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Sample records for intergranular impurity concentration

  1. Removal Of Volatile Impurities From Copper Concentrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, L.; Schuler, A.; Frei, A.; Sturzenegger, M.

    2005-03-01

    To study the removal of volatile impurities from two different copper concentrates they have been heated on a thermo balance to temperatures between 900 and 1500 C. This sample treatment revealed that both concentrates undergo strong weight losses at 500 and 700 C. They were attributed to the removal of sulfur. Elemental analyses of the residues by ICP spectrometry have shown that the thermal treatment efficiently removes the volatile impurities. Already below 900 C most of the arsenic is removed by evaporation, the largest fraction of lead and zinc is removed in the temperature interval of 1300-1500 C. It was observed that quartz in the concentrate leads to the formation of a silicon-enriched phase besides a metal rich sulfide phase. The former is interpreted as an early stage of a silicate slag. Elemental analysis showed that the formation of this distinct slag phase does not hinder the efficient removal of volatile impurities. (author)

  2. Influence of C, N and Ti concentration on the intergranular corrosion resistance of AISI 316 Ti stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, A.; Merino, M.C.; Carboneras, M.; Coy, A.E.; Viejo, F.; Arrabal, R.; Munoz, J.A. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Complutense, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The influence of Ti, C, and N concentration on the intergranular corrosion resistance of AISI 316 Ti stainless steel has been studied. A kinetic study of the corrosion process has been carried out using gravimetric tests according to ASTM A-262 practices B and C (Streicher and Huey, respectively). The TTS diagrams were drawn as a function of alloying elements concentration (C, N and Ti). Materials characterization under several test conditions was carried out using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysing microstructural characteristics and the attack microstructure. The chemical resistance of these steels to intergranular test was function of N, C and Ti concentration. High Ti and N concentration favoured the precipitation of TiN during the material manufacture process. N forms TiN very stable, causing the removal of Ti from the matrix and, indirectly, favouring the Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitation during the sensitization process and increasing the corrosion rate. In order to inhibit the intergranular corrosion in these materials the N and Ti concentrations must be optimised. (authors)

  3. Diffusion-Coupled Cohesive Interface Simulations of Stress Corrosion Intergranular Cracking in Polycrystalline Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Chao; Gao, Yanfei; Wang, Yanli; Sham, T.-L.

    2017-09-01

    To study the stress corrosion intergranular cracking mechanism, a diffusion-coupled cohesive zone model (CZM) is proposed for the simulation of the stress-assisted diffusional process along grain boundaries and the mechanical response of grain boundary sliding and separation. This simulation methodology considers the synergistic effects of impurity diffusion driven by pressure gradient and degradation of grain boundary strength by impurity concentration. The diffusion-coupled CZM is combined with crystal plasticity finite element model (CPFEM) to simulate intergranular fracture of polycrystalline material under corrosive environment. Significant heterogeneity of the stress field and extensive impurity accumulation is observed at grain boundaries and junction points. Deformation mechanism maps are constructed with respect to the grain boundary degradation factor and applied strain rate, which dictate the transition from internal to near-surface intergranular fracture modes under various strain amplitudes and grain sizes.

  4. Effect of impurity doping concentration on solar cell output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, P. A.; Soclof, S. I.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental measurements were made of solar cell and related photovoltaic parameters for silicon with high concentrations of dopant impurities. The cell output peaked for doping levels around 10 to the 17th power per cu cm. Independent measurements of diffusion length and open circuit voltage at high doping levels showed severe reductions at concentrations above 10 to the 18th power per cu cm. Theoretical reasons are given to explain these reductions. Indication is given of the problems requiring solution before increased cell output can be achieved at high doping levels.

  5. Approaches to modeling of plasmas containing impurity at arbitrary concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokar, Mikhail Z.

    2016-02-01

    A new approximate method to modeling of two-ion-species plasmas with arbitrary concentration of impurity is developed. It based on the usage of equations for the electron density and the ratio of the ion species densities as new dependent variables. In contrast to motion equations for the ion mass velocities used normally, those for the new variables have a singularity at the Debye sheath only, as in the case of a one species plasma. Computations for the most critical situations of weak and intermediate friction between species due to Coulomb collisions reproduce nearly perfectly the results got by solving the original equations, however within a calculation time reduced by a factor of 102-103. In the case of strong friction, where ions’ velocities are very close each other, the normal procedure does not converge at all, but the new one, being precise in this limit, operates very reliably. Calculations are done for conditions typical in the linear device PSI-2, with deuterium plasmas seeded by neon impurity. For fixed electron and ion temperatures a critical density of impurity atoms is found, at which the electron density grows without limits. Such a catastrophic behavior does not occur if the electron and ion heat balances are taken into account to calculate the temperature profiles self-consistently.

  6. The impact of neutral impurity concentration on charge drift mobility in germanium

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, H; Wang, G -J; Yang, G

    2016-01-01

    We report a new result of the neutral impurity scattering of electrons and holes that has impact on the charge drift mobility in high purity germanium crystals at 77 Kelvin. The charge carrier concentration, mobility and resistivity are measured by Hall Effect system at 77 Kelvin. We investigated the contribution to the total charge drift mobility from ionized impurity scattering, lattice scattering, and neutral impurity scattering with the best theoretical models and experimental data. Several samples with measured Hall mobility from the grown crystals are used for this investigation. With the measured Hall mobility and ionized impurity concentration as well as the theoretical models, we calculated the neutral impurity concentration by the Matthiessen's rule. As a result, the distributions of the neutral impurity concentrations with respect to the radius of the crystals are obtained. Consequently, we demonstrate that neutral impurity scattering is a significant contribution to the charge drift mobility, whic...

  7. Modeling Electronegative Impurity Concentrations in Liquid Argon Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Li, Yichen; Thorn, Craig; Qian, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Achieving long electron lifetime is crucial to reach the high performance of large Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) envisioned for next generation neutrino experiments. We have built up a quantitative model to describe the impurity distribution and transportation in a cryostat. Henrys constants of Oxygen and water, which describe the partition of impurities between gas argon and liquid argon, have been deduced through this model with the measurements in BNL 20-L LAr test stand. These results indicate the importance of the gas purification system and prospects on large LArTPC detectors will be discussed.

  8. Quantifying Main Trends in Lysozyme Nucleation: The Effects of Precipitant Concentration, Supersaturation and Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Michael W.; Leardi, Riccardo; Judge, Russell A.; Pusey, Marc L.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Full factorial experimental design incorporating multi-linear regression analysis of the experimental data allows quick identification of main trends and effects using a limited number of experiments. In this study these techniques were employed to identify the effect of precipitant concentration, supersaturation, and the presence of an impurity, the physiological lysozyme dimer, on the nucleation rate and crystal dimensions of the tetragonal forin of chicken egg white lysozyme. Decreasing precipitant concentration, increasing supers aturation, and increasing impurity, were found to increase crystal numbers. The crystal axial ratio decreased with increasing precipitant concentration, independent of impurity.

  9. Effect of Impurity Concentration on the Depth Profile of the Electric Field within Monolayer Thin Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.F. Habubi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of impurity concentration ratios on the depth profile of electric field within monolayer film is presented. SnO2 monolayer thin film material was prepared and doped with Co using spray chemical pyrolysis. The concentration ratios of impurity were 1 %, 3 %, 5 % and 7 %. The analysis utilizes matrix formulas based on Abele's formulas from the calculation of reflectance and transmittance. Present study gives an information to contamination sensitivity in optical coating issue.

  10. Radiated Power and Impurity Concentrations in the EXTRAP-T2R Reversed-Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corre, Y.; Rachlew, E.; Cecconello, M.; Gravestijn, R. M.; Hedqvist, A.; Pégourié, B.; Schunke, B.; Stancalie, V.

    2005-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of the impurity concentration and radiation in the EXTRAP-T2R device is reported. The experimental setup consists of an 8-chord bolometer system providing the plasma radiated power and a vacuum-ultraviolet spectrometer providing information on the plasma impurity content. The plasma emissivity profile as measured by the bolometric system is peaked in the plasma centre. A one dimensional Onion Skin Collisional-Radiative model (OSCR) has been developed to compute the density and radiation distributions of the main impurities. The observed centrally peaked emissivity profile can be reproduced by OSCR simulations only if finite particle confinement time and charge-exchange processes between plasma impurities and neutral hydrogen are taken into account. The neutral hydrogen density profile is computed with a recycling code. Simulations show that recycling on metal first wall such as in EXTRAP-T2R (stainless steel vacuum vessel and molybdenum limiters) is compatible with a rather high neutral hydrogen density in the plasma centre. Assuming an impurity concentration of 10% for oxygen and 3% for carbon compared with the electron density, the OSCR calculation including lines and continuum emission reproduces about 60% of the total radiated power with a similarly centrally peaked emissivity profile. The centrally peaked emissivity profile is due to low ionisation stages and strongly radiating species in the plasma core, mainly O4+ (Be-like) and C3+ Li-like.

  11. Band tailing in heavily doped semiconductors. Scattering and impurity-concentration-fluctuation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serre, J.; Ghazali, A.; Hugon, P. Leroux

    1981-02-01

    Using a self-consistent multiple-scattering method, we estimate the relative importance of both effects of scattering and of impurity-concentration fluctuations on band states in heavily doped semiconductors and thus we account for band tailing. We apply this formalism to the estimate of the interband absorption spectrum in a typical case, in satisfactory agreement with experiment.

  12. Effect of Impurities and Cerium on Stress Concentration Sensitivity of Al-Li Based Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟亮; 田丽

    2002-01-01

    A notch sensitivity factor was derived in order to evaluate the stress concentration sensitivity of Al-Li based alloys. The factor values for the Al-Li alloy sheets containing various contents of impurities and cerium addition were evaluated by determining the mechanical properties. It is found that the impurities Fe, Si, Na and K significantly enhance the stress concentration sensitivity of the alloys 2090 and 8090, whereas cerium addition reduces the stress concentration sensitivity to a certain degree for the high strength alloys. However, an excess amount of cerium addition in the high ductility alloy 1420 can significantly increase the stress concentration sensitivity. As compared with conventional aluminum alloys, the Al-Li based alloys generally show high stress concentration sensitivity. Therefore, a special attention must be paid to this problem in the practical application of Al-Li based alloys.

  13. On the Paramagnetic Impurity Concentration of Silicate Glasses from Low-Temperature Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfanti, Silvia; Jug, Giancarlo

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of paramagnetic trace impurities in glasses can be determined via precise SQUID measurements of the sample's magnetization in a magnetic field. However, the existence of quasi-ordered structural inhomogeneities in the disordered solid causes correlated tunneling currents that can contribute to the magnetization, surprisingly, also at the higher temperatures. We show that taking into account such tunneling systems gives rise to a good agreement between the concentrations extracted from SQUID magnetization and those extracted from low-temperature heat capacity measurements. Without suitable inclusion of such magnetization contribution from the tunneling currents, we find that the concentration of paramagnetic impurities gets considerably over-estimated. This analysis represents a further positive test for the structural inhomogeneity theory of the magnetic effects in the cold glasses.

  14. Impurity concentrations and surface charge densities on the heavily doped face of a silicon solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Hsu, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    Increased solar cell efficiencies are attained by reduction of surface recombination and variation of impurity concentration profiles at the n(+) surface of silicon solar cells. Diagnostic techniques are employed to evaluate the effects of specific materials preparation methodologies on surface and near surface concentrations. It is demonstrated that the MOS C-V method, when combined with a bulk measurement technique, yields more complete concentration data than are obtainable by either method alone. Specifically, new solar cell MOS C-V measurements are combined with bulk concentrations obtained by a successive layer removal technique utilizing measurements of sheet resistivity and Hall coefficient.

  15. The effects of impurity composition and concentration in reactor structure material on neutron activation inventory in pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Gil Yong; Kim, Soon Young [RADCORE, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Min [TUV Rheinland Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Soo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The neutron activation inventories in reactor vessel and its internals, and bio-shield of a PWR nuclear power plant were calculated to evaluate the effect of impurity elements contained in the structural materials on the activation inventory. Carbon steel is, in this work, used as the reactor vessel material, stainless steel as the reactor vessel internals, and ordinary concrete as the bio-shield. For stainless steel and carbon steel, one kind of impurity concentration was employed, and for ordinary concrete five kinds were employed in this study using MCNP5 and FISPACT for the calculation of neutron flux and activation inventory, respectively. As the results, specific activities for the cases with impurity elements were calculated to be more than twice than those for the cases without impurity elements in stainless and carbon steel. Especially, the specific activity for the concrete material with impurity elements was calculated to be 30 times higher than that without impurity. Neutron induced reactions and activation inventories in each material were also investigated, and it is noted that major radioactive nuclide in steel material is Co-60 from cobalt impurity element, and, in concrete material, Co-60 and Eu-152 from cobalt and europium impurity elements, respectively. The results of this study can be used for nuclear decommissioning plan during activation inventory assessment and regulation, and it is expected to be used as a reference in the design phase of nuclear power plant, considering the decommissioning of nuclear power plants or nuclear facilities.

  16. Neutral beam injector oxygen impurity measurements and concentration reduction via gettering processes. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, R.J.; Hsu, W.L.; Kerr, R.G.; Mills, B.E.; Poulsen, P.; Hibbs, S.

    1984-12-01

    We have measured the reduction of oxygen impurity levels by means of gettering within the arc chambers of the TMX-U neutral-beam injectors using the TMX-U neutral-beam test stand. Our analysis incorporated silicon surface-probe measurements and optical Doppler-shift measurements of the hydrogen alpha spectra of deuterium atoms with energies appropriate for D/sub 2/O parentage. Without gettering, the Auger electron spectroscopy analysis of an exposed silicon sample showed a large oxygen peak below the surface peak with a concentration equivalence of approximately 2% for an accelerated beam. After gettering, with either titanium or chromium getters, optical monochromator data indicated a reduction in the oxygen concentration of at least a factor of 10 whereas Auger spectroscopy data showed at least a factor-of-eight reduction. Other metallic impurities remained below the level of detection even after gettering. Additional effects observed during this study include a change in the accelerated deuterium species concentrations, loss of gettering activity, loss of arc operation, and a change in arc performance due to arc chamber gas absorption during operation.

  17. Neutral beam injector oxygen impurity measurements and concentration reduction via gettering processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, R.J.; Hsu, W.L.; Kerr, R.G.; Mills, B.E.; Poulsen, P.; Hibbs, S.

    1984-10-01

    The reduction of oxygen impurity levels by means of gettering within the arc chambers of the TMX-U neutral beam injectors has been measured. The TMX-U Neutral Beam Test Stand was used for this experiment. Analysis incorporated silicon surface probes and optical Doppler-shift measurements of the Lyman alpha spectra of deuterium atoms with energies appropriate for D/sub 2/O parentage. Without gettering, the Auger electron spectroscopy analysis of an exposed silicon sample showed a large oxygen peak below the surface peak with a concentration equivalent of approximately 2% for an accelerated beam. After gettering, with either titanium or chromium getters, the oxygen concentration was reduced by at least a factor of 10 according to optical monochromator data, and at least a factor of 8 from Auger spectroscopy data. Simultaneously, other metallic impurities were not increased substantially as a result of gettering. Additional effects observed during this study include a change in the accelerated deuterium species concentrations, loss of gettering activity and arc operation, and a change in arc performance from arc chamber gas absorption during operation.

  18. Intergranular fracture in nanocrystalline metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, D.; van Swygenhoven, H.; Derlet, P. M.

    2002-08-01

    Crack propagation studies in nanocrystalline Ni samples with mean grain sizes ranging from 5 to 12 nm are reported using atomistic simulations. For all grain sizes pure intergranular fracture is observed. Intergranular fracture is shown to proceed by the coalescence of microvoids formed at the grain boundaries ahead of the crack. The energy released during propagation is higher than the Griffith value, indicating an additional grain-boundary accommodation mechanism.

  19. Impurity identifications, concentrations and particle fluxes from spectral measurements of the EXTRAP T2R plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menmuir, S.; Kuldkepp, M.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-10-01

    An absolute intensity calibrated 0.5 m spectrometer with optical multi-channel analyser detector was used to observe the visible-UV radiation from the plasma in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Spectral lines were identified indicating the presence of oxygen, chromium, iron and molybdenum impurities in the hydrogen plasma. Certain regions of interest were examined in more detail and at different times in the plasma discharge. Impurity concentration calculations were made using the absolute intensities of lines of OIV and OV measured at 1-2 ms into the discharge generating estimates of the order of 0.2% of ne in the central region rising to 0.7% of ne at greater radii for OIV and 0.3% rising to 0.6% for OV. Edge electron temperatures of 0.5-5 eV at electron densities of 5-10×1011 cm-3 were calculated from the measured relative intensities of hydrogen Balmer lines. The absolute intensities of hydrogen lines and of multiplets of neutral chromium and molybdenum were used to determine particle fluxes (at 4-5 ms into the plasma) of the order 1×1016, 7×1013 and 3×1013 particles cm-2 s-1, respectively.

  20. Mechanism of intergranular corrosion of NiCu alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W.; Zhang, J. [Univ. of Toronto, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study is to simulate intergranular corrosion (or intergranular attack, IGA) of Monel 400 (70Ni-30Cu) tubes that occurs occasionally in practice. In general the hypothesized factors of IGA for Monel 400 tubing could be crevices, dissolved oxygen, low pH, reduced sulfur species, and precipitation of impurities at grain boundaries. Electrochemical techniques including cyclic polarization and long-term potentiostatic polarization were used to test two heats of Monel 400 tubing that had behaved differently in practice. To simulate the situation within a crevice or under a deposit, cupric ions were added to the base solution, which was either neutral or acidic in pH. The effect of thiourea as a representative reduced sulfur compound was investigated. The results show that in neutral solution IGA occurs with little sensitivity to metallurgy and does not require thiourea, but in acid solution it only occurs with thiourea addition, and particular grain boundary microstructures are more susceptible. (author)

  1. A calibration to predict the concentrations of impurities in plutonium oxide by prompt gamma analysis: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Foster, Lynn A.; Kelly, Elizabeth J.; Murray, Roy E., IV

    2009-12-01

    Over 5,500 containers of excess plutonium-bearing materials have been packaged for long-term storage following the requirements of DOE-STD- 3013. Knowledge of the chemical impurities in the packaged materials is important because certain impurities, such as chloride salts, affect the behavior of the material in storage leading to gas generation and corrosion when sufficient moisture also is present. In most cases, the packaged materials are not well characterized, and information about the chemical impurities is limited to knowledge of the material’s processing history. The alpha-particle activity from the plutonium and americium isotopes provides a method of nondestructive self-interrogation to identify certain light elements through the characteristic, prompt gamma rays that are emitted from alpha-particle-induced reactions with these elements. Gamma-ray spectra are obtained for each 3013 container using a highresolution, coaxial high-purity germanium detector. These gamma-ray spectra are scanned from 800 to 5,000 keV for characteristic, prompt gamma rays from the detectable elements, which include lithium, beryllium, boron, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, sodium, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, phosphorus, chlorine, and potassium. The lower limits of detection for these elements in a plutonium-oxide matrix increase with atomic number and range from 100 or 200 ppm for the lightest elements such as lithium and beryllium, to 19,000 ppm for potassium. The peak areas from the characteristic, prompt gamma rays can be used to estimate the concentration of the light-element impurities detected in the material on a semiquantitative basis. The use of prompt gamma analysis to assess impurity concentrations avoids the expense and the risks generally associated with performing chemical analysis on radioactive materials. The analyzed containers are grouped by impurity content, which helps to identify high-risk containers for surveillance and in sorting materials before packaging.

  2. A calibration to predict the concentrations of impurities in plutonium oxide by prompt gamma analysis: Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Foster, Lynn A.; Kelly, Elizabeth J.; Murray, Roy E., IV

    2009-12-01

    Over 5,500 containers of excess plutonium-bearing materials have been packaged for long-term storage following the requirements of DOE-STD- 3013. Knowledge of the chemical impurities in the packaged materials is important because certain impurities, such as chloride salts, affect the behavior of the material in storage leading to gas generation and corrosion when sufficient moisture also is present. In most cases, the packaged materials are not well characterized, and information about the chemical impurities is limited to knowledge of the material’s processing history. The alpha-particle activity from the plutonium and americium isotopes provides a method of nondestructive self-interrogation to identify certain light elements through the characteristic, prompt gamma rays that are emitted from alpha-particle-induced reactions with these elements. Gamma-ray spectra are obtained for each 3013 container using a highresolution, coaxial high-purity germanium detector. These gamma-ray spectra are scanned from 800 to 5,000 keV for characteristic, prompt gamma rays from the detectable elements, which include lithium, beryllium, boron, nitrogen, oxygen, fluorine, sodium, magnesium, aluminum, silicon, phosphorus, chlorine, and potassium. The lower limits of detection for these elements in a plutonium-oxide matrix increase with atomic number and range from 100 or 200 ppm for the lightest elements such as lithium and beryllium, to 19,000 ppm for potassium. The peak areas from the characteristic, prompt gamma rays can be used to estimate the concentration of the light-element impurities detected in the material on a semiquantitative basis. The use of prompt gamma analysis to assess impurity concentrations avoids the expense and the risks generally associated with performing chemical analysis on radioactive materials. The analyzed containers are grouped by impurity content, which helps to identify high-risk containers for surveillance and in sorting materials before packaging.

  3. Hydrogen Induced Intergranular Cracking of Nickel-Base Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    treatment a) Austenitize 5 1/2 hr at 954C + water quench b) Temper 8 hr at 6630C c) Stress relieve 15 hr at 593C 22 hr at 6490C 18 hr at 663C iii...intergranularly embrittle in a matter of minutes (2). There is, however, evidence to suggest that grain boundary segregates (particularly metalloid impurities...hereafter referred to as SA542-3). The chemical composition, heat treatment and ambient temperature mechanical properties of this steel are listed

  4. Reduction of Intergranular Cracking Susceptibility by Precipitation Control in 2.25Cr Heat-Resistant Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyun Je; Heo, Nam Hoe; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2017-01-01

    This research is performed to decrease reheat cracking susceptibility in the T/P23 heat-resistant steels (2.25Cr1.5WVNbTi), in other words, to reduce phosphorus and sulfur segregation concentration at the prior austenite grain boundary/carbide interfaces (GCIs) and the carbide-free prior austenite grain boundaries (carbide-free PAGBs) causing intergranular cracking. The increase of bulk vanadium content reduces the amount of M23C6 carbides consuming carbon atoms which can repulse phosphorus and sulfur from interfaces, but promotes the precipitation reaction of V-rich MX carbo-nitrides. Such a precipitation reaction results in the lower segregation concentration of phosphorus or no sulfur at the GCIs and the carbide-free PAGBs. This is because the carbon atoms remaining after precipitation reaction segregates to the interfaces and repels phosphorus and sulfur. Also, tungsten segregation can increase the cohesive grain boundary strength as one of the grain boundary strengtheners. Consequently, the lower segregation concentration of the impurities and the segregation of tungsten atoms lower the intergranular cracking susceptibility.

  5. Reduction of Intergranular Cracking Susceptibility by Precipitation Control in 2.25Cr Heat-Resistant Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyun Je; Heo, Nam Hoe; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2017-03-01

    This research is performed to decrease reheat cracking susceptibility in the T/P23 heat-resistant steels (2.25Cr1.5WVNbTi), in other words, to reduce phosphorus and sulfur segregation concentration at the prior austenite grain boundary/carbide interfaces (GCIs) and the carbide-free prior austenite grain boundaries (carbide-free PAGBs) causing intergranular cracking. The increase of bulk vanadium content reduces the amount of M23C6 carbides consuming carbon atoms which can repulse phosphorus and sulfur from interfaces, but promotes the precipitation reaction of V-rich MX carbo-nitrides. Such a precipitation reaction results in the lower segregation concentration of phosphorus or no sulfur at the GCIs and the carbide-free PAGBs. This is because the carbon atoms remaining after precipitation reaction segregates to the interfaces and repels phosphorus and sulfur. Also, tungsten segregation can increase the cohesive grain boundary strength as one of the grain boundary strengtheners. Consequently, the lower segregation concentration of the impurities and the segregation of tungsten atoms lower the intergranular cracking susceptibility.

  6. Laboratory measurements of ice tensile strength dependence on density and concentration of silicate and polymer impurities at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, K. L.; Beyeler, J. D.; Polito, P. J.; Zygielbaum, B. R.; Sklar, L. S.; Collins, G. C.

    2009-12-01

    The tensile strength of ice bedrock on Titan should strongly influence the effectiveness of the erosional processes responsible for carving the extensive fluvial drainage networks and other surface features visible in images returned by the Cassini and Huygens probes. Recent measurements of the effect of temperature on the tensile strength of low-porosity, polycrystalline ice, without impurities, suggest that ice bedrock at the Titan surface temperature of 93 K may be as much as five times stronger than ice at terrestrial surface temperatures. However, ice bedrock on Titan and other outer solar system bodies may have significant porosity, and impurities such silicates or polymers are possible in such ices. In this laboratory investigation we are exploring the dependence of tensile strength on the density and concentration of impurities, for polycrystalline ice across a wide range of temperatures. We use the Brazilian tensile splitting test to measure strength, and control temperature with dry ice and liquid nitrogen. The 50 mm diameter ice cores are made from a log-normally distributed seed crystal mixture with a median size of 1.4 mm. To control ice density and porosity we vary the packing density of the seed grains in core molds and vary the degree of saturation of the matrix with added near-freezing distilled water. We also vary ice density by blending in a similarly-sized mixture of angular fragments of two types of impurities, a fine-grained volcanic rock and a polyethylene polymer. Because both types of impurities have greater tensile strength than ice at Earth surface temperatures, we expect higher concentrations of impurities to correlate with increased strength for ice-rock and ice-polymer mixtures. However, at the ultra-cold temperatures of the outer planets, we expect significant divergence in the temperature dependence of ice tensile strength for the various mixtures and resulting densities. These measurements will help constrain the range of possible

  7. Specific features of SRS-CARS monitoring of low impurity concentrations of hydrogen in dense gas mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikheev, Gennady M.; Mogileva, Tatyana N.; Popov, Aleksey Yu.

    2006-09-01

    The possibility of measuring the hydrogen impurity concentration in dense gas mixtures by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) is studied. In this technique, biharmonic laser pumping based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in compressed hydrogen is used. Because of the interference between the coherent scattering components from buffer gas molecules and molecules of the impurity to be detected, the signal recorded may depend on the hydrogen concentration by a parabolic law, which has a minimum and makes the results uncertain. It is shown that this uncertainty can be removed if the frequency of the biharmonic laser pump, which is produced by the SRS oscillator, somewhat differs from the frequency of molecular oscillations of hydrogen in the test mixture. A sensitivity of 5 ppm is obtained as applied to the hydrogen-air mixture under normal pressure. The description of a set-up for the determination of the coefficient of the hydrogen diffusion in gas mixtures is given. The main assembly units are a diffusion chamber and an automated laser system for the selective hydrogen diagnostics in gas mixtures by the SRS-CARS method. The determination of the diffusion coefficient is based on the approximation of the experimental data describing the hydrogen concentration varying with time at a specified point in the diffusion chamber and the accurate solution of the diffusion equation for the selected one-dimensional geometry of the experiment.

  8. Intergranular brittle fracture of a low alloy steel induced by grain boundary segregation of impurities: influence of the microstructure; Rupture intergranulaire fragile d'un acier faiblement allie induite par la segregation d'impuretes aux joints de grains: influence de la microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raoul, St

    1999-07-01

    The study contributes to improve the comprehension of intergranular embrittlement induced by the phosphorus segregation along prior austenitic grain boundaries of low alloy steels used in pressurized power reactor vessel. A part of this study was performed using a A533 steel which contains chemical fluctuations (ghost lines) with two intensities. Axi-symmetrically notched specimens were tested and intergranular brittle de-cohesions were observed in the ghost lines. The fracture initiation sites observed on fracture surfaces were identified as MnS inclusions. A bimodal statistic obtained in a probabilistic model of the fracture is explained by the double population of ghost lines' intensities. A metallurgical study was performed on the same class of steel by studying the influence of the microstructure on the susceptibility to temper embrittlement. Brittle fracture properties of such microstructures obtained by dilatometric experiments were tested on sub-sized specimens to measure the V-notched fracture toughness. Fraction areas of brittle fracture modes were determined on surface fractures. A transition of the fracture mode with the microstructure is observed. It is shown that tempered microstructures of martensite and lower bainite are more susceptible to intergranular embrittlement than tempered upper bainitic microstructure. The intergranular fracture is the most brittle mode. The analysis of crystalline mis-orientations shows a grain boundary structure appreciably more coherent for tempered microstructures of martensite and lower bainite. The higher density of randomgrain boundaries is susceptible to drag the phosphorus in the upper bainitic matrix and to make the quantity of free phosphorus decreasing. Microstructure observations show a difference in the size and the spatial distribution of carbides, essentially cementite, between tempered martensite and upper bainite. It can explain the bigger susceptibility of this last microstructure to cleavage mode

  9. Application of the MOS C-V technique to determine impurity concentrations and surface parameters on the diffused face of silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation of the feasibility of using the MOS C-V (capacitance-voltage) technique to determine impurity and surface state concentrations on the diffused face of Si solar cells with Ta2O5 coatings. Impurity concentration 10 A from the diffused surface is found to be 2.9 times 10 to the 20th power per cu cm. Charge density in surface and oxide states is 2.1 times 10 to the 13th power per sq cm. These data agree with theoretical predictions.-

  10. A Calibration to Predict the Concentrations of Impurities in Plutonium Oxide by Prompt Gamma Analysis Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narlesky, Joshua Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelly, Elizabeth J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-10

    This report documents the new PG calibration regression equation. These calibration equations incorporate new data that have become available since revision 1 of “A Calibration to Predict the Concentrations of Impurities in Plutonium Oxide by Prompt Gamma Analysis” was issued [3] The calibration equations are based on a weighted least squares (WLS) approach for the regression. The WLS method gives each data point its proper amount of influence over the parameter estimates. This gives two big advantages, more precise parameter estimates and better and more defensible estimates of uncertainties. The WLS approach makes sense both statistically and experimentally because the variances increase with concentration, and there are physical reasons that the higher measurements are less reliable and should be less influential. The new magnesium calibration includes a correction for sodium and separate calibration equation for items with and without chlorine. These additional calibration equations allow for better predictions and smaller uncertainties for sodium in materials with and without chlorine. Chlorine and sodium have separate equations for RICH materials. Again, these equations give better predictions and smaller uncertainties chlorine and sodium for RICH materials.

  11. States of an on-axis two-hydrogenic-impurity complex in concentric double quantum rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R-Fulla, M., E-mail: marlonfulla@yahoo.com [Escuela de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, A.A. 3840, Medellín (Colombia); Institución Universitaria Pascual Bravo, A.A. 6564, Medellín (Colombia); Marín, J.H.; Suaza, Y.A. [Escuela de Física, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, A.A. 3840, Medellín (Colombia); Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensada-U de A, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia, calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2014-06-13

    The energy structure of an on-axis two-donor system (D{sub 2}{sup 0}) confined in GaAs concentric double quantum rings under the presence of magnetic field and hydrostatic pressure was analyzed. Based on structural data for the double quantum ring morphology, a rigorous adiabatic procedure was implemented to separate the electrons' rapid in-plane motions from the slow rotational ones. A one-dimensional equation with an effective angular-dependent potential, which describes the two-electron rotations around the common symmetry axis of quantum rings was obtained. It was shown that D{sub 2}{sup 0} complex characteristic features are strongly dependent on the quantum ring geometrical parameters. Besides, by changing the hydrostatic pressure and magnetic field strengths, it is possible to tune the D{sub 2}{sup 0} energy structure. Our results are comparable to those previously reported for a single and negative ionized donor in a spherical quantum dot after a selective setting of the geometrical parameters of the structure. - Highlights: • We report the eigenenergies of a D{sub 2}{sup 0} complex in concentric double quantum rings. • Our model is versatile enough to analyze the dissociation process D{sub 2}{sup 0}→D{sup 0}+D{sup +}+e{sup −}. • We compare the D{sup 0} eigenenergies in horn toroidal and spherical shaped quantum dots. • We show the effects of hydrostatic pressure and magnetic field on the D{sub 2}{sup 0} spectrum. • The use of hydrostatic pressure provides higher thermal stability to the D{sub 2}{sup 0} complex.

  12. Liquidus slopes of impurities in ITS-90 fixed points from the mercury point to the copper point in the low concentration limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Jonathan V.; Gisby, John A.; Steur, Peter P. M.

    2016-08-01

    A knowledge of the effect of impurities at the level of parts per million on the freezing temperature of very pure metals is essential for realisation of ITS-90 fixed points. New information has become available for use with the thermodynamic modelling software MTDATA, permitting calculation of liquidus slopes, in the low concentration limit, of a wider range of binary alloy systems than was previously possible. In total, calculated values for 536 binary systems are given. In addition, new experimental determinations of phase diagrams, in the low impurity concentration limit, have recently appeared. All available data have been combined to provide a comprehensive set of liquidus slopes for impurities in ITS-90 metal fixed points. In total, liquidus slopes for 838 systems are tabulated for the fixed points Hg, Ga, In, Sn, Zn, Al, Ag, Au, and Cu. It is shown that the value of the liquidus slope as a function of impurity element atomic number can be approximated using a simple formula, and good qualitative agreement with the existing data is observed for the fixed points Al, Ag, Au and Cu, but curiously the formula is not applicable to the fixed points Hg, Ga, In, Sn, and Zn. Some discussion is made concerning the influence of oxygen on the liquidus slopes, and some calculations using MTDATA are discussed. The BIPM’s consultative committee for thermometry has long recognised that the sum of individual estimates method is the ideal approach for assessing uncertainties due to impurities, but the community has been largely powerless to use the model due to lack of data. Here, not only is data provided, but a simple model is given to enable known thermophysical data to be used directly to estimate impurity effects for a large fraction of the ITS-90 fixed points.

  13. Effect of impurities on the transition concentration of helium-3 ions in (3He)-H tokamak plasmas heated with ICRH

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Ye O; Van Eester, D

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen majority plasmas will be used in the initial non-activated phase of ITER operation. Optimizing ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in such scenarios will help in achieving H-mode in these plasmas. Past JET experiments with the carbon wall revealed a significant impact of intrinsic impurities on the ICRH performance in (3He)-H plasmas. High plasma contamination with carbon impurities resulted in the appearance of a supplementary mode conversion layer and significant reduction in the transition concentration of 3He minority ions, defined as the concentration at which the change from minority heating to mode conversion regime occurs. In view of the installation of the new ITER-like wall at JET, it is important to evaluate the effect of Be and W impurities on ICRH scenarios in (3He)-H plasmas. In this paper, an approximate analytical expression for the transition concentration of 3He minority ions is derived as a function of plasma and ICRH parameters, and accounting for typical impurity species at JE...

  14. Challenges in Continuum Modelling of Intergranular Fracture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coffman, Valerie; Sethna, James P.; Ingraffea, A. R.;

    2011-01-01

    Intergranular fracture in polycrystals is often simulated by finite elements coupled to a cohesive zone model for the interfaces, requiring cohesive laws for grain boundaries as a function of their geometry. We discuss three challenges in understanding intergranular fracture in polycrystals. First......, 3D grain boundary geometries comprise a five-dimensional space. Second, the energy and peak stress of grain boundaries have singularities for all commensurate grain boundaries, especially those with short repeat distances. Thirdly, fracture nucleation and growth depend not only upon the properties...... properties. To address the last challenge, we demonstrate a method for atomistically extracting the fracture properties of geometrically complex local regions on the fly from within a finite element simulation....

  15. Application of the MOS-C-V technique to determine impurity concentrations and surface parameters on the diffused face of silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using the MOS C-V technique to obtain information regarding impurity and surface state concentrations on the diffused face of silicon solar cells with Ta2O5 coatings is studied. Results indicate that the MOS C-V technique yields useful information concerning surface parameters which contribute to the high, efficiency limiting, surface recombination velocities on the n+ surface of silicon solar cells.

  16. Donor impurity-related linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients in GaAs/Ga{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}As concentric double quantum rings: Effects of geometry, hydrostatic pressure, and aluminum concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghramyan, H.M.; Barseghyan, M.G.; Kirakosyan, A.A. [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Al. Manookian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Restrepo, R.L. [Física Teórica y Aplicada, Escuela de Ingeniería de Antioquia, AA 7516, Medellín (Colombia); Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultadde Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21,Medellín (Colombia); Mora-Ramos, M.E. [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultadde Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21,Medellín (Colombia); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Morelos, Av. Universidad 1001, CP 62209, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Duque, C.A., E-mail: cduque@fisica.udea.edu.co [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultadde Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21,Medellín (Colombia)

    2014-01-15

    The linear and nonlinear optical absorption associated with the transition between 1s and 2s states corresponding to the electron-donor-impurity complex in GaAs/Ga{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}As three-dimensional concentric double quantum rings are investigated. Taking into account the combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and the variation of the aluminum concentration, the energies of the ground and first excited s-like states of a donor impurity in such a system have been calculated using the effective mass approximation and a variational method. The energies of these states and the corresponding threshold energy of the optical transitions are examined as functions of hydrostatic pressure, aluminum concentration, radial impurity position, as well as the geometrical dimensions of the structure. The dependencies of the linear, nonlinear and total optical absorption coefficients as functions of the incident photon energy are investigated for different values of those mentioned parameters. It is found that the influences mentioned above lead to either redshifts or blueshifts of the resonant peaks of the optical absorption spectrum. It is particularly discussed the unusual property exhibited by the third-order nonlinear of becoming positive for photon energies below the resonant transition one. It is shown that this phenomenon is associated with the particular features of the system under study, which determine the values of the electric dipole moment matrix elements. -- Highlights: • Intra-band optical absorption associated to impurity states in double quantum rings. • Combined effects of hydrostatic pressure and aluminum concentration are studied. • The influences mentioned above lead to shifts of resonant peaks. • It is discussed an unusual property exhibited by the third-order nonlinear absorption.

  17. Film induced intergranular cracking of binary noble alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedersdorf, F. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States); Sieradzki, K. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Dealloying of a binary noble alloy produces a porous layer rich in the more noble element. Application of a tensile load may initiate a brittle intergranular crack in the dealloyed layer that advances into the unattached material. The relationships between the dealloying potential, dealloyed layer thickness and alloy susceptibility to film induced intergranular cracking have been studied. Ag-Au alloys were studied.

  18. Magnetic Field Twisting by Intergranular Downdrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroyan, Youra; Williams, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The interaction of an intergranular downdraft with an embedded vertical magnetic field is examined. It is demonstrated that the downdraft may couple to small magnetic twists leading to an instability. The descending plasma exponentially amplifies the magnetic twists when it decelerates with depth due to increasing density. Most efficient amplification is found in the vicinity of the level, where the kinetic energy density of the downdraft reaches equipartition with the magnetic energy density. Continual extraction of energy from the decelerating plasma and growth in the total azimuthal energy occurs as a consequence of the wave-flow coupling along the downdraft. The presented mechanism may drive vortices and torsional motions that have been detected between granules and in simulations of magnetoconvection.

  19. Determination of elemental impurities and U and O isotopic compositions with a view to identify the geographical and industrial origins of uranium ore concentrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaun, A.; Hubert, A.; Pointurier, F.; Aupiais, J.; Pili, E.; Richon, P.; Fauré, A.; Diallo, S.

    2012-12-01

    First events of illicit trafficking of nuclear and radiological materials occurred 50 years ago. Nuclear forensics expertise are aiming at determining the use of seized material, its industrial history and provenance (geographical area, place of production or processing), at assisting in the identification and dismantling of illicit trafficking networks. This information is also valuable in the context of inspections of declared facilities to verify the consistency of operator's declaration. Several characteristics can be used to determine the origin of uranium ore concentrates such as trace elemental impurity patterns (Keegan et al., 2008 ; Varga et al., 2010a, 2010b) or uranium, oxygen and lead isotopic compositions (Tamborini et al., 2002a, 2002b ; Wallenius et al., 2006; Varga et al., 2009). We developed analytical procedures for measuring the isotopic compositions of uranium (234U/238U and 235U/238U) and oxygen (18O/16O) and levels of elemental impurities (e.g. REE, Th) from very small amounts of uranium ore concentrates (or yellow cakes). Micrometer particles and few milligrams of material are used for oxygen isotope measurements and REE determination, respectively. Reference materials were analyzed by mass spectrometry (TIMS, SF-ICP-MS and SIMS) to validate testing protocols. Finally, materials of unknown origin were analyzed to highlight significant differences and determine whether these differences allow identifying the origin of these ore concentrates. References: Keegan, E., et al. (2008). Applied Geochemistry 23, 765-777. Tamborini, G., et al. (2002a). Analytical Chemistry 74, 6098-6101. Tamborini, G., et al. (2002b). Microchimica Acta 139, 185-188. Varga, Z., et al. (2009). Analytical Chemistry 81, 8327-8334. Varga, Z., et al. (2010a). Talanta 80, 1744-1749. Varga, Z., et al. (2010b). Radiochimica Acta 98, 771-778 Wallenius, M., et al. (2006). Forensic Science International 156, 55-62.

  20. Effects of dopant concentration and impurities on the conductivity of magnetron-sputtered nanocrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillassen, M.; Eklund, P.; Pryds, Nini;

    2010-01-01

    Cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) films with yttria concentrations of 8.7, 9.9, and 11 mol% have been deposited by reactive pulsed DC magnetron from Zr–Y alloy targets. The overall microstructure and texture in the films showed no dependence on the yttria concentration. Films deposited at fl...

  1. Study of intergranular embrittlement in Fe-12Mn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H.J.

    1982-06-01

    A high resolution scanning Auger microscopic study has been performed on the intergranular fracture surfaces of Fe-12Mn steels in the as-austenitized condition. Fracture mode below the ductile-brittle transition temperature was intergranular whenever the alloy was quenched from the austenite field. The intergranular fracture surface failed to reveal any consistent segregation of P, S, As, O, or N. The occasional appearance of S or O on the fracture surface was found to be due to a low density precipitation of MnS and MnO/sub 2/ along the prior austenite boundaries. An AES study with Ar/sup +/ ion-sputtering showed no evidence of manganese enrichment along the prior austenite boundaries, but a slight segregation of carbon which does not appear to be implicated in the tendency toward intergranular fracture. Addition of 0.002% B with a 1000/sup 0/C/1h/WQ treatment yielded a high Charpy impact energy at liquid nitrogen temperature, preventing the intergranular fracture. High resolution AES studies showed that 3 at. % B on the prior austenite grain boundaries is most effective in increasing the grain boundary cohesive strength in an Fe-12Mn alloy. Trace additions of Mg, Zr, or V had negligible effects on the intergranular embrittlement. A 450/sup 0/C temper of the boron-modified alloys was found to cause tempered martensite embrittlement, leading to intergranular fracture. The embrittling treatment of the Fe-12Mn alloys with and without boron additions raised the ductile-brittle transition by 150/sup 0/C. This tempered martensite embrittlement was found to be due to the Mn enrichment of the fracture surface to 32 at. % Mn in the boron-modified alloy and 38 at. % Mn in the unmodified alloy. The Mn-enriched region along the prior austenite grain boundaries upon further tempering is believed to cause nucleation of austenite and to change the chemistry of the intergranular fracture surfaces. 61 figures.

  2. Donor-impurity related photoionization cross section in GaAs/Ga{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}As concentric double quantum rings: Effects of geometry and hydrostatic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghramyan, H.M. [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Alex Manoogian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Barseghyan, M.G., E-mail: mbarsegh@ysu.am [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Alex Manoogian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Kirakosyan, A.A. [Department of Solid State Physics, Yerevan State University, Alex Manoogian 1, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Laroze, D. [Instituto de Alta Investigación, Universidad de Tarapacá, Casilla 7D, Arica (Chile); Duque, C.A. [Grupo de Materia Condensada-UdeA, Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Antioquia UdeA, Calle 70 No. 52-21, Medellín (Colombia)

    2014-09-15

    The donor-impurity related photoionization cross section in GaAs/Ga{sub 1−x}Al{sub x}As three-dimensional concentric double quantum rings is investigated. The photoionization cross section dependence on the incident photon energy is studied considering the effects of hydrostatic pressure, variations of aluminum concentration, geometries of the structure, and impurity position. The interpretation of the dipole matrix element, which reflects the photoionization probability, is also given. We have found that these parameters can lead to both redshift and blueshift of the photoionization spectrum and also influence the cross section peak value.

  3. Peculiarities of the determination of shallow impurity concentrations in semiconductors from the analysis of exciton luminescence spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Glinchuk, K D

    2002-01-01

    An analysis was made of the applicability limits of the method for the determination of the content of shallow acceptors and donors in semiconductors from the ratio of the low-temperature (T = 1.8-4.2 K) luminescence intensities of exciton bands, in particular, induces by radiative annihilation of excitons bound to acceptors (donors) and free excitons. It is shown that correct data about the concentrations of shallow acceptors and donors as well as data on changes in their content as a result of various treatments may be obtained if the occupancy of the defects in question by holes and electrons does not depend on the excitation intensity or external treatments. A way to check the fulfillment of criteria for the method application is suggested. An example is given is given of the method application for determination of thermally stimulated changes in the concentration of shallow acceptors and donors in gallium arsenide

  4. Impurity Influence on Nitride LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Rabinovich

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Light emitting diodes (LEDs are widely used nowadays. They are used in major parts of our life. But it is still necessary to improve their characteristics. In this paper the impurity and Indium atoms influence on the LEDs characteristics is investigated by computer simulation. Simulation was carried out in Sim Windows. The program was improved for this purpose by creating new files for AlGaInN heterostructure and devices including more than 25 basic parameters. It was found that characteristics depend on impurity and indium atoms changes a lot. The optimum impurity concentration for doping barriers between quantum wells was achieved. By varying impurity and Indium concentration the distribution in AlGaInN heterostructure LEDs characteristics could be improved.

  5. Some aspects of the role of intergranular fluids in the compositional evolution of metamorphic rocks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sumit Chakraborty; Ralf Dohmen

    2001-12-01

    Minerals that react with each other during the progressive evolution of metamorphic terranes are not always in physical contact. As such, an "intergranular fluid" could play a major role in element transfer and chemical evolution. However, the nature of this uid and its specific role remains somewhat elusive. Recent experiments in our laboratory shed some light on the behavior of such a uid. Here we present a simple mathematical model which accounts for diffusion within crystals and fluid, solubility in the fluid and mass balance between the various reservoirs. The model elucidates the nature of element exchange between two minerals via the mediation of an intergranular fluid. It is shown that a coupling of thermodynamics and kinetics controls the evolution of the system and the concentration of an element in the intergranular fluid is a key parameter of interest. The results have important implications for standard tools of metamorphic petrology such as geothermometers and barometers, geospeedometry and the closure of isotopic systems. For example, homogeneity of mineral grains may be a poor criterion for equilibrium and the rim compositions of minerals showing diffusion zoning may be out of equilibrium with distant exchange partners, even in the presence of a uid in which transport is fast.

  6. Further Study of near Solidus Intergranular Cracking in Inconel 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A series of tests, performed to determine the strain necessary to initiate intergranular cracking in Inconel 718 as a function of temperature, contained enough scatter near the melting temperature that questions remained as to the best curve of curves to fit to the data. Fracture surface analysis showed that the scatter was due to incipient melting in the grain boundary region. The melting contributed to low fracture strain but had only a small on the incipient cracking strain. Gleeble tests, which could be interrupted by water quenching, were used to study the incipient intergranular melting of Inconel 718. This modified weld simulation test provided a sufficiently rapid quench to preserve the intergranular microstructure created during incipient melting. This structure was studied both microscopically and with energy dispensive X-ray analysis. The implications of incipient melting and low-strain incipient cracking on the development of microfissuring envelopes are discussed.

  7. First-principles investigation of impurity concentration influence on bonding behavior, electronic structure and visible light absorption for Mn-doped BiOCl photocatalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Xiaochao; Zhao Lijun [Institute of Clean Technique for Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Fan Caimei, E-mail: fancm@163.com [Institute of Clean Technique for Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Liang Zhenhai [Institute of Clean Technique for Chemical Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Han Peide [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2012-11-01

    We performed first-principles calculation to investigate the bonding behavior, electronic structure and visible light absorption of Mn{sub x}Bi{sub 1-x}OCl (x=0, 0.0625, 0.09375 and 0.125) using density functional theory (DFT) within a plane-wave ultrasoft pseudopotential scheme. The relaxed structural parameters are consistent with the experimental results. The bonding behavior, bond orders, Mulliken charges and bond populations as well as formation energies are obtained. The calculated band structures and density of states show that Mn incorporation results in some impurity energy levels of Mn 3d states in forbidden band as well as valence band and conduction band, and that Mn 3d states, for the modest Mn doping concentration, not only can act as the capture center of excited electrons under longer wavelength light irradiation, but also may trap the photo-excited holes, improving the transfer of photo-excited carriers to the reactive sites. Our calculated optical absorption spectra exhibit that the spectral absorption edge is obviously red-shifted and extends to the visible, red and infrared light region due to the incorporation of Mn. Our calculated absorption spectra are in excellent agreement with the experimental results of Mn-doped BiOCl photocatalyst.

  8. Towards a liquid Argon TPC without evacuation filling of a 6$m^3$ vessel with argon gas from air to ppm impurities concentration through flushing

    CERN Document Server

    Curioni, A; Gendotti, A; Knecht, L; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Coleman, J; Lewis, M; Mavrokoridis, K; McCormick, K; Touramanis, C

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present a successful experimental test of filling a volume of 6 $m^3$ with argon gas, starting from normal ambient air and reducing the impurities content down to few parts per million (ppm) oxygen equivalent. This level of contamination was directly monitored measuring the slow component of the scintillation light of the Ar gas, which is sensitive to $all$ sources of impurities affecting directly the argon scintillation.

  9. Electronic Theoretical Study of the Interaction between Rare Earth Elements and Impurities at Grain Boundaries in Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘贵立; 张国英; 李荣德

    2003-01-01

    The model of dislocations was used to construct the model of grain boundary (GB) with pure rare earths, and rare earth elements and impurities. The influence of the interaction between rare earth elements and impurities on the cohesive properties of 5.3° low angle GB of Fe was investigated by the recursion method. The calculated results of environment sensitive embeding energy(EESE) show that the preferential segregation of rare earth elements towards GBs exists. Calculations of bond order integrals (BOI) show that rare earth elements increase the cohesive strength of low angle GB, and impurities such as S, P weaken the intergranular cohesion of the GB. So rare earth element of proper quantity added in steel not only cleanses other harmful impurities off the GBs, but also enhances the intergranular cohesion. This elucidates the action mechanism of rare earth elements in steel from electronic level and offers theoretical evidence for applications of rare earth elements in steels.

  10. Computer Simulation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking via Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R.W.

    2000-04-01

    Computer simulation has been applied to the investigation of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in Ni-based alloys based on a hydrogen embrittlement mechanism. The simulation employs computational modules that address (a) transport and reactions of aqueous species giving rise to hydrogen generation at the liquid-metal interface, (b) solid state transport of hydrogen via intergranular and transgranular diffusion pathways, and (c) fracture due to the embrittlement of metallic bonds by hydrogen. A key focus of the computational model development has been the role of materials microstructure (precipitate particles and grain boundaries) on hydrogen transport and embrittlement. Simulation results reveal that intergranular fracture is enhanced as grain boundaries are weakened and that microstructures with grains elongated perpendicular to the stress axis are more susceptible to cracking. The presence of intergranular precipitates may be expected to either enhance or impede cracking depending on the relative distribution of hydrogen between the grain boundaries and the precipitate-matrix interfaces. Calculations of hydrogen outgassing and in gassing demonstrate a strong effect of charging method on the fracture behavior.

  11. Moessbauer Studies of Implanted Impurities in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Moessbauer studies were performed on implanted radioactive impurities in semiconductors and metals. Radioactive isotopes (from the ISOLDE facility) decaying to a Moessbauer isotope were utilized to investigate electronic and vibrational properties of impurities and impurity-defect structures. This information is inferred from the measured impurity hyperfine interactions and Debye-Waller factor. In semiconductors isoelectronic, shallow and deep level impurities have been implanted. Complex impurity defects have been produced by the implantation process (correlated damage) or by recoil effects from the nuclear decay in both semiconductors and metals. Annealing mechanisms of the defects have been studied. \\\\ \\\\ In silicon amorphised implanted layers have been recrystallized epitaxially by rapid-thermal-annealing techniques yielding highly supersaturated, electrically-active donor concentrations. Their dissolution and migration mechanisms have been investigated in detail. The electronic configuration of Sb donors...

  12. Impurity doping processes in silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, FFY

    1981-01-01

    This book introduces to non-experts several important processes of impurity doping in silicon and goes on to discuss the methods of determination of the concentration of dopants in silicon. The conventional method used is the discussion process, but, since it has been sufficiently covered in many texts, this work describes the double-diffusion method.

  13. Magnetic Properties and Intergranular Action in Bonded Hybrid Magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Zhenghe; Li Shandong; Han Zhida; Wang Dunhui; Zhong Wei; Gu Benxi; Lu Mu; Zhang Jianrong; Du Youwei

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic properties and intergranular action in bonded hybrid magnets, based on NdFeB and strontium ferrite powders were investigated. The long-range magnetostatic interaction and short-range exchange coupling interaction existed simultaneously in bonded hybrid magnets, and neither of them could be neglected. Some magnetic property parameters of hybrid magnets could be approximately obtained by adding the hysteresis loops of two magnets pro rata.

  14. Impurity levels, impurity bands, excited impurity bands, and band tails: The electronic density of states in quantum wells and heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serre, J.; Ghazali, A.; Gold, A.

    1989-04-01

    We have investigated in quantum wells (QW's) and heterostructures (HS's) the modification of the electronic structure near the band edge, which is induced by selective doping. The density of states has been calculated as a function of the relevant parameters, namely, carrier and impurity concentrations (and depletion concentrations for HS's), QW width, and impurity position. Using a multiple-scattering method which includes a finite-range screened potential and impurity concentration to all orders, we have succeeded in obtaining ground-state and excited-state impurity bands (IB's). We observed these bands merging gradually with the lowest conduction subband as the impurity concentration is increased, leading to the formation of a band tail into the energy gap. Other main results obtained for different values of the parameters are the binding energy for a single impurity, the widths and energy shifts of ground- and excited-state IB's, and the contribution of the electron-impurity interaction to the gap shrinkage in the band-tail regime. Our results are compared with experiments and other theories.

  15. Intergranular fracture in UO2: derivation of traction-separation law from atomistic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yongfeng Zhang; Paul C Millett; Michael R Tonks; Xian-Ming Bai; S Bulent Biner

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the intergranular fracture behavior of UO2 was studied by molecular dynamics simulations using the Basak potential. In addition, the constitutive traction-separation law was derived from atomistic data using the cohesive-zone model. In the simulations a bicrystal model with the (100) symmetric tilt E5 grain boundaries was utilized. Uniaxial tension along the grain boundary normal was applied to simulate Mode-I fracture. The fracture was observed to propagate along the grain boundary by micro-pore nucleation and coalescence, giving an overall intergranular fracture behavior. Phase transformations from the Fluorite to the Rutile and Scrutinyite phases were identified at the propagating crack tips. These new phases are metastable and they transformed back to the Fluorite phase at the wake of crack tips as the local stress concentration was relieved by complete cracking. Such transient behavior observed at atomistic scale was found to substantially increase the energy release rate for fracture. Insertion of Xe gas into the initial notch showed minor effect on the overall fracture behavior.

  16. Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Superalloys to Resist Environment-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720, ATI 718Plus alloy, Haynes 282, and Inconel 740. Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  17. Sodium sulphate crystallization influence on intergranular destruction of Thassos marble

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Ružička; Tatiana Durmeková; Miroslav Hain; Mária Čaplovičová; Ľubomír Bágeľ; Peter Bačík; Marián Putiš

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with sodium sulphate crystallization in pore spaces of Thassos marble and presents the 3D visualization of intergranular fractures causing a deterioration of the specimen by the salt crystallization. Cylindrical marble specimen with diameter 20 mm and length 50 mm has been submitted to 15 cycles of the dipping in 14 % solution of mirabilite (Na2SO4·10 H2O) according to the STN EN 12370 standard methodical test. Using electron methods (polarization microscopy, SEM – Scanning el...

  18. Paramagnetic Attraction of Impurity-Helium Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, E. P.; Boltnev, R. E.; Khmelenko, V. V.; Lee, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Impurity-helium solids are formed when a mixture of impurity and helium gases enters a volume of superfluid helium. Typical choices of impurity gas are hydrogen deuteride, deuterium, nitrogen, neon and argon, or a mixture of these. These solids consist of individual impurity atoms and molecules as well as clusters of impurity atoms and molecules covered with layers of solidified helium. The clusters have an imperfect crystalline structure and diameters ranging up to 90 angstroms, depending somewhat on the choice of impurity. Immediately following formation the clusters aggregate into loosely connected porous solids that are submerged in and completely permeated by the liquid helium. Im-He solids are extremely effective at stabilizing high concentrations of free radicals, which can be introduced by applying a high power RF dis- charge to the impurity gas mixture just before it strikes the super fluid helium. Average concentrations of 10(exp 19) nitrogen atoms/cc and 5 x 10(exp 18) deuterium atoms/cc can be achieved this way. It shows a typical sample formed from a mixture of atomic and molecular hydrogen and deuterium. It shows typical sample formed from atomic and molecular nitrogen. Much of the stability of Im-He solids is attributed to their very large surface area to volume ratio and their permeation by super fluid helium. Heat resulting from a chance meeting and recombination of free radicals is quickly dissipated by the super fluid helium instead of thermally promoting the diffusion of other nearby free radicals.

  19. Glycolic acid physical properties and impurities assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pickenheim, B. R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hay, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); BIBLER, N. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-09

    This document has been revised to add analytical data for fresh, 1 year old, and 4 year old glycolic acid as recommended in Revision 2 of this document. This was needed to understand the concentration of formaldehyde and methoxyacetic acid, impurities present in the glycolic acid used in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) experiments. Based on this information, the concentration of these impurities did not change during storage. These impurities were in the glycolic acid used in the testing included in this report and in subsequent testing using DuPont (now called Chemours) supplied Technical Grade 70 wt% glycolic acid. However, these impurities were not reported in the first two versions of this report. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is planning to implement a nitric-glycolic acid flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates during Sludge Batch 9. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends.

  20. Microstructural features of intergranular brittle fracture and cold cracking in high strength aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D. G.; ten Brink, Gert; Katgerman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Intergranular brittle fracture has been mainly observed and reported in steel alloys and precipitation hardened At-alloys where intergranular precipitates cover a major fraction of the grain boundary area. 7xxx series aluminum alloys suffer from this problem in the as-cast condition when brittle

  1. AC losses in sintered high-temperature superconductors. Dependence on frequency and intergranular lower critical field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lofland, S.; Huang, M.X.; Bhagat, S.M. (Dept. of Physics and Center for Superconductivity Research, Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States))

    1992-12-10

    The intergranular AC susceptibility loss peak in high-Tc superconductors is measured as a function of frequency and field amplitude. The variation of peak temperature with frequency is strongly influenced by the grain size. For large grains, the maximum loss increases with field amplitude. This is ascribed to a non-zero intergranular lower critical field H[sub cl]. (orig.).

  2. Micromechanics of intergranular creep failure under cyclic loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Giessen, Erik; Tvergaard, Viggo

    1996-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a micromechanical investigation of intergranular creep failure caused by grain boundary cavitation under strain-controlled cyclic loading conditions. Numerical unit cell analyses are carried out for a planar polycrystal model in which the grain material and the grain...... boundaries are modelled individually. The model incorporates power-law creep of the grains, viscous grain boundary sliding between grains as well as the nucleation and growth of grain boundary cavities until they coalesce and form microcracks. Study of a limiting case with a facet-size microcrack reveals...... a relatively simple phenomenology under either balanced loading, slow-fast loading or balanced loading with a hold period at constant tensile stress. Next, a (non-dimensionalized) parametric study is carried out which focusses on the effect of the diffusive cavity growth rate relative to the overall creep rate...

  3. Amorphous intergranular phases control the properties of rodent tooth enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lyle M.; Cohen, Michael J.; MacRenaris, Keith W.; Pasteris, Jill D.; Seda, Takele; Joester, Derk

    2015-02-01

    Dental enamel, a hierarchical material composed primarily of hydroxylapatite nanowires, is susceptible to degradation by plaque biofilm-derived acids. The solubility of enamel strongly depends on the presence of Mg2+, F-, and CO32-. However, determining the distribution of these minor ions is challenging. We show—using atom probe tomography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlative techniques—that in unpigmented rodent enamel, Mg2+ is predominantly present at grain boundaries as an intergranular phase of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP). In the pigmented enamel, a mixture of ferrihydrite and amorphous iron-calcium phosphate replaces the more soluble Mg-ACP, rendering it both harder and more resistant to acid attack. These results demonstrate the presence of enduring amorphous phases with a dramatic influence on the physical and chemical properties of the mature mineralized tissue.

  4. Numerical analysis of impurity separation from waste salt by investigating the change of concentration at the interface during zone refining process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ho-Gil; Shim, Moonsoo; Lee, Jong-Hyeon; Yi, Kyung-Woo

    2017-09-01

    The waste salt treatment process is required for the reuse of purified salts, and for the disposal of the fission products contained in waste salt during pyroprocessing. As an alternative to existing fission product separation methods, the horizontal zone refining process is used in this study for the purification of waste salt. In order to evaluate the purification ability of the process, three-dimensional simulation is conducted, considering heat transfer, melt flow, and mass transfer. Impurity distributions and decontamination factors are calculated as a function of the heater traverse rate, by applying a subroutine and the equilibrium segregation coefficient derived from the effective segregation coefficients. For multipass cases, 1d solutions and the effective segregation coefficient obtained from three-dimensional simulation are used. In the present study, the topic is not dealing with crystal growth, but the numerical technique used is nearly the same since the zone refining technique was just introduced in the treatment of waste salt from nuclear power industry because of its merit of simplicity and refining ability. So this study can show a new application of single crystal growth techniques to other fields, by taking advantage of the zone refining multipass possibility. The final goal is to achieve the same high degree of decontamination in the waste salt as in zone freezing (or reverse Bridgman) method.

  5. Iron recovery from pyrite cinder by flotation process to remove impurities in sulfide concentrates%硫精矿除杂提纯浮选工艺回收利用硫酸烧渣中的铁

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯国臣; 高金昌

    2015-01-01

    Pyrite cinder is the product of oxidizing roasting of pyrite ores. The technical index in iron recovery from pyrite cinder keeps low. The main reason for it is that fine ferric oxide particles produced in the oxidizing roasting process of pyrite ores will in high temperature interact with impurities and gangue minerals including mutual inclu-ding,sticking and polluting. The paper modifies conventional process of iron recovery from pyrite cinder,and turns to a sulfide concentrates flotation process to concentrate ferric sulfide,that is to increase the mass fraction of ferric sulfide in raw materials of pyrites,so that gangue minerals and impurities are removed from the raw materials,reaching a sul-fur grade over 50 % to 52 % and sulfur and iron grade of 90 % to 92 %. The high grade sulfur concentrates are used to made sulfuric acid. The iron in pyrite cinder reaches 63 % to 67 % making the entire cinder directly become iron concentrates without the need of further beneficiation,which is an effective way to utilize the iron in the cinder. The reason for higher technical index lies in the choice of sulfur flotation for impurity removal. High grade sulfur concen-trates making sulfuric acid avoids unwanted minerals hindering the oxidizing roasting of ferric sulfide and high content of impurities,low iron grade and low ore-dressing technical index in the process of iron recovery from pyrite cinder.%硫酸烧渣是硫铁矿制酸氧化焙烧产物;从硫酸烧渣中选铁的工艺技术指标一直不高,其主要原因是硫铁矿氧化焙烧过程中生成的氧化铁矿物颗粒微细,高温时新生成的氧化铁矿物颗粒会与杂质和脉石矿物颗粒相互包裹、相互黏结、相互污染. 该文将硫酸烧渣选铁改为硫精矿再浮选提纯硫化铁,即通过提纯硫酸原料中硫化铁的质量分数,从而去除原料中的脉石和杂质,使硫酸原料中硫品位达到50 % ~52 %(黄铁矿型原料)以上,硫、铁回收率均达到90 % ~92 %;

  6. Zeroth Order Phase Transition in a Holographic Superconductor with Single Impurity

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Hua Bi

    2014-01-01

    We studied the single normal impurity effect in superconductor by using the holographic method. When the size of impurity is much smaller compared to the host superconductor, we reproduced the Anderson theorem, which states that a conventional s-wave superconductor is robust to a normal (non-magnetic) impurity with small impurity strength or impurities with small concentration. While by increasing the size of impurity in a fixed host superconductor we also find a decrease $T_c$ of the host superconductor, the phase transition at the critical impurity strength is of zeroth order.

  7. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Volume 1: Characterization methods for impurities in silicon and impurity effects data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, R. H.; Davis, J. R.; Rohatgi, A.; Campbell, R. B.; Blais, P. D.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Stapleton, R. E.; Mollenkopf, H. C.; Mccormick, J. R.

    1980-01-01

    Two major topics are treated: methods to measure and evaluate impurity effects in silicon and comprehensive tabulations of data derived during the study. Discussions of deep level spectroscopy, detailed dark I-V measurements, recombination lifetime determination, scanned laser photo-response, conventional solar cell I-V techniques, and descriptions of silicon chemical analysis are presented and discussed. The tabulated data include lists of impurity segregation coefficients, ingot impurity analyses and estimated concentrations, typical deep level impurity spectra, photoconductive and open circuit decay lifetimes for individual metal-doped ingots, and a complete tabulation of the cell I-V characteristics of nearly 200 ingots.

  8. Study of the intergranular coupling of Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2-yMgyCu3O10-δ (y = 0, 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5) superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurram, A. A.; Khan, Nawazish A.

    2006-06-01

    The intergranular properties of Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2-yMgyCu3O10-δ superconductor have been studied by resistivity and AC magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnesium substitution has been found to improve the interplane coupling in the unit cell of Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2-yMgyCu3O10-δ, which in turn would enhance the intergranular coupling. The main objective of the present studies was to observe any possible role played by Mg doping in developing and enhancing the intergranular coupling and flux pinning properties of this compound. Any improvement to the intergrain coupling may be promoted by a change in the oxygen content in the final compound. Since the loss and/or intake of oxygen occurs at Ta>=350 °C, the post-annealing experiments were carried out at 500 °C for 3 h in air, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres. It was observed from these studies that the oxygen contents decreased in all the samples after post-annealing in air, nitrogen and oxygen atmospheres. The most prominent effects in terms of enhanced superconductivity in the intergranular regions are observed in Mg-doped samples after post-annealing in air. The Mg-doped samples have shown enhanced granular connectivity, since the intergranular coupling peak observed in χ'' in AC susceptibility measurements is shifted to higher temperatures with the increase of Mg concentration. The enhanced intergranular coupling and flux pinning in magnesium-substituted samples is also observed in AC susceptibility measurements in external magnetic fields. The enhancement of intergranular coupling increases the transport critical current density of the samples.

  9. Curie Temperature of the Intergranular Amorphous Phase in Nanocrystalline Fe89Zr7B4 Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The FeZrB amorphous alloys for simulating the intergranular amorphous phase in the nanocrystalline Fe89Zr7B4 soft magnetic materials were obtained by mechanical alloying of a mixture of elemental Fe, Zr and B powdersfor 25 h. It is shown that the Curie temperature of the simulated intergranular phase alloy is much lower than thatof the intergranular phase with the same chemical composition in the nanocrystalline Fe89Zr7B4 alloy. The possiblemechanism is mainly due to the strong ferromagnetic exchange force among the nanocrystalline α-Fe grains.

  10. Roles of bulk carbon content on grain size, carbide reactions and intergranular rupture life in 2.25cr martensitic heat resistant steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hyun Je; Heo, Nam Hoe; Kim, Sung-Joon

    2016-11-01

    The steel of a higher bulk carbon content shows the denser precipitation distribution of carbides after the solution treatment followed by tempering. Such a carbide distribution produces the smaller prior austenite grain size after the welding simulation at a high temperature. Because the equilibrium segregation concentration of phosphorus decreases with decreasing prior austenite grain size, the specimen of the higher bulk carbon content shows therefore the longer intergranular rupture life. The rupture life is also increased by the partitioning of phosphorus pre-segregated at prior austenite grain boundary/carbide interfaces onto the fresh surface of precipitates formed on the surface of pre-formed carbides. The intergranular rupture life is additionally increased by the repulsive segregation between carbon and phosphorus which decreases the overall phosphorus segregation concentration at the prior austenite grain boundaries.

  11. Homogenization of intergranular fracture towards a transient gradient damage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, G.; Poh, L. H.

    2016-10-01

    This paper focuses on the intergranular fracture of polycrystalline materials, where a detailed model at the meso-scale is translated onto the macro-level through a proposed homogenization theory. The bottom-up strategy involves the introduction of an additional macro-kinematic field to characterize the average displacement jump within the unit cell. Together with the standard macro-strain field, the underlying processes are propagated onto the macro-scale by imposing the equivalence of power and energy at the two scales. The set of macro-governing equations and constitutive relations are next extracted naturally as per standard thermodynamics procedure. The resulting homogenized microforce balance recovers the so-called 'implicit' gradient expression with a transient nonlocal interaction. The homogenized gradient damage model is shown to fully regularize the softening behavior, i.e. the structural response is made mesh-independent, with the damage strain correctly localizing into a macroscopic crack, hence resolving the spurious damage growth observed in many conventional gradient damage models. Furthermore, the predictive capability of the homogenized model is demonstrated by benchmarking its solutions against reference meso-solutions, where a good match is obtained with minimal calibrations, for two different grain sizes.

  12. Electromigration of intergranular voids in metal films for microelectronic interconnects

    CERN Document Server

    Averbuch, A; Ravve, I

    2003-01-01

    Voids and cracks often occur in the interconnect lines of microelectronic devices. They increase the resistance of the circuits and may even lead to a fatal failure. Voids may occur inside a single grain, but often they appear on the boundary between two grains. In this work, we model and analyze numerically the migration and evolution of an intergranular void subjected to surface diffusion forces and external voltage applied to the interconnect. The grain-void interface is considered one-dimensional, and the physical formulation of the electromigration and diffusion model results in two coupled fourth-order one-dimensional time-dependent PDEs. The boundary conditions are specified at the triple points, which are common to both neighboring grains and the void. The solution of these equations uses a finite difference scheme in space and a Runge-Kutta integration scheme in time, and is also coupled to the solution of a static Laplace equation describing the voltage distribution throughout the grain. Since the v...

  13. Evaluation of stainless steels for their resistance to intergranular corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korostelev, A. B.; Abramov, V. Ya.; Belous, V. N.

    1996-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are being considered as structural materials for first wall/blanket systems in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER). The uniform corrosion of stainless steels in water is well known and is not a critical issue limiting its application for the ITER design. The sensitivity of austenitic steels to intergranular corrosion (IGC) can be estimated rather accurately by means of calculation methods, considering structure and chemical composition of steel. There is a maximum permissible carbon content level, at which sensitization of stainless steel is eliminated: K = Cr eff - αC eff, where α-thermodynamic coefficient, Cr eff-effective chromium content (regarding molybdenum influence) and C eff-effective carbon content (taking into account nickel and stabilizing elements). Corrosion tests for 16Cr11Ni3MoTi, 316L and 316LN steel specimens, irradiated up to 2 × 10 22 n/cm 2 fluence have proved the effectiveness of this calculation technique for determination of austenitic steels tendency to IGC. This method is directly applicable in austenitic stainless steel production and enables one to exclude complicated experiments on determination of stainless steel susceptibility to IGC.

  14. Evaluation of stainless steels for their resistance to intergranular corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korostelev, A.B. [Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Abramov, V.Ya. [Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation); Belous, V.N. [Research and Development Inst. of Power Engineering, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are being considered as structural materials for first wall/blanket systems in the international thermonuclear reactor (ITER). The uniform corrosion of stainless steels in water is well known and is not a critical issue limiting its application for the ITER design. The sensitivity of austenitic steels to intergranular corrosion (IGC) can be estimated rather accurately by means of calculation methods, considering structure and chemical composition of steel. There is a maximum permissible carbon content level, at which sensitization of stainless steel is eliminated: K=Cr{sub eff}-{alpha}C{sub eff}, where {alpha}-thermodynamic coefficient, Cr{sub eff}-effective chromium content (regarding molybdenum influence) and C{sub eff}-effective carbon content (taking into account nickel and stabilizing elements). Corrosion tests for 16Cr11Ni3MoTi, 316L and 316LN steel specimens, irradiated up to 2 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} fluence have proved the effectiveness of this calculation technique for determination of austenitic steels tendency to IGC. This method is directly applicable in austenitic stainless steel production and enables one to exclude complicated experiments on determination of stainless steel susceptibility to IGC. (orig.).

  15. Fractal growth in impurity-controlled solidification in lipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogedby, Hans C.; Sørensen, Erik Schwartz; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1987-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional microscopic model is proposed to describe solidifcation processes in systems with impurities which are miscible only in the fluid phase. Computer simulation of the model shows that the resulting solids are fractal over a wide range of impurity concentrations and impurity...... diffusional constants. A fractal-forming mechanism is suggested for impurity-controlled solidification which is consistent with recent experimental observations of fractal growth of solid phospholipid domains in monolayers. The Journal of Chemical Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute of Physics....

  16. Impurity binding energy for -doped quantum well structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Tulupenko; C A Duque; R Demediuk; O Fomina; V Akimov; V Belykh; T Dmitrichenko; V Poroshin

    2014-10-01

    The binding energy of an impurity delta layer situated either in the centre or at the edge of a quantum well (QW) is theoretically considered for the example of -type Si0.8Ge0.2/Si/Si0.8Ge0.2 QW doped with phosphorus. Calculations are made for the case of not so big impurity concentrations, when impurity bands are not yet formed and it is still possible to treat impurity as isolated ones. It is shown on the base of self-consistent solution of Schrödinger, Poisson and electro-neutrality equations that impurity binding energy is dependent on the degree of impurity ionization and the most noticeably for the case of edge-doped QWs.

  17. Issues of intergranular embrittlement of VVER-type nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabusov, O.

    2016-04-01

    In light of worldwide tendency to extension of service life of operating nuclear power plants - VVER-type in the first place - recently a special attention is concentrated on phenomena taking place in reactor pressure vessel materials that are able to lead to increased level of mechanical characteristics degradation (resistibility to brittle fracture) during long term of operation. Formerly the hardening mechanism of degradation (increase in the yield strength under influence of irradiation) mainly had been taken into consideration to assess pressure vessel service life limitations, but when extending the service life up to 60 years and more the non-hardening mechanism (intergranular embrittlement of the steels) must be taken into account as well. In this connection NRC “Kurchatov Institute” has initiated a number of works on investigations of this mechanism contribution to the total embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels. The main results of these investigations are described in this article. Results of grain boundary phosphorus concentration measurements in specimens made of first generation of VVER-type pressure vessels materials as well as VVER-1000 surveillance specimens are presented. An assessment of non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total ductile-to- brittle transition temperature shift is given.

  18. Effects of impurities on growth habit of KDP crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The effects of metaphosphate, boric acid and quaternary ammonium cations with different concentration on the growth habit of KDP crystal are reported. The results are analyzed and discussed, which show that the effects of different impurities on the growth habit of KDP are not the same. It is due to the different adsorption mechanism of the impurities.

  19. Ultrasonic inspection reliability for intergranular stress corrosion cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, P G; Taylor, T T; Spanner, J C; Doctor, S R; Deffenbaugh, J D [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)

    1990-07-01

    A pipe inspection round robin entitled Mini-Round Robin'' was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory from May 1985 through October 1985. The research was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research under a program entitled Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors.'' The Mini-Round Robin (MRR) measured the intergranular stress corrosion (GSC) crack detection and sizing capabilities of inservice inspection (ISI) inspectors that had passed the requirements of IEB 83-02 and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) sizing training course. The MRR data base was compared with an earlier Pipe Inspection Round Robin (PIRR) that had measured the performance of inservice inspection prior to 1982. Comparison of the MRR and PIRR data bases indicates no significant change in the inspection capability for detecting IGSCC. Also, when comparing detection of long and short cracks, no difference in detection capability was measured. An improvement in the ability to differentiate between shallow and deeper IGSCC was found when the MRR sizing capability was compared with an earlier sizing round robin conducted by the EPRI. In addition to the pipe inspection round robin, a human factors study was conducted in conjunction with the Mini-Round Robin. The most important result of the human factors study is that the Relative Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves provide a better methodology for describing inspector performance than only probability of detection (POD) or single-point crack/no crack data. 6 refs., 55 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Diffusion-controlled intergranular penetration and embrittlement of copper by liquid bismuth between 300 and 600 Celsius degrees; Penetration intergranulaire fragilisante du cuivre par le bismuth liquide: identification de la cinetique et du mecanisme de type diffusionnel entre 300 et 600 deg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporte, V

    2005-02-15

    Hybrid reactors are a new concept for energy production and nuclear waste treatment. Among other requirements, structural materials have to withstand liquid metal embrittlement. This thesis aimed therefore to identify the controlling mechanism for the intergranular embrittlement of copper in contact with liquid bismuth. Scanning electron microscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy have been used to analyze fracture surfaces of both copper polycrystals and a copper bicrystal (symmetric tilt boundary 50 degrees <100>). These analyses reveal both parabolic intergranular penetration kinetics and a maximal intergranular bismuth concentration that is less than two monolayers equivalent. These two results allow us to identify grain boundary diffusion as the controlling mechanism for the intergranular penetration of copper by liquid bismuth between 300 and 600 Celsius degrees, showing the absence of perfect grain boundary wetting. (author)

  1. Impurity solitons with quadratic nonlinearities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Carl A. Balslev; Torres, Juan P-; Torner, Lluis

    1998-01-01

    We fmd families of solitary waves mediated by parametric mixing in quadratic nonlinear media that are localized at point-defect impurities. Solitons localized at attractive impurities are found to be dynamically stable. It is shown that localization at the impurity modifies strongly the soliton p...

  2. Use of Slow Strain Rate Tensile Testing to Assess the Ability of Several Superalloys to Resist Environmentally-Assisted Intergranular Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabb, Timothy P.; Telesman, Jack; Banik, Anthony; McDevitt, Erin

    2014-01-01

    Intergranular fatigue crack initiation and growth due to environmental degradation, especially at notched features, can often limit the fatigue life of disk superalloys at high temperatures. For clear comparisons, the effects of alloy composition on cracking in air needs to be understood and compared separately from variables associated with notches and cracks such as effective stress concentration, plastic flow, stress relaxation, and stress redistribution. The objective of this study was to attempt using simple tensile tests of specimens with uniform gage sections to compare the effects of varied alloy composition on environment-assisted cracking of several powder metal and cast and wrought superalloys including ME3, LSHR, Udimet 720(TradeMark) ATI 718Plus(Registered TradeMark) alloy, Haynes 282(Trademark), and Inconel 740(TradeMark) Slow and fast strain-rate tensile tests were found to be a useful tool to compare propensities for intergranular surface crack initiation and growth. The effects of composition and heat treatment on tensile fracture strain and associated failure modes were compared. Environment interactions were determined to often limit ductility, by promoting intergranular surface cracking. The response of various superalloys and heat treatments to slow strain rate tensile testing varied substantially, showing that composition and microstructure can significantly influence environmental resistance to cracking.

  3. Device for sampling and enriching impurities in hydrogen comprising hydrogen-permeable membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Papadias, Dionissios D.; Lee, Sheldon D. H.; Kumar, Romesh

    2017-01-31

    Provided herein are methods and devices to enrich trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentration of impurities so as to allow the detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

  4. Mechanical and chemical behavior of intergranular fluids in nonhydrostatically stressed rocks at low temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘亮明; 彭省临

    2001-01-01

    Intergranular fluids within the nonhydrostatically stressed solids are a sort of important fluids in the crust. Research on the mechanical and chemical behavior of the intergranular fluids in nonhydrostatically stressed rocks at low temperature is a key for understanding deformation and syntectonic geochemical processes in mid to shallow crust. Theoretically, it is suggested that the fluid film sandwiched between solid grains is one of the main states of intergranular fluids in the nonhydrostatically stressed solids. Their superthin thickness makes the fluid films have the mechanical and chemical behavior very different from the common fluids. Because of hydration force, double-layer repulsive force or osmotic pressure due to double-layer, the fluid films can transmit nonhydrostatic stress. The solid minerals-intergranular fluids interaction and mass transfer by intergranular fluids is stress-related, because the stress in solid minerals can enhance the free energy of solid matter on the interfaces. The thermodynamic and kinetic equations for the simple case of stress induced processes are derived.

  5. Microstructure and temperature dependence of intergranular strains on diffractometric macroscopic residual stress analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.N., E-mail: Julia.Wagner@kit.edu [KNMF, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Hofmann, M. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), TU München, Lichtenbergstr. 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Wimpory, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie, D-14109 Berlin Wannsee (Germany); Krempaszky, C. [Christian-Doppler-Labor für Werkstoffmechanik von Hochleistungslegierungen, TU München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85747 Garching (Germany); Lehrstuhl für Werkstoffkunde und Werkstoffmechanik, TU München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85747 Garching (Germany); Stockinger, M. [Böhler Schmiedetechnik GmbH and Co KG, Mariazeller Straße 25, 8605 Kapfenberg (Austria)

    2014-11-17

    Knowledge of the macroscopic residual stresses in components of complex high performance alloys is crucial when it comes to considering the safety and manufacturing aspects of components. Diffraction experiments are one of the key methods for studying residual stresses. However a component of the residual strain determined by diffraction experiments, known as microstrain or intergranular residual strain, occurs over the length scale of the grains and thus plays only a minor role for the life time of such components. For the reliable determination of macroscopic strains (with the minimum influence of these intergranular residual strains), the ISO standard recommends the use of particular Bragg reflections. Here we compare the build-up of intergranular strain of two different precipitation hardened IN 718 (INCONEL 718) samples, with identical chemical composition. Since intergranular strains are also affected by temperature, results from room temperature measurement are compared to results at T=550 °C. It turned out that microstructural parameters, such as grain size or type of precipitates, have a larger effect on the intergranular strain evolution than the influence of temperature at the measurement temperature of T=550 °C. The results also show that the choice of Bragg reflections for the diffractometric residual stress analysis is dependent not only on its chemical composition, but also on the microstructure of the sample. In addition diffraction elastic constants (DECs) for all measured Bragg reflections are given.

  6. THE IMPURITY OF SCIENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvin, Melvin

    1962-04-19

    Science is impure in two ways. There is not a 'pure' science. By this I mean that physics impinges on astronomy, on the one hand, and chemistry on biology on the other. And not only does each support its neighbors but derives sustenance from them. The same can be said of chemistry. Biology is, perhaps, the example par excellence today of an 'impure' science. Beyond this, there is no 'pure' science itself divorced from human values. The importance of science to the humanities and the humanities to science in their complementary contribution to the variety of human life grows daily. The need for men familiar with both is imperative. We are faced today with a social decision resulting from our progress in molecular genetics at least equal to, and probably greater than, that required of us twenty years ago with the maturity of nuclear power.

  7. Ab initio study of H, He, Li and Be impurity effect in tungsten Σ3{1 1 2} and Σ27{5 5 2} grain boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Kurtz, Richard J

    2014-04-02

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to investigate the effect of H, He, Li and Be impurities on the intergranular cohesion of W Σ3〈1 1 0〉{1 1 2} and Σ27〈1 1 0〉{5 5 2} grain boundaries (GBs). A rigorous search of unique interstices was performed to reveal a range of impurity behaviors. It was found that He exhibits the largest defect formation energy, however it is Li that shows the strongest tendency to segregate towards the GBs. The embrittling potency was studied using the ideal GB fracture energy (Rice-Wang) criterion (Rice and Wang 1989 Mater. Sci. Eng. A 107 23). The potency was found to depend significantly on the local atomic environment. A site-dependent concentration was used as the weighing factor to obtain an average potency as a function of temperature. It was found that the potency depends only weakly on temperature. In Σ3 H, He, Li and Be decrease fracture energy by 4%, 27%, 30% and 14%, respectively. In Σ27 H, He and Li also decrease cohesion, albeit less severely: 3%, 14% and 7%. On the other hand, Be increases cohesion in Σ27 by 3%.

  8. Microstructure and intergranular corrosion resistance of UNS S17400 (17-4PH) stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, S.S.M., E-mail: ssmtavares@terra.com.b [Universidade Federal Fluminense - Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica (PGMEC), Rua Passo da Patria, 156 - CEP 24210-240 - Niteroi/RJ (Brazil); Silva, F.J. da; Scandian, C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo - Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica - Av. Fernando Ferrrari, 514 - CEP 29075-910 - Vitoria/ES (Brazil); Silva, G.F. da [Universidade Federal Fluminense - Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica (PGMEC), Rua Passo da Patria, 156 - CEP 24210-240 - Niteroi/RJ (Brazil); Abreu, H.F.G. de [Universidade Federal do Ceara - Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais - Campus do Pici, Bloco 702 - CEP 60455-760 - Fortaleza/CE (Brazil)

    2010-11-15

    UNS S17400 or 17-4PH is a precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel with many industrial applications. Quite different mechanical properties can be produced in this material by varying the aging temperature. In this work, the influence of aging temperature on the intergranular corrosion susceptibility was evaluated by electrochemical and metallographic tests. The microstructural features were investigated by X-ray diffraction, optical and scanning electron microscopy. Intergranular chromium carbide precipitation occurs in specimens aged at high temperatures, although NbC carbides were also observed. The results obtained by double loop electrochemical potentiodynamic reactivation tests (DL-EPR) show that the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion resistance increases with the increase of aging temperature. Healing due to Cr diffusion in the 600-650 {sup o}C range was not observed by DL-EPR tests.

  9. Sanidine holocrystalline ejecta from central Sabatini Volcanic District, Latium (Italy). II. Intergranular ejecta and minerogenetic deductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capitanio, F.; Mottana, A.

    1998-12-31

    The Sanidine holocrystalline ejecta with intergranular texture from the central Sabatini Volcanic District contain high-T feldspars, out-of-equilibrium K- and Na- Ca-feldspar, and two pyroxene generations formed at different depths, as well as many mineral phases which indicate high f (H{sub 2}O) and/or f(O{sub 2}). A simple evolution model by fractional crystallization, in a plutonic or hypoabissal domain, has been derived from the mineralogical assemblages present in both the isotropic and intergranular type of ejecta. The intergranular type, the crystallization of which began at deeper levels than the isotropic one, underwent multiple pyroxene-liquidus re-equilibration during a quick magma ascent to shallower levels.

  10. Effect of intergranular interactions on thermal energy barrier distribution in perpendicular media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Bertram, H. Neal; Schabes, Manfred E.

    2002-05-01

    Micromagnetic simulations have been performed to simulate dynamic hysteresis loops in perpendicular media. Thermal energy barrier distributions have been calculated. For a fixed percentage of magnetization switched, a linear variation between the scaled applied field Ha(t)/HK and ln(f0t)1/2 is found. Without including intergranular magnetostatic interactions, intergranular exchange coupling reduces the thermal energy barrier distribution width, compared to the physical volume distribution width. However, the magnetostatic interactions increase the energy barrier width substantially. The increase is significantly reduced at smaller magnetostatic interactions. For the effective volume of 50% magnetization switched (V50), the results show V50=√ almost independent of intergranular magnetostatic and exchange interactions.

  11. Spectroscopic Analysis of Impurity Precipitates in CdS Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, J. D.; Keane, J.; Ribelin, R.; Gedvilas, L.; Swartzlander, A.; Ramanathan, K.; Albin, D. S.; Noufi, R.

    1999-10-31

    Impurities in cadmium sulfide (CdS) films are a concern in the fabrication of copper (indium, gallium) diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic devices. Devices incorporating chemical-bath-deposited (CBD) CdS are comparable in quality to devices incorporating purer CdS films grown using vacuum deposition techniques, despite the higher impurity concentrations typically observed in the CBD CdS films. In this paper, we summarize and review the results of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Auger, electron microprobe, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) analyses of the impurities in CBD CdS films. We show that these impurities differ as a function of substrate type and film deposition conditions. We also show that some of these impurities exist as 10{sup 2} micron-scale precipitates.

  12. Thresholds of time dependent intergranular crack growth in a nickel disc alloy Alloy 720Li

    OpenAIRE

    Li Hangyue; Fisk Joe; Lim Lik-Beng; Williams Steve; Bowen Paul

    2014-01-01

    At high temperatures in air, introducing a dwell period at the peak stress of fatigue cycles promotes time dependent intergranular crack growth which can increase crack growth rates by upto a few orders of magnitude from the rates of transgranular fatigue crack growth in superalloys. It is expected that time dependent intergranular crack growth in nickel-based superalloys may not occur below a critical mechanical driving force, ΔKth−IG, analogous to a fatigue threshold (ΔKth) and a critical t...

  13. Impurity sources in TEXTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospieszczyk, A.; Bay, H. L.; Bogen, P.; Hartwig, H.; Hintz, E.; Konen, L.; Ross, G. G.; Rusbuldt, D.; Samm, U.; Schweer, B.

    1987-02-01

    The deuterium, oxygen and carbon fluxes from the main limiter and the deuterium fluxes from the wall are measured in TEXTOR for an "all carbon" surrounding as a function of central density ne, of applied ICRH-power and of different wall conditions (carbonization). For this purpose, emission spectroscopy both with filter systems and spectrometers has been used. It is found that a major release mechanism for light impurities is via the formation of molecules. Oxygen seems to enter the discharge from the liner via O-D containing molecules, whereas the limiter acts as the main carbon source by the release of hydro-carbons as indicated by the observed CD-band spectra. Both oxygen and carbon fluxes are reduced by about a factor of two after a fresh carbonization. Above a certain critical density the plasma detaches from the limiter and forms a stable discharge with a radiation cooled boundary layer and with a major fraction of particles now reaching the wall instead of the limiter. The critical density rises with decreasing impurity fluxes or with increasing heating powers.

  14. Density of states in a two-dimensional electron gas: Impurity bands and band tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A.; Serre, J.; Ghazali, A.

    1988-03-01

    We calculate the density of states of a two-dimensional electron gas in the presence of charged impurities within Klauder's best multiple-scattering approach. The silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) system with impurities at the interface is studied in detail. The finite extension of the electron wave function into the bulk is included as well as various dependences of the density of states on the electron, the depletion, and the impurity densities. The transition from an impurity band at low impurity concentration to a band tail at high impurity concentration is found to take place at a certain impurity concentration. If the screening parameter of the electron gas is decreased, the impurity band shifts to lower energy. For low impurity density we find excited impurity bands. Our theory at least qualitatively explains conductivity and infrared-absorption experiments on impurity bands in sodium-doped MOS systems and deep band tails in the gap observed for high doping levels in these systems.

  15. Acetylated Lysozyme as Impurity in Lysozyme Crystals: Constant Distribution Coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, B. R.; Chernov, A. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) was acetylated to modify molecular charge keeping the molecular size and weight nearly constant. Two derivatives, A and B, more and less acetylated, respectively, were obtained, separated, purified and added to the solution from which crystals of tetragonal HEWL crystals were grown. Amounts of the A or B impurities added were 0.76, 0.38 and 0.1 milligram per millimeter while HEWL concentration were 20, 30 and 40 milligram per milliliter. The crystals grown in 18 experiments for each impurity were dissolved and quantities of A or B additives in these crystals were analyzed by cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography. All the data for each set of 18 samples with the different impurity and regular HEWL concentrations is well described by one distribution coefficient K = 2.15 plus or minus 0.13 for A and K = 3.42 plus or minus 0.25 for B. The observed independence of the distribution coefficient on both the impurity concentration and supersaturation is explained by the dilution model described in this paper. It shows that impurity adsorption and incorporation rate is proportional to the impurity concentration and that the growth rate is proportional to the crystallizing protein in solution. With the kinetic coefficient for crystallization, beta = 5.10(exp -7) centimeters per second, the frequency at which an impurity molecule near the growing interface irreversibly joins a molecular site on the crystal was found to be 3 1 per second, much higher than the average frequency for crystal molecules. For best quality protein crystals it is better to have low microheterogeneous protein impurity concentration and high supers aturation.

  16. Intergranular pressure solution in halite aggregates and quartz sands : an experimental investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutjens, P.M.T.M.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis reports an experimental investigation into intergranular pressure solution (IPS) as a compaction mechanism in wet (i.e. brine-saturated) halite aggregates and wet quartz sands. The aims were to determine the compaction behaviour under conditions favouring IPS, to clarify the underlying m

  17. Research progress in non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation and intergranular embrittlement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This paper is a summary of the research progress made by the author in the study of non-equilibrium grain-boundary segregation and intergranular embrittlement during the last 20 years. Some new concepts and new models in this research field are proposed, and their scientific backgrounds are introduced.

  18. STUDY OF PARTICLE COATINGS FOR THE DESIGN OF INTERGRANULAR PHASES IN ENGINEERING CERAMICS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DJURICIC, B; DAVIES, IJ; PICKERING, S; MCGARRY, D; BULLOCK, E

    1995-01-01

    The deposition of nano-dimension coatings of Y2O3 and/or Y2O3/Al2O3 precursor material onto Si3N4 and SiC particles provides a methodology far the uniform dispersion of sintering aid and the compositional tailoring of intergranular phases in engineering ceramics. Coatings were precipitated from aque

  19. Grain boundary network control and its effect on intergranular corrosion resistance of Alloy 690

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuang Xia; Hui Li; Chang Liang Hu; Ting Guang Lui; Bang Xin Zhou; Wen Jue Chen [Institute of Materials, Shanghai University, P.O. Box 269, 149 Yanchang Road (China)

    2011-07-01

    Grain boundary engineering was carried out in Alloy 690 tube sample and its effect on the intergranular corrosion resistance was investigated. Through small amount of deformation by cold drawing and short time annealing at high temperature, the proportion of low {Sigma} coincidence site lattice (CSL) grain boundaries of the Alloy 690 tube sample can be enhanced to about 75% which mainly were of {Sigma}3{sup n} (n = 1, 2, 3...) type. In this case, the grain boundary network (GBN) was featured by the formation of large grain-clusters produced by multiple twinning during recrystallization. All of the grains inside this kind of cluster had {Sigma}3{sup n} mutual mis-orientations, and hence all the boundaries inside the cluster were of {Sigma}3{sup n} type and form many interconnected {Sigma}3{sup n} type triple junctions. The weight losses due to grain dropping during intergranular corrosion for the samples with the modified GBN were much less than that with conventional microstructure. Based on the characterization by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique, it was shown that the large grain-cluster microstructure played a key role in enhancing the intergranular corrosion resistance: 1) the large grain-cluster can arrest the penetration of intergranular corrosion; 2) the large grain-cluster can protect the under layer microstructure. (authors)

  20. Negative compressibility observed in graphene containing resonant impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, X. L.; Wang, L.; Li, W.; Wang, Y.; He, Y. H.; Wu, Z. F.; Han, Y.; Zhang, M. W.; Xiong, W.; Wang, N. [Department of Physics and The William Mong Institute of Nano Science and Technology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2013-05-20

    We observed negative compressibility in monolayer graphene containing resonant impurities under different magnetic fields. Hydrogenous impurities were introduced into graphene by electron beam (e-beam) irradiation. Resonant states located in the energy region of {+-}0.04 eV around the charge neutrality point were probed in e-beam-irradiated graphene capacitors. Theoretical results based on tight-binding and Lifshitz models agreed well with experimental observations of graphene containing a low concentration of resonant impurities. The interaction between resonant states and Landau levels was detected by varying the applied magnetic field. The interaction mechanisms and enhancement of the negative compressibility in disordered graphene are discussed.

  1. Magnetic impurity transition in a (d + s)-wave superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, L.S. [Quantum Physics Division, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2010-03-15

    We consider the superconducting state of d + s symmetry with finite concentration of Anderson impurities in the limit {delta}{sub s} /{delta}{sub d} << 1. The model consists of a BCS-like term in the Hamiltonian and the Anderson impurity treated in the self-consistent large-N mean field approximation. Increasing impurity concentration or lowering the ratio {delta}{sub s} /{delta}{sub d} drives the system through a transition from a state with two sharp peaks at low energies and exponentially small density of states at the Fermi level to one with N(0) {approx_equal}({delta}{sub s} /{delta}{sub d}){sup 2}. This transition is discontinuous if the energy of the impurity resonance is the smallest energy scale in the problem. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. The effect of magnetic impurity scattering in Au films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The magnetic impurity scattering plays an important role in the phase coherence behavior of thin films.By using the thickness and disorder dependences of the low temperature logarithmic anomaly in resistivity we are able to determine the concentration of magnetic impurities in Au films and demonstrate that the low temperature saturation or plateau in phase decoherence time is closely related with the Kondo effect.

  3. Density of states of s+d-wave superconductor with Anderson impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borkowski, L S, E-mail: lsb@man.poznan.p [Quantum Physics Division, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznan (Poland)

    2009-03-01

    We present results for the density of states of a s+d-wave superconductor containing finite concentration of Anderson impurities within the self-consistent slave boson approximation. There may be zero, one or two peaks in the energy gap at low energies. The height of the peaks is controlled by the impurity concentration whereas their position depends on the strength of interaction between impurities and the conduction band. Experimental consequences are briefly discussed.

  4. Some aspects regarding impurities profile in fipronil-HPLC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Csuma,

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a substance as active pharmaceutical ingredient in veterinary drug formulation requires the characterization of this substance as content in active compound and so in terms of impurities possiblepresent in it, the latter being a mandatory requirement for a drug application. Fipronil is a synthetic product belonging to pesticide class used in veterinary practice to manufacture of some products against fleas, given spot–on or in form of spray, in cats and dogs. The main impurities in fipronil include process related impuritiesand degradation products as a result of exposure to environmental conditions: reduction, oxidation, photolysis and hydrolysis. A HPLC method suitable for analytical separation of fipronil from its impurities was established. Separation was achieved on a reversed phase column using a mixture of methanol, acetonitrile and water as mobile phase. In the chosen chromatographic conditions the resolution between fipronil and its sulphone (the main impurity was > 3 and the tailing factor (T < 2.0. Related impurities have absorbed in thesame band of UV wavelength as the main compound fipronil. Comparing the area of impurities obtained for sample solution with the area of the main peak in diluted standard solution allowed the detection of impurities at concentration < 0.1 %. Chromatographic separation on the same analytical column and detection at 280 nm was validated for assay of the content of active substance in fipronil used as ingredient in drug formulations.

  5. Susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of welded joints of Super 13Cr stainless steels; Suscetibilidade a corrosao intergranular de juntas soldadas de acos inoxidaveis Super 13Cr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovere, C.A.D.; Ribeiro, C.R.; Kuri, S.E. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais], e-mail: dellarovere@superig.com.br

    2006-07-01

    The susceptibility to intergranular corrosion was evaluated in distinct regions of radial friction welded joints of super 13 Cr martensitic stainless steel, using the electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation test in the double loop version (DL-EPR). The thermal cycle and the plastic deformation associated to radial friction process alter significantly the microstructure of heat affected zone and thermo-mechanically affected zone, fact that causes a low value in the I{sub r}/I{sub a} ratio of these regions in comparison to the quenching and tempering condition of the base metal. (author)

  6. The effects of oxygen concentration, stress, temperature, and cold work on the constant-load stress-rupture behavior of INCOLOY alloy 908

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morra, M.M.; Steeves, M.M.; Ballinger, R.G. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Constant load stress rupture tests were performed on INCOLOY{reg_sign} alloy 908*. The test matrix varied O{sub 2} concentration, applied load, temperature, and percent cold work. The mechanism for high temperature intergranular fracture in alloy 908 is stress assisted intergranular oxidation cracking. A direct correlation between percent intergranular fracture and O{sub 2} concentration exists. This result is comparable to the oxidation assisted, intergranular fracture behavior of alloy 718. The depth of intergranular oxidation is controlled by both the O{sub 2} concentration and the Cr concentration in the alloy. A transition from intergranular to external oxidation in alloy 908 occurs when the concentration of O{sub 2} is below 0.1 ppm. An oxygen concentration threshold based on zero percent intergranular fracture is a better indicator of the potential for intergranular fracture during heat treatment than one based on time to rupture. An O{sub 2} concentration below 0.1 ppm is recommended for heat treatment of alloy 908 in the presence of residual or applied tensile stresses.

  7. Impurities that cause difficulty in stripping actinides from commercial tetraalkylcarbamoylmethylphosphonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahner, C. T.; Shoun, R. R.; McDowell, W. J.

    1977-09-01

    Dihexyl((diethylcarbamoyl)methyl)phosphonate (DHDECMP) in diethylbenzene extracts actinides well from 6 M nitric acid solution, but commercially available DHDECMP contains impurities which interfere with stripping the actinides from the organic extract. DHDECMP purified by molecular distillation does not contain these impurities, but the pot residue contains increased concentrations of them. Heating the purified DHDECMP causes the formation of products which interfere with stripping in the same way, suggesting that high temperatures employed in the manufacture of DHDECMP may produce the offending impurities. These impurities can be separated from the heat-decomposed material or the pot residues by dilution with a large volume of hexanes (causing part of the impurities to separate as a second liquid phase) followed by equilibration of the hexane solution with dilute alkali. After the treatment with hexane and dilute alkali, the DHDECMP is readily recovered and functions well in the actinide extraction process. Dibutyl((dibutylcarbamoyl)methyl)-phosphonate (DBDBCMP) and di(2-ethylhexyl)((diethylcarbamoyl)-methyl)phosphonate (DEHDECMP) are purified less effectively by these methods. Similar separation methods using diethylbenzene or CCl/sub 4/ as solvent do not remove impurities as completely as the hexane process. Impurities can also be removed from a benzene solution of the DHDECMP pot residue by passing it through a column packed with silica gel or diethylaminoethyl cellulose. These impurities have been separated into fractions for analytical examination by use of various solvents and by column chromatography. Hexyl hydrogen ((diethylcarbamoyl)methyl)-phosphonate has been identified tentatively as a principal objectionable impurity. Dihexyl phosphoric acid and possibly dihexylphosphonate have been identified in other fractions.

  8. Effects of the equilibrium model on impurity transport in tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Skyman, Andreas; Tegnered, Daniel; Nordman, Hans; Anderson, Johan; Strand, Pär

    2014-01-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations of ion temperature gradient mode and trapped electron mode driven impurity transport in a realistic tokamak geometry are presented and compared with results using simplified geometries. The gyrokinetic results, obtained with the GENE code in both linear and non-linear modes are compared with data and analysis for a dedicated impurity injection discharge at JET. The impact of several factors on heat and particle transport is discussed, lending special focus to tokamak geometry and rotational shear. To this end, results using s-alpha and concentric circular equilibria are compared with results with magnetic geometry from a JET experiment. To further approach experimental conditions, non-linear gyrokinetic simulations are performed with collisions and a carbon background included. The impurity peaking factors, computed by finding local density gradients corresponding to zero particle flux, are discussed. The impurity peaking factors are seen to be reduced by a factor of ~2 in realistic ge...

  9. Multi-scale modeling of inter-granular fracture in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, S. Bulent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued in this work to investigate the influence of porosity, pore and grain size on the intergranular brittle fracture in UO2. In this approach, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain the fracture properties for different grain boundary types. A phase-field model is then utilized to perform intergranular fracture simulations of representative microstructures with different porosities, pore and grain sizes. In these simulations the grain boundary fracture properties obtained from molecular dynamics simulations are used. The responses from the phase-field fracture simulations are then fitted with a stress-based brittle fracture model usable at the engineering scale. This approach encapsulates three different length and time scales, and allows the development of microstructurally informed engineering scale model from properties evaluated at the atomistic scale.

  10. A Visual Basic program for analyzing oedometer test results and evaluating intergranular void ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monkul, M. Murat; Önal, Okan

    2006-06-01

    A visual basic program (POCI) is proposed and explained in order to analyze oedometer test results. Oedometer test results have vital importance from geotechnical point of view, since settlement requirements usually control the design of foundations. The software POCI is developed in order perform the necessary calculations for convential oedometer test. The change of global void ratio and stress-strain characteristics can be observed both numerically and graphically. It enables the users to calculate some parameters such as coefficient of consolidation, compression index, recompression index, and preconsolidation pressure depending on the type and stress history of the soil. Moreover, it adopts the concept of intergranular void ratio which may be important especially in the compression behavior of sandy soils. POCI shows the variation of intergranular void ratio and also enables the users to calculate granular compression index.

  11. Aqueous sodium chloride induced intergranular corrosion of Al-Li-Cu alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, P. P.; Daeschner, D. L.

    1986-01-01

    Two methods have been explored to assess the susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu alloys to intergranular corrosion in aqueous sodium chloride solution. They are: (1) constant extension rate testing with and without alternate-immersion preexposure and (2) metallographic examination after exposure to a NaCl-H2O2 corrosive solution per Mil-H-6088F. Intergranular corrosion was found to occur in both powder and ingot metallurgy alloys of similar composition, using both methods. Underaging rendered the alloys most susceptible. The results correlate to stress-corrosion data generated in conventional time-to-failure and crack growth-rate tests. Alternate-immersion preexposure may be a reliable means to assess stress corrosion susceptibility of Al-Li-Cu alloys.

  12. Impurity Deionization Effects on Surface Recombination DC Current-Voltage Characteristics in MOS Transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Zuhui [Lee-Kuan-Yew Postdoctoral Fellow, 2007-2010, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Jie Binbin; Sah Chihtang, E-mail: bb_jie@msn.com [Department of Physics, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Impurity deionization on the direct-current current-voltage characteristics from electron-hole recombination (R-DCIV) at SiO{sub 2}/Si interface traps in MOS transistors is analyzed using the steady-state Shockley-Read-Hall recombination kinetics and the Fermi distributions for electrons and holes. Insignificant distortion is observed over 90% of the bell-shaped R-DCIV curves centered at their peaks when impurity deionization is excluded in the theory. This is due to negligible impurity deionization because of the much lower electron and hole concentrations at the interface than the impurity concentration in the 90% range. (invited papers)

  13. Thresholds of time dependent intergranular crack growth in a nickel disc alloy Alloy 720Li

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hangyue

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available At high temperatures in air, introducing a dwell period at the peak stress of fatigue cycles promotes time dependent intergranular crack growth which can increase crack growth rates by upto a few orders of magnitude from the rates of transgranular fatigue crack growth in superalloys. It is expected that time dependent intergranular crack growth in nickel-based superalloys may not occur below a critical mechanical driving force, ΔKth−IG, analogous to a fatigue threshold (ΔKth and a critical temperature, Tth. In this study, dwell fatigue crack growth tests have been carefully designed and conducted on Alloy 720Li to examine such thresholds. Unlike a fatigue threshold, the threshold stress intensity factor range for intergranular crack growth is observed to be highly sensitive to microstructure, dwell time and test procedure. The near threshold crack growth behaviour is made complex by the interactions between grain boundary oxidation embrittlement and crack tip stress relaxation. In general, lower ΔKth−IG values are associated with finer grain size and/or shorter dwell times. Often a load increasing procedure promotes stress relaxation and tends to lead to higher ΔKth−IG. When there is limited stress relaxation at the crack tip, similar ΔKth−IG values are measured with load increasing and load shedding procedures. They are generally higher than the fatigue threshold (ΔKth despite faster crack growth rates (da/dN in the stable crack growth regime. Time dependent intergranular crack growth cannot be activated below a temperature of 500 ∘C.

  14. Intergranular and inter-phased boundaries in the materials; Joints intergranulaires et interphases dans les materiaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslanides, A. [Electricite de France, Dept. CIMA, 77 - Moret sur Loing (France); Backhaus-Ricoult, M. [Centre d' Etudes de Chimie metallurgique, 94 - Vitry-sur-Seine (France); Bayle-Guillemaud, P. [CEA Grenoble, Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, 38 (France)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    This document collects the abstracts of the talks presented during the colloquium J2IM on the intergranular and inter-phased boundaries in the materials. Around the themes of the interfaces behaviour and grain boundaries defects in materials, these days dealt with the microstructure behaviour in many domains such as the interfaces in batteries, the irradiation damages and the special case of the fuel-cladding interactions, the stressed interfaces, the alumina or silicon carbides substrates. (A.L.B.)

  15. Mechanism of hydrogen-induced intergranular cracking of tubular steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔利杰; 褚武扬; 于广华; 程以环

    1996-01-01

    Hydrogen could be enriched on grain boundaries by stress induction and other traps.The enriched hydrogen facilitated emission and movement of dislocations and lowered plastic work.Consequently,fracture occurred easily along grain boundary.A normalized threshold value of hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) along grain boundary is given as (KIH/KIC)2=1-0.162×10-3 βHCc(H)GH/(2γs-γb-0.16×103∑β CiGi),where βH and βi are the enrichment factors of hydrogen and other elements on grain boundaries,respectively;Cc(H) is hydrogen concentration induced by stress;C,is the average concentration of an element in the steel;GH and Gi are factors of fracture work along grain boundary with hydrogen and other elements,and γs and γb are surface free energy and grain boundary energy of Fe.For tubular steel,the calculated KH/KIC is 0.23 while the determined value is 0.26.The theoretical threshold value is well consistent with the experimental one.

  16. Estimating the Contribution of Impurities to the Uncertainty of Metal Fixed-Point Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, K. D.

    2014-04-01

    The estimation of the uncertainty component attributable to impurities remains a central and important topic of fixed-point research. Various methods are available for this estimation, depending on the extent of the available information. The sum of individual estimates method has considerable appeal where there is adequate knowledge of the sensitivity coefficients for each of the impurity elements and sufficiently low uncertainty regarding their concentrations. The overall maximum estimate (OME) forsakes the behavior of the individual elements by assuming that the cryoscopic constant adequately represents (or is an upper bound for) the sensitivity coefficients of the individual impurities. Validation of these methods using melting and/or freezing curves is recommended to provide confidence. Recent investigations of indium, tin, and zinc fixed points are reported. Glow discharge mass spectrometry was used to determine the impurity concentrations of the metals used to fill the cells. Melting curves were analyzed to derive an experimental overall impurity concentration (assuming that all impurities have a sensitivity coefficient equivalent to that of the cryoscopic constant). The two values (chemical and experimental) for the overall impurity concentrations were then compared. Based on the data obtained, the pragmatic approach of choosing the larger of the chemical and experimentally derived quantities as the best estimate of the influence of impurities on the temperature of the freezing point is suggested rather than relying solely on the chemical analysis and the OME method to derive the uncertainty component attributable to impurities.

  17. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations.

  18. Assessment of susceptibility of Type 304 stainless steel to intergranular stress corrosion cracking in simulated Savannah River Reactor environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ondrejcin, R.S.; Caskey, C.R. Jr.

    1989-12-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Type 304 stainless steel rate tests (CERT) of specimens machined was evaluated by constant extension from Savannah River Plant (SRP) decontaminated process water piping. Results from 12 preliminary CERT tests verified that IGSCC occurred over a wide range of simulated SRP envirorments. 73 specimens were tested in two statistical experimental designs of the central composite class. In one design, testing was done in environments containing hydrogen peroxide; in the other design, hydrogen peroxide was omitted but oxygen was added to the environment. Prediction equations relating IGSCC to temperature and environmental variables were formulated. Temperature was the most important independent variable. IGSCC was severe at 100 to 120C and a threshold temperature between 40C and 55C was identified below which IGSCC did not occur. In environments containing hydrogen peroxide, as in SRP operation, a reduction in chloride concentration from 30 to 2 ppB also significantly reduced IGSCC. Reduction in sulfate concentration from 50 to 7 ppB was effective in reducing IGSCC provided the chloride concentration was 30 ppB or less and temperature was 95C or higher. Presence of hydrogen peroxide in the environment increased IGSCC except when chloride concentration was 11 ppB or less. Actual concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, oxygen and carbon dioxide did not affect IGSCC. Large positive ECP values (+450 to +750 mV Standard Hydrogen Electrode (SHE)) in simulated SRP environments containing hydrogen peroxide and were good agreement with ECP measurements made in SRP reactors, indicating that the simulated environments are representative of SRP reactor environments. Overall CERT results suggest that the most effective method to reduce IGSCC is to reduce chloride and sulfate concentrations.

  19. Multiple-Scattering Approach to the Formation of the Impurity Band in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, A.; Serre, J.

    1982-03-01

    The electronic structure of doped semiconductors is studied by using the best approximation of Klauder's impurity-scattering theory which yields a wave-vector- and energy-dependent self-energy Σ(k-->,E). An approximation is used for electron correlation effects. It is shown that as the impurity concentration is decreased, the conduction-band tail progressively splits off, giving an impurity band. The link between the formation of the latter and the general theory of bifurcation is outlined.

  20. Impurity seeding in ITER DT plasmas in a carbon-free environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacher, H.D., E-mail: pacher@emt.inrs.ca [INRS-EMT, Varennes, Québec (Canada); Kukushkin, A.S., E-mail: andre.kukushkin@iter.org [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Pacher, G.W. [1845 Gray, St. Bruno, QC J3V 4G4 (Canada); Kotov, V. [FZ Jülich, Jülich (Germany); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Reiter, D. [FZ Jülich, Jülich (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Impurity seeding has been studied for a carbon-free divertor configuration in ITER using edge/divertor SOLPS code simulations. For high power DT operation, simulations have been performed for varying throughput, power, pumping speed, impurity seeding concentration and species and the results have been parameterised. With these scalings as boundary conditions, core simulations have determined the operating window for carbon-free, impurity-seeded operation.

  1. Evolution of impurity incorporation during ammonothermal growth of GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sintonen, Sakari; Wahl, Stefanie; Richter, Susanne; Meyer, Sylke; Suihkonen, Sami; Schulz, Tobias; Irmscher, Klaus; Danilewsky, Andreas N.; Tuomi, Turkka O.; Stankiewicz, Romuald; Albrecht, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Ammonothermally grown GaN is a promising substrate for high-power optoelectronics and electronics thanks to its scalability and high structural perfection. Despite extensive research, ammonothermal GaN still suffers from significant concentrations of impurities. This article discusses the evolution of impurity incorporation during growth of basic ammonothermal GaN, in specific whether the impurity concentration changes temporally along the growth direction and how the autoclave influences the impurity concentration. The effect of the impurities on the structural, electrical and optical properties of the grown crystal is also discussed. The chemical analysis is carried out by time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) and laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS). Strain and dislocation generation caused by impurity concentration gradients and steps are studied by synchrotron radiation x-ray topography (SR-XRT). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectivity is used to determine the effect of the impurities on the free carrier concentration, and the luminescent properties are studied by low temperature photoluminescence (PL). The influence of the autoclave is studied by growing a single boule in multiple steps in several autoclaves. LA-ICP-MS and ToF-SIMS ion intensities indicate that the impurity concentrations of several species vary between different autoclaves by over an order of magnitude. SR-XRT measurements reveal strain at the growth interfaces due to impurity concentration gradients and steps. Oxygen is determined to be the most abundant impurity species, resulting in a high free carrier concentration, as determined by FTIR. The large variation in Mn concentration dramatically affects PL intensity.

  2. Modeling of soluble impurities distribution in the steam generator secondary water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matal, O.; Simo, T. [Energovyzkum s.r.o., Brno (Switzerland); Kucak, L.; Urban, F. [Slovak Technical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    1997-12-31

    A model was developed to compute concentration of impurities in the WWER 440 steam generator (SG) secondary water along the tube bundle. Calculated values were verified by concentration values obtained from secondary water sample chemical analysis. (orig.). 2 refs.

  3. Evaluation by the Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation Test of Aged Ferritic Stainless Steel Intergranular Corrosion Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhom, H.; Amadou, T.; Braham, C.

    2010-12-01

    An experimental design method was used to determine the effect of factors that significantly affect the response of the double loop-electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR) test in controlling the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion (IGC) of UNS S43000 (AISI 430) ferritic stainless steel. The test response is expressed in terms of the reactivation/activation current ratio ( I r / I a pct). Test results analysed by the analysis of variance (ANOVA) method show that the molarity of the H2SO4 electrolyte and the potential scanning rate have a more significant effect on the DL-EPR test response than the temperature and the depassivator agent concentration. On the basis of these results, a study was conducted in order to determine the optimal operating conditions of the test as a nondestructive technique for evaluating IGC resistance of ferritic stainless steel components. Three different heat treatments are considered in this study: solution annealing (nonsensitized), aging during 3 hours at 773 K (500 °C) (slightly sensitized), and aging during 2 hours at 873 K (600 °C) (highly sensitized). The aim is to find the operating conditions that simultaneously ensure the selectivity of the attack (intergranular and chromium depleted zone) and are able to detect the effect of low dechromization. It is found that a potential scanning rate of 2.5 mV/s in an electrolyte composed of H2SO4 3 M solution without depassivator, at a temperature around 293 K (20 °C), is the optimal operating condition for the DL-EPR test. Using this condition, it is possible to assess the degree of sensitization (DOS) to the IGC of products manufactured in ferritic stainless steels rapidly, reliably, and quantitatively. A time-temperature-start of sensitization (TTS) diagram for the UNS S43000 (France Inox, Villepinte, France) stainless steel was obtained with acceptable accuracy by this method when the IGC sensitization criterion was set to I r / I a > 1 pct. This diagram is in

  4. Impurity bubbles in a BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Eddy; Blinova, Alina; Boshier, Malcolm

    2013-05-01

    Polarons (particles that interact with the self-consistent deformation of the host medium that contains them) self-localize when strongly coupled. Dilute Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) doped with neutral distinguishable atoms (impurities) and armed with a Feshbach-tuned impurity-boson interaction provide a unique laboratory to study self-localized polarons. In nature, self-localized polarons come in two flavors that exhibit qualitatively different behavior: In lattice systems, the deformation is slight and the particle is accompanied by a cloud of collective excitations as in the case of the Landau-Pekar polarons of electrons in a dielectric lattice. In natural fluids and gases, the strongly coupled particle radically alters the medium, e.g. by expelling the host medium as in the case of the electron bubbles in superfluid helium. We show that BEC-impurities can self-localize in a bubble, as well as in a Landau-Pekar polaron state. The BEC-impurity system is fully characterized by only two dimensionless coupling constants. In the corresponding phase diagram the bubble and Landau-Pekar polaron limits correspond to large islands separated by a cross-over region. The same BEC-impurity species can be adiabatically Feshbach steered from the Landau-Pekar to the bubble regime. This work was funded by the Los Alamos LDRD program.

  5. Impact of diffusion limited aggregates of impurities on nematic ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkai, S.; Ambrožič, M.; Kralj, S.

    2017-02-01

    We study the impact of random bond-type disorder on two-dimensional (2D) orientational ordering of nematic liquid crystal (LC) configurations. The lattice Lebwohl-Lasher pseudospin model is used to model orientational ordering perturbed by frozen-in rod-like impurities of concentration p exhibiting the isotropic orientational probability distribution. The impurities are either (i) randomly spatially distributed or (ii) form diffusion limited aggregation (DLA)-type patterns characterized by the fractal dimensions df, where we consider cases df ∼ 1.7 and df ∼ 1.9. The degree of orientational ordering is quantified in terms of the orientational pair correlation function G(r) . Simulations reveal that the DLA pattern imposed disorder has a significantly weaker impact for a given concentration of impurities. Furthermore, if samples are quenched from the isotropic LC phase, then the fractal dimension is relatively strongly imprinted on quantitative characteristics of G(r) .

  6. Sintering process influence on microstructure and intergranular impedance of rare-earth modified BaTiO3-ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitic V.V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sintering process is a complex of different synergetic effects during the ceramics materials consolidation. The microstructural level properties control is very important as a stage in advanced materials prognosis. SEM analysis of Yb/BaTiO3 doped ceramics showed that in samples doped with a low level of dopant and sintered at higher temperatures the grain size ranged from 10-60μm, while with the higher dopant concentration the grain size ranged between 2-15μm. The morphology of sintered BaTiO3-ceramics grains points out the validity of developing new structure analytical methods based on different geometries of grains' model systems. The idea of electrical properties of BaTiO3-ceramics being influenced by intergrain microcontacts can be successfully followed if we start with the two-sphere Coble’s model and also the correction of the Coble’s model. In this paper, the grains contact models based on spherical, ellipsoidal and polyhedral geometries are presented making a new modeling tool for structure research of BaTiO3-ceramics materials. Intergranular impedance analysis of grains clusters was also introduced. Obtained results enabled establishment of interrelation between structural and electrical parameters.

  7. EFFECT OF FUEL IMPURITIES ON FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H.

    2010-09-28

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that produces electricity during the combination of hydrogen and oxygen to produce water. Proton exchange membranes fuel cells are favored for portable applications as well as stationary ones due to their high power density, low operating temperature, and low corrosion of components. In real life operation, the use of pure fuel and oxidant gases results in an impractical system. A more realistic and cost efficient approach is the use of air as an oxidant gas and hydrogen from hydrogen carriers (i.e., ammonia, hydrocarbons, hydrides). However, trace impurities arising from different hydrogen sources and production increases the degradation of the fuel cell. These impurities include carbon monoxide, ammonia, sulfur, hydrocarbons, and halogen compounds. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has set maximum limits for trace impurities in the hydrogen stream; however fuel cell data is needed to validate the assumption that at those levels the impurities will cause no degradation. This report summarizes the effect of selected contaminants tested at SRNL at ISO levels. Runs at ISO proposed concentration levels show that model hydrocarbon compound such as tetrahydrofuran can cause serious degradation. However, the degradation is only temporary as when the impurity is removed from the hydrogen stream the performance completely recovers. Other molecules at the ISO concentration levels such as ammonia don't show effects on the fuel cell performance. On the other hand carbon monoxide and perchloroethylene shows major degradation and the system can only be recovered by following recovery procedures.

  8. Effects of quenched impurities on surface diffusion, spreading, and ordering of O/W(110)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikunen, P.; Vattulainen, Ilpo Tapio; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2002-01-01

    We study how quenched impurities affect the surface diffusion and ordering of strongly interacting adsorbate atoms on surfaces. To this end, we carry out Monte Carlo simulations for a lattice-gas model of O/W(110), including small concentrations of immobile impurities which block their adsorption...

  9. Oxidation assisted intergranular cracking under loading at dynamic strain aging temperatures in Inconel 718 superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, M.C., E-mail: monica_crezende@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, C.P. 68505, Rio de Janeiro 21945-970 (Brazil); Araújo, L.S.; Gabriel, S.B. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, C.P. 68505, Rio de Janeiro 21945-970 (Brazil); Dille, J. [Université Libre de Bruxelles, 4MAT Department, Av. F. Roosevelt 50, C.P. 194/03, Brussels (Belgium); Almeida, L.H. de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Departamento de Engenharia Metalúrgica e de Materiais, C.P. 68505, Rio de Janeiro 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Mechanical properties are controlled by DSA, precipitation hardening and OAIC. • Between 600 and 700 °C the critical strain for serrations increases with temperature. • This is related to the consumption of matrix elements (especially Nb: for γ′ and γ″). • A reduction in ductility occurs (related to the OAIC) when the DSA is no longer effective. • This reduction is accompanied by an increase in intergranular brittle fracture. - Abstract: It is well established that 718 superalloy exhibits brittle intergranular cracking when deformed under tension at temperatures above 600 °C. This embrittlement effect is related with grain boundary penetration by oxygen (Oxygen Assisted Intergranular Cracking – OAIC). Simultaneously, impacting on its mechanical properties, the precipitation of coherent γ′ and γ″ phases occur above 650 °C and Dynamic Strain Aging (DSA) occurs in the temperature range between 200 and 800 °C. Although literature indicates that OAIC is the mechanism that controls mechanical properties at high temperatures, its interactions with DSA and precipitation are still under discussion. The objective of this work is to investigate the interactions between the embrittlement phenomena (OAIC and DSA) and the hardening mechanism of γ′ and γ″ precipitation on the mechanical properties of an annealed 718 superalloy. Tensile tests were performed at a strain rate of 3.2 × 10{sup −4} s{sup −1} under secondary vacuum, in temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 °C. Fracture surfaces were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and precipitation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of DSA and precipitation on the strength and of OAIC on the ductility was verified.

  10. Molecular-dynamics Simulation-based Cohesive Zone Representation of Intergranular Fracture Processes in Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakov, Vesselin I.; Saether, Erik; Phillips, Dawn R.; Glaessgen, Edward H.

    2006-01-01

    A traction-displacement relationship that may be embedded into a cohesive zone model for microscale problems of intergranular fracture is extracted from atomistic molecular-dynamics simulations. A molecular-dynamics model for crack propagation under steady-state conditions is developed to analyze intergranular fracture along a flat 99 [1 1 0] symmetric tilt grain boundary in aluminum. Under hydrostatic tensile load, the simulation reveals asymmetric crack propagation in the two opposite directions along the grain boundary. In one direction, the crack propagates in a brittle manner by cleavage with very little or no dislocation emission, and in the other direction, the propagation is ductile through the mechanism of deformation twinning. This behavior is consistent with the Rice criterion for cleavage vs. dislocation blunting transition at the crack tip. The preference for twinning to dislocation slip is in agreement with the predictions of the Tadmor and Hai criterion. A comparison with finite element calculations shows that while the stress field around the brittle crack tip follows the expected elastic solution for the given boundary conditions of the model, the stress field around the twinning crack tip has a strong plastic contribution. Through the definition of a Cohesive-Zone-Volume-Element an atomistic analog to a continuum cohesive zone model element - the results from the molecular-dynamics simulation are recast to obtain an average continuum traction-displacement relationship to represent cohesive zone interaction along a characteristic length of the grain boundary interface for the cases of ductile and brittle decohesion. Keywords: Crack-tip plasticity; Cohesive zone model; Grain boundary decohesion; Intergranular fracture; Molecular-dynamics simulation

  11. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of welded ferritic stainless steels in high temperature aqueous environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuzuka, Toshio; Shimogori, Kazutoshi; Fujiwara, Kazuo; Tomari, Haruo (Kobe Steel Ltd. (Japan). Central Research and Development Lab.); Kanda, Masao

    1982-07-01

    In considering the application of ferritic stainless steels to heat exchanger tubing materials for moisture separator-reheaters in LWRs, the effects of environmental conditions (temperature, chloride, dissolved oxygen, pH), thermal history, and steel composition (content of C, N, Cr and Ti) on the Inter-Granular Stress Corrosion Cracking (IGSCC) in high temperature aqueous environments, were studied. The IGSCC was proved to depend on steel composition and thermal history rather than environment. From these results, a steel was designed to prevent IGSCC of the welding HAZ for 18Cr and 13Cr steels.

  12. Film-induced brittle intergranular cracking of silver-gold alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedersdorf, F. [Bethlehem Steel Corp., PA (United States). Homer Research Labs.; Sieradzki, K. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Dealloying of a binary noble alloy produces a porous layer rich in the more noble element. Application of a tensile load initiates a brittle intergranular (IG) crack in the dealloyed layer that advances into the unattacked material. This study showed that the crack penetration depth (C{sub d}) is proportional to the thickness of the dealloyed layer (t). For a given value of t, the grain-boundary crack penetration distance was shown to decrease as the dealloying potential increased. The dependence of C{sub d} on t and the dealloying potential, as opposed to the applied potential at the time of fracture, supported the film-induced cleavage model.

  13. Considerations for metallographic observation of intergranular attack in alloy 600 steam generator tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Do Haeng; Choi, Myung Sik; Lee, Deok Hyun; Han, Jung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This technical note provides some considerations for the metallographic observation of intergranular attack (IGA) in Alloy 600 steam generator tubes. The IGA region was crazed along the grain boundaries through a deformation by an applied stress. The direction and extent of the crazing depended on those of the applied stress. It was found that an IGA defect can be misevaluated as a stress corrosion crack. Therefore, special caution should be taken during the destructive examination of the pulled-out tubes from operating steam generators.

  14. Meso-microstructural computational simulation of the hydrogen permeation test to calculate intergranular, grain boundary and effective diffusivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothi, S., E-mail: s.jothi@swansea.ac.uk [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Winzer, N. [Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials IWM, Wöhlerstraße 11, 79108 Freiburg (Germany); Croft, T.N.; Brown, S.G.R. [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Characterized polycrystalline nickel microstructure using EBSD analysis. • Development meso-microstructural model based on real microstructure. • Calculated effective diffusivity using experimental electrochemical permeation test. • Calculated intergranular diffusivity of hydrogen using computational FE simulation. • Validated the calculated computation simulation results with experimental results. - Abstract: Hydrogen induced intergranular embrittlement has been identified as a cause of failure of aerospace components such as combustion chambers made from electrodeposited polycrystalline nickel. Accurate computational analysis of this process requires knowledge of the differential in hydrogen transport in the intergranular and intragranular regions. The effective diffusion coefficient of hydrogen may be measured experimentally, though experimental measurement of the intergranular grain boundary diffusion coefficient of hydrogen requires significant effort. Therefore an approach to calculate the intergranular GB hydrogen diffusivity using finite element analysis was developed. The effective diffusivity of hydrogen in polycrystalline nickel was measured using electrochemical permeation tests. Data from electron backscatter diffraction measurements were used to construct microstructural representative volume elements including details of grain size and shape and volume fraction of grains and grain boundaries. A Python optimization code has been developed for the ABAQUS environment to calculate the unknown grain boundary diffusivity.

  15. Breatherlike impurity modes in discrete nonlinear lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennig, D.; Rasmussen, Kim; Tsironis, G. P.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the properties of a disordered generalized discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation, containing both diagonal and nondiagonal nonlinear terms. The equation models a Linear host lattice doped with nonlinear impurities. We find different types of impurity states that form itinerant...

  16. Impurity centers in LiF:Cu{sup +} single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nepomnyashchikh, A I; Shalaev, A A; Subanakov, A K; Paklin, A S; Bobina, N S; Myasnikova, A S; Shendrik, R, E-mail: alshal@igc.irk.ru

    2010-11-15

    The single crystals LiF with copper impurity were grown by Czochralski method. The concentrations of Cu in the crystals were 0,0004-0,002%. In order to determine a copper valence impurity, measurements of the ESR, emission, excitation and absorption spectra were performed. We found emission peak at 410 nm and excitation peak at 250 nm. In agreement with reference, these peaks point to presence of Cu{sup +} in our samples. The mechanisms of capture and recombination providing process of thermoluminescence were recognized.

  17. On exchange interaction between shallow impurity centers in diluted semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krotkov, Pavel; Gor'kov, Lev

    2003-03-01

    We generalize the method developed in [1,2] to obtain asymptotically exact expressions for the exchange splitting in semiconductors of the levels of carriers localized on shallow impurities at small impurity concentrations (large inter-center separations). Our approach takes into account degeneracy inherent to shallow centers in most semiconductors. We also consider the effects of spin-orbital interaction and of an external magnetic field. [1] L.P. Gor'kov and L.P. Pitaevskii, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 151, 822 (1963) [Sov. Phys. Dokl. 8, 788 (1964)]. [2] C. Herring and M. Flicker, Phys. Rev. 134, A362 (1964)].

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Intergranular Fracture in Aluminum: Constitutive Relation For Interface Debonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E. H.

    2008-01-01

    Intergranular fracture is a dominant mode of failure in ultrafine grained materials. In the present study, the atomistic mechanisms of grain-boundary debonding during intergranular fracture in aluminum are modeled using a coupled molecular dynamics finite element simulation. Using a statistical mechanics approach, a cohesive-zone law in the form of a traction-displacement constitutive relationship, characterizing the load transfer across the plane of a growing edge crack, is extracted from atomistic simulations and then recast in a form suitable for inclusion within a continuum finite element model. The cohesive-zone law derived by the presented technique is free of finite size effects and is statistically representative for describing the interfacial debonding of a grain boundary (GB) interface examined at atomic length scales. By incorporating the cohesive-zone law in cohesive-zone finite elements, the debonding of a GB interface can be simulated in a coupled continuum-atomistic model, in which a crack starts in the continuum environment, smoothly penetrates the continuum-atomistic interface, and continues its propagation in the atomistic environment. This study is a step towards relating atomistically derived decohesion laws to macroscopic predictions of fracture and constructing multiscale models for nanocrystalline and ultrafine grained materials.

  19. Mitigation of Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking in Al-Mg by Electrochemical Potential Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, M. E.; Scully, J. R.; Burns, J. T.

    2017-08-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking in the Al-Mg alloy AA5456-H116 is suppressed via cathodic polarization in 0.6 M NaCl, saturated (5.45 M) NaCl, 2 M MgCl2, and saturated (5 M) MgCl2. Three zones of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IG-SCC) susceptibility correlate with pitting potentials of unsensitized AA5456-H116 and pure β phase (Al3Mg2) in each solution. These critical potentials reasonably describe the influence of α Al matrix and β phase dissolution rates on IG-SCC severity. Complete inhibition occurred at applied potentials of -1.0 V and -1.1 V versus saturated calomel electrode ( V SCE) in 0.6 M NaCl. Whereas only partial mitigation of IG-SCC was achieved at -0.9 V SCE in 0.6 M NaCl and at -0.9, -1.0, and -1.1 V SCE in the more aggressive environments. Correlation of pitting potentials in bulk environments with IG-SCC behavior suggests an effect of bulk environment [Cl-] and pH on the stabilized crack tip chemistry.

  20. Fundamental aspects of metallic impurities and impurity interactions in silicon during device processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graff, K. [TEMIC, TELEFUNKEN, Heilbronn (Germany)

    1995-08-01

    A review on the behavior of metallic impurities in silicon can be considerably simplified by a restriction on pure, dislocation-free, monocrystalline silicon. In this case interactions between different impurities and between impurities and grown-in lattice defects can be reduced. This restriction is observed in Chapter 1 for discussing the general behavior of metallic impurities in silicon.

  1. Nanoscale Conductive Channels in Silicon Whiskers with Nickel Impurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatsukhnenko, Serhii; Druzhinin, Anatoly; Ostrovskii, Igor; Khoverko, Yuriy; Chernetskiy, Mukhajlo

    2017-01-01

    The magnetization and magnetoresistance of Si whiskers doped with to boron concentrations corresponding to the metal-insulator transition (2 × 1018 cm-3 ÷ 5 × 1018 cm-3) were measured at high magnetic fields up to 14 T in a wide temperature range 4.2-300 K. Hysteresis of the magnetic moment was observed for Si p-type whiskers with nickel impurity in a wide temperature range 4.2-300 K indicating a strong interaction between the Ni impurities and the possibility of a magnetic cluster creation. The introduction of Ni impurity in Si whiskers leads to appearance and increase of the magnitude of negative magnetoresistance up to 10% as well as to the decrease of the whisker resistivity in the range of hopping conductance at low temperatures. The abovementioned effects were explained in the framework of appearance of magnetic polarons leading to modification of the conductive channels in the subsurface layers of the whiskers.

  2. An objective estimation of impurities in oil field stagnant waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abashev, R.G.; Runets, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies and an analysis of published materials are used to establish the predominant role of the mechanical impurities of various origins covered by layers of the heavy components of petroleum products in reducing the injectivity of injection wells for injecting stagnant waters containing concretions. A method is proposed for determining the impurities in the oil field stagnant waters used for flooding; this method makes it possible to obtain more reliable results on the concentration of the concretions responsible in such conditions for the drop in the injectivity of the formation reservoirs. A comparative evaluation of the results from an analysis of the impurities determined by the existing method and the proposed method is given. This method is useful in oil field laboratories in the systematic quality control over injected waters.

  3. Power balance and characterization of impurities in the Maryland Spheromak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cote, C.

    1993-12-31

    The Maryland Spheromak is a medium size magnetically confined plasma of toroidal shape. Low T{sub e} and higher n{sub e} than expected contribute to produce a radiation dominated short-lived spheromak configuration. A pyroelectric radiation detector and a VUV spectrometer have been used for space and time-resolved measurements of radiated power and impurity line emission. Results from the bolometry and VUV spectroscopy diagnostics have been combined to give the absolute concentrations of the major impurity species together with the electron temperature. The large amount of oxygen and nitrogen ions in the plasma very early in the discharge is seen to be directly responsible for the abnormally high electron density. The dominant power loss mechanisms are found to be radiation (from impurity line emission) and electron convection to the end walls during the formation phase of the spheromak configuration, and radiation only during the decay phase.

  4. Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugo, S.A.; Thompson, A.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Hieslmair, H. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Multicrystalline silicon is one of the most promising materials for terrestrial solar cells. It is critical to getter impurities from the material as well as inhibit contamination during growth and processing. Standard processing steps such as, phosphorus in-diffusion for p-n junction formation and aluminum sintering for backside ohmic contact fabrication, intrinsically possess gettering capabilities. These processes have been shown to improve L{sub n} values in regions of multicrystalline silicon with low structural defect densities but not in highly dislocated regions. Recent Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) results indirectly reveal higher concentrations of iron in highly dislocated regions while further work suggests that the release of impurities from structural defects, such as dislocations, is the rate limiting step for gettering in multicrystalline silicon. The work presented here directly demonstrates the relationship between metal impurities, structural defects and solar cell performance in multicrystalline silicon. Edge-defined Film-fed Growth (EFG) multicrystalline silicon in the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing was used in this study. Standard solar cell processing steps were carried out at ASE Americas Inc. Metal impurity concentrations and distributions were determined by use of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe (beamline 10.3.1) at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The sample was at atmosphere so only elements with Z greater than silicon could be detected, which includes all metal impurities of interest. Structural defect densities were determined by preferential etching and surface analysis using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) in secondary electron mode. Mapped areas were exactly relocated between the XRF and SEM to allow for direct comparison of impurity and structural defect distributions.

  5. The effect of sintering temperature on the intergranular properties and weak link behavior of Bi2223 superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kameli

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available  A systematic study of the intergranular properties of (Bi,Pb2 Sr2 Ca2 Cu3 Oy (Bi2223 polycrystalline samples has been done using the electrical resistivity and AC susceptibility techniques. In this study, we have prepared a series of Bi2223 samples with different sintering temperatures. The XRD results show that by increasing the sintering temperature up to 865° c , the Bi2212 phase fraction decreases. It was found that the Bi2212 phase on the grain boundaries is likely to play the role of the weak links and consequently reduces the intergranular critical current densities.

  6. (Scanning) Transmission Electron Microscopy Studies of Grain Boundary Segregation relevant to Intergranular Corrosion in Al-Mg-Si-Cu Alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Holmestad, Jon

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the alloy composition on the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion in Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloys has been investigated by Transmission Electron Microscopy. The main focus of this thesis has been the effect of Mg:Si-ratio and the effect of Mn-content on the intergranular corrosion, since Mg and Si are the main alloying elements of the 6xxx alloys and Mn is a common alloying element. The addition of 0.40 wt% Cu to a 6082 alloy increases the hardness of the alloy b...

  7. Enhancement of intergranular current density of Sm-based oxypnictide superconductors with Sn addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shiv Jee; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi; Ogino, Hiraku; Yamamoto, Akiyasu; Kishio, Kohji

    2014-08-01

    A series of Sn-added Sm1111 sintered bulks (SmFeAs(O, F) + xSn x = 0-0.8) was synthesized, and the influence of Sn addition on the superconducting properties of SmFeAs(O, F) was studied. The cell volume (V) slightly increases with Sn addition in the lightly F-doped Sm1111 (SmFeAsO0.88F0.12), suggesting a slight reduction of F concentration in the lattice, whereas there is almost no change in V for the optimally F-doped sample (SmFeAsO0.8F0.2). The transition temperature (Tc) of SmFeAsO0.88F0.12 decreased from 50 to 40 K for x = 0.35, with another maximum at x = 0.27 (Tc = 50 K). On the other hand, SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 remained an almost constant Tc ˜ 56 K up to x = 0.8. Microstructural analysis depicts that the impurity phases in SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 were reduced by Sn addition, resulting in an increase in clean and well connected grain boundaries. Remanent magnetization measurements revealed that Sn addition improved the intergrain Jc at 5 K from 1 × 102 to 1.1 × 104 A cm-2 for SmFeAsO0.8F0.2 and from 4 × 103 to 9.7 × 103 A cm-2 for SmFeAsO0.88F0.12. We believe this superior intergrain Jc to be attributable to the strong intergrain coupling due to grain connectivity improved by the Sn addition.

  8. Impurity intrusion in radio-frequency micro-plasma jets operated in ambient air

    CERN Document Server

    Niermann, B; Böke, M; Winter, J

    2011-01-01

    Space and time resolved concentrations of helium metastable atoms in an atmospheric pressure radio-frequency micro-plasma jet were measured using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Spatial profiles as well as lifetime measurements show significant influences of air entering the discharge from the front nozzle and of impurities originating from the gas supply system. Quenching of metastables was used to deduce quantitative concentrations of intruding impurities. The impurity profile along the jet axis was determined from optical emission spectroscopy as well as their dependance on the feed gas flow through the jet.

  9. Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of type 304 stainless steels treated with inhibitive chemicals in high temperature pure water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, T.K. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing-Hua Univ. Taiwan (China); Lee, M.Y.; Tsai, C.H. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua Univ. Taiwan (China)

    2002-07-01

    Electrochemical potentiodynamic polarizations, electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) measurements and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests were conducted to investigate the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) characteristics of Type 304 stainless steels treated with inhibitive chemicals in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. A number of thermally sensitized specimens were prepared and were pre-oxidized in a 288 C environment with the presence of 300 ppb dissolved oxygen for 360 hours. Most of the specimens were then treated with various chemicals including powdered zirconium oxide (ZrO{sub 2}), powdered titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), and zirconyl nitrate [ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] via static immersion at 90 C, 150 C, and 200 C. Test environments were specifically designed in a circulation loop to create a dissolved oxygen concentration of 300 ppb. Test results showed that the corrosion current densities of all treated specimens were lower than that of the untreated, pre-oxidized specimen at ambient temperature in a solution mixed with 1 mM K{sub 3}Fe(CN){sub 6} and 1 mM K{sub 4}Fe(CN){sub 6}. The ECPs of the treated specimens could be lower or higher than that of the pre-oxidized one at 288 C, depending upon the type of treating chemical and the treating temperature. In addition, IGSCC was observed on all specimens (treated or untreated) in the same environment. However, the untreated specimen exhibited lower elongation, shorter failure time, and more secondary cracks on the side surfaces. It was therefore suggested that inhibitive chemicals such as ZrO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2}, and ZrO(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} did provide a certain degree of enhancement in improving the mechanical behavior of the treated specimens and in prolonging the IGSCC initiation time. (authors)

  10. Dental materials. Amorphous intergranular phases control the properties of rodent tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lyle M; Cohen, Michael J; MacRenaris, Keith W; Pasteris, Jill D; Seda, Takele; Joester, Derk

    2015-02-13

    Dental enamel, a hierarchical material composed primarily of hydroxylapatite nanowires, is susceptible to degradation by plaque biofilm-derived acids. The solubility of enamel strongly depends on the presence of Mg(2+), F(-), and CO3(2-). However, determining the distribution of these minor ions is challenging. We show—using atom probe tomography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlative techniques—that in unpigmented rodent enamel, Mg(2+) is predominantly present at grain boundaries as an intergranular phase of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP). In the pigmented enamel, a mixture of ferrihydrite and amorphous iron-calcium phosphate replaces the more soluble Mg-ACP, rendering it both harder and more resistant to acid attack. These results demonstrate the presence of enduring amorphous phases with a dramatic influence on the physical and chemical properties of the mature mineralized tissue.

  11. Aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy of the intergranular phase in magnetic recording media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossein-Babaei, Faraz; Koh, Ai Leen; Srinivasan, Kumar; Bertero, Gerardo A; Sinclair, Robert

    2012-05-09

    In perpendicular hard disk memory media, nanometric magnetic Co-rich grains are separated by a ∼1 nm thick nonmagnetic and preferably amorphous intergranular phase (IP). Attempts at observing the IP structure at high resolution using TEM have been obstructed by the superposition of lattice fringes from the crystalline grains extending into the IP region in images. Here we present the first images of a magnetic recording medium produced using a spherical aberration-corrected TEM showing the true amorphous IP structure in contrast to the crystalline grains, allowing the accurate determination of the grain-IP interface and the grain and IP dimensions. It is shown that these aberration-corrected TEM images are functionally superior for analyzing certain features of the ultrahigh capacity data recording media.

  12. Acoustic emission detection of 316L stainless steel welded joints during intergranular corrosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meng-yu Chai; Quan Duan; Wen-jie Bai; Zao-xiao Zhang; Xu-meng Xie

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes acoustic emission (AE) signals during the intergranular corrosion (IGC) process of 316L stainless steel welded joints under different welding currents in boiling nitric acid. IGC generates several AE signals with high AE activity. The AE tech-nique could hardly distinguish IGC in stainless steel welded joints with different welding heat inputs. However, AE signals can effectively distinguish IGC characteristics in different corrosion stages. The IGC resistance of a heat-affected zone is lower than that of a weld zone. The initiation and rapid corrosion stages can be distinguished using AE results and microstructural analysis. Moreover, energy count rate and am-plitude are considered to be ideal parameters for characterizing different IGC processes. Two types of signals are detected in the rapid corro-sion stage. It can be concluded that grain boundary corrosion and grain separation are the AE sources of type 1 and type 2, respectively.

  13. The Mg impurity in nitride alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zvanut, M. E.; Willoughby, W. R.; Sunay, U. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham AL (United States); Koleske, D. D.; Allerman, A. A. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque NM (United States); Wang, Ke; Araki, Tsutomu [Department of Photonics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Nanishi, Yasushi [Department of Photonics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga, Japan and WCU Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-21

    Although several magnetic resonance studies address the Mg acceptor in GaN, there are few reports on Mg doping in the alloys, where hole production depends strongly on the Al or In content. Our electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements of the p-type alloys suggest that the Mg impurity retains the axial symmetry, characteristic of a p-type dopant in both alloys; however, In and Al produce additional, different characteristics of the acceptor. In InGaN, the behavior is consistent with a lowering of the acceptor level and increasing hole density as In concentration increases. For AlGaN, the amount of neutral Mg decreases with increasing Al content, which is attributed to different kinetics of hydrogen diffusion thought to occur in samples with higher Al mole fraction.

  14. Influence of oxygen impurities on the electronic properties of graphene nanoflakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abboodi, Mohammed H.; Ajeel, Fouad N.; Khudhair, Alaa M.

    2017-04-01

    Controlled chemical doping with oxygen impurities is a promising approach for the electronic band engineering of graphene nanoflakes (GNFs). Based on the first-principles of the density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we investigated the effect of various consternations of substitutional impurities from oxygen atoms on the electronic properties of GNFs. Our results show that the electronic properties of GNFs do not only depend on the oxygen impurity concentrations, but also depend on the geometrical pattern of oxygen impurities in the GNFs. Additionally, we also found interesting electronic properties of GNFs structure, which significantly contribute to that oxygen dopants cause a decreased energy gap. So, our results suggest that substitutional impurities are the best viable option for enhancement of desired electronic properties of GNFs.

  15. The Effect of Hydrogen Annealing on the Impurity Content of Alumina-Forming Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialek, James L.

    2000-01-01

    Previously, the effect of hydrogen annealing on increasing the adhesion of Al2O3 scales had been related to the effective desulfurization that occurred during this process. The simultaneous reduction of other impurities has now been re-examined for up to 20 impurity elements in the case of five different alloys (NiCrAl, FeCrAl, PWA 1480, Rene'142, and Rene'N5). Hydrogen annealing produced measurable reductions in elemental concentration for B, C, Na, Mg, P, K, Sr, or Sn in varying degrees for at least one and up to three of these alloys. No single element was reduced by hydrogen annealing for all the alloys except sulfur. In many cases spalling occurred at low levels of these other impurities, while in other cases the scales were adherent at high levels of the impurities. No impurity besides sulfur was strongly correlated with adhesion.

  16. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, R. D., E-mail: rsmirnov@ucsd.edu; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Kukushkin, A. S. [NRC “Kurchatov Institute”, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ion transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. The implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.

  17. Impurity-induced divertor plasma oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, R. D.; Kukushkin, A. S.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.; Pigarov, A. Yu.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2016-01-01

    Two different oscillatory plasma regimes induced by seeding the plasma with high- and low-Z impurities are found for ITER-like divertor plasmas, using computer modeling with the DUSTT/UEDGE and SOLPS4.3 plasma-impurity transport codes. The oscillations are characterized by significant variations of the impurity-radiated power and of the peak heat load on the divertor targets. Qualitative analysis of the divertor plasma oscillations reveals different mechanisms driving the oscillations in the cases of high- and low-Z impurity seeding. The oscillations caused by the high-Z impurities are excited near the X-point by an impurity-related instability of the radiation-condensation type, accompanied by parallel impurity ion transport affected by the thermal and plasma friction forces. The driving mechanism of the oscillations induced by the low-Z impurities is related to the cross-field transport of the impurity atoms, causing alteration between the high and low plasma temperature regimes in the plasma recycling region near the divertor targets. The implications of the impurity-induced plasma oscillations for divertor operation in the next generation tokamaks are also discussed.

  18. On the toughening of brittle materials by grain bridging:promoting intergranular fracture through grain angle, strength, andtoughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulk III, J.W.; Johnson, G.C.; Klein, P.A.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2007-11-15

    The structural reliability of many brittle materials such asstructural ceramics relies on the occurrence of intergranular, as opposedto transgranular, fracture in order to induce toughening by grainbridging. For a constant grain boundary strength and grain boundarytoughness, the current work examines the role of grain strength, graintoughness, and grain angle in promoting intergranular fracture in orderto maintain such toughening. Previous studies have illustrated that anintergranular path and the consequent grain bridging process can bepartitioned into five distinct regimes, namely: propagate, kink, arrest,stall and bridge. To determine the validity of the assumed intergranularpath, the classical penentration/deflection problem of a crack impingingon an interface is reexamined within a cohesive zone framework forintergranular and transgranular fracture. Results considering both modesof propagation, i.e., a transgranular and intergranular path, reveal thatcrack-tip shielding is a natural outcome of the cohesive zone approach tofracture. Cohesive zone growth in one mode shields the opposing mode fromthe stresses required for cohesive zone initiation. Although stablepropagation occurs when the required driving force is equivalent to thetoughness for either transgranular or intergranular fracture, the mode ofpropagation depends on the normalized grain strength, normalized graintoughness, and grain angle. For each grain angle, the intersection ofsingle path and multiple path solutions demarcates "strong" grains thatincrease the macroscopic toughness and "weak" grains that decrease it.The unstable transition to intergranular fracture reveals that anincreasinggrain toughness requires a growing region of the transgranularcohesive zone be at and near the peak cohesive strength. The inability ofthe body to provide the requisite stress field yields an overdriven andunstable configuration. The current results provide restrictions for theachievement of substantial toughening

  19. Influence of the impurity-defect and impurity-impurity interactions on the crystalline silicon solar cells conversion efficiency; Influence des interactions impurete-defaut et impurete-impurete sur le rendement de conversion des cellules photovoltaiques au silicium cristallin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubois, S

    2007-05-15

    This study aims at understanding the influence of the impurity - defect interaction on the silicon solar cell performances. We studied first the case of single-crystalline silicon. We combined numerical simulations and experimental data providing new knowledge concerning metal impurities in silicon, to quantify the evolution of the conversion efficiency with the impurity concentration. Mainly due to the gettering effects, iron appears to be quite well tolerated. It is not the case for gold, diffusing too slowly. Hydrogenation effects were limited. We transposed then this study toward multi-crystalline silicon. Iron seems rather well tolerated, due to the gettering effects but also due to the efficiency of the hydrogenation. When slow diffusers are present, multi crystalline silicon is sensitive to thermal degradation. n-type silicon could solve this problem, this material being less sensitive to metal impurities. (author)

  20. Light-absorbing impurities in Arctic snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Doherty

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Absorption of radiation by ice is extremely weak at visible and near-ultraviolet wavelengths, so small amounts of light-absorbing impurities in snow can dominate the absorption of solar radiation at these wavelengths, reducing the albedo relative to that of pure snow, contributing to the surface energy budget and leading to earlier snowmelt. In this study Arctic snow is surveyed for its content of light-absorbing impurities, expanding and updating the 1983–1984 survey of Clarke and Noone. Samples were collected in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Svalbard, Norway, Russia, and the Arctic Ocean during 2005–2009, on tundra, glaciers, ice caps, sea ice, frozen lakes, and in boreal forests. Snow was collected mostly in spring, when the entire winter snowpack is accessible for sampling. Sampling was carried out in summer on the Greenland ice sheet and on the Arctic Ocean, of melting glacier snow and sea ice as well as cold snow. About 1200 snow samples have been analyzed for this study.

    The snow is melted and filtered; the filters are analyzed in a specially designed spectrophotometer system to infer the concentration of black carbon (BC, the fraction of absorption due to non-BC light-absorbing constituents and the absorption Ångstrom exponent of all particles. The reduction of snow albedo is primarily due to BC, but other impurities, principally brown (organic carbon, are typically responsible for ~40% of the visible and ultraviolet absorption. The meltwater from selected snow samples was saved for chemical analysis to identify sources of the impurities. Median BC amounts in surface snow are as follows (nanograms of carbon per gram of snow: Greenland 3, Arctic Ocean snow 7, melting sea ice 8, Arctic Canada 8, Subarctic Canada 14, Svalbard 13, Northern Norway 21, Western Arctic Russia 26, Northeastern Siberia 17. Concentrations are more variable in the European Arctic than in Arctic Canada or the Arctic Ocean, probably because of the proximity

  1. Impure placebo is a useless concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louhiala, Pekka; Hemilä, Harri; Puustinen, Raimo

    2015-08-01

    Placebos are allegedly used widely in general practice. Surveys reporting high level usage, however, have combined two categories, 'pure' and 'impure' placebos. The wide use of placebos is explained by the high level usage of impure placebos. In contrast, the prevalence of the use of pure placebos has been low. Traditional pure placebos are clinically ineffective treatments, whereas impure placebos form an ambiguous group of diverse treatments that are not always ineffective. In this paper, we focus on the impure placebo concept and demonstrate problems related to it. We also show that the common examples of impure placebos are not meaningful from the point of view of clinical practice. We conclude that the impure placebo is a scientifically misleading concept and should not be used in scientific or medical literature. The issues behind the concept, however, deserve serious attention in future research.

  2. Overview of genotoxic impurities in pharmaceutical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercu, Joel P; Dobo, Krista L; Gocke, Elmar; McGovern, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    This symposium focuses on the management of genotoxic impurities in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals. Recent developments in both Europe and United States require sponsors of new drug applications to develop processes to control the risks of potential genotoxic impurities. Genotoxic impurities represent a special case relative to the International Conference on Harmonisation Q3A/Q3B guidances, because genotoxicity tests used to qualify the drug substance may not be sufficient to demonstrate safety of a potentially genotoxic impurity. The default risk management approach for a genotoxic impurity is the threshold of toxicological concern unless a more specific risk characterization is appropriate. The symposium includes descriptions of industry examples where impurities are introduced and managed in the synthesis of a pharmaceutical. It includes recent regulatory developments such as the "staged threshold of toxicological concern" when administration is of short duration (eg, during clinical trials).

  3. Method for detecting trace impurities in gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, S.M.; Maier, W.B. II; Holland, R.F.; Beattie, W.H.

    A technique for considerably improving the sensitivity and specificity of infrared spectrometry as applied to quantitative determination of trace impurities in various carrier or solvent gases is presented. A gas to be examined for impurities is liquefied and infrared absorption spectra of the liquid are obtained. Spectral simplification and number densities of impurities in the optical path are substantially higher than are obtainable in similar gas-phase analyses. Carbon dioxide impurity (approx. 2 ppM) present in commercial Xe and ppM levels of Freon 12 and vinyl chloride added to liquefied air are used to illustrate the method.

  4. Analytical advances in pharmaceutical impurity profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, René; Elder, David P

    2016-05-25

    Impurities will be present in all drug substances and drug products, i.e. nothing is 100% pure if one looks in enough depth. The current regulatory guidance on impurities accepts this, and for drug products with a dose of less than 2g/day identification of impurities is set at 0.1% levels and above (ICH Q3B(R2), 2006). For some impurities, this is a simple undertaking as generally available analytical techniques can address the prevailing analytical challenges; whereas, for others this may be much more challenging requiring more sophisticated analytical approaches. The present review provides an insight into current development of analytical techniques to investigate and quantify impurities in drug substances and drug products providing discussion of progress particular within the field of chromatography to ensure separation of and quantification of those related impurities. Further, a section is devoted to the identification of classical impurities, but in addition, inorganic (metal residues) and solid state impurities are also discussed. Risk control strategies for pharmaceutical impurities aligned with several of the ICH guidelines, are also discussed.

  5. Behavior of impurities in TRIAM-IM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takashiri, Masayuki; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kawasaki, Shoji; Jotaki, Eriko; Makino, Kenichi; Ito, Sanae; Ito, Satoshi [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    This research is the spectroscopic research on the behavior of impurities in the superconducting strong magnetic field tokamak, TRIAM-1M. In the experiment at the TRIAM-1M, the steady operation of the tokamak by the current drive using 8.2 GHz low hybrid waves has been aimed at toward the practical use of nuclear fusion reactors. In this research, the design and manufacture of the spectroscope system for diagnosing the behavior of impurities and the evaluation of the amount of impurities and effective charge number were carried out. The main impurities were metallic impurities of molybdenum, iron and chrome, and light element impurity of oxygen. The spatial distribution measurement was performed by using a multi-channel vacuum ultraviolet spectroscope system for the spectrum line intensity, and the change with time lapse of the radial distribution of impurity amount was derived. As the results, the amounts of iron and chrome which are the impurities of stainless steel system rapidly increased at plasma center in the latter half of discharge. The increase of the molybdenum amount which is the limiter material was small as compared with iron and chrome, and the amount of oxygen impurity hardly changed throughout discharge. The change with time lapse of the effective charge number in radial distribution was from 4 to 6 during discharge. (K.I.).

  6. Micellar liquid chromatography of terephthalic acid impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ashley E; McPherson, Shakeela D; Fasciano, Jennifer M; Pauls, Richard E; Danielson, Neil D

    2017-03-31

    The production of terephthalic acid (TPA) by oxidation of p-xylene is an important industrial process because high purity TPA is required for the synthesis of polyethylene terephthalate, the primary polymer used to make plastic beverage bottles. Few separation methods have been published that aim to separate TPA from eight major aromatic acid impurities. This work describes a "green" micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) method using a C18 column (100×2.1mm, 3.5μm), an acidic 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) mobile phase, and a simple step flow rate gradient to separate TPA and eight impurities in less than 20min. The resulting chromatogram shows excellent peak shape and baseline resolution of all nine acids, in which there are two sets of isomers. Partition coefficients and equilibrium constants have been calculated for the two sets of isomers by plotting the reciprocal of the retention factor versus micelle concentration. Quantitation of the nine analytes in an actual industrial TPA sample is possible. Limits of detection for all nine acids range from 0.180 to 1.53ppm (2.16-19.3 pmoles) and limits of quantitation range from 0.549 to 3.45ppm (6.48-43.0 pmoles). In addition, the method was tested on two other reversed phase C18 columns of similar dimensions and particle diameter from different companies. Neither column showed quite the same peak resolution as the original column, however slight modifications to the mobile phase could improve the separation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Impurities Removal in Seawater to Optimize the Magnesium Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, N. C.; Firdiyono, F.; Sulistiyono, E.

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium extraction from seawater is promising way because magnesium is the second abundant element in seawater and Indonesia has the second longest coastline in the world. To optimize the magnesium extraction, the impurities in seawater need to be eliminated. Evaporation and dissolving process were used in this research to remove the impurities especially calcium in seawater. Seawater which has been evaporated from 100 ml to 50 ml was dissolved with variations solution such as oxalic acid and ammonium bicarbonate. The solution concentration is 100 g/l and it variations are 2 ml, 4 ml, 6 ml, 8 ml, 10 ml, 20 ml, 30 ml, 40 ml and 50 ml. This step will produce precipitate and filtrate then it will be analysed to find out the result of this process. The precipitate was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) but the filtrate was analysed by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). XRD analysis shows that calcium oxalate and calcium carbonate were formed and ICP analysis shows that the remaining calcium in seawater using oxalic acid is about 0.01% and sodium 0.14% but when using ammonium bicarbonate the remaining calcium is 2.5% and sodium still more than 90%. The results show that both oxalic acid and ammonium bicarbonate can remove the impurities but when using oxalic acid, not only the impurities but also magnesium was precipitated. The conclusion of this research is the best solution to remove the impurities in seawater without precipitate the magnesium is using ammonium bicarbonate.

  8. Cryogenic Laser Calorimetry for Impurity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimm, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The results of a one-year effort to determine the applicability of laser-calorimetric spectroscopy to the study of deep-level impurities in silicon are presented. Critical considerations for impurity analysis by laser-calorimetric spectroscopy are discussed, the design and performance of a cryogenic laser calorimeter is described, and measurements of background absorption in high-purity silicon are presented.

  9. The Effect of Boron Impurity on the Structure and Mechanical Properties of Hafnium

    OpenAIRE

    S.V. Chornobuk; V.A. Makara; A.O. Goncharenko

    2017-01-01

    In present study the influence of low concentrations (≤ 1.5 at. %) impurities of boron on the structure and mechanical properties of hafnium has been discussed. Experimental specimens of the alloys with different content of impurities of boron have been compacted during reaction hot syntering. Revealed significant dependence of structure and mechanical properties of these alloys on their composition. The prospective use of boron as an alloying element to improve the operational characteristic...

  10. Impurity profiles at the JET divertor targets compared with the DIVIMP code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, G.F.; Gottardi, N.A.C.; Harbour, P.J.; Horton, L.D.; Jackel, H.J.; De Kock, L.; Loarte, A.; Maggi, C.F.; O' Brien, D.P.J.; Simonini, R.; Spence, J.; Stamp, M.F.; Stott, P.E.; Summers, H.P.; Tagle, J.; Von Hellerman, M. (JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)); Stangeby, P.C.; Elder, J.D. (Univ. Toronto, Inst. for Aerospace Studies, Downsview, Ontario (Canada))

    1992-12-01

    In this paper we describe the simulation of edge diagnostics in JET using the DIVIMP (divertor impurity) Monte Carlo code. We concentrate on two ohmic pulses and show how the results are influenced by a variety of modeling assumptions. Our results show that a wall source must be included to explain the diagnostic signals. The wall source is shown to be a significant source of impurity in the discharges studied and more generally. (orig.).

  11. Nuclear relaxation via paramagnetic impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Dzheparov, F S; Jacquinot, J F

    2002-01-01

    First part of the work contains a calculation of the kinetics of nuclear relaxation via paramagnetic impurities for systems with arbitrary (including fractal) space dimension d basing on ideas, which run current for 3d objects now. A new mean-field-type theory is constructed in the second part of the work. It reproduces all results of the first part for integer d and gives a possibility to describe the process for longer time, when a crossover to Balagurov-Waks asymptotics starts to develop. Solutions of the equations of the new theory are constructed for integer d. To obtain the solutions a method of calculation of the low-energy and long-wave asymptotics for T matrix of potential scattering out of the mass shell for singular repulsive potentials is developed

  12. Neoclassical impurity transport in stellarator geometry

    CERN Document Server

    García-Regaña, J M; Beidler, C D; berg, H Maaß; Helander, P; Turkin, Y

    2012-01-01

    The impurity dynamics in stellarators has become an issue of moderate concern due to the, \\textit{a priori}, inherent tendency of the impurities to accumulate in the core when the neoclassical ambipolar radial electric field points radially inwards (ion root regime). This accumulation can lead to collapse of the plasma due to radiative losses, and thus limit high performance plasma discharges in non-axisymmetric devices. Theoretically, a quantitative description of the neoclassical impurity transport is complicated by the breakdown of the assumption of small $q \\tilde{\\Phi}/T$ for impurities, where $q$ is the electric charge, $T$ the temperature in energy units, and $\\tilde{\\Phi}$ the electrostatic potential variation within the flux surface. The present work describes quantitatively the particle transport of impurities in the frame of local neoclassical theory when $q\\tilde{\\Phi}/T=O(1)$ in the Large Helical Device (LHD) stellarator. %and the Wendelstein 7-X stellarators. The central numerical tool used is t...

  13. Analytical control of process impurities in Pazopanib hydrochloride by impurity fate mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Liu, David Q; Yang, Shawn; Sudini, Ravinder; McGuire, Michael A; Bhanushali, Dharmesh S; Kord, Alireza S

    2010-08-01

    Understanding the origin and fate of organic impurities within the manufacturing process along with a good control strategy is an integral part of the quality control of drug substance. Following the underlying principles of quality by design (QbD), a systematic approach to analytical control of process impurities by impurity fate mapping (IFM) has been developed and applied to the investigation and control of impurities in the manufacturing process of Pazopanib hydrochloride, an anticancer drug approved recently by the U.S. FDA. This approach requires an aggressive chemical and analytical search for potential impurities in the starting materials, intermediates and drug substance, and experimental studies to track their fate through the manufacturing process in order to understand the process capability for rejecting such impurities. Comprehensive IFM can provide elements of control strategies for impurities. This paper highlights the critical roles that analytical sciences play in the IFM process and impurity control. The application of various analytical techniques (HPLC, LC-MS, NMR, etc.) and development of sensitive and selective methods for impurity detection, identification, separation and quantification are highlighted with illustrative examples. As an essential part of the entire control strategy for Pazopanib hydrochloride, analytical control of impurities with 'meaningful' specifications and the 'right' analytical methods is addressed. In particular, IFM provides scientific justification that can allow for control of process impurities up-stream at the starting materials or intermediates whenever possible.

  14. Intergranular Corrosion of 316L Stainless Steel by Aging and UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano-crystal Surface Modification) treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Kim, Y. S. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Austenitic stainless steels have been widely used in many engineering fields because of their high corrosion resistance and good mechanical properties. However, welding or aging treatment may induce intergranular corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, pitting, etc. Since these types of corrosion are closely related to the formation of chromium carbide in grain boundaries, the alloys are controlled using methods such as lowering the carbon content, solution heat treatment, alloying of stabilization elements, and grain boundary engineering. This work focused on the effects of aging and UNSM (Ultrasonic Nano-crystal Surface Modification) on the intergranular corrosion of commercial 316L stainless steel and the results are discussed on the basis of the sensitization by chromium carbide formation and carbon segregation, residual stress, grain refinement, and grain boundary engineering.

  15. Intergranular Corrosion Behavior of Low-Nickel and 304 Austenitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansod, Ankur V.; Patil, Awanikumar P.; Moon, Abhijeet P.; Khobragade, Nilay N.

    2016-09-01

    Intergranular corrosion (IGC) susceptibility for Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel and 304 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) was estimated using electrochemical techniques. Optical and SEM microscopy studies were carried out to investigate the nature of IGC at 700 °C with increasing time (15, 30, 60, 180, 360, 720, 1440 min) according to ASTM standard 262 A. Quantitative analysis was performed to estimate the degree of sensitization (DOS) using double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR) and EIS technique. DLEPR results indicated that with the increase in thermal aging duration, DOS becomes more severe for both types of stainless steel. The DOS for Cr-Mn ASS was found to be higher (65.12% for 1440 min) than that of the AISI 304 ASS (23% for 1440 min). The higher degree of sensitization resulted in lowering of electrical charge capacitance resistance. Chronoamperometry studies were carried out at a passive potential of 0.4 V versus SCE and was observed to have a higher anodic dissolution of the passive film of Cr-Mn ASS. EDS studies show the formation of chromium carbide precipitates in the vicinity of the grain boundary. The higher Mn content was also observed for Cr-Mn ASS at the grain boundary.

  16. Atomistic Structure, Strength, and Kinetic Properties of Intergranular Films in Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garofalini, Stephen H

    2015-01-08

    Intergranular films (IGFs) present in polycrystalline oxide and nitride ceramics provide an excellent example of nanoconfined glasses that occupy only a small volume percentage of the bulk ceramic, but can significantly influence various mechanical, thermal, chemical, and optical properties. By employing molecular dynamics computer simulations, we have been able to predict structures and the locations of atoms at the crystal/IGF interface that were subsequently verified with the newest electron microscopies. Modification of the chemistry of the crystal surface in the simulations provided the necessary mechanism for adsorption of specific rare earth ions from the IGF in the liquid state to the crystal surface. Such results had eluded other computational approaches such as ab-initio calculations because of the need to include not only the modified chemistry of the crystal surfaces but also an accurate description of the adjoining glassy IGF. This segregation of certain ions from the IGF to the crystal caused changes in the local chemistry of the IGF that affected fracture behavior in the simulations. Additional work with the rare earth ions La and Lu in the silicon oxynitride IGFs showed the mechanisms for their different affects on crystal growth, even though both types of ions are seen adhering to a bounding crystal surface that would normally imply equivalent affects on grain growth.

  17. Status report: Intergranular stress corrosion cracking of BWR core shrouds and other internal components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    On July 25, 1994, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter (GL) 94-03 to obtain information needed to assess compliance with regulatory requirements regarding the structural integrity of core shrouds in domestic boiling water reactors (BWRs). This report begins with a brief description of the safety significance of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) as it relates to the design and function of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. It then presents a brief history of shroud cracking events both in the US and abroad, followed by an indepth summary of the industry actions to address the issue of IGSCC in BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report summarizes the staff`s basis for issuing GL 94-03, as well as the staff`s assessment of plant-specific responses to GL 94-03. The staff is continually evaluating the licensee inspection programs and the results from examinations of BWR core shrouds and other internal components. This report is representative of submittals to and evaluations by the staff as of September 30, 1995. An update of this report will be issued at a later date.

  18. Investigation of intergranular bright points from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Kai-Fan; Xiang, Yong-yuan; Feng, Song; Deng, Hui; Wang, Feng; Yang, Yun-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Six high-resolution TiO-band image sequences from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) are used to investigate the properties of intergranular bright points (igBPs). We detect the igBPs using a Laplacian and morphological dilation algorithm (LMD) and track them using a three-dimensional segmentation algorithm automatically, and then investigate the morphologic, photometric and dynamic properties of igBPs, in terms of equivalent diameter, the intensity contrast, lifetime, horizontal velocity, diffusion index, motion range and motion type. The statistical results confirm the previous studies based on G-band or TiO-band igBPs from the other telescopes. It illustrates that the TiO data from the NVST have a stable and reliable quality, which are suitable for studying the igBPs. In addition, our method is feasible to detect and track the igBPs in the TiO data from the NVST. With the aid of the vector magnetograms obtained from the Solar Dynamics Observatory /Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, the properties of igBP...

  19. Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking in HAZ for super-martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyata, Yukio; Kimura, Mitsuo [Tubular Products and Casting Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Nakamichi, Haruo; Sato, Kaoru [Analysis and Characterization Research Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 1-1, Minamiwatarida-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki (Japan); Itakura, Noritsugu [Products Service and Development Dept., Chita Works, JFE Steel Corporation. 1-1, Kawasaki-cho, Handa (Japan); Masamura, Katsumi [Tubular Products Business Planning Dept., JFE Steel Corporation, 2-2-3, Uchisaiwai-sho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanism of intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) for heat affected zone (HAZ) of super-martensitic stainless steel was studied using two types of the steel. One was a lean grade, which was Mo free and low Ni, and the other was a high grade, which was Mo added and high Ni. Specimens received heat treatments simulating welding thermal cycles were applied to SCC tests. Cracks were observed in some specimens after U-bend SCC test under low pH environments. Thermal cycle conditions with sensitization were verified from the results. No crack was observed in the specimen with the thermal cycle simulating post welding heat treatment (PWHT) after sensitizing conditions. Therefore, PWHT was clarified to be effective to prevent the cracking. Cr carbides were observed along prior austenite grain boundary intermittently, and Cr depleted zone was confirmed on the grain boundary adjacent to carbides that precipitated on the grain boundary. It is, therefore, concluded that the cracking results from Cr depletion on prior austenite grain boundary accompanied by precipitation of Cr carbides under specific welding conditions. (authors)

  20. Numerical modelling of intergranular fracture in polycrystalline materials and grain size effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Wriggers

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the phenomenon of intergranular fracture in polycrystalline materials is investigated using a nonlinear fracture mechanics approach. The nonlocal cohesive zone model (CZM for finite thickness interfaces recently proposed by the present authors is used to describe the phenomenon of grain boundary separation. From the modelling point of view, considering the dependency of the grain boundary thickness on the grain size observed in polycrystals, a distribution of interface thicknesses is obtained. Since the shape and the parameters of the nonlocal CZM depend on the interface thickness, a distribution of interface fracture energies is obtained as a consequence of the randomness of the material microstructure. Using these data, fracture mechanics simulations are performed and the homogenized stress-strain curves of 2D representative volume elements (RVEs are computed. Failure is the result of a diffuse microcrack pattern leading to a main macroscopic crack after coalescence, in good agreement with the experimental observation. Finally, testing microstructures characterized by different average grain sizes, the computed peak stresses are found to be dependent on the grain size, in agreement with the trend expected according to the Hall-Petch law.

  1. A phenomenological variational multiscale constitutive model for intergranular failure in nanocrystalline materials

    KAUST Repository

    Siddiq, A.

    2013-09-01

    We present a variational multiscale constitutive model that accounts for intergranular failure in nanocrystalline fcc metals due to void growth and coalescence in the grain boundary region. Following previous work by the authors, a nanocrystalline material is modeled as a two-phase material consisting of a grain interior phase and a grain boundary affected zone (GBAZ). A crystal plasticity model that accounts for the transition from partial dislocation to full dislocation mediated plasticity is used for the grain interior. Isotropic porous plasticity model with further extension to account for failure due to the void coalescence was used for the GBAZ. The extended model contains all the deformation phases, i.e. elastic deformation, plastic deformation including deviatoric and volumetric plasticity (void growth) followed by damage initiation and evolution due to void coalescence. Parametric studies have been performed to assess the model\\'s dependence on the different input parameters. The model is then validated against uniaxial loading experiments for different materials. Lastly we show the model\\'s ability to predict the damage and fracture of a dog-bone shaped specimen as observed experimentally. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Dynamic Embrittlement in Cu-Cr-Zr-Ti Alloy: Evidence of Intergranular Segregation of Sulphur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenna Krishna, S.; Radhika, K. V.; Tharian, K. Thomas; Swathi Kiranmayee, M.; Sudarshan Rao, G.; Jha, Abhay K.; Pant, Bhanu

    2013-08-01

    In the present investigation, Cu-0.6Cr-0.005Zr-0.0045Ti alloy was subjected to different heat treatment and thermomechanical treatment (TMT) to simulate the conditions experienced during brazing and forming, respectively. Grain coarsening was observed in the samples subjected to heat treatment, and grain refinement was observed in the samples subjected to TMT. Tensile tests conducted with these samples at room temperature and 600 °C have shown that Cu-Cr-Zr-Ti alloy was susceptible to dynamic embrittlement (DE). However, the observation was limited to coarse-grained samples (280-350 μm) at 600 °C. On the other hand, the fine-grained samples (20-40 μm) showed good ductility. Electron microscopy studies conducted on the tensile-tested specimens prone to DE indicated the presence of sulfur on the fractured surface and intergranular segregation of sulfur. Therefore, it can be inferred from the results that DE due to sulfur can occur in Cu-Cr-Zr-Ti alloy at elevated temperature for coarse-grained samples.

  3. Sensitization, intergranular attack, stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation effects on the corrosion of iron--chromium--nickel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.C.S.

    1978-04-01

    A literature review is presented on the sensitization, intergranular attack, and stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels with emphasis on dilute solutions at temperatures below the boiling point of water. An attempt is made to list the possible sources of contaminants during manufacture, shipping, construction and all phases of operation of the sodium containing components. The susceptibility of the different materials to stress corrosion cracking in the various contaminants is discussed and suggestions to prevent serious problems are made. (GHT)

  4. The influence of a homologous protein impurity on lysozyme crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamidi, V.; Hanson, B. L.; Edmundson, A.; Skrzypczak-Jankun, E.; Schall, C.

    1999-08-01

    The effect of a structurally similar protein impurity, turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo) egg-white lysozyme (TEWL) on crystallization of the host protein, hen-egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) from chicken ( Gallus gallus) was studied under varying impurity and host solution concentrations. A change in morphology is observed when crystals of HEWL are grown in the presence of TEWL. As the relative amount of TEWL increases, HEWL crystals become more elongated in the [0 0 1] direction. Elongation is more pronounced in samples with lower initial concentrations of HEWL than in samples with higher initial concentrations. This behavior is consistent with that of impurities in small molecule crystal growth and with predictions based on the Kubota-Mullin model. The observed effect on the growth process can be attributed to the apparent inhibition in the [1 1 0] crystal growth direction of HEWL by TEWL since slowly growing faces become dominant faces in crystal growth. Incorporation of TEWL into HEWL crystals grown in a sitting drop batch method was measured using cation exchange chromatography. The results indicate that impurity incorporation is associated with increasing supersaturation. This conclusion is consistent with a kinetically controlled process of impurity incorporation. The observed impurity effects are most probably associated with the interchange of glutamine in position 41 of HEWL by histidine in TEWL.

  5. Development and validation of a chromatographic method for determining Clematichinenoside AR and related impurities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clematichinenoside AR is a promising lead compound for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. A systematic research for the related impurities in AR bulk samples is still lacking. For the safe use of this natural product in future clinical practice, the structure and content of each constituent, including the main ingredient as well as the impurities in AR bulk sample must be characterized in detail. Results A simple and stability indicating RP-HPLC method was developed and validated for determining the purity of clematichinenoside AR (AR, a natural product from the roots of Clematis manshurica Rupr. (Ranunculaceae with the potential of treating rheumatoid arthritis. Five impurities were characterized, and impurity 2 (Clematomandshurica saponin F is a new triterpenoid saponin isolated from this product. Optimum separation for clematichinenoside AR and five related impurities was carried out on an Agilent octadecylsilane bonded silica gel column (TC-C18, 4.6 mm ×150 mm, 5 μm using a gradient HPLC method. The validation results showed good sensitivity, specificity, linearity(r2>0.9992 precision(RSD Conclusion Five related impurities of clematichinenoside AR were characterized, including a new triterpenoid saponins firstly found in clematichinenoside AR bulk samples. In the simple chromatographic method for determining clematichinenoside AR and its related impurities in bulk samples, the correction factor was better for the quality control in the relative stable concentrations.

  6. Determination of the equivalent intergranular void ratio - Application to the instability and the critical state of silty sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung-Kien; Benahmed, Nadia; Hicher, Pierre-Yves

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of mechanical response of natural Camargue silty sand. The analysis of test results used the equivalent intergranular void ratio instead of the global void ratio. The calculation of equivalent intergranular void ratio requires the determination of parameter b which represents, physically, the fraction of active fines participating on the chain forces network, hence the strength of the soil. A new formula for determining the parameter b by using an approach based on the coordination number distribution and probability calculation is proposed. The validation of the developed relationship was done through back-analysis of published datasets in literature on the effect of fines content on silty sand behavior. It is shown that the equivalent intergranular void ratio calculated with the b value obtained by the new formula is able to provide strong correlation to not only the critical state of but also the onset of instability of various silty sands, in different terms as peak deviator stress, peak stress ratio or cyclic resistance. Therefore, it is suggested that the use of the equivalent void ratio concept and the new b calculating formula is highly desirable in predicting of the silty sand behavior.

  7. Determination of the equivalent intergranular void ratio - Application to the instability and the critical state of silty sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Trung-Kien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of mechanical response of natural Camargue silty sand. The analysis of test results used the equivalent intergranular void ratio instead of the global void ratio. The calculation of equivalent intergranular void ratio requires the determination of parameter b which represents, physically, the fraction of active fines participating on the chain forces network, hence the strength of the soil. A new formula for determining the parameter b by using an approach based on the coordination number distribution and probability calculation is proposed. The validation of the developed relationship was done through back-analysis of published datasets in literature on the effect of fines content on silty sand behavior. It is shown that the equivalent intergranular void ratio calculated with the b value obtained by the new formula is able to provide strong correlation to not only the critical state of but also the onset of instability of various silty sands, in different terms as peak deviator stress, peak stress ratio or cyclic resistance. Therefore, it is suggested that the use of the equivalent void ratio concept and the new b calculating formula is highly desirable in predicting of the silty sand behavior.

  8. Influence of the selected structural parameter on a depth of intergranular corrosion of Al-Si7-Mg0,3 aluminum alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bernat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an influence of the Dendrite Arm Spacing (DAS microstructure parameter on the intergranular corrosion of AlSi7Mg aluminum alloy. The samples were subjected to the corrosion process for: 2,5; 12; 24; 48 and 96 hours in NaCl + HCl + H2O solution. It was noted that the DAS parameter significantly influenced on a distribution and depth of the intergranular corrosion of the hypoeutectic Al - Si - Mg silumin.

  9. Properties of LuAP: CE scintillator containing intentional impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Petrosyan, A G; Ovanesyan, K; Lecoq, Paul; Auffray, Etiennette; Trummer, Julia; Kronberger, Matthias; Pédrini, C; Dujardin, C; Anfre, P

    2007-01-01

    Single crystals of LuAP:Ce and LuYAP(Lu*70%):Ce co-doped with tetravalent (Hf and Zr) and pentavalent (Ta) ions were grown from melts by the Bridgman process. Underlying absorption, slope of the optical edge and transmission in the range of emission were compared to those of LuAP:Ce crystals. Absorption coefficients at 260 nm less than 2 cm−1 have been recorded in LuAP:Ce crystals containing tetravalent ions that are lower than the corresponding figures (5–6 cm−1) measured in undoped LuAP. At high concentrations of added impurities, despite of suppression of the parasitic underlying absorption below 300 nm, the slope of the optical edge and transmission in the range of emission are seriously damaged. Scintillation parameters of crystals with added impurities are compared to those of LuAP:Ce.

  10. Evaluation of hydrogen and oxygen impurity levels on silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Netterfield, R.P.; Martin, P.J.; Leistner, A. [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Div. of Applied Physics

    1996-12-31

    This paper reports on surface analytical techniques used to quantify surface concentrations of impurities such as oxygen and hydrogen. The following analytical techniques were used: Rutherford and Backscattering, elastic recoil detection, time-of-flight SIMS, spectroscopic ellipsometry, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results have shown a spread in thickness of oxide layer, ranging from unmeasurable to 1.6 nm. The data must be considered as preliminary at this stage, but give some insight into the suitability of the techniques and a general idea of the significance of impurities at the monolayer level. These measurements have been carried out on a small number of silicon surfaces both semiconductor grade <111> crystalline material and silicon which has been used in sphere fabrication. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Influence of iron impurities on defected graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccio, Ricardo; Pardo, Helena [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay); Araújo-Moreira, Fernando M. [Materials and Devices Group, Department of Physics, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, SP 13565-905 (Brazil); Mombrú, Alvaro W., E-mail: amombru@fq.edu.uy [Centro NanoMat, Cryssmat-Lab, DETEMA, Polo Tecnológico de Pando, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Cno. Saravia s/n, CP 91000 Pando (Uruguay); Centro Interdisciplinario en Nanotecnología, Química y Física de Materiales, Espacio Interdisciplinario, Universidad de la República, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    2015-03-01

    Highlights: • The interaction among a multivacancy graphene system and iron impurities is studied. • The studied iron impurities were single atom and tetrahedral and octahedral clusters. • DFT calculations using the VASP code were performed. • The embedding of Fe affects the structure and electronic behavior in the graphene. • Half metal or semimetal behavior can be obtained, depending on the Fe impurities. - Abstract: The aim of this work is to study the interaction of selected iron cluster impurities and a multivacancy graphene system, in terms of the structural distortion that the impurities cause as well as their magnetic response. While originally, the interaction has been limited to vacancies and isolated metallic atoms, in this case, we consider small iron clusters. This study was undertaken using Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations. The influence of the iron impurities in the electronic structure of the vacant graphene system is discussed. The main conclusion of this work is that the presence of iron impurities acts lowering the magnetic signal due to the occurrence of spin pairing between carbon and iron, instead of enhancing the possible intrinsic carbon magnetism.

  12. Impurity atoms on view in cuprates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Séamus Davis

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Impurity atoms in a material are usually viewed as a problem because they can result in non-ideal properties. However, they can sometimes be used to advantage when attempting to understand new materials. This is because the interactions of an impurity atom with the material reveal detailed information on the local electronic environment. In this paper we discuss scanning tunneling microscopy studies of the atomic-scale effects of individual Ni and Zn impurity atoms on the cuprate high critical temperature superconductors.

  13. Simulated impurity transport in LHD from MIST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, J.E. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    The impurity transport code MIST and atomic physics package LINES are used to calculate the time evolution of charge state density profiles, individual line emissivity profiles and total radiated power profiles for impurities in LHD plasmas. Three model LHD plasmas are considered; a high density, low temperature case, a low density, high temperature case and the initial LHD start-up plasma (500 kW ECH), using impurity transport coefficient profiles from Heliotron E. The elements oxygen, neon, scandium, iron, nickel and molybdenum are considered, both injected and in steady state. (author)

  14. First-Principles Studies on Properties of Boron-Related Impurities in c-BN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Fu-Bo; WANG Xiao-Li; MA Yan-Ming; CUI Tian; LIU Bing-Bing; ZOU Guang-Tian

    2009-01-01

    We investigate,by first-principles calculations,the pressure dependence of formation enthalpies and defective geometry and bulk modulus of boron-related impurities (VB,CB,NB,and OB ) with different charged states in cubic boron nitride (c-BN) using a supercell approach.It is found that the nitrogen atoms surrounding the defect relax inward in the case of CB,while the nitrogen atoms relax outward in the other cases.These boron-related impurities become much more stable and have larger concentration with increasing pressure.The impurity C+B1 is found to have the lowest formation enthalpy,make the material exhibit semiconductor characters and have the bulk modulus higher than ideal c-BN and than those in the cases of other impurities.Our results suggest that the hardness of c-BN may be strengthened when a carbon atom substitutes at a B site.

  15. Carbon impurities on graphene synthesized by chemical vapor deposition on platinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ping, Jinglei; Fuhrer, Michael S., E-mail: michael.fuhrer@monash.edu [Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111, USA and School of Physics, Monash University, 3800 Victoria (Australia)

    2014-07-28

    We report nanocrystalline carbon impurities coexisting with graphene synthesized via chemical vapor deposition on platinum. For certain growth conditions, we observe micron-size island-like impurity layers which can be mistaken for second graphene layers in optical microscopy or scanning electron microscopy. The island orientation depends on the crystalline orientation of the Pt, as shown by electron backscatter diffraction, indicating growth of carbon at the platinum surface below graphene. Dark-field transmission electron microscopy indicates that in addition to uniform single-crystal graphene, our sample is decorated with nanocrystalline carbon impurities with a spatially inhomogeneous distribution. The impurity concentration can be reduced significantly by lowering the growth temperature. Raman spectra show a large D peak, however, electrical characterization shows high mobility (∼8000 cm{sup 2}/Vs), indicating a limitation for Raman spectroscopy in characterizing the electronic quality of graphene.

  16. Investigation of intergranular bright points from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Kai-Fan; Xiong, Jian-Ping; Xiang, Yong-Yuan; Feng, Song; Deng, Hui; Wang, Feng; Yang, Yun-Fei

    2016-05-01

    Six high-resolution TiO-band image sequences from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) are used to investigate the properties of intergranular bright points (igBPs). We detect the igBPs using a Laplacian and morphological dilation algorithm (LMD) and automatically track them using a three-dimensional segmentation algorithm, and then investigate the morphologic, photometric and dynamic properties of igBPs in terms of equivalent diameter, intensity contrast, lifetime, horizontal velocity, diffusion index, motion range and motion type. The statistical results confirm previous studies based on G-band or TiO-band igBPs from other telescopes. These results illustrate that TiO data from the NVST are stable and reliable, and are suitable for studying igBPs. In addition, our method is feasible for detecting and tracking igBPs with TiO data from the NVST. With the aid of vector magnetograms obtained from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, the properties of igBPs are found to be strongly influenced by their embedded magnetic environments. The areal coverage, size and intensity contrast values of igBPs are generally larger in regions with higher magnetic flux. However, the dynamics of igBPs, including the horizontal velocity, diffusion index, ratio of motion range and index of motion type are generally larger in the regions with lower magnetic flux. This suggests that the absence of strong magnetic fields in the medium makes it possible for the igBPs to look smaller and weaker, diffuse faster, and move faster and further along a straighter path.

  17. Intergranular crack propagation rates in sensitized Type 304 stainless steel in an oxygenated water environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

    1983-12-01

    Intergranular stress-corrosion crack (IGSCC) propagation rates were measured in three heats of sensitized Type 304 stainless steel (SS) as a function of applied load and sensitization in high-purity water with 8 ppM. Active-loading tests yielded IGSCC propagation rates ranging from approx. 2 x 10/sup -10/ to 1 x 10/sup -9/ m/s (approx. 2 x 10/sup -5/ to 2 x 10/sup -4/ in./h) over the range of stress intensities from 25 to 46 MPa..sqrt..m (22 to 41 ksi..sqrt..in.). If the dependence of propagation rate on stress intensity is assumed to follow a power law, a least-squares fit of data yields (da/dt) = 1.23 x 10/sup -8/ K/sup 2/ /sup 42/ (in./h) for K in ksi..sqrt..in. Deflection-controlled tests on standard 12.7-mm-thick compact tension specimens yielded IGSCC propagation rates from 7 x 10/sup -12/ to 2 x 10/sup -10/ m/s (10/sup -6/ to 2 x 10/sup -5/ in./h) at effective average stress intensities in the range 21 to 26 MPa..sqrt..m (19 to 24 ksi..sqrt..in.). Crack lengths were determined by compilance measurements using in-situ high-temperature clip gage or LVDT methods, optical metallography on the side faces of the specimen, and fractography of the cracked surface after completion of the tests. The optical metallography measurements did not provide useful estimates of crack lengths, because large variations in IGSCC propagation across the thickness of the specimens occurred. The effects of the degree of sensitization on the IGSCC propagation rate are obscured by the data scatter. However, it seems clear that these variables do not lead to order-of-magnitude changes in the crack propagation rate.

  18. Study of the Intergranular Corrosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Stainless Steel in Transpassive Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed Behbahani, Khashayar; Najafisayar, Pooria; Pakshir, Mahmoud

    2016-08-01

    In this study, intergranular corrosion behavior of UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel was investigated using conventional potentiodynamic polarization, double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique carried out at different potentials in the transpassive region. Different types of heat treatments were used to obtain samples with different degrees of sensitization. The results of the DLEPR tests showed that the solution-annealed sample and that was sensitized for half an hour would be considered as nonsensitized ones. Moreover, the sample that was sensitized for 24 h exhibits the highest value of the degree of sensitization. Polarization test results showed a typical active-passive behavior from which the transpassive potential range was determined and used as the range of the applied DC bias in the EIS experiments. Three different AC responses (including capacitive and inductive responses) were observed depending on the value of applied DC bias in the EIS experiments. In addition, it was observed that the presence of the second inductive loop at high applied DC bias is due to the adsorption of nonsoluble corrosion products on the surface of the samples. Moreover, the fitted values to the charge transfer and polarization resistances ( R ct and R P) decreased as the sensitization time increased from 30 min to 24 h. Such observations were in good accordance with the metallographic examination of the corroded surfaces, carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques, revealing discontinuous grain boundary attack in nonsensitized samples and a continuous network of grain boundary attack in the case of sensitized ones. Moreover, as the applied DC bias increases the ferrite phase attack also occurs in the sensitized samples. In addition, approximately no pitting corrosion was observed on the surface of the corroded samples which is in accordance with their respective cyclic

  19. Intergranular corrosion testing of austenitic stainless steels in nitric acid solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whillock, G.O.H.; Dunnett, B. F. [British Nuclear Fuels plc, BNFL, B170, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    In hot strong nitric acid solutions, stainless steels exhibit intergranular corrosion. Corrosion rates are often measured from immersion testing of specimens manufactured from the relevant material (e.g. plate or pipe). The corrosion rates, measured from weight loss, are found to increase with time prior to reaching steady state, which can take thousands of hours to achieve. The apparent increase in corrosion rate as a function of time was found to be an artefact due to the surface area of the specimen's being used in the corrosion rate calculations, rather than that of the true area undergoing active corrosion i.e. the grain boundaries. The steady state corrosion rate coincided with the onset of stable grain dropping, where the use of the surface area of the specimen to convert the weight loss measurements to corrosion rates was found to be appropriate. This was confirmed by sectioning of the specimens and measuring the penetration depths. The rate of penetration was found to be independent of time and no induction period was observed. A method was developed to shorten considerably the testing time to reach the steady state corrosion rate by use of a pre-treatment that induces grain dropping. The long-term corrosion rates from specimens which were pre-treated was similar to that achieved after prolonged testing of untreated (i.e. initially ground) specimens. The presence of cut surfaces is generally unavoidable in the simple immersion testing of specimens in test solutions. However, inaccuracy in the results may occur as the measured corrosion rate is often influenced by the orientation of the microstructure, the highest rates typically being observed on the cut surfaces. Two methods are presented which allow deconvolution of the corrosion rates from immersion testing of specimens containing cut surfaces, thus allowing reliable prediction of the long-term corrosion rate of plate surfaces. (authors)

  20. Metallurgical Source of Cryogenic Intergranular Fracture of Fe-38Mn Austenitic Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    SEM and Field emitting TEM-EDAX were used to investigate the fracture surface of series impact specimens and the grain boundary chemistries of VIM (vacuum-induction-melted) Fe-38Mn austenitic alloy before and after ESR (electroslag remelting,). The quantity and the size of inclusions were also examined. The results show that the VIM Fe-38Mn aust enitinic alloy water-quenched from 1 100 ℃ undergoes an obvious ductile-to-brittle transition, and the impact work at ambient temperature is 242 J, the corresponding fracture surface exhibits adimple character. However, the impact work at 77 K of VIM alloy is only 25 J and the fracture mode is IGF (intergranular f racture). After ESR, the impact work at ambient temperature is 320 J and the fra cture surface exhibits a character of "volcano lava" (meaning excellent toughn ess); The impact work at 77 K is up to 300 J and the fracture mode is microvoid coalescence mixed with quasi-cleavage. The segregation of Mn is not found in all specimens, but the segregation of S is observed, and the S segregation is decreased after ESR. The examined results of inclusions show that ESR reduces the quantity and improves the morphology of inclusions. From the above results it can be seen that the cryogenic IGF of VIM Fe-38Mn austenitic alloy is related to the S segregation at grain boundary. After ESR the decrease in the quantity and size of inclusion results in the increase of the impact work at ambient temperature, while the restriction of IGF is related to the decrease in the total level, and hence in the grain boundary segregation of S.

  1. Effects of impurity location on the impurity bands and their spectral densities in quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A.; Ghazali, A.; Serre, J.

    1989-09-01

    The electronic density of states and the spectral density of quantum wells are calculated as functions of the impurity position zi. A multiple-scattering method which accounts for the formation of impurity bands is used. The study of the spectral densities provides us with the behavior of the averaged wave functions of the ground- and excited-state impurity bands in the k space. We demonstrate that our approach can be used to study hybridization effects between different bands.

  2. Characterization of impurities in biogas before and after upgrading to vehicle fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrhenius, Karine; Johansson, Ulrika [SP Technical Research Institute of Sweden, Boraas (Sweden)

    2012-01-15

    Biogases produced by digesting organic wastes, residual sludge from waste water treatment, energy crops,byproducts from industry or in landfills contain impurities which can be harmful for components that will be in contact with the biogas during its utilization. In this project, the impurities present in biogases have been mapped out depending upon which feedstock is digested. P-cymene och D-limonene, two terpenes, have been found to be characteristics for biogases produced from the digestion of waste including household wastes while an 'oil' fraction containing alkanes with 9 to 13 carbon atoms is characteristic for biogases produced at waste water treatment plants. Ketones and sulfur compounds are found in biogases produced from the digestion of food industry wastes or energy crops. It was not possible to characterize impurities in biogases produced in farm plants digesting manure because not enough samples were analyzed from these plants. In order to understand the relation between the feedstock and the impurities present in the biogas, an extensive study on feedstock characterization must be conducted. One question to be answered is if these impurities only originate from the volatilization from the feedstock and in this case, why only these specific compounds are found at significant concentrations. In this study we have also studied how effective purification/upgrading techniques are to remove impurities that have been identified in biogases. En general comment is that the upgraded gas still contains a part of the characteristic impurities which have been identified for each feedstock at different levels of concentration depending on which technique has been used. The results show that activated carbon filters are more or less effective. Some of them can remove more than 90 % of the impurities while others remove less that 10 %. Results show also that the amine scrubber have very moderate effects on the impurities composition. In that case, the

  3. DETERMINATION OF IMPURITY ELEMENTS IN ALUMINIUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯小琳; 张永保

    1994-01-01

    Twenty five impurity elements in aluminium applied as reactor material are determined.Titanium and nickel are determined with epithermal neutron activation analysis(NAA),magnesium and silicon by inductance coupling plasma emission spectra(ICP),other elements by thermal NAA.The fission coefficient of uranium is given by an experiment,the interferences of uranium to Ce,Nd,Mo,Zr,La,Sm are subtracted.The detection limits of these methods to all of impurity elements in aluminium are calculated.

  4. Quantum critical points in quantum impurity systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jung [Theoretische Physik III, Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany); Bulla, Ralf [Theoretische Physik III, Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universitaet Augsburg (Germany)]. E-mail: bulla@cpfs.mpg.de

    2005-04-30

    The numerical renormalization group method is used to investigate zero-temperature phase transitions in quantum impurity systems, in particular in the soft-gap Anderson model, where an impurity couples to a non-trivial fermionic bath. In this case, zero-temperature phase transitions occur between two different phases whose fixed points can be built up of non-interacting single-particle states. However, the quantum critical point cannot be described by non-interacting fermionic or bosonic excitations.

  5. Quantum critical points in quantum impurity systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Bulla, Ralf

    2005-04-01

    The numerical renormalization group method is used to investigate zero-temperature phase transitions in quantum impurity systems, in particular in the soft-gap Anderson model, where an impurity couples to a non-trivial fermionic bath. In this case, zero-temperature phase transitions occur between two different phases whose fixed points can be built up of non-interacting single-particle states. However, the quantum critical point cannot be described by non-interacting fermionic or bosonic excitations.

  6. Parametrically Driven Nonlinear Oscillators with an Impurity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张卓; 唐翌

    2002-01-01

    By virtue of the method of multiple scales, we study a chain of parametrically driven nonlinear oscillators with a mass impurity. An equation is presented to describe the nonlinear wave of small amplitude in the chain.In our derivation, the equation is applicable to any eigenmode of coupled pendulum. Our result shows that a nonpropagation soliton emerges as the lowest or highest eigenmode of coupled pendulum is excited, and the impurity tends to pin the nonpropagation soliton excitation.

  7. Effects of helium impurities on superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selle, J.E.

    1977-07-01

    A review of the literature on the effects of helium impurities on superalloys at elevated temperatures was undertaken. The actual effects of these impurities vary depending on the alloy, composition of the gas atmosphere, and temperature. In general, exposure in helium produces significant but not catastrophic changes in the structure and properties of the alloys. The effects of these treatments on the structure, creep, fatigue, and mechanical properties of the various alloys are reviewed and discussed. Suggestions for future work are presented.

  8. NMR investigation of boron impurities in refined metallurgical grade silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe, Hans-Joachim; Loeser, Wolfgang; Schmitz, Steffen; Sakaliyska, Miroslava [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW), Dresden (Germany); Wurmehl, Sabine [Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW), Dresden (Germany); Institute for Solid State Physics, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany); Eisert, Stefan; Reichenbach, Birk; Mueller, Tim [Adensis GmbH, Dresden (Germany); Acker, Joerg; Rietig, Anja; Ducke, Jana [Department of Chemistry, Faculty for Natural Sciences, Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus-Senftenberg, Senftenberg (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method was applied for tracking boron impurities in the refining process of metallurgical grade (MG) silicon. From the NMR signal of the {sup 11}B isotope at an operating temperature 4.2 K, the boron concentration can be estimated down to the order of 1-10 wppm B. After melting and resolidification of MG-Si alloyed with Ca and Ti, a major fraction of B impurities remains in the Si solid solution as inferred from the characteristic NMR frequency. The alloying element Ti does not form substantial fractions of TiB{sub 2}. Acid leaching of crushed powders of MG-Si alloyed with Ca and Ti can diminish the initial impurity content of B suggesting its accumulation in the grain boundary phases. NMR signals of TiB{sub 2} at 4.2 K and room temperature (RT), and of poly-Si with different B doping at 4.2 K. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Local chemistry of Al and P impurities in silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper; Stokbro, Kurt

    2000-01-01

    The local structure around Al and P impurities in silica is investigated using density-functional theory. Two distinct cases are considered: impurities substituting for a Si atom in alpha quartz, and impurities implanted in a stoichiometric alpha-quartz crystal. Both impurity elements are found t...

  10. Impurity Studies of Cd(0.8)Zn(0.2)Te Crystals Using Photoluminescence and Glow Discharge Mass Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ching-Hua; Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Scripa, Rosalie N.

    2005-01-01

    Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te semiconductor crystal is a highly promising material for room temperature x- and gamma-ray detector applications because of its high resistivity, long carrier lifetime, and relatively high hole and electron mobilities. This paper reports the investigation of the impurities in several Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te (x = 0.20) crystals grown using the vertical Bridgman method under a Cd overpressure. The impurity concentrations were measured using glow discharge mass spectroscopy (GDMS). The energy states of the impurities were studied using photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy at liquid helium temperature. The PL spectra showed a series of sharp high energy lines which are associated with free excitons and excitons bound to impurities as donors and acceptors in the crystals. The impurities also contributed to donor-acceptor pair recombination. The correlation between the GDMS and PL results will be reported.

  11. Impurity effects on residual zonal flow in deuterium (D)-tritium (T) plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weixin; Wang, Lu; Zhuang, Ge

    2017-05-01

    Significant effects of impurities on residual zonal flow (ZF) in deuterium (D)-tritium (T) plasmas are found. When the gyroradius of impurities is larger (smaller) than that of main ions, the intermediate scale (radial wavelength between trapped ion radial width {ρ\\text{bi}} and trapped electron radial width {ρ\\text{be}} ) residual ZF level is increased (decreased) due to the presence of various impurities with the tolerance concentration in JET and ITER, even for trace tungsten (W). For short scale (radial wavelength comparable to {ρ\\text{be}} ) region, the residual ZF level is increased by most of the impurities. Moreover, the trend of stronger intermediate residual ZF in D-T plasmas with heavier effective isotope mass is weakened by non-trace impurities, but is not influenced by trace W. These results reveal that the presence of impurities can modify residual ZF, and possibly further affect the ZF regulation of turbulence as well as the associated anomalous transport and confinement in magnetic fusion plasmas. The potential relevance of our findings to experimental observations and simulation results is discussed.

  12. Impurity in a Bose-Einstein condensate: Study of the attractive and repulsive branch using quantum Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, L. A. Peña; Giorgini, S.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the properties of an impurity immersed in a dilute Bose gas at zero temperature using quantum Monte Carlo methods. The interactions between bosons are modeled by a hard-sphere potential with scattering length a , whereas the interactions between the impurity and the bosons are modeled by a short-range, square-well potential where both the sign and the strength of the scattering length b can be varied by adjusting the well depth. We characterize the attractive and the repulsive polaron branch by calculating the binding energy and the effective mass of the impurity. Furthermore, we investigate the structural properties of the bath, such as the impurity-boson contact parameter and the change of the density profile around the impurity. At the unitary limit of the impurity-boson interaction, we find that the effective mass of the impurity remains smaller than twice its bare mass, while the binding energy scales with ℏ2n2 /3/m , where n is the density of the bath and m is the common mass of the impurity and the bosons in the bath. The implications for the phase diagram of binary Bose-Bose mixtures at low concentrations are also discussed.

  13. Influence of intergranular exchange coupling on the magnetization dynamics of CoCrPt:SiO{sub 2} granular media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, R.; Schmidt, H. [School of Engineering, University of California-Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, California 95064 (United States); Tibus, S. [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Institute of Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany); Springer, F. [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, D-78457 Konstanz (Germany); Fassbender, J. [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Rohrmann, H. [OC Oerlikon Balzers AG, LI-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein); Albrecht, M. [Institute of Physics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Str. 70, 09126 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2012-08-01

    We investigate the effect of Co{sup +} irradiation on the magnetization dynamics of CoCrPt:SiO{sub 2} granular media. Increasing irradiation levels reduce the saturation magnetization and effective anisotropy, which decrease the intrinsic magnetization precession frequency. Furthermore, increasing intergranular exchange coupling results in a qualitative change in the behavior of the magnetic material from a collection of individual grains to a homogeneous thin film, as evidenced in both the switching behavior and dynamics. The frequency change cannot be explained by single crystal macrospin modeling, and can only be reproduced by the inclusion of the dipolar effects and anisotropy distribution inherent in a granular medium.

  14. Impurity radiation in DEMO systems modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lux, H., E-mail: Hanni.Lux@ccfe.ac.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Kemp, R.; Ward, D.J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Sertoli, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasma Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Solving the exhaust problem is crucial for DEMO. • Here, we discuss the new impurity radiation model in the systems code PROCESS. • Furthermore, we assess its effect on DEMO design. • More appropriate scalings will significantly enhance predictions for DEMO. • The controllability of highly radiative scenarios remains to be shown. - Abstract: For fusion reactors with ITER divertor technology, it will be imperative to significantly reduce the heat flux into the divertor e.g. by seeded impurity radiation. This has to be done without affecting the accessibility of a high performance scenario. To assess the implications of seeded plasma impurities on DEMO design, we have developed an impurity radiation model for radiation inside the separatrix. Evaluating the validity of our model, we find the assumption of a local ionisation equilibrium to be appropriate for our purposes and the assumption of flat impurity profiles – even though not satisfactory – to represent the best currently possible. Benchmarking our model against other codes highlights the need to use up to date atomic loss function data. From the impurity radiation perspective, the main uncertainties in current DEMO design stem from the lack of confinement and L-H-threshold scalings that can be robustly extrapolated to highly radiative DEMO scenarios as well as the lack of appropriate models for the power flow from the separatrix into the divertor that include radiation in the scrape off layer. Despite these uncertainties in the model we can exclude that significant fuel dilution through seeded impurities (with Z ≥ Z{sub Ar}) will be an issue for DEMO, but the controllability of highly radiative scenarios still needs to be coherently shown.

  15. The role of Hydrogen and Creep in Intergranular Stress Corrosion Cracking of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 in PWR Primary Water Environments ? a Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebak, R B; Hua, F H

    2004-07-12

    Intergranular attack (IGA) and intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of Alloy 600 in PWR steam generator environment has been extensively studied for over 30 years without rendering a clear understanding of the essential mechanisms. The lack of understanding of the IGSCC mechanism is due to a complex interaction of numerous variables such as microstructure, thermomechanical processing, strain rate, water chemistry and electrochemical potential. Hydrogen plays an important role in all these variables. The complexity, however, significantly hinders a clearer and more fundamental understanding of the mechanism of hydrogen in enhancing intergranular cracking via whatever mechanism. In this work, an attempt is made to review the role of hydrogen based on the current understanding of grain boundary structure and chemistry and intergranular fracture of nickel alloys, effect of hydrogen on electrochemical behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690 (e.g. the passive film stability, polarization behavior and open-circuit potential) and effect of hydrogen on PWSCC behavior of Alloy 600 and Alloy 690. Mechanistic studies on the PWSCC are briefly reviewed. It is concluded that further studies on the role of hydrogen on intergranular cracking in both inert and primary side environments are needed. These studies should focus on the correlation of the results obtained at different laboratories by different methods on materials with different metallurgical and chemical parameters.

  16. Impurity transport of high performance discharges in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauro-Taroni, L.; Alper, B.; Giannella, R.; Marcus, F.; Smeulders, P.; Von Hellermann, M. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Lawson, K. [UKAEA Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom); Mattioli, M. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1994-07-01

    Experimental data show that in the Pellet Enhanced Performance (PEP) H-mode discharges, the light impurities are dominant and accumulate. Furthermore, strong fuel depletion may occur in the plasma centre with n{sub D}/n{sub e} falling to about 0.3 in some cases. On the other hand, in Hot-Ion discharges hollow profiles are measured for C: it is present in lower concentrations and has little effect on fuel dilution. The different behaviour of carbon in the two cases is in agreement with neoclassical predictions for the convection in the plasma core. 6 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Preparation and Characterization of Impurely Irrigated Soil Adsorbent from Beaches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    [Objective]We aimed to study the preparation methods of impurely irrigated soil adsorbent from beaches,as well as its ability to absorb phenol.[Method]Using hydrochloric acid as activator,we compared the influences of various soil adsorbents on the adsorption of phenol through the desired orthogonal tests where the usage of saw dust,concentration of hydrochloric acid,liquid-solid ratio and carbonization temperature varied.Afterwards,we characterized this soil adsorbent.[Result]The optimal conditions for pre...

  18. Overview of SOFC Anode Interactions with Coal Gas Impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O. A. Marina; L. R. Pederson; R. Gemmen; K. Gerdes; H. Finklea; I. B. Celik

    2010-03-01

    An overview of the results of SOFC anode interactions with phosphorus, arsenic, selenium, sulfur, antimony, and hydrogen chloride as single contaminants or in combinations is discussed. Tests were performed using both anode- and electrolyte-supported cells in synthetic and actual coal gas for periods greater than 1000 hours. Post-test analyses were performed to identify reaction products formed and their distribution, and compared to phases expected from thermochemical modeling. The ultimate purpose of this work is to establish maximum permissible concentrations for impurities in coal gas, to aid in the selection of appropriate coal gas clean-up technologies.

  19. THE EFFICIENCY OF IMPURITIES EXTRACTION DURING THE PROCESS OF ETHANOL EPURATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Nikitina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The static model of the hydroselection column that describes the concentration variation of the main components was proposed. The purpose of this work is an optimization of the shared mixture input-position and evaluation of efficiency of the digestion and the impurity compound concentration during the epuration process. To this end, the author developed a static model of epuration columns, which allows to reveal the dependence of the degree of digestion and the degree of concentration of the main impurities in the column of the number of plates in each of these parts. It’s proved that with the increasing of theoretical plates number in the concentration part of the column the concentration effect tends to the limit value. The effects of the head impurities digestion increase indefinitely with the growth of exhausting part. The proportion of the output from the condenser impurities depends more from the digestion effect than from the condensation effect. The effect of alcohol cleaning from the fusel oil components depends strongly from the ratio of the number of plates in the digestion and concentration parts (the optimal ratio for isopropanol, isoamyl, butanol is 1.5, for the propanol, isobutanol is 0.45.

  20. Ionization of impurities in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuźmicz, Wiesław

    1986-12-01

    A model for calculation of the percentage of ionized dopant atoms as a function of the doping concentration and temperature is proposed. The results are compared with experiment. Analytical approximations that facilitate practical applications of the model are given.

  1. Simulating W Impurity Transport in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younkin, Timothy R.; Green, David L.; Lasa, Ane; Canik, John M.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-10-01

    The extreme heat and charged particle flux to plasma facing materials in magnetically confined fusion devices has motivated Tungsten experiments such as the ``W-Ring'' experiment on the DIII-D tokamak to investigate W divertor viability. In this domain, the transport of W impurities from their tile locations to other first-wall tiles is highly relevant to material lifetimes and tokamak operation. Here we present initial results from a simulation of this W transport. Given that sputtered impurities may experience prompt redeposition near the divertor strikepoint, or migrate far from its origin to the midplane, there is a need to track the global, 3-D, impurity redistribution. This is done by directly integrating the 6-D Lorentz equation of motion (plus thermal gradient terms and relevant Monte-Carlo operators) for the impurity ions and neutrals under background plasma parameters determined by the SOLPS edge plasma code. The geometric details of the plasma facing components are represented to a fidelity sufficient to examine the global impurity migration trends with initial work also presented on advanced surface meshing capabilities targeting high fidelity simulation. This work is supported by U.S. DOE Office of Science SciDAC project on plasma-surface interactions under US DOE contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  2. Gettering of metal impurities in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeter, W.; Spiecker, E.; Apel, M. [Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    1995-08-01

    Gettering means the removal of metallic impurities from the device-active area of the wafer by transport to a predesigned region-called gettering layer (GL). We introduce an interface at z = d{sub GL}, at which the effect of the gettering mechanism on the metal impurity distribution in the wafer is quantified, e.g. by specifying currents or by interfacial reactions of metal impurities, self interstitials etc. between GL and wafer. In response metal impurities will diffuse out of the wafer into the gettering layer. Following such a concept, in general three species of the metal impurity (M) are involved in gettering: M{sub p} {l_arrow} M{sub i} {l_arrow} M{sub GL}. M{sub p} denotes immobile species in the wafer, which are precipitated into suicides or segregated at extended defects or whose diffusivity is too small to contribute noticeably to transport during the gettering procedure - like many substitutional metal species.

  3. Oscillatory impurity potential induced dynamics of doped quantum dots: Analysis based on coupled influence of impurity coordinate and impurity influenced domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, Nirmal Kumar [Department of Physics, Suri Vidyasagar College, Suri, Birbhum 731 101, West Bengal (India); Ghosh, Manas, E-mail: pcmg77@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry Section, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, Birbhum 731 235, West Bengal (India)

    2010-06-16

    Graphical abstract: The pattern of time evolution of eigenstates of a repulsive impurity doped quantum dot is explored. We have considered Gaussian impurity centers. Under a periodically fluctuating impurity potential, the system reveals a long time dynamics that is undulatory in nature. Coupled to the dopant location, the domain of influence of the impurity potential affects the separation between the eigenstates of the unperturbed system. The investigation points to a threshold value of spatial extension of impurity potential. Above this threshold value, the dopant location becomes important in monitoring the minimum value of impurity potential required to cause excitation. - Abstract: We explore the pattern of time evolution of eigenstates of a repulsive impurity doped quantum dot. The quantum dot is 2-dimensional and contains one electron which is harmonically confined. We have considered Gaussian impurity centers. A static transverse magnetic field is also present. Under a periodically fluctuating impurity potential, the system reveals a long time dynamics that is undulatory in nature. Coupled to the dopant location, the domain of influence of the impurity potential affects the separation between the eigenstates of the unperturbed system. The investigation points to a threshold value of spatial extension of impurity potential. Above this threshold value, the dopant location becomes important in monitoring the minimum value of impurity potential required to cause excitation.

  4. A Spectroscopic Study of Impurity Behavior in Neutral-beam and Ohmically Heated TFTR Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, B. C.; Ramsey, A. T.; Boody, F. P.; Bush, C. E.; Fonck, R. J.; Groenbner, R. J.; Hulse, R. A.; Richards, R. K.; Schivell, J.

    1987-02-01

    Quantitative spectroscopic measurements of Z{sub eff}, impurity densities, and radiated power losses have been made for ohmic- and neutral-beam-heated TFTR discharges at a plasma current of 2.2 MA and toroidal field of 4.7 T. Variations in these quantities with line-average plasma density (anti n{sub e}) and beam power up to 5.6 MW are presented for discharges on a graphite movable limiter. A detailed discussion of the use of an impurity transport model to infer absolute impurity densities and radiative losses from line intensity and visible continuum measurements is given. These discharges were dominated by low-Z impurities with carbon having a considerably higher density than oxygen, except in high-anti n{sub e} ohmic discharges, where the densities of carbon and oxygen were comparable. Metallic impurity concentrations and radiative losses were small, resulting in hollow radiated power profiles and fractions of the input power radiated being 30 to 50% for ohmic heating and 30% or less with beam heating. Spectroscopic estimates of the radiated power were in good agreement with bolometrically measured values. Due to an increase in the carbon density, Z{sub eff} rose from 2.0 to 2.8 as the beam power increased from 0 to 5.6 MW, pointing to a potentially serious dilution of the neutron-producing plasma ions as the beam power increased. Both the low-Z and metallic impurity concentrations were approximately constant with minor radius, indicating no central impurity accumulation in these discharges.

  5. Dynamical critical behavior of the Ziff-Gulari-Barshad model with quenched impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, M. F.; Figueiredo, W.

    2016-08-01

    The simplest model to explain the CO oxidation in some catalytic processes is the Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model. It predicts a continuous phase transition between an active phase and an absorbing phase composed of O atoms. By employing Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the dynamical critical behavior of the model as a function of the concentration of fixed impurities over the catalytic surface. By means of an epidemic analysis we calculate the critical exponents related to the survival probability Ps (t), the number of empty sites nv (t), and the mean square displacement R2 (t). We show that the critical exponents depend on the concentration of impurities over the lattice, even for small values of this quantity. We also show that the exponents do not belong to the Directed Percolation universality class and are in agreement with the Harris criterion since the quenched impurities behave as a weak disorder in the system.

  6. Hard sphere crystal nucleation and growth near large spherical impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villeneuve, V. W. A.; Verboekend, D.; Dullens, R. P. A.; Aarts, D. G. A. L.; Kegel, W. K.; Lekkerkerker, H. N. W.

    2005-11-01

    We report how large spherical impurities affect the nucleation and growth of hard sphere colloidal crystals. Both the impurities and the colloids are fluorescently labelled polymethylmetacrylate particles and are dispersed in an optically and density matching solvent mixture. Crystal growth, initiated either at the impurity surface, or at the sample bottom, was studied by imaging sequences of two-dimensional xy-slices in the plane of the impurity's centre of mass with a laser scanning confocal microscope. At least two factors determine whether a large impurity can function as a seed for heterogeneous nucleation: timescales and impurity curvature. The curvature needs to be sufficiently low for crystal nuclei to form on the impurity surface. If bulk crystal growth has already approached the impurity, bulk growth is dominant over growth of crystallites on the impurity surface. Such surface crystallites eventually reorient to adapt to the overall bulk crystal symmetry.

  7. Intergranular Corrosion of Low Cr Ferritic Stainless Steel 429 Evaluated by the Optimized Double Loop Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-lei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intergranular corrosion (IGC of Nb-Ti stabilized ferritic stainless steel (FSS 429 was investigated using the double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DL-EPR test combined with the microstructure observation. The results indicated that the optimized DL-EPR test condition for FSS 429 was the solution of 0.5 M H2SO4 + 0.0001 M KSCN with a scanning rate of 100 mV/min at 30°C. Based on this condition, the specimens aging at 400–700°C for different duration were tested and a time-temperature-sensitization (TTS curve for FSS 429 was obtained, which reveals the sensitization nose was located around 550°C. The critical Ir/Ia value was determined to be about 3% above which IGC occurred. After aging treatment, Cr depletion zone was detected using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, most possibly due to Cr segregation around intergranular TiC and NbC.

  8. Effects of Carbon, Nitrogen and Stabilizing Elements(Ti, Nb) On the Intergranular Corrosion of Type 409 Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Mee Cha [Pohang College, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dai Ryong [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-03-15

    The effects of carbon, nitrogen and titanium(niobium) on the intergranular corrosion(IGC) behavior of type 409 stainless steel were investigated. The alloys were heat treated at three different annealing temperature for times varying between 6 minutes and 5 hours and then tested for intergranular corrosion susceptibility in acidified copper-copper sulfate solution. For the nonstabilized alloys, susceptibility to IGC increased due to precipitate chromium carbides and nitrides at grain boundaries by annealing at 550 .deg. C and 1050 .deg. C. Sensitization was due to the precipitation behavior produced during isothermal annealing in the 550 .deg. C and during slow cooling from 1050 .deg. C of specimen. In the effect of addition elements on the IGC, alloys containing 0.024%C plus 0.018%N were shown the most severe IGC with eventual grain dropping when they were annealed at 550 .deg. C. Influence of carbon on IGC was dominant for short heating time at 1050 .deg. C and that of nitrogen was dominant for long heating time. The stabilized alloys have good resistance to IGC because the amount of titanium and niobium was sufficient to stabilize carbon and nitrogen in this chemical etch solution.

  9. On the intergranular fracture behavior of high-temperature plastic deformation of 1420 Al-Li alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The tensile deformation hot simulation test of as-cast 1420 Al-Li alloy was performed on Gleeble-1500 Thermal Simulator in the deformation temperature range from 350 to 450 ℃, and the strain rate range from 0.01 to 10.0 s-1.The tensile fracture behavior of the 1420 Al-Li alloy at high temperature was studied experimently. The results show that the tensile fracture mode of the 1420 Al-Li alloy at high temperature is changed from typical transgranular ductile fracture to intergranular brittle fracture with the increase of the deformation temperature and the strain rate. It is made out that the precipitation of LiH is the fundamental reason for the intergranular brittle fracture of the 1420 Al-Li alloy at high temperature. The mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement of the 1420 Al-Li alloy at high temperature was discussed, and it was proposed that the hydrogen embrittlement at high temperature is an integrated function of the dynamic and the static force, which enrichs the theories of hydrogen embrittlement.

  10. Size induced metal-insulator transition in nanostructured niobium thin films: intra-granular and inter-granular contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Sangita [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Banerjee, Rajarshi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203 (United States); Genc, Arda [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Raychaudhuri, Pratap [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Fraser, Hamish L [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Ayyub, Pushan [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Science, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2006-05-17

    With a reduction in the average grain size in nanostructured films of elemental Nb, we observe a systematic crossover from metallic to weakly insulating behaviour. An analysis of the temperature dependence of the resistivity in the insulating phase clearly indicates the existence of two distinct activation energies corresponding to inter-granular and intra-granular mechanisms of transport. While the high temperature behaviour is dominated by grain boundary scattering of the conduction electrons, the effect of discretization of energy levels due to quantum confinement shows up at low temperatures. We show that the energy barrier at the grain boundary is proportional to the width of the largely disordered inter-granular region, which increases with a decrease in the grain size. For a metal-insulator transition to occur in nano-Nb due to the opening up of an energy gap at the grain boundary, the critical grain size is {approx}8 nm and the corresponding grain boundary width is {approx}1.1 nm.

  11. Standard Test Methods for Detecting Susceptibility to Intergranular Corrosion in Wrought, Nickel-Rich, Chromium-Bearing Alloys

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2008-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover two tests as follows: 1.1.1 Method A, Ferric Sulfate-Sulfuric Acid Test (Sections 3-10, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting the boiling ferric sulfate—50 % sulfuric acid test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to intergranular corrosion (see Terminology G 15), which may be encountered in certain service environments. The uniform corrosion rate obtained by this test method, which is a function of minor variations in alloy composition, may easily mask the intergranular corrosion components of the overall corrosion rate on alloys N10276, N06022, N06059, and N06455. 1.1.2 Method B, Mixed Acid-Oxidizing Salt Test (Sections 11-18, inclusive)—This test method describes the procedure for conducting a boiling 23 % sulfuric + 1.2 % hydrochloric + 1 % ferric chloride + 1 % cupric chloride test which measures the susceptibility of certain nickel-rich, chromium-bearing alloys to display a step function increa...

  12. Role of oxygen diffusion at Ni/Cr2O3 interface in intergranular oxidation of Ni-Cr alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medasani, Bharat; Sushko, Maria; Schreiber, Daniel; Rosso, Kevin; Bruemmer, Stephen

    Certain Ni-Cr alloys used in nuclear systems experience intergranular oxidation and stress corrosion cracking when exposed to high-temperature water leading to their degradation and unexpected failure. To develop a mechanistic understanding of grain boundary oxidation processes, we proposed a mesoscale metal alloy oxidation model that combines quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) with mesoscopic Poisson-Nernst-Planck/classical DFT. This framework encompasses the chemical specificity of elementary diffusion processes and mesoscale reactive dynamics, and allows modeling oxidation processes on experimentally relevant length scales from first principles. As a proof of concept, a preliminary model was previously employed that limited oxygen diffusion pathways to those through the oxide phase and did not allow oxygen diffusion in the alloy or across oxide/alloy interfaces. In this work, we expand the model to include oxygen diffusion pathways along Ni/Cr2O3 interfaces and demonstrate the increasing importance of such pathways for intergranular oxidation of Ni-Cr alloys with high Cr content. This work is supported by the U.S. Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division. Simulations are performed using PNNL Institutional Computing facility.

  13. Strong quantum scarring by local impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luukko, Perttu J. J.; Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Kaplan, Lev; Heller, Eric J.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-11-01

    We discover and characterise strong quantum scars, or quantum eigenstates resembling classical periodic orbits, in two-dimensional quantum wells perturbed by local impurities. These scars are not explained by ordinary scar theory, which would require the existence of short, moderately unstable periodic orbits in the perturbed system. Instead, they are supported by classical resonances in the unperturbed system and the resulting quantum near-degeneracy. Even in the case of a large number of randomly scattered impurities, the scars prefer distinct orientations that extremise the overlap with the impurities. We demonstrate that these preferred orientations can be used for highly efficient transport of quantum wave packets across the perturbed potential landscape. Assisted by the scars, wave-packet recurrences are significantly stronger than in the unperturbed system. Together with the controllability of the preferred orientations, this property may be very useful for quantum transport applications.

  14. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  15. Magnetic impurities in spin-split superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gerven Oei, W.-V.; Tanasković, D.; Žitko, R.

    2017-02-01

    Hybrid semiconductor-superconductor quantum dot devices are tunable physical realizations of quantum impurity models for a magnetic impurity in a superconducting host. The binding energy of the localized subgap Shiba states is set by the gate voltages and external magnetic field. In this work we discuss the effects of the Zeeman spin splitting, which is generically present both in the quantum dot and in the (thin-film) superconductor. The unequal g factors in semiconductor and superconductor materials result in respective Zeeman splittings of different magnitude. We consider both classical and quantum impurities. In the first case we analytically study the spectral function and the subgap states. The energy of bound states depends on the spin-splitting of the Bogoliubov quasiparticle bands as a simple rigid shift. For the case of collinear magnetization of impurity and host, the Shiba resonance of a given spin polarization remains unperturbed when it overlaps with the branch of the quasiparticle excitations of the opposite spin polarization. In the quantum case, we employ numerical renormalization group calculations to study the effect of the Zeeman field for different values of the g factors of the impurity and of the superconductor. We find that in general the critical magnetic field for the singlet-doublet transition changes nonmonotonically as a function of the superconducting gap, demonstrating the existence of two different transition mechanisms: Zeeman splitting of Shiba states or gap closure due to Zeeman splitting of Bogoliubov states. We also study how in the presence of spin-orbit coupling, modeled as an additional noncollinear component of the magnetic field at the impurity site, the Shiba resonance overlapping with the quasiparticle continuum of the opposite spin gradually broadens and then merges with the continuum.

  16. Grain boundary engineering for intergranular corrosion resistant austenitic stainless steel%抗晶间腐蚀奥氏体不锈钢的晶界工程

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    粉川博之

    2005-01-01

    Sensitization by chromium depletion due to chromium carbide precipitation at grain boundaries in austenitic stainless steels can not be prevented perfectly only by previous conventional techniques, such as reduction of carbon content, stabilization-treatment, local solution-heat-treatment, etc. Recent studies on grain boundary structure have revealed that the sensitization depends strongly on grain boundary character and atomic structure, and that low energy grain boundaries such as coincidence-site-lattice (CSL) boundaries have strong resistance to intergranular corrosion. The concept of 'grain boundary design and control' has been developed as grain boundary engineering (GBE). GBEed materials are characterized by high frequencies of CSL boundaries which are resistant to intergranular deterioration of materials, such as intergranular corrosion. A thermomechanical treatment was tried to improve the resistance to the sensitization by GBE. A type 304 austenitic stainless steel was cold-rolled and solution-heat-treated, and then sensitization-heat-treated. The grain boundary character distribution was examined by orientation imaging microscopy (OIM). The intergranular corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (EPR) and ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid tests. The sensitivity to intergranular corrosion was reduced by the thermomechanical treatment and indicated a minimum at a small roll-reduction. The frequency of CSL boundaries indicated a maximum at the small reduction. The ferric sulfate-sulfuric acid test showed much smaller corrosion rate in the thermomechanical-treated specimen than in the base material. A high density of annealing twins were observed in the thermomechanical-treated specimen. The results suggest that the therrmomechanical treatment can introduce low energy segments in the grain boundary network by annealing twins and can arrest the percolation of intergranular corrosion from the surface. The effects of carbon

  17. Sputtering of a silicon surface: Preferential sputtering of surface impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietiadi, Maureen L. [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Rosandi, Yudi [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Department of Physics, Universitas Padjadjaran, Jatinangor, Sumedang 45363 (Indonesia); Lorinčík, Jan [Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkinje University, České mládeže 8, 400 96 Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic); Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Chaberská 57, 182 51 Praha (Czech Republic); Urbassek, Herbert M., E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    We present molecular-dynamics simulations of the sputtering of an impurity atom off a Si 2×1 (100) surface by 2 keV Ar ions. The impurity is characterized by its mass and its binding energy to the Si substrate. We find that sputtering strongly decreases with the mass and even more strongly with the binding energy of the impurity atom to the matrix. The velocity of the impurity perpendicular to the surface is reduced with increasing impurity mass and binding energy. In terms of available ionization theories we can conclude that heavier impurities will have a smaller ionization probability.

  18. Correlations between locked modes and impurity influxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishpool, G.M. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Lawson, K.D. [UKAEA Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1994-07-01

    An analysis of pulses that were disturbed by medium Z impurity influxes (Cl, Cr, Fe and Ni) recorded during the 91/92 JET operations, has demonstrated that such influxes can result in MHD modes which subsequently ``lock``. A correlation is found between the power radiated by the influx and the time difference between the start of the influx and the beginning of the locked mode. The growth in the amplitude of the locked mode itself can lead to further impurity influxes. A correlation is noted between intense influxes (superior to 10 MW) and the mode ``unlocking``. (authors). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Novel Bound States in Graphene with Impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Kumar S

    2008-01-01

    We obtain a novel bound state spectrum of the low energy excitations near the Fermi points of graphene in the presence of a charge impurity. The effects of possible short range interactions induced by the impurity are modelled by suitable boundary conditions. The spectrum in the subcritical region of the effective Coulomb coupling is labelled by a parameter which characterizes the boundary conditions and determines the inequivalent quantizations of the system. In the supercritical region we obtain a renormalization group flow for the effective Coulomb coupling.

  20. The electronic structure of impurities in semiconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    Nylandsted larsen, A; Svane, A

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure of isolated substitutional or interstitial impurities in group IV, IV-IV, and III-V compound semiconductors will be studied. Mössbauer spectroscopy will be used to investigate the incorporation of the implanted isotopes on the proper lattice sites. The data can be directly compared to theoretical calculations using the LMTO scheme. Deep level transient spectroscopy will be used to identify the band gap levels introduced by metallic impurities, mainly in Si~and~Si$ _{x}$Ge$_{1-x}$. \\\\ \\\\

  1. Identification, Characterization, and Quantification of Impurities of Safinamide Mesilate: Process-Related Impurities and Degradation Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Liang; Sun, Lili; Zhang, Hui; Hui, Wenkai; Zou, Qiaogen; Zhu, Zheying

    2017-07-01

    The characterization of process-related impurities and degradation products of safinamide mesilate (SAFM) in bulk drug and a stability-indicating HPLC method for the separation and quantification of all the impurities were investigated. Four process-related impurities (Imp-B, Imp-C, Imp-D, and Imp-E) were found in the SAFM bulk drug. Five degradation products (Imp-A, Imp-C, Imp-D, Imp-E, and Imp-F) were observed in SAFM under oxidative conditions. Imp-C, Imp-D, and Imp-E were also degradation products and process-related impurities. Remarkably, one new compound, identified as (S)-2-[4-(3-fluoro-benzyloxy) benzamido] propanamide (i.e., Imp-D), is being reported here as an impurity for the first time. Furthermore, the structures of the aforementioned impurities were characterized and confirmed via IR, NMR, and MS techniques, and the most probable formation mechanisms of all impurities proposed according to the synthesis route. Optimum separation was achieved on an Inertsil ODS-3 column (250 × 4.6 mm, 5 μm), using 0.1% formic acid in water (pH adjusted to 5.0) and acetonitrile as the mobile phase in gradient mode. The proposed method was found to be stability-indicating, precise, linear, accurate, sensitive, and robust for the quantitation of SAFM and its process-related substances, including its degradation products.

  2. Theoretical Study of Radiation from a Broad Range of Impurity Ions for Magnetic Fusion Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, Alla [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Spectroscopy of radiation emitted by impurities plays an important role in the study of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. The measurements of these impurities are crucial for the control of the general machine conditions, for the monitoring of the impurity levels, and for the detection of various possible fault conditions. Low-Z impurities, typically present in concentrations of 1%, are lithium, beryllium, boron, carbon, and oxygen. Some of the common medium-Z impurities are metals such as iron, nickel, and copper, and high-Z impurities, such as tungsten, are present in smaller concentrations of 0.1% or less. Despite the relatively small concentration numbers, the aforementioned impurities might make a substantial contribution to radiated power, and also influence both plasma conditions and instruments. A detailed theoretical study of line radiation from impurities that covers a very broad spectral range from less than 1 Å to more than 1000 Å has been accomplished and the results were applied to the LLNL Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) and the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) and to the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) at Princeton. Though low- and medium-Z impurities were also studied, the main emphasis was made on the comprehensive theoretical study of radiation from tungsten using different state-of-the-art atomic structure codes such as Relativistic Many-Body Perturbation Theory (RMBPT). The important component of this research was a comparison of the results from the RMBPT code with other codes such as the Multiconfigurational Hartree–Fock developed by Cowan (COWAN code) and the Multiconfiguration Relativistic Hebrew University Lawrence Atomic Code (HULLAC code), and estimation of accuracy of calculations. We also have studied dielectronic recombination, an important recombination process for fusion plasma, for variety of highly and low charged tungsten ions using COWAN and HULLAC codes. Accurate DR rate coefficients are needed for

  3. Effect of Carbon on Grain Boundary Segregation of Phosphorus and Phosphorus-Induced Intergranular Fracture in High Purity Iron with Phosphorus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The segregation of carbon at grain boundaries and its effect on phosphorus segregation and phosphorus-induced intergranular fracture in the alloy of high purity iron with phosphorus were investigated by scanning Auger electron spectroscopy, impact test and SEM observation of fractured surface. The experimental results showed that the carbon segregation at grain boundaries decreases the phosphorus segregation, and a change of fracture mode from intergranular fracture to transgranular one, hence a decrease of ductile-brittle transition temperature is observed. The mechanism of these effects was discussed.

  4. EVALUATION OF IMPURITY EXTREMES IN A PLUTONIUM-LOADED BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J; Kevin Fox, K; Charles Crawford, C; Ned Bibler, N; Elizabeth Hoffman, E; Tommy Edwards, T

    2007-11-12

    A vitrification technology utilizing a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass appears to be a viable option for the disposition of excess weapons-useable plutonium that is not suitable for processing into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. A significant effort to develop a glass formulation and vitrification process to immobilize plutonium was completed in the mid-1990s. The LaBS glass formulation was found to be capable of immobilizing in excess of 10 wt % Pu and to be tolerant of a range of impurities. To confirm the results of previous testing with surrogate Pu feeds containing impurities, four glass compositions were selected for fabrication with actual plutonium oxide and impurities. The four compositions represented extremes in impurity type and concentration. The homogeneity and durability of these four compositions were measured. The homogeneity of the glasses was evaluated using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The XRD results indicated that the glasses were amorphous with no evidence of crystalline species in the glass. The SEM/EDS analyses did show the presence of some undissolved PuO{sub 2} material. The EDS spectra indicated that some of the PuO{sub 2} crystals also contained hafnium oxide. The SEM/EDS analyses showed that there were no heterogeneities in the glass due to the feed impurities. The durability of the glasses was measured using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT results indicated that the durability of Pu impurity glasses was comparable with Pu glasses without impurities and significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass used as the benchmark for repository disposition of high-level waste (HLW) glasses.

  5. Development of Impurity Profiling Methods Using Modern Analytical Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, Bondigalla

    2017-01-02

    This review gives a brief introduction about the process- and product-related impurities and emphasizes on the development of novel analytical methods for their determination. It describes the application of modern analytical techniques, particularly the ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC), liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and high-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC). In addition to that, the application of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was also discussed for the characterization of impurities and degradation products. The significance of the quality, efficacy and safety of drug substances/products, including the source of impurities, kinds of impurities, adverse effects by the presence of impurities, quality control of impurities, necessity for the development of impurity profiling methods, identification of impurities and regulatory aspects has been discussed. Other important aspects that have been discussed are forced degradation studies and the development of stability indicating assay methods.

  6. Crack-impurity interactions and their role in the embrittlement of Fe alloy crystals charged with light elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, N. (Dept. of Metallurgy, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Shiga, T. (Dept. of Metallurgy, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)); Higashida, K. (Dept. of Metallurgy, Kyoto Univ. (Japan))

    1994-03-31

    The effect of mobile impurity doping on fracture behaviour has been investigated using plasma charging of light elements for Fe-2.5wt.%Si alloy crystals with particular attention to the role of crack-impurity elastic interactions. Fe-Si crystals are markedly embrittled by plasma charging of helium as well as hydrogen at around room temperature, this being accompanied by slow crack growth. Neon charging contributes little to the embrittlement, but argon charging does not contribute. The crystals are also embrittled by nitrogen charging in the tests at 450 K and exhibit slow crack growth during the tests. Elastic analyses indicate that crack-impurity interactions are induced not only by the applied K[sub I] field but also by the stress modification due to ambient impurities in the presence of a crack. The interactions serve effectively to concentrate mobile impurities ahead of a crack tip, leading to the increase in the local stress intensity k[sub I]. The effect of interstitial impurities on crack extension is discussed in connection with the modification of stress states due to impurities around a crack tip. (orig.)

  7. Parallel Impurity Spreading During Massive Gas Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, V. A.

    2016-10-01

    Extended-MHD simulations of disruption mitigation in DIII-D demonstrate that both pre-existing islands (locked-modes) and plasma rotation can significantly influence toroidal spreading of impurities following massive gas injection (MGI). Given the importance of successful disruption mitigation in ITER and the large disparity in device parameters, empirical demonstrations of disruption mitigation strategies in present tokamaks are insufficient to inspire unreserved confidence for ITER. Here, MHD simulations elucidate how impurities injected as a localized jet spread toroidally and poloidally. Simulations with large pre-existing islands at the q = 2 surface reveal that the magnetic topology strongly influences the rate of impurity spreading parallel to the field lines. Parallel spreading is largely driven by rapid parallel heat conduction, and is much faster at low order rational surfaces, where a short parallel connection length leads to faster thermal equilibration. Consequently, the presence of large islands, which alter the connection length, can slow impurity transport; but the simulations also show that the appearance of a 4/2 harmonic of the 2/1 mode, which breaks up the large islands, can increase the rate of spreading. This effect is seen both for simulations with spontaneously growing and directly imposed 4/2 modes. Given the prevalence of locked-modes as a cause of disruptions, understanding the effect of large islands is of particular importance. Simulations with and without islands also show that rotation can alter impurity spreading, even reversing the predominant direction of spreading, which is toward the high-field-side in the absence of rotation. Given expected differences in rotation for ITER vs. DIII-D, rotation effects are another important consideration when extrapolating experimental results. Work supported by US DOE under DE-FG02-95ER54309.

  8. The Potts model on a Bethe lattice with nonmagnetic impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semkin, S. V., E-mail: li15@rambler.ru; Smagin, V. P. [Vladivistok State University of Economics and Service (VSUES) (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We have obtained a solution for the Potts model on a Bethe lattice with mobile nonmagnetic impurities. A method is proposed for constructing a “pseudochaotic” impurity distribution by a vanishing correlation in the arrangement of impurity atoms for the nearest sites. For a pseudochaotic impurity distribution, we obtained the phase-transition temperature, magnetization, and spontaneous magnetization jumps at the phase-transition temperature.

  9. Differences between groundwater fauna in shallow and in deep intergranular aquifers as an indication of different characteristics of habitats and hydraulic connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Brancelj

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fauna in the hyporheic zones of rivers has been relatively well studied but that from the phreatic zone remains comparatively unknown and there are few investigations into deeper intergranular aquifers (over 30 m in depth due to technical difficulties. Two shallow boreholes of 29 m depth and two deep boreholes of 100 m depth, both near Ljubljana (Slovenia, were sampled more than 30 times between 14 January 2008 and 3 March 2009.  On each occasion 14.4 to 18.0 m3 of water were abstracted using a high-capacity pump, then filtered by means of a plankton net with a mesh size of 60 µm. Organisms larger than 2 mm were damaged by the pump rotors, but their identification was still possible, while smaller representatives of the Copepoda (Crustacea passed the rotors without  damage. A near-by artesian borehole was sampled on 6 occasions. Water chemistry, physical properties and faunal composition analyses were carried out for each borehole. A total of 32 taxa, 24 of which were stygobites, were identified. Copepoda alone were represented by 16 species, 15 of which were stygobites. The shallow boreholes differ from the deep boreholes in their higher temperatures and higher concentrations of K+, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+ and SO42- ions. The copepod communities in samples from the shallow boreholes differ sharply from those from the deep boreholes. There were also clear differences between shallow boreholes in two aquifers located a few kilometres apart, in physical and chemical characteristics as well as in fauna composition. Taxa with different ecological affinities, collected from groundwater, are indicators of hydraulic connections between different parts of an aquifer as well as of communication between surface and subsurface water bodies. The present study suggests that subterranean fauna, as well as epigean fauna, can provide effective support for classical dye/salt tracing experiments.

  10. Control of metal impurities in 'dirty' multicrystalline silicon for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Istratov, A.A. [Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)]. E-mail: istratov@berkeley.edu; Buonassisi, T. [Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pickett, M.D. [Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Heuer, M. [Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Weber, E.R. [Department of Materials Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The rapid growth of the global photovoltaics (PV) industry is increasingly limited by the availability of suitable Si feedstock material. Therefore, it is very important to explore new approaches that might allow processing of solar cells with satisfactory energy conversion efficiency based on inexpensive feedstock material with less stringent impurity control, i.e., 'dirty' silicon. Our detailed studies of the distribution of metal impurity clusters in multicrystalline Si have demonstrated that cells with the same total impurity content can have widely different minority carrier diffusion lengths based on the distribution of the metals, i.e., whether they are dispersed throughout the material or concentrated in a few, large clusters. Possible approaches to defect engineering of metal clusters in silicon are discussed.

  11. First-principles Study on Neutral Nitrogen Impurities in Zinc Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Li; Sheng-hua Deng; Yi-bao Li; Li Zhang; Guo-hong Liu; Jing Huang

    2012-01-01

    The atomic geometries,electronic structures,and formation energies of neutral nitrogen impurities in ZnO have been investigated by first-principles calculations.The nitrogen impurities are always deep acceptors,thus having no contributions to p-type conductivity.Among all the neutral nitrogen impurities,nitrogen substituting on an oxygen site has the lowest formation energy and the shallowest acceptor level,while nitrogen substituting on a zinc site has the second-lowest formation energy in oxygen-rich conditions.Nitrogen interstitials are unstable at the tetrahedral site and spontaneously relax into a kick-out configuration.Though nitrogen may occupy the octahedral site,the concentrations will be low for the high formation energy.The charge density distributions in various doping cases are discussed,and self-consistent results are obtained.

  12. Monte Carlo method for magnetic impurities in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, J. E.; Fye, R. M.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses a Monte Carlo algorithm to study properties of dilute magnetic alloys; the method can treat a small number of magnetic impurities interacting wiith the conduction electrons in a metal. Results for the susceptibility of a single Anderson impurity in the symmetric case show the expected universal behavior at low temperatures. Some results for two Anderson impurities are also discussed.

  13. Metal-based impurities in graphenes: application for electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Sze Yin; Pumera, Martin

    2012-05-01

    We show here that metallic impurities presented in graphenes prepared from graphite can be usefully employed for electroanalysis. We demonstrate that cumene hydroperoxide electrochemical reduction on graphene containing iron-based impurities provides significantly larger voltammetric currents than the same experiment using iron oxide nanoparticles. This opens doors for turning metallic impurities into potentially useful components of graphene based electrochemical systems.

  14. The Effect of Impurities on the Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zi-Kui Liu; Shengjun Zhang; Qingyou Han; Vinod Sikka

    2007-04-23

    For this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project, the effect of impurities on the processing of aluminum alloys was systematically investigated. The work was carried out as a collaborative effort between the Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Industrial support was provided by ALCOA and ThermoCalc, Inc. The achievements described below were made. A method that combines first-principles calculation and calculation of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) was used to develop the multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na. This method was extensively used in this project for the development of a thermodynamic database. The first-principles approach provided some thermodynamic property data that are not available in the open literature. These calculated results were used in the thermodynamic modeling as experimental data. Some of the thermodynamic property data are difficult, if not impossible, to measure. The method developed and used in this project allows the estimation of these data for thermodynamic database development. The multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na was developed. Elements such as Ca, Li, Na, and K are impurities that strongly affect the formability and corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys. However, these impurity elements are not included in the commercial aluminum alloy database. The process of thermodynamic modeling began from Al-Na, Ca-Li, Li-Na, K-Na, and Li-K sub-binary systems. Then ternary and higher systems were extrapolated because of the lack of experimental information. Databases for five binary alloy systems and two ternary systems were developed. Along with other existing binary and ternary databases, the full database of the multicomponent Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na system was completed in this project. The methodology in integrating with commercial or other aluminum alloy databases can be developed. The mechanism of sodium-induced high-temperature embrittlement (HTE) of Al-Mg is now understood. Using the thermodynamic

  15. The Effect of Impurities on the Processing of Aluminum Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zi-Kui Liu; Shengjun Zhang; Qingyou Han; Vinod Sikka

    2007-04-23

    For this Aluminum Industry of the Future (IOF) project, the effect of impurities on the processing of aluminum alloys was systematically investigated. The work was carried out as a collaborative effort between the Pennsylvania State University and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Industrial support was provided by ALCOA and ThermoCalc, Inc. The achievements described below were made. A method that combines first-principles calculation and calculation of phase diagrams (CALPHAD) was used to develop the multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na. This method was extensively used in this project for the development of a thermodynamic database. The first-principles approach provided some thermodynamic property data that are not available in the open literature. These calculated results were used in the thermodynamic modeling as experimental data. Some of the thermodynamic property data are difficult, if not impossible, to measure. The method developed and used in this project allows the estimation of these data for thermodynamic database development. The multicomponent database Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na was developed. Elements such as Ca, Li, Na, and K are impurities that strongly affect the formability and corrosion behavior of aluminum alloys. However, these impurity elements are not included in the commercial aluminum alloy database. The process of thermodynamic modeling began from Al-Na, Ca-Li, Li-Na, K-Na, and Li-K sub-binary systems. Then ternary and higher systems were extrapolated because of the lack of experimental information. Databases for five binary alloy systems and two ternary systems were developed. Along with other existing binary and ternary databases, the full database of the multicomponent Al-Ca-K-Li-Mg-Na system was completed in this project. The methodology in integrating with commercial or other aluminum alloy databases can be developed. The mechanism of sodium-induced high-temperature embrittlement (HTE) of Al-Mg is now understood. Using the thermodynamic

  16. Magnetic hyperfine interaction studies of isolated Ni impurities in Pd and Pd-Pt alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W.; Bertschat, H. H.; Haas, H.; Spellmeyer, B.; Zeitz, W.-D.

    1989-10-01

    The magnetic hyperfine fields at isolated Ni impurities in Pd and Pd-Pt alloys were studied with the perturbed-angular-distribution (PAD) method by measuring the temperature, magnetic field, and concentration dependence of the nuclear-spin Larmor precession of isomeric states in 63Ni. The recoil-implanted Ni nuclei, as products of heavy-ion nuclear reactions, are present in extreme dilution (Pd-Pt alloys a considerable positive shift remains even at 30 at. % Pt content. The variation of the shift with Pt concentration and temperature reflects the variation of the Pd-Pt alloy susceptibility. The different contributions to the hyperfine field could be differentiated by comparing the Knight shift for Ni in Pd with its susceptibility contribution obtained from extrapolated susceptibility measurements in dilute Pd-Ni alloys. The negative core-polarization field of the impurity spin moment is compensated for by a transferred hyperfine field correlated with the host polarization in the neighborhood of the impurity. The remaining positive hyperfine field is due to a weak orbital moment of 0.3μB at the impurity site. The values obtained for the different contributions are compared with results of the Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker-coherent-potential-approximation calculations for concentrated Pd-Ni alloys extrapolated to the dilute limit.

  17. Silicon materials task of the low-cost solar-array project. Effect of impurities and processing on silicon solar cells. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, R.H.; Davis, J.R.; Rohatgi, A.; Hanes, M.H.; Rai-Choudhury, P.; Mollenkopf, H.C.

    1982-02-01

    The object of the program has been to investigate the effects of various processes, metal contaminants, and contaminant-process interactions on the properties of silicon and on the performance of terrestrial silicon solar cells. The study has encompassed topics such as thermochemical (gettering) treatments, base-doping concentration, base-doping type (n vs. p), grain boundary-impurity interaction in polycrystalline devices, and long-term effects of impurities and impurity impacts on high-efficiency cells, as well as a preliminary evaluation of some potential low-cost silicon materials. The effects have been studied of various metallic impurities, introduced singly or in combination into Czochralski, float zone, and polycrystalline silicon ingots and into silicon ribbons grown by the dendritic web process. The solar cell data indicate that impurity-induced performance loss is caused primarily by a reduction in base diffusion length. An analytical model based on this observation has been developed and verified experimentally for both n- and p-base material. Studies of polycrystalline ingots containing impurities indicate that solar cell behavior is species sensitive and that a fraction of the impurities are segregated to the grain boundaries. HCl and POCl gettering improve the performance of single-crystal solar cells containing Fe, Cr, and Ti. In contrast Mo-doped material is barely affected. The efficiencies of solar cells fabricated on impurity-doped wafers is lower when the front junction is formed by ion implantation than when conventional diffusion techniques are used. For most impurity-doped solar cells stability is expected for projected times beyond 20 years. Feedstock impurity concentrations below one part per million for elements like V, or 100 parts per million for more benign impurities like Cu or Ni, will be required.

  18. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenkov, M.; Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A.; Rolli, R.

    2014-12-01

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  19. Impurity profiling of atropine sulfate by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitar, Yaser; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2007-07-27

    An oil-in-water microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) method has been developed and validated for the determination of atropine, its major degradation products (tropic acid, apoatropine and atropic acid) and related substances from plants material (noratropine, 6-hydroxyhyoscyamine, 7-hydroxyhyoscyamine, hyoscine and littorine). Separation of atropine and all impurities was optimized by varying the voltage, the nature of the oil droplet and the buffer, as well as the organic modifier (methanol, 2-propanol or acetonitrile) and the surfactant type and concentration. The optimum O/W microemulsion background electrolyte (BGE) solution consists of 0.8% (w/w) octane, 6.62% (w/w) 1-butanol, 2.0% (w/w) 2-propanol, 4.44% (w/w) SDS and 86.14% (w/w) 10 mM sodium tetraborate buffer pH 9.2. In order to shorten the analysis time a voltage gradient was applied. The validation was performed with respect to specificity, linearity, range, limit of quantification and detection, precision, accuracy and robustness. The established method allowed the detection and determination of atropine sulfate related substances at impurity levels given in the European Pharmacopoeia. Good agreement was obtained between the established MEEKC method and the traditional RP-HPLC method.

  20. TEM study of impurity segregations in beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenkov, M., E-mail: michael.klimenkov@kit.edu [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chakin, V.; Moeslang, A. [Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, R. [Institute for Applied Materials – Materials and Biomechanics, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Beryllium is planned to be used as a neutron multiplier in the Helium-cooled Pebble Bed European concept of a breeding blanket of demonstration power reactor DEMO. In order to evaluate the irradiation performance, individual pebbles and constrained pebble beds were neutron-irradiated at temperatures typical of fusion blankets. Beryllium pebbles 1 mm in diameter produced by the rotating electrode method were subjected to a TEM study before and after irradiation at High Flux Reactor, Petten, Netherlands at 861 K. The grain size varied in a wide range from sub-micron size up to several tens of micrometers, which indicated formation bimodal grain size distribution. Based on the application of combined electron energy loss spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy methods, we suggest that impurity precipitates play an important role in controlling the mechanical properties of beryllium. The impurity elements were present in beryllium at a sub-percent concentration form beryllide particles of a complex (Fe/Al/Mn/Cr)B composition. These particles are often ordered along dislocations lines, forming several micron-long chains. It can be suggested that fracture surfaces often extended along these chains in irradiated material.

  1. Role of Spin-Orbit Interaction and Impurity Doping in Thermodynamic Properties of Monolayer MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Using linear response theory, a tight-binding Hamiltonian model, and the Green's function technique, the influences of spin-orbit interaction (SOI) and impurity doping on the electronic heat capacity (EHC) and magnetic susceptibility (MS) of monolayer MoS2 have been investigated. The effect of scattering on dilute charged impurities is discussed in terms of the self-consistent Born approximation. We have calculated the temperature dependence of the EHC and MS for different values of SOI, concentration, and scattering strength of dopant impurity. The results show that, in the presence of impurities, the heat capacity of MoS2 decreases (increases) before (after) the Schottky anomaly, as does the MS. It is also found that the EHC and MS of the doped MoS2 reduce with the SOI in all temperature ranges.

  2. Refining of Cd and Zn from interstitial impurities using distillation with a ZrFe getter filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherban’ A. P.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Behavior of interstitial impurities in Cd and Zn is analysed in terms of thermodynamics. The authors consider reduction reactions of cadmium, zinc and carbon oxides, as well as zinc nitride with the getter material from the Zr-Fe alloy, depending on temperature and vacuum. Optimum initial temperature and vacuum conditions for the processes of deep refining of Cd and Zn from interstitial impurities has been developed. It has been shown experimentally that the proposed refining method provides a more effective cleaning of cadmium and zinc from the interstitial impurities than the distillation without a filter: the impurity content is reduced more than tenfold compared to the concentration in the input metal.

  3. Impurity diffusion in a harmonic potential and nonhomogeneous temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragie, Berhanu; Asfaw, Mesfin; Demeyu, Lemi; Bekele, Mulugeta

    2014-09-01

    We propose different ways of manipulating the dispersion of impurities along a semiconductor layer during heat treatment. The impurities undergo a random walk assisted by a nonlinear harmonic potential and nonhomogeneous temperature. Depending on the strength of a hot spot, trap potential, impurity density and standard deviation of the hot spot, the impurities diffuse away from the central region and pile up around the peripheral region of the semiconductor layer. Furthermore, the numerical result depicts that the internal field at high doping level can be of sufficient strength to cause the broadening of the impurity profile.

  4. Power Radiated from ITER and CIT by Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, J.; Cohen, S. A.; Hulse, R.; Post, D. E.; Redi, M. H.; Perkins, J.

    1990-07-01

    The MIST code has been used to model impurity radiation from the edge and core plasmas in ITER and CIT. A broad range of parameters have been varied, including Z{sub eff}, impurity species, impurity transport coefficients, and plasma temperature and density profiles, especially at the edge. For a set of these parameters representative of the baseline ITER ignition scenario, it is seen that impurity radiation, which is produced in roughly equal amounts by the edge and core regions, can make a major improvement in divertor operation without compromising core energy confinement. Scalings of impurity radiation with atomic number and machine size are also discussed.

  5. Time-reversal breaking and spin transport induced by magnetic impurities in a 2D topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.; Moghaddam, A. G.

    2016-09-01

    We employed the formalism of bond currents, expressed in terms of non-equilibrium Green’s function to obtain the local currents and transport features of zigzag silicene ribbon in the presence of magnetic impurity. When only intrinsic and Rashba spin-orbit interactions are present, silicene behaves as a two-dimensional topological insulator with gapless edge states. But in the presence of finite intrinsic spin-orbit interaction, the edge states start to penetrate into the bulk of the sample by increasing Rashba interaction strength. The exchange interaction induced by local impurities breaks the time-reversal symmetry of the gapless edge states and influences the topological properties strongly. Subsequently, the singularity of partial Berry curvature disappears and the silicene nanoribbon becomes a trivial insulator. On the other hand, when the concentration of the magnetic impurities is low, the edge currents are not affected significantly. In this case, when the exchange field lies in the x-y plane, the spin mixing around magnetic impurity is more profound rather than the case in which the exchange field is directed along the z-axis. Nevertheless, when the exchange field of magnetic impurities is placed in the x-y plane, a spin-polarized conductance is observed. The resulting conductance polarization can be tuned by the concentration of the impurities and even completely polarized spin transport is achievable.

  6. Bound States in Boson Impurity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Tao; Wu, Ying-Hai; González-Tudela, A.; Cirac, J. I.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of bound states involving multiple particles underlies many interesting quantum physical phenomena, such as Efimov physics or superconductivity. In this work, we show the existence of an infinite number of such states for some boson impurity models. They describe free bosons coupled to an impurity and include some of the most representative models in quantum optics. We also propose a family of wave functions to describe the bound states and verify that it accurately characterizes all parameter regimes by comparing its predictions with exact numerical calculations for a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian. For that model, we also analyze the nature of the bound states by studying the scaling relations of physical quantities, such as the ground-state energy and localization length, and find a nonanalytical behavior as a function of the coupling strength. Finally, we discuss how to test our theoretical predictions in experimental platforms, such as photonic crystal structures and cold atoms in optical lattices.

  7. Extrinsic germanium Blocked Impurity Bank (BIB) detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krabach, Timothy N.; Huffman, James E.; Watson, Dan M.

    1989-01-01

    Ge:Ga blocked-impurity-band (BIB) detectors with long wavelength thresholds greater than 190 microns and peak quantum efficiencies of 4 percent, at an operating temperature of 1.8 K, have been fabricated. These proof of concept devices consist of a high purity germanium blocking layer epitaxially grown on a Ga-doped Ge substrate. This demonstration of BIB behavior in germanium enables the development of far infrared detector arrays similar to the current silicon-based devices. Present efforts are focussed on improving the chemical vapor deposition process used to create the blocking layer and on the lithographic processing required to produce monolithic detector arrays in germanium. Approaches to test the impurity levels in both the blocking and active layers are considered.

  8. On the Matsubara-Toyozawa Formalism to Treat Impurity Bands in δ-DOPED Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Lima, I. C.; da Silva, A. Ferreira

    We obtain the density of the ground and excited states for electrons bound to shallow donors in a δ-dopping of a quantum well. We use the Matsubara-Toyozawa technique to treat disorder. The impurity bands are calculated for a concentration of 9.4×109 cm-2. We show that for this concentration of interest the excited bands do not overlap the ground state.

  9. Turbulent transport of impurities and their effect on energy confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Pusztai, I; Fulop, T; Candy, J

    2012-01-01

    By presenting linear and nonlinear gyrokinetic similarity studies, based on a balanced neutral beam injection deuterium discharge from the DIII-D tokamak, we demonstrate that impurities alter the scaling of the transport on the charge and mass of the main species, and even more importantly, they can dramatically change the energy transport even in relatively small quantities. A poloidally varying equilibrium electrostatic potential can lead to a strong reduction or sign change of the impurity peaking factor due to the combined effect of the in-out impurity density asymmetry and the EXB drift of impurities. We present an approximate expression for the impurity peaking factor and demonstrate that impurity peaking is not significantly affected by impurity self-collisions.

  10. Quantum Entanglement in the Two Impurity Kondo Model

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, S Y; Cho, Sam Young; Kenzie, Ross H. Mc

    2005-01-01

    In order to quantify quantum entanglement in two impurity Kondo systems, we calculate the concurrence, negativity, and von Neumann entropy. The entanglement of the two Kondo impurities is shown to be determined by two competing many-body effects, the Kondo effect and the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction, $I$. Due to the spin-rotational invariance of the ground state, the concurrence and negativity are uniquely determined by the spin-spin correlation between the impurities. It is found that there exists a critical minimum value of the antiferromagnetic correlation between the impurity spins which is necessary for entanglement of the two impurity spins. The critical value is discussed in relation with the unstable fixed point in the two impurity Kondo problem. Specifically, at the fixed point there is no entanglement between the impurity spins. Entanglement will only be created (and quantum information processing (QIP) be possible) if the RKKY interaction exchange energy, $I$, is at least severa...

  11. Impurities: Curse and blessing for crystal growers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Donald K.; Mazelsky, R.

    1990-11-01

    The indespensability of high-quality source materials research and development has been established for many years. However, because contributors to this field are diverse and communication of research results is often fragmented, transfer of the new knowledge is very slow. This paper describes how increasing source purity has improved the quality of several crystals, and how the addition of controlled impurities has decreased the defect density in these crystals. Experimental evidence is presented in this paper.

  12. Removal of iron from impure graphites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Growcock, F.B.; Heiser, J.

    1979-01-01

    Iron-impregnated and ash-rich graphites have been purified by leaching with gaseous I/sub 2/ at 900/sup 0/C. With addition of H/sub 2/, the rate of removal of impurity iron can be markedly increased and becomes comparable to that obtained with Cl/sub 2/. I/sub 2/ has an advantage in that it can also volatilize Ca and perhaps Ba and Sr.

  13. Characteristics of impurity-induced pseudogap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, Yoshinori, E-mail: yo_c.n-15@ruri.waseda.jp; Uto, Tatsuro; Matuda, Azusa

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • We have studied characteristics of the pseudogap states of Co substituted Bi2212 crystals used by STM/STS. • The pseudogap of Co 4% samples have temperature dependence. • We observed a disappearance of a 4a periodic modulation and a development of 1D modulation in the DOS. • An intimate relation between the DOS modulation and the pseudogap is confirmed. - Abstract: We have performed STM/STS measurements on a single crystal of Bi{sub 2.1}Sr{sub 1.9}Ca (Cu{sub 1−x}Co{sub x}) {sub 2}O{sub 8+δ} (Co-Bi2212), to reveal impurity effects on the pseudogap in cuprate high-T{sub c} superconductors. We report a drastic change in the temperature dependence of a pseudogap and in the density of states (DOS) modulation with a 4a period, in a certain doping range. In the Co 4% substituted samples, the pseudogap gradually closed like a gap of a BCS superconductor for slightly overdoped and overdoped regime, while their low temperature values were enhanced due to impurity. In addition, a disappearance of a 4a periodic modulation and a development of new modulation were observed in the DOS spatial distribution. These results indicate an intimate relation between the DOS modulation and the pseudogap, and qualitative difference in the impurity enhanced pseudogap and conventional one.

  14. Electrophobic interaction induced impurity clustering in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Long; Jiang, W.; Lu, Guang-Hong; Aguiar, J. A.; Liu, Feng

    2016-10-01

    We introduce the concept of electrophobic interaction, analogous to hydrophobic interaction, for describing the behavior of impurity atoms in a metal, a 'solvent of electrons'. We demonstrate that there exists a form of electrophobic interaction between impurities with closed electron shell structure, which governs their dissolution behavior in a metal. Using He, Be and Ar as examples, we predict by first-principles calculations that the electrophobic interaction drives He, Be or Ar to form a close-packed cluster with a clustering energy that follows a universal power-law scaling with the number of atoms (N) dissolved in a free electron gas, as well as W or Al lattice, as Ec is proportional to (N2/3-N). This new concept unifies the explanation for a series of experimental observations of close-packed inert-gas bubble formation in metals, and significantly advances our fundamental understanding and capacity to predict the solute behavior of impurities in metals, a useful contribution to be considered in future material design of metals for nuclear, metallurgical, and energy applications.

  15. Motion of a Distinguishable Impurity in the Bose Gas: Arrested Expansion Without a Lattice and Impurity Snaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Neil J.; Caux, Jean-Sébastien; Konik, Robert M.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the real-time dynamics of an initially localized distinguishable impurity injected into the ground state of the Lieb-Liniger model. Focusing on the case where integrability is preserved, we numerically compute the time evolution of the impurity density operator in regimes far from analytically tractable limits. We find that the injected impurity undergoes a stuttering motion as it moves and expands. For an initially stationary impurity, the interaction-driven formation of a quasibound state with a hole in the background gas leads to arrested expansion—a period of quasistationary behavior. When the impurity is injected with a finite center-of-mass momentum, the impurity moves through the background gas in a snaking manner, arising from a quantum Newton's cradlelike scenario where momentum is exchanged back and forth between the impurity and the background gas.

  16. Density of states of the one-dimensional electron gas: Impurity levels, impurity bands, and the band tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, A.; Ghazali, A.

    1994-06-01

    The density of states of cylindrical quantum wires is calculated in the presence of charged impurities located in the center of the wire. A multiple-scattering approach (Klauder's fifth approximation), which represents a self-consistent t-matrix approximation, is used. For small impurity densities and in the weak screening limit the ground-state impurity band and four excited-state impurity bands are obtained within our approach. We find good agreement between the numerically obtained spectral densities with the corresponding analytical spectral densities calculated with the single-impurity wave functions. The merging of impurity bands is studied. For large impurity densities we obtain a band tail. We present an analytical expression for the disorder-induced renormalized band-edge energy in the band-tail regime.

  17. Impurity microsegregation due to periodic changes in the temperature and pulling rate of crystal grown by the Stepanov method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhdanov, A.V.; Nikolaeva, L.P.; Red`kin, B.S. [Institute of Solid-State Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    A mathematical model is proposed to describe the behavior of a doping impurity concentration in a crystal grown by the Stepanov method from a melt and subjected to periodic changes in its pulling rate and temperature of the thermal node. Various modes of these effects are discussed. The results obtained are given by graphs that characterize their influence on concentration distribution.

  18. Influence of complex impurity centres on radiation damage in wide-gap metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lushchik, A., E-mail: aleksandr.lushchik@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Lushchik, Ch. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Popov, A.I. [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Kengaraga 8, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia); Schwartz, K. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Shablonin, E.; Vasil’chenko, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, Ravila 14c, 50411 Tartu (Estonia)

    2016-05-01

    Different mechanisms of radiation damage of wide-gap metal oxides as well as a dual influence of impurity ions on the efficiency of radiation damage have been considered on the example of binary ionic MgO and complex ionic–covalent Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} single crystals. Particular emphasis has been placed on irradiation with ∼2 GeV heavy ions ({sup 197}Au, {sup 209}Bi, {sup 238}U, fluence of 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}) providing extremely high density of electronic excitations within ion tracks. Besides knock-out mechanism for Frenkel pair formation, the additional mechanism through the collapse of mobile discrete breathers at certain lattice places (e.g., complex impurity centres) leads to the creation of complex defects that involve a large number of host atoms. The experimental manifestations of the radiation creation of intrinsic and impurity antisite defects (Lu|{sub Al} or Ce|{sub Al} – a heavy ion in a wrong cation site) have been detected in LuAG and LuAG:Ce{sup 3+} single crystals. Light doping of LuAG causes a small enhancement of radiation resistance, while pair impurity centres (for instance, Ce|{sub Lu}–Ce|{sub Al} or Cr{sup 3+}–Cr{sup 3+} in MgO) are formed with a rise of impurity concentration. These complex impurity centres as well as radiation-induced intrinsic antisite defects (Lu|{sub Al} strongly interacting with Lu in a regular site) tentatively serve as the places for breathers collapse, thus decreasing the material resistance against dense irradiation.

  19. Impurity Diffusion Coefficients of Al and Zn in Mg Determined from Solid-to-Solid Diffusion Couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kammerer, Catherine [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Warmack, Robert J Bruce [ORNL; Perry, Kelly A [ORNL; Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Sohn, Yong Ho [University of Central Florida

    2013-08-01

    Increasing use and development of lightweight Mgalloys have led to the desire for more fundamental research in and understanding of Mg-based systems. As property enhancing components, Al and Zn are two of the most important and common alloying elements for Mg-alloys. We have investigated the concentration dependent interdiffusion of Al and Zn in Mg using diffusion couples of pure polycrystalline Mg mated to Mg solid solutions containing either <9 at.% Al or <3 at.% Zn. Concentration profiles were determined by electron micro-probe microanalysis of the diffusion zone. The interdiffusion coefficients were determined by the classical Boltzmann-Matano method within the Mg solid solution. As the concentration of Al or Zn approaches the dilute ends, we employ an analytical approach based on the Hall method to estimate the impurity diffusion coefficients. Results of Al and Zn impurity diffusion in Mg are reported and compared to published impurity diffusion coefficients typically determined by thin film techniques.

  20. The effect of working gas impurities on plasma jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X. Y.; He, M. B., E-mail: pulhmb@mail.hust.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, HuBei 430074 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, D. W. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, WuHan, HuBei 430074 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shanxi 710049 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Air intrusion reduced the purity of working gas inside the tube for plasma jet, and thereby, affected the discharge dynamics. In this paper, the effect of using working gas with different purity level (helium purity 99.99999%, 99.99%, 99.9%, and 99%) on photoionization and the chemical reactivity of plasma jet were studied using a 2 dimensional plasma jet model. Photoionization of air species acted as a source of pre-ionization in front of the ionization region, which facilitated the transition from localized discharge to streamers inside the tube. The density of reactive species inside the tube was found to increase with the concentration of working gas impurities. For the highest purity helium (99.99999%), despite a low photoionization rate and the distance between the photoionization region and ionization region inside the tube, by increasing the applied voltage and decreasing the distance between the electrode and nozzle, plasma jets were formed.

  1. Sublattice asymmetry of impurity doping in graphene: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Lawlor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this review we highlight recent theoretical and experimental work on sublattice asymmetric doping of impurities in graphene, with a focus on substitutional nitrogen dopants. It is well known that one current limitation of graphene in regards to its use in electronics is that in its ordinary state it exhibits no band gap. By doping one of its two sublattices preferentially it is possible to not only open such a gap, which can furthermore be tuned through control of the dopant concentration, but in theory produce quasi-ballistic transport of electrons in the undoped sublattice, both important qualities for any graphene device to be used competetively in future technology. We outline current experimental techniques for synthesis of such graphene monolayers and detail theoretical efforts to explain the mechanisms responsible for the effect, before suggesting future research directions in this nascent field.

  2. Structural Identification and Characterization of Potential Impurities of Azelnidipine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sureshbabu Kapavarapu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Azelnidipine (AZL is a pale yellowish white tablet (16mg with diameter of 9.2mm and thickness of 3.3mm. A reverse phase performance liquid chromatographic method was developed for the determination of AZL in bulk and pharmaceutical dosage form. During the synthesis of bulk drug of AZL, we observed four impurities. All the impurities were detected by a gradient high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC method. LC-MS was performed to identify the mass number of these impurities. A thorough study was carried out to characterize the impurities. These impurities were synthesized, characterized and were co-injected with the sample containing impurities and are found to be matching with the impurities present in the sample. Based on the complete spectral analysis (UV, IR, NMR and MS these impurities were characterized as 1 Azelnidipine Stage-I para impurity [Impurity 1], whose molecular formula is C14 H15 NO5 and molecular weight is 277.27, 2 Azelnidipine Intermediate [Impurity 2], whose molecular formula is C14H15NO5 and molecular weight is 277.27, 3 4-Nitro Azelnidipine [Impurity 3], whose molecular formula is C33H34N4O6 and molecular weight is 582.65 and, 4 2-Nitro Azelnidipine [Impurity 4], whose molecular formula is C33H34N4O6 and molecular weight is 582.65. The proposed method was validated as per International Conference on Harmonization (ICH guidelines. The method was accurate, precise, specific and rapid found to be suitable for the quantitative analysis of the drug and dosage form.

  3. Evaluation of metal impurities in foods preserved with sodium lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kimberly Ferren; Carter, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    The public is being bombarded by the media almost dailywith real and potential food health concerns leadingto a public sentiment that questions the vulnerability and quality of our food. Sodium lactate is a food-grade product that in recent years has been used in bioremediation to stimulate microbial growth and contaminant breakdown processes. In previous work, impurities including arsenic and chromium were discovered to be present in the sodium lactate concentrate. The study described in this article was performed to determine whether arsenic and chromium were at detectable levels, posing a potential concern in food products preserved with sodium lactate available to the general public. A pilot sampling of three sodium-lactate-preserved food products was obtained from a local market and used to determine the commercial laboratory's detection and reporting limits for arsenic and chromium for these food products. Once these limits were established, a random sampling and analyses of 17 food products was performed. Arsenic was not reported above the detection limits in either the pilot or subsequent study, but chromium was detected at concentrations up to 0.30 parts per million in a pilot test sample and lower concentrations in the subsequent study. This study suggests that the sodium lactate in the sampled products was diluted enough for the arsenic concentration to be below the laboratory detection limit. Chromium was detected and may be an unaccounted source of chromium in diets of vulnerable populations.

  4. Infrared Response of Impurity Doped Silicon MOSFET’s (IRFET’S)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    have an impurity or gold concentration , Njless than the boron concentration, N.. In this case the simple model discussed in previous section applies...the furnace and cooled to 15 -3 room temperature. The resulting gold concentration of approximately 2 x 10 cm corresponds to the results of...type substrate of l-2ft-cm resistivity and doped with a gold concentration of 2 x 10 5 cm-3. The gate oxide of the MOSFET is 4000 A thick and the -3

  5. Exact solution of a t-J chain with impurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beduerftig, G. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Essler, F.H.L. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; Frahm, H. [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    1997-04-07

    We study the effects of an integrable impurity in a periodic t-J chain. The impurity couples to both spin and charge degrees of freedom and has the interesting feature that the interaction with the bulk can be varied continuously without losing integrability. We first consider ground state properties close to half-filling in the presence of a small bulk magnetic field. We calculate the impurity contributions to the (zero-temperature) susceptibilities and the low-temperature specific heat and determine the high-temperature characteristics of the impurity. We then investigate transport properties by computing the spin and charge stiffnesses at zero temperature. Finally the impurity phase shifts are calculated and the existence of an impurity bound state in the holon sector is established. (orig.).

  6. Magnetic states of single impurity in disordered environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.W. Ponedilok

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The charged and magnetic states of isolated impurities dissolved in amorphous metallic alloy are investigated. The Hamiltonian of the system under study is the generalization of Anderson impurity model. Namely, the processes of elastic and non-elastic scattering of conductive electrons on the ions of a metal and on a charged impurity are included. The configuration averaged one-particle Green's functions are obtained within Hartree-Fock approximation. A system of self-consistent equations is given for calculation of an electronic spectrum, the charged and the spin-polarized impurity states. Qualitative analysis of the effect of the metallic host structural disorder on the observed values is performed. Additional shift and broadening of virtual impurity level is caused by a structural disorder of impurity environment.

  7. Transitions and excitations in a superfluid stream passing small impurities

    KAUST Repository

    Pinsker, Florian

    2014-05-08

    We analyze asymptotically and numerically the motion around a single impurity and a network of impurities inserted in a two-dimensional superfluid. The criticality for the breakdown of superfluidity is shown to occur when it becomes energetically favorable to create a doublet—the limiting case between a vortex pair and a rarefaction pulse on the surface of the impurity. Depending on the characteristics of the potential representing the impurity, different excitation scenarios are shown to exist for a single impurity as well as for a lattice of impurities. Depending on the lattice characteristics it is shown that several regimes are possible: dissipationless flow, excitations emitted by the lattice boundary, excitations created in the bulk, and the formation of large-scale structures.

  8. Numerical calculation of impurity charge state distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crume, E. C.; Arnurius, D. E.

    1977-09-01

    The numerical calculation of impurity charge state distributions using the computer program IMPDYN is discussed. The time-dependent corona atomic physics model used in the calculations is reviewed, and general and specific treatments of electron impact ionization and recombination are referenced. The complete program and two examples relating to tokamak plasmas are given on a microfiche so that a user may verify that his version of the program is working properly. In the discussion of the examples, the corona steady-state approximation is shown to have significant defects when the plasma environment, particularly the electron temperature, is changing rapidly.

  9. Some aspects of impurity trapping of muons

    CERN Document Server

    Karlsson, E

    1981-01-01

    Several aspects of muon trapping in metals have been studied during the last two years, but the situation is still far from clear. The precise nature of the traps as well as the mechanisms leading to trapping seem to require more detailed investigations than those carried out so far. This review contains therefore a certain number of ideas which should be regarded as working hypotheses rather than established facts or descriptions of positive muon behaviour. The author considers muons in FCC metals (Al:Mn and Cu), and impurity trapping in BCC metals (V, Nb, Ta, Fe). (21 refs).

  10. Germanium Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, E. E.; Baumann, H.; Beeman, J. W.; Hansen, W. L.; Luke, P. N.; Lutz, M.; Rossington, C. S.; Wu, I. C.

    1989-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form. The advantages of the Si blocked impurity band (BIB) detector invented by M. D. Petroff and M. G. Stabelbroek are noted: smaller detection volume leading to a reduction of cosmic ray interference, extended wavelength response because of dopant wavefunction overlap, and photoconductive gain of unity. It is argued that the stated advantages of Si BIB detectors should be realizable for Ge BIB detectors. Information is given on detector development, subtrate choice and preparation, wafer polising, epitaxy, characterization of epi layers, and preliminary Ge BIB detector test results.

  11. ACCELERATING COLUMN FOR SEPARATION OF ETHANOL FROM FACTIONS OF INTERMEDIATE AND HEAD IMPURITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Agafonov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Nowadays purification of ethanol from the head and intermediate impurities is done with the selection of fractions of fusel alcohol and fusel oil from the distillation column and head and intermediate fractions impurities from condenser Epuration column operating accord-ing to the hydro-selection method. Due to this the fraction contains at least 13% ethyl alcohol, resulting in a reduced yield of the final product. Distillation of these fractions in the known acceleration columns requires increased consumption of heating steam for 6-8 kg / dal and increasing installation metal content. In this paper we investigate the process of distillation fraction from the condenser of Epura-tion column, fusel alcohol from the distillation column and subfusel liquid layer from the decanter, which is fed on a plate of supply of new accelerating column (AC, which operates on Epuration technology with the supply of hydro-selection water on the top plate and has in its composition concentration, boiling and stripping parts, a dephlagmator, a condenser, a boiler. Material balance equations of the column were obtained and ethyl alcohol concentration on its plates were determined by them. Having converted the material balance equations, we determined the dependences for the impurities ratio being drawn from the accelerating column with the Luther flows and ethyl alcohol fraction. Then we received the equation for determining the proportion of impurities taken from the column condenser with fraction. These calculations proved that the studied impurities are almost completely selected with this faction, ethyl alcohol content of it being 0.14% of the hourly output.

  12. Electric Effect of Impurity in Square Quantum Wires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Kui-Hua; ZHANG Ying-Tao; LI You-Cheng

    2004-01-01

    @@ In the presence of an electric fidd perpendicular to the axes of the wire, the binding energy of shallow donor impurity in finite square quantum well wires is calculated. For different impurity positions and aspect ratios of the wires, we investigate the Stark shift of the 1s-like state energy of the impurity by expanding the wavefunction into a two-dimensional Fourier series and by using the variational scheme.

  13. Recommended methods for purification of solvents and tests for impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Coetzee, J F

    1982-01-01

    Recommended Methods for Purification of Solvents and Tests for Impurities is a compilation of recommended procedures for purification of solvents and tests for solvent impurities. Ten solvents are covered: acetonitrile, sulfolane, propylene carbonate, dimethyl sulfoxide, dimethylformamide, hexamethylphosphoramide, pyridine, ethylenediamine, N-methylacetamide, and N-methylpropionamide. This book is comprised of 12 chapters and opens with an introduction to general aspects of impurity effects. The rationale for the selection of solvent is explained, and the relative reactivities of solutes in di

  14. Interactions of Ultracold Impurity Particles with Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0141 INTERACTIONS OF ULTRACOLD IMPURITY PARTICLES WITH BOSE- EINSTEIN CONDENSATES Georg Raithel UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Final...SUBTITLE Interactions of ultracold impurity particles with Bose- Einstein Condensates 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0453 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...Interactions of ultracold impurity particles with Bose- Einstein Condensates Contract/Grant #: FA9550-10-1-0453 Reporting Period: 8/15/2010 to 2/14

  15. Renormalization-group calculation of excitation properties for impurity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, M.; Whitaker, M. A.; Oliveira, L. N.

    1990-05-01

    The renormalization-group method developed by Wilson to calculate thermodynamical properties of dilute magnetic alloys is generalized to allow the calculation of dynamical properties of many-body impurity Hamiltonians. As a simple illustration, the impurity spectral density for the resonant-level model (i.e., the U=0 Anderson model) is computed. As a second illustration, for the same model, the longitudinal relaxation rate for a nuclear spin coupled to the impurity is calculated as a function of temperature.

  16. Anomalous screening of quantum impurities by a neutral environment

    OpenAIRE

    Yakaboylu, Enderalp; Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    It is a common knowledge that an effective interaction of a quantum impurity with an electromagnetic field can be screened by surrounding charge carriers, whether mobile or static. Here we demonstrate that very strong, `anomalous' screening can take place in the presence of a neutral, weakly-polarizable environment, due to an exchange of orbital angular momentum between the impurity and the bath. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to generalize all phenomena related to isolated impuriti...

  17. Corrosion behavior of two heat treatment Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys in different intergranular corrosion solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹发和; 张昭; 李劲风; 程英亮; 张鉴清; 曹楚南

    2004-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of two kinds of artificial aged Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys in two intergranular corrosion (IGC) solutions were studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and open circuit potential (OCP) at steady-state. EDAX result indicates that different artificial ageing methods change the composition and content of Cu and Zn in different zones. Zn/Cu depleted precipitation-free zone that plays a very important role in IGC is formed by heating the solubilized Al alloy for 135 ℃ at 16 h. All impedance spectra of the two alloys in two IGC solutions can be divided into three types. The two different states Al alloys takes on one time constant and two capacitive arcs at high-mediate frequency and low frequency in the NaCl+(NH4 )2 SO4 solution respectively; but in the NaCl+HCl solution, impedance displays one capacitive arc at the high-mediate frequency and an inductive loop at low frequency. OCP results show that more micro-galvanic cells in the NaCl+ (NH4)2SO4 solution than that in the NaCl+HCl solution results in more potential fluctuation amplitude, and long-term drift of OCP is due to the long-term variation of the cathodic and anodic corrosion processes.

  18. Study of the Precipitation Hardening Behaviour and Intergranular Corrosion of Al-Mg-Si Alloys with Differing Si Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaya Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Si addition on the precipitation hardening behaviour and evolution of intergranular corrosion (IGC of Al-Mg-Si alloys were investigated using hardness tests, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, potentiodynamic polarization measurements, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. With an increase of the Si content, the peak hardness of the Al-Mg-Si alloys considerably increased by enhancing the density of the β″ (Mg5Si6 phase inside the grains. The microstructures affecting the IGC performance consisted of MgSi particles, Si particles, Al-Fe-Mn-Si intermetallics, and the precipitate-free zone (PFZ. The IGC susceptibility of the Al-Mg-Si alloys was mainly attributed to the high electrochemical potential difference between the MgSi particles and solute-depleted zones. Excess Si improved the IGC susceptibility of the alloys, mainly due to an increase of the grain boundary MgSi precipitates. Furthermore, the evolution of the IGC process was discussed in detail.

  19. Intergranular properties of uniaxially pressed YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}-delta ceramic samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia F, I. [Universidad de Granma, Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Apdo. 21, P.O. Box 85100, Bayamo, Cuba (Cuba); Govea A, E.; Jardim, R. F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, C. P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Brazil (Brazil); Mune, P., E-mail: malvareza@udg.co.c [Universidad de Oriente, Departamento de Fisica, Patricio Lummumba s/n, P. O. Box 90500, Santiago de Cuba (Cuba)

    2010-07-01

    We performed measurements of electrical resistivity as a function of temperature, rho(T), in polycrystalline samples of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}-delta (Y-123) subjected to different uniaxial compacting pressures. We observed by using X-ray diffractometry that samples have a very similar composition. Most of the identified peaks are related to the superconducting Y-123 phase. Also, from the X-ray diffraction patterns performed, in powder and pellet samples, we estimated the Lotgering factor along the (00iota) direction, F{sub (00iota)}. The results indicate that F{sub (00iota)} increases from 0.13 to 0.16. From electrical resistivity measurements as a function of temperature, we were able to separate contributions arising from both the grain misalignment and microstructural defects. We found appreciable degradation in the normal-state transport properties of samples with an increase in uniaxial compacting pressure. It seems that this type of behaviour is associated with an increase in the influence of microstructural defects at the intergranular level. The experimental results are analyzed in the framework of a current conduction model of granular samples. (Author)

  20. Influence of impurities on the specific optical rotation of cefozopran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Yu; Li, Ya-Ping; Hu, Chang-Qin

    2012-07-01

    The impurities of cefozopran hydrochloride are analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with UV absorbance and optical rotation (OR) detection. The results show that the impurities can affect the specific optical rotation of the cefozopran product. Due to the different composition of impurities, the Chinese cefozopran hydrochloride product has a specific optical rotation different from the Japanese product. The relationship between impurity limits and specific optical rotation of cefozopran hydrochloride is revealed. The results provide a scientific rationale for setting the limit of specific optical rotation of cefozopran hydrochloride.

  1. Observation of interactions between impurities and hydrodynamics solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Lei; CHEN Weizhong; ZHU Yifei; LIN Han

    2004-01-01

    We have experimentally investigated interactions between impurities and hydrodynamic solitons in a shallow water trough subject to vertical vibration. The impurities are minor convex and concave defects located on the bottom of the trough, slightly varying the water depth. The experiments show that a shallow impurity will attract breathers and kinks while a deep one will repel them. These observations are consistent with the theoretical prediction proposed in the continuous Frankel-Kontorova model with impurities and can also be explained in the view of energy absorption.

  2. Ground- and excited-state impurity bands in quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, A.; Gold, A.; Serre, J.

    1989-02-01

    The density of states and the spectral density of electrons in quantum wells with charged impurities are calculated with use of a multiple-scattering method. The impurity-density-dependent broadening and the gradual merging of the ground (1s) and excited (2p+/-,2s) impurity levels into impurity bands are investigated. At low density the shapes of the 1s, 2p+/-, and 2s spectral densities are found to be in excellent agreement with the analytical results obtained for the ideal two-dimensional Coulomb problem.

  3. Phase Behavior and Micellar Packing of Impurity-Free Pluronic Block Copolymers in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Chang Yeol; Park, Hanjin

    We have investigated the impacts of the non-micellizable polymeric impurities on the micellar packing and solution phase behavior of Pluronic block copolymers in water. In particular, small angle x-ray scattering, rheology and dynamic light scattering techniques have been employed to elucidate how the low MW impurities affect the micellar packing and solution phase diagram in water, when ordered cubic structures of spherical micelles are formed. A silica slurry method has been developed using the competitive adsorption of the PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers over the low MW polymeric impurities for a large scale purification of Pluronics and it purity of Pluronics has been assessed by interaction chromatography. Based on the comparative studies on micellar packing between As-Received (AR) and Purified (Pure) Pluronic F108 solutions, we found experimental evidence to support the hypothesis that the inter-micellar distance of Pluronic cubic structures in aqueous solution is governed by the effective polymer concentration in terms of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers. Removal of the impurities in AR F108 offers an important clue on window into the onset of BCC ordering via hydrodynamic contact between micelles in solution. NSF DMR Polymers.

  4. Simulation and measurement of ferromagnetic impurities in non-magnetic aeroengine turbine disks using fluxgate magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Hantscher

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, ferromagnetic impurities in paramagnetic aeroengine turbine disks are investigated. Because such inclusions represent a significant threat in aviation, a detailed analysis is required for impured turbine disks. For this purpose, sensitive fluxgate magnetometers are used. After a premagnetisation, this sensor is able to detect small ferromagnetic particles by recording the variation of the magnetic flux density while the disk rotates below the sensor head. This trajectory creates a unique signature. However, the measured signatures are often distorted. A main reason for these distortions is that the particles are not oriented in axial direction (in the direction of the disks axis. Up to now, it was not possible to interpret the measured signatures. Thus, a simulation tool has been developed that provides a catalogue of different magnetic flux density distributions of typical orientations, positions and various distances to the fluxgate magnetometer position. For these simulations, the particles are assumed to be dipoles. As part of impurities are not caused by concentrated particles but by elongated ones, so-called or dipole lines, the model has been expanded for these cases by using numerical integration techniques. Measurements verify the assumption to approximate impurities by dipoles.

  5. Effects of argon flow on impurities transport in a directional solidification furnace for silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zaoyang; Liu, Lijun; Ma, Wencheng; Kakimoto, Koichi

    2011-03-01

    A global simulation including coupled oxygen and carbon transport was carried out to study the argon flow effects on the impurities transport in a directional solidification furnace for silicon solar cells. The simulation is based on a fully coupled calculation of the thermal and flow fields in a furnace including argon gas flow and melt convection. Five chemical reactions are considered in the impurity transport model. The effects of both the argon flow rate and the furnace pressure were examined. It was found that the argon flow has an important effect on the silicon melt convection, which will further influence the evaporation characteristic of SiO at the melt free surface. The amount of SiO carried away by the argon flow increases with increase in the argon flow rate while the CO gas can be prevented from being transported to the melt free surface. There exists a peak value for the concentration of impurities in the furnace chamber regarding argon flow rate due to the correlation among SiO evaporated, reacted and taken away. The pressure also influences the impurity transport in the furnace by modifying the pattern of argon flow. The numerical results demonstrate a method to control the oxygen and carbon transport in a directional solidification furnace by adjusting the argon flow rate and the furnace pressure.

  6. Impurity modes in Frenkel exciton systems with dipolar interactions and cubic symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgin, I; Huber, D L

    2013-04-28

    We introduce a continuum model for impurity modes of Frenkel excitons in fully occupied face-centered and body-centered cubic lattices with dipole-dipole interactions and parallel moments. In the absence of impurities, the model reproduces the small-k behavior found in numerical calculations of dipolar lattice sums. The exciton densities of states near the upper and lower band edges are calculated and compared with the corresponding results for a random array of dipoles. The Green function obtained with the continuum model, together with a spherical approximation to the Brillouin zone, is used to determine the conditions for the formation of a localized exciton mode associated with a shift in the transition energy of a single chromophore. The dependence of the local mode energy on the magnitude of the shift is ascertained. The formation of impurity bands at high concentrations of perturbed sites is investigated using the coherent potential approximation. The contribution of the impurity bands to the optical absorption is calculated in the coherent potential approximation. The locations of the optical absorption peaks of the dipolar system are shown to depend on the direction of propagation of the light relative to the dipolar axis, a property that is maintained in the presence of short-range interactions.

  7. Pattern recognition model to estimate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) at crevices and pit sites of 304 SS in BWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna [Penn State University, 212 Earth-Engineering Science Building, University Park, PA 16801 (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Many publications have shown that crack growth rates (CGR) due to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of metals is dependent on many parameters related to the manufacturing process of the steel and the environment to which the steel is exposed. Those parameters include, but are not restricted to, the concentration of chloride, fluoride, nitrates, and sulfates, pH, fluid velocity, electrochemical potential (ECP), electrolyte conductivity, stress and sensitization applied to the steel during its production and use. It is not well established how combinations of each of these parameters impact the CGR. Many different models and beliefs have been published, resulting in predictions that sometimes disagree with experimental observations. To some extent, the models are the closest to the nature of IGSCC, however, there is not a model that fully describes the entire range of observations, due to the difficulty of the problem. Among the models, the Fracture Environment Model, developed by Macdonald et al., is the most physico-chemical model, accounting for experimental observations in a wide range of environments or ECPs. In this work, we collected experimental data on BWR environments and designed a data mining pattern recognition model to learn from that data. The model was used to generate CGR estimations as a function of ECP on a BWR environment. The results of the predictive model were compared to the Fracture Environment Model predictions. The results from those two models are very close to the experimental observations of the area corresponding to creep and IGSCC controlled by diffusion. At more negative ECPs than the potential corresponding to creep, the pattern recognition predicts an increase of CGR with decreasing ECP, while the Fracture Environment Model predicts the opposite. The results of this comparison confirm that the pattern recognition model covers 3 phenomena: hydrogen embrittlement at very negative ECP, creep at intermediate ECP, and IGSCC

  8. Impurity detection in alkali-metal vapor cells via nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, B.; Ishikawa, K.

    2016-11-01

    We use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of alkali metals sealed in glass vapor cells to perform in situ identification of chemical contaminants. The alkali Knight shift varies with the concentration of the impurity, which in turn varies with temperature as the alloy composition changes along the liquidus curve. Intentional addition of a known impurity validates this approach and reveals that sodium is often an intrinsic contaminant in cells filled with distilled, high-purity rubidium or cesium. Measurements of the Knight shift of the binary Rb-Na alloy confirm prior measurements of the shift's linear dependence on Na concentration, but similar measurements for the Cs-Na system demonstrate an unexpected nonlinear dependence of the Knight shift on the molar ratio. This non-destructive approach allows monitoring and quantification of ongoing chemical processes within the kind of vapor cells which form the basis for precise sensors and atomic frequency standards.

  9. Metallic impurities in gallium nitride grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugo, S.A.; Krueger, J.; Kisielowski, C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Transition metals are often encountered in trace amounts in semiconductors. They have been extensively studied in most elemental and compound systems, since they form deep donor and/or acceptor levels which usually degrade the electronic and optical material properties. Only very little is known about transition metals in recent III-V semiconducting materials, such as GaN, AlN and InN. These few studies have been done exclusively on Metal-Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) or Hybrid Vapor Phase Epitaxy HVPE-grown GaN. Preliminary x-ray fluorescence studies at the Advanced Light Source, beamline 10.3.1, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have revealed that GaN materials grown by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) have Fe, Ni and Cr as the dominant transition metal contaminants. This finding is commensurate with the extremely high concentrations of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen (up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}) measured by Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). Preliminary work using the mapping capabilities of the x-ray fluorescence microprobe revealed the metal impurities were inhomogeneously distributed over the film. Future work of this collaboration will be to find a correlation between the existence of transition metals in MBE films, as revealed by x-ray fluorescence, and Photoluminescence (PL) spectra taken in the infrared region. Also, the authors will make use of the 1 {mu}m spatial resolution of x-ray microprobe to locate the contaminants in relation to structural defects in the GaN films. Because of the large strain caused by the lattice mismatch between the GaN films and the substrates, the films grow in a columnar order with high densities of grain boundaries and dislocations. These structural defects offer preferential sites for metal precipitation or agglomeration which could degrade the optical properties of this material more so than if the impurities were left dissolved in the GaN.

  10. Solubilization and stabilization Heat treatments influence on the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion in AISI-321 steel. Influencia de los tratamientos termicos de solubilizacion estabilizacion sobre la respuesta a la corrosion integranular del acero AISI-321

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fosca, C.; Salas, R.; Saenz, E.; Otero, E.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of heat treatments on the susceptibility to intergranular corrosion of AISI-321 steel is studied by using the EPR method (Electrochemical Potentiokinetic Reactivation). It is shown that a solubilization treatment at 1.373 K gives the material a better resistance against intergranular attach than higher temperatures treatments. A subsequent stabilization heat treatment at 1.073 K gives the best resistance against this type of corrosion to the studied steel. (Author) 12 refs.

  11. Characterizing trace metal impurities in optical waveguide materials using x-ray absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citrin, P.H.; Northrup, P.A.; Atkins, R.M.; Niu, L.; Marcus, M.A.; Jacobson, D.C. [Lucent Technologies, Murray Hill, NJ (United States). Bell Labs.; Glodis, P.F. [Lucent Technologies, Norcross, GA (United States). Bell Labs.

    1998-12-31

    X-ray absorption measurements are described for identifying metal impurities in silica preforms, the rod-like starting materials from which hair-like optical fibers are drawn. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach as a non-destructive, quantitative, element-selective, position-sensitive, and chemical-state-specific means for characterizing transition metals in the concentration regime of parts per billion.

  12. Systematic Study of Trace Radioactive Impurities in Candidate Construction Materials for EXO-200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard, D.S.; Grinberg, P.; Weber, P.; Baussan, E.; Djurcic, Z.; Keefer, G.; Piepke, A.; Pocar, A.; Vuilleumier, J.-L.; Vuilleumier, J.-M.; Akimov, D.; Bellerive, A.; Bowcock, M.; Breidenbach, M.; Burenkov, A.; Conley, R.; Craddock, W.; Danilov, M.; DeVoe, R.; Dixit, M.; Dolgolenko, A.; /Alabama U. /NRC-INMS /Neuchatel U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Colorado State U. /Laurentian U. /Maryland U. /UC, Irvine

    2007-10-24

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) will search for double beta decays of 136Xe. We report the results of a systematic study of trace concentrations of radioactive impurities in a wide range of raw materials and finished parts considered for use in the construction of EXO-200, the first stage of the EXO experimental program. Analysis techniques employed, and described here, include direct gamma counting, alpha counting, neutron activation analysis, and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry.

  13. Glycolic acid physical properties and impurities assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, D. P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pickenheim, B. R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bibler, N. E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hay, M. S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-06-08

    This document has been revised due to recent information that the glycolic acid used in Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) experiments contains both formaldehyde and methoxyacetic acid. These impurities were in the glycolic acid used in the testing included in this report and in subsequent testing using DuPont (now called Chemours) supplied Technical Grade 70 wt% glycolic acid. However, these impurities were not reported in earlier revisions. Additional data concerning the properties of glycolic acid have also been added to this report. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is planning to implement a nitric-glycolic acid flowsheets to increase attainment to meet closure commitment dates during Sludge Batch 9. In fiscal year 2009, SRNL was requested to determine the physical properties of formic and glycolic acid blends. Blends of formic acid in glycolic acid were prepared and their physical properties tested. Increasing amounts of glycolic acid led to increases in blend density, viscosity and surface tension as compared to the 90 wt% formic acid that is currently used at DWPF. These increases are small, however, and are not expected to present any difficulties in terms of processing. The effect of sulfur impurities in Technical Grade glycolic acid was studied for its impact on DWPF glass quality. While the glycolic acid specification allows for more sulfate than the current formic acid specification, the ultimate impact is expected to be on the order of 0.033 wt% sulfur in glass. Note that lower sulfur content glycolic acid could likely be procured at some increased cost if deemed necessary. A paper study on the effects of radiation on glycolic acid was performed. The analysis indicates that substitution of glycolic acid for formic acid would not increase the radiolytic production rate of H2 and cause an adverse effect in the Slurry Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) process. It has been cited that glycolic acid

  14. Simulation of runaway electron generation during plasma shutdown by impurity injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feher, Tamas

    2011-03-15

    Disruptions are dangerous instabilities in tokamaks that should be avoided or mitigated. One possible disruption mitigation method is to inject impurities into the plasma to shut it down in a controlled way. Runaway Electrons (REs) can be generated after the plasma is cooled down by the impurities and these electrons can damage the tokamak. In this work a simulation code is developed to investigate different disruption mitigation scenarios. The response of the bulk plasma, more precisely the temperature evolution of electrons, deuterium and impurity ions are described by energy balance equations in a 1D cylindrical plasma model. The induction and resistive diffusion of electric field is calculated. RE generation rates are used to calculate the runaway current. The Dreicer, hot-tail and avalanche effect is taken into account and a simple model for RE losses is also included. RE generation is studied in JET-like plasmas during pellet injection. Carbon pellets cause effective cooling but these scenarios are prone to runaway generation. A mixture of argon and deuterium gas could be used for safe shutdown without RE generation. In ITER the hot-tail RE generation process becomes important, and the simulation is therefore extended to take this into account. Shutdown scenarios with different concentration of neon and argon impurities were tested in ITER-like plasmas. To simplify the problem the impurity injection into the plasma is not modeled in these cases, only the response of the bulk plasma. The avalanche process cannot be suppressed in a simple way and would produce high runaway current. It can be avoided if some runaway loss phenomenon is included in the simulations, like diffusion due to magnetic perturbations

  15. Fast determination of impurities in metallurgical grade silicon for photovoltaics by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, J., E-mail: jonathan.hampel@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstrasse 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Boldt, F.M. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstrasse 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Gerstenberg, H. [ZWE FRM-II der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hampel, G.; Kratz, J.V. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Fritz-Strassmann-Weg 2, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Reber, S. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems, Heidenhofstrasse 2, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Wiehl, N. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Fritz-Strassmann-Weg 2, D-55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Standard wafer solar cells are made of near-semiconductor quality silicon. This high quality material makes up a significant part of the total costs of a solar module. Therefore, new concepts with less expensive so called solar grade silicon directly based on physiochemically upgraded metallurgical grade silicon are investigated. Metallurgical grade silicon contains large amounts of impurities, mainly transition metals like Fe, Cr, Mn, and Co, which degrade the minority carrier lifetime and thus the solar cell efficiency. A major reduction of the transition metal content occurs during the unidirectional crystallization due to the low segregation coefficient between the solid and liquid phase. A further reduction of the impurity level has to be done by gettering procedures applied to the silicon wafers. The efficiency of such cleaning procedures of metallurgical grade silicon is studied by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Small sized silicon wafers of approximately 200 mg with and without gettering step were analyzed. To accelerate the detection of transition metals in a crystallized silicon ingot, experiments of scanning whole vertical silicon columns with a diameter of approximately 1 cm by gamma spectroscopy were carried out. It was demonstrated that impurity profiles can be obtained in a comparably short time. Relatively constant transition metal ratios were found throughout an entire silicon ingot. This led to the conclusion that the determination of several metal profiles might be possible by the detection of only one 'leading element'. As the determination of Mn in silicon can be done quite fast compared to elements like Fe, Cr, and Co, it could be used as a rough marker for the overall metal concentration level. Thus, a fast way to determine impurities in photovoltaic silicon material is demonstrated. - Highlights: > We demonstrate a fast way to determine impurities in photovoltaic silicon by NAA. > We make first experiments of

  16. Impurity Conductivity in Semiconductors Resulting from Radiant Excitation

    OpenAIRE

    TOULANOV, Vakhab T.; DAVLETOVA, Aziza SH.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with the derivation of common formulae for induced impurity photosensibility with an arbitrary set of energy levels in the semiconductor gap. We give the expression for the real recombinational situation with two types of impurity levels as well. The basic properties and certain common peculiarities concerning induced photoconductivity in semiconductors are under consideration.

  17. Steady-state organization of binary mixtures by active impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Gilhøj, Henriette; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1998-01-01

    The structural reorganization of a phase-separated binary mixture in the presence of an annealed dilution of active impurities is studied by computer-simulation techniques via a simple two-dimensional lattice-gas model. The impurities, each of which has two internal states with different affinity...

  18. Multiple magnetic impurities on surfaces: Scattering and quasiparticle interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitchell, A.

    2015-01-01

    We study systems of multiple interacting quantum impurities deposited on a metallic surface in a three-dimensional host. For the real-space two-impurity problem, using numerical renormalization group calculations, a rich range of behavior is shown to arise due to the interplay between Kondo physics

  19. Tight-Binding Description of Impurity States in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez-Adame, F.

    2012-01-01

    Introductory textbooks in solid state physics usually present the hydrogenic impurity model to calculate the energy of carriers bound to donors or acceptors in semiconductors. This model treats the pure semiconductor as a homogeneous medium and the impurity is represented as a fixed point charge. This approach is only valid for shallow impurities…

  20. Fluid and gyrokinetic simulations of impurity transport at JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordman, H; Skyman, A; Strand, P

    2011-01-01

    Impurity transport coefficients due to ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) mode and trapped-electron mode turbulence are calculated using profile data from dedicated impurity injection experiments at JET. Results obtained with a multi-fluid model are compared with quasi-linear and nonlinear gyrokineti...

  1. Improvement of hydrogen sorption properties of compounds based on Vanadium “bcc” alloys by mean of intergranular phase development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planté, D., E-mail: damien.plante@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Néel CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Raufast, C.; Miraglia, S. [Institut Néel CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rango, P. de [Institut Néel CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); CRETA, CNRS, BP166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Fruchart, D. [Institut Néel CNRS et Université Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Decrease of “bcc” pseudo cell with the increase of amount of additive. •Additive phase improve activation kinetics. •Chromium in the “bcc” matrix decreases the lattice parameter and destabilizes hydride formation/dissociation. •Lower working temperatures could be obtain. -- Abstract: Body centered cubic structure (“bcc”) type alloys based on Vanadium [1] reveal promising characteristics for mobile applications. These disordered solid solutions have particular metal/hydride equilibrium and some regulation aspects have leaded us to pay special attention to this type of material [2]. Compounds based on Vanadium-rich solid solution have been elaborated in order to destabilize γ hydride phase (corresponding to the face centered cubic (“fcc”) structure of VH{sub 2}). Addition of Ni and Zr-rich Laves phase as a secondary phase results in the development of a particular microstructure composed of a principal “bcc” matrix rounded by intergranular activating phase. This results in a facilitated and faster activation of these compounds. The present study shows that some constituting species of the secondary phase have diffused in the main matrix and therefore have modified the thermodynamic of hydride. In fact, chromium diffusion into the “bcc” matrix destabilizes hydride. It is correlated to the lower stability of chromium hydride compared to Vanadium hydride. The enthalpic terms of each sample have been measured (assuming standard entropy of 130 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}). The equilibrium metal/hydride can be easily switched in order to adapt it to a mobile hydride tank and obtain low working temperature in regard to the potential use.

  2. Cohesive zone model for intergranular slow crack growth in ceramics: influence of the process and the microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero de la Osa, M.; Estevez, R.; Olagnon, C.; Chevalier, J.; Tallaron, C.

    2011-10-01

    Ceramic polycrystals are prone to slow crack growth (SCG) which is stress and environmentally assisted, similarly to observations reported for silica glasses. The kinetics of fracture are known to be dependent on the load level, the temperature and the relative humidity. In addition, evidence is available on the influence of the microstructure on the SCG rate with an increase in the crack velocity with decreasing the grain size. Crack propagation takes place beyond a load threshold, which is grain size dependent. We present a cohesive zone model for the intergranular failure process. The methodology accounts for an intrinsic opening that governs the length of the cohesive zone and allows the investigation of grain size effects. A rate and temperature-dependent cohesive model is proposed (Romero de la Osa M, Estevez R et al 2009 J. Mech. Adv. Mater. Struct. 16 623-31) to mimic the reaction-rupture mechanism. The formulation is inspired by Michalske and Freiman's picture (Michalske and Freiman 1983 J. Am. Ceram. Soc. 66 284-8) together with a recent study by Zhu et al (2005 J. Mech. Phys. Solids 53 1597-623) of the reaction-rupture mechanism. The present investigation extends a previous work (Romero de la Osa et al 2009 Int. J. Fracture 158 157-67) in which the problem is formulated. Here, we explore the influence of the microstructure in terms of grain size, their elastic properties and residual thermal stresses originating from the cooling from the sintering temperature down to ambient conditions. Their influence on SCG for static loadings is reported and the predictions compared with experimental trends. We show that the initial stress state is responsible for the grain size dependence reported experimentally for SCG. Furthermore, the account for the initial stresses enables the prediction of a load threshold below which no crack growth is observed: a crack arrest takes place when the crack path meets a region in compression.

  3. The role of time-dependent deformation in intergranular crack initiation of alloy 600 steam generator tubing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Was, G.S.; Lian, K.

    1998-03-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of two commercial alloy 600 conditions (600LT, 600HT) and controlled- purity Ni-18Cr-9Fe alloys (CDMA, CDTT) were investigated using constant extension rate tensile (CERT) tests in primary water (0.01M LiOH+0.01M H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}) with 1 bar hydrogen overpressure at 360{degrees}C and 320{degrees}C. Heat treatments produced two types of microstructures in both commercial and controlled-purity alloys: one dominated by grain boundary carbides (600HT and CDTT) and one dominated by intragranular carbides (600LT and CDMA). CERT tests were conducted over a range of strain rates and at two temperatures with interruptions at specific strains to determine the crack depth distributions. Results show that in all samples, IGSCC was the dominant failure mode. For both the commercial alloy and the controlled-purity alloys, the microstructure with grain boundary carbides showed delayed crack initiation and shallower crack depths than did the intragranular carbide microstructure under all experimental conditions. This data indicates that a grain boundary carbide microstructure is more resistant to IGSCC than an intragranular carbide microstructure. Observations support both the film rupture/slip dissolution mechanism and enhanced localized plasticity. The advantage of these results over previous studies is that the different carbide distributions were obtained in the same commercial alloy using different heat treatments, and in the other case, in nearly identical controlled-purity alloys. Therefore, observations of the effects of carbide distribution on IGSCC can more confidently be attributed to the carbide distribution alone rather than other potentially significant differences in microstructure or composition.

  4. Gaussian impurity moving through a Bose-Einstein superfluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsker, Florian

    2017-09-01

    In this paper a finite Gaussian impurity moving through an equilibrium Bose-Einstein condensate at T = 0 is studied. The problem can be described by a Gross-Pitaevskii equation, which is solved perturbatively. The analysis is done for systems of 2 and 3 spatial dimensions. The Bogoliubov equation solutions for the condensate perturbed by a finite impurity are calculated in the co-moving frame. From these solutions the total energy of the perturbed system is determined as a function of the width and the amplitude of the moving Gaussian impurity and its velocity. In addition we derive the drag force the finite sized impurity approximately experiences as it moves through the superfluid, which proves the existence of a superfluid phase for finite extensions of the impurities below the speed of sound. Finally we find that the force increases with velocity until an inflection point from which it decreases again in 2 and 3d.

  5. Reduction of Oxygen Impurity in Multicrystalline Silicon Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective control of oxygen impurity in multicrystalline silicon is required for the production of a high-quality crystal. The basic principle and some techniques for reducing oxygen impurity in multicrystalline silicon during the unidirectional solidification process are described in this paper. The oxygen impurity in multicrystalline silicon mainly originates from the silica crucible. To effectively reduce the oxygen impurity, it is essential to reduce the oxygen generation and enhance oxygen evaporation. For reduction of oxygen generation, it is necessary to prevent or weaken any chemical reaction with the crucible, and for the enhancement of oxygen evaporation, it is necessary to control convection direction of the melt and strengthen gas flow above the melt. Global numerical simulation, which includes heat transfer in global furnace, argon gas convection inside furnace, and impurity transport in both melt and gas regions, has been implemented to validate the above methods.

  6. Impurity transport in trapped electron mode driven turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mollén, A; Moradi, S; Fülöp, T

    2013-01-01

    Collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence is studied by gyrokinetic simulations with the GYRO code. Its impact on radial transport of high-Z trace impurities close to the core is thoroughly investigated, including the situation when a poloidally varying equilibrium electrostatic potential is present, and the dependence of the zero-flux impurity density gradient (peaking factor) on local plasma parameters is presented. Parameters such as ion-to-electron temperature ratio, electron temperature gradient and main species density gradient mainly affect the impurity peaking through their impact on mode characteristics. The poloidal asymmetry, the safety factor and magnetic shear have the strongest effect on impurity peaking, and it is shown that under certain scenarios where trapped electron modes are dominant, core accumulation of high-Z impurities can be avoided.

  7. [Impurity removal technology of Tongan injection in liquid preparation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-fang; Wang, Xiu-hai; Bai, Wei-rong; Kang, Xiao-dong; Liu, Jun-chao; Wu, Yun; Xiao, Wei

    2015-08-01

    In order to effectively remove the invalid impurities in Tongan injection, optimize the optimal parameters of the impurity removal technology of liquid mixing process, in this paper, taking Tongan injection as the research object, with the contents of celandine alkali, and sinomenine, solids reduction efficiency, and related substances inspection as the evaluation indexes, the removal of impurities and related substances by the combined process of refrigeration, coction and activated carbon adsorption were investigated, the feasibility of the impurity removal method was definited and the process parameters were optimized. The optimized process parameters were as follows: refrigerated for 36 h, boiled for 15 min, activated carbon dosage of 0.3%, temperature 100 degrees C, adsorption time 10 min. It can effectively remove the tannin, and other impurities, thus ensure the quality and safety of products.

  8. Quantum dynamics of impurities coupled to a Fermi sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, Meera M.; Levinsen, Jesper

    2016-11-01

    We consider the dynamics of an impurity atom immersed in an ideal Fermi gas at zero temperature. We focus on the coherent quantum evolution of the impurity following a quench to strong impurity-fermion interactions, where the interactions are assumed to be short range like in cold-atom experiments. To approximately model the many-body time evolution, we use a truncated basis method, where at most two particle-hole excitations of the Fermi sea are included. When the system is initially noninteracting, we show that our method exactly captures the short-time dynamics following the quench, and we find that the overlap between initial and final states displays a universal nonanalytic dependence on time in this limit. We further demonstrate how our method can be used to compute the impurity spectral function, as well as describe many-body phenomena involving coupled impurity spin states, such as Rabi oscillations in a medium or highly engineered quantum quenches.

  9. Interplay of quantum impurities and topological surface modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Shi-Han; Deng, Ming-Xun; Qiu, Jian-Ming; Zhong, Qing-Hu; Yang, Mou; Wang, Rui-Qiang, E-mail: rqwanggzu@163.com

    2015-11-06

    The interplay of an Anderson quantum impurity with topological surface modes is studied. We find that the quantum impurity scattering can locally destroy the Dirac electron spectra by creating a significant resonance exactly at the Dirac point, in stark contrast to the case of classic impurities. When an external magnetic field is applied to the topological insulator (TI) surfaces, a bound state is found either at the gap edges or within the gap. We discuss the coexistence of the Kondo resonance and the bound state and their effect on TI local density of states. - Highlights: • A resonance at the Dirac point is found, differing from classic impurity theory. • A magnetic field-induced bound state is found within the energy gap. • Impurity Kondo resonance can cause corresponding signatures in the LDOS of TIs. • The results can be tuned by a gate voltage or a chemical potential.

  10. Leaching kinetics of ionic rare-earth in ammonia-nitrogen wastewater system added with impurity inhibitors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱廷省; 朱冬梅; 方夕辉; 曾清华; 高广阔; 朱华磊

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia-nitrogen wastewater is produced during the dressing and smelting process of rare-earth ores. Such wastewater includes a very high concentration of NH4+, as well as other ions (e.g., NH4+, RE3+, Al3+, Fe3+, Ca2+, Cl–, and SiO32–) with a pH of 5.4–5.6. Its direct discharge will pollute, yet it can be recycled and used as a leaching reagent for ionic rare-earth ores. In this study, leaching kinetics studies of both rare earth ions and impurity ion Al3+were conducted in the ammonia-nitrogen wastewater system with the aid of impurity inhibitors. Results showed that the leaching process of rare-earth followed the internal diffusion kinetic model. When the temperature was 298 K and the concentration of NH4+was 0.3 mol/L, the leaching reaction rate constant of ionic rare-earth was 1.72 and the apparent activation energy was 9.619 kJ/mol. The leaching rate was higher than that of conventional leaching system with ammonium sulfate, which indicated that ammonia-nitrogen wastewater system and the addition of impurity inhibitors could pro-mote ionic rare-earth leaching. The leaching kinetic process of impurity Al3+did not follow either internal diffusion kinetic model or chemical reaction control, but the hybrid control model which was affected by a number of process factors. Thus, during the industrial production the leaching of impurity ions could be reduced by increasing the concentration of impurity inhibitors, reducing the leach-ing temperature to a proper range, accelerating the seepage velocity of leaching solution, or increasing the leaching rate of rare earths.

  11. Size dependence of the stability, electronic structure, and optical properties of silicon nanocrystals with various surface impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocevski, V.; Eriksson, O.; Rusz, J.

    2015-03-01

    We present a comprehensive, ground-state density functional theory study of the size dependence of the optical and electronic properties and the stability of spherical silicon nanocrystals (NCs) with different impurities on the surface. We vary the size of the NCs from 1.0 to 3.5 nm, considering single-bonded (CH3 , F, Cl, OH) and double-bonded (O, S) impurities and bridged oxygen. We show that the density of states (DOS) and absorption indices of the NCs with single-bonded impurities are very similar to each other and the fully hydrogenated NCs, except for the 1.0-nm NCs, where a slight difference is present. In the case of the NCs with double-bonded impurities, the DOS and absorption indices exhibit a significant difference, compared to the fully hydrogenated NCs, for sizes up to 2.5 nm. We argue that this difference arises from the difference in the contribution from the impurity to the states around the gap, which can considerably change the character of the states. We demonstrate that the double-bonded impurities contribute significantly to the states around the gap, compared to the single-bonded impurities, causing changes in the symmetry of these states. This observation was further supported by analyzing the changes of the Fourier transform of the charge densities of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied eigenstate. We also show that the formation energies of NCs with bridged oxygen and fluorine are the lowest, regardless of the size. Furthermore, we show that high hydrogen concentration can be used to suppress the addition of oxygen and fluorine on the surface of the Si NCs.

  12. Determination of impurities in crude light pyridine bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, E.G.; Tsaur, A.G.; Lisina, L.A.; Dybkin, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen sulfide, ammonia and phenols are always products of coal pyrolysis. In addition the coke oven gas contains carbon disulfide. The simultaneous presence of ammonia and carbon disulfide leads inevitably to the formation of thiocyanates in the entire recovery system before the saturator, and particularly in the ammonia liquor. All these compounds may be expected to be present in the crude light pyridine bases (CLPB). This causes corrosion of the equipment and reduces the photostability of the final process products. The ability of the phenols to form high boiling point azeotropes with the bases reduces the ..beta..-picoline fraction yield. For these reasons the presence of the stated impurities in the CLPB is undesirable. In the present work an estimate has been made of the average annual concentration of phenols, cyanides, thiocyanates and chlorides in the crude light pyridine bases of all the plants supplying this material in the Eastern USSR. The table shows only the mean values of the concentrations for each component in the samples of the individual plants, and also those for water.

  13. Reversed-phase ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method development and validation for determination of impurities related to torsemide tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hitesh B; Mohan, Arivozhi; Joshi, Hitendra S

    2011-01-01

    A simple RP-ultra-performance LC method was developed and validated for determination of impurities related to torsemide tablets. The rapid method provided adequate separation of all known related impurities and degradation products. Separation was achieved on a Zorbax SB-C18 column (50 x 4.6 mm id, 1.8 microm particle size) with binary gradient elution, and detection was performed at 288 nm. The drug product was subjected to oxidative, hydrolytic, photolytic, and thermal stress conditions to prove the specificity of the proposed method. The linearity and recovery were investigated for known impurities in the range of 0.025 to 1.0%, with respect to the drug concentration in the prepared sample. The linearity of the calibration curve for each of the impurities and torsemide was found to be very good (r2 > 0.999). Relative response factors for each of the known impurities were established by the slope ratio method from the linearity study.

  14. Diclofenac sodium injection sterilized by autoclave and the occurrence of cyclic reaction producing a small amount of impurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, J; Islam, M; Khan, A H; Das, S C; Akhteruzzaman, M; Deb, A K; Alam, A H

    2001-05-01

    A known impurity is formed in the production of a parenteral dosage form of diclofenac sodium if terminally sterilized by autoclave. This impurity has been detected as 1-(2,6-dichlorophenyl) indolin-2qone, which is also an intermediate from which diclofenac sodium is generally synthesized. It is only the condition of the autoclave method (i.e., 123 +/- 2 degrees C) that enforces the intramolecular cyclic reaction of diclofenac sodium forming the indolinone derivative and sodium hydroxide. The formation of this impurity has been found to depend on the initial pH of the formulation. The reaction follows first-order kinetics, and the energy of activation is 5.34 kcal/mol. The other excipients in the formulation do not have a role in this reaction. The concentration of the impurity in the resultant product in the ampule goes beyond the limit of the raw materials in the pharmacopoeias. It is thus preferable to use an alternative sterilization method; that is, an aseptic filtration method in which the formation of this impurity can be avoided.

  15. Simulation and optimization of an organic-impurity oxidization reactor with a fixed porous bed and an electric heating element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnezdilov, N. N.; Dobrego, K. V.; Kozlov, I. M.; Shmelev, E. S.

    2006-09-01

    A reactor for oxidization of low-caloric-value organic impurities contained in the air has been simulated. It comprises a tube with a recuperator, filled with a porous carcass mix, and includes a heating element. The influence of the heating-element placement, the heat losses through the upper cover of the reactor, the flow rate of a gas mixture, and the power of the heater on the maximum temperatures of the porous carcass and the gas and on the concentration of the incompletely oxidized organic impurity at the output of the reactor has been investigated. It is shown that, to burn an impurity completely, it will suffice to heat the gas δTe to 300 K. It has been established that it is best to place a heater at the level of the upper cut of the inner tube of the reactor.

  16. Competing effects of magnetic impurities in the anomalous Hall effect on the surface of a topological insulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ming-Xun; Luo, Wei; Deng, W. Y.; Chen, M. N.; Sheng, L.; Xing, D. Y.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) on the surface of a topological insulator induced by a finite concentration of magnetic impurities, and find topologically nontrivial and trivial mechanisms simultaneously contributing to the Hall conductivity. In the topologically nontrivial mechanism, the impurities gap the surface spectrum and result in a half-integer quantized intrinsic Hall conductivity in units e2/h , while in the topologically trivial mechanism, the half-integer quantized plateau is modified by impurity-induced localized states via a gap-filling process. The nonmagnetic charge potential itself, though participating in the gap-filling process, cannot induce the AHE. In the presence of a finite magnetic potential, the charge potential would destroy the symmetric distribution of the Hall conductivity by redistributing the localized levels. More interestingly, the sign of the Hall conductivity is tunable by changing the strength of the charge potential.

  17. Spin Hall conductivity in the impure two-dimensional Rashba s-wave superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biderang, M.; Yavari, H.

    2016-06-01

    Based on the Kubo formula approach, the spin Hall conductivity (SHC) of a two-dimensional (2D) Rashba s-wave superconductor in the presence of nonmagnetic impurities is calculated. We will show that by increasing the superconducting gap, the SHC decreases monotonically to zero, while by decreasing the concentration of impurities at zero gap, the SHC closes to the clean limit universal value - e/8 π. As a function of the impurity relaxation rate τ at Tc = 0.1 and γ = 0.01 (γ is the spin-orbit coupling in unit of eV · m), we will show that in the dirty limit (τ → 0) the SHC vanishes, and by increasing the relaxation time (τ → ∞) the SHC depends on the value of superconducting gap (Δ = 1.76Tc√{ 1 -T/Tc }), is changed from zero for full gap to -e/8 π in zero gap. At low temperatures, the SHC goes to zero exponentially and near the critical temperature depending on the concentration of the scattering centers, the SHC will tend to the value of normal state. We will also show that the SHC is independent of spin-orbit coupling (γ) in the clean limit.

  18. Impurity processing system for the JET active gas handling system - inactive commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupo, J.; Hemmerich, J.L.; Lasser, R.; Yorkshades, J.; Salanave, J.L. [JET Joint Undertaking, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    1995-10-01

    The Impurity Processing (IP) system is designed to recover tritium from tritiated compounds (Q{sub 2}O, C{sub x}Q{sub y}, NQ{sub 3}, with Q = H, D, T and x>=1, y>=4) collected from the JET torus or generated during the processing of gases inside the Active Gas Handling System (AGHS). The recovery process involves dilution of the impurities in helium, addition of oxygen, recirculation of the helium-impurities-oxygen mixture over a hot recombiner (773K) to generate water and CO{sub 2}, and trapping of the water on 160K cold surfaces. The remaining gas species He, CO{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, N{sub 2} (with a very small tritium concentration) are transferred finally to the Exhaust Detritiation (ED) system for further reduction of the tritium concentration by at least a factor of 1000. The cold trap is heated (473K) and the water vapour passed over two hot iron beds at 823K to `crack` the water. The recovered hydrogen isotopes are stored in cold uranium beds (U-beds) for further processing in AGHS. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  19. The effect of iron and copper impurities on the wettability of sphalerite (110) surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Darren J; Bredow, Thomas; Chandra, Anand P; Cavallaro, Giuseppe P; Gerson, Andrea R

    2011-07-15

    The effect of impurities in the zinc sulfide mineral sphalerite on surface wettability has been investigated theoretically to shed light on previously reported conflicting results on sphalerite flotation. The effect of iron and copper impurities on the sphalerite (110) surface energy and on the water adsorption energy was calculated with the semi-empirical method modified symmetrically orthogonalized intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MSINDO) using the cyclic cluster model. The effect of impurities or dopants on surface energies is small but significant. The surface energy increases with increasing surface iron concentration while the opposite effect is reported for increasing copper concentration. The effect on adsorption energies is much more pronounced with water clearly preferring to adsorb on an iron site followed by a zinc site, and copper site least favorable. The theoretical results indicate that a sphalerite (110) surface containing iron is more hydrophilic than the undoped zinc sulfide surface. In agreement with the literature, the surface containing copper (either naturally or by activation) is more hydrophobic than the undoped surface. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Fully Converting Graphite into Graphene Oxide Hydrogels by Preoxidation with Impure Manganese Dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiaojiao; Yang, Ningxin; Sun, Zhe; Zeng, Mengqi; Fu, Lei; Hu, Chengguo; Hu, Shengshui

    2015-09-30

    Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) has been proved to be an efficient oxidant for converting graphite into graphite oxide, but its slow diffusion in the interlayer of graphite seriously restricts the production of graphene oxide (GO). Here, we demonstrate that the preoxidation of graphite by impure manganese dioxide (MnO2) in a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and phosphorus pentoxide (P2O5) can efficiently improve the synthesis of GO when KMnO4 is employed as the oxidant. The prepared honey-like GO hydrogels possess a high yield of single-layer sheets, large sizes (average lateral size up to 20 μm), wide ranges of stable dispersion concentrations (from dilute solutions, viscous hydrogels, to dry films), and good conductivity after reduction (~2.9 × 10(4) S/m). The mechanism for the improved synthesis of GO by impure MnO2 was explored. The enhanced exfoliation and oxidation of graphite by oxidative Mn ions (mainly Mn(3+)), which are synergistically produced by the reaction of impure MnO2 with H2SO4 and P2O5, are found to be responsible for the improved synthesis of such GO hydrogels. Particularly, preoxidized graphite (POG) can be partially dispersed in water with sonication, which allows the facile construction of flexible and highly conductive graphene nanosheet film electrodes with excellent electrochemical sensing properties.

  1. Influence of Impurities on the Radiation Response of the TlBr Semiconductor Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Alves dos Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Two commercially available TlBr salts were used as the raw material for crystal growths to be used as radiation detectors. Previously, TlBr salts were purified once, twice, and three times by the repeated Bridgman method. The purification efficiency was evaluated by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS, after each purification process. A compartmental model was proposed to fit the impurity concentration as a function of the repetition number of the Bridgman growths, as well as determine the segregation coefficients of impurities in the crystals. The crystalline structure, the stoichiometry, and the surface morphology of the crystals were evaluated, systematically, for the crystals grown with different purification numbers. To evaluate the crystal as a radiation semiconductor detector, measurements of its resistivity and gamma-ray spectroscopy were carried out, using 241Am and 133Ba sources. A significant improvement of the radiation response was observed in function of the crystal purity.

  2. Validation of gyrokinetic modelling of light impurity transport including rotation in ASDEX Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Casson, F J; Angioni, C; Camenen, Y; Dux, R; Fable, E; Fischer, R; Geiger, B; Manas, P; Menchero, L; Tardini, G

    2013-01-01

    Upgraded spectroscopic hardware and an improved impurity concentration calculation allow accurate determination of boron density in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. A database of boron measurements is compared to quasilinear and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations including Coriolis and centrifugal rotational effects over a range of H-mode plasma regimes. The peaking of the measured boron profiles shows a strong anti-correlation with the plasma rotation gradient, via a relationship explained and reproduced by the theory. It is demonstrated that the rotodiffusive impurity flux driven by the rotation gradient is required for the modelling to reproduce the hollow boron profiles at higher rotation gradients. The nonlinear simulations validate the quasilinear approach, and, with the addition of perpendicular flow shear, demonstrate that each symmetry breaking mechanism that causes momentum transport also couples to rotodiffusion. At lower rotation gradients, the parallel compressive convection is required to match the mos...

  3. Ab initio study of hydrogenic effective mass impurities in Si nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelaers, H; Durgun, E; Partoens, B; Bilc, D I; Ghosez, Ph; Van de Walle, C G; Peeters, F M

    2017-03-08

    The effect of B and P dopants on the band structure of Si nanowires is studied using electronic structure calculations based on density functional theory. At low concentrations a dispersionless band is formed, clearly distinguishable from the valence and conduction bands. Although this band is evidently induced by the dopant impurity, it turns out to have purely Si character. These results can be rigorously analyzed in the framework of effective mass theory. In the process we resolve some common misconceptions about the physics of hydrogenic shallow impurities, which can be more clearly elucidated in the case of nanowires than would be possible for bulk Si. We also show the importance of correctly describing the effect of dielectric confinement, which is not included in traditional electronic structure calculations, by comparing the obtained results with those of G0W0 calculations.

  4. Impurity distribution in high purity germanium crystal and its impact on the detector performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guojian; Amman, Mark; Mei, Hao; Mei, Dongming; Irmscher, Klaus; Guan, Yutong; Yang, Gang

    High-purity germanium crystals were grown in a hydrogen atmosphere using the Czochralski method. The axial and radial distributions of impurities in the crystals were measured by Hall effect and Photo-thermal ionization spectroscopy (PTIS). Amorphous semiconductor contacts were deposited on the germanium crystals to make detectors. Three planar detectors were fabricated from three crystals with different net carrier concentrations (1.7, 7.9 and 10x1010 cm-3). We evaluated the electrical and spectral performance of three detectors. Measurements of gamma-ray spectra from 137Cs, 241Am and 60Co sources demonstrate that the detectors have excellent energy resolution. The relationship between the impurities and detector's energy resolution was analyzed. Keywords: High-purity germanium crystal, High-purity germanium detector This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota..

  5. Potential metal impurities in active pharmaceutical substances and finished medicinal products - A market surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollein, Uwe; Bauer, Bettina; Habernegg, Renate; Schramek, Nicholas

    2015-09-18

    A market surveillance study has been established by using different atomic spectrometric methods for the determination of selected elemental impurities of particular interest, to gain an overview about the quality of presently marketed drug products and their bulk drug substances. The limit tests were carried out with respect to the existing EMA guideline on the specification limits for residuals of metal catalysts or metal reagents. Also attention was given to the future implementation of two new chapters of the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) stating limit concentrations of elemental impurities. The methods used for determination of metal residues were inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), and atomic absorption spectrometry technologies (GFAAS, CVAAS, HGAAS). This article presents the development and validation of the methods used for the determination of 21 selected metals in 113 samples from drug products and their active pharmaceutical ingredients.

  6. Recent trends in the impurity profile of pharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Pilaniya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various regulatory authorities such as the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH, the United States Food and Drug administration (FDA, and the Canadian Drug and Health Agency (CDHA are emphasizing on the purity requirements and the identification of impurities in Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients (APIs. The various sources of impurity in pharmaceutical products are - reagents, heavy metals, ligands, catalysts, other materials like filter aids, charcoal, and the like, degraded end products obtained during \\ after manufacturing of bulk drugs from hydrolysis, photolytic cleavage, oxidative degradation, decarboxylation, enantiomeric impurity, and so on. The different pharmacopoeias such as the British Pharmacopoeia, United State Pharmacopoeia, and Indian Pharmacopoeia are slowly incorporating limits to allowable levels of impurities present in APIs or formulations. Various methods are used to isolate and characterize impurities in pharmaceuticals, such as, capillary electrophoresis, electron paramagnetic resonance, gas-liquid chromatography, gravimetric analysis, high performance liquid chromatography, solid-phase extraction methods, liquid-liquid extraction method, Ultraviolet Spectrometry, infrared spectroscopy, supercritical fluid extraction column chromatography, mass spectrometry, Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, and RAMAN spectroscopy. Among all hyphenated techniques, the most exploited techniques for impurity profiling of drugs are Liquid Chromatography (LC-Mass Spectroscopy (MS, LC-NMR, LC-NMR-MS, GC-MS, and LC-MS. This reveals the need and scope of impurity profiling of drugs in pharmaceutical research.

  7. Impurity-limited resistance and phase interference of localized impurities under quasi-one dimensional nano-structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, Nobuyuki, E-mail: sano@esys.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan)

    2015-12-28

    The impurity-limited resistance and the effect of the phase interference among localized multiple impurities in the quasi-one dimensional (quasi-1D) nanowire structures are systematically investigated under the framework of the scattering theory. We derive theoretical expressions of the impurity-limited resistance in the nanowire under the linear response regime from the Landauer formula and from the Boltzmann transport equation (BTE) with the relaxation time approximation. We show that the formula from the BTE exactly coincides with that from the Landauer approach with the weak-scattering limit when the energy spectrum of the in-coming electrons from the reservoirs is narrow and, thus, point out a possibility that the distinction of the impurity-limited resistances derived from the Landauer formula and that of the BTE could be made clear. The derived formulas are applied to the quasi-1D nanowires doped with multiple localized impurities with short-range scattering potential and the validity of various approximations on the resistance are discussed. It is shown that impurity scattering becomes so strong under the nanowire structures that the weak-scattering limit breaks down in most cases. Thus, both phase interference and phase randomization simultaneously play a crucial role in determining the impurity-limited resistance even under the fully coherent framework. When the impurity separation along the wire axis direction is small, the constructive phase interference dominates and the resistance is much greater than the average resistance. As the separation becomes larger, however, it approaches the series resistance of the single-impurity resistance due to the phase randomization. Furthermore, under the uniform configuration of impurities, the space-average resistance of multiple impurities at room temperature is very close to the series resistance of the single-impurity resistance, and thus, each impurity could be regarded as an independent scattering center. The

  8. Impurity effects on trapped electron mode in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Huarong; Wang, Zheng-Xiong; Dong, J. Q.

    2016-07-01

    The effects of impurity ions on the trapped electron mode (TEM) in tokamak plasmas are numerically investigated with the gyrokinetic integral eigenmode equation. It is shown that in the case of large electron temperature gradient ( η e ), the impurity ions have stabilizing effects on the TEM, regardless of peaking directions of their density profiles for all normalized electron density gradient R / L n e . Here, R is the major radius and L n e is the electron density gradient scale length. In the case of intermediate and/or small η e , the light impurity ions with conventional inwardly (outwardly) peaked density profiles have stabilizing effects on the TEM for large (small) R / L n e , while the light impurity ions with steep inwardly (outwardly) peaked density profiles can destabilize the TEM for small (large) R / L n e . Besides, the TEM driven by density gradient is stabilized (destabilized) by the light carbon or oxygen ions with inwardly (outwardly) peaked density profiles. In particular, for flat and/or moderate R / L n e , two independent unstable modes, corresponding respectively to the TEM and impurity mode, are found to coexist in plasmas with impurity ions of outwardly peaked density profiles. The high Z tungsten impurity ions play a stronger stabilizing role in the TEM than the low Z impurity ions (such as carbon and oxygen) do. In addition, the effects of magnetic shear and collision on the TEM instability are analyzed. It is shown that the collisionality considered in this work weakens the trapped electron response, leading to a more stable TEM instability, and that the stabilizing effects of the negative magnetic shear on the TEM are more significant when the impurity ions with outwardly peaked density profile are taken into account.

  9. Mechanisms of intergranular fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farkas, D. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1999-08-01

    The authors present a study of the atomistic mechanisms of crack propagation along grain boundaries in metals and alloys. The failure behavior showing cleavage crack growth and/or crack-tip dislocation emission is demonstrated using atomistic simulations for an embedded-atom model. The simulations follow the quasi-equilibrium growth of a crack as the stress intensity applied increases. Dislocations emitted from crack tips normally blunt the crack and inhibit cleavage, inducing ductile behavior. When the emitted dislocations stay near the crack tip (sessile dislocations), they do blunt the crack but brittle cleavage can occur after the emission of a sufficient number of dislocations. The fracture process occurs as a combination of dislocation emission/micro-cleavage portions that are controlled by the local atomistic structure of the grain boundary. The grain boundary is shown to be a region where dislocation emission is easier, a mechanism that competes with the lower cohesive strength of the boundary region.

  10. Long-range exchange interaction between magnetic impurities in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, M.; Mishchenko, E. G.

    2017-02-01

    The effective spin exchange RKKY coupling between impurities (adatoms) on graphene mediated by conduction electrons is studied as a function of the strength of the potential part of the on-site energy U of the electron-adatom interaction. With increasing U , the exchange coupling becomes long range, determined largely by the impurity levels with energies close to the Dirac points. When adatoms reside on opposite sublattices, their exchange coupling, normally antiferromagnetic, becomes ferromagnetic and resonantly enhanced at a specific distance where an impurity level crosses the Dirac point.

  11. Generalized Wilson chain for solving multichannel quantum impurity problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Andrew K.; Galpin, Martin R.; Wilson-Fletcher, Samuel; Logan, David E.; Bulla, Ralf

    2014-03-01

    The numerical renormalization group is used to solve quantum impurity problems, which describe magnetic impurities in metals, nanodevices, and correlated materials within dynamical mean field theory. Here we present a simple generalization of the Wilson chain, which improves the scaling of computational cost with the number of conduction bands, bringing more complex problems within reach. The method is applied to calculate the t matrix of the three-channel Kondo model at T =0, which shows universal crossovers near non-Fermi-liquid critical points. A nonintegrable three-impurity problem with three bands is also studied, revealing a rich phase diagram and novel screening and overscreening mechanisms.

  12. Thermal quantum discord in the Heisenberg chain with impurity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jia-Min, E-mail: jmgong@yeah.net; Hui, Zhan-Qiang

    2014-07-01

    We study thermal quantum discord (TQD) in the Heisenberg chain with spin site or magnetic impurity. The former one of which may induce inhomogeneous exchange interactions between the neighboring spins, while the latter one may model a spin chain with nonuniform magnetic field. In contrast to one's traditional understanding, we found that the spin impurity can be used to enhance the TQD greatly for all the bipartition schemes of the chain, while the magnetic impurity located on one spin can make the TQD between the other two spins approaching its maximum 1 for the antiferromagnetic chain.

  13. Exact Solution for Perk-Schultz Model with Boundary Impurities *

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guang-Liang; YUE Rui-Hong; SHI Kang-Jie; HOU Bo-Yu

    2001-01-01

    The Perk-Schultz model with SUq(m|n) spin boundary impurities is constructed by dressing the c-number reflecting K-matrix with the local L-matrix which acts non-trivially on an impurity Hilbert space. The eigenvalue of the transfer matrix and the corresponding Bethe ansatz equations with different c-number reflecting K-matrices are obtained by using the nested Bethe ansatz method (m ≠ n). When m = 1,n = 2, our results come back to that of supersymmetric t - J model with SUq(1|2) spin boundary impurities.

  14. The influences of the properties of impurities and defects on the dark I-V characteristic curve and output parameters of c-Si solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaodong; Song, Yang; Gao, Jie; Wang, Xinxin; Zhang, Yufeng

    2017-09-01

    The influences of the coating ratio of electrode, doping concentration of substrate and type of impurities and defects on the dark I-V characteristic curves and output parameters of c-Si solar cells are studied by finite difference method and the dark I-V characteristic curves under different conditions are analyzed by their ideal factors, the results show that: the dark current values under the same bias voltage will increase with the increasing of the coating ratio of electrode or doping concentration of substrate; the influences of donor-like, acceptor-like and recombination-center-like impurities and defects on the dark I-V characteristic curves have threshold effects; the parameters of the impurities and defects smaller than their corresponding threshold will have no obvious influences on dark I-V characteristic curves; the acceptor-like impurities and defects on the surface of c-Si solar cells have no influences on their dark I-V characteristic curve, but the donor-like and recombination-center-like impurities and defects have strong influences on their dark I-V characteristic curve; the variations of the output parameters of c-Si solar cells are analyzed in detail under the different properties of the impurities and defects inside and on the surfaces of c-Si solar cells.

  15. VARIABILITY STUDY TO DETERMINE THE SOLUBILITY OF IMPURITIES IN PLUTONIUM-BEARING, LANTHANIDE BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K; Elizabeth Hoffman, E; Charles Crawford, C; Tommy Edwards, T; David Best, D; James Marra, J

    2007-09-26

    This study focuses on the development of a compositional envelope that describes the retention of various impurities in lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass for vitrification and immobilization of excess, defense-related plutonium. A limited amount of impurity data for the various plutonium sources is available and projections were made through analysis of the available information. These projections were used to define types and concentrations of impurities in the LaBS glass compositions to be fabricated and tested. Sixty surrogate glass compositions were developed through a statistically designed approach to cover the anticipated ranges of concentrations for several impurity species expected in the plutonium feeds. An additional four glass compositions containing actual plutonium oxide were selected based on their targeted concentrations of metals and anions. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory and shielded cells facility to determine the degree of retention of the impurity components, the impact of the impurities on the durability of each glass, and the degree of crystallization that occurred, both upon quenching and slow cooling. Overall, the LaBS glass system appears to be very tolerant of most of the impurity types and concentrations projected in the plutonium waste stream. For the surrogate glasses, the measured CuO, Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, NiO, and Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} concentrations fell very close to their target values across the ranges of concentrations targeted in this study for each of these components. The measured CaO and PbO concentrations were consistently higher than the targeted values. The measured Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations were very close to the targets except for the one highest targeted value for each of these components. A solubility limit may have been approached in this glass system for K{sub 2}O and MgO. The measured Cl{sup -}, F{sup -}, SeO{sub 2} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2

  16. On Clustering Impurities by Liquid Density Fluctuations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander L. Shimkevich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in liquid technology have created a new class of fluids called “nanofluids” which are two-phase mixtures of a non-metal-liquid matrix and addon particles usually less than 100 nm in size. It is reputed that such liquids have a great potential for application. Indeed, many tests have shown that their thermal conductivity can be increased by almost 20% compared to that of the base fluids for a relatively low particle loading (of 1 up to 5% in volume. It is confirmed by experimental data and simulation results. In this study, the author considers an effect of impurity clustering by liquid density fluctuations as a natural mechanism for stabilizing microstructure of the colloidal solution and estimates the effect of fractal structure of colloidal particles on thermal conductivity of water. The results of this study may be useful for motivating choosing the composition of heat-transfer suspension and developing technology for making the appropriate nanofluid.

  17. Impurity trapped excitons under high hydrostatic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, Marek

    2013-09-01

    Paper summarizes the results on pressure effect on energies of the 4fn → 4fn and 4fn-15d1 → 4fn transitions as well as influence of pressure on anomalous luminescence in Lnα+ doped oxides and fluorides. A model of impurity trapped exciton (ITE) was developed. Two types of ITE were considered. The first where a hole is localized at the Lnα+ ion (creation of Ln(α+1)+) and an electron is attracted by Coulomb potential at Rydberg-like states and the second where an electron captured at the Lnα+ ion (creation of Ln(α-1)+) and a hole is attracted by Coulomb potential at Rydberg-like states. Paper presents detailed analysis of nonlinear changes of energy of anomalous luminescence of BaxSr1-xF2:Eu2+ (x > 0.3) and LiBaF3:Eu2+, and relate them to ITE-4f65d1 states mixing.

  18. Impurity Trapping of Positive Muons in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Polarized positive muons are implanted into metal samples. In an applied magnetic field the muon spin precession is studied. The line width in the precession frequency spectrum gives information about the static and dynamic properties of muons in a metal lattice. At temperatures where the muon is immobile within its lifetime the line width gives information about the site of location. At temperatures where the muon is mobile, the line width gives information on the diffusion process. It is known from experiments on quasi-elastic neutron scattering on hydrogen in niobium that interstitial impurities like nitrogen tend to act as traps for hydrogen. These trapping effects have now been studied systematically for muons in both f.c.c. metals (aluminium and copper) and b.c.c. metals (mainly niobium). Direct information on the trapping rates and the nature of the diffusion processes can be obtained since the muonic lifetime covers a time range where many of these processes occur.\\\\ \\\\ Mathematical models are set up ...

  19. Lipopolysaccharide contamination in intradermal DNA vaccination: toxic impurity or adjuvant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Joost H; Quaak, Susanne G L; Beijnen, Jos H; Hennink, Wim E; Storm, Gert; Schumacher, Ton N; Haanen, John B A G; Nuijen, Bastiaan

    2010-05-05

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are known both as potential adjuvants for vaccines and as toxic impurity in pharmaceutical preparations. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LPS in intradermal DNA vaccination administered by DNA tattooing. Mice were vaccinated with a model DNA vaccine (Luc-NP) with an increasing content of residual LPS. The effect of LPS on systemic toxicity, antigen expression and cellular immunity was studied. The presence of LPS in the DNA vaccine neither induced systemic toxicity (as reflected by IL-6 concentration in serum), nor influenced antigen expression (measured by intravital imaging). Higher LPS contents however, appeared to be associated with an elevated cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response but without reaching statistical significance. Interestingly, the DNA tattoo procedure by itself was shown to induce a serum cytokine response that was at least as potent as that induced by parenteral LPS administration. LPS does not show toxicity in mice vaccinated by DNA tattooing at dose levels well above those encountered in GMP-grade DNA preparations. Thus, residual LPS levels in the pharmaceutical range are not expected to adversely affect clinical outcome of vaccination trials and may in fact have some beneficial adjuvant effect. The observed pro-inflammatory effects of DNA tattoo may help explain the high immunogenicity of this procedure. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of bromfenvinphos and its impurities on human erythrocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatkowska, Bozena; Bukowska, Bozena; Huras, Bogumiła

    2011-02-01

    Bromfenvinphos - (E,Z)-O,O-diethyl-O-[1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2-bromovinyl] phosphate (BFVF) is the insecticide elaborated in Poland, which has been used against Varroa destructor causing honey bees disease called as varroosis. The substances that are formed as a result of bromfenvinphos synthesis are dihydro-bromfenvinphos (O,O-diethyl O-[1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)vinyl] phosphate); dibromo-bromfenvinphos (O,O-diethyl O-[1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-2,2-dibromovinyl] phosphate); 2,4-dichlorophenacyl bromide; 2,4-dichlorophenacylidene bromide and 2,4-dichlorophenacylidyne bromide. In this work, we evaluated the effect of these compounds on hemolysis and hemoglobin oxidation (met-Hb formation) in human erythrocytes. Moreover, the changes in the size (FSC-A) and the shape (SSC-A) of red blood cells were assessed using flow cytometry and phase contrast microscopy. It was proven that bromfenvinphos at concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 250 μM during 1h incubation did not change the parameters examined in human erythrocytes. Similarly, most of bromfenvinphos impurities did not increase hemolysis and methemoglobin level nor changed the size and shape of the erythrocytes. The exception was dibromo-bromfenvinphos, which changed the FSC-A and SSC-A parameters, as well as 2,4-dichlorophenacyl bromide which induced hemolysis, increased the level of met-Hb and changed erythrocytes morphology.

  1. Runaway electron dynamics in tokamak plasmas with high impurity content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of high energy runaway electrons is analyzed for plasmas with high impurity content. It is shown that modified collision terms are required in order to account for the collisions of the relativistic runaway electrons with partially stripped impurity ions, including the effect of the collisions with free and bound electrons, as well as the scattering by the full nuclear and the electron-shielded ion charge. The effect of the impurities on the avalanche runaway growth rate is discussed. The results are applied, for illustration, to the interpretation of the runaway electron behavior during disruptions, where large amounts of impurities are expected, particularly during disruption mitigation by massive gas injection. The consequences for the electron synchrotron radiation losses and the resulting runaway electron dynamics are also analyzed.

  2. Parallel impurity dynamics in the TJ-II stellarator

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, J A; Estrada, T; Fontdecaba, J M; García-Regaña, J M; Geiger, J; Landreman, M; McCarthy, K J; Medina, F; Van Milligen, B Ph; Ochando, M A; Parra, F I; Velasco, J L

    2016-01-01

    We review in a tutorial fashion some of the causes of impurity density variations along field lines and radial impurity transport in the moment approach framework. An explicit and compact form of the parallel inertia force valid for arbitrary toroidal geometry and magnetic coordinates is derived and shown to be non-negligible for typical TJ-II plasma conditions. In the second part of the article, we apply the fluid model including main ion-impurity friction and inertia to observations of asymmetric emissivity patterns in neutral beam heated plasmas of the TJ-II stellarator. The model is able to explain qualitatively several features of the radiation asymmetry, both in stationary and transient conditions, based on the calculated in-surface variations of the impurity density.

  3. A bijection theorem for domino tiling with diagonal impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Nakano, Fumihiko

    2009-01-01

    We consider the dimer problem on a non-bipartite graph $G$, where there are two types of dimers one of which we regard impurities. Results of simulations using Markov chain seem to indicate that impurities are tend to distribute on the boundary, which we set as a conjecture. We first show that there is a bijection between the set of dimer coverings on $G$ and the set of spanning forests on two graphs which are made from $G$, with configuration of impurities satisfying a pairing condition. This bijection can be regarded as a extension of the Temperley bijection. We consider local move consisting of two operations, and by using the bijection mentioned above, we prove local move connectedness. We further obtained some bound of the number of dimer coverings and the probability finding an impurity at given edge, by extending the argument in our previous result.

  4. Effect of impurities in industrial salts on aluminum scrap melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, J.; Sahai, Y. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Revet, A. [Kalium Canada, ltd., Regina, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    1996-10-01

    Aluminum scrap such as Used Beverage Containers (UBC) is melted under a protective molten salt cover. An appropriate salt protects metal from oxidation, promotes coalescence of molten droplets, and separates clean metal from the oxide contamination. Generally, the salt compositions for aluminum scrap recycling are based on equimolar mixtures of NaCl and KCl. A small amount of fluoride is also added in the salt. In the past, laboratory research at universities and industrial laboratories have been limited to pure salts. However, the industrial salts have impurities such as sulfates and other insoluble materials. These impurities have a pronounced effect on the efficiency of the scrap remelting process. In this paper, the role of impurities in industrial salts in terms of their chemical interactions with the metal are summarized. The efficiency of different industrial grade salts containing varying amounts of sulfates and other insoluble impurities for scrap recycling is compared.

  5. Simulating the symmetron: domain walls and symmetry-restoring impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the dynamics of relativistic domain walls in the presence of static symmetry-restoring impurities. The field theory is precisely the same as what is known to cosmologists as the "symmetron model", whereby the usual $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ symmetry breaking potential is appended with a space-varying mass-term (the space-variation is set by the profile of the impurity, which we take to be a "tanh"-function). After presenting the outcomes of a suite of different numerical experiments we have three main results: (1) domain walls pin to impurities, (2) domain wall necklaces can be energetically preferred configurations, and (3) impurities significantly modifies the usual ${N}_{\\rm dw}\\propto t^{-1}$ scaling law for random networks of domain walls.

  6. Parallel impurity dynamics in the TJ-II stellarator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, J. A.; Velasco, J. L.; Calvo, I.; Estrada, T.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; García-Regaña, J. M.; Geiger, J.; Landreman, M.; McCarthy, K. J.; Medina, F.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Ochando, M. A.; Parra, F. I.; the TJ-II Team; the W7-X Team

    2016-07-01

    We review in a tutorial fashion some of the causes of impurity density variations along field lines and radial impurity transport in the moment approach framework. An explicit and compact form of the parallel inertia force valid for arbitrary toroidal geometry and magnetic coordinates is derived and shown to be non-negligible for typical TJ-II plasma conditions. In the second part of the article, we apply the fluid model including main ion-impurity friction and inertia to observations of asymmetric emissivity patterns in neutral beam heated plasmas of the TJ-II stellarator. The model is able to explain qualitatively several features of the radiation asymmetry, both in stationary and transient conditions, based on the calculated in-surface variations of the impurity density.

  7. Radiative instabilities in plasmas: impurity motion and recombination effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, D.K.; Herrera, J.J.E. [Instituto de Ciencias y Artes, Chiapas (Mexico). Escuela de Biologia

    1995-03-01

    Radiative instabilities in an impurity-seeded plasma are investigated when the plasma is supposed to be highly but partially ionized. Since in such plasmas radiative losses strongly depend on neutral and impurity densities, their dynamics are taken into account. As a result, a new radiative-recombination instability is found and described. We show that the influence of the ionization-recombination balance on plasma stability is sufficient for plasma densities above 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3}. The effects of a finite impurity Larmor radius are not small and play a stabilizing role as well as the thermal forces. On the other hand, compressibility of the magnetic field leads to plasma destabilization. We note that this radiative-recombination instability accumulates impurities in a cold zone while cleaning other regions. (Author).

  8. Mechanisms, kinetics, impurities and defects: consequences in macromolecular crystallization

    OpenAIRE

    McPherson, Alexander; Kuznetsov, Yurii G

    2014-01-01

    New imaging techniques, particularly AFM, permitted the elucidation of the mechanisms for protein and virus crystal growth. They have also allowed direct visualization of crystal defect structure and the consequences of impurity incorporation.

  9. Surface Kondo Impurities in the Slave-Boson Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anda, Enrique; Vernek, Edson

    2005-03-01

    Transport properties of magnetic impurities on surfaces have captured a great deal of attention lately. Atom manipulation and topographic imaging techniques using scanning tunneling microscope have confirmed some theoretical predictions on Kondo physics and at the same time revealed other interesting behavior in these systems. For example, experiments have reported unexpectedly high Kondo temperatures for multi-impurity and molecular structures on metallic surfaces. Motivated by these experimental results we apply slave boson techniques for finite Coulomb interaction (finite U) to study the transport properties of magnetic impurities on a metallic surface in the Kondo regime. We report here on our studies of the role of fluctuations on the slave boson number for the case of one impurity on metallic surfaces. We compare our results to other theoretical approaches and to experimental results. Supported by CAPES-Brazil and NSF-IMC and NSF-NIRT.

  10. Energy levels of isoelectronic impurities by large scale LDA calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Li, J

    2002-01-01

    Isoelectronic impurity states are localized states induced by stoichiometric single atom substitution in bulk semiconductor. Photoluminescence spectra indicate deep impurity levels of 0.5 to 0.9eV above the top of valence band for systems like: GaN:As, GaN:P, CdS:Te, ZnS:Te. Previous calculations based on small supercells seemingly confirmed these experimental results. However, the current ab initio calculations based on thousand atom supercells indicate that the impurity levels of the above systems are actually much shallower(0.04 to 0.23 eV), and these impurity levels should be compared with photoluminescence excitation spectra, not photoluminescence spectra.

  11. Energy levels of isoelectronic impurities by large scale LDA calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jingbo; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2002-11-22

    Isoelectronic impurity states are localized states induced by stoichiometric single atom substitution in bulk semiconductor. Photoluminescence spectra indicate deep impurity levels of 0.5 to 0.9eV above the top of valence band for systems like: GaN:As, GaN:P, CdS:Te, ZnS:Te. Previous calculations based on small supercells seemingly confirmed these experimental results. However, the current ab initio calculations based on thousand atom supercells indicate that the impurity levels of the above systems are actually much shallower(0.04 to 0.23 eV), and these impurity levels should be compared with photoluminescence excitation spectra, not photoluminescence spectra.

  12. Fermionic impurities in Chern-Simons-matter theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benincasa, Paolo; Ramallo, Alfonso V.

    2012-02-01

    We study the addition of quantum fermionic impurities to the mathcal{N} = 6 super-symmetric Chern-Simons-matter theories in 2 + 1 spacetime dimensions. The impurities are introduced by means of Wilson loops in the antisymmetric representation of the gauge group. In a holographic setup, the system is represented by considering D6-branes probing the AdS 4 × mathbb{C}mathbb{P} 3 background of type IIA supergravity. We study the thermodynamic properties of the system and show how a Kondo lattice model with holographic dimers can be constructed. By computing the Kaluza-Klein fluctuation modes of the probe brane we determine the complete spectrum of dimensions of the impurity operators. A very rich structure is found, depending both on the Kaluza-Klein quantum numbers and on the filling fraction of the impurities.

  13. Fermionic impurities in Chern-Simons-matter theories

    CERN Document Server

    Benincasa, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    We study the addition of quantum fermionic impurities to the N=6 supersymmetric Chern-Simons-matter theories in 2+1 spacetime dimensions. The impurities are introduced by means of Wilson loops in the antisymmetric representation of the gauge group. In a holographic setup, the system is represented by considering D6-branes probing the AdS_4 x CP^3 background of type IIA supergravity. We study the thermodynamic properties of the system and show how a Kondo lattice model with holographic dimers can be constructed. By computing the Kaluza-Klein fluctuation modes of the probe brane we determine the complete spectrum of dimensions of the impurity operators. A very rich structure is found, depending both on the Kaluza-Klein quantum numbers and on the filling fraction of the impurities.

  14. On the state of Mn impurity implanted in Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orlov, A. F., E-mail: rmdp@girmet.ru [State Institute for Rare Metals (Russian Federation); Bublik, V. T. [Moscow State Institute of Steel and Alloys (Russian Federation); Vdovin, V. I. [Institute for Chemical Problems of Microelectronics (Russian Federation); Agafonov, Yu. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics, Technology, and High Purity Materials (Russian Federation); Balagurov, L. A. [State Institute for Rare Metals (Russian Federation); Zinenko, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Microelectronics, Technology, and High Purity Materials (Russian Federation); Kulemanov, I. V. [State Institute for Rare Metals (Russian Federation); Shcherbachev, K. D. [Moscow State Institute of Steel and Alloys (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-15

    The state of manganese impurity in implanted silicon at implantation doses of up to 5 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2} has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. It is established that, after short-term vacuum annealing at 850{sup o}C, most of the implanted manganese impurities are in microinclusions up to 20 nm in size formed by a tetragonal silicide phase of the Mn{sub 15}Si{sub 26} type.

  15. Thermal Conductivity of Nanotubes: Effects of Chirality and Isotope Impurity

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Zhang; Li, Baowen

    2005-01-01

    We study the dependence of thermal conductivity of single walled nanotubes (SWNT) on chirality and isotope impurity by nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method with accurate potentials. It is found that, contrary to electronic conductivity, the thermal conductivity is insensitive to the chirality. The isotope impurity, however, can reduce the thermal conductivity up to 60% and change the temperature dependence behavior. We also study the dependence of thermal conductivity on tube length for t...

  16. Phase Transition of Spin-Peierls Systems with Impurities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bo-Wei; DING Guo-Hui; YE Fei

    2000-01-01

    The quasi-one-dimensional spin-Peierls(SP) systems with impurities are studied in their bosonized form. The spins of the dimerized state are bounded into singlets with an SP gap, while the impurities of doped systems will induce fluctuations of the coupling strength between the spins at different sites and break some pairs of spin singlets. The doping suppresses the dimerized SP state and induces a Kosterlitz-Thouless phase transition from the dimerized state into the undimerized one.

  17. Impurity modes in the one-dimensional XXZ Heisenberg model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, J.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Piauí, Campus Ministro Petrônio Portella, 57072-970 Teresina, Piauí (Brazil); Leite, R.V. [Centro de Ciências Exatas e Tecnologia, Curso de Física, Universidade Estadual Vale do Acaraú, Av. Dr. Guarany 317, Campus Cidao, 62040-730 Sobral, Ceará (Brazil); Landim, R.R. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil); Costa Filho, R.N., E-mail: rai@fisica.ufc.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, Caixa Postal 6030, Campus do Pici, 60455-760 Fortaleza, Ceará (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    A Green's function formalism is used to calculate the energy of impurity modes associated with one and/or two magnetic impurities in the one-dimensional Heisenberg XXZ magnetic chain. The system can be tuned from the Heisenberg to the Ising model varying a parameter λ. A numerical study is performed showing two types of localized modes (s and p). The modes depend on λ and the degeneracy of the acoustic modes is broken.

  18. The effects of naturally occurring impurities in rock salt

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alina-Mihaela Badescu; Alexandra Saftoiu

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the effect that naturally occurring impurities in salt mines have both on effective permittivity of the medium and on radio wave propagation at ∼200 MHz. The effective permittivity is determined based on the dielectric properties of salt and the characteristics of the main impurities. We conclude that at such frequencies the scattering is negligible compared to absorptions. The effect of trapped water in different forms is also evaluated.

  19. Sensitivity of graphene flakes and nanorings to impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konobeeva, N.N., E-mail: yana_nn@volsu.ru [Volgograd State University, University Avenue 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation); Belonenko, M.B. [Volgograd State University, University Avenue 100, Volgograd 400062 (Russian Federation); Volgograd Institute of Business, Uzhno-Ukrainskaya Str., Volgograd 400048 (Russian Federation)

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we consider the influence of impurity on the graphene flakes and nanorings conductance. Based on the jumping Hamiltonian for graphene electrons with its direct diagonalization, we obtain the density of states. Further, the tunneling current is calculated for the following contacts: graphene flake-metal, graphene flake-quantum dots, graphene nanoring-quantum dots. We analyze the effect of the flake dimensions and the positions of the adsorbed molecule of impurity on the characteristic properties of the tunneling current.

  20. Impurities incorporation into magnetite scale formed on simulated steam generator tubing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, K.; Yamaguchi, K.; Koike, M. [Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Kawamura, H.; Hirano, H. [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry (Japan); Yamada, Y.; Nakamura, T. [The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    From a viewpoint of ensuring the integrity of steam generators (SGs) tubing in PWR plants, the research was made into how impurities in the secondary coolant are incorporated into magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) scale formed on the tube in a laboratory test. We experimented with a method to form Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} scale on a tube under a boiling heat transfer condition in the laboratory test, simulating the conditions of SG in the actual PWR plants. Based on the scale formation method, we investigated the incorporation of sulfur (S) into the scale. S is known as the most common impurity solved in the secondary coolant and a dominant factor in making heat transfer crevice environment acidic. The effects of sodium (Na) and silicon (Si), solved in test solution with S, on the S incorporation into scale were also investigated. The test resulted in a double-layered scale being formed on the tube surface, with the outer scale being porous and the inner scale dense. It was revealed that the S incorporation into scales was affected by the S concentration in the solution and existence of other impurities, such as Na and Si. (authors)

  1. Classical impurities and boundary Majorana zero modes in quantum chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus; Nersesyan, Alexander A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the response of classical impurities in quantum Ising chains. The Z2 degeneracy they entail renders the existence of two decoupled Majorana modes at zero energy, an exact property of a finite system at arbitrary values of its bulk parameters. We trace the evolution of these modes across the transition from the disordered phase to the ordered one and analyze the concomitant qualitative changes of local magnetic properties of an isolated impurity. In the disordered phase, the two ground states differ only close to the impurity, and they are related by the action of an explicitly constructed quasi-local operator. In this phase the local transverse spin susceptibility follows a Curie law. The critical response of a boundary impurity is logarithmically divergent and maps to the two-channel Kondo problem, while it saturates for critical bulk impurities, as well as in the ordered phase. The results for the Ising chain translate to the related problem of a resonant level coupled to a 1d p-wave superconductor or a Peierls chain, whereby the magnetic order is mapped to topological order. We find that the topological phase always exhibits a continuous impurity response to local fields as a result of the level repulsion of local levels from the boundary Majorana zero mode. In contrast, the disordered phase generically features a discontinuous magnetization or charging response. This difference constitutes a general thermodynamic fingerprint of topological order in phases with a bulk gap.

  2. Synthesis, Isolation and Characterization of Process-Related Impurities in Oseltamivir Phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Kumar Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Three known impurities in oseltamivir phosphate bulk drug at level 0.1% (ranging from 0.05-0.1% were detected by gradient reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. These impurities were preliminarily identified by the mass number of the impurities. Different experiments were conducted and finally the known impurities were synthesized and characterized.

  3. The effect of carbon impurities on molybdenum surface morphology evolution under high-flux low-energy helium ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, J. K.; Novakowski, T. J.; Gonderman, S.; Bharadwaj, N.; Hassanein, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the role of carbon (C) impurities, in molybdenum (Mo) fuzz evolutions on Mo surface during 100 eV He+ ion irradiations. In this study we considered 0.01, 0.05, and 0.5% C+ ion impurities in He+ ion irradiations. For introducing such tiny C+ ion impurities, gas mixtures of He and CH4 have been chosen in following ratios; 99.95: 0.05, 99.75: 0.25, and 97.5: 2.5. Apart from these three cases, two additional cases, 100% He+ ion (for Mo fuzz growth due to only He+ ions) and 100% H+ ion (for confirming the significance of tiny 0.04-2.0% H+ ions in terms of Mo fuzz evolutions on Mo surface, if any), have also been considered. Ion energy (100 eV), ion fluence (2.6 × 1024 ions m-2), and target temperature (923 K) were kept constant for each experiment and their selections were based on our previous studies [1,2]. Our study shows homogeneously populated and highly dense Mo fuzz evolutions on entire Mo surface for 100% He+ ion irradiation case. Enhancement of C+ ion impurities in He+ ions causes a sequential reduction in Mo fuzz evolutions, leading to almost complete prevention of Mo fuzz evolutions for 0.5% C+ ion impurity concentrations. Additionally, no fuzz formation for 100% H+ ion irradiation at all, were seen (apart from some tiny nano-structuring, in very limited regions). This indicates that there is no significant role of H+ ions in Mo fuzz evolutions (at least for such tiny amount, 0.04-2.0% H+ ions). The study is significant to understand the behavior of potential high-Z plasma facing components (PFCs), in the, presence of tiny amount of C impurities, for nuclear fusion relevant applications.

  4. Saturation of impurity-rich phases in a cerium-substituted pyrochlore-rich titanate ceramic: part 1 experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryerson, F J; Ebbinghaus, B; Kirkorian, O; VanKonynenburg, R

    2000-05-25

    The saturation of impurity-rich accessory phases in a Ce-analog baseline ceramic formulation for the immobilization of excess plutonium has been tested by synthesizing an impurity-rich baseline compositions at 1300 C, 1350 C, and 1400 C in air. Impurity oxides are added at the 10 wt% level. The resulting phases assemblages are typically rich in pyrochlore, Hf-zirconolite (hafnolite), brannerite and rutile, but in many instances also contain an accessory mineral enriched in the impurity oxide. The concentration of that oxide in coexisting pyrochlore sets the saturation limit for solid solution of the component in question. In most cases, the accessory phase does not contain significant amounts of Ce, Gd or U. Exceptions are the stabilization of a Ca-lanthanide phosphate and a phosphate glass when P{sub 2}O{sub 5} is added to the formulation. P{sub 2}O{sub 5} addition is also very effective in reducing the modal amount of pyrochlore in the form relative to brannerite. Addition of the sodium-aluminosilicate, NaAlSiO{sub 4}, also results in the formation of a grain boundary melt at run conditions, but the fate of this phase on cooling is not well determined. At temperatures above 1300 C, addition of 10 wt% Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} also leads to melting. Substitution of cations of different valences can also be associated with model-dependent changes in the oxidation state of uranium via charge transfer reactions. A set of simple components is suggested for the description of pyrochlores in both impurity-free and impurity-rich formulations.

  5. Effect of Ag2O addition on the intergranular properties of the superconducting Bi-(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, I.; Çelebi, S.; Varilci, A.; Malik, A. I.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of Ag2O addition on the Bi-(Pb)-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system has been investigated in terms of ac susceptibility, phase evolution, critical current density and critical temperature. It was found that as the amount of Ag2O addition increases, the intergranular critical current density decreases in our samples (Bi1.84Pb0.34Sr1.91Ca2.03Cu3.06O10) fabricated by ammonium nitrate technique. The analysis for comparison is based on the suppression degree of the diamagnetic behaviour with respect to fields, rapid or slow shift of the summit in chi'(T) to lower temperature with increasing field amplitude and the sharpness of the transition of chi'(T) for intergranular component for the same field amplitude. We also qualitatively discuss experimental results in the framework of the critical state model. The room temperature XRD diagram indicates the presence of large amount of high-Tc (2223) phase. The percentage of Bi-2223 phase in the phase mixture was estimated from the intensities of high-Tc (2223) and low-Tc (2212) phase peaks as 78% for the pure BSCCO sample. Among the Ag2O-added BSCCO samples studied, the one in which 5 wt%Ag2O was added shows the highest rate of Bi-2223 formation as 92%. The SEM analysis reveals some morphological changes induced by silver addition.

  6. Dressed topological insulators. Rashba impurity, Kondo effect, magnetic impurities, proximity-induced superconductivity, hybrid systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posske, Thore Hagen

    2016-02-26

    Topological insulators are electronic phases that insulate in the bulk and accommodate a peculiar, metallic edge liquid with a spin-dependent dispersion. They are regarded to be of considerable future use in spintronics and for quantum computation. Besides determining the intrinsic properties of this rather novel electronic phase, considering its combination with well-known physical systems can generate genuinely new physics. In this thesis, we report on such combinations including topological insulators. Specifically, we analyze an attached Rashba impurity, a Kondo dot in the two channel setup, magnetic impurities on the surface of a strong three-dimensional topological insulator, the proximity coupling of the latter system to a superconductor, and hybrid systems consisting of a topological insulator and a semimetal. Let us summarize our primary results. Firstly, we determine an analytical formula for the Kondo cloud and describe its possible detection in current correlations far away from the Kondo region. We thereby rely on and extend the method of refermionizable points. Furthermore, we find a class of gapless topological superconductors and semimetals, which accommodate edge states that behave similarly to the ones of globally gapped topological phases. Unexpectedly, we also find edge states that change their chirality when affected by sufficiently strong disorder. We regard the presented research helpful in future classifications and applications of systems containing topological insulators, of which we propose some examples.

  7. Kinetic processes in solid helium involving impurities and vacancies (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidanov, V. A.; Rudavskii, E. Ya.; Sokolov, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    A brief review is given of the kinetic behavior of impurities and vacancies in solid helium, which Andreev and Lifshitz predicted should be delocalized and converted into unique quasiparticles. Primary attention is devoted to the unusual diffusion processes in solid 3He-4He solutions as they undergo phase separation. Because mechanical stresses develop in the crystal during separation, the diffusive flow is substantially reduced and the effective diffusion coefficient becomes smaller than the coherent quantum diffusion coefficient. During the inverse transition from a separated mixture into the homogeneous state, anomalously rapid mass transfer is observed which can be explained qualitatively in terms of a model in which 3He inclusions are dissolved in three stages. Experimental data on the kinetics of phase separation are compared with a diffusive description of the process that takes into account the difference between diffusion processes outside and inside a nucleus of the new phase. Good agreement is obtained between a theoretical calculation and the experimental data. A homogeneous nucleation model is used to estimate the concentration of nuclei. For the first time, the coefficient of mass diffusion is estimated over the entire range of the concentration of the solutions. The behavior of delocalized vacancies in 4He and 3He solid solutions is studied near the separation temperature. The observed features of the pressure in this kind of system during repeated temperature cycling are explained by the formation of pure 4He vacancy clusters. Although the crystal itself has no strict periodicity owing to the random separation of 3He and 4He atoms at the lattice sites, a periodic structure is realized within a cluster and vacancies become delocalized.

  8. Characterization of a novel impurity in bulk drug of lisinopril by multidimensional NMR technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    During the routine impurity profile of lisinopril bulk drug by HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography), a potential impurity was detected. Using multidimensional NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) technique, the trace-level impurity was unambiguously identified to be 2-(-2-oxo-azocan-3-ylamino)-4-phenyl-butyric acid after isolation from lisinopril bulk drug by semi-preparative HPLC. Formation of the impurity was also discussed. To our knowledge, this is a novel impurity and not reported elsewhere.

  9. Effect of Single Particle Hopping and Out of Plane Magnetic Impurity on Coupled Planar Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardar, Manas; Sa, Debanand

    It is shown that the single particle band motion along the c axis is harmful for superconductivity in anisotropic systems. Variation of Tc with c axis hopping parameter is shown for both the conventional Josephson coupled, planar superconductors and for interlayer pair tunneling mechanism of Wheatley, Hsu, and Anderson (WHA). Effect of out-of-plane magnetic impurity substitution is shown to suppress Tc more for conventional superconductors whereas there is a very sharp decrease of Tc in the WHA mechanism at larger concentrations.

  10. Effect of single particle hopping and out of plane magnetic impurity on coupled planar superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Sardar, M; Manas Sardar; Debanand Sa

    1994-01-01

    It is shown that the single particle band motion along the c axis is harmful for superconductivity. Variation of T_c with c axis hopping parameter is shown for both the conventional planar superconductors and for interlayer pair tunneling mechanism of Wheatley Hsu and Anderson(WHA).Effect of out of plane magnetic impurity substitution is shown to suppres T_c more for conventional superconductors whereas there is very sharp decrease of T_c in the WHA mechanism at larger concentrations.

  11. Separation of Impurity Vanadium from TiCl4 by Means of Adsorption

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The possibility and extent of the separation of impurity vanadium in titanium tetrachloride by means of adsorption with molecular sieves were studied. As ascertained by the experimental results, the adsorption of VOCl3 onto molecular sieve internal surface was controlled by the intraparticle diffusion of the molecules. Although all of the three kinds of molecular sieves used are competent for removing vanadium from titanium tetrachloride, type 4 A behaves more effectively than the others under the same conditions. After adsorption for nine stages, the concentration of vanadium in the product becomes as less as that of industrial standard level.

  12. Non-linear model of impurity diffusion in nanoporous materials upon ultrasonic treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.M. Peleshchak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-linear theory of diffusion of impurities in porous materials upon ultrasonic treatment is described. It is shown that at a defined value of deformation amplitude, an average concentration of vacancies and temperature as a result of the effect of ultrasound possibly leads to the formation of nanoclusters of vacancies and to their periodic educations in porous materials. It is shown that at a temperature smaller than some critical value, a significant growth of a diffusion coefficient is observed in porous materials.

  13. Fifth workshop on the role of impurities and defects in silicon device processing. Extended abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.L.; Luque, A.; Sopori, B.; Swanson, D.; Gee, J.; Kalejs, J.; Jastrzebski, L.; Tan, T.

    1995-08-01

    This workshop dealt with engineering aspects and material properties of silicon electronic devices. Crystalline silicon growth, modeling, and properties are discussed in general and as applied to solar cells. Topics considered in discussions of silicon growth include: casting, string ribbons, Al backside contacts, ion implantation, gettering, passivation, and ultrasound treatments. Properties studies include: Electronic properties of defects and impurities, dopant and carrier concentrations, structure and bonding, nitrogen effects, degradation of bulk diffusion length, and recombination parameters. Individual papers from the workshop are indexed separately on the Energy Data Bases.

  14. Comparing Nafion and ceramic separators used in electrochemical purification of spent chromium plating solutions: cationic impurity removal and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuo-Lin; Holsen, Thomas M; Chou, Tse-Chuan; Selman, J Robert

    2003-05-01

    This study focuses on the electrolytic regeneration of spent chromium plating solutions. These solutions contain a significant amount of chromium and a lesser amount of other heavy metals, which makes them a significant environmental concern and an obvious target for recycling and reuse. The type of separator used is extremely critical to the performance of the process because they are the major resistance in the transport-related impurity (Cu(II), Ni(II), and Fe(III)) removals from contaminated chromic acid solutions. A Nafion 117 membrane and a ceramic diaphragm separator traditionally used in the industry were tested for comparison. It was found that the mobilities of Cu(II) and Ni(II) were similar and higher than that of Fe(III) using both separators. The mobility of each cation was smaller in the Nafion membrane than in the ceramic diaphragm. The measured conductivity of the ceramic diaphragm was slightly higher than that of Nafion membrane. However, the Nafion membrane was much thinner than the ceramic diaphragm resulting in the system using the Nafion membrane having higher impurity removal rates than the system using the ceramic diaphragm. The removal rates were approximately equal for Cu(II) and Ni(II) and lowest for Fe(III). Both current and initial concentration affected the removal rates of the impurities. Modeling results indicated that a system using a Nafion separator and a small catholyte/anolyte volume ratio was better than a system using a ceramic separator for removing impurities from concentrated plating solutions if the impurities transported into the catholyte are deposited or precipitated.

  15. Impurities in Silicon Nanocrystals: The intentional and the inherent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, David J.

    Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) have become an important class of materials in the fields of photovoltaics, thermoelectrics, lighting, and medicine. Impurities within SiNCs dramatically alter the electrical and optical properties of the host material, whether the impurity is intentionally added in an attempt to manipulate properties, or is inherent to the material and its natural state. Despite such remarkable changes, impurity incorporation within SiNCs remains poorly understood, since concepts applied to understanding impurities in bulk materials may not completely translate to nanomaterials. Understanding the effect of SiNC impurities requires new technologies to produce materials suitable for study combined with new insights to expound the differences in the nanoscale physics. Nonthermal plasma-assisted gas-phase synthesis provides an excellent route to producing and investigating impurities within SiNCs due to the unique chemical reaction environment of the plasma. The robustness of such a technique allows for the production of very pure SiNCs or SiNCs with added impurities simply by adding different chemicals to the plasma. The chapters in this document focus on the effect that different impurities have on the properties of SiNCs. Chapter 2 focuses on heavily P-doped SiNCs exhibiting the first known observation of a unique electrical and optical property known as localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) within free-standing SiNCs. Chapter 3 explains the synthesis of B- and P-doped SiGeNC alloys and their deposition into thin films for thermoelectric applications. Chapter 4 highlights research which uses P-doped SiNCs to form emitter layers for pn-junction type solar cells, including device fabrication and optical characterization. Chapter 5 examines inherent impurities in the form of dangling bond defects which may be responsible for the quenching of SiNC photoluminescence, and their evolution during the process of air-ambient oxidation. Several appendices at

  16. Spectroscopic Measurements of Impurity Spectra on the EAST Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jia; LI Yingying; SHI Yuejiang; WANG Fudi; ZHANG Wei; LV Bo; HUANG Juan; WAN Baonian; ZHOU Qian

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) and visible impurity spectra (200-750 nm) are commonly used to study plasma and wall interactions in magnetic fusion plasmas. Two optical multi-channel analysis (OMA) systems have been installed for the UV-visible spectrum measurement on EAST. These two OMA systems are both equipped with the Czerny-Turner (C-T) type spectrometer. The upper vacuum vessel and inner divertor baffle can be viewed simultaneously through two optical lenses. The OMA1 system is mainly used for multi-impurity lines radiation measurement. A 280 nm wavelength range can be covered by a 300 mm focal length spectrometer equipped with a 300 grooves/mm grating. The Da/Ha line shapes can be resolved by the OMA2 system. The focal length is 750 mm. The spectral resolution can be up to 0.01 nm using a 1800 grooves/mm grating. The impurity behaviour and hydrogen ratio evolution after boroniztion, lithium coating, and siliconization are compared. Lithium coating has shown beneficial effects on the reduction of edge recycling and low Z impurity (C, O) influx. The impurity expelling effect of the divertor configuration is also briefly discussed through multi-channels observation of OMA1 system.

  17. Global effects on neoclassical transport in the pedestal with impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Pusztai, I; Landreman, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a numerical study of collisional transport in a tokamak pedestal in the presence of non-trace impurities, using the radially global $\\delta f$ neoclassical solver PERFECT [M. Landreman et al. 2014 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 56 045005]. It is known that in a tokamak core with non-trace impurities present the radial impurity flux opposes the bulk ion flux to provide an ambipolar particle transport, with the electron transport being negligibly small. However, in a sharp density pedestal with sub-sonic ion flows the electron transport can be comparable to the ion and impurity flows. Furthermore, the neoclassical particle transport is not intrinsically ambipolar, and the non-ambipolarity of the fluxes extends outside the pedestal region by the radial coupling of the perturbations. The neoclassical momentum transport, which is finite in the presence of ion orbit-width scale profile variations, is significantly enhanced when impurities are present in non-trace quantities, even if the total parallel mass...

  18. Occurrence of arsenic impurities in organoarsenics and animal feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lixian; Huang, Lianxi; He, Zhaohuan; Zhou, Changmin; Li, Guoliang

    2013-01-16

    Organoarsenics are widely used as excellent feed additives in animal production in the world. Roxarsone (ROX) and arsanilic acid (ASA) are two organoarsenics permitted to be used in China. We collected 146 animal feed samples to investigate the appearance of ROX, ASA, and potential metabolites, including 3-amino-4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (3-A-HPA), 4-hydroxyphenylarsonic acid (4-HPA), As(V), As(III), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in feeds. The stability of ROX in both ROX additives and animal feeds was also examined. The results show that 25.4% of the 146 animal feeds contained organoarsenics, with average contents of ROX and ASA as 7.0 and 21.2 mg of As/kg, respectively. Unexpectedly, As(III) and MMA frequently occurred as As impurities in feeds bearing organoarsenics, with higher contents than organoarsenics in some samples. 3-A-HPA, 4-HPA, and DMA were not detected in all samples. ROX and As impurities in both ROX additives and feeds stayed unchanged in the shelf life. It suggests that As impurities in animal feeds bearing organoarsenics should generate from the use of organoarsenics containing As impurities. This constitutes the first report of As impurities in organoarsenics.

  19. Identification and Manipulations of Impurity Ions in Magnesium Ion Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.; Dubin, D. H. E.

    2011-10-01

    A nominally ``pure'' Mg24+ ion plasma accumulates impurity ions over periods of hours to days by charge exchange with residual background gas (P ~10-10 Torr) in a Penning-Malmberg trap. We use thermal cyclotron spectroscopy (TCS) to identify ion impurities, and observe spatial separation at low temperatures. TCS consists of applying rf bursts at the impurity cyclotron frequencies, with LIF measurement of the majority species heating due to collisions with the heated impurites. We find that for short bursts the heating is proportional to the burst amplitude squared, and to the square of the burst duration, as predicted by a simple single particle model. We spatially separate the impurities from the Magnesium ions by two different techniques: a) With laser cooling to T ions at larger radii. We typically observe a 5-20% ``hole'' in the center of the Mg plasma where the ``dark'' lower-mass impurities reside; and we directly observe the Mg25 and Mg26 at the outer edge of the Mg24 column. b) Resonant laser pressure in the z-direction pushes on the Mg24, and the species separates longitudinally when this laser force is greater than the mass-dependent centrifugal force. Supported by NSF PHY-0903877 and DOE DE-SC0002451.

  20. Effects of impurities on crystal growth in fructose crystallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y. D.; Shiau, L. D.; Berglund, K. A.

    1989-10-01

    The influence of impurities on the crystallization of anhydrous fructose from aqueous solution was studied. The growth kinetics of fructose crystals in the fructose-water-glucose and fructose-water-difructose dianhydrides systems were investigated using photomicroscopic contact nucleation techniques. Glucose is the major impurity likely to be present in fructose syrup formed during corn wet milling, while several difructose dianhydrides are formed in situ under crystallization conditions and have been proposed as a cause in the decrease of overall yields. Both sets of impurities were found to cause inhibition of crystal growth, but the mechanisms responsible in each case are different. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the solubility of fructose in water and thus lowers the supersaturation of the solution. This is probably the main effect responsible for the decrease of crystal growth. Since the molecular structures of difructose dianhydrides are similar to that of fructose, they are probably "tailor-made" impurities. The decrease of crystal growth is probably caused by the incorporation of these impurities into or adsorption to the crystal surface which would accept fructose molecules in the orientation that existed in the difructose dianhydride.

  1. Interplay of light and heavy impurities in a fusion device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaja, M.; Tokar, M. Z.

    2017-02-01

    ‘Breathing’ activity observed in the Large Helical Device stellarator is characterized by macro-scale oscillations of diverse plasma parameters such as the radiation losses from heavy (iron) and light (carbon and oxygen) impurities, electron density, temperature and the power absorbed in the plasma from neutral beam. They provide an example of a complex behavior in fusion plasmas triggered by the synergy effects from impurities of different species. A one-dimensional non-stationary model, describing the transport across flux surfaces in the plasma of the main and impurity neutral and charged particles, as well as of the thermal energy with the heat absorption from the neutral beam, radiation of high-Z ions from the plasma core and of low-Z impurities from the edge, is elaborated. The model is numerically realized, by applying the finite volume and ‘progonga’ methods to integrate the system of non-linearly coupled transport equations. The results of simulations presented reproduce qualitatively and essentially quantitatively the observations. The model allows prediction of the plasma and impurity environment conditions under which one has to expect ‘breathing’ oscillations.

  2. Adjacent stage impurity ratio in rare earth countercurrent extraction process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Fuxiang; WU Sheng; LIAO Chunsheng; YAN Chunhua

    2013-01-01

    Impurity components decrease stage by stage in a cascade of rare earth (RE) extraction separation,and adjacent stage impurity ratio (ASIR) which is defined as the ratio of an impurity's contents in the aqueous/organic phase of two adjacent stages can be used to evaluate the capacity of impurity removal for the two stages.On the basis of extraction equilibrium and mass balance,the ASIR in a two-component extraction separation was deducted and its simplified expressions were given for different process sections according to reasonable assumptions.The calculation simulation was then carried out to obtain the ASIR distribution in the cascade.The results showed that in both the extraction and scrubbing sections the ASIR principally increased with the decrease of the molar proportion of the impurity but along with a flat appearing in the purification zone located in the middle of the cascade.The ASIR intuitively exhibits the nmning status of RE extraction separation and purification,which could provide a theoretic guide for investigating the influence factors of RE extraction separation process in practical industry.

  3. Determination of impurities in raw light pyridine bases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novikov, E.G.; Dybkin. L.A.; Galleway, B.J.; Lisina, L.A.; Tsaur, A.G.

    1981-01-01

    An estimate has been made of the annual average content of phenols, cyanides, rhodanides and chlorides in the raw light pyridine bases of the works in the East of the USSR. The mean values of the content of every component in the tests are given, and the amount of water in them is indicated. The bases with the highest content of phenols were those of the Cherepovets Metallurgical Works and the Gubakhin Coke and Chemical Works, and some specimens of the Karagandinsk Metallurgical Works. For most enterprises, the concentration of phenols depended on the time of the year: the phenol content in the specimens was mostly higher in the summer than in the winter. For the works in the East of USSR, the mean annual content of cyanides was 1.5 g/lit. Some enterprises supplied light pyridine bases whose cyanide content was almost ten times less. The pyridine bases of the Karagandinsk Metallurgical Works, especially those with phenolates, have an especially high content of cyanides. For instance, the cyanide content in one test was 8.9 g/lit. The mean annual content of rhodanides in the tested bases was 3.5-4.0 g/lit. The raw light pyridine bases of the Karagandinsk Metallurgical Works, from which a large amount of crystalline salt mixtures precipitates during storage when they contain phenolates, have the highest rhodamine content. The bases of the Chelyabin Metallurgical Works and the Gubakhin Coke and Chemical Works contain the least amount of salts. The mean annual content of phenols in the tests of the works in the East of the USSR is 5%. This is probably less than in the specimens of the works in the Sought of the USSR. It has been established that, besides the above-mentioned impurities, raw light pyridine bases have components which form a dark flake-like precipitate of an unknown composition during storage.

  4. Soot on snow experiments: light-absorbing impurities effect on the natural snowpack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Svensson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Light-absorbing impurities affect snow and ice via a decrease in albedo and a consequent disturbance to the radiative energy balance. Experimentally, these matters have only been examined in a few studies. Here we present results from a series of experiments in which we deposited different soot concentrations onto natural snow in different regions of Finland, and thereafter monitored the changes of the snowpack through the melting season. Measurements of the particulates in the snow indicated concentrations in the range of thousands of ppb to have clear effects on the snow properties, including the albedo, the physical snow characteristics, and an increased melt rate. For soot concentrations in the hundreds of ppb range, the effects were not as clearly visible, and it was more difficult to attribute the effects solely to the soot on the snow. Comparisons between our experimental data and the widely used Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR model showed a general agreement when the model was specifically tuned to our measurements. This study highlights the importance of additional experimental studies, to further articulate and quantify the effects of light-absorbing impurities on snow.

  5. Advanced far infrared blocked impurity band detectors based on germanium liquid phase epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Christopher Sean [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    This research has shown that epilayers with residual impurity concentrations of 5 x 1013 cm-3 can be grown by producing the purest Pb available in the world. These epilayers have extremely low minority acceptor concentrations, which is ideal for fabrication of IR absorbing layers. The Pb LPE growth of Ge also has the advantageous property of gettering Cu from the epilayer and the substrate. Epilayers have been grown with intentional Sb doping for IR absorption on lightly doped substrates. This research has proven that properly working Ge BIB detectors can be fabricated from the liquid phase as long as pure enough solvents are available. The detectors have responded at proper wavelengths when reversed biased even though the response did not quite reach minimum wavenumbers. Optimization of the Sb doping concentration should further decrease the photoionization energy of these detectors. Ge BIB detectors have been fabricated that respond to 60 cm-1 with low responsivity. Through reduction of the minority residual impurities, detector performance has reached responsivities of 1 A/W. These detectors have exhibited quantum efficiency and NEP values that rival conventional photoconductors and are expected to provide a much more sensitive tool for new scientific discoveries in a number of fields, including solid state studies, astronomy, and cosmology.

  6. GaAs Blocked-Impurity-Band Detectors for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardozo, Benjamin Lewin

    2004-12-21

    High-purity and doped GaAs films have been grown by Liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) for development of a blocked impurity band (BIB) detector for far-infrared radiation. The film growth process developed has resulted in the capability to grow GaAs with a net active impurity concentration below 1 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, ideal for the blocking layer of the BIB detector. The growth of n-type LPE GaAs films with donor concentrations below the metal-insulator transition, as required for the absorbing layer of a BIB detector, has been achieved. The control of the donor concentration, however, was found to be insufficient for detector production. The growth by LPE of a high-purity film onto a commercially grown vapor-phase epitaxial (VPE) n-type GaAs doped absorbing layer resulted in a BIB device that showed a significant reduction in the low-temperature dark current compared to the absorbing layer only. Extended optical response was not detected, most likely due to the high compensation of the commercially grown GaAs absorbing layer, which restricts the depletion width of the device.

  7. GaAs Blocked-Impurity-Band Detectors for Far-Infrared Astronomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardozo, Benjamin Lewin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    High-purity and doped GaAs films have been grown by Liquid-phase epitaxy (LPE) for development of a blocked impurity band (BIB) detector for far-infrared radiation. The film growth process developed has resulted in the capability to grow GaAs with a net active impurity concentration below 1 x 1013 cm-3, ideal for the blocking layer of the BIB detector. The growth of n-type LPE GaAs films with donor concentrations below the metal-insulator transition, as required for the absorbing layer of a BIB detector, has been achieved. The control of the donor concentration, however, was found to be insufficient for detector production. The growth by LPE of a high-purity film onto a commercially grown vapor-phase epitaxial (VPE) n-type GaAs doped absorbing layer resulted in a BIB device that showed a significant reduction in the low-temperature dark current compared to the absorbing layer only. Extended optical response was not detected, most likely due to the high compensation of the commercially grown GaAs absorbing layer, which restricts the depletion width of the device.

  8. Soot on snow experiments: light-absorbing impurities effect on the natural snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, J.; Virkkula, A.; Meinander, O.; Kivekäs, N.; Hannula, H.-R.; Järvinen, O.; Peltoniemi, J. I.; Gritsevich, M.; Heikkilä, A.; Kontu, A.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Neitola, K.; Brus, D.; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P.; Anttila, K.; Hakala, T.; Kaartinen, H.; Vehkamäki, M.; de Leeuw, G.; Lihavainen, H.

    2015-02-01

    Light-absorbing impurities affect snow and ice via a decrease in albedo and a consequent disturbance to the radiative energy balance. Experimentally, these matters have only been examined in a few studies. Here we present results from a series of experiments in which we deposited different soot concentrations onto natural snow in different regions of Finland, and thereafter monitored the changes of the snowpack through the melting season. Measurements of the particulates in the snow indicated concentrations in the range of thousands of ppb to have clear effects on the snow properties, including the albedo, the physical snow characteristics, and an increased melt rate. For soot concentrations in the hundreds of ppb range, the effects were not as clearly visible, and it was more difficult to attribute the effects solely to the soot on the snow. Comparisons between our experimental data and the widely used Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model showed a general agreement when the model was specifically tuned to our measurements. This study highlights the importance of additional experimental studies, to further articulate and quantify the effects of light-absorbing impurities on snow.

  9. Toward an Impurity Band PV: Dynamics of Carriers Generated via Sub-band gap Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Joseph; Simmons, Christie; Akey, Austin; Aziz, Michael; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2013-03-01

    Intermediate band solar cells are a pathway to cells that surpass the Shockley-Queisser limit by enabling the utilization of sub-band gap photons. A proposed method for fabricating an intermediate band material is to use impurities that introduce electronic levels within the band gap. At sufficiently high dopant concentrations, band formation may lead to a suppression of Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination, an idea known as ``lifetime recovery''. We investigate a proposed intermediate band material, silicon hyper-doped with sulfur. This material system exhibits strong sub-band gap optical absorption and metallic conductivity at sufficiently high sulfur concentrations, which makes it a strong candidate for an impurity-band material. We employ low-temperature photoconductivity using sub-band gap light to estimate the trapping rate of electrons in the conduction band. We vary the sulfur concentration near the critical value for the metal-insulator transition to test the idea of ``lifetime recovery'' in the S:Si system.

  10. GGA+U investigations of impurity d-electrons effects on the electronic and magnetic properties of ZnO

    KAUST Repository

    Ul Haq, Bakhtiar

    2014-08-01

    Stimulation of novel features in ZnO by impurity electrons has attracted a remarkable attention of researchers from the past decade. Consequently, ZnO has found several applications in the field of spintronics and optoelectronics. We report, the effect of 3d-(V, Ag) electrons on the properties of ZnO in stable wurtzite (WZ) and metastable zincblende (ZB) phase using the density functional theory. Introduction of V-3d electrons was found to induce a high magnetic moment value of 5.22 in WZ and 3.26 in the ZB phase, and moreover transform the semiconductor character of ZnO into a metallic nature. Ag-d electrons result in the p-type half-metallic nature of ZnO with a weak ferromagnetic background. Our calculations for ground-state magnetic ordering show that ZnO in the presence of impure 3d-(V, Ag) electrons favors ferromagnetic ordering, and obey the double exchange mechanism. However, impurity atoms have very marginal effect on the lattice parameters of ZnO, thereby exposing its potential to absorb the impurity atoms in high concentration. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Determination of cetirizine dihydrochloride, related impurities and preservatives in oral solution and tablet dosage forms using HPLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, A M Y; Al Sherife, H A; Al Omari, M M; Badwan, A A

    2004-10-29

    An HPLC method was developed and validated for the determination of cetirizine dihydrochloride (CZ) as well as its related impurities in commercial oral solution and tablet formulations. Furthermore, two preservatives associated with the drug formulations, namely, propyl (PP) and butylparabens (BP) were successfully determined by this method. The chromatographic system used was equipped with a Hypersil BDS C18, 5 microm column (4.6 x 250 mm) and a detector set at 230 nm in conjunction with a mobile phase of 0.05 M dihydrogen phosphate:acetonitrile:methanol:tetrahydrofuran (12:5:2:1, v/v/v/v) at a pH of 5.5 and a flow rate of 1 ml min(-1). The calibration curves were linear within the target concentration ranges studied, namely, 2 x 10(2) - 8 x 10(2) microg ml(-1) and 1-4 microg ml(-1) for CZ, 20-100 microg ml(-1) for preservatives and 1-4 microg ml(-1) for CZ related impurities. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) for CZ were, respectively, 0.10 and 0.34 microg ml(-1) and for CZ related impurities were in the ranges of 0.08-0.26 microg ml(-1) and 0.28-0.86 microg ml(-1), respectively. The method proved to be specific, stability indicating, accurate, precise, robust and could be used as an alternative to the European pharmacopoeial method set for CZ and its related impurities.

  12. Effect of impurities and grain boundaries on the kinetic characteristics of the radiation damage of iron and austenitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, D.; Smirnov, E.; Tsepelev, A.

    2016-04-01

    Austenitic stainless steel AISI 304, 316 and similar in composition, are used to create many elements of the reactor core, such as fuel cladding of fast-neutron reactor. It is known that during the operation, they became subject to such type of radiation damage, as the vacancy swelling and radiation creep. In this paper, was analyzed the effect of alloying elements, impurities and their complexes with radiation defects (RD) on the characteristics of RD and radiation-enhanced diffusion (RED) Parameters of vacancy voids nucleation and growth processes were also studied on the example of Cr18Ni10T steel. Evaluation of the temperature dependence of steady-state concentration of RD for materials with different binding energy complexes "defect - impurity", the effective values of mutual recombination rate RD for materials complexes, influence the formation of impurity complexes and volume density of grain boundaries on the rate of growth of vacancy voids and radiation creep was conducted. The possibility of varying the characteristics of the complex defect - impurity and grain boundary size for the suppression of radiation creep and vacancy swelling was studied

  13. The Influence of Impurities and Metallic Capping Layers on the Microstructure of Copper Interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolo, Michael

    As copper interconnects have scaled to ever smaller dimensions on semiconductor devices, the microstructure has become increasingly detrimental for performance and reliability. Small grains persist in interconnects despite annealing at high temperatures, leading to higher line resistance and more frequent electromigration-induced failures. Conventionally, it was believed that impurities from the electrodeposition pinned grain growth, but limitations in analytical techniques meant the effect was inferred rather than observed. Recent advances in analytical techniques, however, have enabled this work to quantify impurity content, location, and diffusion in relation to microstructural changes in electroplated copper. Surface segregation of impurities during the initial burst of grain growth was investigated. After no surface segregation was observed, a microfluidic plating cell was constructed to plate multilayer films with regions of intentionally high and low impurity concentrations to determine if grain growth could be pinned by the presence of impurities; it was not. An alternate mechanism for grain boundary pinning based on the texture of the seed layer is proposed, supported by time-resolved transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron backscatter diffraction data. The suggested model posits that the seed in narrow features has no preferred orientation, which results in rapid nucleation of subsurface grains in trench regions prior to recrystallization from the overburden down. These rapidly growing grains are able to block off several trenches from the larger overburden grains, inhibiting grain growth in narrow features. With this knowledge in hand, metallic capping layers were employed to address the problematic microstructure in 70nm lines. The capping layers (chromium, nickel, zinc, and tin) were plated on the copper overburden prior to annealing to manipulate the stress gradient and microstructural development during annealing. It appeared that

  14. Experimental Characterization of the Poisoning Effects of Methanol-Based Reformate Impurities on a PBI-Based High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    surface area is investigated by means of impedance spectroscopy. The concentrations in the anode feed gas of all impurities, unconverted methanol-water vapor mixture, CO and CO2 were varied along with current density according to a multilevel factorial design of experiments. Results show that all......In this work the effects of reformate gas impurities on a H3PO4-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI) membrane-based high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) are studied. A unit cell assembly with a BASF Celtec®-P2100 high temperature membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of 45 cm2 active...... the impurities degrade the performance, with CO being the most degrading agent and CO2 the least. The factorial analysis shows that there is interdependence among the effects of the different factors considered. This interdependence suggests, for example, that tolerances to concentrations of CO above 2% may...

  15. Low temperature thermal conductivity of Zn-doped YBCO evidence for impurity-induced electronic bound states

    CERN Document Server

    Behnia, K; Taillefer, L; Gagnon, R

    1996-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of Zn-doped YBCO crystals was studied at low temperature (0.15 < T < 0.8 K) for different concentrations of Zn impurities. A small amount of Zn induces a dramatic decrease in the non-linear component of the low-temperature thermal conductivity. Moreover, the magnitude of the linear component (obtained by extrapolating the data to T=0) is found to depend on Zn concentration. After an initial decrease, this linear term, associated with the electronic contribution to the conductivity, increases with increasing Zn dopage. Such an increase is consistent with the introduction of low-energy excitations by Zn impurities as expected for a $d_{x^2-y^2}$ superconducting state in contrast to an anisotropic s-wave gap. The results are compared to quantitative predictions of available theoretical models.

  16. From band tailing to impurity-band formation and discussion of localization in doped semiconductors: A multiple-scattering approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serre, J.; Ghazali, A.

    1983-10-01

    Klauder's best multiple-scattering approximation which allows the use of a realistic interaction potential and in which electron-electron interactions may be incorporated is shown to constitute a sound basis for the study of the electronic structure of doped semiconductors. The implementation of this formalism requires the solution of a self-consistent set of nonlinear integral equations. This has been done numerically over a large impurity-concentration range. We have thus shown that as the concentration decreases, the band tail gradually splits off from the main band, giving an impurity band. Spectral-density analysis allows one to distinguish between localized and extended states. Compensation effects have also been analyzed. Finally, our results are discussed and compared with various experiments.

  17. Removal of fluoride impurities from UF.sub.6 gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitz, James V.

    1985-01-01

    A method of purifying a UF.sub.6 gas stream containing one or more metal fluoride impurities composed of a transuranic metal, transition metal or mixtures thereof, is carried out by contacting the gas stream with a bed of UF.sub.5 in a reaction vessel under conditions where at least one impurity reacts with the UF.sub.5 to form a nongaseous product and a treated gas stream, and removing the treated gas stream from contact with the bed. The nongaseous products are subsequently removed in a reaction with an active fluorine affording agent to form a gaseous impurity which is removed from the reaction vessel. The bed of UF.sub.5 is formed by the reduction of UF.sub.6 in the presence of UV light. One embodiment of the reaction vessel includes a plurality of UV light sources as tubes on which UF.sub.5 is formed.

  18. Extracting Impurity Locations using Scanning Capacitance Microscopy Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGHAEI, S.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article we investigate the possibility to use scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM for the 2-D and 3-D "atomistic" dopant profiling of semiconductor materials. For this purpose, we first analyze the effects of random dopant fluctuations (RDF on SCM measurements with nanoscale probes and show that the discrete and random locations of dopant impurities significantly affect the differential capacitance measured in SCM experiments if the dimension of the probe is below 50 nm. Then, we present an algorithm to compute the x, y, and z coordinates of the ionized impurities in the semiconductor material using a set of SCM measurements. The algorithm is based on evaluating the doping sensitivity functions of the differential capacitance and uses a gradient-based iterative method to compute the locations of dopants. Finally, we discuss a standard simulation case and show that we are able to successfully retrieve the locations of the ionized impurities using the proposed algorithm.

  19. Polymeric efficiency in remove impurities during cottonseed biodiesel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H. L.; Liang, Y. H.; Yan, J.; Lin, H. D.; Espinosa, A. R.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes a new process for developing biodiesel by polymer from crude cottonseed oil. The study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of the alkali transesterification-flocculation-sedimentation process on fast glycerol and other impurities in the separation from biodiesel by using quaternary polyamine-based cationic polymers SL2700 and polyacylamide cationic polymer SAL1100. The settling velocity of glycerol and other impurities in biodiesel was investigated through settling test experiments; the quality of the biodiesel was investigated by evaluating the viscosity and density. The results revealed that SL2700, SAL1100 and their combination dramatically improved the settling velocity of glycerol and other impurities materials than traditional method. SL 2700 with molecular weight of 0.2 million Da and charge density of 50% then plus SAL1100 with molecular weight of 11 million Da and charge density of 10% induced observable particle aggregation with the best settling performance.

  20. Macroscopic scattering of cracks initiated at single impurity atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kermode, J. R.; Ben-Bashat, L.; Atrash, F.; Cilliers, J. J.; Sherman, D.; de Vita, A.

    2013-09-01

    Brittle crystals, such as coloured gems, have long been known to cleave with atomically smooth fracture surfaces, despite being impurity laden, suggesting that isolated atomic impurities do not generally cause cracks to deflect. Whether cracks can ever deviate when hitting an atomic defect, and if so how they can go straight in real brittle crystals, which always contain many such defects, is still an open question. Here we carry out multiscale molecular dynamics simulations and high-resolution experiments on boron-doped silicon, revealing that cracks can be deflected by individual boron atoms. The process, however, requires a characteristic minimum time, which must be less than the time spent by the crack front at the impurity site. Deflection therefore occurs at low crack speeds, leading to surface ridges which intensify when the boron-dopage level is increased, whereas fast-moving cracks are dynamically steered away from being deflected, yielding smooth cleavage surfaces.

  1. Effect of impurities on kinetic transport processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Stefanie

    2010-12-10

    Within the framework of this thesis, different problems arising in connection with impurities have been investigated. Collisional damping of zonal flows in tokamaks: Since the Coulomb collision frequency increases with increasing ion charge, heavy, highly charged impurities play an important role in this process. The effect of such impurities on the linear response of the plasma to an external potential perturbation, as caused by zonal flows, is calculated with analytical methods. In comparison with a pure plasma, the damping of the flows occurs, as expected, considerably faster; for experimentally relevant parameters, the enhancement exceeds the effective charge Z{sub eff} of the plasma. Impurity transport driven by microturbulence in tokamaks: With regard to impurities, it is especially important whether the resulting flows are directed inwards or outwards, since they are deleterious for core energy confinement on the one hand, but on the other hand help protecting plasma-facing components from too high energy fluxes in the edge region. A semi-analytical model is presented describing the resulting impurity fluxes and the stability boundary of the underlying mode. The main goal is to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, costly numerical simulations, which are applicable to a broad range of problems but yield scarcely traceable results, and, on the other hand, analytical theory, which might ease the interpretation of the results but is so far rather rudimentary. The model is based on analytical formulae whenever possible but resorts to a numerical treatment when the approximations necessary for an analytical solution would lead to a substantial distortion of the results. Both the direction of the impurity flux and the stability boundary are found to depend sensitively on the plasma parameters such as the impurity density and the temperature gradient. Pfirsch-Schlueter transport in stellarators: Due to geometry effects, collisional transport plays a much more

  2. Moving impurity in an inhomogenous Bose-Einstein condensate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Ranchu; Tiesinga, Eite

    2016-05-01

    We study the dynamics of a non-uniform Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) under the influence of a moving weak point-like impurity. When the condensate density varies slowly compared to its healing length the critical velocity of the impurity, beyond which the condensate becomes unstable, can be calculated using the Local Density Approximation (LDA). This critical velocity corresponds to the smallest local sound speed. The LDA breaks down when the length scale of density variations is of the order of the healing length. We have calculated corrections to the critical velocity in this regime as an asymptotic expansion in the size of the BEC. We also discuss the experimental implications of our calculations by studying the stability of the atomic analogue of a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID). The atom-SQUID consists of a BEC in a ring trap with rotating barrier. The impurity corresponds to imperfections in the ring trap.

  3. The effects of ambient impurities on the surface tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponce-Torres A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A liquid bridge is a liquid column held captive between two coaxial and parallel solid disks. It is an excellent test bench where measuring the surface tension. In this paper, we used this fluid configuration to examine experimentally the effects of ambient impurities on the surface tension over time. For this purpose, the liquid bridge equilibrium shape was analyzed when the liquid bridge was surrounded by three environments: the uncontrolled ambient, and both air and argon encapsulated in a small glass cover. Ambient contamination produced a sharp decrease of the surface tension of ultra-pure water. The presence of an anionic surfactant in the free surface of an aqueous solution did not inhibit the action of impurities coming from the ambient. Impurities can influence the dynamical behavior of the free surface in flows dominated by the surface tension. Therefore, a careful control of that influence can be crucial in many applications of fluid mechanics.

  4. Radiated power distributions in impurity-seeded plasmas in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morisaki, T., E-mail: morisaki@nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Oyama, K. [Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Tamura, N.; Masuzaki, S.; Akiyama, T.; Motojima, G.; Miyazawa, J.; Peterson, B.J. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yamada, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    In LHD, impurity seeding has been performed to enhance the radiative cooling in the edge region. Neon, nitrogen and argon were seeded by gas puffing, and the behaviour of those impurities in the plasma was investigated with the innovative diagnostic method. Two bolometer arrays were used to measure the two-dimensional radiated power distribution. Using the tomographic technique, radiated power distributions on a poloidal plane can be obtained with the high time resolution. During the discharge with neon puff, considerable radiation from the core region was observed, in addition to the strong edge radiation. In spite of the highly radiated power, plasma did not result in the radiation collapse. On the other hand, in the nitrogen-seeded discharge, the strong radiation only from the peripheral region was observed. Different time evolutions of the total radiated power between neon and nitrogen seeded discharges were observed after stopping each impurity puff.

  5. Ionic screening of charged impurities in electrolytically gated graphene: A partially linearized Poisson-Boltzmann model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P; Mišković, Z L

    2015-10-07

    We present a model describing the electrostatic interactions across a structure that consists of a single layer of graphene with large area, lying above an oxide substrate of finite thickness, with its surface exposed to a thick layer of liquid electrolyte containing salt ions. Our goal is to analyze the co-operative screening of the potential fluctuation in a doped graphene due to randomness in the positions of fixed charged impurities in the oxide by the charge carriers in graphene and by the mobile ions in the diffuse layer of the electrolyte. In order to account for a possibly large potential drop in the diffuse later that may arise in an electrolytically gated graphene, we use a partially linearized Poisson-Boltzmann (PB) model of the electrolyte, in which we solve a fully nonlinear PB equation for the surface average of the potential in one dimension, whereas the lateral fluctuations of the potential in graphene are tackled by linearizing the PB equation about the average potential. In this way, we are able to describe the regime of equilibrium doping of graphene to large densities for arbitrary values of the ion concentration without restrictions to the potential drop in the electrolyte. We evaluate the electrostatic Green's function for the partially linearized PB model, which is used to express the screening contributions of the graphene layer and the nearby electrolyte by means of an effective dielectric function. We find that, while the screened potential of a single charged impurity at large in-graphene distances exhibits a strong dependence on the ion concentration in the electrolyte and on the doping density in graphene, in the case of a spatially correlated two-dimensional ensemble of impurities, this dependence is largely suppressed in the autocovariance of the fluctuating potential.

  6. Impurity/defect interactions during MeV Si{sup +} ion implantation annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, A.; Koveshnikov, S.; Christensen, K. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Ion implantation of dopant atoms at MeV energies is currently being explored in several integrated circuit device manufacturing processes. MeV implantation offers immediate advantages such as vertical well modulation, latch-up protection, device structure isolation, and reduced temperature processing. Simultaneously, it presents an opportunity to achieve {open_quotes}proximity{close_quotes} gettering of impurities from the active device region by placing high impurity solubility and/or secondary defect gettering sites within microns of the surface. If the MeV implanted species is a dopant ion, all three gettering mechanisms, i.e, segregation, relaxation and injection, can be involved in the gettering process, complicating the analysis and optimization of the process. However, investigation of gettering using non-dopant Si{sup +} ion damage allows the relaxation component of the gettering process to be isolated and examined separately. In general, gettering is verified by a reduction in impurity concentration in the region of interest, usually the device region, and/or a build-up of concentration/precipitation in a non-device sink region. An alternate and more meaningful approach is to use simple devices as materials characterization probes via changes in the electrical activity of the gettering sites. Device space charge probes also allow the evolution of the defect sites upon contamination to be tracked. We report here results of the electrical, structural, and chemical characterization of MeV implanted Si{sup +} damage using Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS). The damage has been characterized both as a function of annealing from 600 to 1100{degrees}C for 1 hr, and after contamination with Fe followed by low temperature gettering annealing.

  7. The effect of inter-granular constraints on the response of polycrystalline piezoelectric ceramics at the surface and in the bulk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Wang, Zhiyang; Khansur, Neamul H.

    2016-01-01

    The electro-mechanical coupling mechanisms in polycrystalline ferroelectric materials, including a soft PbZrxTi1−xO3 (PZT) and lead-free 0.9375(Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3-0.0625BaTiO3 (BNT-6.25BT), have been studied using a surface sensitive low-energy (12.4 keV) and bulk sensitive high-energy (73 ke...... methods demonstrates that the intergranular constraints have a significant influence on the electric-field-induced electro-mechanical responses in polycrystalline ferroelectrics. These results have implications for the design of higher performance polycrystalline piezoelectrics....

  8. The effect of inter-granular constraints on the response of polycrystalline piezoelectric ceramics at the surface and in the bulk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mohammad J.; Wang, Zhiyang; Khansur, Neamul H.;

    2016-01-01

    The electro-mechanical coupling mechanisms in polycrystalline ferroelectric materials, including a soft PbZrxTi1−xO3 (PZT) and lead-free 0.9375(Bi1/2Na1/2)TiO3-0.0625BaTiO3 (BNT-6.25BT), have been studied using a surface sensitive low-energy (12.4 keV) and bulk sensitive high-energy (73 keV) sync...... methods demonstrates that the intergranular constraints have a significant influence on the electric-field-induced electro-mechanical responses in polycrystalline ferroelectrics. These results have implications for the design of higher performance polycrystalline piezoelectrics....

  9. Origins of Negative Strain Rate Dependence of Stress Corrosion Cracking Initiation in Alloy 690, and Intergranular Crack Formation in Thermally Treated Alloy 690

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Sung Soo

    2016-09-01

    We show that enhanced stress corrosion cracking (SCC) initiation in cold-rolled Alloy 690 with decreasing strain rate is related to the rate of short-range ordering (SRO) but not to the time-dependent corrosion process. Evidence for SRO is provided by aging tests on cold-rolled Alloy 690 at 623 K and 693 K (350 °C and 420 °C), respectively, which demonstrate its enhanced lattice contraction and hardness increase with aging temperature and time, respectively. Secondary intergranular cracks formed only in thermally treated and cold-rolled Alloy 690 during SCC tests, which are not SCC cracks, are caused by its lattice contraction by SRO before SCC tests but not by the orientation effect.

  10. Current fluctuations in unconventional superconductor junctions with impurity scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burset, Pablo; Lu, Bo; Tamura, Shun; Tanaka, Yukio

    2017-06-01

    The order parameter of bulk two-dimensional superconductors is classified as nodal if it vanishes for a direction in momentum space, or gapful if it does not. Each class can be topologically nontrivial if Andreev bound states are formed at the edges of the superconductor. Nonmagnetic impurities in the superconductor affect the formation of Andreev bound states and can drastically change the tunneling spectra for small voltages. Here, we investigate the mean current and its fluctuations for two-dimensional tunnel junctions between normal-metal and unconventional superconductors by solving the quasiclassical Eilenberger equation self-consistently, including the presence of nonmagnetic impurities in the superconductor. As the impurity strength increases, we find that superconductivity is suppressed for almost all order parameters since (i) at zero applied bias, the effective transferred charge calculated from the noise-current ratio tends to the electron charge e , and (ii) for finite bias, the current-voltage characteristics follows that of a normal-state junction. There are notable exceptions to this trend. First, gapful nontrivial (chiral) superconductors are very robust against impurity scattering due to the linear dispersion relation of their surface Andreev bound states. Second, for nodal nontrivial superconductors, only px-wave pairing is almost immune to the presence of impurities due to the emergence of odd-frequency s -wave Cooper pairs near the interface. Due to their anisotropic dependence on the wave vector, impurity scattering is an effective pair-breaking mechanism for the remaining nodal superconductors. All these behaviors are neatly captured by the noise-current ratio, providing a useful guide to find experimental signatures for unconventional superconductivity.

  11. An effective electron mass in heavily doped gallium arsenide under ordering impurity complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanova, V A; Semikolenova, N A; Sidorov, E N

    2002-01-01

    The results of an investigation of edge photoluminescence spectra at 300 K for series of Czochralski grown tellurium doped gallium arsenide monocrystals with free carriers concentration n sub 0 = 10 sup 1 sup 7 -10 sup 1 sup 9 cm sup - sup 3 are presented. On the basis of photoluminescence spectra contour analysis the concentration dependences of chemical potential and value of band gap narrowing are obtained. The concentration dependence of electron effective mass m* sub 0 (n sub 0) at the bottom of the conduction band is calculated. It is shown, that the nonmonotonous dependence m* sub 0 (n sub 0) is an accordance with electron scattering data in the material under study and is conditioned by ordering of impurity complexes

  12. Effect of the microstructure on the sensibilization to intergranular corrosion of a 24. 7 Cr7. 4Ni duplex stainless steel. Efecto de la microestructura en la sensibilizacion a la corrosion inoxidable duplex 24, 7Cr7,Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otero, E.; Pardo, A.; Merino, C.; Hierro, P.; Perez, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on the resistance to intergranular corrosion of a 24.4Cr7.4Ni is studied. The results are discussed both in terms of the Huey experiment as well as of the sweeping corresponding to the experimental conditions under which the experiments have been performed. Author (11 refs.)

  13. Interfacial reactions in Ti-6Al-4V with laser-embedded SiC particles and the origin of intergranular corrosion susceptibility of an Al-Mg alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, BJ; De Hosson, JTM; Carter, CB; Hall, EL; Nutt,; Briant, CL

    2000-01-01

    In the first part of the paper the microstructure of Ti-6Al-4V with laser embedded SiC particle is explained. The interfacial reaction between Ti and SiC is responsible for the largely improved wear resistance of the Ti alloy. In the second part the phase responsible for the intergranular corrosion

  14. Mitigation strategies of intergranular corrosion in systems of reactors of water boiling (BWR). Combined action of the chemistry of the hydrogen and the oxygen; Estrategias de mitigacion de la corrosion intergranular en sistemas de reactores de agua en ebullicion (BWR). Accion combinada de la quimica del hidrogeno y del oxigeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdugo, M.

    2015-07-01

    Inter-Granular Stress Corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in austenitic stainless steel and in austenitic nickel-based alloys has been the subject of many studies the aim of which was to resolve one of the main problems faced by BWR nuclear power plants since the 1960s. This corrosion phenomenon is the result of the combined action of three factors: sensitization of the material, high local stresses and an aggressive medium. This paper deals with these factors separately and analyzes the oxidative chemistry of BWR reactors (aggressivity of the medium) as one the main causes if IGSCC. (Author)

  15. Anomalous diffusion, clustering, and pinch of impurities in plasma edge turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Priego, M.; Garcia, O.E.; Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    The turbulent transport of impurity particles in plasma edge turbulence is investigated. The impurities are modeled as a passive fluid advected by the electric and polarization drifts, while the ambient plasma turbulence is modeled using the two-dimensional Hasegawa-Wakatani paradigm for resistive......-diffusion analysis of the evolution of impurity puffs. Additional effects appear for inertial impurities as a consequence of compressibility. First, the density of inertial impurities is found to correlate with the vorticity of the electric drift velocity, that is, impurities cluster in vortices of a precise...

  16. Local measurement of transport parameters for laser injected trace impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannella, R.; Lauro-Taroni, L. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    A procedure has been developed that determines local measurements of transport parameters`s profiles for injected impurities. The measured profiles extend from the plasma centre up to a certain radial position (usually {rho} = 0.6-0.7). In the outer region of the plasma the procedure supplies ``most suitable extensions`` up to the plasma edge of the measured transport profiles. The procedure intrinsically assures consistency and excellent agreement between the simulated and experimental data of local broad band soft X-ray emissivity and intensities of individual emission lines from different ion states of the injected impurities. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Neutrality point of graphene with coplanar charged impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogler, Michael M

    2009-12-04

    The ground state and the transport properties of graphene subject to the potential of in-plane charged impurities are studied. The screening of the impurity potential is shown to be nonlinear, producing a fractal structure of electron and hole puddles. Statistical properties of this density distribution as well as the charge compressibility of the system are calculated in the leading-log approximation. The conductivity depends logarithmically on alpha, the dimensionless strength of the Coulomb interaction. The theory is asymptotically exact when alpha is small, which is the case for graphene on a substrate with a high dielectric constant.

  18. Critical quasiparticles in single-impurity and lattice Kondo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, M.; Bulla, R.; Wölfle, P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum criticality in systems of local moments interacting with itinerant electrons has become an important and diverse field of research. Here we review recent results which concern (a) quantum phase transitions in single-impurity Kondo and Anderson models and (b) quantum phase transitions in heavy-fermion lattice models which involve critical quasiparticles. For (a) the focus will be on impurity models with a pseudogapped host density of states and their applications, e.g., in graphene and other Dirac materials, while (b) is devoted to strong-coupling behavior near antiferromagnetic quantum phase transitions, with potential applications in a variety of heavy-fermion metals.

  19. Nonlinear excitations in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Rasmussen, Kim; Christiansen, Peter Leth

    1995-01-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of electronic excitations interacting with acoustic phonons in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities. We show that the problem is reduced to the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a varying coefficient. The latter represents the influence of the imp......We study the nonlinear dynamics of electronic excitations interacting with acoustic phonons in two-dimensional molecular structures with impurities. We show that the problem is reduced to the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a varying coefficient. The latter represents the influence...... excitations. Analytical results are in good agreement with numerical simulations of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation....

  20. Virmid: accurate detection of somatic mutations with sample impurity inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sangwoo; Jeong, Kyowon; Bhutani, Kunal; Lee, Jeong; Patel, Anand; Scott, Eric; Nam, Hojung; Lee, Hayan; Gleeson, Joseph G; Bafna, Vineet

    2013-08-29

    Detection of somatic variation using sequence from disease-control matched data sets is a critical first step. In many cases including cancer, however, it is hard to isolate pure disease tissue, and the impurity hinders accurate mutation analysis by disrupting overall allele frequencies. Here, we propose a new method, Virmid, that explicitly determines the level of impurity in the sample, and uses it for improved detection of somatic variation. Extensive tests on simulated and real sequencing data from breast cancer and hemimegalencephaly demonstrate the power of our model. A software implementation of our method is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/virmid/.

  1. Flat panel display - Impurity doping technology for flat panel displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshiharu [Advanced Technology Planning, Sumitomo Eaton Nova Corporation, SBS Tower 9F, 10-1, Yoga 4-chome, Setagaya-ku, 158-0097 Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: suzuki_tsh@senova.co.jp

    2005-08-01

    Features of the flat panel displays (FPDs) such as liquid crystal display (LCD) and organic light emitting diode (OLED) display, etc. using low temperature poly-Si (LTPS) thin film transistors (TFTs) are briefly reviewed comparing with other FPDs. The requirements for fabricating TFTs used for high performance FPDs and system on glass (SoG) are addressed. This paper focuses on the impurity doping technology, which is one of the key technologies together with crystallization by laser annealing, formation of high quality gate insulator and gate-insulator/poly-Si interface. The issues to be solved in impurity doping technology for state of the art and future TFTs are clarified.

  2. Tricritical wetting in the two-dimensional Ising magnet due to the presence of localized non-magnetic impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trobo, Marta L; Albano, Ezequiel V

    2016-03-31

    Fixed vacancies (non-magnetic impurities) are placed along the centre of Ising strips in order to study the wetting behaviour in this confined system, by means of numerical simulations analysed with the aid of finite size scaling and thermodynamic integration methods. By considering strips of size L × M (L interface between magnetic domains of different orientation (driven by the corresponding surface fields), which are the precursors of the wetting transitions that occur in the thermodynamic limit. By placing vacancies or equivalently non-magnetic impurities along the centre of the sample, we found that for low vacancy densities the wetting transitions are of second order, while by increasing the concentration of vacancies the transitions become of first order. Second- and first-order lines meet in tricritical wetting points (H(tric)(SW), T(tric)(W)), where H(tric)(SW) and T(Tric)(W) are the magnitude of the surface field and the temperature, respectively. In the phase diagram, tricritical points shift from the high temperature and weak surface field regime at large vacancy densities to the T --> 0, H(tric)(SW) --> 1 limit for low vacancy densities. By comparing the locations of the tricritical points with those corresponding to the case of mobile impurities, we conclude that in order to observe similar effects, in the latter the required density of impurities is much smaller (e.g. by a factor 3-5). Furthermore, a proper density of non magnetic impurities placed along the centre of a strip can effectively pin rather flat magnetic interfaces for suitable values of the competing surface fields and temperature.

  3. Recirculation of Chilean copper smelting dust with high impurities contents to the smelting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano, H.; Fujisawa, T. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan). EcoTopia Science Inst.; Montenegro, V. [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Dust generated during the copper smelting process is generally stabilized using hydrometallurgical methods as it contains high concentrations of arsenic. In this laboratory study, dust was recirculated during the smelting process in order to recover more copper and decrease dust emissions while recovering more copper. The behaviour of impurities and their influence on matte quality was also investigated. Industrial matte, flue dust, slag, and copper concentrates from a Chilean smelter were used as test materials. Dust recirculation tests were conducted in a simulated electric furnace. Off-gases were collected in a reaction tube, and the condensed volatile matter, slag, and matte phases were analyzed for their elemental content by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. The distribution of arsenic (As); antimony (Sb), bismuth (Bi), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) were investigated by varying the amounts of dust recirculating to the smelting stage with 21 per cent of the oxygen. Results showed that distributions of all analyzed elements increased with recirculation. It was concluded that copper can be recovered using the dust recirculation technique. However, impurities may limit the efficacy of the dust recirculation process. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  4. Electronic and Shallow Impurity States in Semiconductor Heterostructures Under an Applied Electric Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Hai-Yang; GU Shi-Wei; SHI Yao-Ming

    2005-01-01

    With the use of variational method to solve the effective mass equation, we have studied the electronic and shallow impurity states in semiconductor heterostructures under an applied electric field. The electron energy levels are calculated exactly and the impurity binding energies are calculated with the variational approach. It is found that the behaviors of electronic and shallow impurity states in heterostructures under an applied electric field are analogous to that of quantum wells. Our results show that with the increasing strength of electric field, the electron confinement energies increase, and the impurity binding energy increases also when the impurity is on the surface, while the impurity binding energy increases at first, to a peak value, then decreases to a value which is related to the impurity position when the impurity is away from the surface. In the absence of electric field, the result tends to the Levine's ground state energy (-1/4 effective Rydberg) when the impurity is on the surface, and the ground impurity binding energy tends to that in the bulk when the impurity is far away from the surface. The dependence of the impurity binding energy on the impurity position for different electric field is also discussed.

  5. Development and validation of a selective, sensitive and stability indicating UPLC-MS/MS method for rapid, simultaneous determination of six process related impurities in darunavir drug substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Vijaya Bhaskar Reddy; Yusop, Zulkifli; Jaafar, Jafariah; Aris, Azmi B; Majid, Zaiton A; Umar, Khalid; Talib, Juhaizah

    2016-09-05

    In this study a sensitive and selective gradient reverse phase UPLC-MS/MS method was developed for the simultaneous determination of six process related impurities viz., Imp-I, Imp-II, Imp-III, Imp-IV, Imp-V and Imp-VI in darunavir. The chromatographic separation was performed on Acquity UPLC BEH C18 (50 mm×2.1mm, 1.7μm) column using gradient elution of acetonitrile-methanol (80:20, v/v) and 5.0mM ammonium acetate containing 0.01% formic acid at a flow rate of 0.4mL/min. Both negative and positive electrospray ionization (ESI) modes were operated simultaneously using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) for the quantification of all six impurities in darunavir. The developed method was fully validated following ICH guidelines with respect to specificity, linearity, limit of detection (LOD), limit of quantification (LOQ), accuracy, precision, robustness and sample solution stability. The method was able to quantitate Imp-I, Imp-IV, Imp-V at 0.3ppm and Imp-II, Imp-III, and Imp-VI at 0.2ppm with respect to 5.0mg/mL of darunavir. The calibration curves showed good linearity over the concentration range of LOQ to 250% for all six impurities. The correlation coefficient obtained was >0.9989 in all the cases. The accuracy of the method lies between 89.90% and 104.60% for all six impurities. Finally, the method has been successfully applied for three formulation batches of darunavir to determine the above mentioned impurities, however no impurity was found beyond the LOQ. This method is a good quality control tool for the trace level quantification of six process related impurities in darunavir during its synthesis.

  6. Metal impurity-assisted formation of nanocone arrays on Si by low energy ion-beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeves Lloyd, Kayla; Bolotin, Igor L.; Schmeling, Martina; Hanley, Luke; Veryovkin, Igor V.

    2016-10-01

    Fabrication of nanocone arrays on Si surfaces was demonstrated using grazing incidence irradiation with 1 keV Ar+ ions concurrently sputtering the surface and depositing metal impurity atoms on it. Among three materials compared as co-sputtering targets Si, Cu and stainless steel, only steel was found to assist the growth of dense arrays of nanocones at ion fluences between 1018 and 1019 ions/cm2. The structural characterization of samples irradiated with these ion fluences using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy revealed that regions far away from co-sputtering targets are covered with nanoripples, and that nanocones popped-up out of the rippled surfaces when moving closer to co-sputtering targets, with their density gradually increasing and reaching saturation in the regions close to these targets. The characterization of the samples' chemical composition with Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy revealed that the concentration of metal impurities originating from stainless steel (Fe, Cr and Ni) was relatively high in the regions with high density of nanocones (Fe reaching a few atomic percent) and much lower (factor of 10 or so) in the region of nanoripples. Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry measurements showed that higher concentrations of these impurities are accumulated under the surface in both regions. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy experiments showed no direct evidence of metal silicide formation occurring on one region only (nanocones or nanoripples) and thus showed that this process could not be the driver of nanocone array formation. Also, these measurements indicated enhancement in oxide formation on regions covered by nanocones. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the difference in concentration of metal impurities in the thin near-surface layer forming under ion irradiation might be responsible for the differences in surface structures.

  7. Lipopolysaccharide contamination in intradermal DNA vaccination : toxic impurity or adjuvant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J.H. van den; Quaak, S.G.L.; Beijnen, J.H.; Hennink, W.E.; Storm, G.; Schumacher, T.N.; Haanen, J.B.A.G.; Nuijen, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are known both as potential adjuvants for vaccines and as toxic impurity in pharmaceutical preparations. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LPS in intradermal DNA vaccination administered by DNA tattooing. Method: Micewere vaccinated with a model DNA v

  8. Determination of Impurity Elements in Pure Cerium Oxide Product

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Peizhong; Chen Limin; Li Jie

    2004-01-01

    Determination of the rare earth impurity in pure cerium oxide is done by ICP-MS.The interference and other factors which affect analytical results were discussed.The accuracy are between 0.81% ~ 11.98% and the recoveries of standard addition are 96% ~ 112.5%.This method can meet the demand for product inspection.

  9. Effect of sample preparation on charged impurities in graphene substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burson, K. M.; Dean, C. R.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Hone, J.; Kim, P.; Cullen, W. G.; Fuhrer, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    The mobility of graphene as fabricated on SiO2 has been found to vary widely depending on sample preparation conditions. Additionally, graphene mobility on SiO2 appears to be limited to ~20,000 cm2/Vs, likely due to charged impurities in the substrate. Here we present a study of the effect of fabrication procedures on substrate charged impurity density (nimp) utilizing ultrahigh-vacuum Kelvin probe force microscopy. We conclude that even minimal SEM exposure, as from e-beam lithography, induces an increased impurity density, while heating reduces the number of charges for sample substrates which already exhibit a higher impurity density. We measure both SiO2 and h-BN and find that all nimp values observed for SiO2 are higher than those observed for h-BN; this is consistent with the observed improvement in mobility for graphene devices fabricated on h-BN over those fabricated on SiO2 substrates. This work was supported by the US ONR MURI program, and the University of Maryland NSF-MRSEC under Grant No. DMR 05-20471.

  10. Strong impact of impurity bands on domain formation in superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wacker, Andreas; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    1998-01-01

    The formation of electric field domains in doped semiconductor superlattices is described within a microscopic model. Due to the presence of impurity bands in low-doped samples the current-voltage characteristic is essentially different compared to medium-doped samples. (C) 1998 Published by Else...

  11. Lipopolysaccharide contamination in intradermal DNA vaccination : toxic impurity or adjuvant?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, J.H. van den; Quaak, S.G.L.; Beijnen, J.H.; Hennink, W.E.; Storm, G.; Schumacher, T.N.; Haanen, J.B.A.G.; Nuijen, B.

    Purpose: Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are known both as potential adjuvants for vaccines and as toxic impurity in pharmaceutical preparations. The aim of this study was to assess the role of LPS in intradermal DNA vaccination administered by DNA tattooing. Method: Micewere vaccinated with a model DNA

  12. Recovery of surfaces from impurity poisoning during crystal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Terry A.; Martin, Tracie L.; Potapenko, Sergey; Palmore, G. Tayhas; de Yoreo, James J.

    1999-06-01

    Growth and dissolution of crystal surfaces are central to processes as diverse as pharmaceutical manufacturing,, corrosion, single-crystal production and mineralization in geochemical and biological environments,. Impurities are either unavoidable features of these processes or intentionally introduced to modify the products. Those that act as inhibiting agents induce a so-called `dead zone', a regime of low supersaturation where growth ceases. Models based on the classic theory of Cabrera and Vermilyea explain behaviour near the dead zone in terms of the pinning of elementary step motion by impurities,. Despite general acceptance of this theory, a number of commonly investigated systems exhibit behaviour not predicted by such models. Moreover, no clear microscopic picture of impurity-step interactions currently exists. Here we use atomic force microscopy to investigate the potassium dihydrogen phosphate {100} surface as it emerges from the dead zone. We show that traditional models are not able to account for the behaviour of this system because they consider only elementary steps, whereas it is the propagation of macrosteps (bunches of monolayer steps) that leads to resurrection of growthout of the dead zone. We present a simple physical model of this process that includes macrosteps and relates characteristics of growth near the dead zone to the timescale for impurity adsorption.

  13. Neoclassical transport in density pedestals with non-trace impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Stefan; Pusztai, Istvan; Landreman, Matt

    2016-10-01

    We study neoclassical transport in steady-state density pedestals with non-trace impurities using the Eulerian δf code Perfect, with an emphasis on radially global effects and the effects of impurities. To properly describe transport in a tokamak pedestal, radial coupling must be included, which strongly affects the transport. We find that radial coupling reduces the pedestal heat flux compared to local predictions. Furthermore, the influence of the pedestal persists several orbit widths into the core. The electron flux is significant in the pedestal, and global neoclassical transport is not intrinsically ambipolar. Thus, the impurity flux is not simply opposing the ion flux. The resulting radial current gives a torque that is balanced by a non-negligible radial transport of toroidal momentum. The effective Prandtl number is comparable to typical turbulent values in the core (0.1 - 0.3), and is sensitive to the impurity content. Global effects have a strong contribution to the poloidal flows of low- Z ions, which give rise to larger in-out flow asymmetries. Supported by the INCA Grant of Vetenskapsrådet (Dnr. 330-2014-6313). ML is supported by the USDoE Grants DEFG0293ER54197 and DEFC0208ER54964. The simulations used computational resources of Hebbe at C3SE (C3SE2016-1-10 & SNIC2016-1-161).

  14. Charged impurity-induced scatterings in chemical vapor deposited graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming-Yang; Tang, Chiu-Chun [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Ling, D. C. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui Dist., New Taipei 25137, Taiwan (China); Li, L. J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Institute of Atomic and Molecular Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Chi, C. C.; Chen, Jeng-Chung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Sciences of Matters, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-21

    We investigate the effects of defect scatterings on the electric transport properties of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene by measuring the carrier density dependence of the magneto-conductivity. To clarify the dominant scattering mechanism, we perform extensive measurements on large-area samples with different mobility to exclude the edge effect. We analyze our data with the major scattering mechanisms such as short-range static scatters, short-range screened Coulomb disorders, and weak-localization (WL). We establish that the charged impurities are the predominant scatters because there is a strong correlation between the mobility and the charge impurity density. Near the charge neutral point (CNP), the electron-hole puddles that are induced by the charged impurities enhance the inter-valley scattering, which is favorable for WL observations. Away from the CNP, the charged-impurity-induced scattering is weak because of the effective screening by the charge carriers. As a result, the local static structural defects govern the charge transport. Our findings provide compelling evidence for understanding the scattering mechanisms in graphene and pave the way for the improvement of fabrication techniques to achieve high-quality CVD graphene.

  15. Hyperfine Interactions, Magnetic Impurities and Ordering in Praseodymium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Jensen, J. Z.; Wulff, M.;

    1982-01-01

    The antiferromagnetic ordering in Pr due to the coupling of the 4f electronic system to the nuclei and to magnetic Nd impurities has been studied by neutron diffraction. A pure monocrystal of Pr develops true long-range order at about 50-60 mK. The ordering in both this crystal and a PrNd alloy i...

  16. Nonlinearity and disorder: Classification and stability of nonlinear impurity modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Bang, Ole

    2001-01-01

    We study the effects produced by competition of two physical mechanisms of energy localization in inhomogeneous nonlinear systems. As an example, we analyze spatially localized modes supported by a nonlinear impurity in the generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation and describe three types of no...

  17. Dynamic and Impure Perovskite Structured Metal Oxide Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Norrman, Kion; Traulsen, Marie Lund

    2017-01-01

    on the electrode surfaces. An experimental test of the suggestion that the segregation might happen in the vacuum in the analysis equipment gave a negative result. Formation of particles containing significant amounts of S and Cr from segregation of the trace impurities in the acquired powders were observed...

  18. Analysis of Radioactive Nuclide Impurities in Potassium Pertechnetate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Xiu-feng; CHEN; Ming; SUN; Hong-qing; SUN; Xiao-yi; MA; Peng; DING; You-qian

    2015-01-01

    99Tc is a pure beta radionuclide,its half-life is 2.111×105 a,and is widely used in nuclear medicine.Potassium pertechnetate is an important material of technetium(99Tc)methylene diphosphate injection.In order to determinate the radioactive impurity content,this study established

  19. Impurity and trace tritium transport in tokamak edge turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    and locally exceeds its initial values due to the compressibility of the flow. An approximate decomposition of the impurity flux into a diffusive part and an effective convective part (characterized by a pinch velocity) is performed and a net inward pinch effect is recovered. The pinch velocity is explained...

  20. Effect of impurities in description of surface nanobubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Siddhartha; Snoeijer, Jacco H.; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Surface nanobubbles emerging at solid-liquid interfaces of submerged hydrophobic surfaces show extreme stability and very small (gas-side) contact angles. In a recent paper Ducker [ W. A. Ducker Langmuir 25 8907 (2009)]. conjectured that these effects may arise from the presence of impurities at the

  1. Effect of Impurities in Description of Surface Nanobubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Siddhartha; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    Surface nanobubbles emerging at solid-liquid interfaces of submerged hydrophobic surfaces show extreme stability and very small (gas-side) contact angles. In a recent study Ducker (W. A. Ducker, Langmuir 25, 8907 (2009).) conjectured that these effects may arise from the presence of impurities at the air-water interface of the nanobubbles. In this paper we present a quantitative analysis of this hypothesis by estimating the dependence of the contact angle and the Laplace pressure on the fraction of impurity coverage at the liquid-gas interface. We first develop a general analytical framework to estimate the effect of impurities (ionic or non-ionic) in lowering the surface tension of a given air-water interface. We then employ this model to show that the (gas-side) contact angle and the Laplace pressure across the nanobubbles indeed decrease considerably with an increase in the fractional coverage of the impurities, though still not sufficiently small to account for the observed surface nanobubble stability. T...

  2. Impurities in silicon and their impact on solar cell performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coletti, Gianluca

    2011-01-01

    Photovoltaic conversion of solar energy is a rapidly growing technology. More than 80% of global solar cell production is currently based on silicon. The aim of this thesis is to understand the complex relation between impurity content of silicon starting material (“feedstock”) and the resulting sol

  3. 40 CFR 158.340 - Discussion of formation of impurities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... its use. (v) Post-production reactions between the ingredients in the product. (vi) The possible... between the active ingredient and the production equipment. (4) Post-production reactions between any of... production or formulation process. If the applicant has reason to believe that an impurity that EPA would...

  4. Specific Activity and Impurities in Irradiated Natural Nickel Target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the specific activity of the 63Ni which is produced by irradiating natural nickel in a nuclear reactor is calculated. And in the 1 g irradiated natural nickel target, the species of the key impurity nuclides were analyzed,

  5. Controlled samples for silicon defect and impurity studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciszek, T.F. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Because of the diverse defects and impurities that are present in any given sample of silicon material, it can be extremely difficult to conduct a controlled experiment to study the influence of any particular defect or impurity on photovoltaic properties such as minority charge carrier lifetime {tau} or solar cell efficiency q. For example, the influence of iron may be different if boron is present, or the influence of silicon self interstitial clusters may be different if oxygen is present. It thus becomes important to conduct such studies on controlled samples where the influence of secondary effects is minimized. At NREL, over the past several years, we have focused on using the high-purity float-zone (FZ) growth method to obtain controlled samples. Because the silicon melt is not in contact with a container, and no heated components are in the growth region, very high purities and low defect levels can be achieved in baseline material. The baseline can be controllably perturbed by introduction of specific defects or impurities. The chart shown below lists some of the types of defect and impurity. combinations that can be studied in this way. The boxes marked with an {open_quotes}x{close_quotes} represent combinations we have studied to some extent.

  6. Quasilinear Carbon Transport In An Impurity Hole Plasma In LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, David R. [PPPL; Tanaka, K. [NIFS; Nunami, M. [NIFS; Watanabe, T-H. [Nagoya University; Sugama, H. [NIFS; Yoshinuma, M. [NIFS; Suzuki, Y. [NIFS; Goto, M. [NIFS; Morita, S. [NIFS; Wieland, B. [NIFS; Yamada, I. [NIFS; Yashura, R. [NIFS; Akiyama, T. [NIFS; Pablant, Novimir A. [PPPL

    2014-04-01

    Comprehensive electrostatic gyrokinetic linear stability calculations for ion-scale microinstabilities in an LHD plasma with an ion-ITB and carbon "impurity hole" are used to make quasilinear estimates of particle flux to explore whether microturbulence can explain the observed outward carbon fluxes that flow "up" the impurity density gradient. The ion temperature is not stationary in the ion-ITB phase of the simulated discharge, during which the core carbon density decreases continuously. To fully sample these varying conditions the calculations are carried out at three radial locations and four times. The plasma parameter inputs are based on experimentally measured profiles of electron and ion temperature, as well as electron and carbon density. The spectroscopic line-average ratio of hydrogen and helium densities is used to set the density of these species. Three ion species (H,He,C) and the electrons are treated kinetically, including collisions. Electron instability drive does enhance the growth rate significantly, but the most unstable modes have characteristics of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in all cases. As the carbon density gradient is scanned between the measured value and zero, the quasilinear carbon flux is invariably inward when the carbon density profile is hollow, so turbulent transport due to the instabilities considered here does not explain the observed outward flux of impurities in impurity hole plasmas. The stiffness of the quasilinear ion heat flux is found to be 1.7-2.3, which is lower than several estimates in tokamaks.

  7. Substitutional 4d and 5d impurities in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Lanza, Tomás; Ayuela, Andrés; Aguilera-Granja, Faustino

    2016-08-21

    We describe the structural and electronic properties of graphene doped with substitutional impurities of 4d and 5d transition metals. The adsorption energies and distances for 4d and 5d metals in graphene show similar trends for the later groups in the periodic table, which are also well-known characteristics of 3d elements. However, along earlier groups the 4d impurities in graphene show very similar adsorption energies, distances and magnetic moments to the 5d ones, which can be related to the influence of the 4d and 5d lanthanide contraction. Surprisingly, within the manganese group, the total magnetic moment of 3 μB for manganese is reduced to 1 μB for technetium and rhenium. We find that compared with 3d elements, the larger size of the 4d and 5d elements causes a high degree of hybridization with the neighbouring carbon atoms, reducing spin splitting in the d levels. It seems that the magnetic adjustment of graphene could be significantly different if 4d or 5d impurities are used instead of 3d impurities.

  8. Identification, synthesis, isolation and characterization of new impurity in metoprolol tartrate tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, R Buchi; More, Kishor R; Gupta, Leena; Jha, Mukesh S; Magar, Laki

    2016-01-05

    A new unknown impurity was observed in accelerated stability studies of Metoprolol tartrate tablets. This impurity has been identified, synthesized and characterized through different spectral studies and confirmed as an adduct of lactose and Metoprolol formed by Maillard reaction.

  9. mu. /sup +/ diffusion and trapping in high purity and oxygen-doped Nb. [Temperature dependence, 10 to 120/sup 0/K, impurity-associated traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.A.; Heffner, R.H.; Leon, M.; Parkin, D.M.; Schillaci, M.E.; Gauster, W.B.; Fiory, A.T.; Kossler, W.J.; Birnbaum, H.K.; Denison, A.B.; Cooke, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    Data are presented for the temperature dependence of the muon depolarization rate between 10 and 120 K for three samples of niobium of varying purity. Two samples, each containing approximately 200 ppM substitutional Ta and interstitial concentrations of 10 ppM and 560 ppM (mostly O), respectively, were studied. A third sample containing only 3 ppM Ta and an estimated 10 ppM total interstitial impurities was also measured. The results indicate that even at the lowest temperatures studied the depolarization of the muon is dominated by traps associated with impurities. 9 references.

  10. Biological and chemical interactions excelerating the removal of impurities from fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štyriaková Iveta

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The mesophilic bacteria were isolated from the deposit of fly ash in Chalmová (Slovakia and identified using the BBL identification system. Bacillus cereus was the dominant species in this deposit of aluminosilicate minerals. Under laboratory conditions , Bacillus cereus accelerated the extraction of major and trace impurities in fly ash during bioleaching processes. This process was dependent on bacterial adhesion and production of organic acids. The effect of organic acids produced by bacteria was detected especially in sites where impregnated metals were found in the aluminosilicate structure. Amorphous spherical aluminosilicate particles in allotriomorphic aluminosilicate grains represent a main mineral component of fly-ash in which also elements such as Fe, Ti, Mn, As are bound. The rate of mobilization of Al, Si and Ti from coal fly ash under biochemically relevant conditions in vitro was previously shown to depend on the quantity of the ash microspheres. The qualitative EDS analyse of leachates confirmed the extraction of toxic elements (As and Mn from the initial sample of fly ash.Heterotrophic bacteria of Bacillus genus are capable to remove impurities from deposited fly-ash. A long-term deposition of energy fly-ash causes chemical and mineralogical changes as a result of weathering processes. Depending on the composition of coal concentrate containing SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO and other oxides, fly ash can provide a useful preliminary batch for the preparation of glass-ceramics or zeolite after extracting of bacterially dissolved elements from it. The mobility of major impurities (Ca and Fe and heavy metals, caused by biochemical leaching of fly ash, suggests the possibility of the development of an alternative way of this raw material treatment. The advantage of bioleaching is relatively low cost and the subsequent low demand for energy compared with conventional technologies.

  11. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chernov, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Magee, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  12. Detection, isolation and characterization of principle synthetic route indicative impurity in telmisartan

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, V.; Sivaramakrishnan, H.; Karthikeyan, B

    2016-01-01

    An unknown impurity was detected in the telmisartan bulk drug (active pharmaceutical ingredient – API) using an isocratic reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This impurity was isolated by preparative HPLC. Spectral data of the isolated impurity were collected. Based on the spectral data deriving from two dimensional nuclear magnetic spectroscopy (2D-NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS), the impurity was characterized as “methyl 4′,4′-dibromo methyl biphenyl-2-carboxylate”...

  13. Investigation of Impurity Ion Transport with Laser Blow-off in HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Zheng-Ying; DONG Yun-Bo; DENG Wei; YANG Qing-Wei; DING Xuan-Tong; HUANG Yuan; SUN Ping; ZHENG Yong-Zhen; SHI Pei-Lan; LU Jie; FU Bing-Zhong; ZHANG Peng; PAN Yu-Dong

    2006-01-01

    @@ Non-recycling impurities are injected into ohmic HL-2A plasma for the first time. The impurities of titanium and aluminium are injected in the discharges with varying plasma density and current. The convection and diffusion process of the injected impurity ions during the inward phase are qualitatively investigated. The results show that the transport of impurities is much slower in the central region of the plasma than outside of it and that it is greatly enhanced during sawtooth crashes.

  14. A Study on Behavior of Inorganic Impurities in Water-tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumazawa, Takao; Nakagawa, Wataru; Tsurumaru, Hidekazu

    It is well known that water-tree propagation in XLPE cable is significantly influenced by inorganic impurities in water. Therefore, we investigated both changes in concentration and deviation of isotopic content of inorganic elements in XLPE samples by water-tree experiments under clean environment. The concentration of several kinds of elements, e.g., Li, Na, Mg, Al, K, Ca, Fe, Ni, Pb and Bi, in water-treed sample showed anomalous increase or decrease dependent on cation (K+, Na+ or Ag+) in water solution compared with blank or original sample. Furthermore, the isotopic content of Zn deviated over 6% from natural abundance. These results suggest that water-tree propagation is concerned with unknown physical or electro-chemical reactions.

  15. Analysis of metal radioisotope impurities generated in [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O during the cyclotron production of fluorine-18

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillies, J.M. [Cancer Research-UK/UMIST Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jgillies@picr.man.ac.uk; Najim, N. [Cancer Research-UK/UMIST Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom); Zweit, J. [Cancer Research-UK/UMIST Radiochemical Targeting and Imaging Group, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX (United Kingdom); School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences, University of Manchester, P.O. Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-15

    We show the separation of metal radioistope impurities using capillary electrophoresis (CE). The methodology used is an improvement of existent protocols for separation of stable metal ions. Production of fluorine-18 using [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O-enriched water encased in a titanium target body results in the production of several metal radioisotope impurities. Optimisation of the conditions for CE separation of the metal radioisotope impurities incorporated the use of 6 mM 18-Crown-6 in combination with 12 mM glycolic acid as complexing agents within the running buffer (10 mM pyridine, pH 4.0). Using this optimised procedure, we were able to separate and detect a number of metal radioisotopes, including chromium, cobalt, manganese, vanadium and berillium, within the fM concentration range.

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of Process-Related Impurities of Antihypertensive Drug Olmesartan Medoxomil

    OpenAIRE

    Venkanna, G.; Madhusudhan, G.; K. Mukkanti; A. Sankar; Sampath Kumar, Y.; G. Venakata Narayana

    2013-01-01

    Olmesartan medoxomil (1) is the latest angiotensin receptor antagonist approved by the FDA for the treatment of hypertension. During the process development of olmesartan medoxomil, three process-related impurities were observed along with the final API. These impurities were identified as isopropyl olmesartan (12), dimedoxomil olmesartan (19), dibiphenyl olmesartan (17). The present work describes the synthesis and characterization of all these three impurities.

  17. Geochemical effects of impurities in CO2 on a sandstone reservoir

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, M.; Tambach, T.J.; Neele, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    In most cases, CO2 captured from power plants or large industrial sources contains impurities. As purification of the stream is energy and cost intensive it is necessary to allow a certain level of impurities. The effects of impurities on (short- and long-term) geological storage are, however, uncer

  18. Isolation, synthesis and characterization of impurities in celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyanarayana, U; Rao, D Sreenivas; Kumar, Y Ravindra; Babu, J Moses; Kumar, P Rajender; Reddy, J Tirupathi

    2004-06-29

    During the impurity profile of Celecoxib, four polar impurities (impurity I, II, III and IV) and one non-polar impurity (impurity V) with respect to Celecoxib were detected by HPLC. LC-MS has been employed in this impurity profile study. The three polar impurities (I, II and III) were found to be process related while impurities (IV and V) turned out to be isomers. The impurities III, IV and V were isolated with the help of preparative HPLC. The structure of impurities III, IV (ortho-isomer) and V (regio-isomer) were confirmed as [5-(4-methylphenyl)-3-trifluoromethyl-1H-pyrazole], 4-[5-(2'-methyl phenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl] benzenesulfonamide, and 4-[4-(4'-methylphenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-pyrazol-1-yl]-benzenesulfonamide, respectively. The structures of impurities I, II, III and IV were confirmed by synthesis and structural characterization using spectral data. However, the impurity V was not synthesized.

  19. Screening of potentially genotoxic impurities in pharmaceuticals by LC-MS and CE-MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Every day we are at risk for exposure to toxic components present in the environment and in food. Also medicines may contain traces of potentially genotoxic impurities (PGI), resulting from residues of process impurities or degradation.The presence of well-defined functional groups in impurities is

  20. Synthesis, Isolation and Characterization of Process-Related Impurities in Salbutamol Sulphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Kumar Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Three known and one unknown impurities in salbutamol sulphate bulk drug at level 0.1% (ranging from 0.05-0.1% were detected by gradient reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. These impurities were preliminarily identified by the mass number of the impurities. Different experiments were conducted and finally synthesized and characterized the known and unknown imputities.

  1. Impurity-induced host-lattice vacancies in metals and interstitial alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugaev, V.M.; Tatarenko, V.A.; Tsynman, C.L.; Yanchitskii, B.Z. [G.V. Kurdyumov Institute for Metal Physics, Kyyiv (Ukraine). Dept. of Solid State Theory; Maksimchuk, I.M.; Tkachenko, V.G. [I.M. Frantsevich Institute for Problems in Materials Science, Kyyiv (Ukraine)

    1999-02-01

    The concentration of site vacancies ({nu}) is analysed as a function of the concentration of interstitial nonmetallic (X) atoms inside cubic-metal (Me) crystals. Its increasing dependence is established. The {nu} concentration may exceed the concentration of thermally activated vacancies in the `pure` F.C.C.-Me at the same temperature and over a wide interval of X-concentration. Factors assisting the formation of such X-induced {nu} are the following: (1) a strong repulsion of interstitial X-atoms and site Me-cations (2) a sufficient solubility of X-atoms (or clustering that leads to their local accumulation in interstices). On the contrary, an application of the pressure decreases the content of the impurity-induced {nu}. An influence of such {nu} on instability of alloys, that may lead to their polymorphic transformations, is considered. A monotonously increasing dependence is established for the {nu} concentration as a function of H concentration in F.C.C.-Fe. The {gamma}*-phase of F.C.C.-Fe--H is expected to be enriched with vacancies at high H-doping levels. For instance, that is important as a precursor effect of spontaneous deformation (`quasi-liquid state`) near the F.C.C. to B.C.C.-Fe transformation in H atmosphere. (author)

  2. The effect of impurities on the performance of lithium intended for lithium/thionyl chloride battery manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, W. P.; Hampson, N. A.; Packer, R. K.

    The elemental impurities in four different, commercially-available lithium samples have been determined. Cells consisting of these lithium samples as anodes and pressed acetylene black as cathodes were discharged at 20 °C and at 70 °C at a rate of 50 mA cm -2. The passivating films remaining on the lithium surface after discharge were examined using electron microscopy and their elemental compositions determined using the surface sensitive technique of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Performance characteristics (voltage and capacity) of test cells consisting, in part, of the different lithium samples are discussed in terms of impurity concentrations determined by secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The permeability and electronic conductivity of the LiCl passivating films are adduced as two possible reasons for the variations in capacity and on-load voltage of the different lithium samples.

  3. Evaluation of alcohol content and metal impurities in liquid dietary supplements by sHSS-GC-FID and GFAAS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mornar, Ana; Sertić, Miranda; Amidžić Klarić, Daniela; Klarić, Ilija; Stipanović, Ksenija; Nigović, Biljana

    2016-11-15

    Despite efforts by many dietary supplements' manufactures to reduce or replace ethanol, many products containing ethanol in concentrations up to 70% are available on market. Furthermore, botanical dietary supplements can vary in metal content as a function of the environment, processing equipment and product containers. Therefore, the aim of study was to develop a new rapid and highly sensitive method for simultaneous determination of ethanol and its impurities in dietary supplements by sHSS-GC-FID technique. In addition, contamination with metals by GFAAS technique was evaluated. The proposed sHSS-GC-FID method was successfully applied for analysis of 93 samples containing various amounts of ethanol. It should be highlighted that the dramatic variation from manufacture's claims was found in even one third of products. Furthermore, high amounts of ethanol were found in several products especially designed for children and in one product labeled as "alcohol-free". Metal impurities were below the limits established by USP.

  4. The Effect of Nonmagnetic Impurities on Phase-Transition Kinetics and Correlation Effects in a Quasi-1D Ising Nanomagnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabunina, E. V.; Spirin, D. V.; Popov, A. A.; Udodov, V. N.; Potekaev, A. I.

    2013-05-01

    Using a Monte Carlo simulation, the effect of external field, temperature, system's dimensions and interaction of non-nearest neighbors on the relaxation time and critical indices of an antiferromagnetic-to-ferromagnetic phase transition is investigated taking into account nonmagnetic impurities within a modified, onedimensional, nanosized Ising model. It is shown that the non-equilibrium processes taking place in the magnetic material could be classified as fast and slow, whose velocities differ by more than a thousand times. In the case of fast processes, metastable (including ferromagnetic) states (observed experimentally) are the first to form, while in the case of slow processes the system transits into a stable state. The behavior of the dynamic critical exponent ( z) and static correlation-length critical exponent ( ν) is revealed for the model of a 1D ferromagnetic for the case of arbitrary concentrations of nonmagnetic impurities.

  5. MOS Capacitance-Voltage Characteristics Ⅱ.Sensitivity of Electronic Trapping at Dopant Impurity from Parameter Variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Binbin; Sah Chihtang

    2011-01-01

    Low-frequency and high-frequency Capacitance-Voltage(C V)curves of Metal OxideSemiconductor Capacitors(MOSC),including electron and hole trapping at the dopant donor and acceptor impurities,are presented to illustrate giant trapping capacitances,from > 0.01Cox to > 10Cox.Five device and materials parameters are varied for fundamental trapping parameter characterization,and electrical and optical signal processing applications.Parameters include spatially constant concentration of the dopant-donor-impurity electron trap,NDD,the ground state electron trapping energy level depth measured from the conduction band edge,EC-ED,the degeneracy of the trapped electron at the ground state,gD,the device temperature,T,and the gate oxide thickness,xox.

  6. Final Technical Report: Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Hector Colon-Mercado; Kitiya Hongsirikarn; and Jack Z. Zhang

    2011-11-11

    The main objectives of this project were to investigate the effect of a series of potential impurities on fuel cell operation and on the particular components of the fuel cell MEA, to propose (where possible) mechanism(s) by which these impurities affected fuel cell performance, and to suggest strategies for minimizing these impurity effects. The negative effect on Pt/C was to decrease hydrogen surface coverage and hydrogen activation at fuel cell conditions. The negative effect on Nafion components was to decrease proton conductivity, primarily by replacing/reacting with the protons on the Bronsted acid sites of the Nafion. Even though already well known as fuel cell poisons, the effects of CO and NH3 were studied in great detail early on in the project in order to develop methodology for evaluating poisoning effects in general, to help establish reproducibility of results among a number of laboratories in the U.S. investigating impurity effects, and to help establish lower limit standards for impurities during hydrogen production for fuel cell utilization. New methodologies developed included (1) a means to measure hydrogen surface concentration on the Pt catalyst (HDSAP) before and after exposure to impurities, (2) a way to predict conductivity of a Nafion membranes exposed to impurities using a characteristic acid catalyzed reaction (methanol esterification of acetic acid), and, more importantly, (3) application of the latter technique to predict conductivity on Nafion in the catalyst layer of the MEA. H2-D2 exchange was found to be suitable for predicting hydrogen activation of Pt catalysts. The Nafion (ca. 30 wt%) on the Pt/C catalyst resides primarily on the external surface of the C support where it blocks significant numbers of micropores, but only partially blocks the pore openings of the meso- and macro-pores wherein lie the small Pt particles (crystallites). For this reason, even with 30 wt% Nafion on the Pt/C, few Pt sites are blocked and, hence, are

  7. Final Technical Report: Effects of Impurities on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Hector Colon-Mercado; Kitiya Hongsirikarn; and Jack Z. Zhang

    2011-11-11

    The main objectives of this project were to investigate the effect of a series of potential impurities on fuel cell operation and on the particular components of the fuel cell MEA, to propose (where possible) mechanism(s) by which these impurities affected fuel cell performance, and to suggest strategies for minimizing these impurity effects. The negative effect on Pt/C was to decrease hydrogen surface coverage and hydrogen activation at fuel cell conditions. The negative effect on Nafion components was to decrease proton conductivity, primarily by replacing/reacting with the protons on the Bronsted acid sites of the Nafion. Even though already well known as fuel cell poisons, the effects of CO and NH3 were studied in great detail early on in the project in order to develop methodology for evaluating poisoning effects in general, to help establish reproducibility of results among a number of laboratories in the U.S. investigating impurity effects, and to help establish lower limit standards for impurities during hydrogen production for fuel cell utilization. New methodologies developed included (1) a means to measure hydrogen surface concentration on the Pt catalyst (HDSAP) before and after exposure to impurities, (2) a way to predict conductivity of a Nafion membranes exposed to impurities using a characteristic acid catalyzed reaction (methanol esterification of acetic acid), and, more importantly, (3) application of the latter technique to predict conductivity on Nafion in the catalyst layer of the MEA. H2-D2 exchange was found to be suitable for predicting hydrogen activation of Pt catalysts. The Nafion (ca. 30 wt%) on the Pt/C catalyst resides primarily on the external surface of the C support where it blocks significant numbers of micropores, but only partially blocks the pore openings of the meso- and macro-pores wherein lie the small Pt particles (crystallites). For this reason, even with 30 wt% Nafion on the Pt/C, few Pt sites are blocked and, hence, are

  8. Experimental Characterization of the Poisoning Effects of Methanol-Based Reformate Impurities on a PBI-Based High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Simon Araya

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work the effects of reformate gas impurities on a H3PO4-doped polybenzimidazole (PBI membrane-based high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC are studied. A unit cell assembly with a BASF Celtec®-P2100 high temperature membrane electrode assembly (MEA of 45 cm2 active surface area is investigated by means of impedance spectroscopy. The concentrations in the anode feed gas of all impurities, unconverted methanol-water vapor mixture, CO and CO2 were varied along with current density according to a multilevel factorial design of experiments. Results show that all the impurities degrade the performance, with CO being the most degrading agent and CO2 the least. The factorial analysis shows that there is interdependence among the effects of the different factors considered. This interdependence suggests, for example, that tolerances to concentrations of CO above 2% may be compromised by the presence in the anode feed of CO2. Methanol has a poisoning effect on the fuel cell at all the tested feed ratios, and the performance drop is found to be proportional to the amount of methanol in feed gas. The effects are more pronounced when other impurities are also present in the feed gas, especially at higher methanol concentrations.

  9. Universal temperature dependence, flux extinction, and the role of 3He impurities in superfluid mass transport through solid 4He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekhov, Ye; Mullin, W J; Hallock, R B

    2014-07-18

    The mass flux, F, carried by as-grown solid (4)He in the range 25.6-26.3 bar rises with falling temperature, and at a concentration-dependent temperature, T(d), the flux decreases sharply within a few mK. We study F as a function of (3)He impurity concentration, χ. We find that T(d) is an increasing function of increasing χ. At temperatures above T(d) the flux has a universal temperature dependence and the flux terminates in a narrow window near a characteristic temperature T(h) ≈ 625 mK, which is independent of χ.

  10. Infrared Response of Impurity Doped Silicon MOSFET’s (IRFET’S): Gold, Indium, and Gallium Doped and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-11-01

    cooled to room temperature. The resulting gold concentration of approximately 2 x 10l5 cm-3 corresponds to the results of previous work with bulk silicon...on (100) orientation silicon p-type substrate of 1-2nScm resistivity and doped with a gold concentration of 2 x 101 cm 3 . The gate oxide of the MOSFET...intrinsic and highly resistive even at room temperature. As a consequence the gold-doped devices are of the type NI<NA, or have anI: impurity or gold

  11. The Gibbs-Thomson effect and intergranular melting in ice emulsions: Interpreting the anomalous heat capacity and volume of supercooled water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G. P.

    1997-12-01

    Calculations for the Gibbs-Thomson effect and the intergranular melting of the ice droplets in (water) emulsions at temperatures below 273.16 K show that water and ice coexist at thermodynamic equilibrium in an apparently frozen emulsion. The fraction of water at this equilibrium increases on heating, which alters further the thermodynamic properties of the emulsion. As some of the ice in the emulsion has already melted, the increase in the enthalpy, H, and heat capacity, Cp, and the decrease in the volume measured on the normal melting at 273.16 K, are less than the values anticipated. The ratio of this increase in H, or Cp, on melting of the emulsion to the corresponding value for pure ice, underestimates the emulsion's water content which, when used for scaling the difference between the Cp of the unfrozen and frozen emulsion at lower temperatures, as in earlier studies, leads to a larger Cp of supercooled water than the actual value. Similar scaling of the corresponding difference between the volume leads to higher volume, or lower density, than the actual value. A formalism for this premelting effect is given for both the adiabatic and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and its magnitude is calculated. New experiments show that the rise in the DSC signal, or equivalently in the apparent Cp observed on heating the frozen emulsion, occurs over a temperature range much wider than the Gibbs-Thomson effect and intergranular melting predict, for which reasons are given. It is shown that Cp of the dispersant phase is also affected by the melting of ice droplets. There are four consequences of the premelting effects for all finely dispersed materials, for frozen water emulsions below 273.16 K: (i) water and ice coexist in the emulsion, (ii) its apparent Cp will increase with increase in the heat input used to measure it, (iii) the apparent Cp will increase with decrease in the average size of the droplets, and (iv) the apparent Cp will decrease on annealing the

  12. Impurity incorporation in orientation patterned GaAs grown by low pressure HVPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snure, M.; Jiménez, J.; Hortelano, V.; Swider, S.; Mann, M.; Tassev, V.; Lynch, C.; Bliss, D.

    2012-08-01

    Orientation-patterned GaAs (OP-GaAs) has shown promise as an efficient frequency-shifted laser source over the range of 2-12 μm. In order to make OP-GaAs a viable source, efficiency and output power must be significantly increased, which requires minimizing major sources of loss. Low pressure HVPE has been adopted as the most suitable technique for regrowth of thick high quality GaAs layers on OP templates. We have explored process parameters in bulk and OP material to identify and control the sources of point defects, a key contributor to optical losses. Growth on OP templates with periodic [001] and [00-1] domains results in domain specific surface orientation, which should have inhomogeneous defect incorporation. Hall measurements, SIMS depth profiling, and cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to identify point defects in bulk and OP-GaAs. It was found that Si impurities are the primary source of donors, while VGa were identified as the primary source of acceptors. In order to study the incorporation of impurities in OP-GaAs samples, we intentionally doped samples with Si to increase CL and SIMS detectability. Spatially resolved CL and SIMS revealed regions with significant differences in the defect concentration, which can affect device output.

  13. Luminescence and electrophysical characteristics of ZnSe implanted with acceptor impurities

    CERN Document Server

    Georgobiani, A N; Dravin, V A; Lepnev, L S; Mullabaev, I D; Ursaki, V V; Iljukhina, Z P

    1999-01-01

    The investigation of traps and recombination centres in structures based on ZnSe single crystals by means of the deep level transient spectroscopy, photoluminescence and electroluminescence methods are presented. The implantation of Ag sup + , Au sup + and N sup + ions was used for the creation of these centres. The activation energies equal to 0.26, 0.35 and 0.86 eV were determined from the temperature dependencies of the carriers emission rate from DLTS spectra for majority carriers (electrons). The levels 0.42 and 0.26 eV were observed only in the samples implanted with Ag and Au, respectively. In the case of minority carriers (holes), in all the diodes produced by Ag sup + ions implantation, the depth of the trap was 0.30 eV. Traps with a depth of about 0.72 eV were observed independently on various kind of impurities. In all the cases when these impurities are used together with nitrogen a hole trap with a depth of 0.47 eV is observed. The concentrations and capture cross-sections of the centres were cal...

  14. Effects of the impurity-host interactions on the nonradiative processes in ZnS:Cr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tablero, C.

    2010-11-01

    There is a great deal of controversy about whether the behavior of an intermediate band in the gap of semiconductors is similar or not to the deep-gap levels. It can have significant consequences, for example, on the nonradiative recombination. In order to analyze the behavior of an intermediate band, we have considered the effect of the inward and outward displacements corresponding to breathing and longitudinal modes of Cr-doped ZnS and on the charge density for different processes involved in the nonradiative recombination using first-principles. This metal-doped zinc chalcogenide has a partially filled band within the host semiconductor gap. In contrast to the properties exhibited by deep-gap levels in other systems, we find small variations in the equilibrium configurations, forces, and electronic density around the Cr when the nonradiative recombination mechanisms modify the intermediate band charge. The charge density around the impurity is equilibrated in response to the perturbations in the equilibrium nuclear configuration and the charge of the intermediate band. The equilibration follows a Le Chatelier principle through the modification of the contribution from the impurity to the intermediate band and to the valence band. The intermediate band introduced by Cr in ZnS for the concentrations analyzed makes the electronic capture difficult and later multiphonon emission in the charge-transfer processes, in accordance with experimental results.

  15. Enhanced spin Hall ratios by Al and Hf impurities in Pt thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Minh-Hai; Zhao, Mengnan; Ralph, Daniel C.; Buhrman, Robert A.

    The spin Hall effect (SHE) in Pt has been reported to be strong and hence promising for spintronic applications. In the intrinsic SHE mechanism, which has been shown to be dominant in Pt, the spin Hall conductivity σSH is constant, dependent only on the band structure of the spin Hall material. The spin Hall ratio θSH =σSH . ρ , on the other hand, should be proportional to the electrical resistivity ρ of the spin Hall layer. This suggests the possibility of enhancing the spin Hall ratio by introducing additional diffusive scattering to increase the electrical resistivity of the spin Hall layer. Our previous work has shown that this could be done by increasing the surface scattering by growing thinner Pt films in contact with higher resistivity materials such as Ta. In this talk, we discuss another approach: to introduce impurities of metals with negligible spin orbit torque into the Pt film. Our PtAl and PtHf alloy samples exhibit strong enhancement of the spin Hall torque efficiency with impurity concentration due to increased electrical resistivity. Supported in part by Samsung Electronics.

  16. Impurity-free quantum well intermixing for large optical cavity high-power laser diode structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Abdullah; Gür, Emre; Aydınlı, Atilla

    2016-08-01

    We report on the correlation of atomic concentration profiles of diffusing species with the blueshift of the quantum well luminescence from both as-grown and impurity free quantum wells intermixed on actual large optical cavity high power laser diode structures. Because it is critical to suppress catastrophic optical mirror damage, sputtered SiO2 and thermally evaporated SrF2 were used both to enhance and suppress quantum well intermixing, respectively, in these (Al)GaAs large optical cavity structures. A luminescence blueshift of 55 nm (130 meV) was obtained for samples with 400 nm thick sputtered SiO2. These layers were used to generate point defects by annealing the samples at 950 °C for 3 min. The ensuing Ga diffusion observed as a shifting front towards the surface at the interface of the GaAs cap and AlGaAs cladding, as well as Al diffusion into the GaAs cap layer, correlates well with the observed luminescence blue shift, as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Although this technique is well-known, the correlation between the photoluminescence peak blue shift and diffusion of Ga and Al during impurity free quantum well intermixing on actual large optical cavity laser diode structures was demonstrated with both x ray photoelectron and photoluminescence spectroscopy, for the first time.

  17. Effect of charged impurities and morphology on oxidation reactivity of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mahito; Cullen, William; Einstein, Theodore; Fuhrer, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Chemical reactivity of single layer graphene supported on a substrate is observed to be enhanced over thicker graphene. Possible mechanisms for the enhancement are Fermi level fluctuations due to ionized impurities on the substrate, and structural deformation of graphene induced by coupling to the substrate geometry. Here, we study the substrate-dependent oxidation reactivity of graphene, employing various substrates such as SiO2, mica, SiO2 nanoparticle thin film, and hexagonal boron nitride, which exhibit different charged impurity concentrations and surface roughness. Graphene is prepared on each substrate via mechanical exfoliation and oxidized in Ar/O2 mixture at temperatures from 400-600 ^oC. After oxidation, the Raman spectrum of graphene is measured, and the Raman D to G peak ratio is used to quantify the density of point defects introduced by oxidation. We will discuss the correlations among the defect density in oxidized graphene, substrate charge inhomogeneity, substrate corrugations, and graphene layer thickness. This work has been supported by the University of Maryland NSF-MRSEC under Grant No. DMR 05-20471 with supplemental funding from NRI, and NSF-DMR 08-04976.

  18. Determination of dew point conditions for CO2 with impurities using microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wen; Fadaei, Hossein; Sinton, David

    2014-03-18

    Impurities can greatly modify the phase behavior of carbon dioxide (CO2), with significant implications on the safety and cost of transport in pipelines. In this paper we demonstrate a microfluidic approach to measure the dew point of such mixtures, specifically the point at which water in supercritical CO2 mixtures condenses to a liquid state. The method enables direct visualization of dew formation (∼ 1-2 μm diameter droplets) at industrially relevant concentrations, pressures, and temperatures. Dew point measurements for the well-studied case of pure CO2-water agreed well with previous theoretical and experimental data over the range of pressure (up to 13.17 MPa), temperature (up to 50 °C), and water content (down to 0.00229 mol fraction) studied. The microfluidic approach showed a nearly 3-fold reduction in error as compared to previous methods. When applied to a mixture with nitrogen (2.5%) and oxygen (5.8%) impurities--typical of flue gas from natural gas oxy-fuel combustion processes--the measured dew point pressure increased on average 17.55 ± 5.4%, indicating a more stringent minimum pressure for pipeline transport. In addition to increased precision, the microfluidic method offers a direct measurement of dew formation, requires very small volumes (∼ 10 μL), and is applicable to ultralow water contents (<0.005 mol fractions), circumventing the limits of previous methods.

  19. A-centers and isovalent impurities in germanium: Density functional theory calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chroneos, A., E-mail: alexander.chroneos@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Londos, C.A. [University of Athens, Solid State Physics Section, Panepistimiopolis Zografos, Athens 157 84 (Greece); Bracht, H. [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

    2011-03-25

    In the present study density functional theory calculations have been used to calculate the binding energies of clusters formed between lattice vacancies, oxygen and isovalent atoms in germanium. In particular we concentrated on the prediction of binding energies of A-centers or oxygen interstitials that are at nearest and next nearest neighbor sites to isovalent impurities (carbon, silicon and tin) in germanium. The A-center is an oxygen interstitial atom near a lattice vacancy and is an important impurity-defect pair in germanium. In germanium doped with carbon or silicon, we calculated that most of the binding energy of the cluster formed between A-centers and the carbon or silicon atoms is due to the interaction between the oxygen interstitial atom and the carbon or silicon atoms. For tin-doped germanium most of the binding energy is due to the interaction of the oversized tin atom and the lattice vacancy, which essentially provide space for tin to relax. The nearest neighbor carbon-oxygen interstitial and the silicon-oxygen interstitial pairs are significantly bound, whereas the tin-oxygen interstitial pairs are not. The results are discussed in view of analogous investigations in isovalently doped silicon.

  20. Tuning third harmonic generation of impurity doped quantum dots in the presence of Gaussian white noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Surajit; Ghosh, Manas

    2016-03-01

    We perform a broad exploration of profiles of third harmonic generation (THG) susceptibility of impurity doped quantum dots (QDs) in the presence and absence of noise. We have invoked Gaussian white noise in the present study. A Gaussian impurity has been introduced into the QD. Noise has been applied to the system additively and multiplicatively. A perpendicular magnetic field emerges out as a confinement source and a static external electric field has been applied. The THG profiles have been pursued as a function of incident photon energy when several important parameters such as electric field strength, magnetic field strength, confinement energy, dopant location, Al concentration, dopant potential, relaxation time and noise strength assume different values. Moreover, the role of the pathway through which noise is applied (additive/multiplicative) on the THG profiles has also been deciphered. The THG profiles are found to be decorated with interesting observations such as shift of THG peak position and maximization/minimization of THG peak intensity. Presence of noise alters the characteristics of THG profiles and sometimes enhances the THG peak intensity. Furthermore, the mode of application of noise (additive/multiplicative) also regulates the THG profiles in a few occasions in contrasting manners. The observations highlight the possible scope of tuning the THG coefficient of doped QD systems in the presence of noise and bears tremendous technological importance.