period among behaviorally HIV infected young men and seronegative control...

  16. Body image, body mass index, and body composition in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streeter, Veronica M; Milhausen, Robin R; Buchholz, Andrea C

    2012-01-01

    Associations were examined between body image and body mass index (BMI) in comparison with body composition in healthy weight, overweight, and obese young adults. Weight and height were determined, and the percentage of fat mass (%FM) and percentage of fat-free mass (%FFM) were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in 75 male and 87 female young adults (21.1 ± 1.9 years; 25.2 ± 4.4 kg/m² [mean ± standard deviation]). Body image was measured using the three subscales Weight Esteem, Appearance Esteem, and External Attribution of the Body-Esteem Scale for Adolescents and Adults (BESAA). Body mass index and %FM were highly correlated (r for males = 0.74, r for females = 0.82; both pbody image, particularly Weight Esteem. After adjustment for physical activity, BMI and %FM (and %FFM, although in the opposite direction) were associated with each BESAA subscale: %FM, %FFM, and BMI explained 12% to 14% of the variance in Appearance Esteem for both sexes, 33% to 41% in Weight Esteem in women and 16% to 18% in men, and 8% to 10% in External Attribution in women (all pbody image decreases, particularly in women.

  17. Body mass index and subjective well-being in young adults: a twin population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linna, Milla S; Kaprio, Jaakko; Raevuori, Anu; Sihvola, Elina; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Rissanen, Aila

    2013-03-16

    Body mass index (BMI) is associated with subjective well-being. Higher BMI is believed to be related with lower well-being. However, the association may not be linear. Therefore, we investigated whether a nonlinear (U-shaped) trend would better describe this relationship, and whether eating disorders might account for the association in young adults. FinnTwin16 study evaluated multiple measures of subjective well-being, including life satisfaction, General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20), satisfaction with leisure time, work, and family relationships, and satisfaction with sex life in young adulthood in the 1975-79 birth cohorts of Finnish twins (n=5240). We studied the relationship between indicators of subjective well-being and BMI both in full birth cohorts and in subgroups stratified by lifetime DSM-IV eating disorders. We found an inverse U-shaped relationship between all indicators of subjective well-being and BMI in men. There was no overall association between BMI and subjective well-being in women. However, there was an inverse U-shaped relationship between BMI and indicators of subjective well-being in women with a lifetime eating disorder and their healthy female co-twins. Subjective well-being was optimal in the overweight category. Both underweight and obesity are associated with impaired subjective well-being in young men. The BMI reflecting optimal subjective well-being of young men may be higher than currently recognized. Categorization of body weight in terms of BMI may need to be reassessed in young men. BMI and subjective well-being are related in women with a lifetime eating disorder, but not in the general population of young women.

  18. Spectroscopic confirmation of young planetary-mass companions on wide orbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowler, Brendan P. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Liu, Michael C.; Mann, Andrew W. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai' i, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Kraus, Adam L., E-mail: bpbowler@caltech.edu [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA. (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We present moderate-resolution (R ∼ 4000-5000) near-infrared integral field spectroscopy of the young (1-5 Myr) 6-14 M {sub Jup} companions ROXs 42B b and FW Tau b obtained with Keck/OSIRIS and Gemini-North/NIFS. The spectrum of ROXs 42B b exhibits clear signs of low surface gravity common to young L dwarfs, confirming its extreme youth, cool temperature, and low mass. Overall, it closely resembles the free-floating 4-7 M {sub Jup} L-type Taurus member 2MASS J04373705+2331080. The companion to FW Tau AB is more enigmatic. Our optical and near-infrared spectra show strong evidence of outflow activity and disk accretion in the form of line emission from [S II], [O I], Hα, Ca II, [Fe II], Paβ, and H{sub 2}. The molecular hydrogen emission is spatially resolved as a single lobe that stretches ≈0.''1 (15 AU). Although the extended emission is not kinematically resolved in our data, its morphology resembles shock-excited H{sub 2} jets primarily seen in young Class 0 and Class I sources. The near-infrared continuum of FW Tau b is mostly flat and lacks the deep absorption features expected for a cool, late-type object. This may be a result of accretion-induced veiling, especially in light of its strong and sustained Hα emission (EW(Hα) ≳ 290 Å). Alternatively, FW Tau b may be a slightly warmer (M5-M8) accreting low-mass star or brown dwarf (0.03-0.15 M {sub ☉}) with an edge-on disk. Regardless, its young evolutionary stage is in stark contrast to its Class III host FW Tau AB, indicating a more rapid disk clearing timescale for the host binary system than for its wide companion. Finally, we present near-infrared spectra of the young (∼2-10 Myr) low-mass (12-15 M {sub Jup}) companions GSC 6214-210 B and SR 12 C and find they best resemble low-gravity M9.5 and M9 substellar templates.

  19. Longitudinal Study of Body Mass Index in Young Males and the Transition to Fatherhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Craig F; Duncan, Greg; Gutina, Anna; Rutsohn, Joshua; McDade, Thomas W; Adam, Emma K; Coley, Rebekah Levine; Chase-Lansdale, P Lindsay

    2016-11-01

    Despite a growing understanding that the social determinants of health have an impact on body mass index (BMI), the role of fatherhood on young men's BMI is understudied. This longitudinal study examines BMI in young men over time as they transition from adolescence into fatherhood in a nationally representative sample. Data from all four waves of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health supported a 20-year longitudinal analysis of 10,253 men beginning in 1994. A "fatherhood-year" data set was created and changes in BMI were examined based on fatherhood status (nonfather, nonresident father, resident father), fatherhood years, and covariates. Though age is positively associated with BMI over all years for all men, comparing nonresident and resident fathers with nonfathers reveals different trajectories based on fatherhood status. Entrance into fatherhood is associated with an increase in BMI trajectory for both nonresident and resident fathers, while nonfathers exhibit a decrease over the same period. In this longitudinal, population-based study, fatherhood and residence status play a role in men's BMI. Designing obesity prevention interventions for young men that begin in adolescence and carry through young adulthood should target the distinctive needs of these populations, potentially improving their health outcomes. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. LIMES: A computer program for analyses of light and intermediate-mass fragment emission in heavy ion reactions by an extended sum-rule model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brancus, I.M.; Wentz, J.; Hohn, H.U.

    1989-10-01

    The computer program LIMES is based on an improved version of the extended sum-rule model for light and intermediate-mass fragment emission in heavy ion reactions. It includes a code for dynamical calculations of the critical angular momentum for fusion following the suggestions. The report briefly describes the use of this program, the necessary input for the calculations of the element distribution and partial cross sections and gives a Fortran listing. Using the fitting routine FITEX the program provides an option for fast parameter adjustments. The use is demonstrated by an application to a specific example. (orig.) [de

  1. Combine body mass index and body fat percentage measures to improve the accuracy of obesity screening in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Shang-Ping; Chen, Ching-Yu; Guo, Fei-Ran; Chang, Ching-I; Jan, Chyi-Feng

    Obesity screening among young adult groups is meaningful. Body mass index (BMI) is limited to discriminate between fat and lean mass. Asian young adult group tends to have lower BMI and higher body fat percentage (BFP) than other ethnic groups. Accuracy of obesity screening by commonly used BMI criteria is unclear in young Taiwanese population. A total of 894 young adults (447 males and 447 females) aged 20-26 were recruited. BMI, regional fat percentage and BFP determined by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) were measured. BMI cutoff points were based on the criteria adopted by the Ministry of Health and Welfare in Taiwan. Cutoff points of low or high BFP were defined as 24% in men and 31.4% in women. Prevalence of BFP defining obesity was 14.8% in young men and 27.3% in young women. 23.2% of young men and only 8.3% of young women were classified to overweight or obesity categories according to the BMI criteria. Disagreement was noticed mainly among overweight males and normal weight females. 68.7% of BMI defining overweight young men had low BFP; however, 29.7% of young women of BMI defining normal group had high BFP. Up to 69.7% of young women with high BFP would be missed by BMI category only. Disagreement between BMI and BFP was significant among young adults, especially young women. We suggest combining BMI and BIA for obesity and overweight screening in Asian young adults. Copyright © 2016 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Discovery of a wide planetary-mass companion to the young M3 star GU PSC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naud, Marie-Eve; Artigau, Étienne; Malo, Lison; Albert, Loïc; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Gagné, Jonathan; Boucher, Anne [Département de physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, Montréal H3C 3J7 (Canada); Saumon, Didier [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Morley, Caroline V. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Allard, France; Homeier, Derek [Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, UMR 5574 CNRS, Université de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d' Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Beichman, Charles A.; Gelino, Christopher R., E-mail: naud@astro.umontreal.ca [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    We present the discovery of a comoving planetary-mass companion ∼42'' (∼2000 AU) from a young M3 star, GU Psc, a likely member of the young AB Doradus Moving Group (ABDMG). The companion was first identified via its distinctively red i – z color (>3.5) through a survey made with Gemini-S/GMOS. Follow-up Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/WIRCam near-infrared (NIR) imaging, Gemini-N/GNIRS NIR spectroscopy and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer photometry indicate a spectral type of T3.5 ± 1 and reveal signs of low gravity which we attribute to youth. Keck/Adaptive Optics NIR observations did not resolve the companion as a binary. A comparison with atmosphere models indicates T {sub eff} = 1000-1100 K and log g = 4.5-5.0. Based on evolution models, this temperature corresponds to a mass of 9-13 M {sub Jup} for the age of ABDMG (70-130 Myr). The relatively well-constrained age of this companion and its very large angular separation to its host star will allow its thorough characterization and will make it a valuable comparison for planetary-mass companions that will be uncovered by forthcoming planet-finder instruments such as Gemini Planet Imager and SPHERE 9.

  3. A Multi-Fiber Spectroscopic Search for Low-mass Young Stars in Orion OB1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerincs, Jacqueline; Briceno, Cesar; Calvet, Nuria; Mateo, Mario L.; Hernandez, Jesus

    2017-01-01

    We present here results of a low resolution spectroscopic followup of candidate low-mass pre-main sequence stars in the Orion OB1 association. Our targets were selected from the CIDA Variability Survey of Orion (CVSO), and we used the Michigan/Magellan Fiber Spectrograph (M2FS) on the Magellan Clay 6.5m telescope to obtain spectra of 500 candidate T Tauri stars distributed in seven 0.5 deg diameter fields, adding to a total area of ~5.5 deg2. We identify young stars by looking at the distinctive Hα 6563 Å emission and Lithium Li I 6707 Å absorption features characteristic of young low mass pre-main sequence stars. Furthermore, by measuring the strength of their Hα emission lines, confirmed T Tauri stars can be classified as either Classical T Tauris (CTTS) or Weak-line T Tauris (WTTS), which give indication of whether the star is actively accreting material from a gas and dust disk surrounding the star, which may be the precursor of a planetary system. We confirm a total of 90 T Tauri stars, of which 50% are newly identified young members of Orion; out of the 49 new detections,15 are accreting CTTS, and of these all but one are found in the OB1b sub-region. This result is in line with our previous findings that this region is much younger than the more extended Orion OB1a sub-association. The M2FS results add to our growing census of young stars in Orion, that is allowing us to characterize in a systematic and consistent way the distribution of stellar ages across the entire complex, in order to building a complete picture of star formation in this, one of nearest most active sites of star birth.

  4. Comprehensive determination of macrolide antibiotics, their synthesis intermediates and transformation products in wastewater effluents and ambient waters by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senta, Ivan; Krizman-Matasic, Ivona; Terzic, Senka; Ahel, Marijan

    2017-08-04

    Macrolide antibiotics are a prominent group of emerging contaminants frequently found in wastewater effluents and wastewater-impacted aquatic environments. In this work, a novel analytical method for simultaneous determination of parent macrolide antibiotics (azithromycin, erythromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin), along with their synthesis intermediates, byproducts, metabolites and transformation products in wastewater and surface water was developed and validated. Samples were enriched using solid-phase extraction on Oasis HLB cartridges and analyzed by reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The target macrolide compounds were separated on an ACE C18 PFP column and detected using multiple reaction monitoring in positive ionization polarity. The optimized method, which included an additional extract clean-up on strong anion-exchange cartridges (SAX), resulted in high recoveries and accuracies, low matrix effects and improved chromatographic separation of the target compounds, even in highly complex matrices, such as raw wastewater. The developed method was applied to the analysis of macrolide compounds in wastewater and river water samples from Croatia. In addition to parent antibiotics, several previously unreported macrolide transformation products and/or synthesis intermediates were detected in municipal wastewater, some of them reaching μg/L levels. Moreover, extremely high concentrations of macrolides up to mg/L level were found in pharmaceutical industry effluents, indicating possible importance of this source to the total loads into ambient waters. The results revealed a significant contribution of synthesis intermediates and transformation products to the overall mass balance of macrolides in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Event Rates of Gravitational Waves from merging Intermediate mass Black Holes: based on a Runaway Path to a SMBH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Hisaaki

    2018-01-01

    Based on a dynamical formation model of a supermassive black hole (SMBH), we estimate the expected observational profile of gravitational wave at ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA or advanced LIGO/VIRGO. Noting that the second generation of detectors have enough sensitivity from 10 Hz and up, we are able to detect the ring-down gravitational wave of a BH with the mass M LIGO/VIRGO), we find that the BH merger of its total mass M ˜ 60M⊙ is at the peak of the expected mass distribution. With its signal-to-noise ratio ρ = 10(30), we estimate the event rate R ˜ 200(20) per year in the most optimistic case, and we also find that BH mergers in the range M 1 per year for ρ = 10. Thus, if we observe a BH with more than 100M⊙ in future gravitational-wave observations, our model naturally explains its source.

  6. BLAST: THE MASS FUNCTION, LIFETIMES, AND PROPERTIES OF INTERMEDIATE MASS CORES FROM A 50 deg2 SUBMILLIMETER GALACTIC SURVEY IN VELA (l ∼ 2650)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netterfield, Calvin B.; Martin, Peter G.; Roy, Arabindo; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Phillip; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Scott, Douglas; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeff; Rex, Marie; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    We present first results from an unbiased 50 deg 2 submillimeter Galactic survey at 250, 350, and 500 μm from the 2006 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope. The map has resolution ranging from 36'' to 60'' in the three submillimeter bands spanning the thermal emission peak of cold starless cores. We determine the temperature, luminosity, and mass of more than 1000 compact sources in a range of evolutionary stages and an unbiased statistical characterization of the population. From comparison with C 18 O data, we find the dust opacity per gas mass, κr= 0.16 cm 2 g -1 at 250 μm, for cold clumps. We find that 2% of the mass of the molecular gas over this diverse region is in cores colder than 14 K, and that the mass function for these cold cores is consistent with a power law with index α = -3.22 ± 0.14 over the mass range 14 M sun sun . Additionally, we infer a mass-dependent cold core lifetime of t c (M) = 4 x 10 6 (M/20 M sun ) -0.9 yr-longer than what has been found in previous surveys of either low or high-mass cores, and significantly longer than free fall or likely turbulent decay times. This implies some form of non-thermal support for cold cores during this early stage of star formation.

  7. ON THE INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT CENTRAL STELLAR MASS-HALO MASS RELATION, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EVOLUTION OF THE MOST MASSIVE GALAXIES SINCE z ∼ 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shankar, Francesco; Buchan, Stewart [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Guo, Hong; Zheng, Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, UT 84112 (United States); Bouillot, Vincent [Centre for Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravitation, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Cape Town 7701 (South Africa); Rettura, Alessandro [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 169-234, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Meert, Alan; Bernardi, Mariangela; Sheth, Ravi; Vikram, Vinu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Kravtsov, Andrey [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Marchesini, Danilo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Behroozi, Peter [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Maraston, Claudia; Capozzi, Diego [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Ascaso, Begoña; Huertas-Company, Marc [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, Univ. Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon (France); Lemaux, Brian C. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Gal, Roy R. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Lubin, Lori M., E-mail: F.Shankar@soton.ac.uk [University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); and others

    2014-12-20

    The stellar mass-halo mass relation is a key constraint in all semi-analytic, numerical, and semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution. However, its exact shape and redshift dependence remain under debate. Several recent works support a relation in the local universe steeper than previously thought. Based on comparisons with a variety of data on massive central galaxies, we show that this steepening holds up to z ∼ 1 for stellar masses M {sub star} ≳ 2 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. Specifically, we find significant evidence for a high-mass end slope of β ≳ 0.35-0.70 instead of the usual β ≲ 0.20-0.30 reported by a number of previous results. When including the independent constraints from the recent Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey clustering measurements, the data, independent of any systematic errors in stellar masses, tend to favor a model with a very small scatter (≲ 0.15 dex) in stellar mass at fixed halo mass, in the redshift range z < 0.8 and for M {sub star} > 3 × 10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}, suggesting a close connection between massive galaxies and host halos even at relatively recent epochs. We discuss the implications of our results with respect to the evolution of the most massive galaxies since z ∼ 1.

  8. Luminosity excesses in low-mass young stellar objects - a statistical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, K.M.; Strom, S.E.; Kenyon, S.J.; Hartmann, L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical study in which the observed total luminosity is compared quantitatively with an estimate of the stellar luminosity for a sample of 59 low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Taurus-Auriga complex. In 13 of the analyzed YSOs, luminosity excesses greater than 0.20 are observed together with greater than 0.6 IR excesses, which typically contribute the bulk of the observed excess luminosity and are characterized by spectral energy distributions which are flat or rise toward long wavelengths. The analysis suggests that YSOs showing the largest luminosity excesses typically power optical jets and/or molecular outflows or have strong winds, as evidenced by the presence of O I emission, indicating a possible correlation between accretion and mass-outflow properties. 38 references

  9. OH far-infrared emission from low- and intermediate-mass protostars surveyed with Herschel-PACS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wampfler, Susanne Franziska; Bruderer, S.; Karska, A.

    2013-01-01

    are sufficiently high. Using realistic source parameters and radiation fields, it is shown for the case of Ser SMM1 that radiative pumping plays an important role in transitions arising from upper level energies higher than 300 K. The compact emission in the low-mass sources and the required presence of a strong...

  10. THE LEECH EXOPLANET IMAGING SURVEY: ORBIT AND COMPONENT MASSES OF THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE, LATE-TYPE BINARY NO UMa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlieder, Joshua E. [NASA Ames Research Center, Space Science and Astrobiology Division, MS 245-6, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip; Leisenring, Jarron; Defrère, Denis; Close, Laird M.; Eisner, Josh A. [Steward Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Maire, Anne-Lise; Desidera, Silvano [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell’Osservatorio 5, I-35122, Padova (Italy); Skrutskie, Michael F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, 22904 (United States); Bailey, Vanessa [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Esposito, Simone [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125, Firenze (Italy); Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Weber, Michael [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482, Potsdam (Germany); Biller, Beth A.; Bonnefoy, Mickaël; Buenzli, Esther; Henning, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Crepp, Justin R. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN, 46556 (United States); Hofmann, Karl-Heinz, E-mail: joshua.e.schlieder@nasa.gov [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121, Bonn (Germany); and others

    2016-02-10

    We present high-resolution Large Binocular Telescope LBTI/LMIRcam images of the spectroscopic and astrometric binary NO UMa obtained as part of the LBT Interferometer Exozodi Exoplanet Common Hunt exoplanet imaging survey. Our H-, K{sub s}-, and L′-band observations resolve the system at angular separations <0.″09. The components exhibit significant orbital motion over a span of ∼7 months. We combine our imaging data with archival images, published speckle interferometry measurements, and existing spectroscopic velocity data to solve the full orbital solution and estimate component masses. The masses of the K2.0 ± 0.5 primary and K6.5 ± 0.5 secondary are 0.83 ± 0.02 M{sub ⊙} and 0.64 ± 0.02 M{sub ⊙}, respectively. We also derive a system distance of d = 25.87 ± 0.02 pc and revise the Galactic kinematics of NO UMa. Our revised Galactic kinematics confirm NO UMa as a nuclear member of the ∼500 Myr old Ursa Major moving group, and it is thus a mass and age benchmark. We compare the masses of the NO UMa binary components to those predicted by five sets of stellar evolution models at the age of the Ursa Major group. We find excellent agreement between our measured masses and model predictions with little systematic scatter between the models. NO UMa joins the short list of nearby, bright, late-type binaries having known ages and fully characterized orbits.

  11. Contrasting associations of body mass index and measles with asthma and rhinitis in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hirokazu; Konno, Satoshi; Isada, Akira; Maeda, Yukiko; Musashi, Manabu; Nishimura, Masaharu

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and allergic rhinitis often coexist and are increasing worldwide, particularly among the younger generation. Although the prevalences of adult asthma and allergic rhinitis and their risk factors have been reported, there have been few studies focusing on young adults. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalences of asthma and allergic rhinitis and their associated factors in Japanese young adults. A questionnaire survey of new students at Hokkaido University about the presence of current wheeze and rhinitis and a history of several viral infections during childhood was conducted in 2008 and 2010. The prevalences of wheeze and rhinitis and their associated factors were evaluated. Of 4076 nonsmoking subjects aged 18-25 years, 261 (6.4%) had current wheeze and 1373 (33.7%) had allergic rhinitis. On multivariate analyses, current wheeze was associated with high body mass index (BMI), atopic dermatitis, allergic rhinitis, food allergy, and a history of measles infection. In contrast, allergic rhinitis was associated with low BMI, current wheeze, atopic dermatitis, food allergy, and no history of measles. When subjects were classified into four groups by the presence or absence of wheeze and rhinitis, both high BMI and a history of measles were positively associated with wheeze without rhinitis but negatively associated with rhinitis without wheeze. High BMI and past measles infection showed contrasting associations with asthma and allergic rhinitis in nonsmoking young adults. It is important to not only recognize the common pathophysiological characteristics of asthma and allergic rhinitis but also to understand their differences.

  12. VLA Observations of the Disk around the Young Brown Dwarf 2MASS J044427+2512

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Rome, H. [The Kinkaid School, 201 Kinkaid School Drive, Houston, TX 77024 (United States); Pinilla, P. [Department of Astronomy Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Facchini, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Birnstiel, T. [University Observatory, Faculty of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 Munich (Germany); Testi, L., E-mail: luca.ricci@rice.edu [European Southern Observatory (ESO) Headquarters, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2017-09-01

    We present multi-wavelength radio observations obtained with the VLA of the protoplanetary disk surrounding the young brown dwarf 2MASS J04442713+2512164 (2M0444) in the Taurus star-forming region. 2M0444 is the brightest known brown dwarf disk at millimeter wavelengths, making this an ideal target to probe radio emission from a young brown dwarf. Thermal emission from dust in the disk is detected at 6.8 and 9.1 mm, whereas the 1.36 cm measured flux is dominated by ionized gas emission. We combine these data with previous observations at shorter sub-mm and mm wavelengths to test the predictions of dust evolution models in gas-rich disks after adapting their parameters to the case of 2M0444. These models show that the radial drift mechanism affecting solids in a gaseous environment has to be either completely made inefficient, or significantly slowed down by very strong gas pressure bumps in order to explain the presence of mm/cm-sized grains in the outer regions of the 2M0444 disk. We also discuss the possible mechanisms for the origin of the ionized gas emission detected at 1.36 cm. The inferred radio luminosity for this emission is in line with the relation between radio and bolometric luminosity valid for for more massive and luminous young stellar objects, and extrapolated down to the very low luminosity of the 2M0444 brown dwarf.

  13. New circumstellar disk candidates around young low mass stars and brown dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Anne; Lafrenière, David; Gagné, Jonathan; Malo, Lison; Doyon, Rene

    2015-12-01

    It is now common knowledge that circumstellar disks are signposts of past or ongoing planetary system formation. Their presence and their properties, in relation to those of their host star, also bear valuable information about the process of star formation itself. To address these questions, we started a project to uncover new circumstellar disks around newly identified low mass star and brown dwarf candidates in nearby young kinematic associations. Being near the stellar/substellar mass boundary, these hosts - and their potential disks - are particularly interesting to study both star and planet formation. We used a least squares approach to fit synthetic spectra to the observed photometric data of each star, covering from 0.8 µm up to 22 µm, and then identified candidates showing a significant excess compared to the best fits. We then carefully looked at the data for these candidates to filter out those biased by contaminants or other artefacts. We ended up with a list of 4 young stars and brown dwarfs strongly suspected of being surrounded by a disk. Here we will present our search method and some properties of our newly identified disk-bearing candidates.

  14. The Prototypical Young L/T-Transition Dwarf HD 203030B Likely Has Planetary Mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles-Páez, Paulo A.; Metchev, Stanimir; Luhman, Kevin L.; Marengo, Massimo; Hulsebus, Alan

    2017-12-01

    Upon its discovery in 2006, the young L7.5 companion to the solar analog HD 203030 was found to be ≈ 200 K cooler than older late-L dwarfs, which is quite unusual. HD 203030B offered the first clear indication that the effective temperature at the L-to-T spectral type transition depends on surface gravity: now a well-known characteristic of low-gravity ultra-cool dwarfs. An initial age analysis of the G8V primary star indicated that the system was 130-400 Myr old, and so the companion would be between 12 and 31 {M}{Jup}. Using moderate-resolution near-infrared spectra of HD 203030B, we now find features of very low gravity comparable to those of 10-150 Myr old L7-L8 dwarfs. We also obtained more accurate near-infrared and Spitzer/IRAC photometry, and we find a {(J-K)}{MKO} color of 2.56 ± 0.13 mag—comparable to those observed in other young planetary-mass objects—and a luminosity of log({L}{bol}/{L}⊙ ) = -4.75 ± 0.04 dex. We further re-assess the evidence for the young age of the host star, HD 203030, with a more comprehensive analysis of the photometry and updated stellar activity measurements and age calibrations. Summarizing the age diagnostics for both components of the binary, we adopt an age of 100 Myr for HD 203030B and an age range of 30-150 Myr. Using cloudy evolutionary models, the new companion age range and luminosity result in a mass of 11 {M}{Jup} with a range of 8-15 {M}{Jup}, and an effective temperature of 1040 ± 50 K.

  15. Thermohaline instability and rotation-induced mixing in low and intermediate mass stars: Consequences on global asteroseismic quantities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekström S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermohaline mixing has been recently identified as the probable dominating process that governs the photospheric composition of low-mass bright red giant stars. Here, we present the predictions of stellar models computed with the code STAREVOL including this process together with rotational mixing. We compare our theoretical predictions with recent observations, and discuss the effects of both mechanisms on asteroseismic diagnostics.

  16. Herschel/PACS far-IR spectral imaging of a jet from an intermediate mass protostar in the OMC-2 region

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-García, B.; Manoj, P.; Watson, D. M.; Vavrek, R.; Megeath, S. T.; Stutz, A. M.; Osorio, M.; Wyrowski, F.; Fischer, W.; Tobin, J. J.; Sánchez-Portal, M.; Diaz Rodriguez, A. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2016-11-01

    We present the first detection of a jet in the far-IR [O I] lines from an intermediate mass protostar. This jet was detected in a Herschel/PACS spectral mapping study in the [O I] lines of OMC-2 FIR 3 and FIR 4, two of the most luminous protostars in Orion outside of the Orion Nebula. The spatial morphology of the fine structure line emission reveals the presence of an extended photodissociation region (PDR) and a narrow, but intense jet connecting the two protostars. The jet seen in [O I] emission is spatially aligned with the Spitzer/IRAC 4.5 μm jet and the CO (6-5) molecular outflow centered on FIR 3. The mass-loss rate derived from the total [O I] 63 μm line luminosity of the jet is 7.7 × 10-6M⊙ yr-1, more than an order of magnitude higher than that measured for typical low-mass class 0 protostars. The implied accretion luminosity is significantly higher than the observed bolometric luminosity of FIR 4, indicating that the [O I] jet is unlikely to be associated with FIR 4. We argue that the peak line emission seen toward FIR 4 originates in the terminal shock produced by the jet driven by FIR 3. The higher mass-loss rate that we find for FIR 3 is consistent with the idea that intermediate-mass protostars drive more powerful jets than their low-mass counterparts. Our results also call into question the nature of FIR 4. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.The final reduced Herschel data used in this paper (FITS) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/596/A26

  17. Amino acid profiles of young adults differ by sex, body mass index and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-Cruz, M; Vargas-Morales, J M; Méndez-García, A L; López-Barradas, A M; Granados-Portillo, O; Ordaz-Nava, G; Rocha-Viggiano, A K; Gutierrez-Leyte, C A; Medina-Cerda, E; Rosado, J L; Morales, J C; Torres, N; Tovar, A R; Noriega, L G

    2018-04-01

    An increase in plasma branched-chain amino acids is associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about the basal plasma amino acid concentrations in young adults. Our aim was to determine the plasma amino acid profiles of young adults and to evaluate how these profiles were modified by sex, body mass index (BMI) and insulin resistance (IR). We performed a transversal study with 608 Mexican young adults aged 19.9 ± 2.4 years who were applicants to the Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí. The subjects underwent a physical examination and provided a clinical history and a blood sample for biochemical, hormonal and amino acid analyses. The women had higher levels of arginine, aspartate and serine and lower levels of α-aminoadipic acid, cysteine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, proline, tryptophan, tyrosine, urea and valine than the men. The obese subjects had higher levels of alanine, aspartate, cysteine, ornithine, phenylalanine, proline and tyrosine and lower levels of glycine, ornithine and serine than the normal weight subjects. Subjects with IR (defined as HOMA > 2.5) had higher levels of arginine, alanine, aspartate, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, proline, tyrosine, taurine and valine than the subjects without IR. Furthermore, we identified two main groups in the subjects with obesity and/or IR; one group was composed of amino acids that positively correlated with the clinical, biochemical and hormonal parameters, whereas the second group exhibited negative correlations. This study demonstrates that young adults with obesity or IR have altered amino acid profiles characterized by an increase in alanine, aspartate, proline and tyrosine and a decrease in glycine. Copyright © 2018 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II

  18. Framingham Score and LV Mass predict Events in Young Adults: CARDIA Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Anderson C.; Jacobs, David R.; Gidding, Samuel S.; Colangelo, Laura A.; Gjesdal, Ola; Lewis, Cora E.; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Sidney, Stephen; Schreiner, Pamela J.; Williams, O. D.; Goff, David C.; Liu, Kiang; Lima, Joao A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Framingham risk score (FRS) underestimates risk in young adults. LV mass (LVM) relates to cardiovascular disease (CVD), with unclear value in youth. In a young biracial cohort, we investigate how FRS predicts CVD over 20 years and the incremental value of LVM. We also explore the predictive ability of different cut-points for hypertrophy. Methods We assessed FRS and echocardiography-derived LVM (indexed by BSA or height2.7) from 3980 African-American and white CARDIA participants (1990-1991); and followed over 20 years for a combined endpoint: cardiovascular death; nonfatal myocardial infarction, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral artery disease. We assessed the predictive ability of FRS for CVD and also calibration, discrimination, and net reclassification improvement for adding LVM to FRS. Results Mean age was 30±4 years, 46% males, and 52% white. Event incidence (n = 118) across FRS groups was, respectively, 1.3%, 5.4%, and 23.1% (p<0.001); and was 1.4%, 1.3%, 3.7%, and 5.4% (p<0.001) across quartiles of LVM (cut-points 117g, 144g, and 176g). LVM predicted CVD independently of FRS, with the best performance in normal weight participants. Adding LVM to FRS modestly increased discrimination and had a statistically significant reclassification. The 85th percentile (≥116 g/m2 for men; ≥96 g/m2 for women) showed event prediction more robust than currently recommended cut-points for hypertrophy. Conclusion In a biracial cohort of young adults, FRS and LVM are helpful independent predictors of CVD. LVM can modestly improve discrimination and reclassify participants beyond FRS. Currently recommended cut-points for hypertrophy may be too high for young adults. PMID:24507735

  19. Adolescents bullying and young adults body mass index and obesity: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamun, A A; O'Callaghan, M J; Williams, G M; Najman, J M

    2013-08-01

    To examine whether adolescent males and females who were victims of bullying were at greater risk of a higher body mass index (BMI) and obesity by young adulthood. Secondary analysis of data from a community-based cohort study. A sub-sample of 1694 offspring (50% males) who were participants in the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy (MUSP), Brisbane, and who provided bullying information at 14 years and physical assessment at 21 years. BMI and its categories as normal, overweight or obese at 21 years. One in two adolescent males and one in three adolescent females reported that they had been bullied at school by others. We found that adolescent males and females who were bullied were at a significantly greater risk of a higher BMI and obesity by young adulthood. Fourteen-year-old males who were occasionally/often bullied at school had 0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.02, 1.27) kg m(2) greater mean BMI by 21 years compared with males who were never bullied by 14 years. This mean difference in BMI was 1.52, (95% CI: 0.75, 2.29) kg m(2) for females. Similarly, the odds of being obese were 2.54 (95% CI: 1.58, 4.09) times at 21 years for those males who were bullied occasionally/often compared with adolescent males who were never bullied. For females, this was 2.18 (95% CI: 1.40, 3.39). Overweight adolescents who experienced bullying had the greatest increase in BMI by young adulthood. Adjusting for potential confounding or mediating factors, the associations remain strong for males but are attenuated for females. The findings of this study suggest that both male and female adolescents who were bullied often/sometimes by their peer group at 14 years were at greater risk of higher BMI and obesity by young adulthood.

  20. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T.; Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya; Wani, Mohan R.; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet

  1. High fat diet promotes achievement of peak bone mass in young rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malvi, Parmanand; Piprode, Vikrant; Chaube, Balkrishna; Pote, Satish T. [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Mittal, Monika; Chattopadhyay, Naibedya [Division of Endocrinology and Center for Research in Anabolic Skeletal Targets in Health and Illness (ASTHI), CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute, Jankipuram Extension, Sitapur Road, Lucknow 226 031 (India); Wani, Mohan R. [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India); Bhat, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: manojkbhat@nccs.res.in [National Centre for Cell Science, Savitribai Phule Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • High fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass at younger age. • Shifting from high fat to normal diet normalizes obese parameters. • Bone parameters are sustained even after withdrawal of high fat diet. - Abstract: The relationship between obesity and bone is complex. Epidemiological studies demonstrate positive as well as negative correlation between obesity and bone health. In the present study, we investigated the impact of high fat diet-induced obesity on peak bone mass. After 9 months of feeding young rats with high fat diet, we observed obesity phenotype in rats with increased body weight, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol. There were significant increases in serum total alkaline phosphatase, bone mineral density and bone mineral content. By micro-computed tomography (μ-CT), we observed a trend of better trabecular bones with respect to their microarchitecture and geometry. This indicated that high fat diet helps in achieving peak bone mass and microstructure at younger age. We subsequently shifted rats from high fat diet to normal diet for 6 months and evaluated bone/obesity parameters. It was observed that after shifting rats from high fat diet to normal diet, fat mass, serum triglycerides and cholesterol were significantly decreased. Interestingly, the gain in bone mineral density, bone mineral content and trabecular bone parameters by HFD was retained even after body weight and obesity were normalized. These results suggest that fat rich diet during growth could accelerate achievement of peak bone mass that is sustainable even after withdrawal of high fat diet.

  2. Event Rates of Gravitational Waves from merging Intermediate mass Black Holes: based on a Runaway Path to a SMBH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkai Hisaaki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a dynamical formation model of a supermassive black hole (SMBH, we estimate the expected observational profile of gravitational wave at ground-based detectors, such as KAGRA or advanced LIGO/VIRGO. Noting that the second generation of detectors have enough sensitivity from 10 Hz and up, we are able to detect the ring-down gravitational wave of a BH with the mass M 1 per year for ρ = 10. Thus, if we observe a BH with more than 100M⊙ in future gravitational-wave observations, our model naturally explains its source.

  3. An Asymmetric Runaway Domain Swap Antithrombin Dimer as a Key Intermediate for Polymerization Revealed by Hydrogen/Deuterium-Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelle, Morten Beck; Pedersen, Shona; Østerlund, Eva Christina; Madsen, Jeppe Buur; Kristensen, Søren Risom; Jørgensen, Thomas J D

    2017-01-03

    Antithrombin deficiency is associated with increased risk of venous thrombosis. In certain families, this condition is caused by pathogenic polymerization of mutated antithrombin in the blood. To facilitate future development of pharmaceuticals against antithrombin polymerization, an improved understanding of the polymerogenic intermediates is crucial. However, X-ray crystallography of these intermediates is severely hampered by the difficulty in obtaining well-diffracting crystals of transient and heterogeneous noncovalent protein assemblies. Furthermore, their large size prohibits structural analysis by NMR spectroscopy. Here, we show how hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) provides detailed insight into the structural dynamics of each subunit in a polymerization-competent antithrombin dimer. Upon deuteration, this dimer surprisingly yields bimodal isotope distributions for the majority of peptides, demonstrating an asymmetric configuration of the two subunits. The data reveal that one subunit is very dynamic, potentially intrinsically disordered, whereas the other is considerably less dynamic. The local subunit-specific deuterium uptake of this polymerization-competent dimer strongly supports a β4A-β5A β-hairpin runaway domain swap mechanism for antithrombin polymerization. HDX-MS thus holds exceptional promise as an enabling analytical technique in the efforts toward future pharmacological intervention with protein polymerization and associated diseases.

  4. Measurement of Fragment Mass Distributions in Neutron-induced Fission of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th at Intermediate Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simutkin, V.D. [Uppsala University, P.O Box 525, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2008-07-01

    Conceptual analysis of accelerator-driven systems assumes extensive use of nuclear data on neutron-induced reactions at intermediate energies. In particular, information about the fission fragment yields from the {sup 238}U(n,f) and {sup 232}Th(n,f) reactions is of particular interest at neutron energies from 10 to 200 MeV. However, there is a lack of such data for both {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th. Up to now, the intermediate energy measurements have been performed for {sup 238}U only, and there are no data for the {sup 232}Th(n,f) reaction. The aim of the work is to provide such data. Fission fragment mass distributions for the {sup 232}Th(n,f) and {sup 238}U(n,f) reactions have been measured for the incident neutron energies 32.8 MeV, 45.3 MeV and 59.9 MeV. The experiments have been performed at the neutron beam facility of the Universite Catholique de Louvain, Belgium. A multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber has been used as a fission fragment detector. The data obtained have been interpreted in terms of the multimodal random neck-rupture model (MMRNRM). (authors)

  5. An Explanation of the Very Low Radio Flux of Young Planet-mass Companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ya-Lin; Close, Laird M.; Eisner, Josh A.; Sheehan, Patrick D.

    2017-12-01

    We report Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) 1.3 mm continuum upper limits for five planetary-mass companions DH Tau B, CT Cha B, GSC 6214-210 B, 1RXS 1609 B, and GQ Lup B. Our survey, together with other ALMA studies, have yielded null results for disks around young planet-mass companions and placed stringent dust mass upper limits, typically less than 0.1 M ⊕, when assuming dust continuum is optically thin. Such low-mass gas/dust content can lead to a disk lifetime estimate (from accretion rates) much shorter than the age of the system. To alleviate this timescale discrepancy, we suggest that disks around wide companions might be very compact and optically thick in order to sustain a few Myr of accretion, yet have very weak (sub)millimeter flux so as to still be elusive to ALMA. Our order-of-magnitude estimate shows that compact optically thick disks might be smaller than 1000 R Jup and only emit ∼μJy of flux in the (sub)millimeter, but their average temperature can be higher than that of circumstellar disks. The high disk temperature could impede satellite formation, but it also suggests that mid- to far-infrared might be more favorable than radio wavelengths to characterize disk properties. Finally, the compact disk size might imply that dynamical encounters between the companion and the star, or any other scatterers in the system, play a role in the formation of planetary-mass companions.

  6. Isobaric yield curves at A=72 from the spallation of medium mass isotopes by intermediate energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tobin, M.J.; Karol, P.J.; Department of Chemistry, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213)

    1989-01-01

    Cross sections of radionuclides in the A∼72 mass region produced by the interaction 800 MeV protons with 89 Y, /sup 92,96,100/Mo, and 130 Te were measured. Particular emphasis was paid to the measurement of short-lived products far from β stability. The cross sections were used to generate isobaric yield curves at A=72. Precise characterization of these curves showed that the distribution parameters (mean, standard deviation, skewness) vary in a regular fashion with target N/Z. For 89 Y, relative isobaric curves produced by 500 and 800 MeV protons were found to be identical within experimental error. The yield distributions for the /sup 92,96,100/Mo targets also scaled with those from an earlier alpha-induced spallation study. These findings lend strong support to the argument that the spallation mechanism is independent of projectile energy and target composition

  7. An integrated metabolomics workflow for the quantification of sulfur pathway intermediates employing thiol protection with N-ethyl maleimide and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmayr, Karin; Schwaiger, Michaela; Hann, Stephan; Koellensperger, Gunda

    2015-11-21

    The sulfur metabolic pathway is involved in basic modes of cellular metabolism, including methylation, cell division, respiratory oscillations and stress responses. Hence, the implicated high reactivity of the sulfur pathway intermediates entails challenges for their quantitative analysis. In particular the unwanted oxidation of the thiol group-containing metabolites glutathione, cysteine, homocysteine, γ-glutamyl cysteine and cysteinyl glycine must be prevented in order to obtain accurate snapshots of this important part of cellular metabolism. Suitable analytical methodologies are therefore needed to support studies of drug metabolism and metabolic engineering. In this work, a novel sample preparation strategy targeting thiolic metabolites was established by implementing thiol group protection with N-ethyl maleimide using a cold methanol metabolite extraction procedure. It was shown that N-ethyl maleimide derivatization is compatible with typical metabolite extraction procedures and also allowed for the stabilization of the instable thiolic metabolites in a fully (13)C-labeled yeast cell extract. The stable isotope labeled metabolite analogs could be used for internal standardization to achieve metabolite quantification with high precision. Furthermore, a dedicated hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method for the separation of sulfur metabolic pathway intermediates using a sub-2 μm particle size stationary phase was developed. Coupled with tandem mass spectrometry, the presented methodology proved to be robust, and sensitive (absolute detection limits in the low femtomole range), and allowed for the quantification of cysteine, cysteinyl glycine, cystathionine, cystine, glutamic acid, glutamyl cysteine, reduced glutathione, glutathione disulfide, homocysteine, methionine, S-adenosyl homocysteine and serine in a human ovarian carcinoma cell model.

  8. Cardiometabolic risk in young adults from northern Mexico: Revisiting body mass index and waist-circumference as predictors

    OpenAIRE

    Wall-Medrano, Abraham; Ramos-Jim?nez, Arnulfo; Hernandez-Torres, Rosa P.; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; Tapia-Pancardo, Diana C.; Jim?nez-Flores, J. Rafael; M?ndez-Cruz, A. Ren?; Murgu?a-Romero, Miguel; Gallardo-Ort?z, Itzell A.; Urqu?dez-Romero, Ren?

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background A body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m2 and a waist circumference (WC) ≥80 cm in women (WCF) or ≥90 cm in men (WCM) are reference cardiometabolic risk markers (CMM) for Mexicans adults. However, their reliability to predict other CMM (index tests) in young Mexicans has not been studied in depth. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study evaluating several anthropometric, physiological and biochemical CMM from 295 young Mexicans was performed. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp)...

  9. Running Energy Cost and Spring-Mass Behavior in Young versus Older Trained Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, Patrícia Dias; Morin, Jean Benoit; Peyré-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare energy cost of running and lower limb spring-mass characteristics and maximal power between young and older highly trained runners. Twenty highly trained male endurance runners were divided into two groups: young and master athletes. Two testing sessions were used to measure and compare (i) lower limb power during three jumping tests (squat jump (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ), and rebound jump (RJ)) as well as stiffness during the RJ test and running trials (using an OptoJump system (Microgate, Bolzano, Italy) placed on the floor for jumping and on each side of the treadmill belt for running), and (ii) the energy cost of running and oxygen consumption (V˙O2) kinetics (using an Oxycon Pro breath-by-breath gas analyzer (Jaeger, Höchberg, Germany)) at three speeds: 10 km·h, self-selected speed, and speed corresponding to 90% of the second ventilatory threshold (VT2). Energy cost of running was higher in masters than in young athletes at all speeds (10 km·h, 13.0%; self-selected, 10.8%; 90% VT2, 7.7% on average). Jumping power was lower in masters (SJ, -28.0%; CMJ, -30.5%; RJ, -27.9%) and significantly correlated with energy cost at 10 km·h and at self-selected speed (10 km·h: r = -0.71, -0.70, -0.47; self-selected speed: r = -0.76, -0.74, -0.58, respectively). RJ stiffness was also lower in masters (-27.8%), although stiffness during running showed no difference between groups. A long-lasting running practice seemed to preserve the bouncing mechanism of master athletes, yet their energy cost was higher when compared with younger runners, which might have been associated with a lower muscle power.

  10. Body Mass Index Trajectories and Healthcare Utilization in Young and Middle-aged Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrashidi, Muhamad Y; Jacobson, Debra J; St Sauver, Jennifer; Fan, Chun; Lynch, Brian A; Rutten, Lila J Finney; Ebbert, Jon O

    2016-01-01

    The obesity epidemic is a significant public health issue with adverse impact on health and costs. Applying a life-course perspective to obesity may advance our understanding of the influence of obesity over time on patterns of healthcare utilization in young and middle-aged United States (US) adults.We identified baseline body mass index (BMI) and BMI trajectories, and assessed their association with outpatient visits, emergency department (ED) visits, and hospitalizations in a well-defined population of young and middle-aged US adults.Using the Rochester Epidemiology Project resources, we conducted a retrospective cohort study of adults (N = 23,254) aged 18 to 44 years, with at least 3 BMI measurements, residing in Olmsted County, MN from January 1, 2005 through December 31, 2012.We observed that 27.5% of the population was obese. Four BMI trajectories were identified. Compared to under/normal weight, obese class III adults had higher risk of outpatient visits (adjusted rate ratio [RR], 1.86; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 1.67-2,08), ED visits (adjusted RR, 3.02; 95% CI, 2.74-3.34), and hospitalizations (adjusted RR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.59-1.75). BMI trajectory was positively associated with ED visits after adjustment for age, sex, race, and Charlson Comorbidity Index (P young and middle-aged US adults, baseline BMI is positively associated with outpatient visits, ED visits, and hospitalizations, while BMI trajectory is positively associated with ED visits. These findings extend our understanding of the longitudinal influence of obesity on healthcare utilization in early to mid-adulthood.

  11. YOUNG STELLAR CLUSTERS WITH A SCHUSTER MASS DISTRIBUTION. I. STATIONARY WINDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palous, Jan; Wuensch, Richard; Hueyotl-Zahuantitla, Filiberto [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Bocni II 1401-2a, Prague (Czech Republic); Martinez-Gonzalez, Sergio; Silich, Sergiy; Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo, E-mail: palous@ig.cas.cz [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla (Mexico)

    2013-08-01

    Hydrodynamic models for spherically symmetric winds driven by young stellar clusters with a generalized Schuster stellar density profile are explored. For this we use both semi-analytic models and one-dimensional numerical simulations. We determine the properties of quasi-adiabatic and radiative stationary winds and define the radius at which the flow turns from subsonic to supersonic for all stellar density distributions. Strongly radiative winds significantly diminish their terminal speed and thus their mechanical luminosity is strongly reduced. This also reduces their potential negative feedback into their host galaxy interstellar medium. The critical luminosity above which radiative cooling becomes dominant within the clusters, leading to thermal instabilities which make the winds non-stationary, is determined, and its dependence on the star cluster density profile, core radius, and half-mass radius is discussed.

  12. Evolution of Thermally Pulsing Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars. V. Constraining the Mass Loss and Lifetimes of Intermediate-mass, Low-metallicity AGB Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfield, Philip; Marigo, Paola; Girardi, Léo; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Bressan, Alessandro; Williams, Benjamin F.; Dolphin, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch (TP-AGB) stars are relatively short lived (less than a few Myr), yet their cool effective temperatures, high luminosities, efficient mass loss, and dust production can dramatically affect the chemical enrichment histories and the spectral energy distributions of their host galaxies. The ability to accurately model TP-AGB stars is critical to the interpretation of the integrated light of distant galaxies, especially in redder wavelengths. We continue previous efforts to constrain the evolution and lifetimes of TP-AGB stars by modeling their underlying stellar populations. Using Hubble Space Telescope (HST) optical and near-infrared photometry taken of 12 fields of 10 nearby galaxies imaged via the Advanced Camera for Surveys Nearby Galaxy Survey Treasury and the near-infrared HST/SNAP follow-up campaign, we compare the model and observed TP-AGB luminosity functions as well as the ratio of TP-AGB to red giant branch stars. We confirm the best-fitting mass-loss prescription, introduced by Rosenfield et al., in which two different wind regimes are active during the TP-AGB, significantly improves models of many galaxies that show evidence of recent star formation. This study extends previous efforts to constrain TP-AGB lifetimes to metallicities ranging -1.59 ≲ {{[Fe/H]}} ≲ -0.56 and initial TP-AGB masses up to ˜4 M ⊙, which include TP-AGB stars that undergo hot-bottom burning. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained from the Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555.

  13. Fruit and vegetable intake and bone mass in Chinese adolescents, young and postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Jing; Huang, Zhen-Wu; Wang, Ruo-Qin; Ma, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Zhe-Qing; Liu, Zen; Chen, Yu-Ming; Su, Yi-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies showed an inconsistent association of fruit and vegetable consumption with bone health. We assessed the associations in Chinese adolescents, young and postmenopausal women. A cross-sectional study conducted in China during July 2009 to May 2010. Bone mineral density (BMD) and content (BMC) at the whole body, lumbar spine and left hip were measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Dietary intakes were assessed using an FFQ. All these values were separately standardized into Z-scores in each population subgroup. One hundred and ten boys and 112 girls (11-14 years), 371 young women (20-34 years, postpartum within 2 weeks) and 333 postmenopausal women (50-70 years). After adjustment for potential covariates, analysis of covariance showed a significantly positive association between fruit intake and BMD and BMC in all participants combined (P-trend: bottom tertile of fruit intake (all P intake and bone mass at all bone sites studied except for total body BMD (P = 0.030). Relatively more pronounced effects were observed in boys and postmenopausal women. Our findings add to the existing evidence that fruits and vegetables may have a bone sparing effect.

  14. Mass functions and structure of the young open cluster NGC 6611

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonatto, C.; Santos, J. F. C., Jr.; Bica, E.

    2006-01-01

    We use J, H and KS 2MASS photometry to study colour-magnitude (CMDs) and colour-colour diagrams, structure and mass distribution in the ionizing open cluster NGC 6611. Reddening variation throughout the cluster region is taken into account followed by field-star decontamination of the CMDs. Decontamination is also applied to derive the density profile and luminosity functions in the core, halo and overall (whole cluster) regions. The field-star decontamination showed that the lower limit of the main sequence (MS) occurs at ≈5 M_⊙. Based on the fraction of KS excess stars in the colour-colour diagram we estimate an age of 1.3±0.3 Myr which is consistent with the presence of a large number of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars. The distance from the Sun was estimated from known O V stars in the cluster area and the turn-on stars connecting the PMS and MS, resulting in d_⊙=1.8±0.5 kpc. The radial density distribution including MS and PMS stars is fitted by a King profile with a core radius R_core=0.70±0.08 pc. The cluster density profile merges into the background at a limiting radius R_lim=6.5±0.5 pc. From the field-star subtracted luminosity functions we derive the mass functions (MFs) in the form φ(m)∝ m-(1+χ). In the halo and through the whole cluster the MFs have slopes χ=1.52±0.13 and χ=1.45±0.12, respectively, thus slightly steeper than Salpeter's IMF. In the core the MF is flat, χ=0.62±0.16, indicating some degree of mass segregation since the cluster age is a factor 2 larger than the relaxation time. Because of the very young age of NGC 6611, part of this effect appears to be related to the molecular cloud-fragmentation process itself. We detect 362±120 PMS stars. The total observed mass including detected MS (in the range 5{-}85 M_⊙) and PMS stars amounts to 1600 M_⊙, thus more massive than the Trapezium cluster. Compared to older open clusters of different masses, the overall NGC 6611 fits in the relations involving structural and

  15. New probe of dark-matter properties: gravitational waves from an intermediate-mass black hole embedded in a dark-matter minispike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eda, Kazunari; Itoh, Yousuke; Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Silk, Joseph

    2013-05-31

    An intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) may have a dark-matter (DM) minihalo around it and develop a spiky structure within less than a parsec from the IMBH. When a stellar mass object is captured by the minihalo, it eventually infalls into such an IMBH due to gravitational wave backreaction which in turn could be observed directly by future space-borne gravitational wave experiments such as eLISA and NGO. In this Letter, we show that the gravitational wave (GW) detectability strongly depends on the radial profile of the DM distribution. So if the GW is detected, the power index, that is, the DM density distribution, would be determined very accurately. The DM density distribution obtained would make it clear how the IMBH has evolved from a seed black hole and whether the IMBH has experienced major mergers in the past. Unlike the γ-ray observations of DM annihilation, GW is just sensitive to the radial profile of the DM distribution and even to noninteracting DM. Hence, the effect we demonstrate here can be used as a new and powerful probe into DM properties.

  16. N-body modeling of globular clusters: detecting intermediate-mass black holes by non-equipartition in HST proper motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenti, Michele

    2010-09-01

    Intermediate Mass Black Holes {IMBHs} are objects of considerable astrophysical significance. They have been invoked as possible remnants of Population III stars, precursors of supermassive black holes, sources of ultra-luminous X-ray emission, and emitters of gravitational waves. The centers of globular clusters, where they may have formed through runaway collapse of massive stars, may be our best chance of detecting them. HST studies of velocity dispersions have provided tentative evidence, but the measurements are difficult and the results have been disputed. It is thus important to explore and develop additional indicators of the presence of an IMBH in these systems. In a Cycle 16 theory project we focused on the fingerprints of an IMBH derived from HST photometry. We showed that an IMBH leads to a detectable quenching of mass segregation. Analysis of HST-ACS data for NGC 2298 validated the method, and ruled out an IMBH of more than 300 solar masses. We propose here to extend the search for IMBH signatures from photometry to kinematics. The velocity dispersion of stars in collisionally relaxed stellar systems such as globular clusters scales with main sequence mass as sigma m^alpha. A value alpha = -0.5 corresponds to equipartition. Mass-dependent kinematics can now be measured from HST proper motion studies {e.g., alpha = -0.21 for Omega Cen}. Preliminary analysis shows that the value of alpha can be used as indicator of the presence of an IMBH. In fact, the quenching of mass segregation is a result of the degree of equipartition that the system attains. However, detailed numerical simulations are required to quantify this. Therefore we propose {a} to carry out a new, larger set of realistic N-body simulations of star clusters with IMBHs, primordial binaries and stellar evolution to predict in detail the expected kinematic signatures and {b} to compare these predictions to datasets that are {becoming} available. Considerable HST resources have been invested in

  17. Planets around Low-mass Stars (PALMS). I. A Substellar Companion to the Young M Dwarf 1RXS J235133.3+312720

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Dupuy, Trent J.; Cieza, Lucas A.; Kraus, Adam L.; Tamura, Motohide

    2012-07-01

    We report the discovery of a brown dwarf companion to the young M dwarf 1RXS J235133.3+312720 as part of a high contrast imaging search for planets around nearby young low-mass stars with Keck-II/NIRC2 and Subaru/HiCIAO. The 2farcs4 (~120 AU) pair is confirmed to be comoving from two epochs of high-resolution imaging. Follow-up low- and moderate-resolution near-infrared spectroscopy of 1RXS J2351+3127 B with IRTF/SpeX and Keck-II/OSIRIS reveals a spectral type of L0+2 -1. The M2 primary star 1RXS J2351+3127 A exhibits X-ray and UV activity levels comparable to young moving group members with ages of ~10-100 Myr. UVW kinematics based the measured radial velocity of the primary and the system's photometric distance (50 ± 10 pc) indicate it is likely a member of the ~50-150 Myr AB Dor moving group. The near-infrared spectrum of 1RXS J2351+3127 B does not exhibit obvious signs of youth, but its H-band morphology shows subtle hints of intermediate surface gravity. The spectrum is also an excellent match to the ~200 Myr M9 brown dwarf LP 944-20. Assuming an age of 50-150 Myr, evolutionary models imply a mass of 32 ± 6 M Jup for the companion, making 1RXS J2351+3127 B the second lowest-mass member of the AB Dor moving group after the L4 companion CD-35 2722 B and one of the few benchmark brown dwarfs known at young ages. Some of the data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  18. MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS IN THE SUBSTELLAR DOMAIN: MILLIMETER OBSERVATIONS OF YOUNG VERY LOW MASS OBJECTS IN TAURUS AND ρ OPHIUCHI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoc Phan-Bao; Lee, Chin-Fei; Ho, Paul T. P.; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2011-01-01

    We report here our search for molecular outflows from young very low mass stars and brown dwarfs in Taurus and ρ Ophiuchi. Using the Submillimeter Array and the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy, we have observed four targets at 1.3 mm wavelength (230 GHz) to search for CO J = 2 → 1 outflows. A young very low mass star MHO 5 (in Taurus) with an estimated mass of 90 M J , which is just above the hydrogen-burning limit, shows two gas lobes that are likely outflows. While the CO map of MHO 5 does not show a clear structure of outflow, possibly due to environment gas, its position-velocity diagram indicates two distinct blue- and redshifted components. We therefore conclude that they are components of a bipolar molecular outflow from MHO 5. We estimate an outflow mass of 7.0 x 10 -5 M sun and a mass-loss rate of 9.0 x 10 -10 M sun . These values are over two orders of magnitude smaller than the typical ones for T Tauri stars and somewhat weaker than those we have observed in the young brown dwarf ISO-Oph 102 of 60 M J in ρ Ophiuchi. This makes MHO 5 the first young very low mass star showing a bipolar molecular outflow in Taurus. The detection boosts the scenario that very low mass objects form like low-mass stars but in a version scaled down by a factor of over 100.

  19. Interannual thermohaline (1979-2014) and nutrient (2002-2014) dynamics in the Levantine surface and intermediate water masses, SE Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Tal; Gertman, Isaac; Kress, Nurit; Silverman, Jacob; Herut, Barak

    2017-04-01

    In this study a > 30 years dataset of 1382 CTD casts in the Levantine Basin (LB) was analyzed to examine the thermohaline trends of the Surface ( 0-50 m) and Intermediate ( 150-350 m) Water masses (LSW, LIW). In addition, a 13 years (2002-2014) dataset of 3 deep water stations (> 1000 m) in the eastern Levantine Basin (Haifa Section cruises) that were visited 2-3 times annually was used to explore the relations between the physical and nutrient properties in the LIW. Over the past 30 years the LSW and LIW masses displayed positive long-term trends in salinity of + 0.008 ± 0.006 and + 0.005 ± 0.003 year- 1, respectively, and temperature of + 0.12 ± 0.07 and + 0.03 ± 0.02 °C year- 1, respectively. Decadal variations in salinity and temperature were superimposed on all long-term trends. Throughout the period 2002-2014 nutrient levels in the LIW core and corresponding integrated values of chlorophyll a also varied in nearly opposite phase with temperature and salinity. Furthermore, these variations occurred with a similar decadal periodicity, but with shifted phase with those observed in the Southern Adriatic and North Ionian Seas in the same water mass. The latter were considered to be caused by decadal reversals in the North Ionian Gyre, i.e. Bimodal Oscillation System (BiOS). These results indicate that the thermohaline flux variations attributed to the BiOS mechanism have a significant impact in magnitude on the available nutrients and the dynamics of the eastern basin primary productivity. These results should be taken into consideration in assessing the relative contribution of external nutrient loads in comparison to those attributed to variations in thermohaline fluxes and in the assessment of long-term and interannual primary productivity (chlorophyll a and nutrients) trends in the LB.

  20. Body mass index trajectories from adolescence to early young adulthood : Do adverse life events play a role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenburg, Leonie K.; Smidt, Nynke; Hoek, Hans W.; Liefbroer, Aart C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are different classes of body mass index (BMI) development from early adolescence to young adulthood and whether these classes are related to the number of adverse life events children experienced. Methods: Data were from the TRAILS

  1. Body mass index trajectories from adolescence to early young adulthood: Do adverse life events play a role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenburg, L.; Smidt, N.; Hoek, H.; Liefbroer, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are different classes of body mass index (BMI) development from early adolescence to young adulthood and whether these classes are related to the number of adverse life events children experienced. Methods Data were from the TRAILS

  2. c2d Spitzer IRS spectra of embedded low-mass young stars : gas-phase emission lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahuis, F.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Jorgensen, J. K.; Blake, G. A.; Evans, N. J.

    Context. A survey of mid-infrared gas-phase emission lines of H(2), H(2)O and various atoms toward a sample of 43 embedded low-mass young stars in nearby star-forming regions is presented. The sources are selected from the Spitzer "Cores to Disks" (c2d) legacy program. Aims. The environment of

  3. The longitudinal relation between accumulation of adverse life events and body mass index from early adolescence to young adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenburg, Leonie K.; Smidt, Nynke; Liefbroer, Aart C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Stressors, such as adverse life events, can cause weight changes through behavioral and biological mechanisms. Whether the accumulation of adverse life events is related to body mass index (BMI) across multiple time points from early adolescence to young adulthood has not been

  4. A 21-Week Bone Deposition Promoting Exercise Programme Increases Bone Mass in Young People with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Aguero, Alejandro; Vicente-Rodriguez, German; Gomez-Cabello, Alba; Ara, Ignacio; Moreno, Luis A.; Casajus, Jose A.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether the bone mass of young people with Down syndrome may increase, following a 21-week conditioning training programme including plyometric jumps. Method: Twenty-eight participants with Down syndrome (13 females, 15 males) aged 10 to 19 years were divided into exercise (DS-E; n = 14; eight females, six males mean age 13y 8mo,…

  5. The Longitudinal Relation Between Accumulation of Adverse Life Events and Body Mass Index From Early Adolescence to Young Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenburg, L.; Smidt, N.; Liefbroer, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Stressors, such as adverse life events, can cause weight changes through behavioral and biological mechanisms. Whether the accumulation of adverse life events is related to body mass index (BMI) across multiple time points from early adolescence to young adulthood has not been

  6. Body Mass Index Trajectories from Adolescence to Early Young Adulthood : Do Adverse Life Events Play a Role?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenburg, Leonie K.; Smidt, Nynke; Hoek, Hans W.; Liefbroer, Aart C.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there are different classes of body mass index (BMI) development from early adolescence to young adulthood and whether these classes are related to the number of adverse life events children experienced. Methods: Data were from the TRAILS

  7. The Longitudinal Relation Between Accumulation of Adverse Life Events and Body Mass Index From Early Adolescence to Young Adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsenburg, Leonie K.; Smidt, Nynke; Liefbroer, Aart C.

    Objective: Stressors, such as adverse life events, can cause weight changes through behavioral and biological mechanisms. Whether the accumulation of adverse life events is related to body mass index (BMI) across multiple time points from early adolescence to young adulthood has not been

  8. Lean body mass-based levothyroxine replacement in young athyrotic patients with differentiated carcinoma of thyroid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Begum

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to optimize dose of levothyroxine (LT4 based on lean body mass (LBM in young athyrotic patients with differentiated carcinoma of thyroid (DCT which has not been properly addressed in Bangladesh before. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with DCT (age, range: 20-39 years having total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine ablative therapy (RIT and 23 euthyroid volunteers were recruited. Clinical, biochemical parameters were obtained from all patients after 2 months of RIT and on LT4 replacement at a dose of 200 μg/day as first follow up visit and also from control subjects. Then 60 patients were divided into two groups consisting of 30 patients each. Patients of Group-I received LT4 replacement based on LBM measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA and Group-II continued LT4 replacement in conventional dose. Patients of both groups were assessed again for same parameters at 6 to 12 months at the second visit. Results: Optimized dose of LT4 based on LBM by DXA (131 ±23 μg/day significantly reduced thyroid hormones and kept thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH in expected levels in patients of Group-I at the second visit compared to patients of Group-II who continued conventional LT4 dose (200 μg/day. Hyperthyroid symptom scale (HSS was significantly reduced to 2 ± 1 in patients of Group-I but not in patients of Group-II, HSS, 8 ±1 ( P < 0.001. Conclusion: Optimization of LT4 dose based on LBM can avoid chronic exposure of mild excess of thyroid hormone in young patients with low risk DCT.

  9. Associations between body mass index, post-traumatic stress disorder, and child maltreatment in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Alexis E; Sartor, Carolyn E; Jonson-Reid, Melissa; Munn-Chernoff, Melissa A; Eschenbacher, Michaela A; Diemer, Elizabeth W; Nelson, Elliot C; Waldron, Mary; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Madden, Pamela A F; Heath, Andrew C

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine interrelationships between child maltreatment, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and body mass index (BMI) in young women. We used multinomial logistic regression models to explore the possibility that PTSD statistically mediates or moderates the association between BMI category and self-reported childhood sexual abuse (CSA), physical abuse (CPA), or neglect among 3,699 young women participating in a population-based twin study. Obese women had the highest prevalence of CSA, CPA, neglect, and PTSD (p<.001 for all). Although all three forms of child maltreatment were significantly, positively associated with overweight and obesity in unadjusted models, only CSA was significantly associated with obesity after adjusting for other forms of maltreatment and covariates (OR=2.21, 95% CI: 1.63, 3.00). CSA and neglect, but not CPA, were associated with underweight in unadjusted models; however, after adjusting for other forms of maltreatment and covariates, the associations were no longer statistically significant (OR=1.43, 95% CI: 0.90-2.28 and OR=2.16, 95% CI: 0.90-5.16 for CSA and neglect, respectively). Further adjustment for PTSD generally resulted in modest attenuation of effects across associations of child maltreatment forms with BMI categories, suggesting that PTSD may, at most, be only a weak partial mediator of these associations. Future longitudinal studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms linking CSA and obesity and to further evaluate the role of PTSD in associations between child maltreatment and obesity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Television viewing is not predictive of Body Mass Index in Black and Hispanic young adult females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Tracy K.; Walls, Courtney; Gooding, Holly C.; Field, Alison E.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have observed that television viewing is predictive of obesity and weight gain. We examined whether the cross-sectional association between television viewing and body mass index (BMI) varied by racial/ethnic subgroups among young women in Wave III (collected in 2001–2002) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. We used multivariate linear regression to examine the relationship between TV viewing and BMI among 6,049 females while controlling for socio-demographic and health attributes. We stratified the sample by race/ethnicity to better understand the association between TV viewing and BMI across different groups. Black and Hispanic females had higher BMIs (Black: 28.5 kg/m2, Hispanic: 27.3 kg/m2, White: 26.0kg/m2) than White females while Black females reported higher numbers of hours spent watching TV (Black: 14.7 hrs/wk, Hispanic: 10.6 hrs/wk, White: 11.2 hrs/wk) when compared to their White and Hispanic peers. TV viewing was positively associated with BMI (β=0.79, p=0.003 for 8–14 v. ≤7 hrs/wk; β=1.18, p=0.01 for >14 v. ≤ 7 hrs/wk) independent of race/ethnicity, age, maternal education, history of pregnancy, parental obesity, and household income. However, in models stratified by race/ethnicity, increased TV viewing was associated with increased BMI only among White females. TV viewing was not predictive of higher BMI in Black or Hispanic young adult females. Among Black and Hispanic females, counseling to decrease TV viewing may be important but insufficient for promoting weight loss. PMID:19876003

  11. CORRELATION BETWEEN BODY MASS INDEX AND HANDGRIP STRENGTH AND HANDGRIP ENDURANCE AMONG YOUNG HEALTHY ADULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Physical inactivity has become a serious problem all over the world. Handgrip Strength (a form of isometric static contraction test, is an important test to evaluate the physical fitness and nutritional status of an individua l. A number of factors like a ge, gender, body size, effort, skeletal muscle bulk and contractility may affect the handgrip strength (HGS and handgrip endurance (HGE. AIM: This study was conducted to establish the possible correlation (if any between body mass index and handgrip str ength and endurance among young healthy adults. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A population based cross - sectional study comprising of 200 students (both male and female, age group - 18 - 22 yrs was carried out in the Department of Physiology, Jorhat Medical College. Anthropometric parameters like height and weight were taken to evaluate the BMI and handgrip strength and handgrip endurance were taken by using handgrip dynamometer. According to WHO classification of BMI, subjects were categorized into three groups as un derweight BMI ≤18.5 kg/m 2 , normal weight BMI 18.5 - 24.9 kg/m 2 and overweight BMI≥ 24.9 kg/m 2 . Gender wise difference was analyzed by unpaired t test. Statistical analysis for correlation was done by using Karl Pearson’s Correlation Coefficient denoted by(r. RESULT: Males had higher handgrip strength and handgrip endurance than females. Statistic ally significant correlation was found between BMI and handgrip strength & endurance in underweight & overweight subjects. Gender differences in correlation were observed in correlation between BMI & HGS and HGE. CONCLUSION: The observed influence of BMI a nd gender differences in correlation between BMI and HGS and HGE indicate that besides BMI several other factors like effort, strength, muscular contractility etc . affect muscular strength & endurance in young males and females.

  12. Lean body mass-based levothyroxine replacement in young athyrotic patients with differentiated carcinoma of thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Fatima; Ahmed, Chaudhury M.; Afroz, Shahana; Kabir, Enamul; Alam, Faridul; Banerjee, Sajal; Zaman, Nazma

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to optimize dose of levothyroxine (LT4) based on lean body mass (LBM) in young athyrotic patients with differentiated carcinoma of thyroid (DCT) which has not been properly addressed in Bangladesh before. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients with DCT (age, range: 20-39 years) having total thyroidectomy followed by radioiodine ablative therapy (RIT) and 23 euthyroid volunteers were recruited. Clinical, biochemical parameters were obtained from all patients after 2 months of RIT and on LT4 replacement at a dose of 200 μg/day as first follow up visit and also from control subjects. Then 60 patients were divided into two groups consisting of 30 patients each. Patients of Group-I received LT4 replacement based on LBM measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and Group-II continued LT4 replacement in conventional dose. Patients of both groups were assessed again for same parameters at 6 to 12 months at the second visit. Results: Optimized dose of LT4 based on LBM by DXA (131 ±23 μg/day) significantly reduced thyroid hormones and kept thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) in expected levels in patients of Group-I at the second visit compared to patients of Group-II who continued conventional LT4 dose (200 μg/day). Hyperthyroid symptom scale (HSS) was significantly reduced to 2 ± 1 in patients of Group-I but not in patients of Group-II, HSS, 8 ±1 (P > 0.001). Conclusion: Optimization of LT4 dose based on LBM can avoid chronic exposure of mild excess of thyroid hormone in young patients with low risk DCT. PMID:23776898

  13. Is a High Mass Loss Rate for the Sun a Solution to the Faint Young Sun Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Christene R.; Mutel, R. L.; Gayley, K. G.

    2011-01-01

    During the Archean eon (3.8 Ga) standard stellar evolution theory predicts a solar luminosity of only 75% of the present value; this luminosity predicts freezing surface temperatures on both early Earth and Mars. Yet geological evidence supports the existence of liquid water on these planets during this time. It has been suggested that the Sun had a higher mass and hence higher luminosity at early epochs, but lost mass through a much denser stellar wind. One test of this hypothesis would be detection of large mass loss rates from young solar analogs. However, such detections are difficult due to weak stellar winds and a multi-wavelength study may be necessary. An indirect method of studying these stellar winds and mass loss, involves the interaction of the wind with the interstellar medium (ISM). This interaction leads to Lyman-α absorption lines (aka hydrogen walls). In addition, radio observations of several young, near-by solar-like stars, using the Very Large Array (VLA), have lead to calculations for upper limits of mass loss from these stars. We will present results from a continuation of this latter approach using the Extended Very Large Array (EVLA) to observe the young, near-by solar analogs, π gt01 UMa and κ01 Cet.

  14. Planets around Low-mass Stars. III. A Young Dusty L Dwarf Companion at the Deuterium-burning Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowler, Brendan P.; Liu, Michael C.; Shkolnik, Evgenya L.; Dupuy, Trent J.

    2013-09-01

    We report the discovery of an L-type companion to the young M3.5V star 2MASS J01225093-2439505 at a projected separation of 1.''45 (≈52 AU) as part of our adaptive optics imaging search for extrasolar giant planets around young low-mass stars. 2MASS 0122-2439 B has very red near-infrared colors similar to the HR 8799 planets and the reddest known young/dusty L dwarfs in the field. Moderate-resolution (R ≈ 3800) 1.5-2.4 μm spectroscopy reveals a near-infrared spectral type of L4-L6 and an angular H-band shape, confirming its cool temperature and young age. The kinematics of 2MASS 0122-2439 AB are marginally consistent with members of the ~120 Myr AB Dor young moving group based on the photometric distance to the primary (36 ± 4 pc) and our radial velocity measurement of 2MASS 0122-2439 A from Keck/HIRES. We adopt the AB Dor group age for the system, but the high energy emission, lack of Li I λ6707 absorption, and spectral shape of 2MASS 0122-2439 B suggest a range of ~10-120 Myr is possible. The age and luminosity of 2MASS 0122-2439 B fall in a strip where "hot-start" evolutionary model mass tracks overlap as a result of deuterium burning. Several known substellar companions also fall in this region (2MASS J0103-5515 ABb, AB Pic b, κ And b, G196-3 B, SDSS 2249+0044 B, LP 261-75 B, HD 203030 B, and HN Peg B), but their dual-valued mass predictions have largely been unrecognized. The implied mass of 2MASS 0122-2439 B is ≈12-13 M Jup or ≈22-27 M Jup if it is an AB Dor member, or possibly as low as 11 M Jup if the wider age range is adopted. Evolutionary models predict an effective temperature for 2MASS 0122-2439 B that corresponds to spectral types near the L/T transition (≈1300-1500 K) for field objects. However, we find a mid-L near-infrared spectral type, indicating that 2MASS 0122-2439 B represents another case of photospheric dust being retained to cooler temperatures at low surface gravities, as seen in the spectra of young (8-30 Myr) planetary

  15. Lean Body Mass as a Predictive Value of Hypertension in Young Adults, in Ankara, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAZIRI, Yashar; BULDUK, Sidika; SHADMAN, Zhaleh; BULDUK, Emre Ozgur; HEDAYATI, Mehdi; KOC, Haluk; ER, Fatmanur; ERDOGAN, Ceren Suveren

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to assess the predictive capacity of body composition estimated by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) to identify abnormal blood pressure in physical education and sport teaching students in the city of Ankara. Methods: Data for this cross-sectional study were obtained in the city of Ankara in 2014. A total of 133 students aged 20–35 yr participated in this study. Anthropometric measurements were measured. Body composition was assessed by BIA. Physical activity level (PAL) and usual dietary intake were assessed. Pre-hypertension and hypertension were defined, respectively, as BP ≥120 and/or 80, and ≥140 and /or 90 mmHg. Results: More overweight students showed abnormal BP especially SBP (P=0.005 and 0.002, respectively). Age adjusted regression showed significant association between arm circumference (β= 0.176, P 0.044), mid arm muscle circumference (MAMC) (β= 0.235, P 0.007), lean body mass (LBM) (β= 0.238, P 0.006), basal metabolism rate (BMR) (β= 0.219, P 0.012) and SBP and, also, MAMC (β= 0.201, P 0.022), LBM (β= 0.203, P 0.021), BMR (β= 0.189, P 0.030) and DBP. Fat intake was associated with DBP (β= 0.14, P =0.040). Multivariate regression models adjusted for age, BMI, WC and fat intake/kg body weight showed positive association of SBP with MAMC, BMR and LBM (P<0.05). Conclusion: The relationship between blood pressure and body composition in young adults may be associated to LBM and MAMC. LBM or MAMC in this population may be indirect indicators of heart muscle mass and heart pumping power. PMID:26811815

  16. Production of intermediate vector bosons W and Z in proton and anti-protons interactions at 540 GeV in the center of mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locci, E.

    1984-06-01

    The most important and the most expected result of the s = 540 GeV pantip collider at CERN is the proof of the existence of the weak intermediate bosons W +- and Z 0 , and the study of their properties. This study in the UA1 experiment is presented. 52W + (W - )→e + (e - )νsub(e)(antiνsub(e)) and 4 Z 0 → e + e - have been produced. Their measured masses are Msub(W) = 80.9sub(-1.4)sup(+0.6) GeV/c 2 et Msub(Z) = 95.6 +- 1.4 GeV/c 2 . Their properties are entirely consistent with the ''standard model'' and their characteristics of production are consistent with QCD expectations. The relative numbers of W → eνsub(e) and Z → e + e - , as well as the width of the Z, give an upper limit of the number of ''generations'' [fr

  17. Mass spectrometric identification of intermediates in the O2-driven [4Fe-4S] to [2Fe-2S] cluster conversion in FNR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crack, Jason C; Thomson, Andrew J; Le Brun, Nick E

    2017-04-18

    The iron-sulfur cluster containing protein Fumarate and Nitrate Reduction (FNR) is the master regulator for the switch between anaerobic and aerobic respiration in Escherichia coli and many other bacteria. The [4Fe-4S] cluster functions as the sensory module, undergoing reaction with O 2 that leads to conversion to a [2Fe-2S] form with loss of high-affinity DNA binding. Here, we report studies of the FNR cluster conversion reaction using time-resolved electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. The data provide insight into the reaction, permitting the detection of cluster conversion intermediates and products, including a [3Fe-3S] cluster and persulfide-coordinated [2Fe-2S] clusters [[2Fe-2S](S) n , where n = 1 or 2]. Analysis of kinetic data revealed a branched mechanism in which cluster sulfide oxidation occurs in parallel with cluster conversion and not as a subsequent, secondary reaction to generate [2Fe-2S](S) n species. This methodology shows great potential for broad application to studies of protein cofactor-small molecule interactions.

  18. Body mass index and eating habits in young adults from Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada C

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate Body Mass Index, eating habits, knowledge and practices regarding this. Between 2013-2014 a self-administered questionnaire was used in sample of 1359 subject from urban area, aged 18-30 years. The subjects’ weight and height were measured. SPSS statistical package and chi-square test were employed. Overweight status was diagnosed in 15.7%, obesity in 4% and underweight in 11.6%. Almost never controlled their weight: 25%. Over a quarter had not a correct perception of BMI category they belonged to. In comparison with females the proportion of obese and overweight in males was bigger and the proportion of the young male who checked often their weight and of correct weight self evaluation was lower (p<0.001. Up to half of respondents do not used to have breakfast every day, but consume sweets, chips, energy drinks, don’t have three main meals, eat daily pastries, eat in front of the TV, the computer. Some statistically significant differences by gender and age groups have been observed (p<0.01. In generating health related programmes it is necessary to know those particular groups that hold a high risk for overweight, obesity, underweight and unhealthy eating habits so that education to focus mainly on these vulnerable segments.

  19. Association between body composition and body mass index in young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, Hiroyuki; Kitano, Takao; Kuchiki, Tsutomu; Okazaki, Hideki; Shibata, Shigeo

    2002-06-01

    The National Nutrition Survey of Japan indicated a trend toward a decreasing body mass index (BMI; kg/m2) among young Japanese women. Current studies suggest that not-high BMI often does not correlate with not-high body fat percentage. Recently, the classification of BMI in adult Asians was proposed by the International Obesity Task Force. The addition of an "at risk of overweight" category, BMI as 23.0-24.9, was intended to prevent chronic diseases. We investigated the association between body fat percentage (BF%) and BMI to evaluate the screening performance of BMI focused on individual preventive medicine. The subjects consisted of 605 female college students. The subjects' ages (y), heights (cm), body weights (kg), BMIs, and BF percents with underwater weighing expressed as the means +/- SD were 19.6 +/- 0.5, 158.7 +/- 5.6, 53.8 +/- 7.2, 21.3 +/- 2.4, and 24.9 +/- 4.9, respectively. We defined high BF% as +/- 85th percentile of BF% (29.8%). High-BF% individuals are often not classified into BMI > or = 23.0 because their BMI readings are very broad (18.4-31.7). In comparison to the screening performances (specificity and sensitivity), BMI > or = 23.0 (85.3% and 52.1%, respectively), rather than BMI > or = 25.0 (96.7% and 29.8%, respectively), is recommended for the mass evaluation of fatness. For this reason, the BMI "at risk of overweight" category is characterized as the threshold of increasing the appearance ratio of high-BF% individuals. In conclusion, the BMI > or = 25.0 kg/m2 category is determined as high BF%, regardless of body composition measurement for mass evaluation as a result of quite high specificity. Even so, body composition measurement is necessitated by the individual evaluation of fatness focused on preventive medicine because BMI performed a poor representation of body composition, especially BMI < 25.0 kg/m2 individuals.

  20. Tri-Ponderal Mass Index vs. Fat Mass/Height3 as a Screening Tool for Metabolic Syndrome Prediction in Colombian Children and Young People

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    Robinson Ramírez-Vélez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tri-ponderal mass index (TMI and fat mass index (FMI have been proposed as alternative approaches for assessing body fat since BMI does not ensure an accurate screening for obesity and overweight status in children and adolescents. This study proposes thresholds of the TMI and FMI for the prediction of metabolic syndrome (MetS in children and young people. For this purpose, a cross-sectional study was conducted on 4673 participants (57.1% females, who were 9–25 years of age. As part of the study, measurements of the subjects’ weight, waist circumference, serum lipid indices, blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose were taken. Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA. The TMI and FMI were calculated as weight (kg/height (m3 and fat mass (kg/height (m3, respectively. Following the International Diabetes Federation (IDF definition, MetS is defined as including three or more metabolic abnormalities. Cohort-specific thresholds were established to identify Colombian children and young people at high risk of MetS. The thresholds were applied to the following groups: (i a cohort of children where the girls’ TMI ≥ 12.13 kg/m3 and the boys’ TMI ≥ 12.10 kg/m3; (ii a cohort of adolescents where the girls’ TMI ≥ 12.48 kg/m3 and the boys’ TMI ≥ 11.19 kg/m3; (iii a cohort of young adults where the women’s TMI ≥ 13.21 kg/m3 and the men’s TMI ≥ 12.19 kg/m3. The FMI reference cut-off values used for the different groups were as follows: (i a cohort of children where the girls’ FMI ≥ 2.59 fat mass/m3 and the boys’ FMI ≥ 1.98 fat mass/m3; (ii a cohort of adolescents where the girls’ FMI ≥ 3.12 fat mass/m3 and the boys’ FMI ≥ 1.46 fat mass/m3; (iii a cohort of adults where the women’s FMI ≥ 3.27 kg/m3 and the men’s FMI ≥ 1.65 kg/m3. Our results showed that the FMI and TMI had a moderate discriminatory power to detect MetS in Colombian children, adolescents, and young adults.

  1. The Sitting-Height Index of Build, (Body Mass/(Sitting Height3, as an Improvement on the Body Mass Index for Children, Adolescents and Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Burton

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The body mass index (BMI is unsatisfactory in being affected by both relative leg length and height, and, for use with children and adolescents, therefore needs to be interpreted in relation to age. The sitting-height index of build (body mass/(sitting height3, is largely free of these disadvantages. Furthermore, because that index is independent of relative leg length, the latter can be treated as a separate indicator of nutritional history and health risks. Past studies on white children and adults have shown body mass to be approximately proportional to (sitting height3. Moreover, multiple regression of (body mass1/3 on sitting height and leg length, using year-by-year averages, has indicated that leg length is an insignificant predictor of body mass. The present study used data for individuals, namely 2–20 years old males and females, black as well as white. Regression analysis as above again showed leg length to be an insignificant predictor of body mass, but only above the age of about nine years. However, sitting height is still a stronger predictor of body mass than leg length at all ages. The advantages of the sitting-height index of build for use with young people are confirmed.

  2. Amino acid supplementation improves muscle mass in aged and young horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham-Thiers, P M; Kronfeld, D S

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of supplementary AA on the ability to support muscle mass in aging horses. Sixteen horses of light horse type were used in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments with two age groups [ or = 20 yr (average = 22.4 +/- 0.87 yr)] and two diet groups [no supplementation (N) or supplementary lysine and threonine (S; 20.0 and 15 g/d, respectively)]. Horses were fed the diets for 14 wk and received regular light exercise throughout the study. Body weight, BCS, and venous blood samples were taken every 2 wk. Plasma was analyzed for total protein, albumin, creatinine, urea N (PUN), and an AA profile, including 3-methyl histidine (3MH) and sulfur AA. Photographs of the horses taken at the start and at the end of the experiment were used to assign a subjective muscle mass score from 1 to 5 (1 = lowest to 5 = highest). There was no difference in BW caused by diet; however, the S-group horses tended (P = 0.064) to gain more weight (6.91 +/- 2.3 kg), and in fact, the N-group horses lost weight (- 11.76 +/- 5.2 kg) during the experiment. Repeated measures analysis revealed that BCS was lower for the aged vs. the young horses (P = 0.001) as well as for the S- vs. the N-group horses (P = 0.026). Subjective muscle mass scores were not different at the start of the experiment but were greater (P = 0.047) for the S-group horses (3.77 +/- 0.13) at the end of the experiment compared with the N-group horses (3.28 +/- 0.14). Plasma creatinine was greater (P = 0.032), and PUN was lower (P = 0.027), for S-group horses compared with N-group horses. Initial 3MH concentrations were not different; however, at the end of the experiment, 3MH was lower for the S-group horses (P = 0.016) compared with the N-group horses. Plasma lysine and threonine concentrations were greater for S-group horses at the end of the experiment than for N-group horses (P = 0.023 and 0.009, respectively). Both 3MH and PUN concentrations were negatively correlated

  3. Identification of a dietary pattern prospectively associated with bone mass in Australian young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Hooven, Edith H; Ambrosini, Gina L; Huang, Rae-Chi; Mountain, Jenny; Straker, Leon; Walsh, John P; Zhu, Kun; Oddy, Wendy H

    2015-11-01

    Relatively little is known about the relations between dietary patterns and bone health in adolescence, which is a period of substantial bone mass accrual. We derived dietary patterns that were hypothesized to be related to bone health on the basis of their protein, calcium, and potassium contents and investigated their prospective associations with bone mineral density (BMD), bone area, and bone mineral content (BMC) in a cohort of young adults. The study included 1024 young adults born to mothers who were participating in the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Dietary information was obtained from food-frequency questionnaires at 14 and 17 y of age. Dietary patterns were characterized according to protein, calcium, and potassium intakes with the use of reduced-rank regression. BMD, bone area, and BMC were estimated with the use of a total body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan at 20 y of age. We identified 2 major dietary patterns. The first pattern was positively correlated with intakes of protein, calcium, and potassium and had high factor loadings for low-fat dairy products, whole grains, and vegetables. The second pattern was positively correlated with protein intake but negatively correlated with intakes of calcium and potassium and had high factor loadings for meat, poultry, fish, and eggs. After adjustment for anthropometric, sociodemographic, and lifestyle factors, a higher z score for the first pattern at 14 y of age was positively associated with BMD and BMC at 20 y of age [differences: 8.6 mg/cm(2) (95% CI: 3.0, 14.1 mg/cm(2)) and 21.9 g (95% CI: 6.5, 37.3 g), respectively, per SD increase in z score]. The z score for this same pattern at 17 y of age was not associated with bone outcomes at 20 y of age. The second pattern at 14 or 17 y of age was not associated with BMD, BMC, or bone area. A dietary pattern characterized by high intakes of protein, calcium, and potassium in midadolescence was associated with higher BMD and BMC at 20

  4. AAAS Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellowship Program: Building Communication Skills in Young Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, S.

    2006-12-01

    The AAAS Mass Media Science &Engineering Fellowship program has succeeded in training scientists to become more effective communicators for more than 30 years. The program places advanced science, engineering and mathematics students at media sites to work as science reporters for ten weeks each summer. AAAS places between 15 to 20 students a year at newspapers, magazines and radio stations. Our goal is to create better science communicators who understand their role in fostering the public's understanding of science. Fellows leave the program with a greater awareness of how to communicate complex issues by making the connection as to why people should be interested in certain developments, and more specifically, how they will impact their communities. 2004 AGU Fellow Rei Ueyama put her lessons learned to good use during her Fellowship at the Sacramento Bee. "In a regional paper like The Bee, a (story) also had to have a local touch. I needed to show why people in Sacramento (or California) should bother to read the story. One example is the story I wrote about seeding the ocean with iron particles to fight global warming. Since ocean fertilization is a global issue, I had to clearly specify the reason why The Bee and not The New York Times was running the story. The local angle I chose was to point out that the core group of scientists involved in this study was from Monterey Bay, Calif." Many alumni tell us the program has been an integral force in shaping the course of their career. Similarly, sites often report that having a scientist on staff is an invaluable resource that allows them to cover additional science stories as well as report some technical stories in more depth. The American Geophysical Union has sponsored a Mass Media Fellow since 1997. Sponsorship allows affiliate program partners to establish connections with young professionals in their field. They are then also able to take advantage of the communication skills resident in their alumni base

  5. Associations between Chinese/Asian versus Western mass media influences and body image disturbances of young Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Todd; Jiang, Chengcheng; Chen, Hong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we evaluated associations of experiences with mass media imported from Western nations such as the United States versus mass media from China and other Asian countries with eating and body image disturbances of young Chinese women. Participating women (N=456) completed self-report measures of disordered eating, specific sources of appearance dissatisfaction (fatness, facial features, stature), and Western versus Chinese/Asian mass media influences. The sample was significantly more likely to report perceived pressure from, comparisons with, and preferences for physical appearance depictions in Chinese/Asian mass media than Western media. Chinese/Asian media influences also combined for more unique variance in prediction models for all disturbances except stature concerns. While experiences with Western media were related to disturbances as well, the overall impact of Chinese/Asian media influences was more prominent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CIRCUMSTELLAR ENVIRONMENT AND EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURE OF THE YOUNG SUBSTELLAR ECLIPSING BINARY 2MASS J05352184-0546085

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Stassun, Keivan G.; Mathieu, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    We present new Spitzer IRAC/PU/MIPS photometry from 3.6 to 24 μm, and new Gemini GMOS photometry at 0.48 μm, of the young brown dwarf eclipsing binary 2MASS J05352184-0546085, located in the Orion Nebula Cluster. No excess disk emission is detected. The measured fluxes at λ ≤ 8 μm are within 1σ (∼ -10 M sun ) if it extends in to within ∼0.1 AU of the binary (the approximate tidal truncation radius), or it must be optically thick with a large inner hole, >0.6-10 AU in radius depending on degree of flaring. The consequence in all cases is that disk accretion is likely to be negligible or absent. This supports the recent proposal that the strong Hα emission in the primary (more massive) brown dwarf results from chromospheric activity, and thereby bolsters the hypothesis that the surprising T eff inversion observed between the components is due to strong magnetic fields on the primary. Our data also set constraints on the T eff of the components independent of spectral type, and thereby on models of the aforementioned magnetic field effects. We discuss the consequences for the derived fundamental properties of young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in general. Specifically, if very active isolated young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars suffer the same activity/field related effects as the 2M0535-05 primary, the low-mass stellar/substellar initial mass function currently derived from standard evolutionary tracks may be substantially in error.

  7. Association Between MCT1 A1470T Polymorphism and Fat-Free Mass in Well-Trained Young Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massidda, Myosotis; Eynon, Nir; Bachis, Valeria; Corrias, Laura; Culigioni, Claudia; Cugia, Paolo; Scorcu, Marco; Calò, Carla M

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the MCT1 A1470T polymorphism and fat-free mass in young Italian elite soccer players. Participants were 128 Italian male soccer players. Fat-free mass was estimated for each of the soccer player using age- and gender-specific formulas with plicometry. Genotyping for the MCT1 A1470T polymorphism was performed using polymerase chain reaction. The MCT1 A1470T genotypes were in agreement with the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium distribution. The percentage of fat-free mass was significantly higher in soccer players with the TT genotype and in the T-allele-dominant model group (TT + AT) compared with the soccer players with the AA genotype. The MCT1 T allele is associated with the percentage of fat-free mass in young elite male soccer players. Elucidating the genetic basis of body composition in athletes could potentially be used as an additional tool for strength and conditioning professionals in planning and adjusting training. However, these results are preliminary and need to be replicated in more cohorts.

  8. The effectiveness of mass media in changing HIV/AIDS-related behaviour among young people in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Jane T; Anhang, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    To review the strength of the evidence for the effects of three types of mass media interventions (radio only, radio with supporting media, or radio and television with supporting media) on HIV/AIDS-related behaviour among young people in developing countries and to assess whether these interventions reach the threshold of evidence needed to recommend widespread implementation. We conducted a systematic review of studies that evaluated mass media interventions and were published or released between 1990 and 2004. Studies were included if they evaluated a mass media campaign that had the main objective of providing information about HIV/AIDS or sexual health. To be eligible for inclusion studies had to use a pre-intervention versus post-intervention design or an intervention versus control design or analyse cross-sectional data comparing those who had been exposed to the campaign with those who had not been exposed. Studies also had to comprehensively report quantitative data for most outcomes. Of the 15 programmes identified, 11 were from Africa, 2 from Latin America, 1 from Asia, and 1 from multiple countries. One programme used radio only, six used radio with supporting media, and eight others used television and radio with supporting media. The data support the effectiveness of mass media interventions to increase the knowledge of HIV transmission, to improve self-efficacy in condom use, to influence some social norms, to increase the amount of interpersonal communication, to increase condom use and to boost awareness of health providers. Fewer significant effects were found for improving self-efficacy in terms of abstinence, delaying the age of first sexual experience or decreasing the number of sexual partners. We found that mass media programmes can influence HIV-related outcomes among young people, although not on every variable or in every campaign. Campaigns that include television require the highest threshold of evidence, yet they also yield the

  9. Effects of conjugated linoleic acid and exercise on bone mass in young male Balb/C mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Shea Marianne

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is an increase in obesity among the population of industrialized countries, and dietary supplementation with Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA has been reported to lower body fat mass. However, weight loss is generally associated with negative effects on bone mass, but CLA is reported to have beneficial effects on bone. Furthermore, another factor that is well established to have a beneficial effect on bone is exercise (EX. However, a combination therapy of CLA and EX on bone health has not been studied. In this paper, we report the beneficial effects of CLA and EX on bone, in four different groups of Balb-C young, male mice. There were 4 groups in our study: 1. Safflower oil (SFO sedentary (SED; 2. SFO EX; 3. CLA SED; 4. CLA EX. Two months old mice, under their respective treatment regimens were followed for 14 weeks. Mice were scanned in vivo using a DEXA scanner before and after treatment. At the end of the treatment period, the animals were sacrificed, the left tibia was removed and scanned using peripheral quantitative computerized tomography (pQCT. The results showed that although CLA decreased gain in body weight by 35%, it however increased bone mass by both reducing bone resorption and increasing bone formation. EX also decreased gain in body weight by 21% and increased bone mass; but a combination of CLA and EX, however, did not show any further increase in bone mass. In conclusion, CLA increases bone mass in both cancellous and cortical bones, and the effects of CLA on bone is not further improved by EX in pure cortical bone of young male mice.

  10. Smoking is associated with impaired bone mass development in young adult men: a 5-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudäng, Robert; Darelid, Anna; Nilsson, Martin; Nilsson, Staffan; Mellström, Dan; Ohlsson, Claes; Lorentzon, Mattias

    2012-10-01

    It has previously been shown that smoking is associated with reduced bone mass and increased fracture risk, but no longitudinal studies have been published investigating altered smoking behavior at the time of bone mass acquisition. The aim of this study was to investigate the development of bone density and geometry according to alterations in smoking behavior in a 5-year, longitudinal, population-based study of 833 young men, age 18 to 20 years (baseline). Furthermore, we aimed to examine the cross-sectional, associations between current smoking and parameters of trabecular microarchitecture of the radius and tibia, using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), in young men aged 23 to 25 years (5-year follow-up). Men who had started to smoke since baseline had considerably smaller increases in areal bone mineral density (aBMD) at the total body (mean ± SD, 0.020 ± 0.047 mg/cm(2) versus 0.043 ± 0.040 mg/cm(2) , p young adulthood have poorer development of their aBMD at clinically important sites such as the spine and hip than nonsmokers, possibly due to augmented loss of trabecular density and impaired growth of cortical cross-sectional area. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  11. Mechanistic model of mass-specific basal metabolic rate: evaluation in healthy young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Bosy-Westphal, A; Schautz, B; Müller, M

    2011-12-01

    Mass-specific basal metabolic rate (mass-specific BMR), defined as the resting energy expenditure per unit body mass per day, is an important parameter in energy metabolism research. However, a mechanistic explanation for magnitude of mass-specific BMR remains lacking. The objective of the present study was to validate the applicability of a proposed mass-specific BMR model in healthy adults. A mechanistic model was developed at the organ-tissue level, mass-specific BMR = Σ( K i × F i ), where Fi is the fraction of body mass as individual organs and tissues, and K i is the specific resting metabolic rate of major organs and tissues. The Fi values were measured by multiple MRI scans and the K i values were suggested by Elia in 1992. A database of healthy non-elderly non-obese adults (age 20 - 49 yrs, BMI BMR of all subjects was 21.6 ± 1.9 (mean ± SD) and 21.7 ± 1.6 kcal/kg per day, respectively. The measured mass-specific BMR was correlated with the predicted mass-specific BMR (r = 0.82, P BMR, versus the average of measured and predicted mass-specific BMR. In conclusion, the proposed mechanistic model was validated in non-elderly non-obese adults and can help to understand the inherent relationship between mass-specific BMR and body composition.

  12. Peripheral bone mass is not affected by winter vitamin D deficiency in children and young adults from Ushuaia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, M B; Wittich, A; Mautalen, C; Chaperon, A; Kizlansky, A

    2000-09-01

    Low vitamin D levels in elderly people are associated with reduced bone mass, secondary hyperparathyroidism, and increased fracture risk. Its effect on the growing skeleton is not well known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible influence of chronic winter vitamin D deficiency and higher winter parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels on bone mass in prepubertal children and young adults. The study was carried out in male and female Caucasian subjects. A total of 163 prepubertal children (X age +/- 1 SD: 8.9 +/- 0.7 years) and 234 young adults (22.9 +/- 3.6 years) who had never received vitamin D supplementation were recruited from two areas in Argentina: (1)Ushuaia (55 degrees South latitude), where the population is known to have low winter 25OHD levels and higher levels of PTH in winter than in summer, and (2)Buenos Aires (34 degrees S), where ultraviolet (UV) radiation and vitamin D nutritional status in the population are adequate all year round. Bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) of the ultradistal and distal radius were measured in the young adults. Only distal radius measurements were taken in the children. Similar results were obtained in age-sex matched groups from both areas. The only results showing significant difference corresponded to comparison among the Ushuaian women: those whose calcium (Ca) intake was below 800 mg/day presented lower BMD and BMC values than those whose Ca intake was above that level (0.469 +/- 0.046 versus 0.498 +/- 0.041 g/cm(2), P children and young adults from Ushuaia and Buenos Aires in spite of the previously documented difference between both areas regarding UV radiation and winter vitamin D status. BMD of axial skeletal areas as well the concomitant effect of a low Ca diet and vitamin D deficiency on the growing skeleton should be studied further.

  13. An Effective Method to Detect Volatile Intermediates Generated in the Bioconversion of Coal to Methane by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry after In-Situ Extraction Using Headspace Solid-Phase Micro-Extraction under Strict Anaerobic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianmin; Wang, Baoyu; Tai, Chao; Wu, Li; Zhao, Han; Guan, Jiadong; Chen, Linyong

    2016-01-01

    Bioconversion of coal to methane has gained increased attention in recent decades because of its economic and environmental advantages. However, the mechanism of this process is difficult to study in depth, partly because of difficulties associated with the analysis of intermediates generated in coal bioconversion. In this investigation, we report on an effective method to analyze volatile intermediates generated in the bioconversion of coal under strict anaerobic conditions. We conduct in-situ extraction of intermediates using headspace solid-phase micro-extraction followed by detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Bioconversion simulation equipment was modified and combined with a solid-phase micro-extraction device. In-situ extraction could be achieved by using the combined units, to avoid a breakdown in anaerobic conditions and to maintain the experiment continuity. More than 30 intermediates were identified qualitatively in the conversion process, and the variation in trends of some typical intermediates has been discussed. Volatile organic acids (C2-C7) were chosen for a quantitative study of the intermediates because of their importance during coal bioconversion to methane. Fiber coating, extraction time, and solution acidity were optimized in the solid-phase micro-extraction procedure. The pressure was enhanced during the bioconversion process to investigate the influence of headspace pressure on analyte extraction. The detection limits of the method ranged from 0.0006 to 0.02 mmol/L for the volatile organic acids and the relative standard deviations were between 4.6% and 11.5%. The volatile organic acids (C2-C7) generated in the bioconversion process were 0.01-1.15 mmol/L with a recovery range from 80% to 105%. The developed method is useful for further in-depth research on the bioconversion of coal to methane.

  14. The Sloan Lens ACS Survey. XI. Beyond Hubble Resolution : Size, Luminosity, and Stellar Mass of Compact Lensed Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newton, Elisabeth R.; Marshall, Philip J.; Treu, Tommaso; Auger, Matthew W.; Gavazzi, Raphaeel; Bolton, Adam S.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.

    We exploit the strong lensing effect to explore the properties of intrinsically faint and compact galaxies at intermediate redshift (z(s) similar or equal to 0.4-0.8) at the highest possible resolution at optical wavelengths. Our sample consists of 46 strongly lensed emission line galaxies (ELGs)

  15. Six weeks' aerobic retraining after two weeks' immobilization restores leg lean mass and aerobic capacity but does not fully rehabilitate leg strenght in young and older men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Gram, Martin; Wiuff, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of aerobic retraining as rehabilitation after short-term leg immobilization on leg strength, leg work capacity, leg lean mass, leg muscle fibre type composition and leg capillary supply, in young and older men. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: Seventeen young (23 ± 1 years...... immobilization had marked effects on leg strength, and work capacity and 6 weeks' retraining was sufficient to increase, but not completely rehabilitate, muscle strength, and to rehabilitate aerobic work capacity and leg lean mass (in the young men)....

  16. Lean body mass as a predictor of performance of young Iranian elite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of body composition and anthropometric variables with the performance of young Iranian elite weightlifters. Forty-two subjects (age 16.21±3.22 years) volunteered to participate in the study. All subjects competed at the Iranian National Championship. Body composition ...

  17. Mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-01-01

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  18. Artistic versus rhythmic gymnastics: effects on bone and muscle mass in young girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Rodriguez, G; Dorado, C; Ara, I; Perez-Gomez, J; Olmedillas, H; Delgado-Guerra, S; Calbet, J A L

    2007-05-01

    We compared 35 prepubertal girls, 9 artistic gymnasts and 13 rhythmic gymnasts with 13 nonphysically active controls to study the effect of gymnastics on bone and muscle mass. Lean mass, bone mineral content and areal density were measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and physical fitness was also assessed. The artistic gymnasts showed a delay in pubertal development compared to the other groups (pgymnasts had a 16 and 17 % higher aerobic power and anaerobic capacity, while the rhythmic group had a 14 % higher anaerobic capacity than the controls, respectively (all pgymnasts had higher lean mass (prhythmic gymnasts and the controls. Body fat mass was 87.5 and 61.5 % higher in the controls than in the artistic and the rhythmic gymnasts (pgymnastic participation is associated with delayed pubertal development, enhanced physical fitness, muscle mass, and bone density in prepubertal girls, eliciting a higher osteogenic stimulus than rhythmic gymnastic.

  19. Emission line diagnostics for accretion and outflows in young very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzer B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss accretion and outflow properties of three very low-mass young stellar objects based on broad-band mid-resolution X-Shooter/VLT spectra. Our targets (FU Tau A, 2M1207-39, and Par-Lup3-4 have spectral types between M5 and M8, ages between 1Myr and ~ 10Myr, and are known to be accreting from previous studies. The final objective of our project is the determination of mass outflow to accretion rate for objects near or within the substellar regime as a probe for the T Tauri phase of brown dwarfs and the investigation of variability in the accretion and outflow processes.

  20. THE PALOMAR/KECK ADAPTIVE OPTICS SURVEY OF YOUNG SOLAR ANALOGS: EVIDENCE FOR A UNIVERSAL COMPANION MASS FUNCTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metchev, Stanimir A.; Hillenbrand, Lynne A.

    2009-01-01

    We present results from an adaptive optics survey for substellar and stellar companions to Sun-like stars. The survey targeted 266 F5-K5 stars in the 3 Myr-3 Gyr age range with distances of 10-190 pc. Results from the survey include the discovery of two brown dwarf companions (HD 49197B and HD 203030B), 24 new stellar binaries, and a triple system. We infer that the frequency of 0.012-0.072 M sun brown dwarfs in 28-1590 AU orbits around young solar analogs is 3.2 +3.1 -2.7 % (2σ limits). The result demonstrates that the deficiency of substellar companions at wide orbital separations from Sun-like stars is less pronounced than in the radial velocity 'brown dwarf desert'. We infer that the mass distribution of companions in 28-1590 AU orbits around solar-mass stars follows a continuous dN/dM 2 ∝ M -0.4 2 relation over the 0.01-1.0 M sun secondary mass range. While this functional form is similar to that for isolated objects less than 0.1 M sun , over the entire 0.01-1.0 M sun range, the mass functions of companions and of isolated objects differ significantly. Based on this conclusion and on similar results from other direct imaging and radial velocity companion surveys in the literature, we argue that the companion mass function follows the same universal form over the entire range between 0 and 1590 AU in orbital semimajor axis and ∼ 0.01-20 M sun in companion mass. In this context, the relative dearth of substellar versus stellar secondaries at all orbital separations arises naturally from the inferred form of the companion mass function.

  1. The lower mass function of the young open cluster Blanco 1: from 30 MJup to 3 M⊙

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraux, E.; Bouvier, J.; Stauffer, J. R.; Barrado y Navascués, D.; Cuillandre, J.-C.

    2007-08-01

    Aims:We performed a deep wide field optical survey of the young (~ 100-150 Myr) open cluster Blanco 1 to study its low mass population well down into the brown dwarf regime and estimate its mass function over the whole cluster mass range. Methods: The survey covers 2.3 square degrees in the I and z-bands down to I≃ z≃ 24 with the CFH12K camera. Considering two different cluster ages (100 and 150 Myr), we selected cluster member candidates on the basis of their location in the (I,I-z) CMD relative to the isochrones, and estimated the contamination by foreground late-type field dwarfs using statistical arguments, infrared photometry and low-resolution optical spectroscopy. Results: We find that our survey should contain about 57% of the cluster members in the 0.03-0.6~M⊙ mass range, including 30-40 brown dwarfs. The candidate's radial distribution presents evidence that mass segregation has already occured in the cluster. We took it into account to estimate the cluster mass function across the stellar/substellar boundary. We find that, between 0.03~M⊙ and 0.6~M⊙, the cluster mass distribution does not depend much on its exact age, and is well represented by a single power-law, with an index α=0.69± 0.15. Over the whole mass domain, from 0.03 M⊙ to 3 M⊙, the mass function is better fitted by a log-normal function with m0=0.36± 0.07~M⊙ and σ=0.58±0.06. Conclusions: Comparison between the Blanco 1 mass function, other young open clusters' MF, and the galactic disc MF suggests that the IMF, from the substellar domain to the higher mass part, does not depend much on initial conditions. We discuss the implications of this result on theories developed to date to explain the origin of the mass distribution. Based on observations obtained at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l'Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France

  2. Body mass index, physical activity, and fracture among young adults: longitudinal results from the Thai cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Susan; Lim, Lynette; Berecki-Gisolf, Janneke; Bain, Chris; Seubsman, Sam-ang; Sleigh, Adrian; Banks, Emily

    2013-01-01

    We investigated risk factors for fracture among young adults, particularly body mass index (BMI) and physical activity, which although associated with fracture in older populations have rarely been investigated in younger people. In 2009, 4 years after initial recruitment, 58 204 Thais aged 19 to 49 years were asked to self-report fractures incident in the preceding 4 years. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for associations of fracture incidence with baseline BMI and physical activity. Very obese women had a 70% increase in fracture risk (OR = 1.73, 95% CI 1.21-2.46) as compared with women with a normal BMI. Fracture risk increased by 15% with every 5-kg/m(2) increase in BMI. The effects were strongest for fractures of the lower limbs. Frequent purposeful physical activity was also associated with increased fracture risk among women (OR = 1.52, 95% CI 1.12-2.06 for 15 episodes/week vs none). Neither BMI nor physical activity was associated with fracture among men, although fracture risk decreased by 4% with every additional 2 hours of average sitting time per day (OR = 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-0.99). The increase in obesity prevalence will likely increase fracture burden among young women but not young men. While active lifestyles have health benefits, our results highlight the importance of promoting injury prevention practices in conjunction with physical activity recommendations, particularly among women.

  3. Early socioeconomic adversity and young adult physical illness: the role of body mass index and depressive symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickrama, K A S; Kwon, Josephine A; Oshri, Assaf; Lee, Tae Kyoung

    2014-10-01

    The present study investigated the psychophysiological inter- and intra-individual processes that mediate the linkage between childhood and/or adolescent socioeconomic adversities and adult health outcomes. Specifically, the proposed model examined the roles of youth depressive symptoms and body mass index (BMI) trajectories as mediators that explain the link between early adversity and young adults' general health and physical illnesses after controlling for gender, race or ethnicity, and earlier general health reports. Using a nationally representative sample of 12,424 from National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), this study used growth curve modeling to consider both the severity (initial level) and the change over time (deterioration or elevation) as psychophysiological mediators, thereby acknowledging multiple facets of depressive symptoms and BMI trajectories as psychophysiological mediators of early adversity to adult health. Results provide evidence for (1) the influence of early childhood and early adolescent cumulative socioeconomic adversity on both the initial levels and changes over time of depressive symptoms and BMI and (2) the independent influences depressive symptoms and BMI trajectories on the general health and the physical illnesses of young adults. These findings contribute valuable knowledge to existing research by elucidating how early adversity exerts an enduring long-term influence on physical health problems in young adulthood; furthermore, this information suggests that effective intervention and prevention programs should incorporate multiple facets (severity and change over time) of multiple mechanisms (psychological and physiological). Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Trajectories of Body Mass Index from Young Adulthood to Middle Age among Canadian Men and Women

    OpenAIRE

    Meng Wang; Yanqing Yi; Barbara Roebothan; Jennifer Colbourne; Victor Maddalena; Peizhong Peter Wang; Guang Sun

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge regarding the heterogeneity of BMI trajectories is limited for the Canadian population. Using latent class growth modelling, four distinct BMI trajectories of individuals from young adulthood to middle age were identified for both women and men from the longitudinal data of the National Population Health Survey. The associations between BMI trajectories and the individuals’ sociodemographic characteristics and behavioural factors were also examined. Aboriginal women were found more ...

  5. Effect of fat free mass on serum and plasma BDNF concentrations during exercise and recovery in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilder, M; Ramsbottom, R; Currie, J; Sheridan, B; Nevill, A M

    2014-02-07

    Exercise results in release of brain derived neurotrophic factor into the circulation; however, little is known about the changes in serum and plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor concentrations and factors influencing brain derived neurotrophic factor during exercise and recovery. Serum (n=23) and plasma (n=10) brain derived neurotrophic factor concentrations were measured in healthy young men at rest, during steady-rate and after exercise to determine the maximum aerobic power. A two-way analysis of variance was used to investigate brain derived neurotrophic factor levels in blood during exercise and recovery, with one between-subject factor (a median split on: age, height, body mass, fat free mass, body mass index and aerobic fitness), and one within-subject factor (time). Serum brain derived neurotrophic factor concentrations increased in response to exercise and declined rapidly in recovery. Plasma brain derived neurotrophic factor had a greater proportional increase relative to exhaustive exercise compared with serum brain derived neurotrophic factor and was slower to return to near baseline values. There was a significant group-by-time interaction indicating a greater release and faster recovery for serum brain derived neurotrophic factor in high- compared with low-fat free mass individuals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. BANYAN. II. Very low mass and substellar candidate members to nearby, young kinematic groups with previously known signs of youth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne

    2014-01-01

    We present Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), a modified Bayesian analysis for assessing the membership of later-than-M5 objects to any of several Nearby Young Associations (NYAs). In addition to using kinematic information (from sky position and proper motion), this analysis exploits 2MASS-WISE color-magnitude diagrams in which old and young objects follow distinct sequences. As an improvement over our earlier work, the spatial and kinematic distributions for each association are now modeled as ellipsoids whose axes need not be aligned with the Galactic coordinate axes, and we use prior probabilities matching the expected populations of the NYAs considered versus field stars. We present an extensive contamination analysis to characterize the performance of our new method. We find that Bayesian probabilities are generally representative of contamination rates, except when a parallax measurement is considered. In this case contamination rates become significantly smaller and hence Bayesian probabilities for NYA memberships are pessimistic. We apply this new algorithm to a sample of 158 objects from the literature that are either known to display spectroscopic signs of youth or have unusually red near-infrared colors for their spectral type. Based on our analysis, we identify 25 objects as new highly probable candidates to NYAs, including a new M7.5 bona fide member to Tucana-Horologium, making it the latest-type member. In addition, we reveal that a known L2γ dwarf is co-moving with a bright M5 dwarf, and we show for the first time that two of the currently known ultra red L dwarfs are strong candidates to the AB Doradus moving group. Several objects identified here as highly probable members to NYAs could be free-floating planetary-mass objects if their membership is confirmed.

  7. BANYAN. II. Very low mass and substellar candidate members to nearby, young kinematic groups with previously known signs of youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne [Département de Physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, Qc H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-03-10

    We present Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II (BANYAN II), a modified Bayesian analysis for assessing the membership of later-than-M5 objects to any of several Nearby Young Associations (NYAs). In addition to using kinematic information (from sky position and proper motion), this analysis exploits 2MASS-WISE color-magnitude diagrams in which old and young objects follow distinct sequences. As an improvement over our earlier work, the spatial and kinematic distributions for each association are now modeled as ellipsoids whose axes need not be aligned with the Galactic coordinate axes, and we use prior probabilities matching the expected populations of the NYAs considered versus field stars. We present an extensive contamination analysis to characterize the performance of our new method. We find that Bayesian probabilities are generally representative of contamination rates, except when a parallax measurement is considered. In this case contamination rates become significantly smaller and hence Bayesian probabilities for NYA memberships are pessimistic. We apply this new algorithm to a sample of 158 objects from the literature that are either known to display spectroscopic signs of youth or have unusually red near-infrared colors for their spectral type. Based on our analysis, we identify 25 objects as new highly probable candidates to NYAs, including a new M7.5 bona fide member to Tucana-Horologium, making it the latest-type member. In addition, we reveal that a known L2γ dwarf is co-moving with a bright M5 dwarf, and we show for the first time that two of the currently known ultra red L dwarfs are strong candidates to the AB Doradus moving group. Several objects identified here as highly probable members to NYAs could be free-floating planetary-mass objects if their membership is confirmed.

  8. [Physiological and social factors associated with increments of body mass of Mexican young people with intellectual disabilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Jiménez, A; Wall-Medrano, A; Hernández-Torres, R P

    2012-01-01

    Studies on the state of health and nutrition of Mexicans with intellectual disability (ID) including those with Down syndrome (DS), are scarce. To analyze some physiological and social factors associated with the body mass of young people with ID from northern México. Body weight, height and other anthropometric values were measured in fifty seven young (17 ± 5 years) participants with ID (DS,16%) and at least one guardian. BMI (kg/m²), somatotype and nutritional status were established by three international standards and total blood glucose, cholesterol & triacylglycerides, were also analyzed. Guardian's socio-economic, household food insecurity and nutrition literacy status were estimated with validated questionnaires by direct interview. Participants with SD were 12 cm smaller but subscapular skinfold (SECPS) was 6 mm thicker than that from other ID participants (p < 0.05). Prevalence of overweight/obesity was 70 and 44%, respectively. Blood biochemicals were similar between groups, but 25% had dyslipidemias. Participant's BMI correlated (p < 0,01) with several anthropometric & adiposity indicators (r = 0,40 a 0,88 ), blood triglycerides (r = 0,48 ) and cholesterol (r = 0,44) and guardians & participants' age (r = 0,35). The spending in food correlated (p < 0.05) with participant's SECPS (r = -0.33). The circumference of the waist, hip, calf and PSECP, 89% of the variance of the BMI explained. The body mass of young people with DI from northern Mexico, is strongly related to the degree of body adiposity, dyslipidemias, and some socio-economic factors of their family environment.

  9. Determining the cut-off point of osteoporosis based on the osteoporosis self-assessment tool, body mass index and weight in Taiwanese young adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu Fang; Yang, Rong Sen

    2014-09-01

    To examine the cut-off point of the osteoporosis self-assessment tool, age, weight and body mass index for osteoporosis among young adult Taiwanese women, using a large-scale health examination database containing bone mineral density tests. The cut-off points of osteoporosis risk factors identified earlier focus on menopausal or senior Caucasian and Asian women. However, young adult Asian women have seldom been identified. A retrospective historical cohort study. Using the 2009-2011 health examination database of a large-scale medical centre in northern Taiwan, this study investigated young adult Asian women (i.e. range in age from 30-49 years) in Taiwan who had received dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry test. This study also explored the cut-off point, sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy of receiver operating characteristics of osteoporosis among young adult females in Taiwan. This study collected 2454 young adult Asian women in Taiwan. Cochran-Armitage analysis results indicated that the prevalence of osteoporosis increased with decreasing weight, body mass index and osteoporosis self-assessment method quartiles. According to the results of receiver operating characteristics, weight, body mass index and osteoporosis self-assessment tool approaches can generally be used as indicators to predict osteoporosis among young adult Asian women. Results of this study demonstrate that Taiwanese women contracting osteoporosis tend to be young and underweight, as well as having a low body mass index and osteoporosis self-assessment scores. Those results further suggest that the assessment indicators for cut-off points are appropriately suitable for young adult women in Taiwan. Early detection is the only available means of preventing osteoporosis. Professional nurses should apply convenient and accurate assessment procedures to help young adult women to adopt preventive strategies against osteoporosis early, thus eliminating the probability of osteoporotic

  10. Low muscle mass is associated with metabolic syndrome only in nonobese young adults: the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Chul; Kim, Mee Kyoung; Han, Kyungdo; Lee, Sae-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Merchant, Anwar T; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Lee, Won-Chul; Park, Yong Gyu; Park, Yong-Moon

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the relationship between body composition and metabolic risk factors in young adults. We hypothesized that low muscle mass (LMM) is associated with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in young adults and that the associations vary by obesity. A cross-sectional analysis was conducted using the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data. In total, 5300 young adults aged 19 to 39 years were evaluated. Low muscle mass was defined as an appendicular skeletal muscle mass/weight less than 1 SD below the mean for each participant's corresponding sex and age group. Obesity was defined as a body mass index greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2. The prevalence of LMM was higher in obese than nonobese participants (37.6% vs. 9.6%). In the nonobese participants, the prevalence of MetS, high waist circumference, high triglycerides, and high blood pressure was significantly greater in the LMM group than in the high muscle mass group. In the nonobese group, compared with high muscle mass participants, those with LMM had odds ratios for MetS of 3.6 (95% confidence interval, 1.48-8.76; P young adults with LMM may have a high risk of MetS, especially when they are nonobese. Interventions aimed at increasing muscle mass at younger ages may have the potential to reduce MetS. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Calcium supplementation for 1 y does not reduce body weight or fat mass in young girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Janne K; Mølgaard, Christian; Michaelsen, Kim F; Astrup, Arne

    2006-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from observational studies indicates that a high calcium intake may reduce body weight and body fat. However, few randomized trials have been conducted. We examined whether calcium supplementation affects body weight and body fat in young girls and whether a relation exists between habitual calcium intake and body weight and body fat. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled intervention study was conducted in 110 young girls. The subjects were randomly assigned to receive 500 mg Ca/d as calcium carbonate or placebo for 1 y. Two groups of girls were selected according to habitual calcium intake from a large group; one group consumed 1000-1304 mg/d (40th-60th percentile; n = 60) and the other group consumed body weight, body fat, and calcium intake were measured at baseline and after 1 y. At baseline a significant negative correlation was observed between habitual dietary calcium intake and percentage of body fat (r = -0.242, P = 0.011). However, calcium supplementation had no effect on height, body weight, or percentage body fat. Habitual dietary calcium intake was inversely associated with body fat, but a low-dose calcium supplement had no effect on body weight, height, or body fat over 1 y in young girls. It is possible that the effect of calcium on body weight is only exerted if it is ingested as part of a meal, or the effect may be due to other ingredients in dairy products, and calcium may simply be a marker for a high dairy intake.

  12. Thyroid hormone interacts with the sympathetic nervous system to modulate bone mass and structure in young adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Tatiana L; Teixeira, Marilia B C G; Miranda-Rodrigues, Manuela; Rodrigues-Miranda, Manuela; Silva, Marcos V; Martins, Gisele M; Costa, Cristiane C; Arita, Danielle Y; Perez, Juliana D; Casarini, Dulce E; Brum, Patricia C; Gouveia, Cecilia H A

    2014-08-15

    To investigate whether thyroid hormone (TH) interacts with the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) to modulate bone mass and structure, we studied the effects of daily T3 treatment in a supraphysiological dose for 12 wk on the bone of young adult mice with chronic sympathetic hyperactivity owing to double-gene disruption of adrenoceptors that negatively regulate norepinephrine release, α(2A)-AR, and α(2C)-AR (α(2A/2C)-AR(-/-) mice). As expected, T3 treatment caused a generalized decrease in the areal bone mineral density (aBMD) of WT mice (determined by DEXA), followed by deleterious effects on the trabecular and cortical bone microstructural parameters (determined by μCT) of the femur and vertebra and on the biomechanical properties (maximum load, ultimate load, and stiffness) of the femur. Surprisingly, α(2A/2C)-AR(-/-) mice were resistant to most of these T3-induced negative effects. Interestingly, the mRNA expression of osteoprotegerin, a protein that limits osteoclast activity, was upregulated and downregulated by T3 in the bone of α(2A/2C)-AR(-/-) and WT mice, respectively. β1-AR mRNA expression and IGF-I serum levels, which exert bone anabolic effects, were increased by T3 treatment only in α(2A/2C)-AR(-/-) mice. As expected, T3 inhibited the cell growth of calvaria-derived osteoblasts isolated from WT mice, but this effect was abolished or reverted in cells isolated from KO mice. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis of a TH-SNS interaction to control bone mass and structure of young adult mice and suggests that this interaction may involve α2-AR signaling. Finally, the present findings offer new insights into the mechanisms through which TH regulates bone mass, structure, and physiology. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Planck Intermediate Results. XI: The gas content of dark matter halos: the Sunyaev-Zeldovich-stellar mass relation for locally brightest galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    gas, and that this gas must be less concentrated than the dark matter in such halos in order to remain consistent with X-ray observations. At the high-mass end, the measured SZ signal is 20% lower than found from observations of X-ray clusters, a difference consistent with Malmquist bias effects......We present the scaling relation between Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) signal and stellar mass for almost 260,000 locally brightest galaxies (LBGs) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These are predominantly the central galaxies of their dark matter halos. We calibrate the stellar-to-halo...... indication of signal at even lower stellar mass. We derive the scaling relation between SZ signal and halo mass by assigning halo properties from our mock catalogues to the real LBGs and simulating the Planck observation process. This relation shows no evidence for deviation from a power law over a halo mass...

  14. Body mass index in young Dutch adults : its development and the etiology of its development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rookus, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Follow-up studies of long duration have shown a U-shaped relationship between mortality/morbidity and the body mass index (BMI, weight/height 2). The risk to health posed by obesity appears to be larger in younger subjects than in older

  15. Modifiable environmental influences on body mass index shared by young adult brothers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokholm, B; Silventoinen, K; Tynelius, P

    2013-01-01

    Twin and adoption studies suggest that family environment has little, if any, influence on body mass index (BMI) in adulthood. We investigated the hypothesis that the differences in the years of birth between siblings influence their similarity in BMI at comparable ages, which would give evidence...

  16. A wide planetary-mass companion to a young M3 star of the AB Dor moving group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafrenière David

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a planetary-mass companion found 42′′ (2000 AU from a M3 star, candidate member of the young (50-120 Myr AB Doradus moving group. It was identified through an ongoing survey with GMOS at Gemini-South, via its distinctively red i-z color (>3.51. The comoving status of this object was confirmed by 2 epochs of WIRCam/CFHT J-band images. The NIR photometry and WISE colors suggest an early-to-mid T bound companion. A NIR spectrum, taken with GNIRS at Gemini-North, confirms a mid-T spectral type. With an estimated temperature between 900 K and 1200 K, models predict a mass between 7 and 12 MJup for this object. The benchmark character of this planetary-mass object lies in its relatively well-constrained age and in its very wide separation, that allows in-depth studies that can help validating models and understanding similar but closer-in companions such as the ones that will be uncovered by next-generation planet finders (e.g. GPI and SPHERE.

  17. Formation of massive black holes through runaway collisions in dense young star clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portegies Zwart, S.F.; Baumgardt, H.; Hut, P.; Makino, J.; McMillan, S.L.W.

    2004-01-01

    A luminous X-ray source is associated with MGG 11-a cluster of young stars ~200pc from the centre of the starburst galaxy M 82 (refs 1, 2). The properties of this source are best explained by invoking a black hole with a mass of at least 350 solar masses (350Msolar), which is intermediate between

  18. Body mass index, self-esteem and weight contentment from adolescence to young adulthood and women's risk for sexually transmitted disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merten, Michael J; Williams, Amanda L

    2014-12-01

    Background Women's risk for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) were examined in terms of adolescent and young adult weight status, self-esteem trajectories and weight contentment using two waves of a nationally representative dataset. Using Waves 1 and 3 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, body mass index (BMI), self-esteem and weight contentment were examined during adolescence and young adulthood to assess the likelihood of STDs among 4000 young adult single women. Change in BMI, specifically weight loss between adolescence and young adulthood, significantly increased women's risk for STDs. Continuously low self-esteem during adolescence and young adulthood significantly increased women's risk for STDs. When women's contentment with their weight decreased from adolescence to young adulthood, women's risk for STDs was greater. Regardless of other variables, Black women were more likely to have an STD. RESULTS suggest that women's self-perception is important in reducing sexual risk; specifically, patterns of self-esteem, BMI and weight contentment across developmental periods should be a critical focus of research and practice related to adolescent and young adult sexual health. There are many known benefits to fostering self-esteem during adolescence and findings from this study add STD prevention among young women to this list. RESULTS emphasise the needed prevention during adolescence to address self-perspective and self-esteem for the long-term sexual well-being of young women.

  19. The influence of neighborhood food stores on change in young girls' body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cindy W; Laraia, Barbara A; Kelly, Maggi; Nickleach, Dana; Adler, Nancy E; Kushi, Lawrence H; Yen, Irene H

    2011-07-01

    As the prevalence of childhood obesity has risen in past decades, more attention has been given to how the neighborhood food environment affects children's health outcomes. This exploratory study examined the relationship between the presence of neighborhood food stores within a girl's neighborhood and 3-year risk of overweight/obesity and change in BMI, in girls aged 6 or 7 years at baseline. A longitudinal analysis of participants in the Cohort Study of Young Girls' Nutrition, Environment and Transitions (CYGNET) was conducted from 2005 to 2008. Neighborhood food stores were identified from a commercial database and classified according to industry codes in 2006. Generalized linear and logistic models were used to examine how availability of food stores within 0.25-mile and 1.0-mile network buffers of a girl's residence were associated with BMI z-score change and risk of overweight or obesity, adjusting for baseline BMI/weight and family sociodemographic characteristics. Data were analyzed in 2010. Availability of convenience stores within a 0.25-mile network buffer of a girl's residence was associated with greater risk of overweight/obesity (OR=3.38, 95% CI=1.07, 10.68) and an increase in BMI z-score (β=0.13, 95% CI=0.00, 0.25). Availability of produce vendors/farmer's markets within a 1.0-mile network buffer of a girl's residence was inversely associated with overweight/obesity (OR=0.22, 95% CI=0.05, 1.06). A significant trend was observed between availability of produce vendors/farmer's markets and lower risk of overweight/obesity after 3 years. Although food store inventories were not assessed and food store indices were not created, the availability of neighborhood food stores may affect a young girl's weight trajectory over time. Copyright © 2011 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. VLA Ammonia Observations of IRAS 16253-2429: A Very Young and Low Mass Protostellar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.

    2011-01-01

    IRAS l6253-2429. the source of the Wasp-Waist Nebula seen in Spitzer IRAC images, is an isolated very low luminosity ("VeLLO") Class 0 protostar in the nearby rho Ophiuchi cloud. We present VLA ammonia mapping observations of the dense gas envelope feeding the central core accreting system. We find a flattened envelope perpendicular to the outflow axis, and gas cavities that appear to cradle the outflow lobes as though carved out by the flow and associated (apparently precessing) jet. Based on the NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) emission distribution, we derive the mass, velocity fields and temperature distribution for the envelope. We discuss the combined evidence for this source as possibly one of the youngest and lowest mass sources in formation yet known.

  1. Anterior Mediastinal Mass in a Young Marijuana Smoker: A Rare Case of Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiten P. Kothadia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of cannabis is embedded within many societies, mostly used by the young and widely perceived to be safe. Increasing concern regarding the potential for cannabis to cause mental health effects has dominated cannabis research, and the potential adverse respiratory effects have received relatively little attention. We report a rare case of 22-year-old man who presented with bilateral neck lymphadenopathy, fatigue, and sore throat without significant medical or family history. The patient had smoked one marijuana joint three times a week for three years but no cigarettes. Chest CT demonstrated a large anterior mediastinal mass compressing the superior vena cava and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. A final diagnosis of small-cell lung cancer was reached. Although rare, a small-cell lung cancer in this patient should alert the physician that cannabis smoking may be a risk factor for lung cancer.

  2. Binary Populations and Stellar Dynamics in Young Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbeveren, D.; Belkus, H.; Van Bever, J.; Mennekens, N.

    2008-06-01

    We first summarize work that has been done on the effects of binaries on theoretical population synthesis of stars and stellar phenomena. Next, we highlight the influence of stellar dynamics in young clusters by discussing a few candidate UFOs (unconventionally formed objects) like intermediate mass black holes, η Car, ζ Pup, γ2 Velorum and WR 140.

  3. Near-surface Heating of Young Rift Sediment Causes Mass Production and Discharge of Reactive Dissolved Organic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Shih; Koch, Boris P.; Feseker, Tomas; Ziervogel, Kai; Goldhammer, Tobias; Schmidt, Frauke; Witt, Matthias; Kellermann, Matthias Y.; Zabel, Matthias; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-03-01

    Ocean margin sediments have been considered as important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the deep ocean, yet the contribution from advective settings has just started to be acknowledged. Here we present evidence showing that near-surface heating of sediment in the Guaymas Basin, a young extensional depression, causes mass production and discharge of reactive dissolved organic matter (DOM). In the sediment heated up to ~100 °C, we found unexpectedly low DOC concentrations in the pore waters, reflecting the combined effect of thermal desorption and advective fluid flow. Heating experiments suggested DOC production to be a rapid, abiotic process with the DOC concentration increasing exponentially with temperature. The high proportions of total hydrolyzable amino acids and presence of chemical species affiliated with activated hydrocarbons, carbohydrates and peptides indicate high reactivity of the DOM. Model simulation suggests that at the local scale, near-surface heating of sediment creates short and massive DOC discharge events that elevate the bottom-water DOC concentration. Because of the heterogeneous distribution of high heat flow areas, the expulsion of reactive DOM is spotty at any given time. We conclude that hydrothermal heating of young rift sediments alter deep-ocean budgets of bioavailable DOM, creating organic-rich habitats for benthic life.

  4. Effects of Insect Protein Supplementation during Resistance Training on Changes in Muscle Mass and Strength in Young Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangsoe, Mathias T; Joergensen, Malte S; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik L; Hansen, Mette

    2018-03-10

    During prolonged resistance training, protein supplementation is known to promote morphological changes; however, no previous training studies have tested the effect of insect protein isolate in a human trial. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential effect of insect protein as a dietary supplement to increase muscle hypertrophy and strength gains during prolonged resistance training in young men. Eighteen healthy young men performed resistance training four day/week for eight weeks. Subjects were block randomized into two groups consuming either an insect protein isolate or isocaloric carbohydrate supplementation within 1 h after training and pre-sleep on training days. Strength and body composition were measured before and after intervention to detect adaptions to the resistance training. Three-day weighed dietary records were completed before and during intervention. Fat- and bone- free mass (FBFM) improved significantly in both groups (Mean (95% confidence interval (CI))), control group (Con): (2.5 kg (1.5, 3.5) p supplementation did not improve adaptations to eight weeks of resistance training in comparison to carbohydrate supplementation. A high habitual protein intake in both Con and Pro may partly explain our observation of no superior effect of insect protein supplementation.

  5. Near-surface Heating of Young Rift Sediment Causes Mass Production and Discharge of Reactive Dissolved Organic Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Shih; Koch, Boris P; Feseker, Tomas; Ziervogel, Kai; Goldhammer, Tobias; Schmidt, Frauke; Witt, Matthias; Kellermann, Matthias Y; Zabel, Matthias; Teske, Andreas; Hinrichs, Kai-Uwe

    2017-03-22

    Ocean margin sediments have been considered as important sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to the deep ocean, yet the contribution from advective settings has just started to be acknowledged. Here we present evidence showing that near-surface heating of sediment in the Guaymas Basin, a young extensional depression, causes mass production and discharge of reactive dissolved organic matter (DOM). In the sediment heated up to ~100 °C, we found unexpectedly low DOC concentrations in the pore waters, reflecting the combined effect of thermal desorption and advective fluid flow. Heating experiments suggested DOC production to be a rapid, abiotic process with the DOC concentration increasing exponentially with temperature. The high proportions of total hydrolyzable amino acids and presence of chemical species affiliated with activated hydrocarbons, carbohydrates and peptides indicate high reactivity of the DOM. Model simulation suggests that at the local scale, near-surface heating of sediment creates short and massive DOC discharge events that elevate the bottom-water DOC concentration. Because of the heterogeneous distribution of high heat flow areas, the expulsion of reactive DOM is spotty at any given time. We conclude that hydrothermal heating of young rift sediments alter deep-ocean budgets of bioavailable DOM, creating organic-rich habitats for benthic life.

  6. LINE-1 methylation is positively associated with healthier lifestyle but inversely related to body fat mass in healthy young individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Rocha, José Luiz; Milagro, Fermin I; Mansego, Maria Luisa; Mourão, Denise Machado; Martínez, J Alfredo; Bressan, Josefina

    2016-01-01

    With the goal of investigating if epigenetic biomarkers from white blood cells (WBC) are associated with dietary, anthropometric, metabolic, inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in young and apparently healthy individuals. We evaluated 156 individuals (91 women, 65 men; age: 23.1±3.5 years; body mass index: 22.0±2.9 kg/m(2)) for anthropometric, biochemical and clinical markers, including some components of the antioxidant defense system and inflammatory response. DNA methylation of LINE-1, TNF-α and IL-6 and the expression of some genes related to the inflammatory process were analyzed in WBC. Adiposity was lower among individuals with higher LINE-1 methylation. On the contrary, body fat-free mass was higher among those with higher LINE-1 methylation. Individuals with higher LINE-1 methylation had higher daily intakes of calories, iron and riboflavin. However, those individuals who presented lower percentages of LINE-1 methylation reported higher intakes of copper, niacin and thiamin. Interestingly, the group with higher LINE-1 methylation had a lower percentage of current smokers and more individuals practicing sports. On the other hand, TNF-α methylation percentage was negatively associated with waist girth, waist-to-hip ratio and waist-to-stature ratio. Plasma TNF-α levels were lower in those individuals with higher TNF-α methylation. This study suggests that higher levels of LINE-1 and TNF-α methylation are associated with better indicators of adiposity status in healthy young individuals. In addition, energy and micronutrient intake, as well as a healthy lifestyle, may have a role in the regulation of DNA methylation in WBC and the subsequent metabolic changes may affect epigenetic biomarkers.

  7. Association between insulin resistance, lean mass and muscle torque/force in proximal versus distal body parts in healthy young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysel, T; Calders, P; Cambier, D; Roman de Mettelinge, T; Kaufman, J-M; Taes, Y; Zmierczak, H-G; Goemaere, S

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether there is already an association of insulin resistance (IR) with muscle mass and -force/torque in an adult population and whether this relationship is the same in distal and proximal body parts. 358 Healthy young men were divided into a more insulin sensitive (MIS) (n=89) and a less insulin sensitive (LIS) group (n=89), respectively using lower and upper quartiles of HOMA-IR index (Homeostasis Model Assessment of IR). Muscle force/torque and lean mass, were compared between the two groups. LIS subjects had higher absolute thigh lean mass, but not higher thigh muscle torque, resulting in a lower torque per kg muscle. In upper arm, lean mass was higher in LIS subjects, but also absolute muscle torque resulted higher. For handgrip force, the LIS and MIS group had similar results, despite a trend towards higher forearm lean mass in LIS subjects. Lean mass % of total lean mass is lower in LIS subjects in more distal body parts. Already in a young healthy population, IR seems to be associated with lower force/torque per muscle mass and lower lean mass % of total lean mass predominantly in more distal body parts.

  8. Body mass index and eating habits in young adults from Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Rada C

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to investigate Body Mass Index, eating habits, knowledge and practices regarding this. Between 2013-2014 a self-administered questionnaire was used in sample of 1359 subject from urban area, aged 18-30 years. The subjects’ weight and height were measured. SPSS statistical package and chi-square test were employed. Overweight status was diagnosed in 15.7%, obesity in 4% and underweight in 11.6%. Almost never controlled their weight: 25%. Over a quarter had not a cor...

  9. Relationship of life style choices on body fat mass in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehman, Rehana; ullah Shaikh, Saif; Syed, Sadiqa; Shakeel, Nayyab

    2010-01-01

    Healthy diets and regular, adequate physical activity are major factors in the promotion and maintenance of good health throughout entire life course. Accumulation of fat occurs whenever energy consumed by food and drinks exceeds that which can be utilised by an individual's metabolism and physical activity. The objective of this study was to estimate the effect of lifestyle characteristics of a representative segment of medical students in terms of fast food preferences and participation in physical activity with respect to Body Mass Index (BMI). This cross-sectional study was carried out in Physiology Department, Bahria University Medical & Dental College, Karachi on 192 students of 1st and 2nd year MBBS. Body Mass index of students was calculated. They were classified into 4 groups with BMI or = 25 respectively. A life style questionnaire, based on preferences for healthy/unhealthy food, dietary habits and participation in physical activity was filled. Most of medical students (65%) had BMI less than 23. It was because of selection of healthy dietary pattern with nutritious food (p < 0.09) and participation in outdoor games (p < 0.03). Males who had high BMI showed a tendency to daily intake of fast food (p < 0.03). Walking in both the sexes had a positive impact in maintaining normal BMI (p = Males < 0.04, females < 0.001). Obesity can be prevented by innovative approaches, easiest of which is to promote active life styles with intake of healthy diet and involvement in physical activity.

  10. Sauna-Induced Body Mass Loss in Young Sedentary Women and Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Podstawski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between body mass index (BMI and body mass loss (BML induced by thermal stress in a dry sauna. The study was conducted on a group of 674 sedentary students, 326 women and 348 men aged 19-20. The correlations between BMI scores and BML were determined. The subjects were placed in supine position in a dry sauna for two sessions of 10 minutes each with a 5-minute break. The influence of BMI on the amount of BML in the sauna was determined by nonlinear stepwise regression. The smallest BML was noted in underweight subjects; students with normal weight lost more weight, whereas the greatest BML was reported in overweight and obese subjects. Persons with a high BMI are at higher risk of dehydration, and they should pay particular attention to replenishing fluids during a visit to the sauna. The proposed equations for calculating BML based on a person's BMI can be useful in estimating the amount of fluids that should be replenished by both men and women during a visit to a dry sauna.

  11. Influence of androgens on bone mass in young women with sickle cell anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Elq, Abdulmohsen H.; Sultan, Osama A.; Al-Turki, Haifa A.; Sadat-Ali, M.

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the relationship between the gender hormonal levels and bone mineral density in premenopausal women suffering with sickle cell disease. Method was a cross-sectional study including consecutive female adult patients with sickle cell anemia attending the outpatient hematology/orthopedic clinics, or admitted to King Fahd University Hospital, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, between August 2006 and June 2007. Patient's age was documented and body mass index was calculated. Blood was drawn for complete blood picture, biochemistry and hormonal profile including total estradiol E2 and total testosterone Te. Bone mineral density BMD was measured for all patients using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scan at the hip and lumbar spine. We analyzed the data of 51 patients with an average age of 26+/-3.1 years. Patients were divided into two groups group A and group B. Group A had normal BMD and group B with low BMD. Thirty-one (60.8%) were in group A and 20 (39.2%) were in group B. The E-2 level was not statistically different between the 2 groups, while Te level was significantly lower in women with low BMD 38+/-11.8 versus 22.3+/-11.7 ng/dl, p<0.001. Our study indicates that in menopausal female patients with sickle cell anemia, testosterone may play a role in the preservation of bone mass. (author)

  12. Relationship Among Changes in Sedentary Time, Physical Activity, and Body Mass Index in Young Schoolchildren: A 3-Year Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Amanda; Silva-Santos, Sandra; Duncan, Michael; Lagoa, Maria João; Vale, Susana; Mota, Jorge

    2018-02-27

    To examine the association between sedentary time (ST) and light physical activity (LPA), moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA), and body mass index (BMI), and to track these behaviors over a 3-year follow-up in young schoolchildren. The final sample was 64 children (female: n = 36 or 56.3%), enrolled in schools in Porto, Portugal. Height and mass of children were measured by standard methods, and BMI was then calculated. ST, LPA, and MVPA were measured by accelerometer. Changes (Δ) and relative changes (Δ%) between 2009/2010 and 2012/2013 of ST, LPA, MVPA, and BMI were computed. Multiple linear regression analyses were fit to predict Δ%ST (outcome variable), by Δ%LPA, Δ%MVPA, and Δ%BMI (exposure variables). ST increased and LPA decreased significantly for whole sample (both Ps < .05). No statistically significant difference was found for MVPA over time. There were no differences for ΔST, ΔLPA, ΔMVPA, and ΔBMI between boys and girls. The Δ%LPA and Δ%MVPA were negatively associated with Δ%ST, whereas Δ%BMI was positively associated. Tracking coefficients varied from moderate to strong. Time spent in ST increases due to displacement of time in LPA. This reinforces public health measures and suggests the need for interventions focusing on offsetting the decline ST and increasing MVPA during childhood.

  13. Contrasting effects of prenatal life stress on blood pressure and body mass index in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Sunil K; Beilin, Lawrence J; Robinson, Monique; Burrows, Sally; Mori, Trevor A

    2015-04-01

    Various environmental stressors in pregnancy have been reported to affect high blood pressure (BP) in adult offspring. However, few studies have examined the effect of prenatal maternal psychological stress on offspring BP and BMI in early adulthood. In 957 Raine cohort participants, regression analyses were used to examine the association between the count of maternal life stress events experienced during pregnancy and offspring BP and BMI at age 20. Prenatal life stress associated positively with offspring BMI but inversely with SBP. After adjustment for confounders each additional prenatal life stress event reduced offspring SBP by 0.66  mmHg (P = 0.013) in those with an average BMI and lowered the odds of systolic (pre)hypertension by 17% (odds ratio = 0.83; P = 0.008). The inverse relationship between prenatal life stress and adult SBP was stronger in offspring with higher BMI. On the contrary, each unit increase in prenatal life stress score predicted a BMI increase of 0.37  kg/m (P = 0.022). Longitudinal analysis showed similar effects of prenatal life stress for offspring BMI from age 8 and SBP from age 14. This study has shown that maternal stress in pregnancy significantly associated with BMI from early childhood, but contrary to our hypothesis predicted lower resting SBP and lower odds of systolic (pre)hypertension in young adult offspring. The effect of prenatal life stress on BP was accentuated by a higher BMI. Fetal programming events as a result of prenatal stress may underpin some of these relationships.

  14. Relationship of total body fat mass to weight-bearing bone volumetric density, geometry, and strength in young girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Joshua N; Chen, Zhao; Lisse, Jeffrey R; Lohman, Timothy G; Going, Scott B

    2010-04-01

    Understanding the influence of total body fat mass (TBFM) on bone during the peri-pubertal years is critical for the development of future interventions aimed at improving bone strength and reducing fracture risk. Thus, we evaluated the relationship of TBFM to volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), geometry, and strength at metaphyseal and diaphyseal sites of the femur and tibia of young girls. Data from 396 girls aged 8-13 years from the "Jump-In: Building Better Bones" study were analyzed. Bone parameters were assessed using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) at the 4% and 20% distal femur and 4% and 66% distal tibia of the non-dominant leg. Bone parameters at the 4% sites included trabecular vBMD, periosteal circumference, and bone strength index (BSI), while at the 20% femur and 66% tibia, parameters included cortical vBMD, periosteal circumference, and strength-strain index (SSI). Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess associations between bone parameters and TBFM, controlling for muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA). Regression analyses were then repeated with maturity, bone length, physical activity, and ethnicity as additional covariates. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to compare bone parameters among tertiles of TBFM. In regression models with TBFM and MCSA, associations between TBFM and bone parameters at all sites were not significant. TBFM explained very little variance in all bone parameters (0.2-2.3%). In contrast, MCSA was strongly related (p<0.001) to all bone parameters, except cortical vBMD. The addition of maturity, bone length, physical activity, and ethnicity did not alter the relationship between TBFM and bone parameters. With bone parameters expressed relative to total body mass, ANCOVA showed that all outcomes were significantly (p<0.001) greater in the lowest compared to the middle and highest tertiles of TBFM. Although TBFM is correlated with femur and tibia vBMD, periosteal circumference, and

  15. Stellar-mass black holes in young massive and open stellar clusters and their role in gravitational-wave generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2017-05-01

    Stellar-remnant black holes (BH) in dense stellar clusters have always drawn attention due to their potential in a number of phenomena, especially the dynamical formation of binary black holes (BBH), which potentially coalesce via gravitational-wave radiation. This study presents a preliminary set of evolutionary models of compact stellar clusters with initial masses ranging over 1.0 × 104-5.0 × 104 M⊙, and half-mass radius of 2 or 1 pc, which is typical for young massive and starburst clusters. They have metallicities between 0.05 Z⊙ and Z⊙. Including contemporary schemes for stellar wind and remnant formation, such model clusters are evolved, for the first time, using the state-of-the-art direct N-body evolution program nbody7, until their dissolution or at least for 10 Gyr. That way, a self-regulatory behaviour in the effects of dynamical interactions among the BHs is demonstrated. In contrast to earlier studies, the BBH coalescences obtained in these models show a prominence in triple-mediated coalescences while being bound to the clusters, compared to those occurring among the BBHs that are dynamically ejected from the clusters. A broader mass spectrum of the BHs and lower escape velocities of the clusters explored here might cause this difference, which is yet to be fully understood. Among the BBH coalescences obtained here, there are ones that resemble the detected GW151226, LVT151012 and GW150914 events and also ones that are even more massive. A preliminary estimate suggests few 10-100 s of BBH coalescences per year, originating due to dynamics in stellar clusters that can be detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) at its design sensitivity.

  16. Millimeter- and Submillimeter-Wave Observations of the OMC-2/3 Region. I. Dispersing and Rotating Core around the Intermediate-Mass Protostar MMS 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoko; Saito, Masao; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2006-11-01

    We report the results of H13CO+ (1-0), CO (1-0), and 3.3 mm dust continuum observations toward MMS 7, one of the strongest millimeter-wave sources in OMC-3, with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array (NMA) and the Nobeyama 45 m telescope. With the NMA, we detected centrally condensed 3.3 mm dust continuum emission, which coincides with the mid-infrared (MIR) source and the free-free jet. Our H13CO+ observations revealed a disklike envelope around MMS 7, whose size and mass are 0.15×0.11 pc and 5.1 Msolar, respectively. The outer portion of the disklike envelope has a fan-shaped structure, which delineates the rim of the observed CO outflow. The position-velocity diagrams in the H13CO+ (1-0) emission show that the velocity field in the disklike envelope is composed of a dispersing gas motion and a possible rigid-like rotation. The mass-dispersing rate is estimated to be 3.4×10-5 Msolar yr-1, which implies that MMS 7 has an ability to disperse ~10 Msolar during the protostellar evolutional time. The specific angular momentum in the disklike envelope is nearly 2 orders of magnitude larger than that in low-mass cores. The turnover point of the power law of the angular momentum distribution in the disklike envelope (Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan.

  17. Higher body mass index is associated with episodic memory deficits in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheke, Lucy G; Simons, Jon S; Clayton, Nicola S

    2016-11-01

    Obesity has become an international health crisis. There is accumulating evidence that excess bodyweight is associated with changes to the structure and function of the brain and with a number of cognitive deficits. In particular, research suggests that obesity is associated with hippocampal and frontal lobe dysfunction, which would be predicted to impact memory. However, evidence for such memory impairment is currently limited. We hypothesised that higher body mass index (BMI) would be associated with reduced performance on a test of episodic memory that assesses not only content, but also context and feature integration. A total of 50 participants aged 18-35 years, with BMIs ranging from 18 to 51, were tested on a novel what-where-when style episodic memory test: the "Treasure-Hunt Task". This test requires recollection of object, location, and temporal order information within the same paradigm, as well as testing the ability to integrate these features into a single event recollection. Higher BMI was associated with significantly lower performance on the what-where-when (WWW) memory task and all individual elements: object identification, location memory, and temporal order memory. After controlling for age, sex, and years in education, the effect of BMI on the individual what, where, and when tasks remained, while the WWW dropped below significance. This finding of episodic memory deficits in obesity is of concern given the emerging evidence for a role for episodic cognition in appetite regulation.

  18. Cardiometabolic risk in young adults from northern Mexico: Revisiting body mass index and waist-circumference as predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall-Medrano, Abraham; Ramos-Jiménez, Arnulfo; Hernandez-Torres, Rosa P; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; Tapia-Pancardo, Diana C; Jiménez-Flores, J Rafael; Méndez-Cruz, A René; Murguía-Romero, Miguel; Gallardo-Ortíz, Itzell A; Urquídez-Romero, René

    2016-03-08

    A body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m(2) and a waist circumference (WC) ≥80 cm in women (WCF) or ≥90 cm in men (WCM) are reference cardiometabolic risk markers (CMM) for Mexicans adults. However, their reliability to predict other CMM (index tests) in young Mexicans has not been studied in depth. A cross-sectional descriptive study evaluating several anthropometric, physiological and biochemical CMM from 295 young Mexicans was performed. Sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp) and Youden's index (J) of reference BMI/WC cutoffs toward other CMM (n = 14) were obtained and their most reliable cutoffs were further calculated at Jmax. Prevalence, incidence and magnitude of most CMM increased along the BMI range (p HOMA-IR, and QUICKI]. For a BMI = 30 kg/m(2), J ranged from 16 % (HDL-C/LDL-C) to 68 % (WC), being moderately reliable (Jmax = 61-67) to predict high uric acid (UA), metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the hypertriglyceridemic-waist phenotype (HTGW). Corrected WCM/WCF were moderate-highly reliable (Jmax = 66-90) to predict HTGW, MetS, fasting glucose and UA. Most CMM were moderate-highly predicted at 27 ± 3 kg/m(2) (CI 95 %, 25-28), 85 ± 5 cm (CI 95 %, 82-88) and 81 ± 6cm (CI 95 %, 75-87), for BMI, WCM and WCF, respectively. BMI and WC are good predictors of several CMM in the studied population, although at different cutoffs than current reference values.

  19. Early Childhood Caries and Body Mass Index in Young Children from Low Income Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Goretti Queiroz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between early childhood caries (ECC and obesity is controversial. This cross-sectional survey investigated this association in children from low-income families in Goiania, Goias, Brazil and considered the role of several social determinants. A questionnaire examining the characteristics of the children and their families was administered to the primary caregiver during home visits. In addition, children (approximately 6 years of age had their height, weight, and tooth condition assessed. The primary ECC outcome was categorized as one of the following: caries experience (decayed, missing, filled tooth: “dmft” index > 0, active ECC (decayed teeth > 0, or active severe ECC (decayed teeth ≥ 6. Descriptive, bivariate and logistic regression analyses were conducted. The participants in the current study consisted of 269 caregiver-child dyads, 88.5% of whom were included in the Family Health Program. Caregivers were mostly mothers (67.7%, were 35.3 ± 10.0 years old on average and had 9.8 ± 3.1 years of formal education. The mean family income was 2.3 ± 1.5 times greater than the Brazilian minimum wage. On average, the children in the current study were 68.7 ± 3.8 months old. Of these, 51.7% were boys, 23.4% were overweight or obese, 45.0% had active ECC, and 17.1% had severe ECC. The average body mass index (BMI of the children was 15.9 ± 2.2, and their dmft index was 2.5 ± 3.2. BMI was not associated with any of the three categories of dental caries (p > 0.05. In contrast, higher family incomes were significantly associated with the lack of caries experience in children (OR 1.22, 95%CI 1.01–1.50, but the mother’s level of education was not significantly associated with ECC.

  20. The evaluation of a mass media campaign aimed at weight gain prevention among young Dutch adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wammes, Birgitte; Oenema, Anke; Brug, Johannes

    2007-11-01

    The objective was to evaluate a 3-year nationwide mass media campaign aimed at preventing weight gain. The campaign was aimed primarily at raising awareness of the importance of weight-gain prevention and bringing these issues to the attention of the Dutch public. Eleven serial, independent, cross-sectional, population-based telephone surveys were used to assess campaign awareness and impact (N ranged between 483 and 493 for each of the 11 surveys). The surveys were conducted before and after six campaign waves. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were used to test for trends over time and for differences among the surveys for campaign awareness, message recall, perceived body weight status, overweight-related risk perceptions, attitudes, perceived social support, self-efficacy expectations, and motivations for preventing weight gain. Campaign awareness ranged from 61% after the 1st campaign wave to 88.4% after the final wave. The campaign's television broadcasting activities were an important source of campaign awareness, from both the campaign's television commercials and television-based free publicity. Message recall ranged from 41.9% to 68.1%. Small positive differences were found in attitudes, perceived social support, and intentions for preventing weight gain. Additionally, the results suggest mixed effects on self-efficacy expectations and a negative effect on risk perception. The campaign resulted in high campaign awareness, especially as a result of television commercials and free publicity on television. The results suggest that the campaign was able to create more positive attitudes and motivation but lower risk perceptions and efficacy for preventing weight gain.

  1. Reduced Bone and Body Mass in Young Male Rats Exposed to Lead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fellipe Augusto Tocchini de Figueiredo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to see whether there would be differences in whole blood versus tibia lead concentrations over time in growing rats prenatally. Lead was given in the drinking water at 30 mg/L from the time the dams were pregnant until offspring was 28- or 60-day-old. Concentrations of lead were measured in whole blood and in tibia after 28 (28D and 60 days (60D in control (C and in lead-exposed animals (Pb. Lead measurements were made by GF-AAS. There was no significant difference (P>0.05 in the concentration of whole blood lead between Pb-28D (8.0±1.1 μg/dL and Pb-60D (7.2±0.89 μg/dL, while both significantly varied (P<0.01 from controls (0.2 μg/dL. Bone lead concentrations significantly varied between the Pb-28D (8.02±1.12 μg/g and the Pb-60D (43.3±13.26 μg/g lead-exposed groups (P<0.01, while those exposed groups were also significantly higher (P<0.0001 than the 28D and 60D control groups (Pb < 1 μg/g. The Pb-60D group showed a 25% decrease in tibia mass as compared to the respective control. The five times higher amount of lead found in the bone of older animals (Pb-60D versus Pb-28D, which reinforces the importance of using bone lead as an exposure biomarker.

  2. Body Mass Index and Incident Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Young Adults: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Ali; Juszczyk, Dorota; van Jaarsveld, Cornelia H M; Gulliford, Martin C

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the association between obesity and temporal trends in the incidence of diabetes in children and young adults. We examined the recent incidence of types 1 and 2 diabetes in relation to a high body mass index (BMI) in UK children and young adults. Cohort and nested case-control. A total of 375 general practices that contribute to the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). A total of 369,362 participants aged 2 to 15 years at BMI measurement in CPRD from 1994 to 2013. None. Incident type 1 diabetes (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D) diagnoses up to age 25 years. A total of 654 incident cases of T2D and 1318 T1D cases were found. The incidence of T2D per 100,000 persons annually increased from 6.4 in 1994 to 1998 to 33.2 in 2009 to 2013; and that for T1D increased from 38.2 to 52.1 per 100,000 persons during the same period. The incidence of T2D increased in both overweight (85th to 95th percentile for age- and sex-specific BMI; P = 0.01) and obese (≥95th percentile; P < 0.01) individuals from 1994 to 2013. Obese individuals, who constituted 47.1% of T2D cases, had a markedly greater risk of incident T2D [odds ratio, 3.75; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.07 to 4.57], with an incidence rate ratio of 4.33 (95% CI, 3.68 to 5.08) compared with the normal BMI category. No positive linear association was found between obesity (greater BMI) and incident T1D cases. Increasing obesity has contributed to the increasing incidence of T2D but not T1D among UK children and young adults, with a fourfold greater risk of developing T2D in obese individuals.

  3. On the production of He, C, and N by low- and intermediate-mass stars: a comparison of observed and model-predicted planetary nebula abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, R. B. C.; Stephenson, B. G.; Miller Bertolami, M. M.; Kwitter, K. B.; Balick, B.

    2018-01-01

    The primary goal of this paper is to make a direct comparison between the measured and model-predicted abundances of He, C, and N in a sample of 35 well-observed Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe). All observations, data reductions, and abundance determinations were performed in house to ensure maximum homogeneity. Progenitor star masses (M ≤ 4 M⊙) were inferred using two published sets of post-asymptotic giant branch model tracks and L and Teff values. We conclude the following: (1) the mean values of N/O across the progenitor mass range exceeds the solar value, indicating significant N enrichment in the majority of our objects; (2) the onset of hot bottom burning appears to begin around 2 M⊙, i.e. lower than ∼5 M⊙ implied by theory; (3) most of our objects show a clear He enrichment, as expected from dredge-up episodes; (4) the average sample C/O value is 1.23, consistent with the effects of third dredge up; and (5) model grids used to compare to observations successfully span the distribution over metallicity space of all C/O and many He/H data points but mostly fail to do so in the case of N/O. The evident enrichment of N in PN and the general discrepancy between the observed and model-predicted N/O abundance ratios signal the need for extra mixing as an effect of rotation and/or thermohaline mixing in the models. The unexpectedly high N enrichment that is implied here for low-mass stars, if confirmed, will likely impact our conclusions about the source of N in the Universe.

  4. Fission Fragment Mass Distributions and Total Kinetic Energy Release of 235-Uranium and 238-Uranium in Neutron-Induced Fission at Intermediate and Fast Neutron Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duke, Dana Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-12

    This Ph.D. dissertation describes a measurement of the change in mass distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release with increasing incident neutron energy for fission of 235U and 238U. Although fission was discovered over seventy-five years ago, open questions remain about the physics of the fission process. The energy of the incident neutron, En, changes the division of energy release in the resulting fission fragments, however, the details of energy partitioning remain ambiguous because the nucleus is a many-body quantum system. Creating a full theoretical model is difficult and experimental data to validate existing models are lacking. Additional fission measurements will lead to higher-quality models of the fission process, therefore improving applications such as the development of next-generation nuclear reactors and defense. This work also paves the way for precision experiments such as the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for fission cross section measurements and the Spectrometer for Ion Determination in Fission (SPIDER) for precision mass yields.

  5. Relationship of body mass index and waist to hip ratio measurement with hypertension in young adult medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zafar, S.; Haque, I.U.; Rehman, A.U.

    2007-01-01

    To examine the BMI profile and waist to hip ratio measurements of young adult medical students of Lahore medical and dental college and its relationship with hypertension. All the students of Lahore medical and dental college were asked to undergo physical examination. Height, weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were recorded. The partial correlation coefficient was used to quantify the association between BMI and waist-to-hip circumference ratio with systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Linear regression analysis was used to assess the influence of body mass index and waist-to-hip circumference ratio on the variance of systolic and diastolic BP. Mean BMI was 23.24 (SD+-4.31). Descriptive analysis revealed that 103 (21.3%) of the study population were classified as underweight, 251 (52 %) as normal weight, 99 (20.5%) as overweight, and 30 (6.2 %) as obese. Abdominal adiposity, as measured by increased WHR, was present in 56 subjects (11.59 %). Partial correlation controlled for age revealed strong positive correlation between BMI and WHR for males. 7.24% had high systolic blood pressure, minimum systolic BP was 90 while maximum being 160 mmHg. Same was the value for high diastolic blood pressure i.e. 35 (7.24%), range was from 60 to 100mm Hg. Results of the partial correlation coefficient controlled for age, indicated a significant positive correlation between SBP and DBP. Stepwise linear regression analysis controlled for age revealed that both body mass index and waist-to-hip circumference ratio were independently correlated with both systolic and diastolic blood pressures. The present results suggest that prevalence of overweight and obesity among the medical students is higher than in general population. Those with either higher BMI or central adiposity distribution are potential candidates of increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. (author)

  6. An Asymmetric Runaway Domain Swap Antithrombin Dimer as a Key Intermediate for Polymerization Revealed by Hydrogen/Deuterium-Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trelle, Morten Beck; Pedersen, Shona; Østerlund, Eva Christina

    2017-01-01

    analysis by NMR spectroscopy. Here, we show how hydrogen/deuterium-exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) provides detailed insight into the structural dynamics of each subunit in a polymerization-competent antithrombin dimer. Upon deuteration, this dimer surprisingly yields bimodal isotope distributions...... for the majority of peptides, demonstrating an asymmetric configuration of the two subunits. The data reveal that one subunit is very dynamic, potentially intrinsically disordered, whereas the other is considerably less dynamic. The local subunit-specific deuterium uptake of this polymerization-competent dimer...... strongly supports a β4A-β5A β-hairpin runaway domain swap mechanism for antithrombin polymerization. HDX-MS thus holds exceptional promise as an enabling analytical technique in the efforts toward future pharmacological intervention with protein polymerization and associated diseases....

  7. BANYAN. V. A SYSTEMATIC ALL-SKY SURVEY FOR NEW VERY LATE-TYPE LOW-MASS STARS AND BROWN DWARFS IN NEARBY YOUNG MOVING GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagné, Jonathan; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, René; Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne [Département de Physique, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128 Succ. Centre-ville, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2015-01-10

    We present the BANYAN All-Sky Survey (BASS) catalog, consisting of 228 new late-type (M4-L6) candidate members of nearby young moving groups (YMGs) with an expected false-positive rate of ∼13%. This sample includes 79 new candidate young brown dwarfs and 22 planetary-mass objects. These candidates were identified through the first systematic all-sky survey for late-type low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in YMGs. We cross-matched the Two Micron All Sky Survey and AllWISE catalogs outside of the galactic plane to build a sample of 98,970 potential ≥M5 dwarfs in the solar neighborhood and calculated their proper motions with typical precisions of 5-15 mas yr{sup –1}. We selected highly probable candidate members of several YMGs from this sample using the Bayesian Analysis for Nearby Young AssociatioNs II tool (BANYAN II). We used the most probable statistical distances inferred from BANYAN II to estimate the spectral type and mass of these candidate YMG members. We used this unique sample to show tentative signs of mass segregation in the AB Doradus moving group and the Tucana-Horologium and Columba associations. The BASS sample has already been successful in identifying several new young brown dwarfs in earlier publications, and will be of great interest in studying the initial mass function of YMGs and for the search of exoplanets by direct imaging; the input sample of potential close-by ≥M5 dwarfs will be useful to study the kinematics of low-mass stars and brown dwarfs and search for new proper motion pairs.

  8. The combined influence of genetic factors and sedentary activity on body mass changes from adolescence to young adulthood: the National Longitudinal Adolescent Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, M; North, K E; Monda, K L; Lange, E M; Lange, L A; Guo, G; Gordon-Larsen, P

    2011-01-01

    an increase in sedentary activities is likely a major contributor to the rise in obesity over the last three decades. Little research has examined interactions between genetic variants and sedentary activity on obesity phenotypes. High levels of sedentary activity during adolescence may interact with genetic factors to influence body mass changes between adolescence and young adulthood, a high risk period for weight gain. in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, siblings and twin pairs (16.5 ± 1.7 years) were followed into young adulthood (22.4 ± 1.8 years). Self-reported screen time (TV, video, and computer use in h/week) and body mass index (kg/m(2) ), calculated from measured height and weight at adolescence and at young adulthood, were available for 3795 participants. We employed a variance component approach to estimate the interaction between genotype and screen time for body mass changes. Additive genotype-by-screen time interactions were assessed using likelihood-ratio tests. Models were adjusted for race, age, sex, and age-by-sex interaction. the genetic variation in body mass changes was significantly larger in individuals with low ( δ(G) = 27.59 ± 1.58) compared with high (δ(G) = 18.76 ± 2.59) levels of screen time (p adolescence. Our findings demonstrate that sedentary activities during adolescence may interact with genetic factors to influence body mass changes between adolescence and young adulthood. Accounting for obesity-related behaviours may improve current understanding of the genetic variation in body mass changes. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Waist-to-Hip Ratio, but Not Body Mass Index, Is Associated with Testosterone and Estradiol Concentrations in Young Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mondragón-Ceballos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied if testosterone and estradiol concentrations are associated with specific female waist-to-hip ratios (WHRs and body mass indices (BMIs. Participants were 187 young women from which waist, hips, weight, and height were measured. In addition, participants informed on which day of their menstrual cycle they were and provided a 6 mL saliva sample. Ninety-one of them were in the follicular phase and 96 in the luteal phase. Only in the fertile phase of the menstrual cycle we found a significant interaction between testosterone and estradiol affecting WHR (b±s.e.=-0.000003±0.000001; t94=-2.12, adjusted R2=-0.008, P=0.03. Women with the highest levels of both hormones had the lowest WHRs, while women with low estradiol and high testosterone showed the highest WHRs. BMI significantly increased as testosterone increased in female in their nonfertile days.

  10. Cardiometabolic risk in young adults from northern Mexico: Revisiting body mass index and waist-circumference as predictors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Wall-Medrano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A body mass index (BMI ≥30 kg/m2 and a waist circumference (WC ≥80 cm in women (WCF or ≥90 cm in men (WCM are reference cardiometabolic risk markers (CMM for Mexicans adults. However, their reliability to predict other CMM (index tests in young Mexicans has not been studied in depth. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study evaluating several anthropometric, physiological and biochemical CMM from 295 young Mexicans was performed. Sensitivity (Se, specificity (Sp and Youden’s index (J of reference BMI/WC cutoffs toward other CMM (n = 14 were obtained and their most reliable cutoffs were further calculated at Jmax. Results Prevalence, incidence and magnitude of most CMM increased along the BMI range (p < 0.01. BMI explained 81 % of WC’s variance [Se (97 %, Sp (71 %, J (68 %, Jmax (86 %, BMI = 30 kg/m2] and 4–50 % of other CMM. The five most prevalent (≥71 % CMM in obese subjects were high WC, low HDL-C, and three insulin-related CMM [Fasting insulin, HOMA-IR, and QUICKI]. For a BMI = 30 kg/m2, J ranged from 16 % (HDL-C/LDL-C to 68 % (WC, being moderately reliable (Jmax = 61–67 to predict high uric acid (UA, metabolic syndrome (MetS and the hypertriglyceridemic-waist phenotype (HTGW. Corrected WCM/WCF were moderate-highly reliable (Jmax = 66–90 to predict HTGW, MetS, fasting glucose and UA. Most CMM were moderate-highly predicted at 27 ± 3 kg/m2 (CI 95 %, 25–28, 85 ± 5 cm (CI 95 %, 82–88 and 81 ± 6cm (CI 95 %, 75–87, for BMI, WCM and WCF, respectively. Conclusion BMI and WC are good predictors of several CMM in the studied population, although at different cutoffs than current reference values.

  11. Arterial stiffness is associated to cardiorespiratory fitness and body mass index in young Swedish adults: The Lifestyle, Biomarkers, and Atherosclerosis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernberg, Ulrika; Fernström, Maria; Hurtig-Wennlöf, Anita

    2017-11-01

    Background Early changes in the large muscular arteries are already associated with risk factors as hypertension and obesity in adolescence and young adulthood. The present study examines the association between arterial stiffness measurements, pulse wave velocity and augmentation index and lifestyle-related factors, body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness, in young, healthy, Swedish adults. Design This study used a population-based cross-sectional sample. Methods The 834 participants in the study were self-reported healthy, non-smoking, age 18-25 years. Augmentation index and pulse wave velocity were measured with applanation tonometry. Cardiorespiratory fitness was measured by ergometer bike test to estimate maximal oxygen uptake. Body mass index (kg/m 2 ) was calculated and categorised according to classification by the World Health Organisation. Results Young Swedish adults with obesity and low cardiorespiratory fitness have significantly higher pulse wave velocity and augmentation index than non-obese young adults with medium or high cardiorespiratory fitness. The observed U-shaped association between pulse wave velocity and body mass index categories in women indicates that it might be more beneficial to be normal weight than underweight when assessing the arterial stiffness with pulse wave velocity. The highest mean pulse wave velocity was found in overweight/obese individuals with low cardiorespiratory fitness. The lowest mean pulse wave velocity was found in normal weight individuals with high cardiorespiratory fitness. Cardiorespiratory fitness had a stronger effect than body mass index on arterial stiffness in multiple regression analyses. Conclusions The inverse association between cardiorespiratory fitness and arterial stiffness is observed already in young adults. The study result highlights the importance of high cardiorespiratory fitness, but also that underweight individuals may be a possible risk group that needs to be further studied.

  12. Shift work at young age is associated with elevated long-term cortisol levels and body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manenschijn, Laura; van Kruysbergen, Rulanda G P M; de Jong, Frank H; Koper, Jan W; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C

    2011-11-01

    The incidence of obesity and other features of the metabolic syndrome is increased in shift workers. This may be due to a misalignment between the internal circadian rhythm and the behavioral rhythm. The stress hormone cortisol could play a role in this phenomenon because it is secreted in a circadian rhythm, and long-term elevated cortisol leads to components of the metabolic syndrome. We compared cortisol levels in scalp hair of shift and day workers to study changes in long-term cortisol due to shift work. Hair samples were collected from 33 shift workers and 89 day workers. Cortisol was extracted from the hair samples with methanol, and cortisol levels were measured using ELISA. Height and weight were measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. Shift workers had higher hair cortisol levels than day workers: 47.32 pg/mg hair [95% confidence interval (CI) = 38.37-58.21] vs. 29.72 pg/mg hair (95% CI = 26.18-33.73) (P cortisol levels were present only in younger shift workers: 48.53 pg/mg hair (95% CI = 36.56-64.29) vs. 26.42 pg/mg hair (95% CI = 22.91-30.55) (P cortisol and BMI were positively correlated (β = 0.262; P = 0.005). Shift work at a young adult age is associated with elevated long-term cortisol levels and increased BMI. Elevated cortisol levels and BMI may contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk found in shift workers.

  13. Evaluation of the peak bone mass by quantitative heel ultrasound in young women of the centre of Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Puxeddu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To measure the reference young adult mean values in healthy women of the centre of Italy by Quantitative heel UltraSound (QUS. Methods: The study group was composed by 70 caucasian women: mean age was 25.4 years (Standard Deviation 4.7, mean weight was 58 Kg (SD 8.2, mean height was 166 cm (SD 5.8, mean BMI was 20.9 kg/m2 (SD 2.5. Every subject was evaluated firstly with an original questionnaire to discover risk factors (like for example steroids consumption, recent fractures of the lower limb, then was measured by quantitative heel ultrasonometry Hologic Sahara. Results: Mean extimated Bone Mineral Density (BMD 0.588 g/cm2 (SD 0.124 mean Quantitative Ultrasound Index (QUI 105.0 (SD 19.6, mean Speed of Sound (SOS 1564.2 m/s (SD 31.4, mean Broadband Ultrasound Attenuation (BUA 84.8 dB/MHz (SD 17.4. No significant correlation was found between QUS parameters and anthropometric data. A correlation was found between every QUS parameters. No significant differences were found about QUI and extimated BMD, between our results and Hologic normative data for European women. Conclusions: It is very important to develop specific reference values for any measurement device and site of skeleton especially in the age of reaching the peak bone mass because the T score is then measured referring to these data. Usually the normative data are supplied by manufacturer and are based on large multicentric study. In our opinion it could be helpful to verify if these data are compatible with the population examined in every region.

  14. Rapidly increasing body mass index among children, adolescents and young adults in a transitioning population, South Africa, 2008-15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, B; Sartorius, K; Taylor, M; Aagaard-Hansen, J; Dukhi, N; Day, C; Ndlovu, N; Slotow, R; Hofman, K

    2017-12-14

    There is a global epidemic of overweight and obesity; however, this rate of increase is even greater in some low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). South Africa (SA) is undergoing rapid socioeconomic and demographic changes that have triggered a rapid nutrition transition. The paper focuses on the recent rate of change of body mass index (BMI) among children, adolescents and young adults, further stratified by key sociodemographic factors. We analysed mean BMI of 28 247 individuals (including children) from 7301 households by age and year, from anthropometric data from four national cross-sectional (repeated panel) surveys using non-linear fitted curves and associated 95% confidence intervals. From 2008 to 2015, there was rapid rise in mean BMI in the 6-25 age band, with the highest risk (3-4+ BMI unit increase) among children aged 8-10 years. The increase was largely among females in urban areas and of middle-high socioeconomic standing. Prominent gains were also observed in certain rural areas, with extensive geographical heterogeneity across the country. We have demonstrated a major deviation from the current understanding of patterns of BMI increase, with a rate of increase substantially greater in the developing world context compared with the global pattern. This population-wide effect will have major consequences for national development as the epidemic of related non-communicable disease unfolds, and will overtax the national health care budget. Our refined understanding highlights that risks are further compounded for certain groups/places, and emphasizes that urgent geographical and population-targeted interventions are necessary. These interventions could include a sugar tax, clearer food labelling, revised school feeding programmes and mandatory bans on unhealthy food marketing to children.The scenario unfolding in South Africa will likely be followed in other LMICs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the

  15. Weight-Related Health Behaviors and Body Mass: Associations between Young Adults and Their Parents, Moderated by Parental Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemeier, Brandi S.; Hektner, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parents' behaviors could contribute to the development of their children's weight-related health behaviors. Purpose: Relationships of young adults' (N = 151) and their parents' weight-related behaviors were examined along with parental authority styles. Methods: Questionnaires were completed by young adults and their parents.…

  16. Comparison of variations between percentage of body fat, body mass index and daily physical activity among young Japanese and Thai female students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morinaka Tomoko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our series of investigations concerning the causes of seasonal change in fat accumulation in young university students, we could not find any contribution of seasonal variation in the ratio of carbohydrate and fat metabolism to that of body fat percentage in Japanese and Thai participants. After our previous study, we examined the effect of daily physical activity on body fat percentage to look for the major causes of seasonal change in fat accumulation in young university students. Findings In this study, we measured participants’ (young Japanese and Thai university students daily physical activity by a uniaxial accelerometer in addition to the measurements of body fat percentage and body mass index by a bioelectrical impedance meter. We found that there was significant and moderate negative correlation between body fat percentage and daily step counts among Japanese but not Thai participants. We observed significant, moderate and positive correlations between the percentage of body fat and body mass index among Japanese and Thai participants. Conclusions Daily physical activity plays an important role in the seasonal variation of body fat percentage of Japanese female students. Our present study also confirmed the importance of daily physical activity for controlling body mass index and for the prevention of obesity.

  17. The magnetic strip(s) in the advanced phases of stellar evolution. Theoretical convective turnover timescale and Rossby number for low- and intermediate-mass stars up to the AGB at various metallicities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charbonnel, C.; Decressin, T.; Lagarde, N.; Gallet, F.; Palacios, A.; Aurière, M.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Mathis, S.; Anderson, R. I.; Dintrans, B.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Recent spectropolarimetric observations of otherwise ordinary (in terms e.g. of surface rotation and chemical properties) G, K, and M giants have revealed localized magnetic strips in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram coincident with the regions where the first dredge-up and core helium burning occur. Aims: We seek to understand the origin of magnetic fields in such late-type giant stars, which is currently unexplained. In analogy with late-type dwarf stars, we focus primarily on parameters known to influence the generation of magnetic fields in the outer convective envelope. Methods: We compute the classical dynamo parameters along the evolutionary tracks of low- and intermediate-mass stars at various metallicities using stellar models that have been extensively tested by spectroscopic and asteroseismic observations. Specifically, these include convective turnover timescales and convective Rossby numbers, computed from the pre-main sequence (PMS) to the tip of the red giant branch (RGB) or the early asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. To investigate the effects of the very extended outer convective envelope, we compute these parameters both for the entire convective envelope and locally, that is, at different depths within the envelope. We also compute the turnover timescales and corresponding Rossby numbers for the convective cores of intermediate-mass stars on the main sequence. Results: Our models show that the Rossby number of the convective envelope becomes lower than unity in the well-delimited locations of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram where magnetic fields have indeed been detected. Conclusions: We show that α - Ω dynamo processes might not be continuously operating, but that they are favored in the stellar convective envelope at two specific moments along the evolution tracks, that is, during the first dredge-up at the base of the RGB and during central helium burning in the helium-burning phase and early-AGB. This general behavior can explain

  18. Rotation and magnetism in intermediate mass stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quentin, Léo G.; Tout, Christopher A.

    2018-03-01

    Rotation and magnetism are increasingly recognized as important phenomena in stellar evolution. Surface magnetic fields from a few to 20, 000 G have been observed and models have suggested that magnetohydrodynamic transport of angular momentum and chemical composition could explain the peculiar composition of some stars. Stellar remnants such as white dwarfs have been observed with fields from a few to more than 109 G. We investigate the origin of and the evolution, on thermal and nuclear rather than dynamical time-scales, of an averaged large-scale magnetic field throughout a star's life and its coupling to stellar rotation. Large-scale magnetic fields sustained until late stages of stellar evolution with conservation of magnetic flux could explain the very high fields observed in white dwarfs. We include these effects in the Cambridge stellar evolution code using three time-dependant advection-diffusion equations coupled to the structural and composition equations of stars to model the evolution of angular momentum and the two components of the magnetic field. We present the evolution in various cases for a 3 M_{⊙} star from the beginning to the late stages of its life. Our particular model assumes that turbulent motions, including convection, favour small-scale field at the expense of large-scale field. As a result the large-scale field concentrates in radiative zones of the star and so is exchanged between the core and the envelope of the star as it evolves. The field is sustained until the end of the asymptotic giant branch, when it concentrates in the degenerate core.

  19. A UKIDSS-based search for low-mass stars and small stellar clumps in off-cloud parts of young star-forming regions* **

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrado y Navascués D.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The form and universality of the mass function of young and nearby star-forming regions is still under debate. Its relation to the stellar density, its mass peak and the dependency on most recent models shows significant differencies for the various regions and remains unclear up to date. We aim to get a more complete census of two of such regions. We investigate yet unexplored areas of Orion and Taurus-Auriga, observed by the UKIDSS survey. In the latter, we search for low-mass stars via photometric and proper motion criteria and signs for variability. In Orion, we search for small stellar clumps via nearest-neighbor methods. Highlights in Taurus would be the finding of the missing low-mass stars and the detection of a young cluster T dwarf. In Orion, we discovered small stellar associations of its OB1b and OB1c populations. Combined with what is known in literature, we will provide by this investigations a general picture of the results of the star-forming processes in large areas of Taurus and Orion and probe the most recent models.

  20. A young stellar cluster around a massive protostar revealed by ALMA

    OpenAIRE

    Girart, Josep Miquel; Carrasco-Gonzalez, C.; Anglada, G.; Curiel, S.

    2017-01-01

    Here we present 1.1 mm ALMA observations at a very high angular resolution of a high mass star forming region. The high angular resolution and high dynamic range allows to reveal a young stellar cluster of low mass YSO near a massive protostellar object. Most of the sources detected has no counterpart at other wavelengths (the IR is dominated by the bright emission of the massive/intermediate young stars, which mask the emission of the low mass YSO). A description of the properties of the low...

  1. "Affective Encounters": Live Intermedial Spaces in Sites of Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jo

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses live intermediality as a tool for creative learning in the context of workshops carried out with young people in the town of Terezin, in the Czech Republic, site of the Nazi concentration camp, Theresienstadt. Live intermediality, as a mode of live media practice, involves the real time mixing and merging of sound, image,…

  2. Young Adult and Usual Adult Body Mass Index and Multiple Myeloma Risk: A Pooled Analysis in the International Multiple Myeloma Consortium (IMMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmann, Brenda M; Andreotti, Gabriella; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Camp, Nicola J; Chiu, Brian C H; Spinelli, John J; Becker, Nikolaus; Benhaim-Luzon, Véronique; Bhatti, Parveen; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Brown, Elizabeth E; Cocco, Pierluigi; Costas, Laura; Cozen, Wendy; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Foretová, Lenka; Giles, Graham G; Maynadié, Marc; Moysich, Kirsten; Nieters, Alexandra; Staines, Anthony; Tricot, Guido; Weisenburger, Dennis; Zhang, Yawei; Baris, Dalsu; Purdue, Mark P

    2017-06-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma risk increases with higher adult body mass index (BMI). Emerging evidence also supports an association of young adult BMI with multiple myeloma. We undertook a pooled analysis of eight case-control studies to further evaluate anthropometric multiple myeloma risk factors, including young adult BMI. Methods: We conducted multivariable logistic regression analysis of usual adult anthropometric measures of 2,318 multiple myeloma cases and 9,609 controls, and of young adult BMI (age 25 or 30 years) for 1,164 cases and 3,629 controls. Results: In the pooled sample, multiple myeloma risk was positively associated with usual adult BMI; risk increased 9% per 5-kg/m 2 increase in BMI [OR, 1.09; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.14; P = 0.007]. We observed significant heterogeneity by study design ( P = 0.04), noting the BMI-multiple myeloma association only for population-based studies ( P trend = 0.0003). Young adult BMI was also positively associated with multiple myeloma (per 5-kg/m 2 ; OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3; P = 0.0002). Furthermore, we observed strong evidence of interaction between younger and usual adult BMI ( P interaction adult BMI may increase multiple myeloma risk and suggest that healthy BMI maintenance throughout life may confer an added benefit of multiple myeloma prevention. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 876-85. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Comparison of Ground Reaction Forces, Center of Pressure and Body Center of Mass Changes in the Voluntary, Semi-Voluntary and Involuntary Gait Termination in Healthy Young Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    behrooz teymourian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was comparing the ground reaction forces, center of pressure and body center of mass changes in voluntary, semi-voluntary and involuntary gait termination in healthy young men. Methods: In this study, 12 young men performed termination of gait in three different patterns. The variable of peak antero-posterior and vertical forces in two directions at both limbs, the time to reach peak and average forces in every limb in both directions, the center of pressure displacement of medio-lateral and antero-posterior direction for each limb and the net center of pressure and the displacement of the center of mass motion in all three motion plates were recorded using motion analysis system and force plate.The repeated measurements test was used to compare three patterns of gait termination at significance level of p&le0.5. Results: The results showed a significant difference in variables of peak antero-posterior force, the time to reach peak antero-posterior force and mean antero-posterior forces of the leading limb, the peak antero-posterior force of the trialing limbs, the depth force of leading limbs, medio-lateral cop of leading limbs displacement and vertical displacement of the center of mass, among different patterns of gait termination. Conclusion: While walking, the probability of a fall or collision damage, when a sudden or unexpected stop is required, increases. Therefore, more coordination between neuromuscular systems is required.

  4. Race/ethnic differences in desired body mass index and dieting practices among young women attending college in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schembre, Susan M; Nigg, Claudio R; Albright, Cheryl L

    2011-07-01

    In accordance with the sociocultural model, race/ethnicity is considered a major influence on factors associated with body image and body dissatisfaction, and eating disorders are often characterized as problems that are primarily limited to young White women from Western cultures. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences that exist by race in desired body weight; the importance placed on those ideals; and dieting strategies among White, Asian American, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders, and other mixed-race young women in Hawai'i. A total of 144 female college students 18-20 years of age were surveyed about body weight as well as eating and exercise habits. Results demonstrated that all the young women wanted to lose weight. However, there were no differences in desired body weight or desired weight change by race after controlling for body mass index suggesting that current weight rather than race/ethnicity is the predominant influence on weight-related concerns. Young White women placed the greatest level of importance on achieving a lower body weight, which corresponded with a greater likelihood to be attempting weight loss (dieting) and greater endorsement of behaviors consistent with weight loss compared to their counterparts. Findings imply that, for young women, race/ethnicity may not have as significant an impact on factors associated with body weight ideals as previously believed. Rather, differences in the value placed on achieving a desired body weight, as it relates to disordered eating, should be further explored among race/ethnic groups.

  5. A comparison between handgrip strength, upper limb fat free mass by segmental bioelectrical impedance analysis (SBIA) and anthropometric measurements in young males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Correa, C. H.; Caicedo-Eraso, J. C.; Varon-Serna, D. R.

    2013-04-01

    The mechanical function and size of a muscle may be closely linked. Handgrip strength (HGS) has been used as a predictor of functional performing. Anthropometric measurements have been made to estimate arm muscle area (AMA) and physical muscle mass volume of upper limb (ULMMV). Electrical volume estimation is possible by segmental BIA measurements of fat free mass (SBIA-FFM), mainly muscle-mass. Relationship among these variables is not well established. We aimed to determine if physical and electrical muscle mass estimations relate to each other and to what extent HGS is to be related to its size measured by both methods in normal or overweight young males. Regression analysis was used to determine association between these variables. Subjects showed a decreased HGS (65.5%), FFM, (85.5%) and AMA (74.5%). It was found an acceptable association between SBIA-FFM and AMA (r2 = 0.60) and poorer between physical and electrical volume (r2 = 0.55). However, a paired Student t-test and Bland and Altman plot showed that physical and electrical models were not interchangeable (pt<0.0001). HGS showed a very weak association with anthropometric (r2 = 0.07) and electrical (r2 = 0.192) ULMMV showing that muscle mass quantity does not mean muscle strength. Other factors influencing HGS like physical training or nutrition require more research.

  6. Analysis of eating behaviors and eating habits, body mass index and waist-to-hip ratio in association with spirometry results of young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzięciołowska-Baran Edyta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Behavior and eating habits stands as an important factor in terms of maintaining a good health condition in every age group. This involves optimal digestion, maintaining proper metabolism of the entire organism and thus maintaining proper body weight. It is especially important for students, as the increased mental activity results in increased energy expenditure. The state of body weight can affect the respiratory efficiency measured in spirometry. The aim of the study was to assessthe relation between behavior and eating habits, body mass index (BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR and results from spirometry tests among young adults.

  7. Uncommonly Good: Exploring How Mass Media May Be a Positive Influence on Young Women's Sexual Health and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, L. Monique; Day, Kyla M.; Epstein, Marina

    2006-01-01

    This chapter discusses several ways in which the media may serve as a positive force in young women's sexual health and development through the information and models they provide and the opportunities they offer for validation and self-expression. (Contains 1 table.)

  8. Parental correlations of physical activity and body mass index in young children-the GECKO Drenthe cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijtsma, Anna; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Corpeleijn, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Background: Parental behavior can influence the development of overweight in children. The aim of this study is to examine whether parental BMI and parental physical activity are associated with BMI, waist circumference and physical activity in young children. Methods: In 3-4 year old children,

  9. Non-Discriminant Relationships between Leg Muscle Strength, Mass and Gait Performance in Healthy Young and Old Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muehlbauer, Thomas; Granacher, Urs; Borde, Ron; Hortobagyi, Tibor

    2018-01-01

    Background: Gait speed declines with increasing age, but it is unclear if gait speed preferentially correlates with leg muscle strength or mass.  Objective: We determined the relationship between gait speed and (1) leg muscle strength measured at 3 lower extremity joints and (2) leg lean tissue mass

  10. Intermediate algebra a textworkbook

    CERN Document Server

    McKeague, Charles P

    1985-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra: A Text/Workbook, Second Edition focuses on the principles, operations, and approaches involved in intermediate algebra. The publication first takes a look at basic properties and definitions, first-degree equations and inequalities, and exponents and polynomials. Discussions focus on properties of exponents, polynomials, sums, and differences, multiplication of polynomials, inequalities involving absolute value, word problems, first-degree inequalities, real numbers, opposites, reciprocals, and absolute value, and addition and subtraction of real numbers. The text then ex

  11. Intermediate algebra & analytic geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Gondin, William R

    1967-01-01

    Intermediate Algebra & Analytic Geometry Made Simple focuses on the principles, processes, calculations, and methodologies involved in intermediate algebra and analytic geometry. The publication first offers information on linear equations in two unknowns and variables, functions, and graphs. Discussions focus on graphic interpretations, explicit and implicit functions, first quadrant graphs, variables and functions, determinate and indeterminate systems, independent and dependent equations, and defective and redundant systems. The text then examines quadratic equations in one variable, system

  12. Mental distress in treatment seeking young adults (18-25 years) with severe obesity compared with population controls of different body mass index levels: cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreber, H; Reynisdottir, S; Angelin, B; Tynelius, P; Rasmussen, F; Hemmingsson, E

    2017-02-01

    Young adults (18-25) with severe obesity constitute a challenging patient group, and there is limited evidence about their mental health status compared to population controls. Mental distress in treatment seeking young adults with severe obesity (n = 121, mean body mass index [BMI] = 39.8 kg m -2 ) was compared with matched (1:3 for age, gender and socioeconomic status) population controls of normal weight (n = 363, mean BMI = 22.4 kg m -2 ), as well as unmatched population controls with class I obesity (n = 105, mean BMI = 32.1 kg m -2 ) or severe obesity (n = 41, mean BMI = 39.7 kg m -2 ). Mental distress was measured by the General Health Questionnaire-12 (GHQ-12), and we quantified physician-diagnosed depression, present anxiety and suicide attempts. Poisson regression and linear regression analysis were used for analysing differences in mental distress between groups. Treatment seekers experienced more mental distress than normal weight controls as measured by continuous (adjusted mean: 3.9 vs. 2.2 points, P obesity (adjusted mean: 2.3 points) or severe obesity (adjusted mean: 2.1; both, P Young adult treatment seekers with severe obesity constitute a risk group for mental distress compared to population controls of different BMI levels. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  13. HIV Testing Among Young People Aged 16-24 in South Africa: Impact of Mass Media Communication Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Mai; Figueroa, Maria Elena; Lawrence Kincaid, D

    2016-09-01

    Knowing one's serostatus is critical in the HIV prevention, care and treatment continuum. This study examines the impact of communication programs on HIV testing in South Africa. Data came from 2204 young men and women aged 16-24 who reported to be sexually active in a population based survey. Structural equation modeling was used to test the directions and causal pathways between communication program exposure, HIV testing discussion, and having a test in the last 12 months. Bivariate and multivariate probit regressions provided evidence of exogeneity of communication exposure and the two HIV-related outcomes. One in three sampled individuals had been tested in the last 12 months. Communication program exposure only had an indirect effect on getting tested by encouraging young people to talk about testing. The study suggests that communication programs may create an environment that supports open HIV-related discussions and may have a long-term impact on behavior change.

  14. Peak-bone-mass development in young adults: effects of study program related levels of occupational and leisure time physical activity and exercise. A prospective 5-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, W; Bebenek, M; von Stengel, S; Bauer, J

    2015-02-01

    Young adulthood is characterized by profound life-style changes. This study suggests that reduction of sport or exercise, induced by alteration of the occupational situation, negatively impacts generation/maintenance of peak bone mass. In order to compensate occupational-related reductions of physical activity, workplace exercise programs will be helpful. Only few studies have determined the effect of physical activity or physical exercise on bone mineral density (BMD) in the period of late skeletal maturation, i.e. around peak bone mass. The aim of this article was to determine the long-term effect of different levels of physical activity and exercise directly and indirectly derived by occupation during young adulthood. Sixty-one male and female dental students (DES) and 53 male and female sport students (SPS) 21±2 years old were accompanied over the course (4.8±0.5 years) of their study program. BMD at the lumbar spine (LS), hip, and whole body (WB) were determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Parameters of physical activity increased non-significantly in both groups with no relevant differences between the groups. Indices of exercise, however, increased significantly in the SPS group while a significant decrease was assessed for the DES group. Independent of gender, BMD of the SPS increased significantly (p≤0.007) at all skeletal sites (LS, 2.4±3.9%; hip, 1.6±3.5%; WB, 1.8±2.8%) while BMD of the DES remained unchanged at LS (-0.6±4.4%, p=0.432) and WB (0.5±1.9%, p=0.092) but decreased significantly at the hip (-1.9±4.3%, p=0.010). BMD-changes at LS, hip, and WB differ significantly between SPS and DES (p≤0.017). Results remained unchanged after adjusting for baseline BMD-values that differed (p=0.030 to p=0.082) in favor of the SPS group. Changes of exercise levels directly or indirectly caused by occupational factors during young adulthood significantly affected generation and/or maintenance of peak bone mass. Compensatory exercise is

  15. Protein Ingestion before Sleep Increases Muscle Mass and Strength Gains during Prolonged Resistance-Type Exercise Training in Healthy Young Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, Tim; Res, Peter T; Smeets, Joey S J; van Vliet, Stephan; van Kranenburg, Janneau; Maase, Kamiel; Kies, Arie K; Verdijk, Lex B; van Loon, Luc J C

    2015-06-01

    It has been demonstrated that protein ingestion before sleep increases muscle protein synthesis rates during overnight recovery from an exercise bout. However, it remains to be established whether dietary protein ingestion before sleep can effectively augment the muscle adaptive response to resistance-type exercise training. Here we assessed the impact of dietary protein supplementation before sleep on muscle mass and strength gains during resistance-type exercise training. Forty-four young men (22 ± 1 y) were randomly assigned to a progressive, 12-wk resistance exercise training program. One group consumed a protein supplement containing 27.5 g of protein, 15 g of carbohydrate, and 0.1 g of fat every night before sleep. The other group received a noncaloric placebo. Muscle hypertrophy was assessed on a whole-body (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), limb (computed tomography scan), and muscle fiber (muscle biopsy specimen) level before and after exercise training. Strength was assessed regularly by 1-repetition maximum strength testing. Muscle strength increased after resistance exercise training to a significantly greater extent in the protein-supplemented (PRO) group than in the placebo-supplemented (PLA) group (+164 ± 11 kg and +130 ± 9 kg, respectively; P exercise training (P sleep represents an effective dietary strategy to augment muscle mass and strength gains during resistance exercise training in young men. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02222415. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  16. [Overweight and obesity in young adults: relevance of job-related changes of exercise on fat, lean body and body mass in students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmler, Wolfgang; Kohl, Matthias; Bebenek, Michael; von Stengel, Simon

    2015-03-01

    Early adulthood is related to changes in lifestyle that negatively affect body weight and health. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of exercise changes on the development of weight and body composition in college students.Sixty-one randomly selected dental (ZMS) and 53 sport students (SLS) were accompanied over 5 years. Body mass, fat and lean body mass (LBM) were determined via DXA-technique. Exercise and physical activity were assessed by questionnaires and interviews.All exercise indices significantly increased in the SLS and significantly decreased in the ZMS. Physical activity slightly increased in both groups. Both cohorts comparably gained body mass, however, the increase in the SLS group can be attributed to LBM-changes with minor changes of fat-mass (2.4 % ± 3.3 % vs. 0.1 ± 1.0 %) whereas ZMS gained fat and LBM in a proportion of 2:1.Maintenance/increase of exercise compensate the negative effects of lifestyle changes on body composition during young adulthood.

  17. Body mass index trajectories in young adulthood predict non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in middle age: The CARDIA cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanWagner, Lisa B; Khan, Sadiya S; Ning, Hongyan; Siddique, Juned; Lewis, Cora E; Carr, John J; Vos, Miriam B; Speliotes, Elizabeth; Terrault, Norah A; Rinella, Mary E; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Allen, Norrina B

    2018-04-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is an epidemic. Identifying modifiable risk factors for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease development is essential to design effective prevention programmes. We tested whether 25-year patterns of body mass index change are associated with midlife non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In all, 4423 participants from Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults, a prospective population-based biracial cohort (age 18-30), underwent body mass index measurement at baseline (1985-1986) and 3 or more times over 25 years. At Year 25, 3115 had liver fat assessed by non-contrast computed tomography. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease was defined as liver attenuation ≤40 Hounsfield Units after exclusions. Latent mixture modelling identified 25-year trajectories in body mass index per cent change (%Δ) from baseline. We identified four distinct trajectories of BMI%Δ: stable (26.2% of cohort, 25-year BMI %Δ = 3.1%), moderate increase (46.0%, BMI%Δ = 21.7%), high increase (20.9%, BMI%Δ = 41.9%) and extreme increase (6.9%, BMI%Δ = 65.9%). Y25 non-alcoholic fatty liver disease prevalence was higher in groups with greater BMI %Δ: 4.1%, 9.3%, 13.0%, and 17.6%, respectively (P-trend non-alcoholic fatty liver disease compared to the stable group: OR: 3.35 (95% CI: 2.07-5.42), 7.80 (4.60-13.23) and 12.68 (6.68-24.09) for moderate, high and extreme body mass index increase, respectively. Associations were only moderately attenuated when adjusted for baseline or Y25 body mass index. Trajectories of weight gain during young adulthood are associated with greater non-alcoholic fatty liver disease prevalence in midlife independent of metabolic covariates and baseline or concurrent body mass index highlighting the importance of weight maintenance throughout adulthood as a target for primary non-alcoholic fatty liver disease prevention. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Kinematics of a Young Low-mass Star-forming Core: Understanding the Evolutionary State of the First-core Candidate L1451-mm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maureira, María José; Arce, Héctor G. [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Dunham, Michael M. [Department of Physics, State University of New York at Fredonia, Fredonia, NY 14063 (United States); Pineda, Jaime E. [Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fernández-López, Manuel [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía, CCT-La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894, Villa Elisa (Argentina); Chen, Xuepeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2 West Beijing Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Mardones, Diego, E-mail: mariajose.maureira@yale.edu, E-mail: hector.arce@yale.edu [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2017-03-20

    We use 3 mm multiline and continuum CARMA observations toward the first hydrostatic core (FHSC) candidate L1451-mm to characterize the envelope kinematics at 1000 au scales and investigate its evolutionary state. We detect evidence of infall and rotation in the NH{sub 2}D(1{sub 1,1}–1{sub 0,1}), N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1–0), and HCN(1–0) molecular lines. We compare the position–velocity diagram of the NH{sub 2}D(1{sub 1,1}–1{sub 0,1}) line with a simple kinematic model and find that it is consistent with an envelope that is both infalling and rotating while conserving angular momentum around a central mass of about 0.06 M {sub ⊙}. The N{sub 2}H{sup +}(1–0) LTE mass of the envelope along with the inferred infall velocity leads to a mass infall rate of approximately 6 × 10{sup −6} M {sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}, implying a young age of 10{sup 4} years for this FHSC candidate. Assuming that the accretion onto the central object is the same as the infall rate, we obtain a minimum source size of 1.5–5 au, consistent with the size expected for a first core. We do not see any evidence of outflow motions or signs of outflow–envelope interaction at scales ≳2000 au. This is consistent with previous observations that revealed a very compact outflow (≲500 au). We conclude that L1451-mm is indeed at a very early stage of evolution, either a first core or an extremely young Class 0 protostar. Our results provide strong evidence that L1451-mm is the best candidate for being a bona fide first core.

  19. Body mass index in young school-age children in relation to organochlorine compounds in early life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, B B; Ramlau-Hansen, C H; Henriksen, T B

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between maternal pregnancy and estimated postnatal serum concentrations of the organochlorines 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (CB-153) and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (p,p'-DDE) and body mass index (BMI) z-scores in 5- to 9-year-old ch...

  20. Systematic review of the design, implementation and effectiveness of mass media and nutrition education interventions for infant and young child feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziose, Matthew M; Downs, Shauna M; O'Brien, Quentin; Fanzo, Jessica

    2018-02-01

    To systematically review the design, implementation and effectiveness of mass media and nutrition education interventions for improving infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices and related psychosocial factors. A search of PubMed, Embase and PsycINFO databases, a Google search, and a consultation with experts in the field of IYCF performed in July 2016. Low- and middle-income countries, as defined by the World Bank Group. Eligible studies: included a mass media component (with or without nutrition education); conducted a pre-post evaluation (with or without a control group); assessed IYCF knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and/or practices; and were published in English between 2000 and present. Eighteen unique studies were identified that examined the effect of mass media (types included: television; print; voice and/or SMS (text) messages; radio; megaphones/loudspeakers; videos; social media; songs/dramas) and nutrition education interventions on IYCF practices within thirteen countries. Of these, fifteen studies reported improvements in breast- and/or complementary feeding practices, using indicators recommended by the WHO, and six studies reported improvements in related psychosocial factors. However, little detail was provided on the use of formative research, a formal behaviour change theory and behaviour change techniques. Few studies reported both dose delivered and participants' exposure to the intervention. Despite evidence of effectiveness, few common elements in the design of interventions were identified. Future research should consistently report these details to open the 'black box' of IYCF interventions, identify effective design components and ensure replicability.

  1. Mobile communication and intermediality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helles, Rasmus

    2013-01-01

    The article argues the importance of intermediality as a concept for research in mobile communication and media. The constant availability of several, partially overlapping channels for communication (texting, calls, email, Facebook, etc.) requires that we adopt an integrated view of the various...

  2. an intermediate moisture meat

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bunmi

    Matured leaves of Ocimum gratissimum were harvested and the extracts used to cure. Suya (an intermediate moisture meat). O. gratissimum leaves were collected from. Oyo state south west region of Nigeria, rinsed in distilled water and squeezed to extract the fluid. The meat used was Semi membranosus muscle from beef ...

  3. Determinants of bone mass and bone size in a large cohort of physically active young adult men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garrett P

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The determinants of bone mineral density (BMD at multiple sites were examined in a fit college population. Subjects were 755 males (mean age = 18.7 years entering the United States Military Academy. A questionnaire assessed exercise frequency and milk, caffeine, and alcohol consumption and tobacco use. Academy staff measured height, weight, and fitness. Calcaneal BMD was measured by peripheral dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (pDXA. Peripheral-quantitative computed tomography (pQCT was used to measure tibial mineral content, circumference and cortical thickness. Spine and hip BMD were measured by DXA in a subset (n = 159. Mean BMD at all sites was approximately one standard deviation above young normal (p

  4. Free leucine supplementation during an 8-week resistance training program does not increase muscle mass and strength in untrained young adult subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Andreo Fernando; Grala, Alan Pablo; da Silva, Rubens Alexandre; Soares-Caldeira, Lúcio Flávio; Pacagnelli, Francis Lopes; Ribeiro, Alex Silva; da Silva, Douglas Kratki; de Andrade, Walquíria Batista; Balvedi, Mario Carlos Welin

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of free leucine supplementation on changes in skeletal muscle mass and strength during a resistance training (RT) program in previously untrained, young subjects. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 20 healthy young (22 ± 2 years) participants were assigned to two groups: a placebo-supplement group (PLA, N = 10) or a leucine-supplement group (LEU, N = 10). Both groups underwent an 8-week hypertrophic RT program (2 days/week), consuming an equivalent amount of leucine (3.0 g/day in a single post-training dose) or placebo (cornstarch). Quadriceps muscle strength, cross-sectional area (CSA) of the vastus lateralis (VL), and rectus femoris (RF), as well as the habitual dietary intake were assessed before and after the 8-week intervention period. There was a similar improvement in muscle strength (Leg press, LEU: +33% vs. PLA: +37%; P > 0.05, and knee extension, LEU: +31% vs. PLA: 34%; P > 0.05) and CSA (VL, LEU: 8.9% vs. PLA: 9.6%; P > 0.05, and RF, LEU: +21.6% vs. PLA: + 16.4%; P > 0.05) in the both groups from pre- to post-training. In addition, there was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in daily dietary intake between the LEU and PLA groups before and after the intervention period. Free leucine supplementation (3.0 g/day post-training) does not increase muscle strength or CSA during RT in healthy young subjects consuming adequate dietary protein intake.

  5. Infalling young clusters in the Galactic Centre: implications for IMBHs and young stellar populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petts, J. A.; Gualandris, A.

    2017-06-01

    The central parsec of the Milky Way hosts two puzzlingly young stellar populations, a tight isotropic distribution of B stars around SgrA* (the S-stars) and a disc of OB stars extending to ˜0.5 pc. Using a modified version of Sverre Aarseth's direct summation code nbody6, we explore the scenario in which a young star cluster migrates to the Galactic Centre within the lifetime of the OB disc population via dynamical friction. We find that star clusters massive and dense enough to reach the central parsec form a very massive star via physical collisions on a mass segregation time-scale. We follow the evolution of the merger product using the most up to date, yet conservative, mass-loss recipes for very massive stars. Over a large range of initial conditions, we find that the very massive star expels most of its mass via a strong stellar wind, eventually collapsing to form a black hole of mass ˜ 20-400 M⊙, incapable of bringing massive stars to the Galactic Centre. No massive intermediate mass black hole can form in this scenario. The presence of a star cluster in the central ˜10 pc within the last 15 Myr would also leave an ˜2 pc ring of massive stars, which is not currently observed. Thus, we conclude that the star cluster migration model is highly unlikely to be the origin of either young population, and in situ formation models or binary disruptions are favoured.

  6. Extreme CO Isotopic Abundances in the ULIRG IRAS 13120-5453: An Extremely Young Starburst or Top-heavy Initial Mass Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sliwa, Kazimierz [MPI for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wilson, Christine D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Aalto, Susanne [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala Space Observatory, SE-439 94 Onsala (Sweden); Privon, George C., E-mail: sliwa@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Instituto de Astrofśica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile)

    2017-05-10

    We present ALMA {sup 12}CO (J = 1-0, 3-2 and 6-5), {sup 13}CO (J = 1-0), and C{sup 18}O (J = 1-0) observations of the local ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) IRAS 13120-5453. The morphologies of the three isotopic species differ, as {sup 13}CO shows a hole in emission toward the center. We measure integrated brightness temperature line ratios of {sup 12}CO/{sup 13}CO ≥ 60 (exceeding 200) and {sup 13}CO/C{sup 18}O ≤ 1 in the central region. Assuming optical thin emission, C{sup 18}O is more abundant than {sup 13}CO in several regions. The abundances within the central 500 pc are consistent with the enrichment of the interstellar medium via a young starburst (<7 Myr), a top-heavy initial mass function, or a combination of both.

  7. Two dopaminergic genes, DRD4 and SLC6A3, are associated with body mass index in a Colombian sample of young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; Trujillo, Martha L; Forero, Diego A

    2017-11-16

    Obesity is becoming an epidemic in Latin American countries. Genetic analyses of endophenotypes for obesity, such as body mass index (BMI), are quite useful for research. In this study, we analysed two functional polymorphisms in the dopamine receptor 4 (DRD4) and dopamine transporter (SLC6A3) genes. A sample of 232 Colombian young subjects were recruited and evaluated for BMI. Two functional polymorphisms in the DRD4 and SLC6A3 and genes were genotyped by PCR and electrophoresis. A significant association was found between BMI and the polymorphisms in DRD4 and SLC6A3 genes. DRD4 4/4 genotype was associated with a lower mean BMI and SLC6A3 10/10 genotype was associated with a higher mean BMI. Our work provides additional novel findings about the association of dopaminergic genes with BMI in healthy young adults. In addition, our study is one the first analyses of candidate genes for BMI in Latin American samples.

  8. THE YOUNG OPEN CLUSTER BERKELEY 55

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negueruela, Ignacio; Marco, Amparo, E-mail: ignacio.negueruela@ua.es, E-mail: amparo.marco@ua.es [Departamento de Fisica, Ingenieria de Sistemas y Teoria de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, Apdo. 99, E-03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2012-02-15

    We present UBV photometry of the highly reddened and poorly studied open cluster Berkeley 55, revealing an important population of B-type stars and several evolved stars of high luminosity. Intermediate-resolution far-red spectra of several candidate members confirm the presence of one F-type supergiant and six late supergiants or bright giants. The brightest blue stars are mid-B giants. Spectroscopic and photometric analyses indicate an age 50 {+-} 10 Myr. The cluster is located at a distance d Almost-Equal-To 4 kpc, consistent with other tracers of the Perseus Arm in this direction. Berkeley 55 is thus a moderately young open cluster with a sizable population of candidate red (super)giant members, which can provide valuable information about the evolution of intermediate-mass stars.

  9. A comprehensive study of the young open star cluster NGC 6611 based on deep VRI CCD images and 2MASS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.M. Selim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have used Deep CCD images of the extremely young open star cluster NGC 6611, up to a limiting magnitude of V ∼ 22.86 mag in V, R and I passbands. The resulting color-magnitude V; (V–I diagram as well as their radial density profiles has been determined. Using 2MASS data, we confirmed the consistency between the 2MASS photometry, by fitting isochrones, the extinction E(V–I = 0.530 ± 0.04 mag, E(J–H = 0.31 ± 0.02, from the color magnitude diagram the cluster distance =2.2 ± 0.21 kpc and age = 3.6 Myr, based on the fitting of theoretical stellar isochrones of solar metallicity Z = 0.019. The distance modulus of the cluster is estimated at 12.3. The radial stellar density profiles and the cluster center have been determined by two methods. The core and cluster radii are determined from the radial stellar density profiles. Only about 40% of the cluster members are present in the core region. The cluster luminosity function has been calculated. The mass function slope of the entire cluster is ∼−0.67 ± 0.12. The effects of mass segregation, most probably due to dynamical evolution, have been observed in the cluster.

  10. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C.; et al.

    2015-03-23

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  11. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, C.; Ankowski, A.M.; Asaadi, J.A.; Ashenfelter, J.; Axani, S.N.; Babu, K.; Backhouse, C.; Band, H.R.; Barbeau, P.S.; Barros, N.; Bernstein, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bishai, M.; Blucher, E.; Bouffard, J.; Bowden, N.; Brice, S.; Bryan, C.; Camilleri, L.; Cao, J.; Carlson, J.; Carr, R.E.; Chatterjee, A.; Chen, M.; Chen, S.; Chiu, M.; Church, E.D.; Collar, J.I.; Collin, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Convery, M.R.; Cooper, R.L.; Cowen, D.; Davoudiasl, H.; de Gouvea, A.; Dean, D.J.; Deichert, G.; Descamps, F.; DeYoung, T.; Diwan, M.V.; Djurcic, Z.; Dolinski, M.J.; Dolph, J.; Donnelly, B.; Dwyer, D.A.; Dytman, S.; Efremenko, Y.; Everett, L.L.; Fava, A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Fleming, B.; Friedland, A.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Gaisser, T.K.; Galeazzi, M.; Galehouse, D.C.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Garvey, G.T.; Gautam, S.; Gilje, K.E.; Gonzalez-Garcia, M.; Goodman, M.C.; Gordon, H.; Gramellini, E.; Green, M.P.; Guglielmi, A.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Hackenburg, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Harris, D.; Heeger, K.M.; Herman, M.; Hill, R.; Holin, A.; Huber, P.; Jaffe, D.E.; Johnson, R.A.; Joshi, J.; Karagiorgi, G.; Kaufman, L.J.; Kayser, B.; Kettell, S.H.; Kirby, B.J.; Klein, J.R.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kriske, R.M.; Lane, C.E.; Langford, T.J.; Lankford, A.; Lau, K.; Learned, J.G.; Ling, J.; Link, J.M.; Lissauer, D.; Littenberg, L.; Littlejohn, B.R.; Lockwitz, S.; Lokajicek, M.; Louis, W.C.; Luk, K.; Lykken, J.; Marciano, W.J.; Maricic, J.; Markoff, D.M.; Martinez Caicedo, D.A.; Mauger, C.; Mavrokoridis, K.; McCluskey, E.; McKeen, D.; McKeown, R.; Mills, G.; Mocioiu, I.; Monreal, B.; Mooney, M.R.; Morfin, J.G.; Mumm, P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Nelson, J.K.; Nessi, M.; Norcini, D.; Nova, F.; Nygren, D.R.; Orebi Gann, G.D.; Palamara, O.; Parsa, Z.; Patterson, R.; Paul, P.; Pocar, A.; Qian, X.; Raaf, J.L.; Rameika, R.; Ranucci, G.; Ray, H.; Reyna, D.; Rich, G.C.; Rodrigues, P.; Romero, E.Romero; Rosero, R.; Rountree, S.D.; Rybolt, B.; Sanchez, M.C.; Santucci, G.; Schmitz, D.; Scholberg, K.; Seckel, D.; Shaevitz, M.; Shrock, R.; Smy, M.B.; Soderberg, M.; Sonzogni, A.; Sousa, A.B.; Spitz, J.; St. John, J.M.; Stewart, J.; Strait, J.B.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Szelc, A.M.; Tayloe, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Toups, M.; Vacheret, A.; Vagins, M.; Van de Water, R.G.; Vogelaar, R.B.; Weber, M.; Weng, W.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; White, B.R.; Whitehead, L.; Whittington, D.W.; Wilking, M.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Wilson, P.; Winklehner, D.; Winn, D.R.; Worcester, E.; Yang, L.; Yeh, M.; Yokley, Z.W.; Yoo, J.; Yu, B.; Yu, J.; Zhang, C.

    2015-01-01

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

  12. The Intermediate Neutrino Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Alonso, J. R. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ankowski, A. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Asaadi, J. A. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Ashenfelter, J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Axani, S. N. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Babu, K [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Backhouse, C. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Band, H. R. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Barbeau, P. S. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Barros, N. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Betancourt, M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bishai, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blucher, E. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Bouffard, J. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Albany, NY (United States); Bowden, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brice, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Bryan, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Camilleri, L. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Cao, J. [Inst. of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Carlson, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carr, R. E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Chatterjee, A. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Chen, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Chen, S. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Chiu, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Church, E. D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Collar, J. I. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Collin, G. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Conrad, J. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Convery, M. R. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cooper, R. L. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Cowen, D. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Davoudiasl, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gouvea, A. D. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Dean, D. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Deichert, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Descamps, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeYoung, T. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Diwan, M. V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Djurcic, Z. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dolinski, M. J. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Dolph, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Donnelly, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Dwyer, D. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Dytman, S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Efremenko, Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Everett, L. L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Fava, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Figueroa-Feliciano, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Fleming, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Friedland, A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fujikawa, B. K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Gaisser, T. K. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Galeazzi, M. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States); Galehouse, DC [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Garvey, G. T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gautam, S. [Tribhuvan Univ., Kirtipur (Nepal); Gilje, K. E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gonzalez-Garcia, M. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Goodman, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gordon, H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gramellini, E. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Green, M. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guglielmi, A. [University of Padua, Padova (Italy); Hackenburg, R. W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hackenburg, A. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Halzen, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Han, K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hans, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Harris, D. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Heeger, K. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Herman, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hill, R. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Holin, A. [Univ. College London, Bloomsbury (United Kingdom); Huber, P. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Jaffe, D. E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Johnson, R. A. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Joshi, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karagiorgi, G. [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Kaufman, L. J. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Kayser, B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Kettell, S. H. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kirby, B. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Klein, J. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Kolomensky, Y. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kriske, R. M. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Lane, C. E. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Langford, T. J. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Lankford, A. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Lau, K. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Learned, J. G. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Ling, J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Link, J. M. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Lissauer, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littenberg, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Littlejohn, B. R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lockwitz, S. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Lokajicek, M. [Inst. of Physics of the Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic); Louis, W. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Luk, K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lykken, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Marciano, W. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maricic, J. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Markoff, D. M. [North Carolina Central Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Caicedo, D. A. M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mauger, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mavrokoridis, K. [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom); McCluskey, E. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); McKeen, D. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); McKeown, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Mills, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mocioiu, I. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Monreal, B. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mooney, M. R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Morfin, J. G. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Mumm, P. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States); Napolitano, J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Neilson, R. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nelson, J. K. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Nessi, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Norcini, D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Nova, F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Nygren, D. R. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Gann, GDO [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Palamara, O. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Parsa, Z. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Patterson, R. [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Paul, P. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Pocar, A. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Qian, X. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raaf, J. L. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Rameika, R. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ranucci, G. [National Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Milano (Italy); Ray, H. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Reyna, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rich, G. C. [Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC (United States); Rodrigues, P. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Romero, E. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Rosero, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Rountree, S. D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Rybolt, B. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Sanchez, M. C. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Santucci, G. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Schmitz, D. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Scholberg, K. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States); Seckel, D. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States); Shaevitz, M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Shrock, R. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Smy, M. B. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Soderberg, M. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States); Sonzogni, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Sousa, A. B. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Spitz, J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); John, J. M. S. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Stewart, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Strait, J. B. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Sullivan, G. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Svoboda, R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Szelc, A. M. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Tayloe, R. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Thomson, M. A. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Toups, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Vacheret, A. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Vagins, M. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Water, R. G. V. D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogelaar, R. B. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Weber, M. [Bern (Switzerland); Weng, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wetstein, M. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); White, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); White, B. R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitehead, L. [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Whittington, D. W. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Wilking, M. J. [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Wilson, R. J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Wilson, P. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Winklehner, D. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Winn, D. R. [Fairfield Univ., CT (United States); Worcester, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yang, L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Yeh, M [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yokley, Z. W. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States); Yoo, J. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Yu, J. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Zhang, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-04-03

    The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

  13. Intermediate energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.; Fukahori, T.; Hasegawa, A.

    1998-01-01

    Subgroup 13 (SG13) on Intermediate Energy Nuclear data was formed by NEA Nuclear Science Committee to solve common problems of these types of data for nuclear applications. An overview is presented in this final report of the present activities of SG13, including data needs, high-priority nuclear data request list (nuclides), compilation of experimental data, specialists meetings and benchmarks, data formats and data libraries. Some important accomplishments are summarized, and recommendations are presented. (R.P.)

  14. STELLAR MASS DEPENDENT DISK DISPERSAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    We use published optical spectral and infrared (IR) excess data from nine young clusters and associations to study the stellar mass dependent dispersal of circumstellar disks. All clusters older than ∼3 Myr show a decrease in disk fraction with increasing stellar mass for solar to higher mass stars. This result is significant at about the 1σ level in each cluster. For the complete set of clusters we reject the null hypothesis-that solar and intermediate-mass stars lose their disks at the same rate-with 95%-99.9% confidence. To interpret this behavior, we investigate the impact of grain growth, binary companions, and photoevaporation on the evolution of disk signatures. Changes in grain growth timescales at fixed disk temperature may explain why early-type stars with IR excesses appear to evolve faster than their later-type counterparts. Little evidence that binary companions affect disk evolution suggests that photoevaporation is the more likely mechanism for disk dispersal. A simple photoevaporation model provides a good fit to the observed disk fractions for solar and intermediate-mass stars. Although the current mass-dependent disk dispersal signal is not strong, larger and more complete samples of clusters with ages of 3-5 Myr can improve the significance and provide better tests of theoretical models. In addition, the orbits of extra-solar planets can constrain models of disk dispersal and migration. We suggest that the signature of stellar mass dependent disk dispersal due to photoevaporation may be present in the orbits of observed extra-solar planets. Planets orbiting hosts more massive than ∼1.6 M sun may have larger orbits because the disks in which they formed were dispersed before they could migrate.

  15. Blinded by the light: on the relationship between CO first overtone emission and mass accretion rate in massive young stellar objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilee, J. D.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Wheelwright, H. E.; Pomohaci, R.

    2018-04-01

    To date, there is no explanation as to why disc-tracing CO first overtone (or `bandhead') emission is not a ubiquitous feature in low- to medium-resolution spectra of massive young stellar objects, but instead is only detected toward approximately 25 per cent of their spectra. In this paper, we investigate the hypothesis that only certain mass accretion rates result in detectable bandhead emission in the near infrared spectra of MYSOs. Using an analytic disc model combined with an LTE model of the CO emission, we find that high accretion rates (≳ 10-4 M⊙yr-1) result in large dust sublimation radii, a larger contribution to the K-band continuum from hot dust at the dust sublimation radius, and therefore correspondingly lower CO emission with respect to the continuum. On the other hand, low accretion rates (≲ 10-6 M⊙yr-1) result in smaller dust sublimation radii, a correspondingly smaller emitting area of CO, and thus also lower CO emission with respect to the continuum. In general, moderate accretion rates produce the most prominent, and therefore detectable, CO first overtone emission. We compare our findings to a recent near-infrared spectroscopic survey of MYSOs, finding results consistent with our hypothesis. We conclude that the detection rate of CO bandhead emission in the spectra of MYSOs could be the result of MYSOs exhibiting a range of mass accretion rates, perhaps due to the variable accretion suggested by recent multi-epoch observations of these objects.

  16. Effect of drinking water supplementation with phyto-additives (horseradish, dog-rose, French tamarisk and grapes on body mass in young rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Iuliana Bohatâr

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to carry out the experiment, we made 5 hybrid rabbit groups (each one consisted of 5 individuals, homogenous in terms of age and body development, bred in cages of wire gauze. The control group was offered simple drinking water, and the other groups were offered drinking water supplemented with extracts of horseradish, dog-rose, French tamarisk and grape seeds. In each cage, we placed a stainless steel feeder for the administration of granulated forage and a plastic water supplier (300 ml capacity. During the experiment, we determined the granulated forage intake (150 g/individual/day and the weekly body mass (between 35-105 days. At the end of the experiment, the biggest mean body mass was observed in the young rabbits that used to drink water with horseradish extract (3172±377 g, followed by those with French tamarisk (3046±162 g, dog-rose (2949±366 g and finally by the rabbits that drank grape extract (2888±250 g. Along the 10 experimental weeks, the control group recorded significant differences (p<0.05 and distinctly significant (p<0.01 inferior to the experimental groups which were offered extracts of dog-rose, French tamarisk, horseradish and grapes.

  17. Children and young people who are refugees, internally displaced persons or survivors or perpetrators of war, mass violence and terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, John; Williams, Richard

    2012-07-01

    This article draws upon articles published since 2009 to identify research evidence about the psychosocial aspects of children and young people's responses to their exposure to war, collective violence and terrorism. Recent research describes children's distress and the disorders they may develop consequent on their direct and indirect exposure to war. This article covers general responses as well as those that affect refugees, displaced children, and child soldiers. Dose of exposure is the main predictor of their degree of distress. Often, loss of parental support predicts distress or disorder. Research on children who are refugees and internally displaced persons has found that they cope better with the distressing events surrounding their flight if their parents accompany them. Studies of child soldiers show that they suffer from guilt as well as experiencing many violent distressing events. Research has identified the factors that contribute to their resilience, which include their acceptance by the communities to which they return. There are personal and social sources of resilience, including emotion regulation, parenting, and social support, for children who are exposed to war. Much of the recent research confirms earlier findings, which demonstrate that their exposure to war and collective violence leads to distress for many children and/or mental disorders for a smaller but substantial minority of them. The literature shows interest in identifying and measuring protective factors. The emphasis in the articles we reviewed on social as well as personal factors that confer psychosocial resilience reflects the broad interest in the two canons of literature on children's development and disasters. The findings point powerfully to people's needs for holistic and community-level interventions.

  18. All cause mortality and body mass index in a young Asian occupational cohort without baseline metabolic syndrome components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Ki-Chul; Ryu, Seungho; Lee, Jong-Young; Lee, SungHo; Cheong, EunSun; Kim, Jang-Young; Wild, Sarah H; Byrne, Christopher D

    2016-12-01

    The aim was to investigate associations between underweight, overweight and obesity and all cause, cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality, excluding subjects with known CVD, diabetes, hypertension and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) at baseline. The study population consisted of examinees participating in a health screening in Korea from 2002 to 2013. Data were analyzed in 162,194 subjects (in a retrospective cohort study design-median (interquartile range (IQR) follow-up 4.9 (1.8-8.5years))). The outcomes were all cause mortality, cancer and CVD. The mean (age range) and median age (IQR) at baseline were 36.9(20.0-85.3) and 35.2 (30.8-40.6) years. There were 436 deaths during follow-up. For men and women together, the fully adjusted HR for underweight and all cause mortality, cancer and CVD was 1.53 (95% CIs 1.06-2.20), 1.21 (95% CIs 0.68-2.14) and 1.34 (95% CIs 0.40-4.49) respectively. In contrast, the fully adjusted HR for overweight/obesity combined and all cause mortality was 0.77 (95%CIs 0.63-0.95) and there were non significant trends towards decreased cancer and CVD mortality. The association between overweight/obesity and all cause mortality was similar for men and women considered separately and for overweight and obesity as separate BMI categories. Smoking did not seem to explain the increased HR in the underweight BMI category. In a young metabolically healthy adult cohort, underweight was associated with increased all cause mortality and overweight/obesity was associated with decreased all cause mortality if CVD, diabetes, hypertension and components of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) are excluded. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Runaway stars from young star clusters containing initial binaries. I. Equal-mass, equal-energy binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, P.J.T.; Duncan, M.J.

    1988-07-01

    The production of runaway stars by the dynamical-ejection mechanism in an open star cluster containing 50 percent binaries of equal mass and energy is investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations using the NBODY5 code of Aarseth (1985). The construction of the models is outlined, and the results are presented graphically and characterized in detail. It is shown that binary-binary collisions capable of producing runaways can occur (via formation and disruption, with some stellar collisions, of hierarchical double binaries) in clusters of relatively low density (e.g., pc-sized clusters of O or B stars). The frequency of binaries in the runaway population is found to vary between 0 and 50 percent, with the majority of runaways being unevolved early-type stars. 38 references.

  20. Antibiotic Resistance in Young Children in Kilosa District, Tanzania 4 Years after Mass Distribution of Azithromycin for Trachoma Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Evan M; West, Sheila K; Mabula, Kasubi; Weaver, Jerusha; Mrango, Zakayo; Munoz, Beatriz; Lietman, Thomas; Coles, Christian

    2017-09-01

    Mass administration of azithromycin (MDA) is integral to trachoma control. Recent studies suggest that MDA may increase drug-resistant pathogens, yet findings from prior studies suggest little long-term impact on resistance. This disparity may be linked to differences in pre-MDA community-level resistance patterns. We describe carriage prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns for Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) (nasopharyngeal swab collection), Staphylococcus aureus (SA) (nasopharyngeal swabs), and Escherichia coli (EC) (rectal swabs) in 1,047 children ages 1-59 months in a district with MDA cessation 4 years ago. Antibiotic susceptibility was evaluated by disk diffusion and Etest. The carriage rates for Spn, SA, and EC were 43.5% (455/1,047), 13.2% (138/1,047), and 61.7% (646/1,047), respectively. Resistance to AZM was observed in 14.3%, 29.0%, and 16.6% of the Spn, SA, and EC isolates, respectively. Spn resistance was variable (0-67%) by hamlet. Future analyses will assess the influence of pre-MDA antibiotic resistance patterns on those observed following MDA.

  1. No meaningful association of neighborhood food store availability with dietary intake, body mass index, or waist circumference in young Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Kentaro; Sasaki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Yoshiko; Uenishi, Kazuhiro

    2010-08-01

    The affordability of food is considered as an important factor influencing people's diet and hence health status. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis that neighborhood food store availability is associated with some aspects of dietary intake and thus possibly with body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in young Japanese women. Subjects were 989 female Japanese dietetic students 18 to 22 years of age. Neighborhood food store availability was defined as the number of food stores within a 0.5-mile (0.8-km) radius of residence (meat stores, fish stores, fruit and vegetable stores, confectionery stores/bakeries, rice stores, convenience stores, and supermarkets/grocery stores). Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, comprehensive self-administered diet history questionnaire. No association was seen between any measure of neighborhood food store availability and dietary intake, except for a positive association between confectionery and bread availability (based on confectionery stores/bakeries, convenience stores, and supermarkets/grocery stores) and intake of these items (P for trend = .02). Further, no association was seen for BMI or waist circumference, except for an inverse relationship between availability of convenience stores and BMI and a positive relationship between store availability for meat (meat stores and supermarkets/grocery stores) and fish (fish stores and supermarkets/grocery stores) and waist circumference. In conclusion, this study of young Japanese women found no meaningful association between neighborhood food store availability and dietary intake, BMI, or waist circumference, with the exception of a positive relationship between availability and intake for confectionery and bread. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Body mass index in young adulthood and suicidal behavior up to age 59 in a cohort of Swedish men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma Sörberg

    Full Text Available An association of higher body mass index (BMI with lower risk of attempted and completed suicide has been reported. In contrast, increasing BMI has been found to be associated with depression and other risk factors for suicidal behavior. We aimed to investigate this possible paradox in a cohort comprising 49 000 Swedish men. BMI, mental health, lifestyle and socioeconomic measures were recorded at conscription in 1969-70, at ages 18-20. Information on attempted suicide 1973-2008 and completed suicide 1971-2008 was obtained from national records. Hazard ratios (HR were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models. We found that each standard deviation (SD increase in BMI was associated with a 12% lower risk of later suicide attempt (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.83-0.94. Associations were somewhat weaker for completed suicide and did not reach conventional levels of statistical significance (HR 0.93, 95% CI 0.85-1.01. Adjustment for a wide range of possible confounding factors had little effect on the associations. Lower BMI at conscription was also associated with higher prevalence of psychiatric diagnoses, low emotional control and depressed mood. Our results confirm previous findings regarding the association of higher BMI with a reduced risk of suicide, extending them to show similar findings in relation to suicide attempts. The associations were little affected by adjustment for a range of possible confounding factors. However, we found no evidence that high BMI was associated with an increased risk of depression cross-sectionally or longitudinally.

  3. Association of Oral Fat Sensitivity with Body Mass Index, Taste Preference, and Eating Habits in Healthy Japanese Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Masanobu; Hong, Guang; Matsuyama, Yusuke; Wang, Weiqi; Izumi, Satoshi; Izumi, Masayuki; Toda, Takashi; Kudo, Tada-Aki

    2016-02-01

    Oral fat sensitivity (OFS, the ability to detect fat) may be related to overeating-induced obesity. However, it is largely unknown whether OFS affects taste preference and eating habits. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate (1) the association between body mass index (BMI) and OFS and (2) the relationship of OFS with four types of taste preference (sweet, sour, salty, and bitter) and eating habits using serial concentrations of oleic acid (OA) homogenized in non-fat milk and a self-reported questionnaire. Participants were 25 healthy Japanese individuals (mean age: 27.0 ± 5.6 years), among whom the OA detection threshold was significantly associated with BMI. Participants were divided into two subgroups based on oral sensitivity to 2.8 mM OA: hypersensitive (able to detect 2.8 mM OA, n = 16) and hyposensitive (unable to detect 2.8 mM OA, n = 9). The degree of sweet taste preference of the hypersensitive group was significantly higher than that of the hyposensitive group. Furthermore, there was significantly higher degree of preference for high-fat sweet foods than low-fat sweet foods in the hypersensitive group. There was also a significant inverse correlation between the OA detection threshold and the degree of both spare eating and postprandial satiety. Thus, OFS is associated not only with BMI, but also with the preference for high-fat sweet foods and eating habits. The present study provides novel insights that measuring OFS may be useful for assessing the risk of obesity associated with overeating in countries, including Japan, where BMI is increasing in the population.

  4. Growing up in a domestic violence environment: relationship with developmental trajectories of body mass index during adolescence into young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Hee-Jin; Corliss, Heather L; Boynton-Jarrett, Renée; Spiegelman, Donna; Austin, S Bryn; Wright, Rosalind J

    2012-07-01

    This study investigated the relationship between growing up in a violent home and developmental trajectories of body mass index (BMI) in a cohort of adolescents followed longitudinally from 1996 to 2003-4. 6043 girls and 4934 boys aged 9-14 years in 1996 who reported height and weight at least two times and whose mothers completed intimate partner violence (IPV) questions at the 2001 Nurses' Health Study. Main exposure was experiencing the first family violence during early (0-5 years) or later (6-11 years) childhood, based on mother's year-specific exposure of IPV and the birth year of each participant. Mother's report of IPV was ascertained by the abuse assessment screen. Four distinct BMI trajectory groups were estimated from age-specific BMI (age 12-20 years), using general growth mixture modelling. Four distinct BMI trajectories were identified separately for girls and boys: healthy growth; healthy to obese; steady overweight and consistently obese. Compared with boys not exposed to violence at home, boys raised in violent homes before 5 years were at increased risk of being in the consistently obese (OR =2.0; 95% CI 1.2 to 3.5) and steady overweight (OR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1 to 1.9) groups after adjusting for confounders. Girls raised in violent homes were more likely to be in the steady overweight group, but associations did not maintain statistical significance after adjusting for confounding. These data link children's exposure to domestic violence to a risk of unhealthy weight trajectories during adolescence in boys. Detrimental effects of exposure to a domestic violence environment may take root in the first few years of development for boys.

  5. Population-based estimation of renal function in healthy young Indian adults based on body mass index and sex correlating renal volume, serum creatinine, and cystatin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajagopalan P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prashanth Rajagopalan,1 Georgi Abraham,2 Yuvaram NV Reddy,2 Ravivarman Lakshmanasami,1 ML Prakash,1 Yogesh NV Reddy2 1Department of General Medicine, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Puducherry, 2Department of Nephrology, Madras Medical Mission Hospital, Chennai, India Abstract: This population-based prospective study was undertaken in Mahatma Gandhi Medical College to estimate the renal function in young healthy Indian adults. A young healthy heterogeneous Indian cohort comprising 978 individuals, predominantly medical students, was assessed by a detailed questionnaire, and variables such as height, weight, body mass index (BMI, birth weight, and blood pressure were documented. Laboratory investigations included serum creatinine, serum cystatin C, blood sugar, urine protein, and imaging of the kidneys with ultrasound. The mean age of the cohort was 25±6 years, comprising 672 males and 306 females. The estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs by the Cockcroft–Gault formula for BMI <18.5 kg/m2, 18.5–24.99 kg/m2, 25–29.99 kg/m2, and ≥30 kg/m2 were 71.29±10.45 mL/min, 86.38±13.46 mL/min, 98.88±15.29 mL/min, and 109.13±21.57 mL/min, respectively; the eGFRs using cystatin C for the four groups of BMI were 84.53±18.14 mL/min, 84.01±40.11 mL/min, 79.18±13.46 mL/min, and 77.30±10.90 mL/min, respectively. This study attempts to establish a normal range of serum creatinine and cystatin C values for the Indian population and shows that in young healthy Indian adults, eGFR and kidney volume vary by BMI and sex. Keywords: eGFR, birth weight, renal volume

  6. Estimated GFR and Subsequent Higher Left Ventricular Mass in Young and Middle-Aged Adults With Normal Kidney Function: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Nisha; Lin, Feng; Vittinghoff, Eric; Peralta, Carmen; Lima, Joao; Kramer, Holly; Shlipak, Michael; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten

    2016-02-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy is common and is associated with cardiovascular events and death among patients with known chronic kidney disease. However, the link between reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) remains poorly explored among young and middle-aged adults with preserved kidney function. In this study, we examined the association of cystatin C-based estimated GFR (eGFRcys) and rapid decline in eGFR with subsequent LVMI. Observational study. We included 2,410 participants from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) cohort with eGFRcys > 60mL/min/1.73m(2) at year 15 and who had an echocardiogram obtained at year 25. eGFRcys at year 15 and rapid decline in eGFRcys (defined as >3% per year over 5 years from years 15 to 20). LVMI measured at year 25. We adjusted for age, sex, race, diabetes, body mass index, low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, cumulative systolic blood pressure, and albuminuria. Mean age was 40±4 (SD) years, 58% were women, and 43% were black. After 10 years of follow-up, mean LVMI was 39.6±13.4g/m(2.7). Compared with eGFRcys > 90mL/min/1.73m(2) (n = 2,228), eGFRcys of 60 to 75mL/min/1.73m(2) (n = 29) was associated with 5.63 (95% CI, 0.90-10.36) g/m(2.7) greater LVMI (P = 0.02), but there was no association of eGFRcys of 76 to 90mL/min/1.73m(2) (n = 153) with LVMI after adjustment for confounders. Rapid decline in eGFRcys was associated with higher LVMI compared with participants without a rapid eGFRcys decline (β coefficient, 1.48; 95% CI, 0.11-2.83; P = 0.03) after adjustment for confounders. There were a limited number of participants with eGFRcys of 60 to 90mL/min/1.73m(2). Among young and middle-aged adults with preserved kidney function, eGFRcys of 60 to 75mL/min/1.73m(2) and rapid decline in eGFRcys were significantly associated with subsequently higher LVMI. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanisms that contribute to elevated

  7. Stellar-mass black holes in young massive and open stellar clusters and their role in gravitational-wave generation - II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sambaran

    2018-01-01

    The study of stellar-remnant black holes (BH) in dense stellar clusters is now in the spotlight, especially due to their intrinsic ability to form binary black holes (BBH) through dynamical encounters, which potentially coalesce via gravitational-wave (GW) radiation. In this work, which is a continuation from a recent study (Paper I), additional models of compact stellar clusters with initial masses ≲ 105 M⊙ and also those with small fractions of primordial binaries (≲ 10 per cent) are evolved for long term, applying the direct N-body approach, assuming state-of-the-art stellar-wind and remnant-formation prescriptions. That way, a substantially broader range of computed models than that in Paper I is achieved. As in Paper I, the general-relativistic BBH mergers continue to be mostly mediated by triples that are bound to the clusters rather than happen among the ejected BBHs. In fact, the number of such in situ BBH mergers, per cluster, tends to increase significantly with the introduction of a small population of primordial binaries. Despite the presence of massive primordial binaries, the merging BBHs, especially the in situ ones, are found to be exclusively dynamically assembled and hence would be spin-orbit misaligned. The BBHs typically traverse through both the LISA's and the LIGO's detection bands, being audible to both instruments. The 'dynamical heating' of the BHs keeps the electron-capture-supernova (ECS) neutron stars (NS) from effectively mass segregating and participating in exchange interactions; the dynamically active BHs would also exchange into any NS binary within ≲1 Gyr. Such young massive and open clusters have the potential to contribute to the dynamical BBH merger detection rate to a similar extent as their more massive globular-cluster counterparts.

  8. BANYAN. IV. Fundamental parameters of low-mass star candidates in nearby young stellar kinematic groups—isochronal age determination using magnetic evolutionary models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malo, Lison; Doyon, René; Albert, Loïc; Lafrenière, David; Artigau, Étienne; Gagné, Jonathan [Département de physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Feiden, Gregory A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516, SE-751 20 Uppsala (Sweden); Riedel, Adric, E-mail: malo@cfht.hawaii.edu, E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Based on high-resolution optical spectra obtained with ESPaDOnS at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we determine fundamental parameters (T {sub eff}, R, L {sub bol}, log g, and metallicity) for 59 candidate members of nearby young kinematic groups. The candidates were identified through the BANYAN Bayesian inference method of Malo et al., which takes into account the position, proper motion, magnitude, color, radial velocity, and parallax (when available) to establish a membership probability. The derived parameters are compared to Dartmouth magnetic evolutionary models and field stars with the goal of constraining the age of our candidates. We find that, in general, low-mass stars in our sample are more luminous and have inflated radii compared to older stars, a trend expected for pre-main-sequence stars. The Dartmouth magnetic evolutionary models show a good fit to observations of field K and M stars, assuming a magnetic field strength of a few kG, as typically observed for cool stars. Using the low-mass members of the β Pictoris moving group, we have re-examined the age inconsistency problem between lithium depletion age and isochronal age (Hertzspring-Russell diagram). We find that the inclusion of the magnetic field in evolutionary models increases the isochronal age estimates for the K5V-M5V stars. Using these models and field strengths, we derive an average isochronal age between 15 and 28 Myr and we confirm a clear lithium depletion boundary from which an age of 26 ± 3 Myr is derived, consistent with previous age estimates based on this method.

  9. Bacterial intermediate filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charbon, Godefroid; Cabeen, M.; Jacobs-Wagner, C.

    2009-01-01

    Crescentin, which is the founding member of a rapidly growing family of bacterial cytoskeletal proteins, was previously proposed to resemble eukaryotic intermediate filament (IF) proteins based on structural prediction and in vitro polymerization properties. Here, we demonstrate that crescentin...... also shares in vivo properties of assembly and dynamics with IF proteins by forming stable filamentous structures that continuously incorporate subunits along their length and that grow in a nonpolar fashion. De novo assembly of crescentin is biphasic and involves a cell size-dependent mechanism...... a new function for MreB and providing a parallel to the role of actin in IF assembly and organization in metazoan cells. Additionally, analysis of an MreB localization mutant suggests that cell wall insertion during cell elongation normally occurs along two helices of opposite handedness, each...

  10. Wired at a young age: the effect of caffeine and technology on sleep duration and body mass index in school-aged children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamaro, Christina J; Yang, Kyeongra; Ratcliffe, Sarah; Chasens, Eileen R

    2012-01-01

    Two problems affecting school-aged children in the United States are inadequate sleep and an increased prevalence of obesity. The purpose of this study was to quantify media-related technology use and caffeine consumption in order to assess their potential effects on sleep duration and body mass index (BMI) in children. The study was a secondary analysis of children 6 to 10 years of age (N = 625) from the National Sleep Foundation's Sleep in America Poll. Regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between caffeine and technology use, sleep variables, and BMI, adjusting for age, race, gender, and general health. Almost 30% (29.5%) of the children consumed a daily caffeinated beverage, and 42.4% had a television in the bedroom. Children who drank caffeinated beverages had 15 fewer minutes of sleep per night than did children who did not drink such beverages (b = -0.27, p = .002). Children with three technology items in their bedroom received 45 fewer minutes of sleep than did children without these items in their bedroom (b = -0.75, p = .010). Having adjusted for variables, only drinking caffeinated beverages was associated with a BMI z score. The complex relationships between caffeine intake and the use of technology with shortened periods of sleep and increased BMI need further study. Future research should explore how these risk factors for shortened periods of sleep can be modified in this young population. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  11. The 2014-2017 outburst of the young star ASASSN-13db. A time-resolved picture of a very-low-mass star between EXors and FUors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicilia-Aguilar, A.; Oprandi, A.; Froebrich, D.; Fang, M.; Prieto, J. L.; Stanek, K.; Scholz, A.; Kochanek, C. S.; Henning, Th.; Gredel, R.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Rabus, M.; Shappee, B. J.; Billington, S. J.; Campbell-White, J.; Zegmott, T. J.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Accretion outbursts are key elements in star formation. ASASSN-13db is a M5-type star with a protoplanetary disk, the lowest-mass star known to experience accretion outbursts. Since its discovery in 2013, it has experienced two outbursts, the second of which started in November 2014 and lasted until February 2017. Aims: We explore the photometric and spectroscopic behavior of ASASSN-13db during the 2014-2017 outburst. Methods: We use high- and low-resolution spectroscopy and time-resolved photometry from the ASAS-SN survey, the LCOGT and the Beacon Observatory to study the light curve of ASASSN-13db and the dynamical and physical properties of the accretion flow. Results: The 2014-2017 outburst lasted for nearly 800 days. A 4.15 d period in the light curve likely corresponds to rotational modulation of a star with hot spot(s). The spectra show multiple emission lines with variable inverse P-Cygni profiles and a highly variable blue-shifted absorption below the continuum. Line ratios from metallic emission lines (Fe I/Fe II, Ti I/Ti II) suggest temperatures of 5800-6000 K in the accretion flow. Conclusions: Photometrically and spectroscopically, the 2014-2017 event displays an intermediate behavior between EXors and FUors. The accretion rate ([Ṁ]= 1-3 × 10-7 M⊙/yr), about two orders of magnitude higher than the accretion rate in quiescence, is not significantly different from the accretion rate observed in 2013. The absorption features in the spectra suggest that the system is viewed at a high angle and drives a powerful, non-axisymmetric wind, maybe related to magnetic reconnection. The properties of ASASSN-13db suggest that temperatures lower than those for solar-type stars are needed for modeling accretion in very-low-mass systems. Finally, the rotational modulation during the outburst reveals that accretion-related structures settle after the beginning of the outburst and can be relatively stable and long-lived. Our work also demonstrates the power

  12. HUBUNGAN INDEKS MASSA TUBUH DENGAN DENSITAS MINERAL TULANG PADA PEREMPUAN DEWASA MUDA (ASSOCIATION BETWEEN BODY MASS INDEX AND BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN YOUNG ADULT FEMALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Setyawati

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Body Mass Index (BMI is a good indicator for measurement of Bone Mineral Density (BMD, so it is often used to predict BMD. Objective: To assess the association between BMI and status of BMD among 242 young adult female who were 25-35 years of age and who underwent quantitative ultrasound bone densitometry (QUS scan. Method: We used data from the study on “Determinants of Risk Factors for Osteoporosis at three provinces in Indonesia” that was undertaken by the Center for Research and Development in Nutrition and Food, 2007. Design of the study was cross-sectional study. The dependent variable was BMD; the independent variable was BMI; and the confounding variables were: acceptors of hormonal contraception, physical exercises, calcium intake, ratio of Ca: P intake, consumptions of supplements, sources of phytoestrogen, fruits and vegetables. Result: Ca intake < 500 mg/day had a risk twice to low BMD than adequate Ca intake, the association was statistically significant (p<0.05. There are no association between BMI and BMD (p>0,05. Other variables as hormonal contraception, physical exercise, protein intake, Ca: P ratio intake, consumption of supplements source of phytoestrogen, fruits and vegetables have no association with BMD. Conclusion: There are no significant association between BMI and BMD. Calcium intake was the only risk factor for low BMD.   Keywords: osteoporosis, body mass index, bone mass density, bone density, young adult woman   ABSTRAK Latar Belakang: Indeks massa tubuh (IMT adalah indikator yang baik untuk pengukuran densitas mineral tulang (DMT. Tujuan: Mengkaji hubungan antara IMT dan status DMT pada perempuan dewasa muda usia 25-35 tahun. Metode: Data yang digunakan berasal dari penelitian ’Faktor Determinan Risiko Osteoporosis di Tiga Provinsi di Indonesia’ yang dilakukan Pusat Penelitain dan Pengembangan Gizi dan Makanan pada 2007. Penelitian ini merupakan studi observasional-analitis dengan

  13. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hylten, G.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  14. Intermediate Vector Boson

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keith Ulmer

    in a quantum field theory, there exists a massless scalar (spin-0) boson ... Do not know its mass. ❖. Production rate is very very low in comparison with other physics process, need. ➢. High luminosity,. ➢. High energy. ➢. High precision ..... Magnificent triumph of human thought and intelligence! But still strong interaction is ...

  15. application of chemometric methods to resolve intermediates formed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    APPLICATION OF CHEMOMETRIC METHODS TO RESOLVE INTERMEDIATES. FORMED DURING ... Chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry has been proved to be a powerful technique to ..... HPLC/UV-VIS diode array and atmospheric pressure ionization quadrupole ion trap massspectrometry. Int. J. Mass ...

  16. Information acquisition and financial intermediation

    OpenAIRE

    Boyarchenko, Nina

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of information acquisition in an intermediated market, where the specialists have access to superior technology for acquiring information. These informational advantages of specialists relative to households lead to disagreement between the two groups, changing the shape of the intermediation-constrained region of the economy and increasing the frequency of periods when the intermediation constraint binds. Acquiring the additional information is, however, cost...

  17. Intermediate inputs and economic productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptist, Simon; Hepburn, Cameron

    2013-03-13

    Many models of economic growth exclude materials, energy and other intermediate inputs from the production function. Growing environmental pressures and resource prices suggest that this may be increasingly inappropriate. This paper explores the relationship between intermediate input intensity, productivity and national accounts using a panel dataset of manufacturing subsectors in the USA over 47 years. The first contribution is to identify sectoral production functions that incorporate intermediate inputs, while allowing for heterogeneity in both technology and productivity. The second contribution is that the paper finds a negative correlation between intermediate input intensity and total factor productivity (TFP)--sectors that are less intensive in their use of intermediate inputs have higher productivity. This finding is replicated at the firm level. We propose tentative hypotheses to explain this association, but testing and further disaggregation of intermediate inputs is left for further work. Further work could also explore more directly the relationship between material inputs and economic growth--given the high proportion of materials in intermediate inputs, the results in this paper are suggestive of further work on material efficiency. Depending upon the nature of the mechanism linking a reduction in intermediate input intensity to an increase in TFP, the implications could be significant. A third contribution is to suggest that an empirical bias in productivity, as measured in national accounts, may arise due to the exclusion of intermediate inputs. Current conventions of measuring productivity in national accounts may overstate the productivity of resource-intensive sectors relative to other sectors.

  18. THE YOUNG STELLAR POPULATION OF LYNDS 1340. AN INFRARED VIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kun, M.; Moór, A. [Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Budapest, Konkoly Thege út 15-17 (Hungary); Wolf-Chase, G. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium, 1300 South Lake Shore Drive, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Apai, D. [Steward Observatory, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Balog, Z. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); O’Linger-Luscusk, J. [On leave from California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Moriarty-Schieven, G. H., E-mail: kun@konkoly.hu [National Research Council—Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    We present results of an infrared study of the molecular cloud Lynds 1340, forming three groups of low- and intermediate-mass stars. Our goals are to identify and characterize the young stellar population of the cloud, study the relationships between the properties of the cloud and the emergent stellar groups, and integrate L1340 into the picture of the star-forming activity of our Galactic environment. We selected candidate young stellar objects (YSOs) from the Spitzer and WISE databases using various published color criteria and classified them based on the slope of the spectral energy distribution (SED). We identified 170 Class II, 27 flat SED, and 45 Class 0/I sources. High angular resolution near-infrared observations of the RNO 7 cluster, embedded in L1340, revealed eight new young stars of near-infrared excess. The surface density distribution of YSOs shows three groups, associated with the three major molecular clumps of L1340, each consisting of ≲100 members, including both pre-main-sequence stars and embedded protostars. New Herbig–Haro objects were identified in the Spitzer images. Our results demonstrate that L1340 is a prolific star-forming region of our Galactic environment in which several specific properties of the intermediate-mass mode of star formation can be studied in detail.

  19. A generation at risk: a cross-sectional study on HIV/AIDS knowledge, exposure to mass media, and stigmatizing behaviors among young women aged 15-24 years in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoah, Charity Konadu; Asamoah, Benedict Oppong; Agardh, Anette

    2017-01-01

    HIV/AIDS stigmatizing behaviors are a huge barrier to early detection and treatment of individuals with the AIDS virus. HIV/AIDS stigma and related consequences are debilitating, especially for vulnerable populations. This study sought to assess whether young women's HIV/AIDS knowledge levels and exposure to mass media (television and radio) have an influence on their stigmatizing behaviors and role as agents of stigma towards individuals living with HIV and AIDS. The data used for this study originated from the Ghana Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011. Binary and multiple (stepwise) logistic regression analyses were used to examine the associations between HIV/AIDS knowledge, frequency of exposure to mass media, and HIV/AIDS stigmatizing behaviors among young women aged 15-24 years in Ghana. Of the 3573 young women, 80% of 15-19-year-olds and 76% of 20-24-year-olds had at least one stigmatizing behavior towards persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA). Young women with increased knowledge regarding HIV/AIDS and frequent exposure to mass media (television and radio) had lesser tendency to stigmatize or act as agents of stigma towards PLHA (proportion with at least one stigmatizing behavior per subgroup - HIV/AIDS knowledge: those with highest knowledge score 579 [70.1%], those with lowest knowledge score 28 [90.3%]; mass media: those with daily exposure 562 [73.4%], those not exposed at all 249 [89.2%]). There was a graded negative 'exposure-response' association between the ranked variables: HIV/AIDS knowledge, mass media, and HIV/AIDS stigmatizing behaviors. The significant inverse association between HIV/AIDS knowledge, frequency of exposure to mass media, and HIV/AIDS stigmatizing behaviors persisted even after adjusting for all other covariates in the multiple logistic regression models. It is extremely important to increase HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and reduce stigma among young women in Ghana through targeted HIV/AIDS factual knowledge transfer. The

  20. Warm gas towards young stellar objects in Corona Australis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Johan; Jørgensen, Jes Kristian; D. Green, Joel

    2014-01-01

    by an intermediate-mass young star. We study the effects on the warm gas and dust in a group of low-mass young stellar objects from the irradiation by the young luminous Herbig Be star R CrA. Herschel/PACS far-infrared datacubes of two low-mass star-forming regions in the R CrA dark cloud are presented....... The distribution of CO, OH, H2O, [C II], [O I], and continuum emission is investigated. We have developed a deconvolution algorithm which we use to deconvolve the maps, separating the point-source emission from the extended emission. We also construct rotational diagrams of the molecular species. By deconvolution...... Be star R CrA. Our results show that a nearby luminous star does not increase the molecular excitation temperatures in the warm gas around a young stellar object (YSO). However, the emission from photodissociation products of H2O, such as OH and O, is enhanced in the warm gas associated...

  1. The Terneuzen Birth Cohort. Longer exclusive breastfeeding duration is associated with leaner body mass and a healthier diet in young adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Buuren Stef

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breastfeeding (BF is protective against overweight and is associated with dietary behaviour. The aims of our study were to assess the relationship between exclusive BF duration and BMI, waist circumference (WC and waist-hip ratio (WHR at adulthood, and to study whether dietary behaviour could explain the relationship between BF duration and the proxies of fat mass. Methods In 2004-2005, 822 subjects from the Terneuzen Birth Cohort (n = 2,604, aged 18-28 years, filled in postal questionnaires including sociodemographic factors and aspects of dietary behaviour (dietary pattern, and consumption of fruit and vegetables, snacks, sweetened beverages and alcohol; 737 subjects also underwent anthropometric measurements of weight, height, and waist and hip circumference. The relationship between exclusive BF duration and dietary outcomes was investigated by logistic regression analysis. The relationships of BF duration with the anthropometric measures were investigated by linear regression analyses. All results were corrected for age, gender and possible confounders. Finally, regression analyses were performed to investigate if diet factors had a mediating effect on the relationship between BF duration and fat mass. Results A significant inverse dose-response relationship of BF duration was found for BMI (β-0.13, SE 0.06, WC (β-0.39, SE 0.18 and WHR (β-0.003, SE 0.001, after correction for age, gender and confounders. The odds ratio (OR of exclusive BF duration in months for a breakfast frequency of at least 5 times a week was 1.16 (95%CI 1.06-1.27, and for snack consumption of less than twice a week was 1.15 (95%CI 1.06-1.25. Both ORs were corrected for age, gender and confounders. For other dietary outcomes, the results point in the same direction, i.e. a positive relationship with BF duration, but these were not statistically significant. A mediating effect of the diet factors on the association between BF and anthropometric

  2. Study protocol: psychological and physiological consequences of exposure to mass media in young women - an experimental cross-sectional and longitudinal study and the role of moderators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Repeated exposure to thin beauty ideals is part of the daily routine. Exposure to thin ideals via mass media plays an important role in the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs), low self-esteem, depressive or anxious feelings in young females. It is important to elucidate the circumstances under which exposure to thin ideals develops its detrimental impact and to investigate whether these features are more pronounced in EDs than in other mental disorders also related to negative body image. We investigate the following key questions: (1) Does laboratory induced exposure to thin ideals (waiting room design) relate to impairments in terms of body image, affect and eating behavior and biological stress response (salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol, heart rate and heart rate variability) in 18 to 35 year old female suffering from anorexia and bulimia nervosa (AN, BN) compared to female healthy controls and to a sample of females suffering from mixed mental disorders (depression, anxiety and somatic symptom disorder (SSD) disorders)? (2) How do moderators such as cognitive distortions ("Thought-Shape Fusion, TSF"), and correlates of emotion regulation (ER) moderate the influence of the exposure? (3) Are these characteristics amenable to change after treatment? Altogether 250 female participants including patients with AN, BN, depressive, anxiety and SSD disorders, and healthy women will be recruited in Switzerland and Germany. The findings will provide knowledge about the role of moderators influencing the effects of exposure to thin ideals promoted by mass media in eating disorder (ED) patients, patients suffering from mixed mental disorders and healthy controls. Evaluating their differential susceptibility will contribute to a better understanding of the role of negative body image in the maintenance of not only symptoms of ED, but also of depression, anxiety and SSD. Additionally our results will shed light on the stability of effects in

  3. Instrumental-Variables Simultaneous Equations Model of Physical Activity and Body Mass Index: The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Katie A; Guilkey, David K; Tien, Hsiao-Chuen; Kiefe, Catarina I; Popkin, Barry M; Gordon-Larsen, Penny

    2016-09-15

    We used full-system-estimation instrumental-variables simultaneous equations modeling (IV-SEM) to examine physical activity relative to body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) using 25 years of data (1985/1986 to 2010/2011) from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study (n = 5,115; ages 18-30 years at enrollment). Neighborhood environment and sociodemographic instruments were used to characterize physical activity, fast-food consumption, smoking, alcohol consumption, marriage, and childbearing (women) and to predict BMI using semiparametric full-information maximum likelihood estimation to control for unobserved time-invariant and time-varying residual confounding and differential measurement error through model-derived discrete random effects. Comparing robust-variance ordinary least squares, random-effects regression, fixed-effects regression, single-equation-estimation IV-SEM, and full-system-estimation IV-SEM, estimates from random- and fixed-effects models and the full-system-estimation IV-SEM were unexpectedly similar, despite the lack of control for residual confounding with the random-effects estimator. Ordinary least squares tended to overstate the significance of health behaviors in BMI, while results from single-equation-estimation IV-SEM were notably different, revealing the impact of weak instruments in standard instrumental-variable methods. Our robust findings for fixed effects (which does not require instruments but has a high cost in lost degrees of freedom) and full-system-estimation IV-SEM (vs. standard IV-SEM) demonstrate potential for a full-system-estimation IV-SEM method even with weak instruments. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Pubertal Development and Prepubertal Height and Weight Jointly Predict Young Adult Height and Body Mass Index in a Prospective Study in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Aryeh D; Lundeen, Elizabeth A; Martorell, Reynaldo; Suchdev, Parminder S; Mehta, Neil K; Richter, Linda M; Norris, Shane A

    2016-07-01

    Height and adiposity track over childhood, but few studies, to our knowledge, have longitudinally examined the mediating relation of the timing and progression of puberty. We assessed interrelations between prepubertal height and body mass index, the progression through puberty, and young adult height and adiposity. We analyzed data from the Birth to Twenty Plus study (females, n = 823; males, n = 765). Serial measures of anthropometry and pubertal development were obtained between ages 9 and 16 y. We used latent class growth analysis to categorize pubertal development with respect to pubic hair (females and males), breasts (females), and genitalia (males) development. Adult height and weight were obtained at ages 18 to 20 y. Among females, higher latent class (earlier initiation and faster progression through puberty) was associated with an increased risk of obesity [pubic hair class 3 compared with class 1: RR, 3.41 (95% CI: 1.57, 7.44)] and inconsistent associations with height. Among males, higher latent class was associated with increased adult height [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: 2.43 cm (95% CI: 0.88, 4.00)] and increased risk of overweight/obesity [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: OR, 3.44 (95% CI: 1.44, 8.20)]. In females, the association with adult height became inverse after adjusting for prepubertal height [pubic hair development class 3 compared with class 1: females, -1.31 cm (95% CI: -2.32, -0.31)]; in males, the association with height was attenuated with this adjustment [-0.56 cm (95% CI: -1.63, 0.52)]. Associations with adiposity were attenuated after adjusting for prepubertal adiposity. Progression through puberty modifies the relation between prepubertal and adult anthropometry. Screening for early or rapid progression of puberty might identify children at an increased risk of becoming overweight or obese adults.

  5. SIMULTANEOUS MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF MAGNETIC ACTIVITY IN ULTRACOOL DWARFS. IV. THE ACTIVE, YOUNG BINARY NLTT 33370 AB (= 2MASS J13142039+1320011)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, P. K. G.; Berger, E.; Irwin, J.; Charbonneau, D.; Berta-Thompson, Z. K.

    2015-01-01

    We present multi-epoch simultaneous radio, optical, Hα, UV, and X-ray observations of the active, young, low-mass binary NLTT 33370 AB (blended spectral type M7e). This system is remarkable for its extreme levels of magnetic activity: it is the most radio-luminous ultracool dwarf (UCD) known, and here we show that it is also one of the most X-ray luminous UCDs known. We detect the system in all bands and find a complex phenomenology of both flaring and periodic variability. Analysis of the optical light curve reveals the simultaneous presence of two periodicities, 3.7859 ± 0.0001 and 3.7130 ± 0.0002 hr. While these differ by only ∼2%, studies of differential rotation in the UCD regime suggest that it cannot be responsible for the two signals. The system's radio emission consists of at least three components: rapid 100% polarized flares, bright emission modulating periodically in phase with the optical emission, and an additional periodic component that appears only in the 2013 observational campaign. We interpret the last of these as a gyrosynchrotron feature associated with large-scale magnetic fields and a cool, equatorial plasma torus. However, the persistent rapid flares at all rotational phases imply that small-scale magnetic loops are also present and reconnect nearly continuously. We present a spectral energy distribution of the blended system spanning more than 9 orders of magnitude in wavelength. The significant magnetism present in NLTT 33370 AB will affect its fundamental parameters, with the components' radii and temperatures potentially altered by ∼+20% and ∼–10%, respectively. Finally, we suggest spatially resolved observations that could clarify many aspects of this system's nature

  6. Maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index is not associated with infant and young child feeding in low-income Mexican children 1-24 months old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterrosa, Eva C; Frongillo, Edward A; Neufeld, Lynnette M; Egan, Kelsey A; Ramakrishnan, Usha; Rasmussen, Kathleen M

    2015-04-01

    Pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity is associated with shorter breastfeeding (BF) duration. Whether pre-pregnancy overweight and obesity is associated with other aspects of infant and young child feeding (IYCF) has not been investigated. We used data from 370 children born January 1999-September 2001 in a semi-urban community in Morelos, Mexico, where information on how they were fed was available at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18 and 24 months of age. We modified the World Health Organization's dietary diversity indicator to assess the quality of the complementary foods. An index that included BF, quality of complementary foods and other behaviours was constructed to measure IYCF. We used survival analysis to examine the association of pre-pregnancy body mass index (pBMI) category and BF duration and mixed models for quality of complementary food and IYCF index. Mean maternal pBMI was 24.4 ± 4.1; 31% were overweight, and 9% were obese. pBMI was not associated with BF duration. Quality of complementary food improved over time (6 months, 1.3 ± 1.3; 24 months, 3.8 ± 1.04). Compared with normal-weight women, overweight and obese women were more likely to feed from more food groups (0.24 ± 0.11 point, P=0.03), but this did not improve diet diversity from 6 to 24 months. IYCF index decreased throughout follow-up (1 month, 7.8 ± 2.4; 24 months, 5.5 ± 1.8), and pBMI was not associated with IYCF (-0.11 ± 0.13 point, P=0.4). We conclude that heavier women were not engaging in IYCF behaviours that were distinct from those of normal-weight women from 1 to 24 months post-partum. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Welding. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kenneth

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of nine terminal objectives for an intermediate welding course. The materials were developed for a 36-week (3 hours daily) course designed to prepare the student for employment in the field of welding. Electric welding and specialized (TIG & MIG)…

  8. YOUNG STELLAR CLUSTERS CONTAINING MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE VVV SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borissova, J.; Alegría, S. Ramírez; Kurtev, R.; Medina, N.; Navarro, C.; Kuhn, M.; Gromadzki, M.; Retamales, G.; Fernandez, M. A.; Agurto-Gangas, C.; Amigo, P. [Instituto de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de Valparaíso, Av. Gran Bretaña 1111, Playa Ancha, Casilla 5030 (Chile); Alonso, J.; Decany, I. [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics (MAS), Santiago (Chile); Lucas, P. W.; Pena, C. Contreras; Thompson, M. A. [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Chené, A.-N. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 N. A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Minniti, D. [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Catelan, M. [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Morales, E. F. E., E-mail: jura.borissova@uv.cl [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy (Germany)

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the connections of the global properties of eight young stellar clusters projected in the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea (VVV) ESO Large Public Survey disk area and their young stellar object (YSO) populations. The analysis is based on the combination of spectroscopic parallax-based reddening and distance determinations with main-sequence and pre-main-sequence ishochrone fitting to determine the basic parameters (reddening, age, distance) of the sample clusters. The lower mass limit estimations show that all clusters are low or intermediate mass (between 110 and 1800  M {sub ⊙}), the slope Γ of the obtained present-day mass functions of the clusters is close to the Kroupa initial mass function. The YSOs in the cluster’s surrounding fields are classified using low resolution spectra, spectral energy distribution fits with theoretical predictions, and variability, taking advantage of multi-epoch VVV observations. All spectroscopically confirmed YSOs (except one) are found to be massive (more than 8 M {sub ⊙}). Using VVV and GLIMPSE color–color cuts we have selected a large number of new YSO candidates, which are checked for variability and 57% are found to show at least low-amplitude variations. In few cases it was possible to distinguish between YSO and AGB classifications on the basis of light curves.

  9. Formation of massive black holes through runaway collisions in dense young star clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwart, Simon F Portegies; Baumgardt, Holger; Hut, Piet; Makino, Junichiro; McMillan, Stephen L W

    2004-04-15

    A luminous X-ray source is associated with MGG 11--a cluster of young stars approximately 200 pc from the centre of the starburst galaxy M 82 (refs 1, 2). The properties of this source are best explained by invoking a black hole with a mass of at least 350 solar masses (350 M(o)), which is intermediate between stellar-mass and supermassive black holes. A nearby but somewhat more massive cluster (MGG 9) shows no evidence of such an intermediate-mass black hole, raising the issue of just what physical characteristics of the clusters can account for this difference. Here we report numerical simulations of the evolution and motion of stars within the clusters, where stars are allowed to merge with each other. We find that for MGG 11 dynamical friction leads to the massive stars sinking rapidly to the centre of the cluster, where they participate in a runaway collision. This produces a star of 800-3,000 M(o) which ultimately collapses to a black hole of intermediate mass. No such runaway occurs in the cluster MGG 9, because the larger cluster radius leads to a mass segregation timescale a factor of five longer than for MGG 11.

  10. The Effects of Stellar Dynamics on the Evolution of Young, Dense Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkus, H.; van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    In this paper, we report on first results of a project in Brussels in which we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using 3 decades of expertise in massive-star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass-loss formalism on the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  11. Dynamics of light, intermediate, heavy and superheavy nuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-05-01

    May 1, 2014 ... Various features related to the dynamics of competing decay modes of nuclear systems are explored by addressing the experimental data of a number of reactions in light, intermediate, heavy and superheavy mass regions. The DCM, being a non-statistical description for the decay of a com- pound nucleus ...

  12. Gravity with Intermediate Goods Trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper derives the gravity equation with intermediate goods trade. We extend a standard monopolistic competition model to incorporate intermediate goods trade, and show that the gravity equation with intermediates trade is identical to the one without it except in that gross output should be used as the output measure instead of value added. We also show that the output elasticity of trade is significantly underestimated when value added is used as the output measure. This implies that with the conventional gravity equation, the contribution of output growth can be substantially underestimated and the role of trade costs reduction can be exaggerated in explaining trade expansion, as we demonstrate for the case of Korea's trade growth between 1995 and 2007.

  13. Larval helminths in intermediate hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredensborg, Brian Lund; Poulin, R

    2005-01-01

    Density-dependent effects on parasite fitness have been documented from adult helminths in their definitive hosts. There have, however, been no studies on the cost of sharing an intermediate host with other parasites in terms of reduced adult parasite fecundity. Even if larval parasites suffer...... transmission to their bird definitive host by predation. In experimental infections, we found an intensity-dependent establishment success, with a decrease in the success rate of cercariae developing into infective metacercariae with an increasing dose of cercariae applied to each amphipod. In natural...... the two species. Our results thus indicate that the infracommunity of larval helminths in their intermediate host is interactive and that any density-dependent effect in the intermediate host may have lasting effects on individual parasite fitness....

  14. My body looks like that girl's : Body mass index modulates brain activity during body image self-reflection among young women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Xiao; Deng, Xiao; Wen, Xin; She, Ying; Vinke, Petra Corianne; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Body image distress or body dissatisfaction is one of the most common consequences of obesity and overweight. We investigated the neural bases of body image processing in overweight and average weight young women to understand whether brain regions that were previously found to be involved in

  15. APEX-CHAMP(+) high-J CO observations of low-mass young stellar objects I. The HH 46 envelope and outflow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kempen, T. A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Guesten, R.; Kristensen, L. E.; Schilke, P.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Boland, W.; Nefs, B.; Menten, K. M.; Baryshev, A.; Wyrowski, F.

    Context. The spectacular outflow of HH 46/47 is driven by HH 46 IRS 1, an embedded Class I Young Stellar Object (YSO). Although much is known about this region from extensive optical and infrared observations, the properties of its protostellar envelope and molecular outflow are poorly constrained.

  16. Body mass index bias in defining obesity of diverse young adults: The Training Intervention and Genetics of Exercise Response (TIGER) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BMI cut-score used to define overweight and obesity was derived primarily using data from Caucasian men and women. The present study evaluated the racial/ethnic bias of BMI to estimate the adiposity of young men and women (aged 17–35 years) using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) determinat...

  17. Effects of Growth Hormone Therapy on Bone Mass, Metabolic Balance, and Well-Being in Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heijkant, Silvia; Hoorweg-Nijman, Gera; Huisman, Jaap; Drent, Madeleine; van der Pal, Heleen; Kaspers, Gert-Jan; Delemarre-van de Waal, Henriette

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone deficiency (GHD), mostly after cranial radiotherapy (CRT), may lead to several negative effects. Young adult survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) could benefit from GH therapy in different ways. Twenty ALL survivors (17.1 +/- 4.3 y after diagnosis) with low bone mineral

  18. Intermediate Infrastructure Analyst | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The incumbent conducts research on technologies and tools that might enhance service delivery and where appropriate, makes recommendations to management. The Intermediate Infrastructure System Analyst provides leadership and direction to junior team members and functional direction to consultants and ...

  19. M Dwarf Rotation from the K2 Young Clusters to the Field. I. A Mass-Rotation Correlation at 10 Myr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Garrett; Stauffer, John; Rebull, Luisa; Cody, Ann Marie; Pinsonneault, Marc

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations of the low-mass (0.1-0.6 {M}⊙ ) rotation distributions of the Pleiades and Praesepe clusters have revealed a ubiquitous correlation between mass and rotation, such that late M dwarfs rotate an order-of-magnitude faster than early M dwarfs. In this paper, we demonstrate that this mass-rotation correlation is present in the 10 Myr Upper Scorpius association, as revealed by new K2 rotation measurements. Using rotational evolution models, we show that the low-mass rotation distribution of the 125 Myr Pleiades cluster can only be produced if it hosted an equally strong mass-rotation correlation at 10 Myr. This suggests that physical processes important in the early pre-main sequence (PMS; star formation, accretion, disk-locking) are primarily responsible for the M dwarf rotation morphology, and not quirks of later angular momentum (AM) evolution. Such early mass trends must be taken into account when constructing initial conditions for future studies of stellar rotation. Finally, we show that the average M star loses ˜25%-40% of its AM between 10 and 125 Myr, a figure accurately and generically predicted by modern solar-calibrated wind models. Their success rules out a lossless PMS and validates the extrapolation of magnetic wind laws designed for solar-type stars to the low-mass regime at early times.

  20. My Body Looks Like That Girl’s: Body Mass Index Modulates Brain Activity during Body Image Self-Reflection among Young Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xin; She, Ying; Vinke, Petra Corianne; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Body image distress or body dissatisfaction is one of the most common consequences of obesity and overweight. We investigated the neural bases of body image processing in overweight and average weight young women to understand whether brain regions that were previously found to be involved in processing self-reflective, perspective and affective components of body image would show different activation between two groups. Thirteen overweight (O-W group, age = 20.31±1.70 years) and thirteen average weight (A-W group, age = 20.15±1.62 years) young women underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a body image self-reflection task. Among both groups, whole-brain analysis revealed activations of a brain network related to perceptive and affective components of body image processing. ROI analysis showed a main effect of group in ACC as well as a group by condition interaction within bilateral EBA, bilateral FBA, right IPL, bilateral DLPFC, left amygdala and left MPFC. For the A-W group, simple effect analysis revealed stronger activations in Thin-Control compared to Fat-Control condition within regions related to perceptive (including bilateral EBA, bilateral FBA, right IPL) and affective components of body image processing (including bilateral DLPFC, left amygdala), as well as self-reference (left MPFC). The O-W group only showed stronger activations in Fat-Control than in Thin-Control condition within regions related to the perceptive component of body image processing (including left EBA and left FBA). Path analysis showed that in the Fat-Thin contrast, body dissatisfaction completely mediated the group difference in brain response in left amygdala across the whole sample. Our data are the first to demonstrate differences in brain response to body pictures between average weight and overweight young females involved in a body image self-reflection task. These results provide insights for understanding the vulnerability to body image distress

  1. Periampullary mass--a rare presentation of poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cancer of duodenum in a young adult: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neha; Nayak, Hemanta K; Bagchi, Avishek; Kar, Premashis

    2012-10-09

    Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumour in the periampullary region of the duodenum is a rare entity. This entity usually present in old men. Here we report a periampullary poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cancer (PDEC) of duodenum presenting in a young man with subacute history of jaundice, abdominal pain, pancreatitis and constitutional symptoms. MRI localised the tumour and endoscopy-guided biopsy of the lesion proved the diagnosis. Although palliative surgery and chemotherapy were planned, the patient opted to leave against medical advice.

  2. Race/Ethnic Differences in Desired Body Mass Index and Dieting Practices Among Young Women Attending College in Hawai‘i

    OpenAIRE

    Schembre, Susan M; Nigg, Claudio R; Albright, Cheryl L

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the sociocultural model, race/ethnicity is considered a major influence on factors associated with body image and body dissatisfaction, and eating disorders are often characterized as problems that are primarily limited to young White women from Western cultures. The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are differences that exist by race in desired body weight; the importance placed on those ideals; and dieting strategies among White, Asian American, Native ...

  3. Reactive intermediates in the gas phase generation and monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Setser, D W

    2013-01-01

    Reactive Intermediates in the Gas Phase: Generation and Monitoring covers methods for reactive intermediates in the gas phase. The book discusses the generation and measurement of atom and radical concentrations in flow systems; the high temperature flow tubes, generation and measurement of refractory species; and the electronically excited long-lived states of atoms and diatomic molecules in flow systems. The text also describes the production and detection of reactive species with lasers in static systems; the production of small positive ions in a mass spectrometer; and the discharge-excite

  4. Apolipoprotein E4, Gender, Body Mass Index, Inflammation, Insulin Resistance, and Air Pollution Interactions: Recipe for Alzheimer's Disease Development in Mexico City Young Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; de la Monte, Suzanne M

    2017-01-01

    Given the epidemiological trends of increasing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and growing evidence that exposure and lifestyle factors contribute to AD risk and pathogenesis, attention should be paid to variables such as air pollution, in order to reduce rates of cognitive decline and dementia. Exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and ozone (O3) above the US EPA standards is associated with AD risk. Mexico City children experienced pre- and postnatal high exposures to PM2.5, O3, combustion-derived iron-rich nanoparticles, metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and endotoxins. Exposures are associated with early brain gene imbalance in oxidative stress, inflammation, innate and adaptive immune responses, along with epigenetic changes, accumulation of misfolded proteins, cognitive deficits, and brain structural and metabolic changes. The Apolipoprotein E (APOE) 4 allele, the most prevalent genetic risk for AD, plays a key role in the response to air pollution in young girls. APOE 4 heterozygous females with >75% to <94% BMI percentiles are at the highest risk of severe cognitive deficits (1.5-2 SD from average IQ). This review focused on the relationships between gender, BMI, systemic and neural inflammation, insulin resistance, hyperleptinemia, dyslipidemia, vascular risk factors, and central nervous system involvement in APOE4 urbanites exposed to PM2.5 and magnetite combustion-derived iron-rich nanoparticles that can reach the brain. APOE4 young female heterozygous carriers constitute a high-risk group for a fatal disease: AD. Multidisciplinary intervention strategies could be critical for prevention or amelioration of cognitive deficits and long-term AD progression in young individuals at high risk.

  5. Influence of Electrophoresis of Antler Mass on Restorative Processes in Young Athletes during the Preparatory Period of a One-Year Training Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina S. Gavrileva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the influence of electrophoresis of antler mass (according to Vermel’s method on the peripheral blood and indicators of cardiac function in elite athletes during intensive exercise during the preparatory period. This study included 27 male athletes, aged 16-17 years old. Application of electrophoresis of antler mass led to improvement of hemoglobin level and hematocrit, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC, normalization of hormonal status and myocardial metabolism, and promoted increased fitness and adaptability to physical stress.

  6. The Preventive Effect of Calcium Supplementation on Weak Bones Caused by the Interaction of Exercise and Food Restriction in Young Female Rats During the Period from Acquiring Bone Mass to Maintaining Bone Mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikawa, Yuki; Agata, Umon; Kakutani, Yuya; Kato, Shoyo; Noma, Yuichi; Hattori, Satoshi; Ogata, Hitomi; Ezawa, Ikuko; Omi, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing calcium (Ca) intake is important for female athletes with a risk of weak bone caused by inadequate food intake. The aim of the present study was to examine the preventive effect of Ca supplementation on low bone strength in young female athletes with inadequate food intake, using the rats as an experimental model. Seven-week-old female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: the sedentary and ad libitum feeding group (SED), voluntary running exercise and ad libitum feeding group (EX), voluntary running exercise and 30% food restriction group (EX-FR), and a voluntary running exercise, 30% food-restricted and high-Ca diet group (EX-FR+Ca). To Ca supplementation, we used 1.2% Ca diet as "high-Ca diet" that contains two-fold Ca of normal Ca diet. The experiment lasted for 12 weeks. As a result, the energy availability, internal organ weight, bone strength, bone mineral density, and Ca absorption in the EX-FR group were significantly lower than those in the EX group. The bone strength and Ca absorption in the EX-FR+Ca group were significantly higher than those in the EX-FR group. However, the bone strength in the EX-FR+Ca group did not reach that in the EX group. These results suggested that Ca supplementation had a positive effect on bone strength, but the effect was not sufficient to prevent lower bone strength caused by food restriction in young female athletes.

  7. Is allometry for aboveground organ’s mass estimation in young Norway spruce stands aff ected by diff erent type of thinning?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krejza, Jan; Pokorný, Radek; Marková, I.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 6 (2013), s. 1755-1761 ISSN 1211-8516 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010945 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : allometry * mass * Norway spruce * thinning Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour http://dx.doi.org/10.11118/actaun201361061755

  8. Reduced bone mass in obese young rats through PPAR omega suppression of wnt/beta-catenin signaling and direct action of free fatty acids (NEFA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship of obesity to skeletal development is unclear. We utilized total enteral nutrition to feed high and low fat diets (HFD and LFD) to rats for 4 wks to produce obesity. Weight gain was matched but fat mass, serum leptin and NEFA were increased by HFD (P < 0.05). HFD lowered total bone ...

  9. Type VI collagen turnover-related peptides—novel serological biomarkers of muscle mass and anabolic response to loading in young men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedergaard, Anders; Sun, Shu; Karsdal, Morten A

    2013-01-01

    Immobilization-induced loss of muscle mass is a complex phenomenon with several parallels to sarcopenic and cachectic muscle loss. Muscle is a large organ with a protein turnover that is orders of magnitude larger than most other tissues. Thus, we hypothesize that muscle loss and regain is reflec...

  10. Seeing the beauty in everyday people: a qualitative study of young Australians' opinions on body image, the mass media and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrichs, Phillippa C; Lee, Christina; Kelly, Marguerite

    2011-06-01

    While governments have called for greater body size diversity in media imagery to promote positive body image and prevent disordered eating, the fashion and advertising industries often argue that average-size models do not appeal to consumers. Focus groups were conducted with 76 young Australian women and men to provide a previously neglected consumer perspective on this debate. Thematic analysis identified dissatisfaction with the restricted range of body sizes, and the objectification of women, in media imagery. Participants indicated a desire for change and positive reactions to average-size models in advertising, but also suggested barriers to their increased use, including concerns about the promotion of obesity. The results suggest that there is some consumer support for increased body size diversity in media imagery. Consumer and industry barriers, however, will need to be addressed in the future if this is to be an effective public health intervention to promote positive body image. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. ESL intermediate/advanced writing

    CERN Document Server

    Munoz Page, Mary Ellen; Jaskiewicz, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Master ESL (English as a Second Language) Writing with the study guide designed for non-native speakers of English. Skill-building lessons relevant to today's topics help ESL students write complete sentences, paragraphs, and even multi-paragraph essays. It's perfect for classroom use or self-guided writing preparation.DETAILS- Intermediate drills for improving skills with parallel structure, mood, correct shifting errors & dangling participles- Advanced essay drills focusing on narrative, descriptive, process, reaction, comparison and contrast- Superb preparation for students taking the TOEFL

  12. An isolated penile mass in a young adult turned out to be a primary marginal zone lymphoma of the penis. A case report and a review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Giorgio; Broccoli, Alessandro; Brunocilla, Eugenio; Schiavina, Riccardo; Borghesi, Marco; Romagnoli, Daniele; Bianchi, Lorenzo; Derenzini, Enrico; Agostinelli, Claudio; Franceschelli, Alessandro; Colombo, Fulvio; Zinzani, Pier Luigi

    2013-06-01

    to discuss the rationale of the management of penile MALT lymphoma. A 24-year-old patient presented with a painless and mobile nodule localized in the ventral part of the penis. The lesion was firstly evaluated through Doppler ultrasonography, which showed a hypoechoic and vascularized solid mass, a subsequent magnetic resonance confirmed size and position of the lesion. Subsequently the patient underwent a surgical excision of the mass, the pathological diagnosis was consistent with penile lymphoma, MALT-type. The patient underwent a consolidative immunotherapy with rituximab. Disease re-staging was performed through a MR without any detection of local or systemic recurrences. To our knowledge, no cases of MALT lymphoma involving the penis have been reported in the literature so far. Surgical excision with organ sparing and immunotherapy with rituximab, successfully induced a complete response. Based upon this experience, we may recommend a conservative surgery associated with a systemic approach.

  13. Model of cosmology and particle physics at an intermediate scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastero-Gil, M.; Di Clemente, V.; King, S. F.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a model of cosmology and particle physics in which all relevant scales arise in a natural way from an intermediate string scale. We are led to assign the string scale to the intermediate scale M * ∼10 13 GeV by four independent pieces of physics: electroweak symmetry breaking; the μ parameter; the axion scale; and the neutrino mass scale. The model involves hybrid inflation with the waterfall field N being responsible for generating the μ term, the right-handed neutrino mass scale, and the Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking scale. The large scale structure of the Universe is generated by the lightest right-handed sneutrino playing the role of a coupled curvaton. We show that the correct curvature perturbations may be successfully generated providing the lightest right-handed neutrino is weakly coupled in the seesaw mechanism, consistent with sequential dominance

  14. Intermediate neutron detection by thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, E.N. dos; Muccillo, R.

    1979-01-01

    Thermoluminescent (TL) studies were carried out in cold-pressed CaSO 4 :Dy + Dy 2 O 3 + KCl and CaF 2 + Dy 2 O 3 + KCl polycrystalline samples exposed to mixed neutron-gamma fields, for the detection of intermediate neutrons which is based on the evaluation of the TL signal of the specimens stored for 24 hours after being exposed to a mixed neutron-gamma field and thermally annealed to erase the total radiation-induced TL. The addition of Dy 2 O 3 to CaSO 4 :Dy in the proportion 1:2 increased the neutron response by a factor of 160 relative to that of CaSO 4 :Dy. 180 mg of CaSO 4 :Dy + Dy 2 O 3 + KCl in the proportion 2:1:3 showed to be an appropriate detector of intermediate neutrons; the minimum detectable fluence was estimated to be 3.5 x 10 5 neutrons/cm 2 . (Author) [pt

  15. Structure-dependent reactivity of Criegee intermediates studied with spectroscopic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jr-Min Lin, Jim; Chao, Wen

    2017-12-11

    Criegee intermediates are very reactive carbonyl oxides that are formed in reactions of unsaturated hydrocarbons with ozone (ozonolysis). Recently, Criegee intermediates have gained significant attention since a new preparation method has been reported in 2012, which employs the reaction of iodoalkyl radical with molecular oxygen: for instance, CH 2 I + O 2 → CH 2 OO + I. This new synthesis route can produce Criegee intermediates with a high number density, which allows direct detection of the Criegee intermediate via various spectroscopic tools, including vacuum UV photoionization mass spectrometry, absorption and action spectroscopy in the UV and IR regions, and microwave spectroscopy. Criegee intermediates have been thought to play important roles in atmospheric chemistry, such as in OH radical formation as well as oxidation of atmospheric gases such as SO 2 , NO 2 , volatile organic compounds, organic and inorganic acids, and even water. These reactions are relevant to acid rain and aerosol formation. Kinetics data including rate coefficients, product yields and their temperature and pressure dependences are important for understanding and modeling relevant atmospheric chemistry. In fundamental physical chemistry, Criegee intermediates have unique and interesting features, which have been partially revealed through spectroscopic, kinetic, and dynamic investigations. Although previous review articles have discussed Criegee intermediates, new data and knowledge on Criegee intermediates are still being accumulated. In this tutorial review, we have focused on structure-dependent reactivity of Criegee intermediates and various spectroscopic tools that have been utilized to probe the kinetics of Criegee intermediates.

  16. Fat-free Mass and Excess Post-exercise Oxygen Consumption in the 40 Minutes after Short-duration Exhaustive Exercise in Young Male Japanese Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Tahara, Yasuaki; Moji, Kazuhiko; Honda, Sumihisa; Nakao, Rieko; Tsunawake, Noriaki; Fukuda, Rika; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; Mascie-Taylor, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between fat-free mass (FFM) and excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) has not been well researched because of the relatively small number of subjects studied. This study investigated the effects of FFM on EPOC and EPOC/maximum oxygen consumption. 250 Japanese male athletes between 16 and 21 years old from Nagasaki prefecture had their EPOC measured up to 40 minutes after short-duration exhaustive exercise. The value was named as EPOC_. The proportions of EPOC up to 1...

  17. Effects of cigarette smoke exposure during suckling on food intake, fat mass, hormones, and biochemical profile of young and adult female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisboa, Patricia Cristina; Soares, Patricia Novaes; Peixoto, Thamara Cherem; Carvalho, Janaine Cavalcanti; Calvino, Camila; Rodrigues, Vanessa Silva Tavares; Bernardino, Dayse Nascimento; Younes-Rapozo, Viviane; Manhães, Alex Christian; de Oliveira, Elaine; de Moura, Egberto Gaspar

    2017-07-01

    Children from smoking mothers have a higher risk of developing obesity and associated comorbidities later in life. Different experimental models have been used to assess the mechanisms involved with this increased risk. Using a rat model of neonatal nicotine exposure via implantation of osmotic minipumps in lactating dams, we have previously shown marked sexual dimorphisms regarding metabolic and endocrine outcomes in the adult progeny. Considering that more than four thousand substances are found in tobacco smoke besides nicotine, we then studied a rat model of neonatal tobacco smoke exposure: adult male offspring had hyperphagia, obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, secondary hyperthyroidism and lower adrenal hormones. Since litters were culled to include only males and since sexual dimorphisms had already been identified in the nicotine exposure model, here we also evaluated the effects of tobacco smoke exposure during lactation on females. Wistar rat dams and their pups were separated into two groups of 8 litters each: SMOKE (4 cigarettes per day, from postnatal day 3 to 21) and CONTROL (filtered air). Offspring of both sexes were euthanized at PN21 and PN180. Changes in male offspring corroborated previous data. At weaning, females showed lower body mass gain and serum triglycerides, but no alterations in visceral fat and hormones. At adulthood, females had higher body mass, hyperphagia, central obesity, hyperleptinemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypercorticosteronemia, but no change in serum TSH and T3, and adrenal catecholamine CONCLUSIONS: Sexual dimorphisms were observed in several parameters, thus indicating that metabolic and hormonal changes due to smoke exposure during development are sex-dependent.

  18. GAS SURFACE DENSITY, STAR FORMATION RATE SURFACE DENSITY, AND THE MAXIMUM MASS OF YOUNG STAR CLUSTERS IN A DISK GALAXY. II. THE GRAND-DESIGN GALAXY M51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Lopezlira, Rosa A. [On sabbatical leave from the Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, UNAM, Campus Morelia, Michoacan, C.P. 58089, Mexico. (Mexico); Pflamm-Altenburg, Jan; Kroupa, Pavel, E-mail: r.gonzalez@crya.unam.mx [Argelander Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2013-06-20

    We analyze the relationship between maximum cluster mass and surface densities of total gas ({Sigma}{sub gas}), molecular gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}}), neutral gas ({Sigma}{sub H{sub I}}), and star formation rate ({Sigma}{sub SFR}) in the grand-design galaxy M51, using published gas data and a catalog of masses, ages, and reddenings of more than 1800 star clusters in its disk, of which 223 are above the cluster mass distribution function completeness limit. By comparing the two-dimensional distribution of cluster masses and gas surface densities, we find for clusters older than 25 Myr that M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.4{+-}0.2}}, whereM{sub 3rd} is the median of the five most massive clusters. There is no correlation with{Sigma}{sub gas},{Sigma}{sub H2}, or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. For clusters younger than 10 Myr, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub I}{sup 0.6{+-}0.1}} and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 0.5{+-}0.2}; there is no correlation with either {Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}} or{Sigma}{sub SFR}. The results could hardly be more different from those found for clusters younger than 25 Myr in M33. For the flocculent galaxy M33, there is no correlation between maximum cluster mass and neutral gas, but we have determined M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub gas}{sup 3.8{+-}0.3}, M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub H{sub 2}{sup 1.2{+-}0.1}}, and M{sub 3rd}{proportional_to}{Sigma}{sub SFR}{sup 0.9{+-}0.1}. For the older sample in M51, the lack of tight correlations is probably due to the combination of strong azimuthal variations in the surface densities of gas and star formation rate, and the cluster ages. These two facts mean that neither the azimuthal average of the surface densities at a given radius nor the surface densities at the present-day location of a stellar cluster represent the true surface densities at the place and time of cluster formation. In the case of the younger sample, even if the clusters have not yet

  19. Intermediate processes in nuclear reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovici, M.

    1983-01-01

    The main results presented here cannot be interpreted in terms of the direct reaction model or the statistical models and one can more or less explicitely use some nuclear configurations for their interpretation. The first chapter deals with the so-called second order intermediate structures observed in the elastic and inelastic proton scattering on 66 Zn and 70 Ge targets in the energetic regions of some isobaric analog resonances. A formal theory for their interpretation is developed and the comparison with the experimental data is presented. New experimental results on the resonant structures observed in the elastic and inelastic scattering of 12 C on 24 Mg are presented in the second chapter. Detailed statistical analysis and their interpretation is presented too. Charge equilibration in deep inelastic collisions is the main subject of the third chapter. The experimental results obtained by the 98 Mo + 154 Sm collision at 12 MeV/n, a quantum treatment of a damped harmonic oscillator and the comparison with the experimental data are given. In the last chapter, some results on the existence of two other processes which could candidate to be involved in the main topic are presented. Those processes are: the fast fragmentation and preequilibrium charged particles emission. All these processes originate in the excitation of some simple configurations which can be seen on ''doorway'' states (''Hallway'' in the case of the second intermediate structures). The coupling of these states to other more complicated excitation modes of the nuclei and to outgoing channel=gives the possibility to study the nuclear dynamics. This justifies the interest for their detailed theoretical and experimental investigations. (author)

  20. A Closer Earth and the Faint Young Sun Paradox: Modification of the Laws of Gravitation or Sun/Earth Mass Losses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Iorio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Given a solar luminosity LAr = 0.75L0 at the beginning of the Archean 3.8 Ga ago, where L0 is the present-day one, if the heliocentric distance, r, of the Earth was rAr = 0.956r0, the solar irradiance would have been as large as IAr = 0.82I0. It would have allowed for a liquid ocean on the terrestrial surface, which, otherwise, would have been frozen, contrary to the empirical evidence. By further assuming that some physical mechanism subsequently displaced the Earth towards its current distance in such a way that the irradiance stayed substantially constant over the entire Archean from 3.8 to 2.5 Ga ago, a relative recession per year as large as r˙/r ≈3.4 × 10−11 a−1 would have been required. Although such a figure is roughly of the same order of magnitude of the value of the Hubble parameter 3.8 Ga ago HAr = 1.192H0 = 8.2 × 10−11 a−1, standard general relativity rules out cosmological explanations for the hypothesized Earth’s recession rate. Instead, a class of modified theories of gravitation with nonminimal coupling between the matter and the metric naturally predicts a secular variation of the relative distance of a localized two-body system, thus yielding a potentially viable candidate to explain the putative recession of the Earth’s orbit. Another competing mechanism of classical origin that could, in principle, allow for the desired effect is the mass loss, which either the Sun or the Earth itself may have experienced during the Archean. On the one hand, this implies that our planet should have lost 2% of its present mass in the form of eroded/evaporated hydrosphere. On the other hand, it is widely believed that the Sun could have lost mass at an enhanced rate, due to a stronger solar wind in the past for not more than ≈ 0.2–0.3 Ga.

  1. Family history, body mass index, selected dietary factors, menstrual history, and risk of moderate to severe acne in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Landro, Anna; Cazzaniga, Simone; Parazzini, Fabio; Ingordo, Vito; Cusano, Francesco; Atzori, Laura; Cutrì, Francesco Tripodi; Musumeci, Maria Letizia; Zinetti, Cornelia; Pezzarossa, Enrico; Bettoli, Vincenzo; Caproni, Marzia; Lo Scocco, Giovanni; Bonci, Angela; Bencini, Pierluca; Naldi, Luigi

    2012-12-01

    Genetic and environmental components may contribute to acne causation. We sought to assess the impact of family history, personal habits, dietary factors, and menstrual history on a new diagnosis of moderate to severe acne. We conducted a case-control study in dermatologic outpatient clinics in Italy. Cases (205) were consecutive those receiving a new diagnosis of moderate to severe acne. Control subjects (358) were people with no or mild acne, coming for a dermatologic consultation other than for acne. Moderate to severe acne was strongly associated with a family history of acne in first-degree relatives (odds ratio 3.41, 95% confidence interval 2.31-5.05). The risk was reduced in people with lower body mass index with a more pronounced effect in male compared with female individuals. No association with smoking emerged. The risk increased with increased milk consumption (odds ratio 1.78, 95% confidence interval 1.22-2.59) in those consuming more than 3 portions per week. The association was more marked for skim than for whole milk. Consumption of fish was associated with a protective effect (odds ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.47-0.99). No association emerged between menstrual variables and acne risk. Some degree of overmatching may arise from choosing dermatologic control subjects and from inclusion of mild acne in the control group. Family history, body mass index, and diet may influence the risk of moderate to severe acne. The influence of environmental and dietetic factors in acne should be further explored. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. BANYAN. III. Radial velocity, rotation, and X-ray emission of low-mass star candidates in nearby young kinematic groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malo, Lison; Artigau, Étienne; Doyon, René; Lafrenière, David; Albert, Loïc; Gagné, Jonathan, E-mail: malo@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: doyon@astro.umontreal.ca [Département de physique and Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada)

    2014-06-10

    Based on high-resolution spectra obtained with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, CRIRES at VLT-UT1, and ESPaDOnS at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we present new measurements of the radial and projected rotational velocities of 219 low-mass stars. The target likely membership was initially established using the Bayesian analysis tool recently presented in Malo et al., taking into account only the position, proper motion, and photometry of the stars to assess their membership probability. In the present study, we include radial velocity as an additional input to our analysis, and in doing so we confirm the high membership probability for 130 candidates: 27 in β Pictoris, 22 in Tucana-Horologium, 25 in Columba, 7 in Carina, 18 in Argus and 18 in AB Doradus, and 13 with an ambiguous membership. Our analysis also confirms the membership of 57 stars proposed in the literature. A subsample of 16 candidates was observed at 3 or more epochs, allowing us to discover 6 new spectroscopic binaries. The fraction of binaries in our sample is 25%, consistent with values in the literature. Of the stars in our sample, 20% show projected rotational velocities (vsin i) higher than 30 km s{sup –1} and therefore are considered as fast rotators. A parallax and other youth indicators are still needed to fully confirm the 130 highly probable candidates identified here as new bona fide members. Finally, based on the X-ray emission of bona fide and highly probable group members, we show that for low-mass stars in the 12-120 Myr age range, the X-ray luminosity is an excellent indicator of youth and better than the more traditionally used R {sub X} parameter, the ratio of X-ray to bolometric luminosity.

  3. Anthropometry of young competitive sport rock climbers

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, P; Joubert, L; Lish, A; Mast, J; Wilkins, B

    2003-01-01

    Background: Adult elite competitive rock climbers are small in stature with low body mass and very low body fat percentage. These characteristics have generated concern that young climbers may attempt body mass reduction to extreme levels with adverse consequences for health and performance. No published anthropometry data for young competitive climbers exist.

  4. RHIZOME AND DISCOURSE OF INTERMEDIALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Л Н Синельникова

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhizomaticity is a strategy and a regularity of text creation in a lot of modern commu-nicative discourse practices. What remains urgent is the problem of the systematic interdisciplinary de-scription of texts whose structure and language qualities are determined by the signs of the rhizome - a concept of post-modern philosophy introduced into the scientific field by the French philosopher Gilles Deleuze and the psychotherapist Félix Guattari (Deleuze, Guattari 1996. The rhizome (Fr. rhizome - rootstock, tuber, bulb, mycelium possesses the following qualities: it is non-linear, open and directed towards the unpredictability of discourse transformations through the possibilities of structure development in any direction; there is no centre or periphery in the rhizome, and any discourse element can become ‘a vital structure’ for text-creation. The rhizome does not have non-intersecting boundaries; and in the space of the rhizomatic discourse environment, an increase of reality facets takes place, non-standard associative con-nections appear, multiplication effects are formed, which create new meanings. Rhizomaticity is the quality of texts being organised by the laws of rhizomatic logic (V.F. Sharkov 2007, by the terms of which ‘su-perposition’ of discourses can take place, a transition from one semiotic system to another. The article makes an attempt to correlate the qualities of the rhizome with the signs of the intermedia discourse, which is built on the semiotic interaction of different media. The moving lines of the rhizome, its ‘branch-ing’ qualities can be found in poetic texts, in the evaluating segments of political discourse, in advertising discourse, in internet communications, which represent rhizomorphic environments. An analysis of examples from these spheres has shown that the rhizomatic approach opens new facets of intermediality. The author uses the methods of discourse analysis to prove that the openness and non

  5. On financial equilibrium with intermediation costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markeprand, Tobias Ejnar

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the set of competitive equilibria in financial economies with intermediation costs. We consider an arbitrary dividend structure, which includes options and equity with limited liabilities.We show a general existence result and upper-hemi continuity of the equilibrium...... correspondence. Finally, we prove that when intermediation costs approach zero, unbounded volume of asset trades is a necessary and sufficient condition, provided that, there is no financial equilibrium without intermediation costs....

  6. Biocatalytic Synthesis of Chiral Pharmaceutical Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh N. Patel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of single enantiomers of drug intermediates has become increasingly important in the pharmaceutical industry. Chiral intermediates and fine chemicals are in high demand from both the pharmaceutical and agrochemical industries for the preparation of bulk drug substances and agricultural products. The enormous potential of microorganisms and enzymes for the transformation of synthetic chemicals with high chemo-, regio- and enantioselectivities has been demonstrated. In this article, biocatalytic processes are described for the synthesis of chiral pharmaceutical intermediates.

  7. Experiments in intermediate energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehnhard, D.

    2003-02-28

    Research in experimental nuclear physics was done from 1979 to 2002 primarily at intermediate energy facilities that provide pion, proton, and kaon beams. Particularly successful has been the work at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) on unraveling the neutron and proton contributions to nuclear ground state and transition densities. This work was done on a wide variety of nuclei and with great detail on the carbon, oxygen, and helium isotopes. Some of the investigations involved the use of polarized targets which allowed the extraction of information on the spin-dependent part of the triangle-nucleon interaction. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) we studied proton-induced charge exchange reactions with results of importance to astrophysics and the nuclear few-body problem. During the first few years, the analysis of heavy-ion nucleus scattering data that had been taken prior to 1979 was completed. During the last few years we created hypernuclei by use of a kaon beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and an electron beam at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab). The data taken at BNL for a study of the non-mesonic weak decay of the A particle in a nucleus are still under analysis by our collaborators. The work at JLab resulted in the best resolution hypernuclear spectra measured thus far with magnetic spectrometers.

  8. Unconventional actin conformations localize on intermediate filaments in mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubert, Thomas; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Gettemans, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Unconventional actin conformations colocalize with vimentin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. → These conformations are detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 ('lower dimer') and 2G2 ('nuclear actin'), but not C4 (monomeric actin). → Mitotic unconventional actin cables are independent of filamentous actin or microtubules. → Unconventional actin colocalizes with vimentin on a nocodazole-induced perinuclear dense mass of cables. -- Abstract: Different structural conformations of actin have been identified in cells and shown to reside in distinct subcellular locations of cells. In this report, we describe the localization of actin on a cage-like structure in metaphase HEK 293T cells. Actin was detected with the anti-actin antibodies 1C7 and 2G2, but not with the anti-actin antibody C4. Actin contained in this structure is independent of microtubules and actin filaments, and colocalizes with vimentin. Taking advantage of intermediate filament collapse into a perinuclear dense mass of cables when microtubules are depolymerized, we were able to relocalize actin to such structures. We hypothesize that phosphorylation of intermediate filaments at mitosis entry triggers the recruitment of different actin conformations to mitotic intermediate filaments. Storage and partition of the nuclear actin and antiparallel 'lower dimer' actin conformations between daughter cells possibly contribute to gene transcription and transient actin filament dynamics at G1 entry.

  9. Compact Intermediate-Temperature Fuel Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Yipeng

    2003-01-01

    In Phase I, we demonstrate the feasibility of making supported electronically insulating, proton conducting inorganic thin films on metal hydride foils for intermediate temperature fuel cell electrolytes...

  10. Relic Neutralino Density in Scenarios with Intermediate Unification Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Khalil, S; Torrente-Lujan, E

    2002-01-01

    We analyse the relic neutralino density in supersymmetric models with an intermediate unification scale. In particular, we present concrete cosmological scenarios where the reheating temperature is as small as $\\cal{O}$ $1 - 1000$ MeV). When this temperature is associated to the decay of moduli fields producing neutralinos, we show that the relic abundance increases considerably with respect to the standard thermal production. Thus the neutralino becomes a good dark matter candidate with $0.1\\lsim \\Omega h^2 \\lsim 0.3$, even for regions of the parameter space where large neutralino-nucleon cross sections, compatible with current dark matter experiments, are present. This is obtained for intermediate scales $M_I\\sim 10^{11}-10^{14}$ GeV, and moduli masses $m_\\phi\\sim 100-1000$ GeV. On the other hand, when the above temperature is associated to the decay of an inflaton field, the relic abundance is too small.

  11. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, B.E.; Mutchler, G.S.

    1991-01-01

    The theme that unites the sometimes seemingly disparate experiments undertaken by the Bonner Lab Medium Energy Group is a determination to understand in detail the many facets and manifestations of the strong interaction, that which is now referred to as nonperturbative QCD. Whether we are investigating the question of just what does carry the spin of baryons, or the extent of the validity of the SU(6) wavefunctions for the excited hyperons (as will be measured in their radiative decays in our CEBAF experiment), or questions associated with the formation of a new state of matter predicted by QCD (the subject of our BNL experiments E810, E854, as well as our approved experiment at RHIC), -- all these projects share this common goal. Our other experiments represent different approaches to the same broad undertaking. LAMPF E1097 will provide definitive answers to the question of the spin dependence of the inelastic channel of pion production in the n-p interaction. FNAL E683 may well open a new field of investigation in nuclear physics: that of just how quarks and gluons interact with nuclear matter as they transverse nuclei of different sizes. In most all of the experiments mentioned above, the Bonner Lab Group is playing major leadership roles as well as doing a big fraction of the hard work that such experiments require. We use many of the facilities that are unavailable to the intermediate energy physics community and we use our expertise to design and fabricate the detectors and instrumentation that are required to perform the measurements which we decide to do

  12. Nuclear structure at intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonner, B.E.; Mutchler, G.S.

    1991-09-30

    The theme that unites the sometimes seemingly disparate experiments undertaken by the Bonner Lab Medium Energy Group is a determination to understand in detail the many facets and manifestations of the strong interaction, that which is now referred to as nonperturbative QCD. Whether we are investigating the question of just what does carry the spin of baryons, or the extent of the validity of the SU(6) wavefunctions for the excited hyperons (as will be measured in their radiative decays in our CEBAF experiment), or questions associated with the formation of a new state of matter predicted by QCD (the subject of our BNL experiments E810, E854, as well as our approved experiment at RHIC), -- all these projects share this common goal. Our other experiments represent different approaches to the same broad undertaking. LAMPF E1097 will provide definitive answers to the question of the spin dependence of the inelastic channel of pion production in the n-p interaction. FNAL E683 may well open a new field of investigation in nuclear physics: that of just how quarks and gluons interact with nuclear matter as they transverse nuclei of different sizes. In most all of the experiments mentioned above, the Bonner Lab Group is playing major leadership roles as well as doing a big fraction of the hard work that such experiments require. We use many of the facilities that are unavailable to the intermediate energy physics community and we use our expertise to design and fabricate the detectors and instrumentation that are required to perform the measurements which we decide to do.

  13. A comparison of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and two bioelectrical impedance analyzers to measure body fat percentage and fat-free mass index in a group of Mexican young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Alva, Maria Del Consuelo; Irigoyen-Camacho, Maria Esther; Huerta-Huerta, Raquel; Delgadillo-Velazquez, Jaime

    2014-05-01

    Studies of obesity require the estimation of fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM); therefore it is important to validate methods that evaluate these measurements. We sought to compare two different bioelectrical impedance analysis systems (BIAs) to estimate FM and FFM using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as reference. We used a cross-sectional design. We evaluated FM and FFM using DXA and two types of BIA equipment: a foot-foot system (FFS) and a hand-foot system (HFS). We conducted paired analysis (paired ttest). We used Bland-Altman plots to assess the relationships between FM and FFMI, limits of agreement were constructed (CL). A total of 175 female students (22.9 ± 2.2 years old) participated in the study. The paired analysis showed significant differences between the mean value of body fat percentage (BF%) estimated by BIA equipment compared to DXA (FFS = 28.7%, HFS= 34.4% and DXA= 35.3%). The mean difference between the HFS and DXA of BF% was -0.96, ((CL -5.29, 7.20). For the FFS, the mean difference was -6.69, (CL -0.29, -13.09). The paired analysis revealed significant differences between the estimates of FFMI by BIA compared to DXA (FFS =16.29, HFS =14.95, DXA =14.18). The mean difference between HFS and DXA was 0.78, and (CL -2.27, 0.72) whereas the FFS mean difference was -2.11 (CL -3.73 -0.49). A different magnitude of bias was observed between the BIA equipment arrays. The HFS appears to be more reliable than the FFS used, particularly in obtaining FFMI in young women. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  14. 19 CFR 122.84 - Intermediate airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intermediate airport. 122.84 Section 122.84... Intermediate airport. (a) Application. The provisions of this section apply at any U.S. airport to which an... aircraft arrives at the next airport, the aircraft commander or agent shall make entry by filing the: (1...

  15. Gasoline Engine Mechanics. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marion

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of six terminal objectives presented in this curriculum guide for an intermediate gasoline engine mechanics course at the secondary level. (For the beginning course guide see CE 010 947.) The materials were developed for a two-semester (2 hour…

  16. Some Intermediate-Level Violin Concertos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Contends that many violin students attempt difficult concertos before they are technically or musically prepared. Identifies a variety of concertos at the intermediate and advanced intermediate-level for students to study and master before attempting the advanced works by Bach and Mozart. Includes concertos by Vivaldi, Leclair, Viotti, Haydn,…

  17. Automotive Body Repair. Performance Objectives. Intermediate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Thomas

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 10 terminal objectives for an intermediate automotive body repair and refinishing course. The materials were developed for a two-semester (3 hours daily) course for specialized classrooms, shop, and practical experiences designed to enable the…

  18. 39 CFR 3001.39 - Intermediate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermediate decisions. 3001.39 Section 3001.39 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Rules of General Applicability § 3001.39 Intermediate decisions. (a) Initial decision by presiding officer. In any proceedings in...

  19. Brazil : Interest Rates and Intermediation Spreads

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2006-01-01

    This study sheds light on the analytical and policy issues regarding the high intermediation spread in Brazil, focusing on its determinants, the reasons for its persistence, and its impact on the real economy, especially on access to finance for Brazilian firms. The key contention of the analysis is that high intermediation spreads are a symptom of underlying problems; as such, spreads constitute ...

  20. Young Money

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roelsgaard Obling, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Book review of: Kevin Roose: "Young Money: Inside the Hidden World of Wall Street's Post-Crash Recruits". New York: Grand Central Publishing, 2014. 320 pp.......Book review of: Kevin Roose: "Young Money: Inside the Hidden World of Wall Street's Post-Crash Recruits". New York: Grand Central Publishing, 2014. 320 pp....

  1. Mass at work

    CERN Document Server

    Kukla, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    From weight to size to motion, science is at work all around us! Mass at Workintroduces young readers to a physical science concept. A high-impact design and engaging visuals help bring this important concept to life as readers learn all about mass in the real world. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Applied to STEM Concepts of Learning Principles. Sandcastle is an imprint of Abdo Publishing, a division of ABDO.

  2. Epithelial Intermediate Filaments: Guardians against Microbial Infection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Geisler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Intermediate filaments are abundant cytoskeletal components of epithelial tissues. They have been implicated in overall stress protection. A hitherto poorly investigated area of research is the function of intermediate filaments as a barrier to microbial infection. This review summarizes the accumulating knowledge about this interaction. It first emphasizes the unique spatial organization of the keratin intermediate filament cytoskeleton in different epithelial tissues to protect the organism against microbial insults. We then present examples of direct interaction between viral, bacterial, and parasitic proteins and the intermediate filament system and describe how this affects the microbe-host interaction by modulating the epithelial cytoskeleton, the progression of infection, and host response. These observations not only provide novel insights into the dynamics and function of intermediate filaments but also indicate future avenues to combat microbial infection.

  3. Effect of Intermediate Hosts on Emerging Zoonoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jing-An; Chen, Fangyuan; Fan, Shengjie

    2017-08-01

    Most emerging zoonotic pathogens originate from animals. They can directly infect humans through natural reservoirs or indirectly through intermediate hosts. As a bridge, an intermediate host plays different roles in the transmission of zoonotic pathogens. In this study, we present three types of pathogen transmission to evaluate the effect of intermediate hosts on emerging zoonotic diseases in human epidemics. These types are identified as follows: TYPE 1, pathogen transmission without an intermediate host for comparison; TYPE 2, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as an amplifier; and TYPE 3, pathogen transmission with an intermediate host as a vessel for genetic variation. In addition, we established three mathematical models to elucidate the mechanisms underlying zoonotic disease transmission according to these three types. Stability analysis indicated that the existence of intermediate hosts increased the difficulty of controlling zoonotic diseases because of more difficult conditions to satisfy for the disease to die out. The human epidemic would die out under the following conditions: TYPE 1: [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]; TYPE 2: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text]; and TYPE 3: [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] Simulation with similar parameters demonstrated that intermediate hosts could change the peak time and number of infected humans during a human epidemic; intermediate hosts also exerted different effects on controlling the prevalence of a human epidemic with natural reservoirs in different periods, which is important in addressing problems in public health. Monitoring and controlling the number of natural reservoirs and intermediate hosts at the right time would successfully manage and prevent the prevalence of emerging zoonoses in humans.

  4. Young Love

    OpenAIRE

    Regmi, Pramod; Simkhada, Padam; Van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2010-01-01

    Your article on love and relationship deals with a very important issue (“Love makes the world go round,” Feb. 15, Page 1).It is now widely accepted that romantic relationships and dating are normative among adolescents and young people in Nepal. In our qualitative study of urban and rural young males and females using same sex researchers — in perhaps the first study of dating practice among Nepali youth — almost all of our respondents reported that young people in Nepal form partnerships wi...

  5. An evaluation of ICD-11 posttraumatic stress disorder criteria in two samples of adolescents and young adults exposed to mass shootings: factor analysis and comparisons to ICD-10 and DSM-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haravuori, Henna; Kiviruusu, Olli; Suomalainen, Laura; Marttunen, Mauri

    2016-05-12

    The proposed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) criteria for the International Classification of Diseases (ICD) 11th revision are simpler than the criteria in ICD-10, DSM-IV or DSM-5. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ICD-11 PTSD factor structure in samples of young people, and to compare PTSD prevalence rates and diagnostic agreement between the different diagnostic systems. Possible differences in clinical characteristics of the PTSD cases identified by ICD-11, ICD-10 and DSM-IV are explored. Two samples of adolescents and young adults were followed after exposure to similar mass shooting incidents in their schools. Semi-structured diagnostic interviews were performed to assess psychiatric diagnoses and PTSD symptom scores (N = 228, mean age 17.6 years). PTSD symptom item scores were used to compose diagnoses according to the different classification systems. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that the proposed ICD-11 PTSD symptoms represented two rather than three factors; re-experiencing and avoidance symptoms comprised one factor and hyperarousal symptoms the other factor. In the studied samples, the three-factor ICD-11 criteria identified 51 (22.4%) PTSD cases, the two-factor ICD-11 identified 56 (24.6%) cases and the DSM-IV identified 43 (18.9%) cases, while the number of cases identified by ICD-10 was larger, being 85 (37.3%) cases. Diagnostic agreement of the ICD-11 PTSD criteria with ICD-10 and DSM-IV was moderate, yet the diagnostic agreement turned to be good when an impairment criterion was imposed on ICD-10. Compared to ICD-11, ICD-10 identified cases with less severe trauma exposure and posttraumatic symptoms and DSM-IV identified cases with less severe trauma exposure. The findings suggest that the two-factor model of ICD-11 PTSD is preferable to the three-factor model. The proposed ICD-11 criteria are more restrictive compared to the ICD-10 criteria. There were some differences in the clinical characteristics of the PTSD cases

  6. Language in use intermediate : classroom book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1995-01-01

    ach of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  7. Language in use intermediate : teacher's book

    CERN Document Server

    Doff, Adrian

    1998-01-01

    Each of the four levels comprises about 80 hours of class work, with additional time for the self-study work. The Teacher's Book contains all the pages from the Classroom Book, with interleaved teaching notes including optional activities to cater for different abilities. There is a video to accompany the Beginner, Pre-intermediate and Intermediate levels. Each video contains eight stimulating and entertaining short programmes, as well as a booklet of photocopiable activities. Free test material is available in booklet and web format for Beginner and Pre-intermediate levels. Visit www.cambridge.org/elt/liu or contact your local Cambridge University Press representative.

  8. Intermedial Strategies of Memory in Contemporary Novels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanderup, Sara

    2014-01-01

    , and Judd Morrissey and drawing on the theoretical perspectives of N. Katherine Hayles (media studies) and Andreas Huyssen (cultural memory studies), Tanderup argues that recent intermedial novels reflect a certain nostalgia celebrating and remembering the book as a visual and material object in the age......In her article "Intermedial Strategies and Memory in Contemporary Novels" Sara Tanderup discusses a tendency in contemporary literature towards combining intermedial experiments with a thematic preoccupation with memory and trauma. Analyzing selected works by Steven Hall, Jonathan Safran Foer...... of digital media while also highlighting the influence of new media on our cultural understanding and representation of memory and the past....

  9. Transport and transformation of surface water masses across the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transport and transformation of surface water masses across the Mascarene Plateau during the Northeast Monsoon season. ... Mixing occurs in the central gap between intermediate water masses (Red Sea Water [RSW] and Antarctic Intermediate Water [AAIW]) as well as in the upper waters (Subtropical Surface Water ...

  10. Intermediate/Advanced Research Design and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this module is To provide Institutional Researchers (IRs) with an understanding of the principles of advanced research design and the intermediate/advanced statistical procedures consistent with such designs

  11. The deterioration of intermediate moisture foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labruza, T. P.

    1971-01-01

    Deteriorative reactions are low and food quality high if intermediate moisture content of a food is held at a water activity of 0.6 to 0.75. Information is of interest to food processing and packaging industry.

  12. Proposed changes in intermediate pipe break criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    Bechtel Power Corporation proposed to the US NRC in 1983 that the NRC eliminate from their criteria all intermediate breaks. Bechtel's rationale for the proposal and support for their position are presented

  13. MNE Entrepreneurial Capabilities at Intermediate Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoenen, Anne K.; Nell, Phillip Christopher; Ambos, Björn

    2014-01-01

    at intermediate geographical levels differ from local subsidiaries and global corporate headquarters, and why those differences are important. We illustrate our arguments using data on European regional headquarters (RHQs). We find that RHQs' entrepreneurial capabilities depend on their external embeddedness...

  14. Directional spread parameter at intermediate water depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    SanilKumar, V.; Deo, M.C.; Anand, N.M.; AshokKumar, K.

    The characteristics of directional spread parameters at intermediate water depth are investigated based on a cosine power '2s' directional spreading model. This is based on wave measurements carried out using a Datawell directional waverider buoy...

  15. Intermediality, Architecture, and the Politics of Urbanity

    OpenAIRE

    Tortosa Garrigós, Virgilio

    2011-01-01

    In his article "Intermediality, Architecture, and the Politics of Urbanity" Virgilio Tortosa Garrigós discusses aspects of the exponential development of large cities, the neoliberal economy, and the "spectacle" of architecture in the context of intermediality. With the connivance between land speculators and politicians — which has led not only to the loss of spatial identity but to irreversible pollution and geographic degradation — urbanity is epitomized on the Mediterranean coast line. In...

  16. Intermediate Inflation or Late Time Acceleration?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    The expansion rate of intermediate inflation lies between the exponential and power law expansion but corresponding accelerated expansion does not start at the onset of cosmological evolution. Present study of intermediate inflation reveals that it admits scaling solution and has got a natural exit form it at a later epoch of cosmic evolution, leading to late time acceleration. The corresponding scalar field responsible for such feature is also found to behave as a tracker field for gravity with canonical kinetic term.

  17. Lymphatic filariasis elimination efforts in Rufiji, southeastern Tanzania: decline in circulating filarial antigen prevalence in young school children after twelve rounds of mass drug administration and utilization of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clarer; Ngasalla, Billy; Derua, Yahya A; Tarimo, Donath; Malecela, Mwelecele N

    2017-08-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (LF) is a parasitic infection transmitted by mosquito vectors, and in Sub-Saharan Africa it is caused by the nematode Wuchereria bancrofti. The disease has been targeted for global elimination with the annual mass drug administration (MDA) strategy. Vector control is known to play an important complementary role to MDA in reducing the transmission of LF. The effects of an MDA and insecticide-treated net intervention implemented in an endemic area of southeastern Tanzania are reported here. A cross-sectional study assessing W. bancrofti circulating filarial antigen (CFA) was conducted in five primary schools in five different villages. Standard one pupils aged 6-9 years were screened for CFA using immunochromatographic test cards (ICT), with a total of 413 screened in 2012 and 659 in 2015. Just after CFA testing, the children were interviewed on their participation in the MDA campaign. Moreover, 246 heads of households in 2012 and 868 in 2015 were interviewed on their participation in MDA and utilization of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs). The prevalence of CFA for the 413 children tested in 2012 was 14.3%, while it was 0.0% for the 659 children tested in 2015. The Tanzanian National Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Programme reported annual treatment coverage for Rufiji District ranging from 54.3% to 94.0% during the years 2002-2014. The surveyed treatment was 51.6% in 2011 and 57.4% in 2014. With regard to LLINs, possession and utilization increased from 63.4% and 59.2%, respectively, in 2012, to 92.5% and 75.4%, respectively, in 2015. The findings suggest that 12 rounds of MDA complemented with vector control through the use of insecticide-treated nets resulted in a marked reduction in W. bancrofti CFA in young school children. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Higher order antibunching in intermediate states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Amit; Sharma, Navneet K.; Pathak, Anirban

    2008-01-01

    Since the introduction of binomial state as an intermediate state, different intermediate states have been proposed. Different nonclassical effects have also been reported in these intermediate states. But till now higher order antibunching is predicted in only one type of intermediate state, which is known as shadowed negative binomial state. Recently we have shown that the higher order antibunching is not a rare phenomenon [P. Gupta, P. Pandey, A. Pathak, J. Phys. B 39 (2006) 1137]. To establish our earlier claim further, here we have shown that the higher order antibunching can be seen in different intermediate states, such as binomial state, reciprocal binomial state, hypergeometric state, generalized binomial state, negative binomial state and photon added coherent state. We have studied the possibility of observing the higher order subpoissonian photon statistics in different limits of intermediate states. The effects of different control parameters on the depth of non classicality have also been studied in this connection and it has been shown that the depth of nonclassicality can be tuned by controlling various physical parameters

  19. Associations of Systemic Diseases with Intermediate Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoughy, Samir S; Kozak, Igor; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2016-01-01

    To determine the associations of systemic diseases with intermediate uveitis. The medical records of 50 consecutive cases with intermediate uveitis referred to The Eye Center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, were reviewed. Age- and sex-matched patients without uveitis served as controls. Patients had complete ophthalmic and medical examinations. There were 27 male and 23 female patients. Mean age was 29 years with a range of 5-62 years. Overall, 21 cases (42%) had systemic disorders associated with intermediate uveitis and 29 cases (58%) had no associated systemic disease. A total of 11 patients (22%) had asthma, 4 (8%) had multiple sclerosis, 3 (6%) had presumed ocular tuberculosis, 1 (2%) had inflammatory bowel disease, 1 (2%) had non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 1 (2%) had sarcoidosis. Evidence of systemic disease was found in 50 (5%) of the 1,000 control subjects. Bronchial asthma was found in 37 patients (3.7 %), multiple sclerosis in 9 patients (0.9%), inflammatory bowel disease in 3 patients (0.3%), and tuberculosis in 1 patient (0.1%). None of the control patients had sarcoidosis or lymphoma. There were statistically significant associations between intermediate uveitis and bronchial asthma (p = 0.0001), multiple sclerosis (p = 0.003) and tuberculosis (p = 0.0005). Bronchial asthma and multiple sclerosis were the most frequently encountered systemic diseases associated with intermediate uveitis in our patient population. Patients with intermediate uveitis should undergo careful history-taking and investigations to rule out associated systemic illness.

  20. Partially folded intermediates during trypsinogen denaturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins N.F.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium unfolding of bovine trypsinogen was studied by circular dichroism, differential spectra and size exclusion HPLC. The change in free energy of denaturation was = 6.99 ± 1.40 kcal/mol for guanidine hydrochloride and = 6.37 ± 0.57 kcal/mol for urea. Satisfactory fits of equilibrium unfolding transitions required a three-state model involving an intermediate in addition to the native and unfolded forms. Size exclusion HPLC allowed the detection of an intermediate population of trypsinogen whose Stokes radii varied from 24.1 ± 0.4 Å to 26.0 ± 0.3 Å for 1.5 M and 2.5 M guanidine hydrochloride, respectively. During urea denaturation, the range of Stokes radii varied from 23.9 ± 0.3 Å to 25.7 ± 0.6 Å for 4.0 M and 6.0 M urea, respectively. Maximal intrinsic fluorescence was observed at about 3.8 M urea with 8-aniline-1-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS binding. These experimental data indicate that the unfolding of bovine trypsinogen is not a simple transition and suggest that the equilibrium intermediate population comprises one intermediate that may be characterized as a molten globule. To obtain further insight by studying intermediates representing different stages of unfolding, we hope to gain a better understanding of the complex interrelations between protein conformation and energetics.

  1. Observation of an intermediate state in psi (3684) radiative cascade decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanenbaum, W.; Whitaker, J.S.; Abrams, G.S.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Bulos, F.; Chinowsky, W.; Feldman, G.J.; Friedberg, C.E.; Fryberger, D.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Hartill, D.L.; Jean-Marie, B.; Kadyk, J.A.; Larsen, R.R.; Litke, A.M.; Luke, D.; Lulu, B.A.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H.L.; Morehouse, C.C.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Pierre, F.M.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Sadoulet, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Trilling, G.H.; Vannucci, F.; Winkelmann, F.C.; Wiss, J.E.

    1975-01-01

    We present evidence for the existence of an intermediate state observed in the decay sequence psi(3684) → psi(3095)γγ. The mass of the state is either 3500+-10 or 3270+-10 MeV. The branching fraction of the sequence is (3.6+-0.7)%

  2. The ARES High-level Intermediate Representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moss, Nicholas David [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-03

    The LLVM intermediate representation (IR) lacks semantic constructs for depicting common high-performance operations such as parallel and concurrent execution, communication and synchronization. Currently, representing such semantics in LLVM requires either extending the intermediate form (a signi cant undertaking) or the use of ad hoc indirect means such as encoding them as intrinsics and/or the use of metadata constructs. In this paper we discuss a work in progress to explore the design and implementation of a new compilation stage and associated high-level intermediate form that is placed between the abstract syntax tree and when it is lowered to LLVM's IR. This highlevel representation is a superset of LLVM IR and supports the direct representation of these common parallel computing constructs along with the infrastructure for supporting analysis and transformation passes on this representation.

  3. Young Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoogd, Glenn, Ed.

    This document contains the following papers focusing on contexts and activities in which teachers can use technology to promote learning with young children: (1) "Read, Write and Click: Using Digital Camera Technology in a Language Arts and Literacy K-5 Classroom" (Judith F. Robbins and Jacqueline Bedell); (2) "Technology for the…

  4. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MASS OF NEWLY HATCHED INDIVIDUALS AND COCOON MASS IN LUMBRICID EARTHWORMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruus, Marianne; Bjerre, Arne

    1991-01-01

    Earthworm cocoons from laboratory cultures were collected and their mass was determined. When hatched, the mass of the young worms was found. Cocoon mass and the mass of hatchlings varied considerably within species. The hygromass of newly hatched earthworms was found to correlate linearly...

  5. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

  6. Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities

  7. Governance-Default Risk Relationship and the Demand for Intermediated and Non-Intermediated Debt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husam Aldamen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of corporate governance on the demand for intermediated debt (asset finance, bank debt, non-bank private debt and non-intermediated debt (public debt in the Australian debt market. Relative to other countries the Australian debt market is characterised by higher proportions of intermediated or private debt with a lower inherent level of information asymmetry in that private lenders have greater access to financial information (Gray, Koh & Tong 2009. Our firm level, cross-sectional evidence suggests that higher corporate governance impacts demand for debt via the mitigation of default risk. However, this relationship is not uniform across all debt types. Intermediated debt such as bank and asset finance debt are more responsive to changes in governance-default risk relationship than non-bank and non-intermediated debt. The implication is that a firm’s demand for different debt types will reflect its governance-default risk profile.

  8. Metabolomic study of aging in mouse plasma by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Chan; Hwang, Yun-Ho; Kim, Youngbae; Joo, Bo Sun; Yee, Sung-Tae; Kim, Cheol Min; Paik, Man-Jeong

    2016-07-01

    Metabolomic analysis of aging was performed in plasma samples of young (8 weeks) and old (72 weeks) mice as ethoxycarbonyl/methoxime/tert-butyldimethylsilyl derivatives by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). As new approaches, study of altered metabolism from aging was attempted by simultaneous profiling analysis of amino acids (AAs), organic acids (OAs) and fatty acids (FAs) by GC-MS in a single run combined with pattern analysis. As a result, 27 amino acids (AAs), 17 organic acids (OAs) and 24 fatty acids (FAs) were positively screened with large variations in plasma samples. Among altered metabolites, levels of six AAs (proline, methionine, 4-hydroxyproline, pipecolic acid, glutamic acid, α-aminoadipic acid) as neurotransmetters and nutrients, five OAs (2-hydroxybutyric acid, 2-hydroxyglutaric acid, cis-aconitic acid citric acid, isocitric acid) including intermediate metabolites in the TCA cycle, and three n-3 polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs) of α-octadecatrienoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid as potential biomarkers were significantly different between young and old groups. Their levels were normalized to the corresponding mean values of the young group and then plotted into star symbol patterns, which were clearly distinct compared with numerical data and readily distinguishable for young and old groups. Thus, the present metabolomic screening and the star pattern recognition method might be useful for understanding the complexity of biochemical events in aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Young-Onset Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What Is Parkinson's? › Young Onset Parkinson's Young-Onset Parkinson's 1. Symptoms 2. How Is Young-Onset PD ... of the foot Why Is Distinguishing Young-Onset Parkinson's Important? Socially, people who are affected by PD ...

  10. Fostering teamwork in an intermediate care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spence, Heather; Cappleman, Julia

    2011-06-01

    The government has emphasised that, to deliver high quality, integrated care, staff must work across organisational boundaries using a team approach so that everyone works towards the same goals. This article describes how one NHS-managed intermediate care unit has integrated care staff employed by the independent sector.

  11. Essays in corporate finance and financial intermediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempf, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    This thesis consists of three chapters in corporate finance and financial intermediation. The first two chapters explore sources of incentives and learning for finance professionals. Specifically, the first chapter studies how the option to go work for an investment bank affects the incentives of

  12. 34 CFR 200.17 - Intermediate goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TITLE I-IMPROVING THE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF THE DISADVANTAGED Improving Basic.... Each State must establish intermediate goals that increase in equal increments over the period covered by the timeline under § 200.15 as follows: (a) The first incremental increase must take effect not...

  13. Trusted intermediating agents in electronic trade networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.B. Klos (Tomas); F. Alkemade (Floortje)

    2005-01-01

    htmlabstract Electronic commerce and trading of information goods significantly impact the role of intermediaries: consumers can bypass intermediating agents by forming direct links to producers. One reason that traditional intermediaries can still make a profit, is that they have more knowledge of

  14. Intermediates and Generic Convergence to Equilibria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcondes de Freitas, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Feliu, Elisenda

    2017-01-01

    Known graphical conditions for the generic and global convergence to equilibria of the dynamical system arising from a reaction network are shown to be invariant under the so-called successive removal of intermediates, a systematic procedure to simplify the network, making the graphical condition...

  15. Financial intermediation with credit constrained agents

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boháček, Radim

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 29, č. 4 (2007), s. 741-759 ISSN 0164-0704 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA700850602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : financial intermediation * occupational choice * general equilibrium Subject RIV: AH - Economics Impact factor: 0.360, year: 2007

  16. What Should be Taught in Intermediate Macroeconomics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Pedro; O'Sullivan, Roisin; Simpson, Nicole B.

    2013-01-01

    A lack of consensus remains on what should form the theoretical core of the undergraduate intermediate macroeconomic course. In determining how to deal with the Keynesian/classical divide, instructors must decide whether to follow the modern approach of building macroeconomic relationships from micro foundations, or to use the traditional approach…

  17. Interaction between Biomphalaria pfeifferi, the snail intermediate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological control of snail intermediate host of human schistosome parasites has been suggested. In this study, the effect of Indoplanobis exustus a planorbid snail and possible competitor snail of Biomphalaria pfeifferi on the fecundity and growth rate of the later was evaluated. The results showed a significant difference in ...

  18. Bridge: Intelligent Tutoring with Intermediate Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-01

    Research and Development Center and Psychology Department University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh, PA. 15260 The Artificial Intelligence and Psychology...problem never introduces more than one unfamiliar plan. Inteligent Tutoring With Intermediate Representations - Bonar and Cunniigbam 4 You must have a... Inteligent Tutoring With ntermediate Representations - Bonar and Cunningham 7 The requirements are specified at four differcnt levels, corresponding to

  19. Intermediality and politics in theatre and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dapp, G.S.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation applies the concepts of intermediality and politics to five performances by Rimini Protokoll, Christoph Schlingensief, and Igneous, and analyzes the implications that emerge on both a significational and a theoretical level. Based on the specific mediality involved, it argues that

  20. Changes to the Intermediate Accounting Course Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Lesley H.; Francisco, William H.

    2009-01-01

    There is an ever-growing amount of information that must be covered in Intermediate Accounting courses. Due to recent accounting standards and the implementation of IFRS this trend is likely to continue. This report incorporates the results of a recent survey to examine the trend of spending more course time to cover this additional material.…

  1. Unraveling Intermediate Filaments : The super resolution solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahidiazar, L.

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate Filaments (IFs) carry out major functions in cells. Several diseases have been associated with malfunctioning IFs in the cells and among them are certain sub types of cancer. To determine the structure and organization of IFs, we have used Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM)

  2. Intermediate state trapping of a voltage sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacroix, Jérôme J; Pless, Stephan Alexander; Maragliano, Luca

    2012-01-01

    transition pathway determined using the string method. The experimental results and computational analysis suggest that the phenotype of I241W may originate in the formation of a hydrogen bond between the indole nitrogen atom and the backbone carbonyl of R2. This work provides new information on intermediate...... states in voltage-gated ion channels with an approach that produces minimum chemical perturbation....

  3. Intuitionistic Rules : Admissible Rules of Intermediate Logics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goudsmit, J.P.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the admissible rules of intermediate logics. On the one hand, one can characterize the admissibility of rules in certain logic, and on the other hand, one can characterize logics through their admissible rules. We take both approaches, and reach new results in both

  4. Intermediate Systems Analyst | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The intermediate Systems Analyst will bring to the System Development Group the necessary skills to understand in depth the architecture of Oracle to allow better design and implementation of new and enhanced information systems and applications. The incumbent will take full responsibility for the ITM division's ...

  5. Software Testing An ISEB Intermediate Certificate

    CERN Document Server

    Hambling, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Covering testing fundamentals, reviews, testing and risk, test management and test analysis, this book helps newly qualified software testers to learn the skills and techniques to take them to the next level. Written by leading authors in the field, this is the only official textbook of the ISEB Intermediate Certificate in Software Testing.

  6. Bismuth phosphates as intermediate temperature proton conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Yunjie; Christensen, Erik; Shuai, Qin

    2017-01-01

    Proton conducting electrolyte materials operational in the intermediate temperature range of 200-400 °C are of special interest for applications in fuel cells and water electrolysers. Bismuth phosphates in forms of polycrystalline powders and amorphous glasses are synthesized and investigated...

  7. THE LOW-MASS STELLAR POPULATION IN L1641: EVIDENCE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DEPENDENCE OF THE STELLAR INITIAL MASS FUNCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Wen-Hsin; Hartmann, Lee [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Allen, Lori [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Hernandez, Jesus [Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomia, Apdo. Postal 264, Merida 5101-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Megeath, S. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 West Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Mosby, Gregory [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Tobin, John J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Espaillat, Catherine [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-06-10

    We present results from an optical photometric and spectroscopic survey of the young stellar population in L1641, the low-density star-forming region of the Orion A cloud south of the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). Our goal is to determine whether L1641 has a large enough low-mass population to make the known lack of high-mass stars a statistically significant demonstration of environmental dependence of the upper mass stellar initial mass function (IMF). Our spectroscopic sample consists of IR-excess objects selected from the Spitzer/IRAC survey and non-excess objects selected from optical photometry. We have spectral confirmation of 864 members, with another 98 probable members; of the confirmed members, 406 have infrared excesses and 458 do not. Assuming the same ratio of stars with and without IR excesses in the highly extincted regions, L1641 may contain as many as {approx}1600 stars down to {approx}0.1 M{sub Sun }, comparable within a factor of two to the ONC. Compared to the standard models of the IMF, L1641 is deficient in O and early B stars to a 3{sigma}-4{sigma} significance level, assuming that we know of all the massive stars in L1641. With a forthcoming survey of the intermediate-mass stars, we will be in a better position to make a direct comparison with the neighboring, dense ONC, which should yield a stronger test of the dependence of the high-mass end of the stellar IMF on environment.

  8. Massive, Absorption-selected Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanekar, N.; Prochaska, J. X.; Christensen, L.; Rhodin, N. H. P.; Neeleman, M.; Zwaan, M. A.; Møller, P.; Dessauges-Zavadsky, M.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Zafar, T.

    2018-04-01

    The nature of absorption-selected galaxies and their connection to the general galaxy population have been open issues for more than three decades, with little information available on their gas properties. Here we show, using detections of carbon monoxide emission with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, that five of seven high-metallicity, absorption-selected galaxies at intermediate redshifts, z ≈ 0.5–0.8, have large molecular gas masses, M Mol ≈ (0.6–8.2) × 1010 M ⊙ and high molecular gas fractions (f Mol ≡ M Mol/(M * + M Mol) ≈ 0.29–0.87). Their modest star formation rates (SFRs), ≈(0.3–9.5) M ⊙ yr‑1, then imply long gas depletion timescales, ≈(3–120) Gyr. The high-metallicity absorption-selected galaxies at z ≈ 0.5–0.8 appear distinct from populations of star-forming galaxies at both z ≈ 1.3–2.5, during the peak of star formation activity in the Universe, and lower redshifts, z ≲ 0.05. Their relatively low SFRs, despite the large molecular gas reservoirs, may indicate a transition in the nature of star formation at intermediate redshifts, z ≈ 0.7.

  9. Photodissociation dynamics and spectroscopy of free radical combustion intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osborn, David Lewis [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals is studied by the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Photodetachment of internally cold, mass-selected negative ions produces a clean source of radicals, which are subsequently dissociated and detected. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states of the radical. In addition, the photodissociation dynamics, product branching ratios, and bond energies are probed at fixed photon energies by measuring the translational energy, P(ET), and angular distribution of the recoiling fragments using a time- and position-sensitive detector. Ab initio calculations are combined with dynamical and statistical models to interpret the observed data. The photodissociation of three prototypical hydrocarbon combustion intermediates forms the core of this work.

  10. Calculation of Environmental Conditions in NEK Intermediate Building Following HELB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grgic, D.; Spalj, S.; Basic, I.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of Equipment Qualification (EQ) in nuclear power plants is to ensure the capability of safety related equipment to perform its function on demand under postulated service conditions, including harsh accident environment (e.g. Loss of Coolant Accident - LOCA, High Energy Line Break - HELB). The determination of the EQ conditions and zones is one of the basic steps in the frame of the overall EQ project. The EQ parameters (temperature, pressure, relative humidity, chemical spray, submergence, radiation) should be defined for all locations of the plant containing equipment important to safety. This paper presents the calculation of thermohydraulic environmental parameters (pressure and temperature) inside Intermediate Building (IB) of Krsko NPP after the postulated HELB. The RELAP5/mod2 computer code was used for the determination of HELB mass and energy release and computer code GOTHIC was used to calculate pressure and temperature profiles inside NPP Krsko IB. (author)

  11. Rapid quantification of alpha emitters in low- and intermediate-level dry radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tae-Hong Park; Eul-Hye Jeon; Yong Sul Choi; Jong-Ho Park; Hong Joo Ahn; Yong Jun Park

    2016-01-01

    We developed a rapid quantification method of Pu, Am, and Cm in low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste using TRU resin, alpha spectrometry, and thermal ionization mass spectrometry for radioactive waste disposal. In particular, we focused on the optimization of sample preparation methods for alpha spectrometry and mass spectrometry to reduce the analysis time. The optimized method used Am and Pu stripping solutions for micro-coprecipitation and showed good recovery and alpha spectrum resolution for alpha counting. In addition, appropriate selection of Pu elution solution decreased the sample preparation time for thermal ionization mass spectrometry measurements. (author)

  12. Opening the Black Box of Intermediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nowinska, Agnieszka

    ) and at the interfirm level (between partners and within alliances and associations).The tentative results show that both of these levels are important in defining the intermediating firms' business models and in answering their environmental threats and in building up competitive advantage. The paper ends with a short......This paper attempts to answer how external environmental factors affect intermediating firms within the maritime industry - the middlemen that plays a very important role in the sector. The category encompasses firms such as liner and port agencies, freight forwarders and shipbrokers, who link......, by its global character and by volatility. As such, the industry offers an interesting and generalizable environment for research. Moreover, the choice of the middleman, an intermediary in the value chain, as the object of study, offers additional insights into the complex industry and value chain...

  13. Hγ Line Spectrum of Intermediate Polars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggi Kim

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Kim & Beuermann (1995, 1996 have developed a model for the propagation of X-rays from the accreting white dwarf through the infalling material and the re-emission of the energy deposited by photo-absorption in the optical (and UV spectral range. By using this model, we calculate the profiles of the Hγ emission-line spectrum of intermediate polars. Photoabsorption of X-rays by the infalling material is the dominant process in forming the observed energy-dependent rotational modulation of the X-ray flux. X-ray and optical modulations are sensitive to model parameters in different ways. In principle, these dependencies allow us to obtain improved insight into the accretion geometry of the intermediate polars. We present results of our calculations and compare them with the Hβ line spectrum (Kim & Beuermann 1996.

  14. Intermediate storage for the Start accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, N.I.; Tkach, Yu.V.; Stepanenko, I.A.; Kozachek, A.S.; Komarov, A.D.; Gadetskij, N.P.

    1988-01-01

    Usage of the chain of series-connected capacitors, placed near the voltage pulse generator (VPG) cascades, as an intermediate storage (IS) has allowed to reduce the inductance of the PG-IS charging circuit and to reduce storage charging time up to 30 ns. In such cases the electrical strength of the IS capacitor insulation is essentially higher, than at dc voltage, it has allowed to reduce the number of capacitors in the chain and to reduce IS self-inductance. Additional ways to reduce the inductance of the VPG-IS charging circuit are considered. Reduction of storage charging time has allowed to stabilize the operation of the commutator, which connects the intermediate storage with the accelerator shaping line

  15. Dynamical aspects of intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, James Francis

    1997-10-01

    The production of neutrons, light charged particles (LCPs), and intermediate-mass fragments (IMFs), from the four reactions 55 MeV/A [124,136Xe] + [112,124Sn], is studied with an experimental apparatus which is highly efficient for the detection of both charged particles and neutrons. The IMFs are found more localized in the mid-velocity region (parallel velocity close to center of mass) than are the LPCs, and the detected multiplicity of IMFs depends linearly on the charge lost from the projectile. IMF multiplicity is found to be largely independent of the neutron excess of the system, aside from a slight increase with increasing neutron excess that is expected from statistical-model simulations. Remnants of the projectile, with very little velocity reduction, are found for most of the reaction cross section. Isotopic and isobaric fragment yields in the projectile-velocity region indicate that charge-to- mass ratio neutralization is generally not achieved but is approached when little remains of the projectile. For all systems, the fragments found in the mid-velocity region are substantially more neutron rich than those found in the velocity region dominated by the emission from the projectile. This observation can be qualitatively accounted for if the mid-velocity source (or sources) is either more neutron rich or smaller, with the same neutron-to-proton ratio, than the source with the velocity of the projectile. The observations of this work suggest that the intermediate mass fragments are, to a large extent, formed dynamically by a multiple neck rupture or a proximity-fission type mechanism. Though it remains unexplained, this process enhances the neutron- to-proton ratio of the emitted fragments. This scenario is reminiscent of low-energy ternary fission and one predicted by Boltzmann-Uehling-Uhlenbeck (BUU) calculations. However, these calculations predict too much velocity damping of the projectile remnant and do not produce a mid-velocity neutron

  16. Far from the intermediate nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietrich, K.; Wagner, G.J.; Gregoire, C.; Campi, X.; Silvestre-Brac, B.; Platchkov, S.; Mayer, B.; Abgrall, Y.; Bohigas, O.; Grange, P.; Signarbieux, C.

    1988-01-01

    Pairing correlations in nuclear physics; the BCS state and quasi-particles; the layer model; collision effects on nuclear dynamics; the theory of cluster formation (application to nucleus fragmentation); short range correlations (few-particle systems); deuterium electron scattering; dibaryonic resonances; traditional and exotic hadron probes of nuclear structure; spectral fluctuations and chaotic motion; corrections to the intermediate nuclear field (nonrelativistic and other effects); and heavy nuclei splitting and nuclear superfluidity are introduced [fr

  17. International express student's book : pre-intermediate

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Liz

    1996-01-01

    The New Edition of International Express Pre-Intermediate retains all the keys features of this popular and successel four-level course. It combines engaging, up-to-date topics with a time-efficient and student-centred approach to language work, and clearly focused activities that reflect learner's real communicative needs - the ideal course for professional adults who use English for work, travel, and socializing.

  18. Assembly of intermediates for rapid membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harner, Max; Wickner, William

    2018-01-26

    Membrane fusion is essential for intracellular protein sorting, cell growth, hormone secretion, and neurotransmission. Rapid membrane fusion requires tethering and Sec1-Munc18 (SM) function to catalyze R-, Qa-, Qb-, and Qc-SNARE complex assembly in trans , as well as SNARE engagement by the SNARE-binding chaperone Sec17/αSNAP. The hexameric vacuolar HOPS ( ho motypic fusion and vacuole p rotein s orting) complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae tethers membranes through its affinities for the membrane Rab GTPase Ypt7. HOPS also has specific affinities for the vacuolar SNAREs and catalyzes SNARE complex assembly, but the order of their assembly into a 4-SNARE complex is unclear. We now report defined assembly intermediates on the path to membrane fusion. We found that a prefusion intermediate will assemble with HOPS and the R, Qa, and Qc SNAREs, and that this assembly undergoes rapid fusion upon addition of Qb and Sec17. HOPS-tethered membranes and all four vacuolar SNAREs formed a complex that underwent an even more dramatic burst of fusion upon Sec17p addition. These findings provide initial insights into an ordered fusion pathway consisting of the following intermediates and events: 1) Rab- and HOPS-tethered membranes, 2) a HOPS:R:Qa:Qc trans -complex, 3) a HOPS:4-SNARE trans -complex, 4) an engagement with Sec17, and 5) the rapid lipid rearrangements during fusion. In conclusion, our results indicate that the R:Qa:Qc complex forms in the context of membrane, Ypt7, HOPS, and trans -SNARE assembly and serves as a functional intermediate for rapid fusion after addition of the Qb-SNARE and Sec17 proteins. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Decline in bone mass with tenofovir disoproxil fumarate/emtricitabine is associated with hormonal changes in the absence of renal impairment when used by HIV uninfected adolescent boys and young men for HIV pre-exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background. We aimed to define the relative importance of renal and endocrine changes in tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF)-related bone toxicity. Methods. In a study of daily TDF/emtricitabine (FTC) pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) in HIV uninfected young men who have sex with men, we measured ch...

  20. The variable mass loss of the AGB star

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Decin, L.K.E.; Hony, S.; de Koter, A.; Molenberghs, G.; Dehaes, S.; Markwick-Kemper, F.

    2007-01-01

    Context: Low and intermediate mass stars lose a significant fraction of their mass through a dust-driven wind during the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) phase. Recent studies show that winds from late-type stars are far from being smooth. Mass-loss variations occur on different time scales, from years

  1. Cryo-EM structures of two bovine adenovirus type 3 intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Lingpeng; Huang, Xiaoxing; Li, Xiaomin [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Xiong, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Luo-jia-shan, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Sun, Wei; Yang, Chongwen; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Ying [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Liu, Hongrong [College of Physics and Information Science, Hunan Normal University, Changsha, Hunan 410081 (China); Huang, Xiaojun; Ji, Gang; Sun, Fei [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Zheng, Congyi, E-mail: cctcc202@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Luo-jia-shan, Wuhan, Hubei 430072 (China); Zhu, Ping, E-mail: zhup@ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Adenoviruses (Ads) infect hosts from all vertebrate species and have been investigated as vaccine vectors. We report here near-atomic structures of two bovine Ad type 3 (BAd3) intermediates obtained by cryo-electron microscopy. A comparison between the two intermediate structures reveals that the differences are localized in the fivefold vertex region, while their facet structures are identical. The overall facet structure of BAd3 exhibits a similar structure to human Ads; however, BAd3 protein IX has a unique conformation. Mass spectrometry and cryo-electron tomography analyses indicate that one intermediate structure represents the stage during DNA encapsidation, whilst the other intermediate structure represents a later stage. These results also suggest that cleavage of precursor protein VI occurs during, rather than after, the DNA encapsidation process. Overall, our results provide insights into the mechanism of Ad assembly, and allow the first structural comparison between human and nonhuman Ads at backbone level. - Highlights: • First structure of bovine adenovirus type 3. • Some channels are located at the vertex of intermediate during DNA encapsidation. • Protein IX exhibits a unique conformation of trimeric coiled–coiled structure. • Cleavage of precursor protein VI occurs during the DNA encapsidation process.

  2. Reactive intermediates revealed in secondary organic aerosol formation from isoprene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surratt, Jason D; Chan, Arthur W H; Eddingsaas, Nathan C; Chan, ManNin; Loza, Christine L; Kwan, Alan J; Hersey, Scott P; Flagan, Richard C; Wennberg, Paul O; Seinfeld, John H

    2010-04-13

    Isoprene is a significant source of atmospheric organic aerosol; however, the oxidation pathways that lead to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) have remained elusive. Here, we identify the role of two key reactive intermediates, epoxydiols of isoprene (IEPOX = beta-IEPOX + delta-IEPOX) and methacryloylperoxynitrate (MPAN), which are formed during isoprene oxidation under low- and high-NO(x) conditions, respectively. Isoprene low-NO(x) SOA is enhanced in the presence of acidified sulfate seed aerosol (mass yield 28.6%) over that in the presence of neutral aerosol (mass yield 1.3%). Increased uptake of IEPOX by acid-catalyzed particle-phase reactions is shown to explain this enhancement. Under high-NO(x) conditions, isoprene SOA formation occurs through oxidation of its second-generation product, MPAN. The similarity of the composition of SOA formed from the photooxidation of MPAN to that formed from isoprene and methacrolein demonstrates the role of MPAN in the formation of isoprene high-NO(x) SOA. Reactions of IEPOX and MPAN in the presence of anthropogenic pollutants (i.e., acidic aerosol produced from the oxidation of SO(2) and NO(2), respectively) could be a substantial source of "missing urban SOA" not included in current atmospheric models.

  3. Nominal Mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attygalle, Athula B; Pavlov, Julius

    2017-08-01

    The current IUPAC-recommended definition of the term "nominal mass," based on the most abundant naturally occurring stable isotope of an element, is flawed. We propose that Nominal mass should be defined as the sum of integer masses of protons and neutrons in any chemical species. In this way, all isotopes and isotopologues can be assigned a definitive identifier. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  4. One-stage correction of intermediate imperforate anus in males ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This prospective study was designed to assess the safety, cost effectiveness, and advantages of performing posterior sagittal anorectoplasty without colostomy on males with intermediate imperforate anus. Method: Five consecutive males with intermediate imperforate anus were entered into the study.

  5. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600

  6. Intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Daniel J L; Atkinson, Alan; Brandon, Nigel P; Skinner, Stephen J

    2008-08-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), typified by developers such as Siemens Westinghouse and Rolls-Royce, operate in the temperature region of 850-1000 degrees C. For such systems, very high efficiencies can be achieved from integration with gas turbines for large-scale stationary applications. However, high temperature operation means that the components of the stack need to be predominantly ceramic and high temperature metal alloys are needed for many balance-of-plant components. For smaller scale applications, where integration with a heat engine is not appropriate, there is a trend to move to lower temperatures of operation, into the so-called intermediate temperature (IT) range of 500-750 degrees C. This expands the choice of materials and stack geometries that can be used, offering reduced system cost and, in principle, reducing the corrosion rate of stack and system components. This review introduces the IT-SOFC and explains the advantages of operation in this temperature regime. The main advances made in materials chemistry that have made IT operation possible are described and some of the engineering issues and the new opportunities that reduced temperature operation affords are discussed. This tutorial review examines the advances being made in materials and engineering that are allowing solid oxide fuel cells to operate at lower temperature. The challenges and advantages of operating in the so-called 'intermediate temperature' range of 500-750 degrees C are discussed and the opportunities for applications not traditionally associated with solid oxide fuel cells are highlighted. This article serves as an introduction for scientists and engineers interested in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells and the challenges and opportunities of reduced temperature operation.

  7. Nutrition for Young Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Aging Nutrition for Young Men Print Email Nutrition for Young Men Reviewed by Taylor Wolfram, MS, ... 2017 XiXinXing/iStock/Thinkstock For many young men, nutrition isn't always a focus. There are many ...

  8. Intermediate Energy Activation File (IEAF-99)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korovin, Yu.; Konobeev, A.; Pereslavtsev, P.; Stankovskij, A.; Fischer, U.; Moellendorff, U. von

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear data library IEAF-99, elaborated to study processes of interactions of intermediate energy neutrons with materials in accelerator driven systems, is described. The library is intended for activation and transmutation studies for materials irradiated by neutrons. IEAF-99 contains evaluated neutron induced reaction cross sections at the energies 0-150 MeV for 665 stable and unstable nuclei from C to Po. Approximately 50,000 excitation functions are included in the library. The IEAF-99 data are written in the ENDF-6 format combining MF = 3,6 MT = 5 data recording. (author)

  9. Thermoelectric power generator with intermediate loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Lon E; Crane, Douglas Todd

    2013-05-21

    A thermoelectric power generator is disclosed for use to generate electrical power from heat, typically waste heat. An intermediate heat transfer loop forms a part of the system to permit added control and adjustability in the system. This allows the thermoelectric power generator to more effectively and efficiently generate power in the face of dynamically varying temperatures and heat flux conditions, such as where the heat source is the exhaust of an automobile, or any other heat source with dynamic temperature and heat flux conditions.

  10. MHD oxidant intermediate temperature ceramic heater study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, A. W.; Chait, I. L.; Saari, D. P.; Marksberry, C. L.

    1981-09-01

    The use of three types of directly fired ceramic heaters for preheating oxygen enriched air to an intermediate temperature of 1144K was investigated. The three types of ceramic heaters are: (1) a fixed bed, periodic flow ceramic brick regenerative heater; (2) a ceramic pebble regenerative heater. The heater design, performance and operating characteristics under conditions in which the particulate matter is not solidified are evaluated. A comparison and overall evaluation of the three types of ceramic heaters and temperature range determination at which the particulate matter in the MHD exhaust gas is estimated to be a dry powder are presented.

  11. Intermediate Bandgap Solar Cells From Nanostructured Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Marcie [Bandgap Engineering, Lincoln, MA (United States)

    2014-10-30

    This project aimed to demonstrate increased electronic coupling in silicon nanostructures relative to bulk silicon for the purpose of making high efficiency intermediate bandgap solar cells using silicon. To this end, we formed nanowires with controlled crystallographic orientation, small diameter, <111> sidewall faceting, and passivated surfaces to modify the electronic band structure in silicon by breaking down the symmetry of the crystal lattice. We grew and tested these silicon nanowires with <110>-growth axes, which is an orientation that should produce the coupling enhancement.

  12. Mass spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manojlov, V.E.; Nedelin, P.N.; Lukichev, A.N.; Sapozhkov, L.K.; Turubarov, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    Mass spectrometers of different types are suggested to use for qualitative and quantitative analyses of gas. The operation principles of static and dynamic mass spectrometer are studied. In static mass spectrometers mass separation of ions is performed by changing the value of accelerating voltage in the ion source when retaining the magnetic field intensity. Such devices are stationary. The device mass is conditioned by the magnet mass. Mass separation in dynamic mass spectrometers is dependent on the degree of energy increment of ions in HF-electric fields. Radio frequency mass spectrometers are used with advantage for studying upper layers of an atmosphere and are installed on radiosondes and satellites. The main technical characteristics of the MX-1330 mass spectrometer, the basis of which is the analyzer with 180 deg deviation of an ion beam in the field of permanent magnet, are presented. The device is intended for controlling the environment and permits to analyze gases with a molecular mass up to 450 using various systems of gas filling. The error of determination of molecular substance is not greater than +-3 %; the magnetic field intensity constitutes 4.8x10 5 A/m; the supply voltage is 380/220 V; the total power is 5.0 kVA [ru

  13. 40 CFR 721.983 - Sulfonyl azide intermediate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sulfonyl azide intermediate (generic... Substances § 721.983 Sulfonyl azide intermediate (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as sulfonyl azide intermediate...

  14. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically...

  15. Intermediate product selection and blending in the food processing industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilic, Onur A.; Akkerman, Renzo; van Donk, Dirk Pieter

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses a capacitated intermediate product selection and blending problem typical for two-stage production systems in the food processing industry. The problem involves the selection of a set of intermediates and end-product recipes characterising how those selected intermediates...

  16. 42 CFR 54.12 - Treatment of intermediate organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Treatment of intermediate organizations. 54.12... intermediate organizations. If a nongovernmental organization (referred to here as an “intermediate organization”), acting under a contract or other agreement with the Federal Government or a State or local...

  17. 40 CFR 86.246-94 - Intermediate temperature testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intermediate temperature testing. 86... New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.246-94 Intermediate temperature testing. (a) This section is applicable to tests which are conducted at an intermediate...

  18. Empowering young people/ young adults to action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, Birgitte Gade

    Research questions: How do the young students relate to their community? How do young students position themselves as agents in their own lives and in the places they live – which discourse is used?......Research questions: How do the young students relate to their community? How do young students position themselves as agents in their own lives and in the places they live – which discourse is used?...

  19. Can Morphing Methods Predict Intermediate Structures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dahlia R.; Levitt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Movement is crucial to the biological function of many proteins, yet crystallographic structures of proteins can give us only a static snapshot. The protein dynamics that are important to biological function often happen on a timescale that is unattainable through detailed simulation methods such as molecular dynamics as they often involve crossing high-energy barriers. To address this coarse-grained motion, several methods have been implemented as web servers in which a set of coordinates is usually linearly interpolated from an initial crystallographic structure to a final crystallographic structure. We present a new morphing method that does not extrapolate linearly and can therefore go around high-energy barriers and which can produce different trajectories between the same two starting points. In this work, we evaluate our method and other established coarse-grained methods according to an objective measure: how close a coarse-grained dynamics method comes to a crystallographically determined intermediate structure when calculating a trajectory between the initial and final crystal protein structure. We test this with a set of five proteins with at least three crystallographically determined on-pathway high-resolution intermediate structures from the Protein Data Bank. For simple hinging motions involving a small conformational change, segmentation of the protein into two rigid sections outperforms other more computationally involved methods. However, large-scale conformational change is best addressed using a nonlinear approach and we suggest that there is merit in further developing such methods. PMID:18996395

  20. Intermediate heat exchanger project for Super Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roumailhac, J.; Desir, D.

    1975-01-01

    The Super Phenix (1200 MWe) intermediate heat exchangers are derived directly from those of Phenix (250 MWe). The intermediate exchangers are housed in the reactor vessel annulus: as this annulus must be of the smallest volume possible, these IHX are required to work at a high specific rating. The exchange surface is calculated for nominal conditions. A range is then defined, consistent with the above requirements and throughout which the ratio between bundle thickness and bundle length remains acceptable. Experimental technics and calculations were used to determine the number of tube constraint systems required to keep the vibration amplitude within permissible limits. From a knowledge of this number, the pressure drop produced by the primary flow can be calculated. The bundle geometry is determined together with the design of the corresponding tube plates and the way in which these plates should be joined to the body of the IHX. The experience (technical and financial) acquired in the construction of Phenix is then used to optimize the design of the Super Phenix project. An approximate definition of the structure of the IHX is obtained by assuming a simplified load distribution in the calculations. More sophisticated calculations (e.g. finite element method) are then used to determine the behaviour of the different points of the IHX, under nominal and transient conditions

  1. The Luminosity Functions of Old and Intermediate-Age Globular Clusters in NGC 3610

    OpenAIRE

    Whitmore, B. C.; Schweizer, F.; Kundu, A.; Miller, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    The WFPC2 Camera on board HST has been used to obtain high-resolution images of NGC 3610, a dynamically young elliptical galaxy. These observations supersede shorter, undithered HST observations where an intermediate-age population of globular clusters was first discovered. The new observations show the bimodal color distribution of globular clusters more clearly, with peaks at (V-I)o = 0.95 and 1.17. The luminosity function (LF) of the blue, metal-poor population of clusters in NGC 3610 turn...

  2. The intermediate endpoint effect in logistic and probit regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, DP; Lockwood, CM; Brown, CH; Wang, W; Hoffman, JM

    2010-01-01

    Background An intermediate endpoint is hypothesized to be in the middle of the causal sequence relating an independent variable to a dependent variable. The intermediate variable is also called a surrogate or mediating variable and the corresponding effect is called the mediated, surrogate endpoint, or intermediate endpoint effect. Clinical studies are often designed to change an intermediate or surrogate endpoint and through this intermediate change influence the ultimate endpoint. In many intermediate endpoint clinical studies the dependent variable is binary, and logistic or probit regression is used. Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe a limitation of a widely used approach to assessing intermediate endpoint effects and to propose an alternative method, based on products of coefficients, that yields more accurate results. Methods The intermediate endpoint model for a binary outcome is described for a true binary outcome and for a dichotomization of a latent continuous outcome. Plots of true values and a simulation study are used to evaluate the different methods. Results Distorted estimates of the intermediate endpoint effect and incorrect conclusions can result from the application of widely used methods to assess the intermediate endpoint effect. The same problem occurs for the proportion of an effect explained by an intermediate endpoint, which has been suggested as a useful measure for identifying intermediate endpoints. A solution to this problem is given based on the relationship between latent variable modeling and logistic or probit regression. Limitations More complicated intermediate variable models are not addressed in the study, although the methods described in the article can be extended to these more complicated models. Conclusions Researchers are encouraged to use an intermediate endpoint method based on the product of regression coefficients. A common method based on difference in coefficient methods can lead to distorted

  3. Effect of long-term impact-loading on mass, size, and estimated strength of humerus and radius of female racquet-sports players: a peripheral quantitative computed tomography study between young and old starters and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontulainen, Saija; Sievänen, Harri; Kannus, Pekka; Pasanen, Matti; Vuori, Ilkka

    2003-02-01

    Bone characteristics of the humeral shaft and distal radius were measured from 64 female tennis and squash players and their 27 age-, height-, and weight-matched controls with peripheral quantitative tomography (pQCT) and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The players were divided into two groups according to the starting age of their tennis or squash training (either before or after menarche) to examine the possible differences in the loading-induced changes in bone structure and volumetric density. The following pQCT variables were used: bone mineral content, total cross-sectional area of bone (TotA), cross-sectional area of the marrow cavity (CavA) and that of the cortical bone (CoA), cortical wall thickness (CWT), volumetric density of the cortical bone (CoD) and trabecular bone (TrD), and torsional bone strength index for the shaft (BSIt) and compressional bone strength index for the bone end (BSIc). These bone strength indices were compared with the DXA-derived areal bone mineral density (aBMD) to assess how well the latter represents the effect of mechanical loading on apparent bone strength. At the humeral shaft, the loaded arm's greater bone mineral content (an average 19% side-to-side difference in young starters and 9% in old starters), was caused by an enlarged cortex (CoA; side-to-side differences 20% and 9%, respectively). The loaded humerus seemed to have grown periosteally (the CavA did not differ between the sites), leading to 26% and 11% side-to-side BSIt differences in the young and old starters, respectively. CoD was equal between the arms (-1% difference in both player groups). The side-to-side differences in the young starters' bone mineral content, CoA, TotA, CWT, and BSIt were 8-22% higher than those of the controls and 8-14% higher than those of the old starters. Old starters' bone mineral content, CoA, and BSIt side-to-side differences were 6-7% greater than those in the controls. The DXA-derived side-to-side aBMD difference was 7

  4. Neutrino mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1992-01-01

    Despite intensive experimental work since the neutrino's existence was proposed by Pauli 60 years ago, and its first observation by Reines and Cowan almost 40 years ago, the neutrino's fundamental properties remain elusive. Among those properties are the masses of the three known flavors, properties under charge conjugation, parity and time-reversal, and static and dynamic electromagnetic moments. Mass is perhaps the most fundamental, as it constrains the other properties. The present status of the search for neutrino mass is briefly reviewed

  5. MASS SPECTROMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  6. Dust Evolution in Intermediate Velocity Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro Gonçalves, D.; Martin, P. G.; Blagrave, K.; Miville-Deschenes, M. A.

    We search for evidence of dust evolution in high Galactic latitude regions by looking at variations in the emissivities of dust associated with different velocity clouds. In order to do so, we spatially correlate infrared IRAS/IRIS dust maps with HI column density maps derived from 21-cm radio observations with the GBT. Our findings show that intermediate velocity clouds (IVCs or halo clouds) have a higher 60µm/100µm and lower 12µm/100µm color ratio when compared to dust in local low-velocity gas. This suggests that large thermal dust grains are shattered into smaller ones (VSGs) and that there is a low relative abundance of PAHs in IVCs.

  7. Slab tears and intermediate-depth seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meighan, Hallie E.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Pulliam, Jay

    2013-01-01

    Active tectonic regions where plate boundaries transition from subduction to strike slip can take several forms, such as triple junctions, acute, and obtuse corners. Well-documented slab tears that are associated with high rates of intermediate-depth seismicity are considered here: Gibraltar arc, the southern and northern ends of the Lesser Antilles arc, and the northern end of Tonga trench. Seismicity at each of these locations occurs, at times, in the form of swarms or clusters, and various authors have proposed that each marks an active locus of tear propagation. The swarms and clusters start at the top of the slab below the asthenospheric wedge and extend 30–60 km vertically downward within the slab. We propose that these swarms and clusters are generated by fluid-related embrittlement of mantle rocks. Focal mechanisms of these swarms generally fit the shear motion that is thought to be associated with the tearing process.

  8. Intermediate normal metal layers in superconducting circuitry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, M.F.; Gershenson, M.; Fleming, D.L.; Barta, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a superconducting device comprising a first superconducting layer, a junction layer on the first superconducting layer, an insulating layer on the first superconducting layer, at least one superconducting area on the junction layer surrounded by the insulator layer, superconducting connector pad means disposed over the superconducting area, and superconducting wire means electrically connected to the superconducting connector pad means. The improvement comprising a first metal layer is disposed over the insulator layer and intermediate the superconducting area. The connector pad means and a second metal layer are disposed between the connector pad means and the superconductor wire means. The first metal layer covers the superconducting area and the first and second metal layers are sufficiently thin to allow quantum mechanical tunneling between the connector pad means and the superconducting area and the connector pad means and the superconducting wire means, respectively

  9. Modernisation of the intermediate physics laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontro, Inkeri; Heino, Olga; Hendolin, Ilkka; Galambosi, Szabolcs

    2018-03-01

    The intermediate laboratory courses at the Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, were reformed using desired learning outcomes as the basis for design. The reformed laboratory courses consist of weekly workshops and small-group laboratory sessions. Many of the laboratory exercises are open-ended and have several possible ways of execution. They were designed around affordable devices, to allow for the purchase of multiple sets of laboratory equipment. This allowed students to work on the same problems simultaneously. Thus, it was possible to set learning goals which build on each other. Workshop sessions supported the course by letting the students solve problems related to conceptual and technical aspects of each laboratory exercise. The laboratory exercises progressed biweekly to allow for iterative problem solving. Students reached the learning goals well and the reform improved student experiences. Neither positive or negative changes in expert-like attitudes towards experimental physics (measured by E-CLASS questionnaire) were observed.

  10. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva

    2013-08-01

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety

  11. Environmental issues of an intermediate city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, N.

    2005-01-01

    Our urban centers present a unique dimension of environmental problems. They are at one and the same time, enormous consumers of natural resources and produces of waste and pollution. In this respect intermediate cities and small towns appear to be more vulnerable to natural catastrophes and ecological accidents caused by human factors. While in large cities there exist pressure groups which attain government attention for the solution of their problems and have well equipped municipalities. However, a vast majority of the population lives in rural areas and depends upon medium sized cities and towns for access to services. These cities and towns form the pivot of economic, social, cultural and political life for a large part of the population. Therefore, it deserves more attention than bigger ones. This paper explores local people perception about urban environmental problems exist in the city. Attempts are also made to shape and guide municipality efforts to overcome such problems with available resources. (author)

  12. q-Gamow states for intermediate energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plastino, A. [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Rocca, M.C., E-mail: mariocarlosrocca@gmail.com [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Ferri, G.L. [Fac. de C. Exactas, National University La Pampa, Peru y Uruguay, Santa Rosa, La Pampa (Argentina); Zamora, D.J. [La Plata National University and Argentina' s National Research Council, (IFLP-CCT-CONICET)-C. C. 727, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-11-15

    In a recent paper Plastino and Rocca (2016) [18] we have demonstrated the possible existence of Tsallis' q-Gamow states. Now, accelerators' experimental evidence for Tsallis' distributions has been ascertained only at very high energies. Here, instead, we develop a different set of q-Gamow states for which the associated q-Breit–Wigner distribution could easily be found at intermediate energies, for which accelerators are available at many locations. In this context, it should be strongly emphasized Vignat and Plastino (2009) [2] that, empirically, one never exactly and unambiguously “detects” pure Gaussians, but rather q-Gaussians. A prediction is made via Eq. (3.4).

  13. Being back home after intermediate care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bente; Harder, Ingegerd; Norlyk, Annelise

    2015-01-01

    Older people may face many challenges and experience insecurity after discharge from hospital to home. To bridge the potential gap between general hospital and home, the concept ‘Intermediate Care’ (IC) was developed at the beginning of 2000. IC aims to safeguard older people from being discharged...... to their home before they have sufficiently recovered, but knowledge within this area is sparse. In particular the experience of older people is yet to be explored. The aim of this study was to explore older people’s experiences of being back home after a stay in an IC unit. Data were drawn from 12 interviews....... Transcripts were analysed using a phenomenological approach. The essential meaning of being back home after a stay in an IC unit was characterised by ‘uncertainty’. Four constituents emerged: ‘in a state of shock about coming home’, ‘dependence on informal helpers’, ‘a sense of isolation’, and ‘fear of losing...

  14. Turned Back: Mad Men as Intermedial Melodrama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique Rooney

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This essay draws on definitions of gesture (Giorgio Agamben and Peter Brooks and catachresis (Peter Brooks, Jacques Derrida to examine the primacy of non-verbal signifiers as communicators of meaning in AMC’s Mad Men. Beginning with an analysis of Mad Men’s credit sequence, it draws attention to Mad Men’s use of gesture and catachresis in relation to melodrama’s privileging of non-verbal and naturalistic expression and its persistence as an intermedial mode that has moved back and forth between various media (theatre, novel, cinema, television and now digital formats. It argues that Mad Men’s melodramatic aesthetic is one that obliquely, and via a gestural and rhetorical ‘turned back’, communicates its relation to the past and the present.

  15. Treatment of low and intermediate level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoehlein, G.

    1978-05-01

    The methods described of low and intermediate level waste treatment are based exclusively on operating experience gathered with the KfK facilities for waste management, the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant (WAK), the ALKEM fuel element fabrication plant, the MZFR, KNK and FR 2 reactors as well as at the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center and at the state collecting depot of Baden-Wuerttemberg. The processing capacities and technical status are similar to that in 1976. With an annual throughput of 10000 m 3 of solid and liquid raw wastes, an aggregate activity of 85000 Ci, 500 kg of U and 2 kg of Pu, final waste in the amount of 500 m 3 was produced which was stored in the ASSE II salt mine. (orig.) [de

  16. Fission cross section measurements at intermediate energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laptev, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    The activity in intermediate energy particle induced fission cross-section measurements of Pu, U isotopes, minor actinides and sub-actinides in PNPI of Russia is reviewed. The neutron-induced fission cross-section measurements are under way in the wide energy range of incident neutrons from 0.5 MeV to 200 MeV at the GNEIS facility. In number of experiments at the GNEIS facility, the neutron-induced fission cross sections were obtained for many nuclei. In another group of experiments the proton-induced fission cross-section have been measured for proton energies ranging from 200 to 1000 MeV at 100 MeV intervals using the proton beam of PNPI synchrocyclotron. (author)

  17. Melting of metallic intermediate level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huutoniemi, Tommi; Larsson, Arne; Blank, Eva [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    This report presents a feasibility study of a melting facility for core components and reactor internals. An overview is given of how such a facility for treatment of intermediate level waste might be designed, constructed and operated and highlights both the possibilities and challenges. A cost estimate and a risk analysis are presented in order to make a conclusion of the technical feasibility of such a facility. Based on the authors' experience in operating a low level waste melting facility, their conclusion is that without technical improvements such a facility is not feasible today. This is based on the cost of constructing and operating such a facility, in conjunction with the radiological risks associated with operation and the uncertain benefits to disposal and long term safety.

  18. On the Intermediate Line Region in AGNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tek P. Adhikari

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore the intermediate line region (ILR by using the photoionisation simulations of the gas clouds present at different radial distances from the center, corresponding to the locations from BLR out to NLR in four types of AGNs. We let for the presence of dust whenever conditions allow for dust existence. All spectral shapes are taken from the recent multi-wavelength campaigns. The cloud density decreases with distance as a power law. We found that the slope of the power law density profile does not affect the line emissivity radial profiles of major emission lines: Hβ, He II, Mg II, C III, and O III. When the density of the cloud at the sublimation radius is as high as 1011.5 cm−3, the ILR should clearly be seen in the observations independently of the shape of the illuminating radiation. Moreover, our result is valid for low ionization nuclear emission regions of active galaxies.

  19. Intermediate storage device of start accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaponenko, N.I.; Tkach, Yu.V.; Stepanenko, I.A.; Kozachek, A.S.; Komarov, A.D.; Gadetskii, N.P.

    1989-01-01

    The use as an intermediate storage device (ISD) of a chain of series-connected capacitors near the stages of a voltage-pulse generator (VPG) reduces the inductance of the VPG-ISD charging circuit and reduces the charging time to 330 nsec. For such times, the electric strength of the capacitor insulation is considerably higher than for dc voltage, which makes it possible to reduce the number of capacitors in the chain and the inductance of the ISD. Additional methods for reduction of the inductance of the VPG-ISD charging circuit are examined. Reduction of the charging time of the storage device makes the operation of the switch connecting the ISD to the shaping line more stable

  20. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.