WorldWideScience

Sample records for interdisciplinary expert consultation

  1. Consultant pharmacists, advanced practice nurses, and the interdisciplinary team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    Although in geriatrics we are better than many other clinical disciplines in terms of providing interdisciplinary care to older adults, I hope that we will continue to recognize how much more could actually be done. Before addressing the relationship between advanced practice nurses (APNs) and consultant pharmacists in real world settings, I want to review teamwork in geriatrics in general. It is critical to define what we mean by team, what type of team, and what the goals are of this teamwork.

  2. Novice-Expert Design Consultations: Findings from a Field Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deken, F.; Aurisicchio, M.; Kleinsmann, M.; Lauche, K.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the process of novice-expert consultation meetings in an organizational context by identifying phases of the discourse and analysing the nature of these phases. An empirical study was performed at Rolls-Royce Aerospace Engineering by capturing 7 audio-records of

  3. Expert system for skin problem consultation in Thai traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopparatkiat, Pornchai; na Nagara, Byaporn; Chansa-ngavej, Chuvej

    2014-01-01

    This paper aimed to demonstrate the research and development of a rule-based expert system for skin problem consulting in the areas of acne, melasma, freckle, wrinkle, and uneven skin tone, with recommended treatments from Thai traditional medicine knowledge. The tool selected for developing the expert system is a software program written in the PHP language. MySQL database is used to work together with PHP for building database of the expert system. The system is web-based and can be reached from anywhere with Internet access. The developed expert system gave recommendations on the skin problem treatment with Thai herbal recipes and Thai herbal cosmetics based on 416 rules derived from primary and secondary sources. The system had been tested by 50 users consisting of dermatologists, Thai traditional medicine doctors, and general users. The developed system was considered good for learning and consultation. The present work showed how such a scattered body of traditional knowledge as Thai traditional medicine and herbal recipes could be collected, organised and made accessible to users and interested parties. The expert system developed herein should contribute in a meaningful way towards preserving the knowledge and helping promote the use of Thai traditional medicine as a practical alternative medicine for the treatment of illnesses.

  4. The consultant nurse - expert practitioner and much more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Theresa; Butler-Williams, Carole; Easton, Karen; Ingledew, Ian; Parkin, Donna; Wade, Sharon; Warner, Richard

    The consultant nurse (CN) role is usually described in terms of four domains devised by the Department of Health - clinical practice, education and training, leadership, and research and service development. This study set out to explicate the diversity and complexity of CN roles in an NHS trust; to describe aspects of extraordinary practice and to identify perceived differences between this role and other advanced practice roles. Accounts were written by six CNs and subjected to concept mapping to facilitate identification of extraordinary practice. Four themes emerged: entrepreneurial activity and innovation; clinical autonomy and role dynamism; influential national and international research conduct; consultancy and education across discipline boundaries. These included descriptions of higher order skills that surpass usual requirements of 'expert' or 'advanced' practice. Comparisons with other advanced practice roles are drawn from the literature and data collected in this study. Differences between the roles have implications for sustainability.

  5. Different roles of electromagnetic field experts when giving policy advice: an expert consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt, Pita; Knol, Anne B; Petersen, Arthur C; Lebret, Erik

    2015-01-21

    The overall evidence for adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) at levels of exposure normally experienced by the public is generally considered weak. However, whether long-term health effects arise remains uncertain and scientific policy advice is therefore given against a background of uncertainty. Several theories exist about different roles that experts may take when they provide advice on complex issues such as EMF. To provide empirical evidence for these theories, we conducted an expert consultation with as main research question: What are the different roles of EMF experts when they provide policy advice? Q methodology was used to empirically test theoretical notions on the existence and determinants of different expert roles and to analyze which roles actually play out in the domain of EMF. Experts were selected based on a structured nominee process. In total 32 international EMF experts participated. Responses were analyzed using Principal Component Analysis and for the open questions we used Atlas.ti. Four expert roles were found. Most striking differences between the four roles are whether experts consider current EMF policies adequate or not, whether additional -precautionary- measures are needed, and how experts view their position vis-à-vis policymakers and/or other stakeholders. This empirical study provides support for the so far mainly theoretical debate about the existence of different roles of experts when they give policy advice. The experts' assessment of the degree of uncertainty of the issue turned out to be highly associated with their role. We argue that part of the controversy that exists in the debate regarding scientific policy advice on EMF is about different values and roles.

  6. Addressing Palliative Sedation during Expert Consultation: A Descriptive Analysis of the Practice of Dutch Palliative Care Consultation Teams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Hoek

    Full Text Available Since palliative sedation is considered a complex intervention, consultation teams are increasingly established to support general practice. This study aims to offer insight into the frequency and characteristics of expert consultations regarding palliative sedation.We performed a retrospective analysis of a longitudinal database. This database contained all patient-related consultations by Dutch Palliative Care Consultation teams, that were requested between 2004 and 2011. We described the frequency and characteristics of these consultations, in particular of the subgroup of consultations in which palliative sedation was addressed (i.e. PSa consultations. We used multivariate regression analysis to explore consultation characteristics associated with a higher likelihood of PSa consultations.Of the 44,443 initial consultations, most were requested by general practitioners (73% and most concerned patients with cancer (86%. Palliative sedation was addressed in 18.1% of all consultations. Palliative sedation was relatively more often discussed during consultations for patients with a neurologic disease (OR 1.79; 95% CI: 1.51-2.12 or COPD (OR 1.39; 95% CI: 1.15-1.69 than for patients with cancer. We observed a higher likelihood of PSa consultations if the following topics were also addressed during consultation: dyspnoea (OR 1.30; 95% CI: 1.22-1.40, agitation/delirium (OR 1.57; 95% CI: 1.47-1.68, exhaustion (OR 2.89; 95% CI: 2.61-3.20, euthanasia-related questions (OR 2.65; 95% CI: 2.37-2.96 or existential issues (OR 1.55; 95% CI: 1.31-1.83.In conclusion, PSa consultations accounted for almost one-fifth of all expert consultations and were associated with several case-related characteristics. These characteristics may help clinicians in identifying patients at risk for a more complex disease trajectory at the end of life.

  7. Distributed Expert-Based Information Systems: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkin, Nicholas J.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Based on an international workshop held at Rutgers University, this article discusses problems and issues in the design, research, and implementation of distributed expert-based information systems (DEBIS). Information needs of end users are stressed, architectures for expert information retrieval systems are explored, and prototype models are…

  8. [Expert evidence in whiplash injury: interdisciplinary orthopaedic and biomechanical approach].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, M N; Auer, C

    2014-03-01

    Considering the controversially discussed issue of whiplash injury a pragmatic approach based on our own experience in the area of forensic expert opinion is presented. Findings of accident analysis and biomechanics are correlated with the individual situation after the accident (initial clinical appearance), the course of the ailment and the indispensable physical examination. The latter leads to determination of the individual vulnerability (not increased/increased) which is important for the evaluation of the physical condition and estimation of the physical stress limit. These limits vary widely between individuals and must be considered carefully when relating dose and effect of accident severity to a possible physical injury. Determination of the accident severity is especially important when there are no objective signs of injury and the existence of a minor whiplash injury (Quebec Task Force degree 1 or 2) is in question.

  9. Clinical Ethics Consultants are not "Ethics" Experts-But They do Have Expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lisa M

    2016-08-01

    The attempt to critique the profession of clinical ethics consultation by establishing the impossibility of ethics expertise has been a red herring. Decisions made in clinical ethics cases are almost never based purely on moral judgments. Instead, they are all-things-considered judgments that involve determining how to balance other values as well. A standard of justified decision-making in this context would enable us to identify experts who could achieve these standards more often than others, and thus provide a basis for expertise in clinical ethics consultation. This expertise relies in part on what Richard Zaner calls the "expert knowledge of ethical phenomena" (1988, 8).

  10. EXPERT MODEL OF CHILDREN'S HEALTH AS A BASIS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION OF INTERDISCIPLINARY MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Chechel’nitskaya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For the purpose of provision of wide range of specialists with authentic information about health state of children and ado les cents it's necessary to create new systems of their observation, based on interdisciplinary principles. An expert model of health, which gives a basis for a construction of such systems, is described in this article. 132 experts took part in this trial; they were doctors, psychologists, teachers, philosophers, sociologists, and elder adolescents and adults independently of their profession. A del phi method was used in this expert model. A factorial analysis was used for a classification of health indicators and factors, which influence on it. A detailed nominal expert classification was suggested, and the state of health can be estimated on the basis of it as an object, having definite behaviors and depending of some external factors. A nominal expert classification includes 36 indices of state of health and 37 factors, influencing on it. An ordinal expert classification was obtained as a result of factorial analysis, which allows estimation of significance level of every index.Key words: health, monitoring, expert questionnaires, heath monitoring.

  11. Analysis and Lessons Learned from an Online, Consultative Dialogue between Community Leaders and Climate Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylak-Glassman, E.; Clavin, C.

    2016-12-01

    Common approaches to climate resilience planning in the United States rely upon participatory planning approaches and dialogues between decision-makers, science translators, and subject matter experts. In an effort to explore alternative approaches support community climate resilience planning, a pilot of a public-private collaboration called the Resilience Dialogues was held in February and March of 2016. The Resilience Dialogues pilot was an online, asynchronous conversation between community leaders and climate experts, designed to help communities begin the process of climate resilience planning. In order to identify lessons learned from the pilot, we analyzed the discourse of the facilitated dialogues, administered surveys and conducted interviews with participants. Our analysis of the pilot suggests that participating community leaders found value in the consultative dialogue with climate experts, despite limited community-originated requests for climate information. Community leaders most often asked for advice regarding adaptation planning, including specific engineering guidance and advice on how to engage community members around the topic of resilience. Community leaders that had access to downscaled climate data asked experts about how to incorporate the data into their existing planning processes. The guidance sought by community leaders during the pilot shows a large range of hurdles that communities face in using climate information to inform their decision-making processes. Having a forum that connects community leaders with relevant experts and other community leaders who have familiarity with both climate impacts and municipal planning processes would likely help communities accelerate their resilience efforts.

  12. Design Features in Games for Health: Disciplinary and Interdisciplinary Expert Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Christina; Wilcox, Lauren; Ng, Wendy; Schiffer, Jade; Hammer, Jessica

    2017-06-01

    Games for health (G4H) aim to improve health outcomes and encourage behavior change. While existing theoretical frameworks describe features of both games and health interventions, there has been limited systematic investigation into how disciplinary and interdisciplinary stakeholders understand design features in G4H. We recruited 18 experts from the fields of game design, behavioral health, and games for health, and prompted them with 16 sample games. Applying methods including open card sorting and triading, we elicited themes and features (e.g., real-world interaction, game mechanics) around G4H. We found evidence of conceptual differences suggesting that a G4H perspective is not simply the sum of game and health perspectives. At the same time, we found evidence of convergence in stakeholder views, including areas where game experts provided insights about health and vice versa. We discuss how this work can be applied to provide conceptual tools, improve the G4H design process, and guide approaches to encoding G4H-related data for large-scale empirical analysis.

  13. Consultation System with Contact Person through On-demand Calling of a Proper Expert for a Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terahama, Yukinori; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Kinukawa, Hiroshi

    The financial service counter is consisted of several advisory services, and service improvement is needed to offer effectively proper responses for various kinds of customer request. But it is not practical to put various expert staffs at each financial branch office, because of much cost and task performance falling. This paper proposes the window consultation system with contact persons at the financial branch office through on-demand calling of a proper expert for a problem. This proposed system has mainly two functions, remote experts selection and tele-consultation function, to offer replies or expert advises to the problem, using multimedia network technology. Customers can consult effectively with a proper expert staff about their requests through the proposed system, because it can connect the expert by the clerk of the window counter who comprehends beforehand the customer's requests. This system with contact persons can offer high quality services and avoid mistakes, which a customer makes in operating the consultation systems terminal alone by oneself. And this system is composed of three-layered structures, application component layer, middleware component layer and fundamental component layer. This structure is able to construct much easily various services at various scale financial branch office.

  14. Effective nutrition programming for children and the role of UNICEF: consensus points from an expert consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultink, Werner; Arabi, Mandana

    2009-06-01

    Countries of the world have agreed on eradicating extreme poverty and hunger and reducing the mortality rate of children under five by two-thirds by 2015 as part of the Millennium Development Goals, and without mainstreaming maternal, infant, and young child nutrition in the development agenda, these goals cannot be achieved. Although the recent Lancet Series on Maternal and Child Undernutrition brought attention to the importance of early nutrition interventions to improve child health, nutrition, and future economic productivity, there needs to be a more concerted effort at clarifying the path forward, focusing on moving beyond projects and evidence from randomized, controlled trials towards developing large-scale programs with sound plausibility design to achieve results for children. In an effort to cast a fresh eye on nutrition programming in light of the new evidence, UNICEF Headquarters hosted an Expert Consultation on effective nutrition programming with participants from various academic organizations and United Nations agencies to discuss effective program strategies in nutrition. The consultation resulted in recommendations for UNICEF on eight focus areas for programming and recognition of six overarching themes. It is clear that more action is needed to accelerate progress: more effective global coalitions, better coordination, more coherence, and better targeting of efforts.

  15. Results of a transparent expert consultation on patient and public involvement in palliative care research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveson, Barbara A; de Wolf-Linder, Susanne; Witt, Jana; Newson, Kirstie; Morris, Carolyn; Higginson, Irene J; Evans, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Support and evidence for patient, unpaid caregiver and public involvement in research (user involvement) are growing. Consensus on how best to involve users in palliative care research is lacking. Aim: To determine an optimal user-involvement model for palliative care research. Design: We hosted a consultation workshop using expert presentations, discussion and nominal group technique to generate recommendations and consensus on agreement of importance. A total of 35 users and 32 researchers were approached to attend the workshop, which included break-out groups and a ranking exercise. Descriptive statistical analysis to establish consensus and highlight divergence was applied. Qualitative analysis of discussions was completed to aid interpretation of findings. Setting/participants: Participants involved in palliative care research were invited to a global research institute, UK. Results: A total of 12 users and 5 researchers participated. Users wanted their involvement to be more visible, including during dissemination, with a greater emphasis on the difference their involvement makes. Researchers wanted to improve productivity, relevance and quality through involvement. Users and researchers agreed that an optimal model should consist of (a) early involvement to ensure meaningful involvement and impact and (b) diverse virtual and face-to-face involvement methods to ensure flexibility. Conclusion: For involvement in palliative care research to succeed, early and flexible involvement is required. Researchers should advertise opportunities for involvement and promote impact of involvement via dissemination plans. Users should prioritise adding value to research through enhancing productivity, quality and relevance. More research is needed not only to inform implementation and ensure effectiveness but also to investigate the cost-effectiveness of involvement in palliative care research. PMID:25931336

  16. The role of process analysis and expert consultation in implementing an electronic medical record solution for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubeshan Perumal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Process analysis and expert consultation help streamline and optimise processes, but these are underutilised. The World Health Organisation (WHO recommends migration to electronic data collection by 2015, partly in response to multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB. We explore the influence of process analysis and iterative expert consultation, on shaping health information solutions to MDR-TB programmes.Methods: The study employs a two phase design. Phase one involves a process analysis of the South African National Tuberculosis Programme and an electronic medical records (EMR solution and the generation of a detailed process model grounded in the fit between individual task and technology (FITT theoretical framework using ‘business process modelling notation’. Phase two involves a two round Delphi study in the clinical management of tuberculosis and implementers of EMR solutions. Expert opinion is analysed according to emergent thematic content. Analyses and graphical model representation are performed using Microsoft Excel® and Visio® software.Results: A detailed process model is constructed which reveals 54 break points, 12 gaps, 3 risks, 5 wastes. Five participants are included in the Delphi study which support the findings of the process analysis. Thematic analysis identifies five themes: the individual, the process, technology, capacity, and collaboration. The opportunity to include synergistic relations across programmes emerges as a strong theme.Conclusions: Overall, the findings highlight inefficiencies, risk and gaps in the current process and the need for an operational excellence intervention. The study demonstrated the value of process engineering with iterative expert consultation toward developing a meaningful EMR solution consultation in a resource constrained, developing world context.

  17. Conclusions and recommendations of a WHO expert consultation meeting on iron supplementation for infants and young children in malaria endemic areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Allen, L; Black, R E; Brandes, N; Brittenham, G; Chazot, G; Chunming, C; Crawley, J; de Benoist, B; Dalmiya, N; Darnton-Hill, I; Dewey, K; El-Arifeen, S; Fontaine, O; Geissler, C; Haberle, H; Harvey, P; Hasler, J; Hershko, C; Hurrell, R; Juma, M A; Lönnerdal, B; Lozoff, B; Lynch, S; Martines Salgado, H; McLean, E; Metz, J; Oppenheimer, S; Premji, Z; Prentice, A; Ramsan, M; Ratledge, C; Stoltzfus, R; Tielsch, J; Winachagoon, P

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the results of an expert consultation meeting aimed at evaluating the safety and public health implications of administering supplemental iron to infants and young children in malaria-endemic areas...

  18. Experts' Encounters in Antenatal Diabetes Care: A Descriptive Study of Verbal Communication in Midwife-Led Consultations

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    Christina Furskog Risa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We regard consultations as cocreated communicatively by the parties involved. In this paper on verbal communication in midwife-led consultations, we consequently focus on the actual conversation taking place between the midwife and the pregnant woman with diabetes, especially on those sequences where the pregnant woman initiated a topic of concern in the conversation. Methods. This paper was undertaken in four hospital outpatient clinics in Norway. Ten antenatal consultations between midwives and pregnant women were audiotaped, transcribed to text, and analyzed using theme-oriented discourse analysis. Two communicative patterns were revealed: an expert's frame and a shared experts' frame. Within each frame, different communicative variations are presented. The topics women initiated in the conversations were (i delivery, time and mode; (ii previous birth experience; (iii labor pain; and (iv breast feeding, diabetes management, and fetal weight. Conclusion. Different ways of communicating seem to create different opportunities for the parties to share each other's perspectives. Adequate responses and a listening attitude as well as an ambiguous way of talking seem to open up for the pregnant women's perspectives. Further studies are needed to investigate the obstacles to, and premises for, providing midwifery care in a specialist outpatient setting.

  19. SFTYCHEF: A Consultative, Diagnostic Expert System for Trench Excavation Safety Analysis on Light Commercial Construction Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-30

    following seven characteristics. 1. EXPERTISE - The most important goal in expert system work is to attain the high level of performance that a human .The...simply results that are right , but as can easily be imagined, problems unfold quickly when right and wrong answers are not known or when multiple right ...Chang, T. C., Sanjay Joshi, R. L. Kashyap , S. R. T. Kumara, and C. L. Moodie, "Expert Systems in Industrial Engineering." Technical Report, Purdue

  20. On Tour with the "Accidental" Expert: Ethical Dilemmas of the Development Consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Michael L.

    This paper explores Max Weber's study of the origins of the secularization of the Puritan work ethic and examines the hybridized category of secular science expert. The hybrid construct provides an opening for the critical analysis of the concrete activity of development from two perspectives, the structural and the individual. The individual…

  1. Proceedings of the 3rd Expert Consultation and Planning Meeting on Infant and Young Child Nutrition--(Part 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarra, Sofia; Chan, Pauline

    2013-04-01

    During the 2nd ILSI SEA Region Expert Consultation and Planning Meeting in 2011, the following information gaps were identified: (i) Some Southeast Asian countries did not have data on infant and young child feeding (IYCF) indicators; (ii) There is a need to know the reasons for the disparities in duration of breastfeeding, age of giving complementary foods, and other breastfeeding and complementary feeding practices in Southeast Asian populations; (iii) Optimal complementary feeding practices that are most suitable in the context of Southeast Asia need to be identified. This report presents highlights from a literature review regarding the above topics. Findings from nationwide surveys and small scale studies were compiled to provide a snapshot of the state of infant and young child feeding practices in the region. Results for Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines, and Vietnam are presented here.

  2. Defining European preparedness and research needs regarding emerging infectious animal diseases: results from a Delphi expert consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentholt, M T A; Cardoen, S; Imberechts, H; Van Huffel, X; Ooms, B W; Frewer, L J

    2012-02-01

    Emerging and major infectious animal diseases can have significant international impact on social, economic and environmental level, and are being driven by various factors. Prevention and control measures should be prepared at both national and international level to mitigate these disease risks. Research to support such policy development is mostly carried out at national level and dedicated transnational research programmes are still in its infancy. This research reports on part of a process to develop a common strategic research agenda on emerging and major infectious diseases of livestock in Europe, covering a 5-15-year time span. A two round online Delphi study was conducted to explore the views of experts on issues relating to research needs on emerging infectious diseases of livestock in Europe. Drivers that may influence the incidence of emerging infectious animal diseases in both the short (next 5 years) and medium term (10-15 years) were identified. Drivers related to regulatory measures and biological science developments were thought to decrease the incidence, and socio-economic factors to increase the incidence of emerging infectious animal diseases. From the first round a list of threats to animal health was compiled and participants combined these threats with relevant drivers in the second round. Next to identifying threats to animal health, also possible mitigatory actions to reduce the negative impact of these threats were identified. Participants emphasised that interdisciplinary research is needed to understand drivers of emerging infectious animal diseases, as well as to develop prevention and control measures which are both socio-economic and technical. From this it can be concluded that interdisciplinary research combining both natural and social research themes is required. Some of the European member states research budget needs to be allocated so that effective prevention and mitigation strategies can be developed. Copyright © 2011

  3. Electronic expert consultation using digital still images for evaluation of atypical small acinar proliferations of the prostate: a comparison with immunohistochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banihashemi, Amir; Asgari, Mojgan; Shooshtarizade, Tina; Abolhasani, Maryam; Mireskandari, Masoud

    2014-06-01

    This study was performed on a series of prostate needle biopsies with diagnosis of atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) to verify to what extent the application of immunohistochemistry (IHC) for p504s and p63 markers as well as expert consultation by still images could affect the diagnosis. The results of these 2 methods were compared. Immunohistochemistry staining for p504s and p63 was performed on sections from 42 patients with a primary diagnosis of ASAP. Meanwhile, digital still images were taken from hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides of cases and were sent to an expert uropathologist, blind to IHC staining interpretations. The results of IHC staining were compared with diagnostic interpretations of the consultant pathologist. In 13 cases, the focus of concern was not detectable on IHC slides. In the remaining 29 cases, IHC showed a benign and malignant expression pattern in 17 and 9 patients, respectively. In 3 cases, IHC findings were inconclusive and retained the diagnosis of ASAP. The consultant pathologist diagnosed 11 cases of benign and 7 cases of malignant processes. He retained the diagnosis of ASAP in 11 cases. There was high concordance between the results of IHC and electronic consultation in the group of benign cases. All 11 cases with the diagnosis of benignancy by electronic consultation showed a benign IHC pattern. Among 7 cases with the diagnosis of malignancy by the consultant pathologist, 5 were classified as malignant, 1 as benign, and 1 as inconclusive IHC groups. Considering problems with IHC staining of prostate needle biopsy, including loss of focus of interest, expert consultation using still images can provide very useful diagnostic information. This approach can be used as an adjunct to other diagnostic activities like IHC or even as an independent source of information to reach more accurate diagnoses in ASAP cases, particularly in institutions with limited resources.

  4. Road Safety Data, Collection, Transfer and Analysis DaCoTa. Workpackage 4, Decision Support: Deliverable 4.1: Consultation of a panel of experts on the needs for data and technical tools in road safety policy-making.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupont, E. Martensen, H. Papadimitriou, E. Yannis, G. Muhlrad, N. Jähi, H. Vallet, G. Giustiniani, G. Tripodi, A. Usami, D. Bax, C. Wijnen, W. Schöne, M.-L. Machata, K. Buttle, I. Zysinska, M. Talbot, R. Gitelman, V. & Hakkert, S.

    2015-01-01

    In a co-production of DaCoTA WP1 and DaCoTA WP4, an Experts Panel was created and a consultation was launched for the preliminary assessment of knowledge, data and analysis needs within road safety management. The objective of the consultation of this Experts Panel was the assessment of current need

  5. The Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth (HELP system: One-year review of adult and Pediatric Asynchronous Telehealth Consultations

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    Andrew H Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth teleconsultation system is designed to connect health providers in the Navy Medicine East Region to specialists at Naval Medical Center Portsmouth. Methods: A review of the first year of the Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth system was performed. Data on each teleconsultation were extracted from the Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth system database and analyzed. Results: From June 2014 to May 2015 there have been 585 teleconsultations. Providers stationed on 36 ships/submarines and at 28 remote military treatment facilities have utilized the Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth system. Over 280 specialists in 34 different specialties were consulted. The median time to first response from a specialist was 6 h and 8 min, with 75% of all consults being addressed within 24 h. Eighteen medevacs were recommended. Thirty-nine potential medevacs were prevented, and 100 potential civilian network deferrals were prevented, resulting in an estimated savings of over US$580,000. Discussion: Based on the 1-year metrics, Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth has provided improved access and quality of care to service members and their families throughout the Navy Medicine East Region. It has helped avoid over US$580,000 in unnecessary cost burden. Further review at the 2-year time interval will demonstrate the continued growth and effectiveness of the Health Experts onLine at Portsmouth system.

  6. The public, experts and deliberations. Consultations about final disposal of nuclear waste; Allmaenhet, expertis och deliberation. Samraad om slutfoervar av kaernavfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soneryd, Linda [Stockholms Univ. (Sweden); Lidskog, Rolf [OerebrUniv. (Sweden). Man-Technology-Environment Research Centre

    2006-10-15

    The Swedish process for consultations are studied in order to gain knowledge about the relation between experts and the general public in processes that involve complex scientific and technological issues. The following questions are discussed: How to delimit and define 'the general public' and which methods are used for doing this? Which arenas for dialog are created, and which are the institutional conditions for participation. Are there mechanisms that support or counteract negotiations about the boundaries of the expertise? How do actors that participate in consultation activities relate to experts? How are local and cross-border environment consequences discussed in consultations? The empirical material used in the study consists of observation, formal and informal interviews and documents. Conclusions drawn are that the organisation of consultations puts a special focus on the municipalities, the local population and local environmental issues. SKB has, after advice from consultation participants taken measures to change the process. This has not, however, changed the institutional conditions for participating as given on the different arenas. SKB's local information and communication activity create good relationships but have only weak mechanisms to counteract the dominating role of SKB. The process holds mechanisms that both support and counteract discussions and negotiations about the expertise's boundaries. A counteracting mechanism is when participants relate to EIS as a legal tool and make references to law interpretations that support their own position. The expertise's boundaries are challenged through views and comments about the long time aspects that are involved in the repository question. During consultations, no systematic discussion is pursued about values related to different disposal solutions and images of the future or about which roles citizens have in the consultation process, in their function of municipality

  7. Transaction Cost Analysis of In-Clinic Versus Telehealth Consultations for Chronic Pain: Preliminary Evidence for Rapid and Affordable Access to Interdisciplinary Collaborative Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Brian R.; Whittington, Jan; Towle, Cara; Tauben, David J.; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara; Cahana, Alex; Doorenbos, Ardith Z.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives With ever increasing mandates to reduce costs and increase the quality of pain management, health care institutions are faced with the challenge of adopting innovative technologies and shifting workflows to provide value-based care. Transaction cost economic analysis can provide comparative evaluation of the consequences of these changes in the delivery of care. The aim of this study was to establish proof-of-concept using transaction cost analysis to examine chronic pain management in-clinic and through telehealth. Methods Participating health care providers were asked to identify and describe two comparable completed transactions for patients with chronic pain: one consultation between patient and specialist in-clinic and the other a telehealth presentation of a patient’s case by the primary care provider to a team of pain medicine specialists. Each provider completed two on-site interviews. Focus was on the time, value of time, and labor costs per transaction. Number of steps, time, and costs for providers and patients were identified. Results Forty-six discrete steps were taken for the in-clinic transaction, and 27 steps were taken for the telehealth transaction. Although similar in costs per patient ($332.89 in-clinic vs. $376.48 telehealth), the costs accrued over 153 business days in-clinic and 4 business days for telehealth. Time elapsed between referral and completion of initial consultation was 72 days in-clinic, 4 days for telehealth. Conclusions U.S. health care is moving toward the use of more technologies and practices, and the information provided by transaction cost analyses of care delivery for pain management will be important to determine actual cost savings and benefits. PMID:25616057

  8. Transaction cost analysis of in-clinic versus telehealth consultations for chronic pain: preliminary evidence for rapid and affordable access to interdisciplinary collaborative consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Brian R; Whittington, Jan; Towle, Cara; Tauben, David J; Endicott-Popovsky, Barbara; Cahana, Alex; Doorenbos, Ardith Z

    2015-06-01

    With ever increasing mandates to reduce costs and increase the quality of pain management, health care institutions are faced with the challenge of adopting innovative technologies and shifting workflows to provide value-based care. Transaction cost economic analysis can provide comparative evaluation of the consequences of these changes in the delivery of care. The aim of this study was to establish proof-of-concept using transaction cost analysis to examine chronic pain management in-clinic and through telehealth. Participating health care providers were asked to identify and describe two comparable completed transactions for patients with chronic pain: one consultation between patient and specialist in-clinic and the other a telehealth presentation of a patient's case by the primary care provider to a team of pain medicine specialists. Each provider completed two on-site interviews. Focus was on the time, value of time, and labor costs per transaction. Number of steps, time, and costs for providers and patients were identified. Forty-six discrete steps were taken for the in-clinic transaction, and 27 steps were taken for the telehealth transaction. Although similar in costs per patient ($332.89 in-clinic vs. $376.48 telehealth), the costs accrued over 153 business days in-clinic and 4 business days for telehealth. Time elapsed between referral and completion of initial consultation was 72 days in-clinic, 4 days for telehealth. U.S. health care is moving toward the use of more technologies and practices, and the information provided by transaction cost analyses of care delivery for pain management will be important to determine actual cost savings and benefits. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Reconceptualizing children's complex discharge with health systems theory: novel integrative review with embedded expert consultation and theory development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, Jane; Brenner, Maria; Fox, Patricia; Guerin, Ashleigh

    2014-05-01

    To report a novel review to develop a health systems model of successful transition of children with complex healthcare needs from hospital to home. Children with complex healthcare needs commonly experience an expensive, ineffectual and prolonged nurse-led discharge process. Children gain no benefit from prolonged hospitalization and are exposed to significant harm. Research to enable intervention development and process evaluation across the entire health system is lacking. Novel mixed-method integrative review informed by health systems theory. DATA  CINAHL, PsychInfo, EMBASE, PubMed, citation searching, personal contact. REVIEW  Informed by consultation with experts. English language studies, opinion/discussion papers reporting research, best practice and experiences of children, parents and healthcare professionals and purposively selected policies/guidelines from 2002-December 2012 were abstracted using Framework synthesis, followed by iterative theory development. Seven critical factors derived from thirty-four sources across five health system levels explained successful discharge (new programme theory). All seven factors are required in an integrated care pathway, with a dynamic communication loop to facilitate effective discharge (new programme logic). Current health system responses were frequently static and critical success factors were commonly absent, thereby explaining ineffectual discharge. The novel evidence-based model, which reconceptualizes 'discharge' as a highly complex longitudinal health system intervention, makes a significant contribution to global knowledge to drive practice development. Research is required to develop process and outcome measures at different time points in the discharge process and future trials are needed to determine the effectiveness of integrated health system discharge models. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Music Education for the Improvement of Coexistence in and beyond the Classroom: A Study Based on the Consultation of Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabedo-Mas, Alberto; Díaz-Gómez, Maravillas

    2016-01-01

    This study examines theoretical principles and models of music education to promote interpersonal and social relations. It focuses on the primary and secondary stages of education in Spain. To this end, relevant national and international figures in education, music or critical thinking were consulted. Their responses to the consultation were…

  11. Music Education for the Improvement of Coexistence in and beyond the Classroom: A Study Based on the Consultation of Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabedo-Mas, Alberto; Díaz-Gómez, Maravillas

    2016-01-01

    This study examines theoretical principles and models of music education to promote interpersonal and social relations. It focuses on the primary and secondary stages of education in Spain. To this end, relevant national and international figures in education, music or critical thinking were consulted. Their responses to the consultation were…

  12. Ischemic Heart Disease and Work Disability in Patients Treated at the Internal Medicine Consultation and Assessed by the Expert Medical Labor Commission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Vicente Sánchez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: ischemic heart disease represents a major challenge given the large number of people affected by this condition, its increasing contribution to overall mortality, the frequent disability resulting from it, and the complexity and high cost of its treatment. Objective: to describe the work disability caused by ischemic heart disease in patients treated at the internal medicine consultation and assessed by the Expert Medical Labor Commission of Cienfuegos municipality. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted including all patients with ischemic heart disease treated at the internal medicine consultation and assessed by the Expert Medical Labor Commission of Cienfuegos municipality from October 2012 to July 2013. The variables analyzed were: age, sex, occupation, years of work and accrued salary, clinical diagnosis, length of time the condition had been present and associated chronic diseases; existence of prior assessment by an Expert Medical Labor Commission and decision reached, previous days of sick leave and current decision of the commission. The data were analyzed using SPSS (version 18.0 and the results are shown in tables and graphs as numbers and percentages. Results: a predominance of men was observed. Forty two point nine percent were service workers and the average number of years of work was 24.60. Forty two point nine percent were previously assessed by the commission. Two hundred one point thirteen days of sick leave were granted and social security expenditure in a month was high. Diabetes mellitus was the most common chronic disease followed by hypertension, obesity and dyslipidemia. Of the workers previously assessed, half received permanent and temporary disability benefits. Conclusions: ischemic heart disease causes different degrees of disability. Its costs in terms of social security are increasing.

  13. Development of the Expert Consulting System based on Active Push%基于主动推送的专家咨询系统开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武大愚; 王志华

    2015-01-01

    The Internet is developing rapidly. Under this background, people will be able to solve questions in their works quickly with the helping of the expert knowledge within different areas. Based on lots of information and the requirements of the expert consulting system, it builds the three layers of the system and system structure, defines the data table and the process of the operation, completes the design of the structure and the partition of the functional models. After that, it also builds the entity relationship diagram and logic structure. Using PHP script language, MySQL Database, JSP, HTML and CSS technology realizes the basic function of the expert consulting system.%在互联网快速发展的局势下,借助不同领域专家知识可以快速解决工作中遇到的问题。本文在查阅大量资料的基础上,根据专家咨询系统要求,构建了咨询系统三层架构及系统结构,定义了数据表和数据操作流程,完成了结构设计和功能模块划分,建立了各数据库实体联系图和逻辑结构。采用PHP脚本语言、MySQL数据库、JSP、HTML和CSS技术,实现了专家咨询系统基本功能。

  14. 决策专家咨询中的信息不对称问题探析%Asymmetric Information in Government Decision-Making Expert Consultation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张慧颖; 王佳; 张颖春; 齐欣原

    2015-01-01

    政府决策的专家咨询过程是一个政治过程,同时也是一种政府与专家的信息交互过程。在政府与专家的信息交互模型基础上,分析了目前政府与专家两者之间由于体制、机制、社会分工和价值取向等原因造成的数据信息和知识信息两类信息不对称问题,从改进经济导向的激励机制、完善信息扩散机制的制度规范和加强信息沟通等方面,提出克服政府决策咨询中两种信息不对称问题的途径,进而完善政府决策专家咨询制度。%The expert consultation process of Government decision-making, is not only a political process , but a kind of in-formation interaction between the government and experts .In this paper , two kinds of asymmetric information were expoun-ded and analyzed based on the information interaction model between government and experts , including data information and knowledge information , due to the system and mechanism , the social division of labor along with the value orientation of causes, etc.Some approaches and measures were put forward to overcome the information asymmetry problems in govern -ment decision-making consultation , from improving economic incentive mechanism strengthening the rights and responsibili -ties of both sides qualified institutional constraints , widen the channel of the communication , improving the ability to use knowledge to enhance mutual understanding , etc., in order to improve the efficiency of the flow of information between the government and experts , and then to improve the system of government decision-making expert advice .

  15. Enhancing the Capacity of Community Organizations to Evaluate HIV/AIDS Information Outreach: A Pilot Experiment in Expert Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancy-Scott, Nicole; Williams-Livingston, Arletha; Plumer, Andrew; Dutcher, Gale A.; Siegel, Elliot R.

    2017-01-01

    The National Library of Medicine’s AIDS Community Information Outreach Program (ACIOP) supports and enables access to health information on the Internet by community-based organizations. A technical assistance (TA) model was developed to enhance the capacity of ACIOP awardees to plan, evaluate, and report the results of their funded projects. This consisted of individual Consultation offered by an experienced evaluator to advise on the suitability of proposed project plans and objectives, improve measurement analytics, assist in problem resolution and outcomes reporting, and identify other improvement possibilities. Group webinars and a moderated blog for the exchange of project-specific information were also offered. Structured data collections in the form of reports, online surveys, and key informant telephone interviews provided qualitative feedback on project progress, satisfaction with the TA, and the perceived impact of the interventions on evaluation capacity building. The Model was implemented in the 2013 funding cycle with seven organizations, and the level of reported satisfaction was uniformly high. One-on-one TA was requested by four awardee organizations, and was determined to have made a meaningful difference with three. Participation in the webinars was mandatory and high overall; and was deemed to be a useful means for delivering evaluation information. In subsequent funding cycles, submission of a Logic Model will be required of awardees as a new model intervention in the expectation that it will produce stronger proposals, and enable the evaluation consultant to identify earlier intervention opportunities leading to project improvements and evaluation capacity enhancements.

  16. Probability encoding of hydrologic parameters for basalt. Elicitation of expert opinions from a panel of five consulting hydrologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Runchal, A.K.; Merkhofer, M.W.; Olmsted, E.; Davis, J.D.

    1984-11-01

    The Columbia River basalts underlying the Hanford Site in Washington State are being considered as a possible location for a geologic repository for high-level nuclear waste. To investigate the feasibility of a repository at this site, the hydrologic parameters of the site must be evaluated. Among hydrologic parameters of particular interest are the effective porosity of the Cohassett basalt flow top and flow interior and the vertical-to-horizontal hydraulic conductivity, or anisotropy ratio, of the Cohassett basalt flow interior. The Cohassett basalt flow is the prime candidate horizon for repository studies. Site-specific data for these hydrologic parameters are currently inadequate for the purpose of preliminary assessment of candidate repository performance. To obtain credible, auditable, and independently derived estimates of the specified hydrologic parameters, a panel of five nationally recognized hydrologists was assembled. Their expert judgments were quantified during two rounds of Delphi process by means of a probability encoding method developed to estimate the probability distributions of the selected hydrologic variables. The results indicate significant differences of expert opinion for cumulative probabilities of less than 10% and greater than 90%, but relatively close agreement in the middle ranges of values. The principal causes of the diversity of opinion are believed to be the lack of site-specific data and the absence of a single, widely accepted, conceptual or theoretical basis for analyzing these variables.

  17. On Evaluating Index System of Systemic Consulting Website of Agricultural Experts%农业专家系统咨询网站评价指标体系的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海; 史丽萍

    2011-01-01

    This paper builds the agricultural expert system of consulting website by the view of users. The writer puts forward a kind of evaluation index filter method aiming at the complex of the agricultural expert system of consulting website : firstly, We use the method of principal component analysis to conducting the analysis of agricultural expert system of consulting website ; then we filter the evaluation index by the method of grey relational grade analysis;finally, we confirm the detail of the evaluation system of agricultural expert system of consulting website and the weight of the evaluation index.%以用户为切入点进行了农业专家系统咨询网站评价指标体系的构建。针对农业专家系统咨询网站评价指标繁杂的特点,提出了一种指标筛选的方法;首先运用主成分分析法对农业专家系统咨询网站的评价指标进行分析;然后运用灰色关联度方法对评价指标进行筛选;最后确定农业专家系统咨询网站的评价指标体系所包含的内容以及相应评价指标的权重。

  18. Report of the expert consultation on the use of microcomputer for processing statistical and biological data, Chaguaramas, Trinidad and Tobago, 17-21 November 1986: Rapport de la consultation d'experts sur l'utilisation des micro- ordinateurs dans le traitement des donnees statistiques et biologiques sur les peches, Chaguaramas, Trinite-et-Tobago, 17-21 novembre 1986 = Informe de la consulta des expertos sobre el Empleo di micro-computa doras para el tratamiento de datos estadisticos y biologicos de la pesca, Chaguaramas, Trinidad y Tobago, 17-21 de noviembre de 1986

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1987-01-01

    .... La Consultation d'experts sur l'utilisation des micro- ordinateurs dans le traitement des donnees statistiques et biologiques sur les peches s'est tenue a la Trinite-et-Tobago du 17 au 21 novembre 1986...

  19. Report of the Expert Consultation on Interactions between Sea Turtles and Fisheries within an Ecosystem Context, Rome, Italy, 9-12 March 2004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2004-01-01

    This information paper provides a summary of the Consultation's outcomes and outputs, including overviews of sea turtle status, fisheries impacts, possible managerial solutions, socio-economic aspects...

  20. The Contemporary Consultant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Thomas; Poulfelt, Flemming; Greiner, Larry

    This book complements The handbook of Management Consulting: The Contemporary Consultant: Insights from Leading Experts, 1e but can also be studied separately. The book consists of 20 cases including Harvard and Stanford cases. The cases present the broad range of topics that are pertinent...

  1. The Star of Bethlehem and the Magi : Interdisciplinary Perspectives from Experts on the Ancient Near East, the Greco-Roman World, and Modern Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kooten, George; Barthel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This book is the fruit of the first ever interdisciplinary international scientific conference on the biblical story of the Magi and the Star of Bethlehem. The conference, held in 2014 at the University of Groningen, was attended by world-leading specialists in astronomy, the history of science, the

  2. Clinical relevance and indications for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging 2013. An interdisciplinary expert statement; Klinischer Stellenwert und Indikationen zur Magnetresonanztomografie des Herzens 2013. Ein interdisziplinaeres Expertenstatement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hergan, Klaus [Universitaetsklinikum Salzburg (Austria). Universitaetsinst. fuer Radiologie; Globits, S. [Herz-Kreislauf-Zentrum Gross Gerungs (Austria); Schuchlenz, H. [Landeskrankenhaus Graz-West (Austria). Dept. fuer Kardiologie/Intensivmedizin] [and others

    2013-03-15

    During the last years the indications of Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMRI) have been continuously expanded. However, the acceptance of the method by cardiologists and radiologists does not correlate with respect to the diagnostic potential. Several factors, such as expensive equipment, relatively long examination times, high technical know how and lack of remuneration, limit the application of CMRI in everyday clinical practice. Furthermore, doctors tend to apply more conventional, well established diagnostic procedures, the access to the method is still limited and there exist difficulties in the interdisciplinary collaboration. The interdisciplinary Austrian approach to Cardiac Imaging is aimed to improve the aforementioned problems and to support the implementation of CMRI in the diagnostic tree of cardiac diseases thus enabling a cost efficient management of patients in cardiology. (orig.)

  3. RESEARCH IN EXPERT CONSULTING SYSTEM FOR FIRING FLAWS OF BUILDING CERAMIC TILES%建筑砖烧成缺陷咨询专家系统的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈功备; 张海荣; 胡国林

    2011-01-01

    An expert consulting system for solving firing flaws of building Ceramic tiles was set up by using forward reasoning and uncertainty reasoning with weighting. A user of the system may find suggested solutions to a firing flaw by the name of a defect and the phenomenon.%将专家系统的知识应用于建筑砖烧成缺陷领域中,通过正向推理和加权的不确定推理,开发了一个建筑砖烧成缺陷咨询专家系统,方便用户查询.

  4. Planning and Designing Academic Library Learning Spaces: Expert Perspectives of Architects, Librarians, and Library Consultants. Project Information Literacy Research Report. The Practitioner Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Alison J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper identifies approaches, challenges, and best practices related to planning and designing today's academic library learning spaces. As part of the Project Information Literacy (PIL) Practitioner Series, qualitative data is presented from 49 interviews conducted with a sample of academic librarians, architects, and library consultants.…

  5. Designing consultancy on energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Lene [Danish Energy Authority, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2005-07-01

    There is a wide tradition for using energy consultancy in all end-using sectors and in various models. A lot of aspects have to be taken into consideration when a consultant scheme is to be launched. This paper will contribute to the discussion of the role of the consultant in the different energy end-use sectors: Energy consultancy is defined. The process for energy consulting is related to the eight fundamental objectives for effective management consulting (Arthur N. Turner): responding to a client's request for information; providing solutions to specific problems; giving an in-depth, accurate diagnosis; presenting a program of recommended corrective actions; implementing changes; building consensus and commitment; facilitating client learning; and enhancing organizational effectiveness. The role of the consultant is divided into 4 categories (expert, diagnostician, sparring partner, process consultant) depending on the consultant's focus (process or cases) and methodology (analysis or dialogue). Designing energy consultancy should reflect the end-use sector (household, industry etc.)

  6. The usefulness of in vitro models to predict the bioavailability of iron and zinc: A consensus statement from the HarvestPlus expert consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairweather-Tait, S.; Lynch, S.; Hotz, C.; Hurrell, R.; Abrahamse, L.; Beebe, S.; Bering, S.; Bukhave, K.; Glahn, R.; Hambidge, M.; Hunt, J.; Lonnerdal, B.; Miller, D.; Mohktar, N.; Nestel, P.; Reddy, M.; Sandberg, A.S.; Sharp, P.; Teucher, B.; Trinidad, T.P.

    2005-01-01

    A combination of dietary and host-related factors determines iron and zinc absorption, and several in vitro methods have been developed as preliminary screening tools for assessing bioavailability. An expert committee has reviewed evidence for their usefulness and reached a consensus. Dialyzability

  7. [Decision of German Supreme Court on July 30, 1999 relating to scientific evidence requirements for psychological expert opinion with respect to credibility of testimony and its consequences for future expert consultation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balloff, R

    2000-04-01

    Basically nothing has been changed by this significant, clarifying, establishing and, most important, determining decision of the Highest Federal Court concerning the specific methods long since applied by experts in the field of deciding whether or not a testimony is believeable. None the less such a decision through the higher courts was obviously long overdue because numerous opinions of experts utilized in court cases were reached by applying methods not free of fault. The psychological evaluation of the content of truth in a testimony in cases of sexual abuse will therefore still be established with help of a methodical procedure of steps made under the assumption that statements pertaining to personal experiences differ in quality from those resulting from imagination in their characteristics of reality.

  8. [Consensus statement of an interdisciplinary group of French experts on modalities of diagnosis and medical treatment of Alzheimer's disease at a treatable stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, H; Bakchine, S; Dubois, B; Laurent, B; Montagne, B; Touchon, J; Robert, P; Vellas, B; Vetel, J M; Cogneau, J; Marin La Meslée, R; Sorbé, G

    1998-06-01

    A group of French expert met on the 7th and 8th of February 1998 in order to establish a consensus attitude for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis and treatment. Members were drawn from primary care, geriatrics, neurology and psychiatry. They used the consensus statement of the American Association for Geriatrics, the Alzheimer's Association and the American Geriatrics Society published in JAMA, in October 1997 as a source of data for further consideration. Alzheimer's disease in the most common etiology of dementia. Main clinical features are cognitive impairment and psycho-behavioral disorders. Diagnosis must be one of inclusion and not exclusion. It is based on interviews of informants and family members and office-based clinical assessment. After a physical examination, cognitive function must be evaluated using the Mini-Mental State Examination. A laboratory evaluation should include a complete blood cell count, blood chemistry and determination of thyroid-stimulating hormone. In addition, noncontrast computed tomography head scans are adequate in most cases. Available pharmacologic treatments are not curative but are given to improve quality of life and enhance cognition and behavior. Two cholinesterases inhibitors, tacrine and donepezil, are the only agents officially authorized for treatment of the cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease. Mood and behaviour disorder also have to be treated by both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic strategies. Only pharmacologic treatments will be detailed here. The consensus statements established by this group of experts will be reevaluated each year, considering the new available data on Alzheimer's disease.

  9. Guidance for contact tracing of cases of Lassa fever, Ebola or Marburg haemorrhagic fever on an airplane: results of a European expert consultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilsdorf Andreas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Travel from countries where viral haemorrhagic fevers (VHF are endemic has increased significantly over the past decades. In several reported VHF events on airplanes, passenger trace back was initiated but the scale of the trace back differed considerably. The absence of guidance documents to help the decision on necessity and scale of the trace back contributed to this variation. This article outlines the recommendations of an expert panel on Lassa fever, Ebola and Marburg haemorrhagic fever to the wider scientific community in order to advise the relevant stakeholders in the decision and scale of a possible passenger trace back. Method The evidence was collected through review of published literature and through the views of an expert panel. The guidance was agreed by consensus. Results Only a few events of VHF cases during air travel are reported in literature, with no documented infection in followed up contacts, so that no evidence of transmission of VHF during air travel exists to date. Based on this and the expert opinion, it was recommended that passenger trace back was undertaken only if: the index case had symptoms during the flight; the flight was within 21 days after detection of the event; and for Lassa fever if exposure of body fluid has been reported. The trace back should only be done after confirmation of the index case. Passengers and crew with direct contact, seat neighbours (+/− 1 seat, crew and cleaning personal of the section of the index case should be included in the trace back. Conclusion No evidence has been found for the transmission of VHF in airplanes. This information should be taken into account, when a trace back decision has to be taken, because such a measure produces an enormous work load. The procedure suggested by the expert group can guide decisions made in future events, where a patient with suspected VHF infection travelled on a plane. However, the actual decision on start and scale

  10. Executive summary and recommendations from the WHO/UNAIDS/IAVI expert group consultation on 'Phase IIB-TOC trials as a novel strategy for evaluation of preventive HIV vaccines', 31 January-2 February 2006, IAVI, New York, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-19

    This report summarizes the discussions and recommendations from a consultation held in New York City, USA (31 January-2 February 2006) organized by the joint World Health Organization-United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS HIV Vaccine Initiative and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative. The consultation discussed issues related to the design and implementation of phase IIB 'test of concept' trials (phase IIB-TOC), also referred to as 'proof of concept' trials, in evaluating candidate HIV vaccines and their implications for future approval and licensure. The results of a single phase IIB-TOC trial would not be expected to provide sufficient evidence of safety or efficacy required for licensure. In many instances, phase IIB-TOC trials may be undertaken relatively early in development, before manufacturing processes and capacity are developed sufficiently to distribute the vaccine on a large scale. However, experts at this meeting considered the pressure that could arise, particularly in regions hardest hit by AIDS, if a phase IIB-TOC trial showed high levels of efficacy. The group largely agreed that full-scale phase III trials would still be necessary to demonstrate that the vaccine candidate was safe and effective, but emphasized that governments and organizations conducting trials should consider these issues in advance. The recommendations from this meeting should be helpful for all organizations involved in HIV vaccine trials, in particular for the national regulatory authorities in assessing the utility of phase IIB-TOC trials in the overall HIV vaccine research and development process.

  11. The Interdisciplinary Curriculum for Oncology Palliative Care Education (iCOPE): meeting the challenge of interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Barbara A; Schapmire, Tara; Hermann, Carla; Earnshaw, Lori; Faul, Anna; Jones, Carol; Kayser, Karen; Martin, Amy; Shaw, Monica Ann; Woggon, Frank; Pfeifer, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Background: Interprofessional education is necessary to prepare students of the health professions for successful practice in today's health care environment. Because of its expertise in interdisciplinary practice and team-based care, palliative care should be leading the way in creating educational opportunities for students to learn the skills for team practice and provision of quality patient-centered care. Multiple barriers exist that can discourage those desiring to create and implement truly interdisciplinary curriculum. An interdisciplinary faculty team planned and piloted a mandatory interdisciplinary palliative oncology curriculum and responded to formative feedback. The project took place at a large public metropolitan university. Medical, nursing, and social work students and chaplains completing a clinical pastoral education internship participated in the curriculum. Formative feedback was received via the consultation of an interdisciplinary group of palliative education experts, focus groups from students, and student evaluations of each learning modality. Multiple barriers were experienced and successfully addressed by the faculty team. Curricular components were redesigned based on formative feedback. Openness to this feedback coupled with flexibility and compromise enabled the faculty team to create an efficient, sustainable, and feasible interdisciplinary palliative oncology curriculum. Interdisciplinary palliative education can be successful if faculty teams are willing to confront challenges, accept feedback on multiple levels, and compromise while maintaining focus on desired learner outcomes.

  12. Using health technology assessment to assess the value of new medicines: results of a systematic review and expert consultation across eight European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Aris; Lange, Ansgar; Kanavos, Panos

    2017-03-16

    Although health technology assessment (HTA) systems base their decision making process either on economic evaluations or comparative clinical benefit assessment, a central aim of recent approaches to value measurement, including value based assessment and pricing, points towards the incorporation of supplementary evidence and criteria that capture additional dimensions of value. To study the practices, processes and policies of value-assessment for new medicines across eight European countries and the role of HTA beyond economic evaluation and clinical benefit assessment. A systematic (peer review and grey) literature review was conducted using an analytical framework examining: (1) 'Responsibilities and structure of HTA agencies'; (2) 'Evidence and evaluation criteria considered in HTAs'; (3) 'Methods and techniques applied in HTAs'; and (4) 'Outcomes and implementation of HTAs'. Study countries were France, Germany, England, Sweden, Italy, Netherlands, Poland and Spain. Evidence from the literature was validated and updated through two rounds of feedback involving primary data collection from national experts. All countries assess similar types of evidence; however, the specific criteria/endpoints used, their level of provision and requirement, and the way they are incorporated (e.g. explicitly vs. implicitly) varies across countries, with their relative importance remaining generally unknown. Incorporation of additional 'social value judgements' (beyond clinical benefit assessment) and economic evaluation could help explain heterogeneity in coverage recommendations and decision-making. More comprehensive and systematic assessment procedures characterised by increased transparency, in terms of selection of evaluation criteria, their importance and intensity of use, could lead to more rational evidence-based decision-making, possibly improving efficiency in resource allocation, while also raising public confidence and fairness.

  13. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ IntroductionInterdisciplinary rehabilitation, or care by a team of rehabilitation professionals, has been a core strategy of rehabilitation medicine since its beginning. As a result, quality assessments of these programs universally include evaluating the effectiveness of their interdisciplinary teams. Rehabilitation programs for individuals with physical and cognitive disabilities originally were institutionally based, an environment that facilitated the communication needed for interdisciplinary care. These programs addressed a full spectrum of problems, including health, physical functioning, psychological adjustment, social integration, and vocational or other significant role participation. The implementation of truly interdisciplinary programs has always been difficult because of this complexity, but recent restrictions in the resources available to provide rehabilitation have increased this difficulty. With less professional time available because of limited funds, the interdisciplinary process is being challenged to show its value, and to be as efficient as possible.This paper discusses the benefits to be gained through the interdisciplinary process, factors that reduce its cost effectiveness and strategies to maintain its advantages at the least possible cost.

  14. Learning through inter- and intradisciplinary problem solving: using cognitive apprenticeship to analyse doctor-to-doctor consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimmer, Christoph; Pachler, Norbert; Nierle, Julia; Genewein, Urs

    2012-12-01

    Today's healthcare can be characterised by the increasing importance of specialisation that requires cooperation across disciplines and specialities. In view of the number of educational programmes for interdisciplinary cooperation, surprisingly little is known on how learning arises from interdisciplinary work. In order to analyse the learning and teaching practices of interdisciplinary cooperation, a multiple case study research focused on how consults, i.e., doctor-to-doctor consultations between medical doctors from different disciplines were carried out: semi-structured interviews with doctors of all levels of seniority from two hospital sites in Switzerland were conducted. Starting with a priori constructs based on the 'methods' underpinning cognitive apprenticeship (CA), the transcribed interviews were analysed according to the principles of qualitative content analysis. The research contributes to three debates: (1) socio-cognitive and situated learning, (2) intra- and interdisciplinary learning in clinical settings, and (3), more generally, to cooperation and problem solving. Patient cases, which necessitate the cooperation of doctors in consults across boundaries of clinical specialisms, trigger intra- as well as interdisciplinary learning and offer numerous and varied opportunities for learning by requesting doctors as well as for on-call doctors, in particular those in residence. The relevance of consults for learning can also be verified from the perspective of CA which is commonly used by experts, albeit in varying forms, degrees of frequency and quality, and valued by learners. Through data analysis a model for collaborative problem-solving and help-seeking was developed which shows the interplay of pedagogical 'methods' of CA in informal clinical learning contexts.

  15. Management Consulting for Technological Modernization and Industry of the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Davidovich Gitelman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the authors’ study based on the hypothesis that aaddressing the multidimensional highly complex tasks of technological modernization and new industry against the background of a wave of breakthrough innovations is only possible within the framework of proactive management. Its methodological, instrumental and competence basis results from «smart» partnership of regional science, education, and business. In this case, the management сconsulting of a new type, being fundamentally different from the traditional one, plays the role of the partnership coordinator. These differences are expressed in specific intellectual logistics and organizational architecture of consulting projects, close connection to universities, innovation centres and various research structures of the region as well as the high specialization, which is reached by the involvement of the virtual teams of cross-disciplinary experts in the developments, the flexible products designed on the basis of the modular principle. In this regard, the study presents a number of new scientific results proving the hypothesis. The paper substantiates the approach to the organization and methodology of consulting activities for complex, rapidly developing systems which requires expanding the range of competencies and scope of the interaction of various actors — carriers of interdisciplinary knowledge. In accordance with this approach, the authors introduce the concept of integratory consulting for advanced development that offers a package of intellectual services for addressing challenges of the future. We have developed the methodology of the integrated system of research, consultations, training and transforming action that makes it possible to generate pre-emptive actions amid crisis, risk and threats. The article has proposed and tested an organizational mechanism of cooperation between parties (science, education, business involved in smart

  16. Experts views' on Digital Competence

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, José; Stoyanov, Slavi

    2013-01-01

    Janssen, J., & Stoyanov, S. (2012, 20 November). Online Consultation for a Digital Competence Framework: Experts' views on Digital Competence. Workshop presentation at the Institute for Prospective Technological Studies, Seville, Spain.

  17. 精神分裂症中医狂证证候标准第二轮专家咨询问卷分析%Schizophrenia TCM crazy syndrome standard second expert consultation questionnaire analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄诚; 宋炜熙; 张宏根

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨精神分裂症(狂证)常见中医证型的证候标准.方法 根据第一轮专家咨询问卷结果设计第二轮问卷,向全国专家进行问卷征询,用专家咨询法进行统计分析.结果 专家积极系数为89.7%;权威程度为0.776;在各证型中,符合均数>1.5,满分比>50%,变异系数<40%,等级和>90的证候指标痰火内扰证有14个;气滞血瘀证共9个;阴虚火旺证共11个,痰结血淤证共9个,阳明热结证共9个,气阴两虚证共6个,肝胆火盛证共13个.结论 证候指标中具有上述条件者可作为精神分裂症(狂证)上述中医证型的主症.%Objective To explore the common criterions of syndromes of Schizophrenia(manic psychosis) in TCM. Methods Second round expert questionnaires were designed according to the results of the round one,and 61 experts were consulted around the country. Delphi method was used for statistical analysis. Results the active coefficient was 89.7%,authoritative grade of experts was 0.776;among the syndromes the items whose come up to means>l.5,full dark rations >50%,coefficient of variation <40%,rand sums of the index >90,there are 14 in the internal disturbance of pyrophlegm,there are 9 in the qi-stagnancy and blood stasis.there are 11 in the asthenic yin causing excessive pyrexia,there are 9 in the Stagnant phlegm and blood stasis, there are 9 in the heat stagnant in yangming Meridians, there are 6 in the deficiency of both qi and yin,there are 13 in the hepatochlic hyperpyrexia. Conclusion the symptoms such as whose satisfy the condition above act as the main symptoms of syndromes above in Schizophrenia(manic psychosis)in TCM.

  18. Situational Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimehaug, Tormod; Helmersberg, Ingunn

    2010-01-01

    Situational Consultation (SC) is presented as a framework for flexible integration of several models and methodologies in consultation practice by choosing an approach adapted to the specific situation. In SC, models and their characteristic role positions are considered interchangeable tools with qualitative differences in strengths and…

  19. Expert Systems Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Richard O.; Shortliffe, Edward H.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses a class of artificial intelligence computer programs (often called "expert systems" because they address problems normally thought to require human specialists for their solution) intended to serve as consultants for decision making. Also discusses accomplishments (including information systematization in medical diagnosis and…

  20. Global Grid Telemedicine System: Expert Consult Manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    Therapy, anterior) ( Pulpotomy ) (RCT, Bicuspid) D3240 (Pulpal D3221 (Pulpal D3330 (RCT, molar) Therapy, Posterior) debridement) ID...Ert= EL.EE E =£ ID i£l (£) OO "O Ol O OOOOOOHHHHHrKNN’rNNNNN rtOrHrH OIIHTH OlHHHfMTI f\\irMr« irM ...inrintHAjzuiij-m- irm -irt KMsN’rNTJNNNNNNNNNNNNNNNVNNNNNN atr^i^r». h^r^ s N N N T i^r^rN.h* tN.r^T-rvf^’r-r^.Q.r*.T-i^- r^.r^T-rv-r

  1. [Bioclimatic consultation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, H; Reinke, R

    1975-01-23

    The climatological environment may effect the human state of health, disadvantageously or favourably. This knowledge, confirmed by empiric as well as scientific research can be used by e.g. changing the place of residence towards a healthy and benefical climate. For a professional climatological planning of such a project the "Deutscher Wetterdienst" renders bioclimatic consultations within the Federal Republic of Germany. For this purpose individual reactions as well as state health of the person in question have to be considered. A method will be shown how to combine medical diagnostic facts and bioclimatic consultation.

  2. Interdisciplinary Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagib Callaos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication is fundamental in scientific practice and an integral part of academic work. The practice of communication cannot be neglected by those who are trying to advance scientific research. Effective means should continuously be identified in order to open channels of communication within and among disciplines, among scientists and between scientists and the general public.[1]The increasing importance of interdisciplinary communication has been pointed out by an increasing number of researchers and scholars, as well as in conferences and roundtables on the subject. Some authors even estimate that "interdisciplinary study represents the future of the university."[2] Since interdisciplinary study is "the most underthought critical, pedagogical and institutional concept in modern academy"[3] it is important to think and reflect, and even do some research, on this concept or notion. Research and practice based reflections with regards to this issue are important especially because the increasing complexity and proliferation of scientific research is generating countless specialties, sub-specialties and sub-sub-specialties, with their respective special languages; which were "created for discrete local areas of research based upon the disconnected branches of science."[4] On the other hand, scientific, technical and societal problems are requiring multi- or inter-disciplinary consideration. Consequently, interdisciplinary communication channels are being needed with urgency, and scientific research should be integrated, not just in the context of its discipline, but also in the context of related disciplines. Much more reflection and research should be done on this issue. Research on adequate research integration and communication is urgently required, i.e. meta-research efforts should be done in order to relate research results in an adequate and more useful way. This meta-research effort might be done in the context of each particular

  3. Boundary breaking for interdisciplinary learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Kidron

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to contribute to the body of knowledge on processesby which students develop interdisciplinary understanding of contents, as well as to suggest technology-enhanced means for supporting them in these processes in the context of higher education. In doing so, we suggest a rethinking of three traditional practices that tend to characterise typical higher education instruction: (1 compartmentalisation of disciplines; (2 traditional pedagogy; and (3 traditional hierarchies based on levels of expertise. Our high-level conjecture was that meaningful dialogue with peers and experts supports both the deepening of ideas in one knowledge domain and the formation of connections between ideas from several domains, both of which are required for the development of interdisciplinary understanding. We developed the Boundary Breaking for Interdisciplinary Learning (BBIL model, which harnesses technology to break boundaries between disciplines, learners and organisational levels of hierarchy. Findings indicate that 36 undergraduate students who participated in an interdisciplinary online course that implemented the BBIL model have significantly improved their interdisciplinary understanding of the course contents. This study illustrates how innovative use of available, free and low-cost technology can produce a ‘positive disruption’ in higher education instruction.

  4. Consultancy and innovation the business service revolution in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Wood, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Consultancy and Innovation links two important aspects of European economic development in the past thirty years: the pace of technical and management innovation, and the growing significance of technical and business consultancy. This book includes detailed studies of consultancy activities or 'knowledge intensive services' (KIS) in eight EU countries, written by national experts in the field.

  5. Individual Consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Walkinshaw

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Responding to calls for research into measurable English language outcomes from individual language support consultations at universities, this study investigated the effect of individual consultations (ICs on the academic writing skills and lexico-grammatical competence of students who speak English as an additional language (EAL. Attendance by 31 EAL students at ICs was recorded, and samples of their academic writing texts before and after a 9-month interval were compared. Participants’ academic writing skills were rated, and lexico-grammatical irregularities were quantified. No statistically significant positive shifts manifested, due to the relatively short research period and limited participant uptake, but there were encouraging predictors of future shifts given continued utilization of the service. First, although a Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed no association between attendance at ICs and shifts in academic writing ability, a Spearman’s rho calculation suggested a tentative relationship to positive pre–post shifts in three academic writing sub-skills: Task Fulfillment, Grammar, and Vocabulary. Second, instances of four common lexico-grammatical irregularities (subject/verb, wrong word, plural/singular, and punctuation declined at post-testing. Although only regular, sustained attendance would produce statistically significant shifts, there is a potential association between participants’ use of ICs and improved academic writing skills/lexico-grammatical competence.

  6. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    OpenAIRE

    Sporer, Scott M.; Bernard R. Bach, Jr

    2009-01-01

    DESCRIPTION A user friendly reference for decision making in hip arthroplasty designed in a question formed clinical problem scenarios and answers format .The articles composed of the answers, containing current concepts and preferences of experts in primary and revision hip surgery are enhanced by several images, diagrams and references and written in the form of a curbside consultation by Scott M. Sporer, MD. and his collaborators. PURPOSE By this practical reference of hip arthroplasty, Sc...

  7. Expert System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hildebrandt, Thomas Troels; Cattani, Gian Luca

    2016-01-01

    An expert system is a computer system for inferring knowledge from a knowledge base, typically by using a set of inference rules. When the concept of expert systems was introduced at Stanford University in the early 1970s, the knowledge base was an unstructured set of facts. Today the knowledge...... base of expert systems is often given in terms of an ontology, extracted and built from various data sources by employing natural language-processing and statistics. To emphasize such capabilities, the term “expert” is now often replaced by “cognitive,” “knowledge,” “knowledge-based,” or “intelligent......” system. With very few exceptions, general-purpose expert systems have failed to emerge so far. However, expert systems are applied in specialized domains, particularly in healthcare. The increasing availability of large quantities of data to organizations today provides a valuable opportunity...

  8. Consulting in Collection Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Lee

    1980-01-01

    Considers the role of the consultant in the areas of library collection development and weeding, and offers suggestions on determining the need for a consultant, obtaining one, and what to do when the consultant arrives. (FM)

  9. Expert systems in treating substance abuse.

    OpenAIRE

    Wesson, D R; Hink, R H

    1990-01-01

    Computer programs can assist humans in solving complex problems that cannot be solved by traditional computational techniques using mathematic formulas. These programs, or "expert systems," are commonly used in finance, engineering, and computer design. Although not routinely used in medicine at present, medical expert systems have been developed to assist physicians in solving many kinds of medical problems that traditionally require consultation from a physician specialist. No expert system...

  10. An Expert support model for ex situ soil remediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okx, J.P.; Frankhuizen, E.M.; Wit, de J.C.; Pijls, C.G.J.M.; Stein, A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an expert support model recombining knowledge and experience obtained during ex situ soil remediation. To solve soil remediation problems, an inter-disciplinary approach is required. Responsibilities during the soil remediation process, however, are increasingly decentralised, wh

  11. Expert Seeker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Becerra

    2003-01-01

    Expert Seeker is a computer program of the knowledge-management-system (KMS) type that falls within the category of expertise-locator systems. The main goal of the KMS system implemented by Expert Seeker is to organize and distribute knowledge of who are the domain experts within and without a given institution, company, or other organization. The intent in developing this KMS was to enable the re-use of organizational knowledge and provide a methodology for querying existing information (including structured, semistructured, and unstructured information) in a way that could help identify organizational experts. More specifically, Expert Seeker was developed to make it possible, by use of an intranet, to do any or all of the following: Assist an employee in identifying who has the skills needed for specific projects and to determine whether the experts so identified are available. Assist managers in identifying employees who may need training opportunities. Assist managers in determining what expertise is lost when employees retire or otherwise leave. Facilitate the development of new ways of identifying opportunities for innovation and minimization of duplicated efforts. Assist employees in achieving competitive advantages through the application of knowledge-management concepts and related systems. Assist external organizations in requesting speakers for specific engagements or determining from whom they might be able to request help via electronic mail. Help foster an environment of collaboration for rapid development in today's environment, in which it is increasingly necessary to assemble teams of experts from government, universities, research laboratories, and industries, to quickly solve problems anytime, anywhere. Make experts more visible. Provide a central repository of information about employees, including information that, heretofore, has typically not been captured by the human-resources systems (e.g., information about past projects, patents, or

  12. Uniqueness of family therapists as family business systems consultants: a cross-disciplinary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinhee; Danes, Sharon M

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to address how the consulting approaches of family therapists working with family businesses differ from those of business consultants. The logic of analytic induction was used to analyze qualitative data from family business consultants with and without training in family therapy. Consultants were asked to respond to two vignettes: one emphasized primarily family system problems, whereas the other emphasized business problems with influencing issues at the family/business intersection. Both similarities and differences were found in reference to problem assessment, consulting goal orientation, intervention strategy focus, consultant role and function, and consulting setting preference between consultants with and without family therapy training. Results indicate that consultants of each discipline provide a unique perspective and expertise that allow them to successfully address the spectrum of issues that family firms face. Further, findings highlight the unique contribution of family therapists to an interdisciplinary consulting team. © 2012 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  13. Expert Systems: What Is an Expert System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Beverly K.; Main, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Describes expert systems and discusses their use in libraries. Highlights include parts of an expert system; expert system shells; an example of how to build an expert system; a bibliography of 34 sources of information on expert systems in libraries; and a list of 10 expert system shells used in libraries. (Contains five references.) (LRW)

  14. Expert Systems: What Is an Expert System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Beverly K.; Main, Linda

    1994-01-01

    Describes expert systems and discusses their use in libraries. Highlights include parts of an expert system; expert system shells; an example of how to build an expert system; a bibliography of 34 sources of information on expert systems in libraries; and a list of 10 expert system shells used in libraries. (Contains five references.) (LRW)

  15. Operational expert system applications in Europe

    CERN Document Server

    Zarri, Gian Piero

    1992-01-01

    Operational Expert System Applications in Europe describes the representative case studies of the operational expert systems (ESs) that are used in Europe.This compilation provides examples of operational ES that are realized in 10 different European countries, including countries not usually examined in the standard reviews of the field.This book discusses the decision support system using several artificial intelligence tools; expert systems for fault diagnosis on computerized numerical control (CNC) machines; and expert consultation system for personal portfolio management. The failure prob

  16. Tribal Consultation Tracking System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The consultation-related information the AIEO Consultation Team working with our Tribal Portal contractors has developed a Lotus Notes Database that is capable of...

  17. Campaign Consultants - Client Payments

    Data.gov (United States)

    City of San Francisco — Campaign Consultants are required to report ���economic consideration�۝ promised by or received from clients in exchange for campaign consulting services during the...

  18. ExpertFOAF recommends experts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iofcu, Tereza; Diederich, Joerg; Dolog, Peter

    2007-01-01

    the GrowBag approach [1]. The main assumption is that such user profiles can provide good hints about users' expertise. Such extended FOAF files (called ExpertFOAF) can be published on a user's home page, on web pages of institutions or conferences to characterize them. They can be crawled by distributed...

  19. Expert Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    This guide summarizes the work of Subtask B of IEA-ECBCS Annex 44 “Integrating Environmentally Responsive Elements in Buildings” and is based on the contributions from the participating countries. The publication is an official Annex report. With a focus on innovative building concepts...... that dynamically respond to changes in climate and user demands, the report describes building concepts, design methods and tools that have been tested in theory and practice in buildings around the world. This guide is aimed at designers and consultants and describes the principles of responsive building concepts...

  20. Interdisciplinary counseling service for renal malignancies: a patient-centered approach to raise guideline adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Johannes; Ihrig, Andreas; Winkler, Eva; Brechtel, Anette; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Herzog, Wolfgang; Frank, Martin; Grüllich, Carsten; Hallscheidt, Peter; Zeier, Martin; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Tumor boards have become an integral part of high-quality cancer care, but in general, patients are not directly involved. To overcome this weakness, we established an interdisciplinary counseling service for renal malignancies where 4 specialists talked to the patient at once. We evaluated this approach from the patients' and physicians' perspective. For 3 months, we assessed organizational and clinical data. Within a standardized telephone interview lasting for 14 ± 8 minutes, we explored the patients' view 1 week after counseling. A focus group contributed the physicians' perspective. Costs and revenues were calculated from the hospital's perspective. We included 52 consecutive patients aged 62 ± 10 years. Patients' initiative for a "second opinion" triggered 37% of all appointments. Patients had localized (52%) and systemic (48%) disease presenting with primary diagnosis (48%), relapse (27%), or under continuous therapy (25%). The treatment strategy was changed significantly in 16 of 30 (53%) patients reporting a specific external opinion. The most frequent changes in recommendation were nephron-sparing surgery instead of radical nephrectomy in 8 cases and divergent judgments on restaging causing changes in systemic treatment in 6 cases. We successfully interviewed 43 of 52 patients. Overall, patients rated the consultation as very positive and only 1 patient (2%) was dissatisfied. Patients rated the quality of interpersonal interaction as very positive and said they would recommend the consultation service to others. Disease state was not associated with ratings. Physicians expressed a very positive opinion, highlighting the patients' benefit and very constructive case discussions. Nevertheless, they report remarkable efforts concerning time investment and effective coordination of medical experts. We estimated a deficit of 39 Euro per patient given the German health care system. There might be relevant secondary positive economic effects for the hospital

  1. Spatial information in public consultation within environmental impact assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mwenda, A.N.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis Summary Spatial information in public consultation within Environmental Impact Assessments Angela N. Mwenda Established in the United States of America in 1970, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an interdisciplinary approach that considers the anticipated impacts of

  2. Spatial information in public consultation within environmental impact assessments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mwenda, A.N.

    2015-01-01

    Thesis Summary Spatial information in public consultation within Environmental Impact Assessments Angela N. Mwenda Established in the United States of America in 1970, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an interdisciplinary approach that considers the anticipated impacts of de

  3. Optimizing Consulting Delivery Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spottswood, Curran

    1980-01-01

    Summarizes a study of several types of consulting groups in the Bell System and describes characteristics which are associated with high-impact consulting. A strategy which is designed for internal consulting organizations to maximize the likelihood of both initial success and long-term survival of the group is proposed. (Author/MER)

  4. Bioethics Consultations and Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Jennie

    2011-01-01

    Making difficult healthcare decisions is often helped by consultation with a bioethics committee. This article reviews the main bioethics principles, when it is appropriate and how to call a bioethics consult, ethical concerns, and members of the consult team. Bioethics resources are included.

  5. CNPC Engaged 176 Senior Technical Experts for the First Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Jie

    2005-01-01

    @@ On April 20, 2005, 176 experts were granted the certificates of engagement by leaders of CNPC in the engagement meeting, who would become senior technical experts appointed by CNPC for the first time.These experts will be responsible for supervising the technologies of major projects, guiding key research subjects and providing techniques consultation on decision making during their engagement period, and will obtain an expert subsidy of RMB5000 yuan per month.

  6. Experts in science and society

    CERN Document Server

    Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2004-01-01

    In today's complex world, we have come to rely increasingly on those who have expertise in specific areas and can bring their knowledge to bear on crucial social, political and scientific questions. Taking the viewpoint that experts are consulted when there is something important at stake for an individual, a group, or society at large, Experts in Science and Society explores expertise as a relational concept. How do experts balance their commitment to science with that to society? How does a society actually determine that a person has expertise? What personal traits are valued in an expert? From where does the expert derive authority? What makes new forms of expertise emerge? These and related questions are addressed from a wide range of areas in order to be inclusive, as well as to demonstrate similarities across areas. Likewise, in order to be culturally comparative, this volume includes examples and discussions of experts in different countries and even in different time periods. The topics include the r...

  7. The Effect of Audit Standards on Fraud Consultation and Auditor Judgment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Gold-Nöteberg (Anna); W.R. Knechel (Robert); P. Wallage (Philip)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate how the strictness of a requirement to consult on potential client fraud affects auditor assessments of fraud risk and the propensity to consult with firm experts. We test two specific forms of guidance about fraud consultations: (1) relatively strict (i.e., mandatory and

  8. The Effect of Audit Standards on Fraud Consultation and Auditor Judgment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.H. Gold-Nöteberg (Anna); W.R. Knechel (Robert); P. Wallage (Philip)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate how the strictness of a requirement to consult on potential client fraud affects auditor assessments of fraud risk and the propensity to consult with firm experts. We test two specific forms of guidance about fraud consultations: (1) relatively strict (i.e., mandatory and

  9. Consulting on Academic Library Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Ellsworth

    1980-01-01

    Addresses the following aspects of consulting on library buildings: new trends, the need for a consultant, selecting a consultant, timeliness in hiring, expectations, following through, and the cost of consulting. (FM)

  10. Interdisciplinary Work in Schools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tofteng, Ditte Maria Børglum; Rasmussen, Gitte Lyng

    2016-01-01

    , combined with their more formal organizational affiliation. In this way, professionals can be working directly within the school or institution, or they can be in a supportive role being formally affiliated to the local council. Both these types of affiliations entail interdisciplinary cooperation...... the interdisciplinary cooperation in the local practice. What the systemic logic brings into the interdisciplinary cooperation is not just an organizational framework and support, but also a specific vocabulary and a specific task or way of thinking, which in some ways overrules the individual professionals’ own...

  11. A protocol for consultation of another physician in cases of euthanasia and assisted suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der

    2001-01-01

    Objective—Consultation of another physician is an important method of review of the practice of euthanasia. For the project "support and consultation in euthanasia in Amsterdam" which is aimed at professionalising consultation, a protocol for consultation was developed to support the general practitioners who were going to work as consultants and to ensure uniformity. Participants—Ten experts (including general practitioners who were experienced in euthanasia and consultation, a psychiatrist, a social geriatrician, a professor in health law and a public prosecutor) and the general practitioners who were going to use the protocol. Evidence—There is limited literature on consultation: discursive articles and empirical studies describing the practice of euthanasia. Consensus—An initial draft on the basis of the literature was commented on by the experts and general practitioners in two rounds. Finally, the protocol was amended after it had been used during the training of consultants. Conclusions—The protocol differentiates between steps that are necessary in a consultation and steps that are recommended. Guidelines about four important aspects of consultation were given: independence, expertise, tasks and judgment of the consultant. In 97% of 109 consultations in which the protocol was used the consultant considered the protocol to be useful to a greater or lesser extent. Although this protocol was developed locally, it also employs universal principles. Therefore it can be of use in the development of consultation elsewhere. Key Words: Euthanasia • assisted suicide • consultation • quality assurance • protocol PMID:11579191

  12. Designing Interdisciplinary Assessments in Sciences for College Students: An Example on Osmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ji; Liu, Ou Lydia; Sung, Shannon

    2014-01-01

    College science education needs to foster students' habit of mind beyond disciplinary constraints. However, little research has been devoted to assessing students' interdisciplinary understanding. To address this problem, we formed a team of experts from different disciplines to develop interdisciplinary assessments that target…

  13. Insects: An Interdisciplinary Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leger, Heather

    2007-01-01

    The author talks about an interdisciplinary unit on insects, and presents activities that can help students practice communication skills (interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational) and learn about insects with hands-on activities.

  14. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION IN HIP ARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M. Sporer

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION A user friendly reference for decision making in hip arthroplasty designed in a question formed clinical problem scenarios and answers format .The articles composed of the answers, containing current concepts and preferences of experts in primary and revision hip surgery are enhanced by several images, diagrams and references and written in the form of a curbside consultation by Scott M. Sporer, MD. and his collaborators. PURPOSE By this practical reference of hip arthroplasty, Scott M. Sporer, MD. and the contributors have aimed providing the reader practical and clinically relevant information, evidence-based advices, their preferences and opinions containing current concepts for difficult and controversial clinical situations in total hip replacement surgery which are often not addressed clearly in traditional references. FEATURES The book is composed of 9 sections and 49 articles each written by a different expert designed in a question and answers format including several images and diagrams and also essential references at the end of each article. In the first section preoperative questions is subjected. Second section is about preoperative acetabulum questions. Third section is about preoperative femur questions. Fourth section is about intraoperative questions. Intraoperative acetabulum question is subjected in the fifth section and the intraoperative femur questions in the sixth section. The seventh section is about postoperative questions. Eighth and ninth sections are about general questions about failure and failure of acetabulum in turn. AUDIENCE Mainly practicing orthopedic surgeons, fellows and residents who are interested in hip arthroplasty have been targeted but several carefully designed scenarios of controversial and difficult situations surrounding total hip replacement surgery and the current information will also be welcomed by experienced clinicians practicing in hip arthroplasty. ASSESSMENT Scott M. Sporer

  15. Making consultations run smoothly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Astrid Pernille; Jensen, Torben Elgaard

    2012-01-01

    This article investigates the skilful use of time in general practice consultations. It argues that consultation work involves social and material interactions, which are only partially conceptualized in existing medical practice literatures. As an alternative, this article employs ideas from...... the field of science and technology studies (STS), including notions of relationality, multiplicity and otherness. Through this lens, and based on extensive fieldwork, it describes the daily work of arranging time before, during and after consultations. In conclusion, it suggests that a STS...

  16. Interdisciplinary Research Funding: Reaching Outside the Boundaries of Kinesiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedson, Patty

    2009-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research requires that experts from multiple disciplines work together to combine methods and ideas in an integrative fashion to generate new knowledge. In many respects, the field of kinesiology is ideally positioned to take advantage of its inherent multidisciplinary design. Because of the multidisciplinary structure of…

  17. The Dream Consultant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhr, Sara Louise; Kirkegaard, Line

    2013-01-01

    for work. We draw on Lacan's notion of desire as the Other's desire and analyze the consultants' desire as controlled by a need for recognition at work. We show how consultants need off-work fantasies to maintain the illusion of wholeness – of being more than work. Only with this illusion of wholeness can...

  18. Artificial Experts: The Computer as Diagnostician Has Definite Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournelle, Jerry

    1984-01-01

    Argues that, although expert systems--which are supposed to give users all the advantages of consulting with human experts--can be useful for medical diagnosis, where tests tend to be reliable, they can be hazardous in such areas as psychological testing, where test reliability is difficult to measure. (MBR)

  19. Artificial Experts: The Computer as Diagnostician Has Definite Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pournelle, Jerry

    1984-01-01

    Argues that, although expert systems--which are supposed to give users all the advantages of consulting with human experts--can be useful for medical diagnosis, where tests tend to be reliable, they can be hazardous in such areas as psychological testing, where test reliability is difficult to measure. (MBR)

  20. Expert Systems: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiga, Sadashiv

    1984-01-01

    Discusses: (1) the architecture of expert systems; (2) features that distinguish expert systems from conventional programs; (3) conditions necessary to select a particular application for the development of successful expert systems; (4) issues to be resolved when building expert systems; and (5) limitations. Examples of selected expert systems…

  1. Gender: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Wendy; Ridgeway, Cecilia L.

    2010-01-01

    This article is intended to identify research opportunities for gender scholars in all disciplines. The authors explain why a truly interdisciplinary approach is necessary to study gender and offer their current thinking about how to pursue this goal. They first provide a description of gender as it plays out at the individual, interpersonal, and…

  2. Family Practice Consultation.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gauge the patients' opin:on on the family doctors' role regardirg prayer ... family practice consultation arc presented. ... patients' expectation of prayer and ..... New developments and frequently asked questions covering - high and low BMI, ...

  3. Effective healthcare process redesign through an interdisciplinary team approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Rita; Huynh, Nathan; Cai, Bo; Vidal, José; Bennett, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare process redesign is a complex and often high risk undertaking. Typically, there is a limited understanding of the baseline process and often inadequate tools by which to assess it. This can be confounded by narrow redesign team expertise that can result in unanticipated and/or unintended redesign consequences. Interdisciplinary research teams of healthcare, biostatistics, engineering and computer science experts provide broad support for a more effective and safer approach to healthcare process redesign. We describe an interdisciplinary research team focused on medication administration process (MAP)redesign and its achievements and challenges.

  4. Consultation with specialist palliative care services in palliative sedation: considerations of Dutch physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, Ian; van der Heide, Agnes; Janssens, Rien; Swart, Siebe; Perez, Roberto; Rietjens, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Palliative sedation is considered a normal medical practice by the Royal Dutch Medical Association. Therefore, consultation of an expert is not considered mandatory. The European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC) framework for palliative sedation, however, is more stringent: it considers the use of palliative sedation without consulting an expert as injudicious and insists on input from a multi-professional palliative care team. This study investigates the considerations of Dutch physicians concerning consultation about palliative sedation with specialist palliative care services. Fifty-four physicians were interviewed on their most recent case of palliative sedation. Reasons to consult were a lack of expertise and the view that consultation was generally supportive. Reasons not to consult were sufficient expertise, the view that palliative sedation is a normal medical procedure, time pressure, fear of disagreement with the service and regarding consultation as having little added value. Arguments in favour of mandatory consultation were that many physicians lack expertise and that palliative sedation is an exceptional intervention. Arguments against mandatory consultation were practical obstacles that may preclude fulfilling such an obligation (i.e. lack of time), palliative sedation being a standard medical procedure, corroding a physician's responsibility and deterring physicians from applying palliative sedation. Consultation about palliative sedation with specialist palliative care services is regarded as supportive and helpful when physicians lack expertise. However, Dutch physicians have both practical and theoretical objections against mandatory consultation. Based on the findings in this study, there seems to be little support among Dutch physicians for the EAPC recommendations on obligatory consultation.

  5. Shared consultant physician posts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, J

    2012-01-31

    Our aim was to assess the acceptability and cost-efficiency of shared consultancy posts. Two consultant physicians worked alternate fortnights for a period of twelve months. Questionnaires were distributed to general practitioners, nurses, consultants and junior doctors affected by the arrangement. Patients or their next of kin were contacted by telephone. 1\\/17 of consultants described the experience as negative. 14\\/19 junior doctors reported a positive experience. 11 felt that training had been improved while 2 felt that it had been adversely affected. 17\\/17 GPs were satisfied with the arrangement. 1\\/86 nurses surveyed reported a negative experience. 1\\/48 patients were unhappy with the arrangement. An extra 2.2 (p<0.001) patients were seen per clinic. Length of stay was shortened by 2.49 days (p<0.001). A saving of 69,212 was made due to decreased locum requirements. We present data suggesting structured shared consultancy posts can be broadly acceptable and cost efficient in Ireland.

  6. Sustainability: an interdisciplinary guide

    OpenAIRE

    John Pezzey

    1992-01-01

    A definition of sustainability as maintaining 'utility' (average human wellbeing) over the very long term future is used to build ideas from physics, ecology, evolutionary biology, anthropology, history, philosophy, economics and psychology, into a coherent, interdisciplinary analysis of the potential for sustaining industrial civilisation. This potential is highly uncertain, because it is hard to know how long the 'technology treadmill', of substituting accumulated tools and knowledge for de...

  7. Oracle Hyperion Interactive Reporting 11 Expert Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Cody, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    This book is written in a simple, easy to understand format with screenshots, code samples, and step-by-step explanations that will guide you through the advanced techniques used by the experts. If you are an Oracle Hyperion Interactive reporting user or developer looking to become an expert in the product, then this book is for you. You will require a basic knowledge of Interactive Reporting, as this book starts with a brief overview and then dives into advanced techniques, functions, and best practices. Beginner users should consult The Business Analyst's Guide to Oracle Hyperion Interactive

  8. Keeping experience at the bedside: the emergency consultant nurse role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Jane

    The consultant nurse concept has not yet been transferred to the military setting. The motivation for developing the role in the NHS was to improve the quality of patient care by strengthening professional leadership and extending the clinical career ladder. The consultant nurse may be defined as an expert in their clinical field, possessing expert leadership and visionary skills. The role is based on four domains: expert practice, professional leadership, education and research. Typically, the emergency consultant nurse spends 50% of their time working clinically, thereby providing senior clinical expertise and adding value to the clinical role. In a military context the consultant nurse role could be perceived as the coming together of the senior command and administrative role and the clinical role. The military has the opportunity to develop a senior clinical emergency nurse role encompassing elements of the civilian consultant nurse model, which may strengthen leadership, provide a central resource of expertise and raise the profile of military nursing. This has the added potential to provide inspiration for junior nurses and retain experienced emergency nurses in the clinical arena.

  9. Computer system for remote consultations in the diagnosis of urological malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytsev, S. M.; Nikitaev, V. G.; Pronichev, A. N.; Onykiy, B. N.; Polyakov, E. V.; Kurdin, A. A.; Pushkar, D. Y.; Prilepskaya, E. A.; Kovilina, M. V.; Govorov, A. V.; Glotov, A. V.; Vasilyev, A. O.; Kolontarev, K. V.

    2017-01-01

    The complex for the decision support in diagnosis of prostate diseases with using expert knowledge and remote consultations in the process of urologic diseases diagnosis with using prostate preparation images was proposed. The complex allows to ensure consistency in the actions of doctors for remote consultation (areas of interest, marking, and search for informative objects in the preparation images) and to use experts knowledge in cases that are difficult to diagnose.

  10. Speech spectrogram expert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannsen, J.; Macallister, J.; Michalek, T.; Ross, S.

    1983-01-01

    Various authors have pointed out that humans can become quite adept at deriving phonetic transcriptions from speech spectrograms (as good as 90percent accuracy at the phoneme level). The authors describe an expert system which attempts to simulate this performance. The speech spectrogram expert (spex) is actually a society made up of three experts: a 2-dimensional vision expert, an acoustic-phonetic expert, and a phonetics expert. The visual reasoning expert finds important visual features of the spectrogram. The acoustic-phonetic expert reasons about how visual features relates to phonemes, and about how phonemes change visually in different contexts. The phonetics expert reasons about allowable phoneme sequences and transformations, and deduces an english spelling for phoneme strings. The speech spectrogram expert is highly interactive, allowing users to investigate hypotheses and edit rules. 10 references.

  11. Expertise, Ethics Expertise, and Clinical Ethics Consultation: Achieving Terminological Clarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iltis, Ana S; Sheehan, Mark

    2016-08-01

    The language of ethics expertise has become particularly important in bioethics in light of efforts to establish the value of the clinical ethics consultation (CEC), to specify who is qualified to function as a clinical ethics consultant, and to characterize how one should evaluate whether or not a person is so qualified. Supporters and skeptics about the possibility of ethics expertise use the language of ethics expertise in ways that reflect competing views about what ethics expertise entails. We argue for clarity in understanding the nature of expertise and ethics expertise. To be an ethics expert, we argue, is to be an expert in knowing what ought to be done. Any attempt to articulate expertise with respect to knowing what ought to be done must include an account of ethics that specifies the nature of moral truth and the means by which we access this truth or a theoretical account of ethics such that expertise in another domain is linked to knowing or being better at judging what ought to be done and the standards by which this "knowing" or "being better at judging" is determined. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our analysis for the literature on ethics expertise in CEC. We do think that there are clear domains in which a clinical ethics consultant might be expert but we are skeptical about the possibility that this includes ethics expertise. Clinical ethics consultants should not be referred to as ethics experts.

  12. Developing a model osteoarthritis consultation: a Delphi consensus exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porcheret Mark

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a common condition managed in general practice, but often not in line with published guidance. The ideal consultation for a patient presenting with possible OA is not known. The aim of the study was to develop the content of a model OA consultation for the assessment and treatment of older adults presenting in general practice with peripheral joint problems. Methods A postal Delphi consensus exercise was undertaken with two expert groups: i general practitioners (GPs with expertise in OA management and ii patients with experience of living with OA. An advisory group generated 61 possible consultation tasks for consideration in the consensus exercise. Expert groups were asked to consider which tasks should be included in the model OA consultation. The exercise was completed by 15 GPs and 14 patients. The level of agreement for inclusion in the model was set at 90%. Results The model OA consultation included 25 tasks to be undertaken during the initial consultation between a GP and a patient presenting with peripheral joint pain. The 25 tasks provide detailed advice on how the following elements of the consultation should be addressed: i assessment of chronic joint pain, ii patient’s ideas and concerns, iii exclusion of red flags, iv examination, v provision of the diagnosis and written information, vi promotion of exercise and weight loss, vii initial pain management and viii arranging a follow-up appointment. Both groups prioritised a bio-medical approach to the consultation, rather than a bio-psycho-social one, suggesting a discordance between current thinking and research evidence. Conclusions This study has enabled the priorities of GPs and patients to be identified for a model OA consultation. The results of this consensus study will inform the development of best practice for the management of OA in primary care and the implementation of evidence-based guidelines for OA in primary care.

  13. Developing a model osteoarthritis consultation: a Delphi consensus exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcheret, Mark; Grime, Janet; Main, Chris; Dziedzic, Krysia

    2013-01-16

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common condition managed in general practice, but often not in line with published guidance. The ideal consultation for a patient presenting with possible OA is not known. The aim of the study was to develop the content of a model OA consultation for the assessment and treatment of older adults presenting in general practice with peripheral joint problems. A postal Delphi consensus exercise was undertaken with two expert groups: i) general practitioners (GPs) with expertise in OA management and ii) patients with experience of living with OA. An advisory group generated 61 possible consultation tasks for consideration in the consensus exercise. Expert groups were asked to consider which tasks should be included in the model OA consultation. The exercise was completed by 15 GPs and 14 patients. The level of agreement for inclusion in the model was set at 90%. The model OA consultation included 25 tasks to be undertaken during the initial consultation between a GP and a patient presenting with peripheral joint pain. The 25 tasks provide detailed advice on how the following elements of the consultation should be addressed: i) assessment of chronic joint pain, ii) patient's ideas and concerns, iii) exclusion of red flags, iv) examination, v) provision of the diagnosis and written information, vi) promotion of exercise and weight loss, vii) initial pain management and viii) arranging a follow-up appointment. Both groups prioritised a bio-medical approach to the consultation, rather than a bio-psycho-social one, suggesting a discordance between current thinking and research evidence. This study has enabled the priorities of GPs and patients to be identified for a model OA consultation. The results of this consensus study will inform the development of best practice for the management of OA in primary care and the implementation of evidence-based guidelines for OA in primary care.

  14. Interdisciplinary research and trans-disciplinary validity claims

    CERN Document Server

    Gethmann, C F; Hanekamp, G; Kaiser, M; Kamp, G; Lingner, S; Quante, M; Thiele, F

    2015-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity has seemingly become a paradigm for modern and meaningful research. Clearly, the interdisciplinary modus of deliberation enables to unfold relevant but quite different disciplinary perspectives to the reflection of broader scientific questions or societal problems. However, whether the comprehensive results of interdisciplinary reflection prove to be valid or to be acceptable in trans-disciplinary terms depends upon certain preconditions, which have to be fulfilled for securing scientific quality and social trust in advisory contexts. The present book is written by experts and practitioners of interdisciplinary research and policy advice. It analyses topical and methodological approaches towards interdisciplinarity, starting with the current role of scientific research in society. The volume continues with contributions to the issues of knowledge and acting and to trans-disciplinary deliberation. The final conclusions address the scientific system as substantial actor itself as well as the...

  15. Different roles of electromagnetic field experts when giving policy advice : an expert consultation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, Pita; Knol, Anne B; Petersen, Arthur C; Lebret, Erik|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/071318917

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The overall evidence for adverse health effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) at levels of exposure normally experienced by the public is generally considered weak. However, whether long-term health effects arise remains uncertain and scientific policy advice is therefore given against

  16. Lactation Consultants' Perceived Barriers to Providing Professional Breastfeeding Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstey, Erica H; Coulter, Martha; Jevitt, Cecilia M; Perrin, Kay M; Dabrow, Sharon; Klasko-Foster, Lynne B; Daley, Ellen M

    2017-08-01

    Addressing suboptimal breastfeeding initiation and duration rates is a priority in the United States. To address challenges to improving these rates, the voices of the providers who work with breastfeeding mothers should be heard. Research aim: The purpose of this study was to explore lactation consultants' perceived barriers to managing early breastfeeding problems. This qualitative study was conducted with a grounded theory methodological approach. In-depth interviews were conducted with 30 International Board Certified Lactation Consultants across Florida. Lactation consultants were from a range of practice settings, including hospitals, Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children clinics, private practice, and pediatric offices. Data were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed in Atlas.ti. A range of barriers was identified and grouped into the following categories/themes: indirect barriers (social norms, knowledge, attitudes); direct occupational barriers (institutional constraints, lack of coordination, poor service delivery); and direct individual barriers (social support, mother's self-efficacy). A model was developed illustrating the factors that influence the role enactment of lactation consultants in managing breastfeeding problems. Inadequate support for addressing early breastfeeding challenges is compounded by a lack of collaboration among various healthcare providers and the family. Findings provide insight into the professional management issues of early breastfeeding problems faced by lactation consultants. Team-based, interprofessional approaches to breastfeeding support for mothers and their families are needed; improving interdisciplinary collaboration could lead to better integration of lactation consultants who are educated and experienced in providing lactation support and management of breastfeeding problems.

  17. Sharing Expertise: Consulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Bill

    2011-01-01

    A special breed of superintendents who have developed expertise in a particular area find ways of sharing it in other venues as outside consultants. They pull extra duty to put their special skills into practice, to give back to their communities, to stay current and grounded in the field, or to enhance their professional reputations. They teach…

  18. Nonextensive entropy interdisciplinary applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tsallis, Constantino

    2004-01-01

    A great variety of complex phenomena in many scientific fields exhibit power-law behavior, reflecting a hierarchical or fractal structure. Many of these phenomena seem to be susceptible to description using approaches drawn from thermodynamics or statistical mechanics, particularly approaches involving the maximization of entropy and of Boltzmann-Gibbs statistical mechanics and standard laws in a natural way. The book addresses the interdisciplinary applications of these ideas, and also on various phenomena that could possibly be quantitatively describable in terms of these ideas.

  19. Multidisciplinary teams in consultation-liaison psychiatry: the Yale model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, H

    1987-01-01

    The consultation-liaison service at Yale features integrated teams of psychiatrists, social workers, and clinical nurse specialists working together in both consultation and outpatient settings. The model is based on the tenets that (1) comprehensive evaluation of patients is essential for effective treatment; (2) role definition is necessary for specific disciplines, including the definition of overlapping and separate areas of expertise and practice. The multidisciplinary teams are coordinated by a psychiatric resident, who is supervised by an attending psychiatrist. The role of the resident is that of a diagnostician and coordinating physician. The social worker functions as an expert in family evaluation and treatment, and the nurse specialist functions as supportive therapist and liaison with the nursing staff. The structure of the division of consultation-liaison and ambulatory services at Yale is described and the advantages and disadvantages of the multidisciplinary team concept are discussed in comparison with other models of consultation-liaison psychiatry.

  20. US-USSR telemedicine consultation spacebridge to Armenia and Ufa

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The Final Report on the U.S.-U.S.S.R. Telemedicine Consultation Spacebride to Armenia and Ufa is presented. The goal of this activity was to provide expert medical consultation to the Armenian medical personnel in the areas of plastic and reconstructive surgery, physical and psychological rehabilitation, public health, and epidemiology following the devastating earthquake in Dec. 1988. The U.S. and U.S.S.R. implementation teams developed new standards for medical information transmittal as well as protocols and schedules on how to conduct medical consultations. The consultations were provided to the Republic Diagnostic Center in Yerevan, U.S.S.R. by four U.S. medical centers: University of Utah/LDS Hospital, University of Texas, Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Service Systems, and Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

  1. When experts are oceans apart: comparing expert performance values for proficiency-based laparoscopic simulator training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Rovers, Maroeska M; Alken, Alexander; Kengen, Bas; van Goor, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Surgical training is moving away from the operating room toward simulation-based skills training facilities. This has led to the development of proficiency-based training courses in which expert performance data are used for feedback and assessment. However, few expert value data sets have been published, and no standard method for generating expert values has been adopted by the field. To investigate the effect of different proficiency value data sets on simulator training courses, we (1) compared 2 published expert performance data sets for the LapSim laparoscopic virtual-reality simulator (by van Dongen et al. and Heinrichs et al.) and (2) assessed the effect of using either set on LapSim training data obtained from 16 local residents in surgery and gynecology. Across all simulator tasks, the experts consulted by van Dongen et al. performed better on motion efficiency, but not on duration or damage control. Applying both proficiency sets to training data collected during a basic skills laparoscopic simulator course, residents would have graduated on an average in 1.5 fewer sessions using the Heinrichs expert values compared with the van Dongen expert values. The selection of proficiency values for proficiency-based simulator training courses affects training length, skills level assessment, and training costs. Standardized, well-controlled methods are necessary to create valid and reliable expert values for use in training and research. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. What Are Expert Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Agapeyeff, A.

    1986-01-01

    Intended for potential business users, this paper describes the main characteristics of expert systems; discusses practical use considerations; presents a taxonomy of the systems; and reviews several expert system development projects in business and industry. (MBR)

  3. Response to the European Commission's consultation on the future of European company law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Böckli, P.; Davies, P.; Ferran, E.; Ferrarini, G.; Garrido, J.; Hopt, K.; Pietrancosta, A.; Pistor, K.; Skog, R.; Soltysinski, S.; Winter, J.; Wymeersch, E.

    2012-01-01

    This paper contains the views of the European Company Law Experts (ECLE) on the future of European company law. The paper accompanies the responses of the European Company Law Experts to the European Commission’s Consultation on the future of European Company Law of spring 2012. In the first part of

  4. Mentoring for new consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackroyd, R; Adamson, K A

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence of the benefits of having a mentor during the early years as a consultant. Mentoring encourages and provides support to an individual in their professional development. Although there are different forms of mentoring there is recognition that developing a formal mentoring scheme can provide a consistent approach and support within a framework. The Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh has introduced a mentoring scheme for new consultants that provides a forum for supporting them in their ongoing professional wellbeing. There is potential that the process of mentoring can improve an individual's development, and motivate and encourage them to develop the skills needed to achieve their goals, thus having an impact on ultimately improving their ability to deliver an effective patient-centred service.

  5. Health Consultation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1995-01-01

    ONE Sunday morning, I noticed some people gathered at a clearing outside a school in which my family had an apartment. Feeling curious, I joined them to find that some young dentists, wearing their white coats, were offering free consultations for people. They were selling toothbrushes and dental floss at the same time. One of my teeth was bothering me. It always felt odd when I bit something cold. I consulted with a young dentist, who was wearing a pair of glasses. He asked me many questions like when had it begun to hurt, if I felt the pain, how long it had been since I had it filled the previous time. He asked me to open my mouth and checked the tooth carefully. "You should have your

  6. Expert auditors’ services classification

    OpenAIRE

    Jolanta Wisniewska

    2013-01-01

    The profession of an expert auditor is a public trust occupation with a distinctive feature of taking responsibility for actions in the public interest. The main responsibility of expert auditors is performing financial auditing; however, expert auditors are prepared to carry out different tasks which encompass a wide plethora of financial and auditing services for different kinds of institutions and companies. The aim of the article is first of all the description of expert auditors’ service...

  7. Tactical Weather Expert System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of developing an expert system for tactical weather prediction. Using WILLARD, an expert ...indicate that intelligent interpretations of cloud formations can be made. These inferences can then be automatically passed to the expert system for...processing as another piece of information. It is anticipated that this technology will significantly reduce the dependence of the expert system on a

  8. Persuasiveness of expert systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, JJ; Liebrand, WBG; Timminga, E; Liebrand, Wim B.G.

    1998-01-01

    Expert system advice is not always evaluated by examining its contents. Users can be persuaded by expert system advice because they have certain beliefs about advice given by a computer. The experiment in this paper shows that subjects (n = 84) thought that, given the same argumentation, expert syst

  9. Development Expert System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Heng

    2010-01-01

    The expert system is a high-level technology.It is a sub-field of artificial intelligence.We demonstrated the character and software evaluation,carrying out an initial study of expert system.A good development expert system was developed.

  10. The Process of Psychological Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Anna; Moreland, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Consultation is a key means of service delivery in many psychological services. However, the "process" of consultation is little explored in Educational Psychology literature, particularly in the United Kingdom (UK). This paper focuses on a small-scale qualitative research study of psychological consultation provided by educational…

  11. Management Consulting: Planning, Entry, Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosier, Richard A.; Dalton, Dan R.

    1993-01-01

    Contends that counseling has much in common with organizational consulting. Provides overview of consulting practices that counselors might find useful should they decide to investigate organizational consulting. Includes aspects of market research, gauging competition, and target markets. Considers promotion, networking, and elements of…

  12. LEAH interdisciplinary training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Cynthia L; Rickert, Vaughn D

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the Leadership Education in Adolescent Health (LEAH) interdisciplinary training program in the United States. The Maternal and Child Health Bureau authorized by legislation provides monies to train leaders in adolescent health through a competitive grant process. Currently, seven academic medical centers have funding to provide leadership in adolescent health (LEAH) training in five core disciplines: medicine, nursing, psychology, social work and nutrition. LEAH training programs both ensure high clinical competence in core disciplines serving adolescents and prepare trainees for leadership positions in adolescent health and public health care realms. Together, these programs trained almost 1000 long-term trainees across these five disciplines, and graduates from these programs are working in 45 of the 50 states within the United States. About 90% of these graduates are working with maternal and child/adolescent health populations, and almost all have held leadership positions in the areas of public health, advocacy, public policy, academic medical centers and/or clinical care settings.

  13. Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerantzis, Nikolaos; Mitrouda, Aikaterini; Reizopoulou, Ioanna; Sidiropoulou, Eirini; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios

    2016-04-01

    On November 9th, 2015, three didactical hours were dedicated to Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities (http://wp.me/p6Hte2-1I). Our students and their teachers formed three groups and in rotation, were engaged with the following activities: (a) viewing unique images of the Cosmos in the mobile planetarium STARLAB (http://www.planitario.gr/tholos-starlab-classic-standard.html), (b) watching the following videos: Journey to the end of the universe (https://youtu.be/Ufl_Nwbl8xs), Rosetta update (https://youtu.be/nQ9ivd7wv30), The Solar System (https://youtu.be/d66dsagrTa0), Ambition the film (https://youtu.be/H08tGjXNHO4) in the school's library. Students and teachers were informed about our solar system, the Rosetta mission, the universe, etc. and (c) tactile activities such as Meet our home and Meet our neighbors (http://astroedu.iau.org, http://nuclio.org/astroneighbours/resources) and the creation of planets' 3D models (Geology-Geography A' Class Student's book, pg.15). With the activities above we had the pleasure to join the Cosmic Light Edu Kit / International Year of Light 2015 program. After our Interdisciplinary Astronomy Activities, we did a "small" research: our students had to fill an evaluation about their educational gains and the results can be found here http://wp.me/p6Hte2-2q. Moreover, we discussed about Big Ideas of Science (http://wp.me/p3oRiZ-dm) and through the "big" impact of the Rosetta mission & the infinity of our universe, we print posters with relevant topics and place them to the classrooms. We thank Rosa Doran (Nuclio - President of the Executive Council) for her continuous assistance and support on innovative science teaching proposals. She is an inspiration.

  14. Expert status and performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Burgman

    Full Text Available Expert judgements are essential when time and resources are stretched or we face novel dilemmas requiring fast solutions. Good advice can save lives and large sums of money. Typically, experts are defined by their qualifications, track record and experience. The social expectation hypothesis argues that more highly regarded and more experienced experts will give better advice. We asked experts to predict how they will perform, and how their peers will perform, on sets of questions. The results indicate that the way experts regard each other is consistent, but unfortunately, ranks are a poor guide to actual performance. Expert advice will be more accurate if technical decisions routinely use broadly-defined expert groups, structured question protocols and feedback.

  15. Sports chronobiology consultation: from the lab to the arena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postolache, Teodor T; Hung, Tsung-Min; Rosenthal, Richard N; Soriano, Joseph J; Montes, Fernando; Stiller, John W

    2005-04-01

    This final article, coauthored by a chronobiology consultant, a sports psychologist who applied a chronobiology-based program to an Olympic national team, a clinical neurologist, a performance data analyst, a training-conditioning coach from a major league baseball team who applied chronobiology principles to major league pitchers, and a substance abuse expert, discusses practical aspects of a sports chronobiology consultation, including the goals and current arsenal of available interventions. Short vignettes of actual cases are presented for edification, and references are made to appropriate reviews found elsewhere in this issue.

  16. Consulting in Electronic Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentina Loredana Tache

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Economic development of electronic services provide advice and many agents of existingreferral systems to recommend and provide products, information and customized views of thecommunity through a personalized interaction in real time. Distributed systems of autonomous agentsare becoming increasingly important in electronic comet because the basic decisions of agents adviceon trust and reputation are taken in a similar way human society. If these decisions will be as a realconsumer protection, when new aspects of online consumer legislation will become usefulinformation in advice and consulting of electronic commerce.

  17. Health care provider satisfaction with telephone consultations provided by pharmacists and physicians at the National HIV/AIDS Clinicians' Consultation Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Elizabeth M; Cocohoba, Jennifer M; Neff, Sarah E; Dong, Betty J

    2011-12-01

    The federally funded National HIV/AIDS Clinicians' Consultation Center (NCCC) offers US health care providers expert telephone consultations for managing HIV/AIDS and occupational exposures to blood-borne pathogens through 3 telephone services: the National Clinicians' Post-Exposure Prophylaxis Hotline (PEPline), the National HIV Telephone Consultation Service (Warmline), and the Perinatal HIV Hotline. Callers to the NCCC receive consultation from either a clinical pharmacist (PharmD) or a physician (MD) with HIV expertise. To compare the satisfaction of NCCC callers who received clinical consultations from clinical pharmacists and physicians with HIV expertise. We prospectively mailed 1256 satisfaction surveys to NCCC health care provider callers during a 7-month period. Survey recipients were not aware that satisfaction surveys compared PharmD and MD consultation services. Respondents rated their level of agreement with 8 statements about the quality of consultation, the quality of clinical information given, and future calls to the NCCC. Survey return rates were 43% for PEPline and 40% for Warmline and Perinatal HIV Hotline combined. Overall, caller satisfaction with the telephone consultation service was extremely high (>4 in all categories on a 1-5 Likert scale). There was no significant difference in PEPline caller satisfaction ratings between PharmD and MD consultations. Callers to the Warmline and Perinatal HIV Hotline agreed with all 8 satisfaction statements. For the following 3 statements, however, satisfaction was higher when Warmline and Perinatal HIV Hotline consultation was provided by an MD: "Overall, I was pleased with the quality of my consultation" (p = 0.04); "I would use this service again" (p HIV/AIDS telephone consultation service. By measuring callers' survey response to PharmD and MD consultations, the importance of the clinicians' contributions to this advanced HIV/AIDS consultation service is documented.

  18. Beyond the ‘dyad’: a qualitative re-evaluation of the changing clinical consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Roberts, Celia; Li, Shuangyu; Weber, Orest; Singy, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify characteristics of consultations that do not conform to the traditionally understood communication ‘dyad’, in order to highlight implications for medical education and develop a reflective ‘toolkit’ for use by medical practitioners and educators in the analysis of consultations. Design A series of interdisciplinary research workshops spanning 12 months explored the social impact of globalisation and computerisation on the clinical consultation, focusing specifically on contemporary challenges to the clinician–patient dyad. Researchers presented detailed case studies of consultations, taken from their recent research projects. Drawing on concepts from applied sociolinguistics, further analysis of selected case studies prompted the identification of key emergent themes. Setting University departments in the UK and Switzerland. Participants Six researchers with backgrounds in medicine, applied linguistics, sociolinguistics and medical education. One workshop was also attended by PhD students conducting research on healthcare interactions. Results The contemporary consultation is characterised by a multiplicity of voices. Incorporation of additional voices in the consultation creates new forms of order (and disorder) in the interaction. The roles ‘clinician’ and ‘patient’ are blurred as they become increasingly distributed between different participants. These new consultation arrangements make new demands on clinicians, which lie beyond the scope of most educational programmes for clinical communication. Conclusions The consultation is changing. Traditional consultation models that assume a ‘dyadic’ consultation do not adequately incorporate the realities of many contemporary consultations. A paradox emerges between the need to manage consultations in a ‘super-diverse’ multilingual society, while also attending to increasing requirements for standardised protocol-driven approaches to care prompted by computer use. The

  19. Beyond the 'dyad': a qualitative re-evaluation of the changing clinical consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglehurst, Deborah; Roberts, Celia; Li, Shuangyu; Weber, Orest; Singy, Pascal

    2014-09-29

    To identify characteristics of consultations that do not conform to the traditionally understood communication 'dyad', in order to highlight implications for medical education and develop a reflective 'toolkit' for use by medical practitioners and educators in the analysis of consultations. A series of interdisciplinary research workshops spanning 12 months explored the social impact of globalisation and computerisation on the clinical consultation, focusing specifically on contemporary challenges to the clinician-patient dyad. Researchers presented detailed case studies of consultations, taken from their recent research projects. Drawing on concepts from applied sociolinguistics, further analysis of selected case studies prompted the identification of key emergent themes. University departments in the UK and Switzerland. Six researchers with backgrounds in medicine, applied linguistics, sociolinguistics and medical education. One workshop was also attended by PhD students conducting research on healthcare interactions. The contemporary consultation is characterised by a multiplicity of voices. Incorporation of additional voices in the consultation creates new forms of order (and disorder) in the interaction. The roles 'clinician' and 'patient' are blurred as they become increasingly distributed between different participants. These new consultation arrangements make new demands on clinicians, which lie beyond the scope of most educational programmes for clinical communication. The consultation is changing. Traditional consultation models that assume a 'dyadic' consultation do not adequately incorporate the realities of many contemporary consultations. A paradox emerges between the need to manage consultations in a 'super-diverse' multilingual society, while also attending to increasing requirements for standardised protocol-driven approaches to care prompted by computer use. The tension between standardisation and flexibility requires addressing in educational

  20. A Belief Rule-Based Expert System to Diagnose Influenza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hossain, Mohammad Shahadat; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Akter, Shamima

    2014-01-01

    ). The RIMER approach can handle different types of uncertainties, both in knowledge representation, and in inference procedures. The knowledge-base of this system was constructed by using records of the real patient data along with in consultation with the Influenza specialists of Bangladesh. Practical case......, development and application of an expert system to diagnose influenza under uncertainty. The recently developed generic belief rule-based inference methodology by using the evidential reasoning (RIMER) approach is employed to develop this expert system, termed as Belief Rule Based Expert System (BRBES...... studies were used to validate the BRBES. The system generated results are effective and reliable than from manual system in terms of accuracy....

  1. Development and implementation of a proactive geriatrics consultation model in collaboration with hospitalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennour, Youcef; Counsell, Steven R; Jones, Jerrlyn; Weiner, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Acutely ill hospitalized older adults often experience a decline in function that may be preventable using a proactive, interdisciplinary, patient-centered approach. Hospitalists are treating an increasing number of these patients. A collaborative geriatrics consultation model to prevent functional decline and improve care for older patients with geriatrics syndromes was developed and implemented in partnership with a large hospitalist group in a community teaching hospital. A team of a geriatrician and a geriatrics nurse practitioner led the new consultation service. The team assisted with identifying cases, provided consultation early in the hospital stay, focused its evaluation on functional and psychosocial issues, and assisted in clinical management to optimize implementation of recommendations. In the first 4 years, the consultation service conducted 1,538 consultations in patients with a mean age of 81 (range 56-103). The most frequent geriatrics diagnoses were gait instability, delirium, and depression; recommendations usually included consulting physical therapy, increasing activity, and changing medications. The number of referrals and referring physicians grew steadily each year. Twenty-eight of 34 (82%) of the referring hospitalists completed a Web-based satisfaction questionnaire. All responding hospitalists agreed that proactive geriatrics consultation helped them provide better care; 96% rated the service as excellent. Analysis of hospital administrative data revealed a lower length of stay index and lower hospital costs in patients receiving a geriatrics consultation. The Proactive Geriatrics Consultation Service represents a promising model of collaboration between hospitalists and geriatricians for improving care of hospitalized older adults.

  2. [Geriatrics - an interdisciplinary challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Roland; Djukic, Marija; Wappler, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    The care of elderly patients will continue to challenge the healthcare system over the next decades. As a rule geriatric patients suffer from multimorbidities with complex disease patterns, and the ability to cope with everyday life is severely reduced. Treatment is provided by a multiprofessional geriatric team, and the primary goal is improvement of functional status, quality of life in the social environment and autonomy by employing a holistic approach. In Germany geriatric care is provided by physicians from various medical specialties (e.g. general practitioners, internists, neurologists and psychiatrists). In the training for the subspecialty clinical geriatrics, these specialties enjoy equal rights. Recent efforts to establish a qualification as physician for internal medicine and geriatrics have initiated a discussion to make the suitability for qualification as a geriatrician dependent on the medical specialty. Geriatric patients benefit from multidisciplinary cooperation. Neurologists possess great expertise in the treatment of patients with dementia, depression, delirium, consequences of degenerative spinal cord diseases and vertebral bone fractures, stroke, Parkinson's syndrome, epileptic seizures, vertigo and dizziness, neuropathies, lesions of peripheral nerves and in the multimodal therapy of pain. To function in a position of responsibility in a geriatric department, neurologists need skills in general internal medicine. These are acquired either on a geriatric ward or during specialization as a neurologist by full time secondment to large neurological or interdisciplinary intensive care units.

  3. Harnessing competence and confidence: Dimensions in education and development for advanced and consultant practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Richard C. [School of Health and Emergency Professions, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: r.c.price@herts.ac.uk; Edwards, Hazel M. [School of Health and Emergency Professions, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Consultant and advanced practice are relatively new concepts in radiography. There is evidence to show that as the career progression framework is being adopted the numbers of consultant and advanced practitioners in radiography are growing with the latter growing at a faster rate. The article considers the concept of advanced and consultant practice and the education requirements to support development. Preparation for an advanced practice role begins at the practitioner stage. Masters' level programmes are available to support the development of advanced practice. Education needs to be flexible as new advanced practice roles emerge. It is necessary to take practitioners beyond a defined modality to include leadership and people skills. These are essential for those aspiring to become consultants. Consultants require a high level of clinical knowledge for expert practice but also strategic vision and interpersonal intelligence to facilitate leadership and practice innovation. A model for developing leadership skills for consultants focussing on competence, confidence and capacity is proposed.

  4. Epistemics in audiological consultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egbert, Maria

    ' subjective descriptions of hearing experiences in different environments. In these consultations, the institutional conceptualization of hearing (and thus of hearing loss) is that of an objectively measurable functioning of the ear, categorized in an audiogram by decibels and hertz. In contrast, persons......, broad, and metaphorical. Compared to visual impairment, describing hearing seems to be more difficult, and frequently, persons with hearing impairment resort to visual metaphors. A CA examination of conversational order in the areas of turn-taking, sequence, repair, topic, multimodality, and linguistic...... at the micro-level of direct healthcare encounters to the macro-level and globel problems of the impact of untreated hearing loss. The social repercussions are stigmatization, miscommunication, loss of work, social isolation, depression, and suicide (Carmen 2001). The financial loss per person dropping out...

  5. Responsive Systems Consultation: A Model for Conjoint Consultation Preliminary Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad-Gaur, Archna; And Others

    Responsive Systems Consultation (RSC) is an approach for enhancing children's developmental outcomes and involves a psychological or educational consultant working jointly with a child's parents and teachers. The impact of the RSC on parent and teacher consultees' attitudes toward home-school collaboration and their evaluation of the consultation…

  6. Educating Consultants for Multicultural Practice of Consultee-Centered Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Colette L.

    2017-01-01

    Literature about educating consultants with knowledge, skills, and dispositions to work effectively within culturally and linguistically diverse schools is scarce. Research suggests that additional attention is needed on the preparation of consultants to practice with multicultural competence. This article reviews theories and research and…

  7. Expert review remains important in the histopathological diagnosis of cutaneous melanocytic lesions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M. C. R. F.; Aben, K. K. H.; van Hees, F.; Klaasen, A.; Blokx, W. A. M.; Kiemeney, L. A. L. M.; Ruiter, D. J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims: To assess the type of problems encountered in diagnosing melanocytic lesions and to evaluate the contribution of expert review. Methods and results: Data from 1887 lesions submitted for consultation to one of the expert pathologists of the Dutch Melanoma Working Group Pathology Panel between 1

  8. WATERS Expert Query Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Expert Query Tool is a web-based reporting tool using the EPA’s WATERS database.There are just three steps to using Expert Query:1. View Selection – Choose what...

  9. How Expert Designers Design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Carr; Dr. Peter Sloep; P. Kirschner; J. van Merrienboer

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses two studies - the one in a business context, the other in a university context - carried out with expert educational designers. The studies aimed to determine the priorities experts claim to employ when designing competence-based learning environments. Designers in both contexts

  10. Aesthetic Responses Made Visible Through Voices of Experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kholina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional expertise used to play an important role in the field of environmental aesthetics: expert judgements of landscapes and urban scenes were driving forces behind the decision-making process for urban planners. Today however, research in this area is dominated by studies of public opinion and statistical analysis of anonymous data. This article examines the development of professional expertise in environmental aesthetics and proposes to rethink the role of experts and their contribution to the field by addressing tacit processes behind their judgements. Following an interdisciplinary literature review, an approach that relies on active engagement and reflection-on-action is presented. The application of the approach is studied in two empirical cases, demonstrating the possibility of generating insights into the nature of aesthetic experience. The article suggests reconsidering and widening the profile of the expert in environmental aesthetics to blur the divide between experts and lay public as well as between the users and producers of knowledge.

  11. Expert networks in CLIPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruska, S. I.; Dalke, A.; Ferguson, J. J.; Lacher, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    Rule-based expert systems may be structurally and functionally mapped onto a special class of neural networks called expert networks. This mapping lends itself to adaptation of connectionist learning strategies for the expert networks. A parsing algorithm to translate C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) rules into a network of interconnected assertion and operation nodes has been developed. The translation of CLIPS rules to an expert network and back again is illustrated. Measures of uncertainty similar to those rules in MYCIN-like systems are introduced into the CLIPS system and techniques for combining and hiring nodes in the network based on rule-firing with these certainty factors in the expert system are presented. Several learning algorithms are under study which automate the process of attaching certainty factors to rules.

  12. Investigating Public trust in Expert Knowledge: Narrative, Ethics, and Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Silvia; Vaccarella, Maria; Davis, Mark

    2017-03-01

    "Public Trust in Expert Knowledge: Narrative, Ethics, and Engagement" examines the social, cultural, and ethical ramifications of changing public trust in the expert biomedical knowledge systems of emergent and complex global societies. This symposium was conceived as an interdisciplinary project, drawing on bioethics, the social sciences, and the medical humanities. We settled on public trust as a topic for our work together because its problematization cuts across our fields and substantive research interests. For us, trust is simultaneously a matter of ethics, social relations, and the cultural organization of meaning. We share a commitment to narrative inquiry across our fields of expertise in the bioethics of transformative health technologies, public communications on health threats, and narrative medicine. The contributions to this symposium have applied, in different ways and with different effects, this interdisciplinary mode of inquiry, supplying new reflections on public trust, expertise, and biomedical knowledge.

  13. Ontological metaphors for negative energy in an interdisciplinary context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W.; Geller, Benjamin D.; Gouvea, Julia; Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra; Redish, Edward F.

    2014-12-01

    Teaching about energy in interdisciplinary settings that emphasize coherence among physics, chemistry, and biology leads to a more central role for chemical bond energy. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach to chemical energy leads to modeling chemical bonds in terms of negative energy. While recent work on ontological metaphors for energy has emphasized the affordances of the substance ontology, this ontology is problematic in the context of negative energy. Instead, we apply a dynamic ontologies perspective to argue that blending the substance and location ontologies for energy can be effective in reasoning about negative energy in the context of reasoning about chemical bonds. We present data from an introductory physics for the life sciences course in which both experts and students successfully use this blended ontology. Blending these ontologies is most successful when the substance and location ontologies are combined such that each is strategically utilized in reasoning about particular aspects of energetic processes.

  14. Ontological metaphors for negative energy in an interdisciplinary context

    CERN Document Server

    Dreyfus, Benjamin W; Gouvea, Julia; Sawtelle, Vashti; Turpen, Chandra; Redish, Edward F

    2013-01-01

    Teaching about energy in interdisciplinary settings that emphasize coherence among physics, chemistry, and biology leads to a more central role for chemical bond energy. We argue that an interdisciplinary approach to chemical energy leads to modeling chemical bonds in terms of negative energy. While recent work on ontological metaphors for energy has emphasized the affordances of the substance ontology, this ontology is problematic in the context of negative energy. Instead, we apply a dynamic ontologies perspective to argue that blending the substance and location ontologies for energy can be effective in reasoning about negative energy in the context of reasoning about chemical bonds. We present data from an introductory physics for the life sciences (IPLS) course in which both experts and students successfully use this blended ontology. Blending these ontologies is most successful when the substance and location ontologies are combined such that each is strategically utilized in reasoning about particular ...

  15. Advanced training of tax consultants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adigamova Farida F.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to review and analyze the data on the necessity to provide an educational environment for training and advanced training of tax consultants in Russia. The article considers the types of tax consulting, the historical background of training financiers in Russia, as well as identifies conditions determining the significance of tax consulting. The research establishes the connection between the negative attitude to tax payment and tax evasion. The advanced training of tax consultants should be a continuous process as they need to take into account both external and internal taxpayers risks associated with the development of law and law-enforcement practice. Obviously, the training of tax consultants should take into account the experience of developed foreign countries, such as Germany, Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia and other European countries as well. In Russia, it is necessary to open educational institutions, which will not only be involved in the certification of tax consultants, but also provide training courses. These courses should contribute to constant increase of tax consultants knowledge, consider the tax treatment of economic activities, as well changes in the legislation, economics, finance, accounting, manufacturing processes, which will improve the quality of services provided by tax consultants.

  16. The transition to hospital consultant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerman, Michiel; Teunissen, Pim W.; Jorgensen, Rasmus Lundhus

    2013-01-01

    Danish and Dutch new consultants' perceptions regarding the transition to consultant were compared to gain insight into this period, particularly the influence of contextual factors concerning the organisation of specialty training and health care therein. Preparation for medical and generic comp...... competencies, perceived intensity and burnout were compared. Additionally, effects of differences in working conditions and cultural dimensions were explored....

  17. Three CLIPS-based expert systems for solving engineering problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, W. J.; Luger, G. F.; Bretz, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    We have written three expert systems, using the CLIPS PC-based expert system shell. These three expert systems are rule based and are relatively small, with the largest containing slightly less than 200 rules. The first expert system is an expert assistant that was written to help users of the ASPEN computer code choose the proper thermodynamic package to use with their particular vapor-liquid equilibrium problem. The second expert system was designed to help petroleum engineers choose the proper enhanced oil recovery method to be used with a given reservoir. The effectiveness of each technique is highly dependent upon the reservoir conditions. The third expert system is a combination consultant and control system. This system was designed specifically for silicon carbide whisker growth. Silicon carbide whiskers are an extremely strong product used to make ceramic and metal composites. The manufacture of whiskers is a very complicated process. which to date. has defied a good mathematical model. The process was run by experts who had gained their expertise by trial and error. A system of rules was devised by these experts both for procedure setup and for the process control. In this paper we discuss the three problem areas of the design, development and evaluation of the CLIPS-based programs.

  18. Comparing Client Outcomes for Two Evidence-Based Treatment Consultation Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funderburk, Beverly; Chaffin, Mark; Bard, Elizabeth; Shanley, Jenelle; Bard, David; Berliner, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    Posttraining expert case consultation is a key component of transporting and scaling up evidence-based treatments, and hopefully retaining their efficacy. Live practice observation and in vivo coaching is a strategy used in academic training environments, but is rarely feasible in field settings. Post hoc telephone consultation is a substitute strategy but does not approximate many aspects of live coaching. Live video technology offers a closer approximation but has not yet been sufficiently tested. Using a roll-out experimental design, this study compared client outcomes across doses of two posttraining expert consultation strategies-standard telephone consultation and live video coaching. The study was conducted during a two-state, 30-agency implementation involving 80 therapists and 330 cases receiving Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT). Child behavior problems fell from well above to below clinical cutoff values, with about a 1 standard deviation improvement in 14 sessions, which is within the range reported in laboratory efficacy trials. Symptom improvement was augmented by increased therapist dose of live video consultations. Phone consultation dose had no association with client level outcomes. PCIT benefits appear to be retained when the model is transported at scale into the field, and live video consultation appeared to offer small but significant advantages over telephone consultation as one element of an overall transport strategy.

  19. Prototype System Design and Implement of the Database about Science and Technical Consulting Experts Based on Social Network%基于社会网络的科技咨询专家库的原型系统设计与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王曰芬; 王雪芬; 颜端武

    2012-01-01

    本文将社会网络分析方法及可视化技术引入科技咨询专家库构建中,利用Visual Studio.net结合Silverlight可视化技术和SQLSERVER关系数据库技术设计并开发一个面向科研评价或管理机构及政府部门的、通用的专家库原型系统.该系统提供完备的专家信息基础、基于给定主题的专家查找、专家关系的查找以及专家间关联的社会网络分析和可视化,能提高专家查找的准确度和性能,方便用户直观、形象地把握专家间整体科研情况,辅助用户利用社会关系找到合适的科研合作者,或根据社会关系规避有利害关系的专家.为验证本文所开发的专家库原型系统的可用性与适用性,论文利用江苏省科技厅提供的一批图书馆、情报及文献学学科领域的专家数据,对系统提供的各种专家检索服务进行操作与运行,并展示与分析其可视化结果.%In this paper,we introduces social network analysis and visualization technique into the expert databaseconstruction and developed an all-purpose expert database prototype system catering to scientific evaluation and government sectors utilizing Visual Studio.net, Silverlight and SQL Server database. This system provides complete expert information basis, topic-based expert search, expert relation-based search and social network analysis and visualization of expert association, aiming to improve the accuracy and performance of expert search, so that the user can get a whole picture of expert research in a direct and vivid way. By looking into the inner social relations, users can find their prospective cooperator or avoid some stakeholders. To verify the usability and applicability of the system, an actual experiment was carried out: we use the expert data in the field of library, information science and documentation science supplied by the Office of Science and Technology of Jiangsu Province to run all kinds of expert searches on the system and

  20. Nurse consultants 10 years on: an insight to the role for nurse managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Chris; Gavin-Daley, Ann; Kilgannon, Helen; Swift, Juliette

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the Non-Medical Consultant role in the North West of England. The objective was to identify the current number of Non-Medical Consultants, what they do and the impact of the role in practice. The Non-Medical Consultant role for nursing and midwifery was introduced in the UK in 2000 to provide better outcomes for patients by improving service and quality; strengthening clinical leadership; and providing a new career opportunity to help retain experienced and expert professionals in practice. A combined qualitative and quantitative design was adopted. This included desktop review of previous studies, a survey questionnaire to current consultants, focus group meetings with Non-Medical Consultants, sponsors and champions. The role is effective, flexible, responsive and outward facing both internal to the organization and externally on a local, regional and national basis. A key challenge for the Non-Medical Consultants was organizational understanding of the role. The small size of the Non-Medical Consultant workforce can limit individual organizations experience of establishing and supporting the role. Effective Non-Medical Consultants lead, drive and support quality improvement, increased productivity and service effectiveness. Other impacts include sharing and promoting best practice with colleagues, income generation and financial savings through service redesign and/or staff skill mix changes. Managerial issues identified may assist Nurse Managers seeking to introduce new consultant roles and/or support, and retain existing consultants to reach their full potential. 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. The consultation as an interpretive dialogue about the child's health needs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten Lykke; Christensen, Pia Haudrup; Reventlow, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Though uniquely placed in the health care system, GPs only become aware of a small number of children with behavioural and emotional problems. Research evaluating the challenges and barriers in general practice for identifying children with problems is therefore important. OBJECTIVES...... group discussions and nine individual interviews. The focus of study was to explore GP consultations with children 0-5 years of age and their parent/s. RESULTS: Though expressing a family-focused approach to the child consultation, the GPs often did not succeed in making the consultation family focused....... The analysis revealed that the GPs often were 'stuck' in the traditional role of expert and this made it difficult for them to explore the child's well-being. The consultation became more family focused when the GPs moved away from the role of expert. The GPs experienced that by sharing their uncertainty...

  2. Study on the Consultation Mechanism of an Internet-Based Remote Fault Diagnosis System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Aimed at the deficiency of the mechanism of management and consultation, an idea of an internet-based Virtual Diagnosis Center (VDC) for machine fault is proposed, and the key elements of remote consultation are abstracted. Around the key elements, the construct scheme and cooperative mechanism among experts of VDC are designed. According to the diagnosed object, the context knowledge of a fault machine, fault cases and ActiveX-based analysis tools are integrated into a multimedia consultation environment in VDC to enhance the efficiency of expert consultation. Simultaneously, the technique of push subscription in a SQL Server is utilized to collect machine condition data in an enterprise machine condition database, which ensures the security of the database. The VDC system in Xi'an Jiaotong University has been applied to remote diagnosis of a blower in Wuhan Iron and Steel Corporation and the system construction reasonableness and the running stability are verified.

  3. Expert F# 20

    CERN Document Server

    Syme, Don; Cisternino, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Expert F# 2.0 is about practical programming in a beautiful language that puts the power and elegance of functional programming into the hands of professional developers. In combination with .NET, F# achieves unrivaled levels of programmer productivity and program clarity. Expert F# 2.0 is * The authoritative guide to F# by the inventor of F# * A comprehensive reference of F# concepts, syntax, and features * A treasury of expert F# techniques for practical, real-world programming F# isn't just another functional programming language. It's a general-purpose language ideal for real-world develop

  4. Benchmarking expert system tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gary

    1988-01-01

    As part of its evaluation of new technologies, the Artificial Intelligence Section of the Mission Planning and Analysis Div. at NASA-Johnson has made timing tests of several expert system building tools. Among the production systems tested were Automated Reasoning Tool, several versions of OPS5, and CLIPS (C Language Integrated Production System), an expert system builder developed by the AI section. Also included in the test were a Zetalisp version of the benchmark along with four versions of the benchmark written in Knowledge Engineering Environment, an object oriented, frame based expert system tool. The benchmarks used for testing are studied.

  5. Peer-reviewed forensic consultation in practice: multidisciplinary oversight in common expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welner, Michael; Davey, Emily E; Bernstein, Adam

    2014-09-01

    The fallibility of forensic science consultation is an ongoing and major justice concern. Prospective peer-reviewed forensic consultation has over 10 years of application in American criminal and civil courts, adapting from the traditional oversight of teaching hospitals, rules of evidence and discovery, conventions of testimony of expert witnesses, and attorneys' overall trial strategy. In systematizing heightened oversight, this process ensures greater accountability in forensic science consultation. The integration of peer reviewers' complementary expertise and experience enhances the sophistication and overall quality of assessment. Forensic examination frequently involves the interface of different specialties. Multidisciplinary peer review augments expert proficiency with that of professional peers having different vantage points from relevant scientific disciplines. This approach ensures greater sophistication of a case inquiry, built-in accountability, and streamlined processes when multiple experts are necessitated. Here, the authors present examples of several cases and the primary and secondary benefits of this collaborative, rigorous, cross-disciplinary exercise.

  6. Modeling interdisciplinary activities involving Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Steffen Møllegaard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a didactical model is presented. The goal of the model is to work as a didactical tool, or conceptual frame, for developing, carrying through and evaluating interdisciplinary activities involving the subject of mathematics and philosophy in the high schools. Through the terms...... of Horizontal Intertwining, Vertical Structuring and Horizontal Propagation the model consists of three phases, each considering different aspects of the nature of interdisciplinary activities. The theoretical modelling is inspired by work which focuses on the students abilities to concept formation in expanded...... domains (Michelsen, 2001, 2005a, 2005b). Furthermore the theoretical description rest on a series of qualitative interviews with teachers from the Danish high school (grades 9-11) conducted recently. The special case of concrete interdisciplinary activities between mathematics and philosophy is also...

  7. City evacuations an interdisciplinary approach

    CERN Document Server

    Binner, Jane; Branicki, Layla; Galla, Tobias; Jones, Nick; King, James; Kolokitha, Magdalini; Smyrnakis, Michalis

    2015-01-01

    Evacuating a city is a complex problem that involves issues of governance, preparedness education, warning, information sharing, population dynamics, resilience and recovery. As natural and anthropogenic threats to cities grow, it is an increasingly pressing problem for policy makers and practitioners.   The book is the result of a unique interdisciplinary collaboration between researchers in the physical and social sciences to consider how an interdisciplinary approach can help plan for large scale evacuations.  It draws on perspectives from physics, mathematics, organisation theory, economics, sociology and education.  Importantly it goes beyond disciplinary boundaries and considers how interdisciplinary methods are necessary to approach a complex problem involving human actors and increasingly complex communications and transportation infrastructures.   Using real world case studies and modelling the book considers new approaches to evacuation dynamics.  It addresses questions of complexity, not only ...

  8. Efficacy of brief interdisciplinary psychotherapeutic intervention for motor conversion disorder and nonepileptic attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubschmid, M; Aybek, S; Maccaferri, G E; Chocron, O; Gholamrezaee, M M; Rossetti, A O; Vingerhoets, F; Berney, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to compare a brief interdisciplinary psychotherapeutic intervention to standard care as treatments for patients recently diagnosed with severe motor conversion disorder or nonepileptic attacks. This randomized controlled trial of 23 consecutive patients compared (a) an interdisciplinary psychotherapeutic intervention group receiving four to six sessions by a consultation liaison psychiatrist, the first and last sessions adding a neurological consultation and a joint psychiatric and neurological consultation, and (b) a standard care group. After intervention, patients were assessed at 2, 6 and 12 months with the Somatoform Dissociation Questionnaire (SDQ-20), Clinical Global Impression scale, Rankin scale, use of medical care, global mental health [Montgomery and Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Beck Depression Inventory, mental health component of Short Form (SF)-36] and quality of life (SF-36). We calculated linear mixed models. Our intervention brought a statistically significant improvement of physical symptoms [as measured by the SDQ-20 (P<.02) and the Clinical Global Impression scale (P=.02)] and psychological symptoms [better scores on the mental health component of the SF-36 (P<.05) and on the Beck Depression Inventory (P<.05)] and a reduction in new hospital stays after intervention (P<.05). A brief psychotherapeutic intervention taking advantage of a close collaboration with neurology consultants in the setting of consultation liaison psychiatry appears effective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Differentiating between a consultant nurse and a clinical nurse specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylor, Miles

    With the introduction of nurse consultants, and regulation of the use of the designation 'specialist nurse', experienced practitioners such as clinical nurse specialists have seen their position eroded. Nurse consultants are a new NHS-employment category, and are expected to be at the top rank of the profession both in status and in salary. However, this article argues that nurses at various levels have the same core functions, and that these do not differ for nurse consultants. Distinguishing between practitioners that might have the same job description could be better done by measuring outcomes. More care needs to be taken over the use of words such as 'expert', which is used differently in different contexts, and it is suggested that competencies be developed by which to measure the effects of expertise. Although nurse consultant appointments are often driven by various political directives and they are employed to meet local and national priorities, difficult issues need to be faced. First, if nurse consultant jobs are the top of the clinical career ladder, will clinical nurse specialists (CNSs) need to accept a lower rung on it? Further, perhaps the title CNS should become obsolete or be regulated? Can CNSs claim parity of pay using the 'Agenda for Change' framework?

  10. Interdisciplinary and participatory approaches: the key to effective groundwater management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Roland; Foster, Stephen; Villholth, Karen G.

    2017-06-01

    The challenges of a changing world, which are progressively threatening sustainable use of groundwater resources, can only be rationally and effectively addressed through close collaboration between experts and practitioners from different disciplines. Furthermore, science and management need to build on stakeholder opinions and processes in order to generate useful knowledge and positive outcomes in terms of sustainable and equitable groundwater management. This essay provides a discussion of the status of and vision for participatory and inter-disciplinary approaches to groundwater evaluation and management as well as a conceptual framework and relevant research questions that will facilitate such approaches.

  11. Modeling interdisciplinary activities involving Mathematics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Steffen Møllegaard

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a didactical model is presented. The goal of the model is to work as a didactical tool, or conceptual frame, for developing, carrying through and evaluating interdisciplinary activities involving the subject of mathematics and philosophy in the high schools. Through the terms...... domains (Michelsen, 2001, 2005a, 2005b). Furthermore the theoretical description rest on a series of qualitative interviews with teachers from the Danish high school (grades 9-11) conducted recently. The special case of concrete interdisciplinary activities between mathematics and philosophy is also...

  12. Exploring indicators of interdisciplinary research and education success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Gemma; Blanch, Anicet; Blaschke, Alfred Paul; Brouwer, Roy; Bucher, Christian; Farnleitner, Andreas; Fürnkranz-Prskawetz, Alexia; Loucks, Daniel Pete; Morgenroth, Eberhard; Parajka, Juraj; Pfeifer, Norbert; Rechberger, Helmut; Wagner, Wolfgang; Zessner, Matthias; Blöschl, Günter

    2017-04-01

    Interdisciplinary research and education programmes aim to produce groundbreaking research, often on socially relevant topics, and to produce experts with the skills to work across disciplines. However, there are many outstanding questions on the effectiveness of interdisciplinary programmes. Such as whether they produce novel and groundbreaking research, whether interdisciplinary graduates are leading to a more interdisciplinary culture of research and practice in academia and beyond, and whether an interdisciplinary approach can more effectively address issues of societal relevance than a mono-disciplinary approach. The Vienna Doctoral Programme on Water Resource Systems at Vienna University of Technology is currently in its eighth year and offers a valuable case study to contribute to understanding interdisciplinary research and education. Ten different research fields are covered by the Programme and because collaborative research takes place both between researchers from different research fields (cross-disciplinary research) and from researchers from the same research field (mono-disciplinary research) we are able to compare the impacts of each research type. We specifically explored three questions: i) whether cross-disciplinary research leads to more innovative scientific findings than mono-disciplinary research, ii) whether cross-disciplinary researchers develop professional skills that benefit their future careers, and iii) whether cross-disciplinary research produces findings of greater societal relevance than mono-disciplinary research. To conduct the evaluation we identified a variety of indicators. Journal impact factors (IF) and citation rates of ISI indexed publications were used to compare scientific innovativeness. Based on these indicators, our findings suggest that cross-disciplinary work is more innovative. The cross-disciplinary work is published in journals with a slightly higher impact factor (mean IF is 2.36) and receives slightly more

  13. 40 CFR 1502.6 - Interdisciplinary preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 1502.6 Interdisciplinary preparation. Environmental impact statements shall be prepared using an inter-disciplinary approach which will insure the integrated use of the natural and social sciences and...

  14. MOORE: A prototype expert system for diagnosing spacecraft problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlin, Katherine; Weissert, Jerry; Krantz, Kerry

    1988-01-01

    MOORE is a rule-based, prototype expert system that assists in diagnosing operational Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) problems. It is intended to assist spacecraft engineers at the TDRS ground terminal in trouble shooting problems that are not readily solved with routine procedures, and without expert counsel. An additional goal of the prototype system is to develop in-house expert system and knowledge engineering skills. The prototype system diagnoses antenna pointing and earth pointing problems that may occur within the TDRS Attitude Control System (ACS). Plans include expansion to fault isolation of problems in the most critical subsystems of the TDRS spacecraft. Long term benefits are anticipated with use of an expert system during future TDRS programs with increased mission support time, reduced problem solving time, and retained expert knowledge and experience. Phase 2 of the project is intended to provide NASA the necessary expertise and capability to define requirements, evaluate proposals, and monitor the development progress of a highly competent expert system for NASA's Tracking Data Relay Satellite. Phase 2 also envisions addressing two unexplored applications for expert systems, spacecraft integration and tests (I and T) and support to launch activities. The concept, goals, domain, tools, knowledge acquisition, developmental approach, and design of the expert system. It will explain how NASA obtained the knowledge and capability to develop the system in-house without assistance from outside consultants. Future plans will also be presented.

  15. Interdisciplinary Science Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, P. J.; Hine, D.; Barnard, R. T.

    2013-01-01

    Science history shows us that interdisciplinarity is a spontaneous process that is intrinsic to, and engendered by, research activity. It is an activity that is done rather than an object to be designed and constructed. We examine three vignettes from the history of science that display the interdisciplinary process at work and consider the…

  16. Health Counseling: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, John H., Jr.; Guyton, Rick

    1985-01-01

    The Counselor Education and Health Education programs at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, recently cooperated in developing a curriculum to prepare health counselors. The goals and objectives of counselor education and of health education are so similar that an interdisciplinary health care specialization is a natural development. (MT)

  17. Interdisciplinary Collaboration in EHDI Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lauri; Houston, K. Todd; Hoffman, Jeff; Bradham, Tamala S.

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs were asked to complete a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that consisted of 12 evaluative areas of EHDI programs. For the interdisciplinary area, 47 coordinators responded with 224 items, and themes were identified within each SWOT…

  18. Interdisciplinary Science Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, P. J.; Hine, D.; Barnard, R. T.

    2013-01-01

    Science history shows us that interdisciplinarity is a spontaneous process that is intrinsic to, and engendered by, research activity. It is an activity that is done rather than an object to be designed and constructed. We examine three vignettes from the history of science that display the interdisciplinary process at work and consider the…

  19. Something Essential about Interdisciplinary Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyfuss, Simeon

    2011-01-01

    The integrative thinking essential to interdisciplinary inquiry requires not only critical reflection concerning the points of convergence and dissonance between disciplinary insights, but also something more personal and less predictable that this paper describes as "holding in relationship difference ways of knowing." Using the process…

  20. Interdisciplinary Research Boosted by Serendipity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbellay, Frédéric; Moody, Zoe; Sedooka, Ayuko; Steffen, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Interdisciplinary research can be defined as the practice of discovering new objects of knowledge beyond disciplinary borders. It often operates through the cross-fertilization and hybridization of concepts, theoretical frameworks, and methodological tools to enable the description, analysis, and understanding of the complexity of objects of study…

  1. The Twin Interdisciplinary Neuroticism Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, Harriette; Rijsdijk, Fruehling V.; Snieder, Harold; Ormel, Johan

    The Twin Interdisciplinary Neuroticism Study (TWINS) is a three-wave study including >800 twin pairs from the northern part of the Netherlands. The aim of the study is to unravel why neuroticism reflects vulnerability to mental disorders. In this study, we focus on possible mechanisms underlying

  2. Personal Finance: An Interdisciplinary Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchardt, Jane; Bagwell, Dorothy C; Bailey, William C.; DeVaney, Sharon A.; Grable, John E.; Leech, Irene E.; Lown, Jean M.; Sharpe, Deanna L.; Xiao, Jing J.

    2007-01-01

    This commentary recommends that financial counseling and planning research, education, and practice be framed as an interdisciplinary profession called personal finance. Authors summarize the history of the profession and key theories providing the conceptual foundation. In order for the emerging profession of personal finance to achieve…

  3. Interdisciplinary Collaboration in EHDI Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lauri; Houston, K. Todd; Hoffman, Jeff; Bradham, Tamala S.

    2011-01-01

    State coordinators of early hearing detection and intervention (EHDI) programs were asked to complete a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats, or SWOT, analysis that consisted of 12 evaluative areas of EHDI programs. For the interdisciplinary area, 47 coordinators responded with 224 items, and themes were identified within each SWOT…

  4. Health Counseling: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, John H., Jr.; Guyton, Rick

    1985-01-01

    The Counselor Education and Health Education programs at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, recently cooperated in developing a curriculum to prepare health counselors. The goals and objectives of counselor education and of health education are so similar that an interdisciplinary health care specialization is a natural development. (MT)

  5. Boundary Breaking for Interdisciplinary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidron, Adi; Kali, Yael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to contribute to the body of knowledge on processes by which students develop interdisciplinary understanding of contents, as well as to suggest technology-enhanced means for supporting them in these processes in the context of higher education. In doing so, we suggest a rethinking of three traditional practices that…

  6. Successful Components of Interdisciplinary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Katherine; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This article presents 10 ideas for developing successful interdisciplinary curricula as suggested in the allied health literature. Implementation of the ideas is illustrated by examples from a clinical geriatric course involving physical therapy, physician assistant, nurse practitioner, and medical students. (Author/CT)

  7. Simulated consultations: a sociolinguistic perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Atkins, Sarah; Roberts, Celia; Hawthorne, Kamila; Greenhalgh, Trisha

    2016-01-01

    .... Equally important, but less researched, is the question of how far consultations with simulated patients reflect real clinical encounters--for which sociolinguistics, defined as the study of language...

  8. Virtually expert: modes of environmental computer simulation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landström, Catharina; Whatmore, Sarah J

    2014-12-01

    This paper challenges three assumptions common in the literature on expertise: that expertise is linearly derived from scientific knowledge; that experts always align with the established institutional order; and that expertise is a property acquired by individuals. We criticize these ideas by juxtaposing three distinct expert practices involved with flood risk management in England. Virtual engineering is associated with commercial consultancy and relies on standardized software packages to assess local flood inundation. Mathematical experimentation refers to academic scientists creating new digital renderings of the physical dynamics of flooding. Participatory modeling denotes research projects that aim to transform the relationships between experts and local communities. Focusing on different modes of modeling we contribute an analysis of how particular models articulate with specific politics of knowledge as experts form relationships with flood risk management actors. Our empirical study also shows how models can contribute to re-distribution of expertise in local flood risk management.

  9. Appropriateness of gastrointestinal consultations for hospitalized patients in an academic medical center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Consultation of experts in the internal medicine or surgery subspecialties is needed in the hospitalized population according to decisions of the house staff. Sometimes the referrals are not justified, consuming time and money without a significant change in the patient outcome. Objectives: The aim of our retrospective study was to evaluate justification of consecutive referrals of hospitalized patients for gastroenterology consultation. Materials and Methods: Request for consultation was deemed not justified when at least one of the following parameters was found: No contribution to case management, discharge before consultation, cancellation at the last minute, and a recommendation for ambulatory management or surgery. Results: In August-September 2006, there were 232 requests for gastroenterology consultations. Of them 127 (54.7% were men. The average age was 64.13±20.33 years. Ninety-four (40.2% of the cases had been hospitalized because of other reasons than the consultation issue. Consultation was not justified in 60 patients (25.9%. Ambulatory management was a possibility in 151 cases (65.0%. Request for colonoscopy and gastrointestinal background disease were the only significant predictive factors for justification of consultation, P < 0.0001 for both. Conclusions: In one fourth of the cases, gastroenterology consultation was not justified according to our strict criteria.

  10. An Interdisciplinary Practical for Multimedia Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos-Jorquera, Diego; Pertegal-Felices, María Luisa; Jimeno-Morenilla, Antonio; Gilar-Corbí, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinary projects in the industry typically require collaboration between professionals from various fields. However, this relationship is not generally addressed in the training offered by university programs, which often ignore this interdisciplinary approach. This paper offers an example of interdisciplinary interaction through joint…

  11. Disciplinary Foundations for Solving Interdisciplinary Scientific Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongmei; Shen, Ji

    2015-10-01

    Problem-solving has been one of the major strands in science education research. But much of the problem-solving research has been conducted on discipline-based contexts; little research has been done on how students, especially individuals, solve interdisciplinary problems. To understand how individuals reason about interdisciplinary problems, we conducted an interview study with 16 graduate students coming from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds. During the interviews, we asked participants to solve two interdisciplinary science problems on the topic of osmosis. We investigated participants' problem reasoning processes and probed in their attitudes toward general interdisciplinary approach and specific interdisciplinary problems. Through a careful inductive content analysis of their responses, we studied how disciplinary, cognitive, and affective factors influenced their interdisciplinary problems-solving. We found that participants' prior discipline-based science learning experiences had both positive and negative influences on their interdisciplinary problem-solving. These influences were embodied in their conceptualization of the interdisciplinary problems, the strategies they used to integrate different disciplinary knowledge, and the attitudes they had toward interdisciplinary approach in general and specific interdisciplinary problems. This study sheds light on interdisciplinary science education by revealing the complex relationship between disciplinary learning and interdisciplinary problem-solving.

  12. CSIR at TREC 2008 Expert Search Task: Modeling Expert Evidence in Expert Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    CSIR at TREC 2008 Expert Search Task: Modeling Expert Evidence in Expert Search Jiepu Jiang1, Wei Lu1, Haozhen Zhao2 1 Center for Studies of...AND SUBTITLE CSIR at TREC 2008 Expert Search Task: Modeling Expert Evidence in Expert Search 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...15. J. Jiang, W. Lu, D. Liu. CSIR at TREC 2007. In Proceedings of the 16th Text REtrieval Conference (TREC 2007), 2007. 16. J. Jiang, W. Lu. IR

  13. Experts' opinions on ethical issues of genetic research into Alzheimer's disease: results of a Delphi study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vorm, A; van der Laan, A L; Borm, G; Vernooij-Dassen, M; Olde Rikkert, M; van Leeuwen, E; Dekkers, W

    2010-04-01

    Most publications on the ethical aspects of genetic research into Alzheimer's Disease (AD) concentrate on the differences between the opinions of professionals and non-professionals. Differences in rating of morally relevant issues between groups of professionals have not yet been described. A modified Delphi study in two rounds was held to identify differences between groups of experts (i.e. clinicians, representatives of patient organisations, ethicists and persons with a commercial background). The strongest correlation was found between the opinions of ethicists and representatives of patient organisations (0.67) and between clinicians and ethicists (0.62). Moderate correlation (0.55) was found between the opinions of clinicians and representatives of patient organisations. Persons with a commercial background showed a weak correlation with clinicians (0.41), ethicists (0.35) and representatives of patient organisations (0.30). These differences in rating of morally relevant issues between various professional groups are relevant for clinical practice and dementia care, particularly the different rating of prenatal diagnosis found between clinicians and representatives of patient organisations. Interdisciplinary consultations between various professional groups -including at least researchers, clinicians and ethicists -are recommended to guarantee that all considerations will be incorporated into the debate on ethical issues of genetic research into AD.

  14. Diagnoses, Requests and Timing of 503 Psychiatric Consultations in Two General Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elahe Sahimi Izadian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The high comorbidity of medical and psychiatric diagnoses in the general hospital population requires collaboration between various medical fields to provide comprehensive health care. This study aims to find the rate of psychiatric consultations, their timing and overall diagnostic trend in comparison to previous studies. Tehran University of Medical Sciences has got an active psychiatric consultation-liaison service which includes services provided by four faculty psychiatrists (two full-time and two part-time. This study was done in two general hospitals by simple sampling in available cases. For each consultation, a board-certified faculty psychiatrist conducted a clinical evaluation based on DSM-IV-TR. Other than psychiatric diagnoses, socio-demographic variables, relative consultation rates, reasons for referral, medical diagnoses and the time stay after admission were assessed. Among 503 patients who were visited by the consultation-liaison service, there were 54.3% female with mean age of 39.8 years. In 90.1% of consultations, at least one DSM-IV-TR diagnosis was made. The most frequent diagnosis groups were mood disorder (43.5%, adjustment disorder (10.9% and cognitive disorder (7.6%. In about 10.9% of the consultations, multiple psychiatric diagnoses were made. The mean length of hospital stay before the consultation was 12.56 days (range=1-90, SD=13. Based on our findings, the mood and cognitive disorders still remain major foci of consultation-liaison practice in general hospitals; however our findings showed high rate of adjustment disorders diagnosis and ambiguous request for psychiatric consultation which need more interdisciplinary interaction.

  15. Heuristic thinking: interdisciplinary perspectives on medical error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annegret F. Hannawa

    2013-12-01

    Switzerland to stimulate such interdisciplinary dialogue. International scholars from eight disciplines and 17 countries attended the congress to discuss interdisciplinary ideas and perspectives for advancing safer care. The team of invited COME experts collaborated in compiling this issue of the Journal of Public Health Research entitled Interdisciplinary perspectives on medical error. This particular issue introduces relevant North American and European theorizing and research on preventable adverse events. The caliber of scientists who have contributed to this issue is humbling. But rather than naming their affiliations and summarizing their individual manuscripts here, it is more important to reflect on the contribution of this special issue as a whole. Particularly, I would like to raise two important take-home messages that the articles yield: i What new insights can be derived from the papers collected in this issue? ii What are the central challenges implied for future research on medical error?

  16. L’antropologo e i progetti interdisciplinari : che tipo di collaborazione?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Stoica

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I discuss the role of the anthropologist within an interdisciplinary project Best Combat (Beluga Sturgeon Community Based Tourism whose scope was to bring together experts from different countries with the aim of studying the impact of the sturgeon fishing ban on the communities of the Danube Delta (Romania. My reflections are related to the considerations that emerged during my collaboration with the Best Combat researchers and after the end of the project in an attempt to continue the interdisciplinary collaboration in search for European funding to start a new project.

  17. ENTRA - or the chances of interdisciplinary work; ENTRIA - oder die Chancen des Interdisziplinaeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walther, Clemens [Leibniz Univ. Hannover (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiooekologie und Strahlenschutz; Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. fuer Endlagerforschung; Smeddinck, Ulrich [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Rechtswissenschaften

    2015-07-01

    Since 2013 about 60 scientists work together in the research platform ENTRA (disposal options for radioactive residuals: interdisciplinary analyses and development of evaluation criteria). The scientists group includes physicists, mathematicians, engineers, jurists, experts from ethics, social and political sciences. The common question is the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The contribution describes the concept of interdisciplinary work, using the example of the definition of terms like risk by different scientists, projects for specific disposal options, the problem of public distrust, the problem of limiting values and the optimization of final repository systems.

  18. Expert Oracle application express

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, John Edward

    2011-01-01

    Expert Oracle Application Express brings you groundbreaking insights into developing with Oracle's enterprise-level, rapid-development tool from some of the best practitioners in the field today. Oracle Application Express (APEX) is an entirely web-based development framework that is built into every edition of Oracle Database. The framework rests upon Oracle's powerful PL/SQL language, enabling power users and developers to rapidly develop applications that easily scale to hundreds, even thousands of concurrent users. The 13 authors of Expert Oracle Application Express build their careers aro

  19. Teaching statistics to nursing students: an expert panel consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Matthew J; Eckardt, Patricia; Higgins, Melinda; Kim, MyoungJin; Schmiege, Sarah J

    2013-06-01

    Statistics education is a necessary element of nursing education, and its inclusion is recommended in the American Association of Colleges of Nursing guidelines for nurse training at all levels. This article presents a cohesive summary of an expert panel discussion, "Teaching Statistics to Nursing Students," held at the 2012 Joint Statistical Meetings. All panelists were statistics experts, had extensive teaching and consulting experience, and held faculty appointments in a U.S.-based nursing college or school. The panel discussed degree-specific curriculum requirements, course content, how to ensure nursing students understand the relevance of statistics, approaches to integrating statistics consulting knowledge, experience with classroom instruction, use of knowledge from the statistics education research field to make improvements in statistics education for nursing students, and classroom pedagogy and instruction on the use of statistical software. Panelists also discussed the need for evidence to make data-informed decisions about statistics education and training for nurses.

  20. Assessment on nursing serviceat hospital external consulting rooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mª Dolores Poyatos Ruiz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The social needs and requests change constantly, so that health care is evolving to a more focused on the users, in order to meet users´ needs and expectations of those who are going to get our assistance. Aim: We have developed a research to evaluate the quality of the assistance received by the patientst in their first encounter in the hospital external consulting rooms of traumathology at Santa Bárbara Hospital, letting us know about the patient´s satisfaction after the consulting has finished. Material and method: A transverse descriptive study on the traumathology consulting room of Santa Bárbara Hospital in Puertollano was developed for two months. The research is formed by the patients who attend this consulting room for their first time. A self made multiple choice questionnaire, which was designe by experts, and patients were asked to answer it once their first consulting at traumathology service had finished. Results: 95.6% of the patients considered as good or very good the nursing kindness (confidence/reliabitity when seeing them; 93.5% of them considered as good or very good the information given to them and 90.6% of them considered as good or very good the medical explanations they got. We also noticed a significant statistical difference among nursing kindness (confidence/reliabitity, enough consultation time and explanations received, with regard to the variant high resolution. Conclusions: The study reveals that more than 90% of the interviewed people considered as good or very good the clinical assistance and service given. The research has allowed us to know the areas that we can work on and improve.

  1. Academic Development for Careers in Management Consulting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Susan M.; Zanzi, Alberto

    2004-01-01

    Explores the extent to which academic offerings are serving the consulting industry and identifies ways that academia can help. The numbers of management consulting courses, field experiences in consulting and consulting concentrations by graduate business schools were tracked over a three-year period to assess the current state of offerings. A…

  2. Communication Consulting as Persuasion: Issues and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Roseanna G.

    Focusing on the issue of the training and preparation of the communication specialist in communication consulting, an investigation of the persuasive elements in the client-consulting relationship suggests that more direct focus on consulting as persuasion can lead to more responsible and effective enactment of the role of both consultant and…

  3. Ask an Expert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautman, Steve; Klein, Kate

    1993-01-01

    Offers guidelines for determining when and how to recruit subject matter experts (SMEs) and for ensuring that they deliver high quality training. Considers common problems of SMEs, such as giving too much information, conflicts with their job commitments, and stage fright. (JOW)

  4. Computers Simulate Human Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Steven K.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses recent progress in artificial intelligence in such narrowly defined areas as medical and electronic diagnosis. Also discusses use of expert systems, man-machine communication problems, novel programing environments (including comments on LISP and LISP machines), and types of knowledge used (factual, heuristic, and meta-knowledge). (JN)

  5. Bloggers as experts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Balog; M. de Rijke; W. Weerkamp

    2008-01-01

    We address the task of (blog) feed distillation: to find blogs that are principally devoted to a given topic. The task may be viewed as an association finding task, between topics and bloggers. Under this view, it resembles the expert finding task, for which a range of models have been proposed. We

  6. Computers Simulate Human Experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Steven K.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses recent progress in artificial intelligence in such narrowly defined areas as medical and electronic diagnosis. Also discusses use of expert systems, man-machine communication problems, novel programing environments (including comments on LISP and LISP machines), and types of knowledge used (factual, heuristic, and meta-knowledge). (JN)

  7. Interdisciplinary rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iansek, R

    1999-01-01

    The use of a multidisciplinary team in managing end-stage PD was described, emphasizing the use of a specifically designed rehabilitation program based on current concepts of basal ganglia function and malfunction in PD as a means of unifying the team members, providing them with a common knowledge base and enabling the team members to speak to the patients with a common language. This approach has enabled the multidisciplinary team to function in an interdisciplinary and intradisciplinary manner.

  8. Removing Barriers to Interdisciplinary Research

    CERN Document Server

    Jacobs, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    A significant amount of high-impact contemporary scientific research occurs where biology, computer science, engineering and chemistry converge. Although programmes have been put in place to support such work, the complex dynamics of interdisciplinarity are still poorly understood. In this paper we interrogate the nature of interdisciplinary research and how we might measure its "success", identify potential barriers to its implementation, and suggest possible mechanisms for removing these impediments.

  9. Boundary breaking for interdisciplinary learning

    OpenAIRE

    Kidron, Adi; Kali, Yael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to contribute to the body of knowledge on processes by which students develop interdisciplinary understanding of contents, as well as to suggest technology-enhanced means for supporting them in these processes in the context of higher education. In doing so, we suggest a rethinking of three traditional practices that tend to characterise typical higher education instruction: (1) compartmentalisation of disciplines; (2) traditional pedagogy; and (3) traditional hier...

  10. Structural Narratology and Interdisciplinary Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohammadi Kalesar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the relationship between structural narratology and interdisciplinary studies. We will try to answer two main questions: What factors have been effective in narratology’s orientation toward interdisciplinary studies? Is this tendency the result of a possibility in narration or a methodological necessity? The movement of narratology to interdisciplinary is observable not only in new narratological tendencies but also in changes in structural theories. Therefore, this article will trace the roots of this tendency in the revises and critiques of these theories until 1970s. By tracing these changes it can be realized that the theories of structural narrotology have broken with idea of independence and self-sufficiency of literature and embraced other disciplines. The main factors in these changes are: attention to cultural elements and reading process in the perception of narrative structure. These considerations have been accompanied by some results; first, the main targets of narratology changed from investigating textual properties to reading and understanding the narration process; second, some disciplines and fields related to culture and mind studies found their way into narratology.

  11. Spanning Boundaries: The Case of an Intercultural E-Consulting Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Ana-Paula; Baran, Evrim; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to understand ways to plan, organize and facilitate experiences in which experts who are geographically dispersed act as effective consultants. Graduate students enrolled in an advanced course in instructional technology at a large university in the Midwestern United States interacted with colleagues studying at a…

  12. A Consultative Itinerant Approach to Service Delivery: Considerations for the Early Childhood Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnebeil, Laurie; Pretti-Frontczak, Kristie; McInerney, William

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article, written by experts in itinerant early childhood special education, describes and differentiates approaches to itinerant early childhood special education as a primary service delivery option. Consultative itinerant early childhood special education services, in particular, are a means of ensuring that young children with…

  13. Unsaturated Zone Flow Model Expert Elicitation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppersmith, K. J.

    1997-05-30

    This report presents results of the Unsaturated Zone Flow Model Expert Elicitation (UZFMEE) project at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. (Geomatrix), for TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc. The objective of this project was to identify and assess the uncertainties associated with certain key components of the unsaturated zone flow system at Yucca Mountain. This assessment reviewed the data inputs, modeling approaches, and results of the unsaturated zone flow model (termed the ''UZ site-scale model'') being developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the US Geological Survey (USGS). In addition to data input and modeling issues, the assessment focused on percolation flux (volumetric flow rate per unit cross-sectional area) at the potential repository horizon. An understanding of unsaturated zone processes is critical to evaluating the performance of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. A major goal of the project was to capture the uncertainties involved in assessing the unsaturated flow processes, including uncertainty in both the models used to represent physical controls on unsaturated zone flow and the parameter values used in the models. To ensure that the analysis included a wide range of perspectives, multiple individual judgments were elicited from members of an expert panel. The panel members, who were experts from within and outside the Yucca Mountain project, represented a range of experience and expertise. A deliberate process was followed in facilitating interactions among the experts, in training them to express their uncertainties, and in eliciting their interpretations. The resulting assessments and probability distributions, therefore, provide a reasonable aggregate representation of the knowledge and uncertainties about key issues regarding the unsaturated zone at the Yucca

  14. Bioethics for Technical Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Shigetaka

    Along with rapidly expanding applications of life science and technology, technical experts have been implicated more and more often with ethical, social, and legal problems than before. It should be noted that in this background there are scientific and social uncertainty elements which are inevitable during the progress of life science in addition to the historically-established social unreliability to scientists and engineers. In order to solve these problems, therefore, we should establish the social governance with ‘relief’ and ‘reliance’ which enables for both citizens and engineers to share the awareness of the issues, to design social orders and criterions based on hypothetical sense of values for bioethics, to carry out practical use management of each subject carefully, and to improve the sense of values from hypothetical to universal. Concerning these measures, the technical experts can learn many things from the present performance in the medical field.

  15. Expert Script Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Nancy E.; Cooper, Eric G.

    1991-01-01

    Program provides additional level of interface to facilitate use of telerobotic system. ESG (Expert Script Generator) is software package automatically generating high-level task objective commands from complex menu-driven language of the NASA Intelligent Systems Research Laboratory (ISRL). Makes telerobotics laboratory accessible to researchers not familiar with comprehensive language developed by ISRL for interacting with various systems of ISRL test bed. Incorporates expert-system technology to capture typical rules of operation that skilled operator uses. Result: operator interfact optimizing ability of system to perform task remotely in hazardous environment, in timely manner, and without undue stress to operator, while minimizing change for operator erros that damage equipment. Written in CLIPS.

  16. Expert PLSQL Practices

    CERN Document Server

    Beresniewicz, John

    2011-01-01

    Expert PL/SQL Practices is a book of collected wisdom on PL/SQL programming from some of the best and the brightest in the field. Each chapter is a deep-dive into a specific problem, technology, or feature set that you'll face as a PL/SQL programmer. Each author has chosen their topic out of the strong belief that what they share can make a positive difference in the quality and scalability of code that you write. The path to mastery begins with syntax and the mechanics of writing statements to make things happen. If you've reached that point with PL/SQL, then let the authors of Expert PL/SQL

  17. ALICE Expert System

    CERN Document Server

    Ionita, C

    2014-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at CERN employs a number of human operators (shifters), who have to make sure that the experiment is always in a state compatible with taking Physics data. Given the complexity of the system and the myriad of errors that can arise, this is not always a trivial task. The aim of this paper is to describe an expert system that is capable of assisting human shifters in the ALICE control room. The system diagnoses potential issues and attempts to make smart recommendations for troubleshooting. At its core, a Prolog engine infers whether a Physics or a technical run can be started based on the current state of the underlying sub-systems. A separate C++ component queries certain SMI objects and stores their state as facts in a Prolog knowledge base. By mining the data stored in dierent system logs, the expert system can also diagnose errors arising during a run. Currently the system is used by the on-call experts for faster response times, but we expect it to be adopted as a standard tool by reg...

  18. Perceived incivility during emergency department phone consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Amith L; Vaghasiya, Milan; Boddy, Rachel; Byth, Karen; Unwin, Danielle

    2016-06-01

    Perceived incivility during ED medical phone consultations is poorly researched. We aimed to determine frequency and factors influencing perceived incivility during ED phone consultations. We conducted a prospective self-reported survey of 40 consecutive phone consultations for 21 ED volunteer doctors. Consultations were classified based on the aim of consultation and deemed as 'positive', 'neutral' or 'negative' based on the perceptions of the consulting doctor. Training levels, time bands and specialty data were collected for both consulting and consulted parties. Fifty-seven of 714 included consultations (7.98%, 95% CI 6.2-10.2%) were reported as negative by ED medical staff. Factors associated with significant incidence of negative grading of consultation involved requests for investigations (19.3% vs 5.3%, P  4 (9.1% vs 3.8%, P incivility during ED phone consultations. Perceived incivility occurs infrequently during ED phone consultations. ED female medical staff are at an increased risk of perceived incivility during phone consultations with non-ED medical professionals. Health organisations should actively pursue programmes to investigate the occurrence of incivility during healthcare consultations and implement programmes to mitigate the risk of developing a negative workplace culture. © 2016 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  19. Narrative and Structure in Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadley, David

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the process of consultation to professional networks, teams, groups and individuals concerned with the mental health of children and young people in the care system, and those adopted. Frequently there are significant elements of early trauma suffered by the young people and disruption in the professional organisation. The…

  20. Gamification in a Consulting Company

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, Frank; Bazylevska, L.; Aiello, M.

    2014-01-01

    Gamification refers to the use of game-design elements in a non-gaming context. The consulting company Capgemini has set up a rudimentary Gamification platform to help motivating the people to do extra work for the company in their spare time. In order to re- ward people for this effort, they can re

  1. [Remote medical consultations in gerontology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu-Fritz, Alexandre; Esterle, Laurence; Espinoza, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Experimental teleconsultations have been set up between a university hospital and a public geriatric hospital in Paris in order to facilitate elderly patients' access to specialist consultations. Caregivers have had to accept major changes to their professional practices (delegation of tasks, sharing of knowledge, etc.). This new telemedecine scheme represents huge progress in patient care.

  2. Tianjin Architects & Consulting Engineers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Tianjin Architects& Consulting Engineers (TACE), established in 1952,is the largest integrated architectural design institutein Tianjian. TACE has five A-Class certificates issued by the Ministry of Construction in areas such as engineering design, and it is rated as one of the top 100 exploration and design companies in China.

  3. Gamification in a Consulting Company

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaauw, Frank; Bazylevska, L.; Aiello, M.

    2014-01-01

    Gamification refers to the use of game-design elements in a non-gaming context. The consulting company Capgemini has set up a rudimentary Gamification platform to help motivating the people to do extra work for the company in their spare time. In order to re- ward people for this effort, they can re

  4. Profiles of self-care management versus consulting behaviors in adults with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christopher S; Gelow, Jill M; Mudd, James O; Green, Jennifer K; Hiatt, Shirin O; Chien, Christopher; Riegel, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Patients with heart failure (HF) vary in their ability to respond to symptoms when they occur. The goal of this study was to classify common patterns of symptom response behaviors among adults with HF and identify biobehavioral determinants thereof. Consulting behaviors (i.e. contacting a provider for guidance) were measured using the European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale consulting behaviors subscale, and self-care management (i.e. recognizing and engaging in self-initiated treatment of symptoms) was measured with the Self-Care of HF Index self-care management scale in a prospective cohort study. Latent class mixture modeling was used to identify distinct profiles of consulting and of self-care management behaviors. The mean age (n=146) was 57±13 years, 30% were female, and 59% had class III/IV HF. Two distinct profiles of consulting behaviors (novice and expert) and three distinct profiles of self-care management (novice, inconsistent and expert) were identified. There was a weak association between profiles of consulting behaviors and self-care management (Kendall's tau-b=0.211). Higher levels of anxiety were associated with worse consulting behaviors (β=1.67±0.60) and worse self-care management (β= -5.82±3.12) and lower odds of exhibiting expert level consulting behaviors (odds ratio (OR)=0.50; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.26-0.95) and self-care management (OR=0.47; 95% CI=0.24-0.92) (all pconsulting behaviors does not necessarily confer expertise in symptom self-care management and vice versa. Physical and psychological symptoms are strong determinants of symptom response behaviors. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013.

  5. Experiences of using email for general practice consultations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Helen; Pappas, Yannis; Heneghan, Carl; Murray, Elizabeth

    2013-11-01

    Reports suggest approximately 21-23% of GPs in the UK have consulted with patients using email, but little is known about the nature of this use and what it means for clinicians and patients in general practice. To understand the use of email consultation in general practice by investigating the experiences of existing users and views of experts. A qualitative study conducted in 2010 using purposive sampling and semi-structured interviews in general practice and community settings in some London boroughs. A maximum variation sample of GPs and patients who had used email for consultation in general practice were recruited, as were policy and/or implementation experts. Interviews continued until saturation was achieved. In total 10 GPs, 14 patients, and six experts were interviewed. Consultation by email was often triggered by logistic or practical issues; motivators for ongoing use were the benefits, such as convenience, for GPs and patients. Both GPs and patients reported concerns about safety and lack of guidance about the 'rules of engagement' in email consultations, with GPs also concerned about workload. In response, both groups attempted to introduce their own rules, although this only went some way to addressing uncertainty. Long term, participants felt there was a need for regulation and guidance. Consultations by email in general practice occur in an unregulated and unstructured way. Current UK policy is to promote consultations by email, making it crucial to consider the responsibility and workload faced by clinicians, and the changes required to ensure safe use; not doing so may risk safety breaches and result in suboptimal care for patients.

  6. Translation and Transfer: Interdisciplinary Writing and Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Denise Comer

    2013-01-01

    As institutions of higher learning make growing numbers of interdisciplinary faculty hires, establish ever more interdisciplinary units, develop interdisciplinary curricula, and pursue growth sectors such as global and online education, the ability to write effectively across disciplinary boundaries is becoming ever more vital, and ever more complex. The rapidly changing and expanding academic climate lends urgency for all students, faculty, staff, and administrators not only to learn how to ...

  7. Ten principles of good interdisciplinary team work

    OpenAIRE

    Nancarrow, S.A.; Booth, A; Ariss, S; T. Smith; Enderby, P; Roots, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background\\ud Interdisciplinary team work is increasingly prevalent, supported by policies and practices that bring care closer to the patient and challenge traditional professional boundaries. To date, there has been a great deal of emphasis on the processes of team work, and in some cases, outcomes.\\ud \\ud Method\\ud This study draws on two sources of knowledge to identify the attributes of a good interdisciplinary team; a published systematic review of the literature on interdisciplinary te...

  8. The crucial role of nomothetic and idiographic conceptions of time: interdisciplinary collaboration in nuclear waste management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Corinne; Stauffacher, Michael; Krütli, Pius; Scholz, Roland W

    2012-01-01

    The disposal of nuclear waste involves extensive time scales. Technical experts consider up to 1 million years for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in their safety assessment. Yet nuclear waste is not only a technical but also a so-called sociotechnical problem and, therefore, requires interdisciplinary collaboration between technical, natural, social sciences, and the humanities in its management. Given that these disciplines differ in their language, epistemics, and interests, such collaboration might be problematic. Based on evidence from cognitive psychology, we suggest that, in particular, a concept like time is presumably critical and can be understood differently. This study explores how different scientific disciplines understand extensive time scales in general and then focuses on nuclear waste. Eighteen qualitative exploratory interviews were conducted with experts for time-related phenomena of different disciplines, among them experts working in nuclear waste management. Analyses revealed two distinct conceptions of time corresponding to idiographic and nomothetic research approaches: scientists from the humanities and social sciences tend to have a more open, undetermined conception of time, whereas natural scientists tend to focus on a more determined conception that includes some undetermined aspects. Our analyses lead to reflections on potential difficulties for interdisciplinary teams in nuclear waste management. We focus on the understanding of the safety assessment, on potential implications for communication between experts from different disciplines (e.g., between experts from the humanities and engineering for risk assessment and risk communication), and we reflect on the roles of different disciplines in nuclear waste management.

  9. Patient experiences questionnaire for interdisciplinary treatment for substance dependence (PEQ-ITSD): reliability and validity following a national survey in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugum, Mona; Iversen, Hilde Hestad; Bjertnaes, Oyvind; Lindahl, Anne Karin

    2017-02-20

    Patient experiences are an important aspect of health care quality, but there is a lack of validated instruments for their measurement in the substance dependence literature. A new questionnaire to measure inpatients' experiences of interdisciplinary treatment for substance dependence has been developed in Norway. The aim of this study was to psychometrically test the new questionnaire, using data from a national survey in 2013. The questionnaire was developed based on a literature review, qualitative interviews with patients, expert group discussions and pretesting. Data were collected in a national survey covering all residential facilities with inpatients in treatment for substance dependence in 2013. Data quality and psychometric properties were assessed, including ceiling effects, item missing, exploratory factor analysis, and tests of internal consistency reliability, test-retest reliability and construct validity. The sample included 978 inpatients present at 98 residential institutions. After correcting for excluded patients (n = 175), the response rate was 91.4%. 28 out of 33 items had less than 20.5% of missing data or replies in the "not applicable" category. All but one item met the ceiling effect criterion of less than 50.0% of the responses in the most favorable category. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in three scales: "treatment and personnel", "milieu" and "outcome". All scales showed satisfactory internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.75-0.91) and test-retest reliability (ICC ranged from 0.82-0.85). 17 of 18 significant associations between single variables and the scales supported construct validity of the PEQ-ITSD. The content validity of the PEQ-ITSD was secured by a literature review, consultations with an expert group and qualitative interviews with patients. The PEQ-ITSD was used in a national survey in Norway in 2013 and psychometric testing showed that the instrument had satisfactory internal consistency

  10. Development of an Expert System for Reducing Medical Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ramadan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in patient safety have been hampered by the harddealing with the development of auniform classification of patient safety conceptsin a systematic way.Therefore, many believe that medicalexpert systems have great potential to improve health care.A framework for computer-based medicalerrors diagnoses of primary systems’ deficiencies is presented.Results of this research assisted indeveloping the hierarchical structure of the medical errors expert system whichwaswritten and compliedin CLIPS. It has225rules,52parameters and830conditional paragraphs. The system prompts the userfor response with suggested input formats. The system checks the user input for consistency within thegiven limits. In addition, the system was validated through numerous consultations with the experts in thefield.The benefits thataregained from such types of expert systemsare eliminatingthe fear from dealingwithpersonal mistake, and providing the up-date information and helps medical staff as a learning tool

  11. Teaching about Fascism: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfield, Claire

    1980-01-01

    Describes a university course which teaches the history of fascism and nazism through interdisciplinary methods: philosophy, film, literature, and art. Visiting lecturers include survivors of concentration camps. (KC)

  12. Teaching about Fascism: An Interdisciplinary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfield, Claire

    1980-01-01

    Describes a university course which teaches the history of fascism and nazism through interdisciplinary methods: philosophy, film, literature, and art. Visiting lecturers include survivors of concentration camps. (KC)

  13. Revolutionary interdisciplinary cooperation. Effects of short- term regulation studied in a river environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saimakallio, H.; Virsu, R.

    1996-11-01

    A three-year study on how short-term regulation affects the river environment provides power plant builders with new capabilities to meet the needs of the riverside population, recreational users and power plants. The study also opens up new perspectives to researchers. Interdisciplinary cooperation between experts on the living environment, vegetation, fish, recreational use and energy has been revolutionary even on the international scale. (orig.)

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans. European consensus-based interdisciplinary guideline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saiag, Philippe; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Lebbe, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a skin fibroblastic tumour that is locally aggressive, with a tendency for local recurrence, but rarely metastasizes. A unique collaboration of multi-disciplinary experts from the European Dermatology Forum (EDF), the European Association of Dermato-Oncol...... should be confirmed by clinical trials. Therapeutic decisions for patients with fibrosarcomatous DFSP should be primarily made by an interdisciplinary oncology team ('tumour board')....

  15. Revolutionary interdisciplinary cooperation. Effects of short- term regulation studied in a river environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saimakallio, H.; Virsu, R.

    1996-11-01

    A three-year study on how short-term regulation affects the river environment provides power plant builders with new capabilities to meet the needs of the riverside population, recreational users and power plants. The study also opens up new perspectives to researchers. Interdisciplinary cooperation between experts on the living environment, vegetation, fish, recreational use and energy has been revolutionary even on the international scale. (orig.)

  16. Doctor-patient dialogue--basic aspect of medical consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murariu-Brujbu, Isabella Cristina; Macovei, Luana Andreea

    2013-01-01

    Family medicine is the specialty that provides ongoing primary medical care and improves the health status of the individual, of the family and of the community through preventive, educational, therapeutic and rehabilitation measures. The family doctor often makes the interdisciplinary synthesis, in a flexible manner, either alone or in most cases with interdisciplinary consultation. In the latter case, the family doctor initiates the team work and makes the final evaluation by using the longitudinal follow-up of the disease. The doctor-patient encounter represents the "confrontation" with the greatest moral weight, due to the complexity of the values involved, the status of the doctor in a society, and patient's involvement in decision making. The patient is a person who should be treated with respect, honesty, professionalism and loyalty, whatever the clinical status, severity of illness, mental competence or incompetence. A focus, on an international scale, is represented by the characteristics of a good doctor, family physician included, as the latter is the first link in the network of health services. Each model of consultation varies in a more or less subtle way in priorities assignment, and suggests slight differences regarding the role played by doctor and patient in their collaboration. The qualities of a good family physician include not only the strictly professional competences, that also apply to other medical specialties, but also duties, such as, clearly explaining to patients issues concerning their health, informing them about all the possible preventive measures of diseases, making a diagnosis, initiating and supervising a therapy. Medical responsibility lies at the crossroads between medical science and the conscience of the doctor.

  17. Expert and Knowledge Based Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaid, Adrian; Edwards, Lyndon

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the nature and current state of knowledge-based systems and expert systems. Describes an expert system from the viewpoints of a computer programmer and an applications expert. Addresses concerns related to materials selection and forecasts future developments in the teaching of materials engineering. (ML)

  18. Expert Systems and Special Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Alan M.; Ferrara, Joseph M.

    1986-01-01

    The article discusses the characteristics of expert systems (computer programs designed to replicate human expertise in a variety of areas), describes recently available expert system development tools, suggests applications within the field of special education, and reviews recent efforts to apply expert systems technology to special education…

  19. Consultation Barriers between Teachers and External Consultants: A Grounded Theory of Change Resistance in School Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study, conducted in Sweden, was to investigate the cultural barriers between school personnel (teachers and principals) and nonschool personnel (a resource team), who were external to the school system, regarding consultation about challenging or difficult-to-teach students. Focus groups with teachers, principals, and the resource…

  20. Consultation Barriers between Teachers and External Consultants: A Grounded Theory of Change Resistance in School Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornberg, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study, conducted in Sweden, was to investigate the cultural barriers between school personnel (teachers and principals) and nonschool personnel (a resource team), who were external to the school system, regarding consultation about challenging or difficult-to-teach students. Focus groups with teachers, principals, and the resource…

  1. [Teledermatology versus consultations--a comparative study of 120 consultations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, F E; Sönnichsen, K; Blum, A

    2005-10-01

    Dermatology fulfills the prerequisites for telemedicine. An important application of telemedicine might be the field of dermatologic consultations. In this comparative study images of skin disease were taken of 120 patients hospitalized in the University Hospitals of Tuebingen to answer the following questions: (1) are the preconditions in daily routine given for teledermatology, (2) is there adequate agreement between the diagnoses reached in dermatologic consultations and with teledermatology, and (3) can the images be utilized for teaching purposes. Patient acceptance was very good and the images captured with a digital camera were easily obtained. The results of intraobserver analysis for the two teledermatologists without any knowledge of the patients' history were 70.2% and 46.4%, respectively, and with knowledge of the history 76.6% and 64.3%. The results of interobserver analysis without any knowledge of the patients' history were 46.4% and 57.2% and with knowledge of the history 64.3% and 66%, respectively. With the reduction of the image quality, reduced reliability of the diagnoses was observed. Seven of ten images could be used for teaching purposes. It was demonstrated that in dermatology telemedicine is applicable in many, but not in all patients who are referred for dermatologic consultations.

  2. Experts on public trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blok, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Citizen deliberation on technoscientific developments is regularly regarded as a hallmark of Danish democracy, embodied in particular by the Danish Board of Technology. Few empirically guided questions have been raised, however, as to how the Board's democratic projects actually work. Through...... a case study of the May 2003 Danish consensus conference on environmental economics as a policy tool, the article reflects on the politics of expert authority permeating practices of public participation. Adopting concepts from the sociology of scientific knowledge (SSK), the conference is seen...

  3. Expert Oracle Exadata

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Randy

    2011-01-01

    Throughout history, advances in technology have come in spurts. A single great idea can often spur rapid change as the idea takes hold and is propagated, often in totally unexpected directions. Exadata embodies such a change in how we think about and manage relational databases. The key change lies in the concept of offloading SQL processing to the storage layer. That concept is a huge win, and its implementation in the form of Exadata is truly a game changer. Expert Oracle Exadata will give you a look under the covers at how the combination of hardware and software that comprise Exadata actua

  4. Expert Systems Development Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-28

    expert systems has been hardware development. In the middle 1950’s at the very birth of AI, hardware was large very slow and extremely expensive. In...into another report. For example, MOBPLEX provides output into the Lotus spreadsheet as a semi-automated destination. From the spreadsheet the user of...designed on top of the Lotus 1-2- 3 interface. Lotus was used because it was decided there was no need to build a powerful ad hoc report generator

  5. Epistemic dependence in interdisciplinary groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hanne; Wagenknecht, Susann

    2013-01-01

    ignores the issue of differences in background knowledge, or it focuses explicitly on conflicting background knowledge. In this paper we provide an analysis of the interplay between epistemic dependence between individual experts with different areas of expertise. We analyze the cooperative activity...

  6. How to Enhance Interdisciplinary Competence--Interdisciplinary Problem-Based Learning versus Interdisciplinary Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassler, Mirjam; Dettmers, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinary competence is important in academia for both employability and sustainable development. However, to date, there are no specific interdisciplinary education models and, naturally, no empirical studies to assess them. Since problem-based learning (PBL) and project-based learning (PjBL) are learning approaches that emphasize…

  7. Ethnicity and interdisciplinary pain treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Christine M; Matsuura, Justin T; Smith, Clark C; Stanos, Steven P

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify ethnic differences in interdisciplinary pain treatment outcome and whether these differences occur while controlling for the effects of demographics, psychosocial, and secondary gain. We assessed a sample of 116 (Caucasian, African American, and Latino/a) chronic pain patients who participated a 4-week interdisciplinary pain treatment program. Outcome measure included pretreatment, post-treatment, and change scores on the Multidimensional Pain Inventory, Pain Anxiety Symptom Scale 20, Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire, Coping Strategies Questionnaire-revised, and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale-short form. Analysis of covariances revealed that after accounting for educational and sex differences, ethnic minorities differed from Caucasians on a number of treatment outcome measures at pre- and post-treatment [F's ≥ 5.38; P's activity than Caucasians. Results support the notion that ethnic differences in pain treatment outcome exist. Further, ethnic minority groups appear to have greater levels of distress compared to Caucasians. However, African Americans, Latino/a's and Caucasians demonstrated similar improvements on all outcome measures, with exception of the use of prayer. Future studies should begin to explore the mechanisms to explain why ethnic group differences in pain treatment outcome occur. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  8. Interdisciplinary Approach in Engineering Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anda Zeidmane

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the scientific literature available on the types of general competences and their classification caused the authors to conclude that it is necessary to implement interdisciplinary approach in engineering education to develop competences necessary for engineers to make them competitive in the labour market. The attention should be paid to a professional foreign language, computer literacy and educational psychology recommendations. To improve professional foreign language skills, CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning method should be integrated in the study process of engineering education. In order to develop information literacy competence, it is important to create a single e-study environment. The academic staff, developing study subjects for engineering programmes, should focus on the study content and study methods. As regards the content, the compromise should be sought between fundamental acquisition of the knowledge of the subject matter, the know-how of the application of this knowledge as well as the use of brand new software in the calculations. The paper presents the examples of the application of the interdisciplinary approach in the universities, where the authors of the paper are affiliated: the LUA (Latvia University of Agriculture and the RTU (Riga Technical University, respectively.

  9. Psychometric Testing of the Self-Efficacy for Interdisciplinary Plans of Care Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molle, Elizabeth; Froman, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Computerized interdisciplinary plans of care have revitalized nurse-centric care plans into dynamic and meaningful electronic documents. To maximize the benefits of these documents, it is important to understand healthcare professionals' attitudes, specifically their confidence, for making computerized interdisciplinary care plans useful and meaningful documents. The purpose of the study was to test the psychometric properties of the Self-Efficacy for Interdisciplinary Plans of Care instrument intended to measure healthcare professionals' self-efficacy for using such documents. Content validity was assessed by an expert review panel. Content validity indices ranged from 0.75 to 1.00, with a scale CVI of 0.94. A sample of 389 healthcare providers completed the 14-item instrument. Principal axis factoring was used to assess factor structure. The exploratory factor analysis yielded a single-factor structure accounting for 71.76% of covariance. Cronbach internal consistency coefficient for the single factor solution was .97. The corrected item-total correlations ranged from 0.71 to 0.90. The coefficient of stability, during a 2-week period, with a subset of the sample (n = 38), was estimated at 0.82. The results of this study suggest that the Self-Efficacy for Interdisciplinary Plans of Care has sturdy reliability and validity for measuring the self-efficacy of healthcare providers to make computerized interdisciplinary plans of care meaningful and useful documents.

  10. Core Competencies for Training Effective School Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie Lynn Sutton

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and validate a set of core competencies of effective school-based consultants for preservice school psychology consultation training. With recent changes in service delivery models, psychologists are challenged to engage in more indirect, preventative practices (Reschly, 2008). Consultation emerges as…

  11. Core Competencies for Training Effective School Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie Lynn Sutton

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and validate a set of core competencies of effective school-based consultants for preservice school psychology consultation training. With recent changes in service delivery models, psychologists are challenged to engage in more indirect, preventative practices (Reschly, 2008). Consultation emerges as…

  12. Special Education Teacher Consultant: Idealism versus Realism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haight, Sherrel Lee

    1984-01-01

    A review of literature on topics of teacher consultant roles, cross-categorical services, approval criteria, and caseloads suggests the position of teacher consultant as it is being implemented may be untenable. There is a critical lack of role definition at state and local levels and a dearth of professional preparation in consultation skills.…

  13. Observed Consultation: Confidence and Accuracy of Assessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweed, Mike; Ingham, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Judgments made by the assessors observing consultations are widely used in the assessment of medical students. The aim of this research was to study judgment accuracy and confidence and the relationship between these. Assessors watched recordings of consultations, scoring the students on: a checklist of items; attributes of consultation; a…

  14. Observed Consultation: Confidence and Accuracy of Assessors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweed, Mike; Ingham, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Judgments made by the assessors observing consultations are widely used in the assessment of medical students. The aim of this research was to study judgment accuracy and confidence and the relationship between these. Assessors watched recordings of consultations, scoring the students on: a checklist of items; attributes of consultation; a…

  15. Assessing Interdisciplinary Education in U.S. Dental Hygiene Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Lorie; Bray, Kimberly; Mayberry, Bill; Overman, Pamela

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 136 of 216 dental hygiene programs indicated that 31% included interdisciplinary activities in the curriculum; only 15% included both clinical and instructional interdisciplinary coursework. However, 74% felt that students would benefit from interdisciplinary experiences. (SK)

  16. Fostering Interdisciplinary Communication between Pharmacy and Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Aleda M. H.; Kiersma, Mary E.; Keib, Carrie N.; Cailor, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate pharmacy and nursing student self-perceptions of interdisciplinary communication skills, faculty member perceptions of interdisciplinary communication skills, and changes in those skills after increasing the interdisciplinary education content.

  17. Interdisciplinary Approach to Understanding Literary Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossanova, Altynay Zh.; Ismakova, Bibissara S.; Tapanova, Saule E.; Ayupova, Gulbagira K.; Gotting, Valentina V.; Kaltayeva, Gulnar K.

    2016-01-01

    The primary purpose is the implementation of the interdisciplinary approach to understanding and the construction of integrative models of understanding literary texts. The interdisciplinary methodological paradigm of studying text understanding, based on the principles of various sciences facilitating the identification of the text understanding…

  18. Authentic Interdisciplinary Instruction: Raising the Bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohnsen, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    This article addressed the need for authentic interdisciplinary instruction. Authentic interdisciplinary instruction is defined as a learning activity that simultaneously improves student performance related to grade-level standards in two or more disciplines (e.g., science and physical education). The process described for creating authentic…

  19. Interdisciplinary Best Practices for Adapted Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Rick

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the literature on interdisciplinary research. It then draws lessons from that literature for the field of adapted physical activity. It is argued that adapted physical activity should be a self-consciously interdisciplinary field. It should insist that research be performed according to recognized…

  20. Engaging Undergraduates through Interdisciplinary Research in Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, Anura U.; Offutt, Christine; Whitling, Jacqueline; Woodhouse, Donald

    2012-01-01

    To recruit and retain more students in all science disciplines at our small (5,000 student) public university, we implemented an interdisciplinary strategy focusing on nanotechnology and enhanced undergraduate research. Inherently interdisciplinary, the novelty of nanotechnology and its growing career potential appeal to students. To engage…

  1. Interdisciplinary Student Teams Projects: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruck, S. E.; Teer, Faye P.

    2009-01-01

    In today's organizations team work has become an integral part of the day-to-day routine. For this reason, University professors are including group projects in many courses. In such group assessments, we advocate the use of interdisciplinary teams, where possible. As a case study, we report an interdisciplinary group technical project with…

  2. Interdisciplinary Student Teams Projects: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruck, S. E.; Teer, Faye P.

    2009-01-01

    In today's organizations team work has become an integral part of the day-to-day routine. For this reason, University professors are including group projects in many courses. In such group assessments, we advocate the use of interdisciplinary teams, where possible. As a case study, we report an interdisciplinary group technical project with…

  3. Interdisciplinary Training: Preparing Counselors for Collaborative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okech, Jane E. Atieno; Geroski, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    This article utilizes one counselor education program's experience as a framework for exploring how to prepare counselors to work in interdisciplinary teams. Based on an interdisciplinary training program that involves faculty and graduate students from counseling, social work, nursing, internal medicine and family medicine, the article explores…

  4. Engaging Undergraduates through Interdisciplinary Research in Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goonewardene, Anura U.; Offutt, Christine; Whitling, Jacqueline; Woodhouse, Donald

    2012-01-01

    To recruit and retain more students in all science disciplines at our small (5,000 student) public university, we implemented an interdisciplinary strategy focusing on nanotechnology and enhanced undergraduate research. Inherently interdisciplinary, the novelty of nanotechnology and its growing career potential appeal to students. To engage…

  5. Teaching Interdisciplinary Engineering and Science Educations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise B.; S. Stachowicz, Marian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the challenges for the involved teachers who plan and implement interdisciplinary educations. They are confronted with challenges regarding their understanding of using known disciplines in a new interdisciplinary way and see the possibilities of integrating disciplines when...

  6. Interdisciplinary Best Practices for Adapted Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Rick

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an introduction to the literature on interdisciplinary research. It then draws lessons from that literature for the field of adapted physical activity. It is argued that adapted physical activity should be a self-consciously interdisciplinary field. It should insist that research be performed according to recognized…

  7. Second-Order Science of Interdisciplinary Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Noe, Egon

    2014-01-01

    require and challenge interdisciplinarity. Problem: The conventional methods of interdisciplinary research fall short in the case of wicked problems because they remain first-order science. Our aim is to present workable methods and research designs for doing second-order science in domains where...... there are many different scientific knowledges on any complex problem. Method: We synthesize and elaborate a framework for second-order science in interdisciplinary research based on a number of earlier publications, experiences from large interdisciplinary research projects, and a perspectivist theory...... of science. Results: The second-order polyocular framework for interdisciplinary research is characterized by five principles. Second-order science of interdisciplinary research must: 1. draw on the observations of first-order perspectives, 2. address a shared dynamical object, 3. establish a shared problem...

  8. Second-Order Science of Interdisciplinary Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Noe, Egon

    2014-01-01

    require and challenge interdisciplinarity. Problem: The conventional methods of interdisciplinary research fall short in the case of wicked problems because they remain first-order science. Our aim is to present workable methods and research designs for doing second-order science in domains where...... there are many different scientific knowledges on any complex problem. Method: We synthesize and elaborate a framework for second-order science in interdisciplinary research based on a number of earlier publications, experiences from large interdisciplinary research projects, and a perspectivist theory...... of science. Results: The second-order polyocular framework for interdisciplinary research is characterized by five principles. Second-order science of interdisciplinary research must: 1. draw on the observations of first-order perspectives, 2. address a shared dynamical object, 3. establish a shared problem...

  9. Position Paper: Designing Complex Systems to Support Interdisciplinary Cognitive Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Melissa T.; Papalambros, Panos Y.; Mcgowan, Anna-Maria R.

    2016-01-01

    The paper argues that the field we can call cognitive science of interdisciplinary collaboration is an important area of study for improving design of Large-Scale Complex Systems (LaCES) and supporting cognitive work. The paper mostly raised questions that have been documented in earlier qualitative analysis studies, and provided possible avenues of exploration for addressing them. There are likely further contributions from additional disciplines beyond those mentioned in this paper that should be considered and integrated into such a cognitive science framework. Knowledge and awareness of various perspectives will help to inform the types of interventions available for improving LaCES design and functionality. For example, a cognitive interpretation of interdisciplinary collaborations in LaCES elucidated the need for a "translator" or "mediator" in helping subject matter experts to transcend language boundaries, mitigate single discipline bias, support integrative activities, and correct misaligned objectives. Additional research in this direction is likely to uncover similar gaps and opportunities for improvements in practice.

  10. Analysis and visualisation of movement: an interdisciplinary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demšar, Urška; Buchin, Kevin; Cagnacci, Francesca; Safi, Kamran; Speckmann, Bettina; Van de Weghe, Nico; Weiskopf, Daniel; Weibel, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The processes that cause and influence movement are one of the main points of enquiry in movement ecology. However, ecology is not the only discipline interested in movement: a number of information sciences are specialising in analysis and visualisation of movement data. The recent explosion in availability and complexity of movement data has resulted in a call in ecology for new appropriate methods that would be able to take full advantage of the increasingly complex and growing data volume. One way in which this could be done is to form interdisciplinary collaborations between ecologists and experts from information sciences that analyse movement. In this paper we present an overview of new movement analysis and visualisation methodologies resulting from such an interdisciplinary research network: the European COST Action "MOVE - Knowledge Discovery from Moving Objects" (http://www.move-cost.info). This international network evolved over four years and brought together some 140 researchers from different disciplines: those that collect movement data (out of which the movement ecology was the largest represented group) and those that specialise in developing methods for analysis and visualisation of such data (represented in MOVE by computational geometry, geographic information science, visualisation and visual analytics). We present MOVE achievements and at the same time put them in ecological context by exploring relevant ecological themes to which MOVE studies do or potentially could contribute.

  11. Interdisciplinary in the Information Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity and its implications for developing a conceptual framework for the Information Field is discussed, and Zhang & Benjamin’s (2007) paper Understanding Information Related Fields: A Conceptual Framework is examined. It is argued that the fundamental components of a framework must...... be seen as embedded in disciplines, with their theories, concepts, approaches and assumptions. It is argued that a theoretically based distinction between multi-, inter- and transdisciplinarity is important as a foundation for a discussion of a conceptual framework for the Information Field. It is shown...... how interdisciplinary theory may inform the development of a shared conceptual framework for the Information Field. A continuum of integration from multi- to inter- to transdisciplinarity is useful for a distinction of different degrees of synthesis, as common conceptual frameworks tend...

  12. Expert system rheometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiul Amin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Inks, drilling fluids, shower gels and drug delivery vehicles are just a few examples of the many industrial and consumer products based on colloidal and nanostructured complex fluids. The successful formulation of these materials is promoted by understanding how rheological behaviour, which typically dictates performance, relates to underlying microstructure. However, this knowledge can be difficult to obtain for those without the necessary expertise. This article shows how recent developments in rheometer technology address this issue. New rheometers, exemplified by the Kinexus from Malvern have expert knowledge embedded within the instrument and are able to guide users through measurement and data analysis to relevant information. Such systems facilitate development of the design rules to optimize formulations and generate novel and high performance materials of the future.

  13. Impact of the nursing consultation in the External Fixatives Clinic of National Children Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Salas Cerdas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a study which analyzed 10 cases (8 female and 2 male aged betweentwo and 17 years, with a number of bone defects, and conducted over a period of three months in the externalfixator Clinic National Children's Hospital. Aimed to provide a clear vision about the need of this pediatricpopulation to have a consultation with Clinical Nursing. The exploratory study was conducted using anobservation guide and interviews with users, parents and interdisciplinary team, and implemented the nursingsegmented into three stages: pre-consultation, consultation and post-consultation, evaluating each the problemsand needs of each user (a, as well as the achievements of the children in this research and the role played by thenurse in the consultations. The results show specifically the educational aspects in physical and emotional healthnurse that gave the users and their families and at-hospital benefits through the implementation of the nursing. Weconclude that children participating in the study achieve proper assimilation and implementation of healtheducation regarding: skin healing fixer, signs and symptoms of infection, operation keys, administration ofantibiotics, plaster care and healthy food choices. In addition, awareness was achieved in children and theirparents in monitoring medical indications allowing satisfactory results in treatment.

  14. IMPLEMENTATION AND SUSTAINABILITY OF CHILD-PARENT PSYCHOTHERAPY: THE ROLE OF REFLECTIVE CONSULTATION IN THE LEARNING COLLABORATIVE MODEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noroña, Carmen Rosa; Acker, Michelle L

    2016-11-01

    Recent implementation science in mental health has focused on identifying the most effective strategies to disseminate and implement evidence-based treatments (EBTs) into real-world practice settings. The learning collaborative training methodology and its use of expert trainers/consultants have become increasingly popular as one of these approaches. Moreover, there is preliminary evidence that ongoing expert consultation may increase the adoption, learning, and sustainability of EBTs by an already practicing workforce and, consequently, help trainers, practitioners, and organizations address implementation barriers. This article describes the authors' experiences in facilitating Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP) training and explores the role of reflective clinical consultation as an active process that supports the implementation of a rich, but complex, model that requires sophisticated knowledge and skills from practitioners. It examines the intricate range of the CPP consultant's functions, which ultimately support clinicians' reflective practice as they learn and adopt this EBT. Reflective consultation is proposed as an essential component for the integration of knowledge, experience, and emotions in practitioners and as a catalyst for organizational change. Using their voices as trainers-consultants and those of their trainees, the authors discuss the implications of reflective consultation for the effective implementation and sustainability of CPP. Reflections are offered on lessons learned. © 2016 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  15. Expert Systems for the Analytical Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Monchy, Allan R.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Discusses two computer problem solving programs: rule-based expert systems and decision analysis expert systems. Explores the application of expert systems to automated chemical analyses. Presents six factors to consider before using expert systems. (MVL)

  16. Expert Systems as Tools for Technical Communicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grider, Daryl A.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses expertise, what an expert system is, what an expert system shell is, what expert systems can and cannot do, knowledge engineering and technical communicators, and planning and managing expert system projects. (SR)

  17. Finding Trustworthy Experts to Help Problem Solving on the Programming Learning Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shian-Shyong; Weng, Jui-Feng

    2010-01-01

    The most important thing for learners in Programming Language subject is problem solving. During the practical programming project, various problems may occur and learners usually need consultation from the senior programmers (i.e. the experts) to assist them in solving the problems. Thus, the inquiry-based learning with learning forum is applied…

  18. External Tank Liquid Hydrogen (LH2) Prepress Regression Analysis Independent Review Technical Consultation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Vickie s.

    2009-01-01

    The request to conduct an independent review of regression models, developed for determining the expected Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) External Tank (ET)-04 cycle count for the Space Shuttle ET tanking process, was submitted to the NASA Engineering and Safety Center NESC on September 20, 2005. The NESC team performed an independent review of regression models documented in Prepress Regression Analysis, Tom Clark and Angela Krenn, 10/27/05. This consultation consisted of a peer review by statistical experts of the proposed regression models provided in the Prepress Regression Analysis. This document is the consultation's final report.

  19. Tips for telephone and electronic medical consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sailesh G

    2013-11-01

    The world is gradually shrinking in terms of time, and communications, while expanding in terms of population and distances. Patients demand and expect telephone and e-mail consultations and medical professionals are only too happy to oblige. However, a telephone consult is never so satisfying for the patients and well as the doctor as a face consult. Besides much essential information, cues and clues to diagnosis may be missed only with an audio input from patients. A telephone consult should be offered only to know the patient, and only after a prior face consult. It should be ensured that the patient can definitely understand, and follow the directions, and manage the disorder at home. While a telephone consultation may be considered convenient and short, there may be several disadvantages of such consultation, a wrong diagnosis and an inappropriate prescription being just two of them. Telephone etiquette should be followed by the staff and the physician. A triage system may be set up to filter calls that need to be necessarily answered by the physician himself. Telephone consults should be charged, and should be followed by a face consult as soon as possible. E-mail consultations are governed essentially by the same principles that govern telephone consultations. There is a slight advantage of e-mail consultation in that reports can be submitted online, including radiological reports. However, confidentiality is an important and uncertain issue in cyber space. A memorandum of understanding maybe signed between the patient and the physician. The information provided on e-mail should be of a general nature and a face consult should precede e-mail consultation. Patients may be referred to web resources for information. Telemedicine is a useful tool to obtain a medical diagnosis and to provide medical advice, and is likely to be used vastly in the near future.

  20. Ten principles of good interdisciplinary team work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancarrow, Susan A; Booth, Andrew; Ariss, Steven; Smith, Tony; Enderby, Pam; Roots, Alison

    2013-05-10

    Interdisciplinary team work is increasingly prevalent, supported by policies and practices that bring care closer to the patient and challenge traditional professional boundaries. To date, there has been a great deal of emphasis on the processes of team work, and in some cases, outcomes. This study draws on two sources of knowledge to identify the attributes of a good interdisciplinary team; a published systematic review of the literature on interdisciplinary team work, and the perceptions of over 253 staff from 11 community rehabilitation and intermediate care teams in the UK. These data sources were merged using qualitative content analysis to arrive at a framework that identifies characteristics and proposes ten competencies that support effective interdisciplinary team work. Ten characteristics underpinning effective interdisciplinary team work were identified: positive leadership and management attributes; communication strategies and structures; personal rewards, training and development; appropriate resources and procedures; appropriate skill mix; supportive team climate; individual characteristics that support interdisciplinary team work; clarity of vision; quality and outcomes of care; and respecting and understanding roles. We propose competency statements that an effective interdisciplinary team functioning at a high level should demonstrate.

  1. Teaching Interdisciplinary Engineering and Science Educations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise B.; S. Stachowicz, Marian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we study the challenges for the involved teachers who plan and implement interdisciplinary educations. They are confronted with challenges regarding their understanding of using known disciplines in a new interdisciplinary way and see the possibilities of integrating disciplines when...... curriculum are used to find the problems. The conclusion is that teachers have to develop understanding of how to integrate their expertise in a new interdisciplinary curriculum. Furthermore they have to be aware of their knowledge profile. Teachers also need to use resources to find a common goal...

  2. A Non-randomized Comparison of Strategies for Consultation in a Community-Academic Training Program to Implement an Evidence-Based Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Pontoski, Kristin; Creed, Torrey; Xhezo, Regina; Evans, Arthur C.; Beck, Aaron T.; Crits-Christoph, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Despite the central role of training and consultation in the implementation of evidence-based psychological interventions (EBPIs), comprehensive reviews of research on training have highlighted serious gaps in knowledge regarding best practices. Consultation after initial didactic training appears to be of critical importance, but there has been very little research to determine optimal consultation format or interventions. This observational study compared two consultation formats that included review of session audio and feedback in the context of a program to train clinicians (n = 85) in community mental health clinics to deliver cognitive therapy (CT). A “gold standard” condition in which clinicians received individual feedback after expert consultants reviewed full sessions was compared to a group consultation format in which short segments of session audio were reviewed by a group of clinicians and an expert consultant. After adjusting for potential baseline differences between individuals in the two consultation conditions, few differences were found in terms of successful completion of the consultation phase or in terms of competence in CT at the end of consultation or after a 2 year follow-up. However, analyses did not support hypotheses regarding non-inferiority of the group consultation condition. While both groups largely maintained competence, clinicians in the group consultation condition demonstrated increases in competence over the follow-up period, while a sub-group of those in the individual condition experienced decreases. These findings, if replicated, have important implications for EBP implementation programs, as they suggest that observation and feedback is feasible in community mental health setting, and that employing this method in a group format is an effective and efficient consultation strategy that may enhance the implementation and sustainability of evidence-based psychotherapies. PMID:26577646

  3. What is an expert? A systems perspective on expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caley, Michael Julian; O'Leary, Rebecca A; Fisher, Rebecca; Low-Choy, Samantha; Johnson, Sandra; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2014-02-01

    Expert knowledge is a valuable source of information with a wide range of research applications. Despite the recent advances in defining expert knowledge, little attention has been given to how to view expertise as a system of interacting contributory factors for quantifying an individual's expertise. We present a systems approach to expertise that accounts for many contributing factors and their inter-relationships and allows quantification of an individual's expertise. A Bayesian network (BN) was chosen for this purpose. For illustration, we focused on taxonomic expertise. The model structure was developed in consultation with taxonomists. The relative importance of the factors within the network was determined by a second set of taxonomists (supra-experts) who also provided validation of the model structure. Model performance was assessed by applying the model to hypothetical career states of taxonomists designed to incorporate known differences in career states for model testing. The resulting BN model consisted of 18 primary nodes feeding through one to three higher-order nodes before converging on the target node (Taxonomic Expert). There was strong consistency among node weights provided by the supra-experts for some nodes, but not others. The higher-order nodes, "Quality of work" and "Total productivity", had the greatest weights. Sensitivity analysis indicated that although some factors had stronger influence in the outer nodes of the network, there was relatively equal influence of the factors leading directly into the target node. Despite the differences in the node weights provided by our supra-experts, there was good agreement among assessments of our hypothetical experts that accurately reflected differences we had specified. This systems approach provides a way of assessing the overall level of expertise of individuals, accounting for multiple contributory factors, and their interactions. Our approach is adaptable to other situations where it is

  4. Expert system aids reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A.T. [Tennessee Gas Pipeline, Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Quality and Reliability are key requirements in the energy transmission industry. Tennessee Gas Co. a division of El Paso Energy, has applied Gensym`s G2, object-oriented Expert System programming language as a standard tool for maintaining and improving quality and reliability in pipeline operation. Tennessee created a small team of gas controllers and engineers to develop a Proactive Controller`s Assistant (ProCA) that provides recommendations for operating the pipeline more efficiently, reliably and safely. The controller`s pipeline operating knowledge is recreated in G2 in the form of Rules and Procedures in ProCA. Two G2 programmers supporting the Gas Control Room add information to the ProCA knowledge base daily. The result is a dynamic, constantly improving system that not only supports the pipeline controllers in their operations, but also the measurement and communications departments` requests for special studies. The Proactive Controller`s Assistant development focus is in the following areas: Alarm Management; Pipeline Efficiency; Reliability; Fuel Efficiency; and Controller Development.

  5. Expert and novice facilitated modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavella, Elena; Papadopoulos, Thanos

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical study based on action research in which expert and novice facilitators in facilitated modelling workshops are compared. There is limited empirical research analysing the differences between expert and novice facilitators. Aiming to address this gap we study...

  6. Interdisciplinary German-Language Cultural-Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Meriam M.

    1974-01-01

    The suggested themes, activities and projects presented here evolved from the interdisciplinary advanced German-language-mini-courses at Ridgefield (Connecticut) High School. Many of the activities can be adapted for use at earlier levels. (PP)

  7. Is pretenure interdisciplinary research a career risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E. V.; Mackey, K. R. M.; Cusack, D. F.; DeSantis, L. R. G.; Hartzell-Nichols, L.; Lutz, J. A.; Melbourne-Thomas, J.; Meyer, R.; Riveros-Iregui, D. A.; Sorte, C. J. B.; Taylor, J. R.; White, S. A.

    2012-08-01

    Despite initiatives to promote interdisciplinary research, early-career academics continue to perceive professional risks to working at the interface between traditional disciplines. Unexpectedly, the inherent practical challenges of interdisciplinary scholarship, such as new methodologies and lexicons, are not the chief source of the perceived risk. The perception of risk is pervasive across disciplines, and it persists despite efforts to support career development for individuals with common interests [Mitchell and Weiler, 2011]. Suggestions that interdisciplinary work can go unrewarded in academia [Clark et al., 2011] foster a concern that targeting interdisciplinary questions, such as those presented by climate change, will pose problems for acquiring and succeeding in a tenure-track position. If self-preservation limits the questions posed by early-career academics, a perceived career risk is as damaging as a real one to new transdisciplinary initiatives. Thus, institutions should address the source of this perception whether real or specious.

  8. Interdisciplinary Collaborative Mathematics: Standards Correlation Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiatula, Victoria Oliaku

    2015-01-01

    This guide outlines teacher preparation, professional association, and Common Core State Standards aligned to an "interdisciplinary collaborative mathematics" approach using Junior Achievement educational programs within a Math Methods course to train pre-service elementary teachers to teach math.

  9. Teaching Bioethics from an Interdisciplinary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Rivers, Jr.; Brock, D. Heyward

    1982-01-01

    Outlines an interdisciplinary workshop in bioethics for secondary teachers taught by a team consisting of a scientist, a philosopher, and a literary critic. Discusses definitions, topics, reading selections, problems, and value. (DC)

  10. Evolution--A Topic for Interdisciplinary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stall, Pat; Keating, Joe

    1990-01-01

    Outlines an award-winning interdisciplinary unit of study (used in biology and English classrooms) that combines literature, mythology, religious history relating to origins, and Charles Darwin's theory of evolution. (RS)

  11. Integrative and Interdisciplinary Approaches to Leadership Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Julie E

    2015-01-01

    Integrating diverse conceptions of leadership across different disciplines, perspectives, and epistemologies is imperative if leaders are to operate in a global and networked world. Interdisciplinary and integrative leadership courses and digital learning communities are featured examples.

  12. Interdisciplinary Symposium on Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zelinka, Ivan; Rössler, Otto

    2014-01-01

    The book you hold in your hands is the outcome of the "ISCS 2013: Interdisciplinary Symposium on Complex Systems" held at the historical capital of Bohemia as a continuation of our series of symposia in the science of complex systems. Prague, one of the most beautiful European cities, has its own beautiful genius loci. Here, a great number of important discoveries were made and many important scientists spent fruitful and creative years to leave unforgettable traces. The perhaps most significant period was the time of Rudolf II who was a great supporter of the art and the science and attracted a great number of prominent minds to Prague. This trend would continue. Tycho Brahe, Niels Henrik Abel, Johannes Kepler, Bernard Bolzano, August Cauchy Christian Doppler, Ernst Mach, Albert Einstein and many others followed developing fundamental mathematical and physical theories or expanding them. Thus in the beginning of the 17th century, Kepler formulated here the first two of his three laws of planetary motion on ...

  13. Engineering monitoring expert system's developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ching F.

    1991-01-01

    This research project is designed to apply artificial intelligence technology including expert systems, dynamic interface of neural networks, and hypertext to construct an expert system developer. The developer environment is specifically suited to building expert systems which monitor the performance of ground support equipment for propulsion systems and testing facilities. The expert system developer, through the use of a graphics interface and a rule network, will be transparent to the user during rule constructing and data scanning of the knowledge base. The project will result in a software system that allows its user to build specific monitoring type expert systems which monitor various equipments used for propulsion systems or ground testing facilities and accrues system performance information in a dynamic knowledge base.

  14. Towards mutual understanding within interdisciplinary palaeoenvironmental research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Förster, F.; Großmann, R.; Hinz, M.;

    2013-01-01

    The term landscape is a crucial term for a diversity of scientific disciplines researching the Quaternary, each of which maintains different concepts and definitions. With increasing interdisciplinary research cooperation between disparate disciplines, a basis for communication has to be establis......The term landscape is a crucial term for a diversity of scientific disciplines researching the Quaternary, each of which maintains different concepts and definitions. With increasing interdisciplinary research cooperation between disparate disciplines, a basis for communication has...

  15. Interdisciplinary approach for improved esthetic results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This clinical report describes an interdisciplinary (orthodontic, prosthodontics and operative dentist approach for the coordinated treatment of an adult patient diagnosed with severely mutilated dentition secondary to caries lesion warranting restorative procedures that was facilitated with orthodontic treatment. The patient′s specific esthetic expectation for the anterior teeth and improved smile were successfully met through planned treatment, including orthodontic tooth movement, restoration and porcelain conversion crowns. Such coordinated interdisciplinary evaluations and treatment are necessary for improved esthetics.

  16. Integrating corpus consultation in language studies

    OpenAIRE

    Angela Chambers

    2005-01-01

    peer-reviewed Alongside developments in language research, the potential of corpora as a resource in language learning and teaching has been evident to researchers and teachers since the late 1960s. Despite publications which emphasise the benefits of corpus consultation for language learners (Bernardini, 2002; Kennedy & Miceli, 2001), there is little evidence to suggest that direct corpus consultation is coming to be seen as a complement or alternative to consultation of a dictionary, cou...

  17. Interdisciplinary research has consistently lower funding success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromham, Lindell; Dinnage, Russell; Hua, Xia

    2016-06-30

    Interdisciplinary research is widely considered a hothouse for innovation, and the only plausible approach to complex problems such as climate change. One barrier to interdisciplinary research is the widespread perception that interdisciplinary projects are less likely to be funded than those with a narrower focus. However, this commonly held belief has been difficult to evaluate objectively, partly because of lack of a comparable, quantitative measure of degree of interdisciplinarity that can be applied to funding application data. Here we compare the degree to which research proposals span disparate fields by using a biodiversity metric that captures the relative representation of different fields (balance) and their degree of difference (disparity). The Australian Research Council's Discovery Programme provides an ideal test case, because a single annual nationwide competitive grants scheme covers fundamental research in all disciplines, including arts, humanities and sciences. Using data on all 18,476 proposals submitted to the scheme over 5 consecutive years, including successful and unsuccessful applications, we show that the greater the degree of interdisciplinarity, the lower the probability of being funded. The negative impact of interdisciplinarity is significant even when number of collaborators, primary research field and type of institution are taken into account. This is the first broad-scale quantitative assessment of success rates of interdisciplinary research proposals. The interdisciplinary distance metric allows efficient evaluation of trends in research funding, and could be used to identify proposals that require assessment strategies appropriate to interdisciplinary research.

  18. Towards the Semantic Web Expert System

    OpenAIRE

    Verhodubs, O; Grundspeņķis, J

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a conception of the Semantic Web Expert System which is the logical continuation of the expert system development. The Semantic Web Expert System emerges as the result of evolution of expert system concept and it means expert system moving toward the Web and using new Semantic Web technologies. The proposed conception of the Semantic Web Expert System promises to have new useful features that distinguish it from other types of expert systems

  19. [Feeding disorders in infants and toddlers: advantages of a joint consultation with pediatrician and psychologist].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascales, T; Olives, J-P

    2013-08-01

    Feeding disorders and food refusal can be found in 25% of infants, a minority of these disorders has an organic explanation. Failure to thrive and/or severe malnutrition is found in 3-5% of infants in the general population. The authors describe the various phases of the interdisciplinary therapeutic intervention by underlining the advantages and the objectives to integrate therapeutic approaches across professional boundaries. Caregiver-infant relationship disturbances are certainly the most important factor, but the induced psychosomatic conditions also have a multifactorial etiology. This article points out the specificities of the disorders of infant feeding behaviors and explains the advantages of a joint pediatrician-psychologist consultation compared to separate consultations in pediatrics and child psychiatry.

  20. Statistical challenges in nursing education and research: an expert panel consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayat, Matthew J; Higgins, Melinda; Schwartz, Todd A; Staggs, Vincent S

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes an expert panel discussion, "Statistical Challenges in Nursing Research," conducted at the 2013 Joint Statistical Meetings. The panel consisted of doctorally prepared statisticians with faculty appointments in United States-based academic nursing programs. The discussion centered on challenges concerning the use of statistics in nursing education and research. Five domains were identified, including perceptions about statistics, statisticians' roles and responsibilities, interdisciplinary collaboration between statisticians and nurse investigators, statistics education, and the use of statistics in the nursing literature.

  1. Consulting--Part 2. The art and science of using consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, E D; Pirrotta, S

    1996-11-01

    Part I of this series described a research project--a survey of more than 300 physician executives. Asked to share their personal experiences of unsuccessful consultations, our correspondents painted a clear picture of what can go wrong when organizational consultants enter health care systems, and described the lasting destructive sequelae to failed consultations. The two issues responsible for most failed consultations were the intrusion of internal politics into the process and the failure to clearly establish and maintain consensual goals. In Part 2, the consultation process is explored from a very different perspective. What are the issues that often trigger requests for consultation services, as well as the dynamics that can foreshadow success or failure before consultants are even engaged? What are the pitfalls and pointers for the successful use of consultation services?

  2. Interdisciplinary Science in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, L. M.; Lopresti, V. C.; Papali, P.

    1993-05-01

    The practice of science is by its very nature interdisciplinary. Most school curricula, however, present science as a "layer cake" with one year each of biology, chemistry, earth science, and physics. Students are too often left with a fragmented, disjointed view of the sciences as separate and distinct bodies of information. The continuity of scientific thought and the importance of major ideas such as energy, rates of change, and the nature of matter are not seen. We describe two efforts to integrate the sciences in a middle school curriculum and in an introductory science course for prospective elementary teachers. Introductory physical science for eighth graders at the Park School has three major units: "Observing the Sky", "The Nature of Matter", and "The Nature of Light". The course moves from simple naked-eye observations of the Sun and Moon to an understanding of the apparent motions of the Sun and of the Earth's seasons. In "The Nature of Matter", students construct operational definitions of characteristic properties of matter such as density, boiling point, solubility, and flame color. They design and perform many experiments and conclude by separating a mixture of liquids and solids by techniques such as distillation and fractional crystallization. In studying flame tests, students learn that different materials have different color "signatures" and that the differences can be quantified with a spectroscope. They then observe solar absorption lines with their spectroscopes and discover which elements are present in the Sun. Teachers of young children are potentially some of the most powerful allies in increasing our country's scientific literacy, yet most remain at best uneasy about science. At Wheelock College we are designing a course to be called "Introduction to Natural Science" for elementary education majors. We will address special needs of many in this population, including science anxiety and poor preparation in mathematics. A broad conceptual

  3. Interdisciplinary Adventures in Perceptual Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocast, Christopher S.

    A portfolio dissertation that began as acoustic ecology and matured into perceptual ecology, centered on ecomusicology, bioacoustics, and translational audio-based media works with environmental perspectives. The place of music in Western eco-cosmology through time provides a basis for structuring an environmental history of human sound perception. That history suggests that music may stabilize human mental activity, and that an increased musical practice may be essential for the human project. An overview of recent antecedents preceding the emergence of acoustic ecology reveals structural foundations from 20th century culture that underpin modern sound studies. The contextual role that Aldo Leopold, Jacob von Uexkull, John Cage, Marshall McLuhan, and others played in anticipating the development of acoustic ecology as an interdiscipline is detailed. This interdisciplinary aspect of acoustic ecology is defined and defended, while new developments like soundscape ecology are addressed, though ultimately sound studies will need to embrace a broader concept of full-spectrum "sensory" or "perceptual" ecology. The bioacoustic fieldwork done on spawning sturgeon emphasized this necessity. That study yielded scientific recordings and spectrographic analyses of spawning sounds produced by lake sturgeon, Acipenser fulvescens, during reproduction in natural habitats in the Lake Winnebago watershed in Wisconsin. Recordings were made on the Wolf and Embarrass River during the 2011-2013 spawning seasons. Several specimens were dissected to investigate possible sound production mechanisms; no sonic musculature was found. Drumming sounds, ranging from 5 to 7 Hz fundamental frequency, verified the infrasonic nature of previously undocumented "sturgeon thunder". Other characteristic noises of sturgeon spawning including low-frequency rumbles and hydrodynamic sounds were identified. Intriguingly, high-frequency signals resembling electric organ discharges were discovered. These

  4. Explanatory Power for Medical Expert Systems: Studies in the Representation of Causal Relationships for Clinical Consultations,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    Present Illness Program (PIP) and CADUCEUS , two recent medical reasoning programs, deal with the task of representing both cause-effect and effect-cause...information. CADUCEUS [15] has two numbers for each manifestation of disease, an "evoking strength" (the likelihood that an observed manifestation is...the inference weightings on effect-cause rules and cause-effect rules respectively. However, the first version of the CADUCEUS program (INTERNIST-1

  5. Breast Implant–associated Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: Updated Results from a Structured Expert Consultation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Kim, MD, MPhil

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Our assessment yielded consistent results on a number of key, incompletely addressed issues regarding BIA-ALCL, but additional research is needed to support these statement ratings and enhance our understanding of the biology, treatment, and outcomes associated with this disease.

  6. Sugars or sweeteners: towards guidelines for their use in practice - report from an expert consultation

    OpenAIRE

    Nowicka, Paulina; Bryngelsson, Susanne

    2006-01-01

    With the aim of suggesting recommendations regarding the practical implementation of sweeteners from a nutritional point of view for different groups of consumers, based on present scientific knowledge, the Swedish Nutrition Foundation (SNF) arranged a workshop focusing on the use of sugars and sweeteners in relation to obesity, diabetes, dental health, appetite, reward and addiction. The discussions and conclusions are summarized in this article. It was concluded that restrictions to keep th...

  7. The effect of parallel consulting on the quality of consultations in regional general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Peter Duy; Laurence, Jerome Martin; Weston, Kathryn M; McLennan, Peter L

    2012-05-01

    The sustainability of community-based medical education relies on maintaining consultation quality as perceived by patients. This study aims to investigate the effect of an alternative model (parallel consultation) of teaching on patients' views of consultation quality as compared to the conventional consultation model in a general practice setting. A cross-sectional questionnaire study. Patients attending a regional general practice in the Southern Highlands of New South Wales between February and May 2010, who consented to student involvement in their consultation. Instruments to measure 'empathy' (CARE score) and 'enablement' (PEI score) as markers for consultation quality were administered after patient consultations. There was no difference in consultation length between the two groups. There was a small increase in the level of empathy experienced by patients attending parallel consultations compared to conventional consultations (Pconsultation group (Pconsultation quality, as experienced by the patient, when using the parallel consulting model. Parallel consulting does not change the length of time a patient spends with their doctor, and patients have a positive perception of the students involved in this model of clinical teaching.

  8. Competency-Based Behavior Consultation Training: An Evaluation of Consultant Outcomes, Treatment Effects, and Consumer Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepage, Kathy; Kratochwill, Thomas R.; Elliott, Stephen N.

    2004-01-01

    Assessments of consultants, clients, and consumer satisfaction were used to examine the effects of a competency-based consultation training program conducted over 4 years. Using a multiple-baseline framework to assess training effects on consultants and single-case study designs to evaluate changes in client behavior, a number of significant…

  9. Using Expert System Job Aids: A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Clay

    1989-01-01

    Explains how current commercial expert system technology can be used to create useful job aids. Expert systems are defined, situations in which an expert system job aid will be most effective are described, expert system shells are discussed, and three commercial expert system products are described. (LRW)

  10. Using Expert System Job Aids: A Primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Clay

    1989-01-01

    Explains how current commercial expert system technology can be used to create useful job aids. Expert systems are defined, situations in which an expert system job aid will be most effective are described, expert system shells are discussed, and three commercial expert system products are described. (LRW)

  11. Videoconference as a tool for European interhospital consultations in radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Frank-Reinhard; Gerneth, Marlene; Schosser, Rudolf

    1993-10-01

    In the frame of the EC-sponsored TELEMED project, videoconferencing was evaluated as a tool for Remote Expert Consultation (REC) in radiology. The REC environment has been established as a pan-European demonstrator for advanced telecommunication applications in medicine. Five European university hospitals have been interconnected using broadband networks at a speed of 2 Mbit/s and 140 Mbit/s. Videoconference was evaluated in more than 120 sessions. In the experiments, videoconference proved to be a useful tool for teleconsultations, providing a set of requirements identified as indispensable for medical videoconference such as remotely adjustable iris for the document camera are fulfilled. Diagnostic reliability of images recorded with our equipment proved acceptable for digitally acquired images while reliability is limited for conventional images with a high demand of spatial and contrast resolution. Regional spin-off applications that have been established at some participating sites underline the potential of videoconference in health care.

  12. Teaching CONSULT: Consultation with Novel methods & Simulation for UME Longitudinal Training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keme Carter

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An important area of communication in healthcare is the consultation. Existing literature suggests that formal training in consultation communication is lacking. We aimed to conduct a targeted needs assessment of third-year students on their experience calling consultations, and based on these results, develop, pilot, and evaluate the effectiveness of a consultation curriculum for different learner levels that can be implemented as a longitudinal curriculum. Methods: Baseline needs assessment data were gathered using a survey completed by third-year students at the conclusion of the clinical clerkships. The survey assessed students’ knowledge of the standardized consultation, experience and comfort calling consultations, and previous instruction received on consultation communication. Implementation of the consultation curriculum began the following academic year. Second-year students were introduced to Kessler’s 5 Cs consultation model through a didactic session consisting of a lecture, viewing of “trigger” videos illustrating standardized and informal consults, followed by reflection and discussion. Curriculum effectiveness was assessed through pre- and post- curriculum surveys that assessed knowledge of and comfort with the consultation process. Fourth-year students participated in a consultation curriculum that provided instruction on the 5 Cs model and allowed for continued practice of consultation skills through simulation during the Emergency Medicine clerkship. Proficiency in consult communication in this cohort was assessed using two assessment tools, the Global Rating Scale and the 5 Cs Checklist. Results: The targeted needs assessment of third-year students indicated that 93% of students have called a consultation during their clerkships, but only 24% received feedback. Post-curriculum, second-year students identified more components of the 5 Cs model (4.04 vs. 4.81, p<0.001 and reported greater comfort with the

  13. Linking Knowledge and Action: PRI's Community Consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Gregory P.

    Within the Partnership for Rural Improvement (PRI), community consultants operate within three complex sets of relationships: client groups, the organizational structure of PRI, and the local operational base. Community consultants are responsible for developing and facilitating rural development and for providing assistance in community and…

  14. Consulting Careers: A Profile of Three Occupations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, John

    2011-01-01

    Choosing an industry in which to work is often as important as choosing an occupation. And over the next several years, the best advice for some workers may be to choose an industry that sells advice: consulting. The management, scientific, and technical consulting services industry comprises businesses that offer specialized advice to other…

  15. The Consulting Challenge: A Case Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Daniel A.; Naas, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    The Consulting Challenge is a yearly case competition in which teams of graduate students respond to a request for proposals (RFP) for consulting services. The case and RFP are based on a problem that a host organization has experienced. Over 3 days, students meet with representatives of the host organization, analyze data, prepare a proposal for…

  16. Capturing the Competence of Management Consulting Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Klaasjan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to assess whether the effort of consulting firms and branch organizations to establish a shared and standardized methodology as a means to professionalize consulting and as a standard for training is possible and sensible. Design/methodology/approach: A survey was conducted among Dutch management…

  17. Linking Knowledge and Action: PRI's Community Consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Gregory P.

    Within the Partnership for Rural Improvement (PRI), community consultants operate within three complex sets of relationships: client groups, the organizational structure of PRI, and the local operational base. Community consultants are responsible for developing and facilitating rural development and for providing assistance in community and…

  18. How to Hire a Search Consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, Virginia L.

    1993-01-01

    Increasingly, colleges and universities are using consultants to help search committees find the right president for the institution. Search consultants bring experience, historical and national perspectives, objectivity, personal knowledge of candidates, and a professional approach. Energy, enthusiasm, and style are important consultant…

  19. Patient expectations from consultation with family physician.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tähepöld, H.; Brink-Muinen, A. van den; Maaroos, H.I.

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To assess patient expectations from a consultation with a family physician and determine the level and area of patient involvement in the communication process. Method: We videotaped 403 consecutive patient-physician consultations in the offices of 27 Estonian family physicians. All videotaped

  20. ARL/OMS Consultant Training Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euster, Joanne R.

    1982-01-01

    Describes Academic Library Consultant Training Program begun in 1979, sponsored by Office of Management Studies (OMS) and designed to provide 80 consultants to aid academic libraries in improving performance. Viewpoints are included from OMS Director and participants concerning program objectives, trainee selection, workshops, internships, and the…

  1. Capturing the competence of management consulting work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, Klaasjan

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to assess whether the effort of consulting firms and branch organizations to establish a shared and standardized methodology as a means to professionalize consulting and as a standard for training is possible and sensible. - Design/methodology/approach: A su

  2. Patients with environment-related disorders: comprehensive results of interdisciplinary diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Serge; Heller, Pia; Bircher, Andreas J; Braun-Fahrleander, Charlotte; Huss, Anke; Niederer, Markus; Schwarzenbach, Simone; Waeber, Roger; Wegmann, Lukas; Kuechenhoff, Joachim

    2009-03-01

    Researchers dealing with environmental illnesses face complex diagnostic and methodological difficulties. Poor objective findings contrast with high subjective suffering and a firm belief that environmental exposure is the only source of complaints. The Basel pilot research project established a multi-modal assessment procedure and assessed complaints attributed to the environment. Medical, psychological and environmental findings were evaluated as to their pathogenic validity. Furthermore, patients were pooled into distinguishable subgroups in order to formulate more appropriate therapy strategies. Sixty-three patients took part in the threefold diagnostic approach (medical examination, psychiatric exploration, environmental analysis) of a mixed qualitative/quantitative study. Interdisciplinary case conferences allowed a consensus rating of the aetiological relevance of the findings to be reached. The discrepancy between self-rating and experts' judgement was exploited for subgroup formation. About 50% of the patients' symptoms could be attributed to psychiatric causes. Based on self-rating and experts' judgement, four subgroups were distinguished with differing medical, psychiatric and environmental aetiologies, personality traits and interactional competencies. Patients with environment-related disorders form a heterogeneous group. An interdisciplinary assessment and a comparison between self- and experts' judgements enable a more differentiated psychotherapeutic procedure and may enhance future treatment success.

  3. Expert opinion vs. empirical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Rod A; Raybould, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Expert opinion is often sought by government regulatory agencies when there is insufficient empirical evidence to judge the safety implications of a course of action. However, it can be reckless to continue following expert opinion when a preponderance of evidence is amassed that conflicts with this opinion. Factual evidence should always trump opinion in prioritizing the information that is used to guide regulatory policy. Evidence-based medicine has seen a dramatic upturn in recent years spurred by examples where evidence indicated that certain treatments recommended by expert opinions increased death rates. We suggest that scientific evidence should also take priority over expert opinion in the regulation of genetically modified crops (GM). Examples of regulatory data requirements that are not justified based on the mass of evidence are described, and it is suggested that expertise in risk assessment should guide evidence-based regulation of GM crops. PMID:24637724

  4. Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page provides an overview Cornell Mixing Zone Expert System water quality modeling and decision support system designed for environmental impact assessment of mixing zones resulting from wastewater discharge from point sources

  5. Expert systems in clinical microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Trevor; Courvalin, Patrice

    2011-07-01

    This review aims to discuss expert systems in general and how they may be used in medicine as a whole and clinical microbiology in particular (with the aid of interpretive reading). It considers rule-based systems, pattern-based systems, and data mining and introduces neural nets. A variety of noncommercial systems is described, and the central role played by the EUCAST is stressed. The need for expert rules in the environment of reset EUCAST breakpoints is also questioned. Commercial automated systems with on-board expert systems are considered, with emphasis being placed on the "big three": Vitek 2, BD Phoenix, and MicroScan. By necessity and in places, the review becomes a general review of automated system performances for the detection of specific resistance mechanisms rather than focusing solely on expert systems. Published performance evaluations of each system are drawn together and commented on critically.

  6. Timer: a new objective measure of consultation content and its application to computer assisted consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, M; Robins, S; Brown, G

    1986-01-01

    As part of the research into the effect in the consultation of the use of a computer to prompt opportunistic preventive care a valid, objective, and practical measure of the consultation process was required. After a review of the alternative methods the Time Interval Medical Event Recorder (Timer) was developed, its reliability tested, and applied to 93 control consultations and 49 computer assisted consultations. Timer records, every five seconds, four consultation events: the problems being dealt with, the physical activity, the verbal activity, and the secondary tasks being attempted. Timer showed that control consultations lasted an average of 6 minutes 58 seconds. The doctors spent 35% of their time on administration, and patients and doctors were both conversational for just 33% of the consultation. Giving information was the most common verbal activity (48% of the duration of the consultation) with silence accounting for 21% of the time. When the computer was used the average consultation was longer, at 7 minutes and 46 seconds. The doctor's contribution to the consultation appeared to have increased. Patient centred speech fell from 36% in controls to 28% of the duration of the consultation when the computer was used, while doctor centred speech rose from 30% to 34.5%. Secondary tasks (exploring patient concepts, education, management sharing, and prevention) were attempted during 28% of the control consultations and 40% of the computer consultations. This was accounted for by the increase in prevention (p less than 0.001). Timer is a reliable and practical tool for researching the consultation, and though it has shown validity in detecting differences between consultations that use a computer and those that do not, further applications are required to establish its full value. PMID:3089391

  7. An Interdisciplinary and Intersectoral Action-research Method: Case-Study of Climate Change Adaptation by Cities Using Participatory Web 2.0 Urban Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève VACHON

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the last segment of a three-year interdisciplinary and intersectoral action research on climate change and urban transformation. The project had, as one of its core missions, the role of imagining urban and architectural adaptations for urban neighbourhoods that would contribute to minimizing the negative impacts of climate change on people’s comfort, health and safety. The first part of the paper describes the collaborative design and augmented participation method used in the context of Québec City, Canada. These include the design process conducted to imagine adaptation scenarios, the visual strategies undertaken to make these understandable for the population, and the Web 2.0 crowdsourcing approach forwarded to measure feasibility and social acceptability of the design and visualization strategies. The second part discusses three positive outcomes of the process. First, collaborative design conducted with intersectoral groups of experts constitutes a promising avenue to identify adaptations and evaluate their relevance. Second, crowdsourcing is a powerful tool to inform the general public about climate change including both negative and potential aspects. As well, the crowdsource model allows access to particular knowledge which empowered users to make changes around their homes and neighbourhoods or advocating action from their local government. Crowdsourcing is also an efficient tool to help understand what people know about the potential impact of climate change and how it bears on their comfort, health and safety. Third and finally, the design proposals and the evaluation comments generated by working closely with various stakeholders, along with the public on-line consultation, allow for the induction of pragmatic recommendations that can be used as decision aids by elected officials and civil servants to better prepare their municipalities for climate change. 

  8. Asthma consultations with specialists: what do the pediatricians seek?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poowuttikul, Pavadee; Kamat, Deepak; Thomas, Ronald; Pansare, Milind

    2011-01-01

    "Expert Panel Report 3 (EPR-3): Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Asthma" includes guidelines for referral to an asthma specialist. Because most cases of asthma are managed by primary care physicians, we intended to explore the referral practices of pediatricians managing childhood asthma. This study was designed to identify important considerations by pediatricians while referring a child to an asthma specialist. An electronic survey was sent to 1200 graduated pediatricians enlisted in the Michigan Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics directory. The questions explored asthma disease characteristics, physician preferences when referring children with asthma, and reasons and barriers for asthma consultations. All responses were collected anonymously. We received 240/1200 (20%) questionnaires. The majority of pediatricians considered referral to a specialist if a child had severe persistent asthma (201/236 [85.2%]) or had a single life-threatening asthma event (188/229 [82.1%]). The top two likely reasons of referral included poor asthma control (200/224 [89.3%]) and unclear diagnosis (139/224 [62.1%]). We found 74/219 (33.8%) preferred consultation to a pediatric pulmonologist when compared with 93/219 (42.5%) allergists. We found the minority of pediatricians "always" recommended referral to a specialist for the following reasons: allergy skin testing (30/222 [13.5%]), possible allergen immunotherapy (54/223 [24.2%]), and spirometry (26/221 [11.8%]). The major barrier for childhood asthma specialist consultations was issues with medical insurance coverage (137/205 [66.8%]). Allergists have to educate primary care providers about the importance of allergen control, role of allergen immunotherapy, and updating current asthma treatment guidelines when treating a child with allergic asthma.

  9. Consulting by Business College Academics: Lessons for Business Communication Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Anish

    2009-01-01

    Business communication (BC) is a crucial aspect of management consulting. BC scholars have widely studied the relationship between BC and management consulting, including consulting by BC academics. A limited review of the studies of management consulting, including consulting done by business college academics, hereafter referred to simply as…

  10. Consulting by Business College Academics: Lessons for Business Communication Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Anish

    2009-01-01

    Business communication (BC) is a crucial aspect of management consulting. BC scholars have widely studied the relationship between BC and management consulting, including consulting by BC academics. A limited review of the studies of management consulting, including consulting done by business college academics, hereafter referred to simply as…

  11. CONSULTATION ON UPDATED METHODOLOGY FOR ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) expects to publish the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) committee's report (BEIR VII) on risks from ionizing radiation exposures in calendar year 2005. The committee is expected to have analyzed the most recent epidemiology from the important exposed cohorts and to have factored in any changes resulting from the updated analysis of dosimetry for the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. To the extent practical, the Committee will also consider any relevant radiobiological data, including those from the Department of Energy's low dose effects research program. Based on their evaluation of relevant information, the Committee is then expected to propose a set of models for estimating risks from low-dose ionizing radiation. ORIA will review the BEIR VII report and consider revisions to the Agency's methodology for estimating cancer risks from exposure to ionizing radiation in light of this report and other relevant information. This will be the subject of the Consultation. This project supports a major risk management initiative to improve the basis on which radiation risk decisions are made. This project, funded by several Federal Agencies, reflects an attempt to characterize risks where there are substantial uncertainties. The outcome will improve our ability to assess risks well into the future and will strengthen EPAs overall capability for assessing and managing radiation risks. the BEIR VII report is funde

  12. The Consultation of the Puericulture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotardo Rafael Navarro Ruíz

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available He/she was carried out a bibliographical revision related with the topic Puericulture with the objective of deepening in the knowledge related with the topic, keeping in mind that it is the consultation, par excellence, of the Primary Attention that takes charge of the care and the minor cultivation from a lot before the conception. The visit of the children and young to their doctor, without problems of health mediate they allow to evaluate the integral operation of these and to guide the parents on as acting before possible situations that are presented we Also insist in the different subespecialitys that compose the Puericulture like they are: Puericulture Preconcepcional, Intra-uterine Puericulture and or Prenatal, Puericulture Neonatal, Puericulture of the Infant, Puericulture of the Naive one, Puericulture of the Scholar, the adolescent's Puericulture and that of the boy handicapped. We stand out that this realized activity with quality guarantees the full health of the children, through the clinical exam and other observations we can identify and to diagnose some situation of health that can arise precociously and to diminish future problems.

  13. INNOVATION ACCELERATORS AS ENTREPRENEURIAL AND INTERDISCIPLINARY ENGINES: THE PORTUGUESE CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Fernandes

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Today’s competition is tough, due especially to emergent information systems (IS and information technology (IT support. Managers must continuously cope with challenges to keep their businesses innovative and sustainable. They take most of their decisions based on considerable amounts of data. An important step is to employ strategies based on open innovation: partnerships with people who know the technology better, or how to conceive or run a certain activity, product or process. All these issues and potentials have been explored and supported in the so-called innovation accelerators or ‘boot camps’, either for launching new businesses or supporting their IT/IS platforms. These initiatives are based on a dynamic entrepreneurial and interdisciplinary ambience, which introduces the candidates (mainly start-ups, spin-offs to consultants, investors, managers, designers, innovators, etc. This study determines where Portugal stands in terms of innovation in general, open innovation (cooperative or firm-based, venture capital adherence and innovation sustainability. It then discusses the results of some Portuguese innovation accelerators (such as ‘Beta-i’ and ‘Cria’ from the point of view of target sectors/markets and the sustainability of accelerated firms over time.

  14. From Solution Shop to Boutique Consulting? Capturing Recent Developments on the German Consulting Marke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Jasper DÖTSCH

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Digitalization, globalization, new technologies and shorter product life cycles are only a few keywords underlining the fact that companies are under increasing pressure for faster adaptation, innovation and hence applying a higher knowledge intensity. We assume that these conditions require an increasingly important role of consulting companies, because they seem to be the intermediaries needed to bridge the faster growing gaps between existing business models, organizational structures and accelerating market change. Market pressure is growing on the market for consultant companies as well. New technologies and digitalization should influence both the structure of the consultancy market and the business models of consultancies. Christensen suggested a trend from Dzsolution shop” to Dzboutique consulting.” To track current developments, we concentrate on the German consulting market as one of the most important consultant markets worldwide and explore changes of the last two years based on various studies. Processes of change seem to be both substantially driven by digitalization and to reflect change on the non-consultancy markets. A high willingness to switch among providers documents a high pressure on performance. The impact of digitalisation seem• to be observable in structural and qualitative change. With regard to the German consulting market and the latest available data we cannot validate a tendency from a dominance of “solution shop” consultancies to “boutique” consultancy services.

  15. Advancing MCH Interdisciplinary/Interprofessional Leadership Training and Practice Through a Learning Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Meaghan C; Margolis, Lewis H; Rosenberg, Angela; Humphreys, Elizabeth

    2016-11-01

    Purpose The Interdisciplinary Leadership Learning Collaborative (ILLC), under the sponsorship of AUCD and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, brought together six teams, composed of 14 MCHB and UCEDD training programs to enhance their leadership training. Description Using adult learning principles, interactive training methods, and skill-focused learning, the ILLC built upon the evidence-based Interdisciplinary Leadership Development Program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The program began with a 4-day on-site intensive and then continued through monthly conference calls, a mid-term on-site workshop, and a summary virtual workshop to present programmatic accomplishments and share plans for sustainability. Coaching/consultation for the teams around particular challenges was also part of the program. Assessment All teams reported enhancements in intentional leadership training, threading of leadership concepts across clinical, didactic, and workshop settings, and new collaborative partnerships for leadership training. Teams also identified a number of strategies to increase sustainability of their intentional leadership training efforts. Conclusion for Practice The learning collaborative is a productive model to address the growing need for interdisciplinary MCH leaders.

  16. An object oriented expert system to enhance the log analysis of the Colombian basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, R.; Soto, C.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes an Expert System developed to predict whether a pay zone will produce hydrocarbon or water. This Expert System was applied to the Caballos and Villeta Formations in the Putumayo basin and the Mirador Formation of the Cusiana Field, both in Colombia. Log analysis {open_quotes}rules{open_quotes} relating the combination of logs (SP, GR, caliper, resistivity, density, neutron, sonic, etc.) and basic information are included in the knowledge base, The Expert System uses the Kappa-PC Shell and is composed of three sub-systems: (1) an inference engine, (2) a knowledge base, and (3) a user interface. We also consulted human experts to formulate and expand the knowledge base. Additionally, each formation was characterized using a Log Interpretation System (QLA2). The results from each characterization were used to develop cross plots. The QLA2 cross plots provided practical correlations from which to formulate {open_quotes}rules{close_quotes} for the Expert System. Logs from nine wells in the Cusiana Field were used to evaluate the Expert System. The recommendations of the Expert System agreed with conventional log analysis theory as well as with the known field results. Furthermore, it minimized the time and cost required to evaluate the pay zones. In conclusion, this Expert System can be used to predict whether or not a zone will produce oil or water with a high degree of accuracy.

  17. Empowering Graduate Students to Lead on Interdisciplinary Societal Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubert, E.

    2015-12-01

    Challenging societal problems that cannot be solved by one method or one discipline alone, like epidemic preparedness, mental health, and climate change, demand leadership and the ability to work across disciplines from those with specialized expertise. Teaching leadership at the graduate school level is a challenge that many schools are striving to meet, through mechanisms like project-based courses, leadership skill development workshops, and others. We argue that some of the most valuable but most difficult leadership skills to learn are those that require cultural norms that are fundamentally different from those traditionally encountered in graduate school. These include the ability to make informed decisions based on limited knowledge and resources, the need to make choices in the face of uncertainty, and the recognition that one ultimately bears responsibility for the outcomes. These skills are also among the most important for students planning on nonacademic careers. Acquiring such skills requires a focus on learning-by-doing and a culture of graduate student empowerment. This submission focuses on the experience of students in a student-centered, interdisciplinary, cross-campus leadership program called Emerging Leaders in Science and Society (ELISS), hosted by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). ELISS establishes the expectation that students act as leaders, which in itself reframes leadership as an achievable goal. A major finding from two years of experience with ELISS is the critical importance of establishing cultures of trust and empowerment at the graduate level in order to foster development of transferable skills. ELISS graduate students specifically focus on interdisciplinary collaboration (the 13 2015 fellows come from 13 academic disciplines); stakeholder engagement, primarily focused on outreach to both traditional and nontraditional experts in our communities outside of academia; and solution-generating rather

  18. Organizational Influences on Interdisciplinary Interactions during Research and Design of Large-Scale Complex Engineered Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Seifert, Colleen M.; Papalambros, Panos Y.

    2012-01-01

    The design of large-scale complex engineered systems (LaCES) such as an aircraft is inherently interdisciplinary. Multiple engineering disciplines, drawing from a team of hundreds to thousands of engineers and scientists, are woven together throughout the research, development, and systems engineering processes to realize one system. Though research and development (R&D) is typically focused in single disciplines, the interdependencies involved in LaCES require interdisciplinary R&D efforts. This study investigates the interdisciplinary interactions that take place during the R&D and early conceptual design phases in the design of LaCES. Our theoretical framework is informed by both engineering practices and social science research on complex organizations. This paper provides preliminary perspective on some of the organizational influences on interdisciplinary interactions based on organization theory (specifically sensemaking), data from a survey of LaCES experts, and the authors experience in the research and design. The analysis reveals couplings between the engineered system and the organization that creates it. Survey respondents noted the importance of interdisciplinary interactions and their significant benefit to the engineered system, such as innovation and problem mitigation. Substantial obstacles to interdisciplinarity are uncovered beyond engineering that include communication and organizational challenges. Addressing these challenges may ultimately foster greater efficiencies in the design and development of LaCES and improved system performance by assisting with the collective integration of interdependent knowledge bases early in the R&D effort. This research suggests that organizational and human dynamics heavily influence and even constrain the engineering effort for large-scale complex systems.

  19. Improvements in CanMEDS competencies for medical students in an interdisciplinary and voluntary setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vildbrad MD

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mads Dam Vildbrad, Johanne Marie Lyhne International Medical Cooperation Committee, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark Background: To practice medicine, doctors must master leadership, communication, team management, and collaboration, in addition to medical knowledge. The CanMEDS framework describes seven roles of a doctor, but the six nonmedical expert roles are de-emphasized in the academic medical curriculum. Innovative opportunities are needed for medical students to develop as participants in a world of interdisciplinary health care. Methods: We founded a volunteer-based, interdisciplinary, student-run project called SUNDdag (HEALTHday with 60 students from 12 different educational backgrounds. To evaluate the learning outcomes of the project, we conducted a cross-sectional study using an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire. Results: Students joined the project due to it being health-promoting, volunteer-based, and interdisciplinary. The medical students reported a significant increase of skills in all seven roles except for “medical expert”. They reported an increased understanding of the non-health-related students' skills. Conclusion: In their future careers, medical students must collaborate with health care professionals in a team-based approach to patient care and with non-health-related professionals in administrative tasks. Interdisciplinary volunteer-based initiatives like SUNDdag are potential platforms for medical students to improve their CanMEDS competencies. We encourage students to initiate similar projects and we encourage faculties to support volunteer-based, interdisciplinary initiatives due to their favorable cost-benefit ratio. Keywords: medical education, voluntarism, interprofessional education, medical students

  20. Practical guidance for charting ethics consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Courtenay R; Smith, Martin L; Tawose, Olubukunola Mary; Sharp, Richard R

    2014-03-01

    It is generally accepted that appropriate documentation of activities and recommendations of ethics consultants in patients' medical records is critical. Despite this acceptance, the bioethics literature is largely devoid of guidance on key elements of an ethics chart note, the degree of specificity that it should contain, and its stylistic tenor. We aim to provide guidance for a variety of persons engaged in clinical ethics consultation: new and seasoned ethics committee members who are new to ethics consultation, students and trainees in clinical ethics, and those who have significant experience with ethics consultation so that they can reflect on their practice. Toward the goal of promoting quality charting practices in ethics consultations, we propose recommendations on a broad array of questions concerning clinical ethics consultation chart notes, including whether and when to write a chart note, and practical considerations for the tenor, purpose, and content of a chart note. Our broader aim is to promote discussion about good charting practices in clinical ethics, with the hope of contributing to clear standards of excellence in clinical ethics consultation.

  1. INTEGRATING CORPUS CONSULTATION IN LANGUAGE STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Chambers

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Alongside developments in language research, the potential of corpora as a resource in language learning and teaching has been evident to researchers and teachers since the late 1960s. Despite publications which emphasise the benefits of corpus consultation for language learners (Bernardini, 2002; Kennedy & Miceli, 2001, there is little evidence to suggest that direct corpus consultation is coming to be seen as a complement or alternative to consultation of a dictionary, course book, or grammar by the majority of learners. There is thus a need for research to underpin the integration of corpora and concordancing in the language-learning environment.This study begins with an account of published research relating to course design and structure in the area of corpus consultation by language learners. The focus then narrows to the initial training of learners in corpus consultation, using as an example a course involving undergraduate students on several language degree programmes. The results of the students' consultation of the corpora are examined, including choice of search word(s, analytical skills, the problems encountered, and their evaluation of the activity. The results reveal how corpus consultation can complement traditional language-learning resources, while also raising questions concerning its integration in the language-learning environment.

  2. Longer-term impact of cardiology e-consults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Jason H; Rao, Sandhya K; Kalwani, Neil; Chittle, Melissa D; Richardson, Calvin A; Gallen, Kathleen M; Isselbacher, Eric M; Kimball, Alexandra B; Ferris, Timothy G

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac e-consults may be an effective way to deliver value-oriented outpatient cardiology care in an accountable care organization. Initial results of cardiac e-consults have demonstrated high satisfaction among both patients and referring providers, no known adverse events, and low rates of diagnostic testing. Nevertheless, differences between e-consults and traditional consults, effects of e-consults on traditional consult volume, and whether patients seek traditional consults after e-consults are unknown. We established a cardiac e-consult program on January 13, 2014. We then conducted detailed medical record reviews of all patients with e-consults to detect any adverse clinical events and detect subsequent traditional visits to cardiologists. We also performed 2 comparisons. First, we compared age, gender, and referral reason for e-consults vs traditional consults. Second, we compared changes in volume of referrals to cardiology vs other medical specialties that did not have e-consults. From January 13 to December 31, 2014, 1,642 traditional referrals and 165 e-consults were requested. The proportion of e-consults of all evaluations requested over that period was 9.1%. Gender balance was similar among traditional consults and e-consults (44.8% male for e-consults vs 45.0% for traditional consults, P = .981). E-consult patients were younger than traditional consult patients (55.3 vs 60.4 years, P cardiology visit during the follow-up period. E-consults are an effective and safe mechanism to enhance value in outpatient cardiology care, with low rates of bounceback to traditional consults. E-consults can account for nearly one-tenth of total outpatient consultation volume at 1 year within an accountable care organization and are associated with a reduction in traditional referrals to cardiologists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. New design of care: Assessment of an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse in the province of Quebec.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G; Bellemare, Christian; Bédard, Suzanne K; He, Jie; Lemieux, Renald

    2010-01-01

    New designs of care in orthopaedic clinics are needed to cope with the shortage of orthopaedic surgeons and the lengthening of waiting times. To assess the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse in the Canadian province of Quebec with regard to accessibility, quality of care, efficacy and efficiency of the clinic, and patient's quality of life. Two strategies were developed: (1) a selected cohort of new patients attending an orthopaedic service from February to September 2008 were entered into a database recording patient details, source of referral, diagnosis, satisfaction, and quality of life (36-Item Short Form Health Survey version 2). In this setting, 2 sets of questionnaires were administered to the patients: the first one during the first visit and the second one, 2 months later. A total of 243 patients from the case control were compared with 89 patients of the case study, where an interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse has been developed; (2) costs per patient were calculated using the staff timesheets provided by the two orthopaedic clinics. The results showed a significant reduction in the waiting-list duration (accessibility) in the case study clinic owing to a strong decrease in the inappropriate consultations with the orthopaedic consultant. The quality of care remained high, and the target surgeries for total hip and knee replacement were reached, despite a strong shortage of orthopaedic doctors. Interdisciplinary orthopaedic clinic with a pivot nurse is a new approach in the province of Quebec and first results are encouraging.

  4. Postpartum consultation: Occurrence, requirements and expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlgren Ingrid

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a matter of routine, midwives in Sweden have spoken with women about their experiences of labour in a so-called 'postpartum consultation'. However, the possibility of offering women this kind of consultation today is reduced due to shortage of both time and resources. The aim of this study was to explore the occurrence, women's requirements of, and experiences of a postpartum consultation, and to identify expectations from women who wanted but did not have a consultation with the midwife assisting during labour. Methods All Swedish speaking women who gave birth to a live born child at a University Hospital in western Sweden were consecutively included for a phone interview over a three-week period. An additional phone interview was conducted with the women who did not have a postpartum consultation, but who wanted to talk with the midwife assisting during labour. Data from the interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results Of the 150 interviewed women, 56% (n = 84 had a postpartum consultation of which 61.9% (n = 52 had this with the midwife assisting during labour. Twenty of the 28 women who did not have a consultation with anyone still desired to talk with the midwife assisting during labour. Of these, 19 were interviewed. The content the women wanted to talk about was summarized in four categories: to understand the course of events during labour; to put into words, feelings about undignified management; to describe own behaviour and feelings, and to describe own fear. Conclusion The survey shows that the frequency of postpartum consultation is decreasing, that the majority of women who give birth today still require it, but only about half of them receive it. It is crucial to develop a plan for these consultations that meets both the women's needs and the organization within current maternity care.

  5. Disciplinary knowledge production and interdisciplinary humanities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, David Budtz; Stjernfelt, Frederik; Emmeche, Claus

    2016-01-01

    to include the social sciences and humanities research in interdisciplinary collaboration. In European research and innovation initiatives, science, technology and innovation can no longer be seen in isolation from wider cultural, societal and ethical aspects. For instance, the shift to a green sustainable...... economy needs to include combined efforts in developing new technologies and at the same time creating new models of democracy, engagement, and sustainable behaviour, which draw on a range of interdisciplinary competences. Special challenges such as the role reserved for humanities and how to integrate...

  6. Humanity in God's Image: An Interdisciplinary Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welz, Claudia

    How can we, in our times, understand the biblical concept that human beings have been created in the image of an invisible God? This is a perennial but increasingly pressing question that lies at the heart of theological anthropology. Humanity in God's Image: An Interdisciplinary Exploration....... Claudia Welz offers an interdisciplinary exploration of theological and ethical 'visions' of the invisible. By analysing poetry and art, Welz exemplifies human self-understanding in the interface between the visual and the linguistic. The content of the imago Dei cannot be defined apart from the image...

  7. Personal Professional Reflection as Interdisciplinary Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezvan Oksana

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Consideration of professional reflection as interdisciplinary problem is the necessary condition of quality analysis for personal professional becoming. Personal becoming in a profession is related to forming the necessary professional skills of a person, behaviour stereotypes which is the area of pedagogics. Reflection processes are inalienable part of self-knowledge of a person which result must lead to his self-perfection (including professional one and studying within the psychology increasingly. Thus the aim of the article is to ground the determination of professional reflection as an interdisciplinary problem in pedagogics and psychology.

  8. Music and physics: a cultural, interdisciplinary history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Myles W

    2008-06-01

    This essay investigates the triangular exchange among physicists, musicians, and instrument makers in nineteenth-century Germany by proffering a material, cultural, and interdisciplinary history. It does so by analyzing four concrete examples of such exchanges: the relationship between musical automata and virtuosi, the reed pipe as an object of music and scientific measurement, the history of standardizing performance pitch, and the attempts to measure musical virtuosity. The goal of the essay is to suggest ways in which interdisciplinary cultural histories, which take the scientific content seriously, can be an improvement upon purely disciplinary histories.

  9. [Structured electronic consultation letter for shoulder disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloneva, Juha; Oikari, Marjo; Ylinen, Jari; Ingalsuo, Minna; Ilkka, Kunnamo; Ilkka, Kiviranta

    2012-01-01

    Referral to a specialist has a significant influence on management of the patient and costs associated with the treatments. However, development and research of the process by which patients are referred has been almost neglected. Expectations considering the purpose, contents, and timing of the referral of the consulting physician and the consultant do not always meet. A structured, electronic consultation letter was developed to respond this need. Functionality and interactivity are the key elements of the referral, including (1) an electronic referral letter to a specialist, (2) interactive education in clinical examination and management of shoulder disorders, and (3) an instrument of clinical examination and documentation of shoulder disorders.

  10. Expert system application education project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzelez, Avelino J.; Ragusa, James M.

    1988-01-01

    Artificial intelligence (AI) technology, and in particular expert systems, has shown potential applicability in many areas of operation at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC). In an era of limited resources, the early identification of good expert system applications, and their segregation from inappropriate ones can result in a more efficient use of available NASA resources. On the other hand, the education of students in a highly technical area such as AI requires an extensive hands-on effort. The nature of expert systems is such that proper sample applications for the educational process are difficult to find. A pilot project between NASA-KSC and the University of Central Florida which was designed to simultaneously address the needs of both institutions at a minimum cost. This project, referred to as Expert Systems Prototype Training Project (ESPTP), provided NASA with relatively inexpensive development of initial prototype versions of certain applications. University students likewise benefit by having expertise on a non-trivial problem accessible to them at no cost. Such expertise is indispensible in a hands-on training approach to developing expert systems.

  11. Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Expert Elicitation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppersmith, Kevin J.; Perman, Roseanne C.

    1998-01-01

    This report presents results of the Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Expert Elicitation (SZEE) project for Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by Geomatrix Consultants, Inc. (Geomatrix), for TRW Environmental Safety Systems, Inc. The DOE's Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (referred to as the YMP) is intended to evaluate the suitability of the site for construction of a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The SZEE project is one of several that involve the elicitation of experts to characterize the knowledge and uncertainties regarding key inputs to the Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The objective of the current project was to characterize the uncertainties associated with certain key issues related to the saturated zone system in the Yucca Mountain area and downgradient region. An understanding of saturated zone processes is critical to evaluating the performance of the potential high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. A major goal of the project was to capture the uncertainties involved in assessing the saturated flow processes, including uncertainty in both the models used to represent the physical processes controlling saturated zone flow and transport, and the parameter values used in the models. So that the analysis included a wide range of perspectives, multiple individual judgments were elicited from members of an expert panel. The panel members, who were experts from within and outside the Yucca Mountain project, represented a range of experience and expertise. A deliberate process was followed in facilitating interactions among the experts, in training them to express their uncertainties, and in eliciting their interpretations. The resulting assessments and probability distributions, therefore, provide a reasonable aggregate representation of the knowledge and

  12. Expert witness and Jungian archetypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallave, Juan Antonio; Gutheil, Thomas Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Jung's theories of archetype, shadow, and the personal and collective unconscious provide a postmodern framework in which to consider the role of the expert witness in judicial proceedings. Archetypal themes, motifs, and influences help to illuminate the shadow of the judicial system and projections and behaviors among the cast of the court in pursuing justice. This article speaks to archetypal influences and dialectical tensions encountered by the expert witness in this judicial drama. The archetype of Justice is born from the human need for order and relational fairness in a world of chaos. The persona of justice is the promise of truth in the drama. The shadow of justice is untruth, the need to win by any means. The dynamics of the trickster archetype serve and promote injustice. These influences are examined by means of a case example. This approach will deepen understanding of court proceedings and the role of the expert witness in the heroic quest for justice.

  13. AN APPROACH TO MANAGING UNIVERSITY STUDENTS’ SELF-STUDY BASED ON INTERDISCIPLINARY E-PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Krasavina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. There are two tendencies considerably allocated in educational process of the modern higher school: the increasing amount of time for independent work of students and the active introduction of the information and communication technologies (ICT which is followed by its continuous updating and improvement. The article contributes to the problem of managing competency-based and professionally-oriented self-study for future teachers; the suggested method combines the advantages of project-based learning and the use of ICT.Aim. The objective of the paper is to assess the efficacy of interdisciplinary e-project-based approach to managing university students’ self-study.Methods. To evaluate the efficacy of such innovative method as interdisciplinary e-projects, we use quantitative and qualitative assessment. A set of quantitative pre- and post-surveys are administered for students in order to evaluate their learning outcomes and competencies development. Students’ motivation and attitudes were evaluated through questionnaires, interviews and discussions. An expert group appraisal method was used to define assessment components. Results. The groups of didactic properties and ICT didactic functions are allocated and analysed. Types of educational projects are presented. Definition and characteristic of the interdisciplinary e-project are given. Results of the pedagogical experiment conducted in M. T. Kalashnikov Izhevsk State University are described; the technology of development among students of foreign-language and information-communication competences as the most important professional ones is approved.Scientific novelty. The method of interdisciplinary e-projects is offered; it involves a set of the educational-informative techniques and procedures realized in the electronic environment and directed to the solution of the interdisciplinary problem connected with types and tasks of vocational activity

  14. 24 CFR 91.100 - Consultation; local governments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Urban Development CONSOLIDATED SUBMISSIONS FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS Citizen Participation and Consultation § 91.100 Consultation; local governments. (a) General. (1) When preparing...

  15. Bladder Pain Syndrome International Consultation on Incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, P.; Lin, A.; Nordling, J.

    2010-01-01

    possible, existing evidence was assessed and a level of recommendation was developed according to the Oxford system of classification. Results: The consultation decided to refer to the condition as "bladder pain syndrome" (BPS) because the designation is more descriptive of the clinical condition......Aims of Study: The Bladder Pain Syndrome Committee of the International Consultation on Incontinence was assigned the task by the consultation of reviewing the syndrome, formerly known as interstitial cystitis, in a comprehensive fashion. This included the topics of definition, nomenclature......, taxonomy, epidemiology, etiology, pathology, diagnosis, symptom scales, outcome assessment, principles of management, specific therapies, and future directions in research. Study Design, Materials, Methods: The emphasis was on new information developed since the last consultation 4 years previously. Where...

  16. Consulting Informs Best Practice in Academia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa Blair

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Conversational Plenary Session began with a clear agenda of describing the process and challenge of developing eLearning and eTraining. After a brief discussion of the benefits and challenges of the modality, the conversation quickly segued to a highly spirited conversation related to consulting and the negative implications when one calls oneself a consultant. In fact, this became an integral theme of multiple discussions throughout the rest of the conference. This author strives to identify a selection of literature which supports the viewpoint that consulting does indeed inform best practices in academia. Those professors with up-to-the-minute consultancies in their fields offer an enriched experience for their students.

  17. Three Obstacles to Improving Academic Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, John F.

    1980-01-01

    Notes three obstacles to improving academic consultation to students: (1) lack of knowledge of techniques to improve student performance; (2) reduction of barriers between students and professors; and (3) needed reinforcements for professors. Suggests strategies for overcoming those problems. (CK)

  18. [A nurse consultation in victimology for minors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soudan, Corinne

    2014-10-01

    The nurse consultation is an integral part of the treatment of children and adolescents experiencing psychological distress following traumatic events. Specific support is therefore offered to young patients, in particular through the intervention of a clinical nurse specialist.

  19. Ethics consultation: a dangerous, antidemocratic charlatanry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilje, Christian

    1993-01-01

    Giles Scofield's argument indicates ethics consultants may need to better clarify what in fact they are and what they are not doing, claiming, and striving for. But we must not step back too far. We must neither engage in putting in envious professional claims for exclusive rights in the area of difficult and momentous decisions in healthcare nor get stuck in discussing normative ethics at the level of metaphysics, ontology, and dogmatics (as has happened in Germany for decades). We must not do so especially in view of the achievements of ethics consultation and the growing demand for it by all parties involved, conceded even by sceptics. Ethics consultation, according to Scofield, appears to be dangerous....Let us look more closely at the logic of the argument by discussing the presumed "antidemocratic" nature. The "new tyranny" of thoughts, and the "proper" role of bioethics consultation. Some considerations about the possibility of ethics expertise shall be left for the end.

  20. 265 Statistical Consulting and the African Universities

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-07-21

    Jul 21, 2011 ... Indexed African Journals Online. An International Multidisciplinary Journal, Ethiopia ... engineering, medicine, public health, psychology, marketing, ..... method and the role of statistics; Statistical Consulting Environments (Life ... intelligible reports, makes presentations using PowerPoint and persuasive.

  1. ACF 2012 Reponse to Tribal Consultation Testimony

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — On March 5 and 6, 2012, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) held its annual tribal consultation session in Washington, D.C. This session marked the...

  2. Bladder Pain Syndrome International Consultation on Incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanno, P.; Lin, A.; Nordling, J.

    2010-01-01

    cytology and cystoscopy are recommended if clinically indicated. Treatment progresses from conservative management through various oral and intravesical therapies, with most surgical therapies reserved for unresponsive cases. Pain management is critical throughout the treatment process. The consultation...

  3. Expert Panel Recommendations for Hanford Double-Shell Tank Life Extension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Charles W; Bush, Spencer H; Berman, Herbert Stanton; Czajkowski, Carl J; Divine, James R; Posakony, Gerald J; Johnson, A B; Elmore, Monte R; Reynolds, D A; Anantatmula, Ramamohan P; Sindelar, Robert L; Zapp, Philip E

    2001-06-29

    Expert workshops were held in Richland in May 2001 to review the Hanford Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project and make recommendations to extend the life of Hanford's double-shell waste tanks. The workshop scope was limited to corrosion of the primary tank liner, and the main areas for review were waste chemistry control, tank inspection, and corrosion monitoring. Participants were corrosion experts from Hanford, Savannah River Site, Brookhaven National Lab., Pacific Northwest National Lab., and several consultants. This report describes the current state of the three areas of the program, the final recommendations of the workshop, and the rationale for their selection.

  4. Forging Alliances in Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Research (FAIRR): A Logic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Simone V; Khetani, Mary A; Yinusa-Nyahkoon, Leanne; McManus, Beth; Gardiner, Paula M; Tickle-Degnen, Linda

    2017-07-01

    In a patient-centered care era, rehabilitation can benefit from researcher-clinician collaboration to effectively and efficiently produce the interdisciplinary science that is needed to improve patient-centered outcomes. The authors propose the use of the Forging Alliances in Interdisciplinary Rehabilitation Research (FAIRR) logic model to provide guidance to rehabilitation scientists and clinicians who are committed to growing their involvement in interdisciplinary rehabilitation research. We describe the importance and key characteristics of the FAIRR model for conducting interdisciplinary rehabilitation research.

  5. Teaching the Broad, Interdisciplinary Impact of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David; Atlas, Pierre; Haberski, Raymond; Higgs, Jamie; Kiley, Patrick; Maxwell, Michael, Jr.; Mirola, William; Norton, Jamey

    2009-01-01

    As perhaps the most encompassing idea in biology, evolution has impacted not only science, but other academic disciplines as well. The broad, interdisciplinary impact of evolution was the theme of a course taught at Marian College, Indianapolis, Indiana in 2002, 2004, and 2006. Using a strategy that could be readily adopted at other institutions,…

  6. Improving Teaching Practice through Interdisciplinary Dialog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardetti, Fabiana A.; Orgnero, M. Carolina

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the results of a self-study of interdisciplinary work that has generated profound changes in our teaching practices. The research grew out of an interest in exploring the nature of our work and the practices that contribute to its success. Our self-study revealed that our work process consists of five stages and is the product…

  7. Interdisciplinary Information Design with an Empowerment Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlach, Anders; Engberg, Axel; Pallesen, Bodil

    2006-01-01

    's perspective. ORGANIZATIONAL LEVEL: Nursing Informatics becomes a tool in the interdisciplinary understanding, allowing the nurses to take responsibility for core nursing themes regarding the healthy and the diseased phases of the patients' lives. Iterative modelling ensuring the results is evident and derived...

  8. Scientific report training workshop interdisciplinary life sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rens, E.G.; Merks, R.M.H.; Boas, S.E.M.; Rens, E.G.; Merks, R.M.H.; et al, not CWI

    2014-01-01

    This preprint is the outcome of the “Training Workshop Interdisciplinary Life Sciences”, held in October 2013 in the Lorentz Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. The motivation to organize this event stems from the following considerations: The enormous progress in laboratory techniques and facilities l

  9. Small Worlds: Biography in the Interdisciplinary Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, David

    2008-01-01

    The interdisciplinary survey inherits from more traditional survey courses the weaknesses embodied in the survey textbook. The standard textbook presentation gives students the impression that each figure's music, art, or literature is the product of the "spirit of the age." Well-chosen biographies temper that presentation by drawing attention to…

  10. Interdisciplinary Teams for High Schools. Fastback 416.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Paul

    A learning team comprises two or more teachers of any two or more subject areas who seek to create a small, cohesive learning community. Interdisciplinary learning teams are vehicles that can empower school community members. This first part of this handbook introduces the learning team concept, discusses issues to consider in implementing…

  11. Teaching design engineering in an interdisciplinary programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel; Homminga, Jasper; Endedijk, Maaike; Visscher, Klaasjan; Krab-Hüsken, Leonie; Berg, van den Frank; Wilhelm, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS, the Academy of Technology and Liberal Arts & Sciences, is an interdisciplinary three-year Bachelor of Science honours programme for talented students that opened its doors in September 2013. This international programme uses the concept of project-led education to teach students to integrate

  12. Identifying Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration in Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity is defined as communication and collaboration across academic disciplines. The instructional technology (IT) field has claimed to have an interdisciplinary nature influenced by neighboring fields such as psychology, communication, and management. However, it has been difficult to find outstanding evidence of the field's…

  13. Synergistic Knowledge Development in Interdisciplinary Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Shorna R.; La Lopa, Joseph Mick; Ross-Davis, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Problem solving, interpersonal skills, information literacy, and critical and independent thinking are essential qualities that employers seek, yet many undergraduates lack. We structured an interdisciplinary classroom and experiential learning environment where students from three undergraduate courses (Hospitality and Tourism Management,…

  14. Interdisciplinary Curriculum Reform in the Changing University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    In response to the current demands and trends within education, the disciplines as one of the core long-standing organizing structures within knowledge production and transmission are questioning and shifting what and how they teach. Universities are increasingly offering interdisciplinary subjects and programmes as an alternative to or alongside…

  15. An Interdisciplinary Study in Initial Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larraz Rada, Virginia; Yáñez de Aldecoa, Cristina; Gisbert Cervera, Mercè; Espuny Vidal, Cinta

    2014-01-01

    This experiment of innovative university education shows the interdisciplinary work carried out in the studies of the Bachelor of Science in Education at the University of Andorra. The study was developed within two subjects: Communication Technology (TAC) and Cultural Heritage Education in Andorra. The main objective of this experiment is to…

  16. The Challenges of Interdisciplinary Epistemology in Neuroaesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, James

    2011-01-01

    Neuroaesthetics is a burgeoning new interdisciplinary research space in which cognitive science, psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy intersect in order to better inform our understanding of aesthetic experience. The purpose of this study is to analyze high-profile work in neuroaesthetics in the light of recent research into interdisciplinary…

  17. Bridges and the City: An Interdisciplinary Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Judith Y.; Goodman, Cecelia; Ridley, Theodora; Singer, Alan

    2000-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary project to help elementary school children discover the relationship among technology, history, and geography that involved the building of a model Brooklyn Bridge and considering the history and role of the real bridge. Suggestions for similar projects for other cities are appended. (JPB)

  18. Geography and Geographical Information Science: Interdisciplinary Integrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellul, Claire

    2015-01-01

    To understand how Geography and Geographical Information Science (GIS) can contribute to Interdisciplinary Research (IDR), it is relevant to articulate the differences between the different types of such research. "Multidisciplinary" researchers work in a "parallel play" mode, completing work in their disciplinary work streams…

  19. Synergistic Knowledge Development in Interdisciplinary Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Shorna R.; La Lopa, Joseph Mick; Ross-Davis, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Problem solving, interpersonal skills, information literacy, and critical and independent thinking are essential qualities that employers seek, yet many undergraduates lack. We structured an interdisciplinary classroom and experiential learning environment where students from three undergraduate courses (Hospitality and Tourism Management,…

  20. Whales and Whaling--An Interdisciplinary Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Richard D.

    1978-01-01

    Outlines the content of this interdisciplinary course and includes a list of the texts being used. Parts one and two are concerned with the biology of the whale and other marine mammals, while part three covers the whaling industry and related topics. (MA)

  1. Thoughts about multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2013-10-01

    This essay focuses on multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary research. The definitions and objectives for these three types of multiple discipline research are given. Discussion centers on the gains and losses that may be experienced by individual nurses who engage in such research, as well as gains and losses for the discipline of nursing.

  2. Enriching Social Work through Interdisciplinary Disability Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Irene; Quaglia, Christine; Leslie, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This paper recommends that faculties of Social Work incorporate Disability Studies in their curriculum by embracing its interdisciplinary deconstructionist perspective. Disability Studies encourages Social Work to move beyond person-in--the-environment and anti-oppressive approaches to find more effective ways of removing barriers for persons with…

  3. Interdisciplinary analysis of digital government work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholl, Hans J.; Mai, Jens Erik; Fidel, Raya

    2006-01-01

    This bird-of-a-feather session attempts to break interdisciplinary ground in the context of work content, workflow, and work context analysis in Digital Government. The authors argue that using and connecting multiple theories and disciplines might yield more robust results and deeper understanding...

  4. Interdisciplinary Approach: A Lever to Business Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmak, Jamil; Bélanger, Charles H.

    2016-01-01

    The advances in interdisciplinary studies are driving universities to utilize their available resources to efficiently enable development processes and provide increasing examples of research while gradually allocating the disciplines' resources. Ultimately, this trend asks universities to provide a platform of integrated disciplines, along with…

  5. The World through an Interdisciplinary Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Helen; Bannon, Bryan; Isard, Jeremy; Stonebraker, Phoebe; Royer, Dana; Yohe, Gary; Chernoff, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Scholars and teachers have long struggled to respond to the growing demand for interdisciplinary approaches to complex social issues. They come to the table with their own disciplinary perspectives (scholars more rigidly than students, perhaps), but they also recognize the limitations of investigating social issues through a single disciplinary…

  6. Identifying Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration in Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity is defined as communication and collaboration across academic disciplines. The instructional technology (IT) field has claimed to have an interdisciplinary nature influenced by neighboring fields such as psychology, communication, and management. However, it has been difficult to find outstanding evidence of the field's…

  7. Whales and Whaling--An Interdisciplinary Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Richard D.

    1978-01-01

    Outlines the content of this interdisciplinary course and includes a list of the texts being used. Parts one and two are concerned with the biology of the whale and other marine mammals, while part three covers the whaling industry and related topics. (MA)

  8. Teaching design engineering in an interdisciplinary programme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wits, Wessel Willems; Homminga, Jasper Johan; Endedijk, Maaike Dorine; Visscher, Klaasjan; Krab-Hüsken, Leonie; van den Berg, Frank; Wilhelm, P.

    2014-01-01

    ATLAS, the Academy of Technology and Liberal Arts & Sciences, is an interdisciplinary three-year Bachelor of Science honours programme for talented students that opened its doors in September 2013. This international programme uses the concept of project-led education to teach students to integrate

  9. Interdisciplinary Aspects of Learning: Physics and Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleg, Yavoruk

    2015-01-01

    The article deals with interdisciplinary aspects of learning in the case of physics and psychology. It describes the lab-based academic course focused on: observation and experimentation; discovery of new scientific facts; measurement; identification of errors; the study of psychological characteristics of people (time perception, the reaction…

  10. QUANTA: An Interdisciplinary Learning Community (Four Studies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avens, Cynthia; Zelley, Richard

    QUANTA is a year-long interdisciplinary program at Daytona Beach Community College (Florida) that seeks to establish a learning community of students and teachers. Three courses (English, Pyschology, and Humanities) are integrated around a common theme each semester of the freshman year, and are taught using a collaborative teaching model. This…

  11. The Challenges of Interdisciplinary Epistemology in Neuroaesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, James

    2011-01-01

    Neuroaesthetics is a burgeoning new interdisciplinary research space in which cognitive science, psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy intersect in order to better inform our understanding of aesthetic experience. The purpose of this study is to analyze high-profile work in neuroaesthetics in the light of recent research into interdisciplinary…

  12. Legal Doctrinal Scholarship and Interdisciplinary Engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bodig (Matyas)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe paper offers a legal theoretical analysis of the disciplinary character of the contemporary practice of legal scholarship. It is assumed that the challenges of interdisciplinary engagement are particularly revealing about the nature of legal scholarship. The paper argues for an

  13. Three Interdisciplinary Studies on IT Outsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantman, Sonia Vilvovsky

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation provides interdisciplinary insights into the role of client's internal collaborative experience in managing communication during a complex outsourced project, building a quality client-vendor relationship and ultimately achieving success in the project. Each of the three studies in this dissertation identifies a gap in…

  14. Exploring Interdisciplinary Themes in Introductory Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Kristin A.; Bott, Jennifer P.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for helping introductory psychology students identify interdisciplinary connections among 5 social science disciplines. Pre- and posttest data assessed 359 undergraduates' understanding of psychology's relation to other fields. Results indicate the method is effective and provides one way for individual instructors to address…

  15. Three Interdisciplinary Studies on IT Outsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantman, Sonia Vilvovsky

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation provides interdisciplinary insights into the role of client's internal collaborative experience in managing communication during a complex outsourced project, building a quality client-vendor relationship and ultimately achieving success in the project. Each of the three studies in this dissertation identifies a gap in…

  16. Validation of Interdisciplinary Cooperative Education Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Sheila D.

    A field test examined the validity of the "Interdisciplinary Cooperative Education Curriculum Manual." (Among those topics covered in the manual are the following: vocational student organizations, leadership, civic responsibility, health and safety, human relations, communications, resource management, consumer skills, consumer law,…

  17. Subject Matter Experts from Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-06

    Citation Index – Psycinfo – Medline – Dissertation Abstracts – Others, consult with librarians UNCLASSIFIED – Approved for Public Release Databases will give you: Authors of articles – social scientists Click on author’s name and automatically access other works, other co-authors Institutions and Departments Other articles that cite the work Journals that publish relevant work Check journals for other scientists who publish there Check the editorial board Check reviewers UNCLASSIFIED – Approved for Public Release Finding

  18. Supporting Group Communication Among UX Consultants

    OpenAIRE

    Feldt, Tommy

    2015-01-01

    Professional User Experience (UX) practitioners have an inherent need for effective group communication practices. If they work as external consultants, the need is arguably even greater. Enterprise Social Media (ESM) technologies have affordances that make them seem promising for this domain. The aim of this thesis is thus to identify the domain-specific communicative needs of UX consultants, and discuss how these might be supported using ESM. A case study was conducted, examining how the ES...

  19. Using Language Consultants in Communicative Language Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroki, Yamamoto; Makoto, Izumisawa; Graduate School, Meiji University

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to introduce a teaching technique using language consultants in communicative language teaching. Language consultant is a role in which a student pays attention to a group member's language use during activities, and provides him/her with corrective and positive feedback after the activities, referring to dictionaries. Its effectiveness in terms of second language (L2) learning and motivation was investigated by using it with 42 English learners at a Japane...

  20. Developing Interdisciplinary Workforce to Meet Future Aerospace Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2017-01-01

    The presentation will focus on the importance of interdisciplinary research for addressing future aerospace challenges. Examples of current research activities at NASA's Glenn Research Center will be provided to illustrate the importance of interdisciplinary research. Challenges with conducting interdisciplinary research will be discussed.

  1. Teaching and Learning in Interdisciplinary Higher Education: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spelt, E.J.H.; Biemans, H.; Tobi, H.; Luning, P.A.; Mulder, M.

    2009-01-01

    Interdisciplinary higher education aims to develop boundary-crossing skills, such as interdisciplinary thinking. In the present review study, interdisciplinary thinking was defined as the capacity to integrate knowledge of two or more disciplines to produce a cognitive advancement in ways that would

  2. Starting to Uncover the Mystery of Interdisciplinary Research in Kinesiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schary, David P.; Cardinal, Bradley J.

    2016-01-01

    The multidisciplinary nature of kinesiology seems to be an ideal configuration for conducting interdisciplinary research. Proposed as a potential solution to overcome fragmentation, interdisciplinary research has a role within kinesiology that remains unknown. In this study, we explored kinesiologists' perceptions of interdisciplinary research,…

  3. The OHS consultant as a ‘political reflective navigator’ in technological change processes at client enterprises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broberg, Ole; Hermund, Ingelise

    2002-01-01

    The occupational health service (OHS) in Denmark is only sparsely in-volved as adviser when technological changes take place in client enter-prises. In order to promote the OHS efforts in this area, the work of OHS consultants has been studied in four cases of technological change. Instead...... of the two-dimensional expert – process consultant role we suggest a sup-plementary third role, the ‘political, reflective navigator’. This role is sug-gested based on evidence from the cases and concepts from actor-network theory on technological development....

  4. Expert Systems in Civil Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    preparation for the next evaluation. Zozaya- Gorostiza and Hendrickson (18,p.4) allude to the importance of this for sensitivity analysis (i.e.- modifying...Intellignce, 2nd ed., Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc., Reading,1984. Zozaya- Gorostiza , Carlos and Chris Hendrickson, An Expert 8ystem for

  5. QUEST: Quality of Expert Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perre, M.

    1991-01-01

    TNO Physics and Electronics laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Limburg and the Research Institute for Knowledge Systems, worked on a technology project named 'QUEST: Quality of Expert Systems' [FEL90]. QUEST was carried out under commision of the Dutch Ministry of Defence. A strong

  6. QUEST: Quality of Expert Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perre, M.

    1991-01-01

    TNO Physics and Electronics laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Limburg and the Research Institute for Knowledge Systems, worked on a technology project named 'QUEST: Quality of Expert Systems' [FEL90]. QUEST was carried out under commision of the Dutch Ministry of Defence. A strong

  7. Hyphenated hydrology: Interdisciplinary evolution of water resource science

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurley, Kathryn L.; Jawitz, James W.

    2017-04-01

    Hydrology has advanced considerably as a scientific discipline since its recognized inception in the mid-twentieth century. Modern water resource related questions have forced adaptation from exclusively physical or engineering science viewpoints toward a deliberate interdisciplinary context. Over the past few decades, many of the eventual manifestations of this evolution were foreseen by prominent expert hydrologists. However, their narrative descriptions have lacked substantial quantification. This study addressed that gap by measuring the prevalence of and analyzing the relationships between the terms most frequently used by hydrologists to define and describe their research. We analyzed 16,591 journal article titles from 1965-2015 in Water Resources Research, through which the scientific dialogue and its time-sensitive progression emerged. Our word frequency and term cooccurrence network results revealed the dynamic timing of the lateral movement of hydrology across multiple disciplines as well as the deepening of scientific discourse with respect to traditional hydrologic questions. The conversation among water resource scientists surrounding the hydrologic subdisciplines of catchment-hydrology, hydro-meteorology, socio-hydrology, hydro-climatology, and eco-hydrology gained statistically significant momentum in the analyzed time period, while that of hydro-geology and contaminant-hydrology experienced periods of increase followed by significant decline. This study concludes that formerly exotic disciplines can potentially modify hydrology, prompting new insights and inspiring unconventional perspectives on old questions that may have otherwise become obsolete.

  8. Astrobiology and society: building an interdisciplinary research community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Margaret; Denning, Kathryn; Bertka, Constance M; Dick, Steven J; Harrison, Albert A; Impey, Christopher; Mancinelli, Rocco

    2012-10-01

    This paper reports recent efforts to gather experts from the humanities and social sciences along with astrobiologists to consider the cultural, societal, and psychological implications of astrobiology research and exploration. We began by convening a workshop to draft a research roadmap on astrobiology's societal implications and later formed a Focus Group on Astrobiology and Society under the auspices of the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI). Just as the Astrobiology Science Roadmap and various astrobiology science focus groups have helped researchers orient and understand their work across disciplinary contexts, our intent was to apply the same approach to examine areas beyond the physical and life sciences and expand interdisciplinary interaction and scholarly understanding. These efforts continue as an experiment in progress, with an open invitation to interested researchers-astrobiologists as well as scholars in the humanities and social sciences-to become involved in research, analysis, and proactive discussions concerning the potential impacts of astrobiology on society as well as the possible impacts of society on progress in astrobiology.

  9. Cardiovascular risk reduction in high-risk pediatric patients: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association Expert Panel on Population and Prevention Science; the Councils on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, Epidemiology and Prevention, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Metabolism, High Blood Pressure Research, Cardiovascular Nursing, and the Kidney in Heart Disease; and the Interdisciplinary Working Group on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research: endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavey, Rae-Ellen W; Allada, Vivek; Daniels, Stephen R; Hayman, Laura L; McCrindle, Brian W; Newburger, Jane W; Parekh, Rulan S; Steinberger, Julia

    2006-12-12

    Although for most children the process of atherosclerosis is subclinical, dramatically accelerated atherosclerosis occurs in some pediatric disease states, with clinical coronary events occurring in childhood and very early adult life. As with most scientific statements about children and the future risk for cardiovascular disease, there are no randomized trials documenting the effects of risk reduction on hard clinical outcomes. A growing body of literature, however, identifies the importance of premature cardiovascular disease in the course of certain pediatric diagnoses and addresses the response to risk factor reduction. For this scientific statement, a panel of experts reviewed what is known about very premature cardiovascular disease in 8 high-risk pediatric diagnoses and, from the science base, developed practical recommendations for management of cardiovascular risk.

  10. Quality improvement of interdisciplinary rounds by leadership training based on essential quality indicators of the Interdisciplinary Rounds Assessment Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Have, Elsbeth C. M.; Nap, Raoul E.; Tulleken, Jaap E.

    2013-01-01

    The implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the intensive care unit (ICU) has focused attention on leadership behavior. Daily interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs) in ICUs integrate leadership behavior and interdisciplinary teamwork. The purpose of this intervention study was to measure the effect of

  11. Water Expert: a conceptualized framework for development of a rule-based decision support system for distribution system decontamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Gutenson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Significant drinking water contamination events pose a serious threat to public and environmental health. Water utilities often must make timely, critical decisions without evaluating all facets of the incident, as the data needed to enact informed decisions are inevitably dispersant and disparate, originating from policy, science, and heuristic contributors. Water Expert is a functioning hybrid decision support system (DSS and expert system framework, with emphases on meshing parallel data structures to expedite and optimize the decision pathway. Delivered as a thin-client application through the user's web browser, Water Expert's extensive knowledgebase is a product of inter-university collaboration that methodically pieced together system decontamination procedures through consultation with subject matter experts, literature review, and prototyping with stakeholders. This paper discusses development of Water Expert, analyzing the development process underlying the DSS and the system's existing architecture specifications.

  12. Nurse consultants: organizational influences on role achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Valerie A; Webb, Christine; Prowse, Morag

    2006-03-01

    This paper reports on organizational influences on nurse consultant post holders. The influence of individual characteristics has been the subject of another paper. Nurse consultant posts were set up in the United Kingdom from the late 1990s onwards and, therefore, there has been little opportunity to report on evaluations of these innovative initiatives. A cross-sectional design, using a convenience sample, was adopted. Ten nurse consultants working in a variety of settings and specialties participated in in-depth, tape-recorded interviews. The data were analysed using the Framework approach. Support systems were important influences on nurse consultants' role achievement levels. These took the form of internal trust networks, nurse consultant forums and links with higher education institutions. Post holders both gave and received support and acted to empower other nurses. Thus, relationships were vital to successful role integration. The culture and structures of the National Health System were also a powerful influence in terms of local and national modernization policies, and participants had to be careful in their choice of strategies to deal with the traditional medically dominated culture. The new nurse consultant role is challenging and innovative, but a major area of contention is how much post holders are expected to take on work previously done by doctors rather than developing their nursing role. Organizational support and commitment are needed if nurse consultants are to maximize the benefits of this innovation. The findings show that new nursing roles are not always easily accepted in multidisciplinary settings and that holders of such post need to have the appropriate previous knowledge, skills and personal characteristics, as well as the ability to negotiate their way through organizational influences.

  13. Interdisciplinary research: putting the methods under the microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Douglas K

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While the desirability of interdisciplinary inquiry has been widely acknowledged, indeed has become 'the mantra of science policy', the methods of interdisciplinary collaboration are opaque to outsiders and generally remain undescribed. Discussion Many have analysed interdisciplinarity, especially in relation to the creation of new disciplines and institutions. These analyses are briefly outlined. Still, there currently persists a silence about the methods of interdisciplinary collaboration itself, and the core of this paper proposes a template for such methods. Summary Breaking this silence – by making the methods of interdisciplinary projects transparent – could further invigorate interdisciplinary research.

  14. Making a team of experts into an expert team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charney, Carol

    2011-10-01

    Health care has traditionally been delivered primarily by experts working individually in a decentralized system lacking cohesive organization among professional disciplines. Only recently have the advantages of teamwork training been acknowledged in health care. This article explores the history, benefits, and recommendations for team training in neonatal care. TeamSTEPPS (Rockville, MD) and the revised Neonatal Resuscitation Program are cited as promising models for improved neonatal outcomes through professional teamwork.

  15. Call-duration and triage decisions in out of hours cooperatives with and without the use of an expert system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Rob S G; Post, Johan; van Rooij, Harry; de Haan, Jan

    2008-02-13

    Cooperatives delivering out of hours care in the Netherlands are hesitant about the use of expert systems during triage. Apart from the extra costs, cooperatives are not sure that quality of triage is sufficiently enhanced by these systems and believe that call duration will be prolonged drastically. No figures about the influence of the use of an expert system during triage on call duration and triage decisions in out of hours care in the Netherlands are available. Electronically registered data concerning call duration and triage decisions were collected in two cooperatives. One in Tilburg, a cooperative in a Southern city of the Netherlands using an expert system, and one in Groningen, a cooperative in a Northern city not using an expert system. Some other relevant information about the care process was collected additionally. Data about call duration was compared using an independent sample t-test. Data about call decisions was compared using Chi Square. The mean call time in the cooperative using the TAS expert system is 4.6 minutes, in the cooperative not using the expert system 3.9 minutes. A significant difference of 0.7 minutes (0.4 - 1.0, 95% CI) minutes. In the cooperative with an expert system a larger percentage of patients is handled by the assistant, patients are less often referred to a telephone consultation with the GP and are less likely to be offered a visit by the GP.A quick interpretation of the impact of the difference in triage decisions, show that these may be large enough to support the hypothesis that longer call duration is compensated for by less contacts with the GP (by telephone or face-to-face). There is no proof, however, that these differences are caused by the use of the triage system. The larger amount of calls handled by the assistant may be partly caused by the fact that the assistants in the cooperative with an expert system more often consult the GP during triage. And it is not likely that the larger amount of home visits in

  16. An Exploration of Consultation Approaches and Implementation in Heterogeneous Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, Paula J.; Crockett, Jean B.

    1999-01-01

    This review of the literature on consultation in heterogeneous classrooms provides first, an overview of consultation; second, a description of school-based consultation; third, a research synthesis of exemplary studies of school-based consultation; and, finally, suggestions for future research and implications for practice. (Author/DB)

  17. 41 CFR 102-78.30 - Who are consulting parties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who are consulting... Preservation § 102-78.30 Who are consulting parties? As more particularly described in 36 CFR 800.2(c), consulting parties are those parties having consultative roles in the Section 106 process (i.e., Section 106...

  18. Expert judgement in performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilmot, R.D.; Galson, D.A. [Galson Sciences Ltd, Oakham (United Kingdom)

    2000-01-01

    This report is a pilot study that systematically describes the various types of expert judgement that are made throughout the development of a PA, and summarizes existing tools and practices for dealing with expert judgements. The report also includes recommendations for further work in the area of expert judgement. Expert judgements can be classified in a number of ways, including classification according to why the judgements are made and according to how the judgements are made. In terms of why judgements are made, there is a broad distinction between: Judgements concerning data that are made because alternatives are not feasible; and Judgements about the conduct of a PA that are made because there are no alternative approaches for making the decision. In the case of how judgements are made, the report distinguishes between non-elicited judgements made by individuals, non-elicited judgements made by groups, and elicited judgements made by individuals or groups. These types of judgement can generally be distinguished by the extent of the associated documentation, and hence their traceability. Tools for assessing judgements vary depending on the type of judgements being examined. Key tools are peer review, an appropriate QA regime, documentation, and elicitation. Dialogue with stake holders is also identified as important in establishing whether judgements are justified in the context in which they are used. The PA process comprises a number of stages, from establishing the assessment context, through site selection and repository design, to scenario and model development and parametrisation. The report discusses how judgements are used in each of these stages, and identifies which of the tools and procedures for assessing judgements are most appropriate at each stage. Recommendations for further work include the conduct of a trial expert elicitation to gain experience in the advantages and disadvantages of this technique, the development of guidance for peer

  19. [An expert system neurology--possibilities and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, A; Grunewald, M

    2006-12-01

    We present an expert system Neurology, which was developed completely on basis of the commercial available data base program Filemaker-7.0. At present it covers approximately 400 diagnoses of neurological and psychiatric diseases. After the input of cardinal symptoms, course and localisation of the disease the program calculates a first set of possible differential diagnoses and asks for additional symptoms or the performance of apparative diagnostics to investigate the final diagnose. At first, the performance of the expert system was tested with 15 predetermined neurological case reports. Users with different previous knowledge of Neurology performed the input. In this test the program was able to identify the correct diagnose in nearly all cases and the diagnostic proposals were superior to those of the users with minor neurological training. In a second test with real patient data, the rate of correct diagnoses was approximately 80%. In summary, the used computer algorithms proved as appropriate for the aim of giving Neurological diagnoses. Possible additional applications could be student training or the use as interdisciplinary reference work.

  20. Improving consultations in oncology: the development of a novel consultation aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furber, L; Murtagh, G M; Bonas, S A; Bankart, J G; Thomas, A L

    2014-01-01

    Background: The way in which patients receive bad news in a consultation can have a profound effect in terms of anxiety, depression and subsequent adjustment. Despite investment in well-researched communication skills training and availability of decision-making aids, communication problems in oncology continue to be encountered. Methods: We conducted a mixed-methods study in a large UK Cancer Centre to develop a novel consultation aid that could be used jointly by patients and doctors. Consultations were audio-recorded and both the doctors and the patients were interviewed. We used conversation analysis to analyse the consultation encounter and interpretative phenomenological analysis to analyse the interviews. Key themes were generated to inform the design of the aid. Results: A total of 16 doctors were recruited into the study along with 77 patients. Detailed analysis from 36 consultations identified key themes (including preparation, information exchange, question-asking and decision making), which were subsequently addressed in the design of the paper-based aid. Conclusions: Using detailed analysis and observation of oncology consultations, we have designed a novel consultation aid that can be used jointly by doctors and patients. It is not tumour-site specific and can potentially be utilised by new and follow-up consultations. PMID:24548856

  1. The geriatric interdisciplinary team training (GITT) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, Terry; Flaherty, Ellen; Hyer, Kathryn

    2003-01-01

    Geriatric interdisciplinary team training (GITT) is an initiative funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation since 1995. Building from the substantial knowledge gained from the Veteran's Administration project in interdisciplinary team training and lessons from the Pew Foundation initiative, GITT was reconceived by the Foundation to address the need for teams in the care of older adults in the new era of managed care and health care cost containment. This training program has served to help us understand attitudes toward teams, how teams function, and how teams should be trained in the changing health care environment, where length of stay is dramatically different from the earlier team training projects. This introductory paper provides an overview of GITT, and the companion papers give detail of the GITT curricula, measures and lessons learned.

  2. Ovarian cancer in an interdisciplinary context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibæk, Lene

    quality of treatment.   Patients/ Methods We developed an interdisciplinary programme including patient data from the records of doctors, nurses, anaesthetists and observations. This programme was applied on a population of 65 women with ovarian malignancies. Subsequently analyses were performed......  Introduction Worldwide, ovarian cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer, with more than 200,000 new cases each year and 125,000 related deaths. During the last decade, centralization and standardisation of surgical treatment have proven to be important tools in ovarian cancer to improve...... care resources and in future research. By using the interdisciplinary approach, women with ovarian cancer can benefit from a coherent and collaborative health care system.  ...

  3. 4th international interdisciplinary chaos symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Santo; Caglar, Suleyman; Ozer, Mehmet; Chaos and complex systems

    2013-01-01

    Complexity Science and Chaos Theory are fascinating areas of scientific research with wide-ranging applications.  The interdisciplinary nature and ubiquity of complexity and chaos are features that provides scientists with a motivation to pursue general theoretical tools and frameworks. Complex systems give rise to emergent behaviors, which in turn produce novel and interesting phenomena in science, engineering, as well as in the socio-economic sciences. The aim of all Symposia on Chaos and Complex Systems (CCS) is to bring together scientists, engineers, economists and social scientists, and to discuss the latest insights and results obtained in the area of corresponding nonlinear-system complex (chaotic) behavior. Especially for the “4th International Interdisciplinary Chaos Symposium on Chaos and Complex Systems,” which took place April 29th to May 2nd, 2012 in Antalya, Turkey, the scope of the symposium had been further enlarged so as to encompass the presentation of work from circuits to econophysic...

  4. Joint Interdisciplinary Earth Science Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafatos, Menas

    2004-01-01

    The report spans the three year period beginning in June of 2001 and ending June of 2004. Joint Interdisciplinary Earth Science Information Center's (JIESIC) primary purpose has been to carry out research in support of the Global Change Data Center and other Earth science laboratories at Goddard involved in Earth science, remote sensing and applications data and information services. The purpose is to extend the usage of NASA Earth Observing System data, microwave data and other Earth observing data. JIESIC projects fall within the following categories: research and development; STW and WW prototyping; science data, information products and services; and science algorithm support. JIESIC facilitates extending the utility of NASA's Earth System Enterprise (ESE) data, information products and services to better meet the science data and information needs of a number of science and applications user communities, including domain users such as discipline Earth scientists, interdisciplinary Earth scientists, Earth science applications users and educators.

  5. Interdisciplinary Integrated Engineering Development Course in HITACHI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Masahiro

    As an example of interdisciplinary education for engineers in private companies, IED (Integrated Engineering Development) course at HITACHI Ltd. is presented. To help 30 years old or so promising engineers create a new product based on a new technology, one year term course is designed for four types of engineers; mechanical, electric & electronic, information software, and digital systems. Each course has core basic technologies plus related supplementary subjects to promote an interdisciplinary integrated engineer. Not only lectures given by university professors but heavy duty home work is also given by senior engineers of HITACHI to make them apply basic theory to practical problems. Furthermore, self development planning, leadership development program and technology-marketing project are introduced to promote human skills and business sense needed for technology leaders in company.

  6. Crisis Typologies Revisited: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albena Björck

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For effective crisis management and communication, a decision maker has to understand the causes and nature of a crisis and how it influences stakeholder perceptions. Identifying an organization’s vulnerabilities is essential for crisis prevention but practitioners often lack the ability to define crisis scenarios, especially the worst-case ones. A crisis typology is a structured approach to analyze crisis situations and to introduce measures for crisis prevention and containment. This paper aims to review recent literature on crisis classifications and to discuss their application. Because a single typology cannot capture the complexity and the interdisciplinary nature of a crisis, four relevant typologies from different disciplines are compared. Their combined application in an interdisciplinary framework is suggested. The paper discusses the need for typologies that reflect the cultural and contextual dimensions. Conclusions concerning the limitations and directions for further research are drawn.

  7. Structuring a written examination to assess ASBH health care ethics consultation core knowledge competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bruce D; Jankowski, Jane B; Shelton, Wayne N

    2014-01-01

    As clinical ethics consultants move toward professionalization, the process of certifying individual consultants or accrediting programs will be discussed and debated. With certification, some entity must be established or ordained to oversee the standards and procedures. If the process evolves like other professions, it seems plausible that it will eventually include a written examination to evaluate the core knowledge competencies that individual practitioners should possess to meet peer practice standards. The American Society for Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) has published core knowledge competencies for many years that are accepted by experts as the prevailing standard. Probably any written examination will be based upon the ASBH core knowledge competencies. However, much remains to be done before any examination may be offered. In particular, it seems likely that a recognized examining board must create and validate examination questions and structure the examination so as to establish meaningful, defensible parameters after dealing with such challenging questions as: Should the certifying examination be multiple choice or short-answer essay? How should the test be graded? What should the pass rate be? How may the examination be best administered? To advance the field of health care ethics consultation, thought leaders should start to focus on the written examination possibilities, to date unaddressed carefully in the literature. Examination models-both objective and written-must be explored as a viable strategy about how the field of health care ethics consultations can grow toward professionalization.

  8. Use of a consultant to assist a dietetic association in its media and public relations efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visocan, B J; Lazin, B

    1989-04-01

    During 1987, the Philadelphia Dietetic Association (PDA) enlisted the aid of a public relations consultant to increase media contacts and thereby accomplish a threefold goal of (a) establishing the dietetic association and its registered dietitian members as the local nutrition experts; (b) distributing reliable, current nutrition information; and (c) marketing the PDA's DIAL-A-DIETITIAN service. Through the advice of the consultant, a media tipsheet, published monthly, was created. This publication, the Nutrition Informationist, effectively increased media contacts from two in 1986 to 19 in 1987 and resulted in a total of 8 hours of air time. Weight reduction, fad diets, and sports nutrition proved to be the most popular topics. Public service announcements (PSAs) concerning the DIAL-A-DIETITIAN program were developed by the consultant to assist the public in gaining access to local registered dietitians. Calls to that service increased 75% (from an average of 47.5 to 83.0 calls) the month following the distribution of PSAs to radio stations. The positive outcome of this collaborative effort shows that public relations consultants can be a useful resource for local dietetic associations, aiding them in their efforts to reach the media and the public and to improve their image.

  9. Consumer versus expert hazard identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagemann, Kit S.; Scholderer, Joachim

    2007-01-01

    between technical experts and consumers over the nature of the hazards on which risk assessments should focus, and perceptions of insufficient openness about uncertainties in risk assessment. Whilst previous research has almost exclusively focused on genetically modified foods, the present paper...... investigates plant varieties developed by means of mutation breeding, a less-debated class of novel foods. Two studies were conducted that investigated the mental models of experts and laypeople. The results revealed that the mental models of both groups differed in terms of scope, depth and the role...... of uncertainty. Furthermore, a number of misconceptions became apparent in the study of laypeople's mental models, often related to the regulatory system governing risk assessments of novel foods. Critical issue are outlined and communication needs are discussed....

  10. Leadership styles in interdisciplinary health science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasnett, Bonita; Clay, Maria

    2008-12-01

    The US Institute of Medicine recommends that all health professionals should deliver patient-centered care as members of interdisciplinary health science teams. The current application of the Bolman and Deal Leadership model to health sciences provides an interesting point of reference to compare leadership styles. This article reviews several applications of that model within academic health care and the aggregate recommendations for leaders of health care disciplines based on collective findings.

  11. Interdisciplinary glossary — particle accelerators and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitrieva, V. V.; Dyubkov, V. S.; Nikitaev, V. G.; Ulin, S. E.

    2016-02-01

    A general concept of a new interdisciplinary glossary, which includes particle accelerator terminology used in medicine, as well as relevant medical concepts, is presented. Its structure and usage rules are described. An example, illustrating the quickly searching technique of relevant information in this Glossary, is considered. A website address, where one can get an access to the Glossary, is specified. Glossary can be refined and supplemented.

  12. Lexicon acquisition in an interdisciplinary learning context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA PAULA SANTOS SOARES DA SILVA LAGO

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the questions that led to the field research, the theoretical frame, the subsequent methodology, and some of the results and conclusions. One of these conclusions is the need of specific tasks aimed at lexicon acquisition and of interdisciplinary work within that acquisition. Some strategies of minimizing failure and e learning enhancement will also be discussed, as well as the learning results achieved in the strict area of lexicon acquisition.

  13. Building interdisciplinary biomedical research using novel collaboratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravid, Katya; Faux, Russell; Corkey, Barbara; Coleman, David

    2013-02-01

    Traditionally, biomedical research has been carried out mainly within departmental boundaries. However, successful biomedical research increasingly relies on development of methods and concepts crossing these boundaries, requiring expertise in different disciplines. Recently, major research institutes have begun experimenting with ways to foster an interdisciplinary ethos. The Evans Center for Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research ("the Evans Center") at Boston University is a new organizational paradigm to address this challenge. The Evans Center is built around interdisciplinary research groups termed affinity research collaboratives (ARCs). Each ARC consists of investigators from several academic departments and at least two research disciplines, bound by a common goal to investigate biomedical problems concerning human disease. Novel aspects of the Evans Center include a "bottom-up" approach to identifying areas of ARC research (research vision and strategy are typically initiated by a core group of faculty with input from the center director); a pre-ARC period of faculty affiliation/project(s)' self-selection prior to formation of a peer-reviewed ARC; and Evans Center support for innovative ARCs for up to three years pending yearly metric evaluation, followed by continued administrative support as a group matures into an ARC program.Since its inception in early 2009, the Evans Center has documented achievements at discovery/publication, grant award, and educational levels. Enhanced interactions between members of individual ARCs, as assessed by quantitative networking analysis, are discussed in the context of high productivity. As universities seek new approaches to stimulate interdisciplinary research, the Evans Center and its ARCs are offered as a productive model for leveraging discovery.

  14. Interdisciplinary Collaboration in Hospice Team Meetings

    OpenAIRE

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Regehr, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Hospice and palliative care teams provide interdisciplinary care to seriously-ill and terminally-ill patients and their families. Care teams are comprised of medical and non-medical disciplines and include volunteers and lay workers in healthcare. The authors explored the perception of collaboration among hospice team members and actual collaborative communication practices in team meetings. The data set consisted of videotaped team meetings, some of which included caregiver participation, an...

  15. Treatment of crown dilaceration: an interdisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, P; Naidu, P

    2010-01-01

    Trauma to primary teeth can result in a wide range of disturbances to the underlying permanent teeth, such as dilaceration. Root dilacerations occur more commonly than crown dilacerations. This paper is a report of an 11-year-old girl with a missing maxillary left anterior tooth. Past history revealed premature loss of primary maxillary anterior teeth due to trauma. Radiographic examination revealed crown dilaceration of permanent maxillary left central incisor. An interdisciplinary approach in the management of this child is presented herewith.

  16. The interdisciplinary approach in community interpreting research

    OpenAIRE

    Vargas Urpi, Mireia

    2011-01-01

    Community interpreting is a complex activity that has been studied from many different angles. Based on a review of the literature, this paper aims to highlight the importance of an interdisciplinary approach in community interpreting research, as well as the close relationship between the theoretical and methodological frameworks that have been used to date. As a prospective study and by describing theories applied from five different fields (i.e. anthropology, sociology, applied linguistics...

  17. Guidelines for Education and Training at the Doctoral and Postdoctoral Levels in Consulting Psychology/Organizational Consulting Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of these "Guidelines for Education and Training at the Doctoral and Postdoctoral Levels in Consulting Psychology/Organizational Consulting Psychology" is to provide a common framework for use in the development, evaluation, and review of education and training in consulting psychology/organizational consulting psychology (CP/OCP). The…

  18. Interdisciplinary information design with an empowerment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlach, Anders; Engberg, Axel; Pallesen, Bodil

    2006-01-01

    An innovative research into a model for ICT enabled Empowerment. By deliberate use of ICT and a feedback-focused communication model in a prototyping process, e-health information based on an empowerment strategy is evaluated. Overall a risk-driven spiral model is applied for Progress and Complexity handling in order to ensure success. The process model devised has a proactive approach to interdisciplinary teamwork, organisational web maturity, and the post-modern user's interaction with ICT. The research is performed and evaluated in cooperation with an interdisciplinary team of health professionals, and voluntary groups of patients from an athletic clinic in a Danish University Hospital.Results are as follows: INDIVIDUAL LEVEL: Empowerment is evaluated as successful using Empiric reception analysis, based on social and humanistic sciences, and showing traces of Empowerment from the patient's perspective. ORGANIZATIONAL LEVEL: Nursing Informatics becomes a tool in the interdisciplinary understanding, allowing the nurses to take responsibility for core nursing themes regarding the healthy and the diseased phases of the patients' lives. Iterative modelling ensuring the results is evident and derived from the patient's perspective.

  19. Consulting as a Strategy for Knowledge Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Nora; Butterill, Dale; Goering, Paula

    2005-01-01

    Academic researchers who work on health policy and health services are expected to transfer knowledge to decision makers. Decision makers often do not, however, regard academics’ traditional ways of doing research and disseminating their findings as relevant or useful. This article argues that consulting can be a strategy for transferring knowledge between researchers and decision makers and is effective at promoting the “enlightenment” and “interactive” models of knowledge use. Based on three case studies, it develops a model of knowledge transfer–focused consulting that consists of six stages and four types of work. Finally, the article explores how knowledge is generated in consulting and identifies several classes of factors facilitating its use by decision makers. PMID:15960773

  20. SCIENTIFIC-PROJECT CONSULTING AS AN INNOVATIVE FORMAT OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Ignatieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Today the main social and economic advantage of Russia in global economy (we do not take natural wealth into account is the human capital which development has to become a priority for all levels of an education system. The relevance of the article determined by the need to modernize the educational programs, technology and content of the educational process in the institutional space of postgraduate teacher education. It is one of the key factors in the development of the intellectual capital of a society, providing a transition to continuous, socially oriented, associated with global and domestic fundamental science education for all people and aimed at the formation of the creative socially responsible personality. The new mission of post-degree training «through all life», consisting in the advancing formation of intellectual potential of the country, demands search of new forms and methods of additional professional education.Aim. The aim of the article is to disclosure the essence of scientific-project consulting as an innovative format of teachers and scientific-pedagogical staff.Methods. The institutional approach is the basis of the study. In accordance with this approach, the development strategy and the areas of work of traditional and new institutions of post-degree education – Department of Pedagogy and Andragogy and the Center of Scientific and Design Consulting are designated. As methodological base of this type of consulting, it is offered to use provisions of the genetic-substantial theory of the developing education, in particular the principle of development regulating processes of continuous improvement of professionalism of experts of education and development of new functions by them in post-industrial society.Results. The conceptual model of a reflexive outline of management of process of formation of new professional positions of the teacher is constructed; its components are

  1. Wind power projects and Aboriginal consultation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaac, T. [McCarthy Tetrault LLP, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    This presentation outlined some of the legal aspects related to Aboriginal involvement in wind power development consultation processes and disputes. Aboriginal rights are rights held by Aboriginal people that are an element of a practice, custom, or tradition integral to the culture of groups claiming such rights. Wind power developers should understand that Aboriginal rights claims may include fishing; whaling; transportation; and cultural and spiritual activities. Aboriginal title is a subcategory of Aboriginal rights, and is a right to land itself, and an encumbrance on the Crown's underlying title to land. Weak Aboriginal claims where potential infringement by energy developers is minor may only require notice and information. Strong prima facie cases for Aboriginal rights and title where the potential for infringement is of high significance may result in more extensive consultation involving interim solutions; formal Aboriginal participation in decision-making processes; and written responses demonstrating how Aboriginal concerns have been considered. There are a number of circumstances requiring a case-by-case approach, and the Crown may make decisions in the face of Aboriginal disagreement. However, energy developers should ensure that consultation processes are fair and reasonable. Conflicting interests can often be successfully resolved through consultation, and accommodation to Aboriginal rights may include mitigation, avoiding interference, and agreeing to as little infringement as possible. Aboriginal title may attach to private land but only to the Crown's underlying title. The Crown has no duty to consult respecting Aboriginal title on private land because title has already been infringed. In these cases, duty to consult and accommodate may be discharged through other regulatory processes such as environmental impact assessments. It was concluded that wind power project proponents should build a relationship with the Crown, as avoiding

  2. Moral mediation in interpreted health care consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Clive; Rivas, Carol; Al-Sarraj, Hela; Webb, Sarah; Kelly, Moira

    2013-12-01

    This paper reports on the moral work done in routine diabetes review consultations in primary care with nurses. Consultations with fluent English speakers are compared with consultations where an interpreter was present, largely involving patients of Bangladeshi origin. The study setting was Tower Hamlets in London, where type 2 diabetes is particularly common. Existing research has shown some dissatisfaction with diabetes care amongst Bangladeshi patients, and studies of care providers in other locations suggest that they at times experience the care of this group as particularly challenging. Through analysis of video-recorded consultations recorded in 2010-2011 we shed light on possible reasons for these difficulties. The 12 non-English speakers often experienced difficulties in raising issues that concerned them, particularly if their interpreter did not translate their utterance because it was deemed to be unrelated to diabetes. These difficulties were not shared by the 24 fluent English speakers, who also found it easier to convey a positive moral reputation and to excuse behaviour that deviated from recommended self-management practices. Interpreters at times also acted as moral mediators. For example, where a participant in the consultation made statements that appeared to convey a negative moral judgement of an other participant, these would often go untranslated. Probably, neither health care providers nor patients are fully aware of the nature of their communication difficulties. Given this, interpreters possess considerable power to influence matters. Understanding the moral work of consultations is important in explaining the findings of other studies showing difficulties in the provision of diabetes care to people with limited English language skills.

  3. WHO Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Expert Committee on Specifications for Pharmaceutical Preparations works towards clear, independent and practical standards and guidelines for the quality assurance of medicines. Standards are developed by the Committee through worldwide consultation and an international consensus-building process. The following new guidelines were adopted and recommended for use, in addition to 20 monographs and general texts for inclusion in The International Pharmacopoeia and 11 new International Chemical Reference Substances. The International Pharmacopoeia--updating mechanism for the section on radiopharmaceuticals; WHO good manufacturing practices for pharmaceutical products: main principles; Model quality assurance system for procurement agencies; Assessment tool based on the model quality assurance system for procurement agencies: aide-memoire for inspection; Guidelines on submission of documentation for prequalification of finished pharmaceutical products approved by stringent regulatory authorities; and Guidelines on submission of documentation for a multisource (generic) finished pharmaceutical product: quality part.

  4. IT Consultants in Acquisition IT Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan; Øhrgaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    ’s IT following a corporate acquisition, presents a difficult but crucial IT challenge for the many acquiring organizations. Through a comparative case study of four acquirers, theoretically grounded in the resource-based view of the firm, it is analyzed how acquirers draw on external consultants to realize...... model, depicting the use of external consultants in acquisition IT integration, contributes to the literature on acquisition IT integration by providing an explanation for IT-based value creation in acquisition that is rooted in the external of the acquirer. In addition to adding to the limited...

  5. Standardization Versus Innovation In Management Consultancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciumara Tudor

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is supported by the Sectoral Operational Programme Human Resources Development (SOP HRD, financed from the European Social Fund and by the Romanian Government under the contract number SOP HRD/89/1.5/S/62988. In this paper we propose some perspectives on the relationship between standardization and innovation in the management consulting business. Most of the consulting services are situated somewhere between absolute standardization and absolute innovation. Approaching any of these poles brings some advantages and disadvantages, both to the service providers and to their customers. It is important to find a balance between innovation and standardization to maximize the results of all agents involved.

  6. CURBSIDE CONSULTATION OF THE ACL: 49 CLINICAL QUESTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard R. Bach

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available DESCRIPTION A unique reference that offers opinions, preferences and expert advice associated with management of ACL injuries in the questions and answers format which enhanced by images, diagrams and references. PURPOSE "Curbside Consultation of the ACL" aims to provide some knowledge more than the basic information in the evaluation and the management of ACL injuries. This information is based on the opinion or the advice of an expert. Quick access of audience to these pearl and pit-falls and evidence-based expert advice for complicated cases in ACL reconstruction in the form of brief answers including current concepts is targeted by the authors. FEATURES 49 Clinical questions are outlined in 5 sections. In the first section is about preoperative questions including indications, diagnostic measures, combined ligament injuries, graft choice, preparation before surgery, avulsion of the eminence, examination in posterolateral corner injury. In the second section is preoperative questions are subjected including dropping the graft to the floor, posterior wall blowout, knees without hamstring tendon, graft amputation by interference screw, to avoid vertical tunnel in tibia, fixation methods of graft, femoral and tibial tunnel positioning. Third section is about postoperative questions including postoperative management, differences in postoperative rehabilitation protocols in different type of grafts, postoperative man-agement of meniscal repair, management in difficulties in gaining extension, infection, patellar pain, timing of reop-eration in motion problems, criteria returning to sports, outcome measures, outcome in using different grafts, role of bracing. The fourth section is about failed ACL recon-struction including causes, indications for revision, ex-panded tunnels, graft choice in revision surgery, contro-lateral patellar tendon graft for revision, rehab protocol after revision surgery, hardware removal, early degenera-tive joint disease

  7. An Interdisciplinary Network Making Progress on Climate Change Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W.; Anderson, J. C.; Bales, S.; Fraser, J.; Yoder, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    Public understanding of climate change continues to lag far behind the scientific consensus not merely because the public lacks information, but because there is in fact too much complex and contradictory information available. Fortunately, we can now (1) build on careful empirical cognitive and social science research to understand what people already value, believe, and understand; and then (2) design and test strategies for translating complex science so that people can examine evidence, make well-informed inferences, and embrace science-based solutions. Informal science education institutions can help bridge the gap between climate scientists and the public. In the US, more than 1,500 informal science venues (science centers, museums, aquariums, zoos, nature centers, national parks, etc.) are visited annually by 61% of the population. Extensive research shows that these visitors are receptive to learning about climate change and trust these institutions as reliable sources. Ultimately, we need to take a strategic approach to the way climate change is communicated. An interdisciplinary approach is needed to bring together three key areas of expertise (as recommended by Pidgeon and Fischhoff, 2011): 1. Climate and decision science experts - who can summarize and explain what is known, characterize risks, and describe appropriate mitigation and adaptation strategies; 2. Social scientists - who can bring to bear research, theory, and best practices from cognitive, communication, knowledge acquisition, and social learning theory; and 3. Informal educators and program designers - who bring a practitioner perspective and can exponentially facilitate a learning process for additional interpreters. With support from an NSF CCEP Phase I grant, we have tested this approach, bringing together Interdisciplinary teams of colleagues for a five month "study circles" to develop skills to communicate climate change based on research in the social and cognitive sciences. In 2011

  8. Ocean acidification and its impacts: an expert survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattuso, J.; Mach, K.; Morgan, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    The number of scientists investigating ocean acidification as well as the number of papers published on this issue have increased considerably in the past few years. On the one hand, the advances are welcome for the assessment of ocean acidification and its impacts. On the other hand, the volume and rapidity of the scientific developments as well as some contradictory results have created challenges for assessing the current state of knowledge and informing policy makers. Two tools are being used to synthesize the current information: meta-analysis and expert survey. In January this year, Working Groups I and II of the IPCC organized an expert meeting on ocean acidification in Okinawa. Following this meeting, we built a set of 22 statements, in consultation with several of the meeting participants. An expert survey was then conducted. It involved 52 experts who provided a considerable amount of information. The statements covered a broad array of research fields and were grouped in 3 categories: chemical aspects, biological and biogeochemical responses, and policy and socio-economic aspects. The survey results indicate a relatively strong consensus for most statements related to the past, present and future chemical aspects. Examples of consensual issues are: non-anthropogenic ocean acidification events have occurred in the geological past, anthropogenic CO2 emissions is the main (but not the only) mechanism generating the current ocean acidification event, and ocean acidification will be felt for centuries. The experts generally agreed that there will be impacts on biological and ecological processes and biogeochemical feedbacks, but for such statements, the levels of agreement were lower overall, with more variability across responses. Levels of agreements among experts surveyed were comparatively higher for statements regarding calcification, primary production and nitrogen fixation, as compared to impacts on food-webs. The levels of agreement for statements

  9. Acquisition of Expert/Non-Expert Vocabulary from Reformulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Edwige; Grabar, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Technical medical terms are complicated to be correctly understood by non-experts. Vocabulary, associating technical terms with layman expressions, can help in increasing the readability of technical texts and their understanding. The purpose of our work is to build this kind of vocabulary. We propose to exploit the notion of reformulation following two methods: extraction of abbreviations and of reformulations with specific markers. The segments associated thanks to these methods are aligned with medical terminologies. Our results allow to cover over 9,000 medical terms and show precision of extractions between 0.24 and 0.98. The results and analyzed and compared with the existing work.

  10. Assessing interdisciplinary education in U.S. dental hygiene programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, L; Bray, K; Mayberry, B; Overman, P

    2000-01-01

    This study was done to examine the role of interdisciplinary education in dental hygiene curricula, identify factors associated with its implementation, explore the perceptions of dental hygiene educators related to interdisciplinary education, and explore these educators' perception of its validity and barriers to implementation. A 36-item questionnaire mailed to directors of all 216 dental hygiene programs in the United States elicited program demographics and information about participation in clinical and didactic interdisciplinary educational experience as well as attitudes regarding such experiences. The response rate was 63% (n = 136). Of the 136 respondents, 31% (n = 69) indicated that the dental hygiene curricula at their institutions included interdisciplinary activities; 15% (n = 33) indicated participation in both clinical and didactic interdisciplinary course work. Student participation was minimal, with most interdisciplinary activities taking place in didactic course work, but 74% (n = 160) of the respondents felt their students should be participating in interdisciplinary educational experiences. Chi-square analysis identified no consistent association among interdisciplinary activity variables. Many respondents felt that interdisciplinary educational experiences would benefit their students, but very few had incorporated them into their curricula, citing lack of resources and time as reasons. In addition, the term interdisciplinary was interpreted variably.

  11. Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis: Ask the Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tetanus, Pertussis Ask the Experts: Diseases & Vaccines Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis Ask the Experts Home Combination Vaccines Diphtheria ... have died. How many doses of pediatric diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine does an infant need ...

  12. Cataloging Expert Systems: Optimism and Frustrated Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstadt, William J.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses artificial intelligence and attempts to catalog expert systems. Topics include the nature of expertise; examples of cataloging expert systems; barriers to implementation; and problems, including total automation, cataloging expertise, priorities, and system design. (LRW)

  13. Telemedicine diabetes consultations are cost-effective, and effects on essential diabetes treatment parameters are similar to conventional treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levin, Klaus; Madsen, Jette R; Petersen, Inge

    2013-01-01

    been offered expert diabetes care using teleconsultations. This article describes the impact of the telemedicine solution on essential diabetes treatment parameters, patient satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness. METHODS: Telemedicine consultations were conducted with the patient and nurse specialist......BACKGROUND: The increasing number of patients with diabetes poses a major challenge for the health care system. One instrument to meet these challenges could be the use of telemedicine, which, at the same time, may reduce treatment costs. Since 2005, diabetes patients on the island of Aeroe have...... placed in a consultation room of Aeroe Hospital in audiovisual contact with the physician situated at the hospital on the mainland. Consultations were supported by an electronic patient record and a Web-based quality-monitoring diabetes database. RESULTS: Inclusion criteria in this retrospective study...

  14. HIN4/397: Designing the Web- and Fax-based Consultancy and Information Service "EcgConsult" for Clinicians Dealing with ECG Diagnostics and Rhythmologic Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, C; Hindricks, G; Kottkamp, H

    1999-01-01

    Introduction Modern strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arhythmias include besides non-invasive methods an increasing variety of invasive and curative therapeutic strategies. In order to define proper rhythmologic diagnosis and to develop an optimal treatment strategy for individual patients, a high degree of rhythmologic expertise is necessary. Adequate platforms for information exchange, where physicians can meet rhythmologic experts to allow proper handling of individual rhythmologic problems are desirable. Thus, the Heart Center Leipzig develops the Web- and Fax-based consultancy and information service "EcgConsult". Methods The service utilizes the network capabilities of the Internet and of the common telecommunication network. This way information input can be achieved either by using a browser/email-client or by using a fax machine. All input from both networks is collected on a centralised mail-server (SSL-POP3 protocol). User interaction on the Web site is achieved with dynamic HTML and a moderated List-Server. The List-Server and an additional discussion area on the Web site are moderated by the Consultants at the Heart Center Leipzig, adequate processing of the site-content and technical management of the site have been outsourced to the university Internet workgroup Elchsoft/Medkonsult. Results A prototype of the site and the communication architecture for fax/email have been established and successfully beta-tested. Any consulting physician can easily send ECGs and additional material to the server with any fax-machine, where they are automatically TIFF-file converted. A password-protected site is already in use with selected clinicians (http://www.ecgconsult.de). For mobile site management, a web-based Control-Center has been designed. Outlines of contract models for members, guidelines for security purposes of the web-based communication, a business/cost plan and models for the logistic request management as well as for member

  15. SciVal Experts: a collaborative tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily; Feddern-Bekcan, Tanya; Moore, Mary

    2011-01-01

    SciVal Experts is a resource for finding experts and fostering collaboration. The tool creates researcher profiles with automatically updated publication and grant information and faculty-inputted curriculum vitae, more fully capturing a researcher's body of work. SciVal Experts indexes campus-based "experts" by research topic, allowing faculty to find potential research partners and mentors, furthering translational research opportunities and dissemination of knowledge.

  16. Framing the consultation: the role of the referral in surgeon-patient consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Sarah J; Stubbe, Maria H; Macdonald, Lindsay M; Dowell, Anthony C; Dew, Kevin P; Gardner, Rod

    2014-01-01

    This study describes and analyzes the impact of the referral process on communication at the beginning of surgeon-patient consultations. We used conversation analysis to analyze the opening interactional activities of surgeon-patient consultations in New Zealand. This study focuses on 20 video-recorded consultations recorded between 2004 and 2006. Participants in surgeon-patient consultations began referred consultations by discussing the referral letter in what we have termed "referral recognition sequences." These sequences are coconstructed activities that can be implicit or explicit and address the minimized epistemic distance between surgeons and patients that is caused by the referral process. These sequences can be simple or complex, and this complexity may be determined by the quality of the referral letter received. Acknowledgment of the referral letter assists in achieving alignment between surgeon, patient, and referring doctor regarding the presenting problem. If this alignment is not achieved, progressivity of the consultation is affected, as there is disagreement as to why the patient is seeing the surgeon. This research shows that to assist in the progressivity of surgeon-patient consultations, referral letters should be clear and patients made aware of the reason for referral. Surgeons should also overtly address the minimized epistemic distance caused by the referral letter to ensure patients present their problems in full.

  17. Principles of effective consultation: an update for the 21st-century consultant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, Stephen M; Hurst, Frank P; Halvorson, Stephanie; Mercado, Donna L

    2007-02-12

    Little information in the literature exists to guide consult interactions between different medical specialties. A total of 323 general internists, family medicine physicians, general surgeons, orthopedic surgeons, and obstetricians/gynecologists (OB/GYNs) from 3 academic medical centers completed a survey addressing their ideal relationship with consultants. Differences between surgeons and nonsurgeons were calculated using logistic regression, adjusting for location and trainee status. Differences between different specialties of surgeons were calculated using analysis of variance with Scheffe post hoc analysis There was a 72% response rate. About half of respondents were surgeons and the rest were general internists and family medicine physicians. More nonsurgeons (69%) desired the consultant to focus on a narrow question than did surgeons (41%). Over half (59%) of family medicine physicians and internists preferred to retain order-writing authority on their patients compared with 37% of surgeons (Pinternal medicine input, preferring to consult medicine subspecialists directly. Specialty-dependent differences exist in consult preferences of physicians. These differences vary from the extremes of orthopedic surgeons desiring a comprehensive co-management approach with the consultant to general internists and family medicine physicians desiring to retain control over order writing and have a more focused consultant approach.

  18. Quality Management in Project Management Consulting. A Case Study in an International Consulting Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard-Gabriel Ceptureanu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses quality management from the specific perspective of project management consulting service providers, in the framework of large infrastructure projects. Because of their supposed superiority in knowledge and experience, project management consultants have an ultimate responsibility for the proper implementing of the project. Therefore, quality management in consulting organizations should focus on critical success factors. As there is no consensus yet regarding the most important aspects of the consulting activity on which depend the achievement of the project aims, there is scope for further investigating this subject. Here, the case of a project management consulting organization involved in large infrastructure projects in Romania, Bulgaria, Moldova, Ukraine and Serbia is analyzed. Data collected through a questionnaire-based survey among international consultants and support personnel suggest that factors related to leadership style and communication skills are more closely tied to the success of the project than more technical aspects. The results constitute an empirical evidence of main success factors for specialized consulting services in project management and can be useful in improving business and project performance and achieving business excellence.

  19. Expert Systems for auditing management information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheroghe Popescu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Expert systems are built with the help of: specialised programming languages or expert system generators (shell. But this structure was reached after tens of years of work and research, because expert systems are nothing but pragmatic capitalisation of the results of research carried out in artificial intelligence and theory of knowledge.

  20. Expert System Prototype for False Event Discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-14

    This report discusses a prototype expert system for event discrimination. We wanted to determine whether applying an expert system to handle and...other potential sources of erroneous information. The expert system is an apt vehicle for growth of systems knowledge, for quick decision making, and

  1. Expert System Initiative in Logistic Readiness (EXSYN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    This initiative is to demonstrate the feasibility of using expert system technology to assist TRADOC combat developers with the assignment of...practices into rule sets; (2) develop a prototype expert system based on the rule sets, using a commercially available expert system development tool

  2. Differentiating Experts' Anticipatory Skills in Beach Volleyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal-Bruland, Rouwen; Mooren, Merel; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined how perceptual-motor expertise and watching experience contribute to anticipating the outcome of opponents' attacking actions in beach volleyball. To this end, we invited 8 expert beach volleyball players, 8 expert coaches, 8 expert referees, and 8 control participants with no beach volleyball experience to watch videos…

  3. Differentiating Experts' Anticipatory Skills in Beach Volleyball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canal-Bruland, Rouwen; Mooren, Merel; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we examined how perceptual-motor expertise and watching experience contribute to anticipating the outcome of opponents' attacking actions in beach volleyball. To this end, we invited 8 expert beach volleyball players, 8 expert coaches, 8 expert referees, and 8 control participants with no beach volleyball experience to watch videos…

  4. Expert Systems and Intelligent Information Retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, H. M.

    1987-01-01

    Explores what an intelligent information retrieval system involves and why expert system techniques might interest system designers. Expert systems research is reviewed with emphasis on components, architecture, and computer interaction, and it is concluded that information retrieval is not an ideal problem domain for expert system application at…

  5. Evaluating Econometric Models and Expert Intuition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Legerstee (Rianne)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis is about forecasting situations which involve econometric models and expert intuition. The first three chapters are about what it is that experts do when they adjust statistical model forecasts and what might improve that adjustment behavior. It is investigated how expert for

  6. Negotiating the Dance: Consulting with Adoptive Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Kent W.; Carson, David K.; Seto, Atsuko; Becker, Carol A.

    2002-01-01

    For marriage and family therapists and educators who train future marriage and family therapists, families formed by means of adoption offer an abundance of learning opportunities in both the areas of assessment and intervention. The following consultation case represents a composite family designed to highlight the unique features of adoptive…

  7. Delivering an MBA Management Consulting Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMaire, Ryan; Fisher, Kirk; Watson, Edward F., III

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on an innovative MBA elective consulting course that attempts to address how to better prepare inexperienced MBA students for a competitive job market. This article is a best practice paper designed to provide insights and encouragement to educators.

  8. School Neuropsychology Consultation in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    The role of school psychologists with training in neuropsychology is examined within the context of multitiered models of service delivery and educational reform policies. An expanded role is suggested that builds on expertise in the assessment of neurodevelopmental disorders and extends to broader tiers through consultation practice. Changes in…

  9. Science Consultants, Fictional Films, and Scientific Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Proposes films to be successful communicative devices within the scientific community by showing that other scientists respond to depictions in films and how they respond. Demonstrates that science consultants use fictional films as promotional devices for their research fields. (Author/NB)

  10. Individualizing Language Strategies Using CONSULT-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Anabel P.; Metz, Elizabeth

    This handbook offers suggestions for implementing actions (termed variously in other settings as treatments, interventions, methods, techniques, strategies or activities) recommended for individual learners by CONSULT-I (R), a computer program created by James Fattu and Edward Patrick. Application of the program described in the handbook was under…

  11. 76 FR 55678 - Tribal Consultation Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-08

    ... proposal, new rule adoption, and other policy changes) that cause ACF to consult with the tribes. ACF's..., including native americans, persons with developmental disabilities, refugees, and legal immigrants, to help... budget (OLAB). Office of planning, research and evaluation (opre). Office of refugee resettlement (ORR...

  12. The Writing Consultation: Developing Academic Writing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rowena; Thow, Morag; Moore, Sarah; Murphy, Maura

    2008-01-01

    This article describes and analyses a specific mechanism, the writing consultation, designed to help academics to prioritise, reconceptualise and improve their writing practices. It makes the case for its potential to stimulate consideration of writing practices and motivations, a possible precondition for creating time for writing in academic…

  13. IT Consultants in Acquisition IT Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsson, Stefan; Øhrgaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    model, depicting the use of external consultants in acquisition IT integration, contributes to the literature on acquisition IT integration by providing an explanation for IT-based value creation in acquisition that is rooted in the external of the acquirer. In addition to adding to the limited...

  14. Psychiatric consultations and the management of associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as delirium, dementia, psychotic disorders due to general medical ... comorbid medical conditions in a regional referral hospital ... (10.0% of cases consulted) were admitted to either the medical or psychiatric wards with a confirmed diagnosis of delirium, .... and Emergency Services (535; 89); Internal Medicine including.

  15. Service Learning In Physics: The Consultant Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, David

    2005-04-01

    Each year thousands of students across the country and across the academic disciplines participate in service learning. Unfortunately, with no clear model for integrating community service into the physics curriculum, there are very few physics students engaged in service learning. To overcome this shortfall, a consultant based service-learning program has been developed and successfully implemented at Saint Anselm College (SAC). As consultants, students in upper level physics courses apply their problem solving skills in the service of others. Most recently, SAC students provided technical and managerial support to a group from Girl's Inc., a national empowerment program for girls in high-risk, underserved areas, who were participating in the national FIRST Lego League Robotics competition. In their role as consultants the SAC students provided technical information through brainstorming sessions and helped the girls stay on task with project management techniques, like milestone charting. This consultant model of service-learning, provides technical support to groups that may not have a great deal of resources and gives physics students a way to improve their interpersonal skills, test their technical expertise, and better define the marketable skill set they are developing through the physics curriculum.

  16. 77 FR 19020 - Tribal Consultation Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... Act of 2007, Public Law 110-134, notice is hereby given of a one-day Tribal Consultation Session to be... into consideration funding allocations, distribution formulas, and other issues affecting the delivery... children and families, taking into consideration funding allocations, distribution formulas, and...

  17. 29 CFR 1691.12 - Interagency consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interagency consultation. 1691.12 Section 1691.12 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION PROCEDURES FOR COMPLAINTS OF...) Prior to the initiation of any legal action against a recipient of Federal financial assistance alleging...

  18. Teacher Utilization of Instructional Consultation Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jill; Yiu, Ho Lam; Nelson, Deborah; Vaganek, Megan; Rosenfield, Sylvia; Gravois, Todd; Gottfredson, Gary; Vu, Phuong; Shanahan, Kate; Hong, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Data regarding intervention utilization among the target population are critical to interpret evidence from efficacy trials for school-based interventions. When use of the intervention is voluntary, intervention diffusion becomes a particularly critical variable. We examined the use of Instructional Consultation Teams (IC Teams), a voluntary…

  19. The representations of adolescents about gynecological consultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia de Oliveira Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the social representation of adolescents about gynecological consultation and the influence of those in searching for consultations. Method: Qualitative descriptive study based on the Social Representations Theory, conducted with 50 adolescents in their last year of middle school. The data was collected between April and May of 2010 by Evocations and a Focal Group. The software EVOC and contextual analysis were used in the data treatment. Results: The elements fear and constraint, constant in the central nucleus, can justify the low frequency of adolescents in consultations. The term embarrassment in the peripheral system reinforce current sociocultural norms, while prevention, associated with learning about sex and clarifying doubts, allows to envision an educative function. Obtained testimonies in the focal groups exemplify and reinforce those findings. Conclusion: For an effective health education, professionals, including nurses, need to clarify the youth individually and collectively about their rights to privacy, secrecy, in addition to focus the gynecological consultation as a promotion measure to sexual and reproductive health.

  20. The Role of the Organisational Development Consultant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Mike

    1972-01-01

    The consultant's concern is to increase an organization's capacity to initiate and manage change through an integrated approach to the company's social, economic, technical, and organizational systems, and to improve the performance and value of its human resources, using measurable criteria whenever possible. (Author/JB)

  1. Viburnum “terugloopziekte” : Consultancy onderzoek

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludeking, D.J.W.; Kromwijk, J.A.M.; Boer-Tersteeg, de P.M.; Bosch, C.

    2012-01-01

    DUTCH Bij de teelt van Viburnum opulus komt het soms voor dat de groei pleksgewijs langzaam terugloopt. Het gewas lijkt niet ziek, maar het blad wordt stug en donker en de taklengte en bladgrootte worden elk jaar kleiner. In dit consultancy onderzoek is onderzocht wat de oorzaak is van deze

  2. The Writing Consultation: Developing Academic Writing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Rowena; Thow, Morag; Moore, Sarah; Murphy, Maura

    2008-01-01

    This article describes and analyses a specific mechanism, the writing consultation, designed to help academics to prioritise, reconceptualise and improve their writing practices. It makes the case for its potential to stimulate consideration of writing practices and motivations, a possible precondition for creating time for writing in academic…

  3. School Neuropsychology Consultation in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    The role of school psychologists with training in neuropsychology is examined within the context of multitiered models of service delivery and educational reform policies. An expanded role is suggested that builds on expertise in the assessment of neurodevelopmental disorders and extends to broader tiers through consultation practice. Changes in…

  4. Psychiatric consultation of patients with hyperemesis gravidarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deborah R; Connolly, K R; Cristancho, Pilar; Zappone, Mark; Weinrieb, Robert M

    2009-04-01

    The request for a psychiatric examination of patients with hyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is a unique challenge for the psychiatric consultant. Unfortunately, there are little data in the psychosomatic medicine literature to guide diagnostic evaluations and treatment of patients with HG. In this article, we summarize the existing literature and propose a practical approach to such patients based on the literature and our clinical experience.

  5. 34 CFR 200.63 - Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... children from low-income families residing in participating public school attendance areas, including... to teachers and families of participating private school children. (c)(1) Consultation by the LEA... Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Participation of Eligible Children in Private Schools §...

  6. Expert Oracle GoldenGate

    CERN Document Server

    Prusinski, Ben; Chung, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Expert Oracle GoldenGate is a hands-on guide to creating and managing complex data replication environments using the latest in database replication technology from Oracle. GoldenGate is the future in replication technology from Oracle, and aims to be best-of-breed. GoldenGate supports homogeneous replication between Oracle databases. It supports heterogeneous replication involving other brands such as Microsoft SQL Server and IBM DB2 Universal Server. GoldenGate is high-speed, bidirectional, highly-parallelized, and makes only a light impact on the performance of databases involved in replica

  7. A Phenomenology of Expert Musicianship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høffding, Simon

    targets a central debate in philosophy and psychology on whether reflection is conducive for, or detrimental to, skillful performance. My analyses show that the concepts assumed in the literature on this question are poorly defined and gloss over more important features of expertise. The second question...... of the nature of the self. I account for the conditions of the possibility of deep absorption and suggest that a detailed and comprehensive grasp of expert musicianship is best achieved through an understanding of the phenomenon that revolves around a changed sense of agency....

  8. Expert Oracle RAC 12c

    CERN Document Server

    Shamsudeen, Riyaj; Yu, Kai; Farooq, Tariq

    2013-01-01

    Expert Oracle RAC 12c is a hands-on book helping you understand and implement Oracle Real Application Clusters (RAC), and to reduce the total-cost-of-ownership (TCO) of a RAC database. As a seasoned professional, you are probably aware of the importance of understanding the technical details behind the RAC stack. This book provides deep understanding of RAC concepts and implementation details that you can apply toward your day-to-day operational practices. You'll be guided in troubleshooting and avoiding trouble in your installation. Successful RAC operation hinges upon a fast-performing netwo

  9. Interdisciplinary recommendations document to improve adherence in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases: Adhing recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Bermejo San José

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patient compliance in chronic inflammatory diseases is essential to achieve treatment effectiveness. The study objective is to develop a recommendations document for healthcare professionals to encourage treatment compliance. Methods: A sequential methodology was followed: 1. Systematic review of EBM Reviews, Embase and MedLine without time restriction of interventions on compliance in chronic inflammatory diseases. Studies were selected according to previously defined criteria (confirmed diagnosis of chronic inflammatory disease of patients included, assessment of adherence interventions and experimental study design. 2. Three expert workshops (hospital pharmacy, nursing and medical specialties to elaborate recommendations. 3. Expert online voting about the degree of agreement with recommendations. 4. Final face to face consensus workshop. Results: A total of 1 115 papers were identified, 84 were fully reviewed and 30 were selected according to criteria. A preli minary list of 8 recommendations based on evidence was developed and discussed in the expert workshops. As a result, a new version of 14 recommendations was created. Later, online voting showed a high degree of agreement among experts: 7 out of 14 recommendations obtained unanimous approval; in the other 7, 1 to 3 experts were partially in disagreement. Recommendations without unanimous agreement were further reviewed and modified in the face to face meeting and final recommendations were approved unanimously. Conclusions: This consensus statement gathers all relevant aspects to be interdisciplinary considered to detect, monitor and assess medication adherence, involving the patient in the process. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of interventions to improve compliance in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases both in terms of adherence and in health outcomes

  10. Accessing primary care Big Data: the development of a software algorithm to explore the rich content of consultation records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, J; Darlow, B; McBain, L; Jones, O; Stubbe, M; Turner, N; Dowell, A

    2015-08-21

    To develop a natural language processing software inference algorithm to classify the content of primary care consultations using electronic health record Big Data and subsequently test the algorithm's ability to estimate the prevalence and burden of childhood respiratory illness in primary care. Algorithm development and validation study. To classify consultations, the algorithm is designed to interrogate clinical narrative entered as free text, diagnostic (Read) codes created and medications prescribed on the day of the consultation. Thirty-six consenting primary care practices from a mixed urban and semirural region of New Zealand. Three independent sets of 1200 child consultation records were randomly extracted from a data set of all general practitioner consultations in participating practices between 1 January 2008-31 December 2013 for children under 18 years of age (n=754,242). Each consultation record within these sets was independently classified by two expert clinicians as respiratory or non-respiratory, and subclassified according to respiratory diagnostic categories to create three 'gold standard' sets of classified records. These three gold standard record sets were used to train, test and validate the algorithm. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and F-measure were calculated to illustrate the algorithm's ability to replicate judgements of expert clinicians within the 1200 record gold standard validation set. The algorithm was able to identify respiratory consultations in the 1200 record validation set with a sensitivity of 0.72 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.78) and a specificity of 0.95 (95% CI 0.93 to 0.98). The positive predictive value of algorithm respiratory classification was 0.93 (95% CI 0.89 to 0.97). The positive predictive value of the algorithm classifying consultations as being related to specific respiratory diagnostic categories ranged from 0.68 (95% CI 0.40 to 1.00; other respiratory conditions) to 0.91 (95% CI 0.79 to 1

  11. Operational expert system applications in Canada

    CERN Document Server

    Suen, Ching Y

    1992-01-01

    This book is part of a new series on operational expert systems worldwide. Expert systems are now widely used in different parts of the world for various applications. The past four years have witnessed a steady growth in the development and deployment of expert systems in Canada. Research in this field has also gained considerable momentum during the past few years. However, the field of expert systems is still young in Canada. This book contains 13 chapters contributed by 31 experts from both universities and industries across Canada covering a wide range of applications related to electric

  12. The role of the expert witness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrold, Laurance

    2007-08-01

    The role of expert witnesses in medical malpractice litigation is often misunderstood. Much maligned, the expert has been the subject of castigation by a range of people, from his professional colleagues to the jurists who preside over his testimony. From an academic perspective, the expert witness is a necessary evil, and his denigration is his own doing; for the expert is a neutral character who creates his own professional persona. This purpose of this article is to serve as a primer for those interested in understanding the role that the expert is supposed to play in litigation, and the factors surrounding his activities.

  13. Chasing polys: Interdisciplinary affinity and its connection to physics identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tyler D.

    This research is based on two motivations that merge by means of the frameworks of interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. First, a goal of education is to develop interdisciplinary abilities in students' thinking and work. But an often ignored factor is students interests and beliefs about being interdisciplinary. Thus, this work develops and uses a framework called interdisciplinary affinity. It encompasses students interests in making connections across disciplines and their beliefs about their abilities to make those connections. The second motivation of this research is to better understand how to engage more students with physics. Physics identity describes how a student sees themselves in relation to physics. By understanding how physics identity is developed, researchers and educators can identify factors that increase interest and engagement in physics classrooms. Therefore, physics identity was used in conjunction with interdisciplinary affinity. Using a mixed methods approach, this research used quantitative data to identify the relationships interdisciplinary affinity has with physics identity and the physics classroom. These connections were explored in more detail using a case study of three students in a high school physics class. Results showed significant and positive relationships between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity, including the individual interest and recognition components of identity. It also identified characteristics of physics classrooms that had a significant, positive relationship with interdisciplinary affinity. The qualitative case study highlighted the importance of student interest to the relationship between interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity. It also identified interest and mastery orientation as key to understanding the link between interdisciplinary affinity and the physics classroom. These results are a positive sign that by understanding interdisciplinary affinity and physics identity

  14. Exposing interdisciplinary diversity in a health care setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte Ravn; Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Nørtoft, Kamilla

    and reflection process orally and in writing. Once the play started, we stepped back as facilitators and let the participants handle the role play and the following dialogical process themselves. Findings The participants appear to be challenged by their interdisciplinary and personal differences and we explore...... professionals´ analytic skills and their ability to link observations with relevant actions. However, it is a challenge to facilitate interdisciplinary differences. More research is called for into facilitation of interdisciplinary learning processes....

  15. Interdisciplinary evidence-based practice: moving from silos to synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Robin P; Spring, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    Despite the assumption that health care providers work synergistically in practice, professions have tended to be more exclusive than inclusive when it comes to educating students in a collaborative approach to interdisciplinary evidence-based practice (EBP). This article explores the state of academic and clinical training regarding interdisciplinary EBP, describes efforts to foster interdisciplinary EBP, and suggests strategies to accelerate the translation of EBP across disciplines. Moving from silos to synergy in interdisciplinary EBP will require a paradigm shift. Changes can be leveraged professionally and politically using national initiatives currently in place on improving quality and health care reform.

  16. Interdisciplinary Approaches to Managing Pain in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickson-Griffiths, Abigail; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Herr, Keela

    2016-11-01

    An interdisciplinary approach to managing pain has been widely used in managing specific pain conditions (eg, lower back and fibromyalgia) but not reviewed specifically for older adults. Interdisciplinary approaches have been used in primary, residential long-term, and acute care settings, where a variety of health care professionals work on pain teams to manage pain in older adults. Given the multidimensional nature of pain in older adults, interdisciplinary approaches to managing pain are recommended in practice. This article reviews the rationale supporting an interdisciplinary approach to managing pain in older adults and summarizes studies that have evaluated this approach. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Interdisciplinary contributions to theory for collaborative networks

    CERN Document Server

    Dekkers, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Scientific progress on a field is mostly discussed within disciplines. Far less attention is paid to outside or between disciplines' work. To speed up research progresses for Collaborative Networks in Manufacturing, a base for further grounded theory establishment is propagated recalling some of the most relevant chapters of philosophy of science. The focus is put onto the roles of disciplines and their scholars involved in interdisciplinary contexts in order to further motivate as well as to hint at a number of catalysing forces and fruitful impacts of outside disciplines' work.

  18. Relevance: An Interdisciplinary and Information Science Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Greisdorf

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Although relevance has represented a key concept in the field of information science for evaluating information retrieval effectiveness, the broader context established by interdisciplinary frameworks could provide greater depth and breadth to on-going research in the field. This work provides an overview of the nature of relevance in the field of information science with a cursory view of how cross-disciplinary approaches to relevance could represent avenues for further investigation into the evaluative characteristics of relevance as a means for enhanced understanding of human information behavior.

  19. Biophysics software for interdisciplinary education and research

    CERN Document Server

    Deutsch, J M

    2013-01-01

    Biophysics is a subject that is spread over many disciplines and transcends the skills and knowledge of the individual student. This makes it challenging both to teach and to learn. Educational materials are described to aid in teaching undergraduates biophysics in an interdisciplinary manner. Projects have been devised on topics that range from x-ray diffraction to the Hodgkin Huxley equations. They are team-based and encourage collaboration. The projects make extensive use of software written in Python/Scipy which can be modified to explore a large range of possible phenomena. The software can also be used in lectures and in the teaching of more traditional biophysics courses.

  20. The nephrology interdisciplinary team: an education synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jane S; Zuber, Kim

    2014-07-01

    Patients with kidney disease often have a poor understanding of their condition. The interdisciplinary team can effectively educate these patients to slow disease progression and enhance self-management. The kidney community needs large, well-designed studies to determine the best way to educate patients and hopefully stem the tide of a rapidly increasing population of kidney patients. Congress authorized payment to eligible providers for kidney disease education for Medicare beneficiaries. However, this benefit is not being optimally used. In addition, reimbursement denials were 14-17% in 2011 and 20-23% in 2012. This is more than 4 times the usual Medicare denial rate for current procedural terminology (CPT) codes.