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Sample records for interfering rnas directed

  1. Interfering Satellite RNAs of Bamboo mosaic virus

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    Kuan-Yu Lin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Satellite RNAs (satRNAs are sub-viral agents that may interact with their cognate helper virus (HV and host plant synergistically and/or antagonistically. SatRNAs totally depend on the HV for replication, so satRNAs and HV usually evolve similar secondary or tertiary RNA structures that are recognized by a replication complex, although satRNAs and HV do not share an appreciable sequence homology. The satRNAs of Bamboo mosaic virus (satBaMV, the only satRNAs of the genus Potexvirus, have become one of the models of how satRNAs can modulate HV replication and virus-induced symptoms. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction of interfering satBaMV and BaMV. Like other satRNAs, satBaMV mimics the secondary structures of 5′- and 3′-untranslated regions (UTRs of BaMV as a molecular pretender. However, a conserved apical hairpin stem loop (AHSL in the 5′-UTR of satBaMV was found as the key determinant for downregulating BaMV replication. In particular, two unique nucleotides (C60 and C83 in the AHSL of satBaMVs determine the satBaMV interference ability by competing for the replication machinery. Thus, transgenic plants expressing interfering satBaMV could confer resistance to BaMV, and interfering satBaMV could be used as biological-control agent. Unlike two major anti-viral mechanisms, RNA silencing and salicylic acid-mediated immunity, our findings in plants by in vivo competition assay and RNA deep sequencing suggested replication competition is involved in this transgenic satBaMV-mediated BaMV interference. We propose how a single nucleotide of satBaMV can make a great change in BaMV pathogenicity and the underlying mechanism.

  2. Molecular Basis for the Immunostimulatory Potency of Small Interfering RNAs

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    Mouldy Sioud

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs represent a new class of antigene agents, which has emerged as a powerful tool for functional genomics and might serve as a potent therapeutic approach. However, several studies have showed that they could trigger several bystander effects, including immune activation and inhibition of unintended target genes. Although activation of innate immunity by siRNAs might be beneficial for therapy in some instances, uncontrolled activation can be toxic, and is therefore a major challenging problem. Interestingly, replacement of uridines in siRNA sequences with their 2′-modified counterparts abrogated siRNA bystander effects. Here we highlight these important findings that are expected to facilitate the rational design of siRNAs that avoid the induction of bystander effects.

  3. Combinatorial delivery of small interfering RNAs reduces RNAi efficacy by selective incorporation into RISC

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    Castanotto, Daniela; Sakurai, Kumi; Lingeman, Robert; Li, Haitang; Shively, Louise; Aagaard, Lars; Soifer, Harris; Gatignol, Anne; Riggs, Arthur; Rossi, John J.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the great potential of RNAi, ectopic expression of shRNA or siRNAs holds the inherent risk of competition for critical RNAi components, thus altering the regulatory functions of some cellular microRNAs. In addition, specific siRNA sequences can potentially hinder incorporation of other siRNAs when used in a combinatorial approach. We show that both synthetic siRNAs and expressed shRNAs compete against each other and with the endogenous microRNAs for transport and for incorporation into the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC). The same siRNA sequences do not display competition when expressed from a microRNA backbone. We also show that TAR RNA binding protein (TRBP) is one of the sensors for selection and incorporation of the guide sequence of interfering RNAs. These findings reveal that combinatorial siRNA approaches can be problematic and have important implications for the methodology of expression and use of therapeutic interfering RNAs. PMID:17660190

  4. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

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    Noah Fahlgren

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  5. Phytophthora have distinct endogenous small RNA populations that include short interfering and microRNAs.

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    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R; Kasschau, Kristin D; Cuperus, Josh T; Press, Caroline M; Sullivan, Christopher M; Chapman, Elisabeth J; Hoyer, J Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Carrington, James C

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work.

  6. Phytophthora Have Distinct Endogenous Small RNA Populations That Include Short Interfering and microRNAs

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    Fahlgren, Noah; Bollmann, Stephanie R.; Kasschau, Kristin D.; Cuperus, Josh T.; Press, Caroline M.; Sullivan, Christopher M.; Chapman, Elisabeth J.; Hoyer, J. Steen; Gilbert, Kerrigan B.; Grünwald, Niklaus J.; Carrington, James C.

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotes, RNA silencing pathways utilize 20-30-nucleotide small RNAs to regulate gene expression, specify and maintain chromatin structure, and repress viruses and mobile genetic elements. RNA silencing was likely present in the common ancestor of modern eukaryotes, but most research has focused on plant and animal RNA silencing systems. Phytophthora species belong to a phylogenetically distinct group of economically important plant pathogens that cause billions of dollars in yield losses annually as well as ecologically devastating outbreaks. We analyzed the small RNA-generating components of the genomes of P. infestans, P. sojae and P. ramorum using bioinformatics, genetic, phylogenetic and high-throughput sequencing-based methods. Each species produces two distinct populations of small RNAs that are predominantly 21- or 25-nucleotides long. The 25-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from loci encoding transposable elements and we propose that these small RNAs define a pathway of short-interfering RNAs that silence repetitive genetic elements. The 21-nucleotide small RNAs were primarily derived from inverted repeats, including a novel microRNA family that is conserved among the three species, and several gene families, including Crinkler effectors and type III fibronectins. The Phytophthora microRNA is predicted to target a family of amino acid/auxin permeases, and we propose that 21-nucleotide small RNAs function at the post-transcriptional level. The functional significance of microRNA-guided regulation of amino acid/auxin permeases and the association of 21-nucleotide small RNAs with Crinkler effectors remains unclear, but this work provides a framework for testing the role of small RNAs in Phytophthora biology and pathogenesis in future work. PMID:24204767

  7. Efficient and specific gene knockdown by small interfering RNAs produced in bacteria

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    Huang, Linfeng; Jin, Jingmin; Deighan, Padraig; Kiner, Evgeny; McReynolds, Larry; Lieberman, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are an indispensable tool to investigate gene function in eukaryotic cells1,2 and may be used for therapeutic purposes to knockdown genes implicated in disease3. Thus far, most synthetic siRNAs have been produced by chemical synthesis. Here we present a method to produce highly potent siRNAs in E. coli. This method relies on ectopic expression of p19, a siRNA-binding protein found in a plant RNA virus4, 5. When expressed in E. coli, p19 stabilizes ~21 nt siRNA-like species produced by bacterial RNase III. Transfection of mammalian cells with siRNAs, generated in bacteria expressing p19 and a hairpin RNA encoding 200 or more nucleotides of a target gene, at low nanomolar concentrations reproducibly knocks down gene expression by ~90% without immunogenicity or off-target effects. Because bacterially produced siRNAs contain multiple sequences against a target gene, they may be especially useful for suppressing polymorphic cellular or viral genes. PMID:23475073

  8. Amides are excellent mimics of phosphate internucleoside linkages and are well tolerated in short interfering RNAs.

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    Mutisya, Daniel; Selvam, Chelliah; Lunstad, Benjamin D; Pallan, Pradeep S; Haas, Amanda; Leake, Devin; Egli, Martin; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an important tool in functional genomics and has an intriguing therapeutic potential. However, the current design of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is not optimal for in vivo applications. Non-ionic phosphate backbone modifications may have the potential to improve the properties of siRNAs, but are little explored in RNAi technologies. Using X-ray crystallography and RNAi activity assays, the present study demonstrates that 3'-CH2-CO-NH-5' amides are excellent replacements for phosphodiester internucleoside linkages in RNA. The crystal structure shows that amide-modified RNA forms a typical A-form duplex. The amide carbonyl group points into the major groove and assumes an orientation that is similar to the P-OP2 bond in the phosphate linkage. Amide linkages are well hydrated by tandem waters linking the carbonyl group and adjacent phosphate oxygens. Amides are tolerated at internal positions of both the guide and passenger strand of siRNAs and may increase the silencing activity when placed near the 5'-end of the passenger strand. As a result, an siRNA containing eight amide linkages is more active than the unmodified control. The results suggest that RNAi may tolerate even more extensive amide modification, which may be useful for optimization of siRNAs for in vivo applications. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Amides are excellent mimics of phosphate internucleoside linkages and are well tolerated in short interfering RNAs

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    Mutisya, Daniel; Selvam, Chelliah; Lunstad, Benjamin D.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Haas, Amanda; Leake, Devin; Egli, Martin; Rozners, Eriks

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has become an important tool in functional genomics and has an intriguing therapeutic potential. However, the current design of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is not optimal for in vivo applications. Non-ionic phosphate backbone modifications may have the potential to improve the properties of siRNAs, but are little explored in RNAi technologies. Using X-ray crystallography and RNAi activity assays, the present study demonstrates that 3′-CH2-CO-NH-5′ amides are excellent replacements for phosphodiester internucleoside linkages in RNA. The crystal structure shows that amide-modified RNA forms a typical A-form duplex. The amide carbonyl group points into the major groove and assumes an orientation that is similar to the P–OP2 bond in the phosphate linkage. Amide linkages are well hydrated by tandem waters linking the carbonyl group and adjacent phosphate oxygens. Amides are tolerated at internal positions of both the guide and passenger strand of siRNAs and may increase the silencing activity when placed near the 5′-end of the passenger strand. As a result, an siRNA containing eight amide linkages is more active than the unmodified control. The results suggest that RNAi may tolerate even more extensive amide modification, which may be useful for optimization of siRNAs for in vivo applications. PMID:24813446

  10. Incorporation of osteogenic and angiogenic small interfering RNAs into chitosan sponge for bone tissue engineering

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    Jia S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Sen Jia,1,* Xinjie Yang,1,* Wen Song,2,* Lei Wang,1 Kaixiu Fang,3 Zhiqiang Hu,1,4 Zihui Yang,1 Chun Shan,1 Delin Lei,1 Bin Lu1 1Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 2Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, 3Department of Implant Dentistry, School of Stomatology, State Key Laboratory of Military Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Otorhinolaryngology, No 113 Hospital of People’s Liberation Army, Ningbo, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed to this paper equally and are considered to be joint first authors Abstract: Engineered bone substitutes are being extensively explored in response to growing demand. However, the angiogenesis that occurs during bone formation is often overlooked in scaffold design. In this novel study, we incorporated two small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, ie, small interfering RNA targets casein kinase 2 interaction protein 1 (siCkip-1 and small interfering RNA targets soluble VEGF receptor 1 (siFlt-1, which can promote osteogenesis and angiogenesis, into a chitosan sponge. This scaffold could maintain siRNAs for over 2 weeks in neutral phosphate-buffered saline and degraded rapidly in the presence of lysozyme. The chitosan sponge with siCkip-1 and siFlt-1 in vitro bioactivity was investigated using mesenchymal stem cells. Target genes were significantly suppressed, and osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and vascular endothelial growth factor were significantly upregulated. Alizarin Red staining revealed that mineralization of the extracellular matrix was markedly enhanced by dual transfection. Further analysis by immunofluorescence confirmed that the siRNA-modified scaffold simultaneously improved the expression of osteocalcin and von Willebrand factor. In vivo testing in a skull critical-size defect model showed marked bone regeneration in rats treated with siCkip-1 and siFlt-1. In conclusion, chitosan sponge containing osteogenic and

  11. Short interfering RNAs targeting a vampire-bat related rabies virus phosphoprotein mRNA.

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    Ono, Ekaterina Alexandrovna Durymanova; Taniwaki, Sueli Akemi; Brandão, Paulo

    The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro and in vivo effects of short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against rabies virus phosphoprotein (P) mRNA in a post-infection treatment for rabies as an extension of a previous report (Braz J Microbiol. 2013 Nov 15;44(3):879-82). To this end, rabies virus strain RABV-4005 (related to the Desmodus rotundus vampire bat) were used to inoculate BHK-21 cells and mice, and the transfection with each of the siRNAs was made with Lipofectamine-2000™. In vitro results showed that siRNA 360 was able to inhibit the replication of strain RABV-4005 with a 1log decrease in virus titter and 5.16-fold reduction in P mRNA, 24h post-inoculation when compared to non-treated cells. In vivo, siRNA 360 was able to induce partial protection, but with no significant difference when compared to non-treated mice. These results indicate that, despite the need for improvement for in vivo applications, P mRNA might be a target for an RNAi-based treatment for rabies. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Profile of small interfering RNAs from cotton plants infected with the polerovirus Cotton leafroll dwarf virus

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    Schrago Carlos EG

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In response to infection, viral genomes are processed by Dicer-like (DCL ribonuclease proteins into viral small RNAs (vsRNAs of discrete sizes. vsRNAs are then used as guides for silencing the viral genome. The profile of vsRNAs produced during the infection process has been extensively studied for some groups of viruses. However, nothing is known about the vsRNAs produced during infections of members of the economically important family Luteoviridae, a group of phloem-restricted viruses. Here, we report the characterization of a population of vsRNAs from cotton plants infected with Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV, a member of the genus Polerovirus, family Luteoviridae. Results Deep sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs from leaves of CLRDV-infected cotton plants revealed that the vsRNAs were 21- to 24-nucleotides (nt long and that their sequences matched the viral genome, with higher frequencies of matches in the 3- region. There were equivalent amounts of sense and antisense vsRNAs, and the 22-nt class of small RNAs was predominant. During infection, cotton Dcl transcripts appeared to be up-regulated, while Dcl2 appeared to be down-regulated. Conclusions This is the first report on the profile of sRNAs in a plant infected with a virus from the family Luteoviridae. Our sequence data strongly suggest that virus-derived double-stranded RNA functions as one of the main precursors of vsRNAs. Judging by the profiled size classes, all cotton DCLs might be working to silence the virus. The possible causes for the unexpectedly high accumulation of 22-nt vsRNAs are discussed. CLRDV is the causal agent of Cotton blue disease, which occurs worldwide. Our results are an important contribution for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in this and related diseases.

  13. Profile of small interfering RNAs from cotton plants infected with the polerovirus Cotton leafroll dwarf virus.

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    Silva, Tatiane F; Romanel, Elisson A C; Andrade, Roberto R S; Farinelli, Laurent; Østerås, Magne; Deluen, Cécile; Corrêa, Régis L; Schrago, Carlos E G; Vaslin, Maite F S

    2011-08-24

    In response to infection, viral genomes are processed by Dicer-like (DCL) ribonuclease proteins into viral small RNAs (vsRNAs) of discrete sizes. vsRNAs are then used as guides for silencing the viral genome. The profile of vsRNAs produced during the infection process has been extensively studied for some groups of viruses. However, nothing is known about the vsRNAs produced during infections of members of the economically important family Luteoviridae, a group of phloem-restricted viruses. Here, we report the characterization of a population of vsRNAs from cotton plants infected with Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), a member of the genus Polerovirus, family Luteoviridae. Deep sequencing of small RNAs (sRNAs) from leaves of CLRDV-infected cotton plants revealed that the vsRNAs were 21- to 24-nucleotides (nt) long and that their sequences matched the viral genome, with higher frequencies of matches in the 3- region. There were equivalent amounts of sense and antisense vsRNAs, and the 22-nt class of small RNAs was predominant. During infection, cotton Dcl transcripts appeared to be up-regulated, while Dcl2 appeared to be down-regulated. This is the first report on the profile of sRNAs in a plant infected with a virus from the family Luteoviridae. Our sequence data strongly suggest that virus-derived double-stranded RNA functions as one of the main precursors of vsRNAs. Judging by the profiled size classes, all cotton DCLs might be working to silence the virus. The possible causes for the unexpectedly high accumulation of 22-nt vsRNAs are discussed. CLRDV is the causal agent of Cotton blue disease, which occurs worldwide. Our results are an important contribution for understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in this and related diseases.

  14. The slicer activity of ARGONAUTE1 is required specifically for the phasing, not production, of trans-acting short interfering RNAs in Arabidopsis

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    Arribas Hernandez, Laura; Marchais, Antonin; Poulsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) mediates posttranscriptional silencing by microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAS (siRNAs). AGO1-catalyzed RNA cleavage (slicing) represses miRNA targets, but current models also highlight the roles of slicing in formation of siRNAs and siRNA-AGO1 complexes. miRNA-guided s......ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) mediates posttranscriptional silencing by microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAS (siRNAs). AGO1-catalyzed RNA cleavage (slicing) represses miRNA targets, but current models also highlight the roles of slicing in formation of siRNAs and siRNA-AGO1 complexes. mi...... is required for assembly of active AGO1-siRNA complexes in vivo, and many AGO1-bound siRNAs are trimmed in the absence of slicer activity. Remarkably, seedlings defective in AGO1 slicer activity produce abundant siRNAs from tasiRNA loci in vivo. These siRNAs depend on RDR6 and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3...

  15. Evasion of short interfering RNA-directed antiviral silencing in Musa acuminata persistently infected with six distinct banana streak pararetroviruses.

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    Rajeswaran, Rajendran; Seguin, Jonathan; Chabannes, Matthieu; Duroy, Pierre-Olivier; Laboureau, Nathalie; Farinelli, Laurent; Iskra-Caruana, Marie-Line; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2014-10-01

    Vegetatively propagated crop plants often suffer from infections with persistent RNA and DNA viruses. Such viruses appear to evade the plant defenses that normally restrict viral replication and spread. The major antiviral defense mechanism is based on RNA silencing generating viral short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that can potentially repress viral genes posttranscriptionally through RNA cleavage and transcriptionally through DNA cytosine methylation. Here we examined the RNA silencing machinery of banana plants persistently infected with six pararetroviruses after many years of vegetative propagation. Using deep sequencing, we reconstructed consensus master genomes of the viruses and characterized virus-derived and endogenous small RNAs. Consistent with the presence of endogenous siRNAs that can potentially establish and maintain DNA methylation, the banana genomic DNA was extensively methylated in both healthy and virus-infected plants. A novel class of abundant 20-nucleotide (nt) endogenous small RNAs with 5'-terminal guanosine was identified. In all virus-infected plants, 21- to 24-nt viral siRNAs accumulated at relatively high levels (up to 22% of the total small RNA population) and covered the entire circular viral DNA genomes in both orientations. The hotspots of 21-nt and 22-nt siRNAs occurred within open reading frame (ORF) I and II and the 5' portion of ORF III, while 24-nt siRNAs were more evenly distributed along the viral genome. Despite the presence of abundant viral siRNAs of different size classes, the viral DNA was largely free of cytosine methylation. Thus, the virus is able to evade siRNA-directed DNA methylation and thereby avoid transcriptional silencing. This evasion of silencing likely contributes to the persistence of pararetroviruses in banana plants. We report that DNA pararetroviruses in Musa acuminata banana plants are able to evade DNA cytosine methylation and transcriptional gene silencing, despite being targeted by the host silencing

  16. CRISPR transcript processing: a mechanism for generating a large number of small interfering RNAs

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    Djordjevic Marko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CRISPR/Cas (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats/CRISPR associated sequences is a recently discovered prokaryotic defense system against foreign DNA, including viruses and plasmids. CRISPR cassette is transcribed as a continuous transcript (pre-crRNA, which is processed by Cas proteins into small RNA molecules (crRNAs that are responsible for defense against invading viruses. Experiments in E. coli report that overexpression of cas genes generates a large number of crRNAs, from only few pre-crRNAs. Results We here develop a minimal model of CRISPR processing, which we parameterize based on available experimental data. From the model, we show that the system can generate a large amount of crRNAs, based on only a small decrease in the amount of pre-crRNAs. The relationship between the decrease of pre-crRNAs and the increase of crRNAs corresponds to strong linear amplification. Interestingly, this strong amplification crucially depends on fast non-specific degradation of pre-crRNA by an unidentified nuclease. We show that overexpression of cas genes above a certain level does not result in further increase of crRNA, but that this saturation can be relieved if the rate of CRISPR transcription is increased. We furthermore show that a small increase of CRISPR transcription rate can substantially decrease the extent of cas gene activation necessary to achieve a desired amount of crRNA. Conclusions The simple mathematical model developed here is able to explain existing experimental observations on CRISPR transcript processing in Escherichia coli. The model shows that a competition between specific pre-crRNA processing and non-specific degradation determines the steady-state levels of crRNA and is responsible for strong linear amplification of crRNAs when cas genes are overexpressed. The model further shows how disappearance of only a few pre-crRNA molecules normally present in the cell can lead to a large (two

  17. Inhibition of Reporter Genes by Small Interfering RNAs in Cell Culture and Living Fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larashati, Sekar; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    2011-01-01

    be used to observe the knock down effect by siRNAs designed to target these reporters. One aim of this project is to verify the specific knock down effect of siRNAs in cell culture and in living fish and to establish easy-read out models for testing the effect especially in vivo. Cell culture from human...... coinjection and the assay is important in order to detect knock down by siRNA. Our experiment reveal in vivo knock down at 72 hours post injection of reporter gene and siRNA, but further dose-response experiments are required to confirm specifity....

  18. Random small interfering RNA library screen identifies siRNAs that induce human erythroleukemia cell differentiation.

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    Fan, Cuiqing; Xiong, Yuan; Zhu, Ning; Lu, Yabin; Zhang, Jiewen; Wang, Song; Liang, Zicai; Shen, Yan; Chen, Meihong

    2011-03-01

    Cancers are characterized by poor differentiation. Differentiation therapy is a strategy to alleviate malignant phenotypes by inducing cancer cell differentiation. Here we carried out a combinatorial high-throughput screen with a random siRNA library on human erythroleukemia K-562 cell differentiation. Two siRNAs screened from the library were validated to be able to induce erythroid differentiation to varying degrees, determined by CD235 and globin up-regulation, GATA-2 down-regulation, and cell growth inhibition. The screen we performed here is the first trial of screening cancer differentiation-inducing agents from a random siRNA library, demonstrating that a random siRNA library can be considered as a new resource in efforts to seek new therapeutic agents for cancers. As a random siRNA library has a broad coverage for the entire genome, including known/unknown genes and protein coding/non-coding sequences, screening using a random siRNA library can be expected to greatly augment the repertoire of therapeutic siRNAs for cancers.

  19. Comparing artificial neural networks, general linear models and support vector machines in building predictive models for small interfering RNAs.

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    Kyle A McQuisten

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous short interfering RNAs (siRNAs induce a gene knockdown effect in cells by interacting with naturally occurring RNA processing machinery. However not all siRNAs induce this effect equally. Several heterogeneous kinds of machine learning techniques and feature sets have been applied to modeling siRNAs and their abilities to induce knockdown. There is some growing agreement to which techniques produce maximally predictive models and yet there is little consensus for methods to compare among predictive models. Also, there are few comparative studies that address what the effect of choosing learning technique, feature set or cross validation approach has on finding and discriminating among predictive models.Three learning techniques were used to develop predictive models for effective siRNA sequences including Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs, General Linear Models (GLMs and Support Vector Machines (SVMs. Five feature mapping methods were also used to generate models of siRNA activities. The 2 factors of learning technique and feature mapping were evaluated by complete 3x5 factorial ANOVA. Overall, both learning techniques and feature mapping contributed significantly to the observed variance in predictive models, but to differing degrees for precision and accuracy as well as across different kinds and levels of model cross-validation.The methods presented here provide a robust statistical framework to compare among models developed under distinct learning techniques and feature sets for siRNAs. Further comparisons among current or future modeling approaches should apply these or other suitable statistically equivalent methods to critically evaluate the performance of proposed models. ANN and GLM techniques tend to be more sensitive to the inclusion of noisy features, but the SVM technique is more robust under large numbers of features for measures of model precision and accuracy. Features found to result in maximally predictive models are

  20. Ligand-targeted delivery of small interfering RNAs to malignant cells and tissues.

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    Thomas, Mini; Kularatne, Sumith A; Qi, Longwu; Kleindl, Paul; Leamon, Christopher P; Hansen, Michael J; Low, Philip S

    2009-09-01

    Potential clinical applications of small interfering RNA (siRNA) are hampered primarily by delivery issues. We have successfully addressed the delivery problems associated with off-site targeting of highly toxic chemotherapeutic agents by attaching the drugs to tumor-specific ligands that will carry the attached cargo into the desired cancer cell. Indeed, several such tumor-targeted drugs are currently undergoing human clinical trials. We now show that efficient targeting of siRNA to malignant cells and tissues can be achieved by covalent conjugation of small-molecular-weight, high-affinity ligands, such as folic acid and DUPA (2-[3-(1, 3-dicarboxy propyl)-ureido] pentanedioic acid), to siRNA. The former ligand binds a folate receptor that is overexpressed on a variety of cancers, whereas the latter ligand binds to prostate-specific membrane antigen that is overexpressed specifically on prostate cancers and the neovasculature of all solid tumors. Using these ligands, we show remarkable receptor-mediated targeting of siRNA to cancer tissues in vitro and in vivo.

  1. Efficient inhibition of the formation of joint adhesions by ERK2 small interfering RNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Fengfeng; Ruan, Hongjiang; Fan, Cunyi; Zeng, Bingfang; Wang, Chunyang; Wang, Xiang

    2010-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 and fibroblast growth factor-2 play very important roles in fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. These processes lead to the formation of joint adhesions through the SMAD and MAPK pathways, in which extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)2 is considered to be crucial. Based on these theories, we examined the effects of a lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting ERK2 on the suppression of joint adhesion formation in vivo. The effects were assessed in vivo from different aspects including the adhesion score, histology and joint contracture angle. We found that the adhesions in the ERK2 siRNA group became soft and weak, and were easily stretched. Accordingly, the flexion contracture angles in the ERK2 siRNA group were also reduced (P < 0.05 compared with the control group). The animals appeared healthy, with no signs of impaired wound healing. In conclusion, local delivery of a lentivirus-mediated siRNA targeting ERK2 can ameliorate joint adhesion formation effectively and safely.

  2. Antifibrotic effects of Smad4 small interfering RNAs in injured skeletal muscle after acute contusion.

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    Li, H; Chen, J; Chen, S; Zhang, Q; Chen, S

    2011-10-01

    Muscle injuries are common musculoskeletal problems encountered in sports medicine clinics. In this study, we examined the effect of lentivirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Smad4 on the suppression of the fibrosis in injured skeletal muscles. We found that Smad4-siRNA could efficiently knock down the expression of Smad4 in the C2C12 myoblast cells and in the contunded mice gastrocnemius muscle. The expression of mRNA level of Smad4 decreased to 11% and 49% compared to the control group, respectively, and the expression of protein level decreased to 13% and 57% respectively. Moreover, the lentivirus-mediated siRNA was stably transfected only into the skeletal muscle and not into the liver of the animals. In contunded mice gastrocnemius, the collagenous and vimentin-positive area in the Smad4 siRNA group reduced to 36% and 37% compared to the control group, respectively. Furthermore, compared to the scrambled Smad4 siRNA-injected mice and PBS control-injected mice, the muscle function of the mice injected with lentivirus-mediated Smad4 siRNA improved in terms of both fast-twitch and tetanic strength (P<0.05). The results suggest that the gene therapy of inhibiting Smad4 by lentivirus-mediated siRNA could be a useful approach to prevent scar tissue formation and improve the function of injured skeletal muscle. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. The use of small interfering RNAs to inhibit adipocyte differentiation in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Y.; Mirmalek-Sani, S.-H.; Yang, X.; Zhang, J.; Oreffo, R.O.C.

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been used in functional genomics and offers innovative approaches in the development of novel therapeutics. Human mesenchymal stem cells offer a unique cell source for tissue engineering/regeneration strategies. The current study examined the potential of small interfering RNAs (siRNA) against human peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) to suppress adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis) in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells. Adipogenesis was investigated using cellular and biochemical analysis. Transient transfection with PPARγ-siRNA using a liposomal-based strategy resulted in a significant inhibition of adipogenesis in human preadipocytes and fetal-femur-derived mesenchymal cells, compared to controls (cell, liposomal and negative siRNA). The inhibitory effect of PPARγ-siRNA was supported by testing human PPARγ mRNA and adipogenic associated genes using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to adiponectin receptor 1 and 2 as well as examination of fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP 3 ) expression, an adipocyte-specific marker. The current studies indicate that PPARγ-siRNA is a useful tool to study adipogenesis in human cells, with potential applications both therapeutic and in the elucidation of mesenchymal cell differentiation in the modulation of cell differentiation in human mesenchymal cells

  4. Endogenous MCM7 microRNA cluster as a novel platform to multiplex small interfering and nucleolar RNAs for combinational HIV-1 gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Janet; Zhang, Jane; Li, Haitang; Ouellet, Dominique L; DiGiusto, David L; Rossi, John J

    2012-11-01

    Combinational therapy with small RNA inhibitory agents against multiple viral targets allows efficient inhibition of viral production by controlling gene expression at critical time points. Here we explore combinations of different classes of therapeutic anti-HIV-1 RNAs expressed from within the context of an intronic MCM7 (minichromosome maintenance complex component-7) platform that naturally harbors 3 microRNAs (miRNAs). We replaced the endogenous miRNAs with anti-HIV small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting HIV-1 tat and rev messages that function to induce post-transcriptional gene silencing by the RNA interference pathway, a nucleolar-localizing RNA ribozyme that targets the conserved U5 region of HIV-1 transcripts for degradation, and finally nucleolar trans-activation response (TAR) and Rev-binding element (RBE) RNA decoys designed to sequester HIV-1 Tat and Rev proteins inside the nucleolus. We demonstrate the versatility of the MCM7 platform in expressing and efficiently processing the siRNAs as miRNA mimics along with nucleolar small RNAs. Furthermore, three of the combinatorial constructs tested potently suppressed viral replication during a 1-month HIV challenge, with greater than 5-log inhibition compared with untransduced, HIV-1-infected CEM T lymphocytes. One of the most effective constructs contains an anti-HIV siRNA combined with a nucleolar-localizing U5 ribozyme and TAR decoy. This represents the first efficacious example of combining Drosha-processed siRNAs with small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP)-processed nucleolar RNA chimeras from a single intron platform for effective inhibition of viral replication. Moreover, we demonstrated enrichment/selection for cells expressing levels of the antiviral RNAs that provide optimal inhibition under the selective pressure of HIV. The combinations of si/snoRNAs represent a new paradigm for combinatorial RNA-based gene therapy applications.

  5. Rootstock-to-scion transfer of transgene-derived small interfering RNAs and their effect on virus resistance in nontransgenic sweet cherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dongyan; Song, Guo-qing

    2014-12-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are silencing signals in plants. Virus-resistant transgenic rootstocks developed through siRNA-mediated gene silencing may enhance virus resistance of nontransgenic scions via siRNAs transported from the transgenic rootstocks. However, convincing evidence of rootstock-to-scion movement of siRNAs of exogenous genes in woody plants is still lacking. To determine whether exogenous siRNAs can be transferred, nontransgenic sweet cherry (scions) was grafted on transgenic cherry rootstocks (TRs), which was transformed with an RNA interference (RNAi) vector expressing short hairpin RNAs of the genomic RNA3 of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV-hpRNA). Small RNA sequencing was conducted using bud tissues of TRs and those of grafted (rootstock/scion) trees, locating at about 1.2 m above the graft unions. Comparison of the siRNA profiles revealed that the PNRSV-hpRNA was efficient in producing siRNAs and eliminating PNRSV in the TRs. Furthermore, our study confirmed, for the first time, the long-distance (1.2 m) transfer of PNRSV-hpRNA-derived siRNAs from the transgenic rootstock to the nontransgenic scion in woody plants. Inoculation of nontransgenic scions with PNRSV revealed that the transferred siRNAs enhanced PNRSV resistance of the scions grafted on the TRs. Collectively, these findings provide the foundation for 'using transgenic rootstocks to produce products of nontransgenic scions in fruit trees'. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Small interfering RNAs from bidirectional transcripts of GhMML3_A12 regulate cotton fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qun; Guan, Xueying; Yang, Nannan; Wu, Huaitong; Pan, Mengqiao; Liu, Bingliang; Fang, Lei; Yang, Shouping; Hu, Yan; Ye, Wenxue; Zhang, Hua; Ma, Peiyong; Chen, Jiedan; Wang, Qiong; Mei, Gaofu; Cai, Caiping; Yang, Donglei; Wang, Jiawei; Guo, Wangzhen; Zhang, Wenhua; Chen, Xiaoya; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2016-06-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs) are commonly observed in eukaryotic genomes, but only a limited number of such genes have been identified as being involved in gene regulation in plants. In this research, we investigated the function of small RNA derived from a NAT in fiber cell development. Using a map-based cloning strategy for the first time in tetraploid cotton, we cloned a naked seed mutant gene (N1 ) encoding a MYBMIXTA-like transcription factor 3 (MML3)/GhMYB25-like in chromosome A12, GhMML3_A12, that is associated with fuzz fiber development. The extremely low expression of GhMML3_A12 in N1 is associated with NAT production, driven by its 3' antisense promoter, as indicated by the promoter-driven histochemical staining assay. In addition, small RNA deep sequencing analysis suggested that the bidirectional transcriptions of GhMML3_A12 form double-stranded RNAs and generate 21-22 nt small RNAs. Therefore, in a fiber-specific manner, small RNA derived from the GhMML3_A12 locus can mediate GhMML3_A12 mRNA self-cleavage and result in the production of naked seeds followed by lint fiber inhibition in N1 plants. The present research reports the first observation of gene-mediated NATs and siRNA directly controlling fiber development in cotton. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. The effects of potato virus Y-derived virus small interfering RNAs of three biologically distinct strains on potato (Solanum tuberosum) transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyo, Lindani; Ramesh, Shunmugiah V; Kappagantu, Madhu; Mitter, Neena; Sathuvalli, Vidyasagar; Pappu, Hanu R

    2017-07-17

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is one of the most economically important pathogen of potato that is present as biologically distinct strains. The virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) from potato cv. Russet Burbank individually infected with PVY-N, PVY-NTN and PVY-O strains were recently characterized. Plant defense RNA-silencing mechanisms deployed against viruses produce vsiRNAs to degrade homologous viral transcripts. Based on sequence complementarity, the vsiRNAs can potentially degrade host RNA transcripts raising the prospect of vsiRNAs as pathogenicity determinants in virus-host interactions. This study investigated the global effects of PVY vsiRNAs on the host potato transcriptome. The strain-specific vsiRNAs of PVY, expressed in high copy number, were analyzed in silico for their proclivity to target potato coding and non-coding RNAs using psRobot and psRNATarget algorithms. Functional annotation of target coding transcripts was carried out to predict physiological effects of the vsiRNAs on the potato cv. Russet Burbank. The downregulation of selected target coding transcripts was further validated using qRT-PCR. The vsiRNAs derived from biologically distinct strains of PVY displayed diversity in terms of absolute number, copy number and hotspots for siRNAs on their respective genomes. The vsiRNAs populations were derived with a high frequency from 6 K1, P1 and Hc-Pro for PVY-N, P1, Hc-Pro and P3 for PVY-NTN, and P1, 3' UTR and NIa for PVY-O genomic regions. The number of vsiRNAs that displayed interaction with potato coding transcripts and number of putative coding target transcripts were comparable between PVY-N and PVY-O, and were relatively higher for PVY-NTN. The most abundant target non-coding RNA transcripts for the strain specific PVY-derived vsiRNAs were found to be MIR821, 28S rRNA,18S rRNA, snoR71, tRNA-Met and U5. Functional annotation and qRT-PCR validation suggested that the vsiRNAs target genes involved in plant hormone signaling, genetic

  8. Amide linkages mimic phosphates in RNA interactions with proteins and are well tolerated in the guide strand of short interfering RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutisya, Daniel; Hardcastle, Travis; Cheruiyot, Samwel K; Pallan, Pradeep S; Kennedy, Scott D; Egli, Martin; Kelley, Melissa L; Smith, Anja van Brabant; Rozners, Eriks

    2017-08-21

    While the use of RNA interference (RNAi) in molecular biology and functional genomics is a well-established technology, in vivo applications of synthetic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) require chemical modifications. We recently found that amides as non-ionic replacements for phosphodiesters may be useful modifications for optimization of siRNAs. Herein, we report a comprehensive study of systematic replacement of a single phosphate with an amide linkage throughout the guide strand of siRNAs. The results show that amides are surprisingly well tolerated in the seed and central regions of the guide strand and increase the silencing activity when placed between nucleosides 10 and 12, at the catalytic site of Argonaute. A potential explanation is provided by the first crystal structure of an amide-modified RNA-DNA with Bacillus halodurans RNase H1. The structure reveals how small changes in both RNA and protein conformation allow the amide to establish hydrogen bonding interactions with the protein. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that these alternative binding modes may compensate for interactions lost due to the absence of a phosphodiester moiety. Our results suggest that an amide can mimic important hydrogen bonding interactions with proteins required for RNAi activity and may be a promising modification for optimization of biological properties of siRNAs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. Amide linkages mimic phosphates in RNA interactions with proteins and are well tolerated in the guide strand of short interfering RNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutisya, Daniel; Hardcastle, Travis; Cheruiyot, Samwel K.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Kennedy, Scott D.; Egli, Martin; Kelley, Melissa L.; Smith, Anja van Brabant; Rozners, Eriks

    2017-06-27

    While the use of RNA interference (RNAi) in molecular biology and functional genomics is a well-established technology, in vivo applications of synthetic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) require chemical modifications. We recently found that amides as non-ionic replacements for phosphodiesters may be useful modifications for optimization of siRNAs. Herein, we report a comprehensive study of systematic replacement of a single phosphate with an amide linkage throughout the guide strand of siRNAs. The results show that amides are surprisingly well tolerated in the seed and central regions of the guide strand and increase the silencing activity when placed between nucleosides 10 and 12, at the catalytic site of Argonaute. A potential explanation is provided by the first crystal structure of an amide-modified RNA–DNA with Bacillus halodurans RNase H1. The structure reveals how small changes in both RNA and protein conformation allow the amide to establish hydrogen bonding interactions with the protein. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that these alternative binding modes may compensate for interactions lost due to the absence of a phosphodiester moiety. Our results suggest that an amide can mimic important hydrogen bonding interactions with proteins required for RNAi activity and may be a promising modification for optimization of biological properties of siRNAs.

  10. Depletion of polycistronic transcripts using short interfering RNAs: cDNA synthesis method affects levels of non-targeted genes determined by quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Jennifer E; Groves, Ian J; Pett, Mark R; Coleman, Nicholas

    2013-05-21

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are often used to deplete viral polycistronic transcripts, such as those encoded by human papillomavirus (HPV). There are conflicting data in the literature concerning how siRNAs targeting one HPV gene can affect levels of other genes in the polycistronic transcripts. We hypothesised that the conflict might be partly explained by the method of cDNA synthesis used prior to transcript quantification. We treated HPV16-positive cervical keratinocytes with siRNAs targeting the HPV16 E7 gene and used quantitative PCR to compare transcript levels of E7 with those of E6 and E2, viral genes located upstream and downstream of the target site respectively. We compared our findings from cDNA generated using oligo-dT primers alone with those from cDNA generated using a combination of random hexamer and oligo-dT primers. Our data show that when polycistronic transcripts are targeted by siRNAs, there is a period when untranslatable cleaved mRNA upstream of the siRNA binding site remains detectable by PCR, if cDNA is generated using random hexamer primers. Such false indications of mRNA abundance are avoided using oligo-dT primers. The period corresponds to the time taken for siRNA activity and degradation of the cleaved transcripts. Genes downstream of the siRNA binding site are detectable during this interval, regardless of how the cDNA is generated. These data emphasise the importance of the cDNA synthesis method used when measuring transcript abundance following siRNA depletion of polycistronic transcripts. They provide a partial explanation for erroneous reports suggesting that siRNAs targeting HPV E7 can have gene-specific effects.

  11. Arabidopsis RNASE THREE LIKE2 Modulates the Expression of Protein-Coding Genes via 24-Nucleotide Small Interfering RNA-Directed DNA Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira-Matelot, Emilie; Hachet, Mélanie; Shamandi, Nahid; Comella, Pascale; Sáez-Vásquez, Julio; Zytnicki, Matthias; Vaucheret, Hervé

    2016-02-01

    RNaseIII enzymes catalyze the cleavage of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and have diverse functions in RNA maturation. Arabidopsis thaliana RNASE THREE LIKE2 (RTL2), which carries one RNaseIII and two dsRNA binding (DRB) domains, is a unique Arabidopsis RNaseIII enzyme resembling the budding yeast small interfering RNA (siRNA)-producing Dcr1 enzyme. Here, we show that RTL2 modulates the production of a subset of small RNAs and that this activity depends on both its RNaseIII and DRB domains. However, the mode of action of RTL2 differs from that of Dcr1. Whereas Dcr1 directly cleaves dsRNAs into 23-nucleotide siRNAs, RTL2 likely cleaves dsRNAs into longer molecules, which are subsequently processed into small RNAs by the DICER-LIKE enzymes. Depending on the dsRNA considered, RTL2-mediated maturation either improves (RTL2-dependent loci) or reduces (RTL2-sensitive loci) the production of small RNAs. Because the vast majority of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to transposons and intergenic regions producing 24-nucleotide siRNAs that guide DNA methylation, RTL2 depletion modifies DNA methylation in these regions. Nevertheless, 13% of RTL2-regulated loci correspond to protein-coding genes. We show that changes in 24-nucleotide siRNA levels also affect DNA methylation levels at such loci and inversely correlate with mRNA steady state levels, thus implicating RTL2 in the regulation of protein-coding gene expression. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  12. Reconstituted influenza virus envelopes as an efficient carrier system for cellular delivery of small-interfering RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, J; Holtrop, M; Wilschut, J; Huckriede, A

    Application of RNA interference for in vivo evaluation of gene function or for therapeutic interventions has been hampered by a lack of suitable delivery methods for small interfering RNA ( siRNA). Here, we present reconstituted viral envelopes (virosomes) derived from influenza virus as suitable

  13. Protein synthesis directed by cowpea mosaic virus RNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuik, E.

    1979-01-01

    The thesis concerns the proteins synthesized under direction of Cowpea mosaic virus RNAs. Sufficient radioactive labelling of proteins was achieved when 35 S as sulphate was administered to intact Vigna plants, cultivated in Hoagland solution. The large polypeptides synthesized under direction of B- and M-RNA are probably precursor molecules from which the coat proteins are generated by a mechanism of posttranslational cleavage. (Auth.)

  14. Antiviral activity of Small interfering RNAs: Specificity testing using heterologous virus reveals interferon-related effects overlooked by conventional mismatch controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2006-01-01

    to the viral glycoprotein gene of the target-virus efficiently inhibited viral multiplication in infected cell cultures, while two of three corresponding mismatched siRNAs did not have this effect. This suggested specific interference, but similar results were obtained when the same siRNAs were tested against...... a heterologous virus. Further analyses revealed that the siRNAs induced a non-target-specific anti-viral effect correlating with upregulation of the interferon induced Mx gene....

  15. Robust Protection against Highly Virulent Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Swine by Combination Treatment with Recombinant Adenoviruses Expressing Porcine Alpha and Gamma Interferons and Multiple Small Interfering RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Hyeon; Lee, Kwang-Nyeong; Kim, Se-Kyung; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Taeseong; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Seo, Min-Goo; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because the currently available vaccines against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) provide no protection until 4 to 7 days postvaccination, the only alternative method to halt the spread of the FMD virus (FMDV) during outbreaks is the application of antiviral agents. Combination treatment strategies have been used to enhance the efficacy of antiviral agents, and such strategies may be advantageous in overcoming viral mechanisms of resistance to antiviral treatments. We have developed recombinant adenoviruses (Ads) for the simultaneous expression of porcine alpha and gamma interferons (Ad-porcine IFN-αγ) as well as 3 small interfering RNAs (Ad-3siRNA) targeting FMDV mRNAs encoding nonstructural proteins. The antiviral effects of Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA expression were tested in combination in porcine cells, suckling mice, and swine. We observed enhanced antiviral effects in porcine cells and mice as well as robust protection against the highly pathogenic strain O/Andong/SKR/2010 and increased expression of cytokines in swine following combination treatment. In addition, we showed that combination treatment was effective against all serotypes of FMDV. Therefore, we suggest that the combined treatment with Ad-porcine IFN-αγ and Ad-3siRNA may offer fast-acting antiviral protection and be used with a vaccine during the period that the vaccine does not provide protection against FMD. IMPORTANCE The use of current foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccines to induce rapid protection provides limited effectiveness because the protection does not become effective until a minimum of 4 days after vaccination. Therefore, during outbreaks antiviral agents remain the only available treatment to confer rapid protection and reduce the spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in livestock until vaccine-induced protective immunity can become effective. Interferons (IFNs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have been reported to be effective antiviral agents against

  16. miRNAs in Tuberculosis: New Avenues for Diagnosis and Host-Directed Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Sabir

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is one of the most fatal infectious diseases and a leading cause of mortality, with 95% of these deaths occurring in developing countries. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, has a well-established ability to circumvent the host’s immune system for its intracellular survival. microRNAs (miRNAs are small, non-coding RNAs having an important function at the post-transcriptional level and are involved in shaping immunity by regulating the repertoire of genes expressed in immune cells. It has been established in recent studies that the innate immune response against TB is significantly regulated by miRNAs. Moreover, differential expression of miRNA in Mtb infection can reflect the disease progression and may help distinguish between active and latent TB infection (LTBI. These findings encouraged the application of miRNAs as potential biomarkers. Similarly, active participation of miRNAs in modulation of autophagy and apoptosis responses against Mtb opens an exciting avenue for the exploitation of miRNAs as host directed therapy (HDT against TB. Nanoparticles mediated delivery of miRNAs to treat various diseases has been reported and this technology has a great potential to be used in TB. In reality, this exploitation of miRNAs as biomarkers and in HDT is still in its infancy stage, and more studies using animal models mimicking human TB are advocated to assess the role of miRNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In this review, we attempt to summarize the recent advancements in the role of miRNAs in TB as immune modulator, miRNAs’ capability to distinguish between active and latent TB and, finally, usage of miRNAs as therapeutic targets against TB.

  17. Role of miRNAs and siRNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses of plants

    KAUST Repository

    Khraiwesh, Basel

    2012-02-01

    Small, non-coding RNAs are a distinct class of regulatory RNAs in plants and animals that control a variety of biological processes. In plants, several classes of small RNAs with specific sizes and dedicated functions have evolved through a series of pathways. The major classes of small RNAs include microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which differ in their biogenesis. miRNAs control the expression of cognate target genes by binding to reverse complementary sequences, resulting in cleavage or translational inhibition of the target RNAs. siRNAs have a similar structure, function, and biogenesis as miRNAs but are derived from long double-stranded RNAs and can often direct DNA methylation at target sequences. Besides their roles in growth and development and maintenance of genome integrity, small RNAs are also important components in plant stress responses. One way in which plants respond to environmental stress is by modifying their gene expression through the activity of small RNAs. Thus, understanding how small RNAs regulate gene expression will enable researchers to explore the role of small RNAs in biotic and abiotic stress responses. This review focuses on the regulatory roles of plant small RNAs in the adaptive response to stresses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant gene regulation in response to abiotic stress. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Rational design of micro-RNA-like bifunctional siRNAs targeting HIV and the HIV coreceptor CCR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Ali; Saetrom, Pål; Zhang, Jane; Alluin, Jessica; Li, Haitang; Snøve, Ola; Aagaard, Lars; Rossi, John J

    2010-04-01

    Small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and micro-RNAs (miRNAs) are distinguished by their modes of action. SiRNAs serve as guides for sequence-specific cleavage of complementary mRNAs and the targets can be in coding or noncoding regions of the target transcripts. MiRNAs inhibit translation via partially complementary base-pairing to 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) and are generally ineffective when targeting coding regions of a transcript. In this study, we deliberately designed siRNAs that simultaneously direct cleavage and translational suppression of HIV RNAs, or cleavage of the mRNA encoding the HIV coreceptor CCR5 and suppression of translation of HIV. These bifunctional siRNAs trigger inhibition of HIV infection and replication in cell culture. The design principles have wide applications throughout the genome, as about 90% of genes harbor sites that make the design of bifunctional siRNAs possible.

  19. Small RNA Profiling in Dengue Virus 2-Infected Aedes Mosquito Cells Reveals Viral piRNAs and Novel Host miRNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miesen, P.; Ivens, A.; Buck, A.H.; Rij, R.P. van

    2016-01-01

    In Aedes mosquitoes, infections with arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) trigger or modulate the expression of various classes of viral and host-derived small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and microRNAs (miRNAs). Viral siRNAs are at the core of

  20. Transfection of small RNAs globally perturbs gene regulation by endogenous microRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Aly A; Betel, Doron; Miller, Martin L

    2009-01-01

    Transfection of small RNAs (such as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs)) into cells typically lowers expression of many genes. Unexpectedly, increased expression of genes also occurs. We investigated whether this upregulation results from a saturation effect--that is, competiti...

  1. Endogenous TasiRNAs mediate non-cell autonomous effects on gene regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Schwab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Different classes of small RNAs (sRNAs refine the expression of numerous genes in higher eukaryotes by directing protein partners to complementary nucleic acids, where they mediate gene silencing. Plants encode a unique class of sRNAs, called trans-acting small interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate protein-coding transcripts, as do microRNAs (miRNAs, and both sRNA classes control development through their targets. TasiRNA biogenesis requires multiple components of the siRNA pathway and also miRNAs. But while 21mer siRNAs originating from transgenes can mediate silencing across several cell layers, miRNA action seems spatially restricted to the producing or closely surrounding cells. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have previously described the isolation of a genetrap reporter line for TAS3a, the major locus producing AUXIN RESPONS FACTOR (ARF-regulating tasiRNAs in the Arabidopsis shoot. Its activity is limited to the adaxial (upper side of leaf primordia, thus spatially isolated from ARF-activities, which are located in the abaxial (lower side. We show here by in situ hybridization and reporter fusions that the silencing activities of ARF-regulating tasiRNAs are indeed manifested non-cell autonomously to spatially control ARF activities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Endogenous tasiRNAs are thus mediators of a mobile developmental signal and might provide effective gene silencing at a distance beyond the reach of most miRNAs.

  2. MicroRNAs in fruit trees: discovery, diversity and future research directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solofoharivelo, M C; van der Walt, A P; Stephan, D; Burger, J T; Murray, S L

    2014-09-01

    Since the first description of microRNAs (miRNAs) 20 years ago, the number of miRNAs identified in different eukaryotic organisms has exploded, largely due to the recent advances in DNA sequencing technologies. Functional studies, mostly from model species, have revealed that miRNAs are major post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression in eukaryotes. In plants, they are implicated in fundamental biological processes, from plant development and morphogenesis, to regulation of plant pathogen and abiotic stress responses. Although a substantial number of miRNAs have been identified in fruit trees to date, their functions remain largely uncharacterised. The present review aims to summarise the progress made in miRNA research in fruit trees, focusing specifically on the economically important species Prunus persica, Malus domestica, Citrus spp, and Vitis vinifera. We also discuss future miRNA research prospects in these plants and highlight potential applications of miRNAs in the on-going improvement of fruit trees. © 2014 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  3. IRAK2 directs stimulus-dependent nuclear export of inflammatory mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Bulek, Katarzyna; Li, Xiao; Herjan, Tomasz; Yu, Minjia; Qian, Wen; Wang, Han; Zhou, Gao; Chen, Xing; Yang, Hui; Hong, Lingzi; Zhao, Junjie; Qin, Luke; Fukuda, Koichi; Flotho, Annette; Gao, Ji; Dongre, Ashok; Carman, Julie A; Kang, Zizhen; Su, Bing; Kern, Timothy S; Smith, Jonathan D; Hamilton, Thomas A; Melchior, Frauke; Fox, Paul L; Li, Xiaoxia

    2017-10-09

    Expression of inflammatory genes is determined in part by post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA metabolism but how stimulus- and transcript-dependent nuclear export influence is poorly understood. Here, we report a novel pathway in which LPS/TLR4 engagement promotes nuclear localization of IRAK2 to facilitate nuclear export of a specific subset of inflammation-related mRNAs for translation in murine macrophages. IRAK2 kinase activity is required for LPS-induced RanBP2-mediated IRAK2 sumoylation and subsequent nuclear translocation. Array analysis showed that an SRSF1-binding motif is enriched in mRNAs dependent on IRAK2 for nuclear export. Nuclear IRAK2 phosphorylates SRSF1 to reduce its binding to target mRNAs, which promotes the RNA binding of the nuclear export adaptor ALYREF and nuclear export receptor Nxf1 loading for the export of the mRNAs. In summary, LPS activates a nuclear function of IRAK2 that facilitates the assembly of nuclear export machinery to export selected inflammatory mRNAs to the cytoplasm for translation.

  4. Use of microRNAs in directing therapy and evaluating treatment response in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreoli, Silmara Cristiane da Silveira; Gasparini, Nina Jardim [Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Carvalho, Gisele Pereira de [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Garicochea, Bernardo [Centro de Oncologia Sírio Libanês, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pogue, Robert Edward; Andrade, Rosângela Vieira de [Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Survival and prognosis depend on tumor stage upon diagnosis, and in more than 50% of cases, the tumor has already invaded adjacent tissues or metastasis has occurred. Aiming to improve diagnosis, clinical prognosis and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, several studies have investigated microRNAs as molecular markers of the disease due to their potential regulatory functions on tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. This review aimed to summarize the main topics related to the use of microRNAs in diagnosis, clinical prognosis and evaluating treatment response in colorectal cancer.

  5. Use of microRNAs in directing therapy and evaluating treatment response in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreoli, Silmara Cristiane da Silveira; Gasparini, Nina Jardim; Carvalho, Gisele Pereira de; Garicochea, Bernardo; Pogue, Robert Edward; Andrade, Rosângela Vieira de

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Survival and prognosis depend on tumor stage upon diagnosis, and in more than 50% of cases, the tumor has already invaded adjacent tissues or metastasis has occurred. Aiming to improve diagnosis, clinical prognosis and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, several studies have investigated microRNAs as molecular markers of the disease due to their potential regulatory functions on tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. This review aimed to summarize the main topics related to the use of microRNAs in diagnosis, clinical prognosis and evaluating treatment response in colorectal cancer

  6. A New Direction of Cancer Classification: Positive Effect of Low-Ranking MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feifei; Piao, Minghao; Piao, Yongjun; Li, Meijing; Ryu, Keun Ho

    2014-10-01

    Many studies based on microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles showed a new aspect of cancer classification. Because one characteristic of miRNA expression data is the high dimensionality, feature selection methods have been used to facilitate dimensionality reduction. The feature selection methods have one shortcoming thus far: they just consider the problem of where feature to class is 1:1 or n:1. However, because one miRNA may influence more than one type of cancer, human miRNA is considered to be ranked low in traditional feature selection methods and are removed most of the time. In view of the limitation of the miRNA number, low-ranking miRNAs are also important to cancer classification. We considered both high- and low-ranking features to cover all problems (1:1, n:1, 1:n, and m:n) in cancer classification. First, we used the correlation-based feature selection method to select the high-ranking miRNAs, and chose the support vector machine, Bayes network, decision tree, k-nearest-neighbor, and logistic classifier to construct cancer classification. Then, we chose Chi-square test, information gain, gain ratio, and Pearson's correlation feature selection methods to build the m:n feature subset, and used the selected miRNAs to determine cancer classification. The low-ranking miRNA expression profiles achieved higher classification accuracy compared with just using high-ranking miRNAs in traditional feature selection methods. Our results demonstrate that the m:n feature subset made a positive impression of low-ranking miRNAs in cancer classification.

  7. Composing Interfering Abstract Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Tecnologia , Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica, Portugal. This document is a companion technical report of the paper, “Composing Interfering Abstract...a Ciência e Tecnologia (Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology) through the Carnegie Mellon Portugal Program under grant SFRH / BD / 33765

  8. New Insight into Inter-kingdom Communication: Horizontal Transfer of Mobile Small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Geyu; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Xi

    2017-01-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs), including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), are conventionally regarded as critical molecular regulators of various intracellular processes. However, recent accumulating evidence indicates that sRNAs can be transferred within cells and tissues and even across species. In plants, nematodes and microbes, these mobile sRNAs can mediate inter-kingdom communication, environmental sensing, gene expression regulation, host-parasite defense and many other biological functions. Strikingly, a recent study by our group suggested that ingested plant miRNAs are transferred to blood, accumulate in tissues and regulate transcripts in consuming animals. While our and other independent groups' subsequent studies further explored the emerging field of sRNA-mediated crosstalk between species, some groups reported negative results and questioned its general applicability. Thus, further studies carefully evaluating the horizontal transfer of exogenous sRNAs and its potential biological functions are urgently required. Here, we review the current state of knowledge in the field of the horizontal transfer of mobile sRNAs, suggest its future directions and key points for examination and discuss its potential mechanisms and application prospects in nutrition, agriculture and medicine.

  9. New Insight into Inter-kingdom Communication: Horizontal Transfer of Mobile Small RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Small RNAs (sRNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs, are conventionally regarded as critical molecular regulators of various intracellular processes. However, recent accumulating evidence indicates that sRNAs can be transferred within cells and tissues and even across species. In plants, nematodes and microbes, these mobile sRNAs can mediate inter-kingdom communication, environmental sensing, gene expression regulation, host-parasite defense and many other biological functions. Strikingly, a recent study by our group suggested that ingested plant miRNAs are transferred to blood, accumulate in tissues and regulate transcripts in consuming animals. While our and other independent groups’ subsequent studies further explored the emerging field of sRNA-mediated crosstalk between species, some groups reported negative results and questioned its general applicability. Thus, further studies carefully evaluating the horizontal transfer of exogenous sRNAs and its potential biological functions are urgently required. Here, we review the current state of knowledge in the field of the horizontal transfer of mobile sRNAs, suggest its future directions and key points for examination and discuss its potential mechanisms and application prospects in nutrition, agriculture and medicine.

  10. Circular RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Yi-Neng; Xia, Shengqiang; Zhang, Yuan-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a novel type of universal and diverse endogenous noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) and they form a covalently closed continuous loop without 5' or 3' tails unlike linear RNAs. Most circRNAs are presented with characteristics of abundance, stability, conservatism, and often exhi...... and expression regulators, RBP sponges in cancer as well as current research methods of circRNAs, providing evidence for the significance of circRNAs in cancer diagnosis and clinical treatment....

  11. Intronic microRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, S.-Y.; Lin, S.-L.

    2005-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), small single-stranded regulatory RNAs capable of interfering with intracellular mRNAs that contain partial complementarity, are useful for the design of new therapies against cancer polymorphism and viral mutation. MiRNA was originally discovered in the intergenic regions of the Caenorhabditis elegans genome as native RNA fragments that modulate a wide range of genetic regulatory pathways during animal development. However, neither RNA promoter nor polymerase responsible for miRNA biogenesis was determined. Recent findings of intron-derived miRNA in C. elegans, mouse, and human have inevitably led to an alternative pathway for miRNA biogenesis, which relies on the coupled interaction of Pol-II-mediated pre-mRNA transcription and intron excision, occurring in certain nuclear regions proximal to genomic perichromatin fibrils

  12. Small silencing RNAs: an expanding universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghildiyal, Megha; Zamore, Phillip D

    2009-02-01

    Since the discovery in 1993 of the first small silencing RNA, a dizzying number of small RNA classes have been identified, including microRNAs (miRNAs), small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). These classes differ in their biogenesis, their modes of target regulation and in the biological pathways they regulate. There is a growing realization that, despite their differences, these distinct small RNA pathways are interconnected, and that small RNA pathways compete and collaborate as they regulate genes and protect the genome from external and internal threats.

  13. An RNA polymerase II-and AGO4-associated protein acts in RNA-directed DNA methylation

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Zhihuan; Liu, Hai-Liang; Daxinger, Lucia; Pontes, Olga; He, Xinjian; Qian, Weiqiang; Lin, Huixin; Xie, Mingtang; Lorkovic, Zdravko J.; Zhang, ShouDong; Miki, Daisuke; Zhan, Xianqiang; Pontier, Dominique; Lagrange, Thierry; Jin, Hailing; Matzke, Antonius J.; Matzke, Marjori; Pikaard, Craig S.; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark in many eukaryotes. In plants, 24-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) bound to the effector protein, Argonaute 4 (AGO4), can direct de novo DNA methylation by the methyltransferase DRM2 (refs 2

  14. Functional specialization of the small interfering RNA pathway in response to virus infection.

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    Joao Trindade Marques

    Full Text Available In Drosophila, post-transcriptional gene silencing occurs when exogenous or endogenous double stranded RNA (dsRNA is processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs by Dicer-2 (Dcr-2 in association with a dsRNA-binding protein (dsRBP cofactor called Loquacious (Loqs-PD. siRNAs are then loaded onto Argonaute-2 (Ago2 by the action of Dcr-2 with another dsRBP cofactor called R2D2. Loaded Ago2 executes the destruction of target RNAs that have sequence complementarity to siRNAs. Although Dcr-2, R2D2, and Ago2 are essential for innate antiviral defense, the mechanism of virus-derived siRNA (vsiRNA biogenesis and viral target inhibition remains unclear. Here, we characterize the response mechanism mediated by siRNAs against two different RNA viruses that infect Drosophila. In both cases, we show that vsiRNAs are generated by Dcr-2 processing of dsRNA formed during viral genome replication and, to a lesser extent, viral transcription. These vsiRNAs seem to preferentially target viral polyadenylated RNA to inhibit viral replication. Loqs-PD is completely dispensable for silencing of the viruses, in contrast to its role in silencing endogenous targets. Biogenesis of vsiRNAs is independent of both Loqs-PD and R2D2. R2D2, however, is required for sorting and loading of vsiRNAs onto Ago2 and inhibition of viral RNA expression. Direct injection of viral RNA into Drosophila results in replication that is also independent of Loqs-PD. This suggests that triggering of the antiviral pathway is not related to viral mode of entry but recognition of intrinsic features of virus RNA. Our results indicate the existence of a vsiRNA pathway that is separate from the endogenous siRNA pathway and is specifically triggered by virus RNA. We speculate that this unique framework might be necessary for a prompt and efficient antiviral response.

  15. TGF-β/Smad2/3 signaling directly regulates several miRNAs in mouse ES cells and early embryos.

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    Nicholas Redshaw

    Full Text Available The Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β signaling pathway is one of the major pathways essential for normal embryonic development and tissue homeostasis, with anti-tumor but also pro-metastatic properties in cancer. This pathway directly regulates several target genes that mediate its downstream functions, however very few microRNAs (miRNAs have been identified as targets. miRNAs are modulators of gene expression with essential roles in development and a clear association with diseases including cancer. Little is known about the transcriptional regulation of the primary transcripts (pri-miRNA, pri-miR from which several mature miRNAs are often derived. Here we present the identification of miRNAs regulated by TGF-β signaling in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells and early embryos. We used an inducible ES cell system to maintain high levels of the TGF-β activated/phosphorylated Smad2/3 effectors, which are the transcription factors of the pathway, and a specific inhibitor that blocks their activation. By performing short RNA deep-sequencing after 12 hours Smad2/3 activation and after 16 hours inhibition, we generated a database of responsive miRNAs. Promoter/enhancer analysis of a subset of these miRNAs revealed that the transcription of pri-miR-181c/d and the pri-miR-341∼3072 cluster were found to depend on activated Smad2/3. Several of these miRNAs are expressed in early mouse embryos, when the pathway is known to play an essential role. Treatment of embryos with TGF-β inhibitor caused a reduction of their levels confirming that they are targets of this pathway in vivo. Furthermore, we showed that pri-miR-341∼3072 transcription also depends on FoxH1, a known Smad2/3 transcription partner during early development. Together, our data show that miRNAs are regulated directly by the TGF-β/Smad2/3 pathway in ES cells and early embryos. As somatic abnormalities in functions known to be regulated by the TGF-β/Smad2/3 pathway underlie tumor

  16. MicroRNAs let-7b/i suppress human glioma cell invasion and migration by targeting IKBKE directly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Yuan; Hao, Shaobo; Ye, Minhua; Zhang, Anling; Nan, Yang; Wang, Guangxiu; Jia, Zhifan; Yu, Kai; Guo, Lianmei; Pu, Peiyu; Huang, Qiang; Zhong, Yue

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated that IKBKE is overexpressed in human gliomas and that the downregulation of IKBKE markedly inhibits the proliferative and invasive abilities of glioma cells, which is consistent with the results reported by several different research groups. Therefore, IKBKE represents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of glioma. In the present study, we verified that the microRNAs let-7b and let-7i target IKBKE through luciferase assays and found that let-7b/i mimics can knock down IKBKE and upregulate E-cadherin through western blot analysis. Moreover, the expression levels of let-7b/i were significantly lower in glioma cell lines than that in normal brain tissues, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells, as determined through wound healing and Transwell assays. The above-mentioned data suggest that let-7b/i inhibit the invasive ability of glioma cells by directly downregulating IKBKE and indirectly upregulating E-cadherin. - Highlights: • Let-7b and let-7i are downregulated in glioma cell lines. • IKBKE is a target gene of let-7b/i. • Let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells. • Let-7b/i upregulate E-cadherin by downregulating IKBKE

  17. MicroRNAs let-7b/i suppress human glioma cell invasion and migration by targeting IKBKE directly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Yuan; Hao, Shaobo [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Ye, Minhua [Department of Neurosurgery, Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province 330006 (China); Zhang, Anling [Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Nan, Yang [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Wang, Guangxiu; Jia, Zhifan [Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Yu, Kai; Guo, Lianmei [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Pu, Peiyu [Laboratory of Neuro-Oncology, Tianjin Neurological Institute, Tianjin 300052 (China); Key Laboratory of Neurotrauma, Variation and Regeneration, Ministry of Education and Tianjin Municipal Government (China); Huang, Qiang, E-mail: huangqiang209@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China); Zhong, Yue, E-mail: zhongyue2457@sina.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Medical University General Hospital, Tianjin 300052 (China)

    2015-03-06

    We demonstrated that IKBKE is overexpressed in human gliomas and that the downregulation of IKBKE markedly inhibits the proliferative and invasive abilities of glioma cells, which is consistent with the results reported by several different research groups. Therefore, IKBKE represents a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of glioma. In the present study, we verified that the microRNAs let-7b and let-7i target IKBKE through luciferase assays and found that let-7b/i mimics can knock down IKBKE and upregulate E-cadherin through western blot analysis. Moreover, the expression levels of let-7b/i were significantly lower in glioma cell lines than that in normal brain tissues, as determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Furthermore, let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells, as determined through wound healing and Transwell assays. The above-mentioned data suggest that let-7b/i inhibit the invasive ability of glioma cells by directly downregulating IKBKE and indirectly upregulating E-cadherin. - Highlights: • Let-7b and let-7i are downregulated in glioma cell lines. • IKBKE is a target gene of let-7b/i. • Let-7b/i inhibit the invasion and migration of glioma cells. • Let-7b/i upregulate E-cadherin by downregulating IKBKE.

  18. Noncanonical microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in lytic infection of murine gammaherpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xia

    Full Text Available MicroRNA (miRNA and endogenous small interfering RNA (endo-siRNA are two essential classes of small noncoding RNAs (sncRNAs in eukaryotes. The class of miRNA is diverse and there exist noncanonical miRNAs that bypass the canonical miRNA biogenesis pathway. In order to identify noncanonical miRNAs and endo-siRNAs responding to virus infection and study their potential function, we sequenced small-RNA species from cells lytically infected with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68. In addition to three novel canonical miRNAs in mouse, two antisense miRNAs in virus and 25 novel noncanonical miRNAs, including miRNAs derived from transfer RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs and introns, in the host were identified. These noncanonical miRNAs exhibited features distinct from that of canonical miRNAs in lengths of hairpins, base pairings and first nucleotide preference. Many of the novel miRNAs are conserved in mammals. Besides several known murine endo-siRNAs detected by the sequencing profiling, a novel locus in the mouse genome was identified to produce endo-siRNAs. This novel endo-siRNA locus is comprised of two tandem inverted B4 short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs. Unexpectedly, the SINE-derived endo-siRNAs were found in a variety of sequencing data and virus-infected cells. Moreover, a murine miRNA was up-regulated more than 35 fold in infected than in mock-treated cells. The putative targets of the viral and the up-regulated murine miRNAs were potentially involved in processes of gene transcription and protein phosphorylation, and localized to membranes, suggesting their potential role in manipulating the host basal immune system during lytic infection. Our results extended the number of noncanonical miRNAs in mammals and shed new light on their potential functions of lytic infection of MHV68.

  19. Horizontal Transfer of Small RNAs To and From Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu eHan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic information is traditionally thought to be transferred from parents to offspring. However, there is evidence indicating that gene transfer can also occur from microbes to higher species, such as plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. This horizontal transfer can be carried out by small RNAs (sRNAs. sRNAs have been recently reported to move across kingdoms as mobile signals, spreading silencing information toward targeted genes. sRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are non-coding molecules that control gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. Some sRNAs act in a cross-kingdom manner between animals and their parasites, but little is known about such sRNAs associated with plants. In this report, we provide a brief introduction to miRNAs that are transferred from plants to mammals/viruses and siRNAs that are transferred from microbes to plants. Both miRNAs and siRNAs can exert corresponding functions in the target organisms. Additionally, we provide information concerning a host-induced gene silencing (HIGS system as a potential application that utilizes the transgenic trafficking of RNA molecules to silence the genes of interacting organisms. Moreover, we lay out the controversial views regarding cross-kingdom miRNAs and call for better methodology and experimental design to confirm this unique function of miRNAs.

  20. MicroRNAs from the parasitic plant Cuscuta campestris target host messenger RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Saima; Kim, Gunjune; Johnson, Nathan R; Wafula, Eric; Wang, Feng; Coruh, Ceyda; Bernal-Galeano, Vivian; Phifer, Tamia; dePamphilis, Claude W; Westwood, James H; Axtell, Michael J

    2018-01-03

    Dodders (Cuscuta spp.) are obligate parasitic plants that obtain water and nutrients from the stems of host plants via specialized feeding structures called haustoria. Dodder haustoria facilitate bidirectional movement of viruses, proteins and mRNAs between host and parasite, but the functional effects of these movements are not known. Here we show that Cuscuta campestris haustoria accumulate high levels of many novel microRNAs (miRNAs) while parasitizing Arabidopsis thaliana. Many of these miRNAs are 22 nucleotides in length. Plant miRNAs of this length are uncommon, and are associated with amplification of target silencing through secondary short interfering RNA (siRNA) production. Several A. thaliana mRNAs are targeted by 22-nucleotide C. campestris miRNAs during parasitism, resulting in mRNA cleavage, secondary siRNA production, and decreased mRNA accumulation. Hosts with mutations in two of the loci that encode target mRNAs supported significantly higher growth of C. campestris. The same miRNAs that are expressed and active when C. campestris parasitizes A. thaliana are also expressed and active when it infects Nicotiana benthamiana. Homologues of target mRNAs from many other plant species also contain the predicted target sites for the induced C. campestris miRNAs. These data show that C. campestris miRNAs act as trans-species regulators of host-gene expression, and suggest that they may act as virulence factors during parasitism.

  1. Production of virus-derived ping-pong-dependent piRNA-like small RNAs in the mosquito soma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M Morazzani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural maintenance cycles of many mosquito-borne pathogens require establishment of persistent non-lethal infections in the invertebrate host. The mechanism by which this occurs is not well understood, but we have previously shown that an antiviral response directed by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs is important in modulating the pathogenesis of alphavirus infections in the mosquito. However, we report here that infection of mosquitoes with an alphavirus also triggers the production of another class of virus-derived small RNAs that exhibit many similarities to ping-pong-dependent piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs. However, unlike ping-pong-dependent piRNAs that have been described previously from repetitive elements or piRNA clusters, our work suggests production in the soma. We also present evidence that suggests virus-derived piRNA-like small RNAs are capable of modulating the pathogenesis of alphavirus infections in dicer-2 null mutant mosquito cell lines defective in viral siRNA production. Overall, our results suggest that a non-canonical piRNA pathway is present in the soma of vector mosquitoes and may be acting redundantly to the siRNA pathway to target alphavirus replication.

  2. Phenotypic silencing of cytoplasmic genes using sequence-specific double-stranded short interfering RNA and its application in the reverse genetics of wild type negative-strand RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barik Sailen

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS by short interfering RNA has opened up new directions in the phenotypic mutation of cellular genes. However, its efficacy on non-nuclear genes and its effect on the interferon pathway remain unexplored. Since directed mutation of RNA genomes is not possible through conventional mutagenesis, we have tested sequence-specific 21-nucleotide long double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs for their ability to silence cytoplasmic RNA genomes. Results Short dsRNAs were generated against specific mRNAs of respiratory syncytial virus, a nonsegmented negative-stranded RNA virus with a cytoplasmic life cycle. At nanomolar concentrations, the dsRNAs specifically abrogated expression of the corresponding viral proteins, and produced the expected mutant phenotype ex vivo. The dsRNAs did not induce an interferon response, and did not inhibit cellular gene expression. The ablation of the viral proteins correlated with the loss of the specific mRNAs. In contrast, viral genomic and antigenomic RNA, which are encapsidated, were not directly affected. Conclusions Synthetic inhibitory dsRNAs are effective in specific silencing of RNA genomes that are exclusively cytoplasmic and transcribed by RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. RNA-directed RNA gene silencing does not require cloning, expression, and mutagenesis of viral cDNA, and thus, will allow the generation of phenotypic null mutants of specific RNA viral genes under normal infection conditions and at any point in the infection cycle. This will, for the first time, permit functional genomic studies, attenuated infections, reverse genetic analysis, and studies of host-virus signaling pathways using a wild type RNA virus, unencumbered by any superinfecting virus.

  3. Novel meiotic miRNAs and indications for a role of phasiRNAs in meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small RNAs (sRNA) add additional layers to the regulation of gene expression, with siRNAs directing gene silencing at the DNA level by RdDM (RNA-directed DNA methylation), and miRNAs directing post-transcriptional regulation of specific target genes, mostly by mRNA cleavage. We used manually isolate...

  4. Non-Protein Coding RNAs

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, Nils G; Batey, Robert T

    2009-01-01

    This book assembles chapters from experts in the Biophysics of RNA to provide a broadly accessible snapshot of the current status of this rapidly expanding field. The 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to the discoverers of RNA interference, highlighting just one example of a large number of non-protein coding RNAs. Because non-protein coding RNAs outnumber protein coding genes in mammals and other higher eukaryotes, it is now thought that the complexity of organisms is correlated with the fraction of their genome that encodes non-protein coding RNAs. Essential biological processes as diverse as cell differentiation, suppression of infecting viruses and parasitic transposons, higher-level organization of eukaryotic chromosomes, and gene expression itself are found to largely be directed by non-protein coding RNAs. The biophysical study of these RNAs employs X-ray crystallography, NMR, ensemble and single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy, optical tweezers, cryo-electron microscopy, and ot...

  5. The Ebola virus VP35 protein binds viral immunostimulatory and host RNAs identified through deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari A Dilley

    Full Text Available Ebola virus and Marburg virus are members of the Filovirdae family and causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with high fatality rates in humans. Filovirus virulence is partially attributed to the VP35 protein, a well-characterized inhibitor of the RIG-I-like receptor pathway that triggers the antiviral interferon (IFN response. Prior work demonstrates the ability of VP35 to block potent RIG-I activators, such as Sendai virus (SeV, and this IFN-antagonist activity is directly correlated with its ability to bind RNA. Several structural studies demonstrate that VP35 binds short synthetic dsRNAs; yet, there are no data that identify viral immunostimulatory RNAs (isRNA or host RNAs bound to VP35 in cells. Utilizing a SeV infection model, we demonstrate that both viral isRNA and host RNAs are bound to Ebola and Marburg VP35s in cells. By deep sequencing the purified VP35-bound RNA, we identified the SeV copy-back defective interfering (DI RNA, previously identified as a robust RIG-I activator, as the isRNA bound by multiple filovirus VP35 proteins, including the VP35 protein from the West African outbreak strain (Makona EBOV. Moreover, RNAs isolated from a VP35 RNA-binding mutant were not immunostimulatory and did not include the SeV DI RNA. Strikingly, an analysis of host RNAs bound by wild-type, but not mutant, VP35 revealed that select host RNAs are preferentially bound by VP35 in cell culture. Taken together, these data support a model in which VP35 sequesters isRNA in virus-infected cells to avert RIG-I like receptor (RLR activation.

  6. The Ebola virus VP35 protein binds viral immunostimulatory and host RNAs identified through deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Kari A; Voorhies, Alexander A; Luthra, Priya; Puri, Vinita; Stockwell, Timothy B; Lorenzi, Hernan; Basler, Christopher F; Shabman, Reed S

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus are members of the Filovirdae family and causative agents of hemorrhagic fever with high fatality rates in humans. Filovirus virulence is partially attributed to the VP35 protein, a well-characterized inhibitor of the RIG-I-like receptor pathway that triggers the antiviral interferon (IFN) response. Prior work demonstrates the ability of VP35 to block potent RIG-I activators, such as Sendai virus (SeV), and this IFN-antagonist activity is directly correlated with its ability to bind RNA. Several structural studies demonstrate that VP35 binds short synthetic dsRNAs; yet, there are no data that identify viral immunostimulatory RNAs (isRNA) or host RNAs bound to VP35 in cells. Utilizing a SeV infection model, we demonstrate that both viral isRNA and host RNAs are bound to Ebola and Marburg VP35s in cells. By deep sequencing the purified VP35-bound RNA, we identified the SeV copy-back defective interfering (DI) RNA, previously identified as a robust RIG-I activator, as the isRNA bound by multiple filovirus VP35 proteins, including the VP35 protein from the West African outbreak strain (Makona EBOV). Moreover, RNAs isolated from a VP35 RNA-binding mutant were not immunostimulatory and did not include the SeV DI RNA. Strikingly, an analysis of host RNAs bound by wild-type, but not mutant, VP35 revealed that select host RNAs are preferentially bound by VP35 in cell culture. Taken together, these data support a model in which VP35 sequesters isRNA in virus-infected cells to avert RIG-I like receptor (RLR) activation.

  7. PIWIs Go Viral: Arbovirus-Derived piRNAs in Vector Mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Miesen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Vector mosquitoes are responsible for transmission of the majority of arthropod-borne (arbo- viruses. Virus replication in these vectors needs to be sufficiently high to permit efficient virus transfer to vertebrate hosts. The mosquito immune response therefore is a key determinant for arbovirus transmission. Mosquito antiviral immunity is primarily mediated by the small interfering RNA pathway. Besides this well-established antiviral machinery, the PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA pathway processes viral RNA into piRNAs. In recent years, significant progress has been made in characterizing the biogenesis and function of these viral piRNAs. In this review, we discuss these developments, identify knowledge gaps, and suggest directions for future research.

  8. Non-Coding RNAs: Multi-Tasking Molecules in the Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Quintal Gomes

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In the last years it has become increasingly clear that the mammalian transcriptome is highly complex and includes a large number of small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs. Here we review the biogenesis pathways of the three classes of sncRNAs, namely short interfering RNAs (siRNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs and PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs. These ncRNAs have been extensively studied and are involved in pathways leading to specific gene silencing and the protection of genomes against virus and transposons, for example. Also, lncRNAs have emerged as pivotal molecules for the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression which is supported by their tissue-specific expression patterns, subcellular distribution, and developmental regulation. Therefore, we also focus our attention on their role in differentiation and development. SncRNAs and lncRNAs play critical roles in defining DNA methylation patterns, as well as chromatin remodeling thus having a substantial effect in epigenetics. The identification of some overlaps in their biogenesis pathways and functional roles raises the hypothesis that these molecules play concerted functions in vivo, creating complex regulatory networks where cooperation with regulatory proteins is necessary. We also highlighted the implications of biogenesis and gene expression deregulation of sncRNAs and lncRNAs in human diseases like cancer.

  9. Genomic Organization of Zebrafish microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paydar Ima

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background microRNAs (miRNAs are small (~22 nt non-coding RNAs that regulate cell movement, specification, and development. Expression of miRNAs is highly regulated, both spatially and temporally. Based on direct cloning, sequence conservation, and predicted secondary structures, a large number of miRNAs have been identified in higher eukaryotic genomes but whether these RNAs are simply a subset of a much larger number of noncoding RNA families is unknown. This is especially true in zebrafish where genome sequencing and annotation is not yet complete. Results We analyzed the zebrafish genome to identify the number and location of proven and predicted miRNAs resulting in the identification of 35 new miRNAs. We then grouped all 415 zebrafish miRNAs into families based on seed sequence identity as a means to identify possible functional redundancy. Based on genomic location and expression analysis, we also identified those miRNAs that are likely to be encoded as part of polycistronic transcripts. Lastly, as a resource, we compiled existing zebrafish miRNA expression data and, where possible, listed all experimentally proven mRNA targets. Conclusion Current analysis indicates the zebrafish genome encodes 415 miRNAs which can be grouped into 44 families. The largest of these families (the miR-430 family contains 72 members largely clustered in two main locations along chromosome 4. Thus far, most zebrafish miRNAs exhibit tissue specific patterns of expression.

  10. Emerging RNA-based drugs: siRNAs, microRNAs and derivates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Tiago Campos; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia

    2012-09-01

    An emerging new category of therapeutic agents based on ribonucleic acid has emerged and shown very promising in vitro, animal and pre-clinical results, known as small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs mimics (miRNA mimics) and their derivates. siRNAs are small RNA molecules that promote potent and specific silencing of mutant, exogenous or aberrant genes through a mechanism known as RNA interference. These agents have called special attention to medicine since they have been used to experimentally treat a series of neurological conditions with distinct etiologies such as prion, viral, bacterial, fungal, genetic disorders and others. siRNAs have also been tested in other scenarios such as: control of anxiety, alcohol consumption, drug-receptor blockage and inhibition of pain signaling. Although in a much earlier stage, miRNAs mimics, anti-miRs and small activating RNAs (saRNAs) also promise novel therapeutic approaches to control gene expression. In this review we intend to introduce clinicians and medical researchers to the most recent advances in the world of siRNA- and miRNA-mediated gene control, its history, applications in cells, animals and humans, delivery methods (an yet unsolved hurdle), current status and possible applications in future clinical practice.

  11. Endogenous small RNAs and antibacterial immunity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hailing

    2008-08-06

    Small RNAs are non-coding regulatory RNA molecules that control gene expression by mediating mRNA degradation, translational inhibition, or chromatin modification. Virus-derived small RNAs induce silencing of viral RNAs and are essential for antiviral defense in both animal and plant systems. The role of host endogenous small RNAs on antibacterial immunity has only recently been recognized. Host disease resistance and defense responses are achieved by activation and repression of a large array of genes. Certain endogenous small RNAs in plants, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are induced or repressed in response to pathogen attack and subsequently regulate the expression of genes involved in disease resistance and defense responses by mediating transcriptional or post-transcriptional gene silencing. Thus, these small RNAs play an important role in gene expression reprogramming in plant disease resistance and defense responses. This review focuses on the recent findings of plant endogenous small RNAs in antibacterial immunity.

  12. Gcn4 misregulation reveals a direct role for the evolutionary conserved EKC/KEOPS in the t6A modification of tRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugeron, Marie-Claire; Lenstra, Tineke L; Frizzarin, Martina; El Yacoubi, Basma; Liu, Xipeng; Baudin-Baillieu, Agnès; Lijnzaad, Philip; Decourty, Laurence; Saveanu, Cosmin; Jacquier, Alain; Holstege, Frank C P; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Libri, Domenico

    2011-08-01

    The EKC/KEOPS complex is universally conserved in Archaea and Eukarya and has been implicated in several cellular processes, including transcription, telomere homeostasis and genomic instability. However, the molecular function of the complex has remained elusive so far. We analyzed the transcriptome of EKC/KEOPS mutants and observed a specific profile that is highly enriched in targets of the Gcn4p transcriptional activator. GCN4 expression was found to be activated at the translational level in mutants via the defective recognition of the inhibitory upstream ORFs (uORFs) present in its leader. We show that EKC/KEOPS mutants are defective for the N6-threonylcarbamoyl adenosine modification at position 37 (t(6)A(37)) of tRNAs decoding ANN codons, which affects initiation at the inhibitory uORFs and provokes Gcn4 de-repression. Structural modeling reveals similarities between Kae1 and bacterial enzymes involved in carbamoylation reactions analogous to t(6)A(37) formation, supporting a direct role for the EKC in tRNA modification. These findings are further supported by strong genetic interactions of EKC mutants with a translation initiation factor and with threonine biosynthesis genes. Overall, our data provide a novel twist to understanding the primary function of the EKC/KEOPS and its impact on several essential cellular functions like transcription and telomere homeostasis.

  13. Analysis of transcription factors, microRNAs and cytokines involved in T lymphocyte differentiation in patients with tuberculosis after directly observed treatment short-course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral-Fernández, Nancy Elizabeth; Cortes-García, Juan Diego; Bruno, Rivas-Santiago; Romano-Moreno, Silvia; Medellín-Garibay, Susanna E; Magaña-Aquino, Martín; Salazar-González, Raúl A; González-Amaro, Roberto; Portales-Pérez, Diana Patricia

    2017-07-01

    Tuberculosis (Tb) is an infectious disease in which the immune system plays an important role. MicroRNAs are involved in the development and maintenance of CD4 + T lymphocyte subpopulations. miR-326 regulates the differentiation to Th17 cells and miR-29 correlates with the Th1 response. The aim of this study was to determine the role of microRNAs, Transcription Factors, and cytokines in Th differentiation before and after the directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells and serum from Tb patients were collected at times 0 (before therapy), 2 (after the intensive phase), and 6 months (after the holding phase). The cells were cultivated in presence or absence of ESAT-6 (10 μg/ml) and CFP-10 (10 μg/ml). Transcription Factor and microRNA expressions were analyzed by qPCR and cytokine production in both serum and culture supernatant using ELISA. A decrease in Th1 response with a diminishing in the relative expression of TBET and miR-29a at 2 and 6 months after the anti-Tb therapy (p < 0.01) were found. The miR-326 levels decreased after the intensive phase of the DOTS scheme. However, subdivision of the Tb patients according to gender, showed increased levels of miR-29a and miR-155 in females after the intensive phase of the therapeutic treatment when compared to time 0 and similar increased levels of miR-326 at time 6 versus time 0. In contrast, we observed a decrease in miR-326 levels in males at 6 months when compared to before therapy (time 0). In addition, high production of IL-17 in the culture supernatant was found at 2 and 6 months (p < 0.05) while in serum IL-17 was decreased. A positive correlation between IL-17 and RORC2 at time 6 was detected (p = 0.0202, r = 0.7880). In conclusion, these data suggest a reduction in Th1 and an induction of Th17 response after the anti-Tb therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. High-Level Accumulation of Exogenous Small RNAs Not Affecting Endogenous Small RNA Biogenesis and Function in Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wan-xia; Neil A Smith; ZHOU Chang-yong; WANG Ming-bo

    2014-01-01

    RNA silencing is a fundamental plant defence and gene control mechanism in plants that are directed by 20-24 nucleotide (nt) small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Infection of plants with viral pathogens or transformation of plants with RNA interference (RNAi) constructs is usually associated with high levels of exogenous siRNAs, but it is unclear if these siRNAs interfere with endogenous small RNA pathways and hence affect plant development. Here we provide evidence that viral satellite RNA (satRNA) infection does not affect siRNA and miRNA biogenesis or plant growth despite the extremely high level of satRNA-derived siRNAs. We generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana plants that no longer develop the speciifc yellowing symptoms generally associated with infection by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y-satellite RNA (Y-Sat). We then used these plants to show that CMV Y-Sat infection did not cause any visible phenotypic changes in comparison to uninfected plants, despite the presence of high-level Y-Sat siRNAs. Furthermore, we showed that the accumulation of hairpin RNA (hpRNA)-derived siRNAs or miRNAs, and the level of siRNA-directed transgene silencing, are not signiifcantly affected by CMV Y-Sat infection. Taken together, our results suggest that the high levels of exogenous siRNAs associated with viral infection or RNAi-inducing transgenes do not saturate the endogenous RNA silencing machineries and have no signiifcant impact on normal plant development.

  15. Small RNA Profiling in Dengue Virus 2-Infected Aedes Mosquito Cells Reveals Viral piRNAs and Novel Host miRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesen, Pascal; Ivens, Alasdair; Buck, Amy H; van Rij, Ronald P

    2016-02-01

    In Aedes mosquitoes, infections with arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) trigger or modulate the expression of various classes of viral and host-derived small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), PIWI interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and microRNAs (miRNAs). Viral siRNAs are at the core of the antiviral RNA interference machinery, one of the key pathways that limit virus replication in invertebrates. Besides siRNAs, Aedes mosquitoes and cells derived from these insects produce arbovirus-derived piRNAs, the best studied examples being viruses from the Togaviridae or Bunyaviridae families. Host miRNAs modulate the expression of a large number of genes and their levels may change in response to viral infections. In addition, some viruses, mostly with a DNA genome, express their own miRNAs to regulate host and viral gene expression. Here, we perform a comprehensive analysis of both viral and host-derived small RNAs in Aedes aegypti Aag2 cells infected with dengue virus 2 (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family. Aag2 cells are competent in producing all three types of small RNAs and provide a powerful tool to explore the crosstalk between arboviral infection and the distinct RNA silencing pathways. Interestingly, besides the well-characterized DENV-derived siRNAs, a specific population of viral piRNAs was identified in infected Aag2 cells. Knockdown of Piwi5, Ago3 and, to a lesser extent, Piwi6 results in reduction of vpiRNA levels, providing the first genetic evidence that Aedes PIWI proteins produce DENV-derived small RNAs. In contrast, we do not find convincing evidence for the production of virus-derived miRNAs. Neither do we find that host miRNA expression is strongly changed upon DENV2 infection. Finally, our deep-sequencing analyses detect 30 novel Aedes miRNAs, complementing the repertoire of regulatory small RNAs in this important vector species.

  16. Global alteration of microRNAs and transposon-derived small RNAs in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) during Cotton leafroll dwarf polerovirus (CLRDV) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanel, Elisson; Silva, Tatiane F; Corrêa, Régis L; Farinelli, Laurent; Hawkins, Jennifer S; Schrago, Carlos E G; Vaslin, Maite F S

    2012-11-01

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs ranging from 20- to 40-nucleotides (nts) that are present in most eukaryotic organisms. In plants, sRNAs are involved in the regulation of development, the maintenance of genome stability and the antiviral response. Viruses, however, can interfere with and exploit the silencing-based regulatory networks, causing the deregulation of sRNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). To understand the impact of viral infection on the plant sRNA pathway, we deep sequenced the sRNAs in cotton leaves infected with Cotton leafroll dwarf virus (CLRDV), which is a member of the economically important virus family Luteoviridae. A total of 60 putative conserved cotton miRNAs were identified, including 19 new miRNA families that had not been previously described in cotton. Some of these miRNAs were clearly misregulated during viral infection, and their possible role in symptom development and disease progression is discussed. Furthermore, we found that the 24-nt heterochromatin-associated siRNAs were quantitatively and qualitatively altered in the infected plant, leading to the reactivation of at least one cotton transposable element. This is the first study to explore the global alterations of sRNAs in virus-infected cotton plants. Our results indicate that some CLRDV-induced symptoms may be correlated with the deregulation of miRNA and/or epigenetic networks.

  17. Plant Responses to Pathogen Attack: Small RNAs in Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Waqar; Noman, Ali; Qasim, Muhammad; Wang, Liande

    2018-02-08

    Small RNAs (sRNA) are a significant group of gene expression regulators for multiple biological processes in eukaryotes. In plants, many sRNA silencing pathways produce extensive array of sRNAs with specialized roles. The evidence on record advocates for the functions of sRNAs during plant microbe interactions. Host sRNAs are reckoned as mandatory elements of plant defense. sRNAs involved in plant defense processes via different pathways include both short interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) that actively regulate immunity in response to pathogenic attack via tackling pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and other effectors. In response to pathogen attack, plants protect themselves with the help of sRNA-dependent immune systems. That sRNA-mediated plant defense responses play a role during infections is an established fact. However, the regulations of several sRNAs still need extensive research. In this review, we discussed the topical advancements and findings relevant to pathogen attack and plant defense mediated by sRNAs. We attempted to point out diverse sRNAs as key defenders in plant systems. It is hoped that sRNAs would be exploited as a mainstream player to achieve food security by tackling different plant diseases.

  18. MicroRNAs and Periodontal Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, X; Zhou, X; Trombetta-eSilva, J; Francis, M; Gaharwar, A K; Atsawasuwan, P; Diekwisch, T G H

    2017-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small RNAs that control gene expression in all aspects of eukaryotic life, primarily through RNA silencing mechanisms. The purpose of the present review is to introduce key miRNAs involved in periodontal homeostasis, summarize the mechanisms by which they affect downstream genes and tissues, and provide an introduction into the therapeutic potential of periodontal miRNAs. In general, miRNAs function synergistically to fine-tune the regulation of biological processes and to remove expression noise rather than by causing drastic changes in expression levels. In the periodontium, miRNAs play key roles in development and periodontal homeostasis and during the loss of periodontal tissue integrity as a result of periodontal disease. As part of the anabolic phase of periodontal homeostasis and periodontal development, miRNAs direct periodontal fibroblasts toward alveolar bone lineage differentiation and new bone formation through WNT, bone morphogenetic protein, and Notch signaling pathways. miRNAs contribute equally to the catabolic aspect of periodontal homeostasis as they affect osteoclastogenesis and osteoclast function, either by directly promoting osteoclast activity or by inhibiting osteoclast signaling intermediaries or through negative feedback loops. Their small size and ability to target multiple regulatory networks of related sets of genes have predisposed miRNAs to become ideal candidates for drug delivery and tissue regeneration. To address the immense therapeutic potential of miRNAs and their antagomirs, an ever growing number of delivery approaches toward clinical applications have been developed, including nanoparticle carriers and secondary structure interference inhibitor systems. However, only a fraction of the miRNAs involved in periodontal health and disease are known today. It is anticipated that continued research will lead to a more comprehensive understanding of the periodontal miRNA world, and a systematic

  19. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-01-01

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  20. Viral MicroRNAs Repress the Cholesterol Pathway, and 25-Hydroxycholesterol Inhibits Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serquiña, Anna K P; Kambach, Diane M; Sarker, Ontara; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M

    2017-07-11

    From various screens, we found that Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) viral microRNAs (miRNAs) target several enzymes in the mevalonate/cholesterol pathway. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (CoA) synthase 1 (HMGCS1), 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR [a rate-limiting step in the mevalonate pathway]), and farnesyl-diphosphate farnesyltransferase 1 (FDFT1 [a committed step in the cholesterol branch]) are repressed by multiple KSHV miRNAs. Transfection of viral miRNA mimics in primary endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells [HUVECs]) is sufficient to reduce intracellular cholesterol levels; however, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting only HMGCS1 did not reduce cholesterol levels. This suggests that multiple targets are needed to perturb this tightly regulated pathway. We also report here that cholesterol levels were decreased in de novo -infected HUVECs after 7 days. This reduction is at least partially due to viral miRNAs, since the mutant form of KSHV lacking 10 of the 12 miRNA genes had increased cholesterol compared to wild-type infections. We hypothesized that KSHV is downregulating cholesterol to suppress the antiviral response by a modified form of cholesterol, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC). We found that the cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H) gene, which is responsible for generating 25HC, had increased expression in de novo -infected HUVECs but was strongly suppressed in long-term latently infected cell lines. We found that 25HC inhibits KSHV infection when added exogenously prior to de novo infection. In conclusion, we found that multiple KSHV viral miRNAs target enzymes in the mevalonate pathway to modulate cholesterol in infected cells during latency. This repression of cholesterol levels could potentially be beneficial to viral infection by decreasing the levels of 25HC. IMPORTANCE A subset of viruses express unique microRNAs (miRNAs), which act like cellular miRNAs to generally repress host gene

  1. Noncoding RNAs in Cancer Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cerchia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Several signalling proteins involved in cell growth and differentiation represent attractive candidate targets for cancer diagnosis and/or therapy since they can act as oncogenes. Because of their high specificity and low immunogeneicity, using artificial small noncoding RNA (ncRNAs as therapeutics has recently become a highly promising and rapidly expanding field of interest. Indeed, ncRNAs may either interfere with RNA transcription, stability, translation or directly hamper the function of the targets by binding to their surface. The recent finding that the expression of several genes is under the control of small single-stranded regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, makes these genes as appropriate targets for ncRNA gene silencing. Furthermore, another class of small ncRNA, aptamers, act as high-affinity ligands and potential antagonists of disease-associated proteins. We will review here the recent and innovative methods that have been developed and the possible applications of ncRNAs as inhibitors or tracers in cancer medicine.

  2. Species specific inhibition of viral replication using dicer substrate siRNAs (DsiRNAs) targeting the viral nucleoprotein of the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohle, Harry; Lorenzen, Niels; Schyth, Brian Dall

    2011-01-01

    Gene knock down by the use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is widely used as a method for reducing the expression of specific genes in eukaryotic cells via the RNA interference pathway. But, the effectivity of siRNA induced gene knock down in cells from fish has in several studies been...

  3. MicroRNAs in Human Placental Development and Pregnancy Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Peng

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs, which function as critical posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression by promoting mRNA degradation and translational inhibition. Placenta expresses many ubiquitous as well as specific miRNAs. These miRNAs regulate trophoblast cell differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, invasion/migration, and angiogenesis, suggesting that miRNAs play important roles during placental development. Aberrant miRNAs expression has been linked to pregnancy complications, such as preeclampsia. Recent research of placental miRNAs focuses on identifying placental miRNA species, examining differential expression of miRNAs between placentas from normal and compromised pregnancies, and uncovering the function of miRNAs in the placenta. More studies are required to further understand the functional significance of miRNAs in placental development and to explore the possibility of using miRNAs as biomarkers and therapeutic targets for pregnancy-related disorders. In this paper, we reviewed the current knowledge about the expression and function of miRNAs in placental development, and propose future directions for miRNA studies.

  4. Inhibition of Hepatitis C Virus in Mice by a Small Interfering RNA Targeting a Highly Conserved Sequence in Viral IRES Pseudoknot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Su Moon

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV internal ribosome entry site (IRES that directs cap-independent viral translation is a primary target for small interfering RNA (siRNA-based HCV antiviral therapy. However, identification of potent siRNAs against HCV IRES by bioinformatics-based siRNA design is a challenging task given the complexity of HCV IRES secondary and tertiary structures and association with multiple proteins, which can also dynamically change the structure of this cis-acting RNA element. In this work, we utilized siRNA tiling approach whereby siRNAs were tiled with overlapping sequences that were shifted by one or two nucleotides over the HCV IRES stem-loop structures III and IV spanning nucleotides (nts 277-343. Based on their antiviral activity, we mapped a druggable region (nts 313-343 where the targets of potent siRNAs were enriched. siIE22, which showed the greatest anti-HCV potency, targeted a highly conserved sequence across diverse HCV genotypes, locating within the IRES subdomain IIIf involved in pseudoknot formation. Stepwise target shifting toward the 5' or 3' direction by 1 or 2 nucleotides reduced the antiviral potency of siIE22, demonstrating the importance of siRNA accessibility to this highly structured and sequence-conserved region of HCV IRES for RNA interference. Nanoparticle-mediated systemic delivery of the stability-improved siIE22 derivative gs_PS1 siIE22, which contains a single phosphorothioate linkage on the guide strand, reduced the serum HCV genome titer by more than 4 log10 in a xenograft mouse model for HCV replication without generation of resistant variants. Our results provide a strategy for identifying potent siRNA species against a highly structured RNA target and offer a potential pan-HCV genotypic siRNA therapy that might be beneficial for patients resistant to current treatment regimens.

  5. Identification and characterization of microRNAs and endogenous siRNAs in Schistosoma japonicum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Heng

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small endogenous non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs such as small interfering RNA (siRNA, microRNA and other small RNA transcripts are derived from distinct loci in the genome and play critical roles in RNA-mediated gene silencing mechanisms in plants and metazoa. They are approximately 22 nucleotides long; regulate mRNA stability through perfect or imperfect match to the targets. The biological activities of sncRNAs have been related to many biological events, from resistance to microbe infections to cellular differentiation. The development of the zoonotic parasite Schistosoma japonicum parasite includes multiple steps of morphological alterations and biological differentiations, which provide a unique model for studies on the functions of small RNAs. Characterization of the genome-wide transcription of the sncRNAs will be a major step in understanding of the parasite biology. The objective of this study is to investigate the transcriptional profile and potential function of the small non-coding RNAs in the development of S. japanicum. Results The endogenous siRNAs were found mainly derived from transposable elements (TE or transposons and the natural antisense transcripts (NAT. In contrast to other organisms, the TE-derived siRNAs in S. japonicum were more predominant than other sncRNAs including microRNAs (miRNAs. Further, there were distinct length and 3'end variations in the sncRNAs, which were associated with the developmental differentiation of the parasite. Among the identified miRNA transcripts, there were 38 unique to S. japonicum and 16 that belonged to 13 miRNA families are common to other metazoan lineages. These miRNAs were either ubiquitously expressed, or they exhibited specific expression patterns related to the developmental stages or sex. Genes that encoded miRNAs are mainly located in clusters within the genome of S. japonicum. However, genes within one cluster could be differentially transcribed, which suggested

  6. Control over interfering memories in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramaccia, Davide Francesco; Penolazzi, Barbara; Libardi, Arianna; Genovese, Aldo; Castelli, Luigi; Palomba, Daniela; Galfano, Giovanni

    2018-02-01

    Recent studies have suggested that patients suffering from either anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) exhibit abnormal performance in the ability to control cognitive interference in response selection. We assessed the status of cognitive control in episodic memory by addressing the ability to inhibit interfering memories. To this end, we used the retrieval-practice paradigm, which allows for measuring both the beneficial and the detrimental effects of memory practice. The latter phenomenon, known as retrieval-induced forgetting (RIF), is thought to reflect an adaptive inhibitory mechanism aimed at reducing competition in memory retrieval. Twenty-seven healthy controls and 27 patients suffering from eating disorders (either AN or BN) performed a retrieval-practice paradigm and a control task addressing general reactivity and filled a self-report questionnaire on impulsivity. No differences between patients and healthy controls were observed for the beneficial effects of practice. The same pattern also emerged for RIF. However, when patients with AN and BN were analyzed separately, a clear dissociation emerged: patients with AN displayed no hint of RIF, whereas patients with BN showed an intact memory suppression performance. No group differences emerged in the control task. Our findings suggest a specific impairment in the ability to suppress interfering memories in patients with AN, thus extending current evidence of cognitive control deficits in AN to episodic memory.

  7. Micro RNAs in animal development.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plasterk, R.H.A.

    2006-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are approximately 22 nucleotide single-stranded noncoding RNA molecules that bind to target messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and silence their expression. This Essay explores the importance of miRNAs in animal development and their possible roles in disease and evolution.

  8. Die Rolle der microRNAs und Dicer in Entzündungszellen von Atemwegserkrankungen

    OpenAIRE

    Thiele, Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    Atemwegserkrankungen stellen ein weltweites Gesundheitsproblem dar und sind durch die Infiltration der Atemwege durch Immunzellen und die daraus resultierende Entzündung charakterisiert. Antientzündliche Therapieansätze sind daher am wichtigsten und effektivsten. Speziell für die Behandlung von Atemwegserkrankungen am Patienten ist eine effiziente topische Verabreichung von Therapeutika über die Atemwege wünschenswert. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) können Gene posttranskriptionell reguliere...

  9. Effects of interfering constituents on tritium smears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, G.D. Jr.; Cheeks, K.E.

    1993-01-01

    Tritium smears are performed by Health Protection Operations (HPO) to assess transferable contamination on work place surfaces, materials for movement outside Radiologically Controlled Areas (RCA), and product containers being shipped between facilities. Historically, gas proportional counters were used to detect transferable tritium contamination collected by smearing. Because tritium is a low-energy beta emitter, gas proportional counters do not provide the sensitivity or the counting efficiency to accurately measure the tritium activity on the smear. Liquid Scintillation Counters (LSC) provide greater counting efficiency for the low-energy beta particles along with greater reliability and reproducibility compared to gas flow proportional counters. The purpose of this technical evaluation was to determine the effects of interfering constituents such as filters, dirt and oil on the counting efficiency and tritium recoveries of tritium smears by LSC

  10. Dicer-like 3 produces transposable element-associated 24-nt siRNAs that control agricultural traits in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liya; Gu, Lianfeng; Song, Xianwei; Cui, Xiekui; Lu, Zhike; Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lulu; Hu, Fengyi; Zhai, Jixian; Meyers, Blake C.; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) and repetitive sequences make up over 35% of the rice (Oryza sativa) genome. The host regulates the activity of different TEs by different epigenetic mechanisms, including DNA methylation, histone H3K9 methylation, and histone H3K4 demethylation. TEs can also affect the expression of host genes. For example, miniature inverted repeat TEs (MITEs), dispersed high copy-number DNA TEs, can influence the expression of nearby genes. In plants, 24-nt small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are mainly derived from repeats and TEs. However, the extent to which TEs, particularly MITEs associated with 24-nt siRNAs, affect gene expression remains elusive. Here, we show that the rice Dicer-like 3 homolog OsDCL3a is primarily responsible for 24-nt siRNA processing. Impairing OsDCL3a expression by RNA interference caused phenotypes affecting important agricultural traits; these phenotypes include dwarfism, larger flag leaf angle, and fewer secondary branches. We used small RNA deep sequencing to identify 535,054 24-nt siRNA clusters. Of these clusters, ∼82% were OsDCL3a-dependent and showed significant enrichment of MITEs. Reduction of OsDCL3a function reduced the 24-nt siRNAs predominantly from MITEs and elevated expression of nearby genes. OsDCL3a directly targets genes involved in gibberellin and brassinosteroid homeostasis; OsDCL3a deficiency may affect these genes, thus causing the phenotypes of dwarfism and enlarged flag leaf angle. Our work identifies OsDCL3a-dependent 24-nt siRNAs derived from MITEs as broadly functioning regulators for fine-tuning gene expression, which may reflect a conserved epigenetic mechanism in higher plants with genomes rich in dispersed repeats or TEs. PMID:24554078

  11. The Complexity of Posttranscriptional Small RNA Regulatory Networks Revealed by In Silico Analysis of Gossypium arboreum L. Leaf, Flower and Boll Small Regulatory RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Hu

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs and secondary small interfering RNAs (principally phased siRNAs or trans-acting siRNAs are two distinct subfamilies of small RNAs (sRNAs that are emerging as key regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression in plants. Both miRNAs and secondary-siRNAs (sec-siRNAs are processed from longer RNA precursors by DICER-LIKE proteins (DCLs. Gossypium arboreum L., also known as tree cotton or Asian cotton, is a diploid, possibly ancestral relative of tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L., the predominant type of commercially grown cotton worldwide known as upland cotton. To understand the biological significance of these gene regulators in G. arboreum, a bioinformatics analysis was performed on G. arboreum small RNAs produced from G. arboreum leaf, flower, and boll tissues. Consequently, 263 miRNAs derived from 353 precursors, including 155 conserved miRNAs (cs-miRNAs and 108 novel lineage-specific miRNAs (ls-miRNAs. Along with miRNAs, 2,033 miRNA variants (isomiRNAs were identified as well. Those isomiRNAs with variation at the 3'-miRNA end were expressed at the highest levels, compared to other types of variants. In addition, 755 pha-siRNAs derived 319 pha-siRNA gene transcripts (PGTs were identified, and the potential pha-siRNA initiators were predicted. Also, 2,251 non-phased siRNAs were found as well, of which 1,088 appeared to be produced by so-called cis- or trans-cleavage of the PGTs observed at positions differing from pha-siRNAs. Of those sRNAs, 148 miRNAs/isomiRNAs and 274 phased/non-phased siRNAs were differentially expressed in one or more pairs of tissues examined. Target analysis revealed that target genes for both miRNAs and pha-siRNAs are involved a broad range of metabolic and enzymatic activities. We demonstrate that secondary siRNA production could result from initial cleavage of precursors by both miRNAs or isomiRNAs, and that subsequently produced phased and unphased siRNAs could result that also serve as triggers

  12. The Complexity of Posttranscriptional Small RNA Regulatory Networks Revealed by In Silico Analysis of Gossypium arboreum L. Leaf, Flower and Boll Small Regulatory RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Rashotte, Aaron M; Singh, Narendra K; Weaver, David B; Goertzen, Leslie R; Singh, Shree R; Locy, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and secondary small interfering RNAs (principally phased siRNAs or trans-acting siRNAs) are two distinct subfamilies of small RNAs (sRNAs) that are emerging as key regulators of posttranscriptional gene expression in plants. Both miRNAs and secondary-siRNAs (sec-siRNAs) are processed from longer RNA precursors by DICER-LIKE proteins (DCLs). Gossypium arboreum L., also known as tree cotton or Asian cotton, is a diploid, possibly ancestral relative of tetraploid Gossypium hirsutum L., the predominant type of commercially grown cotton worldwide known as upland cotton. To understand the biological significance of these gene regulators in G. arboreum, a bioinformatics analysis was performed on G. arboreum small RNAs produced from G. arboreum leaf, flower, and boll tissues. Consequently, 263 miRNAs derived from 353 precursors, including 155 conserved miRNAs (cs-miRNAs) and 108 novel lineage-specific miRNAs (ls-miRNAs). Along with miRNAs, 2,033 miRNA variants (isomiRNAs) were identified as well. Those isomiRNAs with variation at the 3'-miRNA end were expressed at the highest levels, compared to other types of variants. In addition, 755 pha-siRNAs derived 319 pha-siRNA gene transcripts (PGTs) were identified, and the potential pha-siRNA initiators were predicted. Also, 2,251 non-phased siRNAs were found as well, of which 1,088 appeared to be produced by so-called cis- or trans-cleavage of the PGTs observed at positions differing from pha-siRNAs. Of those sRNAs, 148 miRNAs/isomiRNAs and 274 phased/non-phased siRNAs were differentially expressed in one or more pairs of tissues examined. Target analysis revealed that target genes for both miRNAs and pha-siRNAs are involved a broad range of metabolic and enzymatic activities. We demonstrate that secondary siRNA production could result from initial cleavage of precursors by both miRNAs or isomiRNAs, and that subsequently produced phased and unphased siRNAs could result that also serve as triggers of a second

  13. MicroRNA-directed siRNA biogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Régis L; Steiner, Florian A; Berezikov, Eugene; Ketting, René F

    2010-04-08

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a post-transcriptional silencing process, triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), leading to the destabilization of homologous mRNAs. A distinction has been made between endogenous RNAi-related pathways and the exogenous RNAi pathway, the latter being essential for the experimental use of RNAi. Previous studies have shown that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, a complex containing the enzymes Dicer and the Argonaute RDE-1 process dsRNA. Dicer is responsible for cleaving dsRNA into short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) while RDE-1 acts as the siRNA acceptor. RDE-1 then guides a multi-protein complex to homologous targets to trigger mRNA destabilization. However, endogenous role(s) for RDE-1, if any, have remained unexplored. We here show that RDE-1 functions as a scavenger protein, taking up small RNA molecules from many different sources, including the microRNA (miRNA) pathway. This is in striking contrast to Argonaute proteins functioning directly in the miRNA pathway, ALG-1 and ALG-2: these proteins exclusively bind miRNAs. While playing no significant role in the biogenesis of the main pool of miRNAs, RDE-1 binds endogenous miRNAs and triggers RdRP activity on at least one perfectly matching, endogenous miRNA target. The resulting secondary siRNAs are taken up by a set of Argonaute proteins known to act as siRNA acceptors in exogenous RNAi, resulting in strong mRNA destabilization. Our results show that RDE-1 in an endogenous setting is actively screening the transcriptome using many different small RNAs, including miRNAs, as a guide, with implications for the evolution of transcripts with a potential to be recognized by Dicer.

  14. MicroRNA–Directed siRNA Biogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Régis L.; Steiner, Florian A.; Berezikov, Eugene; Ketting, René F.

    2010-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a post-transcriptional silencing process, triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), leading to the destabilization of homologous mRNAs. A distinction has been made between endogenous RNAi–related pathways and the exogenous RNAi pathway, the latter being essential for the experimental use of RNAi. Previous studies have shown that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, a complex containing the enzymes Dicer and the Argonaute RDE-1 process dsRNA. Dicer is responsible for cleaving dsRNA into short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) while RDE-1 acts as the siRNA acceptor. RDE-1 then guides a multi-protein complex to homologous targets to trigger mRNA destabilization. However, endogenous role(s) for RDE-1, if any, have remained unexplored. We here show that RDE-1 functions as a scavenger protein, taking up small RNA molecules from many different sources, including the microRNA (miRNA) pathway. This is in striking contrast to Argonaute proteins functioning directly in the miRNA pathway, ALG-1 and ALG-2: these proteins exclusively bind miRNAs. While playing no significant role in the biogenesis of the main pool of miRNAs, RDE-1 binds endogenous miRNAs and triggers RdRP activity on at least one perfectly matching, endogenous miRNA target. The resulting secondary siRNAs are taken up by a set of Argonaute proteins known to act as siRNA acceptors in exogenous RNAi, resulting in strong mRNA destabilization. Our results show that RDE-1 in an endogenous setting is actively screening the transcriptome using many different small RNAs, including miRNAs, as a guide, with implications for the evolution of transcripts with a potential to be recognized by Dicer. PMID:20386745

  15. Characterization of a defective interfering RNA that contains a mosaic of a plant viral genome. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, T.J.; Jackson, A.O.

    1991-12-31

    Our lab was the first to describe and characterize a defective interfering RNA (DI RNAs or DIs) in association with a small RNA plant virus. The features of the DIs that we discovered in infections of tomato bushy stunt virus were compatible with the properties of DIs identified in many animal virus infections. Animal virologists have generally recognized the importance of studying DIs because they are invaluable tools for identifying cis-acting sequences important in virus multiplication and because they offer the opportunity to elucidate mechanisms involved in viral persistence and disease attenuation. Hence our discovery offered a comparably valuable tool for use in plant virus studies for the first time. Since then, we have also discovered the second example of plant viral DI RNAs associated with turnip crinkle virus (TCV), a virus structurally related to TBSV. We proposed a thorough characterization of this unique class of symptom modulating RNAs with the overall objective of identifying viral RNA nucleotide, sequences involved in such fundamental processes as virus replication and encapsidation as well as the degree of symptom expression resulting from the viral-DI-host interaction. The proposed research focused on the molecular characterization of the DI RNAs and the helper virus. We had demonstrated that the DIs were collinear deletion mutants of the genome of a cherry strain of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV). We had also shown that these low molecular weight RNAs interfered with the helper plant virus and modulated disease expression by preventing the development of a lethal necrotic disease in susceptible host plants. We also suggested that by exploring the mechanisms associated with the symptom attenuation effect, we might be able to devise novel strategies useful for engineering viral disease resistance.

  16. MicroRNAs and Presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiming; Wu, Junwu; Jiang, Wenjing; Tang, Jianguo

    2018-02-01

    Presbycusis (age-related hearing loss) is the most universal sensory degenerative disease in elderly people caused by the degeneration of cochlear cells. Non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) play a fundamental role in gene regulation in almost every multicellular organism, and control the aging processes. It has been identified that various miRNAs are up- or down-regulated during mammalian aging processes in tissue-specific manners. Most miRNAs bind to specific sites on their target messenger-RNAs (mRNAs) and decrease their expression. Germline mutation may lead to dysregulation of potential miRNAs expression, causing progressive hair cell degeneration and age-related hearing loss. Therapeutic innovations could emerge from a better understanding of diverse function of miRNAs in presbycusis. This review summarizes the relationship between miRNAs and presbycusis, and presents novel miRNAs-targeted strategies against presbycusis.

  17. Transposon defense by endo-siRNAs, piRNAs and somatic pilRNAs in Drosophila: contributions of Loqs-PD and R2D2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milijana Mirkovic-Hösle

    Full Text Available Transposable elements are a serious threat for genome integrity and their control via small RNA mediated silencing pathways is an ancient strategy. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has two silencing activities that target transposons: endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs or endo-siRNAs and Piwi-interacting small RNAs (piRNAs. The biogenesis of endo-siRNAs involves the Dicer-2 co-factors Loqs-PD, which acts predominantly during processing of dsRNA by Dcr-2, and R2D2, which primarily helps to direct siRNAs into the RNA interference effector Ago2. Nonetheless, loss of either protein is not sufficient to produce a phenotype comparable with a dcr-2 mutation. We provide further deep sequencing evidence supporting the notion that R2D2 and Loqs-PD have partially overlapping function. Certain transposons display a preference for either dsRBD-protein during production or loading; this appeared to correlate neither with overall abundance, classification of the transposon or a specific site of genomic origin. The endo-siRNA biogenesis pathway in germline operates according to the same principles as the existing model for the soma, and its impairment does not significantly affect piRNAs. Expanding the analysis, we confirmed the occurrence of somatic piRNA-like RNAs (pilRNAs that show a ping-pong signature. We detected expression of the Piwi-family protein mRNAs only barely above background, indicating that the somatic pilRNAs may arise from a small sub-population of somatic cells that express a functional piRNA pathway.

  18. New research progress of microRNAs in retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zeng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma(RBis the most common intraocular malignancy of children with extremely poor prognosis. MicroRNAs are small non-coding single-stranded RNAs in eukaryotic cells, which regulate the expression of gene by mRNA degradation or translation inhibition. MicroRNAs, acting as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, are associated with the occurrence and development of RB directly, which is vital for the early diagnosis and clinical targeted therapy of RB. This review summarized the expression of microRNAs in RB and the related mechanism.

  19. MicroRNAs, Regulatory Networks, and Comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russo, Francesco; Belling, Kirstine; Jensen, Anders Boeck

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs involved in the posttranscriptional regulation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). Each miRNA targets a specific set of mRNAs. Upon binding the miRNA inhibits mRNA translation or facilitate mRNA degradation. miRNAs are frequently deregulated in several pathologies...

  20. Deep sequencing of small RNAs identifies canonical and non-canonical miRNA and endogenous siRNAs in mammalian somatic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Leandro; Stebbing, Justin

    2013-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that regulate gene expression. They are characterized by specific maturation processes defined by canonical and non-canonical biogenic pathways. Analysis of ∼0.5 billion sequences from mouse data sets derived from different tissues, developmental stages and cell types, partly characterized by either ablation or mutation of the main proteins belonging to miRNA processor complexes, reveals 66 high-confidence new genomic loci coding for miRNAs that could be processed in a canonical or non-canonical manner. A proportion of the newly discovered miRNAs comprises mirtrons, for which we define a new sub-class. Notably, some of these newly discovered miRNAs are generated from untranslated and open reading frames of coding genes, and we experimentally validate these. We also show that many annotated miRNAs do not present miRNA-like features, as they are neither processed by known processing complexes nor loaded on AGO2; this indicates that the current miRNA miRBase database list should be refined and re-defined. Accordingly, a group of them map on ribosomal RNA molecules, whereas others cannot undergo genuine miRNA biogenesis. Notably, a group of annotated miRNAs are Dgcr8 independent and DICER dependent endogenous small interfering RNAs that derive from a unique hairpin formed from a short interspersed nuclear element.

  1. RISC assembly: Coordination between small RNAs and Argonaute proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hotaka; Tomari, Yukihide

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs generally form ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes with their partner proteins to exert their functions. Small RNAs, including microRNAs, small interfering RNAs, and PIWI-interacting RNAs, assemble with Argonaute (Ago) family proteins into the effector complex called RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which mediates sequence-specific target gene silencing. RISC assembly is not a simple binding between a small RNA and Ago; rather, it follows an ordered multi-step pathway that requires specific accessory factors. Some steps of RISC assembly and RISC-mediated gene silencing are dependent on or facilitated by particular intracellular platforms, suggesting their spatial regulation. In this review, we summarize the currently known mechanisms for RISC assembly of each small RNA class and propose a revised model for the role of the chaperone machinery in the duplex-initiated RISC assembly pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Non-Coding RNAs and Endometrial Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Vallone

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are involved in the regulation of cell metabolism and neoplastic transformation. Recent studies have tried to clarify the significance of these information carriers in the genesis and progression of various cancers and their use as biomarkers for the disease; possible targets for the inhibition of growth and invasion by the neoplastic cells have been suggested. The significance of ncRNAs in lung cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, and melanoma has been amply investigated with important results. Recently, the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs has also been included in cancer studies. Studies on the relation between endometrial cancer (EC and ncRNAs, such as small ncRNAs or micro RNAs (miRNAs, transfer RNAs (tRNAs, ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs, antisense RNAs (asRNAs, small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs, Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs, small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs, competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs, lncRNAs, and long intergenic ncRNAs (lincRNAs have been published. The recent literature produced in the last three years was extracted from PubMed by two independent readers, which was then selected for the possible relation between ncRNAs, oncogenesis in general, and EC in particular.

  3. Micro-RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taipaleenmäki, H.; Hokland, L. B.; Chen, Li

    2012-01-01

    Osteoblast differentiation and bone formation (osteogenesis) are regulated by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Recently, a novel class of regulatory factors termed microRNAs has been identified as playing an important role in the regulation of many aspects of osteoblast biology...... including proliferation, differentiation, metabolism and apoptosis. Also, preliminary data from animal disease models suggest that targeting miRNAs in bone can be a novel approach to increase bone mass. This review highlights the current knowledge of microRNA biology and their role in bone formation...

  4. Competitive Endogenous RNAs in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    that there is a negative correlation between GAS5 and miR-21, and microRNAs silence target genes via RISC complex carrying AGO2, next we asked whether...GAS5 directly interacts with miR-12 in the RISC complex. Thus, we synthesized GAS5 RNA probe and labeled with biotin and then mixed with cellular

  5. Roles of small RNAs in soybean defense against Phytophthora sojae infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James; Gao, Lei; Yang, Yang; Zhai, Jixian; Arikit, Siwaret; Yu, Yu; Duan, Shuyi; Chan, Vicky; Xiong, Qin; Yan, Jun; Li, Shengben; Liu, Renyi; Wang, Yuanchao; Tang, Guiliang; Meyers, Blake C; Chen, Xuemei; Ma, Wenbo

    2014-09-01

    The genus Phytophthora consists of many notorious pathogens of crops and forestry trees. At present, battling Phytophthora diseases is challenging due to a lack of understanding of their pathogenesis. We investigated the role of small RNAs in regulating soybean defense in response to infection by Phytophthora sojae, the second most destructive pathogen of soybean. Small RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), are universal regulators that repress target gene expression in eukaryotes. We identified known and novel small RNAs that differentially accumulated during P. sojae infection in soybean roots. Among them, miR393 and miR166 were induced by heat-inactivated P. sojae hyphae, indicating that they may be involved in soybean basal defense. Indeed, knocking down the level of mature miR393 led to enhanced susceptibility of soybean to P. sojae; furthermore, the expression of isoflavonoid biosynthetic genes was drastically reduced in miR393 knockdown roots. These data suggest that miR393 promotes soybean defense against P. sojae. In addition to miRNAs, P. sojae infection also resulted in increased accumulation of phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs) that are predominantly generated from canonical resistance genes encoding nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat proteins and genes encoding pentatricopeptide repeat-containing proteins. This work identifies specific miRNAs and phasiRNAs that regulate defense-associated genes in soybean during Phytophthora infection. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Dynamic evolution and biogenesis of small RNAs during sex reversal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Luo, Majing; Sheng, Yue; Hong, Qiang; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2015-05-06

    Understanding origin, evolution and functions of small RNA (sRNA) genes has been a great challenge in the past decade. Molecular mechanisms underlying sexual reversal in vertebrates, particularly sRNAs involved in this process, are largely unknown. By deep-sequencing of small RNA transcriptomes in combination with genomic analysis, we identified a large amount of piRNAs and miRNAs including over 1,000 novel miRNAs, which were differentially expressed during gonad reversal from ovary to testis via ovotesis. Biogenesis and expressions of miRNAs were dynamically changed during the reversal. Notably, phylogenetic analysis revealed dynamic expansions of miRNAs in vertebrates and an evolutionary trajectory of conserved miR-17-92 cluster in the Eukarya. We showed that the miR-17-92 cluster in vertebrates was generated through multiple duplications from ancestor miR-92 in invertebrates Tetranychus urticae and Daphnia pulex from the Chelicerata around 580 Mya. Moreover, we identified the sexual regulator Dmrt1 as a direct target of the members miR-19a and -19b in the cluster. These data suggested dynamic biogenesis and expressions of small RNAs during sex reversal and revealed multiple expansions and evolutionary trajectory of miRNAs from invertebrates to vertebrates, which implicate small RNAs in sexual reversal and provide new insight into evolutionary and molecular mechanisms underlying sexual reversal.

  7. Structured RNAs and synteny regions in the pig genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthon, Christian; Tafer, Hakim; Havgaard, Jakob H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Annotating mammalian genomes for noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) is nontrivial since far from all ncRNAs are known and the computational models are resource demanding. Currently, the human genome holds the best mammalian ncRNA annotation, a result of numerous efforts by several groups. However......, a more direct strategy is desired for the increasing number of sequenced mammalian genomes of which some, such as the pig, are relevant as disease models and production animals. RESULTS: We present a comprehensive annotation of structured RNAs in the pig genome. Combining sequence and structure...... lncRNA loci, 11 conflicts of annotation, and 3,183 ncRNA genes. The ncRNA genes comprise 359 miRNAs, 8 ribozymes, 185 rRNAs, 638 snoRNAs, 1,030 snRNAs, 810 tRNAs and 153 ncRNA genes not belonging to the here fore mentioned classes. When running the pipeline on a local shuffled version of the genome...

  8. Detection and Analysis of Circular RNAs by RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Amaresh C; Gorospe, Myriam

    2018-03-20

    Gene expression in eukaryotic cells is tightly regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Posttranscriptional processes, including pre-mRNA splicing, mRNA export, mRNA turnover, and mRNA translation, are controlled by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) and noncoding (nc)RNAs. The vast family of ncRNAs comprises diverse regulatory RNAs, such as microRNAs and long noncoding (lnc)RNAs, but also the poorly explored class of circular (circ)RNAs. Although first discovered more than three decades ago by electron microscopy, only the advent of high-throughput RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) and the development of innovative bioinformatic pipelines have begun to allow the systematic identification of circRNAs (Szabo and Salzman, 2016; Panda et al ., 2017b; Panda et al ., 2017c). However, the validation of true circRNAs identified by RNA sequencing requires other molecular biology techniques including reverse transcription (RT) followed by conventional or quantitative (q) polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and Northern blot analysis (Jeck and Sharpless, 2014). RT-qPCR analysis of circular RNAs using divergent primers has been widely used for the detection, validation, and sometimes quantification of circRNAs (Abdelmohsen et al ., 2015 and 2017; Panda et al ., 2017b). As detailed here, divergent primers designed to span the circRNA backsplice junction sequence can specifically amplify the circRNAs and not the counterpart linear RNA. In sum, RT-PCR analysis using divergent primers allows direct detection and quantification of circRNAs.

  9. A mathematical solution for the parameters of three interfering resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X.; Shen, C. P.

    2018-04-01

    The multiple-solution problem in determining the parameters of three interfering resonances from a fit to an experimentally measured distribution is considered from a mathematical viewpoint. It is shown that there are four numerical solutions for a fit with three coherent Breit-Wigner functions. Although explicit analytical formulae cannot be derived in this case, we provide some constraint equations between the four solutions. For the cases of nonrelativistic and relativistic Breit-Wigner forms of amplitude functions, a numerical method is provided to derive the other solutions from that already obtained, based on the obtained constraint equations. In real experimental measurements with more complicated amplitude forms similar to Breit-Wigner functions, the same method can be deduced and performed to get numerical solutions. The good agreement between the solutions found using this mathematical method and those directly from the fit verifies the correctness of the constraint equations and mathematical methodology used. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (11575017, 11761141009), the Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2015CB856701) and the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  10. A Transcriptional Regulatory Network Containing Nuclear Receptors and Long Noncoding RNAs Controls Basal and Drug-Induced Expression of Cytochrome P450s in HepaRG Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liming; Bao, Yifan; Piekos, Stephanie C; Zhu, Kexin; Zhang, Lirong; Zhong, Xiao-Bo

    2018-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes are responsible for metabolizing drugs. Expression of P450s can directly affect drug metabolism, resulting in various outcomes in therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects. Several nuclear receptors are transcription factors that can regulate expression of P450s at both basal and drug-induced levels. Some long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) near a transcription factor are found to participate in the regulatory functions of the transcription factors. The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a transcriptional regulatory network containing nuclear receptors and lncRNAs controlling both basal and drug-induced expression of P450s in HepaRG cells. Small interfering RNAs or small hairpin RNAs were applied to knock down four nuclear receptors [hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 α (HNF1 α ), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 α (HNF4 α ), pregnane X receptor (PXR), and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR)] as well as two lncRNAs [HNF1 α antisense RNA 1 (HNF1 α -AS1) and HNF4 α antisense RNA 1 (HNF4 α -AS1)] in HepaRG cells with or without treatment of phenobarbital or rifampicin. Expression of eight P450 enzymes was examined in both basal and drug-induced levels. CAR and PXR mainly regulated expression of specific P450s. HNF1 α and HNF4 α affected expression of a wide range of P450s as well as other transcription factors. HNF1 α and HNF4 α controlled the expression of their neighborhood lncRNAs, HNF1 α -AS1 and HNF4 α -AS1, respectively. HNF1 α -AS1 and HNF4 α -AS1 was also involved in the regulation of P450s and transcription factors in diverse manners. Altogether, our study concludes that a transcription regulatory network containing the nuclear receptors and lncRNAs controls both basal and drug-induced expression of P450s in HepaRG cells. Copyright © 2018 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  11. microRNAs in hematopoiesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazare, Seka S.; Wojtowicz, Edyta E.; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; de Haan, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    miRNAs have been implicated in all stages of hematopoiesis including maintenance of self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and differentiation into mature blood cells. Regulation by miRNAs is markedly intertwined with transcription factors. In this review, we highlight miRNAs shown to be

  12. Role of transposon-derived small RNAs in the interplay between genomes and parasitic DNA in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misuzu Nosaka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is a defense system against "genomic parasites" such as transposable elements (TE, which are potentially harmful to host genomes. In plants, transcripts from TEs induce production of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs and are processed into small RNAs (small interfering RNAs, siRNAs that suppress TEs by RNA-directed DNA methylation. Thus, the majority of TEs are epigenetically silenced. On the other hand, most of the eukaryotic genome is composed of TEs and their remnants, suggesting that TEs have evolved countermeasures against host-mediated silencing. Under some circumstances, TEs can become active and increase in copy number. Knowledge is accumulating on the mechanisms of TE silencing by the host; however, the mechanisms by which TEs counteract silencing are poorly understood. Here, we show that a class of TEs in rice produces a microRNA (miRNA to suppress host silencing. Members of the microRNA820 (miR820 gene family are located within CACTA DNA transposons in rice and target a de novo DNA methyltransferase gene, OsDRM2, one of the components of epigenetic silencing. We confirmed that miR820 negatively regulates the expression of OsDRM2. In addition, we found that expression levels of various TEs are increased quite sensitively in response to decreased OsDRM2 expression and DNA methylation at TE loci. Furthermore, we found that the nucleotide sequence of miR820 and its recognition site within the target gene in some Oryza species have co-evolved to maintain their base-pairing ability. The co-evolution of these sequences provides evidence for the functionality of this regulation. Our results demonstrate how parasitic elements in the genome escape the host's defense machinery. Furthermore, our analysis of the regulation of OsDRM2 by miR820 sheds light on the action of transposon-derived small RNAs, not only as a defense mechanism for host genomes but also as a regulator of interactions between hosts and their parasitic elements.

  13. Identification and molecular characterization of a trans-acting small interfering RNA producing locus regulating leaf rust responsive gene expression in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Summi; Kumar, Dhananjay; Jha, Shailendra; Prabhu, Kumble Vinod; Kumar, Manish; Mukhopadhyay, Kunal

    2017-11-01

    A novel leaf rust responsive ta-siRNA-producing locus was identified in wheat showing similarity to 28S rRNA and generated four differentially expressing ta-siRNAs by phasing which targeted stress responsive genes. Trans-acting-small interfering RNAs (Ta-siRNAs) are plant specific molecules generally involved in development and are also stress responsive. Ta-siRNAs identified in wheat till date are all responsive to abiotic stress only. Wheat cultivation is severely affected by rusts and leaf rust particularly affects grain filling. This study reports a novel ta-siRNA producing locus (TAS) in wheat which is a segment of 28S ribosomal RNA but shows differential expression during leaf rust infestation. Four small RNA libraries prepared from wheat Near Isogenic Lines were treated with leaf rust pathogen and compared with untreated controls. A TAS with the ability to generate four ta-siRNAs by phasing events was identified along with the microRNA TamiR16 as the phase initiator. The targets of the ta-siRNAs included α-gliadin, leucine rich repeat, trans-membrane proteins, glutathione-S-transferase, and fatty acid desaturase among others, which are either stress responsive genes or are essential for normal growth and development of plants. Expression of the TAS, its generated ta-siRNAs, and their target genes were profiled at five different time points after pathogen inoculation of susceptible and resistant wheat isolines and compared with mock-inoculated controls. Comparative analysis of expression unveiled differential and reciprocal relationship as well as discrete patterns between susceptible and resistant isolines. The expression profiles of the target genes of the identified ta-siRNAs advocate more towards effector triggered susceptibility favouring pathogenesis. The study helps in discerning the functions of wheat genes regulated by ta-siRNAs in response to leaf rust.

  14. Silencing of SARS-CoV spike gene by small interfering RNA in HEK 293T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Zhaoling; Zhao Ping; Zhang Xiaolian; Yu Jianguo; Cao Mingmei; Zhao Lanjuan; Luan Jie; Qi Zhongtian

    2004-01-01

    Two candidate small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) corresponding to severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) spike gene were designed and in vitro transcribed to explore the possibility of silencing SARS-CoV S gene. The plasmid pEGFP-optS, which contains the codon-optimized SARS-CoV S gene and expresses spike-EGFP fusion protein (S-EGFP) as silencing target and expressing reporter, was transfected with siRNAs into HEK 293T cells. At various time points of posttransfection, the levels of S-EGFP expression and amounts of spike mRNA transcript were detected by fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, Western blot, and real-time quantitative PCR, respectively. The results showed that the cells transfected with pEGFP-optS expressed S-EGFP fusion protein at a higher level compared with those transfected with pEGFP-S, which contains wildtype SARS-CoV spike gene sequence. The green fluorescence, mean fluorescence intensity, and SARS-CoV S RNA transcripts were found significantly reduced, and the expression of SARS-CoV S glycoprotein was strongly inhibited in those cells co-transfected with either EGFP- or S-specific siRNAs. Our findings demonstrated that the S-specific siRNAs used in this study were able to specifically and effectively inhibit SARS-CoV S glycoprotein expression in cultured cells through blocking the accumulation of S mRNA, which may provide an approach for studies on the functions of SARS-CoV S gene and development of novel prophylactic or therapeutic agents for SARS-CoV

  15. Cell Cycle Regulation of Stem Cells by MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mens, Michelle M J; Ghanbari, Mohsen

    2018-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNA molecules involved in the regulation of gene expression. They are involved in the fine-tuning of fundamental biological processes such as proliferation, differentiation, survival and apoptosis in many cell types. Emerging evidence suggests that miRNAs regulate critical pathways involved in stem cell function. Several miRNAs have been suggested to target transcripts that directly or indirectly coordinate the cell cycle progression of stem cells. Moreover, previous studies have shown that altered expression levels of miRNAs can contribute to pathological conditions, such as cancer, due to the loss of cell cycle regulation. However, the precise mechanism underlying miRNA-mediated regulation of cell cycle in stem cells is still incompletely understood. In this review, we discuss current knowledge of miRNAs regulatory role in cell cycle progression of stem cells. We describe how specific miRNAs may control cell cycle associated molecules and checkpoints in embryonic, somatic and cancer stem cells. We further outline how these miRNAs could be regulated to influence cell cycle progression in stem cells as a potential clinical application.

  16. Vitamin D activation of functionally distinct regulatory miRNAs in primary human osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Thomas S; Chun, Rene F; Rieger, Sandra; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2013-06-01

    When bound to the vitamin D receptor (VDR), the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) is a potent regulator of osteoblast transcription. Less clear is the impact of 1,25D on posttranscriptional events in osteoblasts, such as the generation and action of microRNAs (miRNAs). Microarray analysis using replicate (n = 3) primary cultures of human osteoblasts (HOBs) identified human miRNAs that were differentially regulated by >1.5-fold following treatment with 1,25D (10 nM, 6 hours), which included miRNAs 637 and 1228. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR analyses showed that the host gene for miR-1228, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), was coinduced with miR-1228 in a dose-dependent fashion following treatment with 1,25D (0.1-10 nM, 6 hours). By contrast, the endogenous host gene for miR-637, death-associated protein kinase 3 (DAPK3), was transcriptionally repressed by following treatment with 1,25D. Analysis of two potential targets for miR-637 and miR-1228 in HOB, type IV collagen (COL4A1) and bone morphogenic protein 2 kinase (BMP2K), respectively, showed that 1,25D-mediates suppression of these targets via distinct mechanisms. In the case of miR-637, suppression of COL4A1 appears to occur via decreased levels of COL4A1 mRNA. By contrast, suppression of BMP2K by miR-1228 appears to occur by inhibition of protein translation. In mature HOBs, small interfering RNA (siRNA) inactivation of miR-1228 alone was sufficient to abrogate 1,25D-mediated downregulation of BMP2K protein expression. This was associated with suppression of prodifferentiation responses to 1,25D in HOB, as represented by parallel decrease in osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase expression. These data show for the first time that the effects of 1,25D on human bone cells are not restricted to classical VDR-mediated transcriptional responses but also involve miRNA-directed posttranscriptional mechanisms. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bone and

  17. Different virus-derived siRNAs profiles between leaves and fruits in Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus-infected Lagenaria siceraria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junmin Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanism, through which virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs playing roles in host antiviral defence are produced in virus-infected plant. Deep sequencing technology has revolutionized the study on the interaction between virus and plant host through the analysis of vsiRNAs profile. However, comparison of vsiRNA profiles in different tissues from a same host plant has been rarely reported. In this study, the profiles of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs from leaves and fruits of Lagenaria siceraria plants infected with Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV were comprehensively characterized and compared. Many more vsiRNAs were present in infected leaves than in fruits. vsiRNAs from both leaves and fruits were mostly 21- and 22-nt in size as previously described in other virus-infected plants. Interestingly, vsiRNAs were predominantly produced from the viral positive strand RNAs in infected leaves, whereas in infected fruits they were derived equally from the positive and negative strands. Many leaf-specific positive vsiRNAs with lengths of 21-nt (2,058 or 22-nt (3,996 were identified but only six (21-nt and one (22-nt positive vsiRNAs were found to be specific to fruits. vsiRNAs hotspots were only present in the 5’-terminal and 3’-terminal of viral positive strand in fruits, while multiple hotspots were identified in leaves. Differences in GC content and 5'-terminal nucleotide of vsiRNAs were also observed in the two organs. To our knowledge, this provides the first high-resolution comparison of vsiRNA profiles between different tissues of the same host plant.

  18. Circular RNAs in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, L S; Hansen, T B; Venø, M T

    2018-01-01

    Circular RNA (circRNA) is a novel member of the noncoding cancer genome with distinct properties and diverse cellular functions, which is being explored at a steadily increasing pace. The list of endogenous circRNAs involved in cancer continues to grow; however, the functional relevance of the vast...... for circRNA cancer research and current caveats, which must be addressed to facilitate the translation of basic circRNA research into clinical use.Oncogene advance online publication, 9 October 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.361....

  19. A novel program to design siRNAs simultaneously effective to highly variable virus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui Sun; Ahn, Jeonghyun; Jun, Eun Jung; Yang, Sanghwa; Joo, Chul Hyun; Kim, Yoo Kyum; Lee, Heuiran

    2009-07-10

    A major concern of antiviral therapy using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting RNA viral genome is high sequence diversity and mutation rate due to genetic instability. To overcome this problem, it is indispensable to design siRNAs targeting highly conserved regions. We thus designed CAPSID (Convenient Application Program for siRNA Design), a novel bioinformatics program to identify siRNAs targeting highly conserved regions within RNA viral genomes. From a set of input RNAs of diverse sequences, CAPSID rapidly searches conserved patterns and suggests highly potent siRNA candidates in a hierarchical manner. To validate the usefulness of this novel program, we investigated the antiviral potency of universal siRNA for various Human enterovirus B (HEB) serotypes. Assessment of antiviral efficacy using Hela cells, clearly demonstrates that HEB-specific siRNAs exhibit protective effects against all HEBs examined. These findings strongly indicate that CAPSID can be applied to select universal antiviral siRNAs against highly divergent viral genomes.

  20. Modulation of microRNA activity by semi-microRNAs (smiRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle ePlante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ribonuclease Dicer plays a central role in the microRNA pathway by catalyzing the formation of 19 to 24-nucleotide (nt long microRNAs. Subsequently incorporated into Ago2 effector complexes, microRNAs are known to regulate messenger RNA (mRNA translation. Whether shorter RNA species derived from microRNAs exist and play a role in mRNA regulation remains unknown. Here, we report the serendipitous discovery of a 12-nt long RNA species corresponding to the 5’ region of the microRNA let-7, and tentatively termed semi-microRNA, or smiRNA. Using a smiRNA derived from the precursor of miR-223 as a model, we show that 12-nt long smiRNA species are devoid of any direct mRNA regulatory activity, as assessed in a reporter gene activity assay in transfected cultured human cells. However, smiR-223 was found to modulate the ability of the microRNA from which it derives to mediate translational repression or cleavage of reporter mRNAs. Our findings suggest that smiRNAs may be generated along the microRNA pathway and participate to the control of gene expression by regulating the activity of the related full-length mature microRNA in vivo.

  1. Synaptic vesicles contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs) including transfer RNA fragments (trfRNA) and microRNAs (miRNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huinan; Wu, Cheng; Aramayo, Rodolfo; Sachs, Matthew S; Harlow, Mark L

    2015-10-08

    Synaptic vesicles (SVs) are neuronal presynaptic organelles that load and release neurotransmitter at chemical synapses. In addition to classic neurotransmitters, we have found that synaptic vesicles isolated from the electric organ of Torpedo californica, a model cholinergic synapse, contain small ribonucleic acids (sRNAs), primarily the 5' ends of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) termed tRNA fragments (trfRNAs). To test the evolutionary conservation of SV sRNAs we examined isolated SVs from the mouse central nervous system (CNS). We found abundant levels of sRNAs in mouse SVs, including trfRNAs and micro RNAs (miRNAs) known to be involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. This discovery suggests that, in addition to inducing changes in local dendritic excitability through the release of neurotransmitters, SVs may, through the release of specific trfRNAs and miRNAs, directly regulate local protein synthesis. We believe these findings have broad implications for the study of chemical synaptic transmission.

  2. Identification of Conserved and Novel MicroRNAs in Blueberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyang Yue

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of small endogenous RNAs that play important regulatory roles in cells by negatively affecting gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. There have been extensive studies aiming to identify miRNAs and to elucidate their functions in various plant species. In the present study, we employed the high-throughput sequencing technology to profile miRNAs in blueberry fruits. A total of 9,992,446 small RNA tags with sizes ranged from 18 to 30 nt were obtained, indicating that blueberry fruits have a large and diverse small RNA population. Bioinformatic analysis identified 412 conserved miRNAs belonging to 29 families, and 35 predicted novel miRNAs that are likely to be unique to blueberries. Among them, expression profiles of five conserved miRNAs were validated by stem loop qRT-PCR. Furthermore, the potential target genes of conserved and novel miRNAs were predicted and subjected to Gene Ontology (GO annotation. Enrichment analysis of the GO-represented biological processes and molecular functions revealed that these target genes were potentially involved in a wide range of metabolic pathways and developmental processes. Particularly, anthocyanin biosynthesis has been predicted to be directly or indirectly regulated by diverse miRNA families. This study is the first report on genome-wide miRNA profile analysis in blueberry and it provides a useful resource for further elucidation of the functional roles of miRNAs during fruit development and ripening.

  3. Small RNA-directed epigenetic natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jixian Zhai

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in epigenetics has revealed mechanisms that can heritably regulate gene function independent of genetic alterations. Nevertheless, little is known about the role of epigenetics in evolution. This is due in part to scant data on epigenetic variation among natural populations. In plants, small interfering RNA (siRNA is involved in both the initiation and maintenance of gene silencing by directing DNA methylation and/or histone methylation. Here, we report that, in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, a cluster of approximately 24 nt siRNAs found at high levels in the ecotype Landsberg erecta (Ler could direct DNA methylation and heterochromatinization at a hAT element adjacent to the promoter of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, a major repressor of flowering, whereas the same hAT element in ecotype Columbia (Col with almost identical DNA sequence, generates a set of low abundance siRNAs that do not direct these activities. We have called this hAT element MPF for Methylated region near Promoter of FLC, although de novo methylation triggered by an inverted repeat transgene at this region in Col does not alter its FLC expression. DNA methylation of the Ler allele MPF is dependent on genes in known silencing pathways, and such methylation is transmissible to Col by genetic crosses, although with varying degrees of penetrance. A genome-wide comparison of Ler and Col small RNAs identified at least 68 loci matched by a significant level of approximately 24 nt siRNAs present specifically in Ler but not Col, where nearly half of the loci are related to repeat or TE sequences. Methylation analysis revealed that 88% of the examined loci (37 out of 42 were specifically methylated in Ler but not Col, suggesting that small RNA can direct epigenetic differences between two closely related Arabidopsis ecotypes.

  4. Targeting of microRNAs for therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenvang, Jan; Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2008-01-01

    miRNAs (microRNAs) comprise a class of small endogenous non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally repress gene expression by base-pairing with their target mRNAs. Recent evidence has shown that miRNAs play important roles in a wide variety of human diseases, such as viral infections, cancer...

  5. Pulmonary administration of small interfering RNA : The route to go?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, Mitchel; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter

    2016-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of RNA interference (RNAi), which is a post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism, researchers have been studying the therapeutic potential of using small interfering RNA (siRNA) to treat diseases that are characterized by excessive gene expression. Excessive gene

  6. (AAV)-mediated expression of small interfering RNA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective inhibition of specific gene by adenoassociated virus (AAV)-mediated expression of small interfering RNA. ... To perform functional tests on siRNA, which was expressed by the viral vector, recombinant AAVs, coding for siRNA against exogenous gene, EGFP, and endogenous gene, p53, were established and ...

  7. MAP Detector for Flash Memory Without Accessing the Interfering Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yassine, Hachem; Badiu, Mihai Alin; Coon, Justin P.

    2018-01-01

    the latency cost of accessing the interfering cells. Specifically, we exploit the fact that adjacent cells have common interferers by modeling the system as an appropriate hidden Markov model. Then we use the sum-product (message-passing) algorithm to compute the marginal posterior probabilities of the stored...

  8. Study of criterion for assuring the effectiveness of cathodic protection of buried steel pipelines being interfered with alternative current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, X.; Jiang, G.; Qiu, Y.; Tang, H. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Zhang, G.; Jin, X.; Xiang, Z. [Huazhong Natural Gas Subsidiary of PetroChina Pipeline Company, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Z. [Dwell Company Limited, PetroChina Engineering Company, Ltd, Beijing (China)

    2012-06-15

    Interference of alternative current (AC) on corrosion of X65 steel was investigated in soil. It was observed that the unfavorable effect of interfering AC was able to be effectively inhibited by increasing the direct current density of the cathodic protection (CP) system. A clear correlation was established between the CP current density and the tolerable AC current density. This led to a new criterion for assuring the effectiveness of CP of buried pipelines being interfered with AC. Field experimental results on a buried pipeline running below a 500 kV transmission line showed that the criterion could satisfactorily predict the risk of AC interfering on the CP system. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Spin O decay angular distribution for interfering mesons in electroproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funsten, H.; Gilfoyle, G.

    1994-04-01

    Self analyzing meson electroproduction experiments are currently being planned for the CEBAF CLAS detector. These experiments deduce the spin polarization of outgoing unstable spin s (?)0 mesons from their decay angular distribution, W({theta},{psi}). The large angular acceptance of the CLAS detector permits kinematic tracking of a sufficient number of these events to accurately determine electroproduction amplitudes from the deduced polarization. Maximum polarization information is obtained from W({theta},{psi}) for decay into spin 0 daughters. The helicity of the decaying meson is transferred to the daughter`s relative orbital angular momentum m-projection; none is {open_quotes}absorbed{close_quotes} into daughter helicities. The decaying meson`s helicity maximally appears in W({theta},{psi}). W({theta},{psi}) for spin 0 daughters has been derived for (1) vector meson electroproduction and (2) general interfering mesons produced by incident pions. This paper derives W({theta},{psi}) for electroproduction of two interfering mesons that decay into spin 0 daughters. An application is made to the case of interfering scalar and vector mesons. The derivation is an extension of work by Schil using the general decay formalism of Martin. The expressions can be easily extended to the case of N interfering mesons since interference occurs pairwise in the observable W ({theta},{psi}), a quadratic function of the meson amplitudes. The derivation uses the virtual photon density matrix of Schil which is transformed by a meson electroproduction transition operator, T. The resulting density matrix for the interfering mesons is then converted into a corresponding statistical tensor and contracted into the efficiency tensor for spin 0 daughters.

  10. Detection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by mass spectrometry procedures in doping controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Andreas; Walpurgis, Katja; Delahaut, Philippe; Kohler, Maxie; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Uncovering manipulation of athletic performance via small interfering (si)RNA is an emerging field in sports drug testing. Due to the potential to principally knock down every target gene in the organism by means of the RNA interference pathway, this facet of gene doping has become a realistic scenario. In the present study, two distinct model siRNAs comprising 21 nucleotides were designed as double strands which were perfect counterparts to a sequence of the respective messenger RNA coding the muscle regulator myostatin of Rattus norvegicus. Several modified nucleotides were introduced in both the sense and the antisense strand comprising phosphothioates, 2'-O-methylation, 2'-fluoro-nucleotides, locked nucleic acids and a cholesterol tag at the 3'-end. The model siRNAs were applied to rats at 1 mg/kg (i.v.) and blood as well as urine samples were collected. After isolation of the RNA by means of a RNA purification kit, the target analytes were detected by liquid chromatography - high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Analytes were detected as modified nucleotides after alkaline hydrolysis, as intact oligonucleotide strands (top-down) and by means of denaturing SDS-PAGE analysis. The gel-separated siRNA was further subjected to in-gel hydrolysis with different RNases and subsequent identification of the fragments by untargeted LC-HRMS analysis (bottom-up, 'experimental RNomics'). Combining the results of all approaches, the identification of several 3'-truncated urinary metabolites was accomplished and target analytes were detected up to 24 h after a single administration. Simultaneously collected blood samples yielded no promising results. The methods were validated and found fit-for-purpose for doping controls. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. miRConnect: Identifying Effector Genes of miRNAs and miRNA Families in Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hua, Youjia; Duan, Shiwei; Murmann, Andrea E

    2011-01-01

    have generated custom data sets containing expression information of 54 miRNA families sharing the same seed match. We have developed a novel strategy for correlating miRNAs with individual genes based on a summed Pearson Correlation Coefficient (sPCC) that mimics an in silico titration experiment......micro(mi)RNAs are small non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate expression of most mRNAs. They are powerful regulators of various differentiation stages, and the expression of genes that either negatively or positively correlate with expressed miRNAs is expected to hold information....... By focusing on the genes that correlate with the expression of miRNAs without necessarily being direct targets of miRNAs, we have clustered miRNAs into different functional groups. This has resulted in the identification of three novel miRNAs that are linked to the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT...

  12. C. elegans microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Monica C; Slack, Frank J

    2005-09-21

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding regulatory RNAs found in many phyla that control such diverse events as development, metabolism, cell fate and cell death. They have also been implicated in human cancers. The C. elegans genome encodes hundreds of miRNAs, including the founding members of the miRNA family lin-4 and let-7. Despite the abundance of C. elegans miRNAs, few miRNA targets are known and little is known about the mechanism by which they function. However, C. elegans research continues to push the boundaries of discovery in this area. lin-4 and let-7 are the best understood miRNAs. They control the timing of adult cell fate determination in hypodermal cells by binding to partially complementary sites in the mRNA of key developmental regulators to repress protein expression. For example, lin-4 is predicted to bind to seven sites in the lin-14 3' untranslated region (UTR) to repress LIN-14, while let-7 is predicted to bind two let-7 complementary sites in the lin-41 3' UTR to down-regulate LIN-41. Two other miRNAs, lsy-6 and mir-273, control left-right asymmetry in neural development, and also target key developmental regulators for repression. Approximately one third of the C. elegans miRNAs are differentially expressed during development indicating a major role for miRNAs in C. elegans development. Given the remarkable conservation of developmental mechanism across phylogeny, many of the principles of miRNAs discovered in C. elegans are likely to be applicable to higher animals.

  13. The miRNAome of globe artichoke: conserved and novel micro RNAs and target analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Paola Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant microRNAs (miRNAs are involved in post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms of several processes, including the response to biotic and abiotic stress, often contributing to the adaptive response of the plant to adverse conditions. In addition to conserved miRNAs, found in a wide range of plant species a number of novel species-specific miRNAs, displaying lower levels of expression can be found. Due to low abundance, non conserved miRNAs are difficult to identify and isolate using conventional approaches. Conversely, deep-sequencing of small RNA (sRNA libraries can detect even poorly expressed miRNAs. No miRNAs from globe artichoke have been described to date. We analyzed the miRNAome from artichoke by deep sequencing four sRNA libraries obtained from NaCl stressed and control leaves and roots. Results Conserved and novel miRNAs were discovered using accepted criteria. The expression level of selected miRNAs was monitored by quantitative real-time PCR. Targets were predicted and validated for their cleavage site. A total of 122 artichoke miRNAs were identified, 98 (25 families of which were conserved with other plant species, and 24 were novel. Some miRNAs were differentially expressed according to tissue or condition, magnitude of variation after salt stress being more pronounced in roots. Target function was predicted by comparison to Arabidopsis proteins; the 43 targets (23 for novel miRNAs identified included transcription factors and other genes, most of which involved in the response to various stresses. An unusual cleaved transcript was detected for miR393 target, transport inhibitor response 1. Conclusions The miRNAome from artichoke, including novel miRNAs, was unveiled, providing useful information on the expression in different organs and conditions. New target genes were identified. We suggest that the generation of secondary short-interfering RNAs from miR393 target can be a general rule in the plant

  14. Small regulatory RNAs may sharpen spatial expression patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erel Levine

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The precise establishment of gene expression patterns is a crucial step in development. Formation of a sharp boundary between high and low spatial expression domains requires a genetic mechanism that exhibits sensitivity, yet is robust to fluctuations, a demand that may not be easily achieved by morphogens alone. Recently, it has been demonstrated that small RNAs (and, in particular, microRNAs play many roles in embryonic development. Whereas some RNAs are essential for embryogenesis, others are limited to fine-tuning a predetermined gene expression pattern. Here, we explore the possibility that small RNAs participate in sharpening a gene expression profile that was crudely established by a morphogen. To this end, we study a model in which small RNAs interact with a target gene and diffusively move from cell to cell. Though diffusion generally smoothens spatial expression patterns, we find that intercellular mobility of small RNAs is actually critical in sharpening the interface between target expression domains in a robust manner. This sharpening occurs as small RNAs diffuse into regions of low mRNA expression and eliminate target molecules therein, but cannot affect regions of high mRNA levels. We discuss the applicability of our results, as examples, to the case of leaf polarity establishment in maize and Hox patterning in the early Drosophila embryo. Our findings point out the functional significance of some mechanistic properties, such as mobility of small RNAs and the irreversibility of their interactions. These properties are yet to be established directly for most classes of small RNAs. An indirect yet simple experimental test of the proposed mechanism is suggested in some detail.

  15. Development of a software tool and criteria evaluation for efficient design of small interfering RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Aparna; Srivastava, Sonam; Garg, Sanjeev

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The developed tool predicted siRNA constructs with better thermodynamic stability and total score based on positional and other criteria. → Off-target silencing below score 30 were observed for the best siRNA constructs for different genes. → Immunostimulation and cytotoxicity motifs considered and penalized in the developed tool. → Both positional and compositional criteria were observed to be important. -- Abstract: RNA interference can be used as a tool for gene silencing mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNA). The critical step in effective and specific RNAi processing is the selection of suitable constructs. Major design criteria, i.e., Reynolds's design rules, thermodynamic stability, internal repeats, immunostimulatory motifs were emphasized and implemented in the siRNA design tool. The tool provides thermodynamic stability score, GC content and a total score based on other design criteria in the output. The viability of the tool was established with different datasets. In general, the siRNA constructs produced by the tool had better thermodynamic score and positional properties. Comparable thermodynamic scores and better total scores were observed with the existing tools. Moreover, the results generated had comparable off-target silencing effect. Criteria evaluations with additional criteria were achieved in WEKA.

  16. Protection against lethal Marburg virus infection mediated by lipid encapsulated small interfering RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursic-Bedoya, Raul; Mire, Chad E; Robbins, Marjorie; Geisbert, Joan B; Judge, Adam; MacLachlan, Ian; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2014-02-15

    Marburg virus (MARV) infection causes severe morbidity and mortality in humans and nonhuman primates. Currently, there are no licensed therapeutics available for treating MARV infection. Here, we present the in vitro development and in vivo evaluation of lipid-encapsulated small interfering RNA (siRNA) as a potential therapeutic for the treatment of MARV infection. The activity of anti-MARV siRNAs was assessed using dual luciferase reporter assays followed by in vitro testing against live virus. Lead candidates were tested in lethal guinea pig models of 3 different MARV strains (Angola, Ci67, Ravn). Treatment resulted in 60%-100% survival of guinea pigs infected with MARV. Although treatment with siRNA targeting other MARV messenger RNA (mRNA) had a beneficial effect, targeting the MARV NP mRNA resulted in the highest survival rates. NP-718m siRNA in lipid nanoparticles provided 100% protection against MARV strains Angola and Ci67, and 60% against Ravn. A cocktail containing NP-718m and NP-143m provided 100% protection against MARV Ravn. These data show protective efficacy against the most pathogenic Angola strain of MARV. Further development of the lipid nanoparticle technology has the potential to yield effective treatments for MARV infection.

  17. Detecting and Eliminating Interfering Organic Compounds in Waters Analyzed for Isotopic Composition by Crds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, B. A.; Hsiao, G. S.; Rella, C.

    2010-12-01

    Optical spectroscopy based CRDS technology for isotopic analysis of δD and δ18O directly from liquid water has greatly increased the number and type of liquid samples analyzed. This increase has also revealed a previously unrecognized sample contamination problem. Recently West[1] and Brand[2] identified samples containing ethanol, methanol, plant extracts and other organic compounds analyzed by CRDS and other spectroscopy based techniques as yielding erroneous results for δD and δ18O (especially δD) due to spectroscopic interference. Not all organic compounds generate interference. Thus, identifying which samples are contaminated by which organic compounds is of key importance for data credibility and correction. To address this problem a new approach in the form of a software suite, ChemCorrect™, has been developed. A chemometrics component uses a spectral library of water isotopologues and interfering organic compounds to best fit the measured spectra. The best fit values provide a quantitative assay of the actual concentrations of the various species and are then evaluated to generate a visual flag indicating samples affected by organic contamination. Laboratory testing of samples spiked with known quantities of interfering organic compounds such as methanol, ethanol, and terpenes was performed. The software correctly flagged and identified type of contamination for all the spiked samples without any false positives. Furthermore the reported values were a linear function of actual concentration with an R^2>0.99 even for samples which contained multiple organic compounds. Further testing was carried out against a range of industrial chemical compounds which can contaminate ground water as well as a variety of plant derived waters and juices which were also analyzed by IRMS. The excellent results obtained give good insight into which organic compounds cause interference and which classes of plants are likely to contain interfering compounds. Finally

  18. Can microRNAs act as biomarkers of aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Luv

    2011-02-07

    Aging can be defined as a progressive decline in physiological efficiency regulated by an extremely complex multifactorial process. The genetic makeup of an individual appears to dictate this rate of aging in a species specific manner. For decades now, scientists have tried to look for tiny signatures or signs which might help us predict this rate of aging. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a unique class of short, non-coding RNAs that mediate the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression ranging from developmental processes to disease induction or amelioration. Recently, they have also been implicated to have a role in aging in C.elegans. Based on the fact that there is a considerable similarity between aging in C.elegans and humans, these recent findings might suggest a possible role of miRNAs as bio-markers of aging. This mini-review brushes through the possibilities towards this direction.

  19. Interactions Among Host–Parasite MicroRNAs During Nosema ceranae Proliferation in Apis mellifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay D. Evans

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified microRNA (miRNA from Nosema ceranae and found that knockdowns of transcripts for the parasite protein Dicer greatly reduce parasite reproduction. In order to study parasitic miRNA functions and identify candidate target genes, we fed honey bees infected with N. ceranae with small interfering RNA (siRNA targeting the N. ceranae gene Dicer. We then deep-sequenced honey bee and N. ceranae miRNAs daily across a full 6-day proliferation cycle. We found seven honey bee and five N. ceranae miRNAs that were significantly differently expressed between the infection and siRNA-Dicer groups. N. ceranae miRNA showed potentially strong impacts on the N. ceranae transcriptome, where over 79% of the total protein coding genes were significantly correlated with one or more miRNAs. N. ceranae miRNAs also can regulate honey bee metabolism and immune response, given parasitic miRNAs were secreted into the cytoplasm. Our results suggest that N. ceranae miRNAs regulate both parasite and host gene expression, providing new insights for microsporidia parasitism evolution.

  20. siRNAmod: A database of experimentally validated chemically modified siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Showkat Ahmad; Thakur, Anamika; Qureshi, Abid; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-28

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology has vast potential for functional genomics and development of therapeutics. However, it faces many obstacles predominantly instability of siRNAs due to nuclease digestion and subsequently biologically short half-life. Chemical modifications in siRNAs provide means to overcome these shortcomings and improve their stability and potency. Despite enormous utility bioinformatics resource of these chemically modified siRNAs (cm-siRNAs) is lacking. Therefore, we have developed siRNAmod, a specialized databank for chemically modified siRNAs. Currently, our repository contains a total of 4894 chemically modified-siRNA sequences, comprising 128 unique chemical modifications on different positions with various permutations and combinations. It incorporates important information on siRNA sequence, chemical modification, their number and respective position, structure, simplified molecular input line entry system canonical (SMILES), efficacy of modified siRNA, target gene, cell line, experimental methods, reference etc. It is developed and hosted using Linux Apache MySQL PHP (LAMP) software bundle. Standard user-friendly browse, search facility and analysis tools are also integrated. It would assist in understanding the effect of chemical modifications and further development of stable and efficacious siRNAs for research as well as therapeutics. siRNAmod is freely available at: http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/sirnamod.

  1. Expression of artificial microRNAs in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana confers virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qi-Wen; Lin, Shih-Shun; Reyes, Jose Luis; Chen, Kuan-Chun; Wu, Hui-Wen; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2006-11-01

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate the abundance of target mRNAs by guiding their cleavage at the sequence complementary region. We have modified an Arabidopsis thaliana miR159 precursor to express artificial miRNAs (amiRNAs) targeting viral mRNA sequences encoding two gene silencing suppressors, P69 of turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) and HC-Pro of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). Production of these amiRNAs requires A. thaliana DICER-like protein 1. Transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing amiR-P69(159) and amiR-HC-Pro(159) are specifically resistant to TYMV and TuMV, respectively. Expression of amiR-TuCP(159) targeting TuMV coat protein sequences also confers specific TuMV resistance. However, transgenic plants that express both amiR-P69(159) and amiR-HC-Pro(159) from a dimeric pre-amiR-P69(159)/amiR-HC-Pro(159) transgene are resistant to both viruses. The virus resistance trait is displayed at the cell level and is hereditable. More important, the resistance trait is maintained at 15 degrees C, a temperature that compromises small interfering RNA-mediated gene silencing. The amiRNA-mediated approach should have broad applicability for engineering multiple virus resistance in crop plants.

  2. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing, E-mail: ydqahmu@gmail.com

    2016-08-15

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. - Highlights: • Studies have discovered thousands of circRNAs and interpreted their biogenesis. • Cytoplasmic circRNAs sponge miRNA and nuclear circRNAs modulate gene transcription. • Aberrant expression of circRNAs has been observed in various cancers. • CircRNAs may partake in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  3. Circular RNAs and systemic lupus erythematosus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lian-Ju; Huang, Qing; Pan, Hai-Feng; Ye, Dong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of noncoding RNAs that form covalently closed RNA circles. The discovery of circRNAs discloses a new layer of gene regulation occurred post-transcriptionally. Identification of endogenous circRNAs benefits from the advance in high-throughput RNA sequencing and remains challenging. Many studies probing into the mechanisms of circRNAs formation occurred cotranscriptionally or posttranscriptionally emerge and conclude that canonical splicing mechanism, sequence properties, and certain regulatory factors are at play in the process. Although our knowledge on functions of circRNAs is rather limited, a few circRNAs are shown to sponge miRNA and regulate gene transcription. The clearest case is one circRNA CDR1as that serves as sponge of miR-7. Researches on circRNAs in human diseases such as cancers highlight the function and physical relevance of circRNAs. Given the implication of miRNAs in the initiation and progression of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the roles of circRNAs in sponging miRNA and gene regulation, it is appealing to speculate that circRNAs may associate with SLE and may be potential therapeutic targets for treatment of SLE. Future studies should attach more importance to the relationship between circRNAs and SLE. This review will concern identification, biogenesis, and function of circRNAs, introduce reports exploring the association of circRNAs with human diseases, and conjecture the potential roles of circRNAs in SLE. - Highlights: • Studies have discovered thousands of circRNAs and interpreted their biogenesis. • Cytoplasmic circRNAs sponge miRNA and nuclear circRNAs modulate gene transcription. • Aberrant expression of circRNAs has been observed in various cancers. • CircRNAs may partake in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

  4. MicroRNAs in Amoebozoa: deep sequencing of the small RNA population in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum reveals developmentally regulated microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avesson, Lotta; Reimegård, Johan; Wagner, E Gerhart H; Söderbom, Fredrik

    2012-10-01

    The RNA interference machinery has served as a guardian of eukaryotic genomes since the divergence from prokaryotes. Although the basic components have a shared origin, silencing pathways directed by small RNAs have evolved in diverse directions in different eukaryotic lineages. Micro (mi)RNAs regulate protein-coding genes and play vital roles in plants and animals, but less is known about their functions in other organisms. Here, we report, for the first time, deep sequencing of small RNAs from the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. RNA from growing single-cell amoebae as well as from two multicellular developmental stages was sequenced. Computational analyses combined with experimental data reveal the expression of miRNAs, several of them exhibiting distinct expression patterns during development. To our knowledge, this is the first report of miRNAs in the Amoebozoa supergroup. We also show that overexpressed miRNA precursors generate miRNAs and, in most cases, miRNA* sequences, whose biogenesis is dependent on the Dicer-like protein DrnB, further supporting the presence of miRNAs in D. discoideum. In addition, we find miRNAs processed from hairpin structures originating from an intron as well as from a class of repetitive elements. We believe that these repetitive elements are sources for newly evolved miRNAs.

  5. The identification and characterization of non-coding and coding RNAs and their modified nucleosides by mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of ribonucleic acids (RNA) by mass spectrometry has been a valuable analytical approach for more than 25 years. In fact, mass spectrometry has become a method of choice for the analysis of modified nucleosides from RNA isolated out of biological samples. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in both nucleoside and oligonucleotide mass spectral analysis. Applications of mass spectrometry in the identification, characterization and quantification of modified nucleosides are discussed. At the oligonucleotide level, advances in modern mass spectrometry approaches combined with the standard RNA modification mapping protocol enable the characterization of RNAs of varying lengths ranging from low molecular weight short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to the extremely large 23 S rRNAs. New variations and improvements to this protocol are reviewed, including top-down strategies, as these developments now enable qualitative and quantitative measurements of RNA modification patterns in a variety of biological systems. PMID:25616408

  6. The identification and characterization of non-coding and coding RNAs and their modified nucleosides by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Kirk W; Limbach, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of ribonucleic acids (RNA) by mass spectrometry has been a valuable analytical approach for more than 25 years. In fact, mass spectrometry has become a method of choice for the analysis of modified nucleosides from RNA isolated out of biological samples. This review summarizes recent progress that has been made in both nucleoside and oligonucleotide mass spectral analysis. Applications of mass spectrometry in the identification, characterization and quantification of modified nucleosides are discussed. At the oligonucleotide level, advances in modern mass spectrometry approaches combined with the standard RNA modification mapping protocol enable the characterization of RNAs of varying lengths ranging from low molecular weight short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to the extremely large 23 S rRNAs. New variations and improvements to this protocol are reviewed, including top-down strategies, as these developments now enable qualitative and quantitative measurements of RNA modification patterns in a variety of biological systems.

  7. Retrotransposons and non-protein coding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Willerslev, Eske

    2009-01-01

    does not merely represent spurious transcription. We review examples of functional RNAs transcribed from retrotransposons, and address the collection of non-protein coding RNAs derived from transposable element sequences, including numerous human microRNAs and the neuronal BC RNAs. Finally, we review...

  8. Correlation of LNCR rasiRNAs Expression with Heterochromatin Formation during Development of the Holocentric Insect Spodoptera frugiperda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojcic, Slavica; Gimenez, Sylvie; Permal, Emmanuelle; Cousserans, François; Quesneville, Hadi; Fournier, Philippe; d'Alençon, Emmanuelle

    2011-01-01

    Repeat-associated small interfering RNAs (rasiRNAs) are derived from various genomic repetitive elements and ensure genomic stability by silencing endogenous transposable elements. Here we describe a novel subset of 46 rasiRNAs named LNCR rasiRNAs due to their homology with one long non-coding RNA (LNCR) of Spodoptera frugiperda. LNCR operates as the intermediate of an unclassified transposable element (TE-LNCR). TE-LNCR is a very invasive transposable element, present in high copy numbers in the S. frugiperda genome. LNCR rasiRNAs are single-stranded RNAs without a prominent nucleotide motif, which are organized in two distinct, strand-specific clusters. The expression of LNCR and LNCR rasiRNAs is developmentally regulated. Formation of heterochromatin in the genomic region where three copies of the TE-LNCR are embedded was followed by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and we observed this chromatin undergo dynamic changes during development. In summary, increased LNCR expression in certain developmental stages is followed by the appearance of a variety of LNCR rasiRNAs which appears to correlate with subsequent accumulation of a heterochromatic histone mark and silencing of the genomic region with TE-LNCR. These results support the notion that a repeat-associated small interfering RNA pathway is linked to heterochromatin formation and/or maintenance during development to establish repression of the TE-LNCR transposable element. This study provides insights into the rasiRNA silencing pathway and its role in the formation of fluctuating heterochromatin during the development of one holocentric organism. PMID:21980354

  9. Panning for Long Noncoding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The recent advent of high-throughput approaches has revealed widespread transcription of the human genome, leading to a new appreciation of transcription regulation, especially from noncoding regions. Distinct from most coding and small noncoding RNAs, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are generally expressed at low levels, are less conserved and lack protein-coding capacity. These intrinsic features of lncRNAs have not only hampered their full annotation in the past several years, but have also generated controversy concerning whether many or most of these lncRNAs are simply the result of transcriptional noise. Here, we assess these intrinsic features that have challenged lncRNA discovery and further summarize recent progress in lncRNA discovery with integrated methodologies, from which new lessons and insights can be derived to achieve better characterization of lncRNA expression regulation. Full annotation of lncRNA repertoires and the implications of such annotation will provide a fundamental basis for comprehensive understanding of pervasive functions of lncRNAs in biological regulation.

  10. HIVsirDB: a database of HIV inhibiting siRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul Tyagi

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is responsible for millions of deaths every year. The current treatment involves the use of multiple antiretroviral agents that may harm patients due to their toxic nature. RNA interference (RNAi is a potent candidate for the future treatment of HIV, uses short interfering RNA (siRNA/shRNA for silencing HIV genes. In this study, attempts have been made to create a database HIVsirDB of siRNAs responsible for silencing HIV genes.HIVsirDB is a manually curated database of HIV inhibiting siRNAs that provides comprehensive information about each siRNA or shRNA. Information was collected and compiled from literature and public resources. This database contains around 750 siRNAs that includes 75 partially complementary siRNAs differing by one or more bases with the target sites and over 100 escape mutant sequences. HIVsirDB structure contains sixteen fields including siRNA sequence, HIV strain, targeted genome region, efficacy and conservation of target sequences. In order to facilitate user, many tools have been integrated in this database that includes; i siRNAmap for mapping siRNAs on target sequence, ii HIVsirblast for BLAST search against database, iii siRNAalign for aligning siRNAs.HIVsirDB is a freely accessible database of siRNAs which can silence or degrade HIV genes. It covers 26 types of HIV strains and 28 cell types. This database will be very useful for developing models for predicting efficacy of HIV inhibiting siRNAs. In summary this is a useful resource for researchers working in the field of siRNA based HIV therapy. HIVsirDB database is accessible at http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/hivsir/.

  11. Analyzing the interactions of mRNAs, miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNAs to predict competing endogenous RNA networks in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yang; Jiaoming, Li; Xiang, Wang; Yanhui, Liu; Shu, Jiang; Maling, Gou; Qing, Mao

    2018-05-01

    Cross-talk between competitive endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) may play a critical role in revealing potential mechanisms of tumor development and physiology. Glioblastoma is the most common type of malignant primary brain tumor, and the mechanisms of tumor genesis and development in glioblastoma are unclear. Here, to investigate the role of non-coding RNAs and the ceRNA network in glioblastoma, we performed paired-end RNA sequencing and microarray analyses to obtain the expression profiles of mRNAs, lncRNAs, circRNAs and miRNAs. We identified that the expression of 501 lncRNAs, 1999 mRNAs, 2038 circRNAs and 143 miRNAs were often altered between glioblastoma and matched normal brain tissue. Gene ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analyses were performed on these differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNA-mediated target genes of lncRNAs and circRNAs. Furthermore, we used a multi-step computational framework and several bioinformatics methods to construct a ceRNA network combining mRNAs, miRNAs, lncRNAs and circRNA, based on co-expression analysis between the differentially expressed RNAs. We identified that plenty of lncRNAs, CircRNAs and their downstream target genes in the ceRNA network are related to glutamatergic synapse, suggesting that glutamate metabolism is involved in glioma biological functions. Our results will accelerate the understanding of tumorigenesis, cancer progression and even therapeutic targeting in glioblastoma.

  12. An SGS3-like protein functions in RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional gene silencing in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Zhimin

    2010-01-06

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is an important epigenetic mechanism for silencing transgenes and endogenous repetitive sequences such as transposons. The RD29A promoter-driven LUCIFERASE transgene and its corresponding endogenous RD29A gene are hypermethylated and silenced in the Arabidopsis DNA demethylase mutant ros1. By screening for second-site suppressors of ros1, we identified the RDM12 locus. The rdm12 mutation releases the silencing of the RD29A-LUC transgene and the endogenous RD29A gene by reducing the promoter DNA methylation. The rdm12 mutation also reduces DNA methylation at endogenous RdDM target loci, including transposons and other repetitive sequences. In addition, the rdm12 mutation affects the levels of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) from some of the RdDM target loci. RDM12 encodes a protein with XS and coiled-coil domains, and is similar to SGS3, which is a partner protein of RDR6 and can bind to double-stranded RNAs with a 5′ overhang, and is required for several post-transcriptional gene silencing pathways. Our results show that RDM12 is a component of the RdDM pathway, and suggest that RdDM may involve double-stranded RNAs with a 5′ overhang and the partnering between RDM12 and RDR2. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. On the presence and immunoregulatory functions of extracellular microRNAs in the trematode Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, B; Ovchinnikov, V; Høye, E; Bernal, D; Hackenberg, M; Marcilla, A

    2017-02-01

    Liver flukes represent a paraphyletic group of endoparasitic flatworms that significantly affect man either indirectly due to economic damage on livestock or directly as pathogens. A range of studies have focussed on how these macroscopic organisms can evade the immune system and live inside a hostile environment such as the mammalian liver and bile ducts. Recently, microRNAs, a class of short noncoding gene regulators, have been proposed as likely candidates to play roles in this scenario. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key players in development and pathogenicity and are highly conserved between metazoans: identical miRNAs can be found in flatworms and mammalians. Interestingly, miRNAs are enriched in extracellular vesicles (EVs) which are secreted by most cells. EVs constitute an important mode of parasite/host interaction, and recent data illustrate that miRNAs play a vital part. We have demonstrated the presence of miRNAs in the EVs of the trematode species Dicrocoelium dendriticum and Fasciola hepatica (Fhe) and identified potential immune-regulatory miRNAs with targets in the host. After our initial identification of miRNAs expressed by F. hepatica, an assembled genome and additional miRNA data became available. This has enabled us to update the known complement of miRNAs in EVs and speculate on potential immune-regulatory functions that we review here. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Characterization and Expression Patterns of microRNAs Involved in Rice Grain Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yanxiu; Zhang, Jing; Li, Junzhou; Liu, Yanxia; Zhao, Yafan; Zhao, Quanzhi

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are upstream gene regulators of plant development and hormone homeostasis through their directed cleavage or translational repression of the target mRNAs, which may play crucial roles in rice grain filling and determining the final grain weight and yield. In this study, high-throughput sequencing was performed to survey the dynamic expressions of miRNAs and their corresponding target genes at five distinct developmental stages of grain filling. In total, 445 known miRNAs and 45 novel miRNAs were detected with most of them expressed in a developmental stage dependent manner, and the majority of known miRNAs, which increased gradually with rice grain filling, showed negatively related to the grain filling rate. Detailed expressional comparisons revealed a clear negative correlation between most miRNAs and their target genes. It was found that specific miRNA cohorts are expressed in a developmental stage dependent manner during grain filling and the known functions of these miRNAs are involved in plant hormone homeostasis and starch accumulation, indicating that the expression dynamics of these miRNAs might play key roles in regulating rice grain filling. PMID:23365650

  15. Cadherin complexes recruit mRNAs and RISC to regulate epithelial cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidis, Antonis; Necela, Brian; Lin, Wan-Hsin; Lu, Ruifeng; Feathers, Ryan W; Asmann, Yan W; Thompson, E Aubrey; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2017-10-02

    Cumulative evidence demonstrates that most RNAs exhibit specific subcellular distribution. However, the mechanisms regulating this phenomenon and its functional consequences are still under investigation. Here, we reveal that cadherin complexes at the apical zonula adherens (ZA) of epithelial adherens junctions recruit the core components of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) Ago2, GW182, and PABPC1, as well as a set of 522 messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and 28 mature microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs), via PLEKHA7. Top canonical pathways represented by these mRNAs include Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β, and stem cell signaling. We specifically demonstrate the presence and silencing of MYC, JUN, and SOX2 mRNAs by miR-24 and miR-200c at the ZA. PLEKHA7 knockdown dissociates RISC from the ZA, decreases loading of the ZA-associated mRNAs and miRNAs to Ago2, and results in a corresponding increase of MYC, JUN, and SOX2 protein expression. The present work reveals a mechanism that directly links junction integrity to the silencing of a set of mRNAs that critically affect epithelial homeostasis. © 2017 Kourtidis et al.

  16. In Silico, In Vitro, and In Vivo Studies Indicate the Potential Use of Bolaamphiphiles for Therapeutic siRNAs Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taejin Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific small interfering RNAs (siRNAs designed to silence different oncogenic pathways can be used for cancer therapy. However, non-modified naked siRNAs have short half-lives in blood serum and encounter difficulties in crossing biological membranes due to their negative charge. These obstacles can be overcome by using siRNAs complexed with bolaamphiphiles, consisting of two positively charged head groups that flank an internal hydrophobic chain. Bolaamphiphiles have relatively low toxicities, long persistence in the blood stream, and most importantly, in aqueous conditions can form poly-cationic micelles thus, becoming amenable to association with siRNAs. Herein, two different bolaamphiphiles with acetylcholine head groups attached to an alkyl chain in two distinct configurations are compared for their abilities to complex with siRNAs and deliver them into cells inducing gene silencing. Our explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations showed that bolaamphiphiles associate with siRNAs due to electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and hydrophobic interactions. These in silico studies are supported by various in vitro and in cell culture experimental techniques as well as by some in vivo studies. Results demonstrate that depending on the application, the extent of siRNA chemical protection, delivery efficiency, and further intracellular release can be varied by simply changing the type of bolaamphiphile used.

  17. Site-Specific Modification Using the 2′-Methoxyethyl Group Improves the Specificity and Activity of siRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyun Song

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid progress has been made toward small interfering RNA (siRNA-based therapy for human disorders, but rationally optimizing siRNAs for high specificity and potent silencing remains a challenge. In this study, we explored the effect of chemical modification at the cleavage site of siRNAs. We found that modifications at positions 9 and 10 markedly reduced the silencing potency of the unmodified strand of siRNAs but were well tolerated by the modified strand. Intriguingly, addition of the 2′-methoxyethyl (MOE group at the cleavage site improved both the specificity and silencing activity of siRNAs by facilitating the oriented RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC loading of the modified strand. Furthermore, we combined MOE modifications at positions 9 and 10 of one strand together with 2′-O-methylation (OMe at position 14 of the other strand and found a synergistic effect that improved the specificity of siRNAs. The surprisingly beneficial effect of the combined modification was validated using siRNA-targeting endogenous gene intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1. We found that the combined modifications eliminated its off-target effects. In conclusion, we established effective strategies to optimize siRNAs using site-specific MOE modifications. The findings may allow the creation of superior siRNAs for therapy in terms of activity and specificity.

  18. Selection of peptides interfering with protein-protein interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, Annette; Hagemann, Urs B; Mattay, Dinah; Räuber, Christina; Müller, Kristian M; Arndt, Katja M

    2009-01-01

    Cell physiology depends on a fine-tuned network of protein-protein interactions, and misguided interactions are often associated with various diseases. Consequently, peptides, which are able to specifically interfere with such adventitious interactions, are of high interest for analytical as well as medical purposes. One of the most abundant protein interaction domains is the coiled-coil motif, and thus provides a premier target. Coiled coils, which consist of two or more alpha-helices wrapped around each other, have one of the simplest interaction interfaces, yet they are able to confer highly specific homo- and heterotypic interactions involved in virtually any cellular process. While there are several ways to generate interfering peptides, the combination of library design with a powerful selection system seems to be one of the most effective and promising approaches. This chapter guides through all steps of such a process, starting with library options and cloning, detailing suitable selection techniques and ending with purification for further down-stream characterization. Such generated peptides will function as versatile tools to interfere with the natural function of their targets thereby illuminating their down-stream signaling and, in general, promoting understanding of factors leading to specificity and stability in protein-protein interactions. Furthermore, peptides interfering with medically relevant proteins might become important diagnostics and therapeutics.

  19. Role of micro-RNAs in LRF and BCL6 oncogenes regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rainaldi, G.

    2009-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are short 20-22 nucleotide RNA molecules with an important role in the regulation of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. MiRNA levels have been shown to change markedly in tumors and their expression profile is currently used to classify and diagnose some tumours. MiRNAs have been classified either as oncogenes (overespressed in tumors) or as tumor suppressor (down regulated), and in certain cases they can behave as both depending on the type of tumor. In many cases miRNAs and transcription factors interact directly so that transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression are finely regulated

  20. Micro-masters of glioblastoma biology and therapy: increasingly recognized roles for microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Desiree; Purow, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs encoded in eukaryotic genomes that have been found to play critical roles in most biological processes, including cancer. This is true for glioblastoma, the most common and lethal primary brain tumor, for which microRNAs have been shown to strongly influence cell viability, stem cell characteristics, invasiveness, angiogenesis, metabolism, and immune evasion. Developing microRNAs as prognostic markers or as therapeutic agents is showing increasing promise and has potential to reach the clinic in the next several years. This succinct review summarizes current progress and future directions in this exciting and steadily expanding field.

  1. Friend or Foe: MicroRNAs in the p53 network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhenghua; Cui, Ri; Tili, Esmerina; Croce, Carlo

    2018-04-10

    The critical tumor suppressor gene TP53 is either lost or mutated in more than half of human cancers. As an important transcriptional regulator, p53 modulates the expression of many microRNAs. While wild-type p53 uses microRNAs to suppress cancer development, microRNAs that are activated by gain-of-function mutant p53 confer oncogenic properties. On the other hand, the expression of p53 is tightly controlled by a fine-tune machinery including microRNAs. MicroRNAs can target the TP53 gene directly or other factors in the p53 network so that expression and function of either the wild-type or the mutant forms of p53 is downregulated. Therefore, depending on the wild-type or mutant p53 context, microRNAs contribute substantially to suppress or exacerbate tumor development. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Treating respiratory viral diseases with chemically modified, second generation intranasal siRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Sailen

    2009-01-01

    Chemically synthesized short interfering RNA (siRNA) of pre-determined sequence has ushered a new era in the application of RNA interference (RNAi) against viral genes. We have paid particular attention to respiratory viruses that wreak heavy morbidity and mortality worldwide. The clinically significant ones include respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), parainfluenza virus (PIV) and influenza virus. As the infection by these viruses is clinically restricted to the respiratory tissues, mainly the lungs, the logical route for the application of the siRNA was also the same, i.e., via the nasal route. Following the initial success of intranasal siRNA against RSV, second-generation siRNAs were made against the viral polymerase large subunit (L) that were chemically modified and screened for improved stability, activity and pharmacokinetics. 2'-O-methyl (2'-O-Me) and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro (2'-F) substitutions in the ribose ring were incorporated in different positions of the sense and antisense strands and the resultant siRNAs were tested with various transfection reagents intranasally against RSV. Based on these results, we propose the following consensus for designing intranasal antiviral siRNAs: (i) modified 19-27 nt long double-stranded siRNAs are functional in the lung, (ii) excessive 2'-OMe and 2'-F modifications in either or both strands of these siRNAs reduce efficacy, and (iii) limited modifications in the sense strand are beneficial, although their precise efficacy may be position-dependent.

  3. Defective interfering particles in monolayer-propagated Newcastle disease virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman, J.M.; Simon, E.H.

    1976-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) serially passaged in chick embryo fibroblasts (M-NDV) gives rise to defective interfering (NDV-DI) particles, while NDV passaged in embryonated eggs (E-NDV) does not. Co-infection with these particles and infectious virions results in a 99 percent reduction in yield. Interference is not due to interferon or to prevention of absorption of infectious virions and is specific for NDV. The particles mediating interference sediment at the same velocity as infectious virions. The accumulation of NDV-DI particles in monolayers but not in eggs may be a consequence of the fact that M-NDV virions are larger and probably contain more RNA, or it may reflect differences in NDV replicative processes in eggs and monolayers, or both

  4. A self-interfering clock as a "which path" witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalit, Yair; Zhou, Zhifan; Machluf, Shimon; Rohrlich, Daniel; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2015-09-11

    In Einstein's general theory of relativity, time depends locally on gravity; in standard quantum theory, time is global-all clocks "tick" uniformly. We demonstrate a new tool for investigating time in the overlap of these two theories: a self-interfering clock, comprising two atomic spin states. We prepare the clock in a spatial superposition of quantum wave packets, which evolve coherently along two paths into a stable interference pattern. If we make the clock wave packets "tick" at different rates, to simulate a gravitational time lag, the clock time along each path yields "which path" information, degrading the pattern's visibility. In contrast, in standard interferometry, time cannot yield "which path" information. This proof-of-principle experiment may have implications for the study of time and general relativity and their impact on fundamental effects such as decoherence and the emergence of a classical world. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. High molecular somatostatin, an interfering factor in radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diel, F.; Schneider, E.; Baumann, H.

    1977-01-01

    Cyclic Tyr 1 -somatostatin (Tyr 1 -SRIF) is radioiodinated by the lactoperoxidase method. Purification is achieved by Sephadex G-25 adsorption chromatography. Specific anti-SRIF serum (FA1) has been raised in rabbits. A dose response curve is obtained in the range of 5 - 5,000 pg per tube using an antiserum dilution of 1:2,000. There is little cross-reaction with linear somatostatin and none with ocytocin, (lys-, arg-) vasopressin, valinomycin, polymyxin, insulin, glucagon, human growth hormone (hGH), and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). For recovery tests, extraction procedures are necessary. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and polyacrylamide-disc-electrophoresis (Disc-PAGE) are performed to identify the presumed high molecular 125 I-Tyr 1 -SRIF associate. This high molecular associate may represent an interfering factor in the radioimmunoassay for cyclic SRIF. (orig./AJ) [de

  6. MicroRNAs in Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vienberg, Sara; Geiger, Julian; Madsen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    roles in cholesterol and lipid metabolism, whereas miR-103 and -107 regulates hepatic insulin sensitivity. In muscle tissue a defined number of miRNAs (miR-1, miR-133, mir-206) control myofiber type switch and induce myogenic differentiation programs. Similarly, in adipose tissue a defined number of mi...

  7. MicroRNAs and the metabolic hallmarks of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria, Berta; Nunez Lopez, Yury O; Masternak, Michal M

    2017-11-05

    Aging, the natural process of growing older, is characterized by a progressive deterioration of physiological homeostasis at the cellular, tissue, and organismal level. Metabolically, the aging process is characterized by extensive changes in body composition, multi-tissue/multi-organ insulin resistance, and physiological declines in multiple signaling pathways including growth hormone, insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1, and sex steroids regulation. With this review, we intend to consolidate published information about microRNAs that regulate critical metabolic processes relevant to aging. In certain occasions we uncover relationships likely relevant to aging, which has not been directly described before, such as the miR-451/AMPK axis. We have also included a provocative section highlighting the potential role in aging of a new designation of miRNAs, namely fecal miRNAs, recently discovered to regulate intestinal microbiota in mammals. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. MicroRNAs associated with exercise and diet: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Elena; Won, Gloria Y; Fukuoka, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. MicroRNAs reflect individual biologic adaptation to exposures in the environment. As such, measurement of circulating microRNAs presents an opportunity to evaluate biologic changes associated with behavioral interventions (i.e., exercise, diet) for weight loss. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the literature to summarize what is known about circulating microRNAs associated with exercise, diet, and weight loss. We performed a systematic review of three scientific databases. We included studies reporting on circulating microRNAs associated with exercise, diet, and weight loss in humans. Of 1,219 studies identified in our comprehensive database search, 14 were selected for inclusion. Twelve reported on microRNAs associated with exercise, and two reported on microRNAs associated with diet and weight loss. The majority of studies used a quasiexperimental, cross-sectional design. There were numerous differences in the type and intensity of exercise and dietary interventions, the biologic source of microRNAs, and the methodological approaches used quantitate microRNAs. Data from several studies support an association between circulating microRNAs and exercise. The evidence for an association between circulating microRNAs and diet is weaker because of a small number of studies. Additional research is needed to validate previous observations using methodologically rigorous approaches to microRNA quantitation to determine the specific circulating microRNA signatures associated with behavioral approaches to weight loss. Future directions include longitudinal studies to determine if circulating microRNAs are predictive of response to behavioral interventions. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Regulatory RNAs derived from transfer RNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Thoru

    2010-10-01

    Four recent studies suggest that cleavages of transfer RNAs generate products with microRNA-like features, with some evidence of function. If their regulatory functions were to be confirmed, these newly revealed RNAs would add to the expanding repertoire of small noncoding RNAs and would also provide new perspectives on the coevolution of transfer RNA and messenger RNA.

  10. siRNA-like double-stranded RNAs are specifically protected against degradation in human cell extract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A H Hoerter

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a set of intracellular pathways in eukaryotes that controls both exogenous and endogenous gene expression. The power of RNAi to knock down (silence any gene of interest by the introduction of synthetic small-interfering (siRNAs has afforded powerful insight into biological function through reverse genetic approaches and has borne a new field of gene therapeutics. A number of questions are outstanding concerning the potency of siRNAs, necessitating an understanding of how short double-stranded RNAs are processed by the cell. Recent work suggests unmodified siRNAs are protected in the intracellular environment, although the mechanism of protection still remains unclear. We have developed a set of doubly-fluorophore labeled RNAs (more precisely, RNA/DNA chimeras to probe in real-time the stability of siRNAs and related molecules by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET. We find that these RNA probes are substrates for relevant cellular degradative processes, including the RNase H1 mediated degradation of an DNA/RNA hybrid and Dicer-mediated cleavage of a 24-nucleotide (per strand double-stranded RNA. In addition, we find that 21- and 24-nucleotide double-stranded RNAs are relatively protected in human cytosolic cell extract, but less so in blood serum, whereas an 18-nucleotide double-stranded RNA is less protected in both fluids. These results suggest that RNAi effector RNAs are specifically protected in the cellular environment and may provide an explanation for recent results showing that unmodified siRNAs in cells persist intact for extended periods of time.

  11. Targeting Non-Coding RNAs in Plants with the CRISPR-Cas Technology is a Challenge yet Worth Accepting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Jolly; Nithin, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as versatile master regulator of biological functions in recent years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous ncRNAs of 18-24 nucleotides in length that originates from long self-complementary precursors. Besides their direct involvement in developmental processes, plant miRNAs play key roles in gene regulatory networks and varied biological processes. Alternatively, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse class of transcribed ncRNAs whose length exceed that of 200 nucleotides. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by different RNA polymerases, showing diverse structural features. Plant lncRNAs also are important regulators of gene expression in diverse biological processes. There has been a breakthrough in the technology of genome editing, the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9) technology, in the last decade. CRISPR loci are transcribed into ncRNA and eventually form a functional complex with Cas9 and further guide the complex to cleave complementary invading DNA. The CRISPR-Cas technology has been successfully applied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco and important crops like wheat, maize, and rice. However, all these studies are focused on protein coding genes. Information about targeting non-coding genes is scarce. Hitherto, the CRISPR-Cas technology has been exclusively used in vertebrate systems to engineer miRNA/lncRNAs, but it is still relatively unexplored in plants. While briefing miRNAs, lncRNAs and applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology in human and animals, this review essentially elaborates several strategies to overcome the challenges of applying the CRISPR-Cas technology in editing ncRNAs in plants and the future perspective of this field.

  12. Targeting non-coding RNAs in Plants with the CRISPR-Cas technology is a challenge yet worth accepting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly eBasak

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs have emerged as versatile master regulator of biological functions in recent years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small endogenous ncRNAs of 18-24 nucleotides in length that originates from long self-complementary precursors. Besides their direct involvement in developmental processes, plant miRNAs play key roles in gene regulatory networks and varied biological processes. Alternatively, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs are a large and diverse class of transcribed ncRNAs whose length exceed that of 200 nucleotides. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by different RNA polymerases, showing diverse structural features. Plant lncRNAs also are important regulators of gene expression in diverse biological processes. There has been a breakthrough in the technology of genome editing, the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 technology, in the last decade. CRISPR loci are transcribed into ncRNA and eventually form a functional complex with Cas9 and further guide the complex to cleave complementary invading DNA. The CRISPR-Cas technology has been successfully applied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco and important crops like wheat, maize and rice. However, all these studies are focused on protein coding genes. Information about targeting non-coding genes is scarce. Hitherto, the CRISPR-Cas technology has been exclusively used in vertebrate systems to engineer miRNA/lncRNAs, but it is still relatively unexplored in plants. While briefing miRNAs, lncRNAs and applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology in human and animals, this review essentially elaborates several strategies to overcome the challenges of applying the CRISPR-Cas technology in editing ncRNAs in plants and the future perspective of this field.

  13. siRNAs targeted to certain polyadenylation sites promote specific, RISC-independent degradation of messenger RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Timothy A; Crooke, Stanley T

    2012-07-01

    While most siRNAs induce sequence-specific target mRNA cleavage and degradation in a process mediated by Ago2/RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), certain siRNAs have also been demonstrated to direct target RNA reduction through deadenylation and subsequent degradation of target transcripts in a process which involves Ago1/RISC and P-bodies. In the current study, we present data suggesting that a third class of siRNA exist, which are capable of promoting target RNA reduction that is independent of both Ago and RISC. These siRNAs bind the target messenger RNA at the polyA signal and are capable of redirecting a small amount of polyadenylation to downstream polyA sites when present, however, the majority of the activity appears to be due to inhibition of polyadenylation or deadenylation of the transcript, followed by exosomal degradation of the immature mRNA.

  14. Small RNAs and the regulation of cis-natural antisense transcripts in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lonardi Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of large intergenic spaces in plant and animal genomes, 7% to 30% of genes in the genomes encode overlapping cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs. The widespread occurrence of cis-NATs suggests an evolutionary advantage for this type of genomic arrangement. Experimental evidence for the regulation of two cis-NAT gene pairs by natural antisense transcripts-generated small interfering RNAs (nat-siRNAs via the RNA interference (RNAi pathway has been reported in Arabidopsis. However, the extent of siRNA-mediated regulation of cis-NAT genes is still unclear in any genome. Results The hallmarks of RNAi regulation of NATs are 1 inverse regulation of two genes in a cis-NAT pair by environmental and developmental cues and 2 generation of siRNAs by cis-NAT genes. We examined Arabidopsis transcript profiling data from public microarray databases to identify cis-NAT pairs whose sense and antisense transcripts show opposite expression changes. A subset of the cis-NAT genes displayed negatively correlated expression profiles as well as inverse differential expression changes under at least one of the examined developmental stages or treatment conditions. By searching the Arabidopsis Small RNA Project (ASRP and Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS small RNA databases as well as our stress-treated small RNA dataset, we found small RNAs that matched at least one gene in 646 pairs out of 1008 (64% protein-coding cis-NAT pairs, which suggests that siRNAs may regulate the expression of many cis-NAT genes. 209 putative siRNAs have the potential to target more than one gene and half of these small RNAs could target multiple members of a gene family. Furthermore, the majority of the putative siRNAs within the overlapping regions tend to target only one transcript of a given NAT pair, which is consistent with our previous finding on salt- and bacteria-induced nat-siRNAs. In addition, we found that genes encoding plastid- or

  15. Small RNAs in plants: Recent development and application for crop improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Ayushi eKamthan; Abira eChaudhuri; Mohan eKamthan; Asis eDatta

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) which involves sequence-specific gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs, i.e., small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) has emerged as one of most powerful approaches for crop improvement. RNAi based on siRNA is one of the widely used tools of reverse genetics which aid in revealing gene functions in many species. This technology has been extensively applied to alter the gene expression in plants with an aim to achieve desirable traits. RN...

  16. An RNA polymerase II-and AGO4-associated protein acts in RNA-directed DNA methylation

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Zhihuan

    2010-04-21

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic mark in many eukaryotes. In plants, 24-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) bound to the effector protein, Argonaute 4 (AGO4), can direct de novo DNA methylation by the methyltransferase DRM2 (refs 2, 4-6). Here we report a new regulator of RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) in Arabidopsis: RDM1. Loss-of-function mutations in the RDM1 gene impair the accumulation of 24-nucleotide siRNAs, reduce DNA methylation, and release transcriptional gene silencing at RdDM target loci. RDM1 encodes a small protein that seems to bind single-stranded methyl DNA, and associates and co-localizes with RNA polymerase II (Pol II, also known as NRPB), AGO4 and DRM2 in the nucleus. Our results indicate that RDM1 is a component of the RdDM effector complex and may have a role in linking siRNA production with pre-existing or de novo cytosine methylation. Our results also indicate that, although RDM1 and Pol V (also known as NRPE) may function together at some RdDM target sites in the peri-nucleolar siRNA processing centre, Pol II rather than Pol V is associated with the RdDM effector complex at target sites in the nucleoplasm. © 2010 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  17. An expanding universe of noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storz, Gisela

    2002-05-17

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been found to have roles in a great variety of processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, RNA processing and modification, messenger RNA stability and translation, and even protein degradation and translocation. Recent studies indicate that ncRNAs are far more abundant and important than initially imagined. These findings raise several fundamental questions: How many ncRNAs are encoded by a genome? Given the absence of a diagnostic open reading frame, how can these genes be identified? How can all the functions of ncRNAs be elucidated?

  18. Profiling and Co-expression Network Analysis of Learned Helplessness Regulated mRNAs and lncRNAs in the Mouse Hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoqun Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Although studies provide insights into the neurobiology of stress and depression, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their pathologies remain largely unknown. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA has been implicated in brain functions and behavior. A potential link between lncRNA and psychiatric disorders has been proposed. However, it remains undetermined whether IncRNA regulation, in the brain, contributes to stress or depression pathologies. In this study, we used a valid animal model of depression-like symptoms; namely learned helplessness, RNA-seq, Gene Ontology and co-expression network analyses to profile the expression pattern of lncRNA and mRNA in the hippocampus of mice. We identified 6346 differentially expressed transcripts. Among them, 340 lncRNAs and 3559 protein coding mRNAs were differentially expressed in helpless mice in comparison with control and/or non-helpless mice (inescapable stress resilient mice. Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses indicated that induction of helplessness altered expression of mRNAs enriched in fundamental biological functions implicated in stress/depression neurobiology such as synaptic, metabolic, cell survival and proliferation, developmental and chromatin modification functions. To explore the possible regulatory roles of the altered lncRNAs, we constructed co-expression networks composed of the lncRNAs and mRNAs. Among our differentially expressed lncRNAs, 17% showed significant correlation with genes. Functional co-expression analysis linked the identified lncRNAs to several cellular mechanisms implicated in stress/depression neurobiology. Importantly, 57% of the identified regulatory lncRNAs significantly correlated with 18 different synapse-related functions. Thus, the current study identifies for the first time distinct groups of lncRNAs regulated by induction of learned helplessness in the mouse brain. Our results suggest that lncRNA-directed regulatory mechanisms might contribute to

  19. Profiling and Co-expression Network Analysis of Learned Helplessness Regulated mRNAs and lncRNAs in the Mouse Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoqun; Cao, Feifei; Li, Shengli; Huang, Shenglin; Li, Wei; Abumaria, Nashat

    2017-01-01

    Although studies provide insights into the neurobiology of stress and depression, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their pathologies remain largely unknown. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has been implicated in brain functions and behavior. A potential link between lncRNA and psychiatric disorders has been proposed. However, it remains undetermined whether IncRNA regulation, in the brain, contributes to stress or depression pathologies. In this study, we used a valid animal model of depression-like symptoms; namely learned helplessness, RNA-seq, Gene Ontology and co-expression network analyses to profile the expression pattern of lncRNA and mRNA in the hippocampus of mice. We identified 6346 differentially expressed transcripts. Among them, 340 lncRNAs and 3559 protein coding mRNAs were differentially expressed in helpless mice in comparison with control and/or non-helpless mice (inescapable stress resilient mice). Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses indicated that induction of helplessness altered expression of mRNAs enriched in fundamental biological functions implicated in stress/depression neurobiology such as synaptic, metabolic, cell survival and proliferation, developmental and chromatin modification functions. To explore the possible regulatory roles of the altered lncRNAs, we constructed co-expression networks composed of the lncRNAs and mRNAs. Among our differentially expressed lncRNAs, 17% showed significant correlation with genes. Functional co-expression analysis linked the identified lncRNAs to several cellular mechanisms implicated in stress/depression neurobiology. Importantly, 57% of the identified regulatory lncRNAs significantly correlated with 18 different synapse-related functions. Thus, the current study identifies for the first time distinct groups of lncRNAs regulated by induction of learned helplessness in the mouse brain. Our results suggest that lncRNA-directed regulatory mechanisms might contribute to stress

  20. Role of Small RNAs in Trypanosomatid Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhares-Lacerda, Leandra; Morrot, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatid parasites survive and replicate in the host by using mechanisms that aim to establish a successful infection and ensure parasite survival. Evidence points to microRNAs as new players in the host-parasite interplay. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that control proteins levels via post-transcriptional gene down-regulation, either within the cells where they were produced or in other cells via intercellular transfer. These microRNAs can be modulated in host cells during infection and are among the growing group of small regulatory RNAs, for which many classes have been described, including the transfer RNA-derived small RNAs. Parasites can either manipulate microRNAs to evade host-driven damage and/or transfer small RNAs to host cells. In this mini-review, we present evidence for the involvement of small RNAs, such as microRNAs, in trypanosomatid infections which lack RNA interference. We highlight both microRNA profile alterations in host cells during those infections and the horizontal transfer of small RNAs and proteins from parasites to the host by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles in a cell communication mechanism. PMID:27065454

  1. Association of RNAs with Bacillus subtilis Hfq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Dambach

    Full Text Available The prevalence and characteristics of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs have not been well characterized for Bacillus subtilis, an important model system for Gram-positive bacteria. However, B. subtilis was recently found to synthesize many candidate sRNAs during stationary phase. In the current study, we performed deep sequencing on Hfq-associated RNAs and found that a small subset of sRNAs associates with Hfq, an enigmatic RNA-binding protein that stabilizes sRNAs in Gram-negatives, but whose role is largely unknown in Gram-positive bacteria. We also found that Hfq associated with antisense RNAs, antitoxin transcripts, and many mRNA leaders. Several new candidate sRNAs and mRNA leader regions were also discovered by this analysis. Additionally, mRNA fragments overlapping with start or stop codons associated with Hfq, while, in contrast, relatively few full-length mRNAs were recovered. Deletion of hfq reduced the intracellular abundance of several representative sRNAs, suggesting that B. subtilis Hfq-sRNA interactions may be functionally significant in vivo. In general, we anticipate this catalog of Hfq-associated RNAs to serve as a resource in the functional characterization of Hfq in B. subtilis.

  2. Memory interfering effects of chlordiazepoxide on consummatory successive negative contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Leonardo A; Glueck, Amanda C; Daniel, Alan M; Prado-Rivera, Mayerli A; White, Michelle M; Papini, Mauricio R

    2014-01-01

    Long-Evans rats downshifted from 32% to 4% sucrose solution exhibit lower consummatory behavior during downshift trials than rats exposed only to 4% sucrose. In Experiment 1, this effect, called consummatory successive negative contrast (cSNC), was attenuated by administration of the benzodiazepine anxiolytic chlordiazepoxide (CDP, 5mg/kg, ip) before the second downshift trial (Trial 12), but was not affected when CDP was administered before the first downshift trial (Trial 11). In Experiment 2, CDP administered after Trial 11 actually enhanced the cSNC effect on Trial 12. This posttrial effect of CDP was reduced by delayed administration (Experiment 3). This CDP effect was not present in the absence of incentive downshift (Experiments 4-5), or when animals were tested with the preshift incentive (Experiment 6) or after complete recovery from cSNC (Experiment 7). The posttrial CDP effect was observed after an 8-day interval between Trials 11 and 12 (Experiment 8) and when administered after Trial 12, rather than Trial 11 (Experiment 9). Experiment 10 extended the effect to Wistar rats. Because CDP is a memory interfering drug, it was hypothesized that its posttrial administration interferes with the consolidation of the memory of the downshifted incentive, thus prolonging the mismatch between expected (32% sucrose) and obtained (4% sucrose) incentives that leads to the cSNC effect. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. ROW (Right-of-Way) interfering construction activities management program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosito, Roberta; Oliveira, Marisa; Lima, Shirley [TRANSPETRO - PETROBRAS Transporte S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    A significant portion of pipeline failures occurs due to external damage. This includes third party right of way (ROW) encroachment, which shall be identified and avoided. However, injuries caused by known and planned activities do happen. Construction of crossing or sharing ROW pipelines, crossing roads and bridges, neighboring buildings and excavations of any kind might put existing pipelines in risk. This paper presents how the TRANSPETRO ROW Interfering Construction Activities Management Program is implemented by a regional ROW maintenance department responsible for more than 3,000 km of pipelines, mostly in Rio de Janeiro and Minas Gerais states. This program is based on a TRANSPETRO procedure that was written after the publication of the Official Order number 125 of ANP (Oil, Gas and Biofuel Brazilian National Agency). Tasks from design review and approval to field construction supervision are performed by the staff responsible for the routine patrols and maintenance management. The ability of foreseeing risky activities is improved by expertise gained from day-to-day work on site. (author)

  4. Determination of mutually interfering elements in activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, A.M.G.

    1979-01-01

    The determination of the elements present in the groups scandium-zinc, mercury-selenium and arsenic-antimony-bromine represents a classical problem in thermal neutron activation analysis because the gamma-ray peaks of the radioisotopes produced from these elements by activation appear very close in the spectrum. A study is made of the possibility of simultaneous instrumental determination of these elements by means of the spectrum stripping technique, using a 400-channel analyser coupled to a Nal(Tl) detector and a 4096-channel analyser coupled to a Ge(Li) detector. Artificial mixtures of the interfering elements in varying proportions are prepared, so as to reproduce possible real samples, where the elements may be present at several concentrations. Radiochemical separation techniques for the cited elements are studied with the use of tracers. For the separation of scadium and zinc, the technique of extraction chromatography is applied. The separation of mercury and selenium is accomplished by means of ion exchange. The technique of coprecipitation is used to separate bromine from arsenic and antimony followed by ion exchange to isolate these two elements from each other. The precision and the accuracy of the results are discussed. (Author) [pt

  5. Small interfering RNA delivery through positively charged polymer nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragoni, Luca; Cesana, Alberto; Moscatelli, Davide; Ferrari, Raffaele; Morbidelli, Massimo; Lupi, Monica; Falcetta, Francesca; Ubezio, Paolo; D’Incalci, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is receiving increasing attention with regard to the treatment of many genetic diseases, both acquired and hereditary, such as cancer and diabetes. Being a high molecular weight (MW) polyanion, siRNA is not able to cross a cell membrane, and in addition it is unstable in physiological conditions. Accordingly, a biocompatible nanocarrier able to deliver siRNA into cells is needed. In this work, we synthesized biocompatible positively charged nanoparticles (NPs) following a two-step process that involves ring opening polymerization (ROP) and emulsion free radical polymerization (EFRP). Firstly, we proved the possibility of fine tuning the NPs’ characteristics (e.g. size and surface charge) by changing the synthetic process parameters. Then the capability in loading and delivering undamaged siRNA into a cancer cell cytoplasm has been shown. This latter process occurs through the biodegradation of the polymer constituting the NPs, whose kinetics can be tuned by adjusting the polymer’s MW. Finally, the ability of NPs to carry siRNA inside the cells in order to inhibit their target gene has been demonstrated using green flourescent protein positive cells. (paper)

  6. Peptides Interfering 3A Protein Dimerization Decrease FMDV Multiplication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica González-Magaldi

    Full Text Available Nonstructural protein 3A is involved in relevant functions in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV replication. FMDV 3A can form homodimers and preservation of the two hydrophobic α-helices (α1 and α2 that stabilize the dimer interface is essential for virus replication. In this work, small peptides mimicking residues involved in the dimer interface were used to interfere with dimerization and thus gain insight on its biological function. The dimer interface peptides α1, α2 and that spanning the two hydrophobic α-helices, α12, impaired in vitro dimer formation of a peptide containing the two α-helices, this effect being higher with peptide α12. To assess the effect of dimer inhibition in cultured cells, the interfering peptides were N-terminally fused to a heptaarginine (R7 sequence to favor their intracellular translocation. Thus, when fused to R7, interference peptides (100 μM were able to inhibit dimerization of transiently expressed 3A, the higher inhibitions being found with peptides α1 and α12. The 3A dimerization impairment exerted by the peptides correlated with significant, specific reductions in the viral yield recovered from peptide-treated FMDV infected cells. In this case, α2 was the only peptide producing significant reductions at concentrations lower than 100 μM. Thus, dimer interface peptides constitute a tool to understand the structure-function relationship of this viral protein and point to 3A dimerization as a potential antiviral target.

  7. miRNAs in brain development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petri, Rebecca; Malmevik, Josephine; Fasching, Liana; Åkerblom, Malin; Jakobsson, Johan

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In the brain, a large number of miRNAs are expressed and there is a growing body of evidence demonstrating that miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. Conditional knockout studies of the core components in the miRNA biogenesis pathway, such as Dicer and DGCR8, have demonstrated a crucial role for miRNAs during the development of the central nervous system. Furthermore, mice deleted for specific miRNAs and miRNA-clusters demonstrate diverse functional roles for different miRNAs during the development of different brain structures. miRNAs have been proposed to regulate cellular functions such as differentiation, proliferation and fate-determination of neural progenitors. In this review we summarise the findings from recent studies that highlight the importance of miRNAs in brain development with a focus on the mouse model. We also discuss the technical limitations of current miRNA studies that still limit our understanding of this family of non-coding RNAs and propose the use of novel and refined technologies that are needed in order to fully determine the impact of specific miRNAs in brain development. - Highlights: • miRNAs are essential for brain development and neuronal function. • KO of Dicer is embryonically lethal. • Conditional Dicer KO results in defective proliferation or increased apoptosis. • KO of individual miRNAs or miRNA families is necessary to determine function

  8. In vivo therapeutic potential of Dicer-hunting siRNAs targeting infectious hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tsunamasa; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Matsuda-Yasui, Chiho; Sato, Yusuke; Sudoh, Masayuki; Takagi, Asako; Hirata, Yuichi; Ohtsuki, Takahiro; Arai, Masaaki; Inoue, Kazuaki; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Kohara, Michinori

    2014-04-23

    The development of RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapy faces two major obstacles: selecting small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequences with strong activity, and identifying a carrier that allows efficient delivery to target organs. Additionally, conservative region at nucleotide level must be targeted for RNAi in applying to virus because hepatitis C virus (HCV) could escape from therapeutic pressure with genome mutations. In vitro preparation of Dicer-generated siRNAs targeting a conserved, highly ordered HCV 5' untranslated region are capable of inducing strong RNAi activity. By dissecting the 5'-end of an RNAi-mediated cleavage site in the HCV genome, we identified potent siRNA sequences, which we designate as Dicer-hunting siRNAs (dh-siRNAs). Furthermore, formulation of the dh-siRNAs in an optimized multifunctional envelope-type nano device inhibited ongoing infectious HCV replication in human hepatocytes in vivo. Our efforts using both identification of optimal siRNA sequences and delivery to human hepatocytes suggest therapeutic potential of siRNA for a virus.

  9. Efficient inhibition of fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression by ERK2 siRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Fengfeng; Fan, Cunyi; Cheng, Tao; Jiang, Chaoyin; Zeng, Bingfang

    2009-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 and fibroblast growth factor-2 play very important roles in fibroblast proliferation and collagen expression. These processes lead to the formation of joint adhesions through the SMAD and MAPK pathways, in which ERK2 is supposed to be crucial. Based on these assumptions, lentivirus (LV)-mediated small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting ERK2 were used to suppress the proliferation and collagen expression of rat joint adhesion tissue fibroblasts (RJATFs). Among four siRNAs examined, siRNA1 caused an 84% reduction in ERK2 expression (p < 0.01) and was selected as the most efficient siRNA for use in this study. In subsequent experiments, significant downregulation of types I and III collagen were observed by quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. MTT assays and flow cytometry revealed marked inhibition of RJATF proliferation, but no apoptosis. In conclusion, LV-mediated ERK2 siRNAs may represent novel therapies or drug targets for preventing joint adhesion formation.

  10. Anatomy of RISC: how do small RNAs and chaperones activate Argonaute proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Kotaro

    2016-09-01

    RNA silencing is a eukaryote-specific phenomenon in which microRNAs and small interfering RNAs degrade messenger RNAs containing a complementary sequence. To this end, these small RNAs need to be loaded onto an Argonaute protein (AGO protein) to form the effector complex referred to as RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). RISC assembly undergoes multiple and sequential steps with the aid of Hsc70/Hsp90 chaperone machinery. The molecular mechanisms for this assembly process remain unclear, despite their significance for the development of gene silencing techniques and RNA interference-based therapeutics. This review dissects the currently available structures of AGO proteins and proposes models and hypotheses for RISC assembly, covering the conformation of unloaded AGO proteins, the chaperone-assisted duplex loading, and the slicer-dependent and slicer-independent duplex separation. The differences in the properties of RISC between prokaryotes and eukaryotes will also be clarified. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:637-660. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1356 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 The Authors. WIREs RNA published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. High-throughput sequencing of RNA silencing-associated small RNAs in olive (Olea europaea L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Donaire

    Full Text Available Small RNAs (sRNAs of 20 to 25 nucleotides (nt in length maintain genome integrity and control gene expression in a multitude of developmental and physiological processes. Despite RNA silencing has been primarily studied in model plants, the advent of high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled profiling of the sRNA component of more than 40 plant species. Here, we used deep sequencing and molecular methods to report the first inventory of sRNAs in olive (Olea europaea L.. sRNA libraries prepared from juvenile and adult shoots revealed that the 24-nt class dominates the sRNA transcriptome and atypically accumulates to levels never seen in other plant species, suggesting an active role of heterochromatin silencing in the maintenance and integrity of its large genome. A total of 18 known miRNA families were identified in the libraries. Also, 5 other sRNAs derived from potential hairpin-like precursors remain as plausible miRNA candidates. RNA blots confirmed miRNA expression and suggested tissue- and/or developmental-specific expression patterns. Target mRNAs of conserved miRNAs were computationally predicted among the olive cDNA collection and experimentally validated through endonucleolytic cleavage assays. Finally, we use expression data to uncover genetic components of the miR156, miR172 and miR390/TAS3-derived trans-acting small interfering RNA (tasiRNA regulatory nodes, suggesting that these interactive networks controlling developmental transitions are fully operational in olive.

  12. Annotation of mammalian primary microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enright Anton J

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are important regulators of gene expression and have been implicated in development, differentiation and pathogenesis. Hundreds of miRNAs have been discovered in mammalian genomes. Approximately 50% of mammalian miRNAs are expressed from introns of protein-coding genes; the primary transcript (pri-miRNA is therefore assumed to be the host transcript. However, very little is known about the structure of pri-miRNAs expressed from intergenic regions. Here we annotate transcript boundaries of miRNAs in human, mouse and rat genomes using various transcription features. The 5' end of the pri-miRNA is predicted from transcription start sites, CpG islands and 5' CAGE tags mapped in the upstream flanking region surrounding the precursor miRNA (pre-miRNA. The 3' end of the pri-miRNA is predicted based on the mapping of polyA signals, and supported by cDNA/EST and ditags data. The predicted pri-miRNAs are also analyzed for promoter and insulator-associated regulatory regions. Results We define sets of conserved and non-conserved human, mouse and rat pre-miRNAs using bidirectional BLAST and synteny analysis. Transcription features in their flanking regions are used to demarcate the 5' and 3' boundaries of the pri-miRNAs. The lengths and boundaries of primary transcripts are highly conserved between orthologous miRNAs. A significant fraction of pri-miRNAs have lengths between 1 and 10 kb, with very few introns. We annotate a total of 59 pri-miRNA structures, which include 82 pre-miRNAs. 36 pri-miRNAs are conserved in all 3 species. In total, 18 of the confidently annotated transcripts express more than one pre-miRNA. The upstream regions of 54% of the predicted pri-miRNAs are found to be associated with promoter and insulator regulatory sequences. Conclusion Little is known about the primary transcripts of intergenic miRNAs. Using comparative data, we are able to identify the boundaries of a significant proportion of

  13. Computational Prediction of MicroRNAs from Toxoplasma gondii Potentially Regulating the Hosts’ Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müşerref Duygu Saçar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs were discovered two decades ago, yet there is still a great need for further studies elucidating their genesis and targeting in different phyla. Since experimental discovery and validation of miRNAs is difficult, computational predictions are indispensable and today most computational approaches employ machine learning. Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite residing within the cells of its hosts like human, uses miRNAs for its post-transcriptional gene regulation. It may also regulate its hosts’ gene expression, which has been shown in brain cancer. Since previous studies have shown that overexpressed miRNAs within the host are causal for disease onset, we hypothesized that T. gondii could export miRNAs into its host cell. We computationally predicted all hairpins from the genome of T. gondii and used mouse and human models to filter possible candidates. These were then further compared to known miRNAs in human and rodents and their expression was examined for T. gondii grown in mouse and human hosts, respectively. We found that among the millions of potential hairpins in T. gondii, only a few thousand pass filtering using a human or mouse model and that even fewer of those are expressed. Since they are expressed and differentially expressed in rodents and human, we suggest that there is a chance that T. gondii may export miRNAs into its hosts for direct regulation.

  14. Neuroepigenetics of memory formation and impairment: the role of microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Bechara J; Mansuy, Isabelle M

    2014-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short non-coding RNAs that primarily regulate protein synthesis through reversible translational repression or mRNA degradation. MiRNAs can act by translational control of transcription factors or via direct action on the chromatin, and thereby contribute to the non-genetic control of gene-environment interactions. MiRNAs that regulate components of pathways required for learning and memory further modulate the influence of epigenetics on cognition in the normal and diseased brain. This review summarizes recent data exemplifying the known roles of miRNAs in memory formation in different model organisms, and describes how neuronal plasticity regulates miRNA biogenesis, activity and degradation. It also examines the relevance of miRNAs for memory impairment in human, using recent clinical observations related to neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, and discusses the potential mechanisms by which these miRNAs may contribute to memory disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection

  16. Non-coding RNAs as epigenetic regulator of glioma stem-like cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke eKatsushima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas show heterogeneous histological features. These distinct phenotypic states are thought to be associated with the presence of glioma stem cells (GSCs, which are highly tumorigenic and self-renewing sub-population of tumor cells that have different functional characteristics. Differentiation of GSCs may be regulated by multi-tiered epigenetic mechanisms that orchestrate the expression of thousands of genes. One such regulatory mechanism involves functional non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs; a large number of ncRNAs have been identified and shown to regulate the expression of genes associated with cell differentiation programs. Given the roles of miRNAs in cell differentiation, it is possible they are involved in the regulation of gene expression networks in GSCs that are important for the maintenance of the pluripotent state and for directing differentiation. Here, we review recent findings on ncRNAs associated with GSC differentiation and discuss how these ncRNAs contribute to the establishment of tissue heterogeneity during glioblastoma tumor formation.

  17. Microprocessor Recruitment to Elongating RNA Polymerase II Is Required for Differential Expression of MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A. Church

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The cellular abundance of mature microRNAs (miRNAs is dictated by the efficiency of nuclear processing of primary miRNA transcripts (pri-miRNAs into pre-miRNA intermediates. The Microprocessor complex of Drosha and DGCR8 carries this out, but it has been unclear what controls Microprocessor’s differential processing of various pri-miRNAs. Here, we show that Drosophila DGCR8 (Pasha directly associates with the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II elongation complex when it is phosphorylated by the Cdk9 kinase (pTEFb. When association is blocked by loss of Cdk9 activity, a global change in pri-miRNA processing is detected. Processing of pri-miRNAs with a UGU sequence motif in their apical junction domain increases, while processing of pri-miRNAs lacking this motif decreases. Therefore, phosphorylation of RNA polymerase II recruits Microprocessor for co-transcriptional processing of non-UGU pri-miRNAs that would otherwise be poorly processed. In contrast, UGU-positive pri-miRNAs are robustly processed by Microprocessor independent of RNA polymerase association.

  18. MicroRNAs in Renal Diseases: A Potential Novel Therapeutic Target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Federica; Iervolino, Anna; Zacchia, Miriam; Simeoni, Adelina; Masella, Cristina; Capolongo, Giovanna; Perna, Alessandra; Capasso, Giovambattista; Trepiccione, Francesco

    2017-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a family of short noncoding RNAs that play important roles in posttranscriptional gene regulation. miRNAs inhibit target gene expression by blocking protein translation or by inducing mRNA degradation and therefore have the potential to modulate physiological and pathological processes. In the kidney, miRNAs play a role in the organogenesis and in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including renal carcinoma, diabetic nephropathy, cystogenesis, and glomerulopathies. Indeed, podocytes, but also the parietal cells of the Bowman capsule are severely affected by miRNA deregulation. In addition, several miRNAs have been found involved in the development of renal fibrosis. These experimental lines of evidence found a counterpart also in patients affected by diabetic and Ig-A nephropathies, opening the possibility of their use as biomarkers. Finally, the possibility to direct target-specific miRNA to prevent the development of renal fibrosis is encouraging potential novel therapies based on miRNA mimicking or antagonism. This review reports the main studies that investigate the role of miRNAs in the kidneys, in particular highlighting the experimental models used, their potential role as biomarkers and, finally, the most recent data on the miRNA-based therapy. miRNAs are crucial regulators of cell function. They are easy to detect and represent potentially good targets for novel therapies.

  19. Small interfering RNA targeted to IGF-IR delays tumor growth and induces proinflammatory cytokines in a mouse breast cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiphanie Durfort

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I and its type I receptor (IGF-IR play significant roles in tumorigenesis and in immune response. Here, we wanted to know whether an RNA interference approach targeted to IGF-IR could be used for specific antitumor immunostimulation in a breast cancer model. For that, we evaluated short interfering RNA (siRNAs for inhibition of in vivo tumor growth and immunological stimulation in immunocompetent mice. We designed 2'-O-methyl-modified siRNAs to inhibit expression of IGF-IR in two murine breast cancer cell lines (EMT6, C4HD. Cell transfection of IGF-IR siRNAs decreased proliferation, diminished phosphorylation of downstream signaling pathway proteins, AKT and ERK, and caused a G0/G1 cell cycle block. The IGF-IR silencing also induced secretion of two proinflammatory cytokines, TNF- α and IFN-γ. When we transfected C4HD cells with siRNAs targeting IGF-IR, mammary tumor growth was strongly delayed in syngenic mice. Histology of developing tumors in mice grafted with IGF-IR siRNA treated C4HD cells revealed a low mitotic index, and infiltration of lymphocytes and polymorphonuclear neutrophils, suggesting activation of an antitumor immune response. When we used C4HD cells treated with siRNA as an immunogen, we observed an increase in delayed-type hypersensitivity and the presence of cytotoxic splenocytes against wild-type C4HD cells, indicative of evolving immune response. Our findings show that silencing IGF-IR using synthetic siRNA bearing 2'-O-methyl nucleotides may offer a new clinical approach for treatment of mammary tumors expressing IGF-IR. Interestingly, our work also suggests that crosstalk between IGF-I axis and antitumor immune response can mobilize proinflammatory cytokines.

  20. Highly potent and specific siRNAs against E6 or E7 genes of HPV16- or HPV18-infected cervical cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, J T-C; Kuo, T-F; Chen, Y-J; Chiu, C-C; Lu, Y-C; Li, H-F; Shen, C-R; Cheng, A-J

    2010-01-01

    Infection with high-risk types (type 16 or type 18) of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) increases a patient's risk of cervical cancer. Given the importance of the cervix and the severe side effects resulting from traditional cancer therapies, this study aimed to achieve targeted inhibition of viral oncogenes in tumor cells using small interfering RNAs (siRNA). To accomplish this, we developed nine siRNAs against either the E6 or E7 genes of HPV-16 or HPV-18 in several combinations, yielding siRN...

  1. A Protein Complex Required for Polymerase V Transcripts and RNA- Directed DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Julie A.

    2010-05-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene silencing. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation is established by DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 2 (DRM2), which is targeted by small interfering RNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) [1, 2]. Recently, RdDM was shown to require intergenic noncoding (IGN) transcripts that are dependent on the Pol V polymerase. These transcripts are proposed to function as scaffolds for the recruitment of downstream RdDM proteins, including DRM2, to loci that produce both siRNAs and IGN transcripts [3]. However, the mechanism(s) through which Pol V is targeted to specific genomic loci remains largely unknown. Through affinity purification of two known RdDM components, DEFECTIVE IN RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DRD1) [4] and DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING 3 (DMS3) [5, 6], we found that they copurify with each other and with a novel protein, RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (RDM1), forming a complex we term DDR. We also found that DRD1 copurified with Pol V subunits and that RDM1, like DRD1 [3] and DMS3 [7], is required for the production of Pol V-dependent transcripts. These results suggest that the DDR complex acts in RdDM at a step upstream of the recruitment or activation of Pol V. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Protein Complex Required for Polymerase V Transcripts and RNA- Directed DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Law, Julie A.; Ausí n, Israel; Johnson, Lianna M.; Vashisht, Ajay  A Amar; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Wohlschlegel, James  A A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification associated with gene silencing. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation is established by DOMAINS REARRANGED METHYLTRANSFERASE 2 (DRM2), which is targeted by small interfering RNAs through a pathway termed RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) [1, 2]. Recently, RdDM was shown to require intergenic noncoding (IGN) transcripts that are dependent on the Pol V polymerase. These transcripts are proposed to function as scaffolds for the recruitment of downstream RdDM proteins, including DRM2, to loci that produce both siRNAs and IGN transcripts [3]. However, the mechanism(s) through which Pol V is targeted to specific genomic loci remains largely unknown. Through affinity purification of two known RdDM components, DEFECTIVE IN RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (DRD1) [4] and DEFECTIVE IN MERISTEM SILENCING 3 (DMS3) [5, 6], we found that they copurify with each other and with a novel protein, RNA-DIRECTED DNA METHYLATION 1 (RDM1), forming a complex we term DDR. We also found that DRD1 copurified with Pol V subunits and that RDM1, like DRD1 [3] and DMS3 [7], is required for the production of Pol V-dependent transcripts. These results suggest that the DDR complex acts in RdDM at a step upstream of the recruitment or activation of Pol V. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The UEA sRNA Workbench (version 4.4): a comprehensive suite of tools for analyzing miRNAs and sRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, Matthew B; Mohorianu, Irina; Beckers, Matthew; Paicu, Claudia; Moxon, Simon; Thody, Joshua; Dalmay, Tamas; Moulton, Vincent

    2018-05-02

    RNA interference, a highly conserved regulatory mechanism, is mediated via small RNAs. Recent technical advances enabled the analysis of larger, complex datasets and the investigation of microRNAs and the less known small interfering RNAs. However, the size and intricacy of current data requires a comprehensive set of tools, able to discriminate the patterns from the low-level, noise-like, variation; numerous and varied suggestions from the community represent an invaluable source of ideas for future tools, the ability of the community to contribute to this software is essential. We present a new version of the UEA sRNA Workbench, reconfigured to allow an easy insertion of new tools/workflows. In its released form, it comprises of a suite of tools in a user-friendly environment, with enhanced capabilities for a comprehensive processing of sRNA-seq data e.g. tools for an accurate prediction of sRNA loci (CoLIde) and miRNA loci (miRCat2), as well as workflows to guide the users through common steps such as quality checking of the input data, normalization of abundances or detection of differential expression represent the first step in sRNA-seq analyses. The UEA sRNA Workbench is available at: http://srna-workbench.cmp.uea.ac.uk The source code is available at: https://github.com/sRNAworkbenchuea/UEA_sRNA_Workbench. v.moulton@uea.ac.uk.

  4. Sensitization of human carcinoma cells to alkylating agents by small interfering RNA suppression of 3-alkyladenine-DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Johanna; Duncan, Tod; Lindahl, Tomas; Sedgwick, Barbara

    2005-11-15

    One of the major cytotoxic lesions generated by alkylating agents is DNA 3-alkyladenine, which can be excised by 3-alkyladenine DNA glycosylase (AAG). Inhibition of AAG may therefore result in increased cellular sensitivity to chemotherapeutic alkylating agents. To investigate this possibility, we have examined the role of AAG in protecting human tumor cells against such agents. Plasmids that express small interfering RNAs targeted to two different regions of AAG mRNA were transfected into HeLa cervical carcinoma cells and A2780-SCA ovarian carcinoma cells. Stable derivatives of both cell types with low AAG protein levels were sensitized to alkylating agents. Two HeLa cell lines with AAG protein levels reduced by at least 80% to 90% displayed a 5- to 10-fold increase in sensitivity to methyl methanesulfonate, N-methyl-N-nitrosourea, and the chemotherapeutic drugs temozolomide and 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea. These cells showed no increase in sensitivity to UV light or ionizing radiation. After treatment with methyl methanesulfonate, AAG knockdown HeLa cells were delayed in S phase but accumulated in G2-M. Our data support the hypothesis that ablation of AAG activity in human tumor cells may provide a useful strategy to enhance the efficacy of current chemotherapeutic regimens that include alkylating agents.

  5. MicroRNAs in the Hypothalamus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meister, Björn; Herzer, Silke; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (∼22 nucleotides) non-coding ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules that negatively regulate the expression of protein-coding genes. Posttranscriptional silencing of target genes by miRNA is initiated by binding to the 3'-untranslated regions of target mRNAs, resulting...... of the hypothalamus and miRNAs have recently been shown to be important regulators of hypothalamic control functions. The aim of this review is to summarize some of the current knowledge regarding the expression and role of miRNAs in the hypothalamus.......RNA molecules are abundantly expressed in tissue-specific and regional patterns and have been suggested as potential biomarkers, disease modulators and drug targets. The central nervous system is a prominent site of miRNA expression. Within the brain, several miRNAs are expressed and/or enriched in the region...

  6. Characterization of rice black-streaked dwarf virus- and rice stripe virus-derived siRNAs in singly and doubly infected insect vector Laodelphax striatellus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junmin Li

    Full Text Available Replication of RNA viruses in insect cells triggers an antiviral defense that is mediated by RNA interference (RNAi which generates viral-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs. However, it is not known whether an antiviral RNAi response is also induced in insects by reoviruses, whose double-stranded RNA genome replication is thought to occur within core particles. Deep sequencing of small RNAs showed that when the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus was infected by Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV (Reoviridae; Fijivirus, more viral-derived siRNAs accumulated than when the vector insect was infected by Rice stripe virus (RSV, a negative single-stranded RNA virus. RBSDV siRNAs were predominantly 21 and 22 nucleotides long and there were almost equal numbers of positive and negative sense. RBSDV siRNAs were frequently generated from hotspots in the 5'- and 3'-terminal regions of viral genome segments but these hotspots were not associated with any predicted RNA secondary structures. Under laboratory condition, L. striatellus can be infected simultaneously with RBSDV and RSV. Double infection enhanced the accumulation of particular genome segments but not viral coat protein of RBSDV and correlated with an increase in the abundance of siRNAs derived from RBSDV. The results of this study suggest that reovirus replication in its insect vector potentially induces an RNAi-mediated antiviral response.

  7. [Small interfering RNA-mediated COX-2 gene silencing enhances chemosensitivity of KB/VCR cells by suppressing MDR-1 gene expression and P-glycoprotein activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Xianchao; Li, Weizhong

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated COX-2 gene silencing in enhancing the chemosensitivity of KB/VCR cell lines. KB/VCR cells were trasnfected with COX-2 siRNA were examined for expressions of COX-2 and MDR-1 mRNAs with RT-PCR and for Rho-123 accumulation using flow cytometry. MTT assay was used to analyze the proliferation of the transfected KB/VCR cells. Compared with the negative and blank control groups, COX-2 siRNA transfection resulted in significant growth inhibition of KB/VCR cells exposed to vincristine (PKB/VCR cells. COX-2 gene silencing can enhance the chemosensitivity of KB/VCR cells to vincristine, the mechanism of which may involve down-regulated MDR-1 gene expression and inhibition of P-glycoprotein activity.

  8. A retrotransposon-driven Dicer isoform directs endogenous small interfering RNA production in mouse oocytes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Flemr, Matyáš; Malík, Radek; Franke, V.; Nejepínská, Jana; Sedláček, Radislav; Vlahovicek, K.; Svoboda, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 155, č. 4 (2013), s. 807-816 ISSN 0092-8674 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/2215; GA ČR(CZ) GBP305/12/G034; GA ČR GA204/09/0085; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011032; GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0109 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200521202 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Dicer * miRNA * RNAi * mouse oocytes Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 33.116, year: 2013

  9. MicroRNAs regulate osteogenesis and chondrogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Shiwu; Yang, Bo; Guo, Hongfeng; Kang, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► To focus on the role of miRNAs in chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. ► Involved in the regulation of miRNAs in osteoarthritis. ► To speculate some therapeutic targets for bone diseases. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small molecules and non-coding single strand RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by binding to specific sequences within target genes. miRNAs have been recognized as important regulatory factors in organism development and disease expression. Some miRNAs regulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts, osteoclasts and chondrocytes, eventually influencing metabolism and bone formation. miRNAs are expected to provide potential gene therapy targets for the clinical treatment of metabolic bone diseases and bone injuries. Here, we review the recent research progress on the regulation of miRNAs in bone biology, with a particular focus on the miRNA-mediated control mechanisms of bone and cartilage formation.

  10. MicroRNAs regulate osteogenesis and chondrogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Shiwu, E-mail: shiwudong@gmail.com [Laboratory of Biomechanics, Department of Anatomy, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China); Yang, Bo; Guo, Hongfeng; Kang, Fei [Laboratory of Biomechanics, Department of Anatomy, The Third Military Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To focus on the role of miRNAs in chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Involved in the regulation of miRNAs in osteoarthritis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To speculate some therapeutic targets for bone diseases. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small molecules and non-coding single strand RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by binding to specific sequences within target genes. miRNAs have been recognized as important regulatory factors in organism development and disease expression. Some miRNAs regulate the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts, osteoclasts and chondrocytes, eventually influencing metabolism and bone formation. miRNAs are expected to provide potential gene therapy targets for the clinical treatment of metabolic bone diseases and bone injuries. Here, we review the recent research progress on the regulation of miRNAs in bone biology, with a particular focus on the miRNA-mediated control mechanisms of bone and cartilage formation.

  11. Alpha-synuclein suppression by targeted small interfering RNA in the primate substantia nigra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison L McCormack

    Full Text Available The protein alpha-synuclein is involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Its toxic potential appears to be enhanced by increased protein expression, providing a compelling rationale for therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing neuronal alpha-synuclein burden. Here, feasibility and safety of alpha-synuclein suppression were evaluated by treating monkeys with small interfering RNA (siRNA directed against alpha-synuclein. The siRNA molecule was chemically modified to prevent degradation by exo- and endonucleases and directly infused into the left substantia nigra. Results compared levels of alpha-synuclein mRNA and protein in the infused (left vs. untreated (right hemisphere and revealed a significant 40-50% suppression of alpha-synuclein expression. These findings could not be attributable to non-specific effects of siRNA infusion since treatment of a separate set of animals with luciferase-targeting siRNA produced no changes in alpha-synuclein. Infusion with alpha-synuclein siRNA, while lowering alpha-synuclein expression, had no overt adverse consequences. In particular, it did not cause tissue inflammation and did not change (i the number and phenotype of nigral dopaminergic neurons, and (ii the concentrations of striatal dopamine and its metabolites. The data represent the first evidence of successful anti-alpha-synuclein intervention in the primate substantia nigra and support further development of RNA interference-based therapeutics.

  12. MicroRNAs in cancer therapeutics: "from the bench to the bedside".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroig-Bosque, Paloma del C; Rivera, Carlos A; Calin, George A

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNA transcripts that regulate physiological processes by targeting proteins directly. Their involvement in research has been robust, and evidence of their regulative functions has granted them the title: master regulators of the human genome. In cancer, they are considered important therapeutic agents, due to the fact that their aberrant expression contributes to disease development, progression, metastasis, therapeutic response and patient overall survival. This has endeavored fields of biomedical sciences to invest in developing and exploiting miRNA-based therapeutics thoroughly. Herein we highlight relevant ongoing/open clinical trials involving miRNAs and cancer.

  13. The relationship between transcription initiation RNAs and CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taft Ryan J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription initiation RNAs (tiRNAs are nuclear localized 18 nucleotide RNAs derived from sequences immediately downstream of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII transcription start sites. Previous reports have shown that tiRNAs are intimately correlated with gene expression, RNA polymerase II binding and behaviors, and epigenetic marks associated with transcription initiation, but not elongation. Results In the present work, we show that tiRNAs are commonly found at genomic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF binding sites in human and mouse, and that CTCF sites that colocalize with RNAPII are highly enriched for tiRNAs. To directly investigate the relationship between tiRNAs and CTCF we examined tiRNAs originating near the intronic CTCF binding site in the human tumor suppressor gene, p21 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A gene, also known as CDKN1A. Inhibition of CTCF-proximal tiRNAs resulted in increased CTCF localization and increased p21 expression, while overexpression of CTCF-proximal tiRNA mimics decreased CTCF localization and p21 expression. We also found that tiRNA-regulated CTCF binding influences the levels of trimethylated H3K27 at the alternate upstream p21 promoter, and affects the levels of alternate p21 (p21alt transcripts. Extending these studies to another randomly selected locus with conserved CTCF binding we found that depletion of tiRNA alters nucleosome density proximal to sites of tiRNA biogenesis. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that tiRNAs modulate local epigenetic structure, which in turn regulates CTCF localization.

  14. The Potential of MicroRNAs as Prostate Cancer Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Fabris (Linda); Y. Ceder (Yvonne); A.M. Chinnaiyan (Arul); G.W. Jenster (Guido); K.D. Sorensen (Karina D.); S.A. Tomlins (Scott A); T. Visakorpi (Tapio); G.A. Calin (George)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractContext: Short noncoding RNAs known as microRNAs (miRNAs) control protein expression through the degradation of RNA or the inhibition of protein translation. The miRNAs influence a wide range of biologic processes and are often deregulated in cancer. This family of small RNAs constitutes

  15. Visual screening for localized RNAs in yeast revealed novel RNAs at the bud-tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andoh, Tomoko; Oshiro, Yukiko; Hayashi, Sachiko; Takeo, Hideki; Tani, Tokio

    2006-01-01

    Several RNAs, including rRNAs, snRNAs, snoRNAs, and some mRNAs, are known to be localized at specific sites in a cell. Although methods have been established to visualize RNAs in a living cell, no large-scale visual screening of localized RNAs has been performed. In this study, we constructed a genomic library in which random genomic fragments were inserted downstream of U1A-tag sequences under a GAL1 promoter. In a living yeast cell, transcribed U1A-tagged RNAs were visualized by U1A-GFP that binds the RNA sequence of the U1A-tag. In this screening, many RNAs showed nuclear signals. Since the nuclear signals of some RNAs were not seen when the U1A-tag was connected to the 3' ends of the RNAs, it is suggested that their nuclear signals correspond to nascent transcripts on GAL1 promoter plasmids. Using this screening method, we successfully identified two novel localized mRNAs, CSR2 and DAL81, which showed bud-tip localization

  16. Hydrophobically Modified siRNAs Silence Huntingtin mRNA in Primary Neurons and Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia F Alterman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Applications of RNA interference for neuroscience research have been limited by a lack of simple and efficient methods to deliver oligonucleotides to primary neurons in culture and to the brain. Here, we show that primary neurons rapidly internalize hydrophobically modified siRNAs (hsiRNAs added directly to the culture medium without lipid formulation. We identify functional hsiRNAs targeting the mRNA of huntingtin, the mutation of which is responsible for Huntington's disease, and show that direct uptake in neurons induces potent and specific silencing in vitro. Moreover, a single injection of unformulated hsiRNA into mouse brain silences Htt mRNA with minimal neuronal toxicity. Thus, hsiRNAs embody a class of therapeutic oligonucleotides that enable simple and straightforward functional studies of genes involved in neuronal biology and neurodegenerative disorders in a native biological context.

  17. Prevalence of interfering substances with point-of-care glucose testing in a community hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastham, John H; Mason, Debra; Barnes, Deborah L; Kollins, Jerry

    2009-01-15

    This study determined the prevalence of interfering substances with a glucometer using the glucose dehydrogenase pyrroloquinolinequinone method of point-of-care glucose testing (POCGT) and identified the percentage of patients with orders for an insulin product during the interference time interval. A retrospective chart review was conducted for all inpatients with biochemically-identified interfering substances over a 12-month period. The interfering substance report identified all patients with serum uric acid concentrations greater than 10 mg/dL, hematocrit less than 20% or greater than 55%, serum total bilirubin concentrations greater than 20 mg/dL, serum acetaminophen concentrations greater than 8 mg/dL, and serum triglyceride concentrations greater than 5000 mg/dL. Of 6885 hospital admissions during the 12-month study period, 84 patients (1.2%) were identified as having interfering substances. Interfering substances were identified an average mean +/- S.D. of 4.88 +/- 15.56 days following hospital admission. Two patients had interfering substances identified in the emergency department before hospital admission. Five patients (four with total bilirubin and one with uric acid) had initial concentrations below the interference threshold. These concentrations increased during hospitalization to high enough levels to cause interference with POCGT. Since the average length of stay for the identified patients was 10.49 days, an average of 17% of the hospital stay was impacted by an interfering substance. Substances remained at interfering concentrations until the time of discharge in 30% of the patients. Over a 12-month period, interfering substance were identified in1.2% of patients admitted to a hospital. Thirty-six percent of those patients had an active order for an insulin product during the interference time interval.

  18. Multiple RNAs from the mouse carboxypeptidase M locus: functional RNAs or transcription noise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castilho Beatriz A

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major effort of the scientific community has been to obtain complete pictures of the genomes of many organisms. This has been accomplished mainly by annotation of structural and functional elements in the genome sequence, a process that has been centred in the gene concept and, as a consequence, biased toward protein coding sequences. Recently, the explosion of transcriptome data generated and the discovery of many functional non-protein coding RNAs have painted a more detailed and complex scenario for the genome. Here we analyzed the mouse carboxypeptidase M locus in this broader perspective in order to define the mouse CPM gene structure and evaluate the existence of other transcripts from the same genomic region. Results Bioinformatic analysis of nucleotide sequences that map to the mouse CPM locus suggests that, in addition to the mouse CPM mRNA, it expresses at least 33 different transcripts, many of which seem to be non-coding RNAs. We randomly chose to evaluate experimentally four of these extra transcripts. They are expressed in a tissue specific manner, indicating that they are not artefacts or transcriptional noise. Furthermore, one of these four extra transcripts shows expression patterns that differed considerably from the other ones and from the mouse CPM gene, suggesting that there may be more than one transcriptional unit in this locus. In addition, we have confirmed the mouse CPM gene RefSeq sequence by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE and directional cloning. Conclusion This study supports the recent view that the majority of the genome is transcribed and that many of the resulting transcripts seem to be non-coding RNAs from introns of genes or from independent transcriptional units. Although some of the information on the transcriptome of many organisms may actually be artefacts or transcriptional noise, we argue that it can be experimentally evaluated and used to find and define biological

  19. Small RNAs in plants: Recent development and application for crop improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayushi eKamthan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi which involves sequence specific gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs i.e small interfering RNA (siRNA and micro RNA (miRNA has emerged as one of most powerful approaches for crop improvement. RNAi based on siRNA is one of the widely used tools of reverse genetics which aid in revealing gene functions in many species. This technology has been extensively applied to alter the gene expression in plants with an aim to achieve desirable traits. RNAi has been used for enhancing the crop yield and productivity by manipulating the gene involved in biomass, grain yield and enhanced shelf life of fruits & vegetables. It has also been applied for developing resistance against various biotic (bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, insects and abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, cold etc.. Nutritional improvements of crops have also been achieved by enriching the crops with essential amino acids, fatty acids, antioxidants and other nutrients beneficial for human health or by reducing allergens or anti-nutrients. Micro RNAs are key regulators of important plant processes like growth, development and response to various stresses. In spite of similarity in size (20-24nt, miRNA differ from siRNA in precursor structures, pathway of biogenesis, and modes of action. This review also highlights the miRNA based genetic modification technology where various miRNAs/artificial miRNAs and their targets can be utilized for improving several desirable plant traits. Micro RNA based strategies are much efficient than siRNA-based RNAi strategies due to its specificity and less undesirable off target effects. As per the FDA guidelines, small RNA based transgenics are much safer for consumption than those over expressing proteins. This review thereby summarizes the emerging advances and achievement in the field of small RNAs and its application for crop improvement.

  20. Small RNAs in plants: recent development and application for crop improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamthan, Ayushi; Chaudhuri, Abira; Kamthan, Mohan; Datta, Asis

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of RNA interference (RNAi) which involves sequence-specific gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs, i.e., small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) has emerged as one of most powerful approaches for crop improvement. RNAi based on siRNA is one of the widely used tools of reverse genetics which aid in revealing gene functions in many species. This technology has been extensively applied to alter the gene expression in plants with an aim to achieve desirable traits. RNAi has been used for enhancing the crop yield and productivity by manipulating the gene involved in biomass, grain yield and enhanced shelf life of fruits and vegetables. It has also been applied for developing resistance against various biotic (bacteria, fungi, viruses, nematodes, insects) and abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, cold, etc.). Nutritional improvements of crops have also been achieved by enriching the crops with essential amino acids, fatty acids, antioxidants and other nutrients beneficial for human health or by reducing allergens or anti-nutrients. microRNAs are key regulators of important plant processes like growth, development, and response to various stresses. In spite of similarity in size (20-24 nt), miRNA differ from siRNA in precursor structures, pathway of biogenesis, and modes of action. This review also highlights the miRNA based genetic modification technology where various miRNAs/artificial miRNAs and their targets can be utilized for improving several desirable plant traits. microRNA based strategies are much efficient than siRNA-based RNAi strategies due to its specificity and less undesirable off target effects. As per the FDA guidelines, small RNA (sRNA) based transgenics are much safer for consumption than those over-expressing proteins. This review thereby summarizes the emerging advances and achievement in the field of sRNAs and its application for crop improvement.

  1. C-E1 fusion protein synthesized by rubella virus DI RNAs maintained during serial passage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, W.-P.; Frey, Teryl K.

    2006-01-01

    Rubella virus (RUB) replicons are derivatives of the RUB infectious cDNA clone that retain the nonstructural open reading frame (NS-ORF) that encodes the replicase proteins but not the structural protein ORF (SP-ORF) that encodes the virion proteins. RUB defective interfering (DI) RNAs contain deletions within the SP-ORF and thus resemble replicons. DI RNAs often retain the 5' end of the capsid protein (C) gene that has been shown to modulate virus-specific RNA synthesis. However, when replicons either with or without the C gene were passaged serially in the presence of wt RUB as a source of the virion proteins, it was found that neither replicon was maintained and DI RNAs were generated. The majority DI RNA species contained in-frame deletions in the SP-ORF leading to a fusion between the 5' end of the C gene and the 3' end of the E1 glycoprotein gene. DI infectious cDNA clones were constructed and transcripts from these DI infectious cDNA clones were maintained during serial passage with wt RUB. The C-E1 fusion protein encoded by the DI RNAs was synthesized and was required for maintenance of the DI RNA during serial passage. This is the first report of a functional novel gene product resulting from deletion during DI RNA generation. Thus far, the role of the C-E1 fusion protein in maintenance of DI RNAs during serial passage remained elusive as it was found that the fusion protein diminished rather than enhanced DI RNA synthesis and was not incorporated into virus particles

  2. eRNAs promote transcription by establishing chromatin accessibility at defined genomic loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousavi, Kambiz; Zare, Hossein; Dell'orso, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    )RNA acted to activate the downstream myogenic genes. The deployment of transcriptional machinery to appropriate loci is contingent on chromatin accessibility, a rate-limiting step preceding Pol II assembly. By nuclease sensitivity assay, we found that eRNAs regulate genomic access of the transcriptional...... complex to defined regulatory regions. In conclusion, our data suggest that eRNAs contribute to establishing a cell-type-specific transcriptional circuitry by directing chromatin-remodeling events....

  3. Misinterpreting the therapeutic effects of small interfering RNA caused by immune stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Marjorie; Judge, Adam; Ambegia, Ellen; Choi, Catherine; Yaworski, Ed; Palmer, Lorne; McClintock, Kevin; MacLachlan, Ian

    2008-10-01

    Activation of innate immunity has direct effects in modulating viral replication, tumor growth, angiogenesis, and inflammatory and other immunological processes. It is now established that unmodified siRNA can activate this innate immune response and therefore there is real potential for siRNA to elicit nonspecific therapeutic effects in a wide range of disease models. Here we demonstrate that in a murine model of influenza infection, the antiviral activity of siRNA is due primarily to immune stimulation elicited by the active siRNA duplexes and is not the result of therapeutic RNA interference (RNAi) as previously reported. We show that the misinterpretation stems from the use of a particular control green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA that we identify as having unusually low immunostimulatory activity compared with the active anti-influenza siRNA. Curiously, this GFP siRNA has served as a negative control for a surprising number of groups reporting therapeutic effects of siRNA. The inert immunologic profile of the GFP sequence was unique among a broad panel of published siRNAs, all of which could elicit significant interferon induction from primary immune cells. This panel included eight active siRNAs against viral, angiogenic, and oncologic targets, the reported therapeutic efficacy of which was based on comparison with the nonimmunostimulatory GFP siRNA. These results emphasize the need for researchers to anticipate, monitor, and adequately control for siRNA-mediated immune stimulation and calls into question the interpretation of numerous published reports of therapeutic RNAi in vivo. The use of chemically modified siRNA with minimal immunostimulatory capacity will help to delineate more accurately the mechanism of action underlying such studies.

  4. microRNAs in CNS disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kocerha, Jannet; Kauppinen, Sakari; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2009-01-01

    RNAs (miRNAs) have been identified in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and are reported to mediate pivotal roles in many aspects of neuronal functions. Disruption of miRNA-based post-transcriptional regulation has been implicated in a range of CNS disorders as one miRNA is predicted to impact...

  5. Exploiting tRNAs to Boost Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suki Albers

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfer RNAs (tRNAs are powerful small RNA entities that are used to translate nucleotide language of genes into the amino acid language of proteins. Their near-uniform length and tertiary structure as well as their high nucleotide similarity and post-transcriptional modifications have made it difficult to characterize individual species quantitatively. However, due to the central role of the tRNA pool in protein biosynthesis as well as newly emerging roles played by tRNAs, their quantitative assessment yields important information, particularly relevant for virus research. Viruses which depend on the host protein expression machinery have evolved various strategies to optimize tRNA usage—either by adapting to the host codon usage or encoding their own tRNAs. Additionally, several viruses bear tRNA-like elements (TLE in the 5′- and 3′-UTR of their mRNAs. There are different hypotheses concerning the manner in which such structures boost viral protein expression. Furthermore, retroviruses use special tRNAs for packaging and initiating reverse transcription of their genetic material. Since there is a strong specificity of different viruses towards certain tRNAs, different strategies for recruitment are employed. Interestingly, modifications on tRNAs strongly impact their functionality in viruses. Here, we review those intersection points between virus and tRNA research and describe methods for assessing the tRNA pool in terms of concentration, aminoacylation and modification.

  6. Annotating functional RNAs in genomes using Infernal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawrocki, Eric P

    2014-01-01

    Many different types of functional non-coding RNAs participate in a wide range of important cellular functions but the large majority of these RNAs are not routinely annotated in published genomes. Several programs have been developed for identifying RNAs, including specific tools tailored to a particular RNA family as well as more general ones designed to work for any family. Many of these tools utilize covariance models (CMs), statistical models of the conserved sequence, and structure of an RNA family. In this chapter, as an illustrative example, the Infernal software package and CMs from the Rfam database are used to identify RNAs in the genome of the archaeon Methanobrevibacter ruminantium, uncovering some additional RNAs not present in the genome's initial annotation. Analysis of the results and comparison with family-specific methods demonstrate some important strengths and weaknesses of this general approach.

  7. GAMDB: a web resource to connect microRNAs with autophagy in gerontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lan; Xie, Tao; Tian, Mao; Li, Jingjing; Song, Sicheng; Ouyang, Liang; Liu, Bo; Cai, Haoyang

    2016-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous ~23 nucleotides (nt) RNAs, regulating gene expression by pairing to the mRNAs of protein-coding genes to direct their post-transcriptional repression. Both in normal and aberrant activities, miRNAs contribute to a recurring paradigm of cellular behaviors in pathological settings, especially in gerontology. Autophagy, a multi-step lysosomal degradation process with function to degrade long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, has significant impact on gerontology. Thus, elucidating how miRNAs participate in autophagy may enlarge the scope of miRNA in autophagy and facilitate researches in gerontology. Herein, based upon the published studies, predicted targets and gerontology-related diseases, we constructed a web resource named Gerontology-Autophagic-MicroRNA Database (GAMDB) (http://gamdb.liu-lab.com/index.php), which contained 836 autophagy-related miRNAs, 197 targeted genes/proteins and 56 aging-related diseases such as Parkinson' disease, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. We made use of large amounts of data to elucidate the intricate relationships between microRNA-regulated autophagic mechanisms and gerontology. This database will facilitate better understanding of autophagy regulation network in gerontology and thus promoting gerontology-related therapy in the future. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Structural determinants of miRNAs for RISC loading and slicer-independent unwinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Tomoko; Seitz, Hervé; Tomari, Yukihide

    2009-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate expression of their target mRNAs through the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which contains an Argonaute (Ago) family protein as a core component. In Drosophila melanogaster, miRNAs are generally sorted into Ago1-containing RISC (Ago1-RISC). We established a native gel system that can biochemically dissect the Ago1-RISC assembly pathway. We found that miRNA-miRNA* duplexes are loaded into Ago1 as double-stranded RNAs in an ATP-dependent fashion. In contrast, unexpectedly, unwinding of miRNA-miRNA* duplexes is a passive process that does not require ATP or slicer activity of Ago1. Central mismatches direct miRNA-miRNA* duplexes into pre-Ago1-RISC, whereas mismatches in the seed or guide strand positions 12-15 promote conversion of pre-Ago1-RISC into mature Ago1-RISC. Our findings show that unwinding of miRNAs is a precise mirror-image process of target recognition, and both processes reflect the unique geometry of RNAs in Ago proteins.

  9. Synthetic RNAs for Gene Regulation: Design Principles and Computational Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laganà, Alessandro; Shasha, Dennis; Croce, Carlo Maria

    2014-01-01

    The use of synthetic non-coding RNAs for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has not only become a standard laboratory tool for gene functional studies but it has also opened up new perspectives in the design of new and potentially promising therapeutic strategies. Bioinformatics has provided researchers with a variety of tools for the design, the analysis, and the evaluation of RNAi agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA), short-hairpin RNA (shRNA), artificial microRNA (a-miR), and microRNA sponges. More recently, a new system for genome engineering based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), was shown to have the potential to also regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in a more specific way. In this mini review, we present RNAi and CRISPRi design principles and discuss the advantages and limitations of the current design approaches.

  10. Synthetic RNAs for Gene Regulation: Design Principles and Computational Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laganà, Alessandro [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Shasha, Dennis [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, NY (United States); Croce, Carlo Maria [Department of Molecular Virology, Immunology and Medical Genetics, Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-12-11

    The use of synthetic non-coding RNAs for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has not only become a standard laboratory tool for gene functional studies but it has also opened up new perspectives in the design of new and potentially promising therapeutic strategies. Bioinformatics has provided researchers with a variety of tools for the design, the analysis, and the evaluation of RNAi agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA), short-hairpin RNA (shRNA), artificial microRNA (a-miR), and microRNA sponges. More recently, a new system for genome engineering based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), was shown to have the potential to also regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in a more specific way. In this mini review, we present RNAi and CRISPRi design principles and discuss the advantages and limitations of the current design approaches.

  11. Fitness Landscapes of Functional RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ádám Kun

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The notion of fitness landscapes, a map between genotype and fitness, was proposed more than 80 years ago. For most of this time data was only available for a few alleles, and thus we had only a restricted view of the whole fitness landscape. Recently, advances in genetics and molecular biology allow a more detailed view of them. Here we review experimental and theoretical studies of fitness landscapes of functional RNAs, especially aptamers and ribozymes. We find that RNA structures can be divided into critical structures, connecting structures, neutral structures and forbidden structures. Such characterisation, coupled with theoretical sequence-to-structure predictions, allows us to construct the whole fitness landscape. Fitness landscapes then can be used to study evolution, and in our case the development of the RNA world.

  12. Evaluating the potential of housekeeping genes, rRNAs, snRNAs, microRNAs and circRNAs as reference genes for the estimation of PMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chunyan; Du, Tieshuai; Shao, Chengchen; Liu, Zengjia; Li, Liliang; Shen, Yiwen

    2018-04-24

    The precise estimation of postmortem interval (PMI) is a critical step in death investigation of forensic cases. Detecting the degradation of RNA in tissues by real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) technology provides a new theoretical basis for estimation of PMI. However, most commonly used reference genes degrade over time, while previous studies seldom consider this when selecting suitable reference genes for the estimation of PMI. Studies have shown microRNAs (miRNAs) are very stable and circular RNAs (circRNAs) have recently emerged as a novel class of RNAs with high stability. We aimed to evaluate the stability of the two kinds of RNAs and normal reference genes using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms to identify tissue-specific reference genes for PMI estimation. The content of candidate RNAs from mouse heart, liver and skeletal muscle tissues were dynamically examined in 8 consecutive days after death. Among the 11 candidate genes (β-actin, Gapdh, Rps18, 5S, 18S, U6, miR-133a, miR-122, circ-AFF1, LC-Ogdh and LC-LRP6), the following genes showed prioritized stability: miR-122, miR-133a and 18S in heart tissues; LC-Ogdh, circ-AFF1 and miR-122 in liver tissues; and miR-133a, circ-AFF1 and LC-LRP6 in skeletal muscle tissues. Our results suggested that miRNAs and circRNAs were more stable as reference genes than other kinds of RNAs regarding PMI estimation. The appropriate internal control genes were not completely the same across tissue types.

  13. Identification and Characterization of MicroRNAs in the Liver of Blunt Snout Bream (Megalobrama amblycephala Infected by Aeromonas hydrophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Cui

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNA molecules that play key roles in regulation of various biological processes. In order to better understand the biological significance of miRNAs in the context of Aeromonas hydrophila infection in Megalobrama amblycephala, small RNA libraries obtained from fish liver at 0 (non-infection, 4, and 24 h post infection (poi were sequenced using Illumina deep sequencing technology. A total of 11,244,207, 9,212,958, and 7,939,157 clean reads were obtained from these three RNA libraries, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis identified 171 conserved miRNAs and 62 putative novel miRNAs. The existence of ten randomly selected novel miRNAs was validated by RT-PCR. Pairwise comparison suggested that 61 and 44 miRNAs were differentially expressed at 4 and 24 h poi, respectively. Furthermore, the expression profiles of nine randomly selected miRNAs were validated by qRT-PCR. MicroRNA target prediction, gene ontology (GO annotation, and Kyoto Encylopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG analysis indicated that a variety of biological pathways could be affected by A. hydrophila infection. Additionally, transferrin (TF and transferrin receptor (TFR genes were confirmed to be direct targets of miR-375. These results will expand our knowledge of the role of miRNAs in the immune response of M. amblycephala to A. hydrophila infection, and facilitate the development of effective strategies against A. hydrophila infection in M. amblycephala.

  14. microRNA dependent and independent deregulation of long non-coding RNAs by an oncogenic herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunantha Sethuraman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is a highly prevalent cancer in AIDS patients, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is the etiological agent of KS and other cancers like Primary Effusion Lymphoma (PEL. In KS and PEL, all tumors harbor latent KSHV episomes and express latency-associated viral proteins and microRNAs (miRNAs. The exact molecular mechanisms by which latent KSHV drives tumorigenesis are not completely understood. Recent developments have highlighted the importance of aberrant long non-coding RNA (lncRNA expression in cancer. Deregulation of lncRNAs by miRNAs is a newly described phenomenon. We hypothesized that KSHV-encoded miRNAs deregulate human lncRNAs to drive tumorigenesis. We performed lncRNA expression profiling of endothelial cells infected with wt and miRNA-deleted KSHV and identified 126 lncRNAs as putative viral miRNA targets. Here we show that KSHV deregulates host lncRNAs in both a miRNA-dependent fashion by direct interaction and in a miRNA-independent fashion through latency-associated proteins. Several lncRNAs that were previously implicated in cancer, including MEG3, ANRIL and UCA1, are deregulated by KSHV. Our results also demonstrate that KSHV-mediated UCA1 deregulation contributes to increased proliferation and migration of endothelial cells.

  15. [The influence of interfered circadian rhythm on pregnancy and neonatal rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jun; Sheng, Wen-Jie; Guo, Yin-Hua; Tan, Yong

    2015-10-25

    The aim of this study was to observe the influence of interfered circadian rhythm on pregnancy of rats and growth of neonatal rats, and to explore the relationship between the interfered circadian rhythm and the changes of melatonin and progesterone. Continuous light was used to inhibit melatonin secretion and therefore the interfered circadian rhythm animal model was obtained. The influence of interfered circadian rhythm on delivery of pregnant rats was observed. Serum was collected from rats during different stages of pregnancy to measure the concentrations of melatonin and progesterone. In order to observe the embryo resorption rate, half of pregnant rats were randomly selected to undergo a laparotomy, and the remainder was used to observe delivery and assess the growth of neonatal rats after delivery. The results showed that the interfered circadian rhythm induced adverse effects on pregnancy outcomes, including an increase of embryo resorption rate and a decrease in the number of live births; inhibited the secretion of melatonin along with decreased serum progesterone level; prolonged the stage of labor, but not the duration of pregnancy; and disturbed the fetal intrauterine growth and the growth of neonatal rats. The results suggest that interfered circadian rhythm condition made by continuous light could make adverse effects on both pregnant rats and neonatal rats. The results of our study may provide a way to modulate pregnant women's circadian rhythm and a possibility of application of melatonin on pregnant women.

  16. Identification and validation of sRNAs in Edwardsiella tarda S08.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuying Sun

    Full Text Available Bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs are known as novel regulators involved in virulence, stress responsibility, and so on. Recently, a lot of new researches have highlighted the critical roles of sRNAs in fine-tune gene regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Edwardsiella tarda (E. tarda is a gram-negative, intracellular pathogen that causes edwardsiellosis in fish. Thus far, no sRNA has been reported in E. tarda. The present study represents the first attempt to identify sRNAs in E. tarda S08. Ten sRNAs were validated by RNA sequencing and quantitative PCR (qPCR. ET_sRNA_1 and ET_sRNA_2 were homolous to tmRNA and GcvB, respectively. However, the other candidate sRNAs have not been reported till now. The cellular abundance of 10 validated sRNA was detected by qPCR at different growth phases to monitor their biosynthesis. Nine candidate sRNAs were expressed in the late-stage of exponential growth and stationary stages of growth (36~60 h. And the expression of the nine sRNAs was growth phase-dependent. But ET_sRNA_10 was almost expressed all the time and reached the highest peak at 48 h. Their targets were predicted by TargetRNA2 and each sRNA target contains some genes that directly or indirectly relate to virulence. These results preliminary showed that sRNAs probably play a regulatory role of virulence in E. tarda.

  17. Cloning and Identification of Recombinant Argonaute-Bound Small RNAs Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangras, Pooja; Dayeh, Daniel M; Mabin, Justin W; Nakanishi, Kotaro; Singh, Guramrit

    2018-01-01

    Argonaute proteins (AGOs) are loaded with small RNAs as guides to recognize target mRNAs. Since the target specificity heavily depends on the base complementarity between two strands, it is important to identify small guide and long target RNAs bound to AGOs. For this purpose, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have extended our appreciation truly to the nucleotide level. However, the identification of RNAs via NGS from scarce RNA samples remains a challenge. Further, most commercial and published methods are compatible with either small RNAs or long RNAs, but are not equally applicable to both. Therefore, a single method that yields quantitative, bias-free NGS libraries to identify small and long RNAs from low levels of input will be of wide interest. Here, we introduce such a procedure that is based on several modifications of two published protocols and allows robust, sensitive, and reproducible cloning and sequencing of small amounts of RNAs of variable lengths. The method was applied to the identification of small RNAs bound to a purified eukaryotic AGO. Following ligation of a DNA adapter to RNA 3'-end, the key feature of this method is to use the adapter for priming reverse transcription (RT) wherein biotinylated deoxyribonucleotides specifically incorporated into the extended complementary DNA. Such RT products are enriched on streptavidin beads, circularized while immobilized on beads and directly used for PCR amplification. We provide a stepwise guide to generate RNA-Seq libraries, their purification, quantification, validation, and preparation for next-generation sequencing. We also provide basic steps in post-NGS data analyses using Galaxy, an open-source, web-based platform.

  18. In Silico Design and Experimental Validation of siRNAs Targeting Conserved Regions of Multiple Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud ElHefnawi

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism that mediates the sequence-specific degradation of targeted RNA and thus provides a tremendous opportunity for development of oligonucleotide-based drugs. Here, we report on the design and validation of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs targeting highly conserved regions of the hepatitis C virus (HCV genome. To aim for therapeutic applications by optimizing the RNAi efficacy and reducing potential side effects, we considered different factors such as target RNA variations, thermodynamics and accessibility of the siRNA and target RNA, and off-target effects. This aim was achieved using an in silico design and selection protocol complemented by an automated MysiRNA-Designer pipeline. The protocol included the design and filtration of siRNAs targeting highly conserved and accessible regions within the HCV internal ribosome entry site, and adjacent core sequences of the viral genome with high-ranking efficacy scores. Off-target analysis excluded siRNAs with potential binding to human mRNAs. Under this strict selection process, two siRNAs (HCV353 and HCV258 were selected based on their predicted high specificity and potency. These siRNAs were tested for antiviral efficacy in HCV genotype 1 and 2 replicon cell lines. Both in silico-designed siRNAs efficiently inhibited HCV RNA replication, even at low concentrations and for short exposure times (24h; they also exceeded the antiviral potencies of reference siRNAs targeting HCV. Furthermore, HCV353 and HCV258 siRNAs also inhibited replication of patient-derived HCV genotype 4 isolates in infected Huh-7 cells. Prolonged treatment of HCV replicon cells with HCV353 did not result in the appearance of escape mutant viruses. Taken together, these results reveal the accuracy and strength of our integrated siRNA design and selection protocols. These protocols could be used to design highly potent and specific RNAi-based therapeutic

  19. Non-Coding RNAs in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Cordeiro

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs, small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3’-UTR of their target genes, can act as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Recently, other types of non-coding RNAs—piwiRNAs and long non-coding RNAs—have also been identified. Hodgkin lymphoma (HL is a B cell origin disease characterized by the presence of only 1% of tumor cells, known as Hodgkin and Reed-Stenberg (HRS cells, which interact with the microenvironment to evade apoptosis. Several studies have reported specific miRNA signatures that can differentiate HL lymph nodes from reactive lymph nodes, identify histologic groups within classical HL, and distinguish HRS cells from germinal center B cells. Moreover, some signatures are associated with survival or response to chemotherapy. Most of the miRNAs in the signatures regulate genes related to apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, or signaling pathways. Here we review findings on miRNAs in HL, as well as on other non-coding RNAs.

  20. The Impact of MicroRNAs on Brain Aging and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan P. Persengiev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular instructions that govern gene expression regulation are encoded in the genome and ultimately determine the morphology and functional specifications of the human brain. As a consequence, changes in gene expression levels might be directly related to the functional decline associated with brain aging. Small noncoding RNAs, including miRNAs, comprise a group of regulatory molecules that modulate the expression of hundred of genes which play important roles in brain metabolism. Recent comparative studies in humans and nonhuman primates revealed that miRNAs regulate multiple pathways and interconnected signaling cascades that are the basis for the cognitive decline and neurodegenerative disorders during aging. Identifying the roles of miRNAs and their target genes in model organisms combined with system-level studies of the brain would provide more comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of brain deterioration during the aging process.

  1. Role of micro RNAs in development and hematopoietic/mesenchymal/neural neoplasias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peschle, C.; Croce, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Micro RNAs (miRNAs or miRs) are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression primarily through translational repression. In erythropoietic (E) culture of cord blood CD34+ progenitor cells, the level of miR 221 and 222 is gradually and sharply down-modulated. Hypothetically, this decline could promote erythropoiesis by unblocking expression of key functional proteins. Indeed: 1.) bioinformatic analysis suggested that miR 221 and 222 target the 3' UTR of kit mRNA; 2.) the luciferase assay confirmed that both miRNAs directly interact with the kit mRNA target site; and 3.) in E culture undergoing exponential cell growth, miRNA down-modulation is inversely related to increasing kit protein expression, whereas the kit mRNA level is relatively stable

  2. Asymmetric photoelectron angular distributions from interfering photoionization processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Y.; Chen, C.; Elliott, D.S.; Smith, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured asymmetric photoelectron angular distributions for atomic rubidium. Ionization is induced by a one-photon interaction with 280 nm light and by a two-photon interaction with 560 nm light. Interference between the even- and odd-parity free-electron wave functions allows us to control the direction of maximum electron flux by varying the relative phase of the two laser fields

  3. The Host RNAs in Retroviral Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Telesnitsky

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As they assemble, retroviruses encapsidate both their genomic RNAs and several types of host RNA. Whereas limited amounts of messenger RNA (mRNA are detectable within virion populations, the predominant classes of encapsidated host RNAs do not encode proteins, but instead include endogenous retroelements and several classes of non-coding RNA (ncRNA, some of which are packaged in significant molar excess to the viral genome. Surprisingly, although the most abundant host RNAs in retroviruses are also abundant in cells, unusual forms of these RNAs are packaged preferentially, suggesting that these RNAs are recruited early in their biogenesis: before associating with their cognate protein partners, and/or from transient or rare RNA populations. These RNAs’ packaging determinants differ from the viral genome’s, and several of the abundantly packaged host ncRNAs serve cells as the scaffolds of ribonucleoprotein particles. Because virion assembly is equally efficient whether or not genomic RNA is available, yet RNA appears critical to the structural integrity of retroviral particles, it seems possible that the selectively encapsidated host ncRNAs might play roles in assembly. Indeed, some host ncRNAs appear to act during replication, as some transfer RNA (tRNA species may contribute to nuclear import of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 reverse transcription complexes, and other tRNA interactions with the viral Gag protein aid correct trafficking to plasma membrane assembly sites. However, despite high conservation of packaging for certain host RNAs, replication roles for most of these selectively encapsidated RNAs—if any—have remained elusive.

  4. Spatially Controlled Delivery of siRNAs to Stem Cells in Implants Generated by Multi-Component Additive Manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Morten Østergaard; Le, Dang Quang Svend; Chen, Muwan

    2013-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a promising technique in tissue engineering, as it enables truly individualized implants to be made to fit a particular defect. As previously shown, a feasible strategy to produce complex multicellular tissues is to deposit different small interfering RNA (siRNA) in porous...... implants that are subsequently sutured together. In this study, an additive manufacturing strategy to deposit carbohydrate hydrogels containing different siRNAs is applied into an implant, in a spatially controlled manner. When the obtained structures are seeded with mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells......, the selected siRNAs are delivered to the cells and induces specific and localized gene silencing. Here, it is demonstrated how to replicate part of a patient's spinal cord from a computed tomography scan, using an additive manufacturing technique to produce an implant with compartmentalized si...

  5. MicroRNAs in mantle cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husby, Simon; Geisler, Christian; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a rare and aggressive subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. New treatment modalities, including intensive induction regimens with immunochemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, have improved survival. However, many patients still relapse, and there is a need...... for novel therapeutic strategies. Recent progress has been made in the understanding of the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in MCL. Comparisons of tumor samples from patients with MCL with their normal counterparts (naive B-cells) have identified differentially expressed miRNAs with roles in cellular growth...

  6. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-10-28

    The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes is able to reduce immune responses, cytotoxicity, and other side effects caused by viral vectors in clinical applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intratracheal Administration of Small Interfering RNA Targeting Fas Reduces Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Sorbo, Lorenzo; Costamagna, Andrea; Muraca, Giuseppe; Rotondo, Giuseppe; Civiletti, Federica; Vizio, Barbara; Bosco, Ornella; Martin Conte, Erica L; Frati, Giacomo; Delsedime, Luisa; Lupia, Enrico; Fanelli, Vito; Ranieri, V Marco

    2016-08-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury is the main cause of primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation and results in increased morbidity and mortality. Fas-mediated apoptosis is one of the pathologic mechanisms involved in the development of ischemia-reperfusion injury. We hypothesized that the inhibition of Fas gene expression in lungs by intratracheal administration of small interfering RNA could reduce lung ischemia-reperfusion injury in an ex vivo model reproducing the procedural sequence of lung transplantation. Prospective, randomized, controlled experimental study. University research laboratory. C57/BL6 mice weighing 28-30 g. Ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced in lungs isolated from mice, 48 hours after treatment with intratracheal small interfering RNA targeting Fas, control small interfering RNA, or vehicle. Isolated lungs were exposed to 6 hours of cold ischemia (4°C), followed by 2 hours of warm (37°C) reperfusion with a solution containing 10% of fresh whole blood and mechanical ventilation with constant low driving pressure. Fas gene expression was significantly silenced at the level of messenger RNA and protein after ischemia-reperfusion in lungs treated with small interfering RNA targeting Fas compared with lungs treated with control small interfering RNA or vehicle. Silencing of Fas gene expression resulted in reduced edema formation (bronchoalveolar lavage protein concentration and lung histology) and improvement in lung compliance. These effects were associated with a significant reduction of pulmonary cell apoptosis of lungs treated with small interfering RNA targeting Fas, which did not affect cytokine release and neutrophil infiltration. Fas expression silencing in the lung by small interfering RNA is effective against ischemia-reperfusion injury. This approach represents a potential innovative strategy of organ preservation before lung transplantation.

  8. Network analysis of microRNAs and their regulation in human ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian

    2011-11-03

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that repress the translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) or degrade mRNAs. These functions of miRNAs allow them to control key cellular processes such as development, differentiation and apoptosis, and they have also been implicated in several cancers such as leukaemia, lung, pancreatic and ovarian cancer (OC). Unfortunately, the specific machinery of miRNA regulation, involving transcription factors (TFs) and transcription co-factors (TcoFs), is not well understood. In the present study we focus on computationally deciphering the underlying network of miRNAs, their targets, and their control mechanisms that have an influence on OC development.Results: We analysed experimentally verified data from multiple sources that describe miRNA influence on diseases, miRNA targeting of mRNAs, and on protein-protein interactions, and combined this data with ab initio transcription factor binding site predictions within miRNA promoter regions. From these analyses, we derived a network that describes the influence of miRNAs and their regulation in human OC. We developed a methodology to analyse the network in order to find the nodes that have the largest potential of influencing the network\\'s behaviour (network hubs). We further show the potentially most influential miRNAs, TFs and TcoFs, showing subnetworks illustrating the involved mechanisms as well as regulatory miRNA network motifs in OC. We find an enrichment of miRNA targeted OC genes in the highly relevant pathways cell cycle regulation and apoptosis.Conclusions: We combined several sources of interaction and association data to analyse and place miRNAs within regulatory pathways that influence human OC. These results represent the first comprehensive miRNA regulatory network analysis for human OC. This suggests that miRNAs and their regulation may play a major role in OC and that further directed research in this area is of utmost importance to enhance

  9. Network analysis of microRNAs and their regulation in human ovarian cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Schmeier, Sebastian; Schaefer, Ulf; Essack, Magbubah; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNA molecules that repress the translation of messenger RNAs (mRNAs) or degrade mRNAs. These functions of miRNAs allow them to control key cellular processes such as development, differentiation and apoptosis, and they have also been implicated in several cancers such as leukaemia, lung, pancreatic and ovarian cancer (OC). Unfortunately, the specific machinery of miRNA regulation, involving transcription factors (TFs) and transcription co-factors (TcoFs), is not well understood. In the present study we focus on computationally deciphering the underlying network of miRNAs, their targets, and their control mechanisms that have an influence on OC development.Results: We analysed experimentally verified data from multiple sources that describe miRNA influence on diseases, miRNA targeting of mRNAs, and on protein-protein interactions, and combined this data with ab initio transcription factor binding site predictions within miRNA promoter regions. From these analyses, we derived a network that describes the influence of miRNAs and their regulation in human OC. We developed a methodology to analyse the network in order to find the nodes that have the largest potential of influencing the network's behaviour (network hubs). We further show the potentially most influential miRNAs, TFs and TcoFs, showing subnetworks illustrating the involved mechanisms as well as regulatory miRNA network motifs in OC. We find an enrichment of miRNA targeted OC genes in the highly relevant pathways cell cycle regulation and apoptosis.Conclusions: We combined several sources of interaction and association data to analyse and place miRNAs within regulatory pathways that influence human OC. These results represent the first comprehensive miRNA regulatory network analysis for human OC. This suggests that miRNAs and their regulation may play a major role in OC and that further directed research in this area is of utmost importance to enhance our

  10. Influenza polymerase encoding mRNAs utilize atypical mRNA nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Sean; Bui, Steven; Perez, Veronica; Mohammad, Adeba; Medina-Ramirez, Hilario; Newcomb, Laura L

    2014-08-28

    Influenza is a segmented negative strand RNA virus. Each RNA segment is encapsulated by influenza nucleoprotein and bound by the viral RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) to form viral ribonucleoproteins responsible for RNA synthesis in the nucleus of the host cell. Influenza transcription results in spliced mRNAs (M2 and NS2), intron-containing mRNAs (M1 and NS1), and intron-less mRNAs (HA, NA, NP, PB1, PB2, and PA), all of which undergo nuclear export into the cytoplasm for translation. Most cellular mRNA nuclear export is Nxf1-mediated, while select mRNAs utilize Crm1. Here we inhibited Nxf1 and Crm1 nuclear export prior to infection with influenza A/Udorn/307/1972(H3N2) virus and analyzed influenza intron-less mRNAs using cellular fractionation and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). We examined direct interaction between Nxf1 and influenza intron-less mRNAs using immuno purification of Nxf1 and RT-PCR of associated RNA. Inhibition of Nxf1 resulted in less influenza intron-less mRNA export into the cytoplasm for HA and NA influenza mRNAs in both human embryonic kidney cell line (293 T) and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cell line (A549). However, in 293 T cells no change was observed for mRNAs encoding the components of the viral ribonucleoproteins; NP, PA, PB1, and PB2, while in A549 cells, only PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs, encoding the RdRP, remained unaffected; NP mRNA was reduced in the cytoplasm. In A549 cells NP, NA, HA, mRNAs were found associated with Nxf1 but PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNAs were not. Crm1 inhibition also resulted in no significant difference in PA, PB1, and PB2 mRNA nuclear export. These results further confirm Nxf1-mediated nuclear export is functional during the influenza life cycle and hijacked for select influenza mRNA nuclear export. We reveal a cell type difference for Nxf1-mediated nuclear export of influenza NP mRNA, a reminder that cell type can influence molecular mechanisms. Importantly, we

  11. Isolation and Identification of Post-Transcriptional Gene Silencing-Related Micro-RNAs by Functionalized Silicon Nanowire Field-effect Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-I.; Pan, Chien-Yuan; Li, Keng-Hui; Huang, Ying-Chih; Lu, Chia-Wei; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Su, Ya-Wen; Tseng, Ling-Wei; Tseng, Kun-Chang; Lin, Chi-Yun; Chen, Chii-Dong; Lin, Shih-Shun; Chen, Yit-Tsong

    2015-11-01

    Many transcribed RNAs are non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs), which bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNAs to regulate the translation efficacy. Therefore, identifying the miRNAs expressed in cells/organisms aids in understanding genetic control in cells/organisms. In this report, we determined the binding of oligonucleotides to a receptor-modified silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW-FET) by monitoring the changes in conductance of the SiNW-FET. We first modified a SiNW-FET with a DNA probe to directly and selectively detect the complementary miRNA in cell lysates. This SiNW-FET device has 7-fold higher sensitivity than reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction in detecting the corresponding miRNA. Next, we anchored viral p19 proteins, which bind the double-strand small RNAs (ds-sRNAs), on the SiNW-FET. By perfusing the device with synthesized ds-sRNAs of different pairing statuses, the dissociation constants revealed that the nucleotides at the 3‧-overhangs and pairings at the terminus are important for the interactions. After perfusing the total RNA mixture extracted from Nicotiana benthamiana across the device, this device could enrich the ds-sRNAs for sequence analysis. Finally, this bionanoelectronic SiNW-FET, which is able to isolate and identify the interacting protein-RNA, adds an additional tool in genomic technology for the future study of direct biomolecular interactions.

  12. Cloned defective interfering influenza virus protects ferrets from pandemic 2009 influenza A virus and allows protective immunity to be established.

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    Nigel J Dimmock

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the human population, causing epidemics in the winter, and occasional worldwide pandemics. In addition there are periodic outbreaks in domestic poultry, horses, pigs, dogs, and cats. Infections of domestic birds can be fatal for the birds and their human contacts. Control in man operates through vaccines and antivirals, but both have their limitations. In the search for an alternative treatment we have focussed on defective interfering (DI influenza A virus. Such a DI virus is superficially indistinguishable from a normal virus but has a large deletion in one of the eight RNAs that make up the viral genome. Antiviral activity resides in the deleted RNA. We have cloned one such highly active DI RNA derived from segment 1 (244 DI virus and shown earlier that intranasal administration protects mice from lethal disease caused by a number of different influenza A viruses. A more cogent model of human influenza is the ferret. Here we found that intranasal treatment with a single dose of 2 or 0.2 µg 244 RNA delivered as A/PR/8/34 virus particles protected ferrets from disease caused by pandemic virus A/California/04/09 (A/Cal; H1N1. Specifically, 244 DI virus significantly reduced fever, weight loss, respiratory symptoms, and infectious load. 244 DI RNA, the active principle, was amplified in nasal washes following infection with A/Cal, consistent with its amelioration of clinical disease. Animals that were treated with 244 DI RNA cleared infectious and DI viruses without delay. Despite the attenuation of infection and disease by DI virus, ferrets formed high levels of A/Cal-specific serum haemagglutination-inhibiting antibodies and were solidly immune to rechallenge with A/Cal. Together with earlier data from mouse studies, we conclude that 244 DI virus is a highly effective antiviral with activity potentially against all influenza A subtypes.

  13. Identification of microRNAs regulating the developmental pathways of bone marrow derived mast cells.

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    Yang Xiang

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs play important roles in leukocyte differentiation, although those utilised for specific programs and key functions remain incompletely characterised. As a global approach to gain insights into the potential regulatory role of miRNA in mast cell differentiation we characterised expression in BM cultures from the initiation of differentiation. In cultures enriched in differentiating mast cells we characterised miRNA expression and identified miRNA targeting the mRNA of putative factors involved in differentiation pathways and cellular identity. Detailed pathway analysis identified a unique miRNA network that is intimately linked to the mast cell differentiation program.We identified 86 unique miRNAs with expression patterns that were up- or down- regulated at 5-fold or more during bone marrow derived mast cells (BMMC development. By employing TargetScan and MeSH databases, we identified 524 transcripts involved in 30 canonical pathways as potentially regulated by these specific 86 miRNAs. Furthermore, by applying miRanda and IPA analyses, we predict that 7 specific miRNAs of this group are directly associated with the expression of c-Kit and FcεRIα and likewise, that 18 miRNAs promote expression of Mitf, GATA1 and c/EBPα three core transcription factors that direct mast cell differentiation. Furthermore, we have identified 11 miRNAs that may regulate the expression of STATs-3, -5a/b, GATA2 and GATA3 during differentiation, along with 13 miRNAs that target transcripts encoding Ndst2, mMCP4 and mMCP6 and thus may regulate biosynthesis of mast cell secretory mediators.This investigation characterises changes in miRNA expression in whole BM cultures during the differentiation of mast cells and predicts functional links between miRNAs and their target mRNAs for the regulation of development. This information provides an important resource for further investigations of the contributions of miRNAs to mast cell differentiation and

  14. Non-Coding RNAs in Muscle Dystrophies

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    Alessandra Ferlini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ncRNAs are the most recently identified class of regulatory RNAs with vital functions in gene expression regulation and cell development. Among the variety of roles they play, their involvement in human diseases has opened new avenues of research towards the discovery and development of novel therapeutic approaches. Important data come from the field of hereditary muscle dystrophies, like Duchenne muscle dystrophy and Myotonic dystrophies, rare diseases affecting 1 in 7000–15,000 newborns and is characterized by severe to mild muscle weakness associated with cardiac involvement. Novel therapeutic approaches are now ongoing for these diseases, also based on splicing modulation. In this review we provide an overview about ncRNAs and their behavior in muscular dystrophy and explore their links with diagnosis, prognosis and treatments, highlighting the role of regulatory RNAs in these pathologies.

  15. Dual peptide-mediated targeted delivery of bioactive siRNAs to oral cancer cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander-Bryant, Angela A; Zhang, Haiwen; Attaway, Christopher C; Pugh, William; Eggart, Laurence; Sansevere, Robert M; Andino, Lourdes M; Dinh, Lu; Cantini, Liliana P; Jakymiw, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Despite significant advances in cancer treatment, the prognosis for oral cancer remains poor in comparison to other cancer types, including breast, skin, and prostate. As a result, more effective therapeutic modalities are needed for the treatment of oral cancer. Consequently, in the present study, we examined the feasibility of using a dual peptide carrier approach, combining an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeting peptide with an endosome-disruptive peptide, to mediate targeted delivery of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) into EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells and induce silencing of the targeted oncogene, cancerous inhibitor of protein phosphatase 2A (CIP2A). Fluorescence microscopy, real-time PCR, Western blot analysis, and in vivo bioimaging of mice containing orthotopic xenograft tumors were used to examine the ability of the dual peptide carrier to mediate specific delivery of bioactive siRNAs into EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells/tissues. Co-complexation of the EGFR-targeting peptide, GE11R9, with the endosome-disruptive 599 peptide facilitated the specific uptake of siRNAs into oral cancer cells overexpressing EGFR in vitro with optimal gene silencing observed at a 60:30:1 (GE11R9:599:siRNA) molar ratio. Furthermore, when administered systemically to mice bearing xenograft oral tumors, this dual peptide complex mediated increased targeted delivery of siRNAs into tumor tissues in comparison to the 599 peptide alone and significantly enhanced CIP2A silencing. Herein we provide the first report demonstrating the clinical potential of a dual peptide strategy for siRNA-based therapeutics by synergistically mediating the effective targeting and delivery of bioactive siRNAs into EGFR-overexpressing oral cancer cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of dengue virus type 2-specific small RNAs from RNA interference-competent and -incompetent mosquito cells.

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    Jaclyn C Scott

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The exogenous RNA interference (RNAi pathway is an important antiviral defense against arboviruses in mosquitoes, and virus-specific small interfering (siRNAs are key components of this pathway. Understanding the biogenesis of siRNAs in mosquitoes could have important ramifications in using RNAi to control arbovirus transmission. Using deep sequencing technology, we characterized dengue virus type 2 (DENV2-specific small RNAs produced during infection of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes and A. aegypti Aag2 cell cultures and compared them to those produced in the C6/36 Aedes albopictus cell line. We show that the size and mixed polarity of virus-specific small RNAs from DENV-infected A. aegypti cells indicate that they are products of Dicer-2 (Dcr2 cleavage of long dsRNA, whereas C6/36 cells generate DENV2-specific small RNAs that are longer and predominantly positive polarity, suggesting that they originate from a different small RNA pathway. Examination of virus-specific small RNAs after infection of the two mosquito cell lines with the insect-only flavivirus cell fusing agent virus (CFAV corroborated these findings. An in vitro assay also showed that Aag2 A. aegypti cells are capable of siRNA production, while C6/36 A. albopictus cells exhibit inefficient Dcr2 cleavage of long dsRNA. Defective expression or function of Dcr2, the key initiator of the RNAi pathway, might explain the comparatively robust growth of arthropod-borne viruses in the C6/36 cell line, which has been used frequently as a surrogate for studying molecular interactions between arboviruses and cells of their mosquito hosts.

  17. Quantification of analytes affected by relevant interfering signals under quality controlled conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettencourt da Silva, Ricardo J.N.; Santos, Julia R.; Camoes, M. Filomena G.F.C.

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of organic contaminants or residues in biological samples is frequently affected by the presence of compounds producing interfering instrumental signals. This feature is responsible for the higher complexity and cost of these analyses and/or by a significant reduction of the number of studied analytes in a multi-analyte method. This work presents a methodology to estimate the impact of the interfering compounds on the quality of the analysis of complex samples, based on separative instrumental methods of analysis, aiming at supporting the inclusion of analytes affected by interfering compounds in the list of compounds analysed in the studied samples. The proposed methodology involves the study of the magnitude of the signal produced by the interfering compounds in the analysed matrix, and is applicable to analytical systems affected by interfering compounds with varying concentration in the studied matrix. The proposed methodology is based on the comparison of the signals from a representative number of examples of the studied matrix, in order to estimate the impact of the presence of such compounds on the measurement quality. The treatment of the chromatographic signals necessary to collect these data can be easily performed considering algorithms of subtraction of chromatographic signals available in most of the analytical instrumentation software. The subtraction of the interfering compounds signal from the sample signal allows the compensation of the interfering effect irrespective of the relative magnitude of the interfering and analyte signals, supporting the applicability of the same model of the method performance for a broader concentration range. The quantification of the measurement uncertainty was performed using the differential approach, which allows the estimation of the contribution of the presence of the interfering compounds to the quality of the measurement. The proposed methodology was successfully applied to the analysis of

  18. Interplay of noncoding RNAs, mRNAs, and proteins during the growth of eukaryotic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous biological functions of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) in eukaryotic cells are based primarily on their ability to pair with target mRNAs and then either to prevent translation or to result in rapid degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Using a general model describing this scenario, we show that ncRNAs may help to maintain constant mRNA and protein concentrations during the growth of cells. The possibility of observation of this effect on the global scale is briefly discussed.

  19. Long noncoding RNAs(lncRNAs) and the molecular hallmarks of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Panda, Amaresh C; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Gorospe, Myriam

    2014-12-01

    During aging, progressive deleterious changes increase the risk of disease and death. Prominent molecular hallmarks of aging are genomic instability, telomere attrition, epigenetic alterations, loss of proteostasis, cellular senescence, stem cell exhaustion, and altered intercellular communication. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in a wide range of biological processes, including age-related diseases like cancer, cardiovascular pathologies, and neurodegenerative disorders. Evidence is emerging that lncRNAs influence the molecular processes that underlie age-associated phenotypes. Here, we review our current understanding of lncRNAs that control the development of aging traits.

  20. The therapeutic potential of MicroRNAs in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Stine Buch; Obad, Susanna; Jensen, Niels Frank

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been uncovered as important posttranscriptional regulators of nearly every biological process in the cell. Furthermore, mounting evidence implies that miRNAs play key roles in the pathogenesis of cancer and that many miRNAs can function either as oncogenes or tumor...

  1. MicroRNAs: role and therapeutic targets in viral hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ree, Meike H.; de Bruijne, Joep; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Jansen, Peter Lm; Reesink, Hendrik W.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The importance of microRNAs has been shown for several liver diseases, for example, viral hepatitis. MicroRNA-122 is highly abundant in the liver and is involved in the regulation of

  2. A survey of small RNAs in human sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawetz, Stephen A.; Kruger, Adele; Lalancette, Claudia; Tagett, Rebecca; Anton, Ester; Draghici, Sorin; Diamond, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There has been substantial interest in assessing whether RNAs (mRNAs and sncRNAs, i.e. small non-coding) delivered from mammalian spermatozoa play a functional role in early embryo development. While the cadre of spermatozoal mRNAs has been characterized, comparatively little is known about the distribution or function of the estimated 24 000 sncRNAs within each normal human spermatozoon. METHODS RNAs of libraries for Next Generation Sequencing. Known sncRNAs that uniquely mapped to a single location in the human genome were identified. RESULTS Bioinformatic analysis revealed the presence of multiple classes of small RNAs in human spermatozoa. The primary classes resolved included microRNA (miRNAs) (≈7%), Piwi-interacting piRNAs (≈17%), repeat-associated small RNAs (≈65%). A minor subset of short RNAs within the transcription start site/promoter fraction (≈11%) frames the histone promoter-associated regions enriched in genes of early embryonic development. These have been termed quiescent RNAs. CONCLUSIONS A complex population of male derived sncRNAs that are available for delivery upon fertilization was revealed. Sperm miRNA-targeted enrichment in the human oocyte is consistent with their role as modifiers of early post-fertilization. The relative abundance of piRNAs and repeat-associated RNAs suggests that they may assume a role in confrontation and consolidation. This may ensure the compatibility of the genomes at fertilization. PMID:21989093

  3. Circadian changes in long noncoding RNAs in the pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coon, Steven L; Munson, Peter J; Cherukuri, Praveen F

    2012-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a broad range of biological roles, including regulation of expression of genes and chromosomes. Here, we present evidence that lncRNAs are involved in vertebrate circadian biology. Differential night/day expression of 112 lncRNAs (0.3 to >50 kb) occurs in the ra...

  4. Towards Antiviral shRNAs Based on the AgoshRNA Design.

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    Ying Poi Liu

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi can be induced by intracellular expression of a short hairpin RNA (shRNA. Processing of the shRNA requires the RNaseIII-like Dicer enzyme to remove the loop and to release the biologically active small interfering RNA (siRNA. Dicer is also involved in microRNA (miRNA processing to liberate the mature miRNA duplex, but recent studies indicate that miR-451 is not processed by Dicer. Instead, this miRNA is processed by the Argonaute 2 (Ago2 protein, which also executes the subsequent cleavage of a complementary mRNA target. Interestingly, shRNAs that structurally resemble miR-451 can also be processed by Ago2 instead of Dicer. The key determinant of these "AgoshRNA" molecules is a relatively short basepaired stem, which avoids Dicer recognition and consequently allows alternative processing by Ago2. AgoshRNA processing yields a single active RNA strand, whereas standard shRNAs produce a duplex with guide and passenger strands and the latter may cause adverse off-target effects. In this study, we converted previously tested active anti-HIV-1 shRNA molecules into AgoshRNA. We tested several designs that could potentially improve AgoshRNA activity, including extension of the complementarity between the guide strand and the mRNA target and reduction of the thermodynamic stability of the hairpins. We demonstrate that active AgoshRNAs can be generated. However, the RNAi activity is reduced compared to the matching shRNAs. Despite reduced RNAi activity, comparison of an active AgoshRNA and the matching shRNA in a sensitive cell toxicity assay revealed that the AgoshRNA is much less toxic.

  5. Regulation of Corticosteroidogenic Genes by MicroRNAs

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    Stacy Robertson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of normal regulation of corticosteroid secretion is important in the development of cardiovascular disease. We previously showed that microRNAs regulate the terminal stages of corticosteroid biosynthesis. Here, we assess microRNA regulation across the whole corticosteroid pathway. Knockdown of microRNA using Dicer1 siRNA in H295R adrenocortical cells increased levels of CYP11A1, CYP21A1, and CYP17A1 mRNA and the secretion of cortisol, corticosterone, 11-deoxycorticosterone, 18-hydroxycorticosterone, and aldosterone. Bioinformatic analysis of genes involved in corticosteroid biosynthesis or metabolism identified many putative microRNA-binding sites, and some were selected for further study. Manipulation of individual microRNA levels demonstrated a direct effect of miR-125a-5p and miR-125b-5p on CYP11B2 and of miR-320a-3p levels on CYP11A1 and CYP17A1 mRNA. Finally, comparison of microRNA expression profiles from human aldosterone-producing adenoma and normal adrenal tissue showed levels of various microRNAs, including miR-125a-5p to be significantly different. This study demonstrates that corticosteroidogenesis is regulated at multiple points by several microRNAs and that certain of these microRNAs are differentially expressed in tumorous adrenal tissue, which may contribute to dysregulation of corticosteroid secretion. These findings provide new insights into the regulation of corticosteroid production and have implications for understanding the pathology of disease states where abnormal hormone secretion is a feature.

  6. Hidden layers of human small RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaji, Hideya; Nakamura, Mari; Takahashi, Yukari

    2008-01-01

    small RNA have focused on miRNA and/or siRNA rather than on the exploration of additional classes of RNAs. RESULTS: Here, we explored human small RNAs by unbiased sequencing of RNAs with sizes of 19-40 nt. We provide substantial evidences for the existence of independent classes of small RNAs. Our data......BACKGROUND: Small RNA attracts increasing interest based on the discovery of RNA silencing and the rapid progress of our understanding of these phenomena. Although recent studies suggest the possible existence of yet undiscovered types of small RNAs in higher organisms, many studies to profile...... shows that well-characterized non-coding RNA, such as tRNA, snoRNA, and snRNA are cleaved at sites specific to the class of ncRNA. In particular, tRNA cleavage is regulated depending on tRNA type and tissue expression. We also found small RNAs mapped to genomic regions that are transcribed in both...

  7. MicroRNAs in right ventricular remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batkai, Sandor; Bär, Christian; Thum, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Right ventricular (RV) remodelling is a lesser understood process of the chronic, progressive transformation of the RV structure leading to reduced functional capacity and subsequent failure. Besides conditions concerning whole hearts, some pathology selectively affects the RV, leading to a distinct RV-specific clinical phenotype. MicroRNAs have been identified as key regulators of biological processes that drive the progression of chronic diseases. The role of microRNAs in diseases affecting the left ventricle has been studied for many years, however there is still limited information on microRNAs specific to diseases in the right ventricle. Here, we review recently described details on the expression, regulation, and function of microRNAs in the pathological remodelling of the right heart. Recently identified strategies using microRNAs as pharmacological targets or biomarkers will be highlighted. Increasing knowledge of pathogenic microRNAs will finally help improve our understanding of underlying distinct mechanisms and help utilize novel targets or biomarkers to develop treatments for patients suffering from right heart diseases. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Immunomodulating microRNAs of mycobacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Paulo; Pires, David; Anes, Elsa

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs that have emerged as key regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by sequence-specific binding to target mRNAs. Some microRNAs block translation, while others promote mRNA degradation, leading to a reduction in protein availability. A single miRNA can potentially regulate the expression of multiple genes and their encoded proteins. Therefore, miRNAs can influence molecular signalling pathways and regulate many biological processes in health and disease. Upon infection, host cells rapidly change their transcriptional programs, including miRNA expression, as a response against the invading microorganism. Not surprisingly, pathogens can also alter the host miRNA profile to their own benefit, which is of major importance to scientists addressing high morbidity and mortality infectious diseases such as tuberculosis. In this review, we present recent findings on the miRNAs regulation of the host response against mycobacterial infections, providing new insights into host-pathogen interactions. Understanding these findings and its implications could reveal new opportunities for designing better diagnostic tools, therapies and more effective vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Extracellular small RNAs: what, where, why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoy, Anna M.; Buck, Amy H.

    2012-01-01

    miRNAs (microRNAs) are a class of small RNA that regulate gene expression by binding to mRNAs and modulating the precise amount of proteins that get expressed in a cell at a given time. This form of gene regulation plays an important role in developmental systems and is critical for the proper function of numerous biological pathways. Although miRNAs exert their functions inside the cell, these and other classes of RNA are found in body fluids in a cell-free form that is resistant to degradation by RNases. A broad range of cell types have also been shown to secrete miRNAs in association with components of the RISC (RNA-induced silencing complex) and/or encapsulation within vesicles, which can be taken up by other cells. In the present paper, we provide an overview of the properties of extracellular miRNAs in relation to their capacity as biomarkers, stability against degradation and mediators of cell–cell communication. PMID:22817753

  10. The expanding universe of noncoding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannon, G J; Rivas, F V; Murchison, E P; Steitz, J A

    2006-01-01

    The 71st Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology celebrated the numerous and expanding roles of regulatory RNAs in systems ranging from bacteria to mammals. It was clearly evident that noncoding RNAs are undergoing a renaissance, with reports of their involvement in nearly every cellular process. Previously known classes of longer noncoding RNAs were shown to function by every possible means-acting catalytically, sensing physiological states through adoption of complex secondary and tertiary structures, or using their primary sequences for recognition of target sites. The many recently discovered classes of small noncoding RNAs, generally less than 35 nucleotides in length, most often exert their effects by guiding regulatory complexes to targets via base-pairing. With the ability to analyze the RNA products of the genome in ever greater depth, it has become clear that the universe of noncoding RNAs may extend far beyond the boundaries we had previously imagined. Thus, as much as the Symposium highlighted exciting progress in the field, it also revealed how much farther we must go to understand fully the biological impact of noncoding RNAs.

  11. Systematic identification of long noncoding RNAs expressed during zebrafish embryogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauli, Andrea; Valen, Eivind; Lin, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) comprise a diverse class of transcripts that structurally resemble mRNAs but do not encode proteins. Recent genome-wide studies in human and mouse have annotated lncRNAs expressed in cell lines and adult tissues, but a systematic analysis of lncRNAs expressed during...... of genes with developmental functions. The temporal expression profile of lncRNAs revealed two novel properties: lncRNAs are expressed in narrower time windows than protein-coding genes and are specifically enriched in early-stage embryos. In addition, several lncRNAs show tissue-specific expression...... and distinct subcellular localization patterns. Integrative computational analyses associated individual lncRNAs with specific pathways and functions, ranging from cell cycle regulation to morphogenesis. Our study provides the first systematic identification of lncRNAs in a vertebrate embryo and forms...

  12. Review: MicroRNAs in assisted reproduction and their potential role in IVF failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siristatidis, Charalampos; Vogiatzi, Paraskevi; Brachnis, Nikos; Liassidou, Aspasia; Iliodromiti, Zoe; Bettocchi, Stefano; Chrelias, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as important regulators of gene expression stability. In the endometrium, miRNAs are involved in the dynamic changes associated with the menstrual cycle, implicated in implantation and in reproductive disorders. We performed a review in an attempt to assess the potential biological pathways linking altered miRNAs profiles with in vitro fertilisation (IVF) failure. Crucially, as miRNAs appear to have a significant role in the course of reproduction, they are excellent research candidates with the potential to enable a better understanding over the underlying molecular activities that prevent implantation and further progression of the embryo. Further steps include in-depth pathway mapping of the implantation process and the characterization of the respective miRNAs and associated links. The efficiency of any intervention should determine whether miRNA profiling could possibly be adopted in routine practice to substantially improve the diagnostic accuracy and, in parallel, the directed treatment of the next-generation IVF. Copyright © 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. From structure prediction to genomic screens for novel non-coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2011-08-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are receiving more and more attention not only as an abundant class of genes, but also as regulatory structural elements (some located in mRNAs). A key feature of RNA function is its structure. Computational methods were developed early for folding and prediction of RNA structure with the aim of assisting in functional analysis. With the discovery of more and more ncRNAs, it has become clear that a large fraction of these are highly structured. Interestingly, a large part of the structure is comprised of regular Watson-Crick and GU wobble base pairs. This and the increased amount of available genomes have made it possible to employ structure-based methods for genomic screens. The field has moved from folding prediction of single sequences to computational screens for ncRNAs in genomic sequence using the RNA structure as the main characteristic feature. Whereas early methods focused on energy-directed folding of single sequences, comparative analysis based on structure preserving changes of base pairs has been efficient in improving accuracy, and today this constitutes a key component in genomic screens. Here, we cover the basic principles of RNA folding and touch upon some of the concepts in current methods that have been applied in genomic screens for de novo RNA structures in searches for novel ncRNA genes and regulatory RNA structure on mRNAs. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different strategies and how they can complement each other.

  14. Long noncoding RNAs responsive to Fusarium oxysporum infection in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian-Hao; Stephen, Stuart; Taylor, Jennifer; Helliwell, Chris A; Wang, Ming-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Short noncoding RNAs have been demonstrated to play important roles in regulation of gene expression and stress responses, but the repertoire and functions of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) remain largely unexplored, particularly in plants. To explore the role of lncRNAs in disease resistance, we used a strand-specific RNA-sequencing approach to identify lncRNAs responsive to Fusarium oxysporum infection in Arabidopsis thaliana. Antisense transcription was found in c. 20% of the annotated A. thaliana genes. Several noncoding natural antisense transcripts responsive to F. oxysporum infection were found in genes implicated in disease defense. While the majority of the novel transcriptionally active regions (TARs) were adjacent to annotated genes and could be an extension of the annotated transcripts, 159 novel intergenic TARs, including 20 F. oxysporum-responsive lncTARs, were identified. Ten F. oxysporum-induced lncTARs were functionally characterized using T-DNA insertion or RNA-interference knockdown lines, and five were demonstrated to be related to disease development. Promoter analysis suggests that some of the F. oxysporum-induced lncTARs are direct targets of transcription factor(s) responsive to pathogen attack. Our results demonstrated that strand-specific RNA sequencing is a powerful tool for uncovering hidden levels of transcriptome and that IncRNAs are important components of the antifungal networks in A. thaliana. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Apicomplexa-specific tRip facilitates import of exogenous tRNAs into malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bour, Tania; Mahmoudi, Nassira; Kapps, Delphine; Thiberge, Sabine; Bargieri, Daniel; Ménard, Robert; Frugier, Magali

    2016-04-26

    The malaria-causing Plasmodium parasites are transmitted to vertebrates by mosquitoes. To support their growth and replication, these intracellular parasites, which belong to the phylum Apicomplexa, have developed mechanisms to exploit their hosts. These mechanisms include expropriation of small metabolites from infected host cells, such as purine nucleotides and amino acids. Heretofore, no evidence suggested that transfer RNAs (tRNAs) could also be exploited. We identified an unusual gene in Apicomplexa with a coding sequence for membrane-docking and structure-specific tRNA binding. This Apicomplexa protein-designated tRip (tRNA import protein)-is anchored to the parasite plasma membrane and directs import of exogenous tRNAs. In the absence of tRip, the fitness of the parasite stage that multiplies in the blood is significantly reduced, indicating that the parasite may need host tRNAs to sustain its own translation and/or as regulatory RNAs. Plasmodium is thus the first example, to our knowledge, of a cell importing exogenous tRNAs, suggesting a remarkable adaptation of this parasite to extend its reach into host cell biology.

  16. Integrative analysis of circRNAs acting as ceRNAs involved in ethylene pathway in tomato.

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    Wang, Yunxiang; Wang, Qing; Gao, Lipu; Zhu, Benzhong; Luo, Yunbo; Deng, Zhiping; Zuo, Jinhua

    2017-11-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a large class of non-coding endogenous RNAs that could act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs) to terminate the mRNA targets' suppression of miRNAs. To elucidate the intricate regulatory roles of circRNAs in the ethylene pathway in tomato fruit, deep sequencing and bioinformatics methods were performed. After strict screening, a total of 318 circRNAs were identified. Among these circRNAs, 282 were significantly differentially expressed among wild-type and sense-/antisense-LeERF1 transgenic tomato fruits. Besides, 1254 target genes were identified and a large amount of them were found to be involved in ethylene pathway. In addition, a sophisticated regulatory model consisting of circRNAs, target genes and ethylene was set up. Importantly, 61 circRNAs were found to be potential ceRNAs to combine with miRNAs and some of the miRNAs had been revealed to participate in the ethylene signaling pathway. This research further raised the possibility that the ethylene pathway in tomato fruit may be under the regulation of various circRNAs and provided a new perspective of the roles of circRNAs. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  17. MicroRNAs control transcription factor NF-kB (p65) expression in human ovarian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Alexa, Richard; Kišová, Gabriela; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Alwasel, Saleh; Ovcharenko, Dmitriy; Mlynček, Miloš

    2015-05-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to influence ovarian cell proliferation, apoptosis and hormone release, but it remains unknown whether miRNAs affect ovarian functions via transcription factors. We examined the effect of miRNAs on nuclear factor-κappaB (NF-kB) (p65) expression in human ovarian luteinized granulosa cells. We transfected cultured primary human ovarian luteinized granulosa cells with 80 different constructs encoding human pre-miRNAs and then evaluated NF-kB (p65) expression (percentage of cells containing p65) by immunocytochemistry. We found that 21 of the constructs stimulated NF-kB (p65) expression and 18 of the constructs inhibited NF-kB (p65) expression. This is the first direct demonstration that miRNAs affect NF-kB (p65) expression and the first genome-scale miRNA screen to identify upregulation and downregulation of NF-kB accumulation by miRNAs in the ovary. Novel miRNAs that affect the NF-kB signalling pathway could be useful for the control of NF-kB-dependent reproductive processes and the treatment of NF-kB-dependent reproductive disorders.

  18. The highly conserved 5' untranslated region as an effective target towards the inhibition of Enterovirus 71 replication by unmodified and appropriate 2'-modified siRNAs

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    Deng Jun-Xia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is a highly infectious agent that plays an etiological role in hand, foot, and mouth disease. It is associated with severe neurological complications and has caused significant mortalities in recent large-scale outbreaks. Currently, no effective vaccine or specific clinical therapy is available against EV71. Methods Unmodified 21 nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and classic 2′-modified (2′-O-methylation or 2′-fluoro modification siRNAs were designed to target highly conserved 5′ untranslated region (UTR of the EV71 genome and employed as anti-EV71 agents. Real-time TaqMan RT-PCR, western blot analysis and plaque assays were carried out to evaluate specific viral inhibition by the siRNAs. Results Transfection of rhabdomyosarcoma (RD cells with siRNAs targeting the EV71 genomic 5′ UTR significantly delayed and alleviated the cytopathic effects of EV71 infection, increased cell viability in EV71-infected RD cells. The inhibitory effect on EV71 replication was sequence-specific and dosage-dependent, with significant corresponding decreases in viral RNA, VP1 protein and viral titer. Appropriate 2′-modified siRNAs exhibited similar RNA interference (RNAi activity with dramatically increased serum stability in comparison with unmodified counterparts. Conclusion Sequences were identified within the highly conserved 5′ UTR that can be targeted to effectively inhibit EV71 replication through RNAi strategies. Appropriate 2′-modified siRNAs provide a promising approach to optimizing siRNAs to overcome barriers on RNAi-based antiviral therapies for broader administration.

  19. How short RNAs impact the human ribonuclease Dicer activity: putative regulatory feedback-loops and other RNA-mediated mechanisms controlling microRNA processing.

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    Koralewska, Natalia; Hoffmann, Weronika; Pokornowska, Maria; Milewski, Marek; Lipinska, Andrea; Bienkowska-Szewczyk, Krystyna; Figlerowicz, Marek; Kurzynska-Kokorniak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Ribonuclease Dicer plays a pivotal role in RNA interference pathways by processing long double-stranded RNAs and single-stranded hairpin RNA precursors into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), respectively. While details of Dicer regulation by a variety of proteins are being elucidated, less is known about non-protein factors, e.g. RNA molecules, that may influence this enzyme's activity. Therefore, we decided to investigate the question of whether the RNA molecules can function not only as Dicer substrates but also as its regulators. Our previous in vitro studies indicated that the activity of human Dicer can be influenced by short RNA molecules that either bind to Dicer or interact with its substrates, or both. Those studies were carried out with commercial Dicer preparations. Nevertheless, such preparations are usually not homogeneous enough to carry out more detailed RNA-binding studies. Therefore, we have established our own system for the production of human Dicer in insect cells. In this manuscript, we characterize the RNA-binding and RNA-cleavage properties of the obtained preparation. We demonstrate that Dicer can efficiently bind single-stranded RNAs that are longer than ~20-nucleotides. Consequently, we revisit possible scenarios of Dicer regulation by single-stranded RNA species ranging from ~10- to ~60-nucleotides, in the context of their binding to this enzyme. Finally, we show that siRNA/miRNA-sized RNAs may affect miRNA production either by binding to Dicer or by participating in regulatory feedback-loops. Altogether, our studies suggest a broad regulatory role of short RNAs in Dicer functioning.

  20. Identifying small RNAs derived from maternal- and somatic-type rRNAs in zebrafish development.

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    Locati, Mauro D; Pagano, Johanna F B; Abdullah, Farah; Ensink, Wim A; van Olst, Marina; van Leeuwen, Selina; Nehrdich, Ulrike; Spaink, Herman P; Rauwerda, Han; Jonker, Martijs J; Dekker, Rob J; Breit, Timo M

    2018-02-09

    rRNAs are non-coding RNAs present in all prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In eukaryotes there are four rRNAs: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, originating from a common precursor (45S), and 5S. We have recently discovered the existence of two distinct developmental types of rRNA: a maternal-type, present in eggs and a somatic-type, expressed in adult tissues. Lately, next-generation sequencing has allowed the discovery of new small-RNAs deriving from longer non-coding RNAs, including small-RNAs from rRNAs (srRNAs). Here, we systemically investigated srRNAs of maternal- or somatic-type 18S, 5.8S, 28S, with small-RNAseq from many zebrafish developmental stages. We identified new srRNAs for each rRNA. For 5.8S, we found srRNA consisting of the 5' or 3' halves, with only the latter having different sequence for the maternal- and somatic-types. For 18S, we discovered 21 nt srRNA from the 5' end of the 18S rRNA with a striking resemblance to microRNAs; as it is likely processed from a stem-loop precursor and present in human and mouse Argonaute-complexed small-RNA. For 28S, an abundant 80 nt srRNA from the 3' end of the 28S rRNA was found. The expression levels during embryogenesis of these srRNA indicate they are not generated from rRNA degradation and might have a role in the zebrafish development.

  1. Capture of microRNA-bound mRNAs identifies the tumor suppressor miR-34a as a regulator of growth factor signaling.

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    Ashish Lal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A simple biochemical method to isolate mRNAs pulled down with a transfected, biotinylated microRNA was used to identify direct target genes of miR-34a, a tumor suppressor gene. The method reidentified most of the known miR-34a regulated genes expressed in K562 and HCT116 cancer cell lines. Transcripts for 982 genes were enriched in the pull-down with miR-34a in both cell lines. Despite this large number, validation experiments suggested that ~90% of the genes identified in both cell lines can be directly regulated by miR-34a. Thus miR-34a is capable of regulating hundreds of genes. The transcripts pulled down with miR-34a were highly enriched for their roles in growth factor signaling and cell cycle progression. These genes form a dense network of interacting gene products that regulate multiple signal transduction pathways that orchestrate the proliferative response to external growth stimuli. Multiple candidate miR-34a-regulated genes participate in RAS-RAF-MAPK signaling. Ectopic miR-34a expression reduced basal ERK and AKT phosphorylation and enhanced sensitivity to serum growth factor withdrawal, while cells genetically deficient in miR-34a were less sensitive. Fourteen new direct targets of miR-34a were experimentally validated, including genes that participate in growth factor signaling (ARAF and PIK3R2 as well as genes that regulate cell cycle progression at various phases of the cell cycle (cyclins D3 and G2, MCM2 and MCM5, PLK1 and SMAD4. Thus miR-34a tempers the proliferative and pro-survival effect of growth factor stimulation by interfering with growth factor signal transduction and downstream pathways required for cell division.

  2. Capture of microRNA-bound mRNAs identifies the tumor suppressor miR-34a as a regulator of growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Ashish; Thomas, Marshall P; Altschuler, Gabriel; Navarro, Francisco; O'Day, Elizabeth; Li, Xiao Ling; Concepcion, Carla; Han, Yoon-Chi; Thiery, Jerome; Rajani, Danielle K; Deutsch, Aaron; Hofmann, Oliver; Ventura, Andrea; Hide, Winston; Lieberman, Judy

    2011-11-01

    A simple biochemical method to isolate mRNAs pulled down with a transfected, biotinylated microRNA was used to identify direct target genes of miR-34a, a tumor suppressor gene. The method reidentified most of the known miR-34a regulated genes expressed in K562 and HCT116 cancer cell lines. Transcripts for 982 genes were enriched in the pull-down with miR-34a in both cell lines. Despite this large number, validation experiments suggested that ~90% of the genes identified in both cell lines can be directly regulated by miR-34a. Thus miR-34a is capable of regulating hundreds of genes. The transcripts pulled down with miR-34a were highly enriched for their roles in growth factor signaling and cell cycle progression. These genes form a dense network of interacting gene products that regulate multiple signal transduction pathways that orchestrate the proliferative response to external growth stimuli. Multiple candidate miR-34a-regulated genes participate in RAS-RAF-MAPK signaling. Ectopic miR-34a expression reduced basal ERK and AKT phosphorylation and enhanced sensitivity to serum growth factor withdrawal, while cells genetically deficient in miR-34a were less sensitive. Fourteen new direct targets of miR-34a were experimentally validated, including genes that participate in growth factor signaling (ARAF and PIK3R2) as well as genes that regulate cell cycle progression at various phases of the cell cycle (cyclins D3 and G2, MCM2 and MCM5, PLK1 and SMAD4). Thus miR-34a tempers the proliferative and pro-survival effect of growth factor stimulation by interfering with growth factor signal transduction and downstream pathways required for cell division.

  3. Capture of MicroRNA–Bound mRNAs Identifies the Tumor Suppressor miR-34a as a Regulator of Growth Factor Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Elizabeth; Li, Xiao Ling; Concepcion, Carla; Han, Yoon-Chi; Thiery, Jerome; Rajani, Danielle K.; Deutsch, Aaron; Hofmann, Oliver; Ventura, Andrea; Hide, Winston; Lieberman, Judy

    2011-01-01

    A simple biochemical method to isolate mRNAs pulled down with a transfected, biotinylated microRNA was used to identify direct target genes of miR-34a, a tumor suppressor gene. The method reidentified most of the known miR-34a regulated genes expressed in K562 and HCT116 cancer cell lines. Transcripts for 982 genes were enriched in the pull-down with miR-34a in both cell lines. Despite this large number, validation experiments suggested that ∼90% of the genes identified in both cell lines can be directly regulated by miR-34a. Thus miR-34a is capable of regulating hundreds of genes. The transcripts pulled down with miR-34a were highly enriched for their roles in growth factor signaling and cell cycle progression. These genes form a dense network of interacting gene products that regulate multiple signal transduction pathways that orchestrate the proliferative response to external growth stimuli. Multiple candidate miR-34a–regulated genes participate in RAS-RAF-MAPK signaling. Ectopic miR-34a expression reduced basal ERK and AKT phosphorylation and enhanced sensitivity to serum growth factor withdrawal, while cells genetically deficient in miR-34a were less sensitive. Fourteen new direct targets of miR-34a were experimentally validated, including genes that participate in growth factor signaling (ARAF and PIK3R2) as well as genes that regulate cell cycle progression at various phases of the cell cycle (cyclins D3 and G2, MCM2 and MCM5, PLK1 and SMAD4). Thus miR-34a tempers the proliferative and pro-survival effect of growth factor stimulation by interfering with growth factor signal transduction and downstream pathways required for cell division. PMID:22102825

  4. Analysis of antisense expression by whole genome tiling microarrays and siRNAs suggests mis-annotation of Arabidopsis orphan protein-coding genes.

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    Casey R Richardson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs and trans-acting small-interfering RNAs (tasi-RNAs are small (20-22 nt long RNAs (smRNAs generated from hairpin secondary structures or antisense transcripts, respectively, that regulate gene expression by Watson-Crick pairing to a target mRNA and altering expression by mechanisms related to RNA interference. The high sequence homology of plant miRNAs to their targets has been the mainstay of miRNA prediction algorithms, which are limited in their predictive power for other kingdoms because miRNA complementarity is less conserved yet transitive processes (production of antisense smRNAs are active in eukaryotes. We hypothesize that antisense transcription and associated smRNAs are biomarkers which can be computationally modeled for gene discovery.We explored rice (Oryza sativa sense and antisense gene expression in publicly available whole genome tiling array transcriptome data and sequenced smRNA libraries (as well as C. elegans and found evidence of transitivity of MIRNA genes similar to that found in Arabidopsis. Statistical analysis of antisense transcript abundances, presence of antisense ESTs, and association with smRNAs suggests several hundred Arabidopsis 'orphan' hypothetical genes are non-coding RNAs. Consistent with this hypothesis, we found novel Arabidopsis homologues of some MIRNA genes on the antisense strand of previously annotated protein-coding genes. A Support Vector Machine (SVM was applied using thermodynamic energy of binding plus novel expression features of sense/antisense transcription topology and siRNA abundances to build a prediction model of miRNA targets. The SVM when trained on targets could predict the "ancient" (deeply conserved class of validated Arabidopsis MIRNA genes with an accuracy of 84%, and 76% for "new" rapidly-evolving MIRNA genes.Antisense and smRNA expression features and computational methods may identify novel MIRNA genes and other non-coding RNAs in plants and potentially other

  5. Isolation and characterization of the genes for two small RNAs of herpesvirus papio and their comparison with Epstein-Barr virus-encoded EBER RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, J G; Shu, M D

    1988-08-01

    Genes for the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs (EBERs), two low-molecular-weight RNAs encoded by the human gammaherpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hybridize to two small RNAs in a baboon cell line that contains a similar virus, herpesvirus papio (HVP). The genes for the HVP RNAs (HVP-1 and HVP-2) are located together in the small unique region at the left end of the viral genome and are transcribed by RNA polymerase III in a rightward direction, similar to the EBERs. There is significant similarity between EBER1 and HVP-1 RNA, except for an insert of 22 nucleotides which increases the length of HVP-1 RNA to 190 nucleotides. There is less similarity between the sequences of EBER2 and HVP-2 RNA, but both have a length of about 170 nucleotides. The predicted secondary structure of each HVP RNA is remarkably similar to that of the respective EBER, implying that the secondary structures are important for function. Upstream from the initiation sites of all four RNA genes are several highly conserved sequences which may function in the regulation of transcription. The HVP RNAs, together with the EBERs, are highly abundant in transformed cells and are efficiently bound by the cellular La protein.

  6. microRNAs and lipid metabolism

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    Aryal, Binod; Singh, Abhishek K.; Rotllan, Noemi; Price, Nathan; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review Work over the last decade has identified the important role of microRNAs (miRNAS) in regulating lipoprotein metabolism and associated disorders including metabolic syndrome, obesity and atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the most recent findings in the field, highlighting the contribution of miRNAs in controlling low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. Recent findings A number of miRNAs have emerged as important regulators of lipid metabolism, including miR-122 and miR-33. Work over the last two years has identified additional functions of miR-33 including the regulation of macrophage activation and mitochondrial metabolism. Moreover, it has recently been shown that miR-33 regulates vascular homeostasis and cardiac adaptation in response to pressure overload. In addition to miR-33 and miR-122, recent GWAS have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the proximity of miRNAs genes associated with abnormal levels of circulating lipids in humans. Several of these miRNA, such as miR-148a and miR-128-1, target important proteins that regulate cellular cholesterol metabolism, including the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and the ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1). Summary microRNAs have emerged as critical regulators of cholesterol metabolism and promising therapeutic targets for treating cardiometabolic disorders including atherosclerosis. Here, we discuss the recent findings in the field highlighting the novel mechanisms by which miR-33 controls lipid metabolism and atherogenesis and the identification of novel miRNAs that regulate LDL metabolism. Finally, we summarize the recent findings that identified miR-33 as an important non-coding RNA that controls cardiovascular homeostasis independent of its role in regulating lipid metabolism. PMID:28333713

  7. MicroRNAs meet calcium: joint venture in ER proteostasis.

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    Finger, Fabian; Hoppe, Thorsten

    2014-11-04

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular compartment that has a key function in protein translation and folding. Maintaining its integrity is of fundamental importance for organism's physiology and viability. The dynamic regulation of intraluminal ER Ca(2+) concentration directly influences the activity of ER-resident chaperones and stress response pathways that balance protein load and folding capacity. We review the emerging evidence that microRNAs play important roles in adjusting these processes to frequently changing intracellular and environmental conditions to modify ER Ca(2+) handling and storage and maintain ER homeostasis. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Progress and Prospects of Long Noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

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    Chen Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is one of the most frequently occurring cancers with poor prognosis, and novel diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for HCC are urgently required. With the advance of high-resolution microarrays and massively parallel sequencing technology, lncRNAs are suggested to play critical roles in the tumorigenesis and development of human HCC. To date, dysregulation of many HCC-related lncRNAs such as HULC, HOTAIR, MALAT1, and H19 have been identified. From transcriptional “noise” to indispensable elements, lncRNAs may re-write the central dogma. Also, lncRNAs found in body fluids have demonstrated their utility as fluid-based noninvasive markers for clinical use and as therapeutic targets for HCC. Even though several lncRNAs have been characterized, the underlying mechanisms of their contribution to HCC remain unknown, and many important questions about lncRNAs need resolving. A better understanding of the molecular mechanism in HCC-related lncRNAs will provide a rationale for novel effective lncRNA-based targeted therapies. In this review, we highlight the emerging roles of lncRNAs in HCC, and discuss their potential clinical applications as biomarkers for the diagnosis, prognosis, monitoring and treatment of HCC.

  9. Highly Complementary Target RNAs Promote Release of Guide RNAs from Human Argonaute2

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    De, Nabanita; Young, Lisa; Lau, Pick-Wei; Meisner, Nicole-Claudia; Morrissey, David V.; MacRae, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Argonaute proteins use small RNAs to guide the silencing of complementary target RNAs in many eukaryotes. Although small RNA biogenesis pathways are well studied, mechanisms for removal of guide RNAs from Argonaute are poorly understood. Here we show that the Argonaute2 (Ago2) guide RNA complex is extremely stable, with a half-life on the order of days. However, highly complementary target RNAs destabilize the complex and significantly accelerate release of the guide RNA from Ago2. This “unloading” activity can be enhanced by mismatches between the target and the guide 5′ end and attenuated by mismatches to the guide 3′ end. The introduction of 3′ mismatches leads to more potent silencing of abundant mRNAs in mammalian cells. These findings help to explain why the 3′ ends of mammalian microRNAs (miRNAs) rarely match their targets, suggest a mechanism for sequence-specific small RNA turnover, and offer insights for controlling small RNAs in mammalian cells. PMID:23664376

  10. A comparative study of sequence- and structure-based features of small RNAs and other RNAs of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barik, Amita; Das, Santasabuj

    2018-01-02

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria have emerged as key players in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Here, we present a statistical analysis of different sequence- and structure-related features of bacterial sRNAs to identify the descriptors that could discriminate sRNAs from other bacterial RNAs. We investigated a comprehensive and heterogeneous collection of 816 sRNAs, identified by northern blotting across 33 bacterial species and compared their various features with other classes of bacterial RNAs, such as tRNAs, rRNAs and mRNAs. We observed that sRNAs differed significantly from the rest with respect to G+C composition, normalized minimum free energy of folding, motif frequency and several RNA-folding parameters like base-pairing propensity, Shannon entropy and base-pair distance. Based on the selected features, we developed a predictive model using Random Forests (RF) method to classify the above four classes of RNAs. Our model displayed an overall predictive accuracy of 89.5%. These findings would help to differentiate bacterial sRNAs from other RNAs and further promote prediction of novel sRNAs in different bacterial species.

  11. MicroRNAs in Cardiometabolic Diseases

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    Anna Meiliana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are ~22-nucleotide noncoding RNAs with critical functions in multiple physiological and pathological processes. An explosion of reports on the discovery and characterization of different miRNA species and their involvement in almost every aspect of cardiac biology and diseases has established an exciting new dimension in gene regulation networks for cardiac development and pathogenesis. CONTENT: Alterations in the metabolic control of lipid and glucose homeostasis predispose an individual to develop cardiometabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and atherosclerosis. Work over the last years has suggested that miRNAs play an important role in regulating these physiological processes. Besides a cell-specific transcription factor profile, cell-specific miRNA-regulated gene expression is integral to cell fate and activation decisions. Thus, the cell types involved in atherosclerosis, vascular disease, and its myocardial sequelae may be differentially regulated by distinct miRNAs, thereby controlling highly complex processes, for example, smooth muscle cell phenotype and inflammatory responses of endothelial cells or macrophages. The recent advancements in using miRNAs as circulating biomarkers or therapeutic modalities, will hopefully be able to provide a strong basis for future research to further expand our insights into miRNA function in cardiovascular biology. SUMMARY: MiRNAs are small, noncoding RNAs that function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. They are potent modulators of diverse biological processes and pathologies. Recent findings demonstrated the importance of miRNAs in the vasculature and the orchestration of lipid metabolism and glucose homeostasis. MiRNA networks represent an additional layer of regulation for gene expression that absorbs perturbations and ensures the robustness of biological systems. A detailed understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of mi

  12. MicroRNAs in addiction: adaptation's middlemen?

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    Li, M D; van der Vaart, A D

    2011-12-01

    A central question in addiction is how drug-induced changes in synaptic signaling are converted into long-term neuroadaptations. Emerging evidence reveals that microRNAs (miRNAs) have a distinct role in this process through rapid response to cellular signals and dynamic regulation of local mRNA transcripts. Because each miRNA can target hundreds of mRNAs, relative changes in the expression of miRNAs can greatly impact cellular responsiveness, synaptic plasticity and transcriptional events. These diverse consequences of miRNA action occur through coordination with genes implicated in addictions, the most compelling of these being the neurotrophin BDNF, the transcription factor cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) and the DNA-binding methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). In this study, we review the recent progress in the understanding of miRNAs in general mechanisms of plasticity and neuroadaptation and then focus on specific examples of miRNA regulation in the context of addiction. We conclude that miRNA-mediated gene regulation is a conserved means of converting environmental signals into neuronal response, which holds significant implications for addiction and other psychiatric illnesses.

  13. Role of microRNAs in sepsis.

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    Kingsley, S Manoj Kumar; Bhat, B Vishnu

    2017-07-01

    MicroRNAs have been found to be of high significance in the regulation of various genes and processes in the body. Sepsis is a serious clinical problem which arises due to the excessive host inflammatory response to infection. The non-specific clinical features and delayed diagnosis of sepsis has been a matter of concern for long time. MicroRNAs could enable better diagnosis of sepsis and help in the identification of the various stages of sepsis. Improved diagnosis may enable quicker and more effective treatment measures. The initial acute and transient phase of sepsis involves excessive secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines which causes severe damage. MicroRNAs negatively regulate the toll-like receptor signaling pathway and regulate the production of inflammatory cytokines during sepsis. Likewise, microRNAs have shown to regulate the vascular barrier and endothelial function in sepsis. They are also involved in the regulation of the apoptosis, immunosuppression, and organ dysfunction in later stages of sepsis. Their importance at various levels of the pathophysiology of sepsis has been discussed along with the challenges and future perspectives. MicroRNAs could be key players in the diagnosis and staging of sepsis. Their regulation at various stages of sepsis suggests that they may have an important role in altering the outcome associated with sepsis.

  14. Role of Exosomal Noncoding RNAs in Lung Carcinogenesis

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    Tao Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the major cause of cancer death worldwide. Novel, recently discovered classes of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs have diverse functional and regulatory activities and increasing evidence suggests crucial roles for deregulated ncRNAs in the onset and progression of cancer, including lung cancer. Exosomes are small extracellular membrane vesicles of endocytic origin that are released by many cells and are found in most body fluids. Tumor-derived exosomes mediate tumorigenesis by facilitating tumor growth and metastasis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a subclass of ncRNAs that are present in exosomes. miRNAs are taken up by neighboring or distant cells and modulate various functions of recipient cells. Here, we review exosome-derived ncRNAs with a focus on miRNAs and their role in lung cancer biology.

  15. Rapid delivery of small interfering RNA by biosurfactant MEL-A-containing liposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoh, Yoshikazu; Furuno, Tadahide; Hirashima, Naohide; Kitamoto, Dai; Nakanishi, Mamoru

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We use MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. ► MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes can efficiently and rapidly deliver siRNA into the cytoplasm. ► Rapid delivery of siRNA is due to the membrane fusion between liposomes and plasma membrane. -- Abstract: The downregulation of gene expression by RNA interference holds great potential for genetic analysis and gene therapy. However, a more efficient delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA) into the target cells is required for wide fields such as cell biology, physiology, and clinical application. Non-viral vectors are stronger candidates than viral vectors because they are safer and easier to prepare. We have previously used a new method for gene transfection by combining cationic liposomes with the biosurfactant mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A). The novel MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes rapidly delivered DNA (plasmids and oligonucleotides) into the cytosol and nucleus through membrane fusion between liposomes and the plasma membrane, and consequently, enhanced the gene transfection efficiency. In this study, we determined the efficiency of MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes for siRNA delivery. We observed that exogenous and endogenous protein expression was suppressed by approximately 60% at 24 h after brief (30 min) incubation of target cells with MEL-A-containing cationic liposome/siRNA complexes. Confocal microscopic analysis showed that suppression of protein expression was caused by rapid siRNA delivery into the cytosol. We found that the MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes directly delivered siRNA into the cytoplasm by the membrane fusion in addition to endocytotic pathway whereas Lipofectamine™ RNAiMax delivered siRNA only by the endocytotic pathway. It seems that the ability to rapidly and directly deliver siRNA into the cytosol using MEL-A-containing cationic liposomes is able to reduce immune responses, cytotoxicity, and other side effects caused by

  16. The secret role of microRNAs in cancer stem cell development and potential therapy: A Notch-pathway approach.

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    Marianna eProkopi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have been implicated in the development of some if not all cancer types and have been identified as attractive targets for prognosis, diagnosis and therapy of the disease. MiRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs (20-22 nucleotides in length that bind imperfectly to the 3’-untranslated region of target mRNA regulating gene expression. Aberrantly expressed miRNAs in cancer, sometimes known as oncomiRNAs, have been shown to play a major role in oncogenesis, metastasis and drug resistance. Amplification of oncomiRNAs during cancer development correlates with the silencing of tumor suppressor genes; on the other hand, down-regulation of miRNAs has also been observed in cancer and cancer stem cells (CSCs. In both cases, miRNA regulation is inversely correlated with cancer progression. Growing evidence indicates that miRNAs are also involved in the metastatic process by either suppressing or promoting metastasis-related genes leading to the reduction or activation of cancer cell migration and invasion processes. In particular, circulating miRNAs (vesicle-encapsulated or non-encapsulated have significant effects on tumorigenesis: membrane-particles, apoptotic bodies and exosomes have been described as providers of a cell-to-cell communication system transporting oncogenic miRNAs from tumors to neighboring cells and distant metastatic sites. It is hypothesized that MiRNAs control cancer development in a traditional manner, by regulating signaling pathways and factors. In addition, recent developments indicate a non-conventional mechanism of cancer regulation by stem cell reprogramming via a regulatory network consisting of miRNAs and Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, and Hedgehog signaling pathways, all of which are involved in controlling stem cell functions of CSCs. In this review, we focus on the role of miRNAs in the Notch pathway and how they regulate CSC self-renewal, differentiation and tumorigenesis by direct/indirect targeting of

  17. Deep sequencing of Brachypodium small RNAs at the global genome level identifies microRNAs involved in cold stress response

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    Chong Kang

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are endogenous small RNAs having large-scale regulatory effects on plant development and stress responses. Extensive studies of miRNAs have only been performed in a few model plants. Although miRNAs are proved to be involved in plant cold stress responses, little is known for winter-habit monocots. Brachypodium distachyon, with close evolutionary relationship to cool-season cereals, has recently emerged as a novel model plant. There are few reports of Brachypodium miRNAs. Results High-throughput sequencing and whole-genome-wide data mining led to the identification of 27 conserved miRNAs, as well as 129 predicted miRNAs in Brachypodium. For multiple-member conserved miRNA families, their sizes in Brachypodium were much smaller than those in rice and Populus. The genome organization of miR395 family in Brachypodium was quite different from that in rice. The expression of 3 conserved miRNAs and 25 predicted miRNAs showed significant changes in response to cold stress. Among these miRNAs, some were cold-induced and some were cold-suppressed, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated under cold stress condition. Conclusion Our results suggest that Brachypodium miRNAs are composed of a set of conserved miRNAs and a large proportion of non-conserved miRNAs with low expression levels. Both kinds of miRNAs were involved in cold stress response, but all the conserved miRNAs were up-regulated, implying an important role for cold-induced miRNAs. The different size and genome organization of miRNA families in Brachypodium and rice suggest that the frequency of duplication events or the selection pressure on duplicated miRNAs are different between these two closely related plant species.

  18. Evaluation of locked nucleic acid-modified small interfering RNA in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mook, Olaf R.; Baas, Frank; de Wissel, Marit B.; Fluiter, Kees

    2007-01-01

    RNA interference has become widely used as an experimental tool to study gene function. In addition, small interfering RNA (siRNA) may have great potential for the treatment of diseases. Recently, it was shown that siRNA can be used to mediate gene silencing in mouse models. Locally administered

  19. Partial Correction of Psoriasis upon Genetic Knock-Down of Human TNF-α by Lentivirus-Encoded shRNAs in a Xenograft Mouse Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Maria; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia

    samples treated with irrelevant shRNAs, were selected and cloned into lentiviral vectors. The lentiviral vectors expressing TNF- shRNAs were used to transduce HEK-293 cells and verify vector-derived knock-down of stable TNF- expression in vitro. The most efficient TNF- -directed shRNA, which in cell lines...

  20. MicroRNAs, epigenetics and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silahtaroglu, Asli; Stenvang, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the heritable chances that affect gene expression without changing the DNA sequence. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression can be through different mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and nucleosome positioning. MicroRNAs are short RNA molecules...... which do not code for a protein but have a role in post-transcriptional silencing of multiple target genes by binding to their 3' UTRs (untranslated regions). Both epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, and the microRNAs are crucial for normal differentiation...... diseases. In the present chapter we will mainly focus on microRNAs and methylation and their implications in human disease, mainly in cancer....

  1. Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola ePiscopo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD includes a spectrum of disorders characterized by changes of personality and social behaviour and, often, a gradual and progressive language dysfunction. In the last years, several efforts have been fulfilled in identifying both genetic mutations and pathological proteins associated with FTLD. The molecular bases undergoing the onset and progression of the disease remain still unknown. Recent literature prompts an involvement of RNA metabolism in FTLD, particularly miRNAs. Dysregulation of miRNAs in several disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, and increasing importance of circulating miRNAs in different pathologies has suggested to implement the study of their possible application as biological markers and new therapeutic targets; moreover, miRNA-based therapy is becoming a powerful tool to deepen the function of a gene, the mechanism of a disease, and validate therapeutic targets. Regarding FTLD, different studies showed that miRNAs are playing an important role. For example, several reports have evaluated miRNA regulation of the progranulin gene suggesting that it is under their control, as described for miR-29b, miR-107 and miR-659. More recently, it has been demonstrated that TMEM106B gene, which protein is elevated in FTLD-TDP brains, is repressed by miR-132/212 cluster; this post-transcriptional mechanism increases intracellular levels of progranulin, affecting its pathways. These findings if confirmed could suggest that these microRNAs have a role as potential targets for some related-FTLD genes. In this review, we focus on the emerging roles of the miRNAs in the pathogenesis of FTLD.

  2. LncRNAs H19 and HULC, activated by oxidative stress, promote cell migration and invasion in cholangiocarcinoma through a ceRNA manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tao Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs are known to play important roles in different cell contexts, including cancers. However, little is known about lncRNAs in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA, a cholangiocyte malignancy with poor prognosis, associated with chronic inflammation and damage to the biliary epithelium. The aim of the study is to identify if any lncRNA might associate with inflammation or oxidative stress in CCA and regulate the disease progression. Methods In this study, RNA-seqs datasets were used to identify aberrantly expressed lncRNAs. Small interfering RNA and overexpressed plasmids were used to modulate the expression of lncRNAs, and luciferase target assay RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP was performed to explore the mechanism of miRNA-lncRNA sponging. Results We firstly analyzed five available RNA-seqs datasets to investigate aberrantly expressed lncRNAs which might associate with inflammation or oxidative stress. We identified that two lncRNAs, H19 and HULC, were differentially expressed among all the samples under the treatment of hypoxic or inflammatory factors, and they were shown to be stimulated by short-term oxidative stress responses to H2O2 and glucose oxidase in CCA cell lines. Further studies revealed that these two lncRNAs promoted cholangiocyte migration and invasion via the inflammation pathway. H19 and HULC functioned as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs by sponging let-7a/let-7b and miR-372/miR-373, respectively, which activate pivotal inflammation cytokine IL-6 and chemokine receptor CXCR4. Conclusions Our study revealed that H19 and HULC, up-regulated by oxidative stress, regulate CCA cell migration and invasion by targeting IL-6 and CXCR4 via ceRNA patterns of sponging let-7a/let-7b and miR-372/miR-373, respectively. The results suggest that these lncRNAs might be the chief culprits of CCA pathogenesis and progression. The study provides new insight into the mechanism linking lncRNA function with CCA and

  3. Small RNAs controlling outer membrane porins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Johansen, Jesper; Rasmussen, Anders A

    2007-01-01

    are key regulators of environmental stress. Recent work has revealed an intimate interplay between small RNA regulation of outer membrane proteins and the stress-induced sigmaE-signalling system, which has an essential role in the maintenance of the integrity of the outer membrane.......Gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs has been recognized as an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism for several years. In Gram-negative bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella, these RNAs control stress response and translation of outer membrane proteins and therefore...

  4. Network of microRNAs-mRNAs Interactions in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Elnaz; Mostafaei, Mehdi; Pourshams, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Background. MicroRNAs are small RNA molecules that regulate the expression of certain genes through interaction with mRNA targets and are mainly involved in human cancer. This study was conducted to make the network of miRNAs-mRNAs interactions in pancreatic cancer as the fourth leading cause of cancer death. Methods. 56 miRNAs that were exclusively expressed and 1176 genes that were downregulated or silenced in pancreas cancer were extracted from beforehand investigations. MiRNA–mRNA interactions data analysis and related networks were explored using MAGIA tool and Cytoscape 3 software. Functional annotations of candidate genes in pancreatic cancer were identified by DAVID annotation tool. Results. This network is made of 217 nodes for mRNA, 15 nodes for miRNA, and 241 edges that show 241 regulations between 15 miRNAs and 217 target genes. The miR-24 was the most significantly powerful miRNA that regulated series of important genes. ACVR2B, GFRA1, and MTHFR were significant target genes were that downregulated. Conclusion. Although the collected previous data seems to be a treasure trove, there was no study simultaneous to analysis of miRNAs and mRNAs interaction. Network of miRNA-mRNA interactions will help to corroborate experimental remarks and could be used to refine miRNA target predictions for developing new therapeutic approaches. PMID:24895587

  5. Network of microRNAs-mRNAs Interactions in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Naderi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. MicroRNAs are small RNA molecules that regulate the expression of certain genes through interaction with mRNA targets and are mainly involved in human cancer. This study was conducted to make the network of miRNAs-mRNAs interactions in pancreatic cancer as the fourth leading cause of cancer death. Methods. 56 miRNAs that were exclusively expressed and 1176 genes that were downregulated or silenced in pancreas cancer were extracted from beforehand investigations. MiRNA–mRNA interactions data analysis and related networks were explored using MAGIA tool and Cytoscape 3 software. Functional annotations of candidate genes in pancreatic cancer were identified by DAVID annotation tool. Results. This network is made of 217 nodes for mRNA, 15 nodes for miRNA, and 241 edges that show 241 regulations between 15 miRNAs and 217 target genes. The miR-24 was the most significantly powerful miRNA that regulated series of important genes. ACVR2B, GFRA1, and MTHFR were significant target genes were that downregulated. Conclusion. Although the collected previous data seems to be a treasure trove, there was no study simultaneous to analysis of miRNAs and mRNAs interaction. Network of miRNA-mRNA interactions will help to corroborate experimental remarks and could be used to refine miRNA target predictions for developing new therapeutic approaches.

  6. Small interfering RNA targeted to stem-loop II of the 5' untranslated region effectively inhibits expression of six HCV genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dash Srikanta

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antiviral action of interferon alpha targets the 5' untranslated region (UTR used by hepatitis C virus (HCV to translate protein by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES mechanism. Although this sequence is highly conserved among different clinical strains, approximately half of chronically infected hepatitis C patients do not respond to interferon therapy. Therefore, development of small interfering RNA (siRNA targeted to the 5'UTR to inhibit IRES mediated translation may represent an alternative approach that could circumvent the problem of interferon resistance. Results Four different plasmid constructs were prepared for intracellular delivery of siRNAs targeting the stem loop II-III of HCV 5' UTR. The effect of siRNA production on IRES mediated translation was investigated using chimeric clones between the gene for green fluorescence protein (GFP and IRES sequences of six different HCV genotypes. The siRNA targeted to stem loop II effectively mediated degradation of HCV IRES mRNA and inhibited GFP expression in the case of six different HCV genotypes, where as siRNAs targeted to stem loop III did not. Furthermore, intracytoplasmic expression of siRNA into transfected Huh-7 cells efficiently degraded HCV genomic RNA and inhibited core protein expression from infectious full-length infectious clones HCV 1a and HCV 1b strains. Conclusion These in vitro studies suggest that siRNA targeted to stem-loop II is highly effective inhibiting IRES mediated translation of the major genotypes of HCV. Stem-loop II siRNA may be a good target for developing an intracellular immunization strategy based antiviral therapy to inhibit hepatitis C virus strains that are not inhibited by interferon.

  7. MicroRNAs and their predicted target messenger RNAs are deregulated by exposure to a carcinogenic dose of comfrey in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiguang; Fuscoe, James C; Chen, Tao

    2011-07-01

    MicroRNAs (MiRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that function as regulators of gene expression to control cell growth and differentiation. In this study, we analyzed miRNA and mRNA expression in the livers of rats treated with a carcinogenic dose of comfrey (Symphytum officinale) for 12 weeks. Groups of six rats were fed a normal diet or a diet containing 8% comfrey root. The animals were sacrificed 1 day after the last treatment and the livers were isolated for miRNA expression analysis using LC Sciences miRNA microarrays and for mRNA expression analysis using Affymetrix rat genome microarrays. MiRNA expression levels were significantly changed by comfrey treatment. The treated samples were separated clearly from the control samples in both principal component analysis (PCA) and hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA). Quantitative measurements of seven miRNAs using TaqMan real-time PCR were consistent with the microarray results in terms of fold-change and the direction of the change in expression. Forty-five miRNAs (P comfrey treatment. Using a target prediction algorithm, 434 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were predicted to be targeted by the differentially expressed miRNAs (DEMs). The DEM-targeted DEGs were more likely to be involved in carcinogenesis than the DEGs that were not targeted by the DEMs. The nontargeted DEGs were enriched in noncancer-related biological processes. Our data suggest that comfrey may exert its carcinogenic effects by disturbing miRNA expression resulting in altered mRNA levels of the DEM-targeted genes that are functionally associated with carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Polymer-Mediated Delivery of siRNAs to Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Variables Affecting Specificity and Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Farra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite the advances in anticancer therapies, their effectiveness for many human tumors is still far from being optimal. Significant improvements in treatment efficacy can come from the enhancement of drug specificity. This goal may be achieved by combining the use of therapeutic molecules with tumor specific effects and delivery carriers with tumor targeting ability. In this regard, nucleic acid-based drug (NABD and particularly small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, are attractive molecules due to the possibility to be engineered to target specific tumor genes. On the other hand, polymeric-based delivery systems are emerging as versatile carriers to generate tumor-targeted delivery systems. Here we will focus on the most recent findings in the selection of siRNA/polymeric targeted delivery systems for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, a human tumor for which currently available therapeutic approaches are poorly effective. In addition, we will discuss the most attracting and, in our opinion, promising siRNA-polymer combinations for HCC in relation to the biological features of HCC tissue. Attention will be also put on the mathematical description of the mechanisms ruling siRNA-carrier delivery, this being an important aspect to improve effectiveness reducing the experimental work.

  9. Individual microRNAs (miRNAs) display distinct mRNA targeting "rules".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wang-Xia; Wilfred, Bernard R; Xie, Kevin; Jennings, Mary H; Hu, Yanling Hu; Stromberg, Arnold J; Nelson, Peter T

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) guide Argonaute (AGO)-containing microribonucleoprotein (miRNP) complexes to target mRNAs.It has been assumed that miRNAs behave similarly to each other with regard to mRNA target recognition. The usual assumptions, which are based on prior studies, are that miRNAs target preferentially sequences in the 3'UTR of mRNAs,guided by the 5' "seed" portion of the miRNAs. Here we isolated AGO- and miRNA-containing miRNPs from human H4 tumor cells by co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) with anti-AGO antibody. Cells were transfected with miR-107, miR-124,miR-128, miR-320, or a negative control miRNA. Co-IPed RNAs were subjected to downstream high-density Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST microarray analyses using an assay we validated previously-a "RIP-Chip" experimental design. RIP-Chip data provided a list of mRNAs recruited into the AGO-miRNP in correlation to each miRNA. These experimentally identified miRNA targets were analyzed for complementary six nucleotide "seed" sequences within the transfected miRNAs. We found that miR-124 targets tended to have sequences in the 3'UTR that would be recognized by the 5' seed of miR-124, as described in previous studies. By contrast, miR-107 targets tended to have 'seed' sequences in the mRNA open reading frame, but not the 3' UTR. Further, mRNA targets of miR-128 and miR-320 are less enriched for 6-mer seed sequences in comparison to miR-107 and miR-124. In sum, our data support the importance of the 5' seed in determining binding characteristics for some miRNAs; however, the "binding rules" are complex, and individual miRNAs can have distinct sequence determinants that lead to mRNA targeting.

  10. Pathogens Use and Abuse MicroRNAs to Deceive the Immune System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flór, Thomas B.; Blom, Bianca

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence has demonstrated that microRNAs (miRs) play a role in the survival and amplification of viruses, bacteria and other pathogens. There are various ways in which pathogens can benefit from miR-directed alterations in protein translation and signal transduction. Members of the

  11. deepBase v2.0: identification, expression, evolution and function of small RNAs, LncRNAs and circular RNAs from deep-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ling-Ling; Li, Jun-Hao; Wu, Jie; Sun, Wen-Ju; Liu, Shun; Wang, Ze-Lin; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2016-01-04

    Small non-coding RNAs (e.g. miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (e.g. lincRNAs and circRNAs) are emerging as key regulators of various cellular processes. However, only a very small fraction of these enigmatic RNAs have been well functionally characterized. In this study, we describe deepBase v2.0 (http://biocenter.sysu.edu.cn/deepBase/), an updated platform, to decode evolution, expression patterns and functions of diverse ncRNAs across 19 species. deepBase v2.0 has been updated to provide the most comprehensive collection of ncRNA-derived small RNAs generated from 588 sRNA-Seq datasets. Moreover, we developed a pipeline named lncSeeker to identify 176 680 high-confidence lncRNAs from 14 species. Temporal and spatial expression patterns of various ncRNAs were profiled. We identified approximately 24 280 primate-specific, 5193 rodent-specific lncRNAs, and 55 highly conserved lncRNA orthologs between human and zebrafish. We annotated 14 867 human circRNAs, 1260 of which are orthologous to mouse circRNAs. By combining expression profiles and functional genomic annotations, we developed lncFunction web-server to predict the function of lncRNAs based on protein-lncRNA co-expression networks. This study is expected to provide considerable resources to facilitate future experimental studies and to uncover ncRNA functions. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Ancient and novel small RNA pathways compensate for the loss of piRNAs in multiple independent nematode lineages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sarkies

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Small RNA pathways act at the front line of defence against transposable elements across the Eukaryota. In animals, Piwi interacting small RNAs (piRNAs are a crucial arm of this defence. However, the evolutionary relationships among piRNAs and other small RNA pathways targeting transposable elements are poorly resolved. To address this question we sequenced small RNAs from multiple, diverse nematode species, producing the first phylum-wide analysis of how small RNA pathways evolve. Surprisingly, despite their prominence in Caenorhabditis elegans and closely related nematodes, piRNAs are absent in all other nematode lineages. We found that there are at least two evolutionarily distinct mechanisms that compensate for the absence of piRNAs, both involving RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs. Whilst one pathway is unique to nematodes, the second involves Dicer-dependent RNA-directed DNA methylation, hitherto unknown in animals, and bears striking similarity to transposon-control mechanisms in fungi and plants. Our results highlight the rapid, context-dependent evolution of small RNA pathways and suggest piRNAs in animals may have replaced an ancient eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerase pathway to control transposable elements.

  13. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3... General Prohibitions § 261.3 Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program..., intimidating, or intentionally interfering with any Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program...

  14. Autophagy regulated by miRNAs in colorectal cancer progression and resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Fesler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The catabolic process of autophagy is an essential cellular function that allows for the breakdown and recycling of cellular macromolecules. In recent years, the impact of epigenetic regulation of autophagy by noncoding miRNAs has been recognized in human cancer. In colorectal cancer, autophagy plays critical roles in cancer progression as well as resistance to chemotherapy, and recent evidence demonstrates that miRNAs are directly involved in mediating these functions. In this review, we focus on the recent advancements in the field of miRNA regulation of autophagy in colorectal cancer.

  15. On the classification of long non-coding RNAs

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, Lina; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Zhang, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been found to perform various functions in a wide variety of important biological processes. To make easier interpretation of lncRNA functionality and conduct deep mining on these transcribed sequences

  16. Diverse microRNAs with convergent functions regulate tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Min-Yan; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate several biological processes, including tumorigenesis. In order to comprehend the roles of miRNAs in cancer, various screens were performed to investigate the changes in the expression levels of miRNAs that occur in different types of cancer. The present review focuses on the results of five recent screens, whereby a number of overlapping miRNAs were identified to be downregulated or differentially regulated, whereas no miRNAs were observed to be frequently upregulated. Furthermore, the majority of the miRNAs that were common to >1 screen were involved in signaling networks, including wingless-related integration site, receptor tyrosine kinase and transforming growth factor-β, or in cell cycle checkpoint control. The present review will discuss the aforementioned miRNAs implicated in cell cycle checkpoint control and signaling networks.

  17. Identification of novel sRNAs in mycobacterial species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Hsun Tsai

    Full Text Available Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs are short transcripts that typically do not encode proteins and often act as regulators of gene expression through a variety of mechanisms. Regulatory sRNAs have been identified in many species, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis. Here, we use a computational algorithm to predict sRNA candidates in the mycobacterial species M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG and confirmed the expression of many sRNAs using Northern blotting. Thus, we have identified 17 and 23 novel sRNAs in M. smegmatis and M. bovis BCG, respectively. We have also applied a high-throughput technique (Deep-RACE to map the 5' and 3' ends of many of these sRNAs and identified potential regulators of sRNAs by analysis of existing ChIP-seq datasets. The sRNAs identified in this work likely contribute to the unique biology of mycobacteria.

  18. Regulatory Role of Circular RNAs and Neurological Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Gabriele; Zhang, Longbin; Follesa, Paolo; Sun, Tao

    2017-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a class of long noncoding RNAs that are characterized by the presence of covalently linked ends and have been found in all life kingdoms. Exciting studies in regulatory roles of circRNAs are emerging. Here, we summarize classification, characteristics, biogenesis, and regulatory functions of circRNAs. CircRNAs are found to be preferentially expressed along neural genes and in neural tissues. We thus highlight the association of circRNA dysregulation with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Investigation of regulatory role of circRNAs will shed novel light in gene expression mechanisms during development and under disease conditions and may identify circRNAs as new biomarkers for aging and neurodegenerative disorders.

  19. Long Noncoding RNAs in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Anna; Diederichs, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Despite great progress in research and treatment options, lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Oncogenic driver mutations in protein-encoding genes were defined and allow for personalized therapies based on genetic diagnoses. Nonetheless, diagnosis of lung cancer mostly occurs at late stages, and chronic treatment is followed by a fast onset of chemoresistance. Hence, there is an urgent need for reliable biomarkers and alternative treatment options. With the era of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing technologies, long noncoding RNAs emerged as a novel class of versatile, functional RNA molecules. Although for most of them the mechanism of action remains to be defined, accumulating evidence confirms their involvement in various aspects of lung tumorigenesis. They are functional on the epigenetic, transcriptional, and posttranscriptional level and are regulators of pathophysiological key pathways including cell growth, apoptosis, and metastasis. Long noncoding RNAs are gaining increasing attention as potential biomarkers and a novel class of druggable molecules. It has become clear that we are only beginning to understand the complexity of tumorigenic processes. The clinical integration of long noncoding RNAs in terms of prognostic and predictive biomarker signatures and additional cancer targets could provide a chance to increase the therapeutic benefit. Here, we review the current knowledge about the expression, regulation, biological function, and clinical relevance of long noncoding RNAs in lung cancer.

  20. MicroRNAs horizon in retinoblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Mirakholi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the retinoblastoma research, it is of great interest to identify molecular markers associated with the genetics of tumorigenesis. microRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that play a regulatory role in many crucial cellular pathways such as differentiation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. A body of evidences showed dysregulation of miRNAs in tumor biology and many diseases. They potentially play a significant role in tumorigenesis processes and have been the subject of research in many types of cancers including retinal tumorigenesis. miRNA expression profiling was found to be associated with tumor development, progression and treatment. These associations demonstrate the putative applications of miRNAs in monitoring of different aspect of tumors consisting diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic. Herein, we review the current literature concerning to the study of miRNA target recognition, function to tumorigenesis and treatment in retinoblastoma. Identification the specific miRNA biomarkers associated with retinoblastoma cancer may help to establish new therapeutic approaches for salvage affected eyes in patients.

  1. miRNAs: Small but deadly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-24

    Aug 24, 2011 ... Levels of some miRNAs are found altered in cancers, so we might expect these regulatory ..... males is the prostate cancer (PCa) (Jemal et al., 2008). ..... 1 growth factor receptor family members HER-1, HER-2, and HER-3.

  2. The Regulatory RNAs of Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mars, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    In vrijwel alle organismen wordt RNA aangemaakt dat niet codeert voor eiwit, maar een regulerende functie heeft. Dit proefschrift beschrijft de identificatie van ~1600 nieuwe potentiële regulatie-RNAs in de bodembacterie Bacillus subtilis die veel voor biotechnologische toepassingen ingezet wordt.

  3. Regulation of cardiac microRNAs by serum response factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Jeanne Y

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Serum response factor (SRF regulates certain microRNAs that play a role in cardiac and skeletal muscle development. However, the role of SRF in the regulation of microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis in cardiac hypertrophy has not been well established. In this report, we employed two distinct transgenic mouse models to study the impact of SRF on cardiac microRNA expression and microRNA biogenesis. Cardiac-specific overexpression of SRF (SRF-Tg led to altered expression of a number of microRNAs. Interestingly, downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a and upregulation of miR-21 occurred by 7 days of age in these mice, long before the onset of cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that SRF overexpression impacted the expression of microRNAs which contribute to cardiac hypertrophy. Reducing cardiac SRF level using the antisense-SRF transgenic approach (Anti-SRF-Tg resulted in the expression of miR-1, miR-133a and miR-21 in the opposite direction. Furthermore, we observed that SRF regulates microRNA biogenesis, specifically the transcription of pri-microRNA, thereby affecting the mature microRNA level. The mir-21 promoter sequence is conserved among mouse, rat and human; one SRF binding site was found to be in the mir-21 proximal promoter region of all three species. The mir-21 gene is regulated by SRF and its cofactors, including myocardin and p49/Strap. Our study demonstrates that the downregulation of miR-1, miR-133a, and upregulation of miR-21 can be reversed by one single upstream regulator, SRF. These results may help to develop novel therapeutic interventions targeting microRNA biogenesis.

  4. Plant microRNAs in larval food regulate honeybee caste development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Kegan; Liu, Minghui; Fu, Zheng; Zhou, Zhen; Kong, Yan; Liang, Hongwei; Lin, Zheguang; Luo, Jun; Zheng, Huoqing; Wan, Ping; Zhang, Junfeng; Zen, Ke; Chen, Jiong; Hu, Fuliang; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Ren, Jie; Chen, Xi

    2017-08-01

    The major environmental determinants of honeybee caste development come from larval nutrients: royal jelly stimulates the differentiation of larvae into queens, whereas beebread leads to worker bee fate. However, these determinants are not fully characterized. Here we report that plant RNAs, particularly miRNAs, which are more enriched in beebread than in royal jelly, delay development and decrease body and ovary size in honeybees, thereby preventing larval differentiation into queens and inducing development into worker bees. Mechanistic studies reveal that amTOR, a stimulatory gene in caste differentiation, is the direct target of miR162a. Interestingly, the same effect also exists in non-social Drosophila. When such plant RNAs and miRNAs are fed to Drosophila larvae, they cause extended developmental times and reductions in body weight and length, ovary size and fecundity. This study identifies an uncharacterized function of plant miRNAs that fine-tunes honeybee caste development, offering hints for understanding cross-kingdom interaction and co-evolution.

  5. Recent advances in extracellular vesicles enriched with non-coding RNAs related to cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As membrane-bound structures that could be shedded by a parental cell, and fuse with others after shedding, and then release its contents, extracellular vesicles (EVs are considered as an indispensable part of intercellular communication system. The EV contents might be all kinds of bioactive molecules including non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, a large and complex group of RNAs with various subtypes that function to regulate biological events but classically do not code for proteins. In this review we covered the recently published works that validated the underlying molecular mechanisms regulating EV-associated ncRNAs' biogenesis, signaling, and particularly the systemic bio-effects related mostly to any stage of cancer progression, and the clinical potential of ncRNA-carrying EVs as diagnostic biomarkers and drug-delivery system that is being engineered for better loading and targeting capacity. Our views on the future direction of basic research and applications of EVs containing ncRNAs have also been shared.

  6. Regulation of connexins expression levels by microRNAs, an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Francisco Calderon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Control of cell-cell coordination and communication is regulated by several factors, including paracrine and autocrine release of biomolecules, and direct exchange of soluble factors between cells through gap junction channels. Additionally, hemichannels also participate in cell-cell coordination through the release of signaling molecules, such as ATP and glutamate. A family of transmembrane proteins named connexins forms both gap junction channels and hemichannels. Because of their importance in cell and tissue coordination, connexins are controlled both by post-translational and post-transcriptional modifications. In recent years, non-coding RNAs have garnered research interest due to their ability to exert post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. One of the most recent, well-documented control mechanisms of protein synthesis is found through the action of small, single-stranded RNA, called micro RNAs (miRNAs or miRs. Put simply, miRNAs are negative regulators of the expression of a myriad proteins involved in many physiological and pathological processes. This mini review will briefly summarize what is currently known about the action of miRNAs over Cxs expression/function in different organs under some relevant physiological and pathological conditions

  7. Molecular mechanisms underlying the role of microRNAs in the chemoresistance of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garajová, Ingrid; Le Large, Tessa Y; Frampton, Adam E; Rolfo, Christian; Voortman, Johannes; Giovannetti, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an extremely severe disease where the mortality and incidence rates are almost identical. This is mainly due to late diagnosis and limited response to current treatments. The tumor macroenvironment/microenvironment have been frequently reported as the major contributors to chemoresistance in PDAC, preventing the drugs from reaching their intended site of action (i.e., the malignant duct cells). However, the recent discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) has provided new directions for research on mechanisms underlying response to chemotherapy. Due to their tissue-/disease-specific expression and high stability in tissues and biofluids, miRNAs represent new promising diagnostic and prognostic/predictive biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Furthermore, several studies have documented that selected miRNAs, such as miR-21 and miR-34a, may influence response to chemotherapy in several tumor types, including PDAC. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of miRNAs in PDAC and recent advances in understanding their role in chemoresistance through multiple molecular mechanisms.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Role of MicroRNAs in the Chemoresistance of Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Garajová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC is an extremely severe disease where the mortality and incidence rates are almost identical. This is mainly due to late diagnosis and limited response to current treatments. The tumor macroenvironment/microenvironment have been frequently reported as the major contributors to chemoresistance in PDAC, preventing the drugs from reaching their intended site of action (i.e., the malignant duct cells. However, the recent discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs has provided new directions for research on mechanisms underlying response to chemotherapy. Due to their tissue-/disease-specific expression and high stability in tissues and biofluids, miRNAs represent new promising diagnostic and prognostic/predictive biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Furthermore, several studies have documented that selected miRNAs, such as miR-21 and miR-34a, may influence response to chemotherapy in several tumor types, including PDAC. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the role of miRNAs in PDAC and recent advances in understanding their role in chemoresistance through multiple molecular mechanisms.

  9. Decoding the function of nuclear long non-coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling-Ling; Carmichael, Gordon G

    2010-06-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are mRNA-like, non-protein-coding RNAs that are pervasively transcribed throughout eukaryotic genomes. Rather than silently accumulating in the nucleus, many of these are now known or suspected to play important roles in nuclear architecture or in the regulation of gene expression. In this review, we highlight some recent progress in how lncRNAs regulate these important nuclear processes at the molecular level. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The role of miRNAs in endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilatou, Diamantina; Sioulas, Vasileios D; Pappa, Vasiliki; Papageorgiou, Sotirios G; Vlahos, Nikolaos F

    2015-01-01

    miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Since their discovery, miRNAs have been associated with every cell function including malignant transformation and metastasis. Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy. However, improvement should be made in interobserver agreement on histological typing and individualized therapeutic approaches. This article summarizes the role of miRNAs in endometrial cancer pathogenesis and treatment.

  11. MicroRNAs and drug addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Kenny

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug addiction is considered a disorder of neuroplasticity in brain reward and cognition systems resulting from aberrant activation of gene expression programs in response to prolonged drug consumption. Noncoding RNAs are key regulators of almost all aspects of cellular physiology. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small (~21–23 nucleotides noncoding RNA transcripts that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Recently, microRNAs were shown to play key roles in the drug-induced remodeling of brain reward systems that likely drives the emergence of addiction. Here, we review evidence suggesting that one particular miRNA, miR-212, plays a particularly prominent role in vulnerability to cocaine addiction. We review evidence showing that miR-212 expression is increased in the dorsal striatum of rats that show compulsive-like cocaine-taking behaviors. Increases in miR-212 expression appear to protect against cocaine addiction, as virus-mediated striatal miR-212 over-expression decreases cocaine consumption in rats. Conversely, disruption of striatal miR-212 signaling using an antisense oligonucleotide increases cocaine intake. We also review data that identify two mechanisms by which miR-212 may regulate cocaine intake. First, miR-212 has been shown to amplify striatal CREB signaling through a mechanism involving activation of Raf1 kinase. Second, miR-212 was also shown to regulate cocaine intake by repressing striatal expression of methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2, consequently decreasing protein levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. The concerted actions of miR-212 on striatal CREB and MeCP2/BDNF activity greatly attenuate the motivational effects of cocaine. These findings highlight the unique role for miRNAs in simultaneously controlling multiple signaling cascades implicated in addiction.

  12. Integrative analysis of lncRNAs and miRNAs with coding RNAs associated with ceRNA crosstalk network in triple negative breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan NJ

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Naijun Yuan,1,* Guijuan Zhang,2,* Fengjie Bie,1 Min Ma,1 Yi Ma,3 Xuefeng Jiang,1 Yurong Wang,1,* Xiaoqian Hao1 1College of Traditional Chinese Medicine of Jinan University, Institute of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine of Jinan University, 2The First Affiliated Hospital of Jinan University, 3Department of Cellular Biology, Guangdong Province Key Lab of Bioengineering Medicine, Institute of Biomedicine, Jinan University, Guangdong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC is a particular subtype of breast malignant tumor with poorer prognosis than other molecular subtypes. Currently, there is increasing focus on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, which can act as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs and suppress miRNA functions involved in post-transcriptional regulatory networks in the tumor. Therefore, to investigate specific mechanisms of TNBC carcinogenesis and improve treatment efficiency, we comprehensively integrated expression profiles, including data on mRNAs, lncRNAs and miRNAs obtained from 116 TNBC tissues and 11 normal tissues from The Cancer Genome Atlas. As a result, we selected the threshold with |log2FC|>2.0 and an adjusted p-value >0.05 to obtain the differentially expressed mRNAs, miRNAs and lncRNAs. Hereafter, weighted gene co-expression network analysis was performed to identify the expression characteristics of dysregulated genes. We obtained five co-expression modules and related clinical feature. By means of correlating gene modules with protein–protein interaction network analysis that had identified 22 hub mRNAs which could as hub target genes. Eleven key dysregulated differentially expressed micro RNAs (DEmiRNAs were identified that were significantly associated with the 22 hub potential target genes. Moreover, we found that 14 key differentially expressed lncRNAs could interact with the key DEmiRNAs. Then, the ceRNA crosstalk network of TNBC was

  13. An atlas of human long non-coding RNAs with accurate 5′ ends

    KAUST Repository

    Hon, Chung-Chau; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Harshbarger, Jayson; Bertin, Nicolas; Rackham, Owen J. L.; Gough, Julian; Denisenko, Elena; Schmeier, Sebastian; Poulsen, Thomas M.; Severin, Jessica; Lizio, Marina; Kawaji, Hideya; Kasukawa, Takeya; Itoh, Masayoshi; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Noma, Shohei; Djebali, Sarah; Alam, Tanvir; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Testa, Alison C.; Lipovich, Leonard; Yip, Chi-Wai; Abugessaisa, Imad; Mendez, Mickaë l; Hasegawa, Akira; Tang, Dave; Lassmann, Timo; Heutink, Peter; Babina, Magda; Wells, Christine A.; Kojima, Soichi; Nakamura, Yukio; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O.; Hoon, Michiel J. L. de; Arner, Erik; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.

    2017-01-01

    RNAs in multiple diseases. We further demonstrate that lncRNAs overlapping expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL)-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms of messenger RNAs are co-expressed with the corresponding messenger RNAs, suggesting their potential

  14. Bioavailability of transgenic microRNAs in genetically modified plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic expression of small RNAs is a prevalent approach in agrobiotechnology for the global enhancement of plant foods. Meanwhile, emerging studies have, on the one hand, emphasized the potential of transgenic microRNAs (miRNAs) as novel dietary therapeutics and, on the other, suggested potentia...

  15. Dicer-independent processing of short hairpin RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Ying Poi; Schopman, Nick C. T.; Berkhout, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) are widely used to induce RNA interference (RNAi). We tested a variety of shRNAs that differed in stem length and terminal loop size and revealed strikingly different RNAi activities and shRNA-processing patterns. Interestingly, we identified a specific shRNA design that

  16. Non-Coding RNAs in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Wonterghem, Miranda

    This work evolves around elucidating the mechanisms of micro RNAs (miRNAs) in Arabidopsis thaliana. I identified a new class of nuclear non-coding RNAs derived from protein coding genes. The genes are miRNA targets with extensive gene body methylation. The RNA species are nuclear localized and de...

  17. Brain expressed microRNAs implicated in schizophrenia etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas; Olsen, Line; Lindow, Morten

    2007-01-01

    Protein encoding genes have long been the major targets for research in schizophrenia genetics. However, with the identification of regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) as important in brain development and function, miRNAs genes have emerged as candidates for schizophrenia-associated genetic factors...

  18. Identifying and annotating human bifunctional RNAs reveals their versatile functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Geng; Yang, Juan; Chen, Jiwei; Song, Yunjie; Cao, Ruifang; Shi, Tieliu; Shi, Leming

    2016-10-01

    Bifunctional RNAs that possess both protein-coding and noncoding functional properties were less explored and poorly understood. Here we systematically explored the characteristics and functions of such human bifunctional RNAs by integrating tandem mass spectrometry and RNA-seq data. We first constructed a pipeline to identify and annotate bifunctional RNAs, leading to the characterization of 132 high-confidence bifunctional RNAs. Our analyses indicate that bifunctional RNAs may be involved in human embryonic development and can be functional in diverse tissues. Moreover, bifunctional RNAs could interact with multiple miRNAs and RNA-binding proteins to exert their corresponding roles. Bifunctional RNAs may also function as competing endogenous RNAs to regulate the expression of many genes by competing for common targeting miRNAs. Finally, somatic mutations of diverse carcinomas may generate harmful effect on corresponding bifunctional RNAs. Collectively, our study not only provides the pipeline for identifying and annotating bifunctional RNAs but also reveals their important gene-regulatory functions.

  19. Utility of MicroRNAs and siRNAs in Cervical Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacnite del Mar Díaz-González

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs and siRNAs belong to a family of small noncoding RNAs which bind through partial sequence complementarity to 3′-UTR regions of mRNA from target genes, resulting in the regulation of gene expression. MicroRNAs have become an attractive target for genetic and pharmacological modulation due to the critical function of their target proteins in several signaling pathways, and their expression profiles have been found to be altered in various cancers. A promising technology platform for selective silencing of cell and/or viral gene expression using siRNAs is currently in development. Cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women in the developing world and sexually transmitted infection with HPV is the cause of this malignancy. Therefore, a cascade of abnormal events is induced during cervical carcinogenesis, including the induction of genomic instability, reprogramming of cellular metabolic pathways, deregulation of cell proliferation, inhibition of apoptotic mechanisms, disruption of cell cycle control mechanisms, and alteration of gene expression. Thus, in the present review article, we highlight new research on microRNA expression profiles which may be utilized as biomarkers for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we discuss selective silencing of HPV E6 and E7 with siRNAs which represents a potential gene therapy strategy against cervical cancer.

  20. Goat activin receptor type IIB knockdown by muscle specific promoter driven artificial microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amrutlal K; Shah, Ravi K; Patel, Utsav A; Tripathi, Ajai K; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2014-10-10

    Activin receptor type IIB (ACVR2B) is a transmembrane receptor which mediates signaling of TGF beta superfamily ligands known to function in regulation of muscle mass, embryonic development and reproduction. ACVR2B antagonism has shown to enhance the muscle growth in several disease and transgenic models. Here, we show ACVR2B knockdown by RNA interference using muscle creatine kinase (MCK) promoter driven artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs). Among the various promoter elements tested, the ∼1.26 kb MCK promoter region showed maximum transcriptional activity in goat myoblasts cells. We observed up to 20% silencing in non-myogenic 293T cells and up to 32% silencing in myogenic goat myoblasts by MCK directed amiRNAs by transient transfection. Goat myoblasts stably integrated with MCK directed amiRNAs showed merely 8% silencing in proliferating myoblasts which was increased to 34% upon induction of differentiation at transcript level whereas up to 57% silencing at protein level. Knockdown of ACVR2B by 5'-UTR derived amiRNAs resulted in decreased SMAD2/3 signaling, increased expression of myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) and enhanced proliferation and differentiation of myoblasts. Unexpectedly, knockdown of ACVR2B by 3'-UTR derived amiRNAs resulted in increased SMAD2/3 signaling, reduced expression of MRFs and suppression of myogenesis. Our study offers muscle specific knockdown of ACVR2B as a potential strategy to enhance muscle mass in the farm animal species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Associative Interference in Pavlovian Conditioning: A Function of Similarity Between the Interfering and Target Associative Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Amundson, Jeffrey C.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2008-01-01

    Three lever-press suppression studies were conducted with water-deprived rats to investigate the role of similarity in proactive interference within first-order Pavlovian conditioning. Experiments 1a and 1b assessed the influence of stimulus complexity in proactive interference. Both experiments found greater interference when the interfering cue and target cue were composed of the same number of elements. Experiment 2 assessed the influence of context similarity in proactive interference and...

  2. Thiophenone Attenuates Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli O103:H2 Virulence by Interfering with AI-2 Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witsø, Ingun Lund; Valen Rukke, Håkon; Benneche, Tore; Aamdal Scheie, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Interference with bacterial quorum sensing communication provides an anti-virulence strategy to control pathogenic bacteria. Here, using the Enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) O103:H2, we showed for the first time that thiophenone TF101 reduced expression of lsrB; the gene encoding the AI-2 receptor. Combined results of transcriptional and phenotypic analyses suggested that TF101 interfere with AI-2 signalling, possibly by competing with AI-2 for binding to LsrB. This is supported by in silico docking prediction of thiophenone TF101 in the LsrB pocket. Transcriptional analyses furthermore showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with expression of the virulence genes eae and fimH. In addition, TF101 reduced AI-2 induced E. coli adhesion to colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. TF101, on the other hand, did not affect epinephrine or norepinephrine enhanced E. coli adhesion. Overall, our results showed that thiophenone TF101 interfered with virulence expression in E. coli O103:H2, suggestedly by interfering with AI-2 mediated quorum sensing. We thus conclude that thiophenone TF101 might represent a promising future anti-virulence agent in the fight against pathogenic E. coli.

  3. Creation of transgenic rice plants producing small interfering RNA of Rice tungro spherical virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Dung Tien; Chu, Ha Duc; Sasaya, Takahide

    2015-01-01

    Rice tungro spherical virus (RTSV), also known as Rice waika virus, does not cause visible symptoms in infected rice plants. However, the virus plays a critical role in spreading Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV), which is the major cause of severe symptoms of rice tungro disease. Recent studies showed that RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to develop virus-resistance transgenic rice plants. In this report, we presented simple procedures and protocols needed for the creation of transgenic rice plants capable of producing small interfering RNA specific against RTSV sequences. Notably, our study showed that 60 out of 64 individual hygromycin-resistant lines (putative transgenic lines) obtained through transformation carried transgenes designed for producing hairpin double-stranded RNA. Northern blot analyses revealed the presence of small interfering RNA of 21- to 24-mer in 46 out of 56 confirmed transgenic lines. Taken together, our study indicated that transgenic rice plants carrying an inverted repeat of 500-bp fragments encoding various proteins of RTSV can produce small interfering RNA from the hairpin RNA transcribed from that transgene. In light of recent studies with other viruses, it is possible that some of these transgenic rice lines might be resistant to RTSV.

  4. The Influence of Interfering Substances on the Antimicrobial Activity of Selected Quaternary Ammonium Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Araújo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Standard cleaning processes may not remove all the soiling typically found in food industry, such as carbohydrates, fats, or proteins. Contaminants have a high impact in disinfection as their presence may reduce the activity of disinfectants. The influence of alginic acid, bovine serum albumin, yeast extract, and humic acids was assessed on the antimicrobial activities of benzalkonium chloride and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide against Bacillus cereus vegetative cells and Pseudomonas fluorescens. The bacteria (single and consortium were exposed to surfactants (single and combined in the absence and presence of potential disinfection interfering substances. The antimicrobial effects of the surfactants were assessed based on the bacterial respiratory activity measured by oxygen uptake rate due to glucose oxidation. The tested surfactants were efficient against both bacteria (single and consortium with minimum bactericidal concentrations ranging from 3 to 35 mg·L−1. The strongest effect was caused by humic acids that severely quenched antimicrobial action, increasing the minimum bactericidal concentration of the surfactants on P. fluorescens and the consortium. The inclusion of the other interfering substances resulted in mild interferences in the antibacterial activity. This study clearly demonstrates that humic acids should be considered as an antimicrobial interfering substance in the development of disinfection strategies.

  5. Undesired small RNAs originate from an artificial microRNA precursor in transgenic petunia (Petunia hybrida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Guo

    Full Text Available Although artificial microRNA (amiRNA technology has been used frequently in gene silencing in plants, little research has been devoted to investigating the accuracy of amiRNA precursor processing. In this work, amiRNAchs1 (amiRchs1, based on the Arabidopsis miR319a precursor, was expressed in order to suppress the expression of CHS genes in petunia. The transgenic plants showed the CHS gene-silencing phenotype. A modified 5' RACE technique was used to map small-RNA-directed cleavage sites and to detect processing intermediates of the amiRchs1 precursor. The results showed that the target CHS mRNAs were cut at the expected sites and that the amiRchs1 precursor was processed from loop to base. The accumulation of small RNAs in amiRchs1 transgenic petunia petals was analyzed using the deep-sequencing technique. The results showed that, alongside the accumulation of the desired artificial microRNAs, additional small RNAs that originated from other regions of the amiRNA precursor were also accumulated at high frequency. Some of these had previously been found to be accumulated at low frequency in the products of ath-miR319a precursor processing and some of them were accompanied by 3'-tailing variant. Potential targets of the undesired small RNAs were discovered in petunia and other Solanaceae plants. The findings draw attention to the potential occurrence of undesired target silencing induced by such additional small RNAs when amiRNA technology is used. No appreciable production of secondary small RNAs occurred, despite the fact that amiRchs1 was designed to have perfect complementarity to its CHS-J target. This confirmed that perfect pairing between an amiRNA and its targets is not the trigger for secondary small RNA production. In conjunction with the observation that amiRNAs with perfect complementarity to their target genes show high efficiency and specificity in gene silencing, this finding has an important bearing on future applications of amiRNAs

  6. Genome-wide identification and characterization of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in Ganoderma lucidum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianqin Li

    Full Text Available Ganoderma lucidum is a white-rot fungus best-known for its medicinal activities. We have previously sequenced its genome and annotated the protein coding genes. However, long non-coding RNAs in G. lucidum genome have not been analyzed. In this study, we have identified and characterized long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNA in G. lucidum systematically. We developed a computational pipeline, which was used to analyze RNA-Seq data derived from G. lucidum samples collected from three developmental stages. A total of 402 lincRNA candidates were identified, with an average length of 609 bp. Analysis of their adjacent protein-coding genes (apcGenes revealed that 46 apcGenes belong to the pathways of triterpenoid biosynthesis and lignin degradation, or families of cytochrome P450, mating type B genes, and carbohydrate-active enzymes. To determine if lincRNAs and these apcGenes have any interactions, the corresponding pairs of lincRNAs and apcGenes were analyzed in detail. We developed a modified 3' RACE method to analyze the transcriptional direction of a transcript. Among the 46 lincRNAs, 37 were found unidirectionally transcribed, and 9 were found bidirectionally transcribed. The expression profiles of 16 of these 37 lincRNAs were found to be highly correlated with those of the apcGenes across the three developmental stages. Among them, 11 are positively correlated (r>0.8 and 5 are negatively correlated (r<-0.8. The co-localization and co-expression of lincRNAs and those apcGenes playing important functions is consistent with the notion that lincRNAs might be important regulators for cellular processes. In summary, this represents the very first study to identify and characterize lincRNAs in the genomes of basidiomycetes. The results obtained here have laid the foundation for study of potential lincRNA-mediated expression regulation of genes in G. lucidum.

  7. Undesired small RNAs originate from an artificial microRNA precursor in transgenic petunia (Petunia hybrida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yulong; Han, Yao; Ma, Jing; Wang, Huiping; Sang, Xianchun; Li, Mingyang

    2014-01-01

    Although artificial microRNA (amiRNA) technology has been used frequently in gene silencing in plants, little research has been devoted to investigating the accuracy of amiRNA precursor processing. In this work, amiRNAchs1 (amiRchs1), based on the Arabidopsis miR319a precursor, was expressed in order to suppress the expression of CHS genes in petunia. The transgenic plants showed the CHS gene-silencing phenotype. A modified 5' RACE technique was used to map small-RNA-directed cleavage sites and to detect processing intermediates of the amiRchs1 precursor. The results showed that the target CHS mRNAs were cut at the expected sites and that the amiRchs1 precursor was processed from loop to base. The accumulation of small RNAs in amiRchs1 transgenic petunia petals was analyzed using the deep-sequencing technique. The results showed that, alongside the accumulation of the desired artificial microRNAs, additional small RNAs that originated from other regions of the amiRNA precursor were also accumulated at high frequency. Some of these had previously been found to be accumulated at low frequency in the products of ath-miR319a precursor processing and some of them were accompanied by 3'-tailing variant. Potential targets of the undesired small RNAs were discovered in petunia and other Solanaceae plants. The findings draw attention to the potential occurrence of undesired target silencing induced by such additional small RNAs when amiRNA technology is used. No appreciable production of secondary small RNAs occurred, despite the fact that amiRchs1 was designed to have perfect complementarity to its CHS-J target. This confirmed that perfect pairing between an amiRNA and its targets is not the trigger for secondary small RNA production. In conjunction with the observation that amiRNAs with perfect complementarity to their target genes show high efficiency and specificity in gene silencing, this finding has an important bearing on future applications of amiRNAs in gene

  8. Implication of microRNAs in the Pathogenesis of MDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Varney, Melinda; Starczynowski, Daniel T.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are significant regulators of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), and their deregulation contributes to hematological malignancies. Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) represent a spectrum of hematological disorders characterized by dysfunctional HSC, ineffective blood cell production, progressive marrow failure, and an increased risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Although miRNAs have been primarily studied in AML, only recently have similar studies been performed on MDS. In this review, we describe the normal function and expression of miRNAs in human HSC, and describe mounting evidence that deregulation of miRNAs contributes to the pathogenesis of MDS. PMID:22571695

  9. Long Non-coding RNAs in Response to Genotoxic Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoman Li; Dong Pan; Baoquan Zhao; Burong Hu

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs(lncRNAs) are increasingly involved in diverse biological processes.Upon DNA damage,the DNA damage response(DDR) elicits a complex signaling cascade,which includes the induction of lncRNAs.LncRNA-mediated DDR is involved in non-canonical and canonical manners.DNA-damage induced lncRNAs contribute to the regulation of cell cycle,apoptosis,and DNA repair,thereby playing a key role in maintaining genome stability.This review summarizes the emerging role of lncRNAs in DNA damage and repair.

  10. Long non-coding RNAs and mRNAs profiling during spleen development in pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Tiandong; Li, Diyan; Jin, Long; Fu, Yuhua; Liu, Yingkai; Liu, Pengliang; Wang, Yixin; Tang, Qianzi; Ma, Jideng; Wang, Xun; Jiang, Anan; Li, Xuewei; Li, Mingzhou

    2018-01-01

    Genome-wide transcriptomic studies in humans and mice have become extensive and mature. However, a comprehensive and systematic understanding of protein-coding genes and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) expressed during pig spleen development has not been achieved. LncRNAs are known to participate in regulatory networks for an array of biological processes. Here, we constructed 18 RNA libraries from developing fetal pig spleen (55 days before birth), postnatal pig spleens (0, 30, 180 days and 2 years after birth), and the samples from the 2-year-old Wild Boar. A total of 15,040 lncRNA transcripts were identified among these samples. We found that the temporal expression pattern of lncRNAs was more restricted than observed for protein-coding genes. Time-series analysis showed two large modules for protein-coding genes and lncRNAs. The up-regulated module was enriched for genes related to immune and inflammatory function, while the down-regulated module was enriched for cell proliferation processes such as cell division and DNA replication. Co-expression networks indicated the functional relatedness between protein-coding genes and lncRNAs, which were enriched for similar functions over the series of time points examined. We identified numerous differentially expressed protein-coding genes and lncRNAs in all five developmental stages. Notably, ceruloplasmin precursor (CP), a protein-coding gene participating in antioxidant and iron transport processes, was differentially expressed in all stages. This study provides the first catalog of the developing pig spleen, and contributes to a fuller understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning mammalian spleen development.

  11. Identifying MicroRNAs and Transcript Targets in Jatropha Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Vanessa; Guzman, Frank; de Oliveira, Luiz F. V.; Loss-Morais, Guilherme; Körbes, Ana P.; Silva, Sérgio D. A.; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia M. A. N.; Margis, Rogério

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs, or miRNAs, are endogenously encoded small RNAs that play a key role in diverse plant biological processes. Jatropha curcas L. has received significant attention as a potential oilseed crop for the production of renewable oil. Here, a sRNA library of mature seeds and three mRNA libraries from three different seed development stages were generated by deep sequencing to identify and characterize the miRNAs and pre-miRNAs of J. curcas. Computational analysis was used for the identification of 180 conserved miRNAs and 41 precursors (pre-miRNAs) as well as 16 novel pre-miRNAs. The predicted miRNA target genes are involved in a broad range of physiological functions, including cellular structure, nuclear function, translation, transport, hormone synthesis, defense, and lipid metabolism. Some pre-miRNA and miRNA targets vary in abundance between the three stages of seed development. A search for sequences that produce siRNA was performed, and the results indicated that J. curcas siRNAs play a role in nuclear functions, transport, catalytic processes and disease resistance. This study presents the first large scale identification of J. curcas miRNAs and their targets in mature seeds based on deep sequencing, and it contributes to a functional understanding of these miRNAs. PMID:24551031

  12. Rethinking the central dogma: noncoding RNAs are biologically relevant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Victoria L

    2009-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a large class of functional molecules with over 100 unique classes described to date. ncRNAs are diverse in terms of their function and size. A relatively new class of small ncRNA, called microRNAs (miRNA), have received a great deal of attention in the literature in recent years. miRNAs are endogenously encoded gene families that demonstrate striking evolutionary conservation. miRNAs serve essential and diverse physiological functions such as differentiation and development, proliferation, maintaining cell type phenotypes, and many others. The discovery and ongoing investigation of miRNAs is part of a revolution in biology that is changing the basic concepts of gene expression and RNA functionality. A single miRNA can participate in controlling the expression of up to several hundred protein-coding genes by interacting with mRNAs, generally in 3' untranslated regions. Our new and developing understanding of miRNAs, and other ncRNAs, promises to lead to significant contributions to medicine. Specifically, miRNAs are likely to serve as the basis for novel therapies and diagnostic tools.

  13. Expression Signatures of Long Noncoding RNAs in Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yang Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS, the most common pediatric spinal deformity, is considered a complex genetic disease. Causing genes and pathogenesis of AIS are still unclear. This study was designed to identify differentially expressed long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs involving the pathogenesis of AIS. Methods. We first performed comprehensive screening of lncRNA and mRNA in AIS patients and healthy children using Agilent human lncRNA + mRNA Array V3.0 microarray. LncRNAs expression in different AIS patients was further evaluated using quantitative PCR. Results. A total of 139 lncRNAs and 546 mRNAs were differentially expressed between AIS patients and healthy control. GO and Pathway analysis showed that these mRNAs might be involved in bone mineralization, neuromuscular junction, skeletal system morphogenesis, nucleotide and nucleic acid metabolism, and regulation of signal pathway. Four lncRNAs (ENST00000440778.1, ENST00000602322.1, ENST00000414894.1, and TCONS_00028768 were differentially expressed between different patients when grouped according to age, height, classification, severity of scoliosis, and Risser grade. Conclusions. This study demonstrates the abnormal expression of lncRNAs and mRNAs in AIS, and the expression of some lncRNAs was related to clinical features. This study is helpful for further understanding of lncRNAs in pathogenesis, treatment, and prognosis of AIS.

  14. Identification of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs involved in fatty acid biosynthesis in tree peony seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Dan-Dan; Li, Shan-Shan; Shu, Qing-Yan; Gu, Zhao-Yu; Wu, Qian; Feng, Cheng-Yong; Xu, Wen-Zhong; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2018-08-05

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) act as important molecular regulators in a wide range of biological processes during plant development and seed formation, including oil production. Tree peony seeds contain >90% unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) and high proportions of α-linolenic acid (ALA, > 40%). To dissect the non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) pathway involved in fatty acids synthesis in tree peony seeds, we construct six small RNA libraries and six transcriptome libraries from developing seeds of two cultivars (J and S) containing different content of fatty acid compositions. After deep sequencing the RNA libraries, the ncRNA expression profiles of tree peony seeds in two cultivars were systematically and comparatively analyzed. A total of 318 known and 153 new miRNAs and 22,430 lncRNAs were identified, among which 106 conserved and 9 novel miRNAs and 2785 lncRNAs were differentially expressed between the two cultivars. In addition, potential target genes of the microRNA and lncRNAs were also predicted and annotated. Among them, 9 miRNAs and 39 lncRNAs were predicted to target lipid related genes. Results showed that all of miR414, miR156b, miR2673b, miR7826, novel-m0027-5p, TR24651|c0_g1, TR24544|c0_g15, and TR27305|c0_g1 were up-regulated and expressed at a higher level in high-ALA cultivar J when compared to low-ALA cultivar S, suggesting that these ncRNAs and target genes are possibly involved in different fatty acid synthesis and lipid metabolism through post-transcriptional regulation. These results provide a better understanding of the roles of ncRNAs during fatty acid biosynthesis and metabolism in tree peony seeds. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. MicroRNAs as regulatory elements in psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, autoimmune, and complex genetic disorder that affects 23% of the European population. The symptoms of Psoriatic skin are inflammation, raised and scaly lesions. microRNA, which is short, nonprotein-coding, regulatory RNAs, plays critical roles in psoriasis. microRNA participates in nearly all biological processes, such as cell differentiation, development and metabolism. Recent researches reveal that multitudinous novel microRNAs have been identified in skin. Some of these substantial novel microRNAs play as a class of posttranscriptional gene regulator in skin disease, such as psoriasis. In order to insight into microRNAs biological functions and verify microRNAs biomarker, we review diverse references about characterization, profiling and subtype of microRNAs. Here we will share our opinions about how and which microRNAs are as regulatory in psoriasis.

  16. miRNAs in Normal and Malignant Hematopoiesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryutaro Kotaki

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Lineage specification is primarily regulated at the transcriptional level and lineage-specific transcription factors determine cell fates. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are 18–24 nucleotide-long non-coding RNAs that post-transcriptionally decrease the translation of target mRNAs and are essential for many cellular functions. miRNAs also regulate lineage specification during hematopoiesis. This review highlights the roles of miRNAs in B-cell development and malignancies, and discusses how miRNA expression profiles correlate with disease prognoses and phenotypes. We also discuss the potential for miRNAs as therapeutic targets and diagnostic tools for B-cell malignancies.

  17. Circular RNAs as Promising Biomarkers: A mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiah Abu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The interest in circular RNAs has resurfaced in the past few years. What was considered as junk for nearly two decades is now one of the most interesting molecules. Circular RNAs are non-coding RNAs that are formed by back-splicing events and have covalently closed loops with no poly-adenylated tails. The regulation of circular RNAs is distinctive and they are selectively abundant in different types of tissues. Based on the current knowledge of circular RNAs, these molecules have the potential to be the next big thing especially as biomarkers for different diseases. This mini-review attempts to concisely look at the biology of circular RNAs, the putative functional activities, the prevalence of circular RNAs, and the possible role of circular RNA as biomarkers for diagnosis or measuring drug response.

  18. Multiple Export Mechanisms for mRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaleau, Mildred; Borden, Katherine L. B.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear mRNA export plays an important role in gene expression. We describe the mechanisms of mRNA export including the importance of mRNP assembly, docking with the nuclear basket of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), transit through the central channel of the NPC and cytoplasmic release. We describe multiple mechanisms of mRNA export including NXF1 and CRM1 mediated pathways. Selective groups of mRNAs can be preferentially transported in order to respond to cellular stimuli. RNAs can be selected based on the presence of specific cis-acting RNA elements and binding of specific adaptor proteins. The role that dysregulation of this process plays in human disease is also discussed. PMID:26343730

  19. Melatonin, Noncoding RNAs, Messenger RNA Stability and Epigenetics—Evidence, Hints, Gaps and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Hardeland

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin is a highly pleiotropic regulator molecule, which influences numerous functions in almost every organ and, thus, up- or down-regulates many genes, frequently in a circadian manner. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling gene expression is actually now expanding to a previously unforeseen extent. In addition to classic actions of transcription factors, gene expression is induced, suppressed or modulated by a number of RNAs and proteins, such as miRNAs, lncRNAs, piRNAs, antisense transcripts, deadenylases, DNA methyltransferases, histone methylation complexes, histone demethylases, histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases. Direct or indirect evidence for involvement of melatonin in this network of players has originated in different fields, including studies on central and peripheral circadian oscillators, shift work, cancer, inflammation, oxidative stress, aging, energy expenditure/obesity, diabetes type 2, neuropsychiatric disorders, and neurogenesis. Some of the novel modulators have also been shown to participate in the control of melatonin biosynthesis and melatonin receptor expression. Future work will need to augment the body of evidence on direct epigenetic actions of melatonin and to systematically investigate its role within the network of oscillating epigenetic factors. Moreover, it will be necessary to discriminate between effects observed under conditions of well-operating and deregulated circadian clocks, and to explore the possibilities of correcting epigenetic malprogramming by melatonin.

  20. Melatonin, Noncoding RNAs, Messenger RNA Stability and Epigenetics—Evidence, Hints, Gaps and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardeland, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin is a highly pleiotropic regulator molecule, which influences numerous functions in almost every organ and, thus, up- or down-regulates many genes, frequently in a circadian manner. Our understanding of the mechanisms controlling gene expression is actually now expanding to a previously unforeseen extent. In addition to classic actions of transcription factors, gene expression is induced, suppressed or modulated by a number of RNAs and proteins, such as miRNAs, lncRNAs, piRNAs, antisense transcripts, deadenylases, DNA methyltransferases, histone methylation complexes, histone demethylases, histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases. Direct or indirect evidence for involvement of melatonin in this network of players has originated in different fields, including studies on central and peripheral circadian oscillators, shift work, cancer, inflammation, oxidative stress, aging, energy expenditure/obesity, diabetes type 2, neuropsychiatric disorders, and neurogenesis. Some of the novel modulators have also been shown to participate in the control of melatonin biosynthesis and melatonin receptor expression. Future work will need to augment the body of evidence on direct epigenetic actions of melatonin and to systematically investigate its role within the network of oscillating epigenetic factors. Moreover, it will be necessary to discriminate between effects observed under conditions of well-operating and deregulated circadian clocks, and to explore the possibilities of correcting epigenetic malprogramming by melatonin. PMID:25310649

  1. NATpipe: an integrative pipeline for systematical discovery of natural antisense transcripts (NATs) and phase-distributed nat-siRNAs from de novo assembled transcriptomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dongliang; Meng, Yijun; Zuo, Ziwei; Xue, Jie; Wang, Huizhong

    2016-01-01

    Nat-siRNAs (small interfering RNAs originated from natural antisense transcripts) are a class of functional small RNA (sRNA) species discovered in both plants and animals. These siRNAs are highly enriched within the annealed regions of the NAT (natural antisense transcript) pairs. To date, great research efforts have been taken for systematical identification of the NATs in various organisms. However, developing a freely available and easy-to-use program for NAT prediction is strongly demanded by researchers. Here, we proposed an integrative pipeline named NATpipe for systematical discovery of NATs from de novo assembled transcriptomes. By utilizing sRNA sequencing data, the pipeline also allowed users to search for phase-distributed nat-siRNAs within the perfectly annealed regions of the NAT pairs. Additionally, more reliable nat-siRNA loci could be identified based on degradome sequencing data. A case study on the non-model plant Dendrobium officinale was performed to illustrate the utility of NATpipe. Finally, we hope that NATpipe would be a useful tool for NAT prediction, nat-siRNA discovery, and related functional studies. NATpipe is available at www.bioinfolab.cn/NATpipe/NATpipe.zip. PMID:26858106

  2. From structure prediction to genomic screens for novel non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gorodkin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are receiving more and more attention not only as an abundant class of genes, but also as regulatory structural elements (some located in mRNAs. A key feature of RNA function is its structure. Computational methods were developed early for folding and prediction of RNA structure with the aim of assisting in functional analysis. With the discovery of more and more ncRNAs, it has become clear that a large fraction of these are highly structured. Interestingly, a large part of the structure is comprised of regular Watson-Crick and GU wobble base pairs. This and the increased amount of available genomes have made it possible to employ structure-based methods for genomic screens. The field has moved from folding prediction of single sequences to computational screens for ncRNAs in genomic sequence using the RNA structure as the main characteristic feature. Whereas early methods focused on energy-directed folding of single sequences, comparative analysis based on structure preserving changes of base pairs has been efficient in improving accuracy, and today this constitutes a key component in genomic screens. Here, we cover the basic principles of RNA folding and touch upon some of the concepts in current methods that have been applied in genomic screens for de novo RNA structures in searches for novel ncRNA genes and regulatory RNA structure on mRNAs. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different strategies and how they can complement each other.

  3. DeepBase: annotation and discovery of microRNAs and other noncoding RNAs from deep-sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput deep-sequencing technology have produced large numbers of short and long RNA sequences and enabled the detection and profiling of known and novel microRNAs (miRNAs) and other noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) at unprecedented sensitivity and depth. In this chapter, we describe the use of deepBase, a database that we have developed to integrate all public deep-sequencing data and to facilitate the comprehensive annotation and discovery of miRNAs and other ncRNAs from these data. deepBase provides an integrative, interactive, and versatile web graphical interface to evaluate miRBase-annotated miRNA genes and other known ncRNAs, explores the expression patterns of miRNAs and other ncRNAs, and discovers novel miRNAs and other ncRNAs from deep-sequencing data. deepBase also provides a deepView genome browser to comparatively analyze these data at multiple levels. deepBase is available at http://deepbase.sysu.edu.cn/.

  4. The Roles of Two miRNAs in Regulating the Immune Response of Sea Cucumber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengjuan; Li, Chenghua; Zhang, Ran; Zhang, Weiwei; Jin, Chunhua; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2015-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key regulators in many pathological processes by suppressing the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of target genes. MiR-2008 was previously found to be significantly up-regulated in diseased sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus by high-through sequencing, whereas the reads of miR-137, a well-documented tumor repressor, displayed no significant change. In the present study, we found that miR-137 expression was slightly attenuated and miR-2008 was significantly enhanced after Vibrio splendidus infection or Lipopolysaccharides application. Further target screening and dual-luciferase reporter assay revealed that the two important miRNAs shared a common target gene of betaine-homocysteine S-methyltransferase (AjBHMT), which exhibited noncorrelated messenger RNA and protein expression patterns after bacterial challenge. In order to fully understand their regulatory mechanisms, we conducted the functional experiments in vitro and in vivo. The overexpression of miR-137 in sea cucumber or primary coelomocytes significantly decreased, whereas the inhibition of miR-137 increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of AjBHMT. In contrast, miR-2008 overexpression and inhibition showed no effect on AjBHMT mRNA levels, but the concentration of AjBHMT protein displayed significant changes both in vitro and in vivo. Consistently, the homocysteine (Hcy) contents were also accordingly altered in the aberrant expression analysis of both miRNAs, consistent with the results of the AjBHMT silencing assay in vitro and in vivo. More importantly, small interfering RNA mediated AjBHMT knockdown and Hcy exposure analyses both significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased the number of surviving invasive pathogen in sea cucumber coelomocytes. Taken together, these findings confirmed the differential roles of sea cucumber miR-137 and miR-2008 in regulating the common target AjBHMT to promote ROS production

  5. A 6-Nucleotide Regulatory Motif within the AbcR Small RNAs of Brucella abortus Mediates Host-Pathogen Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Lauren M; Caswell, Clayton C

    2017-06-06

    In Brucella abortus , two small RNAs (sRNAs), AbcR1 and AbcR2, are responsible for regulating transcripts encoding ABC-type transport systems. AbcR1 and AbcR2 are required for Brucella virulence, as a double chromosomal deletion of both sRNAs results in attenuation in mice. Although these sRNAs are responsible for targeting transcripts for degradation, the mechanism utilized by the AbcR sRNAs to regulate mRNA in Brucella has not been described. Here, two motifs (M1 and M2) were identified in AbcR1 and AbcR2, and complementary motif sequences were defined in AbcR-regulated transcripts. Site-directed mutagenesis of M1 or M2 or of both M1 and M2 in the sRNAs revealed transcripts to be targeted by one or both motifs. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed direct, concentration-dependent binding of both AbcR sRNAs to a target mRNA sequence. These experiments genetically and biochemically characterized two indispensable motifs within the AbcR sRNAs that bind to and regulate transcripts. Additionally, cellular and animal models of infection demonstrated that only M2 in the AbcR sRNAs is required for Brucella virulence. Furthermore, one of the M2-regulated targets, BAB2_0612, was found to be critical for the virulence of B. abortus in a mouse model of infection. Although these sRNAs are highly conserved among Alphaproteobacteria , the present report displays how gene regulation mediated by the AbcR sRNAs has diverged to meet the intricate regulatory requirements of each particular organism and its unique biological niche. IMPORTANCE Small RNAs (sRNAs) are important components of bacterial regulation, allowing organisms to quickly adapt to changes in their environments. The AbcR sRNAs are highly conserved throughout the Alphaproteobacteria and negatively regulate myriad transcripts, many encoding ABC-type transport systems. In Brucella abortus , AbcR1 and AbcR2 are functionally redundant, as only a double abcR1 abcR2 ( abcR1 / 2 ) deletion results in attenuation in

  6. Mirnovo: genome-free prediction of microRNAs from small RNA sequencing data and single-cells using decision forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitsios, Dimitrios M; Kentepozidou, Elissavet; Quintais, Leonor; Benito-Gutiérrez, Elia; van Dongen, Stijn; Davis, Matthew P; Enright, Anton J

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) remains an important problem, particularly given the growth of high-throughput sequencing, cell sorting and single cell biology. While a large number of miRNAs have already been annotated, there may well be large numbers of miRNAs that are expressed in very particular cell types and remain elusive. Sequencing allows us to quickly and accurately identify the expression of known miRNAs from small RNA-Seq data. The biogenesis of miRNAs leads to very specific characteristics observed in their sequences. In brief, miRNAs usually have a well-defined 5' end and a more flexible 3' end with the possibility of 3' tailing events, such as uridylation. Previous approaches to the prediction of novel miRNAs usually involve the analysis of structural features of miRNA precursor hairpin sequences obtained from genome sequence. We surmised that it may be possible to identify miRNAs by using these biogenesis features observed directly from sequenced reads, solely or in addition to structural analysis from genome data. To this end, we have developed mirnovo, a machine learning based algorithm, which is able to identify known and novel miRNAs in animals and plants directly from small RNA-Seq data, with or without a reference genome. This method performs comparably to existing tools, however is simpler to use with reduced run time. Its performance and accuracy has been tested on multiple datasets, including species with poorly assembled genomes, RNaseIII (Drosha and/or Dicer) deficient samples and single cells (at both embryonic and adult stage). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Unusually effective microRNA targeting within repeat-rich coding regions of mammalian mRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnall-Levin, Michael; Rissland, Olivia S.; Johnston, Wendy K.; Perrimon, Norbert; Bartel, David P.; Berger, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate numerous biological processes by base-pairing with target messenger RNAs (mRNAs), primarily through sites in 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), to direct the repression of these targets. Although miRNAs have sometimes been observed to target genes through sites in open reading frames (ORFs), large-scale studies have shown such targeting to be generally less effective than 3′ UTR targeting. Here, we show that several miRNAs each target significant groups of genes through multiple sites within their coding regions. This ORF targeting, which mediates both predictable and effective repression, arises from highly repeated sequences containing miRNA target sites. We show that such sequence repeats largely arise through evolutionary duplications and occur particularly frequently within families of paralogous C2H2 zinc-finger genes, suggesting the potential for their coordinated regulation. Examples of ORFs targeted by miR-181 include both the well-known tumor suppressor RB1 and RBAK, encoding a C2H2 zinc-finger protein and transcriptional binding partner of RB1. Our results indicate a function for repeat-rich coding sequences in mediating post-transcriptional regulation and reveal circumstances in which miRNA-mediated repression through ORF sites can be reliably predicted. PMID:21685129

  8. Sensitive and long-term monitoring of intracellular microRNAs using a non-integrating cytoplasmic RNA vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Masayuki; Ohtaka, Manami; Iijima, Minoru; Nakasu, Asako; Kato, Yoshio; Nakanishi, Mahito

    2017-10-04

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that modulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Different types of cells express unique sets of miRNAs that can be exploited as potential molecular markers to identify specific cell types. Among the variety of miRNA detection methods, a fluorescence-based imaging system that utilises a fluorescent-reporter gene regulated by a target miRNA offers a major advantage for long-term tracking of the miRNA in living cells. In this study, we developed a novel fluorescence-based miRNA-monitoring system using a non-integrating cytoplasmic RNA vector based on a replication-defective and persistent Sendai virus (SeVdp). Because SeVdp vectors robustly and stably express transgenes, this system enabled sensitive monitoring of miRNAs by fluorescence microscopy. By applying this system for cellular reprogramming, we found that miR-124, but not miR-9, was significantly upregulated during direct neuronal conversion. Additionally, we were able to isolate integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells by long-term tracking of let-7 expression. Notably, this system was easily expandable to allow detection of multiple miRNAs separately and simultaneously. Our findings provide insight into a powerful tool for evaluating miRNA expression during the cellular reprogramming process and for isolating reprogrammed cells potentially useful for medical applications.

  9. Isolation and Identification of miRNAs in Jatropha curcas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun Ming; Liu, Peng; Sun, Fei; Li, Lei; Liu, Peng; Ye, Jian; Yue, Gen Hua

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play crucial regulatory roles by targeting mRNAs for silencing. To identify miRNAs in Jatropha curcas L, a bioenergy crop, cDNA clones from two small RNA libraries of leaves and seeds were sequenced and analyzed using bioinformatic tools. Fifty-two putative miRNAs were found from the two libraries, among them six were identical to known miRNAs and 46 were novel. Differential expression patterns of 15 miRNAs in root, stem, leave, fruit and seed were detected using quantitative real-time PCR. Ten miRNAs were highly expressed in fruit or seed, implying that they may be involved in seed development or fatty acids synthesis in seed. Moreover, 28 targets of the isolated miRNAs were predicted from a jatropha cDNA library database. The miRNA target genes were predicted to encode a broad range of proteins. Sixteen targets had clear BLASTX hits to the Uniprot database and were associated with genes belonging to the three major gene ontology categories of biological process, cellular component, and molecular function. Four targets were identified for JcumiR004. By silencing JcumiR004 primary miRNA, expressions of the four target genes were up-regulated and oil composition were modulated significantly, indicating diverse functions of JcumiR004. PMID:22419887

  10. Regulatory Role of Small Nucleolar RNAs in Human Diseases

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    Grigory A. Stepanov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs are appreciable players in gene expression regulation in human cells. The canonical function of box C/D and box H/ACA snoRNAs is posttranscriptional modification of ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs, namely, 2′-O-methylation and pseudouridylation, respectively. A series of independent studies demonstrated that snoRNAs, as well as other noncoding RNAs, serve as the source of various short regulatory RNAs. Some snoRNAs and their fragments can also participate in the regulation of alternative splicing and posttranscriptional modification of mRNA. Alterations in snoRNA expression in human cells can affect numerous vital cellular processes. SnoRNA level in human cells, blood serum, and plasma presents a promising target for diagnostics and treatment of human pathologies. Here we discuss the relation between snoRNAs and oncological, neurodegenerative, and viral diseases and also describe changes in snoRNA level in response to artificial stress and some drugs.

  11. Identification of microRNA-like RNAs in Ophiocordyceps sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Li, Xiaona; Ma, Lina; Urrehman, Uzair; Bao, Xilinqiqige; Zhang, Yujing; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Hou, Dongxia; Zhou, Zhen

    2018-03-27

    Ophiocordyceps sinensis is well known as a traditional Chinese medicine and has widely been used for over 2,000 years to stimulate immune system, decrease blood pressure and to inhibit tumor growth. While miRNAs are increasingly recognized for their roles in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in animals and plants, miRNAs in fungi were less studied until the discovery of microRNA-like RNA (milRNA). High-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics approaches were used to identify conserved and novel milRNAs in O. sinensis. 40 conserved milRNAs were identified, while 23 pre-miRNA candidates encoding 31 novel milRNAs were predicted. Furthermore, the potential target genes of milRNAs in human were predicted and gene ontology analysis was applied to these genes. Enrichment analysis of GO-represented biological process showed that target genes of both conserved and novel milRNAs are involved in development, metabolic and immune processes, indicating the potential roles of milRNAs of O. sinensis in pharmacological effects as health food and traditional Chinese medicine. This study is the first report on genome-wide analysis of milRNAs in O. sinensis and it provides a useful resource to further study the potential roles of milRNAs as active components of O. sinensis in health food or traditional Chinese medicine.

  12. LncRNAs in vertebrates: advances and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallory, Allison C; Shkumatava, Alena

    2015-10-01

    Beyond the handful of classic and well-characterized long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), more recently, hundreds of thousands of lncRNAs have been identified in multiple species including bacteria, plants and vertebrates, and the number of newly annotated lncRNAs continues to increase as more transcriptomes are analyzed. In vertebrates, the expression of many lncRNAs is highly regulated, displaying discrete temporal and spatial expression patterns, suggesting roles in a wide range of developmental processes and setting them apart from classic housekeeping ncRNAs. In addition, the deregulation of a subset of these lncRNAs has been linked to the development of several diseases, including cancers, as well as developmental anomalies. However, the majority of vertebrate lncRNA functions remain enigmatic. As such, a major task at hand is to decipher the biological roles of lncRNAs and uncover the regulatory networks upon which they impinge. This review focuses on our emerging understanding of lncRNAs in vertebrate animals, highlighting some recent advances in their functional analyses across several species and emphasizing the current challenges researchers face to characterize lncRNAs and identify their in vivo functions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. The interplay between noncoding RNAs and insulin in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yan; Xu, Jia; Du, Xiao; Fu, Xianghui

    2018-04-10

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs), including microRNAs, long noncoding RNAs and circular RNAs, regulate various biological processes and are involved in the initiation and progression of human diseases. Insulin, a predominant hormone secreted from pancreatic β cells, is an essential factor in regulation of systemic metabolism through multifunctional insulin signaling. Insulin production and action are tightly controlled. Dysregulations of insulin production and action can impair metabolic homeostasis, and eventually lead to the development of multiple metabolic diseases, especially diabetes. Accumulating data indicates that ncRNAs modulate β cell mass, insulin synthesis, secretion and signaling, and their role in diabetes is dramatically emerging. This review summarizes our current knowledge of ncRNAs as regulators of insulin, with particular emphasis on the implications of this interplay in the development of diabetes. We outline the role of ncRNAs in pancreatic β cell mass and function, which is critical for insulin production and secretion. We also highlight the involvement of ncRNAs in insulin signaling in peripheral tissues including liver, muscle and adipose, and discuss ncRNA-mediated inter-organ crosstalk under diabetic conditions. A more in-depth understanding of the interplay between ncRNAs and insulin may afford valuable insights and novel therapeutic strategies for treatment of diabetes, as well as other human diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Roles of MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Ryou-u; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a large family of small, approximately 20–22 nucleotide, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of target genes, mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating lines of evidence have indicated that miRNAs play important roles in the maintenance of biological homeostasis and that aberrant expression levels of miRNAs are associated with the onset of many diseases, including cancer. In various cancers, miRNAs play important roles in tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis. Recent studies reported that miRNAs could also be secreted via small endosome-derived vesicles called exosomes, which are derived from multiple cell types, including dendritic cells, lymphocytes, and tumor cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication and have been investigated as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the major findings related to the functions of miRNAs in breast cancer, which is the most frequent cancer in women, and discuss the potential clinical uses of miRNAs, including their roles as therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers

  15. Cerebellar neurodegeneration in the absence of microRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Anne; O'Carroll, Dónal; Tan, Chan Lek; Hillman, Dean; Sugimori, Mutsuyuki; Llinas, Rodolfo; Greengard, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Genome-encoded microRNAs (miRNAs) are potent regulators of gene expression. The significance of miRNAs in various biological processes has been suggested by studies showing an important role of these small RNAs in regulation of cell differentiation. However, the role of miRNAs in regulation of differentiated cell physiology is not well established. Mature neurons express a large number of distinct miRNAs, but the role of miRNAs in postmitotic neurons has not been examined. Here, we provide evidence for an essential role of miRNAs in survival of differentiated neurons. We show that conditional Purkinje cell–specific ablation of the key miRNA-generating enzyme Dicer leads to Purkinje cell death. Deficiency in Dicer is associated with progressive loss of miRNAs, followed by cerebellar degeneration and development of ataxia. The progressive neurodegeneration in the absence of Dicer raises the possibility of an involvement of miRNAs in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:17606634

  16. The Roles of MicroRNAs in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Ryou-u [Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Miyazaki, Hiroaki [Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Showa University School of Dentistry, 1-5-8 Hatanodai Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 142-8555 (Japan); Ochiya, Takahiro, E-mail: tochiya@ncc.go.jp [Division of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, National Cancer Center Research Institute 1-1, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2015-04-09

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a large family of small, approximately 20–22 nucleotide, non-coding RNAs that regulate the expression of target genes, mainly at the post-transcriptional level. Accumulating lines of evidence have indicated that miRNAs play important roles in the maintenance of biological homeostasis and that aberrant expression levels of miRNAs are associated with the onset of many diseases, including cancer. In various cancers, miRNAs play important roles in tumor initiation, drug resistance and metastasis. Recent studies reported that miRNAs could also be secreted via small endosome-derived vesicles called exosomes, which are derived from multiple cell types, including dendritic cells, lymphocytes, and tumor cells. Exosomal miRNAs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication and have been investigated as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the major findings related to the functions of miRNAs in breast cancer, which is the most frequent cancer in women, and discuss the potential clinical uses of miRNAs, including their roles as therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers.

  17. First Evidence for the Disease-Stage, Cell-Type, and Virus Specificity of microRNAs during Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Fowler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The potential involvement of host microRNAs (miRNAs in HIV infection is well documented, and evidence suggests that HIV modulates and also dysregulates host miRNAs involved in maintaining the host innate immune system. Moreover, the dysregulation of host miRNAs by HIV also effectively interferes directly with the host gene expression. In this study, we have simultaneously evaluated the expression of host miRNAs in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells derived from HIV-positive (HIV+ individuals (viremic and aviremic individuals while receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART, therapy-naïve long-term non-progressors (LTNP, and HIV-negative (HIV– healthy controls. miRNAs were run on Affymetrix V2 chips, and the differential expression between HIV+ and HIV− samples, along with intergroup comparisons, was derived using PARTEK software, using an FDR of 5% and an adjusted p-value < 0.05. The miR-199a-5p was found to be HIV-specific and expressed in all HIV+ groups as opposed to HIV– controls. Moreover, these are the first studies to reveal clearly the highly discriminatory miRNAs at the level of the disease state, cell type, and HIV-specific miRNAs.

  18. A Rapid Screen for Host-Encoded miRNAs with Inhibitory Effects against Ebola Virus Using a Transcription- and Replication-Competent Virus-Like Particle System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongyi Wang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs may become efficient antiviral agents against the Ebola virus (EBOV targeting viral genomic RNAs or transcripts. We previously conducted a genome-wide search for differentially expressed miRNAs during viral replication and transcription. In this study, we established a rapid screen for miRNAs with inhibitory effects against EBOV using a tetracistronic transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particle (trVLP system. This system uses a minigenome comprising an EBOV leader region, luciferase reporter, VP40, GP, VP24, EBOV trailer region, and three noncoding regions from the EBOV genome and can be used to model the life cycle of EBOV under biosafety level (BSL 2 conditions. Informatic analysis was performed to select up-regulated miRNAs targeting the coding regions of the minigenome with the highest binding energy to perform inhibitory effect screening. Among these miRNAs, miR-150-3p had the most significant inhibitory effect. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, Western blot, and double fluorescence reporter experiments demonstrated that miR-150-3p inhibited the reproduction of trVLPs via the regulation of GP and VP40 expression by directly targeting the coding regions of GP and VP40. This novel, rapid, and convenient screening method will efficiently facilitate the exploration of miRNAs against EBOV under BSL-2 conditions.

  19. MicroRNAs in Obesity, Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Meiliana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small regulatory RNAs that play important roles in development of diseases. Several studies have provided evidences showing that miRNAs affect pathways that are fundamental for metabolic control in adipocyte and skeletal muscle differentiations. Some miRNAs have been implicated in lipid, amino acid, and glucose homeostasis. This leads to the possibility that miRNAs may contribute to common metabolic diseases and point to novel therapeutic opportunities based on targeting of miRNAs. CONTENT: miRNAs have been recognized as a class of epigenetic regulators of metabolism and energy homeostasis, primarily because the simultaneous regulation of a large number of target genes can be accomplished by a single miRNA. Emerging evidences suggest that miRNAs play a key role in the pathological development of obesity by affecting adipocyte differentiation. miRNAs have been implicated as novel protagonists in the pathogenesis of Diabetes Mellitus (DM, regulation of insulin production, secretion and action. They also appear to play a role in the development of diabetic complications such as nephropathy and cardiac hypertrophy. SUMMARY: Involvement of miRNAs in glucose and lipid metabolism has provided strong evidences to confirm their roles as key players in regulation of complex metabolic pathways. Additionally, it indicates potential outlook for novel therapeutic strategies in the management of obesity, metabolic syndrome and DM. Further research in this field is needed to ascertain the full potential of miRNAs as novel metabolic biomarkers and potent therapeutic agents against obesity and its metabolic disorders. KEYWORDS: obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, miRNAs, adipogenesis, insulin, pancreatic cells.

  20. Small Interfering RNA Pathway Modulates Initial Viral Infection in Midgut Epithelium of Insect after Ingestion of Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hanhong; Chen, Hongyan; Liu, Yuyan; Jiang, Chaoyang; Mao, Qianzhuo; Jia, Dongsheng; Chen, Qian; Wei, Taiyun

    2016-01-15

    incompetent vector, the small brown planthopper (SBPH). Here, we show that silencing of the core component Dicer-2 of the small interfering RNA (siRNA) pathway increases viral titers in the midgut epithelium past the threshold (1.99 × 10(9) copies of the SRBSDV P10 gene/μg of midgut RNA) for viral dissemination into the midgut muscles and then into the salivary glands, allowing the SBPH to become a competent vector of SRBSDV. This result is the first evidence that the siRNA antiviral pathway has a direct role in the control of viral dissemination from the midgut epithelium and that it affects the competence of the virus's vector. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Heterophilic antibodies interfering with radioimmunoassay. A false-positive pregnancy test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladutiu, A.O.; Sulewski, J.M.; Pudlak, K.A.; Stull, C.G.

    1982-11-19

    A young woman with amenorrhea had a consistently positive pregnancy test result (serum radioimmunoassay measurement of ..beta..-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). No fetal or placental tissue was found after uterine curettage and exploratory laparotomy. The false-positive pregnancy test result was due to heterophilic antibovine and antigoat antibodies in the patient's serum. These antibodies interfered with radioimmunoassays using goat antibodies. This case shows that serum heterophilic antibodies can interfere with immunoassays and result in unnecessary diagnostic procedures and/or unnecessary treatment.

  2. Heterophilic antibodies interfering with radioimmunoassay. A false-positive pregnancy test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vladutiu, A.O.; Sulewski, J.M.; Pudlak, K.A.; Stull, C.G.

    1982-01-01

    A young woman with amenorrhea had a consistently positive pregnancy test result (serum radioimmunoassay measurement of #betta#-human chorionic gonadotropin hormone). No fetal or placental tissue was found after uterine curettage and exploratory laparotomy. The false-positive pregnancy test result was due to heterophilic antibovine and antigoat antibodies in the patient's serum. These antibodies interfered with radioimmunoassays using goat antibodies. This case shows that serum heterophilic antibodies can interfere with immunoassays and result in unnecessary diagnostic procedures and/or unnecessary treatment

  3. Interfície gràfica per WPKG - distribució de programari

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Morant, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Interfície gràfica per a la gestió del programari de lliure accés per a la distribució de programari WPKG (wpkg.org). Arquitectura MVC en un entorn J2EE6 utilitzant JSF2, JPA2 i EJB 3.1. Interfaz gráfica para la gestión del software de libre acceso para la distribución de software WPKG (wpkg.org). Arquitectura MVC en un entorno J2EE6 utilizando JSF2, JPA2 y EJB 3.1.

  4. Competition at the Wireless Sensor Network MAC Layer: Low Power Probing interfering with X-MAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacharias, Sven; Newe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) combine sensors with computer networks and enable very dense, in-situ and live measurements of data over a large area. Since this emerging technology has the potential to be embedded almost everywhere for numberless applications, interference between different networks can become a serious issue. For most WSNs, it is assumed today that the network medium access is non-competitive. On the basis of X-MAC interfered by Low Power Probing, this paper shows the danger and the effects of different sensor networks communicating on a single wireless channel of the 2.4 GHz band, which is used by the IEEE 802.15.4 standard.

  5. Competition at the Wireless Sensor Network MAC Layer: Low Power Probing interfering with X-MAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zacharias, Sven; Newe, Thomas, E-mail: Sven.Zacharias@ul.ie [University of Limerick (Ireland)

    2011-08-17

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) combine sensors with computer networks and enable very dense, in-situ and live measurements of data over a large area. Since this emerging technology has the potential to be embedded almost everywhere for numberless applications, interference between different networks can become a serious issue. For most WSNs, it is assumed today that the network medium access is non-competitive. On the basis of X-MAC interfered by Low Power Probing, this paper shows the danger and the effects of different sensor networks communicating on a single wireless channel of the 2.4 GHz band, which is used by the IEEE 802.15.4 standard.

  6. Experimental quantum teleportation and multiphoton entanglement via interfering narrowband photon sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jian; Zhang Han; Peng Chengzhi; Chen Zengbing; Bao Xiaohui; Chen Shuai; Pan Jianwei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report a realization of synchronization-free quantum teleportation and narrowband three-photon entanglement through interfering narrowband photon sources. Since both the single-photon and the entangled photon pair utilized are completely autonomous, it removes the requirement of high-demanding synchronization techniques in long-distance quantum communication with pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversion sources. The frequency linewidth of the three-photon entanglement realized is on the order of several MHz, which matches the requirement of atomic ensemble based quantum memories. Such a narrowband multiphoton source will have applications in some advanced quantum communication protocols and linear optical quantum computation.

  7. Competition at the Wireless Sensor Network MAC Layer: Low Power Probing interfering with X-MAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Sven; Newe, Thomas

    2011-08-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) combine sensors with computer networks and enable very dense, in-situ and live measurements of data over a large area. Since this emerging technology has the potential to be embedded almost everywhere for numberless applications, interference between different networks can become a serious issue. For most WSNs, it is assumed today that the network medium access is non-competitive. On the basis of X-MAC interfered by Low Power Probing, this paper shows the danger and the effects of different sensor networks communicating on a single wireless channel of the 2.4 GHz band, which is used by the IEEE 802.15.4 standard.

  8. R-matrix study of ionization in barium via two-photon interfering routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, M.; Luc-Koenig, E.; Lecomte, J. M.; Millet, M.; Lyras, A.

    2000-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of part of the experimental data reported by Wang, Chen and Elliott [1,3] who studied in barium coherent control through two-color resonant interfering paths is reported. Dynamics of the two-color photoionization process, described as an adiabatic process in the rotating wave approximation, is governed by the coherent excitation of the 6s6p and 6s7p 1 P 1 intermediate states. Interference effects are found to play a minor role. The required atomic parameters are obtained from a theoretical approach based on a combination of jj-coupled eigenchannel R-matrix and Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory

  9. Interferência por RNA: uma nova alternativa para terapia nas doenças reumáticas RNA interference: a new alternative for rheumatic diseases therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Regine de França

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A interferência por RNA (RNAi é um mecanismo de silenciamento gênico pós-transcricional conservado durante a evolução. Esse mecanismo, recentemente descrito, é mediado por pequenos RNAs de fita dupla (dsRNAs capazes de reconhecer especificamente uma sequência de mRNA-alvo e mediar sua clivagem ou repressão traducional. O emprego da RNAi como uma ferramenta de terapia gênica tem sido muito estudado, especialmente em infecções virais, câncer, desordens genéticas herdadas, doenças cardiovasculares e mesmo em doenças reumáticas. Aliados aos dados do genoma humano, os conhecimentos do silenciamento gênico mediado por RNAi podem permitir a determinação funcional de praticamente qualquer gene expresso em uma célula e sua implicação para o funcionamento e homeostase celular. Vários estudos terapêuticos in vitro e in vivo em modelos de doenças autoimunes vêm sendo realizados com resultados encorajadores. As vias de quebra de tolerância e inflamação são alvos potenciais para terapia com RNAi em doenças inflamatórias e autoimunes. Nesta revisão vamos recordar os princípios básicos da RNAi e discutir os aspectos que levaram ao desenvolvimento de propostas terapêuticas baseadas em RNAi, começando pelos estudos in vitro de desenvolvimento de ferramentas e identificação de alvos, chegando até os estudos pré-clínicos de disponibilização da droga in vivo, e testes em células humanas e modelos animais de doenças autoimunes. Por fim, vamos revisar os últimos avanços da experiência clínica da terapia com RNAiRNA interference (RNAi is a post-transcriptional gene silencing mechanism preserved during evolution. This mechanism, recently described, is mediated by small double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs that can specifically recognize a target mRNA sequence and mediate its cleavage or translational repression. The use of RNAi as a tool for gene therapy has been extensively studied, especially in viral infections, cancer

  10. Structural and Functional Motifs in Influenza Virus RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Ferhadian

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses (IAV are responsible for recurrent influenza epidemics and occasional devastating pandemics in humans and animals. They belong to the Orthomyxoviridae family and their genome consists of eight (- sense viral RNA (vRNA segments of different lengths coding for at least 11 viral proteins. A heterotrimeric polymerase complex is bound to the promoter consisting of the 13 5′-terminal and 12 3′-terminal nucleotides of each vRNA, while internal parts of the vRNAs are associated with multiple copies of the viral nucleoprotein (NP, thus forming ribonucleoproteins (vRNP. Transcription and replication of vRNAs result in viral mRNAs (vmRNAs and complementary RNAs (cRNAs, respectively. Complementary RNAs are the exact positive copies of vRNAs; they also form ribonucleoproteins (cRNPs and are intermediate templates in the vRNA amplification process. On the contrary, vmRNAs have a 5′ cap snatched from cellular mRNAs and a 3′ polyA tail, both gained by the viral polymerase complex. Hence, unlike vRNAs and cRNAs, vmRNAs do not have a terminal promoter able to recruit the viral polymerase. Furthermore, synthesis of at least two viral proteins requires vmRNA splicing. Except for extensive analysis of the viral promoter structure and function and a few, mostly bioinformatics, studies addressing the vRNA and vmRNA structure, structural studies of the influenza A vRNAs, cRNAs, and vmRNAs are still in their infancy. The recent crystal structures of the influenza polymerase heterotrimeric complex drastically improved our understanding of the replication and transcription processes. The vRNA structure has been mainly studied in vitro using RNA probing, but its structure has been very recently studied within native vRNPs using crosslinking and RNA probing coupled to next generation RNA sequencing. Concerning vmRNAs, most studies focused on the segment M and NS splice sites and several structures initially predicted by bioinformatics analysis

  11. EVLncRNAs: a manually curated database for long non-coding RNAs validated by low-throughput experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huiying; Yu, Jiafeng; Guo, Chengang; Dou, Xianghua; Song, Feng; Hu, Guodong; Cao, Zanxia; Qu, Yuanxu

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important functional roles in various biological processes. Early databases were utilized to deposit all lncRNA candidates produced by high-throughput experimental and/or computational techniques to facilitate classification, assessment and validation. As more lncRNAs are validated by low-throughput experiments, several databases were established for experimentally validated lncRNAs. However, these databases are small in scale (with a few hundreds of lncRNAs only) and specific in their focuses (plants, diseases or interactions). Thus, it is highly desirable to have a comprehensive dataset for experimentally validated lncRNAs as a central repository for all of their structures, functions and phenotypes. Here, we established EVLncRNAs by curating lncRNAs validated by low-throughput experiments (up to 1 May 2016) and integrating specific databases (lncRNAdb, LncRANDisease, Lnc2Cancer and PLNIncRBase) with additional functional and disease-specific information not covered previously. The current version of EVLncRNAs contains 1543 lncRNAs from 77 species that is 2.9 times larger than the current largest database for experimentally validated lncRNAs. Seventy-four percent lncRNA entries are partially or completely new, comparing to all existing experimentally validated databases. The established database allows users to browse, search and download as well as to submit experimentally validated lncRNAs. The database is available at http://biophy.dzu.edu.cn/EVLncRNAs. PMID:28985416

  12. MicroRNAs Expression Profiles in Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Bronze-da-Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The current search for new markers of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs is explained by the high morbidity and mortality still observed in developed and developing countries due to cardiovascular events. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs have emerged as potential new biomarkers and are small sequences of RNAs that regulate gene expression at posttranscriptional level by inhibiting translation or inducing degradation of the target mRNAs. Circulating miRNAs are involved in the regulation of signaling pathways associated to aging and can be used as novel diagnostic markers for acute and chronic diseases such as cardiovascular pathologies. This review summarizes the biogenesis, maturation, and stability of miRNAs and their use as potential biomarkers for coronary artery disease (CAD, myocardial infarction (MI, and heart failure (HF.

  13. Identification of phasiRNAs in wild rice (Oryza rufipogon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Fan, Longjiang

    2013-08-01

    Plant miRNAs can trigger the production of phased, secondary siRNAs from either non-coding or protein-coding genes. In this study, at least 864 and 3,961 loci generating 21-nt and 24-nt phased siRNAs (phasiRNAs),respectively, were identified in three tissues from wild rice. Of these phasiRNA-producing loci, or PHAS genes, biogenesis of phasiRNAs in at least 160 of 21-nt and 254 of 24-nt loci could be triggered by interaction with miRNA(s). Developing seeds had more PHAS genes than leaves and roots. Genetic constrain on miRNA-triggered PHAS genes suggests that phasiRNAs might be one of the driving forces contributed to rice domestication.

  14. Functions of MicroRNAs in Cardiovascular Biology and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    In 1993, lin-4 was discovered as a critical modulator of temporal development in Caenorhabditis elegans and, most notably, as the first in the class of small, single-stranded noncoding RNAs now defined as microRNAs (miRNAs). Another eight years elapsed before miRNA expression was detected in mammalian cells. Since then, explosive advancements in the field of miRNA biology have elucidated the basic mechanism of miRNA biogenesis, regulation, and gene-regulatory function. The discovery of this new class of small RNAs has augmented the complexity of gene-regulatory programs as well as the understanding of developmental and pathological processes in the cardiovascular system. Indeed, the contributions of miRNAs in cardiovascular development and function have been widely explored, revealing the extensive role of these small regulatory RNAs in cardiovascular physiology. PMID:23157557

  15. Identification of Bacterial Small RNAs by RNA Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gómez Lozano, María; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molin, Søren

    2014-01-01

    sequencing (RNA-seq) is described that involves the preparation and analysis of three different sequencing libraries. As a signifi cant number of unique sRNAs are identifi ed in each library, the libraries can be used either alone or in combination to increase the number of sRNAs identifi ed. The approach......Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria are known to modulate gene expression and control a variety of processes including metabolic reactions, stress responses, and pathogenesis in response to environmental signals. A method to identify bacterial sRNAs on a genome-wide scale based on RNA...... may be applied to identify sRNAs in any bacterium under different growth and stress conditions....

  16. MicroRNAs: regulators of oncogenesis and stemness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papagiannakopoulos Thales

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs are essential post-transcriptional regulators that determine cell identity and fate. Aberrant expression of miRNAs can lead to diseases, including cancer. Expression of many miRNAs in the de-differentiated brain tumor cancer stem cells resembles that of neural stem cells. In this issue of BMC Medicine, Silber et al provide evidence of the expression of such miRNAs and their potential to mediate differentiation in both stem cell populations. In this commentary, we discuss the known functions of miRNAs in cancer and stem cells, their therapeutic potential and how the findings of Silber et al provide insight into the role of miR-124/miR-137 dysregulation in glioblastomas.

  17. The application of microRNAs in cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Ostenfeld, Marie Stampe; Kristensen, Helle

    2012-01-01

    hallmark of human cancer. Furthermore, miRNAs have been found to be a new class of promising cancer biomarkers with potential to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and prognosis in several hematologic and solid malignancies, as well as to predict response to specific treatments. Recent studies have......MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important biological roles in cancer development and progression. During the past decade, widespread use of novel high-throughput technologies for miRNA profiling (e.g., microarrays and next-generation sequencing) has revealed deregulation of miRNA expression as a common...... identified exosome-associated tumor-derived miRNAs in, e.g., blood samples from cancer patients, suggesting that miRNAs may be useful as circulation biomarkers for noninvasive diagnostic testing. In this chapter, we review the current state of development of miRNAs as cancer biomarkers with examples from...

  18. Integration of Bacterial Small RNAs in Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzan, Mor; Rehani, Rotem; Margalit, Hanah

    2017-05-22

    Small RNAs (sRNAs) are central regulators of gene expression in bacteria, controlling target genes posttranscriptionally by base pairing with their mRNAs. sRNAs are involved in many cellular processes and have unique regulatory characteristics. In this review, we discuss the properties of regulation by sRNAs and how it differs from and combines with transcriptional regulation. We describe the global characteristics of the sRNA-target networks in bacteria using graph-theoretic approaches and review the local integration of sRNAs in mixed regulatory circuits, including feed-forward loops and their combinations, feedback loops, and circuits made of an sRNA and another regulator, both derived from the same transcript. Finally, we discuss the competition effects in posttranscriptional regulatory networks that may arise over shared targets, shared regulators, and shared resources and how they may lead to signal propagation across the network.

  19. MicroRNAs in large herpesvirus DNA genomes: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorel, Océane; Dewals, Benjamin G

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that regulate gene expression. They alter mRNA translation through base-pair complementarity, leading to regulation of genes during both physiological and pathological processes. Viruses have evolved mechanisms to take advantage of the host cells to multiply and/or persist over the lifetime of the host. Herpesviridae are a large family of double-stranded DNA viruses that are associated with a number of important diseases, including lymphoproliferative diseases. Herpesviruses establish lifelong latent infections through modulation of the interface between the virus and its host. A number of reports have identified miRNAs in a very large number of human and animal herpesviruses suggesting that these short non-coding transcripts could play essential roles in herpesvirus biology. This review will specifically focus on the recent advances on the functions of herpesvirus miRNAs in infection and pathogenesis.

  20. Circulating microRNAs in patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yurong; Yi, Zhengjun; Wu, Xiaoyan; Li, Jianhua; Xu, Fuliang

    2011-12-01

    Emerging evidence shows that microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in pathogen-host interactions. Circulating miRNAs have been repeatedly and stably detected in blood and hold promise to serve as molecular markers for diverse physiological and pathological conditions. To date, the relationship between circulating miRNAs and active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) has not been reported. Using microarray-based expression profiling followed by real-time quantitative PCR validation, the levels of circulating miRNAs were compared between patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis and matched healthy controls. The receiver operating characteristic curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic effect of selected miRNA. Bioinformatic analysis was used to explore the potential roles of these circulating miRNAs in active pulmonary tuberculosis infection. Among 92 miRNAs significantly detected, 59 miRNAs were downregulated and 33 miRNAs were upregulated in the TB serum compared to their levels in the control serum. Interestingly, only two differentially expressed miRNAs were increased not only in the serum but also in the sputum of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis compared to the levels for the healthy controls. Upregulated miR-29a could discriminate TB patients from healthy controls with reasonable sensitivity and specificity. A number of significantly enriched pathways regulated by these circulating miRNAs were predicted, and most of them were involved in acute-phase response, inflammatory response, and the regulation of the cytoskeleton. In all, for the first time our results revealed that a number of miRNAs were differentially expressed during active pulmonary tuberculosis infection, and circulating miR-29a has great potential to serve as a marker for the detection of active pulmonary tuberculosis infection.

  1. MicroRNAs in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    lymphoma. Genes Chromosom. Cancer 39:167–69 131. O’Connell RM, Taganov KD, Boldin MP, Cheng G, Baltimore D. 2007. MicroRNA-155 is induced during the...carcinoma. J. Virol. 81:1033–36 155. Xi Y, Nakajima G, Gavin E, Morris CG, Kudo K, et al. 2007. Systematic analysis of microRNA expression of RNA extracted ...diversity. miRNAs were extracted from the unique sequences by searching against miRNA database (miRbase release 10.0; http://microrna.sanger.ac.uk

  2. Circulating microRNAs in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamam, Rimi; Hamam, Dana; Alsaleh, Khalid A.

    2017-01-01

    Effective management of breast cancer depends on early diagnosis and proper monitoring of patients' response to therapy. However, these goals are difficult to achieve because of the lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers for early detection and for disease monitoring. Accumulating evidence...... in the past several years has highlighted the potential use of peripheral blood circulating nucleic acids such as DNA, mRNA and micro (mi)RNA in breast cancer diagnosis, prognosis and for monitoring response to anticancer therapy. Among these, circulating miRNA is increasingly recognized as a promising...... circulating miRNAs as diagnostic, prognostic or predictive biomarkers in breast cancer management....

  3. MicroRNAs as Biomarkers for Liver Disease and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Nelson Hayes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Serum levels of liver enzymes, such as alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, and α-fetoprotein, provide insight into liver function and are used during treatment of liver disease, but such information is limited. In the case of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, which is often not detected until an advanced stage, more sensitive biomarkers may help to achieve earlier detection. Serum also contains microRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in regulating gene expression. miR-122 is specific to the liver and correlates strongly with liver enzyme levels and necroinflammatory activity, and other microRNAs are correlated with the degree of fibrosis. miR-122 has also been found to be required for hepatitis C virus (HCV infection, whereas other microRNAs have been shown to play antiviral roles. miR-125a-5p and miR-1231 have been shown to directly target hepatitis B virus (HBV transcripts, and others are up- or down-regulated in infected individuals. MicroRNA profiles also differ in the case of HBV and HCV infection as well as between HBeAg-positive and negative patients, and in patients with occult versus active HBV infection. In such patients, monitoring of changes in microRNA profiles might provide earlier warning of neoplastic changes preceding HCC.

  4. The race to decipher the top secrets of TOP mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyuhas, Oded; Kahan, Tamar

    2015-07-01

    Cells encountering hostile growth conditions, like those residing in the middle of a newly developing solid tumor, conserve resources and energy by downregulating protein synthesis. One mechanism in this response is the translational repression of multiple mRNAs that encode components of the translational apparatus. This coordinated translational control is carried through a common cis-regulatory element, the 5' Terminal OligoPyrimidine motif (5'TOP), after which these mRNAs are referred to as TOP mRNAs. Subsequent to the initial structural and functional characterization of members of this family, the research of TOP mRNAs has progressed in three major directions: a) delineating the landscape of the family; b) establishing the pathways that transduce stress cues into selective translational repression; and c) attempting to decipher the most proximal trans-acting factor(s) and defining its mode of action--a repressor or activator. The present chapter critically reviews the development in these three avenues of research with a special emphasis on the two "top secrets" of the TOP mRNA family: the scope of its members and the identity of the proximal cellular regulator(s). This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translation and Cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Opposite responses of rabbit and human globin mRNAs to translational inhibition by cap analogues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakin, S.H.; Liebhaber, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    The translational efficiency of an mRNA may be determined at the step of translational initiation by the efficiency of its interaction with the cap binding protein complex. To further investigate the role of these interactions in translational control, the authors compare in vitro the relative sensitivities of rabbit and human α- and β-globin mRNAs to translational inhibition by cap analogues. They find that rabbit β-globin mRNA is more resistant to translational inhibition by cap analogues than rabbit α-globin mRNA, while in contrast, human β-globin mRNA is more sensitive to cap analogue inhibition than human α- and β-globin mRNAs is unexpected as direct in vivo and in vitro comparisons of polysome profiles reveal parallel translational handling of the α- and β-globin mRNAs from these two species. This discordance between the relative translational sensitivities of these mRNAs to cap analogues and their relative ribosome loading activities suggests that cap-dependent events may not be rate limiting in steady-state globin translation

  6. The Regulatory Role of MicroRNAs in EMT and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolos Zaravinos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT is a powerful process in tumor invasion, metastasis, and tumorigenesis and describes the molecular reprogramming and phenotypic changes that are characterized by a transition from polarized immotile epithelial cells to motile mesenchymal cells. It is now well known that miRNAs are important regulators of malignant transformation and metastasis. The aberrant expression of the miR-200 family in cancer and its involvement in the initiation and progression of malignant transformation has been well demonstrated. The metastasis suppressive role of the miR-200 members is strongly associated with a pathologic EMT. This review describes the most recent advances regarding the influence of miRNAs in EMT and the control they exert in major signaling pathways in various cancers. The ability of the autocrine TGF-β/ZEB/miR-200 signaling regulatory network to control cell plasticity between the epithelial and mesenchymal state is further discussed. Various miRNAs are reported to directly target EMT transcription factors and components of the cell architecture, as well as miRNAs that are able to reverse the EMT process by targeting the Notch and Wnt signaling pathways. The link between cancer stem cells and EMT is also reported and the most recent developments regarding clinical trials that are currently using anti-miRNA constructs are further discussed.

  7. Development of Novel Therapeutic Agents by Inhibition of Oncogenic MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh-Duc Nguyen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRs, miRNAs are regulatory small noncoding RNAs, with their roles already confirmed to be important for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression affecting cell physiology and disease development. Upregulation of a cancer-causing miRNA, known as oncogenic miRNA, has been found in many types of cancers and, therefore, represents a potential new class of targets for therapeutic inhibition. Several strategies have been developed in recent years to inhibit oncogenic miRNAs. Among them is a direct approach that targets mature oncogenic miRNA with an antisense sequence known as antimiR, which could be an oligonucleotide or miRNA sponge. In contrast, an indirect approach is to block the biogenesis of miRNA by genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system or a small molecule inhibitor. The development of these inhibitors is straightforward but involves significant scientific and therapeutic challenges that need to be resolved. In this review, we summarize recent relevant studies on the development of miRNA inhibitors against cancer.

  8. On the normalization of the minimum free energy of RNAs by sequence length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edoardo Trotta

    Full Text Available The minimum free energy (MFE of ribonucleic acids (RNAs increases at an apparent linear rate with sequence length. Simple indices, obtained by dividing the MFE by the number of nucleotides, have been used for a direct comparison of the folding stability of RNAs of various sizes. Although this normalization procedure has been used in several studies, the relationship between normalized MFE and length has not yet been investigated in detail. Here, we demonstrate that the variation of MFE with sequence length is not linear and is significantly biased by the mathematical formula used for the normalization procedure. For this reason, the normalized MFEs strongly decrease as hyperbolic functions of length and produce unreliable results when applied for the comparison of sequences with different sizes. We also propose a simple modification of the normalization formula that corrects the bias enabling the use of the normalized MFE for RNAs longer than 40 nt. Using the new corrected normalized index, we analyzed the folding free energies of different human RNA families showing that most of them present an average MFE density more negative than expected for a typical genomic sequence. Furthermore, we found that a well-defined and restricted range of MFE density characterizes each RNA family, suggesting the use of our corrected normalized index to improve RNA prediction algorithms. Finally, in coding and functional human RNAs the MFE density appears scarcely correlated with sequence length, consistent with a negligible role of thermodynamic stability demands in determining RNA size.

  9. On the normalization of the minimum free energy of RNAs by sequence length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotta, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    The minimum free energy (MFE) of ribonucleic acids (RNAs) increases at an apparent linear rate with sequence length. Simple indices, obtained by dividing the MFE by the number of nucleotides, have been used for a direct comparison of the folding stability of RNAs of various sizes. Although this normalization procedure has been used in several studies, the relationship between normalized MFE and length has not yet been investigated in detail. Here, we demonstrate that the variation of MFE with sequence length is not linear and is significantly biased by the mathematical formula used for the normalization procedure. For this reason, the normalized MFEs strongly decrease as hyperbolic functions of length and produce unreliable results when applied for the comparison of sequences with different sizes. We also propose a simple modification of the normalization formula that corrects the bias enabling the use of the normalized MFE for RNAs longer than 40 nt. Using the new corrected normalized index, we analyzed the folding free energies of different human RNA families showing that most of them present an average MFE density more negative than expected for a typical genomic sequence. Furthermore, we found that a well-defined and restricted range of MFE density characterizes each RNA family, suggesting the use of our corrected normalized index to improve RNA prediction algorithms. Finally, in coding and functional human RNAs the MFE density appears scarcely correlated with sequence length, consistent with a negligible role of thermodynamic stability demands in determining RNA size.

  10. Effects of pathogen reduction systems on platelet microRNAs, mRNAs, activation, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Abdimajid; Hitzler, Walter E; Meyer, Claudius U; Landry, Patricia; Corduan, Aurélie; Laffont, Benoit; Boilard, Eric; Hellstern, Peter; Vamvakas, Eleftherios C; Provost, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Pathogen reduction (PR) systems for platelets, based on chemically induced cross-linking and inactivation of nucleic acids, potentially prevent transfusion transmission of infectious agents, but can increase clinically significant bleeding in some clinical studies. Here, we documented the effects of PR systems on microRNA and mRNA levels of platelets stored in the blood bank, and assessed their impact on platelet activation and function. Unlike platelets subjected to gamma irradiation or stored in additive solution, platelets treated with Intercept (amotosalen+ ultraviolet-A [UVA] light) exhibited significantly reduced levels of 6 of the 11 microRNAs, and 2 of the 3 anti-apoptotic mRNAs (Bcl-xl and Clusterin) that we monitored, compared with platelets stored in plasma. Mirasol (riboflavin+ UVB light) treatment of platelets did not produce these effects. PR neither affected platelet microRNA synthesis or function nor induced cross-linking of microRNA-sized endogenous platelet RNA species. However, the reduction in the platelet microRNA levels induced by Intercept correlated with the platelet activation (p < 0.05) and an impaired platelet aggregation response to ADP (p < 0.05). These results suggest that Intercept treatment may induce platelet activation, resulting in the release of microRNAs and mRNAs from platelets. The clinical implications of this reduction in platelet nucleic acids secondary to Intercept remain to be established.

  11. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Schmid, Tobias; Brauß, Thilo [Institut für Biochemie I (Pathobiochemie), Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pleli, Thomas [Medizinische Klinik 1, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Piiper, Albrecht [Medizinische Klinik 1, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pfeilschifter, Josef [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Eberhardt, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.eberhardt@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D{sub 1} encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on

  12. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel; Schmid, Tobias; Brauß, Thilo; Pleli, Thomas; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar; Piiper, Albrecht; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D 1 encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E 2 synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on different Hu

  13. Non-coding RNAs in the Ovarian Follicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia Battaglia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian ovarian follicle is the complex reproductive unit comprising germ cell, somatic cells (Cumulus and Granulosa cells, and follicular fluid (FF: paracrine communication among the different cell types through FF ensures the development of a mature oocyte ready for fertilization. This paper is focused on non-coding RNAs in ovarian follicles and their predicted role in the pathways involved in oocyte growth and maturation. We determined the expression profiles of microRNAs in human oocytes and FF by high-throughput analysis and identified 267 microRNAs in FF and 176 in oocytes. Most of these were FF microRNAs, while 9 were oocyte specific. By bioinformatic analysis, independently performed on FF and oocyte microRNAs, we identified the most significant Biological Processes and the pathways regulated by their validated targets. We found many pathways shared between the two compartments and some specific for oocyte microRNAs. Moreover, we found 41 long non-coding RNAs able to interact with oocyte microRNAs and potentially involved in the regulation of folliculogenesis. These data are important in basic reproductive research and could also be useful for clinical applications. In fact, the characterization of non-coding RNAs in ovarian follicles could improve reproductive disease diagnosis, provide biomarkers of oocyte quality in Assisted Reproductive Treatment, and allow the development of therapies for infertility disorders.

  14. Dynamic evolution and biogenesis of small RNAs during sex reversal

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jie; Luo, Majing; Sheng, Yue; Hong, Qiang; Cheng, Hanhua; Zhou, Rongjia

    2015-01-01

    Understanding origin, evolution and functions of small RNA (sRNA) genes has been a great challenge in the past decade. Molecular mechanisms underlying sexual reversal in vertebrates, particularly sRNAs involved in this process, are largely unknown. By deep-sequencing of small RNA transcriptomes in combination with genomic analysis, we identified a large amount of piRNAs and miRNAs including over 1,000 novel miRNAs, which were differentially expressed during gonad reversal from ovary to testis...

  15. MicroRNAs Change the Landscape of Cancer Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Zhu, Wei; Wu, Wei

    2018-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the cancer treatment is the development of drug resistance. It represents a major obstacle to curing cancer with constrained efficacy of both conventional chemotherapy and targeted therapies, even recent immune checkpoint blockade therapy. Deciphering the mechanisms of resistance is critical to further understanding the multifactorial pathways involved, and developing more specific targeted treatments. To date, numerous studies have reported the potential role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the resistance to various cancer treatments. MicroRNAs are a family of small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression by sequence-specific targeting of mRNAs causing translational repression or mRNA degradation. More than 1200 validated human miRNAs have been identified in human genome. While one miRNA can regulate hundreds of targets, a single target can also be affected by multiple miRNAs. Evidence suggests that dysregulation of specific miRNAs may be involved in the acquisition of resistance, thereby modulating the sensitivity of cancer cells to treatment. Therefore, manipulation of miRNAs may be an attractive strategy for more effective individualized therapies through reprograming resistant network in cancer cells.

  16. Alcohol dysregulates corticotropin-releasing-hormone (CRH promoter activity by interfering with the negative glucocorticoid response element (nGRE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena M Przybycien-Szymanska

    Full Text Available EtOH exposure in male rats increases corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN, a brain region responsible for coordinating stress and anxiety responses. In this study we identified the molecular mechanisms involved in mediating these effects by examining the direct effects of EtOH on CRH promoter activity in a neuronal cell line derived from the PVN (IVB. In addition, we investigated the potential interactions of EtOH and glucocorticoids on the CRH promoter by concomitantly treating cells with EtOH and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR antagonist RU486, and by sequentially deleting GR binding sites within glucocorticoid response element (GRE on the CRH promoter. Cells were transiently transfected with a firefly luciferase reporter construct containing 2.5 kb of the rat wild type (WT or mutated CRH promoter. Our results showed that EtOH treatment induced a biphasic response in CRH promoter activity. EtOH exposure for 0.5 h significantly decreased promoter activity compared to vehicle treated controls, whereas promoter activity was significantly increased after 2.0 h of EtOH exposure. Treatment with RU486, or deletion of the GR binding sites 1 and 2 within the GRE, abolished the EtOH-induced increase in the promoter activity, however did not affect EtOH-induced decrease in CRH promoter activity at an earlier time point. Overall, our data suggest that alcohol exposure directly regulates CRH promoter activity by interfering with the normal feedback mechanisms of glucocorticoids mediated by GR signaling at the GRE site of the CRH promoter.

  17. L’anàlisi de mediació a través de la macro/interfície Process per a SPSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Fernández Muñoz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available El procediment de mediació simple, o també anomenat anàlisi d’efectes directes i indirectes, està dissenyat per analitzar l’efecte d’una variable mediadora en la relació entre una variable independent o explicativa i una altra de dependent o explicada. Process és una interfície aplicada a SPSS que permet fer aquests procediments d’una manera senzilla i ràpida. L’objectiu d’aquest article és explicar de forma clara i amena com es fa una anàlisi de mediació simple amb Process, interfície/macro per a SPSS, que permeti a qualsevol investigador iniciar-se en els procediments de mediació, àmpliament estesos sobretot en ciències socials. Els resultats obtinguts mostren clarament l’existència d’un efecte indirecte sobre la satisfacció amb la formació en línia mediat a través de les actituds cap a la formació. L’ús d'aquesta eina permet de manera ràpida i amb una fàcil interpretació l’aplicació de models de mediació i la comprovació de diferents proves un cop han estat recollides les dades.

  18. Characterization of piRNAs across postnatal development in mouse brain

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosheh, Yanal; Seridi, Loqmane; Ryu, Tae Woo; Takahashi, Hazuki; Orlando, Valerio; Carninci, Piero; Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are responsible for maintaining the genome stability by silencing retrotransposons in germline tissues– where piRNAs were first discovered and thought to be restricted. Recently, novel functions were reported for piRNAs in germline and somatic cells. Using deep sequencing of small RNAs and CAGE of postnatal development of mouse brain, we identified piRNAs only in adult mouse brain. These piRNAs have similar sequence length as those of MILI-bound piRNAs. In addition, we predicted novel candidate regulators and putative targets of adult brain piRNAs.

  19. MicroRNAs - A New Generation Molecular Targets for Treating Cellular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a unique class of non-coding, small RNAs, similar to mRNAs, transcribed by cells, but for entirely different reasons. While mRNAs are transcribed to code for proteins, miRNAs are produced to regulate the production of proteins from mRNAs. miRNAs are central components that tightly and temporally regulating gene expression in cells. Dysregulation of miRNAs expressions in cellular pathogenesis, including cancer, has been reported, and it clearly supports the importance of...

  20. Characterization of piRNAs across postnatal development in mouse brain

    KAUST Repository

    Ghosheh, Yanal

    2016-04-26

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are responsible for maintaining the genome stability by silencing retrotransposons in germline tissues– where piRNAs were first discovered and thought to be restricted. Recently, novel functions were reported for piRNAs in germline and somatic cells. Using deep sequencing of small RNAs and CAGE of postnatal development of mouse brain, we identified piRNAs only in adult mouse brain. These piRNAs have similar sequence length as those of MILI-bound piRNAs. In addition, we predicted novel candidate regulators and putative targets of adult brain piRNAs.

  1. Smoking-related microRNAs and mRNAs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Ming-Wei; Yu, Sung-Liang; Lin, Wen-Chang; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Chen, Po-Hua; Lee, Yungling Leo

    2016-01-01

    Teenager smoking is of great importance in public health. Functional roles of microRNAs have been documented in smoke-induced gene expression changes, but comprehensive mechanisms of microRNA-mRNA regulation and benefits remained poorly understood. We conducted the Teenager Smoking Reduction Trial (TSRT) to investigate the causal association between active smoking reduction and whole-genome microRNA and mRNA expression changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A total of 12 teenagers with a substantial reduction in smoke quantity and a decrease in urine cotinine/creatinine ratio were enrolled in genomic analyses. In Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes altered by smoke reduction were mainly associated with glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway. The integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA found eleven differentially expressed microRNAs negatively correlated with predicted target genes. CD83 molecule regulated by miR-4498 in human PBMC, was critical for the canonical pathway of communication between innate and adaptive immune cells. Our data demonstrated that microRNAs could regulate immune responses in human PBMC after habitual smokers quit smoking and support the potential translational value of microRNAs in regulating disease-relevant gene expression caused by tobacco smoke. - Highlights: • We conducted a smoke reduction trial program and investigated the causal relationship between smoke and gene regulation. • MicroRNA and mRNA expression changes were examined in human PBMC. • MicroRNAs are important in regulating disease-causal genes after tobacco smoke reduction.

  2. Smoking-related microRNAs and mRNAs in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Ming-Wei [Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Yu, Sung-Liang [Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences and Medical Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Wen-Chang [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ching-Hui [Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Hua [School of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lee, Yungling Leo, E-mail: leolee@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-15

    Teenager smoking is of great importance in public health. Functional roles of microRNAs have been documented in smoke-induced gene expression changes, but comprehensive mechanisms of microRNA-mRNA regulation and benefits remained poorly understood. We conducted the Teenager Smoking Reduction Trial (TSRT) to investigate the causal association between active smoking reduction and whole-genome microRNA and mRNA expression changes in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). A total of 12 teenagers with a substantial reduction in smoke quantity and a decrease in urine cotinine/creatinine ratio were enrolled in genomic analyses. In Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), differentially expressed genes altered by smoke reduction were mainly associated with glucocorticoid receptor signaling pathway. The integrative analysis of microRNA and mRNA found eleven differentially expressed microRNAs negatively correlated with predicted target genes. CD83 molecule regulated by miR-4498 in human PBMC, was critical for the canonical pathway of communication between innate and adaptive immune cells. Our data demonstrated that microRNAs could regulate immune responses in human PBMC after habitual smokers quit smoking and support the potential translational value of microRNAs in regulating disease-relevant gene expression caused by tobacco smoke. - Highlights: • We conducted a smoke reduction trial program and investigated the causal relationship between smoke and gene regulation. • MicroRNA and mRNA expression changes were examined in human PBMC. • MicroRNAs are important in regulating disease-causal genes after tobacco smoke reduction.

  3. Gene function analysis by artificial microRNAs in Physcomitrella patens.

    KAUST Repository

    Khraiwesh, Basel; Fattash, Isam; Arif, Muhammad Asif; Frank, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ~21 nt long small RNAs transcribed from endogenous MIR genes which form precursor RNAs with a characteristic hairpin structure. miRNAs control the expression of cognate target genes by binding to reverse complementary

  4. MicroRNAs in cardiac diseases: The devil is in the details

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijsen, A.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1993, it has become clear that microRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a completely new layer of gene regulation. MiRNAs are ~22 nucleotide long, non-coding RNA sequences that regulate gene expression by binding to the 3’UTR of messenger RNAs (mRNAs), resulting in repression of

  5. Circular RNAs: Biogenesis, Function and Role in Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Greene

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Circular RNAs (circRNAs are currently classed as non-coding RNA (ncRNA that, unlike linear RNAs, form covalently closed continuous loops and act as gene regulators in mammals. They were originally thought to represent errors in splicing and considered to be of low abundance, however, there is now an increased appreciation of their important function in gene regulation. circRNAs are differentially generated by backsplicing of exons or from lariat introns. Unlike linear RNA, the 3′ and 5′ ends normally present in an RNA molecule have been joined together by covalent bonds leading to circularization. Interestingly, they have been found to be abundant, evolutionally conserved and relatively stable in the cytoplasm. These features confer numerous potential functions to circRNAs, such as acting as miRNA sponges, or binding to RNA-associated proteins to form RNA-protein complexes that regulate gene transcription. It has been proposed that circRNA regulate gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level by interacting with miRNAs and that circRNAs may have a role in regulating miRNA function in cancer initiation and progression. circRNAs appear to be more often downregulated in tumor tissue compared to normal tissue and this may be due to (i errors in the back-splice machinery in malignant tissues, (ii degradation of circRNAs by deregulated miRNAs in tumor tissue, or (iii increasing cell proliferation leading to a reduction of circRNAs. circRNAs have been identified in exosomes and more recently, chromosomal translocations in cancer have been shown to generate aberrant fusion-circRNAs associated with resistance to drug treatments. In addition, though originally thought to be non-coding, there is now increasing evidence to suggest that select circRNAs can be translated into functional proteins. Although much remains to be elucidated about circRNA biology and mechanisms of gene regulation, these ncRNAs are quickly emerging as

  6. Mammalian small nucleolar RNAs are mobile genetic elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel J Weber

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs of the H/ACA box and C/D box categories guide the pseudouridylation and the 2'-O-ribose methylation of ribosomal RNAs by forming short duplexes with their target. Similarly, small Cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs guide modifications of spliceosomal RNAs. The vast majority of vertebrate sno/scaRNAs are located in introns of genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II and processed by exonucleolytic trimming after splicing. A bioinformatic search for orthologues of human sno/scaRNAs in sequenced mammalian genomes reveals the presence of species- or lineage-specific sno/scaRNA retroposons (sno/scaRTs characterized by an A-rich tail and an approximately 14-bp target site duplication that corresponds to their insertion site, as determined by interspecific genomic alignments. Three classes of snoRTs are defined based on the extent of intron and exon sequences from the snoRNA parental host gene they contain. SnoRTs frequently insert in gene introns in the sense orientation at genomic hot spots shared with other genetic mobile elements. Previously characterized human snoRNAs are encoded in retroposons whose parental copies can be identified by phylogenic analysis, showing that snoRTs can be faithfully processed. These results identify snoRNAs as a new family of mobile genetic elements. The insertion of new snoRNA copies might constitute a safeguard mechanism by which the biological activity of snoRNAs is maintained in spite of the risk of mutations in the parental copy. I furthermore propose that retroposition followed by genetic drift is a mechanism that increased snoRNA diversity during vertebrate evolution to eventually acquire new RNA-modification functions.

  7. Two classes of silencing RNAs move between C. elegans tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Antony M; Garcia, Giancarlo A; Hunter, Craig P

    2011-01-01

    Summary Organism-wide RNA interference (RNAi) is due to the transport of mobile silencing RNA throughout the organism but the identities of these mobile RNA species in animals are unknown. Here we present genetic evidence that both the initial double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which triggers RNAi, and at least one dsRNA intermediate produced during RNAi can act as or generate mobile silencing RNA in Caenorhabditis elegans. This dsRNA intermediate requires the long dsRNA-binding protein RDE-4, the endonuclease DCR-1, which cleaves long dsRNA into double-stranded short-interfering RNA (ds-siRNA), and the putative nucleotidyltransferase MUT-2 (RDE-3). However, single-stranded siRNA and downstream secondary siRNA produced upon amplification by the RNA-dependent RNA Polymerase RRF-1 do not generate mobile silencing RNA. Restricting inter-tissue transport to long dsRNA and directly processed siRNA intermediates rather than amplified siRNA may serve to modulate the extent of systemic silencing in proportion to available dsRNA. PMID:21984186

  8. Targeting miRNAs by polyphenols: Novel therapeutic strategy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandima Devi, Kasi; Rajavel, Tamilselvam; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Bishayee, Anupam; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-10-01

    In the recent years, polyphenols have gained significant attention in scientific community owing to their potential anticancer effects against a wide range of human malignancies. Epidemiological, clinical and preclinical studies have supported that daily intake of polyphenol-rich dietary fruits have a strong co-relationship in the prevention of different types of cancer. In addition to direct antioxidant mechanisms, they also regulate several therapeutically important oncogenic signaling and transcription factors. However, after the discovery of microRNA (miRNA), numerous studies have identified that polyphenols, including epigallocatechin-3-gallate, genistein, resveratrol and curcumin exert their anticancer effects by regulating different miRNAs which are implicated in all the stages of cancer. MiRNAs are short, non-coding endogenous RNA, which silence the gene functions by targeting messenger RNA (mRNA) through degradation or translation repression. However, cancer associated miRNAs has emerged only in recent years to support its applications in cancer therapy. Preclinical experiments have suggested that deregulation of single miRNA is sufficient for neoplastic transformation of cells. Indeed, the widespread deregulation of several miRNA profiles of tumor and healthy tissue samples revealed the involvement of many types of miRNA in the development of numerous cancers. Hence, targeting the miRNAs using polyphenols will be a novel and promising strategy in anticancer chemotherapy. Herein, we have critically reviewed the potential applications of polyphenols on various human miRNAs, especially which are involved in oncogenic and tumor suppressor pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Toxoplasma gondii infection specifically increases the levels of key host microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti M Zeiner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii can infect and replicate in virtually any nucleated cell in many species of warm-blooded animals; thus, it has evolved the ability to exploit well-conserved biological processes common to its diverse hosts. Here we have investigated whether Toxoplasma modulates the levels of host microRNAs (miRNAs during infection.Using microarray profiling and a combination of conventional molecular approaches we report that Toxoplasma specifically modulates the expression of important host microRNAs during infection. We show that both the primary transcripts for miR-17 approximately 92 and miR-106b approximately 25 and the pivotal miRNAs that are derived from miR-17 approximately 92 display increased abundance in Toxoplasma-infected primary human cells; a Toxoplasma-dependent up-regulation of the miR-17 approximately 92 promoter is at least partly responsible for this increase. The abundance of mature miR-17 family members, which are derived from these two miRNA clusters, remains unchanged in host cells infected with the closely related apicomplexan Neospora caninum; thus, the Toxoplasma-induced increase in their abundance is a highly directed process rather than a general host response to infection.Altered levels of miR-17 approximately 92 and miR-106b approximately 25 are known to play crucial roles in mammalian cell regulation and have been implicated in numerous hyperproliferative diseases although the mechanisms driving their altered expression are unknown. Hence, in addition to the implications of these findings on the host-pathogen interaction, Toxoplasma may represent a powerful probe for understanding the normal mechanisms that regulate the levels of key host miRNAs.

  10. Which Depressive Symptoms and Medication Side Effects Are Perceived by Patients as Interfering Most with Occupational Functioning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond W. Lam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Major depressive disorder (MDD is associated with significant impairment in occupational functioning. This study sought to determine which depressive symptoms and medication side effects were perceived by patients with MDD to have the greatest interference on work functioning. Methods. 164 consecutive patients with MDD by DSM-IV criteria completed a standard assessment that included a self-rated questionnaire about the degree to which symptoms and side effects interfered with work functioning. Results. The symptoms perceived by patients as interfering most with work functioning were fatigue and low energy, insomnia, concentration and memory problems, anxiety, and irritability. The medication side effects rated as interfering most with work functioning were daytime sedation, insomnia, headache, and agitation/anxiety. There were no differences between men and women in symptoms or side effects that were perceived as interfering with work functioning. Limitations. This was a cross-sectional study; only subjective assessments of work functioning were obtained; the fact that patients were using varied medications acts as a potential confound. Conclusions. Specific depressive symptoms and medication side effects were perceived by patients as interfering more with occupational functioning than others. These factors should be considered in treatment selection (e.g., in the choice of antidepressant in working patients with MDD.

  11. Dissecting miRNAs in wheat D genome progenitor, Aegilops tauschii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmet eBudak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available As the post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, microRNAs or miRNAs comprise an integral part of understanding how genomes function. Although miRNAs have been a major focus of recent efforts, miRNA research is still in its infancy in most plant species. Aegilops tauschii, the D genome progenitor of bread wheat, is a wild diploid grass exhibiting remarkable population diversity. Due to the direct ancestry and the diverse gene pool, A. tauschii is a promising source for bread wheat improvement. In this study, a total of 87 Aegilops miRNA families, including 51 previously unknown, were computationally identified both at the subgenomic level, using flow-sorted A. tauschii 5D chromosome, and at the whole genome level. Predictions at the genomic and subgenomic levels suggested A. tauschii 5D chromosome as rich in pre-miRNAs that are highly associated with Class II DNA transposons. In order to gain insights into miRNA evolution, putative 5D chromosome miRNAs were compared to its modern ortholog, T. aestivum 5D chromosome, revealing that 48 of the 58 A. tauschii 5D miRNAs were conserved in orthologous T. aestivum 5D chromosome. The expression profiles of selected miRNAs (miR167, miR5205, miR5175, miR5523 provided the first experimental evidence for miR5175, miR5205 and miR5523, and revealed differential expressional changes in response to drought in different genetic backgrounds for miR167 and miR5175. Interestingly, while miR5523 coding regions were present and expressed as pre-miR5523 in both T. aestivum and A. tauschii, the expression of mature miR5523 was observed only in A. tauschii under normal conditions, pointing out to an interference at the downstream processing of pre-miR5523 in T. aestivum. Overall, this study expands our knowledge on the miRNA catalogue of Aegilops tauschii, locating a subset specifically to the 5D chromosome, with ample functional and comparative insight which should contribute to and complement efforts to

  12. Advances in targeted delivery of small interfering RNA using simple bioconjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christoffer; Kjems, Jørgen; Sorensen, Kristine Rothaus

    2014-01-01

    with a targeting moiety, in a simple bioconjugate construct. We discuss the use of different types of targeting moieties, as well as the different conjugation strategies employed for preparing these bioconjugate constructs that deliver the siRNA to target cells. We focus especially on the in-built or passive......Introduction: Development of drugs based on RNA interference by small interfering RNA (siRNA) has been progressing slowly due to a number of challenges associated with the in vivo behavior of siRNA. A central problem is controlling siRNA delivery to specific cell types. Here, we review existing...... literature on one type of strategy for solving the issue of cell-specific delivery of siRNA, namely delivering the siRNA as part of simple bioconjugate constructs. Areas covered: This review presents current experience from strategies aimed at targeting siRNA to specific cell types, by associating the siRNA...

  13. Elimination of eight interfering radioisotopes in the determination of uranium by activation analysis with epithermic neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requejo, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    The total or parcial elimination interfering radioisotopes in activation analysis of uranium by epithermic neutrons, has been made. It was possible to determine uranium, after chemical separation, from samples of organic and mineral matrixes, which had mercury, selenium, bromine, antimony, gold, barium, molybden and tungsten. Mineral samples were analysed giving results between 0.2 to 5.0 ppm of uranium. The same mineral were ground in agate mortar and in tungsten carbide mill. In the first sample is has been found 0.2277 +- -+ 0.0474 ppm U. The second which had tungsten, at level of 150 ppm, after radiochemical separation, it has been found 0.2465+- -+0.0326 ppm U. These results are considered statistically the same [pt

  14. Interfering Effect of Black Tea Consumption on Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer by CA 19-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Ali Abdul Hussein S; Tawfeeq, Ekhlas F

    2017-06-01

    The study aims to determine the possible effects of black tea consumption on the level of CA 19-9 antigen in the human body. The level of CA 19-9 was measured in 270 healthy individuals who consumed heavy amounts of black tea. About 43.3 % of involved individuals were revealed to have elevated levels of CA 19-9. Males with high values of CA 19-9 represented the greatest number of involved individuals. The cutoff value of high levels of CA 19-9 in all individuals was ranged 69-105 U/ml. Consuming heavy amounts of black tea could be considered an important interfering factor that affects the levels of CA 19-9. The cutoff or predictive value of CA 19-9 in heavy-consuming people of black tea was determined.

  15. Interferência de plantas daninhas na cultura do quiabo Weed interference in okra crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Santos

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se com este trabalho avaliar os períodos de interferência das plantas daninhas na cultura do quiabo (Abelmoschus esculentus na região do Médio Vale do Rio Doce, em Minas Gerais. O experimento foi conduzido em campo, entre maio e outubro de 2007. Utilizaram-se sementes do quiabo Santa Cruz-47, semeadas no espaçamento de 0,25 x 1 m. Foram estabelecidos diferentes períodos de controle das plantas daninhas na cultura, variando entre zero e 120 dias após a emergência (DAE. Foram avaliados 12 tratamentos, correspondendo a diferentes períodos de controle das plantas daninhas na cultura: capina após a emergência a partir dos 20, 40, 60, 80 e 100 dias; capina após a emergência até os 20, 40, 60, 80 e 100 dias; além de duas testemunhas com capina, ou não capinadas, ambas por 120 dias. Determinou-se o número de frutos por planta e o rendimento (produtividade, bem como os valores em dias para período anterior à interferência (PAI, período crítico de prevenção da interferência (PCPI e período total de prevenção da interferência (PTPI, considerando 5% de perdas. A partir das espécies encontradas na área experimental, avaliou-se também, em vasos, isoladamente ou em competição com o quiabeiro, a capacidade competitiva das principais plantas daninhas. Com base nos resultados, verificou-se que o PAI estimado foi de 25 DAE, indicando a época de início das capinas. Para o PCPI, o período observado foi de 75 dias, indicando PTPI de 100 DAE. Entre as plantas daninhas presentes, Eleusine indica apresentou maior capacidade competitiva sobre a cultura.An experiment was carried out under field conditions in Médio Vale do Rio Doce-MG, from May to October, 2007, to establish periods of weed interference in Abelmoschus esculentus crop. 'Santa Cruz-47' seeds were sown in a 0.25 x 1.0 m spacing, and weed control times varied from 0 to 120 days after emergence (DAE. Number of fruit per plant and yield as well as values in days

  16. Identification of Four New agr Quorum Sensing-Interfering Cyclodepsipeptides from a Marine Photobacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Kjaerulff

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During our search for new natural products from the marine environment, we discovered a wide range of cyclic peptides from a marine Photobacterium, closely related to P. halotolerans. The chemical fingerprint of the bacterium showed primarily non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS-like compounds, including the known pyrrothine antibiotic holomycin and a wide range of peptides, from diketopiperazines to cyclodepsipeptides of 500–900 Da. Purification of components from the pellet fraction led to the isolation and structure elucidation of four new cyclodepsipeptides, ngercheumicin F, G, H, and I. The ngercheumicins interfered with expression of virulence genes known to be controlled by the agr quorum sensing system of Staphylococcus aureus, although to a lesser extent than the previously described solonamides from the same strain of Photobacterium.

  17. LABORATORY EVALUATION OF ANDALIN, AN INSECT GROWTH REGULATOR INTERFERING WITH CUTICLE DEPOSITION, AGAINST MOSQUITO LARVAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N REHIMI

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Andalin, a benzoylphenylurea (BPU derivative, was evaluated on Culex pipiens L. (Diptera: Culicidae. Treatment was made on newly 3rd- and 4th instar larvae for 24 h. The compound exhibited insecticidal activity and mortality occured after earlier inhibition of their development or by their inability to complete their ecdysis. Treatment resulted in a significant larvicidal effect and in a inhibition of adult emergence. Moreover, the compound disturbed growth and development since several morphological types and an increase in the duration of larval stage were observed. Histological study conducted on 4th instar larval integument, showed that Andalin caused a significant reduction in the thickness of cuticles secreted compared to controls. Thus, Andalin prevent molting in C. pipiens by interfering with cuticle deposition confirming the primary mode of action of this BPU insecticide.

  18. Two narrow bandwidth photons interfering in an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fuyuan; Shi Baosen; Lu Xiaosong; Guo Guangcan

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we have analysed in detail the quantum interference of the degenerate narrowband two-photon state by using a Mach–Zehnder interferometer, in which an electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) medium is placed in one of two interfering beams. Our results clearly show that it is possible to coherently keep the quantum state at a single photon level in the EIT process, especially when the transparent window of the EIT medium is much larger than the bandwidth of the single photon. This shows that the EIT medium is possibly a kind of memory or repeater for the narrowband photons in the areas of quantum communication and quantum computer. This kind of experiment is feasible within the current technology

  19. Protótipo do primeiro interferômetro brasileiro - BDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecatto, J. R.; Fernandes, F. C. R.; Neri, J. A. C. F.; Bethi, N.; Felipini, N. S.; Madsen, F. R. H.; Andrade, M. C.; Soares, A. C.; Alonso, E. M. B., Sawant, H. S.

    2004-04-01

    A interferometria é uma poderosa ferramenta usada para investigar estruturas espaciais de fontes astrofísicas fornecendo uma riqueza de detalhes inatingível pelas técnicas convencionais de imageamento. Em particular, a interferometria com ondas de rádio abre o horizonte de conhecimento do Universo nesta ampla banda do espectro eletromagnético, que vai de cerca de 20 kHz até centenas de GHz já próximo ao infravermelho, e que está acessível a partir de instrumentos instalados em solo. Neste trabalho, apresentamos o interferômetro designado por Arranjo Decimétrico Brasileiro (BDA). Trata-se do primeiro interferômetro a ser desenvolvido no Brasil e América Latina que já está em operação na fase de protótipo. Apresentamos o desenvolvimento realizado até o momento, o sítio de instalação do instrumento, o protótipo e os principais resultados dos testes de sua operação, as perspectivas futuras e a ciência a ser desenvolvida com o instrumento nas fases II e III. Neste trabalho é dada ênfase ao desenvolvimento, testes de operação e principais resultados do protótipo. É discutida brevemente a ciência que pode ser feita com o instrumento. Tanto os detalhes técnicos quanto os principais parâmetros estimados para o instrumento nas próximas fases de desenvolvimento e o desempenho do protótipo serão publicados em breve.

  20. Differential and coherent processing patterns from small RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pundhir, Sachin; Gorodkin, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional processing events related to short RNAs are often reflected in their read profile patterns emerging from high-throughput sequencing data. MicroRNA arm switching across different tissues is a well-known example of what we define as differential processing. Here, short RNAs from...

  1. Diet-responsive microRNAs are likely exogenous

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a recent report Title "et al". fostered miRNA-375 and miR-200c knock-out pups to wild-type dams and arrived at the conclusion that milk microRNAs are bioavailable in trace amounts at best and that postprandial concentrations of microRNAs are too low to elicit biological effects. Their take home m...

  2. Base Composition Characteristics of Mammalian miRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short RNA sequences that repress protein synthesis by either inhibiting the translation of messenger RNA (mRNA or increasing mRNA degradation. Endogenous miRNAs have been found in various organisms, including animals, plants, and viruses. Mammalian miRNAs are evolutionarily conserved, are scattered throughout chromosomes, and play an important role in the immune response and the onset of cancer. For this study, the author explored the base composition characteristics of miRNA genes from the six mammalian species that contain the largest number of known miRNAs. It was found that mammalian miRNAs are evolutionarily conserved and GU-rich. Interestingly, in the miRNA sequences investigated, A residues are clearly the most frequent occupants of positions 2 and 3 of the 5′ end of miRNAs. Unlike G and U residues that may pair with C/U and A/G, respectively, A residues can only pair with U residues of target mRNAs, which may augment the recognition specificity of the 5′ seed region.

  3. Regulatory Non-Coding RNAs in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Rosa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The most part of our genome encodes for RNA transcripts are never translated into proteins. These include families of RNA molecules with a regulatory function, which can be arbitrarily subdivided in short (less than 200 nucleotides and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs. MicroRNAs, which act post-transcriptionally to repress the function of target mRNAs, belong to the first group. Included in the second group are multi-exonic and polyadenylated long ncRNAs (lncRNAs, localized either in the nucleus, where they can associate with chromatin remodeling complexes to regulate transcription, or in the cytoplasm, acting as post-transcriptional regulators. Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, represent useful systems for modeling normal development and human diseases, as well as promising tools for regenerative medicine. To fully explore their potential, however, a deep understanding of the molecular basis of stemness is crucial. In recent years, increasing evidence of the importance of regulation by ncRNAs in pluripotent cells is accumulating. In this review, we will discuss recent findings pointing to multiple roles played by regulatory ncRNAs in ESC and iPSCs, where they act in concert with signaling pathways, transcriptional regulatory circuitries and epigenetic factors to modulate the balance between pluripotency and differentiation.

  4. miRNAs in Human Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Malene M.; Davidsen, Peter K.; Vigelso, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Objective Obesity is central in the development of insulin resistance. However, the underlying mechanisms still need elucidation. Dysregulated microRNAs (miRNAs; post-transcriptional regulators) in adipose tissue may present an important link. Methods The miRNA expression in subcutaneous adipose ...

  5. Exosomal miRNAs as biomarkers for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Pettersen Hessvik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs that finely regulate gene expression in cells. Alterations in miRNA expression have been associated with development of cancer, and miRNAs are now being investigated as biomarkers for cancer as well as other diseases. Recently, miRNAs have been found outside cells in body fluids. Extracellular miRNAs exist in different forms - associated with Ago2 proteins, loaded into extracellular vesicles (exosomes, microvesicles or apoptotic bodies or into high density lipoprotein particles. These extracellular miRNAs are probably products of distinct cellular processes, and might therefore play different roles. However, their functions in vivo are currently unknown. In spite of this, they are considered as promising, noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic tools. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the Western world, but the currently used biomarker (prostate specific antigen has low specificity. Therefore, novel biomarkers are highly needed. In this review we will discuss possible biological functions of extracellular miRNAs, as well as the potential use of miRNAs from extracellular vesicles as biomarkers for prostate cancer.

  6. Wheat hybridization and polyploidization results in deregulation of small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenan-Eichler, Michal; Leshkowitz, Dena; Tal, Lior; Noor, Elad; Melamed-Bessudo, Cathy; Feldman, Moshe; Levy, Avraham A

    2011-06-01

    Speciation via interspecific or intergeneric hybridization and polyploidization triggers genomic responses involving genetic and epigenetic alterations. Such modifications may be induced by small RNAs, which affect key cellular processes, including gene expression, chromatin structure, cytosine methylation and transposable element (TE) activity. To date, the role of small RNAs in the context of wide hybridization and polyploidization has received little attention. In this work, we performed high-throughput sequencing of small RNAs of parental, intergeneric hybrid, and allopolyploid plants that mimic the genomic changes occurring during bread wheat speciation. We found that the percentage of small RNAs corresponding to miRNAs increased with ploidy level, while the percentage of siRNAs corresponding to TEs decreased. The abundance of most miRNA species was similar to midparent values in the hybrid, with some deviations, as seen in overrepresentation of miR168, in the allopolyploid. In contrast, the number of siRNAs corresponding to TEs strongly decreased upon allopolyploidization, but not upon hybridization. The reduction in corresponding siRNAs, together with decreased CpG methylation, as shown here for the Veju element, represent hallmarks of TE activation. TE-siRNA downregulation in the allopolyploid may contribute to genome destabilization at the initial stages of speciation. This phenomenon is reminiscent of hybrid dysgenesis in Drosophila.

  7. LncRNAs: emerging players in gene regulation and disease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Glavac 2013), accounting for about 20,000 protein coding ... general information on lncRNAs' feature (Da Sacco et al. 2012). ..... mal cells, stabilized Zeb2 intron encompasses an internal ..... cially growth-control genes and cell mobility-induced genes ..... RNAs in development and disease of the central nervous system.

  8. The Role of MicroRNAs in Kidney Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydwell Mukhadi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are short noncoding RNAs that regulate pathophysiological processes that suppress gene expression by binding to messenger RNAs. These biomolecules can be used to study gene regulation and protein expression, which will allow better understanding of many biological processes such as cell cycle progression and apoptosis that control the fate of cells. Several pathways have also been implicated to be involved in kidney diseases such as Transforming Growth Factor-β, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase signaling, and Wnt signaling pathways. The discovery of miRNAs has provided new insights into kidney pathologies and may provide new innovative and effective therapeutic strategies. Research has demonstrated the role of miRNAs in a variety of kidney diseases including renal cell carcinoma, diabetic nephropathy, nephritic syndrome, renal fibrosis, lupus nephritis and acute pyelonephritis. MiRNAs are implicated as playing a role in these diseases due to their role in apoptosis, cell proliferation, differentiation and development. As miRNAs have been detected in a stable condition in different biological fluids, they have the potential to be tools to study the pathogenesis of human diseases with a great potential to be used in disease prognosis and diagnosis. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of miRNA in kidney disease.

  9. IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NEW miRNAs IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pathmanaban

    2012-09-20

    Sep 20, 2012 ... simplest and rapid method of identification of miRNAs is relied on in silico analysis. ... (NRs), are available for several plant species and can be used for ... Currently, there are 89 miRNAs deposited under. Gossypium at Plant ...

  10. Interplay of mitochondrial metabolism and microRNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiger, Julian; Dalgaard, Louise Torp

    2017-01-01

    or the nucleus, a subset of ~150 different miRNAs, called mitomiRs, has also been found localized to mitochondrial fractions of cells and tissues together with the subunits of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC); the protein complex through which miRNAs normally act to prevent translation of their m...

  11. Plant and Animal microRNAs (miRNAs) and Their Potential for Inter-kingdom Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuhai; Cong, Lin; Lukiw, Walter J

    2018-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) comprise a class of ~18-25 nucleotide (nt) single-stranded non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs) that are the smallest known carriers of gene-encoded, post-transcriptional regulatory information in both plants and animals. There are many fundamental similarities between plant and animal miRNAs-the miRNAs of both kingdoms play essential roles in development, aging and disease, and the shaping of the transcriptome of many cell types. Both plant and animal miRNAs appear to predominantly exert their genetic and transcriptomic influences by regulating gene expression at the level of messenger RNA (mRNA) stability and/or translational inhibition. Certain miRNA species, such as miRNA-155, miRNA-168, and members of the miRNA-854 family may be expressed in both plants and animals, suggesting a common origin and functional selection of specific miRNAs over vast periods of evolution (for example, Arabidopsis thaliana-Homo sapiens divergence ~1.5 billion years). Although there is emerging evidence for cross-kingdom miRNA communication-that plant-enriched miRNAs may enter the diet and play physiological and/or pathophysiological roles in human health and disease-some research reports repudiate this possibility. This research paper highlights some recent, controversial, and remarkable findings in plant- and animal-based miRNA signaling research with emphasis on the intriguing possibility that dietary miRNAs and/or sncRNAs may have potential to contribute to both intra- and inter-kingdom signaling, and in doing so modulate molecular-genetic mechanisms associated with human health and disease.

  12. Four MicroRNAs Promote Prostate Cell Proliferation with Regulation of PTEN and Its Downstream Signals In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jing-lun; Chen, Jin-zhong

    2013-01-01

    Background Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN), as a tumor suppressor, plays vital roles in tumorigenesis and progression of prostate cancer. However, the mechanisms of PTEN regulation still need further investigation. We here report that a combination of four microRNAs (miR-19b, miR-23b, miR-26a and miR-92a) promotes prostate cell proliferation by regulating PTEN and its downstream signals in vitro. Methodology/Principal Findings We found that the four microRNAs (miRNAs) could effectively suppress PTEN expression by directly interacting with its 3’ UTR in prostate epithelial and cancer cells. Under-expression of the four miRNAs by antisense neutralization up-regulates PTEN expression, while overexpression of the four miRNAs accelerates epithelial and prostate cancer cell proliferation. Furthermore, the expression of the four miRNAs could, singly or jointly, alter the expression of the key components in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway, including PIK3CA, PIK3CD, PIK3R1 and Akt, along with their downstream signal, cyclin D1. Conclusions These results suggested that the four miRNAs could promote prostate cancer cell proliferation by co-regulating the expression of PTEN, PI3K/Akt pathway and cyclin D1 in vitro. These findings increase understanding of the molecular mechanisms of prostate carcinogenesis and progression, even provide valuable insights into the diagnosis, prognosis, and rational design of novel therapeutics for prostate cancer. PMID:24098737

  13. Allele-Selective Transcriptome Recruitment to Polysomes Primed for Translation: Protein-Coding and Noncoding RNAs, and RNA Isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Mascarenhas

    Full Text Available mRNA translation into proteins is highly regulated, but the role of mRNA isoforms, noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs, and genetic variants remains poorly understood. mRNA levels on polysomes have been shown to correlate well with expressed protein levels, pointing to polysomal loading as a critical factor. To study regulation and genetic factors of protein translation we measured levels and allelic ratios of mRNAs and ncRNAs (including microRNAs in lymphoblast cell lines (LCL and in polysomal fractions. We first used targeted assays to measure polysomal loading of mRNA alleles, confirming reported genetic effects on translation of OPRM1 and NAT1, and detecting no effect of rs1045642 (3435C>T in ABCB1 (MDR1 on polysomal loading while supporting previous results showing increased mRNA turnover of the 3435T allele. Use of high-throughput sequencing of complete transcript profiles (RNA-Seq in three LCLs revealed significant differences in polysomal loading of individual RNA classes and isoforms. Correlated polysomal distribution between protein-coding and non-coding RNAs suggests interactions between them. Allele-selective polysome recruitment revealed strong genetic influence for multiple RNAs, attributable either to differential expression of RNA isoforms or to differential loading onto polysomes, the latter defining a direct genetic effect on translation. Genes identified by different allelic RNA ratios between cytosol and polysomes were enriched with published expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs affecting RNA functions, and associations with clinical phenotypes. Polysomal RNA-Seq combined with allelic ratio analysis provides a powerful approach to study polysomal RNA recruitment and regulatory variants affecting protein translation.

  14. Urinary microRNAs as potential biomarkers of pesticide exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weldon, Brittany A.; Shubin, Sara Pacheco; Smith, Marissa N.; Workman, Tomomi; Artemenko, Alexander; Griffith, William C.; Thompson, Beti; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators that silence messenger RNAs. Because miRNAs are stable at room temperature and long-lived, they have been proposed as molecular biomarkers to monitor disease and exposure status. While urinary miRNAs have been used clinically as potential diagnostic markers for kidney and bladder cancers and other diseases, their utility in non-clinical settings has yet to be fully developed. Our goal was to investigate the potential for urinary miRNAs to act as biomarkers of pesticide exposure and early biological response by identifying the miRNAs present in urine from 27 parent/child, farmworker/non-farmworker pairs (16FW/11NFW) collected during two agricultural seasons (thinning and post-harvest) and characterizing the between- and within-individual variability of these miRNA epigenetic regulators. MiRNAs were isolated from archived urine samples and identified using PCR arrays. Comparisons were made between age, households, season, and occupation. Of 384 miRNAs investigated, 297 (77%) were detectable in at least one sample. Seven miRNAs were detected in at least 50% of the samples, and one miRNA was present in 96% of the samples. Principal components and hierarchical clustering analyses indicate significant differences in miRNA profiles between farmworker and non-farmworker adults as well as between seasons. Six miRNAs were observed to be positively associated with farmworkers status during the post-harvest season. Expression of five of these miRNA trended towards a positive dose response relationship with organophosphate pesticide metabolites in farmworkers. These results suggest that miRNAs may be novel biomarkers of pesticide exposure and early biological response. - Highlights: • A novel method to identify microRNA biomarkers in urinary samples is proposed. • Six miRNAs have been identified as associated with occupational farm work and pesticide exposure. • An observed seasonal difference suggests transient

  15. Urinary microRNAs as potential biomarkers of pesticide exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weldon, Brittany A.; Shubin, Sara Pacheco; Smith, Marissa N.; Workman, Tomomi; Artemenko, Alexander; Griffith, William C. [Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Thompson, Beti [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Faustman, Elaine M., E-mail: faustman@uw.edu [Institute for Risk Analysis and Risk Communication, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators that silence messenger RNAs. Because miRNAs are stable at room temperature and long-lived, they have been proposed as molecular biomarkers to monitor disease and exposure status. While urinary miRNAs have been used clinically as potential diagnostic markers for kidney and bladder cancers and other diseases, their utility in non-clinical settings has yet to be fully developed. Our goal was to investigate the potential for urinary miRNAs to act as biomarkers of pesticide exposure and early biological response by identifying the miRNAs present in urine from 27 parent/child, farmworker/non-farmworker pairs (16FW/11NFW) collected during two agricultural seasons (thinning and post-harvest) and characterizing the between- and within-individual variability of these miRNA epigenetic regulators. MiRNAs were isolated from archived urine samples and identified using PCR arrays. Comparisons were made between age, households, season, and occupation. Of 384 miRNAs investigated, 297 (77%) were detectable in at least one sample. Seven miRNAs were detected in at least 50% of the samples, and one miRNA was present in 96% of the samples. Principal components and hierarchical clustering analyses indicate significant differences in miRNA profiles between farmworker and non-farmworker adults as well as between seasons. Six miRNAs were observed to be positively associated with farmworkers status during the post-harvest season. Expression of five of these miRNA trended towards a positive dose response relationship with organophosphate pesticide metabolites in farmworkers. These results suggest that miRNAs may be novel biomarkers of pesticide exposure and early biological response. - Highlights: • A novel method to identify microRNA biomarkers in urinary samples is proposed. • Six miRNAs have been identified as associated with occupational farm work and pesticide exposure. • An observed seasonal difference suggests transient

  16. MicroRNAs Related to Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anja Elaine; Wissing, Marie Louise Muff; Salö, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common, though heterogeneous, endocrine aberration in women of reproductive age, with high prevalence and socioeconomic costs. The syndrome is characterized by polycystic ovaries, chronic anovulation and hyperandrogenism, as well as being associated...... with infertility, insulin resistance, chronic low-grade inflammation and an increased life time risk of type 2 diabetes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that are able to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Altered miRNA levels have been associated with diabetes, insulin......RNAs with respect to PCOS will be summarized. Our understanding of miRNAs, particularly in relation to PCOS, is currently at a very early stage, and additional studies will yield important insight into the molecular mechanisms behind this complex and heterogenic syndrome...

  17. Functions and mechanisms of long noncoding RNAs in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng ZZ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zhenzi Peng, Chunfang Zhang, Chaojun Duan Institute of Medical Sciences, Key Laboratory of Cancer Proteomics of Chinese Ministry of Health, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and there is a lack of adequate biomarkers for diagnosis. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs are emerging as an important set of molecules because of their roles in various key pathophysiological pathways, including cell growth, apoptosis, and metastasis. We review the current knowledge of the lncRNAs in lung cancer. In-depth analyses of lncRNAs in lung cancer have increased the number of potential effective biomarkers, thus providing options to increase the therapeutic benefit. In this review, we summarize the functions, mechanisms, and regulatory networks of lncRNAs in lung cancer, providing a basis for further research in this field. Keywords: ncRNA, tumorigenesis, biomarker, network, proliferation, apoptosis 

  18. microRNAs in mycobacterial disease: friend or foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manali D Mehta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As the role of microRNA in all aspects of biology continues to be unraveled, the interplay between microRNAs and human disease is becoming clearer. It should come of no surprise that microRNAs play a major part in the outcome of infectious diseases, since early work has implicated microRNAs as regulators of the immune response. Here, we provide a review on how microRNAs influence the course of mycobacterial infections, which cause two of humanity’s most ancient infectious diseases: tuberculosis and leprosy. Evidence derived from profiling and functional experiments suggests that regulation of specific microRNAs during infection can either enhance the immune response or facilitate pathogen immune evasion. Now, it remains to be seen if the manipulation of host cell microRNA profiles can be an opportunity for therapeutic intervention for these difficult-to-treat diseases.

  19. MicroRNAs in Experimental Models of Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soon-Tae Lee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNAs comprised of 20–25 nucleotides that regulates gene expression by inducing translational repression or degradation of target mRNA. The importance of miRNAs as a mediator of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic targets is rapidly emerging in neuroscience, as well as oncology, immunology, and cardiovascular diseases. In Parkinson’s disease and related disorders, multiple studies have identified the implications of specific miRNAs and the polymorphisms of miRNA target genes during the disease pathogenesis. With a focus on Parkinson’s disease, spinocerebellar ataxia, hereditary spastic paraplegia, and Huntington’s disease, this review summarizes and interprets the observations, and proposes future research topics in this field.

  20. N6-adenosine methylation in MiRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea Berulava

    Full Text Available Methylation of N6-adenosine (m6A has been observed in many different classes of RNA, but its prevalence in microRNAs (miRNAs has not yet been studied. Here we show that a knockdown of the m6A demethylase FTO affects the steady-state levels of several miRNAs. Moreover, RNA immunoprecipitation with an anti-m6A-antibody followed by RNA-seq revealed that a significant fraction of miRNAs contains m6A. By motif searches we have discovered consensus sequences discriminating between methylated and unmethylated miRNAs. The epigenetic modification of an epigenetic modifier as described here adds a new layer to the complexity of the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression.

  1. miRNAs as therapeutic targets in ischemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Robert J A; van Rooij, Eva

    2010-06-01

    Ischemic heart disease is a form of congestive heart failure that is caused by insufficient blood supply to the heart, resulting in a loss of viable tissue. In response to the injury, the non-ischemic myocardium displays signs of secondary remodeling, like interstitial fibrosis and hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes. This remodeling process further deteriorates pump function and increases susceptibility to arrhythmias. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression in a sequence-dependent manner. Recently, several groups identified miRNAs as crucial gene regulators in response to myocardial infarction (MI) and during post-MI remodeling. In this review, we discuss how modulation of these miRNAs represents a promising new therapeutic strategy to improve the clinical outcome in ischemic heart disease.

  2. Circulating microRNAs in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamam, Rimi; Hamam, Dana; Alsaleh, Khalid A

    2017-01-01

    Effective management of breast cancer depends on early diagnosis and proper monitoring of patients' response to therapy. However, these goals are difficult to achieve because of the lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers for early detection and for disease monitoring. Accumulating evidence in ...... circulating miRNAs as diagnostic, prognostic or predictive biomarkers in breast cancer management.......Effective management of breast cancer depends on early diagnosis and proper monitoring of patients' response to therapy. However, these goals are difficult to achieve because of the lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers for early detection and for disease monitoring. Accumulating evidence...... in the past several years has highlighted the potential use of peripheral blood circulating nucleic acids such as DNA, mRNA and micro (mi)RNA in breast cancer diagnosis, prognosis and for monitoring response to anticancer therapy. Among these, circulating miRNA is increasingly recognized as a promising...

  3. Identification of microRNAs in the coral Stylophora pistillata.

    KAUST Repository

    Liew, Yi Jin

    2014-03-21

    Coral reefs are major contributors to marine biodiversity. However, they are in rapid decline due to global environmental changes such as rising sea surface temperatures, ocean acidification, and pollution. Genomic and transcriptomic analyses have broadened our understanding of coral biology, but a study of the microRNA (miRNA) repertoire of corals is missing. miRNAs constitute a class of small non-coding RNAs of ∼22 nt in size that play crucial roles in development, metabolism, and stress response in plants and animals alike. In this study, we examined the coral Stylophora pistillata for the presence of miRNAs and the corresponding core protein machinery required for their processing and function. Based on small RNA sequencing, we present evidence for 31 bona fide microRNAs, 5 of which (miR-100, miR-2022, miR-2023, miR-2030, and miR-2036) are conserved in other metazoans. Homologues of Argonaute, Piwi, Dicer, Drosha, Pasha, and HEN1 were identified in the transcriptome of S. pistillata based on strong sequence conservation with known RNAi proteins, with additional support derived from phylogenetic trees. Examination of putative miRNA gene targets indicates potential roles in development, metabolism, immunity, and biomineralisation for several of the microRNAs. Here, we present first evidence of a functional RNAi machinery and five conserved miRNAs in S. pistillata, implying that miRNAs play a role in organismal biology of scleractinian corals. Analysis of predicted miRNA target genes in S. pistillata suggests potential roles of miRNAs in symbiosis and coral calcification. Given the importance of miRNAs in regulating gene expression in other metazoans, further expression analyses of small non-coding RNAs in transcriptional studies of corals should be informative about miRNA-affected processes and pathways.

  4. MicroRNA-encoding long non-coding RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Xiaopeng

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent analysis of the mouse transcriptional data has revealed the existence of ~34,000 messenger-like non-coding RNAs (ml-ncRNAs. Whereas the functional properties of these ml-ncRNAs are beginning to be unravelled, no functional information is available for the large majority of these transcripts. Results A few ml-ncRNA have been shown to have genomic loci that overlap with microRNA loci, leading us to suspect that a fraction of ml-ncRNA may encode microRNAs. We therefore developed an algorithm (PriMir for specifically detecting potential microRNA-encoding transcripts in the entire set of 34,030 mouse full-length ml-ncRNAs. In combination with mouse-rat sequence conservation, this algorithm detected 97 (80 of them were novel strong miRNA-encoding candidates, and for 52 of these we obtained experimental evidence for the existence of their corresponding mature microRNA by microarray and stem-loop RT-PCR. Sequence analysis of the microRNA-encoding RNAs revealed an internal motif, whose presence correlates strongly (R2 = 0.9, P-value = 2.2 × 10-16 with the occurrence of stem-loops with characteristics of known pre-miRNAs, indicating the presence of a larger number microRNA-encoding RNAs (from 300 up to 800 in the ml-ncRNAs population. Conclusion Our work highlights a unique group of ml-ncRNAs and offers clues to their functions.

  5. Guardian small RNAs and sex determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuma, Susumu; Kawamoto, Munetaka; Kiuchi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The W chromosome of the silkworm Bombyx mori has been known to determine femaleness for more than 80 years. However, the feminizing gene has not been molecularly identified, because the B. mori W chromosome is almost fully occupied by a large number of transposable elements. The W chromosome-derived feminizing factor of B. mori was recently shown to be a female-specific PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA). piRNAs are small RNAs that potentially repress invading "non-self" elements (e.g., transposons and virus-like elements) by associating with PIWI proteins. Our results revealed that female-specific piRNA precursors, which we named Fem, are transcribed from the sex-determining region of the W chromosome at the early embryonic stage and are processed into a single mature piRNA (Fem piRNA). Fem piRNA forms a complex with Siwi (silkworm Piwi), which cleaves a protein-coding mRNA transcribed from the Z chromosome. RNA interference of this Z-linked gene, which we named Masc, revealed that this gene encodes a protein required for masculinization and dosage compensation. Fem and Masc both participate in the ping-pong cycle of the piRNA amplification loop by associating with the 2 B. mori PIWI proteins Siwi and BmAgo3 (silkworm Ago3), respectively, indicating that the piRNA-mediated interaction between the 2 sex chromosomes is the primary signal for the B. mori sex determination cascade. Fem is a non-transposable repetitive sequence on the W chromosome, whereas Masc is a single-copy protein-coding gene. It is of great interest how the piRNA system recognizes "self "Masc mRNA as "non-self" RNA.

  6. Expression of Mitochondrial Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) Is Modulated by High Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Oncogenes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Claudio; Campos, América; Vidaurre, Soledad; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Boccardo, Enrique; Burzio, Verónica A.; Varas, Manuel; Villegas, Jaime; Villa, Luisa L.; Valenzuela, Pablo D. T.; Socías, Miguel; Roberts, Sally; Burzio, Luis O.

    2012-01-01

    The study of RNA and DNA oncogenic viruses has proved invaluable in the discovery of key cellular pathways that are rendered dysfunctional during cancer progression. An example is high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), the etiological agent of cervical cancer. The role of HPV oncogenes in cellular immortalization and transformation has been extensively investigated. We reported the differential expression of a family of human mitochondrial non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) between normal and cancer cells. Normal cells express a sense mitochondrial ncRNA (SncmtRNA) that seems to be required for cell proliferation and two antisense transcripts (ASncmtRNAs). In contrast, the ASncmtRNAs are down-regulated in cancer cells. To shed some light on the mechanisms that trigger down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs, we studied human keratinocytes (HFK) immortalized with HPV. Here we show that immortalization of HFK with HPV-16 or 18 causes down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs and induces the expression of a new sense transcript named SncmtRNA-2. Transduction of HFK with both E6 and E7 is sufficient to induce expression of SncmtRNA-2. Moreover, E2 oncogene is involved in down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs. Knockdown of E2 in immortalized cells reestablishes in a reversible manner the expression of the ASncmtRNAs, suggesting that endogenous cellular factors(s) could play functions analogous to E2 during non-HPV-induced oncogenesis. PMID:22539350

  7. Expression of mitochondrial non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) is modulated by high risk human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villota, Claudio; Campos, América; Vidaurre, Soledad; Oliveira-Cruz, Luciana; Boccardo, Enrique; Burzio, Verónica A; Varas, Manuel; Villegas, Jaime; Villa, Luisa L; Valenzuela, Pablo D T; Socías, Miguel; Roberts, Sally; Burzio, Luis O

    2012-06-15

    The study of RNA and DNA oncogenic viruses has proved invaluable in the discovery of key cellular pathways that are rendered dysfunctional during cancer progression. An example is high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), the etiological agent of cervical cancer. The role of HPV oncogenes in cellular immortalization and transformation has been extensively investigated. We reported the differential expression of a family of human mitochondrial non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) between normal and cancer cells. Normal cells express a sense mitochondrial ncRNA (SncmtRNA) that seems to be required for cell proliferation and two antisense transcripts (ASncmtRNAs). In contrast, the ASncmtRNAs are down-regulated in cancer cells. To shed some light on the mechanisms that trigger down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs, we studied human keratinocytes (HFK) immortalized with HPV. Here we show that immortalization of HFK with HPV-16 or 18 causes down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs and induces the expression of a new sense transcript named SncmtRNA-2. Transduction of HFK with both E6 and E7 is sufficient to induce expression of SncmtRNA-2. Moreover, E2 oncogene is involved in down-regulation of the ASncmtRNAs. Knockdown of E2 in immortalized cells reestablishes in a reversible manner the expression of the ASncmtRNAs, suggesting that endogenous cellular factors(s) could play functions analogous to E2 during non-HPV-induced oncogenesis.

  8. Time-Dependent Expression Profiles of microRNAs and mRNAs in Rat Milk Whey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hirohisa; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Shimizu, Takashi; Sekine, Kazunori; Ochiya, Takahiro; Takase, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    Functional RNAs, such as microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA, are present in milk, but their roles are unknown. To clarify the roles of milk RNAs, further studies using experimental animals such as rats are needed. However, it is unclear whether rat milk also contains functional RNAs and what their time dependent expression profiles are. Thus, we prepared total RNA from whey isolated from rat milk collected on days 2, 9, and 16 postpartum and analyzed using microarrays and quantitative PCR. The concentration of RNA in colostrum whey (day 2) was markedly higher than that in mature milk whey (days 9 and 16). Microarray analysis detected 161 miRNAs and 10,948 mRNA transcripts. Most of the miRNAs and mRNA transcripts were common to all tested milks. Finally, we selected some immune- and development-related miRNAs and mRNAs, and analysed them by quantitative PCR (in equal sample volumes) to determine their time-dependent changes in expression in detail. Some were significantly more highly expressed in colostrum whey than in mature milk whey, but some were expressed equally. And mRNA expression levels of some cytokines and hormones did not reflect the protein levels. It is still unknown whether RNAs in milk play biological roles in neonates. However, our data will help guide future in vivo studies using experimental animals such as rats. PMID:24533154

  9. Regulatory RNAs in Bacillus subtilis: a Gram-Positive Perspective on Bacterial RNA-Mediated Regulation of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Ruben A. T.; Nicolas, Pierre; Denham, Emma L.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacteria can employ widely diverse RNA molecules to regulate their gene expression. Such molecules include trans-acting small regulatory RNAs, antisense RNAs, and a variety of transcriptional attenuation mechanisms in the 5′ untranslated region. Thus far, most regulatory RNA research has focused on Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Hence, there is uncertainty about whether the resulting insights can be extrapolated directly to other bacteria, such as the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. A recent study identified 1,583 putative regulatory RNAs in B. subtilis, whose expression was assessed across 104 conditions. Here, we review the current understanding of RNA-based regulation in B. subtilis, and we categorize the newly identified putative regulatory RNAs on the basis of their conservation in other bacilli and the stability of their predicted secondary structures. Our present evaluation of the publicly available data indicates that RNA-mediated gene regulation in B. subtilis mostly involves elements at the 5′ ends of mRNA molecules. These can include 5′ secondary structure elements and metabolite-, tRNA-, or protein-binding sites. Importantly, sense-independent segments are identified as the most conserved and structured potential regulatory RNAs in B. subtilis. Altogether, the present survey provides many leads for the identification of new regulatory RNA functions in B. subtilis. PMID:27784798

  10. Evaluation and rational design of guide RNAs for efficient CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in Ciona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Shashank; Haeussler, Maximilian; Razy-Krajka, Florian; Christiaen, Lionel; Stolfi, Alberto

    2017-05-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system has emerged as an important tool for various genome engineering applications. A current obstacle to high throughput applications of CRISPR/Cas9 is the imprecise prediction of highly active single guide RNAs (sgRNAs). We previously implemented the CRISPR/Cas9 system to induce tissue-specific mutations in the tunicate Ciona. In the present study, we designed and tested 83 single guide RNA (sgRNA) vectors targeting 23 genes expressed in the cardiopharyngeal progenitors and surrounding tissues of Ciona embryo. Using high-throughput sequencing of mutagenized alleles, we identified guide sequences that correlate with sgRNA mutagenesis activity and used this information for the rational design of all possible sgRNAs targeting the Ciona transcriptome. We also describe a one-step cloning-free protocol for the assembly of sgRNA expression cassettes. These cassettes can be directly electroporated as unpurified PCR products into Ciona embryos for sgRNA expression in vivo, resulting in high frequency of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in somatic cells of electroporated embryos. We found a strong correlation between the frequency of an Ebf loss-of-function phenotype and the mutagenesis efficacies of individual Ebf-targeting sgRNAs tested using this method. We anticipate that our approach can be scaled up to systematically design and deliver highly efficient sgRNAs for the tissue-specific investigation of gene functions in Ciona. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulatory RNAs in Bacillus subtilis: a Gram-Positive Perspective on Bacterial RNA-Mediated Regulation of Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Ruben A T; Nicolas, Pierre; Denham, Emma L; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2016-12-01

    Bacteria can employ widely diverse RNA molecules to regulate their gene expression. Such molecules include trans-acting small regulatory RNAs, antisense RNAs, and a variety of transcriptional attenuation mechanisms in the 5' untranslated region. Thus far, most regulatory RNA research has focused on Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli and Salmonella. Hence, there is uncertainty about whether the resulting insights can be extrapolated directly to other bacteria, such as the Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. A recent study identified 1,583 putative regulatory RNAs in B. subtilis, whose expression was assessed across 104 conditions. Here, we review the current understanding of RNA-based regulation in B. subtilis, and we categorize the newly identified putative regulatory RNAs on the basis of their conservation in other bacilli and the stability of their predicted secondary structures. Our present evaluation of the publicly available data indicates that RNA-mediated gene regulation in B. subtilis mostly involves elements at the 5' ends of mRNA molecules. These can include 5' secondary structure elements and metabolite-, tRNA-, or protein-binding sites. Importantly, sense-independent segments are identified as the most conserved and structured potential regulatory RNAs in B. subtilis. Altogether, the present survey provides many leads for the identification of new regulatory RNA functions in B. subtilis. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Potato spindle tuber viroid infection triggers degradation of chloride channel protein CLC-b-like and Ribosomal protein S3a-like mRNAs in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar-Purushothama, Charith Raj; Iyer, Pavithran Sridharan; Perreault, Jean-Pierre

    2017-08-21

    It is well established that viroid derived small RNA (vd-sRNA) induces RNA silencing of endogenous mRNA. However, it remains not clear how exactly viroid infections can lead to severe symptom induction given the fact that fewer vd-sRNAs binding the specific target mRNAs were recovered from the infected plants. To answer this question, the two least expressed (+) and (-) strand vd-sRNAs of potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) binding to both the 3' UTR and the coding region of tomato mRNAs were analyzed by infecting tomato plants with two variants of PSTVd. As products of these putative target mRNAs are involved in plant phenotype, the effect of this viroid on these genes were analyzed by infecting tomato plants with two variants of PSTVd. The direct interaction between the vd-sRNAs and putative mRNAs was validated by artificial microRNA experiments in a transient expression system and by RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of cDNA ends. Parallel analysis of RNA ends of viroid infected plants revealed the widespread cleavage of the target mRNAs in locations other than the vd-sRNA binding site during the viroid infection implying the viroid-infection induced vd-sRNA independent degradation of endogenous mRNAs during viroid infection.

  13. Stress-induced ECM alteration modulates cellular microRNAs that feedback to readjust the extracellular environment and cell behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halyna R Shcherbata

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular environment is a complex entity comprising of the extracellular matrix (ECM and regulatory molecules. It is highly dynamic and under cell-extrinsic stress, transmits the stressed organism’s state to each individual ECM-connected cell. microRNAs (miRNAs are regulatory molecules involved in virtually all the processes in the cell, especially under stress. In this review, we analyse how microRNA expression is regulated downstream of various signal transduction pathways induced by changes in the extracellular environment. In particular, we focus on the muscular dystrophy-associated cell adhesion molecule dystroglycan capable of signal transduction. Then we show how exactly the same miRNAs feedback to regulate the extracellular environment. The ultimate goal of this bi-directional signal transduction process is to change cell behaviour under cell-extrinsic stress in order to respond to it accordingly.

  14. 2'-OMe-phosphorodithioate-modified siRNAs show increased loading into the RISC complex and enhanced anti-tumour activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sherry Y; Yang, Xianbin; Gharpure, Kshipra M; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Egli, Martin; McGuire, Michael H; Nagaraja, Archana S; Miyake, Takahito M; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pecot, Chad V; Taylor, Morgan; Pradeep, Sunila; Sierant, Malgorzata; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Choi, Hyun J; Previs, Rebecca A; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Huang, Li; Martinez, Carlos; Hassell, Tom; Ivan, Cristina; Sehgal, Vasudha; Singhania, Richa; Han, Hee-Dong; Su, Chang; Kim, Ji Hoon; Dalton, Heather J; Kovvali, Chandra; Keyomarsi, Khandan; McMillan, Nigel A J; Overwijk, Willem W; Liu, Jinsong; Lee, Ju-Seog; Baggerly, Keith A; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Ram, Prahlad T; Nawrot, Barbara; Sood, Anil K

    2014-03-12

    Improving small interfering RNA (siRNA) efficacy in target cell populations remains a challenge to its clinical implementation. Here, we report a chemical modification, consisting of phosphorodithioate (PS2) and 2'-O-Methyl (2'-OMe) MePS2 on one nucleotide that significantly enhances potency and resistance to degradation for various siRNAs. We find enhanced potency stems from an unforeseen increase in siRNA loading to the RNA-induced silencing complex, likely due to the unique interaction mediated by 2'-OMe and PS2. We demonstrate the therapeutic utility of MePS2 siRNAs in chemoresistant ovarian cancer mouse models via targeting GRAM domain containing 1B (GRAMD1B), a protein involved in chemoresistance. GRAMD1B silencing is achieved in tumours following MePS2-modified siRNA treatment, leading to a synergistic anti-tumour effect in combination with paclitaxel. Given the previously limited success in enhancing siRNA potency with chemically modified siRNAs, our findings represent an important advance in siRNA design with the potential for application in numerous cancer types.

  15. 2’f-OMe-phosphorodithioate modified siRNAs show increased loading into the RISC complex and enhanced anti-tumour activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sherry Y.; Yang, Xianbin; Gharpure, Kshipra M.; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Egli, Martin; McGuire, Michael H.; Nagaraja, Archana S.; Miyake, Takahito M.; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pecot, Chad V.; Taylor, Morgan; Pradeep, Sunila; Sierant, Malgorzata; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Choi, Hyun J.; Previs, Rebecca A.; Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N.; Huang, Li; Martinez, Carlos; Hassell, Tom; Ivan, Cristina; Sehgal, Vasudha; Singhania, Richa; Han, Hee-Dong; Su, Chang; Kim, Ji Hoon; Dalton, Heather J.; Kowali, Chandra; Keyomarsi, Khandan; McMillan, Nigel A.J.; Overwijk, Willem W.; Liu, Jinsong; Lee, Ju-Seog; Baggerly, Keith A.; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Ram, Prahlad T.; Nawrot, Barbara; Sood, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    Improving small interfering RNA (siRNA) efficacy in target cell populations remains a challenge to its clinical implementation. Here, we report a chemical modification, consisting of phosphorodithioate (PS2) and 2’-O-Methyl (2’-OMe) MePS2 on one nucleotide that significantly enhances potency and resistance to degradation for various siRNAs. We find enhanced potency stems from an unforeseen increase in siRNA loading to the RNA-induced silencing complex, likely due to the unique interaction mediated by 2’-OMe and PS2. We demonstrate the therapeutic utility of MePS2 siRNAs in chemoresistant ovarian cancer mouse models via targeting GRAM Domain Containing 1B (GRAMD1B), a protein involved in chemoresistance. GRAMD1B silencing is achieved in tumors following MePS2-modified siRNA treatment, leading to a synergistic anti-tumor effect in combination with paclitaxel. Given the previously limited success in enhancing siRNA potency with chemically modified siRNAs, our findings represent an important advance in siRNA design with the potential for application in numerous cancer types. PMID:24619206

  16. Non-coding RNAs in endometriosis: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panir, Kavita; Schjenken, John E; Robertson, Sarah A; Hull, M Louise

    2018-04-25

    Endometriosis is a benign gynaecological disorder, which affects 10% of reproductive-aged women and is characterized by endometrial cells from the lining of the uterus being found outside the uterine cavity. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms causing the development of this heterogeneous disease remain enigmatic, and a lack of effective biomarkers necessitates surgical intervention for diagnosis. There is international recognition that accurate non-invasive diagnostic tests and more effective therapies are urgently needed. Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) molecules, which are important regulators of cellular function, have been implicated in many chronic conditions. In endometriosis, transcriptome profiling of tissue samples and functional in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that ncRNAs are key contributors to the disease process. In this review, we outline the biogenesis of various ncRNAs relevant to endometriosis and then summarize the evidence indicating their roles in regulatory pathways that govern disease establishment and progression. Articles from 2000 to 2016 were selected for relevance, validity and quality, from results obtained in PubMed, MEDLINE and Google Scholar using the following search terms: ncRNA and reproduction; ncRNA and endometriosis; miRNA and endometriosis; lncRNA and endometriosis; siRNA and endometriosis; endometriosis; endometrial; cervical; ovary; uterus; reproductive tract. All articles were independently screened for eligibility by the authors. This review integrates extensive information from all relevant published studies focusing on microRNAs, long ncRNAs and short inhibitory RNAs in endometriosis. We outline the biological function and synthesis of microRNAs, long ncRNAs and short inhibitory RNAs and provide detailed findings from human research as well as functional studies carried out both in vitro and in vivo, including animal models. Although variability in findings between individual studies exists, collectively, the

  17. Fluorogenic RNA Mango aptamers for imaging small non-coding RNAs in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autour, Alexis; C Y Jeng, Sunny; D Cawte, Adam; Abdolahzadeh, Amir; Galli, Angela; Panchapakesan, Shanker S S; Rueda, David; Ryckelynck, Michael; Unrau, Peter J

    2018-02-13

    Despite having many key roles in cellular biology, directly imaging biologically important RNAs has been hindered by a lack of fluorescent tools equivalent to the fluorescent proteins available to study cellular proteins. Ideal RNA labelling systems must preserve biological function, have photophysical properties similar to existing fluorescent proteins, and be compatible with established live and fixed cell protein labelling strategies. Here, we report a microfluidics-based selection of three new high-affinity RNA Mango fluorogenic aptamers. Two of these are as bright or brighter than enhanced GFP when bound to TO1-Biotin. Furthermore, we show that the new Mangos can accurately image the subcellular localization of three small non-coding RNAs (5S, U6, and a box C/D scaRNA) in fixed and live mammalian cells. These new aptamers have many potential applications to study RNA function and dynamics both in vitro and in mammalian cells.

  18. RDE-1 slicer activity is required only for passenger-strand cleavage during RNAi in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steiner, F.A.; Okihara, K.L.; Hoogstrate, S.W.; Sijen, T.; Ketting, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a process in which double-stranded RNA is cleaved into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) that induce the destruction of homologous single-stranded mRNAs. Argonaute proteins are essential components of this silencing process; they bind siRNAs directly and can cleave RNA

  19. Zcchc11 Uridylates Mature miRNAs to Enhance Neonatal IGF-1 Expression, Growth, and Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Elyse; Matsuura, Kori Y.; Ferrari, Joseph D.;