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Sample records for interleukin-6-induced c-reactive protein

  1. Suppression of interleukin-6-induced C-reactive protein expression by FXR agonists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Songwen; Liu Qiangyuan; Wang Juan; Harnish, Douglas C.

    2009-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a human acute-phase protein, is a risk factor for future cardiovascular events and exerts direct pro-inflammatory and pro-atherogenic properties. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily, plays an essential role in the regulation of enterohepatic circulation and lipid homeostasis. In this study, we report that two synthetic FXR agonists, WAY-362450 and GW4064, suppressed interleukin-6-induced CRP expression in human Hep3B hepatoma cells. Knockdown of FXR by short interfering RNA attenuated the inhibitory effect of the FXR agonists and also increased the ability of interleukin-6 to induce CRP production. Furthermore, treatment of wild type C57BL/6 mice with the FXR agonist, WAY-362450, attenuated lipopolysaccharide-induced serum amyloid P component and serum amyloid A3 mRNA levels in the liver, whereas no effect was observed in FXR knockout mice. These data provide new evidence for direct anti-inflammatory properties of FXR.

  2. C-reactive protein and later preeclampsia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebelo, Fernanda; Schlüssel, Michael M; Vaz, Juliana S

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether high C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration during pregnancy is associated with later preeclampsia and whether weight status (BMI) is a potential modifier of the relation between CRP and preeclampsia.......This study aims to determine whether high C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration during pregnancy is associated with later preeclampsia and whether weight status (BMI) is a potential modifier of the relation between CRP and preeclampsia....

  3. 91 - 96 Ojo C-reactive protein

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    More males (4.6%) had higher CRP value than females (1.5%), however there was no significant difference between their CRP values (p=0.173). C-reactive protein values was significantly higher (30.8%) among patients with severe anaemia (p<0.001). Also, the CRP value was significantly higher (57.1%) among patients ...

  4. C-reactive protein and bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerdes, Lars Ulrik; Jørgensen, P E; Nexø, E

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to review published articles on the diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests with cerebrospinal fluid and serum in diagnosing bacterial meningitis. The literature from 1980 and onwards was searched using the electronic databases of MEDLINE, and we used summary...... measured in serum, and 4 in which it had been measured in both cerebrospinal fluid and serum. The odds ratio for bacterial meningitis versus aseptic meningitis for a positive CRP test with cerebrospinal fluid was estimated at 241 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 59-980), and the central tendencies.......06-0.08, respectively, the post-test probability of not having bacterial meningitis given a negative test is very high (> or = 97%), in the range of a pre-test probability (prevalence of bacterial meningitis) from 10 to 30%, whereas the post-test probability of bacterial meningitis given a positive test is considerably...

  5. C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, and cardiovascular disease prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Pennells, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events.......There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events....

  6. C reactive protein and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Vestbo, Jørgen; Zacho, Jeppe

    2011-01-01

    It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design.......It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design....

  7. C-reactive (CRP) protein in transfusion dependent thalassaemic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokhio, R.; Mughal, Z.U.N.

    2009-01-01

    In thalassaemic patients iron overload, secondary to blood transfusion, results toxic effects by producing reactive radicals. Iron overload can be studied using serum ferritin level which has a direct correlation with the body's iron status. While oxidative damage can be studied using biomarker of inflammation like hsC-reactive proteins. Blood samples of 55 thalassaemic patients (39 males, 16 females) were collected from Fatmid Foundation (Hyderabad). The samples were analyzed for CBC, serum ferritin level and hsC-reactive proteins. High mean serum ferritin levels was found in all the patients regardless of the frequency of blood transfusion (4774.2135+-3143.3040 mu g/L), indicating the iron overload. High mean hsC-reactive protein was found (2.5151+-1.3712) with a positive correlation with ferritin (r= 0.8371198, p= 0.0000) and platelets (r= 0.43293443, p=0.000962175). C-reactive proteins serve as biomarker of various inflammatory conditions, progression of cardiovascular diseases and as indicator of morbidity and mortality. High C-reactive proteins in these patients indicate ongoing iron overload toxicity related damage in these patients. The estimation of hsC-reactive proteins and other biomarkers of inflammation and oxidation may help in better management of these patients. (author)

  8. Comparative study of C-Reactive Protein and other biochemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum levels of C-reactive proteins (CRP), Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), Aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total protein, albumin and globulins were investigated using high sensitivity Immunoturbidometric and colorimetric techniques in individuals with hepatitis (n=50), Malaria (n=50) and 40 control subjects in age ...

  9. C- Reactive Protein in Tuberculosis and Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections and the follow-up therapeutic response to tuberculosis (TB) among patients aged 19-68 years attending out-patient clinics of two hospitals in Abeokuta, Southwestern ...

  10. C-Reactive Protein in Healthy Adult Nigerians | Baba | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant produced in the liver in response to tissue injury or systemic inflammation, its release is stimulated by cytokines (interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha). Elevated CRP levels have been linked to an increased risk of later development of diabetes ...

  11. Neighborhood Walkable Urban Form and C-Reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Walkable urban form predicts physical activity and lower body mass index, which lower C-reactive protein (CRP). However, urban form is also related to pollution, noise, social and health behavior, crowding, and other stressors, which may complement or contravene walka...

  12. Milk C-reactive protein in canine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiu, Iosif; Dąbrowski, Roman; Martinez-Subiela, Silvia; Ceron, Jose J; Wdowiak, Anna; Pop, Raul Alexandru; Brudaşcă, Florinel Gheorghe; Pastor, Josep; Tvarijonaviciute, Asta

    2017-04-01

    Presence of mastitis in lactating bitches can become life threatening for both the bitch and pups. The aim of the present study was to evaluate a possible utility of C-reactive protein (CRP) in both milk and serum for canine mastitis diagnosis. Our study showed that milk CRP levels ranged between 0.1 and 4.9μg/mL and from 0.3 to 40.0μg/mL in healthy and diseased bitches (Pcanine mastitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. C-Reactive Protein Levels in the Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimé Bonny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation in the Brugada syndrome (BrS and its clinical implication have been little studied. Aims. To assess the level of inflammation in BrS patients. Methods. All studied BrS patients underwent blood samples drawn for C-reactive protein (CRP levels at admission, prior to any invasive intervention. Patients with a previous ICD placement were controlled to exclude those with a recent (<14 days shock. We divided subjects into symptomatic (syncope or aborted sudden death and asymptomatic groups. In a multivariable analysis, we adjusted for significant variables (age, CRP ≥ 2 mg/L. Results. Fifty-four subjects were studied (mean age 45 ± 13 years, 49 (91% male. Twenty (37% were symptomatic. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean CRP level was 1,4 ± 0,9 mg/L in asymptomatic and 2,4 ± 1,4 mg/L in symptomatic groups (P = .003. In the multivariate model, CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L remained an independent marker for being symptomatic (P = .018; 95% CI: 1.3 to 19.3. Conclusion. Inflammation seems to be more active in symptomatic BrS. C-reactive protein concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L might be associated with the previous symptoms in BrS. The value of inflammation as a risk factor of arrhythmic events in BrS needs to be studied.

  14. Association between Depression and C-Reactive Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunsheng Ma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Depression has been associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, and a depression-related elevation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP has been proposed as a possible mechanism. The objective of this paper is to examine association between depression and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP. Methods. Subjects consisted of 508 healthy adults (mean age 48.5 years; 49% women, 88% white residing in central Massachusetts. Data were collected at baseline and at quarterly intervals over a one-year period per individual. Multivariable linear mixed models were used to assess the association for the entire sample and by gender. Results. The mean Beck Depression Inventory score was 5.8 (standard deviation (SD 5.4; median 4.3, and average serum hs-CRP was 1.8 mg/L (SD 1.7; median 1.2. Results from the multivariable linear mixed models show that individuals with higher depression scores have higher levels of hs-CRP. Analyses by gender show persistence of an independent association among women, but not among men. Body mass index (BMI = weight(kg/height(m2 appears to be a partial mediator of this relationship. Conclusion. Depression score was correlated to hs-CRP levels in women. Further studies are required to elucidate the biological mechanisms underlying these associations and their implications.

  15. The value of C-reactive protein in emergency medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jang Su

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is a commonly used tool in emergency department (ED, especially in febrile and infectious patients. It was identified in 1930 and was subsequently classified into an “acute phase protein”, an early indicator of infectious or inflammatory situations in the ED, CRP must be a diagnostic reference and no single value can be indicated to rule in or rule out a specific diagnosis or disease. CRP is a comprehensively assisted tool for evaluation and diagnosis of tissue damage (rheumatologic diseases, stroke, cancer, pancreatitis, burn injury, sepsis and gout and infection (urinary tract infection, pelvic inflammatory disease, meningitis and lung infection. It can be used for treatment monitoring and severity evaluation in pneumonia, pancreatitis, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID, and urinary tract infections (UTI. Otherwise, it also plays the role of prognostic indicator of acute coronary syndrome. C-reactive protein adds little to the diagnosis of pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and pancreatitis. A single CRP value should not straightly make the decision to treat these patients. That is, CRP has no role in diagnosing these clinical entities, and a normal CRP level should never delay antibiotic coverage in ED. Faster and more interpretable tools such as image studies (X-ray, sonography and computed tomography are available to help diagnose suspected cases of aortic dissection, appendicitis, cholecystitis, pancreatitis, pneumonia and stroke in ED.

  16. Rosuvastatin to prevent vascular events in men and women with elevated C-reactive protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridker, Paul M.; Danielson, Eleanor; Fonseca, Francisco A. H.; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J.; Macfadyen, Jean G.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T.; Glynn, Robert J.; Ridker, P. M.; Fonseca, F. A. H.; Genest, J.; Gotto, A. M.; Koenig, W.; Libby, P.; Lorenzatti, A. J.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Shepherd, J.; Willerson, J. T.; Danielson, E.; Glynn, R. J.; MacFadyen, J. G.; Mora, S.; Collins, R.; Bailey, K.; Gersh, B.; Lamas, G.; Smith, S.; Vaughan, D.; Mahaffey, K.; Brown, P.; Montgomery, D.; Wilson, M.; Wood, F.; Altamirano, J.; Boskis, P.; Colombo, H.; Cuneo, C.; Diaz, M.; Esper, R.; Fernandez, A.; Foye, R.; Hershson, A.; Kuschnir, E.; La Greca, R.; Lorenzatti, A.; Lozada, A.; Luciardi, H.; Luquez, H.; Maffei, L.; Majul, C.; Marin, M.; Muntaner, J.; Nul, D.; Paolasso, E.; Rey, R.; Rodenas, P.; Rodriguez, P.; Rojas, C.; Telsolin, P.; Vita, N.; Adrianes, G.; Argento, O.; Bacart, P.; Baeck, L.; Baguet, J.; Balthazar, Y.; Battello, G.; Behets, J.; Beke, P.; Berwouts, P.; Boermans, P.; Bolly, F.; Borms, J.; Boulad, M.; Boulanger, L.; Bous, J.; van Boxstael, R.; Brands, Y.; Buyse, L.; Calozet, Y.; Camps, K.; Capiau, L.; Celis, H.; Coucke, F.; D'Argent, F.; Op de Beeck, G.; de Meulemeester, M.; de Praeter, K.; de Rouck, S.; Delcourt, A.; Delvaux, J.; Demanet, E.; Dendale, P.; Derijcke, M.; Deruyck, C.; Devaux, J.; Dupont, C.; van Duyse, J.; Erpicum, L.; Gilio, C.; Gillet, A.; Grosjean, J.; Heeren, J.; Henry, G.; Heyvaert, F.; Hollanders, G.; Hutsebaut, A.; Janssens, P.; Lannoy, H.; Ledoux, C.; Legros, P.; Leliaert, R.; Martens, R.; Maury, O.; Mehuys, G.; Michaux, J.; Migeotte, A.; Mortelmans, J.; van Mulders, N.; van Parijs, P.; van Peer, W.; Pieters, E.; Reynders, P.; van Riet, D.; Robert, P.; van Stee, J.; Teheux, J.; Teuwen, J.; Thoeng, J.; Timmermans, B.; Tshinkulu, M.; Vanden Bemden, S.; Vantroyen, D.; Veevaete, M.; Vercruysse, K.; Vereecken, G.; Vermeersch, L.; Vernijns, J.; Verspecht, E.; Vinck, G.; Vrancken, F.; Watté, G.; Weymans, J.; Windmolders, S.; Albuquerque, D. C.; Barbosa, E. C. D.; Bertolami, M. C.; Blacher, C.; Brasileiro, A. L. S.; Costa e Forti, A.; Eliaschewitz, F. G.; Esteves, J. P.; Feitosa, G. S.; Francischetti, E. A.; Franco, R. J. S.; Gomes, M. A.; Gross, J. L.; Jardim, P. C.; Kohlmann, O.; Loures-Vale, A. A.; Magalhães, M. E. C.; Maia, L. N.; Moriguchi, E. H.; Nogueira, P. R.; Oigman, W.; Repetto, G.; Santos, R. D.; Saraiva, J. F. K.; Xavier, H. T.; Benov, H.; Chompalova, B.; Donova, T.; Gocheva, N.; Goudev, A.; Grigorov, M.; Gruev, T.; Hergeldjieva, V.; Marchev, S.; Mihov, A.; Pasheva, V.; Penev, A.; Popov, A.; Raev, D.; Sirakova, V.; Slavcheva, A.; Stoikov, A.; Stoilov, R.; Tisheva, S.; Todorov, G.; Torbova, S.; Uzunangelov, J.; Achyuthan, G.; Akhras, R.; Barriere, G.; Bartlett, J.; Behiels, S.; Bell, A.; Bergeron, J.; Berlingieri, J.; Bhamjee, H.; Bodok-Nutzati, R.; Booth, W.; Boyd, C.; Brault, S.; Bruckswaiger, D.; Bukovy, B.; Campbell, G.; Carlson, B.; Cha, J.; Chehayeb, R.; Cheng, W.; Chilvers, M.; Chouinard, G.; Chow, W.; Conter, H.; Conway, J.; Craig, B.; Craig, D.; Dattani, I.; del Grande, R.; Dharamshi, S.; Dickson, M.; Dion, D.; Dowell, A.; Drexler, J.; Dube, S.; Dupont, A.; Dworkin, B.; Fields, L.; Filteau, P.; Gardiner, E.; Gervais, B.; Gillis, G.; Girard, R.; Goldman, H.; Gorfinkel, I.; Goulet, S.; Greenspoon, A.; Gritter, R.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M.; Habib, N.; Harding, R.; Hart, R.; Henein, S.; Henry, D.; Hirsch, Axxx; Ho, K.; Hoag, G.; Houde, D.; Howlett, E.; Ing, G.; Jadd, J.; Janes, J.; Jardine, F.; Johnston, T.; Kanani, S.; Kazimirski, M.; Kelly, A.; Klajner, F.; Kooy, J.; Lalani, A.; Lam, S.; Laranjeiro, J.; LaRose, D.; Leiter, L.; Leung, W.; Li, J.; Lowe, D.; Luces, K.; Ma, P.; MacKinnon, R.; Martinho, V.; Matangi, M.; McCrossin, M.; McIsaac, H.; McMullen, W.; Mehta, P.; Meunier, M.; Misik, K.; Nayar, A.; Ng, A.; Nigro, F.; Noronha, L.; O'Mahony, W.; Pandey, S.; Papp, E.; Patel, V.; Patrick, L.; Peddle, C.; Pinsky, N.; Poirier, P.; Powell, C.; Price, J.; Rolfe, A.; Saliba, N.; Sawkiw, R.; Senior, R.; Shu, D.; Smith, R.; Somani, R.; Soowamber, M.; Stakiw, K.; Talbot, P.; Taliano, J.; Tan, K.; Teitelbaum, I.; Threoux, P.; Tremblay, G.; Turcotte, C.; Tytus, R.; Walsh, P.; Webb, G.; Willoughby, P.; Woo, V.; Woodland, R.; Yee, G.; Acevedo, M.; Caorsi, C.; Cardenas, N.; Gonzalez, B.; Gutierrez, M.; Prieto, J.; Stockins, B.; Valerta, P.; Vejar, M.; Ardila, W.; Aschner, P.; Botero, J.; Botero, R.; Calderon, C.; Casas, L.; Castellanos, R.; Cure, C.; Escobar, I.; Fortich, A.; Garcia, L.; Hernandez, E.; Isaza, D.; Jaramillo, N.; Jiménez, C.; Kattah, W.; Luengas, C.; Matiz, C.; Perez, M.; Quintero, A.; Rizcala, A.; Ruiz, A.; Urina, M.; Valenzuela, A.; Cob-Sanchez, A.; Gutreiman-Golberg, M.; Lainez-Ventosilla, A.; Ramirez-Zamora, L.; Slon-Hitti, C.; Speranza-Sánchez, M.; Vinocour-Fornieri, M.; Hansen, H.; Nordestgaard, B.; Steffensen, R.; Stender, S.; Alvarado-Renderos, J.; Rivera-Ochoa, L.; Villarroel-Abrego, H.; Eha, J.; Jaanson, E.; Kaasik, U.; Keba, E.; Mäeots, E.; Petersen, M.; Reinmets, S.; Roostalu, U.; Vahula, V.; Veidrik, K.; Bellmann, R.; Hanefeld, M.; Horacek, T.; Klein, C.; Knels, R.; Laus, S.; Meissner, G.; Mondrof, C.; Schell, E.; Schuster, H.; Sehnert, W.; Stahl, H.; Szelazek, G.; Winkelmann, B.; Witczak, E.; Elis, A.; Gavish, A.; Grossman, E.; Harats, D.; Keidar, S.; Levy, Y.; Osamah, H.; Shapiro, I.; Shveydel, E.; Wolfovitz, E.; Yogev, R.; Zeltser, D.; Arenas, J. L.; Cardona-Muñoz, E.; Cervantes, J. L.; Flores-Lozano, F.; Gonzalez, Clicerio; Gonzalez-Galvez, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gutierrez-Fajardo, P.; Morales, E.; de los Rios, M.; Romero-Zazueta, A.; Talavera, J. O.; Velasco-Sanchez, R.; Vergara-Takahashi, H.; Zúñiga-Guajardo, S.; Agous, I.; Bak, A.; Bartels, G.; Basart, D.; Cornel, J.; de Schipper, L.; Holwerda, N.; Jonker, J.; Köse, V.; Lok, D.; Lokhorst, B.; Mosterd, A.; Nierop, P.; Oude Ophuis, A.; Somer, S.; Tiebesl, J.; Trip, M.; van Hessen, M.; van Kempen, W.; Andersen, M.; Berz, A.; Bjurstrom, M.; Bo, P.; Brunstad, O.; Daae-Johansen, T.; Elle, S.; Fauske, J.; Fossdal, B.; Gjefsen, O.; Hallaraker, A.; Haugen, J.; Helberg, S.; Holm-Johnsen, S.; Istad, H.; Jacobsen, T.; Johansen, R.; Jorstad, T.; Jorum, I.; Kjorlaug, K.; Kontny, F.; Langaker, K.; Larsen, B.; Lonning, S.; Loraas, A.; Mansilla-Tinoco, R.; Medhus, R.; Meyer, I.; Nasrala, S.; Ofjord, E.; Ose, L.; Palmas, J.; Risberg, K.; Sandberg, A.; Sirnes, P.; Skjegstad, E.; Skjelvan, G.; Solnor, L.; Storm-Larsen, A.; Tandberg, A.; Tomala, T.; Torkelsen, A.; Ursin, A.; Valnes, K.; Walaas, K.; Binns-Halman, R.; Delgado-Paredes, A.; Lombana-Vasquez, B.; Noriega-Aguirre, L.; Trujillo-Sagel, R.; Kowalczyk-Kram, M.; Artemiuk, E.; Asankowicz-Bargiel, B.; Banas, I.; Baranska, E.; Baranski, M.; Bijata-Bronisz, R.; Sikorska, A.; Blaszczyk, B.; Bolanowski, J.; Brokl-Stolarczyk, B.; Brzecki, K.; Buczkowski, K.; Chmielewski, T.; Chojnowska-Jezierska, J.; Chwist-Novak, A.; Cygan, W.; Czajkowska-Kaczmarek, E.; Dargiewicz, A.; Dluzniewski, M.; Dudka, C.; Fares, I.; Flasinska, J.; Gadzinski, W.; Gaszczyk, G.; Golebiowski, G.; Gozdur, W.; Grudzien, K.; Sobieska, E.; Kalamarz, J.; Kalinowska, A.; Kornacewicz-Jach, Z.; Korol, M.; Korycka, W.; Kostka, T.; Kostrzewska, A.; Kot, A.; Kowalska-Werbowy, B.; Krupinska, G.; Lotocka, E.; Luberda-Heynar, Z.; Lukas, W.; Lysek, R.; Machyna-Dybala, A.; Mlynarczyk-Jeremicz, K.; Mocarska-Gorna, B.; Niedbal-Yahfouf, I.; Pasternak, D.; Potakowska, I.; Ramian, U.; Roleder, M.; Rosinska-Migda, J.; Sidorowicz-Bialynicka, A.; Skierkowska, J.; Skorinko, I.; Slaboszewska, J.; Sleziak-Barglik, K.; Stachlewski, P.; Superson-Byra, E.; Tissler-Nahorska, G.; Turbak, R.; Uzunow, A.; Wasowicz, D.; Wodniecki, J.; Wojnowski, L.; Wrzol, A.; Zdrojewska, J.; Zurakowska-Krzywonos, A.; Zurowska-Gebala, M.; Ablachim, T.; Abobului, M.; Balanescu, S.; Bobescu, E.; Bojinca, M.; Cristea, M.; Gaita, D.; Stoicovici, R.; Tataru, R.; Tudose, A.; Ardashev, V.; Arutyunov, G.; Azarin, O.; Barbarash, O.; Bondarev, S.; Borisov, M.; Boyarkin, M.; Burova, N.; Chazova, I.; Dovgalevsky, P.; Duplyakov, D.; Egorova, L.; Goloshchekin, B.; Gratsianskiy, N.; Ivleva, A.; Karpov, R.; Karpov, Y. A.; Karpov, Y. B.; Khokhlov, A.; Khokhlov, R.; Khrustalev, O.; Konyakhin, A.; Kostenko, V.; Libov, I.; Lukyanov, Y.; Mezentseva, N.; Panov, A.; Repin, M.; Shabalin, A.; Shalaev, S.; Shilkina, N.; Shulman, V.; Sidorenko, B.; Smolenskaya, O.; Starodubtsev, A.; Talibov, O.; Titkov, Y.; Tsyba, L.; Uspenskiy, Y.; Vishnevsky, A.; Yarokhno, N.; Ahmed, S.; Ashtiker, H.; Bester, A.; Bhorat, Q.; Biermann, E.; Boyd, W.; Burgess, L.; Dindar, F.; Dulabh, R.; Engelbrecht, I.; Erasmus, E.; Fouche, L.; Furman, S.; Govind, U.; Herbst, L.; Jacovides, A.; Kahanovitz, C.; Kruger, C.; Lakha, D.; Lombaard, J.; Macleod, A.; Makan, H.; Manuel, E.; McDonald, M.; Mitha, E.; Mitha, I.; Moola, S.; Nell, H.; Nieuwoudt, G.; Olivier, P.; Padayachee, T.; Pillai, P.; Pillay, S.; Ranjith, N.; Reyneke, S.; Sandell, R.; Sandell, P.; Sebastian, P.; Skriker, M.; Smit, J.; van Rensburg, D.; van Zyl, L.; Vawda, Z.; Wellman, H.; Miserez, A.; Adbulhakim, E.; Angus, M.; Balmer, F.; Balmer, J.; Barrat, R.; Blair, D.; Blyth, A.; Brodie, R.; Brydie, D.; Campbell, C.; Campbell, I.; Church, M.; Clark, C.; Clements, R.; Donnachie, A. N.; Fitpatrick, P.; Godley, C.; Hill, J.; Jarvie, F.; Kieran, W.; Langridge, S.; Leslie, R.; Liddell, A.; MacKenzie, J.; MacKintosh, C.; Mair, R.; Marshall, G.; Martin, R.; McCann, C.; McKibbin, C.; Mclachlan, B.; McLean, F.; Murray, S.; Norris, A.; Pawa, R.; Pexton, N.; Ramage, A.; Reid, S.; Robertson, A.; Rourke, E.; Sarmiento, R.; Shaw, H.; Shaw, R.; Sheil, L.; Spence, G.; Stewart, E.; Thomas, H.; Thomson, J.; Thomson, W.; Travers, J.; Ward, R.; Williams, L.; Wooff, D.; Young, W.; Belzarena, C.; Huarte, A.; Kuster, F.; Lluberas, R.; Abarikwu, C.; Abate, L.; Abbott, R.; Ackley, C.; Adams, G.; Adkins, S.; Albakri, E.; Albarracin, C.; Allison, J.; Alvarado, O.; Alwine, L.; Amin, K.; Amin, M.; Anderson, J.; Anderson, M.; Anderson, W.; Andrawis, N.; Andrews, C.; Angles, L.; Aquino, N.; Ariani, M.; Armstrong, C.; Aronoff, S.; Arora, N.; Atri, P.; Baker, J.; Baker, K.; Balli, E.; Banish, D.; Bardenheier, J.; Barnett, G.; Bartkowiak, A.; Basista, M.; Beliveau, W.; Bell, G.; Benchimol, G.; Bennett, B.; Bennett, N.; Bermudez, Y.; Bernstein, J.; Berroya, A.; Bhargava, M.; Biaggioni, I.; Bimson, S.; Bittar, N.; Bleser, S.; Blumberg, M.; Bobson, C.; Boeren, J.; Bogan, R.; Boling, E.; Booras, C.; Borge, A.; Bradlau, C.; Brady, J.; Brandon, D.; Brideau, D.; Brobyn, T.; Brodowski, M.; Broker, R.; Broussard, C.; Brown, C.; Browning, D.; Brusco, O.; Bryant, J.; Buchanan, P.; Bueso, G.; Burgess, G.; Burke, B.; Buynak, R.; Byrd, L.; Camilo-Vazquez, E.; Campbell, J.; Cannon, L.; Capo, J.; Carmouche, D.; Castaldo, R.; Castilleja, J.; Caudill, T.; Caulin-Glaser, T.; Champlin, J.; Chardon-Feliciano, D.; Cheng, T.; Cherlin, R.; Cheung, D.; Chodock, A.; Christensen, J.; Christian, D.; Christiansen, L.; Ciemiega, R.; Clark, J.; Coble, S.; Cohen, K.; Colan, D.; Cole, F.; Cole, R.; Colleran, K.; Collins, G.; Conard, S.; Cook, J.; Cooperman, M.; Cooze, D.; Copeland, T.; Corder, C.; Courtney, D.; Cox, W.; Crump, W.; Cruz, L.; Cuellar, J.; Cunningham, T.; Daboul, N.; Dailey, R.; Dallas, A.; Dansinger, M.; Dao, L.; Darwin, C.; Dauber, I.; Davidson, M.; Davis, P.; Degarmo, R.; Degoma, R.; Dempsey, M.; Denny, D.; Denyer, G.; Desai, V.; Despot, J.; Dewan, M.; Dickert, J.; Diederich, C.; Doben, S.; Dobratz, D.; Douglas, B.; Drehobl, M.; Dresner, J.; Dreyfus, J.; Drummond, W.; Dunbar, W.; Dunlap, J.; Dunmyer, S.; Eaton, C.; Ecker, A.; Edris, M.; Egbujiobi, L.; Elkind, A.; Ellis, J.; Ellison, H.; Engeron, E.; Erdy, G.; Ervin, W.; Eshowsky, S.; Estock, D.; Fang, C.; Fanning, J.; Feinberg, B.; Feld, L.; Fenton, I.; Fernandez, E.; Ferrera, R.; Fiacco, P.; Fierer, R.; Finneran, M.; Fintel, D.; Fischer, M.; Flippo, G.; Flores, A.; Folkherth, S.; Forbes, R.; Fowler, R.; Francis, P.; Franco, M.; Frank, A.; Fraser, N.; Fuchs, R.; Gabriel, J.; Gaddam, S.; Gaffney, M.; Gamponia, M.; Gandhi, D.; Ganzman, H.; Gaona, R.; Garibian, G.; Garofalo, J.; Gatewood, R.; Gazda, S.; Geiger, R.; Geller, M.; Germino, W.; Gibbs, R.; Gifford, C.; Gilhooley, N.; Gill, S.; Gillespie, E.; Godwin, D.; Goldberg, M.; Goldberg, R.; Goldstein, M.; Gonzalez-Ortiz, E.; Goodman, D.; Gordon, G.; Gordon, M.; Goswami, A.; Gottlieb, D.; Gottschlich, G.; Graham, D.; Gray, J.; Gray, W.; Green, S.; Greenberg, R.; Greenspan, M.; Greenwald, M.; Grover, D.; Gupta, R.; Gupta-Bala, S.; Guthrie, R.; Gutmann, J.; Gvora, T.; Habib, G.; Hack, T.; Haidar, A.; Hamdy, O.; Hansen, M.; Hanshaw, C.; Hargrove, J.; Harris, H.; Harrison, B.; Hart, T.; Heacock, J.; Head, D.; Headley, D.; Henderson, D.; Herman, L.; Herrera, C.; Hershberger, V.; Hershon, K.; Heym, H.; Hill, G.; Hippert, R.; Hnatiuk, G.; Hoekstra, J.; Holt, W.; Homan, J.; Honsinger, R.; Howard, J.; Howard, V.; Howard, W.; Huling, R.; Imburgia, M.; Isajiw, G.; Ison, R.; Iverson, W.; Jacks, R.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, K.; Jacobs, J.; Jacobson, E.; James, A.; Jayanty, V.; Johary, A.; Johnson, G.; Jones, P.; Jones, T.; Joseph, J.; Julien, C.; Kahn, Z.; Kalvaria, I.; Kang, J.; Kaplan, I.; Karns, R.; Kashi, K.; Kaster, S.; Kaufman, A.; Kawley, F.; Keller, R.; Kenton, D.; Kerlin, J.; Kern, J.; Kerwin, E.; Kerzner, B.; Ketchum, J.; Khan, J.; Khan, S.; Khawar, M.; Khera, A.; Kinstrey, T.; Klein, B.; Klein, E.; Klein, S.; Klein, T.; Kleinsteuber, K.; Klementowicz, P.; Knopp, R.; Knutson, T.; Koch, S.; Kramer, M.; Krause, R.; Krisciunas, V.; Krueger, C.; Kruszewski, D.; Kumar, R.; Kunst, E.; Kuo, D.; Kuritsky, L.; Kushner, P.; Kutner, M.; Kwiterovich, P.; Kwong, S.; Lanese, J.; Lang, B.; Lary, J.; Lasalle, J.; Lasater, S.; Lasser, N.; Laughlin, D.; Lawless, J.; Lawlor, D.; Ledbetter, J.; Ledesma, G.; Lee, D.; Lemanski, P.; Levinson, G.; Levinson, L.; Lewis, D.; Lewis, L.; Lewis, S.; Linden, D.; Loh, I.; Look, M.; Lopez, D.; Loskovitz, L.; Lubin, B.; Lucas, M.; MacAdams, M.; Madden, B.; Magee, P.; Maggiacomo, F.; Magier, D.; Magnuson, S.; Mahaffey, R.; Makowski, D.; Maletz, L.; Mally, A.; Maloney, R.; Mancha, V.; Manolukas, P.; Marple, R.; Masri, A.; Masri, B.; Mattingly, G.; Mayer, N.; McCain, A.; McCall Bundy, J.; McCartney, M.; Mcclain, D.; McConn, M.; Mccullum, K.; Mcdavid, R.; McGettigan, J.; McIvor, M.; McNeff, J.; Mendolla, M.; Mercado, A.; Mersey, J.; Milam, J.; Milko, T.; Miller, M.; Miller, R.; Miller, S.; Mobley, D.; Modi, T.; Modiano, M.; Mollen, M.; Montgomery, R.; Moran, J.; Morelli, J.; Morin, D.; Moskow, H.; Moursi, M.; Mueller, N.; Mullins, M.; Myers, E.; Nadar, V.; Naiser, J.; Nash, S.; Natarajan, S.; Neft, M.; Neuman, D.; Nevins, B.; Newman, J.; Newman, R.; Newman, S.; Nolen, T.; Nwasuruba, C.; Oberoi, M.; Odom, A.; Ong, Y.; Oppy, J.; Owen, S.; Pampe, E.; Pangtay, D.; Parker, R.; Patel, B.; Patel, J.; Patel, M.; Patel, R.; Paul, A.; Pearlstein, R.; Penepent, P.; Peniston, J.; Perlman, M.; Persson, D.; Peters, P.; Peterson, G.; Peterson, J.; Pettyjohn, F.; Phillips, A.; Phillips, D.; Piel, M.; Pillai, T.; Pi-Sunyer, F.; Pollack, A.; Pond, M.; Pongonis, J.; Porras, C.; Portnoy, E.; Potos, W.; Powers, J.; Prasad, J.; Pritchett, K.; Pudi, K.; Pullman, J.; Purdy, A.; Quinones, Y.; Raad, G.; Radbill, M.; Radin, D.; Rai, K.; Raikhel, M.; Raine, C.; Ramanujan, R.; Ramirez, G.; Ramos-Santana, Z.; Rapo, S.; Ravin, S.; Rawtani, P.; Reeves, R.; Reeves, W.; Reiter, W.; Rendell, M.; Resnick, H.; Reynolds, W.; Rhudy, J.; Rice, L.; Rictor, K.; Ringrose, R.; Riser, J.; Rizvi, M.; Rizzo, W.; Robinson, J.; Robison, W.; Rogers, W.; Rohlf, J.; Rosen, R.; Ross, E.; Roth, E.; Rovner, S.; Rucki, P.; Runde, M.; Ryan, W.; Rybicki, J.; Saleem, T.; Salvato, P.; Santram, D.; Scharf, B.; Schear, M.; Schectman, G.; Schmidt, J.; Schneider, A.; Schneider, P.; Schneider, R.; Schoenfelder, S.; Schussheim, A.; Schwartz, R.; Schwartz, S.; Schwarze, M.; Scott, C.; Segal, S.; Settipane, R.; Shah, M.; Shamim, T.; Shanes, J.; Shapero, P.; Shapiro, J.; Shealy, N.; Shepard, M.; Shepherd, A.; Sheta, M.; Shrivastava, R.; Shusman, R.; Siddiqui, M.; Sidney, A.; Silvers, D.; Simek, C.; Simpson, C.; Sinatra, L.; Singh, S.; Singson, D.; Slabic, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.; Smith, T.; Snell, P.; Specter, J.; Speer, J.; Spees, R.; Sperling, M.; Spuhler, W.; Staab, P.; Stafford, J.; Stanton, D.; Stein, E.; Stern, S.; Stocks, T.; Stone, A.; Strader, W.; Strout, C.; Strzinek, R.; Subich, D.; Suen, J.; Sugimoto, D.; Sulman, S.; Suresh, D.; Sweeney, G.; Szatkowski, A.; Szeto, J.; Szewczak, S.; Szulawski, I.; Taber, L.; Taghizadeh, B.; Tague, R.; Tambunan, D.; Tannoury, G.; Tavaez Valle, J.; Thieneman, A.; Thigpen, D.; Thompson, P.; Tidman, R.; Tilton, G.; Tokatlian, E.; Topkis, R.; Torelli, M.; Tortorice, F.; Toth, P.; Touger, M.; Treat, S.; Trevino, M.; Trupin, S.; Turner, A.; Turner, M.; Tweel, C.; Ugarte, J.; Ulmer, E.; Urbach, D.; Vacker, M.; Vallecillo, J.; van de Beek, M.; Vargas, L.; Vazquez Tanus, J.; Verma, A.; Vijayaraghavan, K.; Wade, P.; Wade, T.; Wagner, S.; Wahle, J.; Walker, J.; Walker, M.; Weinstein, R.; Weisbrot, A.; Weiss, R.; West, P.; White, A.; Wickemeyer, W.; Wieskopf, B.; Wiggins, M.; Williams, H.; Wiseman, J.; Yataco, A.; Yates, S.; Zamarra, J.; Zamora, B.; Zawada, E.; Zemel, L.; Zigrang, W.; Zusman, R.; Aguiton, M.; Arroyo-Parejo, M.; Beaujon Sierralta, J.; Berrizbeitia, M.; Carrizales de Marlin, Y.; Colan Parraga, J.; Fernandez, C.; Fuenmayor, N.; Giesen, G.; Gonzalez Gomez, C.; Guaipo, A.; Herrera Rivera, C.; Jaua, L.; Lopez, N.; Lopez Nouel, R.; Marulanda, M.; Morr, I.; Nass, A.; Palmucci, G.; Perez, L.; Ponte, C.; Rivas, I.; de Roa, E.; Figarella Salazar, G.; Sanchez, F.; Siriti, U.; Viloria, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased levels of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein predict cardiovascular events. Since statins lower levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as well as cholesterol, we hypothesized that people with elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels

  17. C-reactive protein genotypes associated with circulating C-reactive protein but not with angiographic coronary artery disease: the LURIC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Tanja B; März, Winfried; Renner, Wilfried; Böhm, Bernhard O; Hoffmann, Michael M

    2009-01-01

    Circulating C-reactive protein is associated with future cardiovascular events. The causal role of C-reactive protein in the development of atherosclerosis remains controversial. We analysed the association between three genetic polymorphisms (PM) (-717C>T, rs2794521; +1059G>C, rs1800947; +1444C>T, rs1130864) at the C-reactive protein locus and related haplotypes with both circulating C-reactive protein and angiographic coronary artery disease (CAD). The concentration of C-reactive protein was similar in patients with stable CAD and in controls, but increased in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes. In models adjusting for the main confounding variables, the minor alleles of the +1059G>C (rs1800947) and the +1444C>T PM (rs1130864) were associated with decreased and increased concentrations of C-reactive protein, respectively. Haplotypes 1 and 4 decreased, and haplotype 2 increased C-reactive protein, whereas haplotype 3 had no appreciable effect. None of the genetic variants affecting circulating C-reactive protein was consistently associated with the prevalence of angiographic CAD. A causal role of C-reactive protein in the development of CAD would require that genetic PM resulting in long-term modulation of the concentration of C-reactive protein be themselves associated with CAD. We were not able to detect such a relationship, which can be attributed to either a very small genetic effect size or the relationship between C-reactive protein and cardiovascular events may reflect confounding and reverse causation.

  18. C-reactive protein in patients with aggressive periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Mysak

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the systemic levels of C-reactive protein (CRP in peripheral blood samples of patients with aggressive periodontitis during the first twelve months of periodontal treatment, at exactly six month interval measurements, and compare them with clinical periodontal parameters. Materials and methods: All patients (N = 45 were examined prior to the initiation of periodontal treatment. Patients were divided into two groups GAgP (Generalised form of aggressive periodontitis, N = 23 and group LAgP (Localised form of aggressive periodontitis, N = 22. Control group (CON included 60 individuals with healthy periodontium. The levels of CRP were determined in both groups GAgP and LAgP three times in 6 month intervals during the periodontal treatment. Results: CRP is a plasma protein that reflects the extent of the acute phase response to inflammation and is one of the markers of choice for monitoring this response. In our study, CRP levels decreased in course of periodontal treatment in both groups (GAgP and LAgP in a similar way as bleeding on probing (BOP and probing pocket depth (PPD indices. Conclusion: Our study results showed that CRP levels, as well as bleeding on probing (BOP and probing pocket depth (PPD, indices decreased in course of periodontal treatment in patients with generalised and localised aggressive periodontitis. Therefore this marker might be exploitable as a means to evaluate periodontal health in patients with aggressive periodontitis. Keywords: aggressive periodontitis, C-reactive protein, periodontal index, cardiovascular diseases

  19. Genetically elevated C-reactive protein and ischemic vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risks of ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. We tested whether this is a causal association. Methods: We studied 10,276 persons from a general population cohort, including 1786 in whom...... ischemic heart disease developed and 741 in whom ischemic cerebrovascular disease developed. We examined another 31,992 persons from a cross-sectional general population study, of whom 2521 had ischemic heart disease and 1483 had ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Finally, we compared 2238 patients...... with ischemic heart disease with 4474 control subjects and 612 patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease with 1224 control subjects. We measured levels of high-sensitivity CRP and conducted genotyping for four CRP polymorphisms and two apolipoprotein E polymorphisms. Results: The risk of ischemic heart...

  20. Capacitive immunosensor for C-reactive protein quantification

    KAUST Repository

    Sapsanis, Christos

    2015-08-02

    We report an agglutination-based immunosensor for the quantification of C-reactive protein (CRP). The developed immunoassay sensor requires approximately 15 minutes of assay time per sample and provides a sensitivity of 0.5 mg/L. We have measured the capacitance of interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) and quantified the concentration of added analyte. The proposed method is a label free detection method and hence provides rapid measurement preferable in diagnostics. We have so far been able to quantify the concentration to as low as 0.5 mg/L and as high as 10 mg/L. By quantifying CRP in serum, we can assess whether patients are prone to cardiac diseases and monitor the risk associated with such diseases. The sensor is a simple low cost structure and it can be a promising device for rapid and sensitive detection of disease markers at the point-of-care stage.

  1. Comparison of C-reactive protein and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imed Helal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic inflammation is highly prevalent in patients on hemodialysis (HD, as evidenced by increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP. We compared CRP to high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP to determine whether it has any clinical implications and prognostic significance in terms of mortality. CRP was measured using a standard immunoturbidometric assay on the COBAS; INTEGRA system and hs-CRP was measured using the Dade Behring on the Konelab Nephelometer in 50 patients on HD. CRP (≥6 mg/L and hs-CRP (≥3 mg/L levels were elevated in 30% and 54% of the patients, respectively. A significant correlation was noted between hs-CRP and CRP levels (r = 0.98, P <0.001. Deming regression analysis showed that the slope was near one (r = 0.90; 0.83-0.94 and that the intercept was small. Multivariate regression confirmed that age above 40 years (RR = 3.69, P = 0.027 and duration on HD greater than five years (RR = 3.71, P = 0.028 remained significant independent predictors of serum hs-CRP. Thirteen patients died during follow-up (26%. Multivariate Cox regression demonstrated that hs-CRP (RR = 1.062, P = 0.03 and CRP levels (RR = 1.057, P = 0.009 and age (RR = 1.078, P = 0.001 were the most powerful predictors of mortality. The CRP standard assay presents a reasonable alternative to the hs-CRP assay in patients on HD. The advantages of the CRP standard assay are its online and real-time availability as well as lower costs, particularly in developing countries.

  2. C-reactive protein, inflammation and coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Shrivastava

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is widely considered to be an important contributing factor of the pathophysiology of coronary heart disease (CHD, and the inflammatory cascade is particularly important in the atherosclerotic process. In consideration of the important role that inflammatory processes play in CHD, recent work has been focused on whether biomarkers of inflammation may help to improve risk stratification and identify patient groups who might benefit from particular treatment strategies. Of these biomarkers, C-reactive protein (CRP has emerged as one of the most important novel inflammatory markers. CRP an acute phase protein is synthesized by hepatocytes in response to proinflammatory cytokines, in particular interleukin-6. Many large-scale prospective studies demonstrate that CRP strongly and independently predicts adverse cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and sudden cardiac death in individuals both with and without overt CHD. CRP is believed to be both a marker and a mediator of atherosclerosis and CHD. CRP plays a pivotal role in many aspects of atherogenesis including, activation of complement pathway, lipids uptake by macrophage, release of proinflammatory cytokines, induces the expression of tissue factor in monocytes, promotes the endothelial dysfunction and inhibits nitric oxide production. The commercial availability of CRP high sensitive assays has made screening for this marker simple, reliable, and reproducible and can be used as a clinical guide to diagnosis, management, and prognosis of CHD.

  3. Fluorescent detection of C-reactive protein using polyamide beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadeesh, Shreesha; Chen, Lu; Aitchison, Stewart

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial infection causes Sepsis which is one of the leading cause of mortality in hospitals. This infection can be quantified from blood plasma using C - reactive protein (CRP). A quick diagnosis at the patient's location through Point-of- Care (POC) testing could give doctors the confidence to prescribe antibiotics. In this paper, the development and testing of a bead-based procedure for CRP quantification is described. The size of the beads enable them to be trapped in wells without the need for magnetic methods of immobilization. Large (1.5 mm diameter) Polyamide nylon beads were used as the substrate for capturing CRP from pure analyte samples. The beads captured CRP either directly through adsorption or indirectly by having specific capture antibodies on their surface. Both methods used fluorescent imaging techniques to quantify the protein. The amount of CRP needed to give a sufficient fluorescent signal through direct capture method was found suitable for identifying bacterial causes of infection. Similarly, viral infections could be quantified by the more sensitive indirect capture method. This bead-based assay can be potentially integrated as a disposable cartridge in a POC device due to its passive nature and the small quantities needed.

  4. The antimicrobial properties of C-reactive protein (CRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sandra S H; Ng, Patricia M L; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2005-01-01

    C-reactive protein, CRP, is a predominant pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) in the plasma of the horseshoe crab, which recognizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Native CRP2 has previously been shown to exhibit agglutination activity against the polysialic capsule of Escherichia coli K1 but its role in bacterial clearance is not well characterized. In this work, the antimicrobial activity of a recombinant CRP2 isoform (rCRP2) was tested against E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. rCRP2 agglutinates bacteria and exhibits bactericidal activity against Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, the antimicrobial activity of rCRP2 is calcium-independent. GST pulldown experiments suggest that in the naïve physiological state, CRP2 interacts with hemocyanin, native CRPs, a 35-kDa plasma lectin and an as yet unidentified 40-kDa protein. This interaction was enhanced upon Pseudomonas infection. We propose that rCRP2 is a PRR with potent antimicrobial activity and its interacting partners contribute to effective bacterial clearance.

  5. C-reactive protein as a predictor of chorioamnionitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Erik J; Muller, Corinna L; Sartorius, Jennifer A; White, David R; Maslow, Arthur S

    2012-10-01

    Chorioamnionitis (CAM) affects many pregnancies complicated by preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM). Finding a serum factor that could accurately predict the presence of CAM could potentially lead to more efficient management of PPROM and improved neonatal outcomes. To determine if C-reactive protein (CRP) is an effective early marker of CAM in patients with PPROM. A retrospective evaluation of pregnant women with PPROM at Geisinger Medical Center in Danville, Pennsylvania, between January 2005 and January 2009. Nonparametric statistical tests (ie, Wilcoxon rank sum and Spearman rank correlation) were used to compare distributions that were skewed. Characteristics of the study population were compared using 2-sample t tests for continuous variables and Fisher exact tests for discrete variables. Logistic regression analysis was used to generate receiver operating characteristic curves and obtain area under the curve estimates in stepwise fashion for predicting histologic CAM. A secondary analysis compared the characteristics among patients with clinical CAM, histologic CAM, or non-CAM. The total population of 73 women was subdivided into patients with histologic CAM (n=26) and patients without histologic CAM (ie, no evidence of CAM on placental pathology; n=47). There was no difference between groups in CRP levels, days of pregnancy latency, white blood cell count, smoking status, antibiotic administration, or steroid benefit. The group with histologic CAM delivered at earlier gestational ages: mean (standard deviation) age was 29.5 (4.4) weeks vs 31.9 (3.5) weeks (P=.02). For our primary analysis, we found no difference in CRP levels (P=.32). Receiver operating characteristic curve plots of CRP levels, temperature at delivery, and white blood cell count resulted in an area under the curve estimate of 0.696, which was 70% predictive of histologic CAM. In the secondary analysis, after adjusting for gestational age, the estimated hazard ratio for CRP change

  6. Solid phase radioimmunoassays for human C-reactive protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shine, B.; Beer, F.C. de; Pepys, M.B.

    1981-01-01

    Two new, rapid and sensitive radioimmunoassays for human C-reactive protein (CRP) have been established using antiserum coupled to magnetizable cellulose particles, which facilitate phase separation. A single antibody method, using solid phase anti-CRP, provides a sensitivity of 50 μg/l with a 1-h incubation time and intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation of 10%. A double antibody method, using fluid phase rabbit anti-CRP serum and solid phase sheep anti-rabbit IgG serum, provides a sensitivity of 3 μg/l with an overnight incubation and intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation of 10%. Among 468 sera from normal adult volunteer blood donors the median CRP concentration was 800 μg/l, interquartile range 340-1700 μg/l and range 70-29,000 μg/l. Ninety percent of samples contained less than 3 mg/l and 99% less than 10 mg/l. Low levels (14-650 μg/l) of CRP were detected both in amniotic fluids and in cerebrospinal fluids. (Auth.)

  7. C-reactive protein levels in patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberg, Trang N; Overstreet, Benjamin T; Rogers, Jeffrey D; Califano, Joseph V; Best, Al M; Schenkein, Harvey A

    2006-06-01

    Sera from patients with periodontal infections contain elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) compared to periodontally healthy individuals. Most studies to date have included patients with chronic periodontitis, and few investigators have studied CRP levels in subjects with aggressive periodontitis (AgP). The purpose of this study was to determine the relative levels of serum CRP in AgP patients and periodontally healthy subjects and to examine patients' characteristics that might account for intergroup differences. Serum samples were collected from 93 patients with generalized AgP (GAgP), from 97 patients with localized AgP (LAgP), and from 91 healthy controls (non-periodontitis [NP]). Periodontal examination consisted of plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, bleeding index, and attachment loss measurements. Current smoking was assessed by determination of serum cotinine levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and serum CRP levels were determined using a high-sensitivity ELISA assay. The three groups were significantly different from one another (P periodontal and demographic variables and current smoking, both mean probing depth and periodontal diagnosis remained correlated with CRP levels. Patients with AgP have statistically significant elevations in serum CRP levels compared to subjects without periodontitis. Elevated CRP in these subjects might represent a contribution of periodontal infections to systemic inflammation in relatively young individuals.

  8. Label-Free Electrochemical Immunoassay for C-Reactive Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madasamy Thangamuthu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is one of the most expressed proteins in blood during acute phase inflammation, and its minute level increase has also been recognized for the clinical diagnosis of cardio vascular diseases. Unfortunately, the available commercial immunoassays are labour intensive, require large sample volumes, and have practical limitations, such as low stability and high production costs. Hence, we have developed a simple, cost effective, and label-free electrochemical immunoassay for the measurement of CRP in a drop of serum sample using an immunosensor strip made up of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPE modified with anti-CRP functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. The measurement relies on the decrease of the oxidation current of the redox indicator Fe3+/Fe2+, resulting from the immunoreaction between CRP and anti-CRP. Under optimal conditions, the present immunoassay measures CRP in a linear range from 0.4–200 nM (0.047–23.6 µg mL−1, with a detection limit of 0.15 nM (17 ng mL−1, S/N = 3 and sensitivity of 90.7 nA nM−1, in addition to a good reproducibility and storage stability. The analytical applicability of the presented immunoassay is verified by CRP measurements in human blood serum samples. This work provides the basis for a low-priced, safe, and easy-to-use point-of-care immunosensor assay to measure CRP at clinically relevant concentrations.

  9. Relationship between C-Reactive Protein and Body Mass Index in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. C-reactive protein is an acute-phase protein synthesized in the liver and its release is stimulated by cytokines (interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha). Baseline levels of C-reactive protein in apparently healthy men and women predict long-term risk of a first myocardial infarction. In older men and ...

  10. C-reactive protein and migraine. Facts or speculations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Mattiuzzi, Camilla; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2014-09-01

    Abstract Migraine is a highly prevalent and frequently disabling disorder. Since the pathogenesis of this condition has a strong inflammatory component and migraine is significantly associated with cardiovascular disease, we assess whether C-reactive protein (CRP) may be epidemiologically or casually linked with migraine. An electronic search on Medline, Scopus and Web of Science produced 17 studies reporting original data about the epidemiological association between CRP and migraine (1 retrospective, 1 interventional, 14 cross-sectional and 1 both interventional and cross-sectional). When all studies reporting sufficient data about CRP values were pooled (n=12; 6980 cases and 38,975 controls), the concentration of CRP was found to be significantly higher in patients with migraine than in controls (weighted mean difference 1.12 mg/L; 95% CI 1.01-1.25 mg/L; p<0.001). In further analysis of studies containing separate data for migraine with and without aura (n=7), CRP values remained significantly higher in both migraineur patients with aura (n=1939; weighted mean difference 0.88 mg/L; 95% CI 0.63-1.14 mg/L; p<0.001) or without aura (n=2483; weighted mean difference 1.04 mg/L; 95% CI 0.78-1.30 mg/L; p<0.001) when compared with controls (n=29,354). Despite a large inter-study heterogeneity (99.3%), our analysis provides evidence of a potential epidemiological association between increased concentration of CRP and migraine, thus paving the way for further clinical investigations about therapeutic agents that may contextually decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease and reduce the burden of migraine.

  11. Human serum protein and C-reactive protein levels among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human serum protein and C-reactive protein levels were determined among HIV patients visiting St Camillus Hospital, Uromi, Edo State, Nigeria, between January to March, 2013. Fifty (50) HIV patients (20 males; 30 females) and 50 control subjects (24 males; 26 females) were enrolled for this study. The clinical status of ...

  12. The effects of probiotic yoghurt on C-Reactive Protein in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hanoyesadat Ejtahed

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Consumption of probiotic yoghurt improved C-Reactive Protein concentration in type 2 diabetic patients. Probiotic yoghurt consumption is recommended as auxiliary therapy in type 2 diabetic patients.

  13. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... C-reactive protein and TC (R = 0.19), TG (R = 0.29), BMI (R = 0.32), glucose (R = 0.11), and uric acid (R = 0.14) (all P

  14. C-reactive protein and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight or obese children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Anajás da Silva; Cardoso, Renata Oliveira; Carvalho, Danielle Franklin de; Collet, Neusa; Medeiros, Carla Campos Muniz

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between ultrasensitive C-reactive protein and cardiometabolic risk factors in overweight or obese childrenand adolescents. METHODS: Cross-sectional study conducted at the Center for Childhood Obesity in the period from April 2009 to April 2010, involving 185 overweight children and adolescents aged 2 to 18 years. Measures of ultrasensitive C-reactive protein according to age, nutritional status, gender, race, cardiometabolic risk factors (waist ...

  15. Predictive value of C-reactive protein in critically ill patients after abdominal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Sapin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The development of sepsis after abdominal surgery is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Due to inflammation, it may be difficult to diagnose infection when it occurs, but measurement of C-reactive protein could facilitate this diagnosis. In the present study, we evaluated the predictive value and time course of C-reactive protein in relation to outcome in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU after abdominal surgery. METHODS: We included patients admitted to the ICU after abdominal surgery over a period of two years. The patients were divided into two groups according to their outcome: favorable (F; left the ICU alive, without modification of the antibiotic regimen and unfavorable (D; death in the ICU, surgical revision with or without modification of the antibiotic regimen or just modification of the regimen. We then compared the highest C-reactive protein level on the first day of admission between the two groups. RESULTS: A total of 308 patients were included: 86 patients had an unfavorable outcome (group D and 222 had a favorable outcome (group F. The groups were similar in terms of leukocytosis, neutrophilia, and platelet count. C-reactive protein was significantly higher at admission in group D and was the best predictor of an unfavorable outcome, with a sensitivity of 74% and a specificity of 72% for a threshold of 41 mg/L. No changes in C-reactive protein, as assessed based on the delta C-reactive protein, especially at days 4 and 5, were associated with a poor prognosis. CONCLUSIONS: A C-reactive protein cut-off of 41 mg/L during the first day of ICU admission after abdominal surgery was a predictor of an adverse outcome. However, no changes in the C-reactive protein concentration, especially by day 4 or 5, could identify patients at risk of death.

  16. The diagnostic value of c-reactive protein estimation in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheikh, A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of serum and CSF C-reactive protein (C-rp) in differentiating bacterial from viral meningitis. Design: An observational, respective hospital-based study. Place and duration of study: It was conducted at the Department of Medicine and Department of Pediatrics, Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute Lahore, Over a Period of one year between march, 1999 and March, 2000. Subject and Methods: A randomized group of thirty patients, who presented with clinical features, suggestive of meningitis, were included in the study. C-reactive protein determinations were performed by latex agglutination method on the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of these patients. Results: In the present study, c-reactive protein was found to be a more sensitive test for differentiating bacterial from non-bacterial meningitis on initial examination than the usual conventional methods used to diagnose bacterial meningitis. CSF C-reactive protein had a greater sensitivity (92% as compared to serum C-reactive protein (71%). Conclusion: C-reactive protein determination in CSF was found to be a useful indicator of bacterial meningitis that can be used to distinguish it from viral meningitis. (author)

  17. Association of C-reactive protein positivity among groups of patients with knee osteoarthritis in Erbil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Ahmed Pirdawood

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disease and a leading cause of disability. Increased circulating levels of C-reactive protein have been associated with prevalent knee osteoarthritis. This study aimed to assess the association between C- reactive protein positivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis in Erbil Methods: Data from100 participants in this case-control study were enrolled from May 1st to December 1st, 2015 in Rizgary Teaching Hospital in Erbil city. Data were divided into two groups. The cases included 50 patients (17 male and 33 female with a mean age of 58.9 ±3.8 years and diagnosed with primary knee osteoarthritis of one or both knee joints. Controls included 50 persons (17 male and 33 female with a mean age of 58.1 ±3.9 years without knee osteoarthritis and matched for age, sex, and body mass index. C-reactive protein qualitatively measured. Patients were radiologically assessed by Kellgren and Lawrence grading scale (grade 0-4. Results: C-reactive protein was positive in 41 out of 50 (82% of knee osteoarthritis patients compared to 3 out of 50 (6% of healthy controls (P = 0.001. C- reactive protein positivity among knee osteoarthritis patients were significantly associated with body mass index, positive family history of knee osteoarthritis, duration of diseases, and Kellgren and Lawrence grade (P 0.05. Conclusion: C-reactive protein positivity was significantly associated with knee osteoarthritis compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, body mass index, positive family history of knee osteoarthritis, early osteoarthritis, and Kellgren and Lawrence grade II, were significantly associated with positive C-reactive protein in knee osteoarthritis.

  18. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... C-reactive protein and TC (R = 0.19), TG (R = 0.29), BMI (R = 0.32), glucose (R = 0.11), and uric acid (R = 0.14) (all P protein and HDL cholesterol (R = 0.13, P protein...

  19. Plasma C-Reactive Protein and Selected Nutritional Indices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Caesarean Section (CS) is a major surgical procedure, often performed when a vaginal delivery is considered unsafe. Objective: This study was carried out to understand the interaction between acute phase proteins and nutritional factors consequent to caesarean section. The knowledge of this interaction is ...

  20. Association of serum leptin with serum C-reactive protein in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastegari Ebrahim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent investigations have shown that leptin is cleared principally by the kidney. Objectives: To examine whether and how in patients on hemodialysis the level of C-reactive protein level correlate with serum leptin. Patients and Methods: The total patients were 36. The mean patients’ age were 46 (16 years. The median length of the time patients were on hemodialysis were 19 months. Results: The mean serum C-reactive protein was 8.7 (6.6 mg/l (median: 8 mg/l. The mean serum leptin was 9.4 (14 ng/ml (median: 5.75 ng/ml. In this study we found a significant inverse correlation of serum leptin with serum C-reactive protein (r= -0.57, p= 0.041 was seen. Conclusion: Our data supports, the positive effect of leptin on nutrition and support the theory of protective effects (reverse epidemiology of leptin in hemodialysis patients.

  1. Can serum concentration of C-reactive protein, albumin and body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The C-reactive protein was estimated using semi-quantitative method, albumin level was estimated using bromocresol green method, and biuret method was used for total protein. The CD4+T-cell count of the subjects was determined using CyFlow Analyzer while their weights were measured using high precision weighing ...

  2. Depressive symptoms and C-reactive protein in a Brazilian urban community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.W. Dressler

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Psychological depression is an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. C-reactive protein has been implicated as a mediator of the effect of psychological depression. Several studies have found that individuals, especially men, who report higher levels of psychological depression also have higher levels of C-reactive protein. The current study was undertaken to replicate these results in a Brazilian population, in which there is a much wider range of variation in both background characteristics (such as socioeconomic status and coronary artery disease risk factors. A sample of 271 individuals was interviewed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Fasting blood samples were obtained and evaluated for C-reactive protein (assessed by a turbidimetric immunoassay using a Dade Behring kit analysis in a subsample (N = 258 of individuals. The mean ± SD C-reactive protein for the entire sample was 0.43 ± 0.44, with 0.42 ± 0.48 for men and 0.43 ± 0.42 mg/L for women. Data were analyzed using multiple regression analysis, controlling for age, sex, body mass index, socioeconomic status, tobacco use, and both total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Higher reported depressive symptoms were correlated with higher C-reactive protein for men (partial r = 0.298, P = 0.004 and with lower C-reactive protein for women (partial r = -0.154, P = 0.059. The differences in the associations for men and women could be a result of differential effects of sex hormones on stress reactivity and immune response. On the other hand, this difference in the associations may be related to gender differences in the disclosure of emotion and the effect that self-disclosure has on physical health and immune response.

  3. Comparison of two automated quantitative immunoassays for the determination of C reactive protein concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, E A; Coia, J E; Kale, P C; Masterton, R G

    1994-01-01

    Two quantitative, automated methods for the determination of C reactive protein (CRP) were compared: turbidimetry (Cobas Fara II, Roche, Welwyn Garden City, UK) and fluorescence polarisation TDx, Abbott, Wokingham, UK). One hundred and twenty routine serum samples submitted for measurement of CRP were tested using both procedures. The results were compared using regression line analysis and showed a high degree of correlation (r2 = 0.99, X coefficient = 1.01, constant = 0.11). C reactive protein can be accurately measured using the automated turbidimetric method which can be recommended as an alternative to fluorescence polarisation. Images PMID:7876389

  4. Serum levels of copeptin, C-reactive protein and cortisol in different ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    Serum levels of copeptin, C-reactive protein and cortisol in different severity groups of sickle cell anaemia. Akinlade K.S.. 1. , Atere A.D.. 1. , Rahamon S.K.. 1 and Olaniyi J.A.. 2. Departments of 1Chemical Pathology and 2Haematology, University of Ibadan/University College Hospital,. Ibadan, Nigeria. Summary: It is well ...

  5. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-01

    Mar 1, 2016 ... C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. CKD patients with elevated CRP .... months with or without reduction in GFR or as the pres- ence of GFR less than or ..... Visceral fat secretes pro-inflammatory cytokines that attracts macrophages that ...

  6. Role of plasma adiponectin /C-reactive protein ratio in obesity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obesity is a modifiable risk factor for hypertension and T2D. Objective(s): We examined relations between fasting plasma adiponectin (ADIP), C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations and markers of T2D in African Americans (AA). Methods: Fasting plasma ADIP, CRP, Insulin (IN), HOMA-IR, lipid profiles, body ...

  7. Plasma high sensitivity C-reactive protein as a marker of severity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ehab

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is one of the most common ... activation during DKA and its treatment.10 ... C-reactive protein (CRP) has been reported to be marker for endothelial cell dysfunction in uncomplicated, well-controlled, type 1 diabetes mellitus. Objective: This study was undertaken to identify the relation.

  8. C-reactive protein and microalbuminuria differ in their associations with various domains of vascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuveling, EM; Hillege, HL; Bakker, SJL; Asselbergs, FW; de Jong, PE; Gans, ROB; de Zeeuw, D

    C-reactive protein (CRP) and microalbuminuria (MA) have been identified as risk markers for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We questioned whether CRP and MA are similar markers of vascular disease in different regions of the vascular tree like the heart, kidneys and extremities or if they differ in

  9. Hepatotoxic effects of fenofibrate in spontaneously hypertensive rats expressing human C-reactive protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škop, V.; Trnovská, J.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Marková, I.; Malínská, H.; Kazdová, L.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Kůdela, M.; Pravenec, Michal; Šilhavý, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, č. 6 (2016), s. 891-899 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT14325 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : fenofibrate * rosuvastatin * C-reactive protein * transgenic * spontaneously hypertensive rat * inflammation * hepatotoxic Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016

  10. Clinical practice of procalcitonin and hypersensitive c-reactive protein test in neonatal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Aimei; Liu, Jingyan; Chang, Jing; Deng, Caiyan; Hu, Yulian; Yu, Fengqin; Ma, Zhanmin; Wang, Guangzhou

    2016-03-01

    To study the clinical practice of procalcitonin and hypersensitive c-reactive protein test in neonatal infection. Two hundred cases of our hospital treatment confirmed infection early newborn children were selected from February 2014 to March 2015. According to the condition, the children were divided into four groups as follows: severe infection group, local infection group, non-infection group and healthy newborns group. At the same time, the new healthy newborns were chosen as control group. The levels of serum procalcitonin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were detected in all children and the levels in severe infection group children before and after treatment were also quantitatively detected and the test results were analyzed. There was significant difference in procalcitonin among the four groups (pSinfection group has no significant difference compared with the non-infection group (p>0.05). But there was significant difference between the local infection group and healthy newborn group. As for the severe infection group, both the levels of procalcitonin and positive rate of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein had significant difference compared with the other groups. The detection of procalcitonin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein could contribute to the diagnose of the early infection neonatal children and has important values in diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases in the newborns.

  11. Investigating the Causal Relationship of C-Reactive Protein with 32 Complex Somatic and Psychiatric Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prins, Bram P; Abbasi, Ali; Wong, Anson

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with immune, cardiometabolic, and psychiatric traits and diseases. Yet it is inconclusive whether these associations are causal. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed Mendelian randomization (MR) analyses using two genetic risk scores (GRSs) as inst...

  12. The correlation between C-reactive protein and toxic granulation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. During inflammation, the serum concentrations of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6), and C-reactive protein (CRP) increase. A positive correlation between CRP and the percentages of neutrophils exhibiting toxic granulation during inflammation has been demonstrated, ...

  13. Total anti-oxidant status and C-reactive protein values in Nigerians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total anti-oxidant status and C-reactive protein values in Nigerians with symptomatic primary osteoarthritis of the knee joint – an initial report. ... Informed consent, biodata and body mass indices were obtained after which venous blood samples were obtained from each subject. Total plasma antioxidant status (TAS) was ...

  14. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-03-01

    Mar 1, 2016 ... SUMMARY. Background: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of hospitalization and mortality in chronic kidney disease. (CKD). C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. CKD patients with elevated CRP should be identified early with ...

  15. Serum C-reactive protein levels in pre-dialysis chronic kidney ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of hospitalization and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). C- reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of cardiovascular disease and predictor of mortality in CKD patients. CKD patients with elevated CRP should be identified early with institution of measures to treat ...

  16. C-reactive protein point-of-care testing and associated antibiotic prescribing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaard, Margaretha C.; van de Pol, Alma C.; Hopstaken, Rogier M.; van Delft, Sanne; Broekhuizen, Berna D. L.; Verheij, Theo J. M.; de Wit, Niek J.

    Background. In clinical trials, the potential of point-of-care (POC) C-reactive protein (CRP) tests was demonstrated in decreasing antibiotic prescribing in adults with acute cough in general practice, but effects of implementation are unknown. Objective. To determine the overall effect of POC CRP

  17. Resting serum concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resting serum concentration of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in sportsmen and untrained male adults. F.A. Niyi-Odumosu, O. A. Bello, S.A. Biliaminu, B.V. Owoyele, T.O. Abu, O.L. Dominic ...

  18. C-reactive Protein and Disease Outcome in Nigerian Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Evidence suggests that sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a chronic inflammatory state. C.reactive protein (CRP) is known to modulate inflammation. Its role in the chronic inflammation of SCD may make it valuable as a therapeutic target. Aim: The aim was to determine CRP levels in SCD subjects in ...

  19. Plasma levels of C-Reactive Protein and Fibrinogen in Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, we determined the changes in plasma C- reactive protein (C-RP) and Fibrinogen levels in Drug sensitive Tuberculosis (DSTB) patients at diagnosis, Multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) patients at diagnosis and during chemotherapy. Twenty-four (24) patients MDRTB patients and 24 newly diagnosed ...

  20. C-reactive protein collaborates with plasma lectins to boost immune response against bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, PM; Le Saux, A; Lee, CM

    2007-01-01

    Although human C-reactive protein (CRP) becomes upregulated during septicemia, its role remains unclear, since purified CRP showed no binding to many common pathogens. Contrary to previous findings, we show that purified human CRP (hCRP) binds to Salmonella enterica, and that binding is enhanced ...

  1. Atherosclerosis, C-reactive protein, and risk for open-angle glaucoma : The Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogd, Simone; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.

    PURPOSE. To test the hypotheses that atherosclerosis and elevated serum C-reactive protein ( CRP) levels are risk factors for open-angle glaucoma ( OAG). METHODS. In a prospective, population-based cohort study, all participants 55 years and older and at risk for incident OAG underwent, at baseline

  2. Atherosclerosis, C-reactive protein, and risk for open-angle glaucoma: The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. de Voogd (Simone); R.C.W. Wolfs (Roger); N.M. Jansonius (Nomdo); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE. To test the hypotheses that atherosclerosis and elevated serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are risk factors for open-angle glaucoma (OAG). METHODS. In a prospective, population-based cohort study, all participants 55 years and older and at risk for incident OAG underwent, at

  3. Atherosclerosis, C-reactive protein, and risk for open-angle glaucoma: the Rotterdam study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Voogd, Simone; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.

    2006-01-01

    To test the hypotheses that atherosclerosis and elevated serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are risk factors for open-angle glaucoma (OAG). In a prospective, population-based cohort study, all participants 55 years and older and at risk for incident OAG underwent, at baseline (1990-1993) and at

  4. Total anti-oxidant status and C-reactive protein values in Nigerians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rev Olaleye

    influence of age; body mass index, total antioxidant status (an indirect measure of total free radicals) and c-reactive protein. (an acute ... African Journal of Biomedical Research, Volume 12, Number 1 (January 2009) muscles. However, taking into cognizance the initiation of the events leading to the observed joint changes ...

  5. Diagnostic properties of C-reactive protein for detecting pneumonia in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.J.; Broekhuizen, B.D.L.; Minnaard, M.C.; Balemans, W.A.; Hopstaken, R.M.; de Jong, P.A.; Verheij, Th.J.M.

    BACKGROUND: The diagnostic value of C-reactive protein (CRP) level for pneumonia in children is unknown. As a first step in the assessment of the value of CRP, a diagnostic study was performed in children at an emergency department (ED). METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, data were

  6. Point-of-care C-reactive protein testing in Febrile Children in General Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Montenij (Miriam); M.H. ten Brinke (Majolein); J. van Brakel (Jocelyn); Y.B. de Rijke (Yolanda); M.Y. Berger (Marjolein)

    2006-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Point-of-care testing for C-reactive protein (CRP) may be helpful in differentiating viral from bacterial infection. Such a device should give results comparable to laboratory testing. The aim was to evaluate two point-of-care CRP tests (Nycocard and QuikRead) in

  7. C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.W.; Olsen, M.H.; Rasmussen, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR), a metabolic disorder, are closely related. CRP and IR have both been identified as significant risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors...

  8. Magnesium Status and Its Relationship with C-Reactive Protein in Obese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Ana Raquel Soares; Cruz, Kyria Jayanne Clímaco; Morais, Jennifer Beatriz Silva; Severo, Juliana Soares; de Freitas, Taynáh Emannuelle Coelho; Veras, Antonio Lobão; da Rocha Romero, Amanda Batista; Colli, Célia; do Nascimento Nogueira, Nadir; Torres-Leal, Francisco Leonardo; do Nascimento Marreiro, Dilina

    2015-12-01

    This study assessed the relationship between magnesium status and C-reactive protein concentration in obese and nonobese women. This cross-sectional study included 131 women, aged between 20 and 50 years, who were divided into two groups: obese (n=65) and control (n=66) groups. Magnesium intake was monitored using 3-day food records and NutWin software version 1.5. The plasma, erythrocyte, and urinary magnesium concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. C-reactive protein concentration in serum was measured by immunoturbidimetric assay. The mean values of the magnesium content in the diet were lower than those recommended, though there was no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). The mean concentrations of plasma and erythrocyte magnesium were within the normal range, with no significant difference between groups (p>0.05). Urinary excretion of this mineral was less than the reference values in both groups, with no significant difference (p>0.05). The mean concentration of serum C-reactive protein was within the normal range in both groups, with no significant difference (p>0.05). There was a positive correlation between urinary magnesium and serum C-reactive protein (p=0.015). Obese patients ingest low dietary magnesium content, which seems to induce hypomagnesuria as a compensatory mechanism to keep plasma concentrations of the mineral at adequate levels. The study shows a positive correlation between urinary magnesium concentrations and serum C-reactive protein, suggesting the influence of hypomagnesuria on this inflammatory protein in obese women.

  9. Label-free detection of C-reactive protein using an electrochemical DNA immunoassay

    OpenAIRE

    Songjaroen, Temsiri; Feeny, Rachel M.; Mensack, Meghan M.; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida; Henry, Charles S.

    2016-01-01

    A label-free electrochemical immunoassay that combines DNA-directed immobilization (DDI) with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on microwire sensors is reported for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is an acute-phase protein that is strongly correlated with systemic inflammation. Since inflammation plays a role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, CRP can be used to predict the likelihood of coronary events. To demonstrate the new chemistry, 25-μm Au electrodes ...

  10. Association between C reactive protein and coronary heart disease: mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wensley, Frances; Gao, Pei; Burgess, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease.......To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease....

  11. The correlation between hs C-reactive protein and left ventricular mass in obese women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrus Alwi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma C-reactive protein (CRP concentrations are increased in obese individuals. In this study, we examined the correlation between hsCRP and left ventricular mass (LV mass. Fourty five healthy obese women and fourty five healthy non obese women as the controls group were studied by echocardiography and hsCRP. There was no significant correlation between hsCRP and left ventricular mass in obese women (r = 0.29, p 0.06. There was a significant correlation between hs CRP and body mass index (r = 0.46, p 0,002, and also hsCRP and visceral fat (r= 0.33, p 0.03. (Med J Indones 2006; 15:100-4 Keywords: hs C-reactive protein, LV mass, obese women

  12. Increased Body Mass Index, Elevated C-reactive Protein, and Short Telomere Length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Line; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Weischer, Maren

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: Obesity is associated with short telomere length. The cause of this association is unknown. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesized that genetically increased body mass index (BMI) is associated with telomere length shortening and that low-grade inflammation might contribute through elevated C......18 rs6548238, and the CRP promoter polymorphism rs3091244 in instrumental variable analyses, we estimated the associations between genetically increased BMI and telomere length and between genetically increased C-reactive protein and telomere length. RESULTS: In multivariable-adjusted observational...... shortening of six base pairs (-37-25) per unit increase in genetically determined BMI. Furthermore, in observational analyses, telomere length decreased with nine base pairs (-16--2) for a doubling in C-reactive protein, supported by the instrumental variable analyses showing a corresponding genetically...

  13. Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein, successful aging, and mortality: the PolSenior study

    OpenAIRE

    Puzianowska-Ku?nicka, Monika; Owczarz, Magdalena; Wieczorowska-Tobis, Katarzyna; Nadrowski, Pawel; Chudek, Jerzy; Slusarczyk, Przemyslaw; Skalska, Anna; Jonas, Marta; Franek, Edward; Mossakowska, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Background In the elderly, chronic low-grade inflammation (inflammaging) is a risk factor for the development of aging-related diseases and frailty. Using data from several thousand Eastern Europeans aged 65?years and older, we investigated whether the serum levels of two proinflammatory factors, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), were associated with physical and cognitive performance, and could predict mortality in successfully aging elderly. Results IL-6 and CRP levels syst...

  14. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF SERUM C - REACTIVE PROTEIN ESTIMATION IN ACUTE MENINGITIS IN ADULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Konatham; Kathyayani

    2015-01-01

    In the study of 50 cases of acute meningitis the following observations were made in sex incidence, age, clinical presentation, CSF analysis and serum C reactive protein levels and prognosis. Serum CRP level of less than 6 mg / l with signs of meningeal inf ection is a definitive indicative of viral meningitis and CRP levels more than 48 mg / l with clinical signs of meningeal infection is definite indication of bacterial meningitis. AIM OF THE STUDY: to evalu...

  15. CORRELATION C-REACTIVE PROTEIN LEVELS WITH CLINICAL OUTCOME INTRACEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE STROKE PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Catur Arisetianto; Hari Purnomo; Eko Arisetijono Marhendraputro; Widodo Mardi Santoso

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Intracerebral hemorrhage stroke remains a major health problem and disability. Increased levels of markers of inflammatory factors after hemorrhage stroke was able to predict poor clinical outcome. Until now, the role of C Reactive Protein (CRP) in the local inflammatory response and clinical determinants output remains unclear. Aims to investigate the correlation of CRP level with poor clinical outcome as measured by Barthel Index. Methods and material. This study was...

  16. Relation of albumin/creatinine ratio to C-reactive protein and to the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Adrian W; Seshadri, Niranjan; Pearce, Gregory L; Sachar, Ravish; Hoogwerf, Byron J; Sprecher, Dennis L

    2003-09-01

    We hypothesized that the association of high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) with urinary albumin excretion (UAE) is predominately mediated through its correlation with the metabolic syndrome. Serum CRP and urine albumin:creatinine ratios (ACR) from 720 preventive cardiology patients were analyzed to estimate age- and gender-adjusted relative risk of high CRP and metabolic syndrome for high ACR. These data demonstrate that CRP independently predicts the presence of UAE, a marker of endothelial dysfunction.

  17. High-sensitive C-reactive protein is associated with reduced lung function in young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Finn; Mikkelsen, Dennis; Hancox, Robert

    2009-01-01

    levels of CRP at age 20 yrs were associated with a greater reduction in both FEV(1) and forced vital capacity between ages 20 and 29 yrs. The findings show that higher levels of C-reactive protein in young adults are associated with subsequent decline in lung function, suggesting that low-grade systemic...... inflammation in young adulthood may lead to impaired lung function independently of the effects of smoking, obesity, cardiorespiratory fitness, asthma and eosinophilic inflammation....

  18. Elevated plasma D-dimer and hypersensitive C-reactive protein levels may indicate aortic disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Shi-Min; Shi, Yong-Hui; Wang, Jun-Jun; Lü, Fang-Qi; Gao, Song

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: D-dimer and C-reactive protein are of diagnostic and predictive values in patients have thrombotic tendency, such as vascular thrombosis, coronary artery disease and aortic dissection. However, the comparative study in these biomarkers between the patients with acute aortic dissection and coronary artery disease has not been sufficiently elucidated. METHODS: Consecutive surgical patients for acute type A aortic dissection (20 patients), aortic aneurysm (nine patients) or coronary a...

  19. Serum alkaline phosphatase levels associate with elevated serum C-reactive protein in chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Damera, Sriharsha; Raphael, Kalani L.; Baird, Bradley C.; Cheung, Alfred K.; Greene, Tom; Beddhu, Srinivasan

    2010-01-01

    High serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations are associated with elevated serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the general population. To examine whether this association is independent of serum vitamin D levels or modified in chronic kidney disease (CKD), we determined if such associations exist using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III of 14,420 adult participants in which 5.7% had CKD (defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 ml/min per 1.73...

  20. Reduction of C-reactive protein and the use of anti-hypertensives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Savoia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Carmine Savoia, Ernesto L SchiffrinLady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Sir Mortimer B. Davis-Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, QC, CanadaAbstract: Inflammatory processes are increasingly recognized as important participants in the pathophysiology of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Angiotensin II may be to a large degree responsible for triggering vascular inflammation by inducing oxidative stress, resulting in up-regulation of inflammatory mediators. Inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein are increased in the blood of patients with hypertension and predict the development of cardiovascular disease. Moreover, C-reactive protein may be a pro-inflammatory molecule under certain circumstances. C-reactive protein and high blood pressure in combination have additional predictive value for cardiovascular outcomes, as they contribute as independent determinants of cardiovascular risk. Therapeutic intervention aimed to reduce vascular inflammation in hypertensive patients has been proposed. Recent lines of evidence suggest that lifestyle modification and pharmacological approaches may reduce blood pressure and inflammation in patients with hypertension. Antagonism of the renin-angiotensin system with the selective angiotensin receptor blockers may improve cardiovascular outcome beyond blood pressure control, by reducing vascular inflammation and remodeling.Keywords: vascular inflammation, hypertension, ARBs

  1. Vitamin D and C-Reactive Protein: A Mendelian Randomization Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marte C Liefaard

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency is widely prevalent and has been associated with many diseases. It has been suggested that vitamin D has effects on the immune system and inhibits inflammation. The aim of our study was to investigate whether vitamin D has an inhibitory effect on systemic inflammation by assessing the association between serum levels of vitamin D and C-reactive protein. We studied the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D and C-reactive protein through linear regression in 9,649 participants of the Rotterdam Study, an observational, prospective population-based cohort study. We used genetic variants related to vitamin D and CRP to compute a genetic risk score and perform bi-directional Mendelian randomization analysis. In linear regression adjusted for age, sex, cohort and other confounders, natural log-transformed CRP decreased with 0.06 (95% CI: -0.08, -0.03 unit per standard deviation increase in 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Bi-directional Mendelian randomization analyses showed no association between the vitamin D genetic risk score and lnCRP (Beta per SD = -0.018; p = 0.082 or the CRP genetic risk score and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (Beta per SD = 0.001; p = 0.998. In conclusion, higher levels of Vitamin D are associated with lower levels of C-reactive protein. In this study we did not find evidence for this to be the result of a causal relationship.

  2. Pro-inflammatory Effects of Bacterial Recombinant Human C-Reactive Protein are Caused by Contamination with Bacterial Products not by C-Reactive Protein Itself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepys, Mark B.; Hawkins, Philip N.; Kahan, Melvyn C.; Tennent, Glenys A.; Gallimore, J. Ruth; Graham, David; Sabin, Caroline A.; Zychlinsky, Arturo; de Diego, Juana

    2006-01-01

    Intravenous administration to human volunteers of a commercial preparation of recombinant human C-reactive protein (CRP) produced in E. coli was recently reported in this journal to induce an acute phase response of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) and of CRP itself, and to activate the coagulation system. The authors concluded that CRP is probably a mediator of atherothrombotic disease. Here we confirm that this recombinant CRP preparation was pro-inflammatory both for mouse macrophages in vitro and for mice in vivo, but show that pure natural human CRP had no such activity. Furthermore mice transgenic for human CRP, and expressing it throughout their lives, maintained normal concentrations of their most sensitive endogenous acute phase reactants, SAA and serum amyloid P component (SAP). The patterns of in vitro cytokine induction and of in vivo acute phase stimulation by the recombinant CRP preparation were consistent with contamination by bacterial products, and there was 46.6 EU of apparent endotoxin activity per mg of CRP in the bacterial product, compared to 0.9 EU per mg of our isolated natural human CRP preparation. The absence of any pro-inflammatory activity in natural CRP for macrophages or healthy mice strongly suggests that the in vivo effects of the recombinant preparation observed in humans were due to pro-inflammatory bacterial products and not human CRP. PMID:16254214

  3. Utility of haematological parameters and C-reactive protein in the detection of neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucha, V; Rusia, U; Sikka, M; Faridi, M M A; Madan, N

    2002-10-01

    To evaluate various haematological parameters, individually and in combination, to formulate a haematological scoring system (HSS, defined by Rodwell et al.), which can then be used to screen for sepsis in neonates who are clinically suspected of infection.1 The study cohort consisted of 150 neonates (from birth to 3 days old) with clinically suspected infection. Blood was collected by peripheral venepuncture in all neonates. A complete blood count, differential leucocyte count, total leucocyte count (TLC), total neutrophil count (TNC), immature neutrophil count, band form count and platelet count were performed. Immature total neutrophil count (I/T) and immature/mature neutrophil count (I/M) ratios were then obtained. C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured semiquantitatively and blood culture and antibiotic sensitivity were performed in each case. The haematological parameters were compared individually and in combination (by HSS) with CRP. Twenty-one (14%) neonates had blood culture proven sepsis. On evaluation of various haematological parameters, TLC 0.25, I/T > 0.14, band count > 15% and platelet count or = 3 had a sensitivity of 86% and NPV of 96%. C-reactive protein as a single test had a sensitivity of 76% and NPV of 96%. A combination of CRP with haematological parameters decreased the sensitivity and NPV of the HSS. A haematological score can be obtained by a complete blood count and examination of peripheral blood smear, thus permitting an objective assessment of haematological changes that occur in a neonate suspected of sepsis. C-reactive protein does not have any advantage over HSS, either as a single test or in combination.

  4. Polymorphisms within the C-reactive protein (CRP) promoter region are associated with plasma CRP levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Christopher S; Aldred, Shelley Force; Lee, Philip K; Tracy, Russell P; Schwartz, Stephen M; Rieder, Mark; Liu, Kiang; Williams, O Dale; Iribarren, Carlos; Lewis, E Cora; Fornage, Myriam; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gross, Myron; Jaquish, Cashell; Nickerson, Deborah A; Myers, Richard M; Siscovick, David S; Reiner, Alexander P

    2005-07-01

    Elevated plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammation-sensitive marker, have emerged as an important predictor of future cardiovascular disease and metabolic abnormalities in apparently healthy men and women. Here, we performed a systematic survey of common nucleotide variation across the genomic region encompassing the CRP gene locus. Of the common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified, several in the CRP promoter region are strongly associated with CRP levels in a large cohort study of cardiovascular risk in European American and African American young adults. We also demonstrate the functional importance of these SNPs in vitro.

  5. Association between C-reactive protein and features of the metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fröhlich, M; Imhof, A; Berg, Gabriele

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of circulating levels of C-reactive protein, a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation, with different components of the metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Total cholesterol (TC), HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, BMI , and prevalence...... concentrations in subjects grouped according to the presence of 0-1, 2-3, and > or =4 features of the metabolic syndrome were 1.11, 1.27, and 2.16 mg/l, respectively, with a statistically highly significant trend (P metabolic syndrome...

  6. C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T.W.; Olsen, M.H.; Rasmussen, S.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR), a metabolic disorder, are closely related. CRP and IR have both been identified as significant risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors...... ischaemic heart disease and nonfatal stroke, amounted to 222 cases. In Cox proportional-hazard models, adjusted for age, sex, smoking habit, total cholesterol, waist circumference, levels of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, physical activity...

  7. Systemic acute-phase reactants, C-reactive protein and haptoglobin, in adult periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    EBERSOLE, J L; MACHEN, R L; STEFFEN, M J; WILLMANN, D E

    1997-01-01

    Capture ELISAs with biotinylated monospecific antibodies were developed to detect both C-reactive protein (CRP) and haptoglobin (Hp) in serum of adult periodontitis (AP) patients and normal subjects. Each acute-phase reactant was significantly increased in serum from AP patients with CRP at 9.12 ±1.61 mg/l versus 2.17 ± 0.41 mg/l (P acute-phase reactants. The conclusions are that either these molecules are formed locally and distributed to the serum, or these presumably localized infections impact upon the systemic components of the host protective responses. PMID:9030874

  8. Effects of Human C-Reactive Protein on Pathogenesis of Features of the Metabolic Syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kajiya, T.; Zídek, Václav; Landa, Vladimír; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Šilhavý, Jan; Malínská, H.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Kazdová, L.; Fan, J.; Wang, J.; Kurtz, T. W.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 57, č. 4 (2011), s. 731-737 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS9759; GA MŠk(CZ) ME08006; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0520; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/0290; GA ČR GAP303/10/0505; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110805 Grant - others:EC(XE) HEALTH-F4-2010-241504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : C-reactive protein * metabolic syndrome * transgenic rat Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 6.207, year: 2011

  9. C-reactive protein, dietary n-3 fatty acids, and the extent of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Trine; Skou, Helle Aarup; Hansen, Vibeke Ellegaard

    2001-01-01

    The acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) has emerged as an independent risk factor for coronary artery disease. Experimental and clinical studies provide evidence of anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) derived from fish. We have studied the effect of marin.......003). The inverse correlation between CRP and DHA may reflect an anti-inflammatory effect of DHA in patients with stable coronary artery disease and suggest a novel mechanism by which fish consumption may decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. (C) 2001 by Excerpta Medica, Inc....

  10. Interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein as prognostic biomarkers in metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Maria; Kersten, Christian; Sorbye, Halfdan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to explore the prognostic significance of IL-6 and markers of systemic inflammatory response (SIR), in particular C-reactive protein (CRP), in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients, in the total study population and according to RAS and BRAF mutation status. Results...... 24.3 months to 12.3 months, (P treatment serum samples...... from 393 patients included in the NORDIC-VII trial, in which patients with mCRC received first line treatment. The effect of serum IL-6 and CRP on progressionfree survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was estimated. Conclusions: High baseline serum consentrations of IL-6 or CRP were associated...

  11. [C-reactive protein and risk of ischaemic vascular and cerebrovascular disease--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated levels of C reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risk of ischaemic vascular disease. We tested whether this is a causal association. CRP > 3 vs cerebrovascular disease of 1.6 and 1.3, respectively. Four...... CRP polymorphisms were associated with a 64% increase in CRP levels, resulting in a theoretically predicted increased risk of 32% and 25% for ischemic heart- and ischemic cerebrovascular disease, respectively. However, these genotype combinations were not associated with an increased risk of ischaemic...... vascular disease Udgivelsesdato: 2009/5/18...

  12. C-reactive protein, genetically elevated levels and risk of ischemic heart and cerebrovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Jeppe; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether genetically elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) cause increased risk of ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Levels of CRP >3mg/L, compared with levels disease and ischemic...... cerebrovascular disease. Genotype combinations of the 4 CRP polymorphisms associated with up to a 64% increase in CRP levels, resulting in a theoretically predicted increased risk of up to 32% for ischemic heart disease and up to 25% for ischemic cerebrovascular disease. However, these genotype combinations did...... not associate with increased risk of ischemic heart and cerebrovascular disease....

  13. Vaginal washing fluid C-reactive protein levels in women with recurrent or treatment resistant vaginitis

    OpenAIRE

    Aytekin Tokmak; İrfan Özer; Selçuk Erkılınç; Ali İrfan Güzel; Mahmut Kuntay Kokanalı; Mustafa Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to evaluate the C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in vaginal washing fluid (VWF) in women with a history of recurrent and/or treatment resistant vaginitis. Methods: This prospective case control study was conducted in the gynecology clinic of the current hospital. A total of 64 women (33 with a history of recurrent and/ or treatment resistant vaginitis as study group and 31 healthy women as control group) were enrolled in the study. The recorded parameters we...

  14. Study of Serum Levels of Leptin, C-Reactive Protein and Nutritional Status in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazerifar, Farzaneh; Karajibani, Mansour; Hassanpour, Zahra; Pourmofatteh, Mahla

    2015-08-01

    Leptin is secreted by adipose tissue and decreases appetite. However, the role of leptin in the pathogenesis of hemodialysis (HD)-related malnutrition has not been fully evaluated. The aim of study was to investigate the association between the serum leptin levels, serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and nutritional status in hemodialysis patients. This analytical descriptive study included 45 hemodialysis patients and 40 healthy subjects. Biochemical parameters and serum leptin levels were measured. The nutritional status was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and the calculation of the body mass index (BMI). Serum leptin (P nutritional factors in hemodialysis patients.

  15. Serum levels of C-reactive protein in adolescents with periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López, Rodrigo; Baelum, Vibeke; Hedegaard, Chris Juul

    2011-01-01

    Background: The results of several cross-sectional studies suggested a relationship between periodontitis and higher serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). Most of these studies were restricted to adult study groups with severe periodontal inflammation, and the potential effects of confounding...... ng/ml (31 to 183 ng/ml), respectively (P = 0.8). Conclusions: Serum levels of CRP were not significantly higher among subjects with periodontitis than among controls. However, a statistically significant positive association between percentages of sites with bleeding on probing and log...

  16. Prognostic Value of C-Reactive Protein, Leukocytes, and Vitamin D in Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moberg, Mia; Vestbo, Jørgen; Martinez, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory biomarkers predict mortality and hospitalisation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Yet, it remains uncertain if biomarkers in addition to reflecting disease severity add new prognostic information on severe COPD. We investigated if leukocytes, C-reactive protein (CRP),...

  17. Ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein, and central augmentation index to identify individuals with severe atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, Nikolaj; Sillesen, Henrik; Prescott, Eva

    2006-01-01

    We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease.......We examined the ability of ankle brachial index, C-reactive protein and central augmentation index to identify individuals in the general population with severe atherosclerosis, diagnosed as those with ischaemic cardiovascular disease....

  18. Baseline C-reactive protein is associated with incident cancer and survival in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allin, Kristine H; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with risk of incident cancer in the general population and early death in patients with cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 10,408 individuals from the Danish general population who had C...... with increased risk of cancer of any type, of lung cancer, and possibly of colorectal cancer. Moreover, elevated levels of baseline CRP associate with early death after a diagnosis of any cancer, particularly in patients without metastases.......PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that baseline plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with risk of incident cancer in the general population and early death in patients with cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 10,408 individuals from the Danish general population who had CRP...... CRP levels were 1.3 (95% CI, 1.0 to 1.6), 2.1 (95% CI, 1.2 to 3.8), 1.7 (95% CI, 0.8 to 3.2), and 0.9 (95% CI, 0.5 to 1.7), respectively. Multifactorially adjusted hazard ratios for early death in patients with cancer were 1.8 (95% CI, 1.2 to 2.7) for CRP more than 3 versus less than 1 mg/L and 1...

  19. The role of C-reactive protein and polyarginine in tumor immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizk, S L; Mold, C; Haklin, M; Roseman, D L

    1986-07-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase reactant whose serum level rises rapidly in response to tissue injury. C-reactive protein binding to cells can activate the classical complement pathway, and enhance opsonophagocytosis. The polycation poly-L-arginine (PLA) can artificially fix CRP to target cells. The effects of CRP and PLA on tumor growth were evaluated, both independently and synergistically, using the V X 2 tumor line in the rabbit host. Ten normal animals and seven acute-phase animals were bilaterally inoculated with V X 2 cells (control side) and PLA-treated V X 2 cells (experimental side). Tumor growth was significantly retarded on the treatment side (P less than 0.005), in both animal groups. It is concluded that topical PLA is a potent inhibitor of V X 2 tumor growth. Comparison of normal and acute-phase animals revealed no persistent difference in tumor growth for either cell inoculum. Similarly, cell treatment with topical CRP did not inhibit tumor growth, whether PLA was present or not. Thus, circulating and topical CRP did not alter the rate of V X 2 tumor growth. PLA cytotoxicity remains to be evaluated when the agent is administered orthotopically, selectively, or systemically.

  20. The physiological structure of human C-reactive protein and its complex with phosphocholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D; Pepys, M B; Wood, S P

    1999-02-15

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) is the classical acute phase reactant, the circulating concentration of which rises rapidly and extensively in a cytokine-mediated response to tissue injury, infection and inflammation. Serum CRP values are routinely measured, empirically, to detect and monitor many human diseases. However, CRP is likely to have important host defence, scavenging and metabolic functions through its capacity for calcium-dependent binding to exogenous and autologous molecules containing phosphocholine (PC) and then activating the classical complement pathway. CRP may also have pathogenic effects and the recent discovery of a prognostic association between increased CRP production and coronary atherothrombotic events is of particular interest. The X-ray structures of fully calcified C-reactive protein, in the presence and absence of bound PC, reveal that although the subunit beta-sheet jellyroll fold is very similar to that of the homologous pentameric protein serum amyloid P component, each subunit is tipped towards the fivefold axis. PC is bound in a shallow surface pocket on each subunit, interacting with the two protein-bound calcium ions via the phosphate group and with Glu81 via the choline moiety. There is also an unexpected hydrophobic pocket adjacent to the ligand. The structure shows how large ligands containing PC may be bound by CRP via a phosphate oxygen that projects away from the surface of the protein. Multipoint attachment of one planar face of the CRP molecule to a PC-bearing surface would leave available, on the opposite exposed face, the recognition sites for C1q, which have been identified by mutagenesis. This would enable CRP to target physiologically and/or pathologically significant complement activation. The hydrophobic pocket adjacent to bound PC invites the design of inhibitors of CRP binding that may have therapeutic relevance to the possible role of CRP in atherothrombotic events.

  1. Functional and structural diversities of C-reactive proteins present in horseshoe crab hemolymph plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, D; Osaki, T; Mizunoe, Y; Wai, S N; Iwanaga, S; Kawabata, S

    1999-09-01

    Limulin, a sialic-acid-binding and phosphorylethanolamine-binding hemagglutinin in the hemolymph plasma of the American horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus), is a hemolytic C-reactive protein [Armstrong, P.B., Swarnakar, S., Srimal, S., Misquith, S., Hahn, E.A., Aimes, R. T. & Quigley, J.P. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 14717-14721]. We have now identified three types of C-reactive protein in the plasma of the Japanese horseshoe crab (Tachypleus tridentatus), based on different affinities against fetuin-agarose and phosphorylethanolamine-agarose determined by quantitative precipitin assays using fetuin and an artificial phosphorylethanolamine-protein conjugate. Partial amino acid sequences of the isolated C-reactive proteins identified homologous proteins which were named Tachypleus tridentatus CRP-1 (tCRP-1), tCRP-2 and tCRP-3, each of which possibly constitute isoprotein mixtures. tCRP-2 and tCRP-3, but not tCRP-1, agglutinated mammalian erythrocytes. tCRP-1, the most abundant C-reative protein in the plasma, exhibited the highest affinity to the phosphorylethanolamine-protein conjugate but lacked both sialic-acid-binding and hemolytic activities. tCRP-2 bound to both fetuin-agarose and phosphorylethanolamine-agarose, and exhibited Ca2+-dependent hemolytic and sialic-acid-binding activities, suggestive of limulin-like properties. Furthermore, tCRP-2 exhibited a higher affinity to colominic acid, a bacterial polysialic acid. By contrast, tCRP-3 shows stronger hemolytic, sialic-acid-binding and hemagglutinating activities than tCRP-2. tCRP-3 has no affinity to phosphorylethanolamine-agarose, phosphorylethanolamine-protein conjugate and colominic acid. This suggests tCRP-3 is a novel hemolytic C-reactive protein lacking a common characteristic of phosphorylethanolamine-agarose binding affinity. Twenty-two clones of tCRPs with different deduced amino acid sequences were obtained by PCR using oligonucleotide primers based on the N-terminal and C-terminal sequences of t

  2. Correlation of Plasma Protein Carbonyls and C-Reactive Protein with GOLD Stage Progression in COPD Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Torres-Ramos, Yessica D; Garc?a-Guillen, Mar?a L; Olivares-Corichi, Ivonne M; Hicks, J. J

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). To investigate the correlation between the progression of COPD and plasma biomarkers of chronic inflammation and oxidative injury, blood samples were obtained from healthy volunteers (HV, n = 14) and stabilized COPD patients. The patients were divided into three groups according to their GOLD stage (II, n = 34; III, n = 18; IV, n = 20). C-reactive protein (CRP), protein carbonyls (PC)...

  3. Quantitative measurements of C-reactive protein using silicon nanowire arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Ho Lee

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Min-Ho Lee, Kuk-Nyung Lee, Suk-Won Jung, Won-Hyo Kim, Kyu-Sik Shin, Woo-Kyeong SeongKorea Electronics Technology Institute, Gyeonggi, KoreaAbstract: A silicon nanowire-based sensor for biological application showed highly desirable electrical responses to either pH changes or receptor-ligand interactions such as protein disease markers, viruses, and DNA hybridization. Furthermore, because the silicon nanowire can display results in real-time, it may possess superior characteristics for biosensing than those demonstrated in previously studied methods. However, despite its promising potential and advantages, certain process-related limitations of the device, due to its size and material characteristics, need to be addressed. In this article, we suggest possible solutions. We fabricated silicon nanowire using a top-down and low cost micromachining method, and evaluate the sensing of molecules after transfer and surface modifications. Our newly designed method can be used to attach highly ordered nanowires to various substrates, to form a nanowire array device, which needs to follow a series of repetitive steps in conventional fabrication technology based on a vapor-liquid-solid (VLS method. For evaluation, we demonstrated that our newly fabricated silicon nanowire arrays could detect pH changes as well as streptavidin-biotin binding events. As well as the initial proof-of-principle studies, C-reactive protein binding was measured: electrical signals were changed in a linear fashion with the concentration (1 fM to 1 nM in PBS containing 1.37 mM of salts. Finally, to address the effects of Debye length, silicon nanowires coupled with antigen proteins underwent electrical signal changes as the salt concentration changed.Keywords: silicon nanowire array, C-reactive protein, vapor-liquid-solid method

  4. Sport-based physical activity recommendations and modifications in C-reactive protein and arterial thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayres, Suziane Ungari; de Lira, Fabio Santos; Kemper, Han C G; Codogno, Jamile Sanches; Barbosa, Maurício Fregonesi; Fernandes, Romulo Araújo

    2018-04-01

    We analyzed the effects of 1 year of engagement in ≥ 300 min/week of organized sports on inflammatory levels and vascular structure in adolescents. The sample was composed of 89 adolescents (11.6 ± 0.7 years old [43 boys and 46 girls]), stratified according to engagement in ≥ 300 min/week of sport practice during at least 12 months of follow-up (n = 15, sport practice; n = 74, non-sport practice). Arterial thickness (carotid and femoral) was assessed by ultrasound scan, while high sensitive C-reactive protein levels were used to assess inflammatory status. Trunk fatness (densitometry scanner), biological maturation (age at peak height velocity), blood pressure, and skipping breakfast were treated as covariates. Independently of body fatness and biological maturation, the group engaged in sports presented a higher reduction in C-reactive protein (mean difference -1.559 mg/L [95%CI -2.539 to -0.579]) than the non-sport group (mean difference -0.414 mg/L [95%CI -0.846 to 0.017]) (p = 0.040). There was a significant relationship between changes in C-reactive protein and changes in femoral intima-media thickness in the non-sport group (r = 0.311 [95%CI 0.026 to 0.549]). Inflammation decreased in adolescents engaged in organized sports, independently of trunk fatness and biological maturation. Moreover, inflammation was related to arterial thickening only in adolescents not engaged in sports. What is Known: • Intima media thickness is a relevant marker of cardiovascular disease in pediatric groups, being affected by obesity and inflammation. • The importance of monitoring inflammatory markers from childhood is enhanced by the fact that alterations in these inflammatory markers in early life predict inflammation and alterations in carotid IMT in adulthood. What is New: • Anti-inflammatory properties related to physical exercise performed at moderate intensity, on inflammation and alterations in IMT are not clear in pediatric

  5. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein based on quantum dots and immunofiltration assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang PF

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pengfei Zhang,1,* Yan Bao,1,* Mohamed Shehata Draz,2,3,* Huiqi Lu,1 Chang Liu,1 Huanxing Han11Center for Translational Medicine, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China; 3Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta, Egypt*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Convenient and rapid immunofiltration assays (IFAs enable on-site “yes” or “no” determination of disease markers. However, traditional IFAs are commonly qualitative or semi-quantitative and are very limited for the efficient testing of samples in field diagnostics. Here, we overcome these limitations by developing a quantum dots (QDs-based fluorescent IFA for the quantitative detection of C-reactive proteins (CRP. CRP, the well-known diagnostic marker for acute viral and bacterial infections, was used as a model analyte to demonstrate performance and sensitivity of our developed QDs-based IFA. QDs capped with both polyethylene glycol (PEG and glutathione were used as fluorescent labels for our IFAs. The presence of the surface PEG layer, which reduced the non-specific protein interactions, in conjunction with the inherent optical properties of QDs, resulted in lower background signal, increased sensitivity, and ability to detect CRP down to 0.79 mg/L with only 5 µL serum sample. In addition, the developed assay is simple, fast and can quantitatively detect CRP with a detection limit up to 200 mg/L. Clinical test results of our QD-based IFA are well correlated with the traditional latex enhance immune-agglutination aggregation. The proposed QD-based fluorescent IFA is very promising, and potentially will be adopted for multiplexed immunoassay and in field point-of-care test.Keywords: C-reactive proteins, point-of-care test, Glutathione capped QDs, PEGylation

  6. Effect of nigella sativa seeds extract on serum c-reactive protein in albino rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, M.U.; Qureshi, H.

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein. It predicts future risk of cardiovascular diseases. Different medicinal plants and their active ingredients possess the ability to reduce serum CRP levels and hence inflammatory disorders and cardiovascular diseases. In our study, ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds was evaluated in albino rats for its possible effect on serum CRP levels. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds on an acute inflammatory biomarker/mediator, C-reactive protein (CRP) in albino rats. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial (RCT). Place and Duration of Study: Physiology Department, Services Institute of Medical Sciences (SIMS), Lahore; from September to November, 2009. Subjects and Methods: The study was carried out on 90 male albino rats. Five percent (5%) formalin in a dose of 50 meu1 was injected into sub-plantar surface of right hind paw of each rat to produce inflammation. The rats were randomly divided into three groups of thirty each. Group A was given normal saline (control); group B was given Nigella sativa seed extract; and group C received diclofenac sodium, as a reference drug. CRP levels in each group were measured from blood samples taken 25 hours after giving formalin. Results: The ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa seeds, given intraperitoneally, caused highly significant (p<0.001) reduction in serum CRP levels as compared to control group. The reduction in CRP levels by ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa was also significantly (p<0.05) more than that produced by diclofenac sodium. Conclusion: Our results suggest that Nigella sativa possesses ability to reduce serum CRP levels significantly, after production of artificial inflammation, in albino rats. (author)

  7. Salivary C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume and neutrophil lymphocyte ratio as diagnostic markers for neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, Ahmed; Maaroof, Abdallah; Saleh, Mai H; Abdelwahab, Amina

    To assess the applicability of salivary C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, and platelet lymphocyte ratio in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. Prospective case-control study of 70 full-term neonates, 35 with sepsis (20 with proven sepsis and 15 with clinical sepsis) and 35 healthy controls. Serum and salivary C-reactive protein concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay while mean platelet volume, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, and platelet lymphocyte ratio were measured by automated blood cell counter. This study showed statistically significant difference of mean salivary C-reactive protein between septic neonates and controls (12.0±4.6ng/L vs. 2.8±1.2ng/L) respectively. At a cut-off point of 3.48ng/L, salivary C-reactive protein showed 94.3% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Salivary C-reactive protein also showed good predictive accuracy for predicting elevated serum C-reactive protein values in septic neonates. Mean platelet volume and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio showed significant difference between septic neonates and controls (10.2±1.2fL vs.8.0±0.5fL; 2.9±1.7 vs. 1.6±0.4, respectively). At a cut-off point of 10.2fL, mean platelet volume presented 80% sensitivity and specificity. At a cut-off point of 2.7, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio presented 80% sensitivity and 57.1% specificity. This study provides support for further studies on the usefulness of salivary C-reactive protein, mean platelet volume, and neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio as diagnostic markers for neonatal sepsis. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. C-reactive protein as a predictor of prognosis in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Vestbo, Jørgen; Lange, Peter

    2007-01-01

    RATIONALE: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have an ongoing systemic inflammation, which can be assessed by measuring serum C-reactive protein (CRP). OBJECTIVE: To determine whether increased serum CRP in individuals with airway obstruction predicts future hospitalization....... During follow-up, 185 (14%) individuals were hospitalized due to COPD and 83 (6%) died of COPD. Incidences of COPD hospitalization and COPD death were increased in individuals with baseline CRP > 3 mg/L versus tobacco...... consumption, and ischemic heart disease, the hazard ratios for hospitalization and death due to COPD were increased at 1.4 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-2.0) and 2.2 (1.2-3.9) in individuals with baseline CRP > 3 mg/L versus

  9. C-reactive protein gene polymorphisms and gene-environment interactions in ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongyun; Yu, Dan; Xu, Zhi-Wei; Li, Shan-Shan; Li, Xiao-Feng; Li, Jing; Yang, Xu

    2015-11-01

    Ischaemic stroke is a heterogeneous, multifactorial disease caused by the combination of certain risk factors and genetic factors. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been reported to be associated with serum CRP levels. However, genetic association studies have produced conflicting results regarding the association between these SNPs and ischaemic stroke. In this paper, we conducted a population-based case-control study to determine whether two SNPs of CRP (rs1800947 and rs3093059) are associated with ischaemic stroke in Chinese Han population and to evaluate their interaction with environmental risk factors. We found that the rs1800947 GC genotype is significantly associated with the risk of ischaemic stroke, particularly the small-vessel disease and its subtype. Crossover analysis revealed that patients with the rs1800947 GC genotype and habits of smoking or drinking were more susceptible to ischaemic stroke. No association was found between the rs3093059 and ischaemic stroke.

  10. Correlation between erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein level in patients with rheumatic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kotulska

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and serum level of C-reactive protein (CRP are the acute phase reactants most commonly determined in patients with rheumatic diseases. The indices are affected by different factors, but both of them are applied for evaluation of the disease activity in patients with inflammatory disorders of the musculoskeletal system. Material and methods : The authors compared the results of ESR and CRP, which were carried out during routine diagnosis in 200 patients admitted to the Department of Rheumatology. Results: A significant correlation between ESR and CRP was found (ESR after 1 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6944, ESR after 2 h/CRP: correlation coefficient 0.6126. There was no difference in ESR or CRP between male and female patients, and patients older than 40 years had higher ESR and CRP. Conclusions : The obtained results support the usefulness of both indices in the clinical practice of rheumatologists.

  11. Elevated C-reactive protein levels in schizophrenia inpatients is associated with aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzilay, R; Lobel, T; Krivoy, A; Shlosberg, D; Weizman, A; Katz, N

    2016-01-01

    An association between inflammation and behavioral domains of mental disorders is of growing interest. Recent studies reported an association between aggression and inflammation. In this study, we investigated the association between aggressive behavior and inflammatory markers in schizophrenia inpatients. Adult schizophrenia inpatients without affective symptoms (n=213) were retrospectively identified and categorized according to their C-reactive protein measurement at admission as either elevated (CRP>1 mg/dL; n=57) or normal (CRPaggression were compared: PANSS excitement component (PANSS-EC), restraints and suicidal behavior during hospitalization. Univariate comparisons between elevated and normal CRP levels were performed and multivariate analysis was conducted to control for relevant covariates. CRP levels significantly correlated with other laboratory markers indicating increased inflammation including leukocyte count and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (r=0.387, Paggressive behavior compared to patients with normal CRP levels (aggression) in schizophrenia inpatients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnostic accuracy of C-reactive protein for intraabdominal infections after colorectal resections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kørner, Hartwig; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Søreide, Jon Arne

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intraabdominal infections are caused mainly by anastomotic leaks and represent a serious complication. Diagnosis is usually made when patients become critically ill. Though inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood count (WBC), may contribute to an early...... diagnosis, their clinical roles remain unclear. The diagnostic accuracy of continuous tests depends on the choice of cut-off values. We analyzed the diagnostic accuracy of serial CRP and WBC measurements to detect infectious complications after colorectal resections. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The CRP and WBC...... of CRP was similar. CONCLUSION: Serial CRP measurements are helpful for detecting intraabdominal infections after colorectal resection. Persistently elevated CRP values after POD 3 should be investigated for intraabdominal infection....

  13. C-reactive protein concentration predicts change in body mass index during childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara H Lourenço

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Inflammation may constitute an underlying mechanism for increased risk of developing chronic diseases in later years, but few prospective studies have assessed the influence of low-grade inflammation on body weight gain, particularly among children in low- to middle-income settings with lower prevalence of overweight and obesity. We aimed to investigate whether C-reactive protein (CRP, as a biomarker of low-grade inflammation, predicts changes in body mass index-for-age z scores (BAZ during childhood. METHODS: A population-based longitudinal study was conducted in the Brazilian Amazon among children aged ≤10 years in 2007, with follow-up visits in 2009 and 2012. Outcome was annual change in BAZ. As the main exposure of interest, CRP concentrations were divided into four categories, with values 5 years, children in the highest tertile of CRP 5 years.

  14. Elevated C-reactive protein, depression, somatic diseases, and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Orsted, David Dynnes; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2014-01-01

    of cancer (p = .002), ischemic heart disease (p = 4 × 10(-99)), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (p = 6 × 10(-86)), and all-cause mortality (p = .001) examined in the same individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated CRP was associated with increased risk of depression in individuals in the general population......BACKGROUND: Elevated levels of plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) have been associated with many diseases including depression, but it remains unclear whether this association is causal. We tested the hypothesis that CRP is causally associated with depression, and compared these results to those...... for cancer, ischemic heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and all-cause mortality. METHODS: We performed prospective and instrumental variable analyses using plasma CRP levels and four CRP genotypes on 78,809 randomly selected 20- to 100-year-old men and women from the Danish general...

  15. The added value of C-reactive protein measurement in diagnosing pneumonia in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minnaard, Margaretha C; de Groot, Joris A H; Hopstaken, Rogier M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is increasingly being included in the diagnostic work-up for community-acquired pneumonia in primary care. Its added diagnostic value beyond signs and symptoms, however, remains unclear. We conducted a meta-analysis of individual patient data to quantify...... to a basic signs-and-symptoms prediction model was assessed. Outcome measures were improvement in discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia in primary care and improvement in risk classification, both within the individual studies and across studies. RESULTS: Authors of 8 eligible studies (n...... = 5308) provided their data sets. In all of the data sets, discrimination between patients with and without pneumonia improved after CRP measurement was added to the prediction model (extended model), with a mean improvement in the area under the curve of 0.075 (range 0.02-0.18). In a hypothetical cohort...

  16. Effects of tongxinluo on C-reactive protein and clinical prognosis in patients after coronary stenting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Hongbing; Zhang Dadong; Gu Jun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of Tongxinluo on C reactive protein(CRP)and clinical prognosis in patients after coronary stenting. Methods: From January 2003 to December 2004, 132 patients in our department diagnosed as coronary artery disease (including acute myocardial infarction, unstable angina pectoris and stable angina pectoris)were divided into two groups: Tongxinluo group and control group. The control group received routine treatment, while Tongxinluo group based on routine treatment was administrated with Tongxinluo capsule in combination for 6 months. Results: CRP level was much lower in Tongxinluo group together with apparent decrease of the major adverse cardiac event (MACE)rate in 6 months' follow-up than those of the control group, but showing no difference in coronary arterial restenosis between the two groups at 6 months after coronary stenting. Conclusion: Tongxinluo has favorable effects to decrease the CRP level and improve clinical efficiency together with prognosis for patients after coronary stenting. (authors)

  17. C-reactive protein: A differential biomarker for major depressive disorder and bipolar II disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui Hua; Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, I Hui; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Kao Chin; Huang, San-Yuan; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band; Chen, Po See

    2017-02-01

    Objectives We aimed to examine whether the C-reactive protein (CRP) level could be used to differentiate between major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar II disorder (BD II). Methods Ninety-six healthy controls, 88 BD II and 72 MDD drug-naïve patients in their major depressive episodes were enrolled. The fasting plasma level of high-sensitivity CRP was assessed at baseline and after treatment. Results The BD II patients presented significantly higher 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) scores and CRP levels at baseline when adjustment for age, gender, and body mass index (P biomarker to differentiate between MDD and BD II depression in both their depressed and euthymic state.

  18. Increased Baseline C-Reactive Protein Concentrations Are Associated with Increased Risk of Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Jeppe; Benfield, Thomas; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    CRP tertile (compared with the lowest) had an increased risk of bacterial diseases (hazard ratio 1.7, 95% CI 1.6-1.8), but not viral, mycosis, and parasitic diseases. The increased risk was mainly carried by pneumonia, sepsis, and particularly gram-negative infections. None of the genotype......BACKGROUND: The acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) increases rapidly during an infection. We tested the hypothesis that chronic low-level increases in CRP are associated with an increased risk of infectious disease. METHODS: We studied 9660 individuals from a prospective general....... RESULTS: Individuals with CRP >3 mg/L had 1.2 and 1.7 times increased risk of infectious disease, in the prospective general population cohort and the cross-sectional general population study, respectively, compared with individuals with CRP

  19. Label-free Electrochemical Impedance Detection of C-reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, Allison; Singh, K.. V.; Solanki, Raj

    2009-05-01

    C-reactive protein, CRP, is a marker present in human serum indicating inflammation and infection. By measuring the amount present in serum, it is possible to monitor the effectiveness of a treatment or roughly gauge the risk of heart disease. Using a double antibody capture system immobilized on an interdigitated electrode array, a label-free device was developed to detect the presence of CRP present in buffer solution and various concentrations of human serum. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to measure the end point data of the binding signal as the assay was exposed to varying amounts of CRP in the presence of a constant concentration of anti-CRP. The sensor is able to achieve linear detection in both buffer solution and human serum spiked with CRP in the range of 1ng/ml to 1ug/ml. The sensor developed can be integrated into a portable microfluidic device.

  20. The routine use of C-reactive protein in forensic investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, B S; Thomsen, Jørgen Lange

    2007-01-01

    with special reference to the cause of death and survival time, Forensic Sci. Int. 130 (2002) 160-166; L. Uhlin-Hansen, C-reactive protein (CRP), a comparison of pre- and post-mortem blood levels, Forensic Sci. Int. 124 (2001) 32-35]. We have analysed the routine use of CRP in non-selected cases. Scarcity...... of blood available for analysis is a common problem in forensic investigation, and in response to this we have developed a method using liver as a source. In 50 consecutive autopsy cases, we have evaluated method, validated results and discussed their interpretation. In three cases the analysis......, and liver is a good post-mortem alternative when blood is not available. We conclude that CRP measurements are easy, viable and inexpensive in a forensic setting, and that the number of cases with CRP elevation is high in a non-selected forensic material. In cases of doubt, marked elevation of CRP...

  1. C reactive protein and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a Mendelian randomisation approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Vestbo, Jørgen; Zacho, Jeppe

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether elevated plasma C reactive protein (CRP) is causally related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The authors tested the hypothesis that genetically elevated plasma CRP causes COPD using a Mendelian randomisation design. Methods The authors measured high...... versus a doubling of genetically elevated CRP resulted in ORs for COPD of 1.27 (95% CI 1.25 to 1.30) versus 1.01 (0.81 to 1.26) and for COPD hospitalisation of 1.47 (1.43 to 1.51) versus 0.82(0.59 to 1.13). Conclusion Although elevated CRP is related to both a diagnosis of COPD and subsequent hospital...... admission, genetically elevated plasma CRP is not associated with an increased risk of clinical COPD. This suggests that the association between CRP levels and COPD is not causal....

  2. Neuropathic pain, depressive symptoms, and C-reactive protein in sciatica patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Tomas; Bob, Petr

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence that neuropathic pain component in low back pain (LBP) patients is associated with higher ratings of comorbidities such as depression and anxiety disorders. In line with current findings, the purpose of this clinical study is to examine a hypothesis regarding a relationship of neuropathic pain component, depression, and other psychopathological symptoms in a specific group of LBP patients with sciatica pain. With respect to findings that depression is related to inflammatory changes, and inflammatory mediators may play a role in neuropathic pain generation, we have assessed also serum C-reactive protein (CRP). Results of the present study show that increased neuropathic pain component in sciatica patients is associated with elevated levels of depression, anxiety, alexithymia, and serum CRP levels. In conclusion, results of this study indicate that CRP levels in sciatica patients are closely associated with neuropathic pain.

  3. C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN BACTERIAL MENINGITIS: DOSE IT HELP TO DIFFERENTIATE BACTERIAL FROM VIRAL MENINGITIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AR EMAMI NAEINI

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Central nervous system infections are among the most serious conditions in of medical practice. C-reactive Protein has recently been evaluated in terms of its ability to diffeccentiate bacterial from nonbacterial central nervous system inflammations.
    Methods. We studied the frequency of positive CRP in 61 patients who had signs of meningitis. All the specimens referred to one laboratory and were examined by Slide method.
    Results. Positive CRP was found in 97.6 percent of those who were finally diagnosed as bacterial meningitis. The frequency of CRP for other types of meningitis was 16.6 percent (P < 0.05.
    Discussion. In the absence of infection, CSF is free of CRP. Positive CRP may help to the differentiate the different types of meningitis.

  4. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Immunoassay for C-Reactive Protein Using Colloidal Semiconducting Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pekka Hänninen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Besides the typical short-lived fluorescence with decay times in the nanosecond range, colloidal II/VI semiconductor nanoparticles dispersed in buffer also possess a long-lived fluorescence component with decay times in the microsecond range. Here, the signal intensity of the long-lived luminescence at microsecond range is shown to increase 1,000-fold for CdTe nanoparticles in PBS buffer. This long-lived fluorescence can be conveniently employed for time-gated fluorescence detection, which allows for improved signal-to-noise ratio and thus the use of low concentrations of nanoparticles. The detection principle is demonstrated with a time-resolved fluorescence immunoassay for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP using CdSe-ZnS nanoparticles and green light excitation.

  5. Rapid quantitative determination of C-reactive protein at chair side in dental emergency patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yan-Fang; Malmstrom, Hans S

    2007-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantitatively determine, at chair side, the serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in dental emergency patients. Quantitative CRP test was performed at chair side in 40 patients with acute alveolar abscess (AAA), acute periodontal abscess (APA), and alveolar osteitis (AO) at the time of dental emergency treatment and 1 week after. CRP levels were compared between groups and before and after treatments using ANOVA and Fisher's Exact tests. Serum CRP levels were greater than 5 mg/L in 30 (75%) of the 40 patients. At 1-week follow-up, the decline in CRP levels was evident in the AAA group (P .05). Serum CRP levels are often elevated in patients with odontogenic infections and postoperative complications. Rapid reduction in serum CRP levels was likely to occur following successful treatment of AAA, but less likely to occur in APA and AO.

  6. C-reactive protein alterations in bipolar disorder: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargél, Aroldo A; Godin, Ophelia; Kapczinski, Flávio; Kupfer, David J; Leboyer, Marion

    2015-02-01

    There is growing evidence that bipolar disorder (BD) is associated with inflammation, including abnormal levels of acute-phase C-reactive protein (CRP). Our meta-analysis was conducted to estimate the size of the association between CRP levels and BD, accounting also for subgroup differences (mood phases and treatment). MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Science and references of identified articles were searched up to June 2013 using the keywords (bipolar disorder) AND (C-reactive protein OR CRP). English language studies measuring blood levels of CRP in patients with BD and control subjects were selected, 136 abstracts were reviewed, 20 articles retrieved, and 11 studies included. Two independent reviewers extracted data. All studies were included in the primary analyses, and between-group differences for subanalyses were also reported. This meta-analysis was performed using random-effects models. Eleven studies comprising 1,618 subjects were eligible for inclusion. Overall, CRP levels were significantly elevated in patients with BD versus controls (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 0.39; 95% CI, 0.24 to 0.55; P < .0001). CRP levels were significantly higher in manic (SMD = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.44 to 1.02; P < .001) and euthymic (SMD = 0.26; 95% CI, 0.01 to 0.51; P = .04), but not in depressed (SMD = 0.28; 95% CI, -0.17 to 0.73; P = .22) patients with BD compared to controls. CRP levels were unrelated to use of lithium or antipsychotic medication. This meta-analysis supports an association between increased CRP levels and BD. Given that an elevated level of CRP is a marker of low-grade inflammation and a risk factor for cardiovascular and malignant diseases, measurement of CRP level might be relevant to the clinical care of bipolar patients. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  7. Serum levels of hypersensitive-C-reactive protein in moderate and severe acne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M R Namazi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elevation of C-reactive protein (CRP has been reported to occur in psoriasis, urticaria, acne, rosacea and many other dermatological and nondermatological conditions. Chronic systemic inflammation has been implicated in the development of neuropsychiatric/degenerative disorders, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus and even carcinogenesis. The present study is designed to determine whether the level of inflammation created by acne vulgaris could be high enough to raise the serum levels of high-sensitive CRP. Materials and Methods: Forty-two patients with moderate and severe acne vulgaris were enrolled, along with 44 age and sex matched healthy blood donors as controls. Hypersensitive-CRP (Hs-CRP was measured in both groups. Results: Hypersensitive-C-reactive protein levels in the case group varied between 0 and 28.1 μg/ml with an average of 2.24 ± 4.87 μg/ml (mean ± standard deviation and a median of 0.6 μg/ml (interquartile range [IQR] =0.3, 1.4 μg/ml. Hs-CRP levels of the control group varied between 0 and 14 μg/ml with an average of 3.12 ± 3.67 μg/ml and a median of 1.5 μg/ml (IQR = 0.55, 5.0 μg/ml. No significant difference of Hs-CRP level between the two groups was seen (t = -0.961, 95% confidence interval: Lower = -2.6942, upper = 0.9377; P = 0.339. Additionally, no significant difference in the level of Hs-CRP was noted between the moderate and severe acne groups (95% confidence interval: Lower = -5.2495, upper = 1.6711; P = 0.165. Conclusion: Acne vulgaris, even in its severe grades (excluding acne fulminans and acne conglobata, does not induce significant inflammation at the systemic level.

  8. Correlation between Plaque Composition as assessed by Virtual Histology and C-reactive Protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siqueira, Dimytri Alexandre de Alvim; Sousa, Amanda Guerra Moraes R.; Costa Junior, José de Ribamar; Costa, Ricardo Alves da; Staico, Rodolfo; Tanajura, Luis Fernando Leite; Centemero, Marinella Patrizia; Feres, Fausto; Abizaid, Alexandre Antonio Cunha; Sousa, J. Eduardo Moraes R.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that coronary plaque composition plays a pivotal role in plaque instability, and imaging modalities and serum biomarkers have been investigated to identify vulnerable plaque. Virtual histology IVUS (VH-IVUS) characterizes plaque components as calcified, fibrotic, fibrofatty, or necrotic core. C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is an independent risk factor and a powerful predictor of future coronary events. However, a relationship between inflammatory response indicated by CRP and plaque characteristics in ACS patients remains not well established. To determine, by using VH-IVUS, the relation between coronary plaque components and plasma high-sensitivity CRP levels in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). 52 patients with ACS were enrolled in this prospective study. Electrocardiographically-gated VH-IVUS were performed in the culprit lesion before PCI. Blood sample was drawn from all patients before the procedure and after 24 hours, and hs-CRP levels were determined. Mean age was 55.3±4.9 years, 76.9% were men and 30.9% had diabetes. Mean MLA was 3.9±1.3 mm 2 , and plaque burden was 69±11.3%, as assessed by IVUS. VH-IVUS analysis at the minimum luminal site identified plaque components: fibrotic (59.6±15.8%), fibrofatty (7.6±8.2%), dense calcium (12.1±9.2%) and necrotic core (20.7±12.7%). Plasma hs-CRP (mean 16.02±18.07 mg/L) did not correlate with necrotic core (r=-0.089, p = 0.53) and other plaque components. In this prospective study with patients with ACS, the predominant components of the culprit plaque were fibrotic and necrotic core. Serum hs C-reactive protein levels did not correlate with plaque composition

  9. Preparation of canine C-reactive protein serum reference material: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canalias, Francesca; Piñeiro, Matilde; Pato, Raquel; Peña, Raquel; Bosch, Lluís; Soler, Lourdes; García, Natalia; Lampreave, Fermín; Saco, Yolanda; Bassols, Anna

    2018-03-01

    The availability of a species-specific reference material is essential for the harmonization of results obtained in different laboratories by different methods. We describe the preparation of a canine C-reactive protein (cCRP) serum reference material containing purified cCRP stabilized in a serum matrix. The material can be used by manufacturers to assign values to their calibrator and control materials. The serum matrix was obtained using blood collected from healthy dogs, stabilized and submitted for a delipidation process. The reference material was prepared by diluting purified cCRP in the serum matrix containing 1.0 mol/L HEPES buffer, 3.0 mmol/L calcium chloride, 80,000 kUI/L aprotinin, and 1.0 mmol/L benzamidine hydrochloride monohydrate at a pH of 7.2, and dispensing (0.5 mL) the matrix into vials that were then frozen. The pilot batch of 200 vials was shown to be homogeneous and stable after a stability study at various temperatures and over a total time of 110 days. The prepared material was submitted to an assignment value study. Eight laboratories from different European countries participated by using the same reagents for an immunoturbidimetric method adapted for different analyzers. The obtained cCRP concentration in the reference material was 78.5 mg/L with an expanded uncertainty (k = 2) of 4.2 mg/L. Canine C-reactive protein serum reference material has been produced that allows harmonization of results obtained by different methods and different laboratories, thus reducing the possibility of errors and misunderstandings. © 2018 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  10. Label-free detection of C-reactive protein using an electrochemical DNA immunoassay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Temsiri Songjaroen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A label-free electrochemical immunoassay that combines DNA-directed immobilization (DDI with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS on microwire sensors is reported for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP. CRP is an acute-phase protein that is strongly correlated with systemic inflammation. Since inflammation plays a role in pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, CRP can be used to predict the likelihood of coronary events. To demonstrate the new chemistry, 25-μm Au electrodes were modified with single strand DNA (ssDNA and exposed to a solution containing complementary ssDNA conjugated to monoclonal anti-CRP. The charge-transfer resistance of the [Fe(CN6]3−/4− redox couple was used to determine the CRP concentration after binding. A stepwise increase in the charge transfer resistance was observed using EIS for each modification step, ssDNA, ssDNA-anti-CRP hybridization and the final CRP capture. Cyclic voltammetry (CV was used to verify the EIS results, and showed an increase in peak potential splitting in a similar stepwise manner for each modification step. Finally, fluorescence microscopy was used to confirm the DNA hybridization and CRP binding. Standard addition of CRP revealed that EIS could be used to detect CRP at clinically relevant levels in serum samples. This new form of electrochemical DNA immunoassay (eDI has significant potential as a simple, label-free sensor for proteins in microfluidic devices.

  11. Interindividual variation in the response by fibrinogen, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 to yellow fever vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuur, M.; Beek, M.T. van der; Tak, H.S.; Visser, L.G.; Maat, M.P.M. de

    2004-01-01

    The acute phase reaction is important in many disease processes. Habitual levels of the acute phase proteins fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the dynamic variation of plasma levels of acute phase

  12. Moderate alcohol consumption reduces plasma C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels : a randomized, diet-controlled intervention study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sierksma, A.; Gaag, M.S. van der; Kluft, C.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of moderate alcohol consumption on the acute phase proteins C-reactive protein and fibrinogen. Design: Randomized, diet-controlled, cross-over study. Setting: The study was performed at TNO Nutrition and Food Research, Zeist, The Netherlands. Subjects: Ten

  13. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events after ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Daniel Rios Pinto; Ramos, Adriane Monserrat; Vieira, Pedro Lima; Menti, Eduardo; Bordin, Odemir Luiz Jr.; Souza, Priscilla Azambuja Lopes de; Quadros, Alexandre Schaan de; Portal, Vera Lúcia, E-mail: veraportal.pesquisa@gmail.com [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde: Cardiologia - Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention remains controversial. To investigate the potential association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and an increased risk of MACE such as death, heart failure, reinfarction, and new revascularization in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. This prospective cohort study included 300 individuals aged >18 years who were diagnosed with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary health center. An instrument evaluating clinical variables and the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk scores was used. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was determined by nephelometry. The patients were followed-up during hospitalization and up to 30 days after infarction for the occurrence of MACE. Student's t, Mann-Whitney, chi-square, and logistic regression tests were used for statistical analyses. P values of ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. The mean age was 59.76 years, and 69.3% of patients were male. No statistically significant association was observed between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent MACE (p = 0.11). However, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was independently associated with 30-day mortality when adjusted for TIMI [odds ratio (OR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.51; p = 0.005] and GRACE (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06-1.49; p = 0.007) risk scores. Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was not predictive of combined major cardiovascular events within 30 days after ST-elevation myocardial infarction in patients who underwent primary angioplasty and stent implantation, it was an independent predictor

  14. Prognostic value of sustained elevated C-reactive protein levels in patients with acute aortic intramural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitai, Takeshi; Kaji, Shuichiro; Kim, Kitae; Ehara, Natsuhiko; Tani, Tomoko; Kinoshita, Makoto; Furukawa, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate management of aortic intramural hematoma is still controversial, because a variety of aortic events can arise during follow-up in some patients. However, simplified identification of these patients remains challenging. The present study aimed to determine the prognostic significance of serial C-reactive protein measurements for the prediction of adverse events in patients with acute aortic intramural hematoma. A total of 180 patients with aortic intramural hematoma were retrospectively reviewed. The C-reactive protein data were obtained at admission and 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks from the onset, and the maximum value was obtained during the acute phase. Adverse aorta-related events were defined by a composite of aortic rupture, aortic aneurysm, and surgical or endovascular aortic repair. The C-reactive protein value was 3.0 ± 4.6, 8.7 ± 5.9, 9.0 ± 5.5, and 5.7 ± 4.5 mg/dL on admission and 2 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks from the onset, respectively. The maximal value of C-reactive protein was 12.4 ± 6.3 mg/dL at a mean of 4 days from the onset. Patients with elevated C-reactive protein levels (≥7.2 mg/dL) at 2 weeks had significantly greater rates of aorta-related events (P analysis, an elevated C-reactive protein level at 2 weeks (hazard ratio, 3.16; P value compared with the development of an ulcer-like projection (chi-square, 16.94 for ulcer-like projection only vs 34.32 with the addition of C-reactive protein at 2 weeks, P < .001). C-reactive protein was a simple and useful marker providing incremental prognostic information compared with the development of an ulcer-like projection in patients with aortic intramural hematoma. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibiting C-Reactive Protein for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Disease: Promising Evidence from Rodent Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Szalai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Raised blood C-reactive protein (CRP level is a predictor of cardiovascular events, but whether blood CRP is causal in the disease process is unknown. The latter would best be defined by pharmacological inhibition of the protein in the context of a randomized case-control study. However, no CRP specific drug is currently available so such a prospective study cannot be performed. Blood CRP is synthesized primarily in the liver and the liver is an organ where antisense oligonucleotide (ASO drugs accumulate. Taking advantage of this we evaluated the efficacy of CRP specific ASOs in rodents with experimentally induced cardiovascular damage. Treating rats for 4 weeks with a rat CRP-specific ASO achieved >60% reduction of blood CRP. Notably, this effect was associated with improved heart function and pathology following myocardial infarction (induced by ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Likewise in human CRP transgenic mice treated for 2 weeks with a human CRP-specific ASO, blood human CRP was reduced by >70% and carotid artery patency was improved (2 weeks after surgical ligation. CRP specific ASOs might pave the way towards a placebo-controlled trial that could clarify the role of CRP in cardiovascular disease.

  16. Lutein supplementation reduces plasma lipid peroxidation and C-reactive protein in healthy nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Xu; Jiao, Jia-Hui; Li, Ze-Yu; Liu, Ru-Ru; Shi, Qiang; Ma, Le

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether lutein affected biomarkers related to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in healthy nonsmokers. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of lutein supplementation was conducted in healthy nonsmokers. 117 eligible subjects were randomly assigned to receive 10 or 20 mg/d of lutein or placebo for 12 weeks. Levels of plasma carotenoid concentrations, total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), the lipoprotein profile, and antioxidant enzymes activities were determined at baseline and at 6, and 12 weeks after the initiation of treatment. Biomarkers of oxidative damage to protein and lipids, and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations were measured at baseline and after supplementation. Plasma lutein and TAOC significantly increased in both active treatment groups during 12 weeks. A significant reduction was found in malondialdehyde in the 20 mg lutein group. CRP concentration decreased in a dose-dependent manner for lutein supplementation, and there was a significant between-group difference in CRP between the 20 mg lutein and the placebo group. Serum CRP was directly related to the change in plasma lutein and TAOC for both active treatment groups. The results support the possibility that lutein supplementation reduce biomarkers of CVD risk via decreased lipid peroxidation and inflammatory response by increasing plasma lutein concentrations and antioxidant capacity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The evaluation of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein levels and nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Ali Akbar; Soleimani, Ali Reza; Nikoueinejad, Hassan; Sarbolouki, Shokooh

    2013-03-16

    Malnutrition and inflammation are the most important causes of cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of increase in hemodialysis frequency on C-reactive protein (CRP) level and nutritional markers in contrast to previous routine method. 18 hemodialysis patients with a mean age of 53±16 years were randomly selected in this before-and-after clinical trial. The patients under a standard hemodialysis of 3 times/4 h per week were converted to 4 times/4 h for a period of 6 weeks. The CRP, albumin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL serum levels, anthropometric indices and 24-h diet recall intake was assessed before and after of the period. The data were analyzed using paired t-test, and P-value less than 0.05 was considered significant. All patients completed the study. Mean weight, body mass index and serum albumin increased while serum CRP level decreased significantly after the intervention (P<0.03). Triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL, HDL, as well as energy, protein and fat intake had no significant change before and after the study. Increase in dialysis frequency decreased systemic inflammation and improved the nutritional state of hemodialysis patients. Therefore, it may decrease the risk of cardiovascular events in these patients.

  18. Rapid and quantitative detection of C-reactive protein using quantum dots and immunochromatographic test strips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng X

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Xianglin Cheng,1,* Xu Pu,2,* Pen Jun,3 XiaoBo Zhu,3 Di Zhu,4 Ming Chen1 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, First Affiliated Hospital of Yangtze University, Jingzhou, 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, RenMin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan, 3Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this study and share first authorship Background: Rapid immunochromatographic tests can detect disease markers in 10–15 minutes, which facilitates clinical diagnosis and treatment programs. However, most immunochromatographic tests employ gold nanoparticles as reporters, and these have only moderate sensitivity and act as qualitative methods for analyzing high biomarker concentrations. Methods: In this study, we introduce quantum dots (QDs as fluorescent probes and immunochromatographic strips to develop quantitative fluorescence point-of-care tests (QF-POCT to analyze C-reactive protein (CRP levels. Goat anti-rabbit IgG and rabbit IgG were used as control antibodies, and mouse monoclonal CRP antibody pairs were used for disease marker detection. One monoclonal CRP antibody was conjugated with QDs and served as a signal antibody, and the other monoclonal CRP antibody was dispensed onto the nitrocellulose membrane and served as a capturing antibody. In the presence of CRP, the fluorescence intensity of the monoclonal antibody-CRP-monoclonal antibody sandwich complex captured on the nitrocellulose membrane was determined using the fluorescence strip reader. Results: QF-POCT assays could quantitatively analyze the concentration of CRP in 15 minutes had a detection limit of 0.25 mg/L, and had a wide detection linearity range (0.5–300 mg/L. The intra-assay and interassay

  19. C-reactive protein a better indicator of inflammation after third molar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    operative pain and pre-operative levels of C-reactive and post-operative pain and swelling in impacted third molar surgery. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study subjects were patients indicated for mandibular third molar extraction.

  20. Serum C-reactive protein and C-reactive gene (-717C>T polymorphism are not associated with periodontitis in Indonesian male patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius Winoto Suhartono

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease caused by periodontal pathogens and influenced by multiple risk factors such as genetics, smoking habit, age and systemic diseases. The inflammatory cascade is characterized by the release of C-reactive protein (CRP. Periodontitis has been reported to have plausible links to increased level of CRP, which in turn has been associated to elevated risk of  cardiovascular disease (CVD. Purpose: The purpose of this study was t o investigate the relationship amongst the severity of periodontitis, CRP level in blood and CRP (-717 C>T gene polymorphism in male Indonesian smokers and non-smokers. Method: The severity of periodontitis was assessed for 97 consenting male Indonesian smokers and non-smokers. The CRP level of the subjects was determined by using immuno-turbidimetric assay performed in PARAHITA Diagnostic Center Laboratory ISO 9001: 2000 Cert No. 15225/2. The rate of CRP (-717C>T gene polymorphism was determined by using PCR-RFLP in Oral Biology Laboratory, Faculty of Dentistry, Universitas Indonesia. Result: The results suggest that the CRP protein level is not significantly associated with the tested CRP gene polymorphism (p>0.05. Also, while the severity of periodontitis increased significantly with subject age, the CRP level in blood serum was not significantly related to the severity of  periodontitis. The genotypes of the tested polymorphism did not show significant association with the severity of periodontitis either in smokers or in the combined population including smokers and non-smokers. The results naturally do not exclude such associations, but suggest that to discern the differences the sample size must be considerably increased. Conclusion: The CRP (-717C>T gene polymorphism and CRP level in blood serum were not found to be associated with the severity of periodontitis in male smokers or in the combined population of smokers and non-smokers.

  1. Neighborhood stressors and cardiovascular health: crime and C-reactive protein in Dallas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Christopher R; Cagney, Kathleen A; Iveniuk, James

    2012-10-01

    We apply neighborhood-based theories of social organization and environmental stress to examine variation in a key indicator of inflammation-related cardiovascular risk-C-reactive protein (CRP). Specifically, we emphasize the potentially health-compromising role of rapid increases in the crime rate or "crime spikes" (focusing on a particularly fear-inducing crime - burglary). We also consider the extent to which the magnitude and significance of the association between burglary rate change and inflammatory processes varies by gender. Data on CRP, neighborhood of residence, and individual-level characteristics for adult women and men ages 30-65 are drawn from the 2000-2002 Dallas Heart Study. Results from neighborhood fixed effects models using piecewise linear splines to estimate short-term burglary rate change effects offer support for the hypothesis that crime spikes are associated with CRP. Specifically, we find that short-term burglary rate change is independently associated with CRP for men. Short-term burglary rate change was not associated with CRP for women. These findings shed light on the contextual processes that influence cardiovascular health and point to the potentially important role of short-term changes in environmental stressors in shaping health outcomes. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Association of serum uric acid with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeisi, A; Ostovar, A; Vahdat, K; Rezaei, P; Darabi, H; Moshtaghi, D; Nabipour, I

    2017-02-01

    To explore the independent correlation between serum uric acid and low-grade inflammation (measured by high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, hs-CRP) in postmenopausal women. A total of 378 healthy Iranian postmenopausal women were randomly selected in a population-based study. Circulating hs-CRP levels were measured by highly specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and an enzymatic calorimetric method was used to measure serum levels of uric acid. Pearson correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression and logistic regression models were used to analyze the association between uric acid and hs-CRP levels. A statistically significant correlation was seen between serum levels of uric acid and log-transformed circulating hs-CRP (r = 0.25, p uric acid levels (β = 0.20, p uric acid levels (odds ratio =1.52, 95% confidence interval 1.18-1.96). Higher serum uric acid levels were positively and independently associated with circulating hs-CRP in healthy postmenopausal women.

  3. Evaluation of point-of-care testing of C-reactive protein in forensic autopsy cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soejima, Mikiko; Koda, Yoshiro

    2014-04-01

    We assessed the technical performance and robustness of the point-of-care test for C-reactive protein (CRP) NycoCard CRP for use in forensic autopsy cases. The results of 17 of 39 cadaver blood samples that had CRP in the range effectively measured by the NycoCard (5-120mg/l) correlated well (r=0.99) with those of quantitative latex agglutination immunoassay (turbidimetry), and the out-of-range NycoCard results were fully consistent with those obtained by turbidimetry. For the ten sera whose CRP >120mg/l according to NycoCard, a significant correlation (r=0.98) was observed between values multiplied by the dilution ratio and those of turbidimetry. No significant differences were observed after a freeze-thaw procedure. In addition, CRP results using recombinant human CRP spiked with hemoglobin up to 80g/l were not significantly different from the unspiked results in PBS. The test allows reliable and cost-effective on-site measurement of CRP from a small volume of serum (5μl) with simple equipment. This semi-quantification method of CRP should be useful for diagnosis during autopsy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. C-reactive protein level and obesity as cardiovascular risk factors in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Ülkü Uludağ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of C-reactive protein(CRP level elevation and obesity for the increased cardiovasculardisease risk in polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS.Methods: A hundred and nine patients with PCOS and 30age matched healthy volunteers with regular menstrualcycle are involved in the study. PCOS group is furthersubdivided into three subgroups according to the bodymass index (BMI. Subgroups included 54 with BMI30. Blood samplesfor glucose, insulin, uric acid, and CRP were collected inthe morning after overnight fasting (12 hours. Homeostasismodel assessment-insulin resistance (HOMA-IRwas calculated. Results: Fasting blood glucose, insulin,and HOMA-IR was significantly higher in PCOS group(p=0.02, p=0.01 and p=0.02. CRP level was higher insubgroup with BMI>30. High CRP level in PCOS wasfound to be independent from BMI (p30.When compared with the control group high insulin levelwas the only to be statistically significant in obese PCOSpatients (p=0.005. HOMA-IR was higher in PCOS subgroupwith BMI>30 when compared with controls and thePCOS subgroup with BMI<25 (p<0.001, p= 0.003.Conclusion: Obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and high CRPlevels are seemed to be related and potentiating eachother in PCOS. Struggling with obesity is one of the mostimportant issues for preventive medicine.Key words: PCOS, CRP, obesity, cardiovascular risk

  5. Cardiovascular mortality and C-reactive protein in elderly patients beginning dialysis: reverse epidemiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Claire; Bosson, Jean Luc; Pernod, Gilles; Wauters, Jean Pierre; Couturier, Pascal; Quesada, Jean Louis; Zaoui, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of mortality in end-stage renal disease patients (ESRD). The rate of elderly and polypathologic patients in ESRD is increasing. Elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) have been shown to be associated with increased mortality in ESRD patients. The aim of this study was to examine whether, in elderly ESRD patients, the conventional relationship between elevated CRP and cardiovascular mortality is maintained. This prospective European cohort study included 150 ESRD patients. Data obtained at baseline included demographics, comorbidity, late referral to a nephrologist, high-sensitivity CRP, and serum albumin and hemoglobin levels. Cardiovascular events were analysed as a combined end-point. The mean age of the cohort was 61 years (22-90), with 33.3% of patients over 70 years (75 yrs, 70-83 yrs). Forty-two patients (28.2%) experienced at least one cardiovascular event. Interaction between age over 70 years and CRP exceeding 3 mg/L was a protective factor. Patients over 70 years beginning dialysis with a CRP value 3 mg/L. Multivariate analysis showed that the independent risk factors for cardiovascular events were, in the whole cohort, age over 70 years, previous cardiovascular comorbidity, and interaction between age and CRP. This trial shows a reverse relation between cardiovascular risk in dialysis patients over 70 and CRP level. This may be a useful element in evaluating older patients before long-term dialysis.

  6. Elevated C-Reactive Protein Levels, Psychological Distress, and Depression in 73 131 Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wium-Andersen, Marie Kim; Ørsted, David Dynnes; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT The pathogenesis of depression is not fully understood, but studies suggest that low-grade systemic inflammation contributes to the development of depression. OBJECTIVE To test whether elevated plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with psychological distress...... to 100 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES We ascertained psychological distress with 2 single-item self-reports and depression using self-reported antidepressant use, register-based prescription of antidepressants, and register-based hospitalization with depression. RESULTS In cross-sectional analyses......, increasing CRP levels were associated with increasing risk for psychological distress and depression (P = 3 × 10-8 to P = 4 × 10-105 for trend). For self-reported use of antidepressants, the odds ratio was 1.38 (95% CI, 1.23-1.55) for CRP levels of 1.01 to 3.00 mg/L, 2.02 (1.77-2.30) for 3.01 to 10.00 mg...

  7. Cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function and C-reactive protein levels in nonsmoking individuals with diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Fisioterapia, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Fisioterapia, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Lopes, S.L.B. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Medicina, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Benze, B.G. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Estatística, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Estatística, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Del Vale, A.M.; Leal, A.M.O. [Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Departamento de Medicina, São Carlos, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness and pulmonary function and the relationship with metabolic variables and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). Nineteen men with diabetes and 19 age- and gender-matched control subjects were studied. All individuals were given incremental cardiopulmonary exercise and pulmonary function tests. In the exercise test, maximal workload (158.3±22.3 vs 135.1±25.2, P=0.005), peak heart rate (HR{sub peak}: 149±12 vs 139±10, P=0.009), peak oxygen uptake (VO{sub 2peak}: 24.2±3.2 vs 18.9±2.8, P<0.001), and anaerobic threshold (VO{sub 2VT}: 14.1±3.4 vs 12.2±2.2, P=0.04) were significantly lower in individuals with diabetes than in control subjects. Pulmonary function test parameters, blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides, HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol), and CRP plasma levels were not different in control subjects and individuals with DM. No correlations were observed between hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c), CRP and pulmonary function test and cardiopulmonary exercise test performance. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that nonsmoking individuals with DM have decreased cardiorespiratory fitness that is not correlated with resting pulmonary function parameters, HbA1c, and CRP plasma levels.

  8. Clinical significance of C-reactive protein values in antibiotic treatment for pyogenic liver abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hai-Nv; Yuan, Wen-Xia; Yang, Mei-Fang; Zhao, Hong; Hu, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Xuan; Fan, Jun; Ma, Wei-Hang

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the clinical significance of C-reactive protein (CRP) values in determining the endpoint of antibiotic treatment for liver abscess after drainage. METHODS: The endpoints of antibiotic treatment in 46 patients with pyogenic liver abscess after complete percutaneous drainage were assessed by performing a retrospective study. After complete percutaneous drainage, normal CRP values were considered as the endpoint in 18 patients (experimental group), and normal body temperature for at least 2 wk were considered as the endpoints in the other 28 patients (control group). RESULTS: The duration of antibiotic treatment after complete percutaneous drainage was 15.83 ± 6.45 d and 24.25 ± 8.18 d for the experimental and the control groups, respectively (P = 0.001), being significantly shorter in the experimental group than in the control group. The recurrence rate was 0% for both groups. However, we could not obtain the follow-up data about 3 patients in the control group. CONCLUSION: CRP values can be considered as an independent factor to determine the duration of the antibiotic treatment for pyogenic liver abscess after complete percutaneous drainage. PMID:20939118

  9. Utility of C-Reactive Protein Levels for Early Prediction of Dengue Severity in Adults

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    Chien-Chih Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue has broad clinical presentation with unpredictable clinical evolution and outcome. We aimed to evaluate the utility of C-reactive protein (CRP levels for distinguishing between mild and severe cases in the early phase of the dengue illness. We retrospectively evaluated adults with dengue from 2006 to 2014, according to 1997 and 2009 World Health Organization (WHO criteria for severity. Of 191 included patients, 32.9% had nonshock dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, 3.1% dengue shock syndrome (DSS, and 7.9% severe dengue. The risk of DHF/DSS and severe dengue is significantly related to the increasing levels of CRP. Of 191 patients, 97 had CRP levels measured during the febrile (days 1–3; 85 during the critical (days 4–6; and 9 during the convalescent (days 7–10 illness phases. During the febrile phase, there was significant higher CRP level for DSS versus DF/nonshock DHF and severe dengue versus nonsevere dengue, with CRP cutoff level 30.1 mg/L (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC, 0.938; 100% sensitivity, 76.3% specificity and 24.2 mg/L (AUC, 0.717; 70% sensitivity, 71.3% specificity, respectively. Our study highlights the utility of the CRP levels in early prediction of DSS and severe dengue in adult patients.

  10. C-reactive protein: an inflammatory marker with prognostic value in patients with decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacorta, Humberto; Masetto, Antonio Claudio; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco

    2007-05-01

    Inflammation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of a series of cardiovascular diseases. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of inflammation easily obtained in the emergency room. To study the prognostic value of CRP in patients admitted for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). A prospective cohort of 119 patients with ADHF treated in the emergency room. Mean age was 74+/-11 years and 76 (64%) of patients were male. All were New York Heart Association Functional Class III or IV. CRP was measured by nephelometry at admission. Patients were followed after hospital discharge for an average of 12+/-9.7 months and cardiovascular mortality was the outcome analyzed. There were 44 (36.9%) deaths, all from cardiovascular causes. Individuals with CRP > 3 mg/dl had higher mortality than those below this level (p=0.018). In the multivariate analysis using Cox proportional model, CRP proved to be the most important independent prognostic factor (odds ratio 0.0916 [95% CI = 0.0341 - 0.1490] for each one-unit increment in CRP). CRP is an independent cardiovascular mortality predictor in patients with ADHF, indicating that inflammation represents an important component in the pathophysiology of the disease.

  11. C-reactive protein in acute myocardial infarction: association with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Giuseppe; Cordiano, Rocco; Palmieri, Rosa; Pianca, Sigismondo; Pagliara, Valeria; Palatini, Paolo

    2003-06-01

    High C-reactive protein (CRP) levels have been associated with higher mortality rate in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, it is not known whether inflammation plays a role in the time-course of heart failure (HF) in this clinical setting. Our aim was to study the nature of the relationship between CRP and HF during AMI. This prospective study was carried out in 269 subjects admitted to the hospital for suspected AMI. Of these, 220 had evidence of AMI. The other 49 subjects were studied as controls. CRP was assessed on the first, third, and seventh day after admission. CRP was significantly higher in the patients with AMI than in the control patients (P =.001) and peaked on the third day. Among the patients with AMI, CRP was higher in patients with HF than in patients without HF (adjusted P =.008, P =.02 and P =.03 on 1st, 3rd, and 7th day, respectively). Prevalence of HF on admission was slightly higher in the subjects with first-day CRP >or=15 mg/L than in those with CRP or=85 mg/L than in those with CRP below that level (P <.0001), and log-third-day CRP was independently associated with 1-year mortality at multivariable analysis (P =.0001). CRP on admission to hospital is suitable for predicting the time-course of HF in patients with AMI. Peak CRP value is a strong independent predictor of global and HF-mortality during the following year.

  12. Genistein Precipitated Hypothyroidism, Altered Leptin and C-Reactive Protein Synthesis in Pregnant Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awobajo, F O; Onokpite, B O; Ali, Y M; Babaleye, T A; Uzor, P O; Tijani, K O

    2015-12-20

    Genistein is an isoflavone constituent of soya. This study examined the mechanism by which genistein produced adverse effects in pregnant laboratory rats. Pregnant rats were divided into control (Con) and genistein (Gen) force fed (2 mg/kg) groups. At terminal gestation day (GD) ranging from 0-20, the rats were sacrificed, and blood samples and amniotic fluids were collected. Thyroid hormone, C-reactive protein (CRP) and leptin assay was carried using the blood samples. Leptin was also assayed in the placenta and amniotic fluid supernatant. Oral exposure of pregnant rats to genistein significantly altered maternal T3, (GD18; Con 1.65 ± 0.01, Gen 1.03 ± 0.04 nmol/L), T4 (GD6; Con 29.60 ± 0.00, Gen 36.04 ± 1.29 nmol/L), Leptin (Placenta GD20; Con 0.08 ± 0.01, Gen 0.31 ± 0.02 ng/ml, amniotic fluid ;GD 20; Con 0.02 ± 0.00, Gen 0.35 ± 0.05 ng/ml) in genistein group. These changes were accompanied with loss of embryonic implants and a decrease in fetal and placental weights. The CRP level was significantly decreased and increased at the onset and toward late pregnancy respectively. Oral exposure of pregnant rats to genistein precipitated hypothyroidism, altered some metabolic hormones with a reduction in fetal and placental growth and increased resorption of embryonic implants.

  13. Validity of C-reactive protein (CRP) for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisamuddin, Effat; Hisam, Aliya; Wahid, Sughra; Raza, Ghulam

    2015-01-01

    To determine the validity of C-reactive protein levels for diagnosis of neonatal sepsis. A cross sectional (Validation) study was conducted at Neonatology unit in KRL general hospital (emergency/OPD) of 7 months duration from February 2012 to August 2012. By using purposive sampling technique, 147, sample size was calculated by using WHO sample size calculator taking sensitivity 75%, specificity 95%, expected prevalence 50%, desired precision 10% and confidence level 95%. Mean age of the neonates was 5.72 days + 3.86. Male patients were 81(55.1%) while 66(44.9%) were female. Neonatal sepsis was observed in 43(29.25%) and were confirmed through blood culture while 104(70.75%) were not confirmed on blood culture as neonatal sepsis. The sensitivity and specificity of CRP in diagnosis of acute neonatal sepsis was 76.92% and 53.49% respectively while it had a positive predictive value of 80% and negative predictive value of 48.94%. Over all the diagnostic accuracy of CRP in diagnosis of neonatal sepsis was 70.07%. CRP estimation does have a role in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis but the test is not specific enough to be relied upon as the only indicator.

  14. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

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    Iván Darío BRAVO-TOBAR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35, II (n = 29, and III (n = 18. A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease.

  15. Homocysteine and C-Reactive Protein as Useful Surrogate Markers for Evaluating CKD Risk in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsun Chuang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of homocysteine and C-reactive protein (CRP as potential markers for chronic kidney disease (CKD in adults in Taiwan, and to identify associations between these factors and CKD, stratifying by gender. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed multi-center data retrospectively. Data were collected from 22,043 adult Taiwanese at Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital from 2005 to 2011. Smoking/drinking history, personal medical/medication history, pregnancy, fasting times as well as laboratory parameters, including homocysteine and CRP were measured and analyzed. Results: Significant differences were observed between four homocysteine and CRP quartiles in eGFR and CKD. For males, only one model showed significant associations between plasma homocysteine and CKD, while in females, all three models showed significant associations with CKD. On the contrary, the gender difference in the case of CRP was opposite. Combined homocysteine and CRP were associated with CKD in males but not in females. Conclusion: Among Taiwanese adults, plasma homocysteine is associated with CKD in females and plasma hsCRP is associated with CKD in males. High hsCRP/high homocysteine is associated with elevated CKD risk in male. Our results suggest that homocysteine and hsCRP may be useful surrogate markers for evaluating CKD risk in adults.

  16. Gender, obesity and repeated elevation of C-reactive protein: data from the CARDIA cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ishii

    Full Text Available C-reactive Protein (CRP measurements above 10 mg/L have been conventionally treated as acute inflammation and excluded from epidemiologic studies of chronic inflammation. However, recent evidence suggest that such CRP elevations can be seen even with chronic inflammation. The authors assessed 3,300 participants in The Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study, who had two or more CRP measurements between 1992/3 and 2005/6 to a investigate characteristics associated with repeated CRP elevation above 10 mg/L; b identify subgroups at high risk of repeated elevation; and c investigate the effect of different CRP thresholds on the probability of an elevation being one-time rather than repeated. 225 participants (6.8% had one-time and 103 (3.1% had repeated CRP elevation above 10 mg/L. Repeated elevation was associated with obesity, female gender, low income, and sex hormone use. The probability of an elevation above 10 mg/L being one-time rather than repeated was lowest (51% in women with body mass index above 31 kg/m(2, compared to 82% in others. These findings suggest that CRP elevations above 10 mg/L in obese women are likely to be from chronic rather than acute inflammation, and that CRP thresholds above 10 mg/L may be warranted to distinguish acute from chronic inflammation in obese women.

  17. Socioeconomic position, health behaviors, and C-reactive protein: a moderated-mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Kiarri N; Mezuk, Briana; Abdou, Cleopatra M; Rafferty, Jane A; Jackson, James S

    2010-05-01

    We sought to understand the link between low socioeconomic position (SEP) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) by examining the association between SEP, health-related coping behaviors, and C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory marker and independent risk factor for CVD, in a U.S. sample of adults. We used a multiple mediation model to evaluate how these behaviors work in concert to influence CRP levels and whether these relationships were moderated by gender and race/ethnicity. CRP levels were divided into two categories: elevated CRP (3.1-10.0 mg/L) and normal CRP (mediator. These behaviors accounted for 87.9% of the total effect of education on CRP and 55.8% the total effect of poverty on CRP. We also found significant moderation of these mediated effects by gender and race/ethnicity. These findings demonstrate the influence of socioeconomically patterned environmental constraints on individual-level health behaviors. Specifically, reducing socioeconomic inequalities may have positive effects on CVD disparities through reducing cigarette smoking and increasing vigorous exercise. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Association between insulin resistance and c-reactive protein among Peruvian adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelaye Bizu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective Insulin resistance (IR, a reduced physiological response of peripheral tissues to the action of insulin, is one of the major causes of type 2 diabetes. We sought to evaluate the relationship between serum C-reactive protein (CRP, a marker of systemic inflammation, and prevalence of IR among Peruvian adults. Methods This population based study of 1,525 individuals (569 men and 956 women; mean age 39 years old was conducted among residents in Lima and Callao, Peru. Fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and CRP concentrations were measured using standard approaches. Insulin resistance was assessed using the homeostasis model (HOMA-IR. Categories of CRP were defined by the following tertiles: 2.53 mg/l. Logistic regression procedures were employed to estimate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Results Elevated CRP were significantly associated with increased mean fasting insulin and mean HOMA-IR concentrations (p 2.53 mg/l (upper tertile had a 2.18-fold increased risk of IR (OR = 2.18 95% CI 1.51-3.16 as compared with those in the lowest tertile ( Conclusion Our observations among Peruvians suggest that chronic systemic inflammation, as evidenced by elevated CRP, may be of etiologic importance in insulin resistance and diabetes.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in patients with depressive disorder on antidepressive medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojević, Albina; Popović, Irena; Nenadović, Milutin; Ravanić, Dragan; Paunović-Milosavljević, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent depression is a psychiatric disorder of which etiology and pathogenesis might be related to immune response. Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and its components are also strongly associated with elevated inflammatory indicators, as so as the body mass index (BMI) and total cholesterol levels. Objective of this study was to investigate if there was any difference in C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in patients with recurrent depressive disorder, treated with antidepressants, compared to a healthy control group of subjects and if there was an association between increased CRP levels and the presence of MetS in these two groups. Sixty subjects entered the study; of these 35 patients with the diagnosis of recurrent depressive disorder, while the healthy control group included 25 subjects. MetS was defined according to the NCEP ATP III criteria. The cut-off point for CRP was set at > 5 mg/L. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of MetS and CRP values between the studied groups. Waist circumference and total cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the experimental group. Patients that fulfilled the criteria for MetS showed significantly higher values of central obesity and arterial hypertension in the experimental group as well. The elevated CRP levels were associated with increased frequency of MetS in depressed patients. Both CRP levels and metabolic risk profile screening, according to the international criteria, may be beneficial in order to obtain better assessment for depressive long-term medicated patients.

  20. Correlation between serum levels of C-reactive protein and infant pneumonia: A meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    XIAO, XIAO; XUE, LONG; SHENG, HUI-LIN; XIAO, ZHI-HUI

    2015-01-01

    Experimental data imply that serum C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of general systemic inflammation, and inflammation may have a role in the development of pneumonia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the associations of serum CRP levels in infant patients with pneumonia by meta-analysis. The Science Citation Index, Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Current Contents and two Chinese (CMB and CNKI) databases were searched. Studies were pooled and standard mean difference (SMD) and the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Subgroup analyses and publication bias detection were also conducted. The statistical analysis was conducted using Stata software version 12.0. Serum CRP levels were analyzed in 10 clinical case-control studies (652 infants with pneumonia and 845 healthy controls); significant differences in serum CRP levels were observed between infants with pneumonia and the healthy controls (SMD=4.41, 95% CI: 3.34–5.47, Ppneumonia in Asian, African and Caucasian populations (all Ppneumonia than in healthy infants, and thus serum levels of CRP may have independent diagnostic value for pneumonia in children. PMID:26136982

  1. C-reactive protein enhances the respiratory burst of neutrophils-induced by antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng-cheng; Hao, Jian; Yang, Xiao-wei; Chang, Dong-yuan; Chen, Min; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2012-10-01

    Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was one of the useful biomarkers for evaluating the disease activity in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis (AAV). Cumulating studies proved that CRP was pathogenic in a variety of diseases. In the current study, the in vitro effects of CRP to prime neutrophils for ANCA-induced respiratory burst were investigated with flow cytometry. Without TNF-α in the reactive system, ANCA could only induce a slight level of respiratory burst of neutrophils. CRP could enhance the respiratory burst of neutrophils induced by ANCA against myeloperoxidse [mean fluorescence intensity (MFI, 68.45 ± 16.87 vs. 58.65 ± 15.09, P Heat-treated CRP could not enhance the levels of neutrophils respiratory burst induced by ANCA or increase the expression of membrane proteinase 3 of neutrophils. So CRP can prime neutrophils and enhance the respiratory burst induced by ANCA and might be pathogenic in AAV. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. C-reactive protein as an inflammatory marker in monitoring therapy effectiveness of acute odontogenic infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražić Radojica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Clinical presentation of acute odontogenic infections may vary, while adequate evaluation of its severity is of great importance for determination of appropriate and effective therapy. Objective. The aim of the present study was to monitor changes of C-reactive protein (CRP levels, to correlate its values with symptoms of different acute odontogenic infections (AOI, and to monitor the effectiveness of the applied therapy. Methods. Fifty-four patients with AOI were included in the study. Eighteen patients with good drainage and normal body temperature were treated only by surgical incision without using antibiotics. Twenty-two patients with poor drainage after incision and normal body temperature were treated by surgical incision and antibiotics. Fourteen patients with elevated body temperature were treated by incision and antibiotics, irrespective of the quality of the drainage. CRP levels were measured on admission, on the 3rd and 7th day after therapy initiation. Results. On admission CRP levels were higher in AOI with elevated body temperature compared to poorly and well-drained AOI. There were no differences in CRP levels between well and poorly drained AOI on admission. On the 3rd day, a decline in the CRP levels was evident in all three groups of patients, and there was no difference among the groups. On the 7th day, the CRP levels normalized in all groups. Conclusion. CRP levels correlate well with the severity and resolution of AOI and could be used as a reliable parameter in monitoring the effectiveness of AOI therapy.

  3. Cardiorespiratory fitness, pulmonary function and C-reactive protein levels in nonsmoking individuals with diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness and pulmonary function and the relationship with metabolic variables and C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma levels in individuals with diabetes mellitus (DM). Nineteen men with diabetes and 19 age- and gender-matched control subjects were studied. All individuals were given incremental cardiopulmonary exercise and pulmonary function tests. In the exercise test, maximal workload (158.3±22.3 vs 135.1±25.2, P=0.005), peak heart rate (HR peak : 149±12 vs 139±10, P=0.009), peak oxygen uptake (VO 2peak : 24.2±3.2 vs 18.9±2.8, P<0.001), and anaerobic threshold (VO 2VT : 14.1±3.4 vs 12.2±2.2, P=0.04) were significantly lower in individuals with diabetes than in control subjects. Pulmonary function test parameters, blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides, HDL, LDL, and total cholesterol), and CRP plasma levels were not different in control subjects and individuals with DM. No correlations were observed between hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c), CRP and pulmonary function test and cardiopulmonary exercise test performance. In conclusion, the results demonstrate that nonsmoking individuals with DM have decreased cardiorespiratory fitness that is not correlated with resting pulmonary function parameters, HbA1c, and CRP plasma levels

  4. C-reactive protein and substance use disorders in adolescence and early adulthood: a prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, E Jane; Copeland, William E; Shanahan, Lilly; Worthman, Carol M; Angold, Adrian

    2013-12-01

    Dysregulated immune function and elevated inflammation markers are seen in adults with chronic diseases, including some psychiatric disorders, but evidence on inflammation in the case of drug abuse is conflicting. To test the concurrent and predictive relations between C-reactive protein (CRP) and use and abuse of alcohol, nicotine and cannabis in a longitudinal, population sample of adolescents and young adults, at the period of highest increase in drug use. Data from the prospective population-based Great Smoky Mountains Study (N=1420) were used, covering children in the community assessed at ages 9-16, 19, and 21. Structured interviews were used to assess substance abuse symptoms and DSM-IV substance use disorders. Bloodspots were collected at each assessment and assayed for CRP. CRP levels were higher in the presence of nicotine, alcohol, and cannabis use and nicotine dependence. In prospective analyses, higher CRP levels predicted cannabis use and nicotine dependence, and nicotine use predicted higher CRP levels, once covariates were included in the models. Significant covariates were age, race (American Indian), and obesity. The inter-relationship of CRP and substance abuse has implications for the later health risks associated with early drug and alcohol use and abuse. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Immunochemical recognition of the binding of C-reactive protein to solid-phase phosphorylethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, J M

    1988-06-01

    The influence of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, trypsin digestion and mercaptoethanol treatment of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the CRP binding to solid-phase phosphorylethanolamine (PE) has been investigated. Nine monoclonal antibodies reacting with CRP could be divided into at least 2 well-defined groups: one group of 6-7 monoclonals interfering with the binding of CRP to PE (mainly represented by monoclonal 2) and the not interfering with the binding of CRP to PE (mainly represented by monoclonal 5). Trypsin digestion resulted in sequence identified CRP fragments still able to bind to PE and detectable by monoclonal 5 but not by monoclonal 2. On the other hand, binding of CRP to PE was abolished by mercaptoethanol treatment. These results, together with the estimation of the extent of the antigenicity of the PE binding site and the characteristics of the hydrophobicity profile of CRP, suggest that most of the hydrophilic sequences contribute to the PE binding region except a non-overlapping region defined by monoclonal 5. Most probably, some of these sequences are located inside or around the internal bisulphide bridge of each monomer of the pentameric CRP.

  6. Dual-Quantum-Dots-Labeled Lateral Flow Strip Rapidly Quantifies Procalcitonin and C-reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, XiaoPing; Huang, YunYe; Lin, ZhongShi; Xu, Liang; Yu, Hao

    2016-03-01

    In the article, a dual-quantum-dots-labeled (dual-QDs-labeled) lateral flow strip (LFS) method was developed for the simultaneous and rapid quantitative detection of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in the blood. Two QD-antibody conjugates with different fluorescence emission spectra were produced and sprayed on the LFS to capture PCT and CRP in the blood. Furthermore, a double antibody sandwich method for PCT and, meanwhile, a competitive inhibition method for CRP were employed in the LFS. For PCT and CRP in serum assayed by the dual-QDs-labeled LFS, their detection sensitivities reached 0.1 and 1 ng/mL, respectively, and their linear quantitative detection ranges were from 0.3 to 200 ng/mL and from 50 to 250 μg/mL, respectively. There was little evidence that the PCT and CRP assays would be interfered with each other. The correlations for testing CRP and PCT in clinical samples were 99.75 and 97.02 %, respectively, between the dual-QDs-labeled LFS we developed and commercial methods. The rapid quantification of PCT and CRP on dual-QDs-labeled LFS is of great clinical value to distinguish inflammation, bacterial infection, or viral infection and to provide guidance for the use of antibiotics or other medicines.

  7. Adolescent sympathetic activity and salivary C-reactive protein: The effects of parental behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Benjamin W; Byrne, Michelle L; Simmons, Julian G; Whittle, Sarah; Schwartz, Orli S; Reynolds, Eric C; O'Brien-Simpson, Neil M; Sheeber, Lisa; Allen, Nicholas B

    2017-10-01

    This study utilized a novel multisystem approach to investigate the effect of observed parental behavior on the relationship between biological mechanisms associated with disease processes (i.e., autonomic physiology and immune response) among their adolescent children. Thirty-three adolescents (23 males), aged 11-13, and their parents participated in a laboratory session in which adolescents provided baseline measures of autonomic (sympathetic) activity, and adolescents and 1 parent participated in a laboratory based dyadic conflict resolution interaction task. This included 3 male parent/male adolescent dyads, 20 female parent/male adolescent dyads, 3 male parent/female adolescent dyads, and 7 female parent/female adolescent dyads. Approximately 3 years later, adolescents provided a salivary measure of C-Reactive Protein (sCRP) to index inflammation. Analyses revealed a positive association between sympathetic activity and sCRP, as well as a moderating role of positive parental behavior in this relationship, such that the association between sympathetic activity and sCRP was greater among adolescents whose parents displayed shorter duration of positive affect. Overall findings indicate parental behavior may influence the association between adolescent sympathetic activity and inflammatory processes. These findings have important implications for understanding the impact of psychosocial factors on biological mechanisms of disease. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. Canine Pancreas-Specific Lipase and C-reactive Protein in Dogs Treated With Anticonvulsants (Phenobarbital and Potassium Bromide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarracín, Viviana; Teles, Mariana; Meléndez-Lazo, Antonio; Rodón, Jaume; Pastor, Josep

    2015-06-01

    Animals treated with anticonvulsant drugs may have increased canine pancreas-specific lipase (cPLI) values. Inflammatory conditions and specifically acute pancreatitis are of major concern in these animals. Elevation in C-reactive protein is being associated with inflammatory status in dogs and it has been correlated with the clinical severity of pancreatitis. In the present study, we investigated if there is a correlation between the cPLI increase, changes in C-reactive protein and hepatic enzymes, as well as the incidence of severe acute pancreatitis (AP) in dogs with anticonvulsant treatment (phenobarbital, or potassium bromide or both). Increased values of pancreas-specific lipase were found in 6.8% of the animals in treatment with anticonvulsants, and this increase is correlated with the increase in triglycerides, alkaline phosphatase, and alanine aminotransferase but not with C-reactive protein levels, which suggests a possible induction or release phenomenon rather than a clear severe AP. C-reactive protein levels did not affect cPLI values on the population studied. Only 2 animals had clinical and analytical data suggestive of AP, indicating a low prevalence (0.6%). In conclusion, cPLI may be increased in a low percentage of animals with anticonvulsants treatment and its increase may not be associated with severe AP. It may be induced by the anticonvulsants drugs; however, further studies are advised to rule out other possible causes that increased cPLI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic air pollution exposure during pregnancy and maternal and fetal c-reactive protein levels: The generation R study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooven, E.H. van den; Kluizenaar, Y. de; Pierik, F.H.; Hofman, A.; Ratingen, S.W. van; Zandveld, P.Y.J.; Lindemans, J.; Russcher, H.; Steegers, E.A.P.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Jaddoe, V.W.V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Exposure to air pollution has been associated with higher C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, suggesting an inflammatory response. Not much is known about this association in pregnancy. Objectives: We investigated the associations of air pollution exposure during pregnancy with maternal and

  10. Prognostic value of anemia and C-reactive protein levels in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hugo J A; De Klerk, John M H; Fijnheer, Rob; Heggelman, Ben G F; Dubois, Stefan V.; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Kwee, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prognostic value of pretreatment anemia, pretreatment elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and 6-month posttreatment anemia in patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin, and

  11. Effects of tylosin administration on C-reactive protein concentration and carriage of Salmonella enterica in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeun Bum; Singer, Randall S; Borewicz, Klaudyna; White, Bryan A; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Johnson, Timothy J; Espejo, Luis A; Isaacson, Richard E

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of tylosin on C-reactive protein concentration, carriage of Salmonella enterica, and antimicrobial resistance genes in commercial pigs. 120 pigs on 2 commercial farms. A cohort of sixty 10-week-old pigs in 4 pens/farm (15 pigs/pen) was randomly selected. Equal numbers of pigs were given feed containing tylosin (40 μg/g of feed) for 0, 6, or 12 weeks. C-reactive protein concentrations were measured, microbial culture for S enterica in feces was performed, and antimicrobial resistance genes in feces were quantified. No significant associations were detected between C-reactive protein concentration or S enterica status and tylosin treatment. During the 12 weeks of tylosin administration, increased levels of 6 antimicrobial resistance genes did not occur. Treatment of pigs with tylosin did not affect C-reactive protein concentration or reduce carriage or load of S enterica. There was no evidence that pigs receiving tylosin had increased carriage of the 6 antimicrobial resistance genes measured. S enterica is a public health concern. Use of the antimicrobial growth promoter tylosin did not pose a public health risk by means of increased carriage of S enterica.

  12. Association between C reactive protein and coronary heart disease: mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensley, Frances; Gao, Pei; Burgess, Stephen; Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Shah, Tina; Engert, James C.; Clarke, Robert; Davey-Smith, George; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sandhu, Manjinder; Anand, Sonia; Pepys, Mark B.; Smeeth, Liam; Whittaker, John; Casas, Juan Pablo; Thompson, Simon G.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Danesh, John; Eiriksdottir, G.; Harris, T. B.; Launer, L. J.; Gudnason, V.; Folsom, A. R.; Andrews, G.; Ballantyne, C. M.; Samani, N. J.; Hall, A. S.; Braund, P. S.; Balmforth, A. J.; Whincup, P. H.; Morris, R.; Lawlor, D. A.; Lowe, G. D. O.; Timpson, N.; Ebrahim, S.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Davey-Smith, G.; Nordestgaard, B. J.; Tybjærg-Hansen, A.; Zacho, J.; Brown, M.; Sandhu, M.; Ricketts, S. L.; Ashford, S.; Lange, L.; Reiner, A.; Cushman, M.; Tracy, R.; Wu, C.; Ge, J.; Zou, Y.; Sun, A.; Hung, J.; McQuillan, B.; Thompson, P.; Beilby, J.; Warrington, N.; Palmer, L. J.; Wanner, C.; Drechsler, C.; Hoffmann, M. M.; Fowkes, F. G. R.; Tzoulaki, I.; Kumari, M.; Miller, M.; Marmot, M.; Onland-Moret, C.; van der Schouw, Y. T.; Boer, J. M.; Wijmenga, C.; Khaw, K.-T.; Vasan, R. S.; Schnabel, R. B.; Yamamoto, J. F.; Benjamin, E. J.; Schunkert, H.; Erdmann, J.; König, I. R.; Hengstenberg, C.; Chiodini, B.; Franzosi, M. G.; Pietri, S.; Gori, F.; Rudock, M.; Liu, Y.; Lohman, K.; Humphries, S. E.; Hamsten, A.; Norman, P. E.; Hankey, G. J.; Jamrozik, K.; Rimm, E. B.; Pai, J. K.; Psaty, B. M.; Heckbert, S. R.; Bis, J. C.; Yusuf, S.; Anand, S.; Engert, J. C.; Xie, C.; Collins, R.; Clarke, R.; Bennett, D.; Kooner, J.; Chambers, J.; Elliott, P.; März, W.; Kleber, M. E.; Böhm, B. O.; Winkelmann, B. R.; Melander, O.; Berglund, G.; Koenig, W.; Thorand, B.; Baumert, J.; Peters, A.; Manson, J.; Cooper, J. A.; Talmud, P. J.; Ladenvall, P.; Johansson, L.; Jansson, J.-H.; Hallmans, G.; Reilly, M. P.; Qu, L.; Li, M.; Rader, D. J.; Watkins, H.; Hopewell, J.; Saleheen, D.; Danesh, J.; Frossard, P.; Sattar, N.; Robertson, M.; Shepherd, J.; Schaefer, E.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J. C. M.; Kardys, I.; Dehghan, A.; de Faire, U.; Bennet, A.; Gigante, B.; Leander, K.; Peters, B.; Maitland-van der Zee, A. H.; de Boer, A.; Klungel, O.; Greenland, P.; Dai, J.; Liu, S.; Brunner, E.; Kivimaki, M.; O'Reilly, D.; Ford, I.; Packard, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease. Design Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of individual participant data from 47 epidemiological studies in 15 countries. Participants 194 418

  13. Association between C reactive protein and coronary heart disease : mendelian randomisation analysis based on individual participant data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensley, Frances; Gao, Pei; Burgess, Stephen; Kaptoge, Stephen; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Shah, Tina; Engert, James C.; Clarke, Robert; Davey-Smith, George; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Saleheen, Danish; Samani, Nilesh J.; Sandhu, Manjinder; Anand, Sonia; Pepys, Mark B.; Smeeth, Liam; Whittaker, John; Casas, Juan Pablo; Thompson, Simon G.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Danesh, John; Eiriksdottir, G.; Harris, T. B.; Launer, L. J.; Gudnason, V.; Folsom, A. R.; Andrews, G.; Ballantyne, C. M.; Samani, N. J.; Hall, A. S.; Braund, P. S.; Balmforth, A. J.; Whincup, P. H.; Morris, R.; Lawlor, D. A.; Lowe, G. D. O.; Timpson, N.; Ebrahim, S.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Davey-Smith, G.; Timpson, N.; Nordestgaard, B. G.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Zacho, J.; Brown, M.; Sandhu, M.; Ricketts, S. L.; Ashford, S.; Lange, L.; Reiner, A.; Cushman, M.; Tracy, R.; Wu, C.; Ge, J.; Zou, Y.; Sun, A.; Hung, J.; McQuillan, B.; Thompson, P.; Beilby, J.; Warrington, N.; Palmer, L. J.; Wanner, C.; Drechsler, C.; Hoffmann, M. M.; Fowkes, F. G. R.; Lowe, G. D. O.; Tzoulaki, I.; Kumari, M.; Miller, M.; Marmot, M.; Onland-Moret, C.; van der Schouw, Y. T.; Boer, J. M.; Wijmenga, C.; Ricketts, S. L.; Ashford, S.; Sandhu, M.; Khaw, K-T; Vasan, R. S.; Schnabel, R. B.; Yamamoto, J. F.; Benjamin, E. J.; Schunkert, H.; Erdmann, J.; Koenig, I. R.; Hengstenberg, C.; Chiodini, B.; Franzosi, M. G.; Pietri, S.; Gori, F.; Rudock, M.; Liu, Y.; Lohman, K.; Harris, T. B.; Humphries, S. E.; Hamsten, A.; Norman, P. E.; Hankey, G. J.; Jamrozik, K.; Palmer, L. J.; Rimm, E. B.; Pai, J. K.; Psaty, B. M.; Heckbert, S. R.; Bis, J. C.; Yusuf, S.; Anand, S.; Engert, J. C.; Xie, C.; Collins, R.; Clarke, R.; Bennett, D.; Kooner, J.; Chambers, J.; Elliott, P.; Maerz, W.; Kleber, M. E.; Boehm, B. O.; Winkelmann, B. R.; Melander, O.; Berglund, G.; Koenig, W.; Thorand, B.; Baumert, J.; Peters, A.; Rimm, E. B.; Manson, J.; Pai, J. K.; Humphries, S. E.; Cooper, J. A.; Talmud, P. J.; Ladenvall, P.; Johansson, L.; Jansson, J-H; Hallmans, G.; Reilly, M. P.; Qu, L.; Li, M.; Rader, D. J.; Watkins, H.; Clarke, R.; Hopewell, J.; Saleheen, D.; Danesh, J.; Frossard, P.; Sattar, N.; Robertson, M.; Shepherd, J.; Schaefer, E.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J. C. M.; Kardys, I.; Dehghan, A.; de Faire, U.; Bennet, A.; Gigante, B.; Leander, K.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Davey-Smith, G.; Timpson, N.; Peters, B.; Maitland-van der Zee, A. H.; de Boer, A.; Klungel, O.; Reiner, A.; Manson, J.; Greenland, P.; Dai, J.; Liu, S.; Brunner, E.; Kivimaki, M.; Marmot, M.; Sattar, N.; O'Reilly, D.; Ford, I.; Packard, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To use genetic variants as unconfounded proxies of C reactive protein concentration to study its causal role in coronary heart disease. Design Mendelian randomisation meta-analysis of individual participant data from 47 epidemiological studies in 15 countries. Participants 194 418

  14. Early rise in C-reactive protein is a marker for infective complications in laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nason, Gregory J

    2014-02-01

    Infective complications are the most significant cause of morbidity associated with elective colorectal surgery. It can sometimes be difficult to differentiate complications from the normal postoperative course. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant which has been reported to be predictive of postoperative infective complications.

  15. Profile of C-reactive protein, white cells and neutrophil populations in febrile children from rural north-eastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahende, Coline; Ngasala, Billy; Lusingu, John

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: C-reactive protein (CRP), white blood cell (WBC) and absolute neutrophil counts (ANC) are important inflammatory biomarkers in the early diagnosis of infections. However, little is known on their profile and usefulness in fever case management in children attending outpatient clinic...

  16. Increased alpha-linolenic acid intake lowers C-reactive protein, but has no effect on markers of atherosclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, WJE; Lefrandt, JD; Feskens, EJM; van Haelst, PL; Broer, J; Meyboom-de Jong, B; May, JF; Cohen Tervaert, Jan; Smit, AJ

    Objective: To investigate the effects of increased alpha-linolenic acid (ALA)-intake on intima-media thickness (IMT), oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) antibodies, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), C-reactive protein (CRP), and interleukins 6 and 10. Design: Randomized

  17. Influence of 3 Months Resistance Training on C-Reactive Protein Serum Levels and Muscle Hypertrophy in Elderly Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Saremi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Sarcopenia is the decline of muscle mass and strength with age. Evidence suggests that inflammation play important roles in age-related muscle atrophy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of 3 months resistance training on skeletal muscle mass and C-reactive protein levels in elderly men. Methods & Materials: In this quasi – experimental study with pretest–posttest design, twenty-five middle-age men (age: 64.10±3.40 yr, body mass index: 28.29±2.38 kg/m 2 were randomly assigned to resistance training (n=13 and control (n=12 groups. Resistance training program was performed 50-60 min/d, 3d/wk, for 3 months. Serum C-reactive protein levels and body composition (DEXA were measured before and after the intervention. Results: After resistance training, leg press (lower body strength index, bench press (upper body strength index, and skeletal muscle mass were significantly increased (P0.05. Concurrently, C-reactive protein levels were significantly decreased in training group (P<0.05. Conclusion: Three months resistance training caused an improvement in muscle mass and strength in elderly men, and this improvement were accompanied by decreases in C-reactive protein serum levels.

  18. Meat consumption and its association with C-reactive protein and incident type 2 diabetes : The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woudenbergh, van G.J.; Kuijsten, A.; Tigcheler, B.; Sijbrands, E.J.G.; Rooij, van F.J.A.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.M.; Feskens, E.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether intake of different types of meat is associated with circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) and risk of type 2 diabetes in a prospective cohort study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Our analysis included 4,366 Dutch participants who did not have diabetes at baseline.

  19. Canine serum C-reactive protein as a quantitative marker of the inflammatory stimulus of aseptic elective soft tissue surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Strøm, Henriette; Mikkelsen, Lars F.

    2013-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an established serum marker for the presence of systemic inflammation in dogs. Results from previous experimental and clinical studies suggest that CRP concentrations also quantitatively reflect the degree and progress of an inflammatory process, suggesting its use for...

  20. Cross-sectional and Longitudinal Relationships between Perceived Stress and C-reactive Protein in Men and Women.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbosa-Leiker, C.; Roper, V.; McPherson, S.; Lei, M.; Wright, B.; Hoekstra, T.; Kostick, M.

    2014-01-01

    To date, an examination of the longitudinal relationship between perceived stress and C-reactive protein (CRP) is limited. We explored the relationship between perceived stress and CRP concurrently and across 2 and 4years in 383 men and women. Multiple linear regressions examined the cross-sectional

  1. In patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration, physical activity may influence C-reactive protein levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Singh, Amardeep; Falk, Mads Krüger

    2014-01-01

    Association of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with C-reactive protein (CRP) was previously reported, indicating a relation to systemic low-grade inflammation. However, visual impairment limits physical activity, and physical activity modulates CRP levels. Here, we investigated...

  2. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts target organ damage in Chinese patients with metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhigang; Nie, Hai; He, Hongbo

    2007-01-01

    with metabolic syndrome. A total of 1082 consecutive patients of Chinese origin were screened for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and target organ damage, including cardiac hypertrophy......, carotid intima-media thickness, and renal impairment, were investigated. The median (25th and 75th percentiles) of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in 619 patients with metabolic syndrome was 2.42 mg/L (0.75 and 3.66 mg/L) compared with 1.13 mg/L (0.51 and 2.46 mg/L) among 463 control subjects (P ...). There was a progressive increase in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level with the number of components of the metabolic syndrome. Stratification of patients with metabolic syndrome into 3 groups according to their high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations (3.0 mg/L) showed that the subjects...

  3. Does C-reactive protein independently predict mortality in adult community-acquired bacteremia patients with known sepsis severity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim O; Jensen, Thøger G; Kolmos, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated whether sepsis severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level on admission prognostically corroborated or annulled each other in adult patients with incident community-acquired bacteremia (Funen, Denmark, 2000-2008). We used logistic regression and area under the receiver operating.......06), thus CRP contributed as much as sepsis severity to prognosis....

  4. Evaluation of C-reactive protein as an inflammatory biomarker in rabbits for vaccine nonclinical safety studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Destexhe, E.; Prinsen, M.K.; Schöll, I. van; Kuper, C.F.; Garçon, N.; Veenstra, S.; Segal, L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Inflammatory reactions are one of the potential safety concerns that are evaluated in the framework of vaccine safety testing. In nonclinical studies, the assessment of the inflammation relies notably on the measurement of biomarkers. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase plasma

  5. Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor on the C-reactive protein promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voleti, Bhavya; Hammond, David J.; Thirumalai, Avinash; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a plasma protein of the innate immune system, is produced by hepatocytes. A critical regulatory region (−42 to −57) on the CRP promoter contains binding site for the IL-6-activated transcription factor C/EBPβ. The IL-1β-activated transcription factor NF-κB binds to a κB site located nearby (−63 to −74). The κB site overlaps an octamer motif (−59 to −66) which is the binding site for the constitutively active transcription factor Oct-1. Oct-1 is known to function both as a transcriptional repressor and as an activator depending upon the promoter context. Also, Oct-1 can regulate gene expression either by binding directly to the promoter or by interacting with other transcription factors bound to the promoter. The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of Oct-1 in regulating CRP expression. In luciferase transactivation assays, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression in Hep3B cells. Deletion of the Oct-1 site from the promoter drastically reduced the cytokine response because the κB site was altered as a consequence of deleting the Oct-1 site. Surprisingly, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited the residual (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. Similarly, deletion of the Oct-1 site reduced the induction of CRP expression in response to overexpressed C/EBPβ, and overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited C/EBPβ-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. We conclude that Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CRP expression and it does so by occupying its cognate site on the promoter and also via other transcription factors by an as yet undefined mechanism. PMID:22750226

  6. Targeting C-reactive protein for the treatment of cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepys, Mark B.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Tennent, Glenys A.; Ruth Gallimore, J.; Kahan, Melvyn C.; Bellotti, Vittorio; Hawkins, Philip N.; Myers, Rebecca M.; Smith, Martin D.; Polara, Alessandra; Cobb, Alexander J. A.; Ley, Steven V.; Andrew Aquilina, J.; Robinson, Carol V.; Sharif, Isam; Gray, Gillian A.; Sabin, Caroline A.; Jenvey, Michelle C.; Kolstoe, Simon E.; Thompson, Darren; Wood, Stephen P.

    2006-04-01

    Complement-mediated inflammation exacerbates the tissue injury of ischaemic necrosis in heart attacks and strokes, the most common causes of death in developed countries. Large infarct size increases immediate morbidity and mortality and, in survivors of the acute event, larger non-functional scars adversely affect long-term prognosis. There is thus an important unmet medical need for new cardioprotective and neuroprotective treatments. We have previously shown that human C-reactive protein (CRP), the classical acute-phase protein that binds to ligands exposed in damaged tissue and then activates complement, increases myocardial and cerebral infarct size in rats subjected to coronary or cerebral artery ligation, respectively. Rat CRP does not activate rat complement, whereas human CRP activates both rat and human complement. Administration of human CRP to rats is thus an excellent model for the actions of endogenous human CRP. Here we report the design, synthesis and efficacy of 1,6-bis(phosphocholine)-hexane as a specific small-molecule inhibitor of CRP. Five molecules of this palindromic compound are bound by two pentameric CRP molecules, crosslinking and occluding the ligand-binding B-face of CRP and blocking its functions. Administration of 1,6-bis(phosphocholine)-hexane to rats undergoing acute myocardial infarction abrogated the increase in infarct size and cardiac dysfunction produced by injection of human CRP. Therapeutic inhibition of CRP is thus a promising new approach to cardioprotection in acute myocardial infarction, and may also provide neuroprotection in stroke. Potential wider applications include other inflammatory, infective and tissue-damaging conditions characterized by increased CRP production, in which binding of CRP to exposed ligands in damaged cells may lead to complement-mediated exacerbation of tissue injury.

  7. Value of procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, and neopterin in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Lacoma

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Alicia Lacoma1,4, Cristina Prat1,4, Felipe Andreo2,4, Luis Lores3, Juan Ruiz-Manzano2,4, Vicente Ausina1,4, Jose Domínguez1,41Servei de Microbiologia, 2Servei de Pneumologia, Hospital Universitari Germans Trias i Pujol, Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Badalona, Spain; 3Servei de Pneumologia, Hospital de Sant Boi, Sant Boi de Llobregat, Spain; 4CIBER Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, SpainObjective: The identification of biological markers in order to assess different aspects of COPD is an area of growing interest. The objective of this study was to investigate whether levels of procalcitonin (PCT, C-reactive protein (CRP, and neopterin in COPD patients could be useful in identifying the etiological origin of the exacerbation and assessing its prognosis.Methods: We included 318 consecutive COPD patients: 46 in a stable phase, 217 undergoing an exacerbation, and 55 with pneumonia. A serum sample was collected from each patient at the time of being included in the study. A second sample was also collected 1 month later from 23 patients in the exacerbation group. We compared the characteristics, biomarker levels, microbiological findings, and prognosis in each patient group. PCT and CRP were measured using an immunofluorescence assay. Neopterin levels were measured using a competitive immunoassay.Results: PCT and CRP showed significant differences among the three patient groups, being higher in patients with pneumonia, followed by patients with exacerbation (P < 0.0001. For the 23 patients with paired samples, PCT and CRP levels decreased 1 month after the exacerbation episode, while neopterin increased. Neopterin showed significantly lower levels in exacerbations with isolation of pathogenic bacteria, but no differences were found for PCT and CRP. No significant differences were found when comparing biomarker levels

  8. Serum C-reactive protein concentrations in healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Valerie M; Kidney, Beverly A; Snead, Elisabeth C R; Myers, Sherry L; Jackson, Marion L

    2011-09-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a sensitive marker for inflammation in people and dogs. In people, an association between CRP concentration and atherosclerosis has been reported. Atherosclerosis is rare in dogs, but the Miniature Schnauzer breed may be at increased risk for developing this vascular disease. It is not known if CRP concentrations in Miniature Schnauzer dogs differ from those in other dog breeds. Our objectives were to validate an automated human CRP assay for measuring CRP in dogs and compare CRP concentrations in healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs with those in non-Miniature Schnauzer breeds. Sera from 37 non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs with inflammatory disease were pooled and used to validate a human CRP immunoturbidimetric assay for measuring canine CRP. Blood was collected from 20 healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs and 41 healthy dogs of other breeds. Median serum CRP concentration of healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs was compared with that of healthy non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs. The human CRP assay measured CRP reliably with linearity between 0 and 20 mg/L. CRP concentration for healthy Miniature Schnauzer dogs (median 4.0 mg/L, minimum-maximum 0-18.2 mg/L) was significantly higher than for the healthy non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs (median 0.1 mg/L, minimum-maximum 0-10.7 mg/L); 17 of the 20 Miniature Schnauzer dogs had values that overlapped with those of the non-Miniature Schnauzer dogs. Median CRP concentration of Miniature Schnauzer dogs was slightly higher than that of other breeds of dogs. A relationship between higher CRP concentration in Miniature Schnauzer dogs and idiopathic hyperlipidemia, pancreatitis, and possible increased risk for atherosclerosis remains to be determined. ©2011 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  9. Exploratory Cohort Study of Associations between Serum C - Reactive Protein and Fatigue after Stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simiao Wu

    Full Text Available Post-stroke fatigue is a common and distressing problem but little is known about its biological mechanisms. This cohort study was to investigate associations between C-reactive protein (CRP and fatigue after stroke.Patients were assessed at one, six and 12 months after their stroke onset, with the Fatigue Assessment Scale, a case definition of post-stroke fatigue, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and daily step counts. Blood samples were collected at each assessment and the CRP level was determined by a standard CRP immunoassay. Cross-sectional associations between CRP and fatigue at each time point were determined by Pearson correlation coefficient and independent-samples t-test. Whether CRP levels at one month predict fatigue scores at six and 12 months was explored by multiple linear regression, with anxiety, depression, and daily step counts as covariates.Sixty-five patients (mean age 67 years, 65% men were included: 61 at one month, 49 at six months, and 41 at 12 months. CRP levels and fatigue scores were not associated at one month (p = 0.88 or 12 months (p = 0.56, but weakly associated at six months (r = 0.27, p = 0.04; however, this association was no longer significant (p = 0.14 after controlling for the effects of covariates. The CRP level was not associated with the fulfilment of case definition of post-stroke fatigue at any time points (all p > 0.05. The CRP level at one month was not a significant predictor for fatigue levels at either six months (p = 0.93 or 12 months (p = 0.78.There is insufficient evidence for the association between CRP and PSF in stroke patients. Future studies with larger sample sizes and controlling for potential confounders are needed to investigate whether this association exists.

  10. Socioeconomic status discrimination and C-reactive protein in African-American and White adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Miriam E; Vaccarino, Viola; Dunbar, Sandra B; Pemu, Priscilla; Gibbons, Gary H; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Lewis, Tené T

    2017-08-01

    We examined the association between socioeconomic status (SES) discrimination and C-reactive protein (CRP) in a biracial cohort of middle-aged adults using an intersectionality framework. Participants were 401 African-American and White adults from a population-based cohort in the Southeastern United States. SES discrimination was self-reported with a modified Experiences of Discrimination Scale, and CRP levels were assayed from blood samples. Linear regression analyses were used to examine the associations among SES discrimination, race, education, and CRP after controlling for age, gender, racial and gender discrimination, financial and general stress, body mass index, smoking, sleep quality, and depressive symptoms. Intersectional effects were tested using race×SES discrimination, education×SES discrimination and race×education×SES discrimination interactions. Adjusting for sociodemographics, racial discrimination, gender discrimination, and all relevant two-way interaction terms, we observed a significant race×education×SES discrimination interaction (p=0.019). In adjusted models stratified by race and education, SES discrimination was associated with elevated CRP among higher educated African-Americans (β=0.29, p=0.018), but not lower educated African-Americans (β=-0.13, p=0.32); or lower educated (β=-0.02, p=0.92) or higher educated (β=-0.01, p=0.90) Whites. Findings support the relevance of SES discrimination as an important discriminatory stressor for CRP specifically among higher educated African-Americans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative evaluation of postmortem serum concentrations of neopterin and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takaki; Hamel, Marianne; Zhu, Bao-Li; Li, Dong-Ri; Zhao, Dong; Michiue, Tomomi; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2008-08-06

    The cellular immune response is accompanied by the release of neopterin. The level of neopterin in serum is increased in patients suffering from viral infections, autoimmune diseases, systemic inflammation, allograft rejection and malignant diseases, while that of C-reactive protein (CRP) is known to rise during inflammatory diseases and traumas. To investigate postmortem neopterin and CRP concentrations with regard to the cause of death, we examined cardiac and peripheral blood samples in 474 autopsy cases without advanced decomposition (0-96 years of age, 343 males and 131 females), 2.8 h to 3 days (median, 18.0 h) after death. Survival time was 0.1 h to 5 months (median, 3.0 h) for traumatic death, and 0.1-1, 440 h (median, 2.5 h) for natural death. In autopsied subjects, neopterin concentrations were higher than the clinical reference, independent of the time after death, and depended on the survival time. In cases of acute and subacute death due to trauma, the neopterin level in right heart blood was mildly to moderately elevated (about 50-200 nmol/l) except for sharp instrument injury, whereas the CRP concentration usually remained low (in the CRP level (around 1-10 mg/dl) was observed in fatal cases of hypothermia (cold exposure). Markedly elevated serum CRP and neopterin levels (>10 mg/dl and >500 nmol/l, respectively) were detected in cases of delayed death due to trauma involving systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and of fatal bacterial infections. For sepsis, the serum CRP level was markedly elevated but the neopterin level was low in some cases. Fatal viral infections usually resulted in a marked elevation in the serum neopterin level (>500 nmol/l) with a mild to moderate rise in the CRP level. Combined analyses of neopterin and CRP may be useful to investigate viral infections and delayed traumatic death involving SIRS to support pathological findings.

  12. [Septic arthritis in children with normal initial C-reactive protein: clinical and biological features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basmaci, R; Ilharreborde, B; Bonacorsi, S; Kahil, M; Mallet, C; Aupiais, C; Doit, C; Dugué, S; Lorrot, M

    2014-11-01

    Septic arthritis has to be suspected in children with joint effusion and fever so as to perform joint aspiration, which will confirm the diagnosis by bacteriological methods, and to perform surgical treatment by joint lavage. Since development of current molecular methods, such as real-time PCR, Kingella kingae has become the first microbial agent of osteoarticular infections in young children, whereas Staphylococcus aureus is second. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an aid used to diagnose septic arthritis, but its elevation could be moderate. In a previous study, conducted at our hospital, 10% of children hospitalized for S. aureus or K. kingae septic arthritis had a CRP levelseptic arthritis could be made by other parameters, we analyzed the clinical and biologic features of these patients and compared them to those of children hospitalized for septic arthritis with initial CRP ≥10 mg/L. Among the 89 children with septic arthritis, 10% (n=9) had initial CRPseptic arthritis had no fever, CRP elevation, or fibrinogen elevation. In the CRP-negative group, three of four children with S. aureus arthritis and one of five with K. kingae arthritis had a high CRP level (34, 40, 61, and 13 mg/L, respectively) 3 days after surgery and antibiotic treatment. One child with K. kingae septic arthritis and initial CRParthritis. In the S. aureus arthritis group, none of the children with initial CRP10 mg/L during septic arthritis in children, it could be negative in up to 20% of patients in different studies. However, a mild inflammatory syndrome or even a CRPseptic arthritis. Therefore, a first episode of monoarthritis in children has to be considered as septic arthritis and treatment should not be delayed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. C-reactive protein in patients with Guillain Barré syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chetana Vaishnavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: C-reactive protein (CRP is an acute phase reactant, widely used as a biomarker for various infectious and inflammatory conditions. Guillain-Barrι syndrome (GBS is an acute, autoimmune, polyradiculoneuropathy, triggered by infectious agents such as Campylobacter jejuni. GBS is generally precipitated 1-3 weeks following C. jejuni infection which suggests a humoral immunopathogenic mechanism. Aims: Basal CRP levels were estimated in sera of patients with GBS and compared with adequate controls. Settings & Design: The study population was divided into 4 groups: (i GBS group included 45 newly diagnosed GBS patients; (ii Neurological control (NC group comprised of 59 patients with non-paralytic neurological symptoms/disorders; (iii Non-neurological controls (NNC comprised of 43 patients having no neurological symptoms and (iv Healthy controls (HC comprised of 101 healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: CRP was evaluated using slide latex agglutination test (LAT and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Statistical Analysis: Statistical analysis was done by the Chi-square test. Results: CRP by LAT was positive in 24.4% GBS group, 34% NC group and 44% NNC group. The range of titer in CRP positive samples in the three patient groups (GBS, NC, NNC was at concentration of 0.6 mg/dl to 19.2 mg/dl. Similar results were also obtained by ELISA in the patient groups. None of the HC subjects was positive for detectable levels of CRP. High basal level of CRP was detected in patients with GBS. Conclusion: Autoimmune conditions like GBS can stimulate the production of a high level of inflammation resulting in an increase in the CRP production.

  14. Fluctuations in C-reactive protein concentration and neutrophil activation during normal human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belo, Luís; Santos-Silva, Alice; Rocha, Susana; Caslake, Muriel; Cooney, Josephine; Pereira-Leite, Luís; Quintanilha, Alexandre; Rebelo, Irene

    2005-11-01

    To clarify the changes in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels and in the neutrophil activation state during normal human pregnancy. A longitudinal study (n=23) was performed during the three trimesters of pregnancy; a group of non-pregnant women (n=24) was used as control. Total and differential leukocyte count, serum concentration of CRP and plasma levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and of lactoferrin and elastase (two indirect markers of neutrophil activation) were measured. Pregnancy imposed an inflammatory response in the mother, observed by the significant increment in total white blood cell (WBC) and neutrophil counts and in the circulating levels of CRP, GM-CSF and lactoferrin, in all trimesters of gestation compared with non-pregnant controls. Plasma elastase concentration was also significantly higher in pregnant women, but only in the first trimester of gestation. Regarding the ratios of lactoferrin and elastase per neutrophil, they were significantly lower in pregnant women (all trimesters). During gestation, WBC and neutrophil count increased significantly from the first to the second trimester and remained high in the third period. In contrast, the ratios of lactoferrin and elastase per neutrophil decreased significantly from the first to the second trimester, remaining low in the last trimester. Concerning CRP levels, no consistent changes were observed throughout gestation; 12 cases (52.2%) presented fluctuations, whereas 7 (30.4%) showed progressive reductions and 4 (17.4%) progressive increments throughout pregnancy. Changes in CRP levels vary in a wide manner between subjects along pregnancy, even though median values are consistently elevated throughout pregnancy. Moreover, circulating levels of neutrophil-activation products are higher in normal human gestation.

  15. H-Type Hypertension and C Reactive Protein in Recurrence of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension with high homocysteine (HHcy (H-type hypertension and C reactive protein (CRP can increase the incidence of ischemic stroke. However, it is not clear whether recurrent ischemic stroke (RIS is related to H-type hypertension and CRP. The present study investigated the correlation of H-type hypertension and CRP level with RIS. Totally, 987 consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke were recruited in a teaching hospital in Henan province, China during March 2014 to March 2015. The demographic and clinical characteristics and blood biochemical parameters of patients were analyzed. Elevated levels of CRP and homocysteine (Hcy were defined as >8.2 mg/L and 10 μmol/L, respectively. Among the 987 patients, 234 were RIS. Thirty-eight percent of RIS patients had elevated CRP level and 91.5% of RIS patients had HHcy. In multivariate analysis, adjusted odds ratio (OR of RIS in patients aged ≥60 years was 1.576 (95% CI: 1.125–2.207, in male patients 1.935 (95% CI: 1.385–2.704, in patients with diabetes 1.463 (95% CI: 1.037–2.064, CRP levels 1.013 (95% CI: 1.006–1.019, simple hypertension 3.370 (95% CI: 1.15–10.183, and H-type hypertension 2.990 (95% CI: 1.176–7.600. RIS was associated with older age, male, diabetes, H-type hypertension and CRP. Controlling H-type hypertension and CRP level may reduce the risk of RIS.

  16. Accuracy of symptoms, signs, and C-reactive protein for early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekhuizen, Berna DL; Sachs, Alfred PE; Verheij, Theo J; Janssen, Kristel JM; Asma, Gerard; Lammers, Jan-Willem J; Hage, René; Lammers, Ernst; Hoes, Arno W; Moons, Karel G

    2012-01-01

    Background Guidelines recommend detection of early chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but evidence on the diagnostic work-up for COPD only concerns advanced and established COPD. Aim To quantify the accuracy of symptoms and signs for early COPD, and the added value of C-reactive protein (CRP), in primary care patients presenting with cough. Design and setting Cross-sectional diagnostic study of 73 primary care practices in the Netherlands Method Four hundred primary care patients (182 males, mean age 63 years) older than 50 years, presenting with persistent cough (>14 days) without established COPD participated, of whom 382 completed the study. They underwent a systematic diagnostic work-up of symptoms, signs, conventional laboratory CRP level, and hospital lung functions tests, including body plethysmography, and an expert panel decided whether COPD was present (reference test). The independent value of all items was estimated by multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results According to the expert panel, 118 patients had COPD (30%). Symptoms and signs with independent diagnostic value were age, sex, current smoking, smoking more than 20 pack-years, cardiovascular comorbidity, wheezing complaints, diminished breath sounds, and wheezing on auscultation. Combining these items resulted in an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC area) of 0.79 (95% confidence interval = 0.74 to 0.83) after internal validation. The proportion of subjects with elevated CRP was higher in those with early COPD, but CRP added no relevant diagnostic information above symptoms and signs. Conclusion In subjects presenting with persistent cough, the CRP level has no added value for detection of early COPD. PMID:22947584

  17. C-reactive protein and homocysteine predict long-term mortality in young ischemic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naess, Halvor; Nyland, Harald; Idicula, Titto; Waje-Andreassen, Ulrike

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) and homocysteine on follow-up and subsequent mortality in young ischemic stroke patients in a population-based study. Young ischemic stroke patients were followed-up on average 6 years after the index stroke. CRP and homocysteine levels were measured and risk factors were recorded, including myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, smoking, alcoholism, and cancer. Stroke outcome was measured using the modified Rankin Scale score. Subsequent survival was obtained by examining the official population registry. Cox regression analyses were performed. In total, 198 patients were included in this study (82 [41%] women and 116 [59%] men). The mean age on follow-up was 47.8 years. In total, 36 (18.2%) patients died during the subsequent mean follow-up of 12.4 years. Cox regression analysis revealed that mortality was associated with CRP (hazard ratio [HR] 1.05; P=.001) and homocysteine levels (HR 1.04; P=.02) in patients without dissection. Kaplan-Meier curves grouped by dichotomized CRP (CRP≤1 v >1 mg/L) showed increasing separation between the survival curves, and likewise for dichotomized homocysteine (≤9 v >9 μg/L). There is an independent association between CRP and homocysteine levels obtained several years after ischemic stroke in young adults and subsequent mortality, even when adjusting for traditional risk factors. This association seems to continue for at least 12 years after the measurements. Copyright © 2013 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Serum C-reactive protein concentration and genotype in relation to ischemic stroke subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladenvall, Claes; Jood, Katarina; Blomstrand, Christian; Nilsson, Staffan; Jern, Christina; Ladenvall, Per

    2006-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has evolved as an inflammatory risk marker of cardiovascular disease. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the CRP locus have been found to be associated with CRP levels. The aim of the present study was to investigate CRP levels and genetic variants in etiological subtypes of ischemic stroke. The Sahlgrenska Academy Study on Ischemic Stroke (SAHLSIS) comprises 600 consecutive ischemic stroke cases (18 to 69 years) and 600 matched controls from western Sweden. Stroke subtypes were defined by the TOAST classification. Serum CRP levels were determined by a high-sensitivity immunometric assay. CRP levels were significantly higher for all ischemic stroke subtypes compared with controls, both in the acute phase and at the 3-month follow-up. After adjustment for traditional risk factors, CRP at follow-up was related to higher odds ratios (ORs) of overall ischemic stroke (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.09 to 1.43) and large-vessel disease (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.09 to 2.00). The CRP -286C>T>A, 1059G>C, and 1444C>T single-nucleotide polymorphisms showed significant associations with CRP levels. However, neither CRP genotypes nor haplotypes showed an association to overall ischemic stroke. This is the first large study on CRP in different TOAST subtypes in a young ischemic stroke population. CRP levels differed between etiological subtypes of ischemic stroke both in the acute phase and at the 3-month follow-up. CRP at follow-up was associated with overall ischemic stroke and the large-vessel disease subtype. Genetic variants at the CRP locus were associated with CRP levels, but no association was detected for overall ischemic stroke.

  19. Sixteen weeks of exercise reduces C-reactive protein levels in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, Andrea Y; Thomas, William; Schmitz, Kathryn H; Kurzer, Mindy S

    2011-06-01

    Regular exercise has been shown to protect against breast cancer risk, and one possible mechanism is through a reduction in inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 16 wk of aerobic exercise training on adipokines and inflammatory markers in healthy young women. Participants were 319 sedentary women aged 18-30 yr, with body mass index of 18-40 kg · m, randomized to an exercise intervention or no exercise for approximately 16 wk. Adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and amyloid A (AA) were measured at baseline and after 16 wk. Adiponectin was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and AA, CRP, and leptin were measured by multiplex bead array assays. Exercise significantly decreased CRP levels in the exercise group compared with the control group (-1.41 mg · L in exercisers vs -0.005 mg · L in controls, P = 0.040), and this effect was largely driven by changes in CRP that occurred in the obese exercisers. There was no effect of exercise on levels of SAA, adiponectin, or leptin. There was also no effect of exercise on stress and depression scores. Neither change in percent body fat nor change in fitness influenced the effects of exercise on these inflammatory markers. This study demonstrated that a 16-wk aerobic exercise program significantly decreased levels of CRP in young women, especially in those who were obese. There was no evidence that this effect was mediated by changes in perceived stress, percent body fat, or fitness. These findings suggest that adopting an exercise routine early in life may decrease future risk of breast cancer and other chronic diseases in obese women.

  20. Does C-reactive Protein Add Prognostic Value to GRACE Score in Acute Coronary Syndromes?

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    Correia, Luis Cláudio Lemos; Vasconcelos, Isis; Garcia, Guilherme; Kalil, Felipe; Ferreira, Felipe; Silva, André; Oliveira, Ruan; Carvalhal, Manuela; Freitas, Caio; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia Maria

    2014-01-01

    The incremental prognostic value of plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to GRACE score has not been established in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with non-ST segment elevation. To test the hypothesis that CRP measurements at admission increases the prognostic value of GRACE score in patients with ACS. A total of 290 subjects, consecutively admitted for ACS, with plasma material obtained upon admission CRP measurement using a high-sensitivity method (nephelometry) were studied. Cardiovascular outcomes during hospitalization were defined by the combination of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction or nonfatal refractory angina. The incidence of cardiovascular events during hospitalization was 15% (18 deaths, 11 myocardial infarctions, 13 angina episodes) with CRP showing C-statistics of 0.60 (95% CI = 0.51-0.70, p = 0.034) in predicting these outcomes. After adjustment for the GRACE score, elevated CRP (defined as the best cutoff point) tended to be associated with hospital events (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 0.92 to 3.88, p = 0.08). However, the addition of the variable elevated CRP in the GRACE model did not result in significant increase in C-statistics, which ranged from 0.705 to 0.718 (p = 0.46). Similarly, there was no significant reclassification of risk with the addition of CRP in the predictor model (net reclassification = 5.7 %, p = 0.15). Although CRP is associated with hospital outcomes, this inflammatory marker does not increase the prognostic value of the GRACE score

  1. Does C-reactive Protein Add Prognostic Value to GRACE Score in Acute Coronary Syndromes?

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    Correia, Luis Cláudio Lemos, E-mail: lccorreia@terra.com.br; Vasconcelos, Isis; Garcia, Guilherme; Kalil, Felipe; Ferreira, Felipe; Silva, André; Oliveira, Ruan; Carvalhal, Manuela; Freitas, Caio; Noya-Rabelo, Márcia Maria [Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Hospital São Rafael, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The incremental prognostic value of plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in relation to GRACE score has not been established in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) with non-ST segment elevation. To test the hypothesis that CRP measurements at admission increases the prognostic value of GRACE score in patients with ACS. A total of 290 subjects, consecutively admitted for ACS, with plasma material obtained upon admission CRP measurement using a high-sensitivity method (nephelometry) were studied. Cardiovascular outcomes during hospitalization were defined by the combination of death, nonfatal myocardial infarction or nonfatal refractory angina. The incidence of cardiovascular events during hospitalization was 15% (18 deaths, 11 myocardial infarctions, 13 angina episodes) with CRP showing C-statistics of 0.60 (95% CI = 0.51-0.70, p = 0.034) in predicting these outcomes. After adjustment for the GRACE score, elevated CRP (defined as the best cutoff point) tended to be associated with hospital events (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 0.92 to 3.88, p = 0.08). However, the addition of the variable elevated CRP in the GRACE model did not result in significant increase in C-statistics, which ranged from 0.705 to 0.718 (p = 0.46). Similarly, there was no significant reclassification of risk with the addition of CRP in the predictor model (net reclassification = 5.7 %, p = 0.15). Although CRP is associated with hospital outcomes, this inflammatory marker does not increase the prognostic value of the GRACE score.

  2. C-reactive protein variability is associated with vascular access outcome in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wei-Hung; Lee, Yueh-Ting; Ng, Hwee-Yeong; Wang, Chun-Yeh; Wu, Chien-Hsing; Lee, Chien-Te

    2018-01-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) vascular access failure is one of the most important causes of morbidity and contributes to the cost of dialysis care. There is paucity of data evaluating long-term monitoring of C-reactive protein (CRP) on outcome of HD vascular access. We conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether variability of serum CRP level was associated with vascular access failure rate over a 7-year period. A total of 318 HD patients were included. Their demographic data, co-morbidities and biochemical data were reviewed and collected. Serum high-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) level was measured every 6 months. Patients were divided into three groups according to their serial hs-CRP levels. Patients with their hs-CRP below 2 mg/L were defined as low group (n=65, 20.4%) and those with higher than 4 mg/L were defined as high (n=39, 12.3%). The rest were classified as fluctuated hs-CRP group (n=214, 67.3%). Treatment of vascular access failure includes angioplasty and access re-creation. Their body mass index, indicators of dialysis adequacy and serum albumin and hs-CRP levels differed significantly among three groups. The annual vascular access failure rate was significantly higher in fluctuated hs-CRP group than in high hs-CRP group (0.41 vs 0.36, P=.037). Serum albumin was a significant associate of vascular access failure. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated patients with high or fluctuated hs-CRP had shorter free interval of vascular access failure than low hs-CRP group. HD patients with fluctuated hs-CRP levels were associated with increased vascular access failure. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Prediction of the Grade of Acute Cholecystitis by Plasma Level of C-Reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabul Gurbulak, Esin; Gurbulak, Bunyamin; Akgun, Ismail Ethem; Duzkoylu, Yigit; Battal, Muharrem; Fevzi Celayir, Mustafa; Demir, Uygar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute cholecystitis is the most common complication of gallbladder stones. Today, Tokyo guidelines criteria are recommended for diagnosis, grading, and management of acute cholecystitis. Objectives: We aimed to evaluate the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) at different cut-off values to predict the severity of the disease and its possible role in grading the disease with regard to the guideline. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective study, analyzing 682 cases out of consecutive 892 patients with acute cholecystitis admitted to two different general surgery clinics in Istanbul, Turkey. Records of patients diagnosed with acute cholecystitis were screened retrospectively from the hospital computer database between January 2011 and July 2014. A total of 210 patients with concomitant diseases causing high CRP levels were excluded from the study. The criteria of Tokyo guidelines were used in grading the severity of acute cholecystitis, and patients were divided into 3 groups. CRP values at the time of admission were analyzed and compared among the groups. Results: Mean CRP levels of groups were found to be significantly different, 18.96 mg/L in Group I, 133.51 mg/L in Group II, and 237.23 mg/L in Group III (P < 0.001). Having examined CRP values among the groups, they were found to be highly and significantly correlated with the disease grade (P < 0.0001). After evaluating CRP levels according to the grade of the disease, group 2 was distinguished from group 1 with a cut-off CRP level of 70.65 mg/L, and from group 3 with a value of 198.95 mg/L. Those results were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.001). Conclusions: CRP, a well-known acute phase reactant that increases rapidly in various inflammatory processes, can be accepted as a strong predictor in classifying different grades of the disease, and treatment can be reliably planned according to this classification. PMID:26023353

  4. The Prognostic Value of C-Reactive Protein Serum Levels in Patients with Uterine Leiomyosarcoma.

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    Richard Schwameis

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP has previously been shown to serve as a prognostic parameter in women with gynecologic malignancies. Due to the lack of valid prognostic markers for uterine leiomyosarcoma (ULMS this study set out to investigate the value of pre-treatment CRP serum levels as prognostic parameter.Data of women with ULMS were extracted from databases of three Austrian centres for gynaecologic oncology. Pre-treatment CRP serum levels were measured and correlated with clinico-pathological parameters. Univariate and multivariable survival analyses were performed.In total, 53 patients with ULMS were included into the analysis. Mean (SD CRP serum level was 3.46 mg/dL (3.96. Solely, an association between pre-treatment CRP serum levels and tumor size (p = 0.04 but no other clinic-pathologic parameter such as tumor stage (p = 0.16, or histological grade (p = 0.07, was observed. Univariate and multivariable survival analyses revealed that CRP serum levels (HR 2.7 [1.1-7.2], p = 0.037 and tumor stage (HR 6.1 [1.9-19.5], p = 0.002 were the only independent prognostic factors for overall survival (OS in patients with ULMS. Patients with high pre-treatment CRP serum levels showed impaired OS compared to women with low levels (5-year-OS rates: 22.6% and 52.3%, p = 0.007.High pre-treatment CRP serum levels were independently associated with impaired prognosis in women with ULMS and might serve as a prognostic parameter in these patients.

  5. Correlates of High Serum C-Reactive Protein Levels in a Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglan Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Individuals from low socioeconomic backgrounds are disproportionately affected by the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD, yet data regarding risk factors in this population are lacking, particularly regarding emerging biomarkers of CVD such as C-reactive protein (CRP. We measured high-sensitivity CRP and examined its association with demographic and lifestyle factors in a sample of 792 participants aged 40–79 years from the Southern Community Cohort Study, which has an over-representation of socioeconomically disadvantaged individuals (over 60% with a total annual household income 3 mg/L varied significantly by sex, race, smoking status, and body mass index (BMI. The multivariable-adjusted prevalence odds ratios (ORs (95% CIs for having elevated CRP were 1.6 (1.1–2.3 for women vs. men, 1.4 (0.9–2.0 for African Americans vs. whites, 2.3 (1.4–3.8 for African American women vs. white men, 1.8 (1.2–2.7 for current smokers vs. non-smokers, and 4.2 (2.7–6.6 for obese (BMI 30.0–44.9 kg/m2 vs. healthy-weight (BMI 18.3–24.9 kg/m2 participants. Further stratified analyses revealed that the association between BMI and elevated CRP was stronger among African Americans than whites and women than men, with prevalence ORs (95% CI comparing obese vs. healthy-weight categories reaching 22.8 (7.1–73.8 for African American women. In conclusion, in this socioeconomically disadvantaged population, sex, race, smoking, and BMI were associated with elevated CRP. Moreover, inflammatory response to obesity differed by race and sex, which may contribute to CVD disparities.

  6. Moderate, but not vigorous, intensity exercise training reduces C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Michael V; Hathaway, Elizabeth D; Higgins, Simon; Forehand, Ronald L; Schmidt, Michael D; Evans, Ellen M

    2017-08-28

    Sprint interval cycle training is a contemporary popular mode of training but its relative efficacy, under conditions of matched energy expenditure, to reduce risk factors for cardiometabolic disease is incompletely characterised, especially in young women. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relative efficacy of six weeks of moderate-intensity cycling (MOD-C) and vigorous sprint-interval cycling (VIG-SIC) on lipid profile, insulin (INS) and insulin resistance using the homeostatic model assessment (HOMA-IR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in inactive, overweight/obese (OW/OB) young women. Participants (BMI ≥25 kg/m 2 , waist circumference ≥88 cm) were randomly assigned to MOD-C (20-30 min at 60-70% of heart rate reserve(HRR)) or VIG-SIC (5-7 repeated bouts 30-second maximal effort sprints, followed by four minutes of active recovery) supervised training three days/week for six weeks, with each group matched on energy expenditure. Adiposity (%Fat) was measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry. Forty-four participants (20.4 ± 1.6 years, 65.9% Caucasian, 29.8 ± 4.1 kg/m 2 ) were included in the analysis. The improvement in CRP observed in the MOD-C group was larger than the VIG-C group (p = .034). Overall, high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL-C) levels improved following training (p  .05). These results indicate MOD-C training may be more effective in reducing CRP than VIG-SIC.

  7. The relationship between C-reactive protein rs3091244 polymorphism and ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbal, Ayla; Reşorlu, Hatice; Gökmen, Ferhat; Savaş, Yılmaz; Zateri, Çoşkun; Sargin, Betül; Bozkurt, Emre; Sılan, Fatma; Özdemir, Öztürk

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that C-reactive protein (CRP) gene polymorphism can be related to inflammatory changes. The present study aimed to examine the association between CRP gene polymorphism and clinical and laboratory findings in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients. A total of 80 patients, 40 with AS and 40 controls, were included in the study. Diagnosis of AS was made according to Assessment in AS International Working Group criteria. Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Radiology Index scores were evaluated. CRP gene C, A and T alleles were evaluated and were determined using the analysis of melting curves after real time polymerase chain reaction. The odds ratios were calculated for all alleles and haploids of the CRP gene. We investigated the relationship between the CRP polymorphism and clinical and laboratory findings. A, C, T allele frequencies in the control group were 15%, 57.5% and 27.5%. The allele frequencies in the AS group were 38%, 68.8% and 26.2%. While C and T allele frequencies were shown to be similar in the two groups, A allele frequency was higher in the AS group compared to the control group. The CC wild allele was 42.5% in the control group and 47.5% in the AS group (P = 1.0). Odds ratios for the C allele were 1.6, for the CC haploid 1.2 and for the CT haploid 3.7. Chest expansion and finger-to-ground distance was better in the CRP gene polymorphism group compared to the no polymorphism group. The presence of the CRP gene CC wild haploid and C allele in patients may indicate an increased risk for AS. © 2015 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. C-reactive protein is independently associated with coronary atherosclerosis burden among octogenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaglia, Luiz A; Freitas, Wladimir; Soares, Alexandre A; Santos, Raul A; Nadruz, Wilson; Blaha, Michael; Coelho, Otavio R; Blumenthal, Roger; Agatston, Arthur; Nasir, Khurram; Sposito, Andrei C

    2014-02-01

    In contrast to the general population, individuals with primarily persistent elevation of inflammatory activity display a significant association between inflammatory biomarkers and atherosclerotic burden. In older individuals, immunosenescence upregulates the innate response and, by this way, may hypothetically favor the presence of this association. The aim of this study was to evaluate this hypothesis in healthy octogenarians. Participants (n = 208) aged 80 years or older, asymptomatic and without medical and laboratory evidence of chronic diseases or use of anti-inflammatory treatments were included in the study. Lipid profile and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured at baseline and cardiac computed tomography was performed within 1-week interval for measuring coronary calcium score (CCS). The median plasma CRP was 1.9 mg/L (1.0–3.4) and 33 % of the participants had elevated CRP defined as C3 mg/L. Among those with high CRP, there was an increased frequency of high CCS (C100) as compared with their counterparts (71 vs 50 %, p = 0.001). The association between CRP and CCS persisted even after adjustment for age, sex, cardiovascular risk factors and statin therapy. The area under the receiver-operating curve for CRP was 0.606 using CCS C100 as a binary outcome. The sensitivities for CCS C100 were 40 and 74 % for the cutoff points of CRP C3 or 1 mg/L, respectively. The present study was able to confirm that in very elderly individuals, systemic inflammatory activity is independently associated with coronary atherosclerosis burden.

  9. Adiponectin and C - reactive protein Relationship in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: Relation to Cardiovascular Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shousha, M.A.; Soliman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), one of the most common reproductive abnormalities, shares some components of the metabolic cardiovascular syndrome. Therefore, PCOS patients may represent the largest group of women at high risk for the development of early-onset cardiovascular disease (CVD) and/or diabetes. The adipokine, adiponectin inhibits vascular inflammation and acts as an endogenous modulator of obesity - linked diseases. High - sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is recently debated as a risk factor and mediator for atherosclerosis. The objective of this study was to investigate the relation between adiponectin and hs- CRP in The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and to identify their relation to Cardiovascular Disease. Adiponectin and hs- CRP measurements were undertaken in 90 PCOS patients and 70 body mass index-matched controls with regular menstrual cycles. Whereas 36.8% of the PCOS patients had CRP levels above 5 mg/liter, only 9.6% of the controls exhibited high CRP levels (P < 0.001). The mean ± SD was 5.46 ± 7.0 in the PCOS group vs. 2.04 ± 1.9 mg/liter in the control (P < 0.001). The body mass index, white blood cell count, TSH, glucose, cholesterol, and homocysteine levels were not significantly different between the two groups. CRP levels are elevated in patients with PCOS and may be a marker of early cardiovascular risk in these patients. The plasma adiponectin levels being significantly lower in these patients. These results suggest that elevation of CRP and reduction of adiponectin could emerge as mediators of atherogenesis and insulin resistance. (author)

  10. Effect of dietary patterns on serum C-reactive protein level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y; Kang, D; Lee, S-A

    2014-09-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of inflammation which has been shown in multiple prospective epidemiological studies to predict the risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Dietary patterns may influence the risk of diseases through the effects of CRP on inflammation. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of dietary patterns with CRP in blood, taking into consideration gender and blood pressure. The present cross-sectional analysis included 7574 participants from a large, population-based study of middle-aged Koreans. Four dietary patterns, including 'fruit', 'vegetable', 'meat' and 'coffee', were derived using factor analysis. Multiple linear regressions were used to evaluate the association between dietary patterns and CRP after adjusting for age, sex, education, waist circumference, smoke status and alcohol consumption. We found that the 'vegetable' pattern was inversely associated with CRP (Ptrend = 0.01). The adjusted mean CRP was 0.04 mg/dl lower (95% CI -0.07, -0.01) for subjects in the highest quartile of the 'vegetable' pattern compared with those in the lowest quartile. This inverse association was more pronounced in men with hypertensive blood; CRP concentrations across increasing quartile categories of the 'vegetable' pattern score were 0.1, 0.14, and 0.15 mg/dl reduction compared to the 1st quartile (the lowest quartile) (Ptrend = 0.04, Plinearity = 0.02). The inverse association of the 'vegetable' pattern with CRP was assessed, and the association appeared to be more predominant in men with hypertensive blood pressure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and elevated C-reactive protein levels in elderly patients with newly diagnosed depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soyeon; Joo, Yeon Ho; McIntyre, Roger S; Kim, Byungsu

    2014-01-01

    Depression and metabolic syndrome (MeS) are prevalent in elderly people and are associated with adverse outcomes, especially cardiovascular disease. Increased C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are a risk factor for depression and chronic medical disorders, such as cardiovascular disease and MeS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of MeS and CRP levels in elderly (>60y) patients with newly-diagnosed major depressive disorder. We enrolled 30 subjects with newly diagnosed depression and 30 age- and sex-matched controls who presented for a health examination at Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Sociodemographic, MeS components, and CRP were measured before starting treatment with antidepressants. There were no significant differences in sociodemographic characteristics or lifestyle factors between depressive and healthy control patients. The newly-diagnosed depression group showed a significantly increased risk of MeS (odds ratio = 4.75, 95% CI: 1.58-14.25) compared with the control group. Of the 5 MeS components examined, only waist circumference was significantly different between the 2 groups (odds ratio = 4.33, 95% CI: 1.20-15.61). Elevated CRP levels were significantly associated with an increased risk for depression (odds ratio = 4.57, 95% 1.45-14.39). The risks of MeS and elevated CRP levels are higher in elderly patients with depression than in normal subjects. Physicians need to be alert to these cardiovascular risk factors when diagnosing and prescribing antidepressants for depression in the elderly. Clinical investigators are encouraged to assess markers of inflammation and review detailed information on risk factors such as waist circumference for MeS in patients with depression. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Peritoneal inflammation and fibrosis in C-reactive protein transgenic mice undergoing peritoneal dialysis solution treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Peter Yam-Kau; Lan, Hui-Yao; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Huang, Xiao-Ru; Chow, Kai-Ming; Szeto, Cheuk-Chun; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2017-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a mediator of systemic inflammation. Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is known to cause peritoneal inflammation and fibrosis. We compare the degree of peritoneal inflammation and fibrosis in wild-type (WT) and CRP-transgenic (Tg) mice after PD treatment. WT (n = 7) and CRP-Tg (n = 10) C57BL/6 J mice (all male, 10-12 weeks old) were injected intra-peritoneally with 4.25% dextrose PD solution (3 mL/mouse) daily for 28 days, followed by a 2-h peritoneal equilibration test (PET). The mice were then killed. Parietal peritoneal and omental tissues were collected for the assessment of inflammation and fibrosis. After 28 days of PD treatment, CRP-Tg mice had higher dialysate-to-plasma (D/P) creatinine ratio than that of WT mice. Parietal peritoneum of the CRP-Tg mice was more cellular and thicker than that of the WT mice. CRP-Tg mice also had higher connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) RNA expressions as well as immunohistochemical staining in the parietal peritoneum than that of the WT mice. CRP-Tg mice have significantly more inflammation and fibrosis than WT mice after PD treatment. Our results suggest that CRP play a role in inflammation and fibrosis induced by PD. The implication of our results to human PD therapy needs further investigations. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  13. Serum brain natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein levels in adolescent with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveer, Rüya; Engin-Üstün, Yaprak; Uysal, Sema; Su, Filiz Akın; Sarıaslan, Seval; Gülerman, Cavidan; Mollamahmutoğlu, Leyla

    2012-08-01

    Our primary aim was to investigate whether N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) increases in adolescent with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) compared with healthy controls and secondary aim was to determine whether metabolic and hormonal differences exist between groups. In this cross-sectional study, 25 adolescent patients with PCOS and 25 normal ovulatory control not suffering from PCOS were involved in the study. Fasting serum NT-proBNP, C-reactive protein (CRP), homocystein, insulin levels and biochemical and hormonal parameters were measured. Serum NT-proBNP was not significantly different in PCOS subjects (0.62 ± 0.80 vs 1.12 ± 1.51 ng/mL, p = 0.154). The mean serum fasting insulin levels (22.64 ± 10.51 vs 13.32 ± 3.97 mIU/mL, p = 0.001) and Homeostasis Model Assessment Insulin-Resistance Index (HOMA-IR) levels (5.16 ± 1.81 vs 2.97 ± 0.89, p = 0.001) were significantly high in the study group. The median serum CRP levels were not significantly different between groups (1 [1-12] vs 1 [1-19] g/dL, p = 0.286). The present study demonstrated that the levels of BNP, CRP and homocystein were not different in PCOS subjects. Serum insulin levels and HOMA-IR were significantly higher in PCOS subjects. Possible serum markers for PCOS-related metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular events, may not present in the adolescent years.

  14. Time variability of C-reactive protein: implications for clinical risk stratification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bogaty

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is proposed as a screening test for predicting risk and guiding preventive approaches in coronary artery disease (CAD. However, the stability of repeated CRP measurements over time in subjects with and without CAD is not well defined. We sought to determine the stability of serial CRP measurements in stable subjects with distinct CAD manifestations and a group without CAD while carefully controlling for known confounders.We prospectively studied 4 groups of 25 stable subjects each 1 a history of recurrent acute coronary events; 2 a single myocardial infarction ≥7 years ago; 3 longstanding CAD (≥7 years that had never been unstable; 4 no CAD. Fifteen measurements of CRP were obtained to cover 21 time-points: 3 times during one day; 5 consecutive days; 4 consecutive weeks; 4 consecutive months; and every 3 months over the year. CRP risk threshold was set at 2.0 mg/L. We estimated variance across time-points using standard descriptive statistics and Bayesian hierarchical models.Median CRP values of the 4 groups and their pattern of variability did not differ substantially so all subjects were analyzed together. The median individual standard deviation (SD CRP values within-day, within-week, between-weeks and between-months were 0.07, 0.19, 0.36 and 0.63 mg/L, respectively. Forty-six percent of subjects changed CRP risk category at least once and 21% had ≥4 weekly and monthly CRP values in both low and high-risk categories.Considering its large intra-individual variability, it may be problematic to rely on CRP values for CAD risk prediction and therapeutic decision-making in individual subjects.

  15. C-reactive protein lowering with rosuvastatin in the METEOR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, S A E; Palmer, M K; Grobbee, D E; Crouse, J R; O'Leary, D H; Raichlen, J S; Bots, M L

    2010-08-01

    In addition to its LDL-C-lowering effects, statin treatment reduces the level of C-reactive protein (CRP). Long-term data on this effect in low-risk populations are limited. Furthermore, whether the CRP reduction is a consequence of LDL-C lowering or occurs independently remains unclear. We studied these aspects in the Measuring Effects on intima media Thickness: an Evaluation Of Rosuvastatin (METEOR) study, a randomized placebo-controlled trial amongst 984 low-risk subjects. METEOR is a randomized placebo-controlled trial that evaluated the effect of 40 mg of rosuvastatin on 2-year change in carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) amongst 984 low-risk patients (10-year Framingham risk or = 1.2 and < 3.5 mm) and elevated LDL-C. CRP levels were measured at baseline and after 2 years of treatment. Median baseline CRP was 1.4 mg L(-1). Rosuvastatin lowered CRP significantly compared with placebo: -36% in the rosuvastatin group versus no change in the placebo group. There was no relation between change in CRP and change in LDL-C (Spearman correlation: 0.08; SE: 0.04). Stratified analyses showed that the CRP-lowering effect was present amongst all strata of baseline characteristics, including baseline lipids and CRP levels. However, the magnitude of CRP reduction was larger amongst women and participants older than 60 years. Rosuvastatin (40 mg) lowers CRP independently from its effects on LDL-C in low-risk subjects with normal baseline CRP levels and modest CIMT.

  16. Peri-implant parameters and C-reactive protein levels among patients with different obesity levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vohra, Fahim; Alkhudhairy, Fahad; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Akram, Zohaib; Javed, Fawad

    2017-11-16

    It is hypothesized that peri-implant conditions are worse with increasing severity of obesity, because systemic low-grade inflammatory marker (C-reactive protein [CRP]) is higher in severe form of obese individuals. The aim of the cross-sectional retrospective study was to compare clinical and radiographic peri-implant inflammatory parameters in patients with different levels of obesity and correlate these parameters with CRP levels. Eighty-four patients who participated in this study were divided into 4 groups: class I obese (group 1), class II obese (group 2), class III obese (group 3), and nonobese individuals (group 4) were included. Clinical (plaque index [PI], bleeding on probing [BOP], probing depth [PD]) and radiographic (marginal bone loss [MBL]) peri-implant parameters were recorded. Serum CRP were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Clinical peri-implant parameters and serum CRP concentrations were analyzed using 1-way analysis of variance. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to analyze correlations of CRP levels with any of the clinical and radiographic parameters assessed. Peri-implant PI, BOP, PD, and MBL were significantly higher in group-1, -2, and -3 patients as compared to nonobese individuals (P implant PI, BOP, PD, and MBL were significantly higher in obese patients of group-2 and group-3 as compared to obese patients in group-1 (P  .05). A significant positive correlations were found between CRP levels and BOP (P = .0148) and PD (P = .0425); and significant negative correlation was found for MBL in group 3, respectively (P = .0212). Clinical and radiographic peri-implant inflammatory parameters and serum CRP were significantly high in patients with severe form of obesity. Serum CRP levels correlated with peri-implant bleeding in obese patients. These findings are preliminary and long-term controlled trials are recommended to support these outcomes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Metabolic syndrome: prevalence, associated factors, and C-reactive protein: the MADRIC (MADrid RIesgo Cardiovascular) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Maria A; Puig, Juan G; Mora, Marta; Aragón, Rosa; O'Dogherty, Pascual; Antón, José L; Sánchez-Villares, Teresa; Rubio, José M; Rosado, Javier; Torres, Rosa; Marcos, Joaquín; Pallardo, Luis F; Banegas, José R

    2008-09-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) is defined by the clustering of a number of cardiovascular risk factors. The aims of the present study were to estimate the prevalence of MS in Madrid (Spain) by 2 definitions and to investigate its relationship with several sociodemographic factors and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. This was a cross-sectional population study, and participants were 1344 subjects aged 31 to 70 years. Clinical evaluation included data on sociodemographic and cardiovascular background, physical examination, fasting glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The CRP levels were determined in a subgroup of 843 subjects. The diagnosis of MS was made according to the 2005 Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) definitions. The age- and sex-adjusted prevalence of MS was 24.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 22.3%-26.9%) using the ATP III definition and 30.9% (95% CI, 28.4%-33.3%) using the International Diabetes Federation definition. The overall agreement rate was 91.5% (kappa = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.76-0.83). Prevalence figures by both definitions were higher in men than in women and increased with age. Male sex, older age, low educational level, and physical inactivity were all determinants of ATP III-defined MS. The presence of MS or any of its components was associated with high CRP levels. In a logistic regression analysis, low educational level and waist circumference were the best predictors for high CRP level. The prevalence of MS in the Madrid region is one of the highest in Europe and confirms the strong Spanish regional variability in this syndrome frequency. Some sociodemographic and lifestyle factors, particularly educational level, are predictors for MS and high CRP levels.

  18. C-reactive protein point-of-care testing and associated antibiotic prescribing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnaard, Margaretha C; van de Pol, Alma C; Hopstaken, Rogier M; van Delft, Sanne; Broekhuizen, Berna D L; Verheij, Theo J M; de Wit, Niek J

    2016-08-01

    In clinical trials, the potential of point-of-care (POC) C-reactive protein (CRP) tests was demonstrated in decreasing antibiotic prescribing in adults with acute cough in general practice, but effects of implementation are unknown. To determine the overall effect of POC CRP testing on antibiotic prescribing rate in general practice. In an observational study, GPs were instructed to use POC CRP in adults with acute cough following current guidelines. After routine history taking and physical examination, they reported whether they intended to prescribe antibiotics ('pre-test decision'). They reported their revised decision after receiving the POC CRP test result ('post-test decision'). Primary outcome was the percentage of patients in whom the GP changed his or her decision to prescribe antibiotics. Secondary outcome was the difference between 'pre-test' and 'post-test' antibiotic prescribing % at group level. A total of 40 GPs enrolled 939 patients, 78% of whom were tested for CRP. GPs changed their decision after POC CRP testing in 200 patients (27%). Antibiotic prescribing before and after CRP testing did not differ ('pre-test' 31%, 'post-test' 28%; 95% confidence interval of difference -7 to 1). In 41% of the tested patients, the indication for testing was in accordance with the guidelines. POC CRP influenced GPs to change their decision about antibiotic prescribing in patients with acute cough. POC CRP testing does not reduce overall antibiotic prescribing by GPs who already have a low antibiotic prescribing rate. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Metabolic syndrome and C-reactive protein in patients with depressive disorder on antidepressive medication

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    Stanojević Albina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recurrent depression is a psychiatric disorder of which etiology and pathogenesis might be related to immune response. Metabolic Syndrome (MetS and its components are also strongly associated with elevated inflammatory indicators, as so as the body mass index (BMI and total cholesterol levels. Objective. Objective of this study was to investigate if there was any difference in C-reactive protein (CRP levels in patients with recurrent depressive disorder, treated with antidepressants, compared to a healthy control group of subjects and if there was an association between increased CRP levels and the presence of MetS in these two groups. Methods. Sixty subjects entered the study; of these 35 patients with the diagnosis of recurrent depressive disorder, while the healthy control group included 25 subjects. MetS was defined according to the NCEP ATP III criteria. The cut-off point for CRP was set at >5 mg /L. Results. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of MetS and CRP values between the studied groups. Waist circumference and total cholesterol levels were significantly higher in the experimental group. Patients that fulfilled the criteria for MetS showed significantly higher values of central obesity and arterial hypertension in the experimental group as well. The elevated CRP levels were associated with increased frequency of MetS in depressed patients. Conclusion. Both CRP levels and metabolic risk profile screening, according to the international criteria, may be beneficial in order to obtain better assessment for depressive long term medicated patients.

  20. High C-Reactive Protein Predicts Delirium Incidence, Duration, and Feature Severity After Major Noncardiac Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasunilashorn, Sarinnapha M; Dillon, Simon T; Inouye, Sharon K; Ngo, Long H; Fong, Tamara G; Jones, Richard N; Travison, Thomas G; Schmitt, Eva M; Alsop, David C; Freedman, Steven D; Arnold, Steven E; Metzger, Eran D; Libermann, Towia A; Marcantonio, Edward R

    2017-08-01

    To examine associations between the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) measured preoperatively and on postoperative day 2 (POD2) and delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity. Prospective cohort study. Two academic medical centers. Adults aged 70 and older undergoing major noncardiac surgery (N = 560). Plasma CRP was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Delirium was assessed from Confusion Assessment Method (CAM) interviews and chart review. Delirium duration was measured according to number of hospital days with delirium. Delirium feature severity was defined as the sum of CAM-Severity (CAM-S) scores on all postoperative hospital days. Generalized linear models were used to examine independent associations between CRP (preoperatively and POD2 separately) and delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity; prolonged hospital length of stay (LOS, >5 days); and discharge disposition. Postoperative delirium occurred in 24% of participants, 12% had 2 or more delirium days, and the mean ± standard deviation sum CAM-S was 9.3 ± 11.4. After adjusting for age, sex, surgery type, anesthesia route, medical comorbidities, and postoperative infectious complications, participants with preoperative CRP of 3 mg/L or greater had a risk of delirium that was 1.5 times as great (95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-2.1) as that of those with CRP less than 3 mg/L, 0.4 more delirium days (P delirium (3.6 CAM-S points higher, P delirium (95% CI = 1.0-2.4) as those in the lowest quartile (≤127.53 mg/L), had 0.2 more delirium days (P delirium (4.5 CAM-S points higher, P delirium incidence, duration, and feature severity. CRP may be useful to identify individuals who are at risk of developing delirium. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  1. Serum C-reactive protein and thioredoxin levels in subjects with mildly reduced glomerular filtration rate

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    Ishimura Eiji

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a newly recognized high-risk condition for cardiovascular disease (CVD, and previous studies reported the changes in inflammation and oxidative stress in advanced stages of CKD. We compared the levels of serum biomarkers for inflammation and oxidative stress between subjects with normal and mildly reduced glomerular filtration rate (GFR. Methods The subjects were 182 participants of a health check-up program including those with normal (≥ 90 mL/min/1.73 m2, N = 79 and mildly reduced eGFR (60-89 mL/min/1.73 m2, N = 103 which was calculated based on serum creatinine, age and sex. We excluded those with reduced eGFR 2. No one had proteinuria. We measured serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP and thioredoxin (TRX as the markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, respectively. Results As compared with subjects with normal eGFR, those with mildly reduced eGFR had increased levels of both CRP and TRX. Also, eGFR was inversely correlated with these biomarkers. The associations of eGFR with these biomarkers remained significant after adjustment for age and sex. When adjustment was done for eight possible confounders, CRP showed significant association with systolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and non-HDL-C, whereas TRX was associated with sex significantly, and with eGFR and systolic blood pressure at borderline significance. Conclusions We showed the increased levels of CRP and TRX in subjects with mildly reduced eGFR. The eGFR-CRP link and the eGFR-TRX link appeared to be mediated, at least partly, by the alterations in blood pressure and plasma lipids in these subjects.

  2. Comparison of serum amyloid A and C-reactive protein as diagnostic markers of systemic inflammation in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Michelle Brønniche; Langhorn, Rebecca; Goddard, Amelia

    2014-01-01

    The diagnostic performance of canine serum amyloid A (SAA) was compared with that of C-reactive protein (CRP) in the detection of systemic inflammation in dogs. Sera from 500 dogs were retrospectively included in the study. C-reactive protein and SAA were measured using validated automated assays....... The overlap performance, clinical decision limits, overall diagnostic performance, correlations, and agreement in the clinical classification between these 2 diagnostic markers were compared. Significantly higher concentrations of both proteins were detected in dogs with systemic inflammation (SAA range: 48.......75 to > 2700 mg/L; CRP range: 0.4 to 907.4 mg/L) compared to dogs without systemic inflammation (SAA range: 1.06 to 56.4 mg/L; CRP range: 0.07 to 24.7 mg/L). Both proteins were shown to be sensitive and specific markers of systemic inflammation in dogs. Significant correlations and excellent diagnostic...

  3. Arsenite activates NFκB through induction of C-reactive protein

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    Druwe, Ingrid L.; Sollome, James J.; Sanchez-Soria, Pablo; Hardwick, Rhiannon N.; Camenisch, Todd D.; Vaillancourt, Richard R., E-mail: vaillancourt@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2012-06-15

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein in humans. Elevated levels of CRP are produced in response to inflammatory cytokines and are associated with atherosclerosis, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. Exposure to inorganic arsenic, a common environmental toxicant, also produces cardiovascular disorders, namely atherosclerosis and is associated with insulin-resistance. Inorganic arsenic has been shown to contribute to cardiac toxicities through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that result in the activation of NFκB. In this study we show that exposure of the hepatic cell line, HepG2, to environmentally relevant levels of arsenite (0.13 to 2 μM) results in elevated CRP expression and secretion. ROS analysis of the samples showed that a minimal amount of ROS are produced by HepG2 cells in response to these concentrations of arsenic. In addition, treatment of FvB mice with 100 ppb sodium arsenite in the drinking water for 6 months starting at weaning age resulted in dramatically higher levels of CRP in both the liver and inner medullary region of the kidney. Further, mouse Inner Medullary Collecting Duct cells (mIMCD-4), a mouse kidney cell line, were stimulated with 10 ng/ml CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. Pretreatment with 10 nM Y27632, a known Rho-kinase inhibitor, prior to CRP exposure attenuated NFκB activation. These data suggest that arsenic causes the expression and secretion of CRP and that CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway, thereby providing a novel pathway by which arsenic can contribute to metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► Exposure to arsenic can induce the expression and secretion of CRP. ► Mice treated with NaAsO{sub 2} showed higher levels of CRP in both the liver and kidney. ► mIMCD-3 were stimulated with CRP which resulted in activation of NFκB. ► CRP activates NFκB through activation of the Rho-kinase pathway. ► Data

  4. Does elevated C-reactive protein increase atrial fibrillation risk? A Mendelian randomization of 47,000 individuals from the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marott, Sarah C W; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Zacho, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether the association of C-reactive protein (CRP) with increased risk of atrial fibrillation is a robust and perhaps even causal association.......The purpose of this study was to test whether the association of C-reactive protein (CRP) with increased risk of atrial fibrillation is a robust and perhaps even causal association....

  5. C REACTIVE PROTEIN AND CARDIOVASCULAR RISK IN CASES WITH DIABETES MALLITUS TYPE II

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    Munevera Bećarević

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Factors of cardiovascular risk (CVR are often grouped in cases with diabetes mellitus (DM with significant increasment of risk for CV disease . The aim of this research is to determine the frequency of CVR and and total CVR in cases with DM and to investigate connection of CRP of other factors of CVR in total cardiovascular risks. Material and methods: In 92 cases with DM weist values were taken as well as body mass index (BMI, blood pressure, sugar in blood, cholesterol, triglycerides, C reactive protein (CRP and according to SCORE system the 10 year period of CVR were determined. Results: Out of 92 tested cases with age 55,22± 8,3 years, 63,05% were males and 36,95% were women, 81,5% were with values of sugar in blood >7mmol/l, 44,6% were with values of HbA1C>7% and 63,0% >6,5%. The value of cholesterol were >4,5mmol/l in 87%, triglycerides >1,7mmol/l in 78.3% of tested cases. 81,5% of tested cases were overweight and 49% with larger weight values. Average cardiovascular factor according to SCORE system was 3, 92± 3,7% with significant difference among sexes (M-4,86; W-2,32, p3mg/l 52% of tested cases were with high cardiovascular risk. There is significant positive correlation between CRP and cholesterol level (p<0, 01, triglycerides, blood in sugar, HbA1c and upper values of blood pressure (p<0, 05. Significant correlation between CRP and total cardiovascular risk (p=0, 63 was not evident. Conclusion: Cases with diabetes mellitus have high level of non regulated cardiovascular risk factors. Even though there is significant correlation between CRP and and pressure values, sugar in blood, HbA1c, cholesterol, triglycerides, significant correlation between CRP and total cardiovascular risk in cases with diabetes mellitus is not evident.

  6. Dietary pattern, serum magnesium, ferritin, C-reactive protein and anaemia among older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyue; Hall, John; Byles, Julie; Shi, Zumin

    2017-04-01

    Epidemiological data of dietary patterns and anaemia among older Chinese remains extremely scarce. We examined the association between dietary patterns and anaemia in older Chinese, and to assess whether biomarkers of serum magnesium, C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum ferritin can mediate these associations. We analysed the 2009 China Health and Nutrition Survey data (2401 individuals aged ≥60 years for whom both dietary and biomarker data are available). Dietary data was obtained using 24 h-recall over three consecutive days. Fasting blood samples and anthropometry measurement were also collected. Factor analysis was used to identify dietary patterns. Factor scores representing dietary patterns were used in Poisson regression models to explore the association between each dietary pattern and anaemia. Of the 2401 participants, 18.9% had anaemia, 1.9% had anaemia related to inflammation (AI), and 1.3% had iron-deficiency anaemia (IDA). A traditional dietary pattern (high intake of rice, pork and vegetables) was positively associated with anaemia; a modern dietary pattern (high intake of fruit and fast food) was inversely associated with anaemia. Progressively lower magnesium and BMI levels were associated with increasing traditional dietary quartiles; while a progressively higher magnesium and BMI levels were associated with increasing modern dietary quartiles (p  0.05) in CRP and serum ferritin across quartiles for either dietary pattern. In the fully adjusted model, the prevalence ratio (PR) of anaemia, comparing the fourth quartile to the first quartile, was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.33; 2.29) for a traditional dietary pattern, and 0.89 (95% CI: 0.68; 1.16) for a modern dietary pattern. The association between dietary patterns and anaemia is mediated by serum magnesium. Traditional dietary pattern is associated with a higher prevalence of anaemia among older Chinese. Future studies need to examine whether correcting micronutrient deficiency (e.g. magnesium) by

  7. C-reactive protein in antiphospholipid syndrome: relationship with cardiovascular pathology

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    N V Seredavkina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess relationship of high sensitivity C reactive protein (hsCRP level in pts with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS with clinico-laboratory features and cardiovascular pathology. Material and methods. 206 pts were included. 58 from them had primary APS (PAPS, 72 –systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with APS and 76 – SLE. 29 from 76 pts of the latter group were positive on anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA – SLE with antiphospholipid antibodies (APhL and 47 – low positive or negative on ACA – SLE without APhL. 72 persons without autoimmune diseases were included into control group. CRP (with high sensitivity immuno-nephelometric assay, APhL (with solid phase immuno-enzyme assay, plasma lipids were evaluated, sonography with measurement of intima-media complex (IMC thickness of common carotid arteries, carotid artery bulbs and internal carotid arteries, electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography (EchoCG, Holter ECG monitoring were performed. Results. HsCRP serum level in pts was significantly higher than in control: 2,55 [0,71; 7,04] mg/l (varied from 0,15 to 39,85 vs 0,68 [0,26; 1,97] mg/l (varied from 0,1 to 9,61, p<0,001. Most high hsCRP concentration was found in SLE with APS (p=0,02. HsCRP level in pts with PAPS with history of combined or isolated arterial thrombosis was significantly higher than in pts with SLE and APS having the same localization of thrombosis. HsCRP concentration less than 3 mg/l correlated with duration of postthrombotic period in pts with PAPS. HsCRP level also correlated with triglyceride concentration, body mass index, summated coronary risk and magistral arteries IMC thickness. Conclusion. HsCRP elevation in pts with APS was associated with development of combined and arterial thrombosis as well as with traditional risk factors of atherosclerosis.

  8. Serum C-Reactive Protein as a Prognostic Biomarker in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

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    Lizio, Andrea; Maestri, Eleonora; Sansone, Valeria Ada; Mora, Gabriele; Miller, Robert G.; Appel, Stanley H.; Chiò, Adriano

    2017-01-01

    Importance Various factors have been proposed as possible candidates associated with the prognosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, there is still no consensus on which biomarkers are reliable prognostic factors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of the inflammatory response that shows significant prognostic value for several diseases. Objective To examine the prognostic significance of CRP in ALS. Design, Setting, and Participants Patients’ serum CRP levels were evaluated from January 1, 2009, to June 30, 2015, in a large cohort of patients with ALS observed by an Italian tertiary multidisciplinary center. Results were replicated in an independent cohort obtained from a population-based registry of patients with ALS. A post hoc analysis was performed of the phase 2 trial of NP001 to determine whether stratification by levels of CRP improves differentiation of responders and nonresponders to the drug. Main Outcomes and Measures Serum CRP levels from the first examination were recorded to assess their effect on disease progression and survival. Results A total of 394 patients with ALS (168 women and 226 men; mean [SD] age at diagnosis, 60.18 [13.60] years) were observed in a tertiary multidisciplinary center, and the analysis was replicated in an independent cohort of 116 patients with ALS (50 women and 66 men; mean [SD] age at diagnosis, 67.00 [10.74] years) identified through a regional population-based registry. Serum CRP levels in the 394 patients with ALS correlated with severity of functional impairment, as measured by total score on the ALS Functional Rating Scale–Revised, at first evaluation (r = –0.14818; P = .004), and with patient survival (hazard ratio, 1.129; 95% CI, 1.033-1.234; P = .007). Similar results were found in the independent cohort (hazard ratio, 1.044; 95% CI, 1.016-1.056; P ≤ .001). Moreover, a post hoc analysis of the phase 2 trial of NP001 using the same CRP threshold showed that patients with

  9. C-reactive protein levels in girls with lower urinary tract symptoms.

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    Tarhan, H; Ekin, R G; Can, E; Cakmak, O; Yavascan, O; Mutlubas Ozsan, F; Helvaci, M; Zorlu, F

    2016-04-01

    Daytime lower urinary tract (LUT) conditions are identified as daytime incontinence problems for children in whom any cause of neuropathy and uropathy has been excluded. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a common marker of acute or chronic inflammation and infection. Increased CRP levels have been detected in the studies conducted on adults diagnosed with overactive bladders and interstitial cystitis. This study aimed to investigate the role of serum CRP levels in girls suffering from daytime LUT conditions. Out of the 752 patients who presented to the outpatient clinics with lower urinary tract symptoms, 709 were excluded due to: being boys, having previous urinary tract surgery, an active urinary tract infection, a neurological anomaly, a urinary system anomaly, having rheumatic disease, any chronic disease, any febrile infection over the past week, a history of constipation, and enuresis nocturna. Forty-three girls with LUT conditions and aged 8-10 years were included in the study as the patient group. Forty girls who attended the urology outpatient clinic without LUT conditions, or active urinary tract infections and any chronic disease requiring follow-up constituted the control group. Under the control of the parents, all subjects were asked to fill out 3-day voiding diaries. The voiding diaries identified frequency, urgency, urgency urinary incontinence, and functional bladder capacity data. All subjects also completed a dysfunctional voiding scoring system (DVSS). The serum CRP levels of all subjects were measured. There was a significant difference in serum CRP levels and DVSS between the patient group and the control group (P = 0.001, P = 0.001). The mean serum CRP levels showed a significant increase when frequency and urgency scores were ≥8, the urge incontinence score was ≥2 and the DVS score DVSS was ≥14 in the voiding diaries of the patient group (Table). Lower urinary tract dysfunction is defined as a condition involving abnormalities of filling and

  10. C-Reactive Protein As a Marker for Initiating Steroid Treatment in Children With Orbital Cellulitis.

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    Davies, Brett W; Smith, Jesse M; Hink, Eric M; Durairaj, Vikram D

    2015-01-01

    To determine both the benefit of systemic steroids in pediatric patients with orbital cellulitis and to assess the usefulness of C-reactive protein (CRP) levels as a marker for starting steroids. Prospective, comparative interventional study. Pediatric patients aged 1 to 18 years admitted to a tertiary care children's hospital with a diagnosis of orbital cellulitis from October 2012 to March 2014 were included in the study. All patients were treated with intravenous antibiotics, and patients with subperiosteal abscess who met previously published criteria for surgical decompression underwent combined transorbital drainage and/or endoscopic sinus surgery. CRP was measured daily as a biomarker of inflammation, and when below 4 mg/dl, patients were started on oral prednisone 1 mg/kg per day for 7 days. Patients whose families did not consent to steroid treatment served as the control group. Patients were followed after discharge until symptoms resolved and all medications were discontinued. Thirty-one children were diagnosed with orbital cellulitis during the study period. Of these 31 children, 24 received oral steroids (77%) and 7 did not (23%). There were 19 males and 5 females in the steroid group with an average age of 8.1 years, and 6 males and 1 female in the nonsteroid group with an average age of 7.1 years (p = 0.618). Thirteen patients (54%) in the steroid group and 2 patients (29%) in the nonsteroid group underwent sinus surgery with or without orbitotomy (p = 0.394). The average CRP at the onset of steroid treatment was 2.8 mg/dl (range: 0.5-4). Patients who received oral steroids were admitted for an average of 3.96 days. In comparison, patients who did not receive steroids were admitted for an average of 7.17 days (p orbital cellulitis. Futhermore, this is the first study to suggest a standardized starting point (CRP ≤ 4 mg/dl) and dosing schedule (oral prednisone 1 mg/kg for 7 days) for children with orbital cellulitis. Patients who received

  11. High C-reactive protein levels are associated with depressive symptoms in schizophrenia.

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    Faugere, M; Micoulaud-Franchi, J-A; Faget-Agius, C; Lançon, C; Cermolacce, M; Richieri, R

    2018-01-01

    Depressive symptoms are frequently associated with schizophrenia symptoms. C - Reactive protein (CRP), a marker of chronic inflammation, had been found elevated in patients with schizophrenia and in patients with depressive symptoms. However, the association between CRP level and depressive symptoms has been poorly investigated in patients with schizophrenia. The only study conducted found an association between high CRP levels and antidepressant consumption, but not with depressive symptoms investigated with the Calgary Depression Rating Scale for Schizophrenia (CDSS). The aim of this study was to evaluate CRP levels and depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia, and to determine whether high CRP levels are associated with depressive symptoms and/or antidepressant consumption, independently of potential confounding factors, especially tobacco-smoking and metabolic syndrome. Three hundred and seven patients with schizophrenia were enrolled in this study (mean age = 35.74 years, 69.1% male gender). Depressive symptoms was investigated with the CDSS. Patients were classified in two groups: normal CRP level (≤ 3.0mg/L) and high CRP level (> 3.0mg/L). Current medication was recorded. 124 subjects (40.4%) were classified in the high CRP level group. After adjusting for confounding factors, these patients were found to have higher CDSS scores than those with normal CRP levels in multivariate analyses (p = 0.035, OR = 1.067, 95% CI = 1.004-1.132). No significant association between CRP levels and antidepressants consumption was found. The size sample is relatively small. The cut-off point for high cardiovascular risk was used to define the two groups. CRP was the sole marker of inflammation in this study and was collected at only one time point. The design of this study is cross-sectional and there are no conclusions about the directionality of the association between depression and inflammation in schizophrenia. This study found an association between high

  12. The relationship between C-reactive protein and subclinical carotid arteriosclerosis in military pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovelić Aleksandra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Inflammation plays a key role in the physiopathology of arteriosclerosis. C-reactive protein (CRP and common carotid artery intima-media thickness are independent predictors of cardiovascular events and diabetes mellitus in apparently healthy men, but relationship between them is not fully elucidated. The aim of the study was to assess the cross-sectional relationship between CRP and cardiovascular risk factors with common carotid artery intima-media thickness in military pilots as representatives of healthy men. Methods. We studied 161 military pilots (age 38 ± 6 years free of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus. Traditional and metabolic risk factors were determined. Plasma CRP was measured by immunonephelometry. The common carotid artery intima-media thickness was measured by ultrasonography in the posterior wall of both common carotid arteries. Results. A total of 66.5% subjects had common carotid artery intima-media thickness > 0.9 mm (p < 0.01. The mean CRP plasma concentration was significantly higher in the subjects with common carotid artery intima- media thickness > 0.9 mm than in those with common carotid artery intima-media thickness ≤ 0.9 mm. In a simple regression analysis age adjusted CRP was associated with common carotid artery intima-media thickness (β = 0.285, p < 0.01, and only high density lipoprotein cholesterol was not associated with common carotid artery intima-media thickness. The association between CRP and common carotid artery intima-media thickness remained highly significant after controlling for body mass index, blood pressure, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glycosylated hemoglobin and smoking (p < 0.01. Controlling for glucose, triglycerides to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, and total cholesterol to high density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio resulted in some reduction in the strength of the association, but including waist

  13. Association of C-Reactive Protein and Metabolic Disorder in a Chinese Population

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    Mingxia Sun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP levels and explore the risk factors for an elevated hs-CRP level. We also provide the clinical utility of CRP to identify subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS. Methods: Data were drawn from a cross-sectional survey in China. Subjects were divided into three subgroups: hs-CRP ≤ 1 mg/L, 1 mg/L < hs-CRP ≤ 3 mg/L and hs-CRP > 3 mg/L. Multiple linear regressions and logistic regression models were used. Results: In the Chinese population, 50.43% subjects had a low hs-CRP level, 30.21% subjects had an intermediate hs-CRP level and 19.36% subjects had an elevated hs-CRP level. Age, physical inactivity, abdominal obesity, a low LDL level, an elevated fasting glucose level, uric acid and urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR were correlated with log-CRP. In multivariate analysis, relative risks of an elevated CRP level were 2.40 (95% CI 1.44–3.99, p = 0.001, 3.63 (95% CI 2.20–5.98, p < 0.001, 4.23 (95% CI 2.51–7.11, p < 0.001 and 6.23 (95% CI 3.45–11.26, p < 0.001 for subjects with 1, 2, 3, or more than 3 MetS components, respectively. The accurate estimates of the area under the receiver operating characteristic of hs-CRP for MetS was 0.6954 (95% CI, 0.67–0.72. Conclusion: Age, physical inactivity, abdominal obesity, a low LDL level, an elevated fasting glucose level, uric acid and ACR are correlated with log-CRP. The number of MetS components is a significant determinant of elevated CRP levels after adjusted for other potential confounders.

  14. Assessment of plasma C-reactive protein as a biomarker of posttraumatic stress disorder risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraly, Satish A; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Maihofer, Adam X; Barkauskas, Donald A; Biswas, Nilima; Agorastos, Agorastos; O'Connor, Daniel T; Baker, Dewleen G

    2014-04-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated in cross-sectional studies with peripheral inflammation. It is not known whether this observed association is the result of PTSD predisposing to inflammation (as sometimes postulated) or to inflammation predisposing to PTSD. To determine whether plasma concentration of the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP) helps predict PTSD symptoms. The Marine Resiliency Study, a prospective study of approximately 2600 war zone-deployed Marines, evaluated PTSD symptoms and various physiological and psychological parameters before deployment and at approximately 3 and 6 months following a 7-month deployment. Participants were recruited from 4 all-male infantry battalions imminently deploying to a war zone. Participation was requested of 2978 individuals; 2610 people (87.6%) consented and 2555 (85.8%) were included in the present analysis. Postdeployment data on combat-related trauma were included for 2208 participants (86.4% of the 2555 included) and on PTSD symptoms at 3 and 6 months after deployment for 1861 (72.8%) and 1617 (63.3%) participants, respectively. Severity of PTSD symptoms 3 months after deployment assessed by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). We determined the effects of baseline plasma CRP concentration on postdeployment CAPS using zero-inflated negative binomial regression (ZINBR), a procedure designed for distributions, such as CAPS in this study, that have an excess of zeroes in addition to being positively skewed. Adjusting for the baseline CAPS score, trauma exposure, and other relevant covariates, we found baseline plasma CRP concentration to be a highly significant overall predictor of postdeployment CAPS scores (P = .002): each 10-fold increment in CRP concentration was associated with an odds ratio of nonzero outcome (presence vs absence of any PTSD symptoms) of 1.51 (95% CI, 1.15-1.97; P = .003) and a fold increase in outcome with a nonzero value (extent of symptoms

  15. Assessment of Plasma C-Reactive Protein as a Biomarker of PTSD Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraly, Satish A.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Maihofer, Adam X.; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Biswas, Nilima; Agorastos, Agorastos; O’Connor, Daniel T.; Baker, Dewleen G.; Team, MRS

    2014-01-01

    Importance Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated in cross-sectional studies with peripheral inflammation. It is not known whether this observed association is due to PTSD predisposing to inflammation (as sometimes postulated) or to inflammation predisposing to PTSD. Objective To determine whether plasma concentration of the inflammatory marker, C-reactive protein (CRP), helps predict future PTSD symptoms. Design and Setting The Marine Resiliency Study (MRS), a prospective study of ~2,600 war zone-deployed Marines, during which PTSD symptomatology and various physiological and psychological parameters were determined pre-deployment and at approximately three and six months following a seven month deployment. Participants Subjects were recruited from four all-male infantry battalions imminently deploying to a war zone. Participation was requested of 2,978 subjects, of whom 2,610 (87.6%) consented and 2,555 (85.8%) were included in the current analysis. Post-deployment data on combat exposure were included from 2,215 subjects (86.7% of the 2,555 included subjects), and on PTSD symptomatology from 1,861 (72.8%) and 1,609 subjects (63.0%) at three and six months following deployment, respectively. Main Outcome Measure(s) PTSD symptoms three months after deployment, assessed by the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS). Results We determined the effects of baseline plasma CRP concentration on post-deployment CAPS using Zero-inflated negative binomial regression (ZINBR), a procedure designed for distributions, such as CAPS in this study, which have an excess of zeros in addition to being positively skewed. Adjusting for baseline CAPS, trauma exposure, and other relevant covariates, we found baseline plasma CRP concentration to be a highly significant overall predictor of post-deployment CAPS scores (p=0.002): each 10-fold increment in CRP concentration was associated with an odds ratio of non-zero outcome (presence vs. absence of any PTSD symptoms

  16. Effect of taurine and caffeine on plasma c-reactive protein and calcium in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owoyele, B V; Oyewole, A L; Biliaminu, S A; Alashi, Y

    2015-09-01

    Caffeine is a component of several beverages such as coffee and tea. It has been shown to possess psychoactive properties because it increases alertness, energy and ability to concentrate at moderate doses. Taurine on the other hand, is an amino acid which has the capacity to promote neural development, osmoregulation and neuroprotection. There is paucity of information on the effect of the combined administration of taurine and caffeine on C-reactive protein (CRP)--a marker of inflammation and plasma calcium level in rats. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of combined taurine and caffeine on the plasma level of CRP, Ca2+ as well as the effect of nifedipine on calcium level. Fifty four rats weighing 120-140 g were used for these studies. The animals were divided into nine groups consisting of six animals each. Group 1 was treated with 10 m/kg of normal saline, Groups 2 and 3 were given 100 mg/kg and 200 mg/kg of taurine respectively, groups 4 and 5 received 7.5 mg/kg and 15 mg/kg of caffeine respectively while group 6 was administered taurine (200 mg/kg) and caffeine (15 mg/kg), groups 7 and 8 were treated with taurine (200 mg/kg) plus nifedipine (10 mg/kg) and taurine (200 mg/kg)plus furosemide (20 mg/kg) respectively while group 9 was given taurine plu caffeine plus nifdipine plus furosemide. Treatment was done once daily for 21 days and blood was finally collected via cardiac puncture for the assay of CRP and calcium while the animals were under anaesthesia. The results showed that CRP was significantly decreased in five of the treated groups compared with the control with the exception of the group treated with taurine alone (Group 2), and that treated with combined taurine and caffeine (Group 6). The Ca2+ level of groups treated with caffeine (11.70 ± 0.29 mg/dL) and taurine with caffeine (11.64 ± 0.15 mg/dL) were significantly (p < 0.05) increased compared with the control (10.70 ± 0.29 mg/dL). However, treatment with taurine and

  17. C-reactive protein/albumin ratio predicts 90-day mortality of septic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otavio T Ranzani

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Residual inflammation at ICU discharge may have impact upon long-term mortality. However, the significance of ongoing inflammation on mortality after ICU discharge is poorly described. C-reactive protein (CRP and albumin are measured frequently in the ICU and exhibit opposing patterns during inflammation. Since infection is a potent trigger of inflammation, we hypothesized that CRP levels at discharge would correlate with long-term mortality in septic patients and that the CRP/albumin ratio would be a better marker of prognosis than CRP alone. METHODS: We evaluated 334 patients admitted to the ICU as a result of severe sepsis or septic shock who were discharged alive after a minimum of 72 hours in the ICU. We evaluated the performance of both CRP and CRP/albumin to predict mortality at 90 days after ICU discharge. Two multivariate logistic models were generated based on measurements at discharge: one model included CRP (Model-CRP, and the other included the CRP/albumin ratio (Model-CRP/albumin. RESULTS: There were 229 (67% and 111 (33% patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, respectively. During the 90 days of follow-up, 73 (22% patients died. CRP/albumin ratios at admission and at discharge were associated with a poor outcome and showed greater accuracy than CRP alone at these time points (p = 0.0455 and p = 0.0438, respectively. CRP levels and the CRP/albumin ratio were independent predictors of mortality at 90 days (Model-CRP: adjusted OR 2.34, 95% CI 1.14-4.83, p = 0.021; Model-CRP/albumin: adjusted OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.10-4.67, p = 0.035. Both models showed similar accuracy (p = 0.2483. However, Model-CRP was not calibrated. CONCLUSIONS: Residual inflammation at ICU discharge assessed using the CRP/albumin ratio is an independent risk factor for mortality at 90 days in septic patients. The use of the CRP/albumin ratio as a long-term marker of prognosis provides more consistent results than standard CRP values alone.

  18. Relationship between C-reactive protein and stroke: a large prospective community based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Liu

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that C-reactive protein (CRP was associated with risk of stroke. There were few studies in Asian population, or on stroke subtypes other than ischemic stroke. We thus investigated the relationship between CRP and the risks of all stroke and its subtypes in a Chinese adult population.In the current study, we included 90,517 Chinese adults free of stroke and myocardial infarction at baseline (June 2006 to October 2007 in analyses. Strokes were classified as ischemic stroke (IS, intracranial heamorrhage (ICH and subarachnoid heamorrhage (SAH. High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP were categorized into three groups: 3 mg/L. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the association between hs-CRP concentrations and all stroke, as well as its subtypes.During a median follow-up time of 49 months, we documented 1,472 incident stroke cases. Of which 1,049 (71.3% were IS, 383 (26.0% were ICH, and 40 (2.7% were SAH. After multivariate adjustment, hs-CRP concentrations ≥1 mg/L were associated with increased risks of all stroke (hs-CRP 1-3 mg/L: hazard ratio (HR 1.17, 95% confidential interval (CI 1.03-1.33; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.07-1.46 and IS (hs-CRP 1-3 mg/L: HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.36; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.11-1.60, but not with ICH and SAH. Subgroup analyses showed that higher hs-CRP concentration was more prone to be a risk factor for all stroke and IS in non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive participants.We found that higher hs-CRP concentrations were associated with a higher risk of IS, particularly for non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive subjects. In contrast, we did not observe significant associations between hs-CRP and ICH/SAH.

  19. C-Reactive Protein Impairs Dendritic Cell Development, Maturation, and Function: Implications for Peripheral Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel V. Jimenez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is the prototypical acute phase reactant, increasing in blood concentration rapidly and several-fold in response to inflammation. Recent evidence indicates that CRP has an important physiological role even at low, baseline levels, or in the absence of overt inflammation. For example, we have shown that human CRP inhibits the progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in CRP transgenic mice by shifting CD4+ T cells away from the TH1 and toward the TH2 subset. Notably, this action required the inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB, but did not require high levels of human CRP. Herein, we sought to determine if CRP’s influence in EAE might be explained by CRP acting on dendritic cells (DC; antigen presenting cells known to express FcγRIIB. We found that CRP (50 µg/ml reduced the yield of CD11c+ bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs and CRP (≥5 μg/ml prevented their full expression of major histocompatibility complex class II and the co-stimulatory molecules CD86 and CD40. CRP also decreased the ability of BMDCs to stimulate antigen-driven proliferation of T cells in vitro. Importantly, if the BMDCs were genetically deficient in mouse FcγRIIB then (i the ability of CRP to alter BMDC surface phenotype and impair T cell proliferation was ablated and (ii CD11c-driven expression of a human FCGR2B transgene rescued the CRP effect. Lastly, the protective influence of CRP in EAE was fully restored in mice with CD11c-driven human FcγRIIB expression. These findings add to the growing evidence that CRP has important biological effects even in the absence of an acute phase response, i.e., CRP acts as a tonic suppressor of the adaptive immune system. The ability of CRP to suppress development, maturation, and function of DCs implicates CRP in the maintenance of peripheral T cell tolerance.

  20. An Evaluation of Serum Procalcitonin and C-Reactive Protein Levels as Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers of Severe Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szederjesi Janos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recommendations have been made, following the multicenter Surviving Sepsis Campaign study, to standardize the definition of severe sepsis with reference to several parameters such as haemodynamic stability, acid-base balance, bilirubin, creatinine, International Normalized Ratio (INR, urine output and pulmonary functional value of the ratio between arterial oxigen partial pressure and inspiratory oxigen concentration. Procalcitonin (PCT is considered to be a gold standard biomarker for the inflammatory response, and recent studies have shown that it may help to discover whether a seriously ill person is developing sepsis. C-reactive protein (CRP is also used as a marker of inflammation in the body, as its blood levels increase if there is any inflammation in the body. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein levels as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of severe sepsis.

  1. human serum protein and c-reactive protein levels among hiv ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-30

    Sep 30, 2016 ... inflammation used to monitor HIV infection (Pepys and Hirschfield, 2003; Baker et al., 2010; Funderburg et al., 2010;. Neuhaus et ... from microbial infections, the CRP concentration can rise up to 300mg/L in 12-24 hours (Le Carrer et al., 1995; Vaishnavi,. 1996 ..... (pentaxins) and serum amyloid A protein.

  2. Diagnostic value of lactate, procalcitonin, ferritin, serum-C-reactive protein, and other biomarkers in bacterial and viral meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Alizadeh, Shekoofan; Karimi, Abdullah; Khalifeh, Masoomeh; Shoja, Seyed Abdolmajid

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There are many difficulties distinguishing bacterial from viral meningitis that could be reasonably solved using biomarkers. The aim of this study was to evaluate lactate, procalcitonin (PCT), ferritin, serum-CRP (C-reactive protein), and other known biomarkers in differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in children. All children aged 28 days to 14 years with suspected meningitis who were admitted to Mofid Children's Hospital, Tehran, between October 2012 and Novemb...

  3. Serum, plasma, and dried blood spot high sensitivity C-reactive protein enzyme immunoassay for population research

    OpenAIRE

    Brindle, Eleanor; Fujita, Masako; Shofer, Jane; O’Connor, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is used as a biomarker of morbidity and mortality risk in studies of population health, and is essential to interpretation of several micronutrient biomarkers. There is thus need for a robust high sensitivity CRP (hsCRP) measurement method for large-scale, non-clinical studies. We developed an efficient, inexpensive assay suitable for quantifying CRP across the physiological range using any blood specimen type. The ELISA uses readily available monoclonal antibodies to...

  4. Estimation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with periodontal disease and without coronary artery disease

    OpenAIRE

    V Anitha; Sushma Nair; V Shivakumar; M Shanmugam; B Meena Priya; P Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Background: HsCRP (Highly sensitive C reactive protein) is a global indicator for future vascular events in adults detected in blood stream 48 hours before the cardiovascular event. Periodontal disease may increase blood levels of inflammatory markers like IL-6, CRP and HsCRP. Hence the aim of the present study is to evaluate the presence of elevated HsCRP levels in chronic periodontitis patients. Material and Methods: 100 patients who reported for cardiac master health check up were enro...

  5. Evaluation of the use of serum C-reactive protein concentration to predict outcome in puppies infected with canine parvovirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McClure, Vanessa; van Schoor, Mirinda; Thompson, Peter N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective-To evaluate associations of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration with duration of hospitalization and with outcome in puppies with canine parvoviral enteritis. Design-Prospective observational study. Animals-79 client-owned puppies with naturally acquired canine parvovirus.......7%, respectively (considered moderately accurate). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Although serum CRP concentration was associated with outcome in puppies with canine parvovirus enteritis, it did not prove to be a good predictor of outcome when used alone....

  6. Selection of symptomatic patients with Crohn's disease for abdominopelvic computed tomography: role of serum C-reactive protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Desmond, Alan N

    2012-11-01

    Results of previous studies have shown that repeated abdominopelvic computed tomography (CT) examinations can lead to substantial cumulative diagnostic radiation exposure in patients with Crohn\\'s disease (CD). Improved selection of patients referred for CT will reduce unnecessary radiation exposure. This study examines if serum C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration predicts which symptomatic patients with CD are likely to have significant disease activity or disease complications (such as abscess) detected on abdominopelvic CT.

  7. C-reactive protein levels in relation to various features of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease among obese patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Esther; Anty, Rodolphe; Tordjman, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major hepatic consequence of obesity. It has been suggested that the high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an obesity-independent surrogate marker of severity of NAFLD, especially development of non-alcoholic steato-hepatitis (NASH......), but this remains controversial. We aimed to investigate whether associations between various features of NAFLD and hs-CRP are independent of body mass index (BMI) in its broad range among obese patients....

  8. Effects of Metformin on Tissue Oxidative and Dicarbonyl Stress in Transgenic Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats Expressing Human C-Reactive Protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malínská, H.; Oliyarnyk, O.; Škop, V.; Šilhavý, Jan; Landa, Vladimír; Zídek, Václav; Mlejnek, Petr; Šimáková, Miroslava; Strnad, Hynek; Kazdová, L.; Pravenec, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 3 (2016), e0150924 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204; GA MZd(CZ) NT14325 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : inflammation * spontaneously hypertensive rat * transgenic * C-reactive protein * dicarbonyl stress * metformin Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  9. [Procalcitonin and C-reactive protein as early indicators of postoperative intra-abdominal infection after surgery for gastrointestinal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Comesaña, Elías; López-Gómez, Victoria; Estevez-Fernández, Sergio Manuel; Mariño Padín, Esther; Ballinas-Miranda, Julio; Carrera-Dacosta, Ester; Piñon-Cimadevila, Miguel Ángel; Barreiro-Morandeira, Francisco

    2014-04-01

    to evaluate the association between serum levels of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein, on the first 3 postoperative days, and the appearance of postoperative intra-abdominal infection. Prospective observational study including 67 patients operated on for colo-rectal, gastric and pancreatic cancer. Serum levels of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein were analyzed before surgery and daily until the third postoperative day. Values of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were recorded as well as their accuracy for detection of postoperative intra-abdominal infection (PIAI). The incidence of postoperative intra-abdominal infection was 13.4%. CRP serum levels at 72h, PCT serum levels at 24, 48 and 72h and the ratio between serum levels of CRP at 72hours and serum levels of CRP at 48hours (CRP D3/CRP D2) were significantly associated with the appearance of postoperative intra-abdominal infection. The highest sensitivity corresponded to PCT at 72hours (88.9%); the highest specificity and positive predictive value corresponded to the ratio CRP D3/CRP D2 (96.49% and 71.4%, respectively); the highest negative predictive value to procalcitonin at 72h and 24h. Serum levels of PCT are significantly associated with the appearance of postoperative intra-abdominal infection. Sensitivity and predictive positive values are low, but negative predictive value is high, even at 24h after surgery. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Study of C-reactive protein and C3 complement as acute phase reactants in unstable angina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Barnali; Gupta, B; Sharma, D K; Talib, V H

    2013-06-01

    Prevalence rates of coronary artery disease are reported to be very high in Asian Indians. Traditional risk factors alone fail to explain the high rates of coronary artery disease in Indians. Acute phase reactants C-reactive protein and C3 in Indian subjects with unstable angina were evaluated and compared them with suitable controls to test the hypothesis that a relationship exists between acute phase reactants and unstable angina. Forty cases of unstable angina and forty suitable controls were enrolled for the study. Cases of unstable angina had significantly increased level of CRP as compared to control group (p = 0.01098). Statistically significant difference was found between case and control groups in TLC (p = 0.0037) and ESR (p = 0.0368), TLC and ESR being more in case group as compared to control group. C-reactive protein was significantly correlated with TLC, ESR and C3 in case group and TLC and ESR in control group. C3 was significantly correlated with all the other three inflammatory markers. C-reactive protein, TLC and ESR in case group while no correlation was observed with any variable in control group. The present study concludes that a relationship exists between acute phase reactants studied and unstable angina.

  11. Rosuvastatin, inflammation, C-reactive protein, JUPITER, and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease--a perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kones, Richard

    2010-12-09

    The major public health concern worldwide is coronary heart disease, with dyslipidemia as a major risk factor. Statin drugs are recommended by several guidelines for both primary and secondary prevention. Rosuvastatin has been widely accepted because of its efficacy, potency, and superior safety profile. Inflammation is involved in all phases of atherosclerosis, with the process beginning in early youth and advancing relentlessly for decades throughout life. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-studied, nonspecific marker of inflammation which may reflect general health risk. Considerable evidence suggests CRP is an independent predictor of future cardiovascular events, but direct involvement in atherosclerosis remains controversial. Rosuvastatin is a synthetic, hydrophilic statin with unique stereochemistry. A large proportion of patients achieve evidence-based lipid targets while using the drug, and it slows progression and induces regression of atherosclerotic coronary lesions. Rosuvastatin lowers CRP levels significantly. The Justification for Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) trial was designed after the observation that when both low density lipoprotein and CRP were reduced, patients fared better than when only LDL was lowered. Advocates and critics alike acknowledge that the benefits of rosuvastatin in JUPITER were real. After a review, the US Food and Drug Administration extended the indications for rosuvastatin to include asymptomatic JUPITER-eligible individuals with one additional risk factor. The American Heart Association and Centers of Disease Control and Prevention had previously recognized the use of CRP in persons with "intermediate risk" as defined by global risk scores. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines went further and recommended use of statins in persons with low LDL and high CRP levels at intermediate risk. The JUPITER study focused attention on ostensibly healthy individuals with

  12. Increased ultrasensitive C-reactive protein is not associated with obesity in hospitalized heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schommer, Vânia Ames; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Marcadenti, Aline; Wittke, Estefania Inez; Galvão, André Luís Câmara; Rosito, Guido Bernardo Aranha

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the association between obesity and levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with heart failure admitted to a tertiary hospital. Cross-sectional study with a consecutive sampling of hospitalized patients with heart failure. Sociodemographic and clinical data were collected, and the nutritional status was assessed through indicators such as body mass index (in kg/m2), waist circumference (in cm), waist-hip ratio, triceps skinfold (in mm) and subscapularis skinfold (in mm). Neck circumference (in cm) was measured as well as serum levels of hs-CRP, in mg/L. Among 123 patients, the mean age was 61.9±12.3 years and 60.2% were male. The median of hs-CRP was 8.87mg/L (3.34 to 20.01). A tendency to an inverse correlation between neck circumference and hs-CRP was detected (r=-0.167; p=0.069). In the multiple linear regression analysis, after adjustment for age, disease severity (NYHA classification III and IV, low ejection fraction, left ventricular dysfunction during diastole), and infectious conditions there was an inverse association between hs-CRP and neck circumference (ß=-0.196; p=0.03) and subscapularis skinfold (ß=-0.005; p=0.01) in the total sample, which was not maintained after the stratification by sex. Increased levels of hs-CRP in patients hospitalized for heart failure were not associated with obesity. Avaliar a associação entre obesidade e níveis de proteína c-reativa ultrassensível (PCR-us) em pacientes com insuficiência cardiac admitidos em um hospital terciário. Estudo transversal com amostragem consecutiva de pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca hospitalizados. Foram coletados dados sociodemográficos e clínicos, e o estado nutricional foi avaliado por meio de indicadores como índice de massa corporal (em kg/m2), circunferência da cintura (em cm), razão cintura-quadril, dobra cutânea tricipital (em mm) e dobra cutânea subescapular (em mm). Circunferência do pescoço (em cm) foi aferida bem como n

  13. The effect of angiotensin receptor blockers on C-reactive protein and other circulating inflammatory indices in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandra, Del Fiorentino; Cianchetti, Silvana; Celi, Alessandro; Dell’Omo, Giulia; Pedrinelli, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory properties may contribute to the pharmacological effects of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), a leading therapeutic class in the management of hypertension and related cardiovascular and renal diseases. That possibility, supported by consistent evidence from in-vitro and animal studies showing pro-inflammatory properties of angiotensin II, has been evaluated clinically by measuring the effect of ARBs on C-reactive protein and other circulating indices of inflammation (e-selectin, adhesion molecules, interleukin-6, tissue necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) of potential clinical relevance, a body of evidence that this paper aims to review. PMID:19436669

  14. Evaluation correlates C-reactive protein with advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma and response to treatment in a tertiary university hospital in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talita Máira Bueno da Silveira da Rocha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate a correlation of C-reactive protein levels with disease stage and response to treatment in Hodgkin's lymphoma patients of the Hematology Service of Santa Casa de São Paulo.METHODS: A retrospective study based on review of medical records was carried out of 38 patients diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma between October 2010 and December 2012. Three patients met the exclusion criteria, giving a final sample of 35 patients for analysis. C-reactive protein levels >1 mg/dL were considered positive.RESULTS: Among the patients analyzed, median age was 29 years, 65% were male and 85% had the classical nodular sclerosis subtype. Twenty-nine (82% were in the advanced stage and 28% had bulky mass at diagnosis. Seventeen percent had bone marrow invasion by lymphoma. Baseline C-reactive protein levels were associated with both stage (p-value = 0.0035 and presence or absence of B symptoms (p-value = 0.008. The highest C-reactive protein levels were detected in patients with advanced disease while no patients with localized disease had C-reactive protein >5 mg/dL (p-value = 0.02. After the first treatment cycle, C-reactive protein fell to near-normal levels and no direct association with response pattern was found. As the mean follow-up was only 14 months, it was not possible to determine whether relapse was accompanied by a further increase in C-reactive protein.CONCLUSION: Baseline C-reactive protein levels directly correlated with stage and presence or absence of B symptoms, but the degree of improvement with treatment did not correlate with response pattern. After a longer follow-up, it may be possible to assess whether relapse correlates with a further increase in C-reactive protein levels.

  15. Influence of C-Reactive Protein and Urinary Protein Excretion on Prediction of Graft Failure and Mortality by Serum Albumin in Renal Transplant Recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ree, Rutger M.; Gross, Sascha; Zelle, Dorien M.; van der Heide, Jaap J. Homan; Schouten, Jan P.; van Son, Willem J.; Gans, Reinold O. B.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Hypoalbuminemia is an established predictor of poor outcome in renal transplant recipients (RTR). It is considered to reflect inflammation, poor nutritional status, or proteinuria. We explored the roles of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and urinary protein excretion in

  16. Post-effort chances in C-reactive protein level among soccer players at the end of the training season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostrzewa-Nowak, Dorota; Nowak, Robert; Chamera, Tomasz; Buryta, Rafał; Moska, Waldemar; Cięszczyk, Paweł

    2015-05-01

    Numerous literature data point out the differences in immunological parameters as a result of physical effort and the relation of those changes to the subject's fitness level. This study was aimed at the assessment of soccer players' condition and adaptation to physical effort based on the changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) blood level. C-reactive protein, total protein, and albumin plasma levels before and after 60-minute-long outdoor running were determined among 16 (8 men and 8 women) soccer players. Statistically significant increase in total blood protein level was observed in both studied groups. However, there were no statistically significant changes in albumin level in soccer players' blood. Determination of CRP showed that the exercise test caused changes in its level among both women and men; yet, statistically significant increase in CRP level was found only in women's blood. The different influence of effort on CRP plasma level may be explained by the involvement of various mechanisms in regulation of acute-phase responses in different conditions. It was found in our study that CRP level could be a valuable tool to assess the metabolic response to aerobic exercise.

  17. Comparative Evaluation of C-Reactive Protein and WBC Count in Fascial Space Infections of Odontogenic Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagul, Ravikiran; Chandan, Sanjay; Sane, Vikrant Dilip; Patil, Sujay; Yadav, Dinesh

    2017-06-01

    To assess efficacy of C-reactive protein levels as monitoring tools for patients with fascial space infections of odontogenic origin. A randomized prospective study was conducted on 20 patients suffering from fascial space infection of odontogenic origin, in the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Bharati Vidyapeeth dental college and hospital, Pune, Patients between 18 and 60 years of age of both the sexes were selected. All patients were treated and observed by the same surgeon. Patient's venous blood sample was collected pre-operatively and on 2nd and 5th post-operative days for evaluation of WBC count and C-reactive protein (CRP). All patients were encouraged for strict follow-up protocol. Where the results of WBC count and CRP when compared it was seen that the mean values of WBC were normal in 15 cases and abnormal in 5 cases on day 0, day 2 and day 5; whereas the mean values of CRP were abnormal on day 0 and day 2 and were within normal limit on day 5 in all cases. The findings of this prospective analysis indicate that White blood cells and C-reactive protein are effective markers for determining severity of infection, efficacy of treatment regime for patients with fascial space infections of odontogenic origin. Thus the markers also help in making treatment of patients with fascial space infections of odontogenic origin more cost effective and they also help protecting patients from side effects of excess drugs usage. Thus we conclude that CRP should be incorporated as monitoring tools for managing patients with fascial space infections of odontogenic origin.

  18. C-reactive protein and parental history improve global cardiovascular risk prediction: the Reynolds Risk Score for men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridker, Paul M; Paynter, Nina P; Rifai, Nader; Gaziano, J Michael; Cook, Nancy R

    2008-11-25

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein and family history are independently associated with future cardiovascular events and have been incorporated into risk prediction models for women (the Reynolds Risk Score for women); however, no cardiovascular risk prediction algorithm incorporating these variables currently exists for men. Among 10 724 initially healthy American nondiabetic men who were followed up prospectively over a median period of 10.8 years, we compared the test characteristics of global model fit, discrimination, calibration, and reclassification in 2 prediction models for incident cardiovascular events, one based on age, blood pressure, smoking status, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (traditional model) and the other based on these risk factors plus high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and parental history of myocardial infarction before age 60 years (Reynolds Risk Score for men). A total of 1294 cardiovascular events accrued during study follow-up. Compared with the traditional model, the Reynolds Risk Score had better global fit (likelihood ratio test Pmen reclassified 17.8% (1904/10 724) of the study population (and 20.2% [1392/6884] of those at 5% to 20% 10-year risk) into higher- or lower-risk categories, with markedly improved accuracy among those reclassified. For this model comparison, the net reclassification index was 5.3%, and the clinical net reclassification index was 14.2% (both Pmen not taking lipid-lowering therapy, 16.7% of the study population (and 20.1% of those at 5% to 20% 10-year risk) were reclassified to higher- or lower-risk groups, again with significantly improved global fit, larger C-index (Paccuracy among those reclassified. For this model, the net reclassification index was 8.4% and the clinical net reclassification index was 15.8% (both Pwomen, a prediction model in men that incorporates high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and parental history significantly improves global cardiovascular risk

  19. Electronegative Low-Density Lipoprotein Increases C-Reactive Protein Expression in Vascular Endothelial Cells through the LOX-1 Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Chih-Sheng; Wang, Yu-Chen; Lu, Long-Sheng; Walton, Brian; Yilmaz, H. Ramazan; Huang, Roger Y.; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Dixon, Richard A. F.; Lai, Wen-Ter; Chen, Chu-Huang; Lu, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Increased plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are associated with the occurrence and severity of acute coronary syndrome. We investigated whether CRP can be generated in vascular endothelial cells (ECs) after exposure to the most electronegative subfraction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), L5, which is atherogenic to ECs. Because L5 and CRP are both ligands for the lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), we also examined the role of LOX-1. Methods and Results Plasma LDL sa...

  20. A C-reactive protein promoter polymorphism is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Pima Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolford, Johanna K; Gruber, Jonathan D; Ossowski, Victoria M

    2003-01-01

    Linkage analysis has identified a susceptibility locus for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on chromosome 1q21-q23 in several populations. Results from recent prospective studies indicate that increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of immune system activation, are predictive...... disequilibrium clusters. We genotyped representative SNPs in approximately 1300 Pima samples and found a single variant in the CRP promoter (SNP 133552) that was associated with T2DM (P=0.014), as well as a common haplotype (CGCG) that was associated with both T2DM (P=0.029) and corrected insulin response...

  1. C-reactive protein levels and body mass index: elucidating direction of causation through reciprocal Mendelian randomization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timpson, N J; Nordestgaard, B G; Harbord, R M

    2011-01-01

    Context:The assignment of direction and causality within networks of observational associations is problematic outside randomized control trials, and the presence of a causal relationship between body mass index (BMI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) is disputed.Objective:Using reciprocal Mendelian...... randomization, we aim to assess the direction of causality in relationships between BMI and CRP and to demonstrate this as a promising analytical technique.Participants and methods:The study was based on a large, cross-sectional European study from Copenhagen, Denmark. Genetic associates of BMI (FTO(rs9939609...

  2. High sensitive C-reactive protein assessment in patients with typical chest pain and normal coronary arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv Xiaojiong; Qiu Jianping

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the changes of high-sensitive serum C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in patients with typical chest pain and normal coronary arteriography. Methods: One hundred and twenty three patients were included. CRP was determined using a standard technique, and all patients underwent ECG exercise testing. Results: Plasma level of hs-CRP was significantly increased in patients with typical chest pain, coronary arteriography negative and exercise test positive. Conclusion: Inflammation may play a role in the mechanism of chest pain for patients with normal coronary angiography. (authors)

  3. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is only weakly related to cardiovascular damage after adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael H; Christensen, Marina K; Hansen, Tine W

    2006-01-01

    The independent prognostic value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) has been questioned, and consequently we decided to investigate whether hsCRP was associated with subclinical cardiovascular (CV) damage independently of traditional CV risk factors.......The independent prognostic value of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) has been questioned, and consequently we decided to investigate whether hsCRP was associated with subclinical cardiovascular (CV) damage independently of traditional CV risk factors....

  4. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, C-reactive protein, and urinary albumin levels as predictors of mortality and cardiovascular events in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kistorp, Caroline; Raymond, Ilan; Pedersen, Frants

    2005-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptides have been shown to predict cardiovascular disease in apparently healthy individuals but their predictive ability for mortality and future cardiovascular events compared with C-reactive protein (CRP) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio is unknown.......B-type natriuretic peptides have been shown to predict cardiovascular disease in apparently healthy individuals but their predictive ability for mortality and future cardiovascular events compared with C-reactive protein (CRP) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio is unknown....

  5. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein for monitoring of postoperative sepsis: complemental to C-reactive protein or redundant?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Tschaikowsky

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To prospectively evaluate the performance of Lipopolysaccharide-Binding Protein (LBP in prediction of hospital mortality and its correlation to C-reactive Protein (CRP, we studied sixty consecutive, postoperative patients with sepsis admitted to the university hospital intensive care unit. MEASUREMENTS AND METHODS: Plasma LBP and CRP were serially measured from day(d1 (onset of sepsis to d14 in parallel with clinical data until d28. Predictive value and correlation of LBP and CRP were analyzed by Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis and Pearson's test, respectively. MAIN RESULTS: LBP and CRP showed the highest levels on d2 or d3 after the onset of sepsis with no significant difference between survivors and nonsurvivors. Only at d7, nonsurvivors had significantly (p = .03 higher levels of CRP than survivors. Accordingly, in ROC analysis, concentration of CRP and LBP on d7 poorly discriminated survivors from nonsurvivors (area under curve = .62 and .55, respectively without significant difference between LBP- and CRP-ROC curves for paired comparison. LBP and CRP plasma levels allocated to quartiles correlated well with each other (r(2 = .95; p = .02. Likewise, changes in plasma concentrations of LBP and CRP from one observation to the next showed a marked concordance as both parameters concomitantly increased or decreased in 76% of all cases. CONCLUSIONS: During the first 14 days of postoperative sepsis, LBP plasma concentrations showed a time course that was very similar to CRP with a high concordance in the pattern of day-to-day changes. Furthermore, like CRP, LBP does not provide a reliable clue for outcome in this setting.

  6. New evidences for C-reactive protein (CRP deposits in the arterial intima as a cardiovascular risk factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Montecucco

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Fabrizio Montecucco, François MachDivision of Cardiology, Foundation for Medical Research, University Hospital, Geneva, SwitzerlandAbstract: Inflammatory processes are orchestrated by several soluble molecules, which interact with cell populations involved. Cytokines, chemokines, acute-phase reactants, and hormones are crucial in the evolution of several inflammatory disorders, such as atherosclerosis. Several evidences suggest that C-reactive protein (CRP started to be considered as a cardiovascular risk factor, since CRP directly induces atheroslerosis development. The recent demonstration of CRP production not only by the liver, but also within atherosclerotic plaques by activated vascular cells, also suggests a possible dual role, as both a systemic and tissue agent. Although more studies are needed, some therapeutic approaches to reduce CRP levels have been performed with encouraging results. However, given the strong limitations represented by its low specificity and still accordingly with the American Heart Association, there is no need for high sensitivity CRP screening of the entire adult population as a public-health measure. The measure of serum CRP might be useful only for patients who are considered at intermediate risk.Keywords: atherosclerosis, inflammation, plaque, cardiovascular risk, C-reactive protein

  7. [Ultra-sensitive C-reactive protein associated to nutritional status and biochemical profile in Mexican shoolchildren].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro-Acosta, María Elena; Ruíz Esparza-Cisneros, Josefina; Delgado-Valdez, Jesús Hernán; Díaz-Molina, Raúl; Ayala-Figueroa, Rafael Iván

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a nonspecific marker of inflammation with low serum levels, which are not usually detectable. In order to assess cardiovascular risk in adults apparently healthy, ultrasensitive methods are used, and the CRP measured through these techniques is known as ultrasensitive C-reactive protein (US-CRP). Some researchers report an association of US-CRP with some anthropometric parameters in children with no apparent disease. The aim was to associate US-CRP with nutritional status and biochemical profiles in Mexican schoolchildren. In this cross-sectional study 300 healthy children (aged 10 to 12 years) were evaluated. Weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, body fat percentage, glucose, lipid profiles and US-CRP were measured. Exclusion criteria was: US-CRP > 10mg/L. We used multivariate regression models. 53.7 % were girls and 46.3 % were boys. The US-CRP median was of 0.3 mg/L (range: 0.3 mg/L-6.8 mg/L), and it was positively and significantly correlated with BMI (ß = 0.226, p = 0.032) and LDL-C (ß = -0.267, p = 0.007) and negatively associated with cholesterol (ß = -0.267, p = 0.007). There is an association between US-CRP and cardiovascular risk indicators, such as obesity and some lipid disorder in childhood; therefore, US-CRP may be used for close examination in Mexican children.

  8. Potential Mediators between Fibromyalgia and C-Reactive protein: Results from a Large U.S. Community Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Termeh; Sambamoorthi, Usha; Lilly, Christa; Innes, Kim Karen

    2017-07-07

    Fibromyalgia, a potentially debilitating chronic pain syndrome of unknown etiology, may be characterized by inflammation. In this study, we investigated the relation of FMS to serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in a large population of adults (18+) and investigated the influence of other factors on this relationship, including BMI, comorbidities, as well as mood and sleep disturbance. Participants were 52,535 Ohio Valley residents (Fibromyalgia n = 1125). All participants completed a comprehensive health survey (2005-2006) part of the C8 Health Project; serum levels of CRP were obtained, as was history of Fibromyalgia physician diagnosis. Logistic and linear regressions were used for this cross-sectional analysis. Mean CRP was higher among participants reporting Fibromyalgia than those without (5.54 ± 9.8 vs.3.75 ± 7.2 mg/L, p Fibromyalgia to serum C-reactive protein may be explained, in part, by BMI and comorbidity. Prospective research is needed to confirm this, and clarify the potential mediating influence of obesity and comorbid conditions on this relationship.

  9. SPR-based plastic optical fibre biosensor for the detection of C-reactive protein in serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aray, Ayda; Chiavaioli, Francesco; Arjmand, Mojtaba; Trono, Cosimo; Tombelli, Sara; Giannetti, Ambra; Cennamo, Nunzio; Soltanolkotabi, Mahmood; Zeni, Luigi; Baldini, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    A plastic optical fibre biosensor based on surface plasmon resonance for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in serum is proposed. The biosensor was integrated into a home-made thermo-stabilized microfluidic system that allows avoiding any thermal and/or mechanical fluctuation and maintaining the best stable conditions during the measurements. A working range of 0.006-70 mg L -1 and a limit of detection of 0.009 mg L -1 were achieved. These results are among the best compared to other SPR-based biosensors for CRP detection, especially considering that they were achieved in a real and complex medium, i.e. serum. In addition, since the sensor performances satisfy those requested in physiologically-relevant clinical applications, the whole biosensing platform could well address high sensitive, easy to realize, real-time, label-free, portable and low cost diagnosis of CRP for future lab-on-a-chip applications. 3D sketch (left) of the thermo-stabilized home-made flow cell developed to house the SPR-based plastic optical fibre biosensor. Exemplary response curve (shift of the SPR wavelength versus time) of the proposed biosensor (right) for the detection of C-reactive protein in serum. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. [TNF-alpha, C-reactive protein and serum adiponectin modified in infertile patients with insulin resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vital Reyes, Victor Saúl; López Alarcón, Mardya; Zavala Ortega, Isabel; Hinojosa Cruz, Juan Carlos; Téllez Velasco, Sergio; Gris Calvo, Judith

    2008-11-01

    Women's reproductive potential is closely related to nutritional status. Some of the molecules that participate in ovarian regulation are produced in the adipose tissue, and therefore their production is associated with adiposity. To determine serum leptin, adiponectin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha in infertile women with or without insulin resistance; and to associate these molecules with adiposity. Thirty-one infertile women were included. Nutritional status was evaluated through clinical and biochemical parameters. Patients were stratified according with their body mass index and the presence of insulin resistance. For statistics, parametric analyses were conducted. The prevalence of overweight was 67.5%; high adiposity was present in 92.3% and central distribution of fat in 96.2% of studied women. Hypercholesterolemia was found in 32.3% of patients, hypertriglyceridemia in 25.8%, and 61.3% presented hyperinsulinemia. Overweight women presented lower adiponectin, and higher TNF-alpha and C-reactive protein concentrations, than those with normal body mass index (p dislipidemias, and IR was high in our population studied. We conclude that adiposity is closely associated with some of the molecules that participate in the reproductive process and that also regulate inflammatory responses.

  11. Correlation between lipid profile and C-reactive protein in children with nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurnia Dwi Astuti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Nephrotic syndrome (NS causes dyslipidemia in children, which can be long term or intermittent. Dyslipidemia has long been established as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. An early sign of atherosclerosis is elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protien (hsCRP. Atherosclerosis early in life, especially in childhood, warrants an assessment for NS. Study on a correlation between lipid profile and hsCRP, as a marker of atherosclerosis, in pediatric NS patients has been limited. Objective To assess for a correlation between lipid profile and hsCRP in childhood nephrotic syndrome. Methods This cross-sectional study was undertaken on 29 children with NS in Dr. Kariadi Hospital. Serum hsCRP, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL were examined in the active phase. Spearman’s test was used to analyze a possible correlation between total cholesterol, LDL, HDL and hsCRP levels. Results Mean levels of total cholesterol (454 mg/dL and LDL (288 mg/dL in this study were high, while the HDL level (55 mg/dL was normal, according to US Department of Health and Human Services classifications. The median hsCRP level was 0.33 mg/L and 9 (31% subjects had high hsCRP levels of more than 1 mg/L. There was a positive correlation between LDL level and hsCRP (r=0.423; P<0.05. Conclusions There is a weak positive correlation between LDL and hsCRP levels in children with NS.

  12. Serum C-reactive protein concentration as an indicator of remission status in dogs with multicentric lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lise; Toft, Nils; Eckersall, David

    2007-01-01

    -two dogs with untreated multicentric lymphoma. Methods: Prospective observational study. Blood samples were collected at the time of diagnosis, before each chemotherapy session, and at follow-up visits, resulting in 287 serum samples. Results: Before therapy, a statistically significant majority......Background: The acute-phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP) is used as a diagnostic and prognostic marker in humans with various neoplasias, including non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Objective: To evaluate if CRP could be used to detect different remission states in dogs with lymphoma. Animals: Twenty...... of the dogs (P = .0019) had CRP concentrations above the reference range (68%, 15/22). After achieving complete remission 90% (18/20) of the dogs had CRP concentrations within the reference range, and the difference in values before and after treatment was statistically significant (P

  13. Acrolein stimulates the synthesis of IL-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) in thrombosis model mice and cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Ryotaro; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ikuo, Yukiko; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Itsuko; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Chiba, Kan; Toida, Toshihiko; Kashiwagi, Keiko; Igarashi, Kazuei

    2013-12-01

    Measurements of protein-conjugated acrolein (PC-Acro), IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma were useful for identifying silent brain infarction with high sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study was to determine whether acrolein causes increased production of IL-6 and CRP in thrombosis model mice and cultured cells. In mice with photochemically induced thrombosis, acrolein produced at the locus of infarction increased the level of IL-6 and then CRP in plasma. This was confirmed in cell culture systems - acrolein stimulated the production of IL-6 in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2a cells, mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), and IL-6 in turn stimulated the production of CRP in human hepatocarcinoma cells. The level of IL-6 mRNA was increased by acrolein through an increase in phosphorylation of the transcription factors, c-Jun, and NF-κB p65. Furthermore, CRP stimulated IL-6 production in mouse macrophage-like J774.1 cells and HUVEC. IL-6 functioned as a protective factor against acrolein toxicity in Neuro-2a cells and HUVEC. These results show that acrolein stimulates the synthesis of IL-6 and CRP, which function as protecting factors against acrolein toxicity, and that the combined measurement of PC-Acro, IL-6, and CRP is effective for identification of silent brain infarction. The combined measurements of protein-conjugated acrolein (PC-Acro), IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma were useful for identifying silent brain infarction. The aim of this study was to determine whether acrolein causes increased production of IL-6 and CRP, and indeed acrolein increased IL-6 synthesis and IL-6 in turn increased CRP synthesis. Furthermore, IL-6 decreased acrolein toxicity in several cell lines. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  14. Uncoupling protein 2 G(-866A polymorphism: a new gene polymorphism associated with C-reactive protein in type 2 diabetic patients C-reactive protein in type 2 diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cocozza Sergio

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluated the relationship between the G(-866A polymorphism of the uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 gene and high-sensitivity C reactive protein (hs-CRP plasma levels in diabetic patients. Methods We studied 383 unrelated people with type 2 diabetes aged 40-70 years. Anthropometry, fasting lipids, glucose, HbA1c, and hs-CRP were measured. Participants were genotyped for the G (-866A polymorphism of the uncoupling protein 2 gene. Results Hs-CRP (mg/L increased progressively across the three genotype groups AA, AG, or GG, being respectively 3.0 ± 3.2, 3.6 ± 5.0, and 4.8 ± 5.3 (p for trend = 0.03. Since hs-CRP values were not significantly different between AA and AG genotype, these two groups were pooled for further analyses. Compared to participants with the AA/AG genotypes, homozygotes for the G allele (GG genotype had significantly higher hs-CRP levels (4.8 ± 5.3 vs 3.5 ± 4.7 mg/L, p = 0.01 and a larger proportion (53.9% vs 46.1%, p = 0.013 of elevated hs-CRP (> 2 mg/L. This was not explained by major confounders such as age, gender, BMI, waist circumference, HbA1c, smoking, or medications use which were comparable in the two genotype groups. Conclusions The study shows for the first time, in type 2 diabetic patients, a significant association of hs-CRP levels with the G(-866A polymorphism of UCP2 beyond the effect of major confounders.

  15. Kinetics of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and -10, and phospholipase A2-II in severely traumatized septic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laušević Željko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Injury-induced anergy is one of the key factors contributing to trauma victims' high susceptibility to sepsis. This group of patients is mostly of young age and it is therefore essential to be able to predict as accurately as possible the development of septic complications, so appropriate treatment could be provided. The aim of this study was to assess kinetics of interleukin (IL -6 and -10, phospholipase A2- II and C-reactive protein (CRP in severely traumatized patients and explore the possibilities for early detection of potentially septic patients. Methods. This prospective study included 65 traumatized patients with injury severity score (ISS > 18, requiring treatment at surgical intensive care units, divided into two groups: 24 patients without sepsis and 41 patients with sepsis. C-reactive protein, IL-6 and -10 and phospholipase A2 group II, were determined within the first 24 hours, and on the second, third and seventh day of hospitalization. Results. Mean values of IL-6 and phospholipase A2-II in the patients with and without sepsis did not show a statistically significant difference on any assessed time points. In the septic patients with ISS 29-35 and > 35 on the days two and seven a statistically significantly lower level of IL-10 was found, compared with those without sepsis and with the same ISS. C-reactive protein levels were significantly higher in septic patients with ISS 18-28 on the first day. On the second, third and seventh day CRP levels were significantly lower in the groups of septic patients with ISS 29-35 and > 35, than in those with the same ISS but without sepsis. Conclusion. Mean levels of CRP on the first day after the injury may be useful predictor of sepsis development in traumatized patients with ISS score 18-28. Mean levels of CRP on the days two, three and seven after the injury may be a useful predictor of sepsis development in traumatized patients with ISS score more than 28. Mean levels of

  16. Correlates of C-reactive protein levels in young adults: a population-based cohort study of 3827 subjects in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nazmi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The socio-demographic, behavioral and anthropometric correlates of C-reactive protein levels were examined in a representative young adult Brazilian population. The 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort Study (Brazil recruited over 99% of births in the city of Pelotas that year (N = 5914. Individuals belonging to the cohort have been prospectively followed up. In 2004-2005, 77.4% of the cohort was traced, members were interviewed and 3827 individuals donated blood. Analyses of the outcome were based on a conceptual model that differentiated confounders from potential mediators. The following independent variables were studied in relation to levels of C-reactive protein in sex-stratified analyses: skin color, age, family income, education, parity, body mass index, waist circumference, smoking, fat/fiber/alcohol intake, physical activity, and minor psychiatric disorder. Geometric mean (95% confidence interval C-reactive protein levels for the 1919 males and 1908 females were 0.89 (0.84-0.94 and 1.96 mg/L (1.85-2.09, respectively. Pregnant women and those using oral contraceptive therapies presented the highest C-reactive protein levels and all sub-groups of women had higher levels than men (P < 0.001. Significant associations between C-reactive protein levels were observed with age, socioeconomic indicators, obesity status, smoking, fat and alcohol intake, and minor psychiatric disorder. Associations were stronger at higher levels of C-reactive protein and some associations were sex-specific. We conclude that both distal (socio-demographic and proximal (anthropometric and behavioral factors exert strong effects on C-reactive protein levels and that the former are mediated to some degree by the latter.

  17. C-reactive protein inhibits survivin expression via Akt/mTOR pathway downregulation by PTEN expression in cardiac myocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Seob Lee

    Full Text Available C-reactive protein (CRP is one of the most important biomarkers for arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have shown that CRP affects cell cycle and inflammatory process in cardiac myocytes. Survivin is also involved in cardiac myocytes replication and apoptosis. Reduction of survivin expression is associated with less favorable cardiac remodeling in animal models. However, the effect of CRP on survivin expression and its cellular mechanism has not yet been studied. We demonstrated that treatment of CRP resulted in a significant decrease of survivin protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner in cardiac myocytes. The upstream signaling proteins of survivin, such as Akt, mTOR and p70S6K, were also downregulated by CRP treatment. In addition, CRP increased the protein and mRNA levels of PTEN. The siRNA transfection or specific inhibitor treatment for PTEN restored the CRP-induced downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway and survivin protein expression. Moreover, pretreatment with a specific p53 inhibitor decreased the CRP-induced PTEN expression. ERK-specific inhibitor also blocked the p53 phosphorylation and PTEN expression induced by CRP. Our study provides a novel insight into CRP-induced downregulation of survivin protein expression in cardiac myocytes through mechanisms that involved in downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway by expression of PTEN.

  18. C-reactive protein inhibits survivin expression via Akt/mTOR pathway downregulation by PTEN expression in cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Beom Seob; Kim, Soo Hyuk; Oh, Jaewon; Jin, Taewon; Choi, Eun Young; Park, Sungha; Lee, Sang-Hak; Chung, Ji Hyung; Kang, Seok-Min

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is one of the most important biomarkers for arteriosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Recent studies have shown that CRP affects cell cycle and inflammatory process in cardiac myocytes. Survivin is also involved in cardiac myocytes replication and apoptosis. Reduction of survivin expression is associated with less favorable cardiac remodeling in animal models. However, the effect of CRP on survivin expression and its cellular mechanism has not yet been studied. We demonstrated that treatment of CRP resulted in a significant decrease of survivin protein expression in a concentration-dependent manner in cardiac myocytes. The upstream signaling proteins of survivin, such as Akt, mTOR and p70S6K, were also downregulated by CRP treatment. In addition, CRP increased the protein and mRNA levels of PTEN. The siRNA transfection or specific inhibitor treatment for PTEN restored the CRP-induced downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway and survivin protein expression. Moreover, pretreatment with a specific p53 inhibitor decreased the CRP-induced PTEN expression. ERK-specific inhibitor also blocked the p53 phosphorylation and PTEN expression induced by CRP. Our study provides a novel insight into CRP-induced downregulation of survivin protein expression in cardiac myocytes through mechanisms that involved in downregulation of Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway by expression of PTEN.

  19. complement C3, Complement C4 and C-reactive protein

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    reactive protein, body mass index, complement. INTRODUCTION. Tobacco was first cultivated in North America. The word. 'nicotine' is derived from French language after French. Ambassador to Portugal Jean Nicot. Nicotine ...

  20. Validation of commercially available automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric method for measuring canine C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillström, Anna; Hagman, Ragnvi; Tvedten, Harold

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) is used for diagnosing and monitoring systemic inflammatory disease in canine patients. An automated human immunoturbidimetric assay has been validated for measuring canine CRP, but cross-reactivity with canine CRP is unpredictable. OBJECTIVE......: The purpose of the study was to validate a new automated canine-specific immunoturbidimetric CRP method (Gentian cCRP). METHODS: Studies of imprecision, accuracy, prozone effect, interference, limit of quantification, and stability under different storage conditions were performed. The new method was compared...... was detected at a concentration of 1200 mg/L. Recovery after spiking serum with purified canine CRP at 2 different concentrations was 123% and 116%, respectively. No interference from hemoglobin or triglycerides (10 g/L) was detected. CRP was stable for 14 days at 4°C and 22°C. In the method comparison study...

  1. C-reactive protein and white blood cell count do not improve clinical decision-making in acute appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tind, Sofie; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Zimmermann-Nielsen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Acute appendicitis (AA) remains a diagnostic challenge as indicated by the high rate of unnecessary surgery. Blood samples, primarily C-reactive protein (CRP) and leucocyte counts, are used as a diagnostic supplement despite their relatively low sensitivities and specificities....... However, their influence on diagnostic decision-making has not previously been investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the results of CRP and leucocytes had any positive or negative influence on the decision-making of surgeons handling patients with suspected AA. METHODS...... appendicitis on histology. The surgeons changed their diagnosis in nine cases after assessing blood samples. The changes in the proportion of correct diagnoses, sensitivity, specificity and predictive values after assessing blood samples were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: The results of CRP and leucocyte...

  2. Effects of Antisense Oligonucleotides against C-Reactive Protein on the Development of Atherosclerosis in WHHL Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP are closely associated with cardiovascular diseases, but whether CRP is directly involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis is still under debate. Many controversial and contradictory results using transgenic mice and rabbits have been published but it is also unclear whether CRP lowering can be used for the treatment of atherosclerosis. In the current study, we examined the effects of the rabbit CRP antisense oligonucleotides (ASO on the development of atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits. CRP ASO treatment led to a significant reduction of plasma CRP levels; however, both aortic and coronary atherosclerotic lesions were not significantly changed compared to those of control WHHL rabbits. These results suggest that inhibition of plasma CRP does not affect the development of atherosclerosis in WHHL rabbits.

  3. The impact of CCR5-Δ32 deletion on C-reactive protein levels and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dinh, Khoa M; Pedersen, Ole B; Petersen, Mikkel S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The C-C chemokine receptor 5-Δ32 deletion (CCR5-Δ32) has been associated with lower levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), but the effect on cardiovascular diseases is uncertain. This study addresses the impact of CCR5-Δ32 on the risk of low-grade inflammation...... and hospitalization with cardiovascular diseases in a large cohort of blood donors. METHODS: Genotyping of 15,206 healthy participants from The Danish Blood Donor Study for CCR5-Δ32 was performed and combined with CRP measurements and questionnaire data. Cardiovascular disease diagnoses were identified by ICD-10...... codes in the Danish National Patient Registry. RESULTS: CCR5-Δ32-carriers had a higher risk of hospitalization for cardiovascular diseases when compared with wild-type homozygotes (hazard ratio = 1.35, 95%-confidence interval: 1.00-1.87). CRP levels were unaffected by the CCR5-Δ32 deletion. CONCLUSION...

  4. Increased serum C-reactive protein concentrations in dogs with congestive heart failure due to myxomatous mitral valve disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimann, M. J.; Ljungvall, I.; Hillstrom, A.

    2016-01-01

    with different severities of MMVD. Dogs were classified based on ACVIM consensus statement guidelines (group A, n = 58; group BI, n = 56; group B2, n = 38; group C, n = 36). Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and multiple regression analysis. Dogs with congestive heart failure (CHF; group C) had......Cardiovascular disease in humans and dogs is associated with mildly increased circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP). Few studies have evaluated associations between circulating CRP and canine myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) and the results reported have been divergent....... The aim of this study was to investigate whether serum concentrations of CRP, determined using a novel automated canine-specific high -sensitivity CRP assay (Gentian hsCRP), were associated with severity of MMVD and selected clinical variables in dogs. The study included 188 client-owned dogs...

  5. C-reactive protein, heart rate variability and prognosis in community subjects with no apparent heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajadieh, A; Nielsen, OW; Rasmussen, Verner

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increased C-reactive protein (CRP) and reduced heart rate variability (HRV) both indicate poor prognosis. An inverse association between HRV and CRP has been reported, suggesting an interaction between inflammatory and autonomic systems. However, the prognostic impact of this interact...... of four HRV measures were significantly associated with increased rate of death or myocardial infarction. In a Cox model with CRP >or=2.5 microg mL(-1), standard deviation for the mean value of the time between normal complexes...... examinations, and 24-h Holter monitoring. Four time domain measures of HRV were studied. All were prospectively followed for up to 5 years. RESULTS: Mean age was 64 years (55-75). During the follow-up, 46 total deaths and 11 cases of definite acute myocardial infarction were observed. Both CRP and three...

  6. Magnetic permeability based diagnostic test for the determination of the canine C-reactive protein concentration in undiluted whole blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibraimi, Filiz; Kriz, Kirstin [Department of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); LifeAssays AB, IDEON Science Park, SE-223 70 Lund (Sweden); Merin, Henrik [Malmoe Animal Hospital, P.O. Box 9090, SE-213 63 Malmoe (Sweden); Kriz, Dario [Department of Pure and Applied Biochemistry, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); LifeAssays AB, IDEON Science Park, SE-223 70 Lund (Sweden)], E-mail: dario.kriz@euris.org

    2009-05-15

    We describe an one-step 11-min magnetic permeability based two-site immunoassay for C-reactive protein (CRP) utilizing polyclonal anti-canine CRP antibody conjugated dextran iron oxide nanoparticles (79 nm) as superparamagnetic labels and polyclonal anti-canine CRP conjugated silica microparticles (15 to 40 {mu}m) as carriers. An inductance based magnetic permeability reader was used to detect the target analyte, CRP, in 10 {mu}L whole blood samples, by measuring the magnetic permeability increase of the silica microparticle sediment due to immuno complex superparamagnetic nanoparticles. Measurements on standards showed a linear response between 0 and 17.5 mg/L CRP. Measurements performed on 16 whole blood samples from mixed breeds showed good correlation with a commercially available ELISA assay.

  7. A C-reactive protein promoter polymorphism is associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Pima Indians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolford, Johanna K; Gruber, Jonathan D; Ossowski, Victoria M

    2003-01-01

    Linkage analysis has identified a susceptibility locus for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) on chromosome 1q21-q23 in several populations. Results from recent prospective studies indicate that increased levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of immune system activation, are predictive...... of diabetes, independent of adiposity. Because CRP is located on 1q21, we considered it a potential positional candidate gene for T2DM. We therefore evaluated CRP and the nearby serum amyloid P-component, APCS, which is structurally similar to CRP, as candidate diabetes susceptibility genes. Approximately 10......, a surrogate measure of insulin secretion in non-diabetic subjects (P=0.050). Linkage analyses that adjusted for the effect of these polymorphisms indicated that they do not in themselves account for the observed linkage with T2DM on chromosome 1q. However, these findings suggest that variation within the CRP...

  8. Local C-Reactive Protein Expression in Obliterative Lesions and the Bronchial Wall in Posttransplant Obliterative Bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Outi E. Päiväniemi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The local immunoreactivity of C-reactive protein (CRP was studied in a heterotopic porcine model of posttranplant obliterative bronchiolitis (OB. Bronchial allografts and control autografts were examined serially 2–28 days after subcutaneous transplantation. The autografts stayed patent. In the allografts, proliferation of inflammatory cells (P<.0001 and fibroblasts (P=.02 resulted in occlusion of the bronchial lumens (P<.01. Influx of CD4+ (P<.001 and CD8+ (P<.0001 cells demonstrated allograft immune response. CRP positivity simultaneously increased in the bronchial walls (P<.01, in macrophages, myofibroblasts, and endothelial cells. Local CRP was predictive of features characteristic of OB (R=0.456–0.879, P< .05−P<.0001. Early obliterative lesions also showed CRP positivity, but not mature, collagen-rich obliterative plugs (P<.05. During OB development, CRP is localized in inflammatory cells, myofibroblasts and endothelial cells probably as a part of the local inflammatory response.

  9. C-reactive protein, heart rate variability and prognosis in community subjects with no apparent heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajadieh, A; Nielsen, OW; Rasmussen, Verner

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Increased C-reactive protein (CRP) and reduced heart rate variability (HRV) both indicate poor prognosis. An inverse association between HRV and CRP has been reported, suggesting an interaction between inflammatory and autonomic systems. However, the prognostic impact...... of this interaction has not been studied. We thus investigated the prognostic impact of CRP, HRV and their combinations. DESIGN: Population-based study. SUBJECTS: A total of 638 middle-aged and elderly subjects with no apparent heart disease from community. METHODS: All were studied by clinical and laboratory...... of four HRV measures were significantly associated with increased rate of death or myocardial infarction. In a Cox model with CRP >or=2.5 microg mL(-1), standard deviation for the mean value of the time between normal complexes...

  10. Lifestyle and clinical factors associated with elevated C-reactive protein among newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Mor, Anil; Rungby, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    % male) with newly diagnosed Type 2 DM included in the prospective nationwide Danish Centre for Strategic Research in Type 2 Diabetes (DD2) project. We assessed the prevalence of elevated CRP and calculated relative risks (RR) examining the association of CRP with lifestyle and clinical factors......BACKGROUND: We aimed to examine the prevalence of and modifiable factors associated with elevated C-reactive Protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, in men and women with newly diagnosed Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (DM) in a population-based setting. METHODS: CRP was measured in 1,037 patients (57...... showed consistent results with the full analysis. The linear regression analysis conveyed an association between high CRP and increased fasting blood glucose. CONCLUSIONS: Among newly diagnosed Type 2 DM patients, 40% had elevated CRP levels. Important modifiable risk factors for elevated CRP may vary...

  11. Prognostic Significance of Pre-treatment Serum C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients with Adenocarcinoma of the Uterine Cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner-Adler, Barbara; Kimberger, Oliver; Schneidinger, Cora; Kölbl, Heinz; Bodner, Klaus

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate pre-treatment serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level as a prognostic parameter in patients with adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. Pre-treatment CRP levels were analyzed to determine potential associations with clinicopathological parameters and to assess prognostic value in 46 patients with sole adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix. The mean (±SD) pre-treatment serum CRP level was 5.82 (7.21) mg/l. Serum CRP concentration significantly correlated positively with age at diagnosis (p=0.001), lymphovascular space invasion (p=0.0026), recurrent disease (p=0.0001) and International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (p=0.0002). In multivariate Cox regression models with age, FIGO stage, histological grade and lymph node status, elevated CRP and cancer antigen 125 levels were associated with shortened survival (pcervix. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  12. Predictive factors of hospital stay in patients with odontogenic maxillofacial infections: the role of C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, P; Igoumenakis, D; Shuttleworth, J; Smith, W; Ameerally, P

    2017-05-01

    To investigate whether clinical or laboratory variables on admission of patients with odontogenic infections are associated with a severe clinical course and a prolonged hospital stay, we hypothesised that specific factors such as the serum concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP) may act as predictors of the duration of stay. We designed a prospective patient-oriented study that included all those treated for maxillofacial infections of odontogenic origin in the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department of Northampton General Hospital between November 2013 and December 2014. A total of 71 were enrolled. We found that the concentration of CRP was a significant predictor of hospital stay (p=0.01). Its measurement on admission can predict the likely duration of stay of these patients and enable beds to be managed more efficiently. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. C-reactive protein concentration as a prognostic factor for inflammation in the management of odontogenic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirochnik, R; Araida, S; Yaffe, V; Abu El-Naaj, I

    2017-12-01

    Our aim was to find out if it is possible to correlate the duration of stay in hospital, the severity of infection, involvement of particular anatomical spaces, white cell count, efficacy of surgical treatment, and fever with C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations on admission. One hundred patients met our inclusion criteria. After their notes had been examined they were subdivided according to whether the infection of the main facial space involved was less severe, moderately severe, or very severe. The relations between degree of severity and CRP concentration on admission (odontogenic infections or presumed duration of stay, but severity scoring was a significant factor in the prediction of duration of stay in hospital. Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Does elevated C-reactive protein cause human atherothrombosis? Novel insights from genetics, intervention trials, and elsewhere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To evaluate evidence from human epidemiology, mechanistic studies, animal studies, human genetics, and human intervention trials to address whether elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) causes human atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Human epidemiology...... demonstrates that elevated CRP levels are associated with increased risk of atherothrombosis. Mechanistic and animal studies provide evidence both for and against a causal relationship of CRP with atherothrombosis. Human genetics demonstrate that genetic variation in the CRP gene is associated with lifelong...... increased CRP levels, but not with increased risk of atherothrombosis. A human intervention trial in healthy people with low LDL cholesterol and elevated CRP demonstrated that aggressive statin treatment caused reductions of 50% in LDL cholesterol, 37% in CRP, 50% in atherothrombotic cardiovascular events...

  15. Impact of vitamin D status and obesity on C-reactive protein in kidney-transplant patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewers, Bettina; Gasbjerg, Ane; Zerahn, Bo

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We examined whether vitamin D status and obesity are associated with low-grade systemic inflammation, as assessed by serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) in an adult population of kidney-transplant patients. DESIGN: This was a single-center, cross-sectional study. SETTING...... was found. Fat mass correlated positively with CRP, suggesting that obesity may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and chronic allograft rejection in kidney-transplant patients....... AND PATIENTS: Data were collected between December 2005 and April 2006 from 161 adult (aged >18 years) kidney-transplant patients (mean age, 53.1 years; SD, 11.5 years; females/males, 78/83), with a median kidney-graft age of 7.0 years and serum CRP levels

  16. Genetic predisposition to elevated levels of C-reactive protein is associated with a decreased risk for preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spracklen, Cassandra N; Smith, Caitlin J; Saftlas, Audrey F; Triche, Elizabeth W; Bjonnes, Andrew; Keating, Brendan J; Saxena, Richa; Breheny, Patrick J; Dewan, Andrew T; Robinson, Jennifer G; Hoh, Josephine; Ryckman, Kelli K

    2017-02-01

    To examine the association between genetic predisposition to elevated C-reactive protein (CRP)and risk for preeclampsia using validated genetic loci for C-reactive protein. Preeclampsia cases (n = 177) and normotensive controls (n = 116) were selected from live birth certificates to nulliparous Iowa women during the period August 2002-May 2005. Disease status was verified by the medical chart review. Genetic predisposition to CRP was estimated by a genetic risk score on the basis of established loci for CRP levels. Logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between the genotype score and preeclampsia. Replication analyses were performed in an independent, US population of preeclampsia cases (n = 516) and controls (n = 1,097) of European ancestry. The genetic risk score (GRS) related to higher levels of CRP demonstrated a significantly decreased risk of preeclampsia (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.82-0.96). When the GRS was analyzed by quartile, an inverse linear trend was observed (p = 0.0006). The results were similar after adjustments for the body mass index (BMI), smoking, and leisure-time physical activity. In the independent replication population, the association with the CRP GRS was also marginally significant (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.92, 1.02). Meta-analysis of the two studies was statistically significant (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.90, 0.99). Our data suggest an inverse, counterintuitive association between the genetic predisposition to elevated levels of CRP and a decreased risk of preeclampsia. This suggests that the blood CRP level is a marker of preeclampsia, but it does not appear to be a factor on the causal pathway.

  17. Association between serum levels of high sensitive C-reactive protein and inflammation activity in chronic gastritis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Asghar; Moradkhani, Atefeh; Hafezi Ahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Jafari Heirdarlo, Ali; Abangah, Ghobad; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Sayehmiri, Kourosh

    2016-01-01

    Gastritis is an important premalignant lesion and recent studies suggested a production of inflammatory cytokine-like C-reactive protein during gastritis. This study aimed to determine any relationship between high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and inflammation activity among patients with gastritis. Demographic and clinical variables of participants were collected by a validated questionnaire. Using histology of the gastric mucosa, Helicobacter pylori status was investigated and serum concentrations of hs-CRP were measured among dyspeptic patients. Correlation between hs-CRP serum levels and inflammation activities was evaluated by logistic regression analysis. The relation between active inflammation and other variables was evaluated by logic link function model. Totally 239 patients (56.6% female) were analysed. The prevalence of mild, moderate and severe inflammation activities was 66.5%, 23.8% and 9.6% respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among men and women were 2.85 ± 2.84 mg/dl and 2.80 ± 4.80 mg/dl (p = 0.047) respectively. Mean ± SD of hs-CRP among patients with H. pylori infection, gland atrophy, metaplasia and dysplasia were 2.83 ± 3.80 mg/dl, 3.52 ± 5.1 mg/dl, 2.22 ± 2.3 mg/dl and 5.3 ± 5.04 mg/dl respectively. Relationship between hs-CRP and inflammation activities (p gastritis, elevated hs-CRP levels may be considered as a predictive marker of changes in gastric mucosa and a promising therapeutic target for patients with gastritis.

  18. MODULASI SEL PUNCA MESENKIMAL DALAM MENURUNKAN KADAR HIGH SENSITIVITY C-REACTIVE PROTEIN SEBAGAI TERAPI NEFRITIS LUPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Putri Maharani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic Lupus Erythematosus merupakan penyakit inflamasi autoimun kronis dengan gambaran klinis luas dan perjalanan penyakit beragam. Pemberian pristan intraperitoneal dapat menginduksi lupus pada mencit. Secretome sel punca mesenkimal bekerja secara parakrin memberikan efek antinflamasi dan imunomodulasi antara lain mensupresi sel T dan sel B autoreaktif. High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP terkait dengan patogenesis SLE dan selaras dengan aktifitas penyakit.Tujuan Penelitian adalah untuk mengetahui pengaruh secretome sel punca mesenkimal terhadap kadar hsCRP pada mencit model lupus dengan induksi pristan. Desain penelitian adalah eksperimental dengan randomisasi, post test only control group design, sampel 21 ekor mencit betina Mus Musculus galur Balb/C, dibagi 3 kelompok yaitu kelompok kontrol (injeksi intraperitoneal NaCl 0,9% 0,5 ml, kelompok perlakuan (injeksi pristan intraperitoneal 0,5 ml dan kelompok terapi (injeksi intraperitoneal pristan 0,5 ml dan secretome 0,45 ml. Penelitian dilakukan selama 3 minggu, secretome diberikan pada akhir penelitian. Sesudah perlakuan dinilai kadar hsCRP secara ELISA. Analisis statistik menggunakan SPSS 22 for windows dengan uji Kruskal-Wallis dilanjutkan Mann-Whitney U test. P bermakna jika p<0,05. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa rata-rata kadar hsCRP pada ketiga kelompok yaitu kontrol 440.68(110.08-564.29 ng/ mL; perlakuan (pristan 2964.26(601.13-3926.10 ng/mL; terapi pristan+secretome 506.93(207.62-1473.46 ng/mL, dengan kemaknaan p=0.008. Terdapat perbedaan bermakna kadar hsCRP antara kelompok pristan vs pristan+secretome (2457.33 ng/mL; p=0.047. Secretome sel punca mesenkimal mampu menurunkan kadar hsCRP pada mencit model lupus dengan induksi pristan. Kata Kunci: High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein, Nefritis lupus, Secretome

  19. Evaluation of intrathecal serum amyloid P (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) synthesis in Alzheimer's disease with the use of index values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, S.D.; Hack, C.E.; van der Flier, W.M.; Scheltens, P.; Blankenstein, M.A.; Veerhuis, R.

    2010-01-01

    Serum amyloid P (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are proteins involved in innate immunity. The expression of SAP and CRP is increased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain tissue, compared to healthy controls. Although both proteins are found in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), their origin is unclear. We

  20. Plasma levels of C-Reactive Protein and Fibrinogen in Pulmonary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Keywords; Tuberculosis, Treatment monitoring, Acute phase proteins, drug resistant. *Author for correspondence: E-mail: ... DOTS programs, and up to 6 million deaths were averted. The treatment success rate (~86%) ... availability of anti-TB drugs without prescription; illiteracy; low socioeconomic status of patients; massive ...

  1. C-reactive protein enhances IgG-mediated phagocyte responses and thrombocytopenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapur, Rick; Heitink-Polle, Katja M. J.; Porcelijn, Leendert; Bentlage, Arthur E. H.; Bruin, MCA; Visser, Remco; Roos, Dirk; Schasfoort, Richard B. M.; de Haas, Masja; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2015-01-01

    Immune-mediated platelet destruction is most frequently caused by allo-or autoantibodies via Fc gamma receptor-dependent phagocytosis. Disease severity can be predicted neither by antibody isotype nor by titer, indicating that other factors play a role. Here we show that the acute phase protein

  2. Mechanistic Links Underlying the Impact of C-Reactive Protein on Muscle Mass in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Wåhlin-Larsson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Mechanisms underlying the relationship between systemic inflammation and age-related decline in muscle mass are poorly defined. The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between the systemic inflammatory marker CRP and muscle mass in elderly and to identify mechanisms by which CRP mediates its effects on skeletal muscle, in-vitro. Methods: Muscle mass and serum CRP level were determined in a cohort of 118 older women (67±1.7 years. Human muscle cells were differentiated into myotubes and were exposed to CRP. The size of myotubes was determined after immunofluorescent staining using troponin. Muscle protein synthesis was assessed using stable isotope tracers and key signalling pathways controlling protein synthesis were determined using western-blotting. Results: We observed an inverse relationship between circulating CRP level and muscle mass (β= -0.646 (95% CI: -0.888, -0.405 p<0.05 and demonstrated a reduction (p < 0.05 in the size of human myotubes exposed to CRP for 72 h. We next showed that this morphological change was accompanied by a CRP-mediated reduction (p < 0.05 in muscle protein fractional synthetic rate of human myotubes exposed to CRP for 24 h. We also identified a CRP-mediated increased phosphorylation (p<0.05 of regulators of cellular energy stress including AMPK and downstream targets, raptor and ACC-β, together with decreased phosphorylation of Akt and rpS6, which are important factors controlling protein synthesis. Conclusion: This work established for the first time mechanistic links by which chronic elevation of CRP can contribute to age-related decline in muscle function.

  3. Mechanistic Links Underlying the Impact of C-Reactive Protein on Muscle Mass in Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wåhlin-Larsson, Britta; Wilkinson, Daniel J; Strandberg, Emelie; Hosford-Donovan, Adrian; Atherton, Philip J; Kadi, Fawzi

    2017-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the relationship between systemic inflammation and age-related decline in muscle mass are poorly defined. The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between the systemic inflammatory marker CRP and muscle mass in elderly and to identify mechanisms by which CRP mediates its effects on skeletal muscle, in-vitro. Muscle mass and serum CRP level were determined in a cohort of 118 older women (67±1.7 years). Human muscle cells were differentiated into myotubes and were exposed to CRP. The size of myotubes was determined after immunofluorescent staining using troponin. Muscle protein synthesis was assessed using stable isotope tracers and key signalling pathways controlling protein synthesis were determined using western-blotting. We observed an inverse relationship between circulating CRP level and muscle mass (β= -0.646 (95% CI: -0.888, -0.405) pmuscle protein fractional synthetic rate of human myotubes exposed to CRP for 24 h. We also identified a CRP-mediated increased phosphorylation (pprotein synthesis. This work established for the first time mechanistic links by which chronic elevation of CRP can contribute to age-related decline in muscle function. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Accuracy of C-reactive protein determination in predicting chorioamnionitis and neonatal infection in pregnant women with premature rupture of membranes: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Laar, Rafli; van der Ham, David P.; Oei, S. Guid; Willekes, Christine; Weiner, Carl P.; Mol, Ben W. J.

    2009-01-01

    Preterm premature rupture of the fetal membranes (PPROM) is associated with intra-uterine infection. Early detection of intra-uterine infection may help prevent neonatal sepsis. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase protein often elevated when inflammation is present. The aim of this review was

  5. Utility of measuring serum levels of anti-PGL-I antibody, neopterin and C-reactive protein in monitoring leprosy patients during multi-drug treatment and reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, E. A.; Iyer, A.; Ura, S.; Lauris, J. R.; Naafs, B.; Das, P. K.; Vilani-Moreno, F.

    2007-01-01

    To verify the validity of measuring the levels of Mycobacterium leprae-specific anti-phenolic glycolipid (PGL)-I antibody, neopterin, a product of activated macrophages, and C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase protein, in serial serum samples from patients for monitoring the leprosy spectrum

  6. Longitudinal changes in C-reactive protein, proform of eosinophil major basic protein, and pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A during weight changes in obese children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausten-Thomsen, Ulrik; Gamborg, Michael; Bøjsøe, Christine

    2015-01-01

    been linked to increased cardiovascular susceptibility. This study investigates these biomarkers during weight loss and regain in obese children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A longitudinal study during a 12-week weight loss program with a 28 months follow-up was conducted. Anthropometrics and plasma......BACKGROUND: Childhood obesity is associated with several complications, including cardiovascular comorbidity. Several biomarkers, such as high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), proform of eosinophil major basic protein (Pro-MBP) and pregnancy associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A), have equally......), and 2.70 (girls) were included. Ninety children completed the weight loss program and 68 children entered the follow-up program. Pro-MBP and PAPP-A, but not hs-CRP, exhibited individual-specific levels (tracking) during weight loss and regain. The PAPP-A/Pro-MBP correlation was strong, whereas the hs...

  7. High-affinity RNA aptamers to C-reactive protein (CRP): newly developed pre-elution methods for aptamer selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orito, N.; Umekage, S.; Sato, K.; Kawauchi, S.; Tanaka, H.; Sakai, E.; Tanaka, T.; Kikuchi, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We have developed a modified SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) method to obtain RNA aptamers with high affinity to C-reactive protein (CRP). CRP is a clinical biomarker present in plasma, the level of which increases in response to infections and noninfectious inflammation. The CRP level is also an important prognostic indicator in patients with several syndromes. At present, CRP content in blood is measured immunochemically using antibodies. To develop a more sensitive method using RNA aptamers, we have attempted to obtain high-affinity RNA aptamers to CRP. We succeeded in obtaining an RNA aptamer with high affinity to CRP using a CRP-immobilized Sepharose column and pre-elution procedure. Pre-elution is a method that removes the weak binding portion from a selected RNA population by washing for a short time with buffer containing CRP. By surface plasmon-resonance (SPR) analysis, the affinity constant of this aptamer for CRP was calculated to be KD = 2.25×10-9 (M). The secondary structure, contact sites with CRP protein, and application of this aptamer will be described.

  8. C-reactive protein gene polymorphisms and myocardial infarction risk: a meta-analysis and meta-regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanbin; Liu, Tongku; He, Haitao; Sun, Yuqing; Zhuo, Fengling

    2013-12-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), the classic acute-phase protein, plays an important role in the etiology of myocardial infarction (MI). Emerging evidence has shown that the common polymorphisms in the CRP gene may influence an individual's susceptibility to MI; but individually published studies showed inconclusive results. This meta-analysis aimed to derive a more precise estimation of the associations between CRP gene polymorphisms and MI risk. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and China BioMedicine (CBM) databases was conducted on articles published before June 1st, 2013. Crude odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. Nine case-control studies were included with a total of 2992 MI patients and 4711 healthy controls. The meta-analysis results indicated that CRP rs3093059 (T>C) polymorphism was associated with decreased risk of MI, especially among Asian populations. However, similar associations were not observed in CRP rs1800947 (G>C) and rs2794521 (G>A) polymorphisms (all p>0.05) among both Asian and Caucasian populations. Univariate and multivariate meta-regression analyses showed that ethnicity may be a major source of heterogeneity. No publication bias was detected in this meta-analysis. In conclusion, the current meta-analysis indicates that CRP rs3093059 (T>C) polymorphism may be associated with decreased risk of MI, especially among Asian populations.

  9. Circulating microparticles in patients with coronary heart disease and its correlation with interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ying; Zheng, Lihui; Jiang, Ming; Jia, Ru; Zhang, Xiao; Quan, Qishan; Du, Guiqin; Shen, Dongjin; Zhao, Xiaodan; Sun, Wenying; Xu, Hongwei; Huang, Lijuan

    2013-11-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are vesicles released from activated or apoptotic cells. MP derive from various cells, most notably platelets, but also leucocytes, lymphocytes, erythrocytes, and endothelial cells. The aim of this study was to investigate endothelial MP (EMP), platelet MP (PMP), lymphocyte MP and monocyte MP and TF-positive MPs (TF+ MPs) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), and to evaluate the correlation of these MPs with Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Different cell-derived MPs and TF+ MPs were analyzed by flow cytometry in 40 patients with myocardial infarction (MI), 30 unstable angina (UA), 20 stable angina (SA) and 20 healthy individuals, and IL-6 and CRP were determined by ELISA and special protein analyzer, respectively. Compared with SA and control, EMP and PMP was significantly elevated in MI and UA (P < 0.001), and TF+ MPs was significantly elevated in MI and UA (P < 0.001). EMP and PMP correlated with IL-6 (r = 0.822, P < 0.001 and r = 0.567, P < 0.001; respectively) or CRP level (r = 0.597, P < 0.001 and r = 0.66, P < 0.001; respectively). Different cell-derived MPs in CHD may indicate the different pathophysiological changes in vessels, and MPs may both participate in the development of thrombosis and enhance the vascular inflammation.

  10. Effect of Whey Supplementation on Circulating C-Reactive Protein: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ling-Mei; Xu, Jia-Ying; Rao, Chun-Ping; Han, Shufen; Wan, Zhongxiao; Qin, Li-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Whey supplementation is beneficial for human health, possibly by reducing the circulating C-reactive protein (CRP) level, a sensitive marker of inflammation. Thus, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted to evaluate their relationship. A systematic literature search was conducted in July, 2014, to identify eligible studies. Either a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model was used to calculate pooled effects. The meta-analysis results of nine trials showed a slight, but no significant, reduction of 0.42 mg/L (95% CI −0.96, 0.13) in CRP level with the supplementation of whey protein and its derivates. Relatively high heterogeneity across studies was observed. Subgroup analyses showed that whey significantly lowered CRP by 0.72 mg/L (95% CI −0.97, −0.47) among trials with a daily whey dose ≥20 g/day and by 0.67 mg/L (95% CI −1.21, −0.14) among trials with baseline CRP ≥3 mg/L. Meta-regression analysis revealed that the baseline CRP level was a potential effect modifier of whey supplementation in reducing CRP. In conclusion, our meta-analysis did not find sufficient evidence that whey and its derivates elicited a beneficial effect in reducing circulating CRP. However, they may significantly reduce CRP among participants with highly supplemental doses or increased baseline CRP levels. PMID:25671415

  11. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of teicoplanin in neonates: making better use of C-reactive protein to deliver individualized therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Martín, V; Neely, M N; McGowan, P; Siner, S; Padmore, K; Peak, M; Beresford, M W; Turner, M A; Paulus, S; Hope, W W

    2016-11-01

    There is uncertainty about the optimal teicoplanin regimens for neonates. The study aim was to determine the population pharmacokinetics (PK) of teicoplanin in neonates, evaluate currently recommended regimens and explore the exposure-effect relationships. An open-label PK study was conducted. Neonates from 26 to 44 weeks post-menstrual age were recruited (n = 18). The teicoplanin regimen was a 16 mg/kg loading dose, followed by 8 mg/kg once daily. Therapeutic drug monitoring and dose adjustment were not conducted. A standard two-compartment PK model was developed, followed by models that incorporated weight. A PK/pharmacodynamic (PD) model with C-reactive protein serial measurements as the PD input was fitted to the data. Monte Carlo simulations (n = 5000) were performed using Pmetrics. The AUCs at steady state and the proportion of patients achieving the recommended drug exposures (i.e. C min >15 mg/L) were determined. The study was registered in the European Clinical Trials Database Registry (EudraCT: 2012-005738-12). The PK allometric model best accounted for the observed data. The PK parameters medians were: clearance = 0.435 × (weight/70) 0.75 (L/h); volume = 0.765 (L); K cp  = 1.3 (h -1 ); and K pc  = 0.629 (h -1 ). The individual time-course of C-reactive protein was well described using the Bayesian posterior estimates for each patient. The simulated median AUC 96-120 was 302.3 mg·h/L and the median C min at 120 h was 12.9 mg/L; 38.8% of patients attained a C min >15 mg/L by 120 h. Teicoplanin population PK is highly variable in neonates, weight being the best descriptor of PK variability. A low percentage of neonates were able to achieve C min >15 mg/L. The routine use of therapeutic drug monitoring and improved knowledge on the PD of teicoplanin is required. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e

  12. The effect of C-reactive protein deposition on myocardium with ischaemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Se Jin; Na Kim, Eun; Jai Kim, Chong; Choi, Jae-Sung; Kim, Ki-Bong

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated the effect of monomeric C-reactive protein (CRP) deposition on areas at risk (AAR) of myocardium with ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Myocardial ischaemia-reperfusion injury model was produced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 45 min followed by 45 min of reperfusion using female Sprague-Dawley rats. Tissue from non-ischaemic areas, areas at risk and infarct areas determined by Evans blue and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining was obtained from the sham group, the ischaemia-reperfusion injury without C-reactive protein (CRP) injection group (I/R only group), and the ischaemia-reperfusion injury with CRP injection group (I/R + CRP group). We assessed the effect of CRP injection on infarct size, CRP deposition, CRP and IL-6 mRNA expression, the third component of complement (C3) immunodeposition and mitochondrial structural remodelling with apoptosis by quantitative RT-PCR analyses, immunohistochemistry, direct immunofluorescence, electron microscopy and Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labelling assay, respectively. All images were analysed using an automated morphology tool. The infarct area significantly increased in the I/R + CRP group compared to the I/R only group. The anti CRP antibody confirmed that CRP deposition occurred in both the infarct and area at risk (AAR) of the I/R + CRP group. The myocardium did not exhibit CRP mRNA expression, and the CRP treatment group showed a tendency for IL-6 to increase without statistical significance. Activated C3, apoptosis and mitochondrial destruction increased on AAR and infarct area in the I/R + CRP group. These results strongly suggest the active participation of the deposition of CRP on AAR in the progression of myocardial infarction following ischaemia-reperfusion injury, accompanied by complement activation and mitochondrial change. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association

  13. C-reactive protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from a vein. The procedure is called a venipuncture . How to Prepare for the Test No special ... but may include: Excessive bleeding Fainting or feeling lightheaded Hematoma (blood accumulating under the skin) Infection (a ...

  14. Assesment of severity and changes in C-reactive protein concentration and various biomarkers in dogs with pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toru; Ohno, Koichi; Tamamoto, Takashi; Oishi, Mariko; Kanemoto, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Kenjiro; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Takahashi, Masashi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2017-01-20

    Canine pancreatitis is a relatively common disorder, and its mortality rate remains high. However, prognostic factors for pancreatitis based on evidence are limited. Moreover, the relationship between changes in C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration-an important prognostic factor for human patients with acute pancreatitis-and the prognosis of dogs with pancreatitis has not been widely studied. Therefore, we examined prognostic factors for canine pancreatitis during the first medical examination and evaluated the usefulness of serial CRP measurements during hospitalization. Sixty-five dogs met the inclusion criteria, including 22 that were hospitalized and treated. In Study 1, a multivariate analysis revealed that three factors- decreased platelet count and a marked (greater than 1,000 µg/l) elevation of specific canine pancreatic lipase (Spec cPL) concentration at the first medical examination, as well as elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and/or creatinine (CRE) level-were significantly different between the survivors and nonsurvivors. Moreover, CRP concentrations on the third and fourth days were significantly different between the two groups in Study 2. An evaluation of the decreased platelet count, remarkable elevation of Spec cPL concentration at the first medical examination, elevation of BUN and/or CRE as well as serial CRP concentration measurements may be useful for predicting the prognosis of canine pancreatitis.

  15. Adipokines, C-reactive protein and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis - results from a population- based ALS registry in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Gabriele; Peter, Raphael S; Rosenbohm, Angela; Koenig, Wolfgang; Dupuis, Luc; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Ludolph, Albert C

    2017-06-29

    To investigate the associations of leptin, adiponectin and high-sensitive (hs) C-reactive protein (CRP) with risk and prognosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Data from a population-based case-control study in Southern Germany (10/2010-6/2014) of 289 ALS patients (mean age of 65.7 (SD 10.5) years, 59.5% men) and 506 controls were included. During median follow-up of 14.5 months of 279 ALS patients 104 (53.9% men, 68.9 (10.3) years) died. Serum samples were measured for leptin, adiponectin and hs-CRP. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate ALS risk. Survival models were used to appraise the prognostic value. ALS patients were characterized by lower levels of school education, BMI and smoking prevalence. Adjusted for covariates, leptin was inversely associated with ALS risk (top vs. bottom quartile: OR 0.49; 95% CI 0.29-0.80), while for adiponectin a positive association was found (OR 2.89; 95% CI 1.78-4.68). Among ALS patients increasing leptin concentrations were associated with longer survival (p for trend 0.002), while for adiponectin no association was found (p for trend 0.55). For hs-CRP no association was found. Leptin and adiponectin, two key hormones regulating energy metabolism, were strongly and independently related with ALS risk. Leptin levels were further negatively related with overall survival of ALS patients.

  16. Evaluation of C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and cardiac troponin 1 levels in brachycephalic dogs with upper airway obstructive syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planellas, Marta; Cuenca, Rafaela; Tabar, Maria-Dolores; Bertolani, Coralie; Poncet, Cyrill; Closa, Josep M; Lorente, Juan; Cerón, Jose J; Pastor, Josep

    2012-08-31

    Brachycephalic dogs have unique upper respiratory anatomy with abnormal breathing patterns similar to those in humans with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between anatomical components, clinical signs and several biomarkers, used to determine systemic inflammation and myocardial damage (C-reactive protein, CRP; Haptoglobin, Hp; cardiac troponin I, cTnI), in dogs with brachycephalic upper airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS). Fifty brachycephalic dogs were included in the study and the following information was studied: signalment, clinical signs, thoracic radiographs, blood work, ECG, components of BAOS, and CRP, Hp and cTnI levels. A high proportion of dogs with BAOS (88%) had gastrointestinal signs. The prevalence of anatomic components of BAOS was: elongated soft palate (100%), stenotic nares (96%), everted laryngeal saccules (32%) and tracheal hypoplasia (29.1%). Increased serum levels of biomarkers were found in a variable proportion of dogs: 14% (7/50) had values of CRP > 20 mg/L, 22.9% (11/48) had values of Hp > 3 g/L and 47.8% (22/46) had levels of cTnI > 0.05 ng/dl. Dogs with everted laryngeal saccules had more severe respiratory signs (pdogs with BAOS that can be detected by cTnI concentration.

  17. Decreased postoperative C-reactive protein production in dogs with pyometra through the use of low-dose ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pei-Yu; Chang, Shi-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Sheng; Wang, Hsien-Chi

    2014-01-01

    To determine the effects of subanesthetic ketamine in dogs with pyometra on C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations following surgery. Prospective, nonconcealed, alternating allocation controlled trial. Veterinary teaching hospital. Sixteen dogs diagnosed with pyometra. The tentative diagnosis of canine pyometra was based on compatible history, physical examination findings, ultrasonographic findings, and hematological evaluation. Two different anesthesia and analgesic protocols with and without low-dose ketamine were used during and following ovariohysterectomy in 16 female dogs (n = 8 per group) that were diagnosed with naturally occurring pyometra. Dogs were sequentially allocated to treatment groups in an alternating fashion without concealment. Serum was collected before, 24, and 48 hours after surgery for CRP measurement. Perioperative physical parameters in the 2 groups of dogs were similar. The serum concentrations of CRP in both groups were essentially the same before surgery, but significantly increased in the control group and decreased in ketamine group at 48 hours after surgery. Low-dose ketamine attenuated the postoperative concentration of serum CRP in dogs with pyometra compared with dogs that did not receive ketamine in the perioperative period. Further studies are warranted to determine the clinical implications of these findings. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2014.

  18. Procalcitonin, C-reactive protein and serum lactate dehydrogenase in the diagnosis of bacterial sepsis, SIRS and systemic candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miglietta, Fabio; Faneschi, Maria Letizia; Lobreglio, Giambattista; Palumbo, Claudio; Rizzo, Adriana; Cucurachi, Marco; Portaccio, Gerolamo; Guerra, Francesco; Pizzolante, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), platelet count (PLT) and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as early markers for diagnosis of SIRS, bacterial sepsis and systemic candidiasis in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Based on blood culture results, the patients were divided into a sepsis group (70 patients), a SIRS group (42 patients) and a systemic candidiasis group (33 patients). PCT, CRP, LDH and PLT levels were measured on day 0 and on day 2 from the sepsis symptom onset. PCT levels were higher in Gram negative sepsis than those in Gram positive sepsis, although the P value between the two subgroups is not significant (P=0.095). Bacterial sepsis group had higher PCT and CRP levels compared with the systemic candidiasis group, whereas PLT and LDH levels showed similar levels in these two subgroups. The AUC for PCT (AUC: 0.892, P candidiasis groups (P=0.093 N.S.). In conclusion, PCT can be used as a preliminary marker in the event of clinical suspicion of systemic candidiasis; however, low PCT levels (candidiasis and SIRS groups.

  19. Traffic exposure in a population with high prevalence type 2 diabetes - Do medications influence concentrations of C-reactive protein?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rioux, Christine L.; Tucker, Katherine L.; Brugge, Doug; Gute, David M.; Mwamburi, Mkaya

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) and particulate air pollution are associated with inflammatory dysregulation. We assessed the modifying effects of diabetes medications on the association of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and traffic exposure in adults with T2D (n = 379). CRP concentrations were significantly positively associated with residence ≤100 m of a roadway, >100 m and ≤200 m of a roadway and increased traffic density for individuals using insulin. For individuals using oral hypoglycemic medications (OHAs), CRP was significantly negatively associated with residence >100 m - ≤200 m of a roadway and multiple roadway exposure in an interaction model. Among people with diabetes, individuals on insulin appear to be most vulnerable to the effects of traffic exposure. Disease severity among insulin users may promote the pro-inflammatory response to traffic exposure, though diabetes medications may also modify the response. Possible anti-inflammatory effects of OHAs with traffic exposure merit further evaluation. - Highlights: →We examine traffic exposure in a population with high rates of Type 2 Diabetes. →Differences in CRP were evaluated by traffic levels, medication use and type. →Those on insulin had significantly higher CRP with traffic exposure. →Interaction models demonstrated lower CRP with traffic exposure and OHA use. →Diabetes medications may modify the response to traffic exposure. - Among people with diabetes, individuals on insulin appear to be most vulnerable to the effects of traffic exposure. Diabetes medications may modify the response to traffic.

  20. C-reactive protein as predictor of recurrence in patients with rectal cancer undergoing chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toiyama, Yuji; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Saigusa, Susumu; Kawamura, Mikio; Kawamoto, Aya; Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Hiro, Jyunichiro; Tanaka, Koji; Mohri, Yasuhiko; Kusunoki, Masato

    2013-11-01

    The clinical significance of the systemic inflammatory response (SIR) in patients with rectal cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), to the best of our knowledge, has not been thus far investigated. The neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet/lymphocyte ratio (PLR) and C-Reactive protein (CRP) levels for 84 patients with rectal cancer undergoing CRT were available as indicators of SIR status. The impact of SIR status on the prognosis of these patients was assessed. Elevated NLR, CRP, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and pathological TNM stage III [ypN(+)] were identified as significant prognostic factors for poor overall survival (OS), with CRP and ypN(+) being validated as independent predictors of OS. Elevated CRP and CEA levels were significant predictive factors for poor disease-free survival (DFS), and an elevated CRP level was identified as the only independent predictive factor for DFS. In addition, an elevated CRP level predicted for poorer OS and DFS in patients with pathological TNM stage I-II [ypN(-)]. CRP is a promising predictor of recurrence and prognosis in patients with rectal cancer treated by CRT.

  1. The role of C-reactive protein in prediction of the severity of acute diverticulitis in an emergency unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkelä, Jyrki T; Klintrup, Kai; Takala, Heikki; Rautio, Tero

    2015-05-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is the most appropriate initial imaging modality for the assessment of acute diverticulitis. The aim here was to determine the usefulness of C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting the severity of the diverticulitis process and the need for a CT examination. The CRP values of 350 patients who presented first time with symptoms of acute diverticulitis and underwent CT imaging on admission to Oulu University Hospital were compared with the CT findings and clinical parameters by means of both univariate and multivariate analyses. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that a CRP cut-off value of 149.5 mg/l significantly discriminated acute uncomplicated diverticulitis from complicated diverticulitis (specificity 65%, sensitivity 85%, area under the curve 0.811, p = 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, a CRP value over 150 mg/l and old age were independent risk factors for acute complicated diverticulitis. The mean CRP value was significantly higher in the patients who died, 207 (84 SD), than in those who survived, 139 (SD 83). In addition, a CRP value over 150 mg/l and free abdominal fluid in CT were independent variables predicting postoperative mortality. CRP is useful for the predicting the severity of acute diverticulitis on admission. Patients with a CRP value higher than 150 mg/l have an in increased risk of complicated diverticulitis and a CT examination should always be carried out.

  2. Effect of nutritional status and dietary patterns on human serum C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidowicz, Angelika; Regula, Julita

    2015-11-01

    The inflammatory process plays an important role in the pathogenesis of many chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, and metabolic syndrome. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) are widely tested inflammatory markers involved in the development of these diseases. Several studies indicate a relation between nutritional status and the concentrations of human high-sensitivity CRP and IL-6. Similarly, the role of diet in reducing inflammation and thereby modulating the risk of non-communicable diseases is supported by numerous studies. This review focuses on the effects of the selected nutrition models in humans on the concentrations of CRP and IL-6. It seems that the Mediterranean diet model is most effective in inhibiting inflammation. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension model and the plant nutrition model also have proven to be beneficial. The data on low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets are inconclusive. Comprehensive studies are necessary, taking into account the cumulative effect of dietary and other factors on the inflammatory process. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. Assessment of blood serum immunoglobulin and C-reactive protein concentrations in workers of X-ray diagnostics units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klucinski, P.; Martirosian, G.; Mazur, B.; Kaufman, J.; Hrycek, A.; Cieslak, P.

    2005-01-01

    Workers of X-rays departments are occupationally exposed to long-term low levels of ionizing radiation. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of occupational exposure of low-level X-ray radiation on immunoglobulin and C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in radiology workers. In the study group of 41 X-ray department workers and the control group composed of 32 persons, immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG,IgA) and CPR concentrations were analyzed. The study group was subdivided by gender and smoking habit. A significant decrease in IgG level was found in the workers and the female subgroup. The same observation was made when smokers and nonsmokers of both groups were compared. Smoking workers showed lower concentrations of IgA than non-smokers. Occupational exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation is associated with suppressive influence on the immunoglobulin production, especially IgG. In addition, smoking decreases the production of IgA in radiology workers. (author)

  4. Increased C-reactive protein plasma levels are not involved in the onset of post-operative atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Andrea; Roldán, Juan; Verdejo, Hugo E; Zalaquett, Ricardo; Becerra, Elia; Navarro-Marquez, Mario; Mellado, Rosemarie; Lavandero, Sergio; Corbalán, Ramón; García, Lorena; Chiong, Mario

    2017-12-01

    Increased inflammation biomarkers plasma levels, including C-reactive protein (CRP), have been associated with the initiation and perpetuation of atrial fibrillation (AF). However, it is not known whether an increased CRP plasma level, without concomitant inflammation, is sufficient to induce AF. We investigated whether higher CRP plasma levels, determined by the presence of +219G>A CRP gene polymorphism, is associated with an increased risk of post-operative AF. One hundred and fifteen adult patients submitted to elective coronary surgery were genotyped for the CRP +219G>A polymorphism. CRP plasma levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CRP plasma levels before surgery were higher in GG than in GA+AA patients (3.4±3.1 vs. 1.7±1.8, p<0.015). Thirteen percent of the patients presented post-operative AF. Despite the positive correlation between the polymorphism and CRP levels, there was no significant difference in the occurrence of post-operative AF between the different genotypes. These results suggest that increased CRP plasma levels that are not associated with an inflammatory process are not sufficient to trigger AF after cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Parental perception of child weight and inflammation: Perceived overweight is associated with higher child c-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutin, Angelina R; Rust, George; Robinson, Eric; Daly, Michael; Terracciano, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Self-perceived overweight and weight discrimination are associated with inflammation in adulthood. We test whether there is an intergenerational association of parent perception of child overweight on higher levels of child c-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation implicated in stress. Data were from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2014 (N=4988). Parents reported their perception of their child's weight; CRP was assayed from children's blood samples. Children whose parents perceived them as overweight had higher CRP levels than children who were perceived about the right weight; perceived underweight was also associated with higher CRP (F(2,4977)=9.23, p<.001). These associations were independent of the child's objective weight status and waist circumference and held when the sample was limited to children with objective overweight and obesity. These results suggest an intergenerational transfer of the psychological perception of body weight from parents to the inflammatory health of their child. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Response of Leptin and C-reactive Protein Serum Levels to 12 Weeks Moderate Intensity Aerobic Exercise in Obese Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Ghiasi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 12 weeks moderate intensity aerobic exercise on leptin and C-reactive protein serum levels in obese men. The study was conducted in Urmia- Iran in 2015. Twenty-four obese men with an aged range 40-50 yrs. were enrolled into the study. Subjects were randomized to one of 2 groups exercise (n=12 and control groups (n=12. The exercise group performed aerobic exercise training up to 50-70 % heart rate reserve, three times a week for 12 weeks. Leptin and CRP serum level was measured by ELISA method before and after the 12 weeks. After 12 weeks exercise training, leptin and CRP serum level in the exercise group compared to the control group, were decreased significantly (P<0.05. To sum up, 12 weeks moderate intensity aerobic exercise in the reduction of CRP and leptin concentration had a prominent role that might be effective in reducing weight and improving cardiovascular risk factors.

  7. The association between economic development, lifestyle differentiation, and C-reactive protein concentration within rural communities in Hainan Island, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yosuke; Stickley, Andrew; Yazawa, Aki; Li, Dandan; Du, Jianwei; Jin, Yuming; Chen, Yan; Watanabe, Chiho

    2016-01-01

    Earlier fieldwork in rural areas of Hainan Island, China, demonstrated that during the course of economic development increasing differences had emerged in lifestyles within communities. It is possible that these variations might have stratified residents into subpopulations with different health attributes. This study examined the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, a biomarker of future cardiovascular events, and personal lifestyle parameters and the degree of community-level economic development among rural communities. A cross-sectional field survey was undertaken in 19 rural communities in Hainan. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 1,744 participants. Dried blood spot samples were collected to measure high-sensitivity CRP concentration. Sex-stratified multilevel regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated with CRP concentration among the participants. While CRP concentration was negatively associated with being married and (more) education among men, for women CRP concentration was associated with the frequency of poultry consumption (P = 0.014) and the experience of migratory work in the previous year (P = 0.009). In addition, for females, living in communities with a greater degree of inequality, as indexed by the Gini coefficient, was also associated with increased CRP concentration (P = 0.003). Given that CRP concentration is a marker of future CVD risk, this study suggests that within these previously homogenous rural communities, economic development might have stratified people into population subgroups with a different CVD risk. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Clinical evaluation of C-reactive protein and procalcitonin for the early detection of postoperative complications after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Frask

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Among the most common early complications after bariatric surgery are anastomosis leak and bleeding. In order to react quickly and perform accurate treatment before the clinical signs appear, early predictors should be found. In the study C-reactive protein (CRP and procalcitonin (PCT levels were investigated. Characterized by a relatively short half-life, they can predict surgical complications. Aim : To develop and implement certain standards for early detection of complications. Material and methods : The study involved 319 adults who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG as a surgical intervention for morbid obesity at the Department of General Surgery of Ceynowa Hospital in Wejherowo. Every patient had CRP and PCT levels measured before the surgery and on the 1st and 2nd postoperative day (POD. Results : Early postoperative complications occurred in 19 (5.96% patients. Septic and non-septic complications occurred in 3 and 16 patients respectively. Among the patients with septic postoperative complications CRP level increased significantly on the 2nd POD compared to the remainder (p = 0.0221. Among the patients with non-septic postoperative complications CRP level increased significantly on the 1st and 2nd POD compared to the remainder. Among the patients with septic and non-septic postoperative complications PCT level increased significantly on the 2nd POD compared to the remainder. Conclusions : The CRP and PCT level are supposed to be relevant diagnostic markers to predict non-septic and septic complications after LSG.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of point-of-care C-reactive protein testing to inform antibiotic prescribing decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppong, Raymond; Jit, Mark; Smith, Richard D; Butler, Christopher C; Melbye, Hasse; Mölstad, Sigvard; Coast, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Background Point-of-care C-reactive protein (POCCRP) is a biomarker of inflammation that offers clinicians a rapid POC test to guide antibiotic prescribing decisions for acute cough and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI). However, evidence that POCCRP is cost-effective is limited, particularly outside experimental settings. Aim To assess the cost-effectiveness of POCCRP as a diagnostic tool for acute cough and LRTI from the perspective of the health service. Design and setting Observational study of the presentation, management, and outcomes of patients with acute cough and LRTI in primary care settings in Norway and Sweden. Method Using hierarchical regression, data were analysed in terms of the effect on antibiotic use, cost, and patient outcomes (symptom severity after 7 and 14 days, time to recovery, and EQ-5D), while controlling for patient characteristics (self-reported symptom severity, comorbidities, and health-related quality of life) at first attendance. Results POCCRP testing is associated with non-significant positive reductions in antibiotic prescribing (P = 0.078) and increased cost (P = 0.092). Despite the uncertainty, POCCRP testing is also associated with a cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gain of €9391. At a willingness-to-pay threshold of €30 000 per QALY gained, there is a 70% probability of CRP being cost-effective. Conclusion POCCRP testing is likely to provide a cost-effective diagnostic intervention both in terms of reducing antibiotic prescribing and in terms of QALYs gained. PMID:23834883

  10. The Social Patterns of a Biological Risk Factor for Disease: Race, Gender, Socioeconomic Position, and C-reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karraker, Amelia; Friedman, Elliot

    2012-01-01

    Objective. Understand the links between race and C-reactive protein (CRP), with special attention to gender differences and the role of class and behavioral risk factors as mediators. Method. This study utilizes the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project data, a nationally representative study of older Americans aged 57–85 to explore two research questions. First, what is the relative strength of socioeconomic versus behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences in CRP levels? Second, what role does gender play in understanding race differences? Does the relative role of socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors in explaining race differences vary when examining men and women separately? Results. When examining men and women separately, socioeconomic and behavioral risk factor mediators vary in their importance. Indeed, racial differences in CRP among men aged 57–74 are little changed after adjusting for both socioeconomic and behavioral risk factors with levels 35% higher for black men as compared to white men. For women aged 57–74, however, behavioral risk factors explain 30% of the relationship between race and CRP. Discussion. The limited explanatory power of socioeconomic position and, particularly, behavioral risk factors, in elucidating the relationship between race and CRP among men, signals the need for research to examine additional mediators, including more direct measures of stress and discrimination. PMID:22588996

  11. Developmental origins of chronic inflammation: a review of the relationship between birth weight and C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deRosset, Leslie; Strutz, Kelly L

    2015-07-01

    The developmental origins of adult disease hypothesis suggests that the intrauterine environment may program postnatal health outcomes through mechanisms such as chronic inflammation. The purpose of this article was to review the literature on the association between infant birth weight and C-reactive protein (CRP), markers of the fetal environment and inflammation, respectively. We used PubMed, Google Scholar, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, the citation lists of the reviewed literature, and recommendations from experts in the field to identify potential articles. Inclusion criteria for the studies, regardless of study design, included human subjects, documented or self-reported infant birth weight, and a minimum of one measurement of CRP (during childhood, adolescence, or adulthood). Several studies demonstrated a statistically significant inverse association between birth weight and CRP in adulthood, although in many cases only after controlling for markers of current adiposity. No studies significantly linked birth weight to CRP in childhood or adolescence. Longitudinal studies, including multigenerational studies, are needed to further understand whether adult CRP has origins in the fetal environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Prognostic role of serum C-reactive protein in esophageal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Feng, Ji-Feng; Liu, Jin-Shi; Chen, Qi-Xun

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that C-reactive protein (CRP) is a useful predictive factor in several cancers; however, its role in esophageal cancer (EC) is controversial. A systematic literature search was performed using Medline, PubMed, and Web of Science to analyze the prognostic value of serum CRP in patients with EC. A meta-analysis was performed to assess the association between serum CRP and overall survival (OS) in patients with EC. A total of eight studies involving 1,471 patients were included in our study. Our pooled results demonstrated that a high level of serum CRP was associated with poor OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-1.57, I (2)=81.3%, P<0.0001). Subgroup analyses were performed in further investigations. When the patients were segregated according to treatment, pathological type, and cut-off level, high levels of serum CRP were found to be significantly correlated with OS. Our meta-analysis revealed that high levels of serum CRP were significantly associated with poor OS in patients with EC.

  13. Prognostic role of C-reactive protein in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A meta-analysis and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yi; Xu, Chang; Wu, Peng; Zhang, Ling-Hao; Li, Da-Wei; Sun, Jie-Hao; Li, Wen-Feng; Liao, Zhi-Su

    2017-11-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been shown to be associated with several tumors. However, its association with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is not well characterized. We performed a literature review and meta-analysis to assess the prognostic relevance of elevated CRP levels in patients with NPC. A literature search for relevant studies was performed on PubMed (Medline), the Cochrane Library, and Web of Science databases. Hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) were calculated to assess the association between elevated CRP levels and survival outcomes. Five studies with a combined study population of 5215 patients with NPC were included. Pooled hazard ratios for overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival were 1.84 (95% CI = 1.57-2.17) and 1.81 (95% CI = 1.53-2.14), respectively. Subgroup analyses showed that types of indicators and treatment before inclusion had no significant impact on the observed association. Elevated serum CRP levels in patients with NPC were associated with worse prognosis.

  14. Prognostic value of C-reactive protein levels in patients with bone neoplasms: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenyi; Luo, Xujun; Liu, Zhongyue; Chen, Yanqiao; Li, Zhihong

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of retrospective studies that investigated the association of preoperative C-reactive protein (CRP) levels with the overall survival (OS) of patients with bone neoplasms. A detailed literature search was performed in the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Embase and PubMed databases up to August 28, 2017, for related research publications written in English. We extracted the data from these studies and combined the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the correlation between CRP levels and OS in patients with bone neoplasms. Five studies with a total of 816 participants from several countries were enrolled in this current meta-analysis. In a pooled analysis of all the publications, increased serum CRP levels had an adverse prognostic effect on the overall survival of patients with bone neoplasms. However, the combined data showed no significant relationship between the level of CRP and OS in Asian patients (HR = 1.73; 95% CI: 0.86-3.49; P = 0.125). Similar trends were observed in patients with bone neoplasms when stratified by ethnicity, histology, metastasis and study sample size. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that increased CRP expression indicates a poorer prognosis in patients with bone neoplasms. More prospective studies are needed to confirm the prognostic significance of CRP levels in patients with bone neoplasms.

  15. Relationship between C-Reactive Protein Level and Diabetic Retinopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Chen, Song; Liu, Xiaoting; Duan, Hongtao; Kong, Jiahui; Li, Zedong

    2015-01-01

    To date, the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) level and diabetic retinopathy (DR) remains controversial. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis was used to reveal the potential relationship between CRP level and DR. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase.com, and Web of Science was performed to identify all comparative studies that compared the CRP level of two groups (case group and control group). We defined that diabetic patients without retinopathy and/or matched healthy persons constituted the control group, and patients with DR were the case group. Two cross sectional studies and twenty case control studies including a total of 3679 participants were identified. After pooling the data from all 22 studies, obvious heterogeneity existed between the studies, so a subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were performed. Removing the sensitivity studies, the blood CRP levels in the case group were observed to be higher than those in the control group [SMD = 0.22, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.11-0.34], and the blood CRP levels in the proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) group were also higher than those in the non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR) group [SMD = 0.50, 95% CI, 0.30-0.70]. The results from this current meta-analysis indicate that the CRP level might be used as a biomarker to determine the severity of DR.

  16. Relationship between C-Reactive Protein Level and Diabetic Retinopathy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Song

    Full Text Available To date, the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP level and diabetic retinopathy (DR remains controversial. Therefore, a systematic review and meta-analysis was used to reveal the potential relationship between CRP level and DR.A systematic search of PubMed, Embase.com, and Web of Science was performed to identify all comparative studies that compared the CRP level of two groups (case group and control group. We defined that diabetic patients without retinopathy and/or matched healthy persons constituted the control group, and patients with DR were the case group.Two cross sectional studies and twenty case control studies including a total of 3679 participants were identified. After pooling the data from all 22 studies, obvious heterogeneity existed between the studies, so a subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were performed. Removing the sensitivity studies, the blood CRP levels in the case group were observed to be higher than those in the control group [SMD = 0.22, 95% confidence interval (CI, 0.11-0.34], and the blood CRP levels in the proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR group were also higher than those in the non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR group [SMD = 0.50, 95% CI, 0.30-0.70].The results from this current meta-analysis indicate that the CRP level might be used as a biomarker to determine the severity of DR.

  17. High sensitivity C-reactive protein distribution in the elderly: the Bambuí Cohort Study, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assunção, L.G.S.; Eloi-Santos, S.M.; Peixoto, S.V.; Lima-Costa, M.F.; Vidigal, P.G.

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of the serum concentration of the acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) provides a useful marker in clinical practice. However, the distribution of CRP is not available for all age and population groups. This study assessed the distribution of high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) by gender and age in 1470 elderly individuals from a Brazilian community that participates in the Bambuí Cohort Study. Blood samples were collected after 12 h of fasting and serum samples were stored at -70°C. Measurements were made with a commercial hs-CRP immunonephelometric instrument. More than 50% of the results were above 3.0 mg/L for both genders. Mean hs-CRP was higher in women (3.62 ± 2.58 mg/L) than in men (3.03 ± 2.50 mg/L). This difference was observed for all ages, except for the over-80 age group. This is the first population-based study to describe hs-CRP values in Latin American elderly subjects. Our results indicate that significant gender differences exist in the distribution of hs-CRP, and suggest that gender-specific cut-off points for hs-CRP would be necessary for the prediction of cardiovascular risks

  18. MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode of the gated lateral bipolar junction transistor for C-reactive protein detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Heng; Kwon, Hyurk-Choon; Yeom, Se-Hyuk; Kwon, Dae-Hyuk; Kang, Shin-Won

    2011-10-15

    In this study, we propose a novel biosensor based on a gated lateral bipolar junction transistor (BJT) for biomaterial detection. The gated lateral BJT can function as both a BJT and a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) with both the emitter and source, and the collector and drain, coupled. C-reactive protein (CRP), which is an important disease marker in clinical examinations, can be detected using the proposed device. In the MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode, the sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility of the gated lateral BJT for biosensors were evaluated in this study. According to the results, in the MOSFET-BJT hybrid mode, the gated lateral BJT shows good selectivity and reproducibility. Changes in the emitter (source) current of the device for CRP antigen detection were approximately 0.65, 0.72, and 0.80 μA/decade at base currents of -50, -30, and -10 μA, respectively. The proposed device has significant application in the detection of certain biomaterials that require a dilution process using a common biosensor, such as a MOSFET-based biosensor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Prognostic Value of C-Reactive Protein, Leukocytes, and Vitamin D in Severe Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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    Mia Moberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory biomarkers predict mortality and hospitalisation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Yet, it remains uncertain if biomarkers in addition to reflecting disease severity add new prognostic information on severe COPD. We investigated if leukocytes, C-reactive protein (CRP, and vitamin D were independent predictors of mortality and hospitalisation after adjusting for disease severity with an integrative index, the i-BODE index. In total, 423 patients participating in a pulmonary rehabilitation programme, with a mean value of FEV1 of 38% of predicted, were included. Mean followup was 45 months. During the follow-up period, 149 deaths (35% were observed and 330 patients (78.0% had at least one acute hospitalisation; 244 patients (57.7% had at least one hospitalisation due to an exacerbation of COPD. In the analysis (Cox proportional hazards model fully adjusted for age, sex, and i-BODE index, the hazard ratio for 1 mg/L increase in CRP was 1.02 (P=0.003 and for 1×109/L increase in leukocytes was 1.43 (P=0.03. Only leukocyte count was significantly associated with hospitalisation. Vitamin D was neither associated with mortality nor hospitalisation. Leukocytes and CRP add little information on prognosis and vitamin D does not seem to be a useful biomarker in severe COPD in a clinical setting.

  20. High sensitivity C-reactive protein distribution in the elderly: the Bambuí Cohort Study, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G.S. Assunção

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of the serum concentration of the acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP provides a useful marker in clinical practice. However, the distribution of CRP is not available for all age and population groups. This study assessed the distribution of high sensitivity-CRP (hs-CRP by gender and age in 1470 elderly individuals from a Brazilian community that participates in the Bambuí Cohort Study. Blood samples were collected after 12 h of fasting and serum samples were stored at -70°C. Measurements were made with a commercial hs-CRP immunonephelometric instrument. More than 50% of the results were above 3.0 mg/L for both genders. Mean hs-CRP was higher in women (3.62 ± 2.58 mg/L than in men (3.03 ± 2.50 mg/L. This difference was observed for all ages, except for the over-80 age group. This is the first population-based study to describe hs-CRP values in Latin American elderly subjects. Our results indicate that significant gender differences exist in the distribution of hs-CRP, and suggest that gender-specific cut-off points for hs-CRP would be necessary for the prediction of cardiovascular risks.

  1. Neurokinin 3 receptor and phosphocholine transferase: missing factors for pathogenesis of C-reactive protein in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parchim, Nicholas F; Wang, Wei; Iriyama, Takayuki; Ashimi, Olaide A; Siddiqui, Athar H; Blackwell, Sean; Sibai, Baha; Kellems, Rodney E; Xia, Yang

    2015-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), an innate immune mediator, is elevated in the circulation before symptoms in patients with preeclampsia, a severe hypertensive pregnancy disorder with high mortality and morbidity. However, the specific sources underlying increased CRP and the role of elevated CRP in preeclampsia are undefined. Here, we report that circulating CRP levels are significantly increased in a large cohort of normotensive pregnant individuals when compared with nulligravid women and is further increased in patients with preeclampsia. These findings led us to discover further that placental syncytiotrophoblasts are previously unrecognized cellular sources of CRP and underlie elevated CRP in normotensive pregnant women and the additional increase in patients with preeclampsia. Next, we demonstrated that injection of CRP induces preeclampsia features, including hypertension (157 mm Hg CRP treated versus 119 mm Hg control), proteinuria (35.0 mg/μg CRP treated versus 14.1 mg/μg control), kidney, and placental damage and increased levels of sFlt-1 in pregnant mice but not in nonpregnant mice. Our study implicates that phosphocholine transferase, a placental-specific enzyme post-translationally modifying neurokinin B, is essential for the pathogenic role of CRP in preeclampsia through activation of the neurokinin 3 receptor. Overall, our studies have provided significant new insight on the pathogenic role of CRP in preeclampsia and highlighted innovative therapeutic strategies. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Apolipoprotein E genotypes, circulating C-reactive protein and angiographic coronary artery disease: the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, Tanja B; Hoffmann, Michael M; Renner, Wilfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Böhm, Bernhard O; März, Winfried

    2011-04-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) has been implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. The genetic polymorphism of apolipoprotein (apo) E is associated with the concentration of CRP. We analyzed the association between the apo E genotype, CRP and angiographic coronary artery disease (CAD). The concentration of CRP was similar in patients with stable CAD and in controls, but increased in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes. In models adjusting for the main confounding variables, the alleles ɛ4 and ɛ2 were associated with decreased and increased concentrations of CRP, respectively, compared to the wild-type allele ɛ3. In spite of this, the ɛ2 allele was associated with a lower prevalence of angiographic CAD, while the slight over-representation of the ɛ4 allele was statistically not significant. We conclude that the apo E genotype is associated with circulating CRP. A causal role of CRP in the development of CAD would be supported if genotypes that raise CRP in the long-term were themselves associated with CAD. As we found the opposite, we suggest that the association between CRP and cardiovascular events reflects confounding and reverse causation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Relation of Serum Uric Acid With C-reactive Protein and Ferritin Levels in Patients Undergoing Hemodialysis

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    Biniaz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Clinical studies have shown that precipitation of urate crystals in joints of hyperuricemic patients could lead to systemic inflammation; however, this subject has been little explored in patients undergoing hemodialysis. Objectives We carried out this study in order to evaluate the association of serum uric acid (SUA levels with plasma concentrations of CRP, an inflammatory marker, and ferritin in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 182 hemodialysis patients in two hemodialysis wards in Iran. Required laboratory parameters, including serum levels of uric acid, C-reactive protein, lipid profiles (cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL, LDL, and ferritin were measured. Demographic data were also collected with the self-report survey. P Value less than 0.05 is considered significant. Results Higher serum levels of uric acid and CRP were seen in 44% and 47% of the patients, respectively. Hyperferritinemia was observed in 80% of participants. Although there was a significant relationship between SUA level and plasma triglyceride (P = 0.007, a linear correlation indicated that SUA level had no significant association with CRP and ferritin. Conclusions Our results indicated that there is no statistical relationship between SUA level and CRP and serum ferritin. Detailed investigations with larger sample size are recommended.

  4. Maternal C-reactive protein at hospital admission is a simple predictor of funisitis in preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Giuseppina; Anceschi, Maurizio M; Capri, Oriana; Galoppi, Paola; Pizzulo, Sabrina; Buccheri, Matteo; Pascone, Roberto; Nofroni, Italo; Brunelli, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    To analyze the prognostic value of maternal serum C-reactive protein (CRP) in predicting funisitis in patients with preterm premature rupture of membranes (pPROM). 66 patients (gestational age 24-33 weeks) hospitalized 1-12 h after pPROM were enrolled. White blood cell count (WBC), platelet count (PLT) and plasma concentration of CRP were assessed every 3 days. Histological evidence of chorioamnionitis and funisitis was obtained post-partum. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were employed to evaluate the role of maternal CRP in predicting funisitis. Funisitis was found in 24 patients (36.3%); 42 patients (63.7%) without funisitis were considered as controls. PLT and WBC at admission and before delivery did not show significant differences and were not statistically different between the two groups. Patients with funisitis had significantly higher CRP levels both at admission to hospital and 24- 48 h before delivery. ROC curve analysis showed that CRP at admission (area under the curve: 0.671, p = 0.021) and before delivery (area under the curve: 0.737, p = 0.001) are predictive of funisitis. High maternal serum CRP levels (>20,000 µg/l) in pPROM patients at admission to hospital may be an early marker which indicates, with a good diagnostic performance, the presence of funisitis. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Dietary Fiber, C-Reactive Protein, and Leisure-Time Physical Activity Among U.S. Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M Ryan; Arikawa, Andrea Y; Churilla, James R

    2018-03-01

    Some evidence suggests an inverse association between increased fiber intake and C-reactive protein (CRP). However, few studies have examined the associations among CRP, dietary fiber, and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) in a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults. Sample (n = 8372) included adults (≥20 years of age) who participated in the 2007-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Tertiles of reported fiber intake were created. The dependent variable was elevated CRP (>3-10 mg/L). Logistic regression models were stratified by LTPA participation and adjusted for age, gender, race, waist circumference (WC), and standing height. In adults reporting any volume of LTPA participation, increased fiber intake was significantly (P < 0.05 for the upper tertile of fiber intake) associated with lower odds of having an elevated CRP concentration when compared with the lowest tertile. Similar associations were not revealed in analyses limited to adults reporting no LTPA participation. After additional adjustment for WC and standing height, this protective association was no longer statistically significant. Results suggest that WC and standing height may mediate the beneficial association between increased fiber intake and lower odds of elevated CRP in adults reporting LTPA participation.

  6. Correlation between C-Reactive Protein in Peripheral Vein and Coronary Sinus in Stable and Unstable Angina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Weverton Ferreira, E-mail: wfleite@cardiol.br [Instituto do Coração (InCor) do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Ramires, José Antonio Franchini; Moreira, Luiz Felipe Pinho; Strunz, Célia Maria Cassaro [Instituto do Coração (InCor) do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo (HC-FMUSP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Mangione, José Armando [Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    High sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is commonly used in clinical practice to assess cardiovascular risk. However, a correlation has not yet been established between the absolute levels of peripheral and central hs-CRP. To assess the correlation between serum hs-CRP levels (mg/L) in a peripheral vein in the left forearm (LFPV) with those in the coronary sinus (CS) of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and a diagnosis of stable angina (SA) or unstable angina (UA). This observational, descriptive, and cross-sectional study was conducted at the Instituto do Coração, Hospital das Clinicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, and at the Hospital Beneficência Portuguesa de Sao Paulo, where CAD patients referred to the hospital for coronary angiography were evaluated. Forty patients with CAD (20 with SA and 20 with UA) were included in the study. Blood samples from LFPV and CS were collected before coronary angiography. Furthermore, analysis of the correlation between serum levels of hs-CRP in LFPV versus CS showed a strong linear correlation for both SA (r = 0.993, p < 0.001) and UA (r = 0.976, p < 0.001) and for the entire sample (r = 0.985, p < 0.001). Our data suggest a strong linear correlation between hs-CRP levels in LFPV versus CS in patients with SA and UA.

  7. Predictors of C-reactive protein in Tsimane' 2 to 15 year-olds in lowland Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDade, T W; Leonard, W R; Burhop, J; Reyes-García, V; Vadez, V; Huanca, T; Godoy, R A

    2005-12-01

    Infectious disease is a major global determinant of child morbidity and mortality, and energetic investment in immune defenses (even in the absence of overt disease) is an important life-history variable, with implications for human growth and development. This study uses a biomarker of immune activation (C-reactive protein) to investigate an important aspect of child health among the Tsimane', a relatively isolated Amerindian population in lowland Bolivia. Our objectives are twofold: 1) to describe the distribution of CRP by age and gender in a cross-sectional sample of 536 2-15-year-olds; and 2) to explore multiple measures of pathogen exposure, economic resources, and acculturation as predictors of increased CRP. The median blood-spot CRP concentration was 0.73 mg/l, with 12.9% of the sample having concentrations greater than 5 mg/L, indicating a relatively high degree of immune activation in this population. Age was the strongest predictor of CRP, with the highest concentrations found among younger individuals. Increased CRP was also associated with higher pathogen exposure, lower household economic resources, and increased maternal education and literacy. The measurement of CRP offers a direct, objective indicator of immune activation, and provides insights into a potentially important pathway through which environmental quality may shape child growth and health. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. ADIPONECTIN AND C-REACTIVE PROTEIN RELATIONSHIP IN PLASMA AND ADIPOSE TISSUE (STUDY AMONG HEALTHY OBESE EGYPTIAN FEMALES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SOLIMAN, S.E.T.

    2008-01-01

    The adipokine, adiponectin inhibits vascular inflammation and acts as an endogenous modulator of obesity - linked diseases. High - sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is recently debated as a risk factor and mediator for atherosclerosis. The present study investigated the association between adiponectin and hs-CRP in plasma and adipose tissue, and their relation to body composition and insulin sensitivity in a cohort of normal (30 subjects), obese (30 subjects) and morbidly - obese females (10 subjects). Messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of CRP and adiponectin in human adipose tissue were measured using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Plasma adiponectin and insulin were measured using radioimmunoassay methods, while, plasma hs-CRP was measured using ultrasensitive latex method.Results showed that adiponectin was negatively correlated with weight, BMI and insulin sensitivity index, and positively correlated with HDLc. The plasma hs-CRP levels were negatively correlated with plasma adiponectin. The plasma adiponectin levels being significantly lower and plasma hs-CRP being significantly higher in obese than normal females. Real- Time PCR analysis revealed the expression of CRP m-RNA in human adipose tissue and this was inversely correlated to adiponectin m RNA. These results suggest that elevation of CRP and reduction of adiponectin could emerge as mediators of atherogenesis and insulin resistance

  9. Alexithymia, Suicide Ideation, C-Reactive Protein, and Serum Lipid Levels Among Outpatients with Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Berardis, Domenico; Serroni, Nicola; Campanella, Daniela; Marini, Stefano; Rapini, Gabriella; Valchera, Alessandro; Iasevoli, Felice; Mazza, Monica; Fornaro, Michele; Perna, Giampaolo; Di Iorio, Giuseppe; Martinotti, Giovanni; Di Giannantonio, Massimo

    2017-01-02

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationships between alexithymia, suicide ideation, C-Reactive Protein (CRP), and serum lipid levels in adult outpatients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Seventy consecutive patients with GAD were recruited and evaluated. Measures were the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), the Scale of Suicide Ideation (SSI), and the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). All patients were assessed for: CRP, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceridaemia (TG), and very-low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C). TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios were also evaluated. Alexithymic patients showed higher scores on almost all rating scales and altered serum CRP and lipid levels vs. non-alexithymics. In the hierarchical regression model, the presence of higher MADRS scores together with higher scores at the Difficulty in Identifying Feelings dimension of TAS-20 were associated with higher rates of suicide ideation. Although alexithymic subjects with GAD may show a CRP and cholesterol dysregulation, this latter seems independent on increased suicide ideation, rather to Difficulty in Identifying Feelings, and subthreshold depressive symptoms. Study limitations and future research implications are discussed.

  10. Gum Arabic Reduces C-Reactive Protein in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients without Affecting Urea or Indoxyl Sulfate Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarra Elamin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gum Arabic (GA is a complex polysaccharide with proven prebiotic properties and potentially beneficial systemic effects. Methods. We randomly allocated 36 chronic kidney disease (CKD patients to receive 10, 20, or 40 grams daily of GA for four weeks and studied the systemic effects of this intervention. Results. Thirty participants completed the study with baseline glomerular filtration rate 29.1±9.9 mL/min/1.7 m2. In contrast to previous observations, we found no effect on serum urea or creatinine levels. GA supplementation was associated with a small but statistically significant drop in serum sodium level (138±2 to 136±3 mmol/L, p = 0.002 without affecting other electrolytes, urine volume, or indoxyl sulfate (IS levels. GA supplementation was also associated with a significant drop in C-reactive protein (CRP level (3.5±1.5 to 2.8±1.6 ng/mL, p = 0.02 even in patients who received only 10 g/day (4.4±1.2 to 3.2±1.5 ng/mL, p = 0.03. Conclusions. Supplementing the diet of CKD patients with 10–40 g/day of GA significantly reduced CRP level which could have a positive impact on these patients’ morbidity and mortality. This trial is registered with Saudi Clinical Trial Registry number 15011402.

  11. Cardiac troponin I is associated with severity of myxomatous mitral valve disease, age, and C-reactive protein in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungvall, L.; Höglund, K.; Tidholm, A.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concentrations of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and C-reactive protein (CRP) might be associated with cardiac remodeling in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD). Age- and sex-dependent variations in cTnI concentration have been described. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether plasma...... concentrations of cTnI and CRP are associated with severity of MMVD, and investigate potential associations of dog characteristics on cTnI and CRP concentrations. ANIMALS: Eighty-one client-owned dogs with MMVD of varying severity. METHODS: Dogs were prospectively recruited for the study. Dogs were classified...... according to severity of MMVD. Plasma cTnI was analyzed by a high sensitivity cTnI assay with a lower limit of detection of 0.001 ng/mL, and plasma CRP was analyzed by a canine-specific CRP ELISA. RESULTS: Higher cTnI concentrations were detected in dogs with moderate (0.014 [interquartile range 0...

  12. Increased serum C-reactive protein level in Japanese patients of psoriasis with cardio- and cerebrovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hidetoshi; Iinuma, Shin; Honma, Masaru; Iizuka, Hajime

    2014-11-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease, which may be associated with metabolic syndrome accompanied by cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases. We investigated the relation between serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases in Japanese psoriasis vulgaris patients. Ninety-seven psoriasis vulgaris patients and 79 healthy controls were assessed for serum CRP levels by immunoturbidimetry. The data were analyzed in terms of Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores, and comorbidity of cardio- and cerebrovascular disease and metabolic syndrome. Serum CRP levels in psoriasis vulgaris patients were significantly higher than those of healthy controls. There was no significant difference between male and female CRP levels in either psoriasis or healthy controls. No correlation was detected between PASI scores and serum CRP levels, either. Psoriasis with cardio- and cerebrovascular disease showed significantly higher CRP levels compared with those without the diseases. Furthermore, psoriasis with metabolic syndrome showed significantly higher serum CRP levels than those without the metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, serum CRP level is increased in psoriasis, and may be a useful marker for the prediction of the future risk of cardio- and cerebrovascular disease. © 2014 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  13. High sensitivity C-reactive protein distribution in the elderly: the Bambuí Cohort Study, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assunção, L.G.S. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Eloi-Santos, S.M. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Departamento de Propedêutica Complementar, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Peixoto, S.V. [Departamento de Enfermagem Aplicada, Escola de Enfermagem, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima-Costa, M.F. [Departamento de Medicina Preventiva e Social, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Centro de Pesquisas René Rachou, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Vidigal, P.G. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Departamento de Propedêutica Complementar, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-09-28

    The measurement of the serum concentration of the acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP) provides a useful marker in clinical practice. However, the distribution of CRP is not available for all age and population groups. This study assessed the distribution of high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) by gender and age in 1470 elderly individuals from a Brazilian community that participates in the Bambuí Cohort Study. Blood samples were collected after 12 h of fasting and serum samples were stored at -70°C. Measurements were made with a commercial hs-CRP immunonephelometric instrument. More than 50% of the results were above 3.0 mg/L for both genders. Mean hs-CRP was higher in women (3.62 ± 2.58 mg/L) than in men (3.03 ± 2.50 mg/L). This difference was observed for all ages, except for the over-80 age group. This is the first population-based study to describe hs-CRP values in Latin American elderly subjects. Our results indicate that significant gender differences exist in the distribution of hs-CRP, and suggest that gender-specific cut-off points for hs-CRP would be necessary for the prediction of cardiovascular risks.

  14. Usefulness of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein for predicting bacteremia in urinary tract infections in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, A; Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Lizcano-Lizcano, A; López-Guerrero, M A; Barroso-Manso, Á; Heredero-Gálvez, E

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the capacity of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), lactate and leukocytes to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs). Observational, retro-prospective analytical study of adult patients (≥15 years) diagnosed with UTI in an emergency department from August 2012 to January 2013. The study included 328 patients diagnosed with UTI, with a mean age of 52±22 years, 74% of whom were women. Of these, 43 (13.1%) had bacteremia. For predicting bacteremia, PCT achieved the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) at .993 (95% CI .987-1; P<.001). A cutoff≥1.16ng/mL achieves a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 97%, a positive predictive value of 84% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Lactate achieved an ROC-AUC of .844, and CRP achieved only .534. The mean values when comparing PCT levels in patients with UTIs with and without bacteremia were 8.08±16.37 and .34±.37ng/mL, respectively (P<.001). For patients with UTIs in the emergency department, PCT achieves considerable diagnostic performance for suspecting bacteremia, a performance greater than that of lactate, CRP and leukocytes. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of a gold coin fine on C-reactive protein test ordering in a tertiary referral emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallows, James L

    2013-12-16

    To examine the effect of an education campaign based around a gold coin fine on ordering of C-reactive protein (CRP) tests. A retrospective analysis of CRP test ordering before and after the intervention in the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary referral hospital in metropolitan Sydney that sees about 60,000 patients per annum. The date of the intervention - 2 August 2013 - corresponded with Jeans for Genes Day. Number of CRP tests ordered in the ED. 1290 CRP tests were ordered before the intervention (1-31 July), and 394 were ordered after the intervention (2-31 August). This decrease in CRP test ordering was despite an increased number of ED presentations in August compared with July (5219 v 5497 presentations). This represented an absolute reduction in the rate of CRP test ordering of 17.6% (95% CI, 16.2%-18.9%; P coin fine for ordering a CRP test, as part of a broader education campaign, significantly reduced the number of CRP tests ordered in a tertiary referral ED.

  16. Elevated salivary C-reactive protein levels are associated with active and passive smoking in healthy youth: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Rima

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined salivary C-reactive protein (CRP levels in the context of tobacco smoke exposure (TSE in healthy youth. We hypothesized that there would be a dose-response relationship between TSE status and salivary CRP levels. Methods This work is a pilot study (N = 45 for a larger investigation in which we aim to validate salivary CRP against serum CRP, the gold standard measurement of low-grade inflammation. Participants were healthy youth with no self-reported periodontal disease, no objectively measured obesity/adiposity, and no clinical depression, based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II. We assessed tobacco smoking and confirmed smoking status (non-smoking, passive smoking, and active smoking with salivary cotinine measurement. We measured salivary CRP by the ELISA method. We controlled for several potential confounders. Results We found evidence for the existence of a dose-response relationship between the TSE status and salivary CRP levels. Conclusions Our preliminary findings indicate that salivary CRP seems to have a similar relation to TSE as its widely used serum (systemic inflammatory biomarker counterpart.

  17. Clinical evaluation of C-reactive protein and procalcitonin for the early detection of postoperative complications after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frask, Agata; Orłowski, Michał; Dowgiałło-Wnukiewicz, Natalia; Lech, Paweł; Gajewski, Krzysztof; Michalik, Maciej

    2017-06-01

    Among the most common early complications after bariatric surgery are anastomosis leak and bleeding. In order to react quickly and perform accurate treatment before the clinical signs appear, early predictors should be found. In the study C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin (PCT) levels were investigated. Characterized by a relatively short half-life, they can predict surgical complications. To develop and implement certain standards for early detection of complications. The study involved 319 adults who underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) as a surgical intervention for morbid obesity at the Department of General Surgery of Ceynowa Hospital in Wejherowo. Every patient had CRP and PCT levels measured before the surgery and on the 1 st and 2 nd postoperative day (POD). Early postoperative complications occurred in 19 (5.96%) patients. Septic and non-septic complications occurred in 3 and 16 patients respectively. Among the patients with septic postoperative complications CRP level increased significantly on the 2 nd POD compared to the remainder (p = 0.0221). Among the patients with non-septic postoperative complications CRP level increased significantly on the 1 st and 2 nd POD compared to the remainder. Among the patients with septic and non-septic postoperative complications PCT level increased significantly on the 2 nd POD compared to the remainder. The CRP and PCT level are supposed to be relevant diagnostic markers to predict non-septic and septic complications after LSG.

  18. Traffic exposure in a population with high prevalence type 2 diabetes - Do medications influence concentrations of C-reactive protein?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioux, Christine L., E-mail: christine.rioux@tufts.edu [Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Tucker, Katherine L. [Department of Health Science, Northeastern University, Boston, MA (United States); Brugge, Doug [Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111 (United States); Gute, David M. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA (United States); Mwamburi, Mkaya [Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University, 136 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111 (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) and particulate air pollution are associated with inflammatory dysregulation. We assessed the modifying effects of diabetes medications on the association of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and traffic exposure in adults with T2D (n = 379). CRP concentrations were significantly positively associated with residence {<=}100 m of a roadway, >100 m and {<=}200 m of a roadway and increased traffic density for individuals using insulin. For individuals using oral hypoglycemic medications (OHAs), CRP was significantly negatively associated with residence >100 m - {<=}200 m of a roadway and multiple roadway exposure in an interaction model. Among people with diabetes, individuals on insulin appear to be most vulnerable to the effects of traffic exposure. Disease severity among insulin users may promote the pro-inflammatory response to traffic exposure, though diabetes medications may also modify the response. Possible anti-inflammatory effects of OHAs with traffic exposure merit further evaluation. - Highlights: >We examine traffic exposure in a population with high rates of Type 2 Diabetes. >Differences in CRP were evaluated by traffic levels, medication use and type. >Those on insulin had significantly higher CRP with traffic exposure. >Interaction models demonstrated lower CRP with traffic exposure and OHA use. >Diabetes medications may modify the response to traffic exposure. - Among people with diabetes, individuals on insulin appear to be most vulnerable to the effects of traffic exposure. Diabetes medications may modify the response to traffic.

  19. Correlation of insulin resistance with serum C-reactive protein, adiponectin and leptin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Yangqiang; Wang Zuobing; Yu Hui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between serum C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin (APN), leptin (Leptin) levels, insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) disease susceptibility. Methods: The plasma leptin and insulin (FINS) levels in the DM patients were determined by RIA, and the serum ANP levels were determined by ELSIA. The CRP, conventional serum fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels were determine by automatic biochemistry analyzer. The insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR, FPG x FINS/22.5) was calculated. The result was analyzed with normal healthy control group. Results: The serum CRP and leptin, HOMA-IR levels in T2DM group were significantly higher than that of in control group (P< 0.01), and the serum ANP was significantly lower than in control group (P<0.01). The HOMA-IR in T2DM was positively correlated with serum CRP (r= 0.36, P<0.05) and leptin(r= 0.39, P<0.05), and was negatively correlated with serum APN (r=0.32, P<0.05). Conclusion: The high serum CRP and leptin and low APN levels hyperlipidaemia might be factors for diabetes, and their metabolic disorders may be closely related with insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. (authors)

  20. Similar erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein sensitivities at the onset of septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, acute rheumatic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Reitzenstein

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C-reactive protein (CRP are employed in the evaluation of patients with suspected septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and acute rheumatic fever. The purpose of this study is to determine if one test has greater sensitivity (rises earlier than the other. Laboratory data were retrieved for pediatric patients hospitalized with one of the above three conditions, who had both ESR and CRP tests done on or shortly prior to admission. Sensitivity calculations were performed for mild, moderate, and severe degrees of ESR and CRP elevation. Microcytic erythrocytes, as defined by mean corpuscular volume (MCV less than 80 μL, were identified to see if this affects the ESR. ESR or CRP sensitivities depend on the cutoff value (threshold chosen as a positive test. The sensitivities were similar for similar degrees of elevation. ESR and CRP discordance was not significantly related to MCV. We concluded that the CRP does not rise earlier than the ESR (their sensitivities are similar. Previously published conclusions are dependent on arbitrary thresholds. We could not find any evidence that MCV affects the ESR.

  1. C-reactive protein and cardiac vagal activity following resistance exercise training in young African-American and white men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Kevin S; Jae, Sae Young; Vieira, Victoria J; Iwamoto, Gary A; Wilund, Kenneth R; Woods, Jeffrey A; Fernhall, Bo

    2009-04-01

    African Americans have a greater prevalence of hypertension and diabetes compared with white Americans, and both autonomic dysregulation and inflammation have been implicated in the etiology of these disease states. The purpose of this study was to examine the cardiac autonomic and systemic inflammatory response to resistance training in young African-American and white men. Linear (time and frequency domain) and nonlinear (sample entropy) heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity, tonic and reflex vagal activity, and postexercise heart rate recovery were used to assess cardiac vagal modulation. C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count were used as inflammatory markers. Twenty two white and 19 African-American men completed 6 wk of resistance training followed by 4 wk of exercise detraining (Post 2). Sample entropy, tonic and reflex vagal activity, and heart rate recovery were increased in white and African-American men following resistance training (P training, with reductions being maintained following detraining (P training improves cardiac autonomic function and reduces inflammation in African-American men, and these adaptations remained after the cessation of training. Resistance training may be an important lifestyle modification for improving cardiac autonomic health and reducing inflammation in young African-American men.

  2. ASSESSMENT OF C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AND OXIDATIVE/ANTIOXIDATIVE STATUS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE BACTERIAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IMAD A.J. THANOON

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to compare the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, serum malondialdehyde (MDA, antioxidant parameters [represented by serum ferritin, uric acid and totalantioxidant status (TAS] in children with bacterial meningitis with a control group. Twenty-seven children with bacterial meningitis were included in this study. Thirty apparently healthy childrenwere also included as the control group. Assays of serum CRP, uric acid, ferritin and TAS were performed on samples from controls and from patients prior to antibiotic therapy. After two weeksof antibiotic therapy, assays of the same parameters were repeated in the patients. A significant rise in the serum levels of MDA and CRP, and a significant reduction in serum uric acid levels andTAS were noted in children with acute bacterial meningitis (before therapy compared to controls. Serum ferritin levels showed no significant differences. When measured parameters of children withbacterial meningitis after therapy were compared with those of the controls, highly significant differences in the mean serum levels of uric acid, CRP and TAS were noted. There were no significant differences in the mean serum ferritin levels. Serum oxidative/antioxidative balance shifted to the oxidative side in meningitis patients before therapy, and improved after therapy.Elevation of CRP in cases with bacterial meningitis may reflect its importance as an aid in the diagnosis of such cases.

  3. The clinical value of determination of serum troponin I and hypersensitive C-reactive protein around extracorporeal circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Rui; Cao Yong; Yan Ji

    2005-01-01

    To explore the clinical value of determination of serum troponin I (cTnI) and hyper-sensitive C-reactive protein(hs-CRP) around extracorporeal circulation, cTnI and hs-CRP were determined in 46 patients with congenital heart disease before and after the surgery (0, 24h, 3d, 7d, 15d respectively). At the same time, electrocardiogram(ECG), hemo dynamics and other adverse events were recorded. Before the surgery results of cTnI and hs-CRP were in nor- mal range, wheraas after surgery the level of cTnI went up, reached its peak at 24h, and returned normal on d7. The level of hs-CRP begin to increase at 24h, returned normal on dT. Its level was higher in patients with postoperative infection than that in patients without infection, however, it returned normal after anti-inflammatory treatment. Therefore, cTnI and hs-CRP may be taken as diagnostic criteria of prognosis in patient after extracorporea circulation surgery. Postoperative infection around extracorporeal circulation surgery could be prevented by monitring hs-CRP concentration. (authors)

  4. Effect of periodontal treatment on serum C-reactive protein level in obese and normal-weight women affected with chronic periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Zahrani, M.S.; Alghamdi, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of conventional periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein (CRP) level and periodontal status in obese and normal-weight chronic periodontitis patients. METHODS: This is a controlled clinical trial conducted at the King Abdulaziz University Faculty of

  5. Preoperative plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 and serum C-reactive protein levels in patients with colorectal cancer. The RANX05 Colorectal Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Sørensen, Steen

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a prognostic variable in patients with colorectal cancer. It has been suggested, however, that plasma PAI-1 is a nonspecific prognostic parameter similar to the acute-phase reactant C-reactive protein (CRP). In the present...

  6. Usefulness of combining complement factor H and C-reactive protein genetic profiles for predicting myocardial infarction (from the Rotterdam Study)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardys, Isabella; de Maat, Moniek P. M.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Despriet, Dominiek D. G.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.

    2007-01-01

    Complement factor H (CFH) is an important regulator of the complement cascade. Binding of C-reactive protein (CRP) to CFH augments the ability of CFH to downregulate the effect of complement in atherosclerotic lesions. The CFH Tyr402His polymorphism has been suggested to influence the ability of CFH

  7. Validity and Agreement between the 28-Joint Disease Activity Score Based on C-Reactive Protein and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielung, Louise; Christensen, Robin; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To validate the agreement between the 28-joint disease activity score based on erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28-ESR) and the 28-joint disease activity score based on C-reactive protein (DAS28-CRP) in a group of Danish patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Data from 109...

  8. Effects of an antisense oligonucleotide inhibitor of C-reactive protein synthesis on the endotoxin challenge response in healthy human male volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noveck, Robert; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Flaim, Joann D.; Baker, Brenda F.; Hughes, Steve; Graham, Mark J.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; Ridker, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) binds to damaged cells, activates the classical complement pathway, is elevated in multiple inflammatory conditions, and provides prognostic information on risk of future atherosclerotic events. It is controversial, however, as to whether inhibiting CRP synthesis would have

  9. Biological variation and reference intervals for circulating osteopontin, osteoprotegerin, total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, H P; Jacobsen, Søren; Jensen, T

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Monitoring inflammatory diseases and osteoclastogenesis with osteopontin (OPN), osteoprotegerin (OPG), total soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (total sRANKL) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) has recently attracted increased interest. The purpose...

  10. C-reactive protein implications in new-onset hypertension in a healthy population initially aged 65 years : the Proof study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dauphinot, Virginie; Roche, Frederic; Kossovsky, Michel P.; Schott, Anne-Marie; Pichot, Vincent; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Gosse, Philippe; Barthelemy, Jean-Claude

    Background Because inflammation is known to be related with several cardiovascular diseases, we sought to determine whether C-reactive protein (CRP) might precede the onset of hypertension. Methods The study population was selected from the Proof study cohort including 1011 individuals initially

  11. The effects of rose hip (Rosa canina) on plasma antioxidative activity and C-reactive protein in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and normal controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bente Kirkeskov; Christensen, Robin; Bügel, Susanne Gjedsted

    2011-01-01

    reductase and catalase and the inflammatory marker C-reactive protein (CRP). The participants kept a food diary for the first 3 days and the last 3 days of the intervention period. The RA-patients completed The Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire at baseline and follow-up. RESULTS: CRP...

  12. Diagnostic utility of procalcitonin versus C-reactive protein as markers for early-onset neonatal sepsis at Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amponsah, Seth Kwabena; Adjei, George Obeng; Sulley, Abdul Malik

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Symptoms of sepsis are non-specific among neonates and diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. The study sought to evaluate the utility of procalcitonin (PCT) versus C-reactive protein (CRP) in diagnosing early-onset neonatal sepsis. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study i...

  13. Diagnostic value of C-reactive protein to rule out infectious complications after major abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gans, Sarah L.; Atema, Jasper J.; van Dieren, Susan; Groot Koerkamp, Bas; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications occur frequently after major abdominal surgery and have a major influence on patient outcome and hospital costs. A marker that can rule out postoperative infectious complications (PICs) could aid patient selection for safe and early hospital discharge. C-reactive protein

  14. Lifestyle intervention and/or statins for the reduction of C-reactive Protein in Type 2 diabetes: From the Look AHEAD Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Objective: Cardiovascular risk remains high despite statin use. Overweight/obese diabetic persons usually have normal/low LDL-cholesterol but high C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. We aimed to examine the effects of intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss (ILI) on CRP levels in overweight/ob...

  15. Genetic variation in estrogen receptor, C-reactive protein and fibrinogen does not predict the plasma levels of inflammation markers after longterm hormone replacement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Maat, Moniek P M; Madsen, Jonna Skov; Langdahl, Bente

    2007-01-01

    Markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen, are associated with the risk of atherothrombosis. Plasma levels of these markers of inflammation are affected by hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and modulated by smoking. We studied whether genetic variation in the estrog...

  16. Late midlife C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 in middle aged danish men in relation to body size history within and across generations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jolene Lee Masters; Budtz-Jørgensen, Esben; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim was to estimate the effects of ponderal index at birth and body mass index (BMI) in early adulthood on C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and to quantify the effects through subsequent measures of body size. In a subanalysis, the contributions of maternal BMI to ...

  17. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in > 80 000 Subjects Identifies Multiple Loci for C-Reactive Protein Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josee; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F.; Pare, Guillaume; Naitza, Silvia; Rudock, Megan E.; Surakka, Ida; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Guralnik, Jack; Shuldiner, Alan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Zee, Robert Y. L.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Nambi, Vijay; Kavousi, Maryam; Ripatti, Samuli; Nauck, Matthias; Smith, Nicholas L.; Smith, Albert V.; Sundvall, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Liu, Yongmei; Ruokonen, Aimo; Rose, Lynda M.; Larson, Martin G.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Teumer, Alexander; Tracy, Russell P.; Launer, Lenore J.; Buring, Julie E.; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Pankow, James; Elliott, Paul; Keaney, John F.; Sun, Wei; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Fontes, Joao D.; Badola, Sunita; Astor, Brad C.; Hofman, Albert; Pouta, Anneli; Werdan, Karl; Greiser, Karin H.; Kuss, Oliver; Schwabedissen, Henriette E. Meyer Zu; Thiery, Joachim; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Voelzke, Henry; Parker, Alexander N.; Aspelund, Thor; Bates, David; Young, Lauren; Tsui, Kim; Siscovick, David S.; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotter, Jerome I.; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Rudan, Igor; Hicks, Andrew A.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Thorand, Barbara; Gieger, Christian; Coresh, Joe; Willemsen, Gonneke; Harris, Tamara B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rice, Kenneth; Radke, Doerte; Salomaa, Veikko; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gibson, Quince D.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Snieder, Harold; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Xiao, Xiangjun; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Pramstaller, Peter P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Peltonen, Leena; Psaty, Bruce M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Ridker, Paul M.; Homuth, Georg; Koenig, Wolfgang; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Perola, Markus; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    Background-C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels. Methods and Results-We performed a genome-wide association analysis of CRP in 66 185

  18. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, C-reactive protein, and urinary albumin levels as predictors of mortality and cardiovascular events in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kistorp, Caroline; Raymond, Ilan; Pedersen, Frants

    2005-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptides have been shown to predict cardiovascular disease in apparently healthy individuals but their predictive ability for mortality and future cardiovascular events compared with C-reactive protein (CRP) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio is unknown....

  19. C-reactive protein and natural IgM antibodies are activators of complement in a rat model of intestinal ischemia and reperfusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padilla, Niubel Diaz; van Vliet, Arlene K.; Schoots, Ivo G.; Seron, Mercedes Valls; Maas, M. Adrie; Peltenburg, Esther E. Posno; de Vries, Annebeth; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Hack, C. Erik; van Gulik, Thomas M.

    2007-01-01

    Background. The role of C-reactive protein (CRP), natural immunoglobulin M (IgM), and natural IgM against phosphorylcholine (anti-Pc IgM) was investigated in relation with complement activation in a rat model of intestinal ischemia and reperfusion (II/R). The effect of Cl-esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh)

  20. Cardiovascular risk prediction by N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide and high sensitivity C-reactive protein is affected by age and sex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M.H.; Hansen, T.W.; Christensen, M.K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown that the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP) predict cardiovascular events in a general population aged 41, 51, 61 or 71 years. This study investigated...

  1. C-Reactive Protein Predicts Progression of Peripheral Arterial Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A 5-Year Follow-Up Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović Ljiljana

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have indicated that high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP is a risk factor for the peripheral arterial disease (PAD in diabetes. This study aimed to evaluate the possible predictive significance of hs-CRP for the development and progression of PAD in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D.

  2. Repeated measures of body mass index and C-reactive protein in relation to all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Doherty, Mark G; Jørgensen, Torben; Borglykke, Anders

    2014-01-01

    body mass index (BMI) and CRP with all-cause mortality and CVD. Being overweight (≥25-...Obesity has been linked with elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), and both have been associated with increased risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous studies have used a single 'baseline' measurement and such analyses cannot account for possible changes in these which...

  3. Periodontal inflamed surface area and C-reactive protein as predictors of HbA1c : a study in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Hoedemaker, Evelien; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank

    Periodontitis may exert an infectious and inflammatory burden, evidenced by increased C-reactive protein (CRP). This burden may impair blood glucose control (HbA1c). The aim of our study was to analyze whether periodontitis severity as measured with the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) and

  4. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shrotriya, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence.

  5. The study of the effect of World Health Organization recommended physical activity program on C- reactive protein and interleukin-6 in middle-aged men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Azad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Based on the World Health Organization (WHO proposition, 5 days a week and 30 minutes a day of aerobic physical activity has numerous healthy effects for middle-aged and adult population. However, to date the anti inflammatory effect of this program has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of 16 weeks of the WHO purposed physical activity program on C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 in middle-aged men. Material and Methods: 30 middle-aged men with C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels higher than the predicted values participated in this study. The subjects randomized to three groups: control(n=10, one training session per day(n=10, 16 weeks, 5 days a week, 30 minutes a day tread mill running, with70-80% of HRmax , and two training sessions per day(n=10, 16 weeks, 5 days a week, 2×15 minutes a day tread mill running, with70-80% of HRmax. Pre and post exercise C-reactive protein (fasting, interleukin-6(fasting, BMI and VO2max were measured. Data were analyzed with paired and one sample t-test and variance analysis. Results: Both training methods caused significant (p<0.05 decrease in C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and BMI, and significant (p<0.05 increase in VO2max in comparison with the control group. Conclusion: 16 weeks of the WHO proposed physical activity program, either one session per day or two sessions per day, can lead to C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 reduction in middle-age men.

  6. Variation in C-reactive protein following weight loss in obese insulin resistant postmenopausal women: is there an independent contribution of lean body mass?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsalani, R; Riesco, É; Perreault, K; Imbeault, P; Brochu, M; Dionne, I J

    2015-03-01

    We showed that obese insulin resistant postmenopausal women are characterized by higher lean body mass and elevated C-reactive protein. Although counterintuitive, we hypothesized that losses in muscle mass following caloric restriction and increase in muscle quality will be associated with improvements in glucose homeostasis through decreases in C-reactive protein. To determine 1) if improvements in C-reactive protein concentrations occurs through losses in lean body mass; and 2) if decreases in C-reactive protein levels contribute to improvements in insulin sensitivity. 50 postmenopausal women (body mass index>26 kg/m(²)) with impaired glucose disposal (body composition (total, trunk, and appendicluar). LBM and FM by DXA), LBM index (LBM (kg)/height (m(2)), body fat distribution (VAT and SAT by CT scan) and plasma high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and interleukin-6 (Il-6). Significant correlations were observed between Δ hsCRP levels with Δ Il-6 (r=0.33, p≤0.05), Δ total LBM index (r=0.44, p≤0.01), Δ trunk LBM (r=0.38, p≤0.01) Δ SAT (r=0.35, p≤0.05) and ∆ glucose disposal rate (r=- 0.44, p≤0.01). After including all the correlated variables in Stepwise linear regression model, Δ LBM index was the only independent predictor of the reduction in hsCRP levels (R(2)=0.20, p≤0.01). Losses in total lean body mass are independently associated with improvements in inflammatory state (CRP levels) in obese postmenopausal women with impaired glucose disposal. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Associations of C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 with cognitive symptoms of depression: 12-year follow-up of the Whitehall II study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, David; Kivimäki, Mika; Brunner, Eric J.; Elovainio, Marko; De Vogli, Roberto; Steptoe, Andrew; Kumari, Meena; Lowe, Gordon D.O.; Rumley, Ann; Marmot, Michael G.; Ferrie, Jane E.

    2009-01-01

    Background A lack of longitudinal studies has made it difficult to establish the direction of associations between circulating concentrations of low-grade chronic inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein and interleukin-6, and cognitive symptoms of depression. The present study sought to assess whether C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 predict cognitive symptoms of depression or whether these symptoms predict inflammatory markers. Methods A prospective occupational cohort study of British white-collar civil servants: Whitehall II. Serum C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and cognitive symptoms of depression were measured at baseline in 1991-3 and at follow-up in 2002-4, an average follow-up of 11.8 years. Symptoms of depression were measured with 4 items describing cognitive symptoms of depression from the General Health Questionnaire. The number of participants varied between 3339 and 3070 (mean age 50 years, 30% women) depending on the analysis. Results Baseline C-reactive protein (β=0.046, p=0.004) and interleukin-6 (β=0.046, p=0.005) predicted cognitive symptoms of depression at follow-up, while baseline symptoms of depression did not predict inflammatory markers at follow-up. After full adjustment for sociodemographic, behavioural and biological risk factors, health conditions and medication use, baseline C-reactive protein (β=0.038, p=0.036) and interleukin-6 (β=0.041, p=0.018) remained predictive of cognitive symptoms of depression at follow-up. Conclusions These findings suggest that inflammation precedes depression at least with regard to the cognitive symptoms of depression. PMID:18533059

  8. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Is a Predictor of Coronary Microvascular Dysfunction in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease

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    David C. Tong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundInflammation and microvascular dysfunction (MVD are independently associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with ischemic heart disease. This study aimed to assess the relationship between inflammation, MVD, and myocardial injury.MethodsCoronary microvascular function was assessed in 74 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI using the index of microvascular resistance (IMR by a pressure–temperature sensor-tipped wire. Serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP level was quantified by rate turbidimetry. Severe MVD was defined as IMR ≥ 30. Pearson correlation was computed to assess the relationships between hsCRP, troponin, and IMR of culprit vessel. Predictors of severe MVD were assessed by regression analysis.ResultsAcute coronary syndromes (ACSs represented 49% of the total cohort. Study cohort was divided into low C-reactive protein (CRP (hsCRP < 3 mg/L and high CRP (hsCRP ≥ 3 mg/L groups. There was higher representation of smokers (78 vs. 52%, diabetics (39 vs. 18%, and ACS (61 vs. 33%, as well as higher body mass index (29.4 ± 4.6 vs. 27.2 ± 4.1 in the high CRP group. Pre-PCI and post-PCI IMR were significantly elevated in the high CRP group compared to the low CRP group (pre-PCI IMR: 29.0 ± 13.9 vs. 17.4 ± 11.1, p < 0.0001; post-PCI IMR: 23.0 ± 16.8 vs. 15.5 ± 8.4, p = 0.02. Peak troponin levels were significantly raised in the high CRP group (9.96 ± 17.19 vs. 1.17 ± 3.00 μg/L, p = 0.002. There was a strong positive correlation between hsCRP and pre-PCI IMR (r = 0.85, p < 0.0001. Pre- and post-PCI IMR levels were correlated with peak troponin level (r = 0.45, p < 0.0001; r = 0.33, p = 0.005, respectively. Predictors of severe MVD include male gender (OR 3.0, diabetes (OR 3.7, smoking history (OR 4.0, ACS presentation (OR 8.5, and hsCRP ≥ 3 mg/L (OR 5.6.ConclusionhsCRP is a

  9. C-reactive protein in outpatients with acute exacerbation of COPD: its relationship with microbial etiology and severity

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    Gallego M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Miguel Gallego,1–3 Xavier Pomares,1,3 Silvia Capilla,4 Maria Angeles Marcos,5,6 David Suárez,7 Eduard Monsó,1–3,* Concepción Montón1,8,* 1Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hospital de Sabadell, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí-UAB, Sabadell, 2Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Esfera UAB, Barcelona, 3CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias, CIBERES, Bunyola, 4Laboratory of Microbiology, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí-UAB, Sabadell, 5Department of Clinical Microbiology, Hospital Clínic, 6ISGlobal, Barcelona Centre for International Health Research (CRESIB, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, 7Epidemiology and Assessment Unit, Fundació Parc Taulí, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Sabadell, 8Health Services Research on Chronic Diseases Network-REDISSEC, Galdakao, Spain *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: C-reactive protein (CRP measurement has proven valuable for detecting exacerbations, but its usefulness in predicting etiology remains controversial. Likewise, its potential value as a marker of severity, which is well established in patients with pneumonia, remains unproven in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations. Methods: A cohort study of 118 patients with severe COPD and acute infectious exacerbations were included and followed up over 1 year. Episodes of exacerbations meeting Anthonisen’s criteria type I–II were evaluated, analyzing the etiology and inflammatory response as measured by CRP in blood. Results: A total of 380 episodes were recorded. Full microbiological analysis was available in 265 samples. Haemophilus influenzae was the most commonly isolated bacteria and rhinovirus the most common virus. Median CRP levels from the 265 episodes were higher in the cases with positive cultures for bacteria (58.30 mg/L, interquartile range [IQR] 21.0–28.2 than in episodes only positive for viruses (37.3 mg/L, IQR 18.6–79.1 and cases negative for any

  10. THE ASSOCIATION OF DEPRESSION WITH C-REACTIVE PROTEIN (THE DATA OF ESSE-RF EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY

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    S. E. Evstifeeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the association of depression with a high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP level, taking into account the main risk factors and noncommunicable diseases in Russia residents.Material and methods. The data of ESSE-RF multicenter study (a representative sample of the unorganized male and female population aged 25-64 years from 8 regions surveyed in 2012-2014 were used in the work. A total 11884 people were involved into the study including 35.9% men. The examination included a survey on the standard questionnaire containing data on disease history, etc. The level of depression was assessed by the validated in Russian Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS, 1983. hsCRP level was determined in all patients.Results. The continuing association between elevated levels of depression (HADS-D ≥8+ and high level of hsCRP ≥3.0 mg/l (odds ratio [OR] 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.03-1.27; p=0.009 was found in the multivariate model, after adjustment for sex, age, education, and risk factors. Reducing of the relationship of elevated levels of depression with a high level of hsCRP (OR 1.11; 95% CI 1.00-1.24; p=0.048 was found with the additional introduction of diseases in the model. This relationship was reduced to not statistically significant level (OR 1.08; 95% CI 0.98-1.20; p=0.134 in the full model adjusted for regions.Conclusion. The reduced association of depression with hsCRP ajusted for aggregate risk factors was found in the study. This suggests about multifactor affecting on this relationship.

  11. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

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    Vinicius Pacheco Garcia

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Metabolic syndrome (MetS is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. Objective: To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. Methods One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors, MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. Results: The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p 0.05. The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01. Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (psex < 0.01. Conclusions: Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions.

  12. Oxidative Stress and C-Reactive Protein in Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident (Ischaemic Stroke): The role of Ginkgo biloba extract.

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    Thanoon, Imad A-J; Abdul-Jabbar, Hilmy As; Taha, Dhia A

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the presence of oxidative stress and inflammation in ischaemic stroke patients by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA), total antioxidant status (TAS), and highly-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in the early post-ischaemic period, and to determine the role of Ginkgo biloba therapy in correcting the markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. This study was conducted at Ibn Seena Hospital, Mosul City, Iraq and included 31 cerebrovascular accident (CVA) patients and 30 healthy controls. Ischaemic stroke patients were divided into two groups: group I (n = 15) received conventional therapy; group II (n = 16) received conventional therapy with G. biloba (1500 mg/day) for 30 days. Blood samples were obtained from patients and controls before treatment and assays done of serum levels of MDA, TAS, and hsCRP. For CVA patients, a post-treatment blood sample was taken and the same parameters reassessed. Compared with the controls, patients' serum levels of MDA, and hsCRP were significantly higher (P ≤0.001) and TAS significantly lower. Group I and II patients reported a significant reduction in serum levels of MDA and hsCRP and a significant increase in serum levels of TAS, in comparison with pre-treatment levels. There was no significant difference (P = 0.19) in serum MDA levels between groups I and II, whereas, serum TAS levels were significantly higher (P ≤0.01) and hsCRP significantly lower (P ≤0.01) in group II. Acute stroke is associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory response in the early period. G. biloba plays a potential role in reducing oxidative damage and inflammatory response.

  13. [Diagnostic usefulness of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein in the Emergency Department for predicting bacterial meningitis in the elderly].

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    Morales-Casado, María Isabel; Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Moreno-Alonso, Fernando; Valente-Rodríguez, Eder; López-Muñoz, Diego; Saura-Montalbán, José; Cuena-Boy, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    To analyse and compare procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) as tools for detecting bacterial meningitis (BM) in the elderly (>74 years of age). A prospective, observational, descriptive, analytical study of 220 consecutive patients aged ≥1year and diagnosed with acute meningitis in an emergency department between September 2009 and July 2014. A total of 220 patients (136 [62%] male) were studied. The mean age was 30±26years, with BM being diagnosed in 17/83 patients from 1 to 14years of age, 32/111 from 15 to 74years of age, and 17/26 patients ≥75years of age. PCT had the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) (0.972; 95%CI, 0.946-0,998; P<.001) to predict bacterial meningitis. With a cut-off of ≥0.52ng/mL, PCT achieved 93% sensitivity and 86% specificity, and for patients over 75years of age 96% sensitivity and 75% specificity, with the same AUC (0.972). The AUC for CRP was 0.888, and a ≥54,4mg/L cut-off achieved 91% sensitivity and 78% specificity, and for patients over 75years of age an AUC of only 0.514 achieved with 97% sensitivity and 43% specificity. For all patients with acute meningitis in the emergency department, PCT has a high diagnostic power, outperforming CRP and Leukocytes for detection of bacterial etiology, but CPR is of not useful in the elderly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  14. [Use of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein as infection markers in febrile neutropenic patients undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

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    Sánchez-Yepes, Marina; Aznar-Oroval, Eduardo; Lorente-Alegre, Pablo; García-Lozano, Tomás; Picón-Roig, Isabel; Pérez-Ballestero, Pilar; Ortiz-Muñoz, Blanca

    2014-01-01

    Neutropenia is a frequent sign in patients who are going to have a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT). Infection is an important complication in these patients, which is favoured by immunosuppression and the degree of neutropenia. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) in onco-haematological patients undergoing chemotherapy and HSCT to determine the origin of the fever. PCT and CRP values were measured in 30 episodes of febrile neutropenia: before starting chemotherapy, appearance of neutropenia, onset of fever, days 1, 2, 3 and 6 after the onset of fever, and when the febrile episode ended. The episodes were classified as 5 bacteraemia, 3 microbiologically documented infections, 10 clinical infections, and 12 fevers of unknown origin. The highest PCT mean values corresponded to the group of patients with bacteraemia. Statistically significant differences (P=.04) were found on the second day after the onset of fever. The cut-off point of 0.5ng/ml showed a sensitivity of 66% and a specificity of 75%. PCR results showed statistically significant differences on days 1, 2 and 3 after the onset of fever (P=.01, P=.003, and P=.002, respectively). The cut-off point of 7.5mg/L had a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 58%. The combination of PCT and CRP is an insufficient method to detect bacterial infections and may not replace the proper clinical and microbiological diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  15. Dietary fiber is associated with circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein in breast cancer survivors: the HEAL study

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    Villaseñor, Adriana; Ambs, Anita; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M.; Neuhouser, Marian L.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a suspected risk factor for breast cancer and its subsequent prognosis. The extent to which dietary and lifestyle factors might influence inflammation is important to examine. Specifically, dietary fiber may reduce systemic inflammation, but this relationship has not been examined among breast cancer survivors. We examined associations between dietary fiber and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid-A (SAA), among 698 female breast cancer survivors from the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) Study. Data are from interviews and clinical visits conducted 24 months post-study enrollment. Multivariate-adjusted linear regression estimated associations of total, soluble and insoluble fiber with serum concentrations of CRP and SAA. Logistic regression estimated the odds of elevated CRP (defined as >3.0 mg/L) across tertiles of dietary fiber intake. Mean total dietary fiber intake was 13.9 ± 6.4 g/day. Mean CRP and SAA were 3.32 ± 3.66 mg/L and 7.73 ± 10.23 mg/L, respectively. We observed a multivariate-adjusted inverse association between total dietary fiber intake and CRP concentrations (β, −0.029; 95% CI, −0.049, −0.008). Results for insoluble fiber were similar (β, −0.039; 95% CI, −0.064, −0.013). Among survivors who consumed >15.5 g/day of insoluble dietary fiber, a 49% reduction in the likelihood of having elevated CRP concentrations (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27, 0.95) was observed compared to those who consumed fiber may benefit breast cancer survivors via reductions in systemic inflammation; elevated inflammation may be prognostic for reduced survival. PMID:21455669

  16. Effects of rice policosanol on serum lipoproteins, homocysteine, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein in hypercholesterolaemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Zeljko; Tedeschi-Reiner, Eugenia; Romić, Zeljko

    2005-01-01

    Policosanol is an agent that includes mixtures of aliphatic primary alcohols extracted primarily from sugar-cane wax. This mixture has been shown to lower total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in animal models, healthy volunteers and hypercholesterolaemic patients. This study investigated the efficacy and tolerability of rice policosanol (Oryza sp.) 10 mg/day in 70 hypercholesterolaemic patients of both sexes aged 20-78 years in a randomised, double-blind, crossover, placebo-controlled, single-centre trial. After an 8-week run-in period during which patients were placed on therapeutic lifestyle changes, in particular a cholesterol-lowering diet, they were randomly assigned to receive rice policosanol 10mg tablets or placebo tablets once daily with the evening meal for 8 weeks. During the next 8 weeks those patients who received policosanol during the first 8 weeks received placebo, and those who received placebo during the first 8 weeks, received policosanol. Total, LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), HDL2 and HDL3 cholesterol, triglycerides, oxidised LDL (ox-LDL), apoproteins (Apos) AI and B, lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)], fibrinogen, homocysteine and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured. Rice policosanol significantly reduced plasma total cholesterol from 7.37 +/- 1.42 mmol/L to 6.99 +/- 1.33 mmol/L (p = 0.007) and increased Apo AI from 1.49 +/- 0.39 mmol/L to 1.58 +/- 0.38 mmol/L (p = 0.037) but did not change plasma triglycerides, HDL, HDL2, HDL3 and LDL cholesterol, ox-LDL, Lp(a), Apo B, fibrinogen, homocysteine or CRP levels. Rice policosanol 10 mg/day moderately decreased plasma total cholesterol and increased Apo AI. Rice policosanol was also well tolerated, with no drug-related effects on safety parameters such as serum aminotransferases and creatine phosphokinase detected or found on physical examination.

  17. Elevated C-reactive protein is associated with severe periodic leg movements of sleep in patients with restless legs syndrome.

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    Trotti, Lynn Marie; Rye, David B; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, W Craig; Quyyumi, Arshed; Bliwise, Donald L

    2012-11-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sleep disorder in which urges to move the legs are felt during rest, are felt at night, and are improved by leg movement. RLS has been implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease. Periodic leg movements (PLMs) may be a mediator of this relationship. We evaluated systemic inflammation and PLMs in RLS patients to further assess cardiovascular risk. 137 RLS patients had PLM measurements taken while unmedicated for RLS. Banked plasma was assayed for high sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Mean (SD) PLM index was 19.3 (22.0). PLMs were unrelated to TNF-a and IL-6, but were modestly correlated with logCRP (r(129)=0.19, p=0.03). Those patients with at least 45PLMs/h had an odds ratio of 3.56 (95% CI 1.26-10.03, p=0.02, df=1) for having elevated CRP compared to those with fewer than 45PLMs/h. After adjustment for age, race, gender, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, inflammatory disorders, CRP-lowering medications, and body mass index, the OR for those with ≥ 45PLMs/h was 8.60 (95% CI 1.23 to 60.17, p=0.03, df=10). PLMs are associated with increased inflammation, such that those RLS patients with at least 45PLMs/h had more than triple the odds of elevated CRP than those with fewer PLMs. Further investigation into PLMs and inflammation is warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association between C-reactive protein, pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance and traditional cardiovascular risk factors in an Iranian population.

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    Razavi, Akramosadat; Baghshani, Mohammad Reza; Rahsepar, Amir Ali; Mohaddes Ardabili, Hossein; Sheikh Andalibi, Mohammad Sobhan; Reza Parizadeh, Seyyed Mohammad; Tavallaie, Shima; Mousavi, Somayeh; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Ferns, Gordon

    2013-03-01

    Inflammatory states are known to cause an imbalance in the redox status. We aimed to study the possible associations between pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB) and serum high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) concentrations and traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in an unselected Iranian population and in groups of individuals with specific disease. The study was conducted among an unselected population of 758 male subjects. Biochemical markers, including hs-CRP and PAB values, were measured. Serum hs-CRP concentrations were positively associated with serum PAB values (r = 0.260, P ≤ 0.001). Univariate analysis showed that PAB values were statistically higher in individuals who were obese or smokers compared with non-obese and non-smokers individuals (P < 0.01). While serum hs-CRP concentrations were significantly higher in older subjects, subjects with obesity, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, central obesity, hypertriglyceridaemia, higher low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, positive history of CVD and lower physical activity than subjects without these risk factors (P < 0.05). Comparing hs-CRP and PAB values in different CVD risk score subgroups showed a significant incremental rise in both parameters as CVD risk score increased (P < 0.05). Using multiple linear regression analysis we found a strong association between PAB values and hs-CRP concentrations. This study showed that among Iranian subjects, the inflammatory marker, hs-CRP, was strongly and positively associated with a marker of oxidative stress and also with several traditional risk factors of CVD. Moreover, the impact of traditional cardiovascular risk factors on hs-CRP concentrations and PAB values differed.

  19. Effects of Radio Frequency and Ultrasound Cavitation Therapy on Serum C-reactive Protein and Pro-oxidant-Antioxidant Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Mahsa; Nasrfard, Samira; Nezafati, Pouya; Arabpour, Mahla; Ghaane, Narjes; Salehi, Maryam; Safarian, Mohammad; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Ferns, Gordon A; Norouzy, Abdolreza

    2016-05-01

    A combination of radio-frequency (RF) and ultrasound cavitation (UC) has been reported to reduce indices of obesity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of a combination of these techniques on anthropometric indices, pro-oxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB), and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). This randomized clinical trial was performed on 50 healthy women between January 2014 and June 2014 in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Participants were randomized to one of two groups, both of which received a low-calorie diet containing 500-kcal energy deficit per day. The trial group included twenty-five subjects who were assigned to the combined treatment of RF and ultrasound cavitation program of abdomen and flank areas. There were twenty-five control subjects who received the low calorie diet alone. Biochemical markers, including serum hs-CRP and PAB values, and anthropometric indices were measured in the intervention group and healthy controls. For both the intervention and control groups, waist circumference was reduced significantly by 3.76 ± 1.69 and 2.40 ± 1.04, respectively (P 0.05). In addition, reductions of hs-CRP and PAB between the two studied groups during five weeks of study were not significant (P > 0.05). Although there were significant reductions in anthropometric indices following treatment with RF and UC, the effects on serum PAB or hs-CRP were no significantly different, compared to the control group. Further studies are needed to confirm the beneficial effect for the use of these techniques.

  20. High sensitive C-reactive protein-Effective tool in determining postoperative recovery in lumbar disc disease

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    Tushar Narayan Rathod

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is common in medical practice to see patients having persistent pain and radiculopathy even after undergoing discectomy surgery. Inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukins are produced at the site of disc herniation and are now considered responsible for the pain perceived by the patient. This study has used high sensitive C-reactive protein (HSCRP assay for predicting inflammation around the nerve roots on very same principle, which has used HSCRP for predicting coronary artery diseases in current clinical practice. Thus, purpose of this study is to test whether HSCRP can stand as an objective tool to predict postoperative recovery in patients undergoing lumbar discectomy. That is, to study association between preoperative HSCRP blood level and postoperative recovery with the help of modified Oswestry Back Disability Score. Materials and Methods: A study group consisting of 50 cases of established lumbar disc disease and control group of 50 normal subjects, matched with the study group. Both the study and control groups were subjected to detailed evaluation with the help of modified Oswestry Low Back Pain Scale both pre and postoperatively at 3 months, 6 months and 1-year. The preoperative blood samples were analyzed to assess the HSCRP concentration. All the cases underwent surgery over a period of 1-year by the same surgeon. Results: The level of HSCRP in the study group was between 0.050- and 0.710 mg/dL and in the control group, 0.005-0.020 mg/dL. There was highly significant positive correlation between preoperative HSCRP level and postoperative score at P 10 points, while those with HSCRP level in the range of 0.470 ± 0.163 mg/dL, showed poor recovery (score improved < 10 points. Conclusion: HSCRP will serve as a good supplementary prognostic marker for operative decision making in borderline and troublesome cases of lumbar disc disease.

  1. Association between alveolar bone loss and serum C-reactive protein levels in aggressive and chronic periodontitis patients

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    Rahul Chopra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-reactive protein (CRP is an acute phase reactant that is produced in response to diverse inflammatory stimuli, and is known predictor of cardiovascular disease risk. Aggressive and chronic periodontitis are two main forms of periodontal disease, which differ mainly in the method of disease progression. This study aims at determining and comparing the relative levels of serum CRP and alveolar bone loss in aggressive and chronic periodontitis patients. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 subjects, which were divided into 3 groups diagnosed as having generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAP, chronic generalized periodontitis (CGP and non-periodontitis controls (NP, were selected for the study. Venous blood samples were collected for quantitative CRP analysis using Turbidimetric immunoassay. Alveolar bone loss (ABL was measured at proximal sites of posterior teeth on a panoramic radiograph. The relationship between the mean ratio of ABL to root length and serum CRP levels was statistically analyzed using Student unpaired t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA and Pearson′s correlation coefficient. Results: Mean CRP levels were significantly greater in both GAP (7.49±2.31 mg/l and CGP (4.88±1.80 mg/l groups as compared to NP (0.68±0.23 mg/l with P value <0.0001. The mean value of ABL (% was 31.58 in CGP group and 36.77 in the GAP group, the difference being statistically significant (P=0.0079. Correlation coefficient between CRP and ABL is 0.9310 in CGP, and 0.9252 in GAP, which indicates a positive correlation between both variables. Conclusion: Both forms of periodontitis are associated with increased systemic inflammatory response with aggressiveness of disease progression determining the degree of response.

  2. Change in levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum cortisol in morbidly obese patients after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Tovar, Jaime; Oller, Inmaculada; Galindo, Isabel; Llavero, Carolina; Arroyo, Antonio; Calero, Alicia; Diez, María; Zubiaga, Lorea; Calpena, Rafael

    2013-06-01

    C-Reactive protein (CRP) has been associated with the macro- and microvascular effects of hypertension and diabetes mellitus. Referring to serum cortisol, it has been proposed to contribute to the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, and it has been demonstrated that weight loss normalizes cortisol levels and improves insulin resistance. The aims of this study were to analyze CRP and cortisol levels pre- and postoperatively in morbidly obese patients undergoing a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and to correlate them with weight loss and parameters associated with cardiovascular risk. A prospective study of all the morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy as bariatric procedure between October 2007 and May 2011 was performed. A total of 40 patients were included in the study. CRP levels decreased significantly 12 months after surgery (median reduction of 8.9 mg/l; p = 0.001). Serum cortisol levels decreased significantly 6 months after surgery (median reduction of 34.9 μg/dl; p = 0.001). CRP values reached the normal range (cortisol, a significant association was observed with the cardiovascular risk predictor (triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio) from the 6th month after surgery onward (Pearson correlation coefficient, 0.559; p = 0.008). CRP levels are increased preoperatively and in the postoperative course up to 1 year after surgery. Serum cortisol levels remain elevated until the 6th month after surgery. From this moment onward, serum cortisol is associated with the cardiovascular risk predictor reflecting the cardiovascular risk decreasement during the weight loss.

  3. Effects of C-reactive protein on adipokines genes expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Guoyue; Jia, Jue; Di, Liangliang; Zhou, Libin; Dong, Sijing; Ye, Jingjing; Wang, Dong; Yang, Ling; Wang, Jifang; Li, Lianxi; Yang, Ying; Mao, Chaoming; Chen, Mingdao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► CRP increases TNF-α and IL-6 genes expression in matured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ► CRP suppresses adiponectin, leptin and PPAR-γ mRNA levels in matured 3T3-L1 cells. ► Wortmannin reverses effects of CRP on adiponectin, TNF-α and leptin mRNA levels. ► CRP may regulate IR, obesity and metabolic syndrome by this mechanism. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue is now recognized to be an important endocrine organ, secreting a variety of adipokines that are involved in the regulation of energy metabolism, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. C-reactive protein (CRP) is considered as one of the most sensitive markers of inflammation. A number of studies have shown that elevation of CRP concentrations is an independent predictive parameter of type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is also strongly associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of CRP on adipokines genes expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that CRP inhibited adiponectin, leptin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) genes expression and raised tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels in matured 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a dose and time-dependent manner. Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3 kinase by wortmannin partially reversed the effects of CRP on adiponectin, TNF-α and leptin genes expression. These results collectively suggest that CRP regulates adiponectin, TNF-α, leptin, IL-6 and PPAR-γ genes expression, and that might represent a mechanism by which CRP regulates insulin resistance, obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  4. Accuracy of commercially available c-reactive protein rapid tests in the context of undifferentiated fevers in rural Laos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phommasone, Koukeo; Althaus, Thomas; Souvanthong, Phonesavanh; Phakhounthong, Khansoudaphone; Soyvienvong, Laxoy; Malapheth, Phatthaphone; Mayxay, Mayfong; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Paris, Daniel H; Dance, David; Newton, Paul; Lubell, Yoel

    2016-02-04

    C-Reactive Protein (CRP) has been shown to be an accurate biomarker for discriminating bacterial from viral infections in febrile patients in Southeast Asia. Here we investigate the accuracy of existing rapid qualitative and semi-quantitative tests as compared with a quantitative reference test to assess their potential for use in remote tropical settings. Blood samples were obtained from consecutive patients recruited to a prospective fever study at three sites in rural Laos. At each site, one of three rapid qualitative or semi-quantitative tests was performed, as well as a corresponding quantitative NycoCard Reader II as a reference test. We estimate the sensitivity and specificity of the three tests against a threshold of 10 mg/L and kappa values for the agreement of the two semi-quantitative tests with the results of the reference test. All three tests showed high sensitivity, specificity and kappa values as compared with the NycoCard Reader II. With a threshold of 10 mg/L the sensitivity of the tests ranged from 87-98 % and the specificity from 91-98 %. The weighted kappa values for the semi-quantitative tests were 0.7 and 0.8. The use of CRP rapid tests could offer an inexpensive and effective approach to improve the targeting of antibiotics in remote settings where health facilities are basic and laboratories are absent. This study demonstrates that accurate CRP rapid tests are commercially available; evaluations of their clinical impact and cost-effectiveness at point of care is warranted.

  5. Are curcuminoids effective C-reactive protein-lowering agents in clinical practice? Evidence from a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2014-05-01

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease (CVD). In this context, C-reactive protein (CRP) has been identified as a strong predictor and independent risk factor of CVD. Curcuminoids are multifunctional natural product with promising cardioprotective and anti-inflammatory properties. Curcuminoids have been suggested to lower circulating levels of CRP, but clinical findings have not been consistent. To pool the published results of clinical trials on the impact of supplementation with curcuminoids on circulating levels of CRP. PubMed/MEDLINE and SCOPUS databases were searched for clinical trials reporting circulating CRP changes in individuals receiving curcuminoids. Effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random-effects model. Inter-study heterogeneity was assessed using Cochran's Q and I(2) tests. Sensitivity analyses were conducted using leave-one-out method. Six trials comprising 172 subjects in the curcuminoids group and 170 subjects in the placebo group fulfilled the eligibility criteria and included in the meta-analysis. Compared with placebo, supplementation with curcuminoids was associated with a significant reduction in circulating CRP levels (weighed mean difference: -6.44 mg/L; 95% CI: -10.77 - -2.11; p = 0.004). This significant effect was maintained in subgroups of trials that used bioavailability-improved preparations of curcuminoids and had supplementation duration of ≥4 weeks, but not in the subgroups without these characteristics. Supplementation with curcuminoids may reduce circulating CRP levels. This effect appears to depend on the bioavailability of curcuminoids preparations and also duration of supplementation. Future well-designed and long-term trials are warranted to verify this effect of curcuminoids. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Estimation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with periodontal disease and without coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, V; Nair, Sushma; Shivakumar, V; Shanmugam, M; Priya, B Meena; Rajesh, P

    2015-01-01

    HsCRP (Highly sensitive C reactive protein) is a global indicator for future vascular events in adults detected in blood stream 48 hours before the cardiovascular event. Periodontal disease may increase blood levels of inflammatory markers like IL-6, CRP and HsCRP. Hence the aim of the present study is to evaluate the presence of elevated HsCRP levels in chronic periodontitis patients. 100 patients who reported for cardiac master health check up were enrolled in the study. The periodontal status was assessed using periodontal probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. The decayed, missing and filled tooth was recorded using DMFT index. The venous samples of these patients were obtained for recording HsCRP levels. Pearson correlation was used to analyze the relationship between HsCRP level and probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and DMFT. The correlation value was 0.051, 0.025 and 0.101 respectively, the correlation is statistically significant for probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level (P>0.05). Chi-square test was performed to study the association between gender and HsCRP, Diabetes Mellitus and HsCRP and Hypertension and HsCRP; the results showed that there is no significant association between any of the above mentioned factors and HsCRP level in blood. We found an increased level of HsCRP in patients with chronic periodontitis which revealed the susceptibility of these patients to cardiac diseases like myocardial infarction and stroke. Hence present day focus in the line of management of cardiac patient has changed from the periodontal perspective.

  7. Estimation of high sensitivity C-reactive protein in patients with periodontal disease and without coronary artery disease

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    V Anitha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: HsCRP (Highly sensitive C reactive protein is a global indicator for future vascular events in adults detected in blood stream 48 hours before the cardiovascular event. Periodontal disease may increase blood levels of inflammatory markers like IL-6, CRP and HsCRP. Hence the aim of the present study is to evaluate the presence of elevated HsCRP levels in chronic periodontitis patients. Material and Methods: 100 patients who reported for cardiac master health check up were enrolled in the study. The periodontal status was assessed using periodontal probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level. The decayed, missing and filled tooth was recorded using DMFT index. The venous samples of these patients were obtained for recording HsCRP levels. Results: Pearson correlation was used to analyze the relationship between HsCRP level and probing pocket depth, clinical attachment loss and DMFT. The correlation value was 0.051, 0.025 and 0.101 respectively, the correlation is statistically significant for probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level (P>0.05. Chi- square test was performed to study the association between gender and HsCRP, Diabetes Mellitus and HsCRP and Hypertension and HsCRP; the results showed that there is no significant association between any of the above mentioned factors and HsCRP level in blood. Conclusions: We found an increased level of HsCRP in patients with chronic periodontitis which revealed the susceptibility of these patients to cardiac diseases like myocardial infarction and stroke. Hence present day focus in the line of management of cardiac patient has changed from the periodontal perspective.

  8. Impact of serum C-reactive protein level on the prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing TACE

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    Chung Hwan Jun

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsThe aim of this study was to determine the relationship between serum CRP levels and the prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC patients.MethodsHCC patients who underwent the first session of transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE between January 2005 and December 2009 (n=211 were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups: high C-reactive protein (CRP; ≥1 mg/dL, n=51 and low CRP (<1 mg/dL, n=160. They were followed for a mean of 22.44 months and their clinicoradiological variables and overall survival were compared.ResultsThere were significant differences between the two groups in regard to tumor type, tumor-progression-free survival, 10-month mortality, white blood cell (WBC count, tumor size, and TNM stage. Multivariate analysis revealed that a high serum CRP level was independently associated with tumor size and tumor type. Subgroup analysis of CRP groups according to tumor size demonstrated that a high serum level of CRP was significantly associated with poorly defined (diffuse tumor type in the tumor size <5 cm group [hazard ratio (HR=4.81, P=0.018]. A Lipiodol dose exceeding 7 mL (HR=5.55, P=0.046 and the 10-month mortality (HR=7.693, P=0.004 were significantly associated with high serum CRP level in the group of patients with a tumor size of ≥5 cm. In addition, subgroup analysis of matched CRP according to TNM stage revealed that elevated serum CRP was independently associated with tumor type, WBC count, and tumorprogression-free survival.ConclusionsA high serum CRP level is associated with large tumors and a poorly defined tumor type, and is significantly associated with 10-month mortality in patients with large HCC (size ≥5 cm who undergo TACE.

  9. Is C-reactive protein the single most useful predictor of difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy or its conversion? A pilot study

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    Kam Wa Jessica Mok

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Both converted and difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomies (LC have impact on operating time and training of juniors. The aim of this study is to evaluate parameters that predict difficult LC or conversion (C, and find predictive values for different cut-off points of C-reactive protein (CRP for conversion. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort study of cholecystectomies performed from January 2011 to December 2012 at NHS trust was undertaken. Association of intra-operative difficulties or conversion with the following factors was studied: Age, gender, CRP, white blood cell count (WBC, history of pancreatitis, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP. Results: Two hundred and ninety one patients were analysed (222 laparoscopic, 45 difficult LC and 24 C. Only 141 patients had a recorded CRP. Median CRP was highest for patients who were converted (286.20 compared to those who had difficult LC (67.40 or LC (7.05. Those patients who did not have preoperative CRP (8/150, 5.3% had less chance of conversion than those who had CRP (16/141, 11.34% (P = 0.063. Patients with CRP of ≤220 (3/91, 3.2% had significantly less chance of conversion than those with CRP >220 (13/21, 61.9% (P < 0.001. High preoperative CRP, WBC count and ERCP, were predictors of conversion. These factors were only marginally better than CRP alone in predicting conversion. Conclusion: CRP can be a strong predictor of conversion of LC. Further validation of the results is needed.

  10. Association between C-reactive protein and atrial fibrillation recurrence after catheter ablation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhouqin; Dai, Limeng; Song, Zhiyuan; Li, Huakang; Shu, Maoqin

    2013-09-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with inflammation. Increased serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels are important representatives of an inflammatory state of AF. A variety of studies have evaluated whether increased CRP levels have an association with AF recurrence after catheter ablation. However, the results remain inconsistent, therefore, this meta-analysis was conducted to offer suggestions. Increased baseline CRP have an association with AF recurrence after catheter ablation. Electronic databases including PubMed, Embase, Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge, and ScienceDirect were searched until December 31, 2012 for any CRP-associated studies. Overall and subgroup analyses were performed. Standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to evaluate the associations between CRP levels and postablation AF recurrence. Statistical analysis was performed with Review Manager 5.2 and Stata 11.0. Seven available studies were identified, which included 526 patients (179 recurrence vs 347 no recurrence). Overall, increased baseline CRP levels had significant positive association with postablation AF recurrence. The SMD in the CRP levels was 0.65 units (95% CI: 0.30-0.99), and the z-score for overall effect was 3.70 (P = 0.0002). The heterogeneity test showed that there were moderate differences between individual studies (P = 0.006, I(2) = 67%). Metaregression revealed that different sample sizes of studies possibly accounted for the heterogeneity. Positive associations were also found in subgroup analyses based on sample size. When stratifying for ethnicity, similarly significant associations were found in both European (Caucasian) and Asian populations. Investigations demonstrate that baseline CRP levels are greater in patients with postablation AF recurrence. Further studies with larger sample size and delicate design for CRP should be conducted. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effects of non-soy legume consumption on C-reactive protein: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Abargouei, Amin; Saraf-Bank, Sahar; Bellissimo, Nick; Azadbakht, Leila

    2015-05-01

    Because of conflicting results of presented studies, the aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) was to examine the effect of non-soy legume intake on inflammatory markers and C-reactive protein (CRP). We searched Pubmed, ISI Web of Knowledge, SCOPUS, and Google Scholar for relevant studies up to July 2013, using medical subject headings [MeSH] and other related keywords. Nine RCTs were systematically reviewed to examine the effect of non-soy legume consumption on inflammatory markers. Eight studies involving 464 participants were included in the meta-analysis. The results of the meta-analysis showed that non-soy legume consumption had a trend toward a significant effect on decreasing CRP and high-sensitivity (hs)-CRP concentrations (mean difference (MD) = -0.21; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.44 to 0.02; P = 0.068). There was no overall effect of non-soy legume consumption on CRP or hs-CRP levels in either the parallel or crossover study designs. Our subgroup analysis of CRP type and study design, showed that non-soy legume intake had a significant effect on CRP levels in parallel studies (MD = -1.01; 95% CI, -1.78 to -0.23; P = 0.011) and a significant effect on hs-CRP levels (MD = -0.53; 95% CI, -0.95 to -0.11; P = 0.014) and in the crossover sub group (MD = -0.68; 95% CI, -1.28 to -0.08; P = 0.026). This review of RCTs showed that non-soy legume consumption may contribute to reductions in CRP and hs-CRP concentrations. However, further controlled clinical trials are needed to investigate the effect of non-soy legume intake on other inflammatory markers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. C-reactive protein + 1059 G>C polymorphism in type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Ramandeep; Matharoo, Kawaljit; Sharma, Rubina; Bhanwer, A J S

    2013-12-01

    Human C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute phase reactant involved in chronic and acute inflammation. CRP is associated with metabolic syndrome, obesity, atherosclerosis, unstable angina, insulin resistance and diabetes. The present study evaluates the association of + 1059 G>C silent polymorphism in exon 2 of CRP gene in 581 cases [CAD (206), T2D (266), T2D with CAD (109)] and 235 controls in the population of Punjab (North-West India). The frequency of + 1059 G allele is highest in CAD (98.3%) followed by T2D (98.1%), T2D + CAD cases (97.7%) and controls (94.7%). G-allele is associated with increased risk of T2D [P = 0.003, OR = 2.93 (1.39-6.17)] and CAD [P = 0.004, OR = 3.25 (1.39-7.60)] in comparison to controls. Recessive model shows that GG genotype increases the risk of CAD by 4 fold (P = 0.003, OR = 4.19, 1.62-10.80), T2D by 3 fold (P = 0.008, OR = 3.23, 1.36-7.60) and T2D + CAD by 3.5 fold (P = 0.029, OR = 3.64, 1.14-11.66). Factor analyses show that BMI, WC, and WHR are core predictors for CAD and T2D, whereas CHO, TG and VLDL for T2D + CAD. The present study concludes that GG genotype of CRP + 1059 G>C polymorphism and clustering of obesity and dyslipidemia underlie the risk towards CAD, T2D and T2D + CAD in the North-West Indian population of Punjab.

  13. The interactive effects of nocturnal sleep and daytime naps in relation to serum C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantua, Janna; Spencer, Rebecca M C

    2015-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a general marker of inflammation that has been differentially linked with sleep. Elevated CRP (ie, high inflammation) has been associated with either short/insufficient sleep duration or long sleep duration, both, or neither. Daytime napping has also been tied to increased and decreased inflammation. We attempted to unify these findings by examining the relationship between CRP and sleep duration in conjunction with napping in a healthy young adult cohort. Participants were young adults (mean age = 29.05 years, n = 2147) from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) cohort, a nationally representative longitudinal sample. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) tests examined whether self-reported sleep duration (short, medium, or long) and nap frequency (none-few days/week; most days/week; every day) interacted in relation to CRP. Standard covariates (ie, age, gender, race/ethnicity, body mass index, physical activity, depression, snoring, systolic blood pressure, clinical symptoms, and household income) were used. There was a linear increase in CRP with increased napping [contrast estimate = 0.265, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.045-0.485), P = 0.018]. There was also an interaction between sleep duration and napping frequency in relation to CRP (F4,2128 = 2.90, P = 0.021). Inflammation differed between nap groups within the long and short sleep groups. Our results suggest that increased napping is an independent predictor of inflammation in young adults. These results also provide evidence for interactive effects of inflammation, nocturnal sleep, and daytime naps. Our findings confirm that excess sleep, insufficient sleep, frequent napping, and infrequent napping can all be linked with elevated CRP, but these relationships depend on both nocturnal and daytime sleep patterns. These analyses will guide future work to more specifically examine sleep-inflammation processes and directionality

  14. Interactive associations of physical activity, adiposity, and oral contraceptive use on C-reactive protein levels in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedewa, Michael V; Hathaway, Elizabeth D; Higgins, Simon; Das, Bhibha M; Forehand, Ronald L; Schmidt, Michael D; Evans, Ellen M

    2018-02-01

    Oral contraceptives (OCs) are the most frequently used type of birth control among young women. OC-users have higher C-reactive protein (CRP) values, an indicator of systemic inflammation, than do non-OC-users. In addition, adiposity (percent fat) is positively associated with CRP, and physical activity (PA) is inversely associated with CRP. The present study determined the interactive associations of PA, percent fat, and OC-use with CRP. Data were collected during 2012-2015 at the University of Georgia. Objective PA was measured via pedometers. Percent fat was measured via dual X-ray absorptiometry. The current OC-use was self-reported. High-sensitivity (hs) CRP was determined using venipuncture. Multivariate linear regression determined the interactive associations of percent fat, OC-use, and PA with hs-CRP. Participants (n = 247; mean age 18.9 ± 1.4 years, 60.7 percent white) accumulated a mean of 10,075.7 ± 3,593.4 steps/day. One-third of participants were categorized as overweight/obese by BMI (mean = 24.5 ± 4.8 kg/m 2 , mean percent fat = 35.2 ± 6.8). The current OC-use was reported by 26.2 percent of the sample (n = 61). A significant three-way interaction (β = 0.01, p = .03) indicated that higher PA was associated with lower hs-CRP in non-OC-users with higher percent fat, but not among OC-users with higher percent fat. These results highlight the need to measure and account for the current OC-use in studies examining the relationship between PA and CRP.

  15. Association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and uric acid with the metabolic syndrome components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Santosh Kumar; Khatiwada, Saroj; Pandey, Sunil; Kc, Rajendra; Das, Binod Kumar Lal; Baral, Nirmal; Lamsal, Madhab

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been found to be associated with inflammatory molecules. This study was conducted among 125 MetS patients at B P Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal to find an association of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and serum uric acid with MetS components. Anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, medical history and blood samples were taken. Estimation of hs-CRP, serum uric acid, blood glucose, triglyceride and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was done. hs-CRP had positive correlation with blood glucose (r = 0.2, p = 0.026) and negative with HDL cholesterol (r = -0.361, p uric acid had positive correlation with waist circumference (r = 0.178, p = 0.047). Patients with elevated hs-CRP and uric acid had higher waist circumference (p = 0.03), diastolic BP (p = 0.002) and lower HDL cholesterol (p = 0.004) than others. Elevated hs-CRP and high uric acid were individually associated with higher odds for low HDL cholesterol (7.992; 1.785-35.774, p = 0.002) and hyperglycemia (2.471; 1.111-5.495, p = 0.029) respectively. Combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid was associated with severity of MetS (p uric acid. The present study demonstrates that hs-CRP and serum uric acid are associated with MetS components, and the combined rise of hs-CRP and uric acid is associated with the increase in severity of MetS.

  16. Effects of estrogen, raloxifene, and hormone replacement therapy on serum C-reactive protein and homocysteine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol, Mert; Akan, Pinar; Dogan, Erbil; Karas, Cigdem; Saygili, Ugur; Posaci, Cemal

    2006-02-20

    To investigate the effects of conjugated equine estrogen (CEE), CEE plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA), CEE plus Nomegestrol acetate (NA), and raloxifene on serum high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) and homocysteine (Hcy) levels in healthy postmenopausal women. One hundred seven healthy postmenopausal women were recruited in a prospective, randomized, and placebo-controlled 6 months study. Of these, 18 were hysterectomized and received daily oral 0.625 mg CEE. Eighty nine non-hysterectomized women were randomly allocated to one of four groups: a group (22 patients) treated with CEE, 0.625 mg/daily plus MPA 2.5 mg/daily; a group (22 patients) treated with CEE, 0.625 mg/daily plus NA 5 mg/daily; a group (23 patients) treated with raloxifene hydrochloride, 60 mg once daily; and a placebo group (22 patients). Hcy and hs-CRP were measured at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. CEE (20%, P=0.03) and CEE+MPA (59%, P=0.006) increased serum hs-CRP levels significantly, whereas CEE+NA decreased serum hs-CRP by 25% (P=0.01). Raloxifene had no significant effect on serum hs-CRP levels during and after the treatment. In all active treatment groups serum Hcy levels decreased significantly compared to baseline and placebo. Conjugated equine estrogen, hormone replacement therapies, and raloxifene lower serum Hcy levels to a comparable extent in postmenopausal women. Hs-CRP, as a cardiovascular risk factor, is not influenced by raloxifene, whereas CEE and CEE plus MPA significantly increase hs-CRP levels. Treatment with CEE plus NA reduces serum hs-CRP levels.

  17. Reverse causation in the association between C-reactive protein and fibrinogen levels and cognitive abilities in an aging sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Michelle; Marioni, Riccardo E; Gow, Alan J; Starr, John M; Deary, Ian J

    2009-05-01

    To test the hypothesis that increased levels of inflammatory and hemostatic markers are associated with poorer cognitive performance and to assess the influence of childhood intelligence quotient (IQ) and current cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors on this relationship. Blood inflammatory markers have been shown to predict late-life cognition, although the mechanism through which this occurs is unknown. Levels of the biomarkers C-reactive protein and fibrinogen were measured in 1053 Scottish participants (50.2% female) from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 ranging in age from 67 to 71 years. Biomarker levels were tested for their association with diverse cognitive abilities. Significant cross-sectional associations were found between the biomarkers and various cognitive abilities: their effect size was around 1% of the variance and was in the direction of higher marker levels conferring poorer cognitive performance. With the exception of the reaction time measures (and fibrinogen), these associations could be explained by childhood IQ, CVD risk factors, or both. Importantly, both the inflammatory markers at age 70 years were associated (p IQ. Whereas inflammatory marker levels predict contemporaneous general cognitive ability, the results support a model of reverse causation because childhood IQ predicts late-life inflammation. This might be through its association with later life CVD risk factors or because it is a measure of system integrity. Unlike general cognitive ability, the association between inflammatory markers (particularly fibrinogen) and processing speed was maintained in the presence of childhood IQ and/or CVD risk factor adjustments. This might also reflect variation in physiological integrity.

  18. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

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    Garcia, Vinicius Pacheco; Rocha, Helena Naly Miguens [Laboratório de Ciências do Exercício - Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Sales, Allan Robson Kluser [Unidade de Reabilitação Cardiovascular e Fisiologia do Exercício - Instituto do Coração (InCor) - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rocha, Natália Galito; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas da, E-mail: anobrega@id.uff.br [Laboratório de Ciências do Exercício - Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacologia - Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-03-15

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years) were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors), MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p < 0.02). There were no differences in hsCRP levels among groups with MetS risk factors (p > 0.05). The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (p{sub sex} < 0.01). Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions.

  19. No Association Between High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein and Carotid Intima-Media Progression: The APAC Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anxin; Huang, Xiaoya; Liu, Xiaoxue; Su, Zhaoping; Wu, Jianwei; Chen, Shuohua; Liu, Xuemei; Ruan, Chunyu; Guo, Xiuhua; Wu, Shouling; Zhao, Xingquan

    2017-02-01

    High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is a risk indicator for atherosclerosis. However, the association between hs-CRP and early carotid atherosclerosis progression is not well established. We undertook a prospective, community-based, observational study to address this question. Common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and hs-CRP values were measured at baseline and after 2 years of follow-up in subjects ≥40 years of age who were participating in the Asymptomatic Polyvascular Abnormalities Community study. Association between hs-CRP values and IMT progression was determined before and after controlling for vascular risk factors. IMT was measured in a total of 1918 subjects at baseline and 52.97% of those (1016 of 1918) had IMT progression after 2 years. No significant association between progression of IMT over a 2-year period and average hs-CRP levels was found (multivariate-adjusted, P for trend = .280). Both hs-CRP values measured at baseline (P = .836) and after 2 years of follow-up (P = .440) were not associated with IMT progression levels. Average hs-CRP values were not related to IMT progression levels in a dose-response manner (P = .784). In a subgroup analysis stratified by age and sex, hs-CRP values were also not significantly associated with IMT progression levels (P > .05). Our results suggest that hs-CRP is not a predictor for the progression of early atherosclerotic changes of the carotid arteries. The hs-CRP levels in early atherosclerosis might be considered as risk markers rather than having a causal role. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. C-Reactive Protein Can Be an Early Predictor of Poststroke Apathy in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liping; Xiong, Siqing; Liu, Yi; Lin, Meiqing; Wang, Jirui; Zhong, Renjia; Zhao, Jiuhan; Liu, Wenjing; Zhu, Lu; Shang, Xiuli

    2018-03-13

    Apathy is a multidimensional syndrome referring to a primary lack of motivation that occurs frequently in survivors of stroke. Higher C-reactive protein (CRP) level was associated with higher apathy scores among Alzheimer disease cases. However, data on the relationship between CRP levels and apathy in patients with stroke are lacking. So, we hypothesized an association between CRP and poststroke apathy (PSA). Two hundred ninety-two consecutive patients with stroke were recruited within 7 days after stroke. Apathy symptoms were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, and 6 months after stoke using the Apathy Evaluation Scale-Clinical (AES-C). Demographic and clinical information were obtained using the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores, Barthel Index (BI) scores, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores, Hamilton Depression Scale (HAMD) scores, and Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMA) scores. CRP was measured at baseline. The presence and the location of infarcts were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging. Apathy at baseline was significantly associated with body mass index (BMI), NIHSS, BI, MMSE, HAMD, and CRP (P < .05) upon admission. PSA at 6 months was significantly associated with elevated CRP concentrations, high AES-C score, and low BI score (P < .05) upon admission. The AES-C scores peaked 3 months after stroke, but then abated over 6 months. CRP, BMI, MMSE, depression, and disability are closely related to apathy during the acute stage of ischemic stroke. Lower BI scores, higher CRP concentrations, and apathy in acute stroke phase increased the risk of PSA at 6 months. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship between C-reactive protein and physical fitness, physical activity, obesity and selected cardiovascular risk factors in schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghipour, Hamid Reza; Rahnama, Ameneh; Salesi, Mohsen; Rahnama, Nader; Mojtahedi, Hossein

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between C-reactive protein (CRP) with physical fitness, physical activity, obesity, and selected cardiovascular risk factors in school-children. Forty-four boy schoolchildren (mean ± SD: age 10.25 ± 0.75 years, height 144 ± 0.2 cm, body weight 46.1 5± 4.59 kg, body mass index 22.16 ± 2.16 kg/m(2)) voluntarily participated in this study. Physical fitness and physical activity were assessed using the 20-meter fitness test. Adiposity was estimated using body mass index. Blood samples were taken after an overnight fast and measured for CRP, LDL, HDL and cholesterol. Pearson's correlation was calculated to determine the relations between these factors. Mean (SD) CRP concentration was 1.07 (0.82) mg/l. A significant correlation was observed between CRP and VO2max (r=-0.45, P= 0.001), body mass index (r=0.55, P=0.000) and cholesterol (r=-0.35, P=0.04). No significant relation was found between CRP and physical activity, LDL and HDL (P> 0.05). Moreover, significant associations were observed between body mass index and VO2max (r=-0.33, P=0.02) and physical activity (r=-0.43, P=0.04). Body mass index was the most powerful predictor of serum concentrations of CRP in schoolchildren. It may be an important factor to control body weight to prevent an increase in serum CRP in children and to help the primordial prevention of chronic diseases.

  2. The relationship between lipid accumulation product, visceral adiposity index and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in healthy adults

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    Yan ZHANG

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the correlation between lipid accumulation product (LAP, visceral adiposity index (VAI and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP in adults, and explore whether to use such correlation as indications is superior to the traditional body fat index based on body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-hip ratio (WHR and waist-height ratio (WHtR. Methods  The present work was a cross-sectional study involving 501 healthy adults (321 males and 180 females from the community of Chongqing Municipality. Anthropometric indexes [height, weight, WC, hip circumference (HC], blood pressure (BP, fasting lipid profile and levels of fasting and post-load glucose, insulin and hs-CRP were measured, and BMI, WHR, WHtR, fasting insulin resistant homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR, LAP and VAI were calculated. The correlations between hs-CRP and other variables were analyzed. Results  Following the elevation of titer of the hs-CRP, LAP, VAI, BMI, WC, WHR, WHtR, BP, glucose level, HOMA-IR, insulin, triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and apolipoprotein B (ApoB increased (P<0.05, while high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1 levels declined (P<0.0001. Pearson's correlation analysis demonstrated that hs-CRP was correlated with all variances (P<0.01 except for total cholesterol (TC (P=0.181 and LDL -C (P=0.325. According to forward stepwise multiple regression analysis with hs-CRP as the dependent variance, WC was the only variance entering the regression model. Conclusion  LAP, VAI levels are correlated with hs-CRP level but not the major determinant factors of hs-CRP. WC is stronger than other variances in the association with hs-CRP in adults, and is still an independent predictor of inflammation.

  3. Preoperative C-Reactive Protein/Albumin Ratio Predicts Prognosis of Patients after Curative Resection for Gastric Cancer

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    Xuechao Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An elevated preoperative C-reactive protein/albumin (CRP/Alb ratio has been reported to be associated with a poor prognosis for hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prognostic value of the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio and compare it with other systemic inflammatory response markers in patients with gastric cancer (GC. METHODS: A retrospective study was performed in 455 patients with GC undergoing curative resection. We investigated the correlations between the preoperative CRP/Alb ratio and overall survival (OS. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression models were used to assess independent prognostic factors. The area under the curve was used to compare the prognostic value of different markers. RESULTS: On multivariate analysis, the CRP/Alb ratio were independently associated with OS in patients with GC (hazard ratio: 1.626; 95% confidence interval: 1.191-2.219; P = .002, along with age (P = .003, preoperative body weight loss (P = .001, tumor location (P = .008, metastatic lymph node ratio (P < .001, and seventh tumor-nodes-metastasis stage (American Joint Committee on Cancer (P = .007. However, several other systemic inflammation–based prognostic scores (neutrophil lymphocyte ratio, platelet lymphocyte ratio and systemic immune-inflammation index, Glasgow Prognostic Score, modified Glasgow prognostic score, and high-sensitivity modified Glasgow prognostic score were not. In addition, the CRP/Alb ratio had a higher area under the curve value (0.625 compared with several other systemic inflammation–based prognostic scores (P < .001. CONCLUSION: The preoperative CRP/Alb ratio, a system inflammation-based prognostic score, is a superior predictor of OS in patients undergoing curative resection for GC and may help to identify the high-risk patients for treatment decisions.

  4. Prognostic value of the C-reactive protein to albumin ratio: a novel inflammation-based prognostic indicator in osteosarcoma

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    Li YJ

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Yong-Jiang Li,1,* Kai Yao,2,* Min-Xun Lu,2 Wen-Biao Zhang,1 Cong Xiao,2 Chong-Qi Tu2 1Department of Oncology, 2Department of Orthopedics, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The prognostic role of the C-reactive protein to albumin ratio (CRP/Alb ratio in patients with osteosarcoma has not been investigated. A total of 216 osteosarcoma patients were enrolled in the study. Univariate and multivariate survival analyses between the groups were performed and Kaplan–Meier analysis was conducted to plot the survival curves. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated and areas under the curve (AUCs were compared to assess the discriminatory ability of the inflammation-based indicators, including CRP/Alb ratio, Glasgow prognostic score (GPS, neutrophil–lymphocyte ratio (NLR, and platelet–lymphocyte ratio (PLR. The optimal cutoff value was 0.210 for CRP/Alb ratio with a Youden index of 0.319. Higher values of CRP/Alb ratio were significantly associated with poorer overall survival in univariate (HR =2.62, 95% CI =1.70–4.03; P<0.001 and multivariate (HR =2.21, 95% CI =1.40–3.49; P=0.001 analyses. In addition, the CRP/Alb ratio had significantly higher AUC values compared with GPS (P=0.003, NLR (P<0.001, and PLR (P<0.001. The study demonstrated that the CRP/Alb ratio is an effective inflammation-based prognostic indicator in osteosarcoma, which potentially has a discriminatory ability superior to that of other inflammatory indicators including GPS, NLR, and PLR. Keywords: osteosarcoma, CRP to albumin ratio, prognosis

  5. Do vitamin D and high-sensitivity-C reactive protein levels differ in patients with hyperemesis gravidarum? A preliminary study.

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    Yılmaz, Saynur; Akdağ Cırık, Derya; Demirtaş, Canan; Timur, Hakan; Şahin, Ayşe; Danışman, Nuri; Uygur, Dilek

    2016-09-01

    The high sensitivity-C reactive protein (hs-CRP) is an inflammatory marker and vitamin D is an immune modulator that might play a critical role in the pathogenesis of hyperemesis gravidarum. Therefore, in the current study, we tested the hypothesis that suggests women with hyperemesis gravidarum have lower 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and higher hs-CRP levels, compared to controls. This prospective case-control study included 30 women with hyperemesis gravidarum (study group) and 30 age- and body mass index-matched healthy women (control group). The levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and hs-CRP were compared between two groups. Both the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (5.30 μg/L vs. 6.44 μg/L; p=0.09) and hs-CRP levels (0.29 mg/dL vs. 0.47 mg/dL; p=0.93) were not significantly different between the study and control groups. Vitamin D deficiency was present in 27 (90.0%) women in the study group and 22 (73.3%) women in the control group (p=0.181). There was also no correlation between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and hs-CRP levels in both groups. Although it did not reach statistical significance, vitamin D levels were lower in the study group compared with controls. Therefore, vitamin D might be speculated to play a crucial role in controlling the inflammatory status associated with hyperemesis gravidarum. Larger studies are required to clarify whether there is a relation between vitamin D deficiency and hyperemesis gravidarum.

  6. Maternal serum C-reactive protein in early pregnancy and occurrence of preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm birth.

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    Moghaddam Banaem, Lida; Mohamadi, Bita; Asghari Jaafarabadi, Mohamad; Aliyan Moghadam, Narges

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between maternal serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the first 20 weeks of pregnancy and later occurrence of preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm birth. A prospective cohort study that measured maternal serum CRP levels in 778 pregnant women in the first half of pregnancy was performed in the city of Noor (north Iran), and included follow-up of patients up to time of delivery. Preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm birth were defined as the occurrence of membranes rupture and birth, respectively before 37 weeks of gestation. Of the 778 pregnancies studied, 19 (2.41%) preterm premature rupture of membranes and 58 (7.3%) preterm births were seen. Median CRP levels in preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm birth cases were much higher than in term deliveries (7 and 6.8 respectively vs 2.4 mg/L; 66.67 and 64.76, respectively vs 24.38 nmol/L). CRP levels >4 mg/L had statistically significant relationships with preterm premature rupture of membranes (OR 5.91, 95% CI 2.07-16.89) and preterm birth (OR 8.95, 95% CI 4.60-17.43). With a cut-off level of 4 mg/L of CRP, sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios (LR(+) and LR(-) ) for preterm birth were 81, 70, 2.70, 0.28%, respectively, and for preterm premature rupture of membranes they were 79, 67, 2.41 and 0.31%, respectively. It seems that the inflammatory marker, CRP, can be used in the early stages of pregnancy to identify women at risk of experiencing preterm premature rupture of membranes and preterm birth. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  7. Salivary C-reactive protein and mean platelet volume in diagnosis of late-onset neonatal pneumonia.

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    Omran, Ahmed; Ali, Mohammed; Saleh, Mai H; Zekry, Osama

    2017-10-13

    Neonatal pneumonia is an important and major cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide therefore; its early detection plays a crucial role in successful therapy. Analysis of saliva as a non-invasive method for detection of neonatal diseases holds great promise for improving health care. Till now, salivary C-reactive protein (CRP), mean platelet volume (MPV), neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelets/lymphocytes ratio (PLR) have not been studied as markers of diagnosis in neonatal pneumonia. To assess the applicability of salivary CRP, MPV, NLR and PLR as diagnostic markers in late-onset neonatal pneumonia. A prospective case control study of 70 full-term neonates, 35 with late-onset neonatal pneumonia and 35 healthy controls, was enrolled. Serum and salivary CRP concentrations were measured by ELISA, while MPV, NLR and PLR were measured by automated blood cell counter. This study showed a statistically significant difference between salivary CRP means in neonates with late-onset neonatal pneumonia vs control neonates (6.2 ± 4.6 and 2.8 ± 1.9 ng/L) respectively. At the cutoff point of 3.8 ng/L, salivary CRP showed 91.4% sensitivity and 80.9% specificity. Salivary CRP also showed accuracy in predicting elevated serum CRP in neonates with pneumonia. MPV showed a significant difference between pneumonia and controls (mean = 10.2 ± 0.7, 8 ± 0.5) respectively. At cutoff point 9.0, it has 80% sensitivity and specificity. The present study showed for the first time that both salivary CRP and MPV are suitable as diagnostic markers in late-onset neonatal pneumonia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Alterations of peripheral leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein in febrile urinary tract infection.

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    Naseri, Mitra

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of peripheral leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) level in febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) for defining the UTI level. A total of 61 children aged between 1 and 10 years with documented febrile UTI (axillary temperature > or = 38 degrees C) were studied. They had a urine culture positive for infection. Laboratory investigations including peripheral total and differential leukocyte counts, ESR, and CRP were assessed in relation to the inflammatory responses. Leukocyte count results were available in all of the patients, ESR in 41, and CRP in 36. Leukocyte count was normal in 6 patients (9.8%). Lymphocytic leukocytosis was seen in 1 patients (1.6%), neutrophilic leukocytosis in 25 (41.0%), and relative neutrophilia in 29 (47.5%). Thirty patients (73.2%) had a high ESR and 23 (63.9%) had a positive CRP. In children with a high ESR, 12 (29.3%) had neutrophilic leukocytosis and 14 (34.1%) had relative neutrophilia. Relative neutrophilia and neutrophilic leukocytosis with positive CRP both were found in 11 patients (30.6%). Negative CRP with absence of neutrophilic leukocytosis was found in a significantly higher proportion of patients. There were no direct correlations between the severity of systemic inflammatory responses and urinary tract inflammatory response. Findings of this study showed that ESR and differential leukocyte count are two valuable tests in febrile UTI and may be useful for localization of UTI level, but the total leukocyte count and CRP level as in qualitative methods are not useful, and many patients with febrile UTI do not have leukocytosis.

  9. Effect of vitamin E supplementation on serum C-reactive protein level: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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    Saboori, S; Shab-Bidar, S; Speakman, J R; Yousefi Rad, E; Djafarian, K

    2015-08-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of chronic inflammation, has a major role in the etiology of chronic disease. Vitamin E may have anti-inflammatory effects. However, there is no consensus on the effects of vitamin E supplementation on CRP levels in clinical trials. The aim of this study was to systematically review randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that report on the effects of vitamin E supplementation (α- and γ-tocopherols) on CRP levels. A systematic search of RCTs was conducted on Medline and EMBASE through PubMed, Scopus, Ovid and Science Direct, and completed by a manual review of the literature up to May 2014. Pooled effects were estimated by using random-effects models and heterogeneity was assessed by Cochran's Q and I(2) tests. Subgroup analyses and meta-regression analyses were also performed according to intervention duration, dose of supplementation and baseline level of CRP. Of 4734 potentially relevant studies, only 12 trials met the inclusion criteria with 246 participants in the intervention arms and 249 participants in control arms. Pooled analysis showed a significant reduction in CRP levels of 0.62 mg/l (95% confidence interval = -0.92, -0.31; P vitamin E-treated individuals, with the evidence of heterogeneity across studies. This significant effect was maintained in all subgroups, although the univariate meta-regression analysis showed that the vitamin E supplementation dose, baseline level of CRP and duration of intervention were not the sources of the observed heterogeneity. The results of this meta-analysis suggest that supplementation with vitamin E in the form of either α-tocopherol or γ-tocopherol would reduce serum CRP levels.

  10. Effect of psyllium fiber supplementation on C-reactive protein: the trial to reduce inflammatory markers (TRIM).

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    King, Dana E; Mainous, Arch G; Egan, Brent M; Woolson, Robert F; Geesey, Mark E

    2008-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a significant association between the intake of dietary fiber and levels of inflammatory markers. The objective of this study was to determine whether daily fiber supplementation would reduce levels of inflammatory markers. This study was a prospective randomized controlled trial at a single university medical center. Participants were overweight or obese adults with no history of heart disease. The intervention was psyllium supplementation at either 7 or 14 g/d for 3 months compared with no supplements in a control group. The main outcome measure was change in level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentration; secondary outcomes included changes in interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels, fibrinogen levels, and white blood cell (WBC) count. Protocol completers attended at least 2 visits and took more than 75% of the prescribed fiber dose. In this intent-to-treat analysis (n = 158), there were no significant differences between either of the 2 treatment groups and the control group in the amount of change in CRP, fibrinogen, or IL-6 levels or in WBC count (P>.05). In the analysis of protocol completers (n = 132), there also were no significant differences between the groups except for a small decrease in fibrinogen level in the high-fiber group (-6 mg/dL [-0.18 micromol/L] compared with 13 mg/dL [0.38 micromol/L] in the control group, PPsyllium fiber supplementation did not significantly reduce CRP levels in overweight or obese individuals in this trial, and changes in other markers were not consistent. Further research is needed to determine whether other fibers or nutrients can reduce inflammatory markers.

  11. Sex differences in the association between stressor-evoked interleukin-6 reactivity and C-reactive protein.

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    Lockwood, Kimberly G; Marsland, Anna L; Cohen, Sheldon; Gianaros, Peter J

    2016-11-01

    Individuals differ consistently in the magnitude of their inflammatory responses to acute stressors, with females often showing larger responses than males. While the clinical significance of these individual differences remains unclear, it may be that greater inflammatory responses relate to increased systemic inflammation and thereby risk for chronic inflammatory disease. Here, we examined whether acute stressor-evoked interleukin (IL)-6 responses associate with resting levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of systemic inflammation, and whether this association differs by sex. Subjects were 57 healthy midlife adults (30-51years; 33% female; 68% white). Blood was drawn before and 30-min after two mental stress tasks: a multisource interference task and a Stroop color word task. Hierarchical regressions controlling for age, sex, race, and BMI tested whether stressor-evoked IL-6 responses were associated with resting CRP and whether this association differed by sex. Results indicated that sex and stressor-evoked IL-6 responses interacted to predict CRP (ΔR 2 =0.08, B=-1.33, β=-0.39, p=0.02). In males, larger stressor-evoked IL-6 responses associated with higher CRP, whereas in females, stressor-evoked IL-6 responses showed a non-significant negative association with CRP. These findings indicate that inflammatory responses to acute stressors associate with resting levels of CRP; however, this association differs by sex. Previous literature suggests that there are sex differences in stressor-evoked IL-6 responses, but this is the first study to show sex differences in the relationship between acute inflammatory responses and systemic inflammation. The contribution of these sex differences to inflammatory disease risk warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of Procalcitonin and C-reactive Protein in Differential Diagnosis of Sepsis and Severe Sepsis in Emergency Department

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    Ali Kemal Erenler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Sepsis and severe sepsis (sepsis accompanied by acute organ dysfunction are leading causes of death worldwide. In this study, our aim was to investigate utility of biomarkers commonly used in diagnosis of sepsis in discriminating these two entities. Methods: Two-hundred and three patients involved were divided into 2 subgroups as sepsis and severe sepsis according to Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012. Then groups were compared according to clinical and laboratory (including C-reactive protein (CRP and procalcitonin (PCT levels characteristics. Results: Of 203 patients included into the study, 124 (61.1% were male and 79 (38.9% were female. The most common reason for sepsis was urinary tract infection (n=64, 31.5%, followed by catheter infection (n=16, 7.9% and pneumonia (n=14, 6.9%. Escherichia coli was the most common agent in both blood and urinary cultures. Majority of the patients were treated with ceftriaxone (n=33, 16.3%, followed by meronem/dapson (n=25, 12.3%. In both groups, CRP and PCT levels were high, even higher in severe sepsis group. However, any statistical significance could not be determined between groups. Mortality rate in sepsis patients was 6.4%. Conclusion: Plasma levels of both markers elevate in sepsis and severe sepsis. It was determined that CRP and PCT is higher in severe sepsis than in sepsis. However, the difference is not statistically significant. Plasma levels of CRP and PCT are not useful in differential diagnosis of sepsis and severe sepsis.

  13. The relation of C - reactive protein to chronic kidney disease in African Americans: the Jackson Heart Study

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    Akylbekova Ermeg L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African Americans have an increased incidence and worse prognosis with chronic kidney disease (CKD - estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] 2 than their counterparts of European-descent. Inflammation has been related to renal disease in non-Hispanic whites, but there are limited data on the role of inflammation in renal dysfunction in African Americans in the community. Methods We examined the cross-sectional relation of log transformed C-reactive protein (CRP to renal function (eGFR by Modification of Diet and Renal Disease equation in African American participants of the community-based Jackson Heart Study's first examination (2000 to 2004. We conducted multivariable linear regression relating CRP to eGFR adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, diabetes, total/HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, smoking, antihypertensive therapy, lipid lowering therapy, hormone replacement therapy, and prevalent cardiovascular disease events. In a secondary analysis we assessed the association of CRP with albuminuria (defined as albumin-to-creatinine ratio > 30 mg/g. Results Participants (n = 4320, 63.2% women had a mean age ± SD of 54.0 ± 12.8 years. The prevalence of CKD was 5.2% (n = 228 cases. In multivariable regression, CRP concentrations were higher in those with CKD compared to those without CKD (mean CRP 3.2 ± 1.1 mg/L vs. 2.4 ± 1.0 mg/L, respectively p 0.05. Conclusion CRP was associated with CKD however not albuminuria in multivariable-adjusted analyses. The study of inflammation in the progression of renal disease in African Americans merits further investigation.

  14. Original Article C-Reactive Protein 1059G/C Gene Polymorphism in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

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    Dilek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: C-reactive protein (CRP is considered to be a cardiovascular risk marker and changes in its level have been attributed to genetic factors. The aim of the study was to determine CRP 1059G/C gene polymorphism frequency and its relationship with CRP levels and carotid artery intima-media thickness (CIMT in type 2 diabetic patients (DM. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty-four type 2 diabetic patients (mean age: 57±7 years; F/M: 80/84 and 151 controls (mean age: 53±7 years; F/M: 81/70 were recruited. CIMT was assessed by carotid ultrasonography. CRP 1059G/C polymorphism was determined by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses. Results: The CRP 1059G/C polymorphism distribution in diabetic group and controls were similar (1059GG in 92% vs. 88%, 1059GC in 2% vs. 5%; 1059CC in 6% vs. 7%. CRP levels (4.3±6.6 mg/L vs. 2.5±2.3 mg/L; p=0.02 and CIMT (0.67±0.18mm vs. 0.56±0.19mm; p<0.0001 were increased in diabetics compared to controls. No association of CRP and CIMT with CRP 1059G/C polymorphism was found. Conclusions: Increased CRP levels and CIMT seem to be independent of CRP 1059G/C gene polymorphism in our group of type 2 diabetic patients. Turk Jem 2010; 14: 85-8

  15. Dietary total antioxidant capacity from different assays in relation to serum C-reactive protein among young Japanese women

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    Kobayashi Satomi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The association between dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC from different assays and serum C-reactive protein (CRP has not been assessed in non-Western populations. We examined the association between dietary TAC and serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women using different four TAC assays. Methods The subjects were 443 young Japanese women aged 18–22 years. Dietary TAC was assessed with a self-administered diet history questionnaire and the TAC value of each food using the following four assays: ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP; oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC; Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC; and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP. Serum CRP concentrations were measured by highly sensitive nephelometry. Results The major contributor to dietary TAC was green, barley, and oolong tea (FRAP: 53%, ORAC: 45%, TEAC: 36%, and TRAP: 44%. The prevalence of elevated CRP concentrations (≥ 1 mg/L was 5.6%. TAC from FRAP was inversely associated with serum CRP concentrations (adjusted odds ratio [OR] for elevated CRP concentration in high [compared with low] dietary TAC group: 0.39 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.16-0.98]; P = 0.04. TAC from ORAC was inversely associated with CRP, although the association was not significant (OR: 0.48 [95% CI: 0.20-1.14]; P = 0.10. TAC from TEAC was inversely associated with CRP (OR: 0.32 [95% CI: 0.12-0.82]; P = 0.02, as was TAC from TRAP (OR: 0.31 [95% CI: 0.12-0.81]; P = 0.02. Conclusions Dietary TAC was inversely associated with serum CRP concentration in young Japanese women regardless of assay. Further studies are needed in other populations to confirm these results.

  16. Oxidative Stress Markers and C-Reactive Protein Are Related to Severity of Heart Failure in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

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    Celina Wojciechowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of study was to determine relationships between functional capacity (NYHA class, left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF, hemodynamic parameters, and biomarkers of redox state and inflammation in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. Methods. DCM patients (n=109, aged 45.97±10.82 years, NYHA class IIV, and LVEF 2.94±7.1% were studied. Controls comprised age-matched healthy volunteers (n=28. Echocardiography and right heart catheterization were performed. Serum activities of superoxide dismutase isoenzymes (MnSOD and CuZnSOD, concentrations of uric acid (UA, malondialdehyde (MDA, and C-reactive protein (hs-CRP were measured. Results. MnSOD, UA, hs-CRP, and MDA were significantly higher in DCM patients compared to controls. Except MDA concentration, above parameters were higher in patients in III-IV NYHA class or with lower LVEF. hsCRP correlated with of MnSOD (P<0.05 and CuZnSOD activity (P<0.01. Both isoenzymes positively correlated with mPAP and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (MnSOD, resp., P<0.01 and P<0.05 and CuZnSOD P<0.05; P<0.05. UA positively correlated with MnSOD (P<0.05, mPAP (P<0.05, and PVRI (P<0.05. The negative correlation between LVEF and UA (P<0.01 was detected. Conclusion. There are relationships among the severity of symptoms of heart failure, echocardiographic hemodynamic parameters, oxidative stress, and inflammatory activation. Increased MnSOD activity indicates the mitochondrial source of ROS in patients with advanced heart failure.

  17. C reactive protein as a predictor of anastomotic leakage in colorectal surgery. Comparison between open and laparoscopic surgery.

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    Ramos Fernández, María; Rivas Ruiz, Francisco; Fernández López, Alberto; Loinaz Segurola, Carmelo; Fernández Cebrián, José María; de la Portilla de Juan, Fernando

    2017-11-01

    Anastomotic leak (AL) is a serious complication in colorectal surgery due to its increase in morbidity and mortality. The aim of this prospective non-randomised study is to determine whether C-reactive Protein (CRP) is useful as a predictor of AL in patients undergoing open versus laparoscopic surgery. A total of 168 patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery were included. CRP was measured daily during the first 5postoperative days. Complications, specially AL, were analysed. Following an open approach 32 patients (45.7%) presented complications, 15 (18.7%) in the laparoscopic group and 12 (29.4%) in the converted group (P=0.153). Following open surgery 9 patients experienced AL, 5 were detected in the laparoscopic group and none in those converted (P=0.153). There were significant differences in CRP values between the 3 groups (P=0.03). ROC Curves showed AUC for the open and laparoscopic approach of 0.731 and 0.760 respectively. On day 4 the AUC was 0.867 for the open group and 0.914 for the laparoscopic group. Cut-off points on day 4 were: Open: 159.2mg/L; sensitivity 75%, specificity 89% and NPP 96% (P<0.001). Following laparoscopic surgery the cut-off point was 67.3%; sensitivity 100%, specificity 89.5% and NPP 100% (P=0.016). CRP on day 4 is useful to diagnose AL. Different cut-off values should be taken into account depending on the approach used. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Impact of C-reactive protein on absolute reticulocyte count in haemodialysis patients: the role of iron status.

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    Mitsopoulos, Efstathios; Tsiatsiou, Maria; Zanos, Stavros; Katodritou, Eirini; Visvardis, Georgios; Papadopoulou, Dorothea; Passadakis, Ploumis; Vargemezis, Vassilis; Tsakiris, Dimitrios

    2011-03-01

    The exact mechanisms by which the effects of inflammation on erythropoiesis occur are still to be determined. We aimed to examine the relation between C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythropoiesis as quantified by the absolute reticulocyte count (RTC) and the possible effect of iron status on this relationship. As part of a study that follows the changes of haematologic parameters after the intravenous (IV) administration of iron in 93 stable haemodialysis (HD) patients, we made a cross-sectional analysis of baseline measurements and an analysis of changes in RTC 1 week after baseline measurements and iron administration. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that RTC had a positive correlation with CRP; RTC had a negative correlation with reticulocyte haemoglobin content (CHr). An interaction was also found between CRP and CHr in that CRP had a significant relation to RTC only in those patients whose CHr was more than 31.2 pg. At lower values of CHr, the correlation between CRP and RTC was not significant. Five days after the IV administration of 200 mg iron sucrose, a significant increase of RTC was observed, only in those patients with elevated baseline CRP levels who also showed an increase in CHr levels from ≤ 31.2 pg at baseline to ≥ 31.2 pg post-administration, supporting the presence of an independent positive correlation between CRP and RTC when iron is adequate. It is indicated that, in HD patients, elevated CRP values are associated with increased erythroid production only when CHr is quite satisfactory.

  19. C-reactive protein point-of-care testing in acutely ill children: a mixed methods study in primary care.

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    Van den Bruel, Ann; Jones, Caroline; Thompson, Matthew; Mant, David

    2016-04-01

    Point-of-care C-reactive protein (CRP) testing of adults with acute respiratory infection in primary care reduces antibiotic prescribing by 22%. The acceptability and impact of CRP testing in children is unknown To determine the acceptability and impact of CRP testing in acutely ill children. Mixed methods study comprising an observational cohort with a nested randomised controlled trial and embedded qualitative study. Children presenting with an acute illness to general practice out-of-hours services; children with a temperature ≥38°C were randomised in the nested trial; parents and clinical staff were invited to the qualitative study. Informed consent rates; parental and staff views on testing. Consent to involvement in the study was obtained for 200/297 children (67.3%, 95% CI 61.7% to 72.6%); the finger-prick test might have been a contributory factor for 63 of the 97 children declining participation but it was cited as a definite factor in only 10 cases. None of the parents or staff raised concerns about the acceptability of testing, describing the pain caused as minor and transient. General practitioner views on the utility of the CRP test were inconsistent. CRP point-of-care testing in children is feasible in primary care and is likely to be acceptable. However, it will not reduce antibiotic prescribing and hospital referrals until general practitioners accept its diagnostic value in children. ISRCTN 69736109. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Quantitative and rapid detection of C-reactive protein using quantum dot-based lateral flow test strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ruili; Zhou, Shuai; Chen, Ting; Li, Jinjie; Shen, Huaibin; Chai, Yujuan; Li, Lin Song

    2018-05-30

    A novel QD-based immunoassay on a paper-based lateral flow system has been developed to quantitatively detect C-reactive protein (CRP). Different standard CRP antigens from 1 to 200 μg mL -1 were diluted 200-fold and only 60 μL diluted sample were needed to load onto the sample pad. The QD fluorescence signals on the test line and the control line were able to be observed within 3 min after the initiation of assay, and the limit of detection was as sensitive as 0.30 ng mL -1  by measuring the fluorescence intensity immediately afterwards with fluorescence immunoassay analyzer. The linearity on the detection of QD fluorescence signals has been established well in the range of 0.5 ng mL -1 and 1 μg mL -1 for CRP. The precision of the assay has been confirmed for low coefficient of variation (CV), satisfying less than 15% (intra-assay and inter-assay), and the accuracy of assay meets the requirements with the mean recovery of the control was 102.63%. These results indicated that such newly developed platform was reliable with high sensitivity, rapidness, and could cover a broad range of target concentrations. Furthermore, a total of 135 human serum clinical samples with inflammation or infection with the concentration of CRP from 0.2 to 200 μg mL -1  has been used to check the performance of this QD-based LFIA, it correlated very well with Roche Tina-quant CRP (Latex) (r = 0.966, n = 135). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cannabis smoking and serum C-reactive protein: a quantile regressions approach based on NHANES 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaarawy, Omayma; Anthony, James C

    2015-02-01

    Pre-clinical studies link cannabinoid-1 receptor activation to inflammation and atherosclerotic effects; anti-inflammation and immunosuppression seem to be mediated by cannabinoid-2 receptor activation. In this epidemiological study, we aim to present estimates on suspected cannabis-attributable immunomodulation as manifest in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels as non-specific inflammatory markers with interpretable clinical values. With strength of data from recent large nationally representative community sample surveys, the research approach illustrates value of a quantile regressions approach in lieu of the commonly used but relatively arbitrary cutpoints for CRP values. The study population encompasses 20-59 year old participants from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2005-2010 (n=1115 recently active cannabis smokers and 8041 non-smokers, identified via confidential Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interviews). Age, sex, race, education, income-poverty ratio, alcohol consumption, and tobacco smoking also were measured, together with body mass index (BMI), which actually might be on a mediational path. Quantile regressions, with bootstrapping for variance estimation, made it possible to hold these covariates constant while estimating cannabis-CRP associations. Evidence suggesting possible cannabis-attributable immunomodulation emerges at CRP levels below the median (pcannabis link with serum CRP, but BMI-stratified analyses disclosed no appreciable variation of the cannabis-CRP relationship across BMI subgroups. Extending pre-clinical research on cannabis-attributable immunomodulation, this study's CRP evidence points toward possible anti-inflammatory effects of cannabis smoking. More definitive evidence can be derived by combining pre-clinical research, studies of patients, and epidemiological research approaches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of C-reactive protein, Haptoglobin and cardiac troponin 1 levels in brachycephalic dogs with upper airway obstructive syndrome

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    Planellas Marta

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brachycephalic dogs have unique upper respiratory anatomy with abnormal breathing patterns similar to those in humans with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between anatomical components, clinical signs and several biomarkers, used to determine systemic inflammation and myocardial damage (C-reactive protein, CRP; Haptoglobin, Hp; cardiac troponin I, cTnI, in dogs with brachycephalic upper airway obstructive syndrome (BAOS. Results Fifty brachycephalic dogs were included in the study and the following information was studied: signalment, clinical signs, thoracic radiographs, blood work, ECG, components of BAOS, and CRP, Hp and cTnI levels. A high proportion of dogs with BAOS (88% had gastrointestinal signs. The prevalence of anatomic components of BAOS was: elongated soft palate (100%, stenotic nares (96%, everted laryngeal saccules (32% and tracheal hypoplasia (29.1%. Increased serum levels of biomarkers were found in a variable proportion of dogs: 14% (7/50 had values of CRP > 20 mg/L, 22.9% (11/48 had values of Hp > 3 g/L and 47.8% (22/46 had levels of cTnI > 0.05 ng/dl. Dogs with everted laryngeal saccules had more severe respiratory signs (p Conclusions According to the low percentage of patients with elevated levels of CRP and Hp, BAOS does not seem to cause an evident systemic inflammatory status. Some degree of myocardial damage may occur in dogs with BAOS that can be detected by cTnI concentration.

  3. Sex Differences in High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Subjects with Risk Factors of Metabolic Syndrome

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    Garcia, Vinicius Pacheco; Rocha, Helena Naly Miguens; Sales, Allan Robson Kluser; Rocha, Natália Galito; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio Lucas da

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with a higher risk of all-cause mortality. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) is a prototypic marker of inflammation usually increased in MetS. Women with MetS-related diseases present higher hsCRP levels than men with MetS-related diseases, suggesting sex differences in inflammatory markers. However, it is unclear whether serum hsCRP levels are already increased in men and/or women with MetS risk factors and without overt diseases or under pharmacological treatment. To determine the impact of the number of MetS risk factors on serum hsCRP levels in women and men. One hundred and eighteen subjects (70 men and 48 women; 36 ± 1 years) were divided into four groups according to the number of MetS risk factors: healthy group (CT; no risk factors), MetS ≤ 2, MetS = 3, and MetS ≥ 4. Blood was drawn after 12 hours of fasting for measurement of biochemical variables and hsCRP levels, which were determined by immunoturbidimetric assay. The groups with MetS risk factors presented higher serum hsCRP levels when compared with the CT group (p < 0.02). There were no differences in hsCRP levels among groups with MetS risk factors (p > 0.05). The best linear regression model to explain the association between MetS risk factors and hsCRP levels included waist circumference and HDL cholesterol (r = 0.40, p < 0.01). Women with MetS risk factors presented higher hsCRP levels when compared with men (p sex < 0.01). Despite the absence of overt diseases and pharmacological treatment, subjects with MetS risk factors already presented increased hsCRP levels, which were significantly higher in women than men at similar conditions

  4. Effects of C-reactive protein on adipokines genes expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Guoyue, E-mail: yuanguoyue@hotmail.com [Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Jia, Jue; Di, Liangliang [Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Zhou, Libin [Ruijin Hospital, Center of Molecular Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Jiaotong University Medical School, 197, Ruijin Road II, Shanghai 200025 (China); Dong, Sijing; Ye, Jingjing; Wang, Dong; Yang, Ling; Wang, Jifang [Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Li, Lianxi [Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People' s Hospital, 600, Yishan Road, Shanghai 200233 (China); Yang, Ying [Ruijin Hospital, Center of Molecular Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Jiaotong University Medical School, 197, Ruijin Road II, Shanghai 200025 (China); Mao, Chaoming [Department of Endocrinology, The Affiliated Hospital of Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, Jiangsu 212001 (China); Chen, Mingdao, E-mail: mingdaochensh@yahoo.com [Ruijin Hospital, Center of Molecular Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Shanghai Jiaotong University Medical School, 197, Ruijin Road II, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRP increases TNF-{alpha} and IL-6 genes expression in matured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRP suppresses adiponectin, leptin and PPAR-{gamma} mRNA levels in matured 3T3-L1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Wortmannin reverses effects of CRP on adiponectin, TNF-{alpha} and leptin mRNA levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CRP may regulate IR, obesity and metabolic syndrome by this mechanism. -- Abstract: Adipose tissue is now recognized to be an important endocrine organ, secreting a variety of adipokines that are involved in the regulation of energy metabolism, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. C-reactive protein (CRP) is considered as one of the most sensitive markers of inflammation. A number of studies have shown that elevation of CRP concentrations is an independent predictive parameter of type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is also strongly associated with various components of the metabolic syndrome. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of CRP on adipokines genes expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that CRP inhibited adiponectin, leptin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-{gamma}) genes expression and raised tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA levels in matured 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a dose and time-dependent manner. Pharmacological inhibition of phosphatidylinositol (PI)-3 kinase by wortmannin partially reversed the effects of CRP on adiponectin, TNF-{alpha} and leptin genes expression. These results collectively suggest that CRP regulates adiponectin, TNF-{alpha}, leptin, IL-6 and PPAR-{gamma} genes expression, and that might represent a mechanism by which CRP regulates insulin resistance, obesity and metabolic syndrome.

  5. Dietary fiber is associated with circulating concentrations of C-reactive protein in breast cancer survivors: the HEAL study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor, Adriana; Ambs, Anita; Ballard-Barbash, Rachel; Baumgartner, Kathy B; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M; Neuhouser, Marian L

    2011-09-01

    Inflammation is a suspected risk factor for breast cancer and its subsequent prognosis. The extent to which dietary and lifestyle factors might influence inflammation is important to examine. Specifically, dietary fiber may reduce systemic inflammation, but this relationship has not been examined among breast cancer survivors. We examined associations between dietary fiber and serum concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A (SAA), among 698 female breast cancer survivors from the Health, Eating, Activity, and Lifestyle (HEAL) Study. Data are from interviews and clinical visits conducted 24-months post-study enrollment. Multivariate-adjusted linear regression estimated associations of total, soluble, and insoluble fiber with serum concentrations of CRP and SAA. Logistic regression estimated the odds of elevated CRP (defined as >3.0 mg/l) across tertiles of dietary fiber intake. Mean total dietary fiber intake was 13.9 ± 6.4 g/day. Mean CRP and SAA were 3.32 ± 3.66 and 7.73 ± 10.23 mg/l, respectively. We observed a multivariate-adjusted inverse association between total dietary fiber intake and CRP concentrations (β, -0.029; 95% CI, -0.049, -0.008). Results for insoluble fiber were similar (β, -0.039; 95% CI, -0.064, -0.013). Among survivors who consumed >15.5 g/day of insoluble dietary fiber, a 49% reduction in the likelihood of having elevated CRP concentrations (OR, 0.51; 95% CI, 0.27, 0.95) was observed compared to those who consumed fiber may benefit breast cancer survivors via reductions in systemic inflammation; elevated inflammation may be prognostic for reduced survival.

  6. Bacterial infections in patients with liver cirrhosis: clinical characteristics and the role of C-reactive protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Melanie; Manolakopoulos, Spilios; Andreadis, Ioannis; Giannaris, Markos; Kontos, George; Kranidioti, Hariklia; Pirounaki, Maria; Koskinas, John

    2018-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients may be difficult, because of the absence of classical signs such as fever and raised white blood cell count. The role of C-reactive protein (CRP) in this context has not been clearly defined. Methods: Clinical and laboratory characteristics of 210 consecutive cirrhotic patients with (n=100) or without (n=110) bacterial infection were compared with a control group of non-cirrhotic patients with infection (n=106). Results: Significantly fewer patients with cirrhosis had a body temperature ≥37°C when presenting with bacterial infection (56% cirrhotic vs. 85.5% non-cirrhotic patients, P=0.01). Mean leukocyte count was 6.92 × 103/mm3 in patients with cirrhosis and infection, 5.75 × 103/mm3 (P=0.02) in cirrhotic patients without infection, and 11.28 × 103/mm3 in non-cirrhotic patients with infection (P10 mg/L indicated the presence of infection with a sensitivity of 68%, a specificity of 84.5% and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.8197. CRP cutoff level differed according to the severity of the liver disease: Child-Pugh score (CPS) A: 21.3 mg/L, B: 17 mg/L, and C: 5.78 mg/L. Conclusions: CRP at admission could help diagnose infection in cirrhotic patients. Since the severity of liver disease seems to affect the CRP values, lower CRP levels might indicate infection. Clinical suspicion is necessary to avoid delay in diagnosis and initiate antibiotic treatment. PMID:29333070

  7. Diagnostic value of lactate, procalcitonin, ferritin, serum-C-reactive protein, and other biomarkers in bacterial and viral meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanaei Dashti, Anahita; Alizadeh, Shekoofan; Karimi, Abdullah; Khalifeh, Masoomeh; Shoja, Seyed Abdolmajid

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There are many difficulties distinguishing bacterial from viral meningitis that could be reasonably solved using biomarkers. The aim of this study was to evaluate lactate, procalcitonin (PCT), ferritin, serum-CRP (C-reactive protein), and other known biomarkers in differentiating bacterial meningitis from viral meningitis in children. All children aged 28 days to 14 years with suspected meningitis who were admitted to Mofid Children's Hospital, Tehran, between October 2012 and November 2013, were enrolled in this prospective cross-sectional study. Children were divided into 2 groups of bacterial and viral meningitis, based on the results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) culture, polymerase chain reaction, and cytochemical profile. Diagnostic values of CSF parameters (ferritin, PCT, absolute neutrophil count [ANC], white blood cell count, and lactate) and serum parameters (PCT, ferritin, CRP, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate [ESR]) were evaluated. Among 50 patients with meningitis, 12 were diagnosed with bacterial meningitis. Concentrations of all markers were significantly different between bacterial and viral meningitis, except for serum (P = .389) and CSF (P = .136) PCT. The best rates of area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) were achieved by lactate (AUC = 0.923) and serum-CRP (AUC = 0.889). The best negative predictive values (NPV) for bacterial meningitis were attained by ANC (100%) and lactate (97.1%). The results of our study suggest that ferritin and PCT are not strong predictive biomarkers. A combination of low CSF lactate, ANC, ESR, and serum-CRP could reasonably rule out the bacterial meningitis. PMID:28858084

  8. Efficacy of a chairside diagnostic test kit for estimation of C-reactive protein levels in periodontal disease

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    Nagarale Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: C-reactive protein [CRP] levels increase to hundreds of mg/mL within hours following infection. Studies have shown that serum CRP levels were elevated in periodontal disease. However, in all the previous studies, CRP levels were measured by using high-sensitivity CRP assay kits with minimal detection limits of 0.1 to 3 mg/L, which was much below the normal value of 10 mg/L. These high-sensitivity CRP assays need a proper laboratory setup, and these methods cannot be used as a routine chair-side test in the dental office. Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum CRP levels in subjects with periodontal disease by using a rapid chair-side diagnostic test kit with a lower detection limit of 6 mg/L and to compare the CRP levels before and after periodontal therapy. Materials and Methods: A total of 45 systemically healthy subjects were selected for the study. Subjects were divided into three groups: group A: healthy controls, group B: gingivitis, group C: periodontitis. Serum levels of CRP were determined by using a latex slide agglutination method with commercially available kit with lower detection limit of 6 mg/L. Results: CRP was negative in all the 15 subjects in groups A and B at baseline, 7th and 30th day. CRP was positive only in 2 subjects in Group C at baseline and 7th day. Conclusion: Estimation of serum CRP by using a rapid chair-side diagnostic test kit is not of any significance in subjects with periodontitis.

  9. The repeatability of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and C-reactive protein in COPD patients over one year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolsum, Umme; Roy, Kay; Starkey, Cerys

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many of the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are mediated through increased systemic levels of inflammatory proteins. We assessed the long term repeatability of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and C-reactive protein......(i)) and the Bland-Altman method. Pearson correlations were used to determine the relationships between the systemic markers at both visits. RESULTS: There was moderate repeatability with a very high degree of statistical significance (p...

  10. The repeatability of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and C-reactive protein in COPD patients over one year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolsum, Umme; Roy, Kay; Starkey, Cerys

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many of the systemic manifestations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are mediated through increased systemic levels of inflammatory proteins. We assessed the long term repeatability of Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and C-reactive protein......(i)) and the Bland-Altman method. Pearson correlations were used to determine the relationships between the systemic markers at both visits. RESULTS: There was moderate repeatability with a very high degree of statistical significance (p...

  11. Prognostic influence of pre-operative C-reactive protein in node-negative breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Sicking

    Full Text Available The importance of inflammation is increasingly noticed in cancer. The aim of this study was to analyze the prognostic influence of pre-operative serum C-reactive protein (CRP in a cohort of 148 lymph node-negative breast cancer patients. The prognostic significance of CRP level for disease-free survival (DFS, metastasis-free survival (MFS and overall survival (OS was evaluated using univariate and multivariate Cox regression, also including information on age at diagnosis, tumor size, tumor grade, estrogen receptor (ER, progesterone receptor (PR and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 status, proliferation index (Ki67 and molecular subtype, as well as an assessment of the presence of necrosis and inflammation in the tumor tissue. Univariate analysis showed that CRP, as a continuous variable, was significantly associated with DFS (P = 0.002, hazard ratio [HR] = 1.04, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02-1.07 and OS (P = 0.036, HR= 1.03, 95% CI = 1.00-1.06, whereas a trend was observed for MFS (P = 0.111. In the multivariate analysis, CRP retained its significance for DFS (P = 0.033, HR= 1.01, 95% CI = 1.00-1.07 as well as OS (P = 0.023, HR= 1.03, 95% CI = 1.00-1.06, independent of established prognostic factors. Furthermore, large-scale gene expression analysis by Affymetrix HG-U133A arrays was performed for 72 (48.6% patients. The correlations between serum CRP and gene expression levels in the corresponding carcinoma of the breast were assessed using Spearman's rank correlation, controlled for false-discovery rate. No significant correlation was observed between CRP level and gene expression indicative of an ongoing local inflammatory process. In summary, pre-operatively elevated CRP levels at the time of diagnosis were associated with shorter DFS and OS independent of established prognostic factors in node-negative breast cancer, supporting a possible link between inflammation and

  12. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-related phospholipase A2, and acute ischemic stroke

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    Kara H

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Hasan Kara,1 Murat Akinci,1 Selim Degirmenci,1 Aysegul Bayir,1 Ahmet Ak,1 Alaaddin Nayman,2 Ali Unlu,3 Fikret Akyurek,3 Mesut Sivri2 1Department of Emergency Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, 3Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Selçuk University, Konya, Turkey Background: Serum biomarkers may be useful for early diagnosis of acute ischemic stroke, exclusion of other diseases that may mimic stroke, and prediction of infarct volume. We evaluated serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP and lipoprotein-related phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2 in patients who had acute ischemic stroke.Methods: In 200 patients who presented to an emergency service (acute ischemic stroke, 102 patients; control with no stroke, 98 patients, stroke patients were evaluated with the Canadian neurological scale and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, and all patients were evaluated with the Glasgow coma scale and their serum hs-CRP level and Lp-PLA2 activity were assessed. The volume of stroke lesions was calculated from magnetic resonance images.Results: Patients who had stroke had higher mean serum hs-CRP level (stroke, 7±6 mg/dL; ­control, mean ± standard deviation 1±1 mg/dL; P≤0.001 and Lp-PLA2 activity (stroke, mean ± standard deviation 113±86 nmol/min/mL; control, mean ± standard deviation 103±50 nmol/min/mL; P≤0.001 than control patients who did not have stroke. The mean hs-CRP level and Lp-PLA2 activity were higher in patients who had greater stroke severity (lower Canadian neurological scale score and were higher in patients who had larger volume strokes. Conclusion: Higher hs-CRP level and Lp-PLA2 activity are significantly associated with more severe neurologic impairment and larger infarct size in patients who have acute ischemic stroke. These biomarkers may be useful for rapid diagnosis and prediction of ischemic tissue volume in the early stage of ischemic stroke. These findings may be important for health

  13. Clinical value of serum C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and lipase in predicting severe acute pancreatitis during pregnancy

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    LI Xianping

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate clinical value of serum C-reactive protein (CRP, procalcitonin (PCT, and lipase in predicting severe acute pancreatitis (SAP during pregnancy. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 126 pregnant women with acute pancreatitis (AP who were treated in Nongken Sanya Hospital from January 2011 to January 2016. According to the severity of AP, the patients were divided into control group (pregnancy complicated by mild-to-moderate AP, 71 patients and observation group (pregnancy complicated by SAP, 55 patients. The clinical features of AP in pregnancy were compared between the two groups. The laboratory markers including venous leukocyte count, hemoglobin, plasma albumin, blood amylase, CRP, PCT, and lipase were observed. The t-test was used for comparision of continuos data between groups, and the chi-square test was used for comparision of categorial data between groups, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves were plotted for statistically significant markers to assess their sensitivities and specificities. Results The observation group had significantly higher serum levels of lipase, PCT, and CRP than the control group (lipase: 857.73±158.61 U/L vs 590.19±138.67 U/L, χ2=7.689, P<0.01; PCT: 10.07±4.55 ng/ml vs 5.89±2.13 ng/ml, χ2=15.492, P<0.01; CRP: 269.93±63.61 mg/L vs 202.64±39.58 mg/L, χ2=7.500, P<0.01. According to the ROC curves, serum lipase, PCT, and CRP had areas under the ROC curve of 0.920, 0.841, and 0.832, respectively, with corresponding cut-off values of 712 U/L, 7.6 ng/ml, and 262.0 mg/L, sensitivities of 87.9%, 83.5%, and 81.3%, and specificities of 83.2%, 86.1%, and 78.9%, respectively. Conclusion Increased serum levels of lipase, PCT, and CRP have a great value in the diagnosis of SAP during pregnancy.

  14. Associations of overall sitting time and TV viewing time with fibrinogen and C reactive protein: the AusDiab study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Bethany J; Balkau, Beverley; Thorp, Alicia A; Magliano, Dianna J; Shaw, Jonathan E; Owen, Neville; Dunstan, David W

    2015-02-01

    Sedentary behaviour is associated with increased risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Plasma fibrinogen and C reactive protein (CRP)-key inflammatory and/or haemostatic markers-may contribute to this association; however, few studies have examined their relationships with sedentary behaviours. We examined associations of overall sitting and TV viewing time with fibrinogen and high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP). Plasma fibrinogen and hsCRP were measured in 3086 Australian adults (mean age: 55±12 years) who participated in the 2004-2005 AusDiab (Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle) study. Multiple linear regression analyses examined cross-sectional associations of self-reported overall sitting and TV viewing time (h/day) with plasma fibrinogen and hsCRP, adjusting for sociodemographic, behavioural and medical treatments and conditions as potential covariates. Overall sitting time and TV viewing time were positively associated with plasma fibrinogen (sitting: β: 0.02 g/L, 95% CI (0.01 to 0.02); TV time: 0.03 g/L (0.02 to 0.05)) and hsCRP (sitting: 2.4% (1.2% to 3.6%); TV time: 4.5% (1.7% to 7.4%)). Associations were independent of leisure-time physical activity, but after adjusting for waist circumference, they remained for fibrinogen, but for hsCRP were attenuated to the null. Interactions were observed for gender×TV (p=0.011) with fibrinogen (associations in women only) and for waist circumference×TV (p=0.084) with hsCRP (associations in low-risk only). Overall sitting time was positively associated with plasma fibrinogen and hsCRP in men and women; associations of TV viewing time with fibrinogen were observed in women only. Abdominal adiposity-mediated associations for hsCRP but not for fibrinogen. Prospective and intervention studies are needed to establish likely causality and elucidate potential mechanisms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. The relationship of C-reactive protein levels and positive culture with quality of life in acute rhinosinusitis

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    Schalek P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Petr Schalek, Zuzana Hornáčková, Aleš Hahn Ear, Nose and Throat department, 3rd Medical Faculty of Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic Background: Acute rhinosinusitis (ARS has been shown to significantly reduce patient quality of life (QoL. While the QoL in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis has been the subject of intensive research over the last decade, studies measuring the impact of ARS on patient QoL have remained relatively scarce. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the QoL and parameters suggestive of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (C-reactive protein [CRP] levels and positive culture and to see if measurement of the QoL could be used as an indicator for antibiotic treatment in ARS.Methods: Eighty patients with ARS were enrolled in the study. A novel QoL instrument for patients with ARS, called Measurement of Acute Rhinosinusitis (MARS questionnaire, was given to patients at the time of diagnosis. We assessed patient QoL, obtained endoscopically guided cultures from the middle meatus, and measured levels of CRP. The relationship between QoL MARS scores (QoL-Mscores and CRP was determined using a correlation coefficient. To compare QoL-Mscores, relative to culture-positive and culture-negative patients, the Student’s t-test was used.Results: No correlation between the QoL, assessed using the MARS questionnaire, and positive middle meatus culture was demonstrated (P=0.332. A weak correlation was found between QoL-Mscores and CRP values, with a correlation coefficient of 0.221 and P=0.0498.Conclusion: No correlation between the QoL in ARS patients and positive culture was found in this study. The clinical significance of the correlation between QoL-Mscores and CRP values in the antibiotic decision making process needs further research. Keywords: endoscopy, quality of life, questionnaires, anti-bacterial agents

  16. C-reactive protein levels and vitamin d receptor polymorphisms as markers in predicting cachectic syndrome in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punzi, Tiziana; Fabris, Ariele; Morucci, Gabriele; Biagioni, Paolo; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2012-04-01

    In patients with advanced cancer, cachexia correlates with low performance status and poor quality of life. In addition, cachexia may be associated with reduced response to chemoradiotherapy and a poor prognosis in cancer patients. Nearly all forms of cachexia are closely associated with chronic inflammation and elevated levels of inflammatory and pro-inflammatory circulating factors, including C-reactive protein (CRP), which is considered a valid laboratory and clinical marker. Among the different pathways involved in the production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, the vitamin D-vitamin D receptor (VDR) axis plays a fundamental role. In this study, we explore the possible association between CRP and key factors pertaining to the vitamin D axis--in particular, VDR gene polymorphisms--in cancer patients with cachexia. Although certain tumor types are more commonly associated with cachexia, even within the same tumor type there are significant differences in the extent and duration of cachexia. Such variations may be due to polymorphisms of the VDR gene that could lead to cachexia-prone genotypes or to cachexia-resistant genotypes. Identification of such genotypes could be very helpful in the management of cancer patients. Forty-three cancer patients were recruited by the Nutritional Unit of the Prato Hospital. Data on age, gender, type of cancer, stage of cancer, and nutritional assessment, as well as transferrin, ferritin, albumin, and CRP levels, were collected. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes and amplified by polymerase chain reaction. BsmI, ApaI, TaqI, and FokI polymorphisms of the VDR gene were investigated using the respective restriction enzymes. For the different VDR polymorphisms, the absence or presence of the restriction sites were designated with capital or small letters, respectively. For example, for the BsmI polymorphism, the presence of the undigested fragment identified the B allele, whereas the presence of the

  17. Plasma iron, C-reactive protein, albumin, and plasma fibrinogen concentrations in dogs with systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrente, Carlos; Manzanilla, Edgar G; Bosch, Luis; Fresno, Laura; Rivera Del Alamo, Montserrat; Andaluz, Anna; Saco, Yolanda; Ruiz de Gopegui, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the diagnostic and prognostic value over time of plasma iron compared with the inflammatory markers albumin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and fibrinogen in dogs with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). Prospective observational study of sequentially enrolled dogs. ICU of a veterinary teaching hospital. One hundred and sixteen client-owned dogs: 54 dogs with SIRS or sepsis, 42 with focal inflammation, and 20 clinically healthy dogs. Blood samples were obtained on admission in all study groups, and then on alternate days until discharge or death in both inflammation groups. On admission, dogs with SIRS had significantly lower plasma iron (65 ± 5.8 μg/dL, P = 0.001) concentrations than dogs with focal inflammation (89.5 ± 6.2 μg/dL, P = 0.001). Plasma iron, albumin, and CRP effectively discriminated the SIRS/sepsis group from those presenting with focal inflammation with areas under the curve for the receiver operating curves of 0.679, 0.834, and 0.704, respectively. The admission values for these variables did not discriminate survivors from nonsurvivors within the SIRS/sepsis group. However, the magnitude of increase in iron concentration and the decrease in CRP concentration from admission to hospital discharge was higher in survivors than in nonsurvivors within the SIRS/septic group (22.8 vs. 2.51 μg/dL, respectively, P = 0.021 for iron; -67.1 vs. -4.1 mg/L, respectively, P = 0.002 for CRP), resulting in iron and CRP concentrations at hospital discharge for survivors similar to those in the focal inflammation group. Hypoferremia is a sensitive marker of systemic inflammation in dogs. In this study, the increase in iron concentrations during the hospitalization period of SIRS/septic dogs was associated with a better prognosis, suggesting that plasma iron in combination with CRP and albumin concentrations might be used to monitor dogs with inflammatory disease processes. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  18. Lipid profile and levels of homocysteine, leptin, fibrinogen and C-reactive protein in hyperthyroid patients before and after treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Sütken

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was carried out to determine whether thyroid hormones affect lipid profile and levels of erithrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, serum total homocysteine (t-hcy, leptin, fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP in patients with hyperthyroidism.Materials and methods: This study was carried out on 23 hyperthroid subjects (3 men / 20 women, mean age 41.8 ± 2.4 years. Serum levels of homocysteine, leptin, fibrinogen, CRP, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C and ESR were measured and body mass index (BMI were calculated before and after treatment of hyperthyroidism.Results: Pretreatment t-hcy, TC, LDL-C, HDL-C levels and BMI of patients were significantly lower than those of the post-treatment (p<0.001, for each variable. However, fibrinogen and ESR decreased after the treatment (p<0.001 and p<0.05, respectively. There were no differences in leptin and CRP levels between pre- and post-treatment periods. Pre and post treatment TC and LDL-C levels were negatively correlated with free triiodothyronine (fT3 levels (r=-0.588, p<0.01; r=-0.534, p<0.01; r=-0.543, p<0.01 and r =-0.653, p<0.01, respectively. Pre-treatment HDL-C was inversely correlated with TSH (r=-0.423, p<0.05. Pre-post- treatment LDL-C was negatively correlated with free thyroxine (fT4 levels (r=-0.536, p<0.001 and r=- 0.422, p<0.05 respectively. Pre-treatment TC was inversely correlated with fT4 (r=-0.590, p<0.01.Conclusion: Hyperthyroidism is associated with high plasma fibrinogen and ESR levels. Elevated plasma fibrinogen and ESR levels may be a possible explanation for the high cardiovascular morbidity among hyperthyroidic subjects. These changes may reflect low-grade inflammation or disturbances in coagulation in hyperthyroidism.

  19. C-reactive Protein -717A>G and -286C>T>A Gene Polymorphism and Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Geng, Pei-Liang; Yan, Fu-Qin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Wei; Tang, Xu-Dong; Zheng, Jing-Chen; Wu, Wei-Ping; Wang, Zhen-Fu

    2015-06-20

    Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the formation and progression of ischemic stroke. Recently, more and more epidemiological studies have focused on the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) -717A > G and -286C > T > A genetic polymorphisms and ischemic stroke. However, the findings of these researches are not conclusive. We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether these two polymorphisms are associated with the risk of ischemic stroke. Eligible studies were identified from the database of PubMed, Medline, Embase, Web of Science, CNKI, Weipu, and Wanfang. We calculated odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the strength of the association. Four articles were included in our study, including 1926 cases and 2678 controls for -717A > G polymorphism, 652 cases and 1103 controls for -286C > T > A polymorphism. The results of meta-analysis showed that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -717A > G was not significantly associated with the risk of ischemic stroke (GG vs. AA, OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 0.83-1.50, P = 0.207; GG + GA vs. AA, OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 0.93-1.17, P = 0.533; GG vs. GA + AA, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 0.82-1.47, P = 0.220). Meta-analysis of SNP - 286C > T > A also demonstrated no statistical evidence of a significant association with the risk of ischemic stroke (AA vs. CC, OR = 0.86, 95% CI = 0.59-1.25, P = 0.348; AA vs. CC, OR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.80-1.06, P = 0.609; AA vs. CC, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.62-1.30, P = 0.374). This meta-analysis demonstrated little evidence to support a role of CRP gene -717A > G, -286C > T > A polymorphisms in ischemic stroke predisposition. However, to draw comprehensive and more reliable conclusions, further larger studies are needed to validate the association between CRP gene polymorphisms and ischemic stroke in various ethnic groups.

  20. C-reactive protein and depression in persons with Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection: the Positive Living with HIV (POLH) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana; Bertone-Johnson, Elizabeth R; Palmer, Paula H; Poudel, Krishna C

    2014-11-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection has been frequently associated with chronic inflammation as well as depression. C-reactive protein (CRP) is positively associated with depression in people without HIV infection. We tested the hypothesis of an independent relationship between CRP and depression in a cohort of HIV-positive people. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 316 HIV-positive people (181 men and 135 women) aged 18-60years residing in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The latex agglutination turbidimetric method was used to measure serum CRP concentrations and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)-I method was used to measure depression, with a cut off of ⩾20 indicating likely depression. The relationship between CRP concentrations and depression symptoms was assessed using both multiple linear regression analysis and multiple logistic regression analysis, with adjustment for potential socio-demographic, cardiovascular, life-style, and HIV-related clinical and treatment confounding factors. Twenty-six percent participants (men: 23%; women: 29%) met criteria for depression. In multiple regression analysis, the authors observed a linear relation between serum CRP concentrations and BDI score (beta for 1 unit change in ln(CRP)=1.13, p=0.001) in HIV-positive participants. In a logistic regression analysis, participants with serum CRP levels>3mg/L had a 2.3-fold higher odds of depression symptoms compared to those with serum CRP level⩽3mg/L (p=0.005). In analyses stratified by sex, associations were stronger in men than in women. For example, CRP>3mg/L was associated with a 3.6-fold higher odds of depression in men (p=0.002), while in women the odds ratio was 1.7 (p=0.33). We found a linear relationship between serum CRP concentrations and depression symptoms score in HIV-positive people, and evidence that risk of depression is elevated among HIV-positive men with a high level of inflammation (CRP>3mg/L). Further prospective study to confirm the

  1. Elevated salivary C-reactive protein predicted by low cardio-respiratory fitness and being overweight in African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, T; Konkol, K; Biccard, B; Dudose, K; McKune, A J

    2012-10-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a sensitive marker of systemic inflammation and is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The aim of the study was to examine the relationship between salivary CRP, cardio-respiratory fitness and body composition in a paediatric population. This was a cross-sectional study of 170 black South African children (age 9.41 ± 1.55 years, 100 females, 70 males) in grades 3 to 7. Unstimulated whole saliva samples were obtained for the analysis of CRP. Height, mass, skin-fold thickness, resting blood pressure, and waist and hip circumference measurements were obtained. Cardio-respiratory fitness was assessed using a 20-m multi-stage shuttle run. Children were classified as overweight/obese according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) body mass index (BMI) percentile ranking, and meeting percentage body fat recommendations, if percentage body fat was ≤ 25% in boys and ≤ 32% in girls. The cut-off point for low cardio-respiratory fitness was a predicted aerobic capacity value ≤ the 50th percentile for the group. Contributions of low cardio-respiratory fitness, overweight/obesity, and not meeting percentage body fat recommendations, to elevated salivary CRP (≥ 75th percentile) concentration and secretion rate were examined using binary logistic regression analysis with a backward stepwise selection technique based on likelihood ratios. Poor cardio-respiratory fitness was independently associated with elevated salivary CRP concentration (OR 3.9, 95% CI: 1.7-8.9, p = 0.001). Poor cardio-respiratory fitness (OR 2.7, 95% CI: 1.2-6.1, p = 0.02) and overweight/obesity (BMI ≥ 85th percentile) (OR 2.5, 95% CI: 1.1-5.9, p = 0.03) were independent predictors of elevated salivary CRP secretion rate. The results suggest a strong association between poor cardio-respiratory fitness and/or overweight/obesity and inflammatory status in children, based on elevated salivary CRP levels.

  2. Six-year change in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrinello, Christina M; Lutsey, Pamela L; Ballantyne, Christie M; Folsom, Aaron R; Pankow, James S; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    Single measurements of elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) are associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and mortality. Large increases or sustained elevations in hs-CRP may be associated with even greater risk of these outcomes. The objective of this study was to characterize the association of 6-year change in hs-CRP with incident diabetes, incident cardiovascular events (heart disease, stroke, and heart failure), and mortality. We included 10,160 ARIC participants with hs-CRP measured at visits 2 (1990-1992) and 4 (1996-1998). Change in hs-CRP was categorized as sustained low/moderate (<3 mg/L at both visits), decreased (≥3 mg/L at visit 2 and <3 mg/L at visit 4), increased (<3 mg/L at visit 2 and ≥3 mg/L at visit 4), and sustained elevated (≥3 mg/L at both visits). Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association of 6-year change in hs-CRP with incident diabetes, cardiovascular events, and death during ~15 years after visit 4. Compared with persons with sustained low/moderate hs-CRP, those with increased or sustained elevated hs-CRP had an increased risk of incident diabetes (hazard ratios [95% CIs] 1.56 [1.38-1.76] and 1.39 [1.25-1.56], respectively), whereas those with deceased hs-CRP did not. Persons with sustained elevated hs-CRP had an increased risk of coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, heart failure, and mortality (hazard ratios [95% CIs] 1.51 [1.23-1.85], 1.70 [1.32-2.20], 1.60 [1.35-1.89], and 1.52 [1.37-1.69], respectively) compared with those with sustained low/moderate hs-CRP. Associations for sustained elevated hs-CRP were greater than for those with increased hs-CRP over 6 years. Large increases or sustained elevations in hs-CRP over a 6-year period were associated with a subsequent increased risk of diabetes, and persons with sustained elevations in hs-CRP were at the highest risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Two measurements of hs-CRP are better than one for

  3. Antiendotoxin Immunity and C-Reactive Protein Level in Patients with Diffuse Toxic Goiter and Heart Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Beloglazov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The changes in cardiovascular system take one of the leading places in the clinic of diffuse toxic goiter (DTG and can define prognosis for a disease. Endotoxin (ET can be the inductor of a systemic inflammation in patients with DTG and aggravate its clinical course. From there, the purpose of this work was to study humoral and cellular antiendotoxin immunity and C-reactive protein (CRP level in patients with heart pathology. The level of antiendotoxin antibodies and CRP were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. As an antigen, we used ET of the Gram-negative Escheriсhia coli K30 (09:K30:P12, isolated from bacterial biomass by method of water phenol extraction and additionally purified from RNA admixtures using cetavlon processing (Serva, Германия. Receptors to ET were determined by flow lase cytometry using a two-color immunofluorescence analysis using a monoclonal anti-CD14-PE IOTest® (CD14 and conjugate of lipopolysaccharide Escherichia coli K235 with fluorescein isothiocyanate (ET-P. For the study we allocated 3 groups of patients. The first group included 11 patients with DTG who do not have heart disease, the second group consisted of 47 patients with DTG and endocrine cardiomyopathy complicated by arrhythmia, and the third group — 13 patients with DTG and concomitant ischemic heart disease (IHD. Control group consisted of 33 apparently healthy subjects. It is found that in all patients with DTG and heart pathology, a possible reduction of anti-ET-sIgA, anti-ET-IgM and anti-ET-IG is observed in comparison with the control group. This is accompanied by an increase in CRP levels in these groups, especially in patients with DTG and IHD, in whom its level was significantly higher than in patients with DTG and without heart disease. Analysis of literature data and our results confirm the hypothesis that extravasation of the excess amount of ET into the bloodstream depletes reserves of synthesis of specific antibodies

  4. The social role of C-reactive protein point-of-care testing to guide antibiotic prescription in Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenssgen, Marco J; Charoenboon, Nutcha; Althaus, Thomas; Greer, Rachel C; Intralawan, Daranee; Lubell, Yoel

    2018-04-01

    New and affordable point-of-care testing (POCT) solutions are hoped to guide antibiotic prescription and to help limit antimicrobial resistance (AMR)-especially in low- and middle-income countries where resource constraints often prevent extensive diagnostic testing. Anthropological and sociological research has illuminated the role and impact of rapid point-of-care malaria testing. This paper expands our knowledge about the social implications of non-malarial POCT, using the case study of a C-reactive-protein point-of-care testing (CRP POCT) clinical trial with febrile patients at primary-care-level health centres in Chiang Rai province, northern Thailand. We investigate the social role of CRP POCT through its interactions with (a) the healthcare workers who use it, (b) the patients whose routine care is affected by the test, and (c) the existing patient-health system linkages that might resonate or interfere with CRP POCT. We conduct a thematic analysis of data from 58 purposively sampled pre- and post-intervention patients and healthcare workers in August 2016 and May 2017. We find widespread positive attitudes towards the test among patients and healthcare workers. Patients' views are influenced by an understanding of CRP POCT as a comprehensive blood test that provides specific diagnosis and that corresponds to notions of good care. Healthcare workers use the test to support their negotiations with patients but also to legitimise ethical decisions in an increasingly restrictive antibiotic policy environment. We hypothesise that CRP POCT could entail greater patient adherence to recommended antibiotic treatment, but it could also encourage riskier health behaviour and entail potentially adverse equity implications for patients across generations and socioeconomic strata. Our empirical findings inform the clinical literature on increasingly propagated point-of-care biomarker tests to guide antibiotic prescriptions, and we contribute to the anthropological and

  5. Univariate and multivariate analysis of risk factors for severe Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea: importance of co-morbidity and serum C-reactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, Christian; Berns, Thomas; Treder, Wolfgang; Dumoulin, Franz-Ludwig

    2008-07-21

    To investigate risk factors for severe clostridium difficile associated diarrhoea (CDAD) in hospitalised patients. We analysed risk factors for severe CDAD (associated with systemic signs of hypovolemia) in 124 hospitalised patients by retrospective chart review. Severe CDAD was present in 27 patients (22%). Statistical analysis showed a significant association with a higher 30-d mortality (33% vs 4%, P < 0.001) and a higher proportion of longer hospital stay exceeding 14 d (74% vs 52%, P = 0.048). Charlson co-morbidity score (OR 1.29 for 1 point increment, P < 0.05) and serum C-reactive protein at diagnosis (OR 1.15 for 10 mg/L increment, P < 0.001) were independent predictors of severe CDAD. Patients with a severe level of co-morbidity and high serum C-reactive protein levels at the time of diagnosis should receive particular attention.

  6. CdSe and ZnSe quantum dots capped with PEA for screening C-reactive protein in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, D; Algarra, M; Diez de los Rios, M J; Arrebola, M M; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M E; Seller-Pérez, G; Esteves da Silva, J C G

    2012-05-15

    A fluorescence chemical sensor for C-reactive protein (CRP) was developed based on the selective interaction with CdSe and ZnSe quantum dots (QDs) coated with O-phosphorylethanolamine (PEA). Synthesis procedure and analytical parameters such as pH and ionic strength were studied. The decrease in the fluorescence emission intensity was explained due to the specific interaction of the QDs-PEA with CRP, and a correlation was observed between the quenching of the fluorescence and the concentration of CRP. The accuracy of the proposed method was 0.37% as RSD. The proposed method was applied to screen serum samples, and showed to be sensible at the C-reactive protein concentrations of risks levels. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. C-reactive protein increases membrane fluidity and distorts lipid lateral organization of pulmonary surfactant. Protective role of surfactant protein A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saenz, Alejandra; Lopez-Sanchez, Almudena; Mojica-Lazaro, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    intratracheal instillation of CRP into rat lungs. Insertion of CRP into surfactant membranes was investigated through monolayer techniques. The effect of CRP on membrane structure was studied through differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy using large and giant unilamellar......The purpose of this study was to investigate how surfactant membranes can be perturbed by C-reactive protein (CRP) and whether surfactant protein A (SP-A) might overcome CRP-induced surfactant membrane alterations. The effect of CRP on surfactant surface adsorption was evaluated in vivo after...... vesicles. Our results indicate that CRP inserts into surfactant membranes and drastically increases membrane fluidity, resulting in surfactant inactivation. At 10% CRP/phospholipid weight ratio, CRP causes disappearance of liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered phase coexistence distinctive of surfactant...

  8. A rapid one-step kinetics-based immunoassay procedure for the highly-sensitive detection of C-reactive protein

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Sandeep Kumar Vashist, Gregor Czilwik, Thomas van Oordt, Felix von Stetten, Roland Zengerle, E. Marion Schneider & John H.T. Luong ### Abstract A rapid one-step kinetics-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) procedure has been developed for highly-sensitive detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in less than 30 min. With minimal process steps, the procedure is highly simplified and cost-effective. The analysis only involves sequentially the formation of a sandwic...

  9. Elevated Baseline C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Outcome After Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Data From the Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage (STASH) Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budohoski, Karol; Smith, Christopher; Hutchinson, Peter J.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There remains a proportion of patients with unfavorable outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, of particular relevance in those who present with a good clinical grade. A forewarning of those at risk provides an opportunity towards more intensive monitoring, investigation, and prophylactic treatment prior to the clinical manifestation of advancing cerebral injury. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether biochemical markers sampled in the first days after the initial hemorrhage can predict poor outcome. METHODS: All patients recruited to the multicenter Simvastatin in Aneurysmal Hemorrhage Trial (STASH) were included. Baseline biochemical profiles were taken between time of ictus and day 4 post ictus. The t-test compared outcomes, and a backwards stepwise binary logistic regression was used to determine the factors providing independent prediction of an unfavorable outcome. RESULTS: Baseline biochemical data were obtained in approximately 91% of cases from 803 patients. On admission, 73% of patients were good grade (World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grades 1 or 2); however, 84% had a Fisher grade 3 or 4 on computed tomographic scan. For patients presenting with good grade on admission, higher levels of C-reactive protein, glucose, and white blood cells and lower levels of hematocrit, albumin, and hemoglobin were associated with poor outcome at discharge. C-reactive protein was found to be an independent predictor of outcome for patients presenting in good grade. CONCLUSION: Early recording of C-reactive protein may prove useful in detecting those good grade patients who are at greater risk of clinical deterioration and poor outcome. ABBREVIATIONS: ALP, alkaline phosphatase ALT, alanine aminotransferase CK, creatine kinase CRP, C-reactive protein EVD, external ventricular drainage ICH GCP, International Conference on Harmonisation guidelines for good clinical practice mRS, modified Rankin Scale SAH, subarachnoid hemorrhage STASH, Simvastatin in

  10. C-reactive Protein −717A>G and −286C>T>A Gene Polymorphism and Ischemic Stroke

    OpenAIRE

    Yan Liu; Pei-Liang Geng; Fu-Qin Yan; Tong Chen; Wei Wang; Xu-Dong Tang; Jing-Chen Zheng; Wei-Ping Wu; Zhen-Fu Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation plays a pivotal role in the formation and progression of ischemic stroke. Recently, more and more epidemiological studies have focused on the association between C-reactive protein (CRP) −717A > G and −286C > T > A genetic polymorphisms and ischemic stroke. However, the findings of these researches are not conclusive. Methods: We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether these two polymorphisms are associated with the risk of ischemic stroke. Eligible studies...

  11. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in > 80 000 Subjects Identifies Multiple Loci for C-Reactive Protein Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josee; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Background-C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels.Methods and Results-We performed a genome-wide association analysis of CRP in 66 185 participants from 15 population-based studies. We sought replication for the genome-wide significant and suggestive loci in a replication panel comprising 16 540 individuals from 10 independent stud...

  12. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Plan Affects C-Reactive Protein, Coagulation Abnormalities, and Hepatic Function Tests among Type 2 Diabetic Patients1234

    OpenAIRE

    Azadbakht, Leila; Surkan, Pamela J.; Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Willett, Walter C.

    2011-01-01

    Few studies exist regarding the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet on novel cardiovascular risk factors among type 2 diabetic patients. We evaluated the effects of the DASH eating pattern on C-reactive protein (CRP) level, coagulation abnormalities, and hepatic function tests in type 2 diabetic patients. In this randomized, crossover clinical trial, 31 type 2 diabetic patients consumed a control diet or the DASH diet for 8 wk. The DASH diet was rich in fruits, ...

  13. Serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and C-reactive protein in a group of Norwegian sled dogs during training and after endurance racing: a prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Fergestad, Marte Ekeland; Jahr, Tuva Holt; Krontveit, Randi I.; Skancke, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Background High incidences of gastritis and gastric ulceration are observed in sled dogs participating in endurance races. Exercise-induced increases in hormones like gastrin and cortisol have been suggested as possible contributing factors. An increase in C-reactive protein (CRP) has also been observed in canines during physical exercise. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of long distance racing on the serum concentration of gastrin, cortisol and CRP in a group of sled dogs, b...

  14. A comparison of osteoprotegerin with adiponectin and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) as a marker for insulin resistance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, Eoin P

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is associated with low adiponectin and elevated high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has been shown to be elevated in type 2 diabetes, but whether it reflects underlying IR is unclear. We aimed to compare the ability of serum OPG with adiponectin and hsCRP to act as a marker for IR in individuals with normal and abnormal glucose tolerance.

  15. Association between serum C-reactive protein and DSM-IV generalized anxiety disorder in adolescence: Findings from the ALSPAC cohort.

    OpenAIRE

    Khandaker, Golam Mohammed; Zammit, S; Lewis, G; Jones, Peter Brian

    2016-01-01

    $\\textit{$Background:}$ Animal studies suggest a role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of anxiety, but human studies of inflammatory markers and anxiety disorders are scarce. We report a study of serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) from the general population-based ALSPAC birth cohort. $\\textit{Methods:}$ DSM-IV diagnosis of GAD was obtained from 5365 cohort members during face-to-face clinical assessment at age 16 years, of which 3392 also provide...

  16. Investigation of two novel biochemical markers of inflammation, matrix metalloproteinase and cathepsin generated fragments of C-reactive protein, in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Schett, Georg; Zhang, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. Current markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), are reflecting the production of an acute phase reactant rather than tissue specific inflammation, but the use of CRP as a diagnostic an...... additional information on systemic inflammation as compared to that of full-length CRP. We investigated whether these CRP degradation products would provide additional diagnostic value in AS patients compared to full-length CRP....

  17. Inverse Association of Plasma IgG Antibody to Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and High C-Reactive Protein Levels in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome and Periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supanee Thanakun

    Full Text Available The association between clinically diagnosed periodontitis, a common chronic oral infection, and metabolic syndrome has been previously reported. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of plasma IgG levels against Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, and Prevotella intermedia, C-reactive protein, and periodontal status with metabolic syndrome. Plasma IgG levels and C-reactive protein were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and salivary levels of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Among 127 individuals aged 35-76 years, 57 participants had metabolic syndrome and severe periodontitis, 25 had metabolic syndrome and an absence of severe periodontitis, 17 healthy individuals had severe periodontitis, and 28 healthy individuals were without severe periodontitis. Patients with metabolic syndrome had reduced humoral immune response to A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.008, regardless of their salivary levels or periodontitis status compared with healthy participants. The IgG antibody response to P. gingivalis, regardless of their salivary levels or participants' health condition, was significantly higher in severe periodontitis patients (p<0.001. Plasma IgG titers for P. intermedia were inconsistent among metabolic syndrome or periodontal participants. Our results indicate that the presence of lower levels of IgG antibodies to A. actinomycetemcomitans (OR = 0.1; 95%CI 0.0-0.7, but not P. gingivalis, a severe periodontitis status (OR = 7.8; 95%CI 1.1-57.0, high C-reactive protein levels (OR = 9.4; 95%CI 1.0-88.2 and body mass index (OR = 3.0; 95%CI 1.7-5.2, are associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome. The role of the decreased IgG antibody response to A. actinomycetemcomitans, increased C-reactive protein levels on the association between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome in a group of Thai patients is

  18. Association between Resting Heart Rate and Inflammatory Markers (White Blood Cell Count and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein) in Healthy Korean People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo-Chul; Seo, Inho; Kim, Shin-Hye; Lee, Yong-Jae; Ahn, Song Vogue

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation is an important underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and an elevated resting heart rate underlies the process of atherosclerotic plaque formation. We hypothesized an association between resting heart rate and subclinical inflammation. Resting heart rate was recorded at baseline in the KoGES-ARIRANG (Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study on Atherosclerosis Risk of Rural Areas in the Korean General Population) cohort study, and was then divided into quartiles. Subclinical inflammation was measured by white blood cell count and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. We used progressively adjusted regression models with terms for muscle mass, body fat proportion, and adiponectin in the fully adjusted models. We examined inflammatory markers as both continuous and categorical variables, using the clinical cut point of the highest quartile of white blood cell count (≥7,900/mm 3 ) and ≥3 mg/dL for high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. Participants had a mean age of 56.3±8.1 years and a mean resting heart rate of 71.4±10.7 beats/min; 39.1% were men. In a fully adjusted model, an increased resting heart rate was significantly associated with a higher white blood cell count and higher levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in both continuous (P for trend heart rate is associated with a higher level of subclinical inflammation among healthy Korean people.

  19. Clinical significance of preoperative serum vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-6, and C-reactive protein level in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kyung A; Roh, Mee Sook; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Kwon, Hyuk-Chan; Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Oh, Sung Yong; Lee, Suee; Han, Jin-Yeong; Kim, Kyeong Hee; Goh, Ri Young; Choi, Hong Jo; Park, Ki Jae

    2010-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a multistep process in which many growth factors and cytokines have an essential role. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic agent that acts as a specific mitogen for vascular endothelial cells through specific cell surface receptors. The interleukin-6 (IL-6) pathway is another mechanism linking angiogenesis to malignancy. C-reactive protein (CRP), a representative marker for inflammation, is known for its association with disease progression in many cancer types. The aim of this study was to determine preoperative serum levels of VEGF, IL-6, and CRP in colorectal carcinoma, and to correlate them with disease status and prognosis. A 132 of 143 patients who underwent curative resection for colorectal cancer were enrolled in this study. 11 patients with resection margin positive were excluded. Factors considered in analysis of the relationship between VEGF, IL-6, and CRP and histological findings. Patient prognosis was investigated. Serum levels of VEGF and IL-6 were assessed using Enzyme-Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA), and CRP was measured using immunoturbidimetry. Median follow-up duration was 18.53 months (range 0.73-43.17 months) and median age of the patients was 62 years (range, 26-83 years). Mean and median levels of VEGF and CRP in colorectal cancer were significantly higher than in the normal control group; 608 vs. 334 pg/mL and 528 (range 122-3242) vs. 312 (range 16-1121) (p < 0.001); 1.05 mg/dL vs. 0.43 mg/dL and 0.22 (range 0.00-18.40) vs. 0.07 (range 0.02-6.94) (p = 0.002), respectively. However mean and median level of IL-6 in patients were not significantly higher than in control; 14.33 pg/mL vs. 5.65 pg/mL and 6.00 (range 1.02-139.17) vs. 5.30 (4.50-13.78) (p = 0.327). Although IL-6 and CRP levels were not correlated with other pathological findings, VEGF level was significantly correlated with tumor size (p = 0.012) and CEA (p = 0.038). When we established the cutoff value for VEGF (825 pg/mL), IL-6 (8

  20. Adjusting CA19-9 values to predict malignancy in obstructive jaundice: Influence of bilirubin and C-reactive protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Greca, Gaetano; Sofia, Maria; Lombardo, Rosario; Latteri, Saverio; Ricotta, Agostino; Puleo, Stefano; Russello, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To find a possible relationship between inflammation and CA19-9 tumor marker by analyzing data from patients with benign jaundice (BJ) and malignant jaundice (MJ). METHODS: All patients admitted for obstructive jaundice, in the period 2005-2009, were prospectively enrolled in the study, obtaining a total of 102 patients. On admission, all patients underwent complete standard blood test examinations including C-reactive protein (CRP), bilirubin, CA19-9. Patients were considered eligible for the study when they presented obstructive jaundice confirmed by instrumental examinations and increased serum bilirubin levels (total bilirubin > 2.0 mg/dL). The standard cut-off level for CA19-9 was 32 U/mL, whereas for CRP this was 1.5 mg/L. The CA19-9 level was adjusted by dividing it by the value of serum bilirubin or by the CRP value. The patients were divided into 2 groups, MJ and BJ, and after the adjustment a comparison between the 2 groups of patients was performed. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values were calculated before and after the adjustment. RESULTS: Of the 102 patients, 51 were affected by BJ and 51 by MJ. Pathologic CA19-9 levels were found in 71.7% of the patients. In the group of 51 BJ patients there were 29 (56.9%) males and 22 (43.1%) females with a median age of 66 years (range 24-96 years), whereas in the MJ group there were 24 (47%) males and 27 (53%) females, with a mean age of 70 years (range 30-92 years). Pathologic CA19-9 serum level was found in 82.3% of MJ. CRP levels were pathologic in 66.6% of the patients with BJ and in 49% with MJ. Bilirubin and CA19-9 average levels were significantly higher in MJ compared with BJ (P = 0.000 and P = 0.02), while the CRP level was significantly higher in BJ (P = 0.000). Considering a CA19-9 cut-off level of 32 U/mL, 82.3% in the MJ group and 54.9% in the BJ group were positive for CA19-9 (P = 0.002). A CA19-9 cut-off of 100 U/mL increases the difference between the two groups: 35.3% in

  1. Prognosis by C-reactive protein and matrix metalloproteinase-9 levels in stable coronary heart disease during 15 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, N; Kragelund, C; Steffensen, R

    2012-01-01

    associate with prognosis in patients with stable coronary heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: We measured baseline plasma CRP and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in 1090 patients with stable coronary heart disease and as the primary composite endpoint detected incident unstable angina, myocardial infarction......BACKGROUND AND AIM: Elevated CRP and matrix metalloproteinase-9 associate with increased risk of cardiovascular events, possibly because these plasma proteins mark vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques. We tested the hypothesis that levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and matrix metalloproteinase-9...

  2. C-reactive protein, haptoglobin and Pig-Major acute phase protein profiles of pigs infected experimentally by different isolates of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saco, Y; Martínez-Lobo, F; Cortey, M; Pato, R; Peña, R; Segalés, J; Prieto, C; Bassols, A

    2016-02-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) is the etiologic agent of PRRS, one of the most important diseases in swine worldwide. In the present work, the effects of different PRRSV strains were tested on a piglet experimental model to study the induced acute phase response. For this purpose, pigs (n=15 for each group) were intranasally inoculated with one of five PRRSV strains (isolates EU10, 12, 17, 18 from genotype 1 and isolate JA-142 from genotype 2). The acute phase response was monitored by measuring acute phase proteins (APPs). Specifically, the serum concentration of haptoglobin (Hp), C-reactive protein (CRP) and Pig-Major Acute Protein (Pig-MAP) was determined at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 days p.i. Clinical signs and growth performance were also monitored during the experiment. All animals became viremic after inoculation during the study period. The APP response was heterogeneous and dependent on the strain, being strains EU10, EU 18 and JA-142 those that induced the highest response and the strongest clinical signs. In general, Hp was the most sensitive biomarker for PRRSV infection, CRP behaved as moderate and Pig-MAP was the less responsive during the course of PRRSV experimental infection. Hp and CRP were significantly discriminatory between infected and control pigs, but not Pig-MAP. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Compound Danshen Dripping Pill on circadian blood pressure, high sensitive C reactive protein and cardiac function in patients with non dipper hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-wei HE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effect of Compound Danshen Dripping Pill on circadian blood pressure, high sensitive C reactive protein and cardiac function in patients with non dipper hypertension. Methods: According to ABPM nocturnal blood pressure decline rate < 10%, select 178 patients whose systolic pressure and diastolic pressure meet the standards, 88 cases were divided into treatment group, and the rest 90 cases were in control group. All patients were having the levoamlodipine maleate 2.5mg, 1 time a day, the blood pressure still > 140 / 90mmHg, the addition of Stan. The treatment group were treated with 10 Compound Danshen Dripping Pills, 3 times a day, June. ABPM and hs-CRP, ultrasonic Beckoning figure was examined before and after treatment.Results: All the patients completed the study in June, by antihypertensive drugs and compound Danshen dripping pills after treatment, consulting room (CSBP and CDBP and BP are parameters of ABPM increased significantly (P < 0.01. Partial parameters compared with the control group after treatment were significantly different (P < 0.05. Systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, circadian variation rate level, variation rate and high sensitive C reactive protein of the treatment group after treatment were significantly improved compared with the control group (P < 0.05. The treatment group after treatment of diastolic function improved significantly (P < 0.05, the control group after treatment had no obvious improvement. Systolic function of two groups before treatment increased slightly, no statistical significance (P > 0.05.Conclusion: Long-term use of Compound Danshen dripping pill can improve the circadian rhythm of blood pressure in patients with non dipper hypertension, reduce the high sensitive C reactive protein level, improve cardiac diastolic function.

  4. Interleukin-6 and C-Reactive Protein Levels and 9-Year Cognitive Decline in Community-Dwelling Older Women: The Women's Health and Aging Study II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Priya; Xue, Qian-Li; Deal, Jennifer A; Fried, Linda P; Walston, Jeremy D; Carlson, Michelle C

    2015-07-01

    Elevated inflammation is a proposed mechanism relating chronic diseases to cognitive dysfunction. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that greater levels of inflammation, as measured by the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein, are associated with faster rates of cognitive decline among cognitively intact community-dwelling older women. We analyzed 336 women from the Women's Health and Aging Study II. Cognitive assessments were performed at baseline and every 18-36 months, and included the following domains: immediate and delayed memory (Hopkins Verbal Learning Test), psychomotor speed (Trail Making Test, Part A), and executive function (Trail Making Test, Part B). Aggregate measures of IL-6 and C-reactive protein, based on the average from visits one and two, were analyzed categorically. Random effects models were employed to test the relationship between tertiles of each inflammatory marker and changes in cognitive domain scores over 9 years. Moderate and high levels of IL-6 predicted early declines in psychomotor speed by 1.0 connection/min per year. There were no differences in baseline scores or rates of change across tertiles of IL-6 in memory or executive function. No differences were observed across tertiles of C-reactive protein for all cognitive domains. Higher levels of serum IL-6 were associated with greater declines in psychomotor speed over 9 years. This finding could suggest that elevated IL-6 may result in microvascular changes that may lead to damage of myelin sheaths that line neuronal axons, leading to decreased neuron propagation and impaired processing speed; however, mechanistic studies are needed to evaluate these hypotheses. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Serum C-reactive protein increases the risk of venous thromboembolism: a prospective study and meta-analysis of published prospective evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunutsor, Setor K; Seidu, Samuel; Blom, Ashley W; Khunti, Kamlesh; Laukkanen, Jari A

    2017-08-01

    Evolving debate suggests that C-reactive protein (CRP) might be associated with the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE); however, the evidence is conflicting. We aimed to assess the prospective association of CRP with VTE risk. C-reactive protein was measured in serum samples at baseline from 2420 men aged 42-61 years, from the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease study. Within-person variability in CRP levels was corrected for using repeat measurements of CRP taken 11 years after baseline. Incident VTE events (n = 119) were recorded during a median follow-up of 24.7 years. The age-adjusted regression dilution ratio for log e CRP was 0.57 [95% confidence interval (CIs): 0.51-0.64]. In age-adjusted Cox regression analysis, the hazard ratio (95% CIs) for VTE per 1 standard deviation (SD) increase in log e baseline CRP was 1.17 (0.98-1.40). Further adjustment for several established and emerging risk factors did not alter the association. In a meta-analysis of nine population-based studies (including the current study) comprising 81,625 participants and 2225 VTE cases, the fully-adjusted risk estimate for VTE was 1.14 (1.08-1.19) per SD increase in log e baseline CRP. In a pooled dose-response analysis, a linear association between CRP and VTE risk was suggested (P for nonlinearity = 0.272). The pooled risk estimate for VTE per 5 mg/l increment in CRP levels was 1.23 (1.09-1.38). C-reactive protein was only modestly associated with VTE risk in the primary analysis. Pooled evidence, however, suggests that elevated CRP is associated with greater VTE risk, consistent with a linear dose-response relationship.

  6. Metabolic syndrome with and without C-reactive protein as a predictor of coronary heart disease and diabetes in the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Naveed; Gaw, Allan; Scherbakova, Olga; Ford, Ian; O'Reilly, Denis St J; Haffner, Steven M; Isles, Chris; Macfarlane, Peter W; Packard, Chris J; Cobbe, Stuart M; Shepherd, James

    2003-07-29

    The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) recently proposed a simple definition for metabolic syndrome. Information on the prospective association of this definition for coronary heart disease (CHD) and type 2 diabetes is currently limited. We used a modified NCEP definition with body mass index in place of waist circumference. Baseline assessments in the West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study were available for 6447 men to predict CHD risk and for 5974 men to predict incident diabetes over 4.9 years of follow-up. Mean LDL cholesterol was similar but C-reactive protein was higher (Pdiseases.

  7. Feeding common carp Cyprinus carpio with b-glucan supplemented \\ud diet stimulates C-reactive protein and complement immune acute\\ud phase responses following PAMPs injection

    OpenAIRE

    Pionnier, Nicolas; Falco, Alberto; Miest, Joanna J.; Shrive, Annette K.; Hoole, Dave

    2014-01-01

    The effect of β-glucan as a feed additive on the serum and gene profile of C-reactive protein (CRP) and complement acute phase responses was ascertained in common carp Cyprinus carpio. In addition effects of subsequent intraperitoneal injections of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), i.e. LPS or poly(I:C), to mimic bacterial or viral infection respectively, were studied. Carp were first orally fed with β-glucan (MacroGard®) with a daily β-glucan intake of 6 mg per kg body weight o...

  8. A Paleolithic diet confers higher insulin sensitivity, lower C-reactive protein and lower blood pressure than a cereal-based diet in domestic pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Tommy; Ahrén, Bo; Pacini, Giovanni; Sundler, Frank; Wierup, Nils; Steen, Stig; Sjöberg, Trygve; Ugander, Martin; Frostegård, Johan; Göransson, Leif; Lindeberg, Staffan

    2006-11-02

    A Paleolithic diet has been suggested to be more in concordance with human evolutionary legacy than a cereal based diet. This might explain the lower incidence among hunter-gatherers of diseases of affluence such as type 2 diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to experimentally study the long-term effect of a Paleolithic diet on risk factors for these diseases in domestic pigs. We examined glucose tolerance, post-challenge insulin response, plasma C-reactive protein and blood pressure after 15 months on Paleolithic diet in comparison with a cereal based swine feed. Upon weaning twenty-four piglets were randomly allocated either to cereal based swine feed (Cereal group) or cereal free Paleolithic diet consisting of vegetables, fruit, meat and a small amount of tubers (Paleolithic group). At 17 months of age an intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed and pancreas specimens were collected for immunohistochemistry. Group comparisons of continuous variables were made by use of the t-test. P Paleolithic group weighed 22% less and had 43% lower subcutaneous fat thickness at mid sternum. No significant difference was seen in fasting glucose between groups. Dynamic insulin sensitivity was significantly higher (p = 0.004) and the insulin response was significantly lower in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.001). The geometric mean of C-reactive protein was 82% lower (p = 0.0007) and intra-arterial diastolic blood pressure was 13% lower in the Paleolithic group (p = 0.007). In