WorldWideScience

Sample records for interactive digital carbon

  1. Digital interactive learning of oral radiographic anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuchkova, J; Maybury, T; Farah, C S

    2012-02-01

    Studies reporting high number of diagnostic errors made from radiographs suggest the need to improve the learning of radiographic interpretation in the dental curriculum. Given studies that show student preference for computer-assisted or digital technologies, the purpose of this study was to develop an interactive digital tool and to determine whether it was more successful than a conventional radiology textbook in assisting dental students with the learning of radiographic anatomy. Eighty-eight dental students underwent a learning phase of radiographic anatomy using an interactive digital tool alongside a conventional radiology textbook. The success of the digital tool, when compared to the textbook, was assessed by quantitative means using a radiographic interpretation test and by qualitative means using a structured Likert scale survey, asking students to evaluate their own learning outcomes from the digital tool. Student evaluations of the digital tool showed that almost all participants (95%) indicated that the tool positively enhanced their learning of radiographic anatomy and interpretation. The success of the digital tool in assisting the learning of radiographic interpretation is discussed in the broader context of learning and teaching curricula, and preference (by students) for the use of this digital form when compared to the conventional literate form of the textbook. Whilst traditional textbooks are still valued in the dental curriculum, it is evident that the preference for computer-assisted learning of oral radiographic anatomy enhances the learning experience by enabling students to interact and better engage with the course material. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. An interactive program on digitizing historical seismograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yihe; Xu, Tao

    2014-02-01

    Retrieving information from analog seismograms is of great importance since they are considered as the unique sources that provide quantitative information of historical earthquakes. We present an algorithm for automatic digitization of the seismograms as an inversion problem that forms an interactive program using Matlab® GUI. The program integrates automatic digitization with manual digitization and users can easily switch between the two modalities and carry out different combinations for the optimal results. Several examples about applying the interactive program are given to illustrate the merits of the method.

  3. Digital Rock Simulation of Flow in Carbonate Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemin, D.; Andersen, M.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoir engineering has becomes more complex to deal with current challenges, so core analysts must understand and model pore geometries and fluid behaviors at pores scales more rapidly and realistically. We introduce an industry-unique direct hydrodynamic pore flow simulator that operates on pore geometries from digital rock models obtained using microCT or 3D scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. The PVT and rheological models used in the simulator represent real reservoir fluids. Fluid-solid interactions are introduced using distributed micro-scale wetting properties. The simulator uses density functional approach applied for hydrodynamics of complex systems. This talk covers selected applications of the simulator. We performed microCT scanning of six different carbonate rock samples from homogeneous limestones to vuggy carbonates. From these, we constructed digital rock models representing pore geometries for the simulator. We simulated nonreactive tracer flow in all six digital models using a digital fluid description that included a passive tracer solution. During the simulation, we evaluated the composition of the effluent. Results of tracer flow simulations corresponded well with experimental data of nonreactive tracer floods for the same carbonate rock types. This simulation data of the non-reactive tracer flow can be used to calculate the volume of the rock accessible by the fluid, which can be further used to predict response of a porous medium to a reactive fluid. The described digital core analysis workflow provides a basis for a wide variety of activities, including input to design acidizing jobs and evaluating treatment efficiency and EOR economics. Digital rock multiphase flow simulations of a scanned carbonate rock evaluated the effect of wettability on flow properties. Various wetting properties were tested: slightly oil wet, slightly water wet, and water wet. Steady-state relative permeability simulations yielded curves for all three

  4. Digital Technology and the Interactive Television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozéias Teixeira de Souza

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this article it is analyzed the impact that the digital technology process causes in the way that television participates of the social life in Brazil. Trying a non-hermeneutic approach, it is proposed to think this new role of television, from the materiality existing on this media that can bring more interactivity and conducts the changes over people behavior. In our opinion, we realize that materiality can support the transposition of the nowadays analogical interaction form – the televiewer-television model – to a user-machine model in the digital television.

  5. Interactive digital narrative history, theory and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Koenitz, Hartmut; Haahr, Mads; Sezen, Digdem; Sezen, Tonguç Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The book is concerned with narrative in digital media that changes according to user input-Interactive Digital Narrative (IDN). It provides a broad overview of current issues and future directions in this multi-disciplinary field that includes humanities-based and computational perspectives. It assembles the voices of leading researchers and practitioners like Janet Murray, Marie-Laure Ryan, Scott Rettberg and Martin Rieser. In three sections, it covers history, theoretical perspectives and varieties of practice including narrative game design, with a special focus on changes in the power rela

  6. Digital Facial Augmentation for Interactive Entertainment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Hieda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Digital projection technology allows for effective and entertaining spatial augmented reality applications. Leveraging the capabilities of reasonably accurate object tracking using commodity cameras and/or depth sensors to determine the 3D position and pose of objects in real time, it is possible to project dynamic graphical content on arbitrary surfaces, such as a person’s face. Coupling these capabilities with a simple drawing application, participants can have the experience of "painting" on someone’s face, or even on their own, by observing the projection in a mirror. Similarly, integrating 2D rigid-body, fluid and gravity simulation, one may interact with virtual objects projected on their own face or body.

  7. Interactive Digital Narratives for iTV and Online Video

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenitz, H.; Knoller, N.; Nakatsu, R.; Rauterberg, M.; Ciancarini, P.

    2015-01-01

    In iTV and online video, narrative interaction has long been a Holy Grail for both audiences and creators of these digital audiovisual works. On the one hand, interactive digital narrative promises interactors some exciting opportunities: to enter the world of the story, to affect the story and

  8. The effect of interactive digital storytelling gamification on microbiology classroom interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Molnar, Andreea

    2018-01-01

    In this research, we study the use of interactive digital storytelling in teaching microbiology. More specifically, we carried out an exploratory study assessing the effect of using the gamification of an interactive digital storytelling on classroom dynamics and students’ interaction. The results show that the presence of gamification led to an increase in classroom discussions and in students’ engagement with the learning objectives taught by the interactive digital storytelling.

  9. Does Digital Game Interactivity Always Promote Self-Efficacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Hao

    2015-11-01

    Interactive digital games can promote self-efficacy by engaging players in enactive and observational learning. However, interactivity does not always lead to greater self-efficacy. Important constructs in social cognitive theory, such as performance outcome and perceived similarity, are often not accounted for in studies that have tested the effect of digital game interactivity on self-efficacy. This study assessed the effects of interactive digital games compared with passive digital games based on video comparison, a common experimental design used to test the effect of digital game interactivity on self-efficacy. In addition, this study also evaluated player performance and measured perceived similarity to the observed player. Findings suggested that in general, digital game interactivity predicted higher self-efficacy compared with noninteractive passive games. However, in the noninteractive conditions, the effects of performance on self-efficacy were moderated by perceived similarity between the observer and the observed player. When the observed player was perceived to be similar to the observer, the effects of performance on self-efficacy were comparable to the interactive game, but when the observed player was perceived as dissimilar to the observer, observing the dissimilar player failed to increase observer self-efficacy. Implications for interactivity manipulations and game developers are discussed.

  10. Interacting with piles of artifacts on digital tables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aliakseyeu, D.; Subramanian, S.; Lucero Vera, A.A.; Gutwin, C.

    2006-01-01

    Designers and architects regularly use piles to organize visual artifacts. Recent efforts have now made it possible for users to create piles in digital systems as well. However, there is still little understanding of how users should interact with digital piles. In this paper we investigate this

  11. The interaction between digital marketing communication and customer loyalty

    OpenAIRE

    Merisavo, Marko

    2008-01-01

    Digital channels and information technology are changing the way that companies communicate and maintain relationships with their customers. The Internet, email, mobile phones, digital TV, and other evolving channels offer opportunities for frequent, costeffective, personalized, and interactive communication between the company and their customers. In addition to traditional offers and persuasion, customers can be provided with relational communication like newsletters, usage tips, maintenanc...

  12. Interactive Digital Textbooks and Engagement: A Learning Strategies Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikowski, Dawn; Casal, J. Elliott

    2018-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explored non-native English speaking students' learning processes and engagement as they used a customized interactive digital textbook housed on a mobile device. Think aloud protocols, surveys of anticipated and actual engagement with the digital textbook, reflective journals, and member checking constituted data…

  13. Digit and letter alexia in carbon monoxide poisoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingyu Shen; Xiaoming Rong; Rui Pan; Ying Peng; Wei Peng; Yamei Tang

    2012-01-01

    This study examined a 24-year-old patient with delayed encephalopathy, who was admitted to hospital with complaints of headache and visual impairment 1 week after acute carbon monoxide poisoning. The results of a visual field assessment, electroencephalography and head magnetic resonance imaging indicated damage to the cerebral cortex. After a 2-week treatment period, the patient had recovered from the visual impairment, but exhibited digit- and letter-reading difficulty. The Chinese aphasia battery and the number and letter battery supplement were conducted. The results revealed that the patient exhibited digit and letter alexia, while the ability to read Chinese characters was preserved. In contrast, the patient exhibited a deficit in Chinese character writing, while number and letter writing remained intact. Following treatment, reading and writing ability was improved and electroencephalographic abnormalities were ameliorated. Overall, our experimental findings demonstrated that delayed encephalopathy following acute carbon monoxide poisoning was characterized by digit and letter alexia.

  14. DIGITAL BROADCASTING and INTERACTIVE TELEVISION in DISTANCE EDUCATION: Digital And Interactive Television Infrastructure Proposol for Anadolu University Open Education Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reha Recep ERGUL

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid changes and improvements in the communication and information technologies beginning from the midst of the 20th Century and continuing today require new methods, constructions, and arrangements in the production and distribution of information. While television having the ability of presenting complex or difficult to comprehend concepts, subjects, and experimental studies to learners from different points of view, supported by 2D or 3D graphics and animations with audio visual stimulators replaces its technology from analog to digital and towards digital-interactive, it has also begun to convert the broadcasting technology in Turkey in this direction. Therefore, television broadcast infrastructure of Anadolu University Open Education Faculty needs to be replaced with a digital and interactive one. This study contains basic concepts of digital and interactive broadcasting and the new improvements. Furthermore, it includes the approaches in the basis of why and how a digital television broadcasting infrastructure should be stablished.

  15. Interaction of multiwalled carbon nanotube produces structural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) has been found to produce structural changes in Calf Thymus-DNA (CT-DNA). The interaction or binding of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) was investigated in order to discover if it brings about any significant changes of the DNA double helix using CD spectra ...

  16. Carbon-nitrogen interactions in forest ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Per; Berg, Bjørn; Currie, W.S.

    This report is a summary of the main results from the EU project “Carbon – Nitrogen Interactions in Forest Ecosystems” (CNTER). Since carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) are bound together in organic matter we studied both the effect of N deposition on C cycling in forest ecosystems, and the effect of C ...

  17. Towards Ways to Promote Interaction in Digital Learning Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson , Hanna ,

    2012-01-01

    Part 7: Doctoral Student Papers; International audience; Social learning is dependent on social interactions. I am exploring ways to promote interaction in Digital Learning Spaces. As theoretical framework I use the types of interaction between learner, instructor and content. That learners feel isolated and lonely in DLSs is a problem which comes at high cost for social learning. My aim is to promote social interaction by offering the edentity: a system for making participants visible to eac...

  18. Empowering Digital Interactions with Real World Conversation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tscholl, Michael; Lindgren, Robb

    2014-01-01

    The potential of augmented reality technologies (AR) for learning in a social and informal setting has been recognized, but little is yet known about the kinds of learning interactions it promotes and supports. In this paper, we describe initial findings from a study where an interactive, immersive, full-body simulation was deployed in a science…

  19. Designing Engaging Interactions with Digital Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozendaal, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis aims to investigate how the experience of engagement in interaction can be explained by examining the experiences of richness and control and how these experiences are influenced by the features of a product, the expertise of a person and the type of task. This research is carried out

  20. INTERACTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE WITH CARBON ADSORBENTS BELOW 400 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deitz, V R; Carpenter, F G; Arnold, R G

    1963-06-15

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide on carbon adsorbents (FT carbon, coconut charcoal, acid-washed bone char) and adsorbents containing basic calcium phosphate (hydroxylapatite, bone char, ash of bone char) was studied. Special consideration was given to the pretreatment of the materials. The carbons equilibrated as rapidly as the temperature; the basic calcium phosphates showed a rapid initial adsorption followed by a very slow rate which continued for days. Linear adsorption isotherms were found on FT carbon and the isosteric heats varied slightiy with coverage. The isotherms for the remaining materials had varying curvature and were for the most part in the same sequence as the estimated surface areas. The isosteric heats of carbon dioxide correlated very well with the magnitude of surface hydroxyl groups, an estimate of which was made from the chemical composition. There appeared to be three increasing levels of interaction: (1) pure physical adsorption; (2) an adsorption complex having 'bicarbonate structure'; and (3) an adsorption complex having 'carbonate structure'. (auth)

  1. Biotic interactions reduce microbial carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, M.; Maynard, D. S.

    2017-12-01

    The efficiency by which microbes decompose organic matter governs the amount of carbon that is retained in microbial biomass versus lost to the atmosphere as respiration. This carbon use efficiency (CUE) is affected by various abiotic conditions, such as temperature and nutrient availability. In biogeochemical model simulations, CUE is a key variable regulating how much soil carbon is stored or lost from ecosystems under simulated global changes, such as climate warming. Theoretically, the physiological costs of biotic interactions such as competition should likewise alter CUE, yet the direction and magnitude of these costs are untested. Here we conduct a microcosm experiment to quantify how competitive interactions among saprotrophic fungi alter growth, respiration, and CUE. Free-living decomposer fungi representing a broad range of traits and phylogenies were grown alone, in pairwise competition, and in multi-species (up to 15) communities. By combing culturing and stable carbon isotope approaches, we could resolve the amount of carbon substrate allocated to fungal biomass versus respiration, and so estimate CUE. By then comparing individual performance to community-level outcomes, we show that species interactions induce consistent declines in CUE, regardless of abiotic conditions. Pairwise competition lowers CUE by as much as 25%, with the magnitude of these costs equal to or greater than the observed variation across abiotic conditions. However, depending on the competitive network structure, increasing species richness led to consistent gains or declines in CUE. Our results suggest that the extent to which microbial-mediated carbon fluxes respond to environmental change may be influenced strongly by competitive interactions. As such, knowledge of abiotic conditions and community composition is necessary to confidently project CUE and hence ecosystem carbon dynamics.

  2. Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Kuznetsova, S.V.

    1996-01-01

    Niobium interaction with chloride-carbonate melt NaCl-KCl-K 2 CO 3 (5 mass %) in the temperature range of 973-1123 K has been studied. The products and niobium corrosion rate have been ascertained, depending on the temperature of melt and time of allowance. Potentials of niobium corrosion have been measured. Refs. 11, figs. 3, tabs. 2

  3. Designing Interactions for Learning: Physicality, Interactivity, and Interface Effects in Digital Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to better understand the role of physicality, interactivity, and interface effects in learning with digital content. Drawing on work in cognitive science, human-computer interaction, and multimedia learning, the study argues that interfaces that promote physical interaction can provide "conceptual leverage"…

  4. CUSTOMER INTERACTION ON DIGITAL ECONOMY: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Tavares da Silva Cozer

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available On a digital economy context, customer interaction is fundamental to any company to provide competitive advantage. This research intends to give concrete answers for the sea of information complexity which is the Internet. The main case is to build a model of digital customer interaction. Customization extends beyond targeted media to include the design and delivery of the product itself. Venkatraman (1998 defines dynamic customization based on three principles: modularity, intelligence and organization. The research is based on Interaction Model and its variables are: Products, Modularity, Artificial Intelligence, Market driven organization, and virtual communities. Two organizations were studied, one with physical product and another with virtual product, and the results were shown from a qualitative research.

  5. Interaction of scandium sesquioxide with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodop'yanov, A.G.; Zakharov, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    In the range of 2350-2470 degrees K at a PCO = 0.0 MPa, interaction in Sc 2 O 3 with carbon mixtures initially occurs by CO chemisorption at the scandium oxide surface and disproportionation into CO 2 and C, with subsequent replacement of oxygen in the oxide anion sublattice by carbon to form ScC. The carbide melt, creating a contact between the reagents, then transforms the process to a diffusion-based one. At 1820-2220 K in vacuum, reduction of the studied mixtures occurs by dissociative vaporization of the oxide, with precipitation of ScC at the carbon surface and generation of CO. The appearance of CO in the vapors of mixture leads to formation of an oxycarbide phase and to the partial occurrence of oxide dissociation

  6. How do young and senior cytopathologists interact with digital cytology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Giovagnoli

    Full Text Available Today thanks to the technological advances in information technology the scenario of utilization of digital cytology has radically changed. New competitive systems, such as client-server architectures are now available in digital cytology. Their application in telemedicine should be investigated. A new interactive tool designed for the final destination user (the cytopathologist has been proposed. Taking into account the different expertise of the subjects of the study, the investigation was focused both on the senior cytopathologist and on the younger student pathologist. The methodology was tested on 10 students of a Master in cytopathology and on 3 senior cytopathologists. The study showed that the use of digital cytology applications is effective and feasible for telediagnosis. In particular, the study on younger and senior expert investigators showed that, although they interacted with the novel technology of the virtual slide in a different manner, all of them reached the objective of a "correct diagnosis". This investigation, in consideration of the effectiveness of the digital cytology, also showed other indirect and tangible cost-beneft and quantitative advantages. In particular for the learning methodologies for the students of the Master itself and for the biomedical personnel involved in diagnosis.

  7. How do young and senior cytopathologists interact with digital cytology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovagnoli, Maria Rosaria; Giarnieri, Enrico; Carico, Elisabetta; Giansanti, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    Today thanks to the technological advances in information technology the scenario of utilization of digital cytology has radically changed. New competitive systems, such as client-server architectures are now available in digital cytology. Their application in telemedicine should be investigated. A new interactive tool designed for the final destination user (the cytopathologist) has been proposed. Taking into account the different expertise of the subjects of the study, the investigation was focused both on the senior cytopathologist and on the younger student pathologist. The methodology was tested on 10 students of a Master in cytopathology and on 3 senior cytopathologists. The study showed that the use of digital cytology applications is effective and feasible for telediagnosis. In particular, the study on younger and senior expert investigators showed that, although they interacted with the novel technology of the virtual slide in a different manner, all of them reached the objective of a "correct diagnosis". This investigation, in consideration of the effectiveness of the digital cytology, also showed other indirect and tangible cost-beneft and quantitative advantages. In particular for the learning methodologies for the students of the Master itself and for the biomedical personnel involved in diagnosis.

  8. Interactive Digital Storytelling: Towards a Hybrid Conceptual Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Spierling, Ulrike

    2005-01-01

    1 Introduction In this contribution, Interactive Digital Storytelling is viewed as a hybrid form of game design and cinematic storytelling for the understanding and making of future learning and entertainment applications. The paper shall present formal design models that provide a conceptual bridge between both traditional linear narrative techniques as well as agent-based emergent conversations with virtual characters. In summary, a theoretical classification of thinking models for authors ...

  9. Bringing Together Interactive Digital Storytelling with Tangible Interaction : Challenges and Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catala, Alejandro; Theune, Mariët; Sylla, Cristina; Ribeiro, Pedro; Nunes, Nuno; Oakley, Ian; Nisi, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    This workshop aims to explore challenges and potential opportunities in bringing interactive digital storytelling into the realm of tangible and embodied interaction. To this end, experts from both fields are invited to present and discuss their ideas. Besides fostering discussion and potential

  10. Argumentation in mathematics: mediation by means of digital interactive storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovannina Albano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is framed in a wider research aimed at outlining an online interactive platform model organizing mathematical learning activities based on a Vygotskian approach. This paper reports on a pilot study concerning a first implementation of a mathematical Learning Activity, as part of an interactive digital storytelling in mathematics, aiming at developing students’ argumentative competences. We present the outcomes of the protocols’ analysis and discuss them with respect two main points: the production of arguments for supporting of the solution to a question and the different functioning of the device according to the student’s attitude with respect to the story and the team work. L’argomentazione in matematica: la mediazione attraverso il digital interactive storytellingQuesto lavoro è inserito in una ricerca più ampia volta a realizzare un modello di piattaforma interattiva online che implementi Learning Activity in matematica basate su un approccio vygotskiano. Questo articolo riporta uno studio pilota riguardante una prima implementazione di un task matematico, come parte di un digital storytelling interattivo in matematica, che mira a sviluppare competenze argomentative negli studenti. Presentiamo i risultati delle analisi dei protocolli e li discutiamo rispetto a due punti principali: sviluppo nella produzione di argomentazioni a supporto della risoluzione ad un quesito e diverso funzionamento del dispositivo a seconda dell’atteggiamento dello studente rispetto alla storia e al lavoro di gruppo.

  11. Digital Ecology: Coexistence and Domination among Interacting Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleineberg, Kaj-Kolja; Boguñá, Marián

    2015-05-01

    The overwhelming success of Web 2.0, within which online social networks are key actors, has induced a paradigm shift in the nature of human interactions. The user-driven character of Web 2.0 services has allowed researchers to quantify large-scale social patterns for the first time. However, the mechanisms that determine the fate of networks at the system level are still poorly understood. For instance, the simultaneous existence of multiple digital services naturally raises questions concerning which conditions these services can coexist under. Analogously to the case of population dynamics, the digital world forms a complex ecosystem of interacting networks. The fitness of each network depends on its capacity to attract and maintain users’ attention, which constitutes a limited resource. In this paper, we introduce an ecological theory of the digital world which exhibits stable coexistence of several networks as well as the dominance of an individual one, in contrast to the competitive exclusion principle. Interestingly, our theory also predicts that the most probable outcome is the coexistence of a moderate number of services, in agreement with empirical observations.

  12. Genome complexity, robustness and genetic interactions in digital organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenski, Richard E.; Ofria, Charles; Collier, Travis C.; Adami, Christoph

    1999-08-01

    Digital organisms are computer programs that self-replicate, mutate and adapt by natural selection. They offer an opportunity to test generalizations about living systems that may extend beyond the organic life that biologists usually study. Here we have generated two classes of digital organism: simple programs selected solely for rapid replication, and complex programs selected to perform mathematical operations that accelerate replication through a set of defined `metabolic' rewards. To examine the differences in their genetic architecture, we introduced millions of single and multiple mutations into each organism and measured the effects on the organism's fitness. The complex organisms are more robust than the simple ones with respect to the average effects of single mutations. Interactions among mutations are common and usually yield higher fitness than predicted from the component mutations assuming multiplicative effects; such interactions are especially important in the complex organisms. Frequent interactions among mutations have also been seen in bacteria, fungi and fruitflies. Our findings support the view that interactions are a general feature of genetic systems.

  13. Interaction of alkali metal nitrates with calcium carbonate and kyanite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protsyuk, A.P.; Malakhov, A.I.; Karabanov, V.P.; Lebedeva, L.P.

    1978-01-01

    Thermographic, thermodynamic and X-ray phase studies have been made into the interaction of alkali metal nitrates with calcium carbonate and kyanite. Examined among other things was the effect of water vapor and carbon dioxide on the interaction between alkali metal nitrates and kyanite. The chemical mechanism of the occurring processes has been established. The interaction with calcium carbonates results in the formation of alkali metal carbonates and calcium oxide with liberation of nitrogen oxide and oxygen. The products of the interaction with kyanite are shown to be identical with the compounds forming when alkali metal carbonates are used

  14. Refining teacher design capacity: mathematics teachers' interactions with digital curriculum resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepin, B.; Gueudet, G.; Trouche, L.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this conceptual paper is to develop enhanced understandings of mathematics teacher design and design capacity when interacting with digital curriculum resources. We argue that digital resources in particular offer incentives and increasing opportunities for mathematics teachers’ design,

  15. Digital storytelling a creator's guide to interactive entertainment

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Carolyn Handler

    2014-01-01

    Digital Storytelling shows you how to create immersive, interactive narratives across a multitude of platforms, devices, and media. From age-old storytelling techniques to cutting-edge development processes, this book covers creating stories for all forms of New Media, including transmedia storytelling, video games, mobile apps, and second screen experiences. The way a story is told, a message is delivered, or a narrative is navigated has changed dramatically over the last few years. Stories are told through video games, interactive books, and social media. Stories are told on all sorts of different platforms and through all sorts of different devices. They're immersive, letting the user interact with the story and letting the user enter the story and shape it themselves.This book features case studies that cover a great spectrum of platforms and different story genres. It also shows you how to plan processes for developing interactive narratives for all forms of entertainment and non-fiction purposes: educat...

  16. Thermodynamic Interactions Among Carbon, Silicon and Iron in Carbon Saturated Manganese Melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, Min-Kyu; Lee, Won-Kyu; Jin, Jinan; Jang, Jung-Mock; Pak, Jong-Jin

    2012-01-01

    Thermodynamics of carbon in manganese alloy melts is important in manufacturing low carbon ferromanganese and silico-manganese alloys. In order to predict the carbon solubility in liquid Mn-Si-Fe-Csat alloys as a function of melt composition and temperature, thermodynamic interactions among carbon, silicon and iron in carbon saturated liquid manganese should be known. In the present study, the effects of silicon and iron on the carbon solubility in Mn-Si, Mn-Fe and Mn-Si-Fe melts were measured in the temperature range from 1673 to 1773 K. The carbon solubility decreases significantly as silicon and iron contents increase in liquid manganese alloy. The interaction parameters among carbon, silicon and iron in carbon saturated liquid manganese were determined from the carbon solubility data and the Lupis' relation for the interaction coefficient at constant activity.

  17. Digital education reform for improving interaction between students and instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qiansong; Li, Yuanjie; Zheng, Lixin

    2017-08-01

    Nowadays it is difficult to attract undergraduate students' interesting to put sufficient time to learn major courses in China, which are too hard for them to quick grasp and fully understanding. Here we report a digital education reform for improving interactions between students and instructors, in which we transform the abstract, obscure and boring knowledge, such as physical, mathematical, electronic or optical concepts into direct and dynamic 3-D model and flash. Therefore, this method can convert theoretical concepts into easy understanding pictures. Our several years' experience shows that this education mode can make students' willing to think and practice, then it is helpful for attracting their learning interests. Most students benefit from this education mode which can greatly enhance their understanding abilities.

  18. INNOCENT BYSTANDERS: CARBON STARS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Paul [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Among stars showing carbon molecular bands (C stars), the main-sequence dwarfs, likely in post-mass transfer binaries, are numerically dominant in the Galaxy. Via spectroscopic selection from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we retrieve 1220 high galactic latitude C stars, {approx}5 times more than previously known, including a wider variety than past techniques such as color or grism selection have netted, and additionally yielding 167 DQ white dwarfs. Of the C stars with proper motion measurements, we identify 69% clearly as dwarfs (dCs), while {approx}7% are giants. The dCs likely span absolute magnitudes M{sub i} from {approx}6.5 to 10.5. 'G-type' dC stars with weak CN and relatively blue colors are probably the most massive dCs still cool enough to show C{sub 2} bands. We report Balmer emission in 22 dCs, none of which are G-types. We find 8 new DA/dC stars in composite spectrum binaries, quadrupling the total sample of these 'smoking guns' for AGB binary mass transfer. Eleven very red C stars with strong red CN bands appear to be 'N'-type AGB stars at large Galactocentric distances, one likely a new discovery in the dIrr galaxy Leo A. Two such stars within 30' of each other may trace a previously unidentified dwarf galaxy or tidal stream at {approx}40 kpc. We explore the multiwavelength properties of the sample and report the first X-ray detection of a dC star, which shows strong Balmer emission. Our own spectroscopic survey additionally provides the dC surface density from a complete sample of dwarfs limited by magnitude, color, and proper motion.

  19. INNOCENT BYSTANDERS: CARBON STARS FROM THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Among stars showing carbon molecular bands (C stars), the main-sequence dwarfs, likely in post-mass transfer binaries, are numerically dominant in the Galaxy. Via spectroscopic selection from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we retrieve 1220 high galactic latitude C stars, ∼5 times more than previously known, including a wider variety than past techniques such as color or grism selection have netted, and additionally yielding 167 DQ white dwarfs. Of the C stars with proper motion measurements, we identify 69% clearly as dwarfs (dCs), while ∼7% are giants. The dCs likely span absolute magnitudes M i from ∼6.5 to 10.5. 'G-type' dC stars with weak CN and relatively blue colors are probably the most massive dCs still cool enough to show C 2 bands. We report Balmer emission in 22 dCs, none of which are G-types. We find 8 new DA/dC stars in composite spectrum binaries, quadrupling the total sample of these 'smoking guns' for AGB binary mass transfer. Eleven very red C stars with strong red CN bands appear to be 'N'-type AGB stars at large Galactocentric distances, one likely a new discovery in the dIrr galaxy Leo A. Two such stars within 30' of each other may trace a previously unidentified dwarf galaxy or tidal stream at ∼40 kpc. We explore the multiwavelength properties of the sample and report the first X-ray detection of a dC star, which shows strong Balmer emission. Our own spectroscopic survey additionally provides the dC surface density from a complete sample of dwarfs limited by magnitude, color, and proper motion.

  20. Innocent Bystanders: Carbon Stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Among stars showing carbon molecular bands (C stars), the main-sequence dwarfs, likely in post-mass transfer binaries, are numerically dominant in the Galaxy. Via spectroscopic selection from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we retrieve 1220 high galactic latitude C stars, ~5 times more than previously known, including a wider variety than past techniques such as color or grism selection have netted, and additionally yielding 167 DQ white dwarfs. Of the C stars with proper motion measurements, we identify 69% clearly as dwarfs (dCs), while ~7% are giants. The dCs likely span absolute magnitudes Mi from ~6.5 to 10.5. "G-type" dC stars with weak CN and relatively blue colors are probably the most massive dCs still cool enough to show C2 bands. We report Balmer emission in 22 dCs, none of which are G-types. We find 8 new DA/dC stars in composite spectrum binaries, quadrupling the total sample of these "smoking guns" for AGB binary mass transfer. Eleven very red C stars with strong red CN bands appear to be "N"-type AGB stars at large Galactocentric distances, one likely a new discovery in the dIrr galaxy Leo A. Two such stars within 30' of each other may trace a previously unidentified dwarf galaxy or tidal stream at ~40 kpc. We explore the multiwavelength properties of the sample and report the first X-ray detection of a dC star, which shows strong Balmer emission. Our own spectroscopic survey additionally provides the dC surface density from a complete sample of dwarfs limited by magnitude, color, and proper motion.

  1. Formulate, Formalize and Run! How Narrative Theories shape and are shaped by Interactive Digital Narrative

    OpenAIRE

    Szilas, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    What are the links between narrative theories and computing? Narrative works are countless in the digital world: narrative hypertext and hypermedia, interactive fiction, video games, blogs, location-based narrative, etc. They not only form new analytical objects for narrative theories, but also may extend existing narrative theories. One specific type of digital narratives, AI-based Interactive Digital Narrative (IDN), plays a special role in this landscape because it makes use of narrative t...

  2. Acting, playing, or talking about the story: an annotation scheme for communication during interactive digital storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theune, Mariet; Linssen, Johannes Maria; Alofs, Thijs

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the communication of children playing with an interactive digital storytelling system. What users say during their interaction with a digital storytelling system can tell us much about how they relate to the characters and how engrossed they are in the storytelling

  3. Digital Interactive Narrative Tools for Facilitating Communication with Children During Counseling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baceviciute, Sarune; Albæk, Katharina R.R.; Arsovski, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    the reconciliation between free-play and narratives afforded by interactive digital tools in order to promote children‟s engagement. We present a digital interactive narrative application integrated with a “step-by-step” guide to the counselor, which could be adapted to many different situations and contexts where...

  4. Digital interactive narrative tools for facilitating communication with children during counseling: A case for audiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baceviciute, Sarune; Rützou Albæk, Katharina Renée; Arsovski, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    the reconciliation between free-play and narratives afforded by interactive digital tools in order to promote children's engagement. We present a digital interactive narrative application integrated with a ``step-by-step'' guide to the counselor, which could be adapted to many different situations and contexts where...

  5. The Effects of an Intervention in Writing with Digital Interactive Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcic, Svjetlana; Johnstone, Robin S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention in writing with digital interactive books. To improve the writing skills of seventh- and eighth-grade students with a learning disability in reading, we conducted a quasi-experimental study in which the students read interactive digital books (i-books), took notes, wrote summaries, and acted as…

  6. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, CARBON COUNTY, UTAH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  7. Fungal interactions reduce carbon use efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maynard, Daniel S.; Crowther, Thomas W.; Bradford, Mark A.

    2017-01-01

    The efficiency by which fungi decompose organic matter contributes to the amount of carbon that is retained in biomass vs. lost to the atmosphere as respiration. This carbon use efficiency (CUE) is affected by various abiotic conditions, including temperature and nutrient availability.

  8. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide interaction with tantalum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, V.D.; Ustinov, Yu.K.; Komar, A.P.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide on tantalum and the dissolution of these gases in the adsorbent at T >= 300 K have been studied. The flash-filament method (FFM) in a monopole mass-spectrometer and a field emission microscopy was used in the same apparatus. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide dissociate on the tantalum surface, carbon monoxide being desorbed in both cases during the flash. The desorption curves of CO reveal three different binding states: two of them (α and β' 1 ) for the adsorbed particles whereas the high temperature desorption state relates to the adsorbate dissolved in the metal. For the β' 1 state of CO the activation energy, the pre-exponential factor and the kinetic order in the kinetic equation of desorption have been estimated. They turned out to be E = 110 kcal/mol, C = 3 X 10 12 sec -1 , and γ = 1. The activation energy of diffusion for CO in tantalum and the energy of outgassing for the metal were found to be 9.4 and 49 kcal/mole, respectively. (Auth.)

  9. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide interaction with tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, V D; USTINOV, YU K; KOMAR, A P [AN SSSR, LENINGRAD. FIZIKO-TEKHNICHESKIJ INST.

    1978-03-01

    The adsorption of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide on tantalum and the dissolution of these gases in the adsorbent at T >= 300 K have been studied. The flash-filament method (FFM) in a monopole mass-spectrometer and a field emission microscopy was used in the same apparatus. Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide dissociate on the tantalum surface, carbon monoxide being desorbed in both cases during the flash. The desorption curves of CO reveal three different binding states: two of them (..cap alpha.. and ..beta..'/sub 1/) for the adsorbed particles whereas the high temperature desorption state relates to the adsorbate dissolved in the metal. For the ..beta..'/sub 1/ state of CO the activation energy, the pre-exponential factor and the kinetic order in the kinetic equation of desorption have been estimated. They turned out to be E = 110 kcal/mol, C = 3 X 10/sup 12/ sec/sup -1/, and ..gamma.. = 1. The activation energy of diffusion for CO in tantalum and the energy of outgassing for the metal were found to be 9.4 and 49 kcal/mole, respectively.

  10. Interacting with piles of artifacts on digital tables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aliakseyeu, D.; Lucero Vera, A.A.; Subramanian, S.

    2007-01-01

    Designers and architects regularly use piles to organise visual artifacts. Recent efforts have now made it possible for users to create piles in digital systems as well. However, there is still little understanding of how users shouldinteract with digital piles. In this paper we investigate this

  11. Carbon Nanotubes-Based Digitally Programmable Current Follower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Tripathi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The physical constraints of ever-shrinking CMOS transistors are rapidly approaching atomistic and quantum mechanical limits. Therefore, research is now directed towards the development of nanoscale devices that could work efficiently in the sub-10 nm regime. This coupled with the fact that recent design trend for analog signal processing applications is moving towards current-mode circuits which offer lower voltage swings, higher bandwidth, and better signal linearity is the motivation for this work. A digitally controlled DVCC has been realized using CNFETs. This work exploited the CNFET’s parameters like chirality, pitch, and numbers of CNTs to perform the digital control operation. The circuit has minimum number of transistors and can control the output current digitally. A similar CMOS circuit with 32 nm CMOS parameters was also simulated and compared. The result shows that CMOS-based circuit requires 418.6 μW while CNFET-based circuit consumes 352.1 μW only. Further, the proposed circuit is used to realize a CNFET-based instrumentation amplifier with digitally programmable gain. The amplifier has a CMRR of 100 dB and ICMR equal to 0.806 V. The 3 dB bandwidth of the amplifier is 11.78 GHz which is suitable for the applications like navigation, radar instrumentation, and high-frequency signal amplification and conditioning.

  12. Scaffolding the Next Wave of Digital Visitor Interaction in Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudloff, Maja

    2013-01-01

    Over the last ten years the possibilities for engaging in dialogue and participation with museum visitors have been greatly improved by developments in digital technologies. Throughout the world museums are experimenting with inclusive and participatory digital projects that can enhance the museum...... visitor experience. Many of these projects are unique and creative in their use of cutting edge technology, and in their search for finding new ways to reach differentiated groups of users. However, building on insights from user studies at a Danish digital museum installation, this paper also suggests...

  13. Interaction of titanium and vanadium with carbon dioxide under heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasyuk, R.Z.; Kurovskij, V.Ya.; Lyapunov, V.P.; Radomysel'skij, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    The methods of gravitmetric and X-ray phase analysis as well as analysis of composition of gases in the heating chamber have been used to investigate the mechanism of titanium and vanadium interaction with carbon dioxide in the 300-1000 deg C temperature range. The analogy of mechanisms of the interaction of titanium and vanadium with carbon dioxide in oxides production on the metal surface with subsequent carbidizing treatment at temperatures above 800 deg C is shown. Temperature limits of material operation on the base of titanium or vanadium in carbon dioxide must not exceed 400 or 600 deg C, respectively

  14. Strain-modified RKKY interaction in carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorman, P. D.; Duffy, J. M.; Power, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    been shown that the interaction range depends on the conformation of the magnetic dopants in both graphene and nanotubes. Here we examine the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction in carbon nanotubes in the presence of uniaxial strain for a range of different impurity configurations. We show......For low-dimensionalmetallic structures, such as nanotubes, the exchange coupling between localized magnetic dopants is predicted to decay slowly with separation. The long-range character of this interaction plays a significant role in determining the magnetic order of the system. It has previously...... that strain is capable of amplifying or attenuating the RKKY interaction, significantly increasing certain interaction ranges, and acting as a switch: effectively turning on or off the interaction. We argue that uniaxial strain can be employed to significantly manipulate magnetic interactions in carbon...

  15. A literature review of actinide-carbonate mineral interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, D.L.

    1993-10-01

    Chemical retardation of actinides in groundwater systems is a potentially important mechanism for assessing the performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility intended to demonstrate safe disposal of transuranic waste. Rigorous estimation of chemical retardation during transport through the Culebra Dolomite, a water-bearing unit overlying the WIPP, requires a mechanistic understanding of chemical reactions between dissolved elements and mineral surfaces. This report represents a first step toward this goal by examining the literature for pertinent experimental studies of actinide-carbonate interactions. A summary of existing models is given, along with the types of experiments on which these models are based. Articles pertaining to research into actinide interactions with carbonate minerals are summarized. Select articles involving trace element-carbonate mineral interactions are also reviewed and may serve as templates for future research. A bibliography of related articles is included. Americium(III), and its nonradioactive analog neodymium(III), partition strongly from aqueous solutions into carbonate minerals. Recent thermodynamic, kinetic, and surface studies show that Nd is preferentially removed from solution, forming a Nd-Ca carbonate solid solution. Neptunium(V) is rapidly removed from solution by carbonates. Plutonium incorporation into carbonates is complicated by multiple oxidation states. Little research has been done on the radium(H) and thorium(IV) carbonate systems. Removal of uranyl ion from solution by calcite is limited to monolayer surface coverage

  16. Interactions of xanthines with activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarrete Casas, R.; Garcia Rodriguez, A.; Rey Bueno, F.; Espinola Lara, A.; Valenzuela Calahorro, C.; Navarrete Guijosa, A.

    2006-01-01

    In the present work, we have studied the adsorption of xanthine derivatives by activated carbon sorbents in aqueous solutions. The study comprised both kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic aspects. The kinetic results were reported in a previous paper; the equilibrium-related results are discussed here. The two types of carbon used exhibit some differences but the equilibrium isotherms obtained are all of the H-3 type in the classification of Giles. This suggests a high affinity of the sorbents for the sorbates. We also found that the overall adsorption process comprises more than one individual adsorption-desorption process of which one leads to the formation of a 'monolayer' and the other to the 'precipitation' of the sorbate on the sorbent surface (multilayer adsorption); the amount of sorbate adsorbed in monolayer form was seemingly greater in C-A14

  17. Collective interaction by design collective controllers for social navigation on digital photos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Marianne Graves; Krogh, Peter; Mortensen, Morten Boye

    2010-01-01

    trial use serves to refine the collective interaction model and identify qualities and shortcommings of collective interaction applications. In this way we wish to point to a design space, which can lead to new interaction techniques and -designs supporting shared social experiences around digital...

  18. Tablet PC interaction with digital micromirror device (DMD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refai, Hakki H.; Dahshan, Mostafa H.; Sluss, James J., Jr.

    2007-02-01

    Digital light processing (DLP) is an innovative display technology that uses an optical switch array, known as a digital micromirror device (DMD), which allows digital control of light. To date, DMDs have been used primarily as high-speed spatial light modulators for projector applications. A tablet PC is a notebook or slate-shaped mobile PC. Its touch screen or digitizing tablet technology allows the user to operate the notebook with a stylus or digital pen instead of using a keyboard or mouse. In this paper, we describe an interface solution that translates any sketch on the tablet PC screen to an identical mirror-copy over the cross-section of the DMD micromirrors such that the image of the sketch can be projected onto a special screen. An algorithm has been created to control each single micromirror of the hundreds of thousands of micromirrors that cover the DMD surface. We demonstrate the successful application of a DMD to a high-speed two-dimensional (2D) scanning environment, acquiring the data from the tablet screen and launching its contents to the projection screen; with very high accuracy up to 13.68 μm x 13.68 μm of mirror pitch.

  19. Interactive Construction Digital Tools With Real Time Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Jens; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2007-01-01

    . The aim of this research is to look into integrated digital design and analysis tools in order to find out if it is suited for use by architects and designers or only by specialists and technicians - and if not, then to look at what can be done to make them more available to architects and designers...... an architect-engineer or hybrid practitioner works simultaneously with both aesthetic and technical design requirements. In this paper the problem of a vague or not existing link between digital design tools, used by architects and designers, and the analysis tools developed by and for engineers is considered......The recent developments in computational design tools have evolved into a sometimes purely digital process which opens up for new perspectives and problems in the sketching process. One of the interesting possibilities lay within the hybrid practitioner- or architect-engineer approach, where...

  20. Interactions between Digital Geometry and Combinatorics on Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srečko Brlek

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We review some recent results in digital geometry obtained by using a combinatorics on words approach to discrete geometry. Motivated on the one hand by the well-known theory of Sturmian words which model conveniently discrete lines in the plane, and on the other hand by the development of digital geometry, this study reveals strong links between the two fields. Discrete figures are identified with polyominoes encoded by words. The combinatorial tools lead to elegant descriptions of geometrical features and efficient algorithms. Among these, radix-trees are useful for efficiently detecting path intersection, Lyndon and Christoffel words appear as the main tools for describing digital convexity; equations on words allow to better understand tilings by translations.

  1. Preliminary investigation of the interaction between radiologists and digital radiologic work stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, L.L.; McNeill, K.M.; Maloney, K.; Mockbee, B.

    1987-01-01

    Using a work station built in the authors' department, they conducted an investigation into the interaction between radiologist and a digital radiologic work station. A survey provided information regarding the experience of 18 radiologists with digital technology and their expectations of its benefits. They ranked the potential attributes of digital work stations, with spatial resolution first, followed by contrast resolution, ease of use, speed, ease of learning, and cost. Observation of the radiologists' interaction with the work station has provided recommendations for implementation of functions. The authors conclude that radiologic work station user interfaces must be intuitive and support the radiologist's task without increasing the time or effort required for the task

  2. Physical Interactions with Digital Strings - A hybrid approach to a digital keyboard instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle

    2017-01-01

    of stopping and muting the strings at arbitrary positions. The parameters of the string model are controlled through TouchKeys multitouch sensors on each key, combined with MIDI data and acoustic signals from the digital keyboard frame, using a novel mapping. The instrument is evaluated from a performing...... of control. The contributions are two-fold. First, the use of acoustic sounds from a physical keyboard for excitations and resonances results in a novel hybrid keyboard instrument in itself. Second, the digital model of "inside piano" playing, using multitouch keyboard data, allows for performance techniques...

  3. Interaction of terbium group metal oxides with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vodop'yanov, A.G.; Baranov, S.V.; Kozhevnikov, G.N.

    1990-01-01

    Mechanism of carbothermal reduction of terbium group metals from oxides is investigated using thermodynamic and kinetic analyses. Interaction of metal oxides with carbon covers dissociation of metal oxides and reduction by carbon monoxide, which contribution into general reduction depends on CO pressure. Temperatures of reaction beginning for batch initial components at P=1.3x10 -4 and P CO =0.1 MPa and of formation of oxycarbide melts are determined

  4. Interaction of carbon dioxide with Cu overlayers on Pt(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, N.; Andersson, Klas Jerker; Grabow, L.C.

    2008-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the interaction of carbon dioxide with pseudomorphic and rough copper layers deposited on a platinum (111) single crystal are reported. Evidence for carbon dioxide dissociation and carbonate formation is presented and the relevance to methanol synthesis......) reveals a broad high temperature desorption state for CO2 with peak maximum around 450 K. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) shows that approximately one third of the oxygen accumulated on the surface upon CO2 exposure remains after TPD, indicative of carbonate formation via CO2 dissociation supplying...... O-ads and then facile CO2 + O-ads association, as well as subsequent decomposition at higher temperatures. Density functional theory studies of stepped Cu and Cu/Pt slabs reproduce vibrational frequencies of the carbonate, suggesting a nearly flat tridentate configuration at steps/defect sites....

  5. Iron-carbonate interaction at Earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, S. M.; Badro, J.; Nabiei, F.; Prakapenka, V.; Gillet, P.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon storage and flux in the deep Earth are moderated by oxygen fugacity and interactions with iron-bearing phases. The amount of carbon stored in Earth's mantle versus the core depends on carbon-iron chemistry at the core-mantle boundary. Oxidized carbonates subducted from Earth's surface to the lowermost mantle may encounter reduced Fe0 metal from disproportionation of Fe2+ in lower mantle silicates or mixing with the core. To understand the fate of carbonates in the lowermost mantle, we have performed experiments on sandwiches of single-crystal (Ca0.6Mg0.4)CO3 dolomite and Fe foil in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell at lower mantle conditions of 49-110 GPa and 1800-2500 K. Syntheses were conducted with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction to identify phase assemblages. After quench to ambient conditions, samples were sectioned with a focused Ga+ ion beam for composition analysis with transmission electron microscopy. At the centers of the heated spots, iron melted and reacted completely with the carbonate to form magnesiowüstite, iron carbide, diamond, magnesium-rich carbonate and calcium carbonate. In samples heated at 49 and 64 GPa, the two carbonates exhibit a eutectoid texture. In the sample heated at 110 GPa, the carbonates form rounded ~150-nm-diameter grains with a higher modal proportion of interspersed diamonds. The presence of reduced iron in the deep lower mantle and core-mantle boundary region will promote the formation of diamonds in carbonate-bearing subducted slabs. The complete reaction of metallic iron to oxides and carbides in the presence of mantle carbonate supports the formation of these phases at the Earth's core-mantle boundary and in ultra-low velocity zones.

  6. The (digital) natives are restless: designing and implementing an interactive digital media assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voge, Catherine; Hirvela, Kari; Jarzemsky, Paula

    2012-01-01

    To create an opportunity for students to connect with the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses competencies and demonstrate learning via knowledge transference, the authors piloted a digital media assignment. Students worked in small groups to create an unfolding patient care scenario with embedded decision points, using presentation software. The authors discuss the assignment and its outcomes.

  7. Construct validation of an interactive digital algorithm for ostomy care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitz, Janice M; Gerlach, Mary A; Schafer, Vickie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate construct validity for a previously face and content validated Ostomy Algorithm using digital real-life clinical scenarios. A cross-sectional, mixed-methods Web-based survey design study was conducted. Two hundred ninety-seven English-speaking RNs completed the study; participants practiced in both acute care and postacute settings, with 1 expert ostomy nurse (WOC nurse) and 2 nonexpert nurses. Following written consent, respondents answered demographic questions and completed a brief algorithm tutorial. Participants were then presented with 7 ostomy-related digital scenarios consisting of real-life photos and pertinent clinical information. Respondents used the 11 assessment components of the digital algorithm to choose management options. Participant written comments about the scenarios and the research process were collected. The mean overall percentage of correct responses was 84.23%. Mean percentage of correct responses for respondents with a self-reported basic ostomy knowledge was 87.7%; for those with a self-reported intermediate ostomy knowledge was 85.88% and those who were self-reported experts in ostomy care achieved 82.77% correct response rate. Five respondents reported having no prior ostomy care knowledge at screening and achieved an overall 45.71% correct response rate. No negative comments regarding the algorithm were recorded by participants. The new standardized Ostomy Algorithm remains the only face, content, and construct validated digital clinical decision instrument currently available. Further research on application at the bedside while tracking patient outcomes is warranted.

  8. Terrestrial nitrogen-carbon cycle interactions at the global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaehle, S

    2013-07-05

    Interactions between the terrestrial nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) cycles shape the response of ecosystems to global change. However, the global distribution of nitrogen availability and its importance in global biogeochemistry and biogeochemical interactions with the climate system remain uncertain. Based on projections of a terrestrial biosphere model scaling ecological understanding of nitrogen-carbon cycle interactions to global scales, anthropogenic nitrogen additions since 1860 are estimated to have enriched the terrestrial biosphere by 1.3 Pg N, supporting the sequestration of 11.2 Pg C. Over the same time period, CO2 fertilization has increased terrestrial carbon storage by 134.0 Pg C, increasing the terrestrial nitrogen stock by 1.2 Pg N. In 2001-2010, terrestrial ecosystems sequestered an estimated total of 27 Tg N yr(-1) (1.9 Pg C yr(-1)), of which 10 Tg N yr(-1) (0.2 Pg C yr(-1)) are due to anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Nitrogen availability already limits terrestrial carbon sequestration in the boreal and temperate zone, and will constrain future carbon sequestration in response to CO2 fertilization (regionally by up to 70% compared with an estimate without considering nitrogen-carbon interactions). This reduced terrestrial carbon uptake will probably dominate the role of the terrestrial nitrogen cycle in the climate system, as it accelerates the accumulation of anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere. However, increases of N2O emissions owing to anthropogenic nitrogen and climate change (at a rate of approx. 0.5 Tg N yr(-1) per 1°C degree climate warming) will add an important long-term climate forcing.

  9. Digitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnemann, Niels Ole

    2014-01-01

    what a concept of digital media might add to the understanding of processes of mediatization and what the concept of mediatization might add to the understanding of digital media. It is argued that digital media open an array of new trajectories in human communication, trajectories which were...

  10. Genre, technology and embodied interaction: The evolution of digital game genres and motion gaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Gregersen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology has been given relatively little attention in genre theory, but this article argues that material technologies can be important components in genre development. The argument is based on a historically informed analysis of digital games, with special attention paid to home console video games and recent genre developments within this domain commonly referred to as motion gaming. The main point is that digital game genres imply structured embodied activity. A constitutive element of digital game mediation is a control interface geared to player embodiment, and I propose the concept of ‘interaction modes’ to describe the coupling of technology and player embodiment and show how this can be integrated with genre theory. The resulting framework allows for increased attention to continuity and change in game and communication genres, material and digital technologies, and the related interaction modes.

  11. Interaction of titanium and vanadium with carbon dioxide in heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasyuk, R.Z.; Kurovskii, V.Y.; Lyapunov, A.P.; Radomysel'skii, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    To obtain prediction data on the change in properties of titaniumand vanadium-base powder metallurgy materials operating in a carbon dioxide atmosphere, and also to clarify the mechanism of their interaction with the gas in this work, gravimetric investigations of specimens heated at temperatures of 300-1000 C and an x-ray diffraction analysis of their surface were made and the composition of the gas in the heating chamber was studied. The results of the investigations indicate a similarity between the mechanisms of interaction of titanium and vanadium with carbon dioxide including the formation of oxides on the surface of the metal with subsequent carbidization at temperatures above 800 C. On the basis of the data obtained, it may be concluded that the operating temperature limits of titanium- or vanadium-base materials in carbon dioxide must not exceed 400 and 600 C, respectively

  12. Policy interactions, risk and price formation in carbon markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyth, William; Bunn, Derek; Kettunen, Janne; Wilson, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Carbon pricing is an important mechanism for providing companies with incentives to invest in carbon abatement. Price formation in carbon markets involves a complex interplay between policy targets, dynamic technology costs, and market rules. Carbon pricing may under-deliver investment due to R and D externalities, requiring additional policies which themselves affect market prices. Also, abatement costs depend on the extent of technology deployment due to learning-by-doing. This paper introduces an analytical framework based on marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves with the aim of providing an intuitive understanding of the key dynamics and risk factors in carbon markets. The framework extends the usual static MAC representation of the market to incorporate policy interactions and some technology cost dynamics. The analysis indicates that supporting large-scale deployment of mature abatement technologies suppresses the marginal cost of abatement, sometimes to zero, whilst increasing total abatement costs. However, support for early stage R and D may reduce both total abatement cost and carbon price risk. An important aspect of the analysis is in elevating risk management considerations into energy policy formation, as the results of the stochastic modelling indicate wide distributions for the emergence of carbon prices and public costs around the policy expectations. (author)

  13. Chirality dependent interaction of ammonia with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2018-04-01

    For the specific structure and extraordinary properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have many applications in diversified fields. The interaction of CNTs with ammonia is a very interesting matter to study as it is related to the application of CNTs as ammonia sensor. Here the interaction of single walled zigzag, armchair and chiral carbon nanotubes is studied in respect of the change in energies before and after binding with ammonia by molecular dynamics simulation. Their deformation after simulation is modeled. The change of thermal conductivity of the CNTs is also found by simulation. The potential energy before and after absorption of ammonia gives useful information of the system. Thermal conductivities of the ammonia bound CNTs are changed considerably. It is observed that the potential energy and thermal conductivity both are changing for the interaction with ammonia and hence they are sensitive to ammonia binding.

  14. Fractal and digital image processing to determine the degree of dispersion of carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xiao-ning; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The degree of dispersion is an important parameter to quantitatively study properties of carbon nanotube composites. Among the many methods for studying dispersion, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy are the most commonly used, intuitive, and convincing methods. However, they have the disadvantage of not being quantitative. To overcome this disadvantage, the fractal theory and digital image processing method can be used to provide a quantitative analysis of the morphology and properties of carbon nanotube composites. In this paper, the dispersion degree of carbon nanotubes was investigated using two fractal methods, namely, the box-counting method and the differential box-counting method. On the basis of the results, we propose a new method for the quantitative characterization of the degree of dispersion of carbon nanotubes. This hierarchical grid method can be used as a supplementary method, and can be combined with the fractal calculation method. Thus, the accuracy and effectiveness of the quantitative characterization of the dispersion degree of carbon nanotubes can be improved. (The outer diameter of the carbon nanotubes is about 50 nm; the length of the carbon nanotubes is 10–20 μm.)

  15. Fractal and digital image processing to determine the degree of dispersion of carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiao-ning, E-mail: xnliang0506@163.com; Li, Wei, E-mail: 1099006@mail.dhu.edu.cn, E-mail: liwei@dhu.edu.cn, E-mail: waiwentougao@outlook.com [Donghua University, College of Textiles (China)

    2016-05-15

    The degree of dispersion is an important parameter to quantitatively study properties of carbon nanotube composites. Among the many methods for studying dispersion, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy are the most commonly used, intuitive, and convincing methods. However, they have the disadvantage of not being quantitative. To overcome this disadvantage, the fractal theory and digital image processing method can be used to provide a quantitative analysis of the morphology and properties of carbon nanotube composites. In this paper, the dispersion degree of carbon nanotubes was investigated using two fractal methods, namely, the box-counting method and the differential box-counting method. On the basis of the results, we propose a new method for the quantitative characterization of the degree of dispersion of carbon nanotubes. This hierarchical grid method can be used as a supplementary method, and can be combined with the fractal calculation method. Thus, the accuracy and effectiveness of the quantitative characterization of the dispersion degree of carbon nanotubes can be improved. (The outer diameter of the carbon nanotubes is about 50 nm; the length of the carbon nanotubes is 10–20 μm.)

  16. Interaction of indium trichloride with calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kochetkova, N.V.; Toptygina, G.M.; Soklakova, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    Interaction of indium trichloride with calcium carbonate in aqueous solutions was studied, using methods of potentiometry, isothermal solubility and physicochemical computer simulating. The Gibb's energy value for crystal indium trihydroxide formation was calculated on the basis of experimental data on In(OH) 3 solubility. The value obtained was used for estimating equilibrium composition of InCl 3 -HCl-CaCO 3 -CO 2 -H 2 O system at a temperature of 25 deg C and carbon dioxide partial pressure of 0.05 to 1 at

  17. Teachers’ Pedagogic Design of Digital Interactive Whiteboard Materials in the UK Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Jewitt

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Teachers have always made texts for use in the classroom. The wide spread introduction of Interactive whiteboard (IWB technology into UK classrooms, and the screen more generally, makes the multimodal resources of color, image, dynamic movement, and sound newly available for pedagogic design in newly connectable ways. These facilities present teachers with new questions about how to design and use teaching materials, new possibilites and constraints. This presentation will examine teachers' design of digital multimodal resources for IWBs and the influence of prevalent policy discourses of interactivity, multimodality and fast pace influence on teacher’s digital materials for the IWB.

  18. Beyond image quality : designing engaging interactions with digital products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, de H.; Rozendaal, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing (or Ambient Intelligence) promises a world in which information is available anytime anywhere and with which humans can interact in a natural, multimodal way. In such world, perceptual image quality remains an important criterion since most information will be displayed

  19. Beyond image quality : Designing engaging interactions with digital products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Ridder, H.; Rozendaal, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Ubiquitous computing (or Ambient Intelligence) promises a world in which information is available anytime anywhere and with which humans can interact in a natural, multimodal way. In such world, perceptual image quality remains an important criterion since most information will be displayed

  20. The Digital Economy: Social Interaction Technologies – an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teófilo Redondo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Social interaction technologies (SIT is a very broad field that encompasses a large list of topics: interactive and networked computing, mobile social services and the Social Web, social software and social media, marketing and advertising, various aspects and uses of blogs and podcasting, corporate value and web-based collaboration, e-government and online democracy, virtual volunteering, different aspects and uses of folksonomies, tagging and the social semantic cloud of tags, blog-based knowledge management systems, systems of online learning, with their ePortfolios, blogs and wikis in education and journalism, legal issues and social interaction technology, dataveillance and online fraud, neogeography, social software usability, social software in libraries and nonprofit organizations, and broadband visual communication technology for enhancing social interaction. The fact is that the daily activities of many businesses are being socialized, as is the case with Yammer (https://www.yammer.com/, the social enterprise social network. The leitmotivs of social software are: create, connect, contribute, and collaborate.

  1. Digital Gaming Perspectives of Older Adults: Content vs. Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    There were two objectives to this study: (a) to establish flow and (2) to establish whether computer game interaction or content was important to the older adult, using the Nintendo Wii and the Sony PlayStation 2 consoles. An earlier study had identified the sports genre as a preference, and three games (golf, tennis, and boxing) were selected…

  2. Interactive Editing and Cataloging Interfaces for Modern Digital Library Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Raae, L C; Helstrup, H

    2009-01-01

    The next-generation High Energy Physics information system, INSPIRE, is being built by combining the content from the successful SPIRES database of bibliographic information with the CDS Invenio software being developed at CERN, an open-source platform for large digital library systems. The project is a collaboration between four major particle physics laboratories in Europe and the U.S. New tools are being developed to enable the global cooperation between catalogers at these labs. The BibEdit module will provide a central interface for the editing, enrichment, correction and verification of a record on its way into the system, by processing and presenting data from several supporting modules to the cataloger. The objective is to minimize the time and actions needed by the cataloger to process the record. To create a fast and powerful web application we make use of modern AJAX technology to create a dynamic and responsive user interface, where server communication happens in the background without delaying t...

  3. Exploring the Use of Interactive Digital Storytelling Video: Promoting Student Engagement and Learning in a University Hybrid Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Catharyn C.; Warren, Annie E.; Archambault, Leanna M.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores interactive digital storytelling in a university hybrid course. Digital stories leverage imagery and narrative-based content to explore concepts, while appealing to millennials. When digital storytelling is used as the main source of course content, tensions arise regarding how to engage and support student learning while…

  4. A digital implementation of neuron-astrocyte interaction for neuromorphic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, Soheila; Faez, Karim; Amiri, Mahmood; Karami, Ehsan

    2015-06-01

    Recent neurophysiologic findings have shown that astrocytes play important roles in information processing and modulation of neuronal activity. Motivated by these findings, in the present research, a digital neuromorphic circuit to study neuron-astrocyte interaction is proposed. In this digital circuit, the firing dynamics of the neuron is described by Izhikevich model and the calcium dynamics of a single astrocyte is explained by a functional model introduced by Postnov and colleagues. For digital implementation of the neuron-astrocyte signaling, Single Constant Multiply (SCM) technique and several linear approximations are used for efficient low-cost hardware implementation on digital platforms. Using the proposed neuron-astrocyte circuit and based on the results of MATLAB simulations, hardware synthesis and FPGA implementation, it is demonstrated that the proposed digital astrocyte is able to change the firing patterns of the neuron through bidirectional communication. Utilizing the proposed digital circuit, it will be illustrated that information processing in synaptic clefts is strongly regulated by astrocyte. Moreover, our results suggest that the digital circuit of neuron-astrocyte crosstalk produces diverse neural responses and therefore enhances the information processing capabilities of the neuromorphic circuits. This is suitable for applications in reconfigurable neuromorphic devices which implement biologically brain circuits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Dephasing and hyperfine interaction in carbon nanotubes double quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reynoso, Andres Alejandro; Flensberg, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We study theoretically the return probability experiment, which is used to measure the dephasing time T-2*, in a double quantum dot (DQD) in semiconducting carbon nanotubes with spin-orbit coupling and disorder-induced valley mixing. Dephasing is due to hyperfine interaction with the spins of the C...... with these for DQDs in clean nanotubes, whereas the disorder effect is always relevant when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the nanotube axis....

  6. SISGR - Hydrogen Caged in Carbon-Exploration of Novel Carbon-Hydrogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Badding, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Crespi, Vinent [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen trapped in a carbon cage, captured through repulsive interactions, is a novel concept in hydrogen storage. Trapping hydrogen via repulsive interactions borrows an idea from macroscale hydrogen storage (i.e. compressed gas storage tanks) and reapplies these concepts on the nanoscale in specially designed molecular containers. Under extreme conditions of pressure, hydrogen solubility in carbon materials is expected to increase and carbon is expected to restructure to minimize volume via a mixed sp2/sp3 hydrogenated state. Thermodynamics dictate that pre-formed C-H structures will rearrange with increased pressure, yet the final carbon-hydrogen interactions may be dependent upon the mechanism by which hydrogen is introduced. Gas “trapping” is meant to denote gas present in a solid in a high density, adsorbed-like state, when the external pressure is much less than that necessary to provide a comparable fluid density. Trapping thus denotes a kinetically metastable state rather than thermodynamic equilibrium. This project probed mechanochemical means to polymerize select hydrocarbons in the presence of gases, in an attempt to form localized carbon cages that trap gases via repulsive interactions. Aromatic, polyaromatic, and hydroaromatic molecules expected to undergo cyclo-addition reactions were polymerized at high (~GPa) pressures to form extended hydrogenated amorphous carbon networks. Notably, aromatics with a pre-existing internal free volume (such as Triptycene) appeared to retain an internal porosity upon application of pressure. However, a high photoluminescence background after polymerization precluded in situ identification of trapped gases. No spectroscopic evidence was found after depressurization that would be indicative of pockets of trapped gases in a localized high-pressure environment. Control studies suggested this measurement may be insensitive to gases at low pressure. Similarly, no spectral fingerprint was found for gas-imbued spherical

  7. Saturated versus unsaturated hydrocarbon interactions with carbon nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deivasigamani eUmadevi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The interactions of various acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons in both saturated and unsaturated forms with the carbon nanostructures (CNSs have been explored by using density functional theory (DFT calculations. Model systems representing armchair and zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs and graphene have been considered to investigate the effect of chirality and curvature of the CNSs towards these interactions. Results of this study reveal contrasting binding nature of the acyclic and cyclic hydrocarbons towards CNSs. While the saturated molecules show stronger binding affinity in acyclic hydrocarbons; the unsaturated molecules exhibit higher binding affinity in cyclic hydrocarbons. In addition, acyclic hydrocarbons exhibit stronger binding affinity towards the CNSs when compared to their corresponding cyclic counterparts. The computed results excellently corroborate the experimental observations. The interaction of hydrocarbons with graphene is more favourable when compared with CNTs. Bader’s theory of atoms in molecules has been invoked to characterize the noncovalent interactions of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons. Our results are expected to provide useful insights towards the development of rational strategies for designing complexes with desired noncovalent interaction involving CNSs.

  8. Parallel algorithms for interactive manipulation of digital terrain models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, E. W.; Mcallister, D. F.; Nagaraj, V.

    1988-01-01

    Interactive three-dimensional graphics applications, such as terrain data representation and manipulation, require extensive arithmetic processing. Massively parallel machines are attractive for this application since they offer high computational rates, and grid connected architectures provide a natural mapping for grid based terrain models. Presented here are algorithms for data movement on the massive parallel processor (MPP) in support of pan and zoom functions over large data grids. It is an extension of earlier work that demonstrated real-time performance of graphics functions on grids that were equal in size to the physical dimensions of the MPP. When the dimensions of a data grid exceed the processing array size, data is packed in the array memory. Windows of the total data grid are interactively selected for processing. Movement of packed data is needed to distribute items across the array for efficient parallel processing. Execution time for data movement was found to exceed that for arithmetic aspects of graphics functions. Performance figures are given for routines written in MPP Pascal.

  9. Making Learning Active with Interactive Whiteboards, Podcasts, and Digital Storytelling in ELL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jung Won; Suh, Suhyun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effective ways to integrate an interactive whiteboard, podcast, and digital storytelling for language proficiency development in English language learners. Researchers integrated these three technologies into a 60-hour intensive summer English program and investigated their impacts on student vocabulary…

  10. SIDAS - a block-diagram programming system for the interactive digital simulation of dynamic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, H.; Burkhardt, H.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes a block-oriented digital simulation system. Some applications clarify the basic structure and operation. The main features of the system are: Easy handling and manipulation through interactive graphical input/output, operational flexibility through successive simulation runs and online modification of parameters, direct access to all facilities of a medium-sized computing system. (orig.) [de

  11. Contradictory Explorative Assessment. Multimodal Teacher/Student Interaction in Scandinavian Digital Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjällander, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    Assessment in the much-discussed digital divide in Scandinavian technologically advanced schools, is the study object of this article. Interaction is studied to understand assessment; and to see how assessment can be didactically designed to recognise students' learning. With a multimodal, design theoretical perspective on learning teachers' and…

  12. Social Phenomenon of Community on Online Learning: Digital Interaction and Collaborative Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksic-Maslac, Karmela; Magzan, Masha; Juric, Visnja

    2009-01-01

    Digital interaction in e-learning offers great opportunities for education quality improvement in both--the classical teaching combined with e-learning, and distance learning. Zagreb School of Economics & Management (ZSEM) is one of the few higher education institutions in Croatia that systematically uses e-learning in teaching. Systematically…

  13. Can an Interactive Digital Game Help French Learners Improve Their Pronunciation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Walcir; Rueb, Avery; Grimshaw, Jennica

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the effects of the pedagogical use of an interactive mobile digital game, Prêt à Négocier (PàN), on improving learners' pronunciation of French as a Second Language (FSL), using three holistic measures: comprehensibility, fluency, and overall pronunciation. Two groups of FSL learners engaged in different types of game-playing…

  14. Effects of Message Interactivity upon Relational Maintenance Strategy in Digital Communications between Organizations and the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication between organizations and the public is strategically important in shaping mutual understanding and long term relationship. The primary focus of this project was to investigate the relationship between message interactivity and relational maintenance strategy in the email communication process on organization websites. At…

  15. Turbulence-cascade interaction noise using an advanced digital filter method

    OpenAIRE

    Gea Aguilera, Fernando; Gill, James; Zhang, Xin; Nodé-Langlois, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Fan wakes interacting with outlet guide vanes is a major source of noise in modern turbofan engines. In order to study this source of noise, the current work presents two-dimensional simulations of turbulence-cascade interaction noise using a computational aeroacoustic methodology. An advanced digital filter method is used for the generation of isotropic synthetic turbulence in a linearised Euler equation solver. A parameter study is presented to assess the influence of airfoil thickness, mea...

  16. DIGITAL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  17. Carbon-nitrogen-water interactions: is model parsimony fruitful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puertes, Cristina; González-Sanchis, María; Lidón, Antonio; Bautista, Inmaculada; Lull, Cristina; Francés, Félix

    2017-04-01

    It is well known that carbon and nitrogen cycles are highly intertwined and both should be explained through the water balance. In fact, in water-controlled ecosystems nutrient deficit is related to this water scarcity. For this reason, the present study compares the capability of three models in reproducing the interaction between the carbon and nitrogen cycles and the water cycle. The models are BIOME-BGCMuSo, LEACHM and a simple carbon-nitrogen model coupled to the hydrological model TETIS. Biome-BGCMuSo and LEACHM are two widely used models that reproduce the carbon and nitrogen cycles adequately. However, their main limitation is that these models are quite complex and can be too detailed for watershed studies. On the contrary, the TETIS nutrient sub-model is a conceptual model with a vertical tank distribution over the active soil depth, dividing it in two layers. Only the input of the added litter and the losses due to soil respiration, denitrification, leaching and plant uptake are considered as external fluxes. Other fluxes have been neglected. The three models have been implemented in an experimental plot of a semi-arid catchment (La Hunde, East of Spain), mostly covered by holm oak (Quercus ilex). Plant transpiration, soil moisture and runoff have been monitored daily during nearly two years (26/10/2012 to 30/09/2014). For the same period, soil samples were collected every two months and taken to the lab in order to obtain the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, microbial biomass carbon, ammonium and nitrate. In addition, between field trips soil samples were placed in PVC tubes with resin traps and were left incubating (in situ buried cores). Thus, mineralization and nitrification accumulated fluxes for two months, were obtained. The ammonium and nitrate leaching accumulated for two months were measured using ion-exchange resin cores. Soil respiration was also measured every field trip. Finally, water samples deriving from runoff, were collected

  18. Modification of the Interfacial Interaction between Carbon Fiber and Epoxy with Carbon Hybrid Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejing Yu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties of the hybrid materials and epoxy and carbon fiber (CF composites were improved significantly as compared to the CF composites made from unmodified epoxy. The reasons could be attributed to the strong interfacial interaction between the CF and the epoxy composites for the existence of carbon nanomaterials. The microstructure and dispersion of carbon nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and optical microscopy (OM. The results showed that the dispersion of the hybrid materials in the polymer was superior to other carbon nanomaterials. The high viscosity and shear stress characterized by a rheometer and the high interfacial friction and damping behavior characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA indicated that the strong interfacial interaction was greatly improved between fibers and epoxy composites. Remarkably, the tensile tests presented that the CF composites with hybrid materials and epoxy composites have a better reinforcing and toughening effect on CF, which further verified the strong interfacial interaction between epoxy and CF for special structural hybrid materials.

  19. Interaction energy for a fullerene encapsulated in a carbon nanotorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapat, Pakhapoom; Baowan, Duangkamon; Hill, James M.

    2018-06-01

    The interaction energy of a fullerene symmetrically situated inside a carbon nanotorus is studied. For these non-bonded molecules, the main interaction originates from the van der Waals energy which is modelled by the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential. Upon utilising the continuum approximation which assumes that there are infinitely many atoms that are uniformly distributed over the surfaces of the molecules, the total interaction energy between the two structures is obtained as a surface integral over the spherical and the toroidal surfaces. This analytical energy is employed to determine the most stable configuration of the torus encapsulating the fullerene. The results show that a torus with major radius around 20-22 Å and minor radius greater than 6.31 Å gives rise to the most stable arrangement. This study will pave the way for future developments in biomolecules design and drug delivery system.

  20. A framework for interactive visualization of digital medical images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehring, Andrew; Foo, Jung Leng; Miyano, Go; Lobe, Thom; Winer, Eliot

    2008-10-01

    The visualization of medical images obtained from scanning techniques such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging is a well-researched field. However, advanced tools and methods to manipulate these data for surgical planning and other tasks have not seen widespread use among medical professionals. Radiologists have begun using more advanced visualization packages on desktop computer systems, but most physicians continue to work with basic two-dimensional grayscale images or not work directly with the data at all. In addition, new display technologies that are in use in other fields have yet to be fully applied in medicine. It is our estimation that usability is the key aspect in keeping this new technology from being more widely used by the medical community at large. Therefore, we have a software and hardware framework that not only make use of advanced visualization techniques, but also feature powerful, yet simple-to-use, interfaces. A virtual reality system was created to display volume-rendered medical models in three dimensions. It was designed to run in many configurations, from a large cluster of machines powering a multiwalled display down to a single desktop computer. An augmented reality system was also created for, literally, hands-on interaction when viewing models of medical data. Last, a desktop application was designed to provide a simple visualization tool, which can be run on nearly any computer at a user's disposal. This research is directed toward improving the capabilities of medical professionals in the tasks of preoperative planning, surgical training, diagnostic assistance, and patient education.

  1. 3D interactive augmented reality-enhanced digital learning systems for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kai-Ten; Tseng, Po-Hsuan; Chiu, Pei-Shuan; Yang, Jia-Lin; Chiu, Chun-Jie

    2013-03-01

    With enhanced processing capability of mobile platforms, augmented reality (AR) has been considered a promising technology for achieving enhanced user experiences (UX). Augmented reality is to impose virtual information, e.g., videos and images, onto a live-view digital display. UX on real-world environment via the display can be e ectively enhanced with the adoption of interactive AR technology. Enhancement on UX can be bene cial for digital learning systems. There are existing research works based on AR targeting for the design of e-learning systems. However, none of these work focuses on providing three-dimensional (3-D) object modeling for en- hanced UX based on interactive AR techniques. In this paper, the 3-D interactive augmented reality-enhanced learning (IARL) systems will be proposed to provide enhanced UX for digital learning. The proposed IARL systems consist of two major components, including the markerless pattern recognition (MPR) for 3-D models and velocity-based object tracking (VOT) algorithms. Realistic implementation of proposed IARL system is conducted on Android-based mobile platforms. UX on digital learning can be greatly improved with the adoption of proposed IARL systems.

  2. Ten years of Toarcian argillite - carbon steel in situ interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauzeres, Alexandre [IRSN, PRP-DGE/SRTG/LETIS, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); Maillet, Anais [IRSN, PRP-DGE/SRTG/LETIS, BP 17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR CNRS 7285, IC2MP, Batiment B35 - 5, avenue Albert Turpain, 86022 Poitiers cedex (France); Gaudin, Anne [UMR CNRS 6112, LPGN, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, BP 92208, 44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); El Albani, Abderrazak; Vieillard, Philippe [UMR CNRS 7285, IC2MP, Batiment B35 - 5, avenue Albert Turpain, 86022 Poitiers cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    In situ interaction experiments over periods of 2, 6, and 10 years between Toarcian argillite and carbon steel discs were carried out in the Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory (URL), yielding a dataset of the materials' geochemical evolution under conditions representative of the future geological disposal of high-level long-lived radioactive wastes. The carbon steel discs were exposed to corrosion due to trapped oxygen. The corrosion rates indicate that the oxidizing transient lasted between 2 and 6 years. A systematic dissolution of calcium phases (Ca-smectite sheets in I/S and calcite) was observed in the iron diffusion halos. The iron release induced mineralogical dissolution and precipitation reactions, which partly clogged the argillite porosity. (authors)

  3. Pore Type Classification on Carbonate Reservoir in Offshore Sarawak using Rock Physics Model and Rock Digital Images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubis, L A; Harith, Z Z T

    2014-01-01

    It has been recognized that carbonate reservoirs are one of the biggest sources of hydrocarbon. Clearly, the evaluation of these reservoirs is important and critical. For rigorous reservoir characterization and performance prediction from geophysical measurements, the exact interpretation of geophysical response of different carbonate pore types is crucial. Yet, the characterization of carbonate reservoir rocks is difficult due to their complex pore systems. The significant diagenesis process and complex depositional environment makes pore systems in carbonates far more complicated than in clastics. Therefore, it is difficult to establish rock physics model for carbonate rock type. In this paper, we evaluate the possible rock physics model of 20 core plugs of a Miocene carbonate platform in Central Luconia, Sarawak. The published laboratory data of this area were used as an input to create the carbonate rock physics models. The elastic properties were analyzed to examine the validity of an existing analytical carbonate rock physics model. We integrate the Xu-Payne Differential Effective Medium (DEM) Model and the elastic modulus which was simulated from a digital carbonate rock image using Finite Element Modeling. The results of this integration matched well for the separation of carbonate pore types and sonic P-wave velocity obtained from laboratory measurement. Thus, the results of this study show that the integration of rock digital image and theoretical rock physics might improve the elastic properties prediction and useful for more advance geophysical techniques (e.g. Seismic Inversion) of carbonate reservoir in Sarawak

  4. Virtual reality and interactive digital game technology: new tools to address obesity and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip Rizzo, Albert; Lange, Belinda; Suma, Evan A; Bolas, Mark

    2011-03-01

    The convergence of the exponential advances in virtual reality (VR)-enabling technologies with a growing body of clinical research and experience has fueled the evolution of the discipline of clinical VR. This article begins with a brief overview of methods for producing and delivering VR environments that can be accessed by users for a range of clinical health conditions. Interactive digital games and new forms of natural movement-based interface devices are also discussed in the context of the emerging area of exergaming, along with some of the early results from studies of energy expenditure during the use of these systems. While these results suggest that playing currently available active exergames uses significantly more energy than sedentary activities and is equivalent to a brisk walk, these activities do not reach the level of intensity that would match playing the actual sport, nor do they deliver the recommended daily amount of exercise for children. However, these results provide some support for the use of digital exergames using the current state of technology as a complement to, rather than a replacement, for regular exercise. This may change in the future as new advances in novel full-body interaction systems for providing vigorous interaction with digital games are expected to drive the creation of engaging, low-cost interactive game-based applications designed to increase exercise participation in persons at risk for obesity. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  5. Virtual Reality and Interactive Digital Game Technology: New Tools to Address Obesity and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    “Skip” Rizzo, Albert; Lange, Belinda; Suma, Evan A; Bolas, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The convergence of the exponential advances in virtual reality (VR)-enabling technologies with a growing body of clinical research and experience has fueled the evolution of the discipline of clinical VR. This article begins with a brief overview of methods for producing and delivering VR environments that can be accessed by users for a range of clinical health conditions. Interactive digital games and new forms of natural movement-based interface devices are also discussed in the context of the emerging area of exergaming, along with some of the early results from studies of energy expenditure during the use of these systems. While these results suggest that playing currently available active exergames uses significantly more energy than sedentary activities and is equivalent to a brisk walk, these activities do not reach the level of intensity that would match playing the actual sport, nor do they deliver the recommended daily amount of exercise for children. However, these results provide some support for the use of digital exergames using the current state of technology as a complement to, rather than a replacement, for regular exercise. This may change in the future as new advances in novel full-body interaction systems for providing vigorous interaction with digital games are expected to drive the creation of engaging, low-cost interactive game-based applications designed to increase exercise participation in persons at risk for obesity. PMID:21527091

  6. Construction and Implementation of Teaching Mode for Digital Mapping based on Interactive Micro-course Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The era of “Internet + education” has caused reforms in teaching ideas, teaching modes, and learning styles. The emergence of micro-course technology provides new strategies for integrating learning styles. Task-driven digital mapping teaching, known as traditional classroom organization, has poor teaching effect due to single learning style and strategy. A new teaching mode for digital mapping was constructed in this study based on micro-course technology by combining interactive micro-course technology and digital mapping teaching to adapt to the demands of modern teaching. This teaching mode mainly included four modules, namely, micro-courseware, micro-video, micro-exercise, and micro-examination. It realized the hierarchical teaching of knowledge points in digital mapping course, simplification of basic principles, simulation of engineering cases, and self-evaluation of learning outcomes. The teaching mode was applied to 114 students from the Mapping Engineering Department of Henan University of Urban Construction. Results indicate that the proposed teaching mode based on interactive micro-course technology promoting the independent after-class learning of the students, stimulating their learning enthusiasm, enhancing their practical abilities of the students, and improving the effect of teaching. This mode of teaching provides a new concept for the teaching mode reform of other courses in mapping engineering.

  7. Stationary intraoral digital tomosynthesis using a carbon nanotube X-ray source array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, J; Tucker, A W; Gaalaas, L R; Wu, G; Platin, E; Mol, A; Lu, J; Zhou, O

    2015-01-01

    Intraoral dental tomosynthesis and closely related tuned-aperture CT (TACT) are low-dose three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities that have shown improved detection of multiple dental diseases. Clinical interest in implementing these technologies waned owing to their time-consuming nature. Recently developed carbon nanotube (CNT) X-ray sources allow rapid multi-image acquisition without mechanical motion, making tomosynthesis a clinically viable technique. The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the feasibility of and produce high-quality images from a digital tomosynthesis system employing CNT X-ray technology. A test-bed stationary intraoral tomosynthesis unit was constructed using a CNT X-ray source array and a digital intraoral sensor. The source-to-image distance was modified to make the system comparable in image resolution to current two-dimensional intraoral radiography imaging systems. Anthropomorphic phantoms containing teeth with simulated and real caries lesions were imaged using a dose comparable to D-speed film dose with a rectangular collimation. Images were reconstructed and analysed. Tomosynthesis images of the phantom and teeth specimen demonstrated perceived image quality equivalent or superior to standard digital images with the added benefit of 3D information. The ability to "scroll" through slices in a buccal-lingual direction significantly improved visualization of anatomical details. In addition, the subjective visibility of dental caries was increased. Feasibility of the stationary intraoral tomosynthesis is demonstrated. The results show clinical promise and suitability for more robust observer and clinical studies.

  8. Amino acids interacting with defected carbon nanotubes: ab initio calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Darvish Ganji

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of a number of amino acids on a defected single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT is investigated by using the density-functional theory (DFT calculations. The adsorption energies and equilibrium distances are calculated for various configurations such as amino acid attaching to defect sites heptagon, pentagon and hexagon in defective tube and also for several molecular orientations with respect to the nanotube surface. The results showed that amino acids prefer to be physisorbed on the outer surface of the defected nanotube with different interaction strength following the hierarchy histidine > glycine > phenylalanine > cysteine. Comparing these findings with those obtained for perfect SWCNTs reveals that the adsorption energy of the amino acids increase for adsorption onto defected CNTs. The adsorption nature has also been evaluated by means of electronics structures analysis within the Mulliken population and DOS spectra for the interacting entities.

  9. Carbonation by fluid-rock interactions at high-pressure conditions: Implications for carbon cycling in subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoli, Francesca; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Beyssac, Olivier; Martinez, Isabelle; Ague, Jay J.; Chaduteau, Carine

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate-bearing lithologies are the main carbon carrier into subduction zones. Their evolution during metamorphism largely controls the fate of carbon, regulating its fluxes between shallow and deep reservoirs. Recent estimates predict that almost all subducted carbon is transferred into the crust and lithospheric mantle during subduction metamorphism via decarbonation and dissolution reactions at high-pressure conditions. Here we report the occurrence of eclogite-facies marbles associated with metasomatic systems in Alpine Corsica (France). The occurrence of these marbles along major fluid-conduits as well as textural, geochemical and isotopic data indicating fluid-mineral reactions are compelling evidence for the precipitation of these carbonate-rich assemblages from carbonic fluids during metamorphism. The discovery of metasomatic marbles brings new insights into the fate of carbonic fluids formed in subducting slabs. We infer that rock carbonation can occur at high-pressure conditions by either vein-injection or chemical replacement mechanisms. This indicates that carbonic fluids produced by decarbonation reactions and carbonate dissolution may not be directly transferred to the mantle wedge, but can interact with slab and mantle-forming rocks. Rock-carbonation by fluid-rock interactions may have an important impact on the residence time of carbon and oxygen in subduction zones and lithospheric mantle reservoirs as well as carbonate isotopic signatures in subduction zones. Furthermore, carbonation may modulate the emission of CO2 at volcanic arcs over geological time scales.

  10. Interactive food and beverage marketing: targeting adolescents in the digital age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Kathryn C; Chester, Jeff

    2009-09-01

    Because of their avid use of new media and their increased spending power, adolescents have become primary targets of a new "Media and Marketing Ecosystem." Digital media resonate particularly well with many of the fundamental developmental tasks of adolescence by enabling instantaneous and constant contact with peers, providing opportunities for self-expression, identity exploration, and social interaction, and facilitating mobility and independence. Six key features of interactive media--ubiquitous connectivity, personalization, peer-to-peer networking, engagement, immersion, and content creation--are emblematic of the ways in which young people are both shaping and being shaped by this new digital culture. The advertising industry, in many instances led by food and beverage marketers, is purposefully exploiting the special relationship that teenagers have with new media, with online marketing campaigns that create unprecedented intimacies between adolescents and the brands and products that now literally surround them. Major food and beverage companies, including Coca-Cola, McDonald's, Burger King, and Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC), have incorporated these elements into their interactive marketing strategies, posing particular risks to adolescents, who are not being addressed in the current U.S. policy and self-regulatory regimens. However, recent and emerging neuroscience and psychological research on adolescents suggests a need to revisit the traditional approach to regulation of advertising. Despite the growth of interactive marketing, academic research on the impact of digital advertising on children and youth remains underdeveloped. Additional research and policy initiatives are needed to address the growing health threat facing youth in the digital marketplace.

  11. Convergent Television and 'Audience Participation': The Early Days of Interactive Digital Television in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivi Theodoropoulou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the introduction of interactive digital television (DTV in the UK, at the turn of the millennium, and its take-up and use by early audiences. It discusses whether the processes of television technological convergence went together with “consumer behavior convergence”[i], enhanced audience engagement with the interactive TV services offered, and participation. Based on findings from a UK-wide survey and interviews with early Sky digital subscribers[ii] it shows that early interactive DTV was taken up because of its multichannel offering and thematic orientation and, interestingly, was approached and appreciated mostly as a television content provider. It thus notes a divergence on industry’s attempts to promote convergence in broadcasting and on the level and pace with which users adopt and adapt to such change. In so doing it highlights the evolutionary nature and slow rate of ‘change’ of cultural habits and forms. [i] Horst Stipp, ‘Convergence now?’, The International Journal of Media Management, 1, 1, 1999, 10-13. [ii] A postal survey using a simple random sample of 1986 early Sky digital subscribers was conducted and achieved a response rate of 35.25%. This was complemented by 15 in-depth interviews with a stratified sample of the original survey sample. In the quotes that follow the gender initial (Male or Female and age of the interviewee is used as an identification mark.

  12. Digital-image-correlation-based experimental stress analysis of reinforced concrete beams strengthened using carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Jeffrey; Kurtz, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    The strengthening of reinforced concrete beams through the use of epoxy-bonded carbon composites has been widely researched in the United States since 1991. Despite the widespread attention of researchers, however, there are no reliable methods of predicting the failure of the repaired and strengthened beams by peeling of the fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) material from the parent concrete. To better understand peeling failure, several investigators have presented analytical work to predict the distribution of stresses along the interface between the FRP and the concrete. Several closed-form solutions can be found in the literature to predict the levels of shear stress present between the bonded composite plate and the parent concrete beam. However, there has been very little experimental verification of these analytical predictions because few experiments on large-scale beams have had sufficient instrumentation to facilitate the comparison. Some experiments have been presented1 in which electrical resistance strain gages were placed along the length of the carbon plate in order to deduce the interfacial shear stress using first differences. This method, though very crude, demonstrated that there are substantial differences between the distributions of interfacial shear stresses in actual repaired beams versus the analytical predictions. This paper presents a new test program in which large-scale carbon-fiber-strengthened reinforced concrete beams are load-tested to failure, while employing digital image correlation (DIC) to record the strains in the carbon fiber plate. Relying on the linear elasticity of carbon fiber, the interfacial shear can be determined and compared with the analytical predictions of the literature. The focus of this paper is the presentation of the experimental shear stress distributions and comparisons of these distributions with previous results available in the literature.

  13. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-01-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA 20 , poly dT 20 , poly dC 20 and the duplex poly dA 20 :dT 20 . Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their purification using strong

  14. Complete Neuron-Astrocyte Interaction Model: Digital Multiplierless Design and Networking Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghiri, Saeed; Ahmadi, Arash; Saif, Mehrdad

    2017-02-01

    Glial cells, also known as neuroglia or glia, are non-neuronal cells providing support and protection for neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). They also act as supportive cells in the brain. Among a variety of glial cells, the star-shaped glial cells, i.e., astrocytes, are the largest cell population in the brain. The important role of astrocyte such as neuronal synchronization, synaptic information regulation, feedback to neural activity and extracellular regulation make the astrocytes play a vital role in brain disease. This paper presents a modified complete neuron-astrocyte interaction model that is more suitable for efficient and large scale biological neural network realization on digital platforms. Simulation results show that the modified complete interaction model can reproduce biological-like behavior of the original neuron-astrocyte mechanism. The modified interaction model is investigated in terms of digital realization feasibility and cost targeting a low cost hardware implementation. Networking behavior of this interaction is investigated and compared between two cases: i) the neuron spiking mechanism without astrocyte effects, and ii) the effect of astrocyte in regulating the neurons behavior and synaptic transmission via controlling the LTP and LTD processes. Hardware implementation on FPGA shows that the modified model mimics the main mechanism of neuron-astrocyte communication with higher performance and considerably lower hardware overhead cost compared with the original interaction model.

  15. Analysis of Interactivity and Autonomy of Existing Digital Educational Resources: The Case of Life and Earth Sciences in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettazarini, Said

    2017-01-01

    The educational policy in Morocco is aimed at promoting the wide use of Information and Communication Technologies in Education and the adoption of interactive and autonomous digital resources for distance teaching and self-learning. The objective of this research is to evaluate the suitability of the existing digital educational resources for…

  16. From digital to Academic Literacy: Interactional Dynamic and Writing Practices on Facebook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Braga Pereira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some of the results obtained in an educational project carried out in a Portuguese undergraduate course at Universidade Federal do Pará. We analyzed the interactional dynamic experienced by students in Facebook when it is used as a teaching platform, as well as the use of writing in these interactions. We understand that the use of digital literacy tools can greatly contribute to the training of future Portuguese language teachers, considering that such tools have directly influenced language practices. Integral formation of our students is one of our main objectives, so we intent not just preparing them for academic practice, but also for future teaching practice in a context which technology and digital tools will be increasingly present. Thus, we aim at contributing to the expansion of digital and academic literacy of our students. Blended Learning, a mix of face-to-face and on line teaching was the methodology used in the project. That way, we believe that learning could become a more continuous process. Our research is theoretically founded on the Studies about Literacy, as Martin (2008, Street (2014 and Lankshear and Knobel (2008 and by Levy (2010 Cyberculture. This ethnographic research analyses the, literacy in context, understood as social practice.

  17. Intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (IA-DSA) with carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshiaki; Ido, Kunio; Yuasa, Yuji

    1988-01-01

    Intra-Arterial Digital Subtraction Angiography (IA-DSA) with Carbon Dioxide (CO 2 ) was performed on 41 patients mainly with liver or renal diseases, and its angiographic manifestation was compared with that of conventional angiography. Although the image quality of the arterial or capillary phase was inferior to that of conventional angiography with iodinated contrast media, the detectablity of arterio-venous shunting was excellent. In fact, DSA with CO 2 revealed the presence of A-V (A-P) shunt in 26 patients (26/41:63.4 % HCC, 13/15:86.7% metastatic liver tumor, 2/3:66.7 % RCC, 1/5:20 %). On the other hand, conventional angiography was able to show in only 5 cases. DSA with CO 2 will become an effective method for detecting minute arterio-venous shunting which can not be demonstrated with conventional angiography. (author)

  18. Experimental investigation of interactions between proteins and carbon nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Bishwambhar

    The global market for nanomaterials based products is forecasted to reach $1 trillion per annum per annum for 2015. Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) exhibit unique physicochemical properties with potential to impact diverse aspects of society through applications in electronics, renewable energy, and medicine. While the research and proposed applications of ENMs continue to grow rapidly, the health and safety of ENMs still remains a major concern to the public as well as to policy makers and funding agencies. It is now widely accepted that focused efforts are needed for identifying the list of physicochemical descriptors of ENM before they can be evaluated for nanotoxicity and biological response. This task is surprisingly challenging, as many physicochemical properties of ENMs are closely inter related and cannot be varied independently (e.g. increasing the size of an ENM can introduce additional defects). For example, varying toxic response may ensue due to different methods of nanomaterial preparation, dissimilar impurities and defects. Furthermore, the inadvertent coating of proteins on ENM surface in any biological milieu results in the formation of the so-called "protein/bio-corona" which can in turn alter the fate of ENMs and their biological response. Carbon nanomaterials (CNMs) such as carbon nanotubes, graphene, and graphene oxide are widely used ENMs. It is now known that defects in CNMs play an important role not only in materials properties but also in the determination of how materials interact at the nano-bio interface. In this regard, this work investigates the influence of defect-induced hydrophilicity on the bio-corona formation using micro Raman, photoluminescence, infrared spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results show that the interaction of proteins (albumin and fibrinogen) with CNMs is strongly influenced by charge transfer between them, inducing protein unfolding which enhances conformational entropy and

  19. The MiSPOT System: Personalized Publicity and Marketing over Interactive Digital TV

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Nores, Martín; Pazos-Arias, José Juan; Blanco-Fernández, Yolanda; García-Duque, Jorge; Tubío-Pardavila, Ricardo; Rey-López, Marta

    The development of Interactive Digital TV bears a great potential for electronic commerce, which remains heavily underexploited to date. The early initiatives to harness these technologies rely on the advertising techniques traditionally employed by the television industry, which have proven deficiencies related to viewers' comfort, locality and targeting. Furthermore, out of dedicated channels, there are very few attempts to provide interactive commercial functionalities through the TV, for example to sell products or to hire services. This chapter presents an overview of a system called MiSPOT that introduces solutions to these problems in two levels: (i) to advertise items that match the preferences and needs of the viewers, without interfering with their enjoyment of the TV programs; and (ii) to assemble specialized interactive applications that provide them with tailor-made commercial functionalities. These solutions are grounded on techniques from the Semantic Web, and are valid for both domestic TV receivers and mobile ones.

  20. Universal interaction-driven gap in metallic carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Mitchell J.; McCulley, Daniel R.; Lotfizadeh, Neda; Deshpande, Vikram V.; Minot, Ethan D.

    2018-02-01

    Suspended metallic carbon nanotubes (m-CNTs) exhibit a remarkably large transport gap that can exceed 100 meV. Both experiment and theory suggest that strong electron-electron interactions play a crucial role in generating this electronic structure. To further understand this strongly interacting system, we have performed electronic measurements of suspended m-CNTs with known diameter and chiral angle. Spectrally resolved photocurrent microscopy was used to determine m-CNT structure. The room-temperature electrical characteristics of 18 individually contacted m-CNTs were compared to their respective diameter and chiral angle. At the charge neutrality point, we observe a peak in m-CNT resistance that scales exponentially with inverse diameter. Using a thermally activated transport model, we estimate that the transport gap is (450 meV nm)/D , where D is CNT diameter. We find no correlation between the gap and the CNT chiral angle. Our results add important constraints to theories attempting to describe the electronic structure of m-CNTs.

  1. EFFECTIVE 3D DIGITIZATION OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL ARTIFACTS FOR INTERACTIVE VIRTUAL MUSEUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Tucci

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a set of results of an on-going research on digital 3D reproduction of medium and small size archaeological artifacts which is intended to support the elaboration of a virtual and interactive exhibition environment, and also to provide a scientific archive of highly accurate models for specialists. After a short illustration of the background project and its finalities, we present the data acquisition through triangulation-based laser scanning and the post-processing methods we used to face the challenge of obtaining a large number of reliable digital copies at reasonable costs and within a short time frame, giving an account of the most recurrent problematic issues of the established work-flow and how they were solved (the careful placing of the artifacts to be digitized so to achieve the best results, the cleaning operations in order to build a coherent single polygon mesh, how to deal with unavoidable missing parts or defected textures in the generated model, etc..

  2. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ku-Herrera, J.J., E-mail: jesuskuh@live.com.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Avilés, F., E-mail: faviles@cicy.mx [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Nistal, A. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cauich-Rodríguez, J.V. [Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C., Unidad de Materiales, Calle 43 No.130, Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo. C.P., 97200 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico); Rubio, F.; Rubio, J. [Instituto de Cerámica y Vidrio (ICV-CSIC), Kelsen 5, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Bartolo-Pérez, P. [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Cinvestav, Unidad Mérida, C.P., 97310 Mérida, Yucatán (Mexico)

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto E-glass fibers. • The role of the fiber coating on the deposition of MWCNTs on the fibers is studied. • A rather homogeneous deposition of MWCNTs is achieved if the coating is maintained. • Multiple oxygen-containing groups were found in the analysis of the fiber coating. • Evidence of chemical interaction between MWCNTs and the fiber coating was found. - Abstract: Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as “sizing”), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible.

  3. Interactions between the glass fiber coating and oxidized carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku-Herrera, J.J.; Avilés, F.; Nistal, A.; Cauich-Rodríguez, J.V.; Rubio, F.; Rubio, J.; Bartolo-Pérez, P.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto E-glass fibers. • The role of the fiber coating on the deposition of MWCNTs on the fibers is studied. • A rather homogeneous deposition of MWCNTs is achieved if the coating is maintained. • Multiple oxygen-containing groups were found in the analysis of the fiber coating. • Evidence of chemical interaction between MWCNTs and the fiber coating was found. - Abstract: Chemically oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were deposited onto commercial E-glass fibers using a dipping procedure assisted by ultrasonic dispersion. In order to investigate the role of the fiber coating (known as “sizing”), MWCNTs were deposited on the surface of as-received E-glass fibers preserving the proprietary coating as well as onto glass fibers which had the coating deliberately removed. Scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to assess the distribution of MWCNTs onto the fibers. A rather homogeneous coverage with high density of MWCNTs onto the glass fibers is achieved when the fiber coating is maintained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of the chemical composition of the glass fiber coating suggest that such coating is a complex mixture with multiple oxygen-containing functional groups such as hydroxyl, carbonyl and epoxy. FTIR and XPS of MWCNTs over the glass fibers and of a mixture of MWCNTs and fiber coating provided evidence that the hydroxyl and carboxyl groups of the oxidized MWCNTs react with the oxygen-containing functional groups of the glass fiber coating, forming hydrogen bonding and through epoxy ring opening. Hydrogen bonding and ester formation between the functional groups of the MWCNTs and the silane contained in the coating are also possible

  4. Taking advantage of reduced droplet-surface interaction to optimize transport of bioanalytes in digital microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Sergio L S; Thorne, Nathaniel; Wutkowski, Michael; Dao, Selina

    2014-11-10

    Digital microfluidics (DMF), a technique for manipulation of droplets, is a promising alternative for the development of "lab-on-a-chip" platforms. Often, droplet motion relies on the wetting of a surface, directly associated with the application of an electric field; surface interactions, however, make motion dependent on droplet contents, limiting the breadth of applications of the technique. Some alternatives have been presented to minimize this dependence. However, they rely on the addition of extra chemical species to the droplet or its surroundings, which could potentially interact with droplet moieties. Addressing this challenge, our group recently developed Field-DW devices to allow the transport of cells and proteins in DMF, without extra additives. Here, the protocol for device fabrication and operation is provided, including the electronic interface for motion control. We also continue the studies with the devices, showing that multicellular, relatively large, model organisms can also be transported, arguably unaffected by the electric fields required for device operation.

  5. Design of an interactive digital nutritional education package for elderly people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nazlena Mohamad; Shahar, Suzana; Kee, You Lee; Norizan, Azir Rezha; Noah, Shahrul Azman Mohd

    2012-12-01

    Designing a system for the elderly is crucial, as aging is associated with physiological changes that may impair perception, cognition and other social aspects; therefore, many aspects need consideration, especially in interface design. This study was conducted to develop a digital nutritional education package (WE Sihat) by following appropriate guidelines for elderly people to achieve better design interface and interaction. Touch-screen technology was used as a platform for user interaction. The nutritional content was based on previous nutrition studies and a lifestyle education package on healthy aging, which contains four modules. The questionnaires were distributed to 31 Malay subjects aged 60-76 years old, containing an evaluation about the overall content, graphics, design layout, colour, font size, audio/video, user-perceived satisfaction and acceptance levels. The findings showed positive feedback and acceptance. Most subjects agreed that the digital nutritional education package can increase their nutritional knowledge for a healthy lifestyle and is easy to use. The touch-screen technology was also well accepted by elderly people and can be used as a kiosk for disseminating nutrition education for healthy aging.

  6. Nano carbon supported platinum catalyst interaction behavior with perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and their interface structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    2016-01-01

    behavior of Nafion ionomer on platinized carbon nano fibers (CNFs), carbon nano tubes (CNTs) and amorphous carbon (Vulcan). The interaction is affected by the catalyst surface oxygen groups as well as porosity. Comparisons between the carbon supports and platinized equivalents are carried out. It reveals......The interaction between perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer and supported platinum catalyst is essential. It directly influences platinum accessibility, stability of carbon support and platinum, proton conductivity and electron conductivity in an electrode. In this study, we compare the adsorption...... that the platinization step modifies the surface nature of the carbon supports in terms of specific surface area, crystallinity and especially porosity; therefore, ionomer adsorption over carbon is not always representative for the ionomer adsorption over carbon supported catalyst, though indicative. Moreover...

  7. Interface interactions in benzophenone doped by multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovka, N. I.; Goncharuk, A.; Melnyk, V. I.; Puchkovska, G. A.

    2009-08-01

    The interface interactions were studied by methods of conductometry, low-temperature phosphorescence and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) in multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and benzophenone (BP) composite. The concentration of MWCNTs was varied within 0-1 wt%. A percolative threshold was found at MWCNT concentrations exceeding 0.1 wt%. The integration of MWCNTs caused melting temperature increase (≈3 K for 1 wt% of MWCNTs). The effect of positive thermal resistively coefficient, as well as substantial hysteretic behaviour of electrical conductivity σ in a heating-cooling cycle, was observed near the melting point of BP ( T m=321.5 K). The activation-type temperature behaviour of electrical conductivity was observed in the temperature range of supercooled BP. The activation energy was decreasing with increase of MWCNT concentration. The observed nonlinear dependencies of electrical conductivity σ vs. applied voltage U reflect the transport mechanism of the charge carriers through amorphous interface films formed near the surface of the MWCNTs. The thermal shifts of phosphorescence spectra measured within the temperature range 5-200 K evidence existence of such interface films of amorphous BP with width of the order of 0.1 μm.

  8. Interactions of alkali metals and electrolyte with cathode carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naas, Tyke

    1997-12-31

    The Hall-Heroult process for electrolytic reduction of alumina has been the only commercial process for production of primary aluminium. The process runs at high temperature and it is important to minimize the energy consumption. To save energy it is desirable to reduce the operating temperature. This can be achieved by adding suitable additives such as LiF or KF to the cryolitic electrolyte. This may conflict with the objective of extending the lifetime of the cathode linings of the cell as much as possible. The thesis investigates this possibility and the nature of the interactions involved. It supports the hypothesis that LiF-additions to the Hall-Heroult cell electrolyte is beneficial to the carbon cathode performance because the diminished sodium activity reduces the sodium induced stresses during the initial period of electrolysis. The use of KF as an additive is more dangerous, but the results indicate that additions up to 5% KF may be tolerated in acidic melts with semigraphitic or graphitic cathodes with little risk of cathode problems. 153 refs., 94 figs., 30 tabs.

  9. Dynamic interaction between localized magnetic moments in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A T; Muniz, R B; Ferreira, M S

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic moments dilutely dispersed in a metallic host tend to be coupled through the conduction electrons of the metal. This indirect exchange coupling (IEC), known to occur for a variety of magnetic materials embedded in several different metallic structures, is of rather long range, especially for low-dimensional structures like carbon nanotubes. Motivated by recent claims that the indirect coupling between magnetic moments in precessional motion has a much longer range than its static counterpart, we consider here how magnetic atoms adsorbed to the walls of a metallic nanotube respond to a time-dependent perturbation that induces their magnetic moments to precess. By calculating the frequency-dependent spin susceptibility, we are able to identify resonant peaks whose respective widths provide information about the dynamic aspect of the IEC. We show that by departing from a purely static representation to another in which the moments are allowed to precess, we change from what is already considered a long-range interaction to another whose range is far superior. In other words, localized magnetic moments embedded in a metallic structure can feel each other's presence more easily when they are set in precessional motion. We argue that such an effect can have useful applications leading to large-scale spintronics devices

  10. Imaging carbon nanotube interactions, diffusion, and stability in nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Shannon L; Smith, Billy; Meric, Gulsum; Fairbrother, D Howard; Bevan, Michael A

    2011-07-26

    We report optical microscopy measurements of three-dimensional trajectories of individual multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in nanoscale silica slit pores. Trajectories are analyzed to nonintrusively measure MWCNT interactions, diffusion, and stability as a function of pH and ionic strength. Evanescent wave scattering is used to track MWCNT positions normal to pore walls with nanometer-scale resolution, and video microscopy is used to track lateral positions with spatial resolution comparable to the diffraction limit. Analysis of MWCNT excursions normal to pore walls yields particle-wall potentials that agree with theoretical electrostatic and van der Waals potentials assuming a rotationally averaged potential of mean force. MWCNT lateral mean square displacements are used to quantify translational diffusivities, which are comparable to predictions based on the best available theories. Finally, measured MWCNT pH and ionic strength dependent stabilities are in excellent agreement with predictions. Our findings demonstrate novel measurement and modeling tools to understand the behavior of confined MWCNTs relevant to a broad range of applications.

  11. An Integrated Carbon Policy-Based Interactive Strategy for Carbon Reduction and Economic Development in a Construction Material Supply Chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon emissions from the construction material industry have become of increasing concern due to increasingly urbanization and extensive infrastructure. Faced with serious atmospheric deterioration, governments have been seeking to reduce carbon emissions, with carbon trading and carbon taxes being considered the most effective regulatory policies. Over time, there has been a global consensus that integrated carbon trading/carbon tax policies are more effective in reducing carbon emissions. However, in an integrated carbon reduction policy framework, balancing the relationship between emission reductions and low-carbon benefits has been found to be a critical issue for governments and enterprises in both theoretical research and carbon emission reduction practices. As few papers have sought to address these issues, this paper seeks to reach a trade-off between economic development and environmental protection involving various stakeholders: regional governments which aim to maximize social benefits, and producers who seek economic profit maximization. An iterative interactive algorithmic method with fuzzy random variables (FRVs is proposed to determine the satisfactory equilibrium between these decision-makers. This methodology is then applied to a real-world case to demonstrate its practicality and efficiency.

  12. Understanding Urban Watersheds through Digital Interactive Maps, San Francisco Bay Area, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, J. M.; Ticci, M. G.; Mulvey, P.

    2014-12-01

    Dense urbanization has resulted in the "disappearance" of many local creeks in urbanized areas surrounding the San Francisco Bay. Long reaches of creeks now flow in underground pipes. Municipalities and water agencies trying to reduce non-point-source pollution are faced with a public that cannot see and therefore does not understand the interconnected nature of the drainage system or its ultimate discharge to the bay. Since 1993, we have collaborated with the Oakland Museum, the San Francisco Estuary Institute, public agencies, and municipalities to create creek and watershed maps to address the need for public understanding of watershed concepts. Fifteen paper maps are now published (www.museumca.org/creeks), which have become a standard reference for educators and anyone working on local creek-related issues. We now present digital interactive creek and watershed maps in Google Earth. Four maps are completed covering urbanized areas of Santa Clara and Alameda Counties. The maps provide a 3D visualization of the watersheds, with cartography draped over the landscape in transparent colors. Each mapped area includes both Present and Past (circa 1800s) layers which can be clicked on or off by the user. The Present layers include the modern drainage network, watershed boundaries, and reservoirs. The Past layers include the 1800s-era creek systems, tidal marshes, lagoons, and other habitats. All data are developed in ArcGIS software and converted to Google Earth format. To ensure the maps are interesting and engaging, clickable icons pop-up provide information on places to visit, restoration projects, history, plants, and animals. Maps of Santa Clara Valley are available at http://www.valleywater.org/WOW.aspx. Maps of western Alameda County will soon be available at http://acfloodcontrol.org/. Digital interactive maps provide several advantages over paper maps. They are seamless within each map area, and the user can zoom in or out, and tilt, and fly over to explore

  13. Polarization dependence of laser interaction with carbon fibers and CFRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitag, Christian; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    2014-01-27

    A key factor for laser materials processing is the absorptivity of the material at the laser wavelength, which determines the fraction of the laser energy that is coupled into the material. Based on the Fresnel equations, a theoretical model is used to determine the absorptivity for carbon fiber fabrics and carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). The surface of each carbon fiber is considered as multiple layers of concentric cylinders of graphite. With this the optical properties of carbon fibers and their composites can be estimated from the well-known optical properties of graphite.

  14. Subcellular analysis of interaction between breast cancer cells and drug by digital holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Lin, Qiaowen; Wang, Dayong; Wang, Yunxin; Ouyang, Liting; Guo, Sha; Yao, Qian

    2017-10-01

    Digital holographic microscopy is a promising quantitative phase-contrast imaging technique, which exhibits the advantages of non-destruction, full field of view, quasi-real time, and don't need dye and external marker to the living biological sample. In this paper, the inverted off-axis image-plane digital holography with pre-magnification is built up to study the living MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. The lateral resolution of the proposed experimental setup is 0.87μm, which is verified by the standard USAF test target. Then the system is used to visualize the interaction between living breast cancer cells and drug. The blebbing is observed after the cells are treated by paclitaxel drug, and the distribution of the paclitaxel inside the cells is detected, which is near the cytomembrane, or in other words the end of the microtubules. It will stop the mitosis and cause the death of the cells. It is helpful to reveal the anticancer mechanism of paclitaxel in the subcellular scale.

  15. An interactive toolkit to extract phenological time series data from digital repeat photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyednasrollah, B.; Milliman, T. E.; Hufkens, K.; Kosmala, M.; Richardson, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    Near-surface remote sensing and in situ photography are powerful tools to study how climate change and climate variability influence vegetation phenology and the associated seasonal rhythms of green-up and senescence. The rapidly-growing PhenoCam network has been using in situ digital repeat photography to study phenology in almost 500 locations around the world, with an emphasis on North America. However, extracting time series data from multiple years of half-hourly imagery - while each set of images may contain several regions of interest (ROI's), corresponding to different species or vegetation types - is not always straightforward. Large volumes of data require substantial processing time, and changes (either intentional or accidental) in camera field of view requires adjustment of ROI masks. Here, we introduce and present "DrawROI" as an interactive web-based application for imagery from PhenoCam. DrawROI can also be used offline, as a fully independent toolkit that significantly facilitates extraction of phenological data from any stack of digital repeat photography images. DrawROI provides a responsive environment for phenological scientists to interactively a) delineate ROIs, b) handle field of view (FOV) shifts, and c) extract and export time series data characterizing image color (i.e. red, green and blue channel digital numbers for the defined ROI). The application utilizes artificial intelligence and advanced machine learning techniques and gives user the opportunity to redraw new ROIs every time an FOV shift occurs. DrawROI also offers a quality control flag to indicate noisy data and images with low quality due to presence of foggy weather or snow conditions. The web-based application significantly accelerates the process of creating new ROIs and modifying pre-existing ROI in the PhenoCam database. The offline toolkit is presented as an open source R-package that can be used with similar datasets with time-lapse photography to obtain more data for

  16. Investigation of the interaction of carbon dioxide fluid with internal and external single-wall carbon nanotubes by DFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oftadeh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The effective parameters of (5, 0 and (5, 5 single-wall carbon nanotubes during the interaction with carbon dioxide as sensors are determined. The interaction of carbon dioxide  molecules with internal and external walls of the nanotubes is studied using Gaussian 03 coding by density functional theory (DFT at the B3LYP/6-311G level of theory. CO2 rotation around tube axles vertically and parallel to the internal and external walls has been investigated. The carbon dioxide molecule is predicted to bind only weakly to nanotubes, and the tube-molecule interactions can be identified as physisorption. CO2 adsorption is stronger on external wallsthan on internal walls, and adsorption on the external wall of (5, 0 is stronger than on the external wall of (5, 5; the adsorption energies are exothermic and equal to -0.8884 and -0.0528 kcal/mol, respectively. The rotation energy barrier for (5, 5 is lower than that for (5, 0 in all rotations, therefore in these interactions (5, 5 is more active. The energy gap significantly changes in the presence of  carbon  dioxide molecules on the inside surface of (5, 0 and the electric conductivity is affected, but no remarkable change is observed in the electronic structure of (5, 5.

  17. Climate Change Feedbacks from Interactions Between New and Old Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dukes, Jeffrey S. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Phillips, Richard P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2016-05-24

    Priming effects, or responses of SOM decomposition rates to inputs of new, labile carbon (C), have the potential to dramatically alter projections of ecosystem C storage. Priming effects occur in most ecosystems, are significant in magnitude, and are highly sensitive to global changes. Nevertheless, our mechanistic understanding of priming effects remains poor, and this has prevented the inclusion of these dynamics into current Earth system models (ESMs). We conducted two manipulative experiments in the field to quantify how priming effects influence SOM dynamics. Specifically, we asked: To what extent do inputs of “new” root-derived carbon (C) influence “older” C in SOM, and are the magnitude and direction of these effects sensitive to climate? We addressed these questions within the Boston-Area Climate Experiment - an old-field ecosystem that has been subjected to three precipitation treatments (ambient, -50%, and +50% of each precipitation event during the growing season) and four warming treatments (from ambient to +4°C) since 2008. In the first experiment, we installed root and fungal ingrowth cores into the plots. Each core was filled with SOM that had an isotopic signature (of its C compounds) that differed from the vegetation in the plots such that inputs of “new” C from roots/fungi could be quantified using the change in isotopic signatures of C in the cores. Further, we used cores with different mesh sizes to isolate root vs. mycorrhizal fungal inputs. We found that belowground C fluxes were dominated by root inputs (as opposed to mycorrhizal inputs), and that root-derived inputs were greatest in the plots subjected to experimental warming. Given that that the warming-induced increase in belowground C flux did not result in a net increase in soil C, we conclude that the warming treatment likely enhanced priming effects in these soils. In the second experiment, we experimentally dripped dissolved organic C compounds into soils in the BACE

  18. CO/sub 2/ carbon cycle and climate interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassl, H; Maier-Reimer, E; Degens, E T; Kempe, S; Spitzy, A

    1984-03-01

    Past and expected emissions of anthropogenic CO/sub 2/ stimulate carbon cycle and climate research. Prognoses of future CO/sub 2/ levels depend on energy scenarios and on the reaction of the biosphere and hydrosphere to elevated atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations. The reaction of the reservoirs vegetation, freshwater and oceans to disturbances of the carbon cycle is reviewed. For the oceans first results of a simple carbon cycle model implanted in a three-dimensional general circulation model are presented. This model allows experiments not possible with previous box models.

  19. Laser printing of nanoparticle toner enables digital control of micropatterned carbon nanotube growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsen, Erik S; Stevens, Adam G; Hart, A John

    2013-05-01

    Commercialization of materials utilizing patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) forests, such as hierarchical composite structures, dry adhesives, and contact probe arrays, will require catalyst patterning techniques that do not rely on cleanroom photolithography. We demonstrate the large scale patterning of CNT growth catalyst via adaptation of a laser-based electrostatic printing process that uses magnetic ink character recognition (MICR) toner. The MICR toner contains iron oxide nanoparticles that serve as the catalyst for CNT growth, which are printed onto a flexible polymer (polyimide) and then transferred to a rigid substrate (silicon or alumina) under heat and mechanical pressure. Then, the substrate is processed for CNT growth under an atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) recipe. This process enables digital control of patterned CNT growth via the laser intensity, which controls the CNT density; and via the grayscale level, which controls the pixelation of the image into arrays of micropillars. Moreover, virtually any pattern can be designed using standard software (e.g., MS Word, AutoCAD, etc.) and printed on demand. Using a standard office printer, we realize isolated CNT microstructures as small as 140 μm and isolated catalyst ″pixels″ as small as 70 μm (one grayscale dot) and determine that individual toner microparticles result in features of approximately 5-10 μm . We demonstrate that grayscale CNT patterns can function as dry adhesives and that large-area catalyst patterns can be printed directly onto metal foils or transferred to ceramic plates. Laser printing therefore shows promise to enable high-speed micropatterning of nanoparticle-containing thin films under ambient conditions, possibly for a wide variety of nanostructures by engineering of toners containing nanoparticles of desired composition, size, and shape.

  20. Assessing the learning potential of an interactive digital game versus an interactive-style didactic lecture: the continued importance of didactic teaching in medical student education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtier, Jesse; Webb, Emily M; Phelps, Andrew S; Naeger, David M

    2016-12-01

    Games with educational intent offer a possible advantage of being more interactive and increasing learner satisfaction. We conducted a two-armed experiment to evaluate student satisfaction and content mastery for an introductory pediatric radiology topic, taught by either an interactive digital game or with a traditional didactic lecture. Medical students participating in a fourth-year radiology elective were invited to participate. Student cohorts were alternatively given a faculty-supervised 1h session playing a simple interactive digital Tic-tac-toe quiz module on pediatric gastrointestinal radiology or a 1h didactic introductory lecture on the same topic. Survey questions assessed the learners' perceived ability to recall the material as well as their satisfaction with the educational experience. Results of an end-of-rotation exam were reviewed to evaluate a quantitative measure of learning between groups. Survey responses were analyzed with a chi-squared test. Exam results for both groups were analyzed with a paired Student's t-test. Students in the lecture group had higher test scores compared to students in the game group (4.0/5 versus 3.6/5, P = 0.045). Students in the lecture group reported greater understanding and recall of the material than students in the game group (P digital interactive materials reported by students in the game group (P = 0.146). Our experience supported the use of a traditional lecture over a digital game module. While these results might be affected by the specific lecture and digital content in any given comparison, a digital module is not always the superior option.

  1. Digital Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon Contents and Stocks in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Hartemink, Alfred E.; Minasny, Budiman

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of carbon contents and stocks are important for carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and national carbon balance inventories. For Denmark, we modeled the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and bulk density, and mapped its spatial distribution at five standard ...

  2. A linguagem audiovisual da lousa digital interativa no contexto educacional/Audiovisual language of the digital interactive whiteboard in the educational environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosária Helena Ruiz Nakashima

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo serão apresentadas informações sobre a lousa digital como um instrumento que proporciona a inserção da linguagem audiovisual no contexto escolar. Para o funcionamento da lousa digital interativa é necessário que esteja conectada a um computador e este a um projetor multimídia, sendo que, através da tecnologia Digital Vision Touch (DViT, a superfície desse quadro torna-se sensível ao toque. Dessa forma, utilizando-se o dedo, professores e alunos executarão funções que aumentam a interatividade com as atividades propostas na lousa. Serão apresentadas duas possibilidades de atividades pedagógicas, destacando as áreas do conhecimento de Ciências e Língua Portuguesa, que poderão ser aplicadas na educação infantil, com alunos de cinco a seis anos. Essa tecnologia reflete a evolução de um tipo de linguagem que não é mais baseada somente na oralidade e na escrita, mas também é audiovisual e dinâmica, pois permite que o sujeito além de receptor, seja produtor de informações. Portanto, a escola deve aproveitar esses recursos tecnológicos que facilitam o trabalho com a linguagem audiovisual em sala de aula, permitindo a elaboração de aulas mais significativas e inovadoras.In this paper we present some information about the digital interactive whiteboard and its use as a tool to introduce the audiovisual language in the educational environment. The digital interactive whiteboard is connected to both a computer and a multimedia projector and it uses the Digital Vision Touch (DViT, which means that the screen is touch-sensitive. By touching with their fingers, both teachers and pupils have access to functionalities that increase the interactivity with the activities worked during the class. We present two pedagogical activities to be used in Science and Portuguese classes, for five- and six-years old pupils. This new technology is the result of the evolution of a new type of communication, which is not grounded

  3. Digital Social Media: An Interactive Technology Incorporated as a Competitive Advantage for Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pereira Correia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In a more transparent and dynamic world, in which consumers trust other consumers more for advice and recommendations on products and services, the continuity of organizations appears to be associated with socialization, the sharing of interests and the interaction with the audience. This is associated with the incorporation of digital technologies to business, specifically the use of social media. Consequently, it is timely and interesting to explore the phenomenon of virtual socialization, although it is a little-studied field and what is needed is an innovative and theoretical approach based upon theories of marketing and communication. Expertise in these areas is present in all organizations and their performance is important for appropriate development of them. This work is a qualitative analysis about the behavior, reactions and attitudes of individuals to organizations, in order to understand the social factors that contribute to sustainable competitive advantages of organizations which can support strategic and future actions. We conclude that relevant factors associated with the tacit knowledge of the organization, specifically to learning and social interaction of the organization and their knowledge of virtual communities. The higher the coexistence of factors, the more difficult is the replication and greater will be the hypothesis of sustainable competitive advantage.

  4. Postcards And Supasigns: Extending Integrationist Theory Through The Creation Of Interactive Digital Artworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Pryor

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrationism is a post-structuralist theory of language and communication. The theory has been applied to a groundbreaking analysis of writing as a form of communication where writing is teased apart from speech and realigned with spatial configurations in general. Although it has many practical applications, this view can be extremely difficult to comprehend when expressed as a very specific form of writing, that is, as written words on paper. A solution to this problem is offered by the creative interaction design of two digital artworks, Postcard From Tunis and Postcards From Writing. The works are interactive multimedia pieces that creatively express the integrationist theory of writing and extend it into the transformations of writing that are possible in the human-computer interface. More generally, the unique rollover-based interfaces of these works both express the integrationist theory of communication and suggest that it is necessary in order to explain the creation of communicative signs that they demonstrate are possible.

  5. A digital interactive human brain atlas based on Chinese visible human datasets for anatomy teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiyu; Ran, Xu; Zhang, Shaoxiang; Tan, Liwen; Qiu, Mingguo

    2014-01-01

    As we know, the human brain is one of the most complicated organs in the human body, which is the key and difficult point in neuroanatomy and sectional anatomy teaching. With the rapid development and extensive application of imaging technology in clinical diagnosis, doctors are facing higher and higher requirement on their anatomy knowledge. Thus, to cultivate medical students to meet the needs of medical development today and to improve their ability to read and understand radiographic images have become urgent challenges for the medical teachers. In this context, we developed a digital interactive human brain atlas based on the Chinese visible human datasets for anatomy teaching (available for free download from http://www.chinesevisiblehuman.com/down/DHBA.rar). The atlas simultaneously provides views in all 3 primary planes of section. The main structures of the human brain have been anatomically labeled in all 3 views. It is potentially useful for anatomy browsing, user self-testing, and automatic student assessment. In a word, it is interactive, 3D, user friendly, and free of charge, which can provide a new, intuitive means for anatomy teaching.

  6. Digital video analysis of health professionals' interactions with an electronic whiteboard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus; Kushniruk, Andre

    2013-01-01

    As hospital departments continue to introduce electronic whiteboards in real clinical settings a range of human factor issues have emerged and it has become clear that there is a need for improved methods for designing and testing these systems. In this study, we employed a longitudinal and natur......As hospital departments continue to introduce electronic whiteboards in real clinical settings a range of human factor issues have emerged and it has become clear that there is a need for improved methods for designing and testing these systems. In this study, we employed a longitudinal...... and naturalistic method in the usability evaluation of an electronic whiteboard system. The goal of the evaluation was to explore the extent to which usability issues experienced by users change as they gain more experience with the system. In addition, the paper explores the use of a new approach to collection...... and analysis of continuous digital video recordings of naturalistic "live" user interactions. The method developed and employed in the study included recording the users' interactions with system during actual use using screen-capturing software and analyzing these recordings for usability issues...

  7. Schools in the Digital Age: teachers’ training role in the innovative use of the Interactive Whiteboard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Ghislandi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a case study research (IWB@Trento conducted in an Italian secondary school, situated in the Trento’s Province that makes good use of Interactive Whiteboard (IWB for the teaching/learning process. We explored in detail how teachers use the Interactive Whiteboard (IWB during Greek and Latin classrooms. In the paper we stress that usually schools use to spend their budget in technologies and they do not implement an appropriate human resources’ training policy, therefore they run the risk of underestimating the pedagogical skills offered by the new equipment and limiting the desired positive changes of the teaching/learning methods. In our research it seems to emerge the fundamental need of investing in the teachers’ training, to increase the IWB’s positive contribution to the teaching/learning process and to help students’ learning, participation and motivation. Otherwise, it will be possible to run the risk of reducing the IWB to a passive instrument, i.e. anything more than a projector connected to a computer. The essential role of teachers’ training is due, also, to the fact that digital natives generation has got ways of communication and learning styles that are different from their teachers.

  8. Computer and Video Games in Family Life: The Digital Divide as a Resource in Intergenerational Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarsand, Pal Andre

    2007-01-01

    In this ethnographic study of family life, intergenerational video and computer game activities were videotaped and analysed. Both children and adults invoked the notion of a digital divide, i.e. a generation gap between those who master and do not master digital technology. It is argued that the digital divide was exploited by the children to…

  9. Preschool Children and iPads: Observations of Social Interactions during Digital Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Sandra M.

    2018-01-01

    Research Findings: Digital play is now commonplace in many young children's lives, but not in preschool settings. This situation is likely due to the fact that the existent literature seldom highlights what digital play looks like, the various ways it can be situated, and what young children do when they play together with digital devices in the…

  10. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian; Cathles, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle

  11. Computational and experimental studies of the interaction between single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rozo, Ciro E.; Castillo-León, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Nlayered Integrated Molecular Orbital and Molecular Mechanics (B3LYP(6–31G(d):UFF)). The results confirmed that the interaction occurred via hydrogen bonding between protons of the glutamic moiety from folic acid and π electrons from the carbon nanotubes. The single-walled carbon nanotube-folic acid...

  12. Biological interactions of carbon-based nanomaterials: From coronation to degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Kunal; Mukherjee, Sourav P; Gallud, Audrey; Burkert, Seth C; Bistarelli, Silvia; Bellucci, Stefano; Bottini, Massimo; Star, Alexander; Fadeel, Bengt

    2016-02-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials including carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, fullerenes and nanodiamonds are potential candidates for various applications in medicine such as drug delivery and imaging. However, the successful translation of nanomaterials for biomedical applications is predicated on a detailed understanding of the biological interactions of these materials. Indeed, the potential impact of the so-called bio-corona of proteins, lipids, and other biomolecules on the fate of nanomaterials in the body should not be ignored. Enzymatic degradation of carbon-based nanomaterials by immune-competent cells serves as a special case of bio-corona interactions with important implications for the medical use of such nanomaterials. In the present review, we highlight emerging biomedical applications of carbon-based nanomaterials. We also discuss recent studies on nanomaterial 'coronation' and how this impacts on biodistribution and targeting along with studies on the enzymatic degradation of carbon-based nanomaterials, and the role of surface modification of nanomaterials for these biological interactions. Advances in technology have produced many carbon-based nanomaterials. These are increasingly being investigated for the use in diagnostics and therapeutics. Nonetheless, there remains a knowledge gap in terms of the understanding of the biological interactions of these materials. In this paper, the authors provided a comprehensive review on the recent biomedical applications and the interactions of various carbon-based nanomaterials. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. An Agent-Based Approach for Delivering Educational Contents through Interactive Digital TV in the Context of T-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes Neto, Francisco Milton; de Carvalho Muniz, Raphael; Filgueira Burlamaqui, Aquiles Medeiros; Castro de Souza, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The support of technological resources in teaching and learning has contributed to make them more efficient and enjoyable. Through this support has become quite common to use media resources before explored only for entertainment for educational purposes, among them the TV. The interactive Digital TV (iDTV) provides resources that make possible…

  14. Building dynamic capabilities in large global advertising agency networks: managing the shift from mass communication to digital interactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suheimat, Wisam; Prætorius, Thim; Brambini-Pedersen, Jan Vang

    2018-01-01

    Interactive digital technologies result in significant managerial challenges for the largest global advertising agency networks. This paper, based on original data from in-depth case research in three of the largest global advertising networks, investigates how advertising agency networks manage...

  15. Marketing Learning Communities to Generation Z: The Importance of Face-to-Face Interaction in a Digitally Driven World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Julia; Zobac, Stephanie R.; Spillane, Allison; Thomas, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to identify the marketing strategies utilized by Learning Community (LC) administrators at two large, public, four-year research universities in the Midwest. The use of digital media coupled with face-to-face interaction is identified as an effective method of marketing LCs to the newest population of incoming college students,…

  16. Designing and Evaluating Tutoring Feedback Strategies for Digital Learning Environments on the Basis of the Interactive Tutoring Feedback Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narciss, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the interactive tutoring feedback model (ITF-model; Narciss, 2006; 2008), and how it can be applied to the design and evaluation of feedback strategies for digital learning environments. The ITF-model conceptualizes formative tutoring feedback as a multidimensional instructional activity that aims at contributing to the…

  17. The Design, Implementation, and Evaluation of a Digital Interactive Globe System Integrated into an Earth Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study is to design and implement a digital interactive globe system (DIGS), by integrating low-cost equipment to make DIGS cost-effective. DIGS includes a data processing unit, a wireless control unit, an image-capturing unit, a laser emission unit, and a three-dimensional hemispheric body-imaging screen. A quasi-experimental study…

  18. Modelling interactions of carbon dioxide, forests, and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxmoore, R.J.; Baldocchi, D.D.

    1994-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide is rising and forests and climate is changing exclamation point This combination of fact and premise may be evaluated at a range of temporal and spatial scales with the aid of computer simulators describing the interrelationships between forest vegetation, litter and soil characteristics, and appropriate meteorological variables. Some insights on the effects of climate on the transfers of carbon and the converse effect of carbon transfer on climate are discussed as a basis for assessing the significance of feedbacks between vegetation and climate under conditions of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide. Three main classes of forest models are reviewed. These are physiologically-based models, forest succession simulators based on the JABOWA model, and ecosystem-carbon budget models that use compartment transfer rates with empirically estimated coefficients. Some regression modeling approaches are also outlined. Energy budget models applied to forests and grasslands are also reviewed. This review presents examples of forest models; a comprehensive discussion of all available models is not undertaken

  19. Microwave interaction with nonuniform hydrogen gas in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babaei, S.; Babaei, Sh.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the reflection, absorption, and transmission of microwave from nonuniform hydrogen gas in carbon nanotubes, grown by iron-catalyzed high-pressure carbon monoxide disproportionate (HiPco) process. A discussion on the effect of various hydrogen gas parameters on the reflected power, absorbed power, and transmitted power is presented. The nonuniform hydrogen gas slab is modeled by a series of subslabs. The overall number density profile across the whole slab follows a parabolic function. The total reflected, absorbed, and transmitted powers are then deduced and their functional dependence on the number density, collision frequency, and angle of propagation is studied

  20. High resolution stationary digital breast tomosynthesis using distributed carbon nanotube x-ray source array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xin; Tucker, Andrew; Gidcumb, Emily; Shan, Jing; Yang, Guang; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Sultana, Shabana; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto; Spronk, Derrek; Sprenger, Frank; Zhang, Yiheng; Kennedy, Don; Farbizio, Tom; Jing, Zhenxue

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the feasibility of increasing the system spatial resolution and scanning speed of Hologic Selenia Dimensions digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) scanner by replacing the rotating mammography x-ray tube with a specially designed carbon nanotube (CNT) x-ray source array, which generates all the projection images needed for tomosynthesis reconstruction by electronically activating individual x-ray sources without any mechanical motion. The stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) design aims to (i) increase the system spatial resolution by eliminating image blurring due to x-ray tube motion and (ii) reduce the scanning time. Low spatial resolution and long scanning time are the two main technical limitations of current DBT technology. A CNT x-ray source array was designed and evaluated against a set of targeted system performance parameters. Simulations were performed to determine the maximum anode heat load at the desired focal spot size and to design the electron focusing optics. Field emission current from CNT cathode was measured for an extended period of time to determine the stable life time of CNT cathode for an expected clinical operation scenario. The source array was manufactured, tested, and integrated with a Selenia scanner. An electronic control unit was developed to interface the source array with the detection system and to scan and regulate x-ray beams. The performance of the s-DBT system was evaluated using physical phantoms. The spatially distributed CNT x-ray source array comprised 31 individually addressable x-ray sources covering a 30 angular span with 1 pitch and an isotropic focal spot size of 0.6 mm at full width at half-maximum. Stable operation at 28 kV(peak) anode voltage and 38 mA tube current was demonstrated with extended lifetime and good source-to-source consistency. For the standard imaging protocol of 15 views over 14, 100 mAs dose, and 2 × 2 detector binning, the projection

  1. Steering the conversation: A linguistic exploration of natural language interactions with a digital assistant during simulated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large, David R; Clark, Leigh; Quandt, Annie; Burnett, Gary; Skrypchuk, Lee

    2017-09-01

    Given the proliferation of 'intelligent' and 'socially-aware' digital assistants embodying everyday mobile technology - and the undeniable logic that utilising voice-activated controls and interfaces in cars reduces the visual and manual distraction of interacting with in-vehicle devices - it appears inevitable that next generation vehicles will be embodied by digital assistants and utilise spoken language as a method of interaction. From a design perspective, defining the language and interaction style that a digital driving assistant should adopt is contingent on the role that they play within the social fabric and context in which they are situated. We therefore conducted a qualitative, Wizard-of-Oz study to explore how drivers might interact linguistically with a natural language digital driving assistant. Twenty-five participants drove for 10 min in a medium-fidelity driving simulator while interacting with a state-of-the-art, high-functioning, conversational digital driving assistant. All exchanges were transcribed and analysed using recognised linguistic techniques, such as discourse and conversation analysis, normally reserved for interpersonal investigation. Language usage patterns demonstrate that interactions with the digital assistant were fundamentally social in nature, with participants affording the assistant equal social status and high-level cognitive processing capability. For example, participants were polite, actively controlled turn-taking during the conversation, and used back-channelling, fillers and hesitation, as they might in human communication. Furthermore, participants expected the digital assistant to understand and process complex requests mitigated with hedging words and expressions, and peppered with vague language and deictic references requiring shared contextual information and mutual understanding. Findings are presented in six themes which emerged during the analysis - formulating responses; turn-taking; back

  2. Influence of intermolecular interactions on the properties of carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-05-19

    May 19, 2018 ... molecules provides attractive opportunities for technological applications. ... organic molecules inside CNTs was reported in the litera- ture during the last .... tion of the dyes (T, 3T, 6T) in open MWCNTs started after the addition ..... define the presence and the chemical state of sulphur, carbon and oxygen.

  3. Wildland fire emissions, carbon, and climate: Wildfire–climate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongqiang Liu; Scott Goodrick; Warren Heilman

    2014-01-01

    Increasing wildfire activity in recent decades, partially related to extended droughts, along with concern over potential impacts of future climate change on fire activity has resulted in increased attention on fire–climate interactions. Findings from studies published in recent years have remarkably increased our understanding of fire–climate interactions and improved...

  4. Learn English or die: The effects of digital games on interaction and willingness to communicate in a foreign language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayo Reinders

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a lot of interest in the potential role of digital games in language education. Playing digital games is said to be motivating to students and to benefit the development of social skills, such as collaboration, and metacognitive skills such as planning and organisation. An important potential benefit is also that digital games encourage the use of the target language in a non-threatening environment. Willingness to communicate has been shown to affect second language acquisition in a number of ways and it is therefore important to investigate if there is a connection between playing games and learners’ interaction in the target language. In this article we report on the results of a pilot study that investigated the effects of playing an online multiplayer game on the quantity and quality of second language interaction in the game and on participants’ willingness to communicate in the target language. We will show that digital games can indeed affect second language interaction patterns and contribute to second language acquisition, but that this depends, like in all other teaching and learning environments, on careful pedagogic planning of the activity.

  5. The role of the adsorption interaction between pitch and filler in the process of baking of carbon/carbon composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, N.; Razvigorova, M.; Budinova, T.; Siskov, K. (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Organic Chemistry)

    1994-01-01

    The adsorption interaction between the filler and the binder in carbon/carbon composite was studied. The binder and the filler should be chosen so as to realize the maximum adsorption interaction between them. The optimum composition of the composite is attained when the maximum part of the binder takes part in the adsorption layer. As a result of the interaction between the binder and the filler polar compounds, higher molecular mass compounds and those with a condensed aromatic structure are concentrated in the adsorption layer. Upon thermal treatment of the composite, these substances yield a larger amount of solid residue than the unadsorbed part of the binder. 3 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  6. Nanoscale Interactions between Engineered Nanomaterials and Black Carbon (Biochar) in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    An understanding of the interactions between engineered nanomaterials (NMs) and soil constituents, and a comprehension of how these interactions may affect biological uptake and toxicity are currently lacking. Charcoal black carbon is a normal constituent of soils due to fire history, and can be pre...

  7. A digital miniature x-ray tube with a high-density triode carbon nanotube field emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Kim, Jae-Woo; Song, Yoon-Ho; Ahn, Seungjoon

    2013-01-01

    We have fabricated a digital miniature x-ray tube (6 mm in diameter and 32 mm in length) with a high-density triode carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter for special x-ray applications. The triode CNT emitter was densely formed within a diameter of below 4 mm with the focusing-functional gate. The brazing process enables us to obtain and maintain a desired vacuum level for the reliable electron emission from the CNT emitters after the vacuum packaging. The miniature x-ray tube exhibited a stable and reliable operation over 250 h in a pulse mode at an anode voltage of above 25 kV.

  8. Interaction between carbon fibers and polymer sizing: Influence of fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosburger-Will, Judith; Bauer, Matthias; Laukmanis, Eva; Horny, Robert; Wetjen, Denise; Manske, Tamara; Schmidt-Stein, Felix; Töpker, Jochen; Horn, Siegfried

    2018-05-01

    Different aspects of the interaction of carbon fibers and epoxy-based polymer sizings are investigated, e.g. the wetting behavior, the strength of adhesion between fiber and sizing, and the thermal stability of the sizing layer. The influence of carbon fiber surface chemistry and sizing reactivity is investigated using fibers of different degree of anodic oxidation and sizings with different number of reactive epoxy groups per molecule. Wetting of the carbon fibers by the sizing dispersion is found to be specified by both, the degree of fiber activation and the sizing reactivity. In contrast, adhesion strength between fibers and sizing is dominated by the surface chemistry of the carbon fibers. Here, the number of surface oxygen groups seems to be the limiting factor. We also find that the sizing and the additional functionalities induced by anodic oxidation are removed by thermal treatment at 600 °C, leaving the carbon fiber in its original state after carbonization.

  9. Uranium tetracyclopentadienyl interaction with carbon oxide and dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonov, M.R.; Solov'eva, G.V.; Kozina, I.Z.; Bolotova, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    Using the methods of gas-liquid chromatography, IR and UV spectroscopy and element analysis, the reactions of tetracyclogentadienyluranium with carbon oxide and dioxide have been studied. It is shown that complete uranium cyclopentadienyl π-complex-tetracyclopentadienyluranium - in pentane under normal conditions for 100 hr reacts with carbon oxide and dioxide with the formation of polymeric complex ([(etasup(5)-Csub(5)Hsub(5))x(-CO-)U(etasup(5)-Csub(5)Hsub(4))(-CO-)]sub(2)]sub(n), in which two uranium atoms are bonded with two bridge fragments (eta 5 -C 5 H 4 -CO-), and dimeric complex [(eta 5 -C 5 H 5 ) 2 UH 2 xCO 2 ] 2 respectively

  10. Interactions of carbon monoxide and hemoglobin at high altitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, C.R. (Univ. of Southern California Medical Center, Los Angeles); Goldsmith, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The health risks to U.S. populations who are exposed to ambient carbon monoxide and live at altitudes (such as Denver, Salt Lake City, and Albuquerque) were evaluated using a set of mathematical models. The assumption that a given increase in carboxyhemoglobin would require a more stringent volumetric air quality standard was tested. The results using the model predict that the 8-h or 1-h standards adopted for sea level condition need not be altered to protect individuals against health risks at altitude, if the standards are in volumetric terms. They would need to be reduced if the standards are left in gravimetric terms. If the guideline is to be based on a given decrement of oxygen tension, many other variables must be specified, but expected differences in ambient carbon monoxide have a small impact compared to the effect of altitude itself.

  11. Interaction of hydrogen in carbon matrix with impurities of nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gervasoni, L L; Segui, S

    2012-01-01

    This work aims to define general criteria to allow theoretical and experimental design of new materials with high hydrogen content, with a view to their potential application as moderators in reactors at high temperatures and hydrogen storage materials. To this end we study the effects of Ni impurities on the properties of pure carbon (slabs as well as nanoparticles and gels) in order to analyze the thermodynamical characteristics, and improve the behavior of alloys for Ni-metal hydride rechargeable batteries. These elements are chosen because they have a wide range of solubility of hydrogen, which from the technological point of view makes them important candidates for the search for new materials. Our results show that this kind of carbon material could be used as support for hydrogen storage improving the screening charge density and the density of available states, as analyzed by the authors in previous works (author)

  12. Interference Correlations of Hyperons in Neutron-Carbon Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Aleev, A N; Balandin, V P; Bulekov, O V; Eremin, S V; Geshkov, I M; Goudzovski, E A; Grigalashvili, T S; Guriev D K; Ivanchenko, I M; Ivanchenko, Z M; Kekelidze, V D; Khristov, P Z; Kopadze, M V; Kosarev, I G; Kozhenkova, Z I; Kuzmin, N A; Kvatadze, R A; Ljubimov, A L; Loktionov, A A; Lomidze, N L; Madigozhin, D T; Maznyj, V G; Mitsyn, V V; Molokanova, N A; Morozov, A N; Pismenyj, R E; Polenkevich, I A; Ponosov, A K; Ponta, T; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Sergeev, F M; Slepets, L A; Spaskov, V N; Zinchenko, A I

    2003-01-01

    The interference correlations of \\Lambda-hyperon pairs produced on the carbon target by 20-70 GeV neutrons have been investigated with the EXCHARM spectrometer. Destructive correlations at low relative 4-momenta are observed for \\Lambda\\Lambda-pairs. No correlations of this type are observed for \\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}. Comparison with the corresponding data on meson correlations shows a decrease of production area sizes with an increase of particle masses.

  13. Laboratory-scale sodium-carbonate aggregate concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westrich, H.R.; Stockman, H.W.; Suo-Anttila, A.

    1983-09-01

    A series of laboratory-scale experiments was made at 600 0 C to identify the important heat-producing chemical reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate concretes. Reactions between sodium and carbonate aggregate were found to be responsible for the bulk of heat production in sodium-concrete tests. Exothermic reactions were initiated at 580+-30 0 C for limestone and dolostone aggregates as well as for hydrated limestone concrete, and at 540+-10 0 C for dehydrated limestone concrete, but were ill-defined for dolostone concrete. Major reaction products included CaO, MgO, Na 2 CO 3 , Na 2 O, NaOH, and elemental carbon. Sodium hydroxide, which forms when water is released from cement phases, causes slow erosion of the concrete with little heat production. The time-temperature profiles of these experiments have been modeled with a simplified version of the SLAM computer code, which has allowed derivation of chemical reaction rate coefficients

  14. An Integrative Framework for Studying, Designing and Conceptualising Interactivity in Children's Digital Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucirkova, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    In the past five years, there have been significant changes concerning the material and design properties of digital books, with an impact on children's enjoyment and learning from reading on screen. Despite the rapid advances in technology, research on children's digital books is disjointed. This is because of no consistent approach to the study…

  15. Communicative Interactions in Everyday and College-Assessed Digital Literacy Practices: Transcribing and Analysing Multimodal Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creer, Adele

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores integrating a range of digital media into classroom practice to establish the effectiveness of the media and its encompassing modes as a pedagogical tool with a focus on assessment. Directing attention on a communication skills module, research indicated that bringing a range of digital media into the classroom motivated and…

  16. Eye and hand motor interactions with the Symbol Digit Modalities Test in early multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Gro O; de Rodez Benavent, Sigrid A; Harbo, Hanne F; Laeng, Bruno; Sowa, Piotr; Damangir, Soheil; Bernhard Nilsen, Kristian; Etholm, Lars; Tønnesen, Siren; Kerty, Emilia; Drolsum, Liv; Inge Landrø, Nils; Celius, Elisabeth G

    2015-11-01

    Eye and hand motor dysfunction may be present early in the disease course of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), and can affect the results on visual and written cognitive tests. We aimed to test for differences in saccadic initiation time (SI time) between RRMS patients and healthy controls, and whether SI time and hand motor speed interacted with the written version of the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (wSDMT). Patients with RRMS (N = 44, age 35.1 ± 7.3 years), time since diagnosis < 3 years and matched controls (N = 41, age 33.2 ± 6.8 years) were examined with ophthalmological, neurological and neuropsychological tests, as well as structural MRI (white matter lesion load (WMLL) and brainstem lesions), visual evoked potentials (VEP) and eye-tracker examinations of saccades. SI time was longer in RRMS than controls (p < 0.05). SI time was not related to the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT), WMLL or to the presence of brainstem lesions. 9 hole peg test (9HP) correlated significantly with WMLL (r = 0.58, p < 0.01). Both SI time and 9HP correlated negatively with the results of wSDMT (r = -0.32, p < 0.05, r = -0.47, p < 0.01), but none correlated with the results of PASAT. RRMS patients have an increased SI time compared to controls. Cognitive tests results, exemplified by the wSDMT, may be confounded by eye and hand motor function. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Interacting With A Near Real-Time Urban Digital Watershed Using Emerging Geospatial Web Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Fazio, D. J.; Abdelzaher, T.; Minsker, B.

    2007-12-01

    The value of real-time hydrologic data dissemination including river stage, streamflow, and precipitation for operational stormwater management efforts is particularly high for communities where flash flooding is common and costly. Ideally, such data would be presented within a watershed-scale geospatial context to portray a holistic view of the watershed. Local hydrologic sensor networks usually lack comprehensive integration with sensor networks managed by other agencies sharing the same watershed due to administrative, political, but mostly technical barriers. Recent efforts on providing unified access to hydrological data have concentrated on creating new SOAP-based web services and common data format (e.g. WaterML and Observation Data Model) for users to access the data (e.g. HIS and HydroSeek). Geospatial Web technology including OGC sensor web enablement (SWE), GeoRSS, Geo tags, Geospatial browsers such as Google Earth and Microsoft Virtual Earth and other location-based service tools provides possibilities for us to interact with a digital watershed in near-real-time. OGC SWE proposes a revolutionary concept towards a web-connected/controllable sensor networks. However, these efforts have not provided the capability to allow dynamic data integration/fusion among heterogeneous sources, data filtering and support for workflows or domain specific applications where both push and pull mode of retrieving data may be needed. We propose a light weight integration framework by extending SWE with open source Enterprise Service Bus (e.g., mule) as a backbone component to dynamically transform, transport, and integrate both heterogeneous sensor data sources and simulation model outputs. We will report our progress on building such framework where multi-agencies" sensor data and hydro-model outputs (with map layers) will be integrated and disseminated in a geospatial browser (e.g. Microsoft Virtual Earth). This is a collaborative project among NCSA, USGS Illinois Water

  18. Potential Benefits of Incorporating Peer-to-Peer Interactions Into Digital Interventions for Psychotic Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagianti, Bruno; Quraishi, Sophia H; Schlosser, Danielle A

    2018-04-01

    Peer-to-peer interactions and support groups mitigate experiences of social isolation and loneliness often reported by individuals with psychotic disorders. Online peer-to-peer communication can promote broader use of this form of social support. Peer-to-peer interactions occur naturally on social media platforms, but they can negatively affect mental health. Recent digital interventions for persons with psychotic disorders have harnessed the principles of social media to incorporate peer-to-peer communication. This review examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of recent digital interventions in order to identify strategies to maximize benefits of online peer-to-peer communication for persons with psychotic disorders. An electronic database search of PubMed, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Ovid MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Health Technology Assessment Database was conducted in February 2017 and yielded a total of 1,015 results. Eight publications that reported data from six independent trials and five interventions were reviewed. The technology supporting peer-to-peer communication varied greatly across studies, from online forums to embedded social networking. When peer-to-peer interactions were moderated by facilitators, retention, engagement, acceptability, and efficacy were higher than for interventions with no facilitators. Individuals with psychotic disorders were actively engaged with moderated peer-to-peer communication and showed improvements in perceived social support. Studies involving service users in intervention design showed higher rates of acceptability. Individuals with psychotic disorders value and benefit from digital interventions that include moderated peer-to-peer interactions. Incorporating peer-to-peer communication into digital interventions for this population may increase compliance with other evidence-based therapies by producing more acceptable and engaging online environments.

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of interaction of UOsub(2+-x) with carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khromov, Yu.F.; Lyutikov, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement results of equilibrium pressure of CO (Psub(CO)) for the WO 2 +C system at carbon excess are presented. The change of oxygen potential in the range of WOsub(2+-x) homogeneity are analyzed. Equilibrium pressure of oxygen has been determined on the basis of the Knudsen method by means of direct mass-spectrometric measurements of equilibrium pressure Psub(CO) for the UOsub(1.9995)+C system. On the basis of equilibrium pressure of oxygen and equilibrium constants Ksub(p)f (T) a general analytic dependence of CO pressure is obtained and a diagram of calculated values of equilibrium pressure of Psub(CO) for the UOsub(2+-x)-UCsub(2)-C system at the temperature of 1500-2500 K and O/U values from 1.97 to 2.1 is plotted [ru

  20. Analysis of the Interaction of Pulsed Laser with Nanoporous Activated Carbon Cloth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.V. Kalucljerovic; M.S. Trtica; B.B. Radak; J.M. Stasic; S.S. Krstic Musovic; V.M. Dodevski

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of pulsed transversely excited atmospheric (TEA) CO2-1aser radiation at 10.6 μm with nanoporous activated carbon cloth was investigated. Activated carbon cloth of different adsorption characteristics was used. Activated carbon cloth modifications were initiated by laser pulse intensities from 0.5 to 28 MW/cm^2, depending on the cloth adsorption characteristics. CO2 laser radiation was effectively absorbed by the used activated carbon cloth and largely converted into thermal energy. The type of modification depended on laser power density, number of pulses, but mostly on material characteristics such as specific surface area. The higher the surface area of activated carbon cloth, the higher the damage threshold.

  1. Managing Interactions Between Carbon Pricing and Existing Energy Policies. Guidance for Policymakers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hood, Christina

    2013-07-01

    Carbon pricing can be a key policy tool to help countries move their energy sectors onto a cleaner development path. One important issue to consider when introducing carbon pricing is how it will integrate with other energy policies that also reduce greenhouse gas emissions, including policies to support low-carbon technologies (such as renewable energy) and energy efficiency programmes. Poor policy integration can undermine energy security and affordability, and affect the performance of renewable energy policies and energy markets. Climate objectives can also be undermined, through low and uncertain carbon prices and the risk of stop-start policy. Understanding how to manage policy interactions can improve the climate and energy policy package, reducing the trade-offs and advancing the synergies between energy and climate objectives. This will benefit the country in terms of a more effective and lower-cost low-carbon development path, as well as supporting a more energy-secure future.

  2. Analytical approach to phonons and electron-phonon interactions in single-walled zigzag carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandemir, B S; Keskin, M [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Ankara University, 06100 Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

    2008-08-13

    In this paper, exact analytical expressions for the entire phonon spectra in single-walled carbon nanotubes with zigzag geometry are presented by using a new approach, originally developed by Kandemir and Altanhan. This approach is based on the concept of construction of a classical lattice Hamiltonian of single-walled carbon nanotubes, wherein the nearest and next nearest neighbor and bond bending interactions are all included, then its quantization and finally diagonalization of the resulting second quantized Hamiltonian. Furthermore, within this context, explicit analytical expressions for the relevant electron-phonon interaction coefficients are also investigated for single-walled carbon nanotubes having this geometry, by the phonon modulation of the hopping interaction.

  3. Analytical approach to phonons and electron-phonon interactions in single-walled zigzag carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kandemir, B S; Keskin, M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, exact analytical expressions for the entire phonon spectra in single-walled carbon nanotubes with zigzag geometry are presented by using a new approach, originally developed by Kandemir and Altanhan. This approach is based on the concept of construction of a classical lattice Hamiltonian of single-walled carbon nanotubes, wherein the nearest and next nearest neighbor and bond bending interactions are all included, then its quantization and finally diagonalization of the resulting second quantized Hamiltonian. Furthermore, within this context, explicit analytical expressions for the relevant electron-phonon interaction coefficients are also investigated for single-walled carbon nanotubes having this geometry, by the phonon modulation of the hopping interaction

  4. The architecture of information architecture, interaction design and the patterning of digital information

    CERN Document Server

    Dade-Robertson, Martyn

    2011-01-01

    This book looks at relationships between the organization of physical objects in space and the organization of ideas. Historical, philosophical, psychological and architectural knowledge are united to develop an understanding of the relationship between information and its representation.Despite its potential to break the mould, digital information has relied on metaphors from a pre-digital era. In particular, architectural ideas have pervaded discussions of digital information, from the urbanization of cyberspace in science fiction, through to the adoption of spatial visualiz

  5. Experimental simulation of magma-carbonate interaction beneath Mt. Vesuvius, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolis, E. M.; Freda, C.; Troll, V. R.; Deegan, F. M.; Blythe, L. S.; McLeod, C. L.; Davidson, J. P.

    2013-11-01

    We simulated the process of magma-carbonate interaction beneath Mt. Vesuvius in short duration piston-cylinder experiments under controlled magmatic conditions (from 0 to 300 s at 0.5 GPa and 1,200 °C), using a Vesuvius shoshonite composition and upper crustal limestone and dolostone as starting materials. Backscattered electron images and chemical analysis (major and trace elements and Sr isotopes) of sequential experimental products allow us to identify the textural and chemical evolution of carbonated products during the assimilation process. We demonstrate that melt-carbonate interaction can be extremely fast (minutes), and results in dynamic contamination of the host melt with respect to Ca, Mg and 87Sr/86Sr, coupled with intense CO2 vesiculation at the melt-carbonate interface. Binary mixing between carbonate and uncontaminated melt cannot explain the geochemical variations of the experimental charges in full and convection and diffusion likely also operated in the charges. Physical mixing and mingling driven by exsolving volatiles seems to be a key process to promote melt homogenisation. Our results reinforce hypotheses that magma-carbonate interaction is a relevant and ongoing process at Mt. Vesuvius and one that may operate not only on a geological, but on a human timescale.

  6. Investigation of sodium - carbon dioxide interactions with calorimetric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, N.; Latge, C.; Gicquel, L.

    2007-01-01

    The supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle could be a promising option to enhance the competitiveness of future Sodium fast reactors but it is highly necessary to get thermodynamic and kinetics information on potential sodium-CO 2 chemical reactions and their consequences. We have studied the interaction between Na and CO 2 via calorimetric methods. These methods are able to point out exothermic/endothermic phenomena and to measure heat of chemical reactions. The main feature of the Na/CO 2 interaction seems to be its sharp dependence on temperature. At low temperature, below 500 C degrees, CO 2 and sodium react and exhibit an induction time which decreases when temperature increases. Above 500 C degrees, we observe a global phenomenon with a fast and instantaneous chemical reaction which may be understood as an auto-combustion of CO 2 in sodium. We clearly demonstrated that Na/CO 2 interaction does not proceed as an auto-catalytic process and is more satisfactorily explained by the occurring of an auto-combustion phenomenon

  7. An immersion calorimetric study of the interactions between some organic molecules and functionalized carbon nanotube surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillejos-López, E.; Bachiller-Baeza, B.; Guerrero-Ruiz, A.; Rodriguez-Ramos, I.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The interaction of organic chemicals with the surface of modified CNTs was studied. ► Specific π–π interactions between graphitic CNTs and toluene have been considered. ► Confinement effects in CNTs increase the adsorption strength of aromatic compounds. ► Methanol molecules form H-bonds with the oxygen functional groups on CNT surfaces. - Abstract: The interaction of organic chemicals with the surface of carbon nanotubes has been studied by immersion calorimetry revealing significant differences in the properties when these materials are modified thermally or chemically. Therefore, multiwall carbon nanotubes have been synthesized using a chemical vapour deposition procedure and subsequently aliquots were treated with HNO 3 at reflux, maintaining the reaction during different times, in order to incorporate oxygen surface groups, or were treated at 2873 K under inert atmosphere. The aim of this thermal treatment is to eliminate structural defects of the carbon nanostructures and to graphitize the amorphous carbon phases. These features were confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The immersion in organic compounds, including toluene, methanol and methylcyclohexane, of all these carbon nanotubes samples reveals that the surface properties are remarkably modified. Thus, the formation of different types of interaction, depending on the surface, gives place to changes in the immersion enthalpies

  8. Digital Culture and Digital Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalçın Yalçınkaya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study; digital culture and digital library which have a vital connection with each other are examined together. The content of the research consists of the interaction of culture, information, digital culture, intellectual technologies, and digital library concepts. The study is an entry work to integrity of digital culture and digital library theories and aims to expand the symmetry. The purpose of the study is to emphasize the relation between the digital culture and digital library theories acting intersection of the subjects that are examined. Also the perspective of the study is based on examining the literature and analytical evaluation in both studies (digital culture and digital library. Within this context, the methodology of the study is essentially descriptive and has an attribute for the transmission and synthesis of distributed findings produced in the field of the research. According to the findings of the study results, digital culture is an inclusive term that describes the effects of intellectual technologies in the field of information and communication. Information becomes energy and the spectrum of the information is expanding in the vertical rise through the digital culture. In this context, the digital library appears as a new living space of a new environment. In essence, the digital library is information-oriented; has intellectual technology support and digital platform; is in a digital format; combines information resources and tools in relationship/communication/cooperation by connectedness, and also it is the dynamic face of the digital culture in time and space independence. Resolved with the study is that the digital libraries are active and effective in the formation of global knowing and/or mass wisdom in the process of digital culture.

  9. Digital marketing strategies in the luxury fashion sector. Interaction and social networks as a necessary tool

    OpenAIRE

    González Romo, Zahaira; Plaza Romero, Noemí

    2017-01-01

    Luxury brands reinvent themselves in their marketing and business strategies to adapt and approach emerging markets eager to consume luxury fashion, which is why digital marketing becomes an essential tool for the communication of luxury brands leaders in the market with their younger audiences. The present research aims to know what are the current strategies in digital marketing that are being carried out by the brands of the luxury fashion sector. The aim is to identify the most relevant a...

  10. Digital earth for manipulating urban greens towards achieving a low carbon urban society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathi, N G; Bedi, P

    2014-01-01

    Urban greens are integral components of urban ecosystem, contributing towards quality of life and sustainable urban development. Urban greens can help in creating Low Carbon Society (LCS) by playing an integral role through sequestering carbon. India is undergoing significant change in the process and pace of its urbanization. As the growing population becomes more urban, the importance of the way urban areas are developed and managed will be a central point of intervention for addressing climate change and maintaining low carbon trajectories in Indian cities

  11. Role of intertube interactions in double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Thomas Ch; Araujo, Paulo T; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin F; Seifert, Max; Nielsch, Kornelius; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2014-02-25

    Resonant Raman spectroscopy studies are performed to access information about the intertube interactions and wall-to-wall distances in double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes. Here, we explain how the surroundings of the nanotubes in a multiwalled system influence their radial breathing modes. Of particular interest, the innermost tubes in double- and triple-walled carbon nanotube systems are shown to be significantly shielded from environmental interactions, except for those coming from the intertube interaction with their own respective host tubes. From a comparison of the Raman results for bundled as well as individual fullerene-peapod-derived double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes, we observe that metallic innermost tubes, when compared to their semiconducting counterparts, clearly show weaker intertube interactions. Additionally, we discuss a correlation between the wall-to-wall distances and the frequency upshifts of the radial breathing modes observed for the innermost tubes in individual double- and triple-walled carbon nanotubes. All results allow us to contemplate fundamental properties related to DWNTs and TWNTs, as for example diameter- and chirality-dependent intertube interactions. We also discuss differences in fullerene-peapod-derived and chemical vapor deposition grown double- and triple-walled systems with the focus on mechanical coupling and interference effects.

  12. Mesoporous silica particles modified with graphitic carbon: interaction with human red blood cells and plasma proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Diego Stefani Teodoro; Franqui, Lidiane Silva; Bettini, Jefferson; Strauss, Mathias, E-mail: diego.martinez@lnnano.cnpem.br [Centro Nacional de Pesquisa em Energia e Materiais (CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Damasceno, Joao Paulo Vita; Mazali, Italo Odone [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: In this work the interaction of the mesoporous silica particles (SBA-15, ∼700 nm) modified with graphitic carbon (SBA-15/C) on human red blood cells (hemolysis) and plasma proteins (protein corona formation) is studied. XPS and CHN analysis showed that the carbon content on the SBA-15/C samples varied from 2 to 10% and was tuned by the functionalization step. The formed carbon structures where associated to graphitic nanodomains coating the pores surface as verified by Raman spectroscopy and {sup 13}C NMR. Advanced TEM/EELS analysis showed that the carbon structures are distributed along the SBA-15 mesopores. SAXS and textural analyses were used to confirm that the porous structure of the silica support is kept after the modification procedure and to calculate the number of graphitic carbon stacked layers coating the mesopores. After incubation of SBA-15 with human red blood cells (RBCs), it was observed a dose-dependent hemolytic effect, probably, due to binding of the material silanol-rich surface to the phosphatidylcholine molecules from the RBC membrane. The graphitic carbon modifications have mitigated this effect, indicating that the graphitic carbon coating protected the silanol groups of the particle surface hindering the hemolysis. Considering the protein corona formation, selective biomolecular interaction of proteins was observed for the different materials using gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis. Besides, graphitic carbon modification decreased the amount of proteins on the corona. Together, the in vitro hemolysis and protein corona assays are promising biological models to understand the influence of silica surface functionalization on their bionano-interactions. Finally, our work contributes to the development of fundamental research on such nanomaterials chemistry in the emerging field of nanobioscience and nanotoxicology. (author)

  13. The Impact of an Intensive Experience on Prospective Teachers' Perception of the Uses of Digital, Interactive Text among K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonier, Francis W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure pre-service teacher perception, awareness, and potential use of digital literacies, media, and digital interactive text in their future classrooms. The study grew from the theoretical rationales of new literacies, technological pedagogical content knowledge, and constructivism. New literacies are…

  14. Nanocomposites from Stable Dispersions of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymeric Matrices Using Dispersion Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Stable dispersions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in polymeric matrices include CNTs dispersed in a host polymer or copolymer whose monomers have delocalized electron orbitals, so that a dispersion interaction results between the host polymer or copolymer and the CNTs dispersed therein. Nanocomposite products, which are presented in bulk, or when fabricated as a film, fiber, foam, coating, adhesive, paste, or molding, are prepared by standard means from the present stable dispersions of CNTs in polymeric matrices, employing dispersion interactions, as presented hereinabove.

  15. Interactions in the Geo-Biosphere: Processes of Carbonate Precipitation in Microbial Mats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupraz, C.; Visscher, P. T.

    2009-12-01

    Microbial communities are situated at the interface between the biosphere, the lithosphere and the hydrosphere. These microbes are key players in the global carbon cycle, where they influence the balance between the organic and inorganic carbon reservoirs. Microbial populations can be organized in microbial mats, which can be defined as organosedimentary biofilms that are dominated by cyanobacteria, and exhibit tight coupling of element cycles. Complex interactions between mat microbes and their surrounding environment can result in the precipitation of carbonate minerals. This process refers as ‘organomineralization sensu lato' (Dupraz et al. in press), which differs from ‘biomineralization’ (e.g., in shells and bones) by lacking genetic control on the mineral product. Organomineralization can be: (1) active, when microbial metabolic reactions are responsible for the precipitation (“biologically-induced” mineralization) or (2) passive, when mineralization within a microbial organic matrix is environmentally driven (e.g., through degassing or desiccation) (“biologically-influenced” mineralization). Studying microbe-mineral interactions is essential to many emerging fields of the biogeoscience, such as the study of life in extreme environments (e.g, deep biosphere), the origin of life, the search for traces of extraterrestrial life or the seek of new carbon sink. This research approach combines sedimentology, biogeochemistry and microbiology. Two tightly coupled components that control carbonate organomineralization s.l.: (1) the alkalinity engine and (2) the extracellular organic matter (EOM), which is ultimately the location of mineral nucleation. Carbonate alkalinity can be altered both by microbial metabolism and environmental factors. In microbial mats, the net accumulation of carbonate minerals often reflect the balance between metabolic activities that consume/produce CO2 and/or organic acids. For example, photosynthesis and sulfate reduction

  16. Adsorption of Cr(III) on ozonised activated carbon. Importance of Cpi-cation interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Utrilla, J; Sánchez-Polo, M

    2003-08-01

    The adsorption of Cr(III) in aqueous solution was investigated on a series of ozonised activated carbons, analysing the effect of oxygenated surface groups on the adsorption process. A study was carried out to determine the adsorption isotherms and the influence of the pH on the adsorption of this metal. The adsorption capacity and affinity of the adsorbent for Cr(III) increased with the increase in oxygenated acid groups on the surface of the activated carbon. These findings imply that electrostatic-type interactions predominate in the adsorption process, although the adsorption of Cr(III) on the original (basic) carbon indicates that other forces also participate in the adsorption process. Thus, the ionic exchange of protons in the -Cpi-H3O(+) interaction for Cr(III) accounts for the adsorption of cationic species in basic carbons with positive charge density. Study of the influence of pH on the adsorption of Cr(III) showed that, in each system, the maximum adsorption occurred when the charge of the carbon surface was opposite that of the species of Cr(III) present at the pH of the experiment. These results confirmed that electrostatic interactions predominate in the adsorption process.

  17. van der Waals interaction between a microparticle and a single-walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blagov, E. V.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.

    2007-01-01

    The Lifshitz-type formulas describing the free energy and the force of the van der Waals interaction between an atom (molecule) and a single-walled carbon nanotube are obtained. The single-walled nanotube is considered as a cylindrical sheet carrying a two-dimensional free-electron gas with appropriate boundary conditions on the electromagnetic field. The obtained formulas are used to calculate the van der Waals free energy and force between a hydrogen atom (molecule) and single-walled carbon nanotubes of different radii. Comparison studies of the van der Waals interaction of hydrogen atoms with single-walled and multiwalled carbon nanotubes show that depending on atom-nanotube separation distance, the idealization of graphite dielectric permittivity is already applicable to nanotubes with only two or three walls

  18. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of solid-phase interaction of alkali metal carbonates with arsenic pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashinkin, A.S.; Buketov, E.A.; Isabaeva, S.M.; Kasenov, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    The thermodynamic analysis of solid-phase reactions of alkali metal carbonates with arsenic pentoxide showing the possibility of formation of all arsenates at a higher than the room temperature is performed. Energetically most advantageous is formation of meta-arsenates. It is shown that temperature increase favours the reaction process. By Gibbs standard energy decrease the reactions form the Li>Na>K>Rb>Cs series. On the base of calculation data linear dependence of Gibbs standard energy in reactions on the atomic number of alkali metalis established. By the continuous weighing method the kinetics of interaction of alkali metal carbonates with arsenic pentoxide under isothermal conditions in the 450-500 deg C range is studied. Studies is the dependence of apparent energy of interaction of carbonates wih As 2 0 5 an atomic parameters of al

  19. Interaction forces and conduction properties between multi wall carbon nanotube tips and Au(1 1 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, M.; Pablo, P.J. de; Colchero, J.; Gomez-Herrero, J.; Baro, A.M.; Tokumoto, H.; Jarvis, S.P

    2003-07-15

    We have studied the interaction forces and electrical conduction properties arising between multiwall carbon nanotube tips and the Au(1 1 1) surface in air, by means of amplitude modulation scanning force microscopy, also called intermittent contact. We have centered our work on tips with metallic electronic structure and for the specific parameters used we have found a preliminary interaction range where there is no contact between tip and surface. Stable imaging in this non-contact range is possible with multiwall carbon nanotube tips. These tips have also been used to obtain simultaneous topographic and current maps of the surface. They show excellent properties as tips due to their high aspect ratio and durability, as a result of their elastic and non-reactive properties. Correspondingly, multiwall carbon nanotube tips allow high resolution local analysis of electrical conductivity on a nanometer scale.

  20. Hierarchical responses of plant–soil interactions to climate change: consequences for the global carbon cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bardgett, R.D.; Manning, P.; Morrien, E.; De Vries, F.T.

    2013-01-01

    1.Interactions between plant and soil communities play a major role in determining the impact of climate change on ecosystem functioning and the carbon cycle, and the mechanisms involved operate over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. 2.We present a framework for understanding the

  1. Interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with perfluorinated sulfonic acid ionomers and surface treatment studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma; Dhiman, Rajnish; Borghei, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between high surface area nano-carbon catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and perfluorinated sulfonic acid (Nafion®) ionomer was studied 19 fluorine nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (19F-NMR). The method was developed and improved for more...

  2. Growth responses of Populus tremuloides clones to interacting elevated carbon dioxide and tropospheric ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. G. Isebrands; E. P. McDonald; E. Kruger; G. Hendrey; K. Percy; K. Pregitzer; J. Sober; D. F. Karnosky

    2001-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (IPCC) has concluded that the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide (CO2) and tropospheric ozone (O3) are increasing concomitantly globally. Little is known about the effect of these interacting gases on growth, survival, and productivity of forest ecosystems. In this study we assess...

  3. Digital mapping of soil organic carbon contents and stocks in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Hartemink, Alfred E; Minasny, Budiman; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette B; Greve, Mogens H

    2014-01-01

    Estimation of carbon contents and stocks are important for carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions and national carbon balance inventories. For Denmark, we modeled the vertical distribution of soil organic carbon (SOC) and bulk density, and mapped its spatial distribution at five standard soil depth intervals (0-5, 5-15, 15-30, 30-60 and 60-100 cm) using 18 environmental variables as predictors. SOC distribution was influenced by precipitation, land use, soil type, wetland, elevation, wetness index, and multi-resolution index of valley bottom flatness. The highest average SOC content of 20 g kg(-1) was reported for 0-5 cm soil, whereas there was on average 2.2 g SOC kg(-1) at 60-100 cm depth. For SOC and bulk density prediction precision decreased with soil depth, and a standard error of 2.8 g kg(-1) was found at 60-100 cm soil depth. Average SOC stock for 0-30 cm was 72 t ha(-1) and in the top 1 m there was 120 t SOC ha(-1). In total, the soils stored approximately 570 Tg C within the top 1 m. The soils under agriculture had the highest amount of carbon (444 Tg) followed by forest and semi-natural vegetation that contributed 11% of the total SOC stock. More than 60% of the total SOC stock was present in Podzols and Luvisols. Compared to previous estimates, our approach is more reliable as we adopted a robust quantification technique and mapped the spatial distribution of SOC stock and prediction uncertainty. The estimation was validated using common statistical indices and the data and high-resolution maps could be used for future soil carbon assessment and inventories.

  4. Evaluation of smartphone-based interaction techniques in a CAVE in the context of immersive digital project review

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Paul; Kemeny, Andras; Colombet, Florent; Merienne, Frédéric; Chardonnet, Jean-Rémy; Thouvenin, Indira Mouttapa

    2014-02-01

    Immersive digital project reviews consist in using virtual reality (VR) as a tool for discussion between various stakeholders of a project. In the automotive industry, the digital car prototype model is the common thread that binds them. It is used during immersive digital project reviews between designers, engineers, ergonomists, etc. The digital mockup is also used to assess future car architecture, habitability or perceived quality requirements with the aim to reduce using physical mockups for optimized cost, delay and quality efficiency. Among the difficulties identified by the users, handling the mockup is a major one. Inspired by current uses of nomad devices (multi-touch gestures, IPhone UI look'n'feel and AR applications), we designed a navigation technique taking advantage of these popular input devices: Space scrolling allows moving around the mockup. In this paper, we present the results of a study we conducted on the usability and acceptability of the proposed smartphone-based interaction metaphor compared to traditional technique and we provide indications of the most efficient choices for different use-cases accordingly. It was carried out in a traditional 4-sided CAVE and its purpose is to assess a chosen set of interaction techniques to be implemented in Renault's new 5-sides 4K x 4K wall high performance CAVE. The proposed new metaphor using nomad devices is well accepted by novice VR users and future implementation should allow an efficient industrial use. Their use is an easy and user friendly alternative of the existing traditional control devices such as a joystick.

  5. First principles investigation of interaction between impurity atom (Si, Ge, Sn) and carbon atom in diamond-like carbon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaowei; Wang, Aiying; Lee, Kwang-Ryeol

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between impurity atom (Si, Ge, and Sn) and carbon atom in diamond-like carbon (DLC) system was investigated by the first principles simulation method based on the density functional theory. The tetrahedral configuration was selected as the calculation model for simplicity. When the bond angle varied in a range of 90°–130° from the equivalent state of 109.471°, the distortion energy and the electronic structures including charge density of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and partial density of state (PDOS) in the different systems were calculated. The results showed that the addition of Si, Ge and Sn atom into amorphous carbon matrix significantly decreased the distortion energy of the system as the bond angles deviated from the equilibrium one. Further studies of the HOMO and PDOS indicated that the weak covalent bond between Si(Ge, Sn) and C atoms was formed with the decreased strength and directionality, which were influenced by the electronegative difference. These results implied that the electron transfer behavior at the junction of carbon nano-devices could be tailored by the impurity element, and the compressive stress in DLC films could be reduced by the incorporation of Si, Ge and Sn because of the formation of weaker covalent bonds. - Highlights: ►Distortion energy after bond angle distortion was decreased comparing with C-C unit. ►The weak covalent bond was formed between impurity atoms and corner carbon atoms. ►Observed electron transfer behavior affected the strength and directionality of bond. ►Reduction of strength and directionality of bond contributed to small energy change.

  6. Assessment of Learning in Digital Interactive Social Networks: A Learning Analytics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark; Gochyyev, Perman; Scalise, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes initial field-test results from data analytics used in the work of the Assessment and Teaching of 21st Century Skills (ATC21S) project, on the "ICT Literacy--Learning in digital networks" learning progression. This project, sponsored by Cisco, Intel and Microsoft, aims to help educators around the world enable…

  7. The Integration of Digital Tools during Strategic and Interactive Writing Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Jennifer Renée; Saulsburry, Rachel; Dostal, Hannah M.; Wolbers, Kimberly A.; Graham, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to gain insight from the ways a group of elementary teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing chose to integrate digital tools into evidence-based writing instruction and the ways these technologies were used to support student learning. After professional development that exposed these teachers to twelve new digital…

  8. UV laser interaction with a fluorescent dye solution studied using pulsed digital holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Eynas; Gren, Per; Sjödahl, Mikael

    2013-10-21

    A frequency tripled Q-switched Nd-YAG laser (wavelength 355 nm, pulse duration 12 ns) has been used to pump Coumarin 153 dye solved in ethanol. Simultaneously, a frequency doubled pulse (532 nm) from the same laser is used to probe the solvent perpendicularly resulting in a gain through stimulated laser induced fluorescence (LIF) emission. The resulting gain of the probe beam is recorded using digital holography by blending it with a reference beam on the detector. Two digital holograms without and with the pump beam were recorded. Intensity maps were calculated from the recorded digital holograms and used to calculate the gain of the probe beam due to the stimulated LIF. In addition numerical data of the local temperature rise was calculated from the corresponding phase maps using Radon inversion. It was concluded that about 15% of the pump beam energy is transferred to the dye solution as heat while the rest is consumed in the radiative process. The results show that pulsed digital holography is a promising technique for quantitative study of fluorescent species.

  9. Continuous approximation for interaction energy of adamantane encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Hill, James M.; Bacsa, Wolfgang

    2018-02-01

    The interaction energy for two adjacent adamantane molecules and that of adamantane molecules encapsulated inside carbon nanotubes are investigated considering only dipole-dipole induced interaction. The Lennard-Jones potential and the continuous approximation are utilised to derive analytical expressions for these interaction energies. The equilibrium distance 3.281 Å between two adamantane molecules is determined. The smallest carbon nanotube radius b0 that can encapsulate the adamantane molecule and the radius of the tube bmax that gives the maximum suction energy, linearly depend on the adamantane radius, are calculated. For larger diameter tubes, the off axis position has been calculated, and equilibrium distance between molecule and tube wall is found to be close to the interlayer spacing in graphene.

  10. Price determinants of the European carbon market and interactions with energy markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumacher, Katja; Cludius, Johanna; Matthes, Felix [Oeko Institut e.V., Berlin (Germany); Diekmann, Jochen; Zaklan, Aleksandar [Deutsches Institut fuer Wirtschaftsforschung, Berlin (Germany); Schleich, Joachim [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Systemtechnik und Innovationsforschung (ISI), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    This report explores the determinants of short run price movements in the carbon market and their interaction with energy markets, in particular with the electricity market. Focusing on Phase 2 of the EU ETS we conduct econometric time series analysis based on continental EU and UK market data. Our findings suggest that market fundamentals have a dominant effect on the EUA price, but that non-fundamental factors may also play a role. We further found that the electricity price has a significant positive impact on the carbon price in the short run.

  11. The Strategy of Creating a Virtual Interactive Platform for the Low-Carbon Open Innovations Relay

    OpenAIRE

    Mykola S. Shestavin

    2013-01-01

    A strategy for the creation of a Virtual Interactive Platform (or Networking Platform) to combine the four web-baseness of expert systems on the transfer and diffusion of low-carbon technologies. It used the concept of “Open Innovation” and “Triple Helix” with regard to theories of “Green Growth” and “Carbon Footprint”. Interpreters expert systems operate on the basis of models of the “Predator-Prey” for the process of transfer and diffusion of technologies, taking into account the features c...

  12. Surface modification of polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fiber and its interaction with imide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Bing; Wang Xiaoshu; Lu Yun

    2006-01-01

    In this work, sized polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers were chemically modified with nitric acid and maleic anhydride (MA) in order to improve the interaction between carbon fiber surface and polyimide matrix. Bismaleimide (BMI) was selected as a model compound of polyimide to react with modified carbon fiber. The surface characteristic changing after modification and surface reaction was investigated by element analysis (EA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The results indicated that the modification of carbon fiber surface with MA might follow the Diels Alder reaction mechanism. In the surface reaction between modified fibers and BMI, among the various surface functional groups, the hydroxyl group provided from phenolic hydroxyl group and bridged structure on carbon fiber may be the most effective group reacted with imide structure. The results may shed some light on the design of the appropriate surface structure, which could react with polyimide, and the manufacture of the carbon fiber-reinforced polyimide matrix composites

  13. Raman studies of the interactions of fibrous carbon nanomaterials with albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesełucha-Birczyńska, Aleksandra; Morajka, Krzysztof; Stodolak-Zych, Ewa; Długoń, Elżbieta; Dużyja, Maria; Lis, Tomasz; Gubernat, Maciej; Ziąbka, Magdalena; Błażewicz, Marta

    2018-05-01

    Adsorption or immobilization of proteins on synthetic surfaces is a key issue in the context of the biocompatibility of implant materials, especially those intended for the needs of cardiac surgery but also for the construction of biosensors or nanomaterials used as drug carriers. The subject of research was the analysis of Raman spectra of two types of fibrous carbon nanomaterials, of great potential for biomedical applications, incubated with human serum albumin (HSA). The first nanomaterial has been created on the layer of MWCNTs deposited by electrophoretic method (EPD) and then covered by thin film of pyrolytic carbon introduced by chemical vapor deposition process (CVD). The second material was formed from carbonized nanofibers prepared via electrospinning (ESCNFs) of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursor and then covered with pyrolytic carbon (CVD). The G-band blue-shift towards the position of about 1600 cm-1, observed for both studied surfaces, clearly indicates the albumin (HSA) adhesion to the surface. The G and G' (2D) peak shift was employed to assess the stress build up on the carbon nanomaterials. The surface nano- and micro-topography as well as the method of ordering the carbon nanomaterial has a significant influence on the mode of surface-protein interaction.

  14. Analysis of carbon mitigation policies. Feed-in tariffs, energy and carbon price interactions and competitive distortions on carbon markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichenbach, Johanna

    2011-07-19

    I study several policy instruments for carbon mitigation with a focus on subsidies for renewable energies, emission taxes and emission allowances. In Chapter 1, I analyze the optimal design and the welfare implications of two policies consisting of an emission tax for conventional fossil-fuel utilities combined with a subsidy for the producers of renewable energy equipment and an emission tax combined with a feed-in tariff for renewable electricity. In Chapter 2 I study the empirical interrelationships between European emission allowance prices and prices for electricity, hard coal and natural gas with an application to portfolio allocation. In Chapters 3 and 4, I discuss several policy-related issues of emissions trading, in particular the potential for market manipulations by firms holding a dominant position in the emission market, the output market or both, and competitive distortions and leakage due to unequal emission regulations across industries, sectors, regions, or countries. (orig.)

  15. Carbon dots: Synthesis from renewable sources via hydrothermal carbonization, characterization and evaluation of their interaction with biological systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Liz Specian de; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Carbon dots (CDs) constitute a new class of carbon-based nanomaterials with interesting photoluminescent properties that enable their potential use in bioimaging, sensing and drug delivery applications. They consist of quasi spherical nanoparticles with size below 10 nm. As a consequence of their low toxicity and biocompatibility, CDs have been considered as a promising alternative to traditional semiconductor-based quantum dots. In addition, they can be synthesized from accessible renewable sources in an environmentally friendly perspective. In this work, we report the use of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine plasma (BP) as precursors to synthesis of CDs applying hydrothermal carbonization method. The study also includes the physical chemical characterization and the evaluation of interaction between these nanomaterials and biosystems, using hemolytic assay. The morphology and size of the carbon nanoparticles were analyzed by Transmission Electronic Microscopy. CDs obtained from BSA (BSA-CDs) and BP (BP-CDs) had spherical shape with an average size of 5.6 and 3.7 nm, respectively. The fluorescence quantum yield was calculated using quinine sulfate as reference. BSA-CDs and BP-CDs exhibited quantum yields of 4.9% and 4.0%, when they were excited at wavelength of 315 and 300 nm, respectively. Furthermore, the red-shift phenomenon was observed in the emission spectra of both synthesized CDs, indicating the formation of particles with different sizes or the presence of surface energy traps distribution. The composition of CDs was determined by Elemental Analysis and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Both nanomaterials contained C, N, O and S elements. The hemolytic assay demonstrated the synthesized CDs did not cause damage to red blood cell membrane at concentrations between 5 and 250 μg mL -1 . (author)

  16. Carbon dots: Synthesis from renewable sources via hydrothermal carbonization, characterization and evaluation of their interaction with biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Liz Specian de; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz, E-mail: liz.specian@hotmail.com.br [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Carbon dots (CDs) constitute a new class of carbon-based nanomaterials with interesting photoluminescent properties that enable their potential use in bioimaging, sensing and drug delivery applications. They consist of quasi spherical nanoparticles with size below 10 nm. As a consequence of their low toxicity and biocompatibility, CDs have been considered as a promising alternative to traditional semiconductor-based quantum dots. In addition, they can be synthesized from accessible renewable sources in an environmentally friendly perspective. In this work, we report the use of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and bovine plasma (BP) as precursors to synthesis of CDs applying hydrothermal carbonization method. The study also includes the physical chemical characterization and the evaluation of interaction between these nanomaterials and biosystems, using hemolytic assay. The morphology and size of the carbon nanoparticles were analyzed by Transmission Electronic Microscopy. CDs obtained from BSA (BSA-CDs) and BP (BP-CDs) had spherical shape with an average size of 5.6 and 3.7 nm, respectively. The fluorescence quantum yield was calculated using quinine sulfate as reference. BSA-CDs and BP-CDs exhibited quantum yields of 4.9% and 4.0%, when they were excited at wavelength of 315 and 300 nm, respectively. Furthermore, the red-shift phenomenon was observed in the emission spectra of both synthesized CDs, indicating the formation of particles with different sizes or the presence of surface energy traps distribution. The composition of CDs was determined by Elemental Analysis and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Both nanomaterials contained C, N, O and S elements. The hemolytic assay demonstrated the synthesized CDs did not cause damage to red blood cell membrane at concentrations between 5 and 250 μg mL{sup -1}. (author)

  17. Interactive effects between carbon allotrope fillers on the mechanical reinforcement of polyisoprene based nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Galimberti

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Interactive effects of carbon allotropes on the mechanical reinforcement of polymer nanocomposites were investigated. Carbon nanotubes (CNT and nano-graphite with high shape anisotropy (nanoG were melt blended with poly(1,4-cis-isoprene, as the only fillers or in combination with carbon black (CB, measuring the shear modulus at low strain amplitudes for peroxide crosslinked composites. The nanofiller was found to increase the low amplitude storage modulus of the matrix, with or without CB, by a factor depending on nanofiller type and content. This factor, fingerprint of the nanofiller, was higher for CNT than for nanoG. The filler-polymer interfacial area was able to correlate modulus data of composites with CNT, CB and with the hybrid filler system, leading to the construction of a common master curve.

  18. Galvanic Interaction between Chalcopyrite and Pyrite with Low Alloy and High Carbon Chromium Steel Ball

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Azizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to investigate the galvanic interaction between pyrite and chalcopyrite with two types of grinding media (low alloy and high carbon chromium steel ball in grinding of a porphyry copper sulphide ore. Results indicated that injection of different gases into mill altered the oxidation-reduction environment during grinding. High carbon chromium steel ball under nitrogen gas has the lowest galvanic current, and low alloy steel ball under oxygen gas had the highest galvanic current. Also, results showed that the media is anodic relative to pyrite and chalcopyrite, and therefore pyrite or chalcopyrite with a higher rest potential acted as the cathode, whilst the grinding media with a lower rest potential acted as the anode, when they are electrochemically contacted. It was also found that low alloy steel under oxygen produced the highest amount of EDTA extractable iron in the slurry, whilst high carbon chromium steel under nitrogen atmosphere led to the lowest amount.

  19. Development of an Intelligent Digital Watershed to understand water-human interaction for a sustainable Agroeconomy in Midwest USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Rapolu, U.; Ding, D.; Muste, M.; Bennett, D.; Schnoor, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Human activity is intricately linked to the quality and quantity of water resources. Although many studies have examined water-human interaction, the complexity of such coupled systems is not well understood largely because of gaps in our knowledge of water-cycle processes which are heavily influenced by socio-economic drivers. Considerable research has been performed to develop an understanding of the impact of local land use decisions on field and catchment processes at an annual basis. Still less is known about the impact of economic and environmental outcomes on decision-making processes at the local and national level. Traditional geographic information management systems lack the ability to support the modeling and analysis of complex spatial processes. New frameworks are needed to track, query, and analyze the massive amounts of data generated by ensembles of simulations produced by multiple models that couple socioeconomic and natural system processes. On this context, we propose to develop an Intelligent Digital Watershed (IDW) which fuses emerging concepts of Digital Watershed (DW). DW is a comprehensive characterization of the eco hydrologic systems based on the best available digital data generated by measurements and simulations models. Prototype IDW in the form of a cyber infrastructure based engineered system will facilitate novel insights into human/environment interactions through multi-disciplinary research focused on watershed-related processes at multiple spatio-temporal scales. In ongoing effort, the prototype IDW is applied to Clear Creek watershed, an agricultural dominating catchment in Iowa, to understand water-human processes relevant to management decisions by farmers regarding agro ecosystems. This paper would also lay out the database design that stores metadata about simulation scenarios, scenario inputs and outputs, and connections among these elements- essentially the database. The paper describes the cyber infrastructure and

  20. Viscosity controlled magma-carbonate interaction: a comparison of Mt. Vesuvius (Italy) and Mt. Merapi (Indonesia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, L. S.; Misiti, V.; Masotta, M.; Taddeucci, J.; Freda, C.; Troll, V. R.; Deegan, F. M.; Jolis, E. M.

    2012-04-01

    Magma-carbonate interaction is increasingly seen as a viable and extremely important cause of magma contamination, and the generation of a crustally sourced CO2 phase (Goff et al., 2001; Freda et al., 2010). Even though the process is well recognized at certain volcanoes e.g. Popocatépetl, (Mexico); Merapi, (Indonesia); and Colli Albani, (Italy) (Goff et al., 2001; Deegan et al., 2010; Freda et al., 2010), neither the kinetics of carbonate assimilation nor its consequences for controlling the explosivity of eruptions have been constrained. Here we show the results of magma-carbonate interaction experiments conducted at 1200 °C and 0.5 GPa for varying durations (0 s, 60 s, 90 s and 300 s) for the Mt. Merapi (Indonesia) and Mt. Vesuvius (Italy) volcanic systems. We performed experiments using glassy starting materials specific to each volcano (shoshonite for Mt. Vesuvius, basaltic-andesite for Mt. Merapi) with different degrees of hydration (anhydrous vs hydration with ~ 2 wt % water) and using carbonate fragments of local origin; see Deegan et al., (2010) and Jolis et al., (2011). Experimental products include a gas phase (CO2-rich) and two melt phases, one pristine (Ca-normal) and one contaminated (Ca-rich) separated by a 'contamination front' which propagates outwards from the carbonate clast. Vesicles appear to nucleate in the contaminated glass and then migrate into the pristine one. Both contamination front propagation and bubble migration away from the carbonate are slower in anhydrous basaltic-andesite (Merapi anhydrous series) than in hydrated basaltic-andesite and shoshonite (Merapi and Vesuvius hydrated series), suggesting that assimilation speed is strongly controlled by the degree of hydration and the SiO2 content, both of which influence melt viscosity and hence diffusivity. As the carbonate dissolution proceeds in our experiments, initially dissolved and eventually exsolved CO2 builds up in the contaminated Ca-rich melt phase. Once melt volatile

  1. Designing and Evaluating Tutoring Feedback Strategies for digital learning environments on the basis of the Interactive Tutoring Feedback Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Narciss

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the interactive tutoring feedback model (ITF-model; Narciss, 2006; 2008, and how it can be applied to the design and evaluation of feedback strategies for digital learning environments. The ITF-model conceptualizes formative tutoring feedback as a multidimensional instructional activity that aims at contributing to the regulation of a learning process in order to help learners acquire or improve the competencies needed to master learning tasks. It integrates findings from systems theory with recommendations of prior research on interactive instruction and elaborated feedback, on task analyses, on error analyses, and on tutoring techniques. Based on this multi-dimensional view of formative tutoring feedback methodological implications for designing and investigating multiple effects of feedback under multiple individual and situational conditions are described. Furthermore, the paper outlines how the implications of the ITF-model have been applied in several studies to the design and evaluation of tutoring feedback strategies for digital learning environments (e.g., Narciss, 2004; Narciss & Huth, 2006; Narciss, Schnaubert, Andres, Eichelmann, Goguadze, & Sosnovsky, 2013.

  2. A systematic review of digital interactive television systems and their applications in the health and social care fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Steven; Brownsell, Simon; Hawley, Mark S

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a systematic review of the applications and technical features of digital interactive television (DITV) in the health and social care fields. The Web of Knowledge and IEEE Xplore databases were searched for articles published between January 2000 and March 2010 which related to DITV systems facilitating the communication of information to/from an individual's home with either a health or social care application. Out of 1679 articles retrieved, 42 met the inclusion criteria and were selected for review. An additional 20 articles were obtained from online grey literature sources. Twenty-five DITV systems operating in health and social care were identified, including seven commercial systems. The most common applications were related to health care, such as vital signs monitoring (68% of systems) and health information or advice (56% of systems). The most common technical features of DITV systems were two-way communication (88%), medical peripherals (68%), on-screen messaging (48%) and video communication (36%). Digital interactive television has the potential to deliver health and social care to people in their own homes. However, the requirement for a high-bandwidth communications infrastructure, the usability of the systems, their level of personalisation and the lack of evidence regarding clinical and cost-effectiveness will all need to be addressed if this approach is to flourish.

  3. Interaction between carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles and porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Song-Bae; Kang, Jin-Kyu; Yi, In-Geol

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanomaterials, such as carbon nanotubes, fullerene, and graphene, have received considerable attention due to their unique physical and chemical characteristics, leading to mass production and widespread application in industrial, commercial, and environmental fields. During their life cycle from production to disposal, however, carbon nanomaterials are inevitably released into water and soil environments, which have resulted in concern about their health and environmental impacts. Carbon black is a nano-sized amorphous carbon powder that typically contains 90-99% elemental carbon. It can be produced from incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons in petroleum and coal. Carbon black is widely used in chemical and industrial products or applications such as ink pigments, coating plastics, the rubber industry, and composite reinforcements. Even though carbon black is strongly hydrophobic and tends to aggregate in water, it can be dispersed in aqueous media through surface functionalization or surfactant use. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the transport behavior of carboxyl-functionalized carbon black nanoparticles (CBNPs) in porous media. Column experiments were performed for potassium chloride (KCl), a conservative tracer, and CBNPs under saturated flow conditions. Column experiments was conducted in duplicate using quartz sand, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS), and aluminum oxide-coated sand (AOCS) to examine the effect of metal (Fe, Al) oxide presence on the transport of CBNPs. Breakthrough curves (BTCs) of CBNPs and chloride were obtained by monitoring effluent, and then mass recovery was quantified from these curves. Additionally, interaction energy profiles for CBNP-porous media were calculated using DLVO theory for sphere-plate geometry. The BTCs of chloride had relative peak concentrations ranging from 0.895 to 0.990. Transport parameters (pore-water velocity v, hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient D) obtained by the model fit from the

  4. Use of interactive live digital imaging to enhance histology learning in introductory level anatomy and physiology classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higazi, Tarig B

    2011-01-01

    Histology is one of the main subjects in introductory college-level Human Anatomy and Physiology classes. Institutions are moving toward the replacement of traditional microscope-based histology learning with virtual microscopy learning amid concerns of losing the valuable learning experience of traditional microscopy. This study used live digital imaging (LDI) of microscopic slides on a SMART board to enhance Histology laboratory teaching. The interactive LDI system consists of a digital camera-equipped microscope that projects live images on a wall-mounted SMART board via a computer. This set-up allows real-time illustration of microscopic slides with highlighted key structural components, as well as the ability to provide the students with relevant study and review material. The impact of interactive LDI on student learning of Histology was then measured based on performance in subsequent laboratory tests before and after its implementation. Student grades increased from a mean of 76% (70.3-82.0, 95% CI) before to 92% (88.8-95.3, 95% CI) after integration of LDI indicating highly significant (P < 0.001) enhancement in students' Histology laboratory performance. In addition, student ratings of the impact of the interactive LDI on their Histology learning were strongly positive, suggesting that a majority of students who valued this learning approach also improved learning and understanding of the material as a result. The interactive LDI technique is an innovative, highly efficient and affordable tool to enhance student Histology learning, which is likely to expand knowledge and student perception of the subject and in turn enrich future science careers. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Anatomists.

  5. Pore-Width-Dependent Preferential Interaction of sp2 Carbon Atoms in Cyclohexene with Graphitic Slit Pores by GCMC Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Kojima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of cyclohexene with two sp2 and four sp3 carbon atoms in graphitic slit pores was studied by performing grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation. The molecular arrangement of the cyclohexene on the graphitic carbon wall depends on the pore width. The distribution peak of the sp2 carbon is closer to the pore wall than that of the sp3 carbon except for the pore width of 0.7 nm, even though the Lennard-Jones size of the sp2 carbon is larger than that of the sp3 carbon. Thus, the difference in the interactions of the sp2 and sp3 carbon atoms of cyclohexene with the carbon pore walls is clearly observed in this study. The preferential interaction of sp2 carbon gives rise to a slight tilting of the cyclohexene molecule against the graphitic wall. This is suggestive of a π-π interaction between the sp2 carbon in the cyclohexene molecule and graphitic carbon.

  6. Interaction of 1-iodochlordecone, as radioactive tracer, with the carboxylate group on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chlordecone is a synthetic organo chlorinated compound that has been used as pesticide. It has been identified and listed as persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The use of activated carbon filters is one of the most widely popular solutions for water decontamination. The chlordecone labeled with radioactive iodine (1-iodochordecone) is a potential radioactive tracer for studying adsorption, environmental availability and bio-distribution of chlordecone. The selection of the best suited activation carbon for this type of contaminants is mainly an empiric process, increasing the costs of research. A simplified activation carbon model, consisting of a seven ring graphene sheet with a functional group (carboxylate) was used to assess the interaction of chlordecone and 1-iodochlordecone with this surface group under neutral pH conditions over the adsorption process. The Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology with the semiempirical Hamiltonian PM7 was used. The results indicate that for carboxylate, in neutral conditions, significant associations appear which suggest chemisorption in activated carbon. No significant differences were observed for the interactions of chlordecone and 1 iodochlordecone with carboxylate, making 1-iodochlordecone a good candidate as a radioactive tracer in medical research. (author)

  7. Experimental Characterization Of The Interaction Between Carbon Fiber Composite Prepregs During The Preforming Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weizhao; Zhang, Zixuan; Lu, Jie; Wang, Q Jane; Su, Xuming; Zeng, Danielle; Mirdamadi, Mansour; Cao, Jian

    2016-04-06

    Carbon fiber composites have received growing attention because of their high performance. One economic method to manufacturing the composite parts is the sequence of forming followed by the compression molding process. In this sequence, the preforming procedure forms the prepreg, which is the composite with the uncured resin, to the product geometry while the molding process cures the resin. Slip between different prepreg layers is observed in the preforming step and this paper reports a method to characterize the properties of the interaction between different prepreg layers, which is critical to predictive modeling and design optimization. An experimental setup was established to evaluate the interactions at various industrial production conditions. The experimental results were analyzed for an in-depth understanding about how the temperature, the relative sliding speed, and the fiber orientation affect the tangential interaction between two prepreg layers. The interaction factors measured from these experiments will be implemented in the computational preforming program.

  8. Digital displacements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pors, Anja Svejgaard

    2014-01-01

    In recent years digital reforms are being introduced in the municipal landscape of Denmark. The reforms address the interaction between citizen and local authority. The aim is, that by 2015 at least 80 per cent of all correspondence between citizens and public authority will be transmitted through...... digital interface. However, the transformation of citizen services from traditional face-to-face interaction to digital self-service gives rise to new practices; some citizens need support to be able to manage self-service through digital tools. A mixture of support and teaching, named co......-service, is a new task in public administration, where street level bureaucrats assist citizens in using the new digital solutions. The paper is based on a case study conducted primarily in a citizen service centre in Copenhagen, Denmark. Based on ethnography the paper gives an empirical account of the ongoing...

  9. Stabilization of growth of a pearlite colony because of interaction between carbon and lattice dilatations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, I. K.

    2017-10-01

    The previously proposed model of pearlite transformation develops taking into account the possible interaction between carbon and lattice dilatations arising in austenite near the pearlite colony. The normal stresses caused by the colony stimulate autocatalysis of plates, and tangential stresses promote the stabilization of the transformation front. The mechanism of ferrite branching, which can play an important role in the kinetics of pearlite and bainite transformations, is discussed.

  10. Regulation of catalytic behaviour of hydrolases through interactions with functionalized carbon-based nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlidis, Ioannis V.; Vorhaben, Torge; Gournis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, George K.; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Stamatis, Haralambos

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of enzymes with carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) is crucial for the function of biomolecules and therefore for the design and development of effective nanobiocatalytic systems. In this study, the effect of functionalized CBNs, such as graphene oxide (GO) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs), on the catalytic behaviour of various hydrolases of biotechnological interest was monitored and the interactions between CBNs and proteins were investigated. The enzyme–nanomaterial interactions significantly affect the catalytic behaviour of enzymes, resulting in an increase up to 60 % of the catalytic efficiency of lipases and a decrease up to 30 % of the esterase. Moreover, the use of CNTs and GO derivatives, especially those that are amine-functionalized, led to increased thermal stability of most the hydrolases tested. Fluorescence and circular dichroism studies indicated that the altered catalytic behaviour of enzymes in the presence of CBNs arises from specific enzyme–nanomaterial interactions, which can lead to significant conformational changes. In the case of lipases, the conformational changes led to a more active and rigid structure, while in the case of esterases this led to destabilization and unfolding. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies indicated that the extent of the interactions between CBNs and hydrolases can be mainly controlled by the functionalization of nanomaterials than by their geometry.

  11. Regulation of catalytic behaviour of hydrolases through interactions with functionalized carbon-based nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlidis, Ioannis V. [University of Ioannina, Laboratory of Biotechnology, Department of Biological Applications and Technologies (Greece); Vorhaben, Torge [Institute of Biochemistry, Greifswald University, Department of Biotechnology and Enzyme Catalysis (Germany); Gournis, Dimitrios [University of Ioannina, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (Greece); Papadopoulos, George K. [Epirus Institute of Technology, Laboratory of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Faculty of Agricultural Technology (Greece); Bornscheuer, Uwe T. [Institute of Biochemistry, Greifswald University, Department of Biotechnology and Enzyme Catalysis (Germany); Stamatis, Haralambos, E-mail: hstamati@cc.uoi.gr [University of Ioannina, Laboratory of Biotechnology, Department of Biological Applications and Technologies (Greece)

    2012-05-15

    The interaction of enzymes with carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) is crucial for the function of biomolecules and therefore for the design and development of effective nanobiocatalytic systems. In this study, the effect of functionalized CBNs, such as graphene oxide (GO) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs), on the catalytic behaviour of various hydrolases of biotechnological interest was monitored and the interactions between CBNs and proteins were investigated. The enzyme-nanomaterial interactions significantly affect the catalytic behaviour of enzymes, resulting in an increase up to 60 % of the catalytic efficiency of lipases and a decrease up to 30 % of the esterase. Moreover, the use of CNTs and GO derivatives, especially those that are amine-functionalized, led to increased thermal stability of most the hydrolases tested. Fluorescence and circular dichroism studies indicated that the altered catalytic behaviour of enzymes in the presence of CBNs arises from specific enzyme-nanomaterial interactions, which can lead to significant conformational changes. In the case of lipases, the conformational changes led to a more active and rigid structure, while in the case of esterases this led to destabilization and unfolding. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies indicated that the extent of the interactions between CBNs and hydrolases can be mainly controlled by the functionalization of nanomaterials than by their geometry.

  12. Interaction of image noise, spatial resolution, and low contrast fine detail preservation in digital image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artmann, Uwe; Wueller, Dietmar

    2009-01-01

    We present a method to improve the validity of noise and resolution measurements on digital cameras. If non-linear adaptive noise reduction is part of the signal processing in the camera, the measurement results for image noise and spatial resolution can be good, while the image quality is low due to the loss of fine details and a watercolor like appearance of the image. To improve the correlation between objective measurement and subjective image quality we propose to supplement the standard test methods with an additional measurement of the texture preserving capabilities of the camera. The proposed method uses a test target showing white Gaussian noise. The camera under test reproduces this target and the image is analyzed. We propose to use the kurtosis of the derivative of the image as a metric for the texture preservation of the camera. Kurtosis is a statistical measure for the closeness of a distribution compared to the Gaussian distribution. It can be shown, that the distribution of digital values in the derivative of the image showing the chart becomes the more leptokurtic (increased kurtosis) the stronger the noise reduction has an impact on the image.

  13. CYCLE OF PDCA T-LEARING MODEL AND ITS APPLICATION ON INTERACTIVE DIGITAL TV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUSTAVO ALBERTO MORENO LÓPEZ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La televisión digital (TD brinda grandes ventajas pedagógicas y tecnológicas a la educación. La TD se presenta como una novedad para los telespectadores y supone la convergencia de los sectores educativo, telecomunicaciones e internet, en un mismo medio. Esta tecnología permitirá el desarrollo de plataformas educativas interactivas conocidas como t-learning. En la actualidad, son escasos los modelos que describen el proceso de t-learning. En este artículo se presenta un modelo cíclico, que toma en cuenta la retroalimentación del proceso y otros requisitos. Presenta también el marco teórico asociado a t-learning. Describe el modelo PHVA (Planear, Hacer, Verificar, Actuar propuesto, el cual ha sido implementado en un prototipo de un módulo (Fundamentos de redes WiFi en el área de las telecomunicaciones. Este aplicativo se probó en un laboratorio de televisión digital terrestre (TDT.

  14. Investigation of the thermoluminescent properties of nanosized Alpha-Al2 O3 doped with carbon for application in digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Edna C.

    2013-01-01

    Thermoluminescent (TL) materials are mainly used in personal and environmental dosimetry. In addition to these applications, their use as the sensor element in the manufacturing of digital radiographic films has been investigated. Particularly, there is an interest concerned to the influence of the particle size in the TL response and in the resolution of the digital imaging. Aluminum oxide, or alumina, is a mineral found in the ruby or sapphire form, and may be synthetically produced in the alpha or gamma crystalline phase. Since the 50s, these materials have been studied in their diverse forms and phases. Particularly, the microsized α-Al 2 O 3 :C is considered one of the best TL dosimeter ever produced in the word. In this work, nanosized alumina particulates in the alpha phase, sintered at different temperatures and doped with different concentrations of carbon, were investigated aiming application in industrial radiography and medical diagnosis. The mixture of the oxide powder with the carbon source was pressed and sintered at temperatures of 1740 deg C and 1745 deg C, under reducing atmosphere. For doping purposes we have used two sources of carbon, graphite and high purity polyvinyl acetate (PVA), respectively. During the sintering process, intentional inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the oxide crystal lattice is performed, allowing the inclusion of carbon atoms into the crystal lattice. Among the samples studied, the nanosized alumina doped with 0.01at.% of carbon and sintered at 1745 deg C has shown an excellent thermoluminescent response, with sensitivity higher than that of LiF: Mg, Ti (TLD-100), when irradiated under similar conditions. This is an excellent result, since the material with nanosized particles offers the best features for radiographic image. Thus, it is concluded that the α-Al 2 O 3 doped with 0.01at.% of carbon is a good candidate for use in TL films for application in digital radiography. (author)

  15. iSOIL: Interactions between soil related sciences - Linking geophysics, soil science and digital soil mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Peter; Werban, Ulrike; Sauer, Uta

    2010-05-01

    High-resolution soil property maps are one major prerequisite for the specific protection of soil functions and restoration of degraded soils as well as sustainable land use, water and environmental management. To generate such maps the combination of digital soil mapping approaches and remote as well as proximal soil sensing techniques is most promising. However, a feasible and reliable combination of these technologies for the investigation of large areas (e.g. catchments and landscapes) and the assessment of soil degradation threats is missing. Furthermore, there is insufficient dissemination of knowledge on digital soil mapping and proximal soil sensing in the scientific community, to relevant authorities as well as prospective users. As one consequence there is inadequate standardization of techniques. At the poster we present the EU collaborative project iSOIL within the 7th framework program of the European Commission. iSOIL focuses on improving fast and reliable mapping methods of soil properties, soil functions and soil degradation risks. This requires the improvement and integration of advanced soil sampling approaches, geophysical and spectroscopic measuring techniques, as well as pedometric and pedophysical approaches. The focus of the iSOIL project is to develop new and to improve existing strategies and innovative methods for generating accurate, high resolution soil property maps. At the same time the developments will reduce costs compared to traditional soil mapping. ISOIL tackles the challenges by the integration of three major components: (i)high resolution, non-destructive geophysical (e.g. Electromagnetic Induction EMI; Ground Penetrating Radar, GPR; magnetics, seismics) and spectroscopic (e.g., Near Surface Infrared, NIR) methods, (ii)Concepts of Digital Soil Mapping (DSM) and pedometrics as well as (iii)optimized soil sampling with respect to profound soil scientific and (geo)statistical strategies. A special focus of iSOIL lies on the

  16. Gene-diet-interactions in folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism modify colon cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Amy Y; Scherer, Dominique; Poole, Elizabeth; Potter, John D; Curtin, Karen; Makar, Karen; Slattery, Martha L; Caan, Bette J; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2013-04-01

    The importance of folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism (FOCM) in colorectal carcinogenesis is emphasized by observations that high dietary folate intake is associated with decreased risk of colon cancer (CC) and its precursors. Additionally, polymorphisms in FOCM-related genes have been repeatedly associated with risk, supporting a causal relationship between folate and colorectal carcinogenesis. We investigated ten candidate polymorphisms with defined or probable functional impact in eight FOCM-related genes (SHMT1, DHFR, DNMT1, MTHFD1, MTHFR, MTRR, TCN2, and TDG) in 1609 CC cases and 1974 controls for association with CC risk and for interaction with dietary factors. No polymorphism was statistically significantly associated with overall risk of CC. However, statistically significant interactions modifying CC risk were observed for DNMT1 I311V with dietary folate, methionine, vitamin B2 , and vitamin B12 intake and for MTRR I22M with dietary folate, a predefined one-carbon dietary pattern, and vitamin B6 intake. We observed statistically significant gene-diet interactions with five additional polymorphisms. Our results provide evidence that FOCM-related dietary intakes modify the association between CC risk and FOCM allelic variants. These findings add to observations showing that folate-related gene-nutrient interactions play an important role in modifying the risk of CC. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Geometric calibration of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system based on distributed carbon nanotube X-ray source arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changhui Jiang

    Full Text Available Stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (sDBT with distributed X-ray sources based on carbon nanotube (CNT field emission cathodes has been recently proposed as an approach that can prevent motion blur produced by traditional DBT systems. In this paper, we simulate a geometric calibration method based on a proposed multi-source CNT X-ray sDBT system. This method is a projection matrix-based approach with seven geometric parameters, all of which can be obtained from only one projection datum of the phantom. To our knowledge, this study reports the first application of this approach in a CNT-based multi-beam X-ray sDBT system. The simulation results showed that the extracted geometric parameters from the calculated projection matrix are extremely close to the input values and that the proposed method is effective and reliable for a square sDBT system. In addition, a traditional cone-beam computed tomography (CT system was also simulated, and the uncalibrated and calibrated geometric parameters were used in image reconstruction based on the filtered back-projection (FBP method. The results indicated that the images reconstructed with calibrated geometric parameters have fewer artifacts and are closer to the reference image. All the simulation tests showed that this geometric calibration method is optimized for sDBT systems but can also be applied to other application-specific CT imaging systems.

  18. Geometric calibration of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis system based on distributed carbon nanotube X-ray source arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Changhui; Zhang, Na; Gao, Juan; Hu, Zhanli

    2017-01-01

    Stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (sDBT) with distributed X-ray sources based on carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission cathodes has been recently proposed as an approach that can prevent motion blur produced by traditional DBT systems. In this paper, we simulate a geometric calibration method based on a proposed multi-source CNT X-ray sDBT system. This method is a projection matrix-based approach with seven geometric parameters, all of which can be obtained from only one projection datum of the phantom. To our knowledge, this study reports the first application of this approach in a CNT-based multi-beam X-ray sDBT system. The simulation results showed that the extracted geometric parameters from the calculated projection matrix are extremely close to the input values and that the proposed method is effective and reliable for a square sDBT system. In addition, a traditional cone-beam computed tomography (CT) system was also simulated, and the uncalibrated and calibrated geometric parameters were used in image reconstruction based on the filtered back-projection (FBP) method. The results indicated that the images reconstructed with calibrated geometric parameters have fewer artifacts and are closer to the reference image. All the simulation tests showed that this geometric calibration method is optimized for sDBT systems but can also be applied to other application-specific CT imaging systems.

  19. HistoStitcher© : An Interactive Program for Accurate and Rapid Reconstruction of Digitized Whole Histological Sections from Tissue Fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappelow, Jonathan; Tomaszewski, John E.; Feldman, Michael; Shih, Natalie; Madabhushi, Anant

    2011-01-01

    We present an interactive program called HistoStitcher© for accurate and rapid reassembly of histology fragments into a pseudo-whole digitized histological section. HistoStitcher© provides both an intuitive graphical interface to assist the operator in performing the stitch of adjacent histology fragments by selecting pairs of anatomical landmarks, and a set of computational routines for determining and applying an optimal linear transformation to generate the stitched image. Reconstruction of whole histological sections from images of slides containing smaller fragments is required in applications where preparation of whole sections of large tissue specimens is not feasible or efficient, and such whole mounts are required to facilitate (a) disease annotation and (b) image registration with radiological images. Unlike manual reassembly of image fragments in a general purpose image editing program (such as Photoshop), HistoStitcher© provides memory efficient operation on high resolution digitized histology images and a highly flexible stitching process capable of producing more accurate results in less time. Further, by parameterizing the series of transformations determined by the stitching process, the stitching parameters can be saved, loaded at a later time, refined, or reapplied to multi-resolution scans, or quickly transmitted to another site. In this paper, we describe in detail the design of HistoStitcher© and the mathematical routines used for calculating the optimal image transformation, and demonstrate its operation for stitching high resolution histology quadrants of a prostate specimen to form a digitally reassembled whole histology section, for 8 different patient studies. To evaluate stitching quality, a 6 point scoring scheme, which assesses the alignment and continuity of anatomical structures important for disease annotation, is employed by three independent expert pathologists. For 6 studies compared with this scheme, reconstructed sections

  20. MIDAS, prototype Multivariate Interactive Digital Analysis System, phase 1. Volume 1: System description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegler, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    The MIDAS System is described as a third-generation fast multispectral recognition system able to keep pace with the large quantity and high rates of data acquisition from present and projected sensors. A principal objective of the MIDAS program is to provide a system well interfaced with the human operator and thus to obtain large overall reductions in turnaround time and significant gains in throughput. The hardware and software are described. The system contains a mini-computer to control the various high-speed processing elements in the data path, and a classifier which implements an all-digital prototype multivariate-Gaussian maximum likelihood decision algorithm operating at 200,000 pixels/sec. Sufficient hardware was developed to perform signature extraction from computer-compatible tapes, compute classifier coefficients, control the classifier operation, and diagnose operation.

  1. MIDAS, prototype Multivariate Interactive Digital Analysis System, phase 1. Volume 3: Wiring diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegler, F. J.; Christenson, D.; Gordon, M.; Kistler, R.; Lampert, S.; Marshall, R.; Mclaughlin, R.

    1974-01-01

    The Midas System is a third-generation, fast, multispectral recognition system able to keep pace with the large quantity and high rates of data acquisition from present and projected sensors. A principal objective of the MIDAS Program is to provide a system well interfaced with the human operator and thus to obtain large overall reductions in turn-around time and significant gains in throughput. The hardware and software generated in Phase I of the overall program are described. The system contains a mini-computer to control the various high-speed processing elements in the data path and a classifier which implements an all-digital prototype multivariate-Gaussian maximum likelihood decision algorithm operating at 2 x 100,000 pixels/sec. Sufficient hardware was developed to perform signature extraction from computer-compatible tapes, compute classifier coefficients, control the classifier operation, and diagnose operation. The MIDAS construction and wiring diagrams are given.

  2. MIDAS, prototype Multivariate Interactive Digital Analysis System, Phase 1. Volume 2: Diagnostic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegler, F. J.; Christenson, D.; Gordon, M.; Kistler, R.; Lampert, S.; Marshall, R.; Mclaughlin, R.

    1974-01-01

    The MIDAS System is a third-generation, fast, multispectral recognition system able to keep pace with the large quantity and high rates of data acquisition from present and projected sensors. A principal objective of the MIDAS Program is to provide a system well interfaced with the human operator and thus to obtain large overall reductions in turn-around time and significant gains in throughout. The hardware and software generated in Phase I of the over-all program are described. The system contains a mini-computer to control the various high-speed processing elements in the data path and a classifier which implements an all-digital prototype multivariate-Gaussian maximum likelihood decision algorithm operating 2 x 105 pixels/sec. Sufficient hardware was developed to perform signature extraction from computer-compatible tapes, compute classifier coefficients, control the classifier operation, and diagnose operation. Diagnostic programs used to test MIDAS' operations are presented.

  3. [Evaluation of digital educational student-technology interaction in neonatal nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Fernanda Salim Ferreira de; Dias, Danielle Monteiro Vilela; Higarashi, Ieda Harumi; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan; Fonseca, Luciana Mara Monti

    2015-02-01

    To assess the digital educational technology interface Caring for the sensory environment in the neonatal unit: noise, lighting and handling based on ergonomic criteria. Descriptive study, in which we used the guidelines and ergonomic criteria established by ISO 9241-11 and an online Likert scale instrument to identify problems and interface qualities. The instrument was built based on Ergolist, which follows the criteria of ISO 9141-11. There were 58 undergraduate study participants from the School of Nursing of Ribeirao Preto, University of Sao Paulo, who attended the classes about neonatal nursing content. All items were positively evaluated by more than 70% of the sample. Educational technology is appropriate according to the ergonomic criteria and can be made available for teaching nursing students.

  4. Interactive Digital e-Health Game for Heart Failure Self-Management: A Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprac, Paul; O'Hair, Matt; Bias, Randolph; Kim, Miyong T.; Bradley, Paul; Mackert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To develop and test the prototype of a serious digital game for improving community-dwelling older adults' heart failure (HF) knowledge and self-management behaviors. The serious game innovatively incorporates evidence-based HF guidelines with contemporary game technology. Materials and Methods: The study included three phases: development of the game prototype, its usability assessment, and evaluation of the game's functionality. Usability testing included researchers' usability assessment, followed by research personnel's observations of participants playing the game, and participants' completion of a usability survey. Next, in a pretest–post-test design, validated instruments—the Atlanta Heart Failure Knowledge Test and the Self Care for Heart Failure Index—were used to measure improvement in HF self-management knowledge and behaviors related to HF self-maintenance, self-management, and self-efficacy, respectively. A postgame survey assessed participants' perceptions of the game. Results: During usability testing, with seven participants, 100%, 100%, and 86% found the game easy to play, enjoyable, and helpful for learning about HF, respectively. In the subsequent functionality testing, with 19 participants, 89% found the game interesting, enjoyable, and easy to play. Playing the game resulted in a significant improvement in HF self-management knowledge, a nonsignificant improvement in self-reported behaviors related to HF self-maintenance, and no difference in HF self-efficacy scores. Participants with lower education level and age preferred games to any other medium for receiving information. Conclusion: It is feasible to develop a serious digital game that community-dwelling older adults with HF find both satisfying and acceptable and that can improve their self-management knowledge. PMID:27976955

  5. Molecular interactions and thermal transport in ionic liquids with carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, João M P; Nieto de Castro, Carlos A; Pádua, Agílio A H

    2017-07-05

    We used molecular dynamics simulation to study the effect of suspended carbon nanomaterials, nanotubes and graphene sheets, on the thermal conductivity of ionic liquids, an issue related to understanding the properties of nanofluids. One important aspect that we developed is an atomistic model of the interactions between the organic ions and carbon nanomaterials, so we did not rely on existing force fields for small organic molecules or assume simple combining rules to describe the interactions at the liquid/material interface. Instead, we used quantum calculations with a density functional suitable for non-covalent interactions to parameterize an interaction model, including van der Waals terms and also atomic partial charges on the materials. We fitted a n-m interaction potential function with n values of 9 or 10 and m values between 5 and 8, so a 12-6 Lennard-Jones function would not fit the quantum calculations. For the atoms of ionic liquids and carbon nanomaterials interacting among themselves, we adopted existing models from the literature. We studied the imidazolium ionic liquids [C 4 C 1 im][SCN], [C 4 C 1 im][N(CN) 2 ], [C 4 C 1 im][C(CN) 3 ] and [C 4 C 1 im][(CF 3 SO 2 ) 2 N]. Attraction is stronger for cations (than for anions) above and below the π-system of the nanomaterials, whereas anions show stronger attraction for the hydrogenated edges. The ordering of ions around and inside (7,7) and (10,10) single-walled nanotubes, and near a stack of graphene sheets, was analysed in terms of density distribution functions. We verified that anions are found, as well as cations, in the first interfacial layer interacting with the materials, which is surprising given the interaction potential surfaces. The thermal conductivity of the ionic liquids and of composite systems containing one nanotube or one graphene stack in suspension was calculated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics. Thermal conductivity was calculated along the axis of the nanotube and

  6. Nanomaterial–protein interactions: the case of pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes and porcine gastric mucin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbero, Nadia; Marenchino, Marco; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Bonandini, Luca; Boskovic, Jasminka; Viscardi, Guido; Visentin, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    Mucus represents a serious obstacle that prevents the penetration of drug carrier's transport across the mucus barrier. This study highlights the interaction between mucin glycoprotein, mucin from porcine stomach Type III (PGM) and different pristine and functionalized single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs), under physiological conditions, in order to investigate the affinity of different CNTs to mucin. This aspect could be of the utmost importance for the use of CNTs for biomedical purposes. The interaction between CNTs and PGM was investigated by using different techniques like fluorescence steady-state spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic light scattering (DLS), circular dichroism (CD), electrophoresis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We demonstrated that mucin has impressive capabilities for binding CNTs in physiological solutions. Moreover, we proved that the nanomaterial–protein interaction is influenced by the different natures of the tubes (SW and MW) and by their different functionalizations (pristine and oxidized CNTs).Graphical Abstract

  7. Capacitance, charge dynamics, and electrolyte-surface interactions in functionalized carbide-derived carbon electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Dyatkin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the dynamics of ionic liquid electrolyte inside of defunctionalized, hydrogenated, and aminated pores of carbide-derived carbon supercapacitor electrodes. The approach tailors surface functionalities and tunes nanoporous structures to decouple the influence of pore wall composition on capacitance, ionic resistance, and long-term cyclability. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering probes the self-diffusion properties and electrode-ion interactions of electrolyte molecules confined in functionalized pores. Room-temperature ionic liquid interactions in confined pores are strongest when the hydrogen-containing groups are present on the surface. This property translates into higher capacitance and greater ion transport through pores during electrochemical cycling. Unlike hydrogenated pores, aminated pores do not favorably interact with ionic liquid ions and, subsequently, are outperformed by defunctionalized surfaces.

  8. Capacitance, charge dynamics, and electrolyte-surface interactions in functionalized carbide-derived carbon electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Mamontov, Eugene; Cook, Kevin M.; Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-12-01

    This study analyzed the dynamics of ionic liquid electrolyte inside of defunctionalized, hydrogenated, and aminated pores of carbide-derived carbon supercapacitor electrodes. The approach tailors surface functionalities and tunes nanoporous structures to decouple the influence of pore wall composition on capacitance, ionic resistance, and long-term cyclability. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering probes the self-diffusion properties and electrode-ion interactions of electrolyte molecules confined in functionalized pores. Room-temperature ionic liquid interactions in confined pores are strongest when the hydrogen-containing groups are present on the surface. This property translates into higher capacitance and greater ion transport through pores during electrochemical cycling. Unlike hydrogenated pores, aminated pores do not favorably interact with ionic liquid ions and, subsequently, are outperformed by defunctionalized surfaces.

  9. Digital dissection and three-dimensional interactive models of limb musculature in the Australian estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus porosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada J Klinkhamer

    Full Text Available Digital dissection is a relatively new technique that has enabled scientists to gain a better understanding of vertebrate anatomy. It can be used to rapidly disseminate detailed, three-dimensional information in an easily accessible manner that reduces the need for destructive, traditional dissections. Here we present the results of a digital dissection on the appendicular musculature of the Australian estuarine crocodile (Crocodylus porosus. A better understanding of this until now poorly known system in C. porosus is important, not only because it will expand research into crocodilian locomotion, but because of its potential to inform muscle reconstructions in dinosaur taxa. Muscles of the forelimb and hindlimb are described and three-dimensional interactive models are included based on CT and MRI scans as well as fresh-tissue dissections. Differences in the arrangement of musculature between C. porosus and other groups within the Crocodylia were found. In the forelimb, differences are restricted to a single tendon of origin for triceps longus medialis. For the hindlimb, a reduction in the number of heads of ambiens was noted as well as changes to the location of origin and insertion for iliofibularis and gastrocnemius externus.

  10. High-temperature interaction of low niobium oxides with carbon and nitrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyubimov, V.D.; Alyamovskij, S.I.; Askarova, L.Kh.

    1980-01-01

    Presented are the results of investigation on the process of high-temperature interaction (1200-1300 deg C) of NbO 2 and NbO with carbon (in the helium medium) and nitrogen. The reaction between NbO 2 and carbon is successfully realized at 1300 deg C and involves two stages, viz. reduction of oxide by the mechanism of direct reduction and subsequent insertion of metalloid into the oxygen vacancies formed. As a result, on the base of the initial oxide a cubic phase is formed, its final composition at 1300 deg C corresponding to the formula NbCsub(0.74)Osub(0.28). Neither NbO monoxide, nor metal is detected in the reaction products under these conditions. Interaction of NbO 2 with carbon and nitrogen proceeds in the similar way. In this case, the oxygen vacancies formed are occupied by the atoms of the two metalloids the end-product of the reaction at 1300 deg C being oxycarbonitride NbCsub(0.30)Nsub(0.66)Osub(0.66). Intermediate products of the reaction between NbO and metalloids involve oxycarbide, oxynitride, or oxycarbonitride and dioxide of niobium, while the end products contain only a cubic phase [ru

  11. Influence of electrolyte ion-solvent interactions on the performances of supercapacitors porous carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaux, C.; Matei Ghimbeu, C.; Dahbi, M.; Anouti, M.; Lemordant, D.; Béguin, F.; Vix-Guterl, C.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.

    2014-10-01

    The development of advanced and safe electrochemical supercapacitors or hybrid supercapacitors combining a battery electrode material such as graphite and a porous carbon electrode implies the use of new electrolytes containing a tetra-alkylammonium or lithium salt dissolved preferentially in a safe and environmentally friendly solvent such as alkylcarbonates. In those systems, the carbon porosity of the activated carbon electrode controls the electrochemical behavior of the whole device. In this work, it is demonstrated that electrolytes containing highly polarizing ions such as Li+ dissolved in polar solvents such as alkylcarbonates do not completely loss their solvation shell at the opposite of what is observed for poorly solvated cations like TEABF4. As a consequence, the optimal carbon pore size for obtaining the largest energy density, while keeping a high power density, is wider when strongly solvated cations, like Li+ are used than for conventional organic electrolytes using acetonitrile as solvent and TEA+ as salt cations. TEA+ cations are easily desolvated and hence are able to penetrate in small pores matching the dimensions of bare ions. The dissimilarity of behavior of alkylcarbonates and acetonitrile based electrolytes highlights the importance of ion-solvent interactions when searching the optimal porous texture for the electrode material.

  12. Orbital hyperfine interaction and qubit dephasing in carbon nanotube quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palyi, Andras; Csiszar, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Hyperfine interaction (HF) is of key importance for the functionality of solid-state quantum information processing, as it affects qubit coherence and enables nuclear-spin quantum memories. In this work, we complete the theory of the basic hyperfine interaction mechanisms (Fermi contact, dipolar, orbital) in carbon nanotube quantum dots by providing a theoretical description of the orbital HF. We find that orbital HF induces an interaction between the nuclear spins of the nanotube lattice and the valley degree of freedom of the electrons confined in the quantum dot. We show that the resulting nuclear-spin-electron-valley interaction (i) is approximately of Ising type, (ii) is essentially local, in the sense that an effective atomic interaction strength can be defined, and (iii) has a strength that is comparable to the combined strength of Fermi contact and dipolar interactions. We argue that orbital HF provides a new decoherence mechanism for single-electron valley qubits and spin-valley qubits in a range of multi-valley materials. We explicitly evaluate the corresponding inhomogeneous dephasing time T2* for a nanotube-based valley qubit. We acknowledge funding from the EU Marie Curie CIG-293834, OTKA Grant PD 100373, and EU ERC Starting Grant CooPairEnt 258789. AP is supported by the Janos Bolyai Scholarship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  13. New digital communication strategies: the effects of personalized and interactive political communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noort, G.; Kruikemeier, S.; Vliegenthart, R.

    2012-01-01

    In communication research, it has been claimed that two important characteristics of online political communication, personalized and interactive two-way communication, can mobilize citizens to become more politically involved. In a survey-embedded experiment, we examine whether levels of

  14. Kinetics and mechanisms of interactions of nitrogen and carbon monoxide with liquid niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.G.

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of interactions of N 2 and CO with liquid niobium were investigated in the temperature range of 2,700 to 3,000 K in samples levitated in N 2 /Ar and CO/Ar streams. The nitrogen absorption and desorption processes were found to be second-order with respect to nitrogen concentration, indicating that the rate controlling step is either the adsorption of nitrogen molecules on the liquid surface or dissociation of absorbed nitrogen molecules into adsorbed atoms. The carbon and oxygen dissolution in liquid niobium from CO gas is an exothermic process and the solubilities of carbon and oxygen (C Ce , C Oe in at%) are related to the temperature and the partial pressure of CO. The reaction CO → [C] + [O] along with the evaporation of niobium oxide takes place during C and O dissolution, whereas C and O desorption occurs via CO evolution only

  15. Microscopical characterization of carbon materials derived from coal and petroleum and their interaction phenomena in making steel electrodes, anodes and cathode blocks for the Microscopy of Carbon Materials Working Group of the ICCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predeanu, G.; Panaitescu, C.; Bălănescu, M.; Bieg, G.; Borrego, A.G.; Diez, M. A.; Hackley, Paul C.; Kwiecińska, B.; Marques, M.; Mastalerz, Maria; Misz-Kennan, M.; Pusz, S.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.; Rodrigues, S.; Singh, A. K.; Varma, A. K.; Zdravkov, A.; Zivotić, D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the evaluation of petrographic textures representing the structural organization of the organic matter derived from coal and petroleum and their interaction phenomena in the making of steel electrodes, anodes and cathode blocks.This work represents the results of the Microscopy of Carbon Materials Working Group in Commission III of the International Committee for Coal and Organic Petrology between the years 2009 and 2013. The round robin exercises were run on photomicrograph samples. For textural characterization of carbon materials the existing ASTM classification system for metallurgical coke was applied.These round robin exercises involved 15 active participants from 12 laboratories who were asked to assess the coal and petroleum based carbons and to identify the morphological differences, as optical texture (isotropic/anisotropic), optical type (punctiform, mosaic, fibre, ribbon, domain), and size. Four sets of digital black and white microphotographs comprising 151 photos containing 372 fields of different types of organic matter were examined. Based on the unique ability of carbon to form a wide range of textures, the results showed an increased number of carbon occurrences which have crucial role in the chosen industrial applications.The statistical method used to evaluate the results was based on the “raw agreement indices”. It gave a new and original view on the analysts' opinion by not only counting the correct answers, but also all of the knowledge and experience of the participants. Comparative analyses of the average values of the level of overall agreement performed by each analyst in the exercises during 2009–2013 showed a great homogeneity in the results, the mean value being 90.36%, with a minimum value of 83% and a maximum value of 95%.

  16. Digital gaming and second language development: Japanese learners interactions in a MMORPG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Peterson

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs are identified as valuable arenas for language learning, as they provide access to contexts and types of interaction that are held to be beneficial in second language acquisition research. This paper will describe the development and key features of these games, and explore claims made regarding their value as environments for language learning. The discussion will then examine current research. This is followed by an analysis of the findings from an experimental qualitative study that investigates the interaction and attitudes of Japanese English as a foreign language learners who participated in MMORPG-based game play. The analysis draws attention to the challenging nature of the communication environment and the need for learner training. The findings indicate that system management issues, proficiency levels, the operation of affective factors, and prior gaming experiences appeared to influence participation. The data shows that for the intermediate learners who were novice users, the interplay of these factors appeared to restrict opportunities to engage in beneficial forms of interaction. In a positive finding, it was found that the intermediate and advanced level participants effectively utilized both adaptive and transfer discourse management strategies. Analysis reveals they took the lead in managing their discourse, and actively engaged in collaborative social interaction involving dialog in the target language. Participant feedback suggests that real time computer-based nature of the interaction provided benefits. These include access to an engaging social context, enjoyment, exposure to new vocabulary, reduced anxiety, and valuable opportunities to practice using a foreign language. This paper concludes by identifying areas of interest for future research.

  17. Development of digital interactive processing system for NOAA satellites AVHRR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R. K.; Murthy, N. N.

    The paper discusses the digital image processing system for NOAA/AVHRR data including Land applications - configured around VAX 11/750 host computer supported with FPS 100 Array Processor, Comtal graphic display and HP Plotting devices; wherein the system software for relational Data Base together with query and editing facilities, Man-Machine Interface using form, menu and prompt inputs including validation of user entries for data type and range; preprocessing software for data calibration, Sun-angle correction, Geometric Corrections for Earth curvature effect and Earth rotation offsets and Earth location of AVHRR image have been accomplished. The implemented image enhancement techniques such as grey level stretching, histogram equalization and convolution are discussed. The software implementation details for the computation of vegetative index and normalized vegetative index using NOAA/AVHRR channels 1 and 2 data together with output are presented; scientific background for such computations and obtainability of similar indices from Landsat/MSS data are also included. The paper concludes by specifying the further software developments planned and the progress envisaged in the field of vegetation index studies.

  18. Interaction of amidated single-walled carbon nanotubes with protein by multiple spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lili [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); The Nursing College of Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China); Lin, Rui [Yancheng Health Vocational and Technical College, Yancheng 224005 (China); He, Hua, E-mail: dochehua@163.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Sun, Meiling, E-mail: sml-nir@sohu.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Jiang, Li; Gao, Mengmeng [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the detailed interaction between BSA and amidated single walled carbon nanotubes (e-SWNTs) in vitro. Ethylenediamine (EDA) was successfully linked on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) via acylation to improve their dispersion and to introduce active groups. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as the template protein to inspect the interaction of e-SWNTs with protein. Decreases in fluorescence intensity of BSA induced by e-SWNTs demonstrated the occurrence of interaction between BSA and e-SWNTs. Quenching parameters and different absorption spectra for e-SWNTs–BSA show that the quenching effect of e-SWNTs was static quenching. Hydrophobic force had a leading contribution to the binding roles of BSA on e-SWNTs, which was confirmed by positive enthalpy change and entropy change. The interference of Na{sup +} with the quenching effect of e-SWNTs authenticated that electrostatic force existed in the interactive process simultaneously. The hydrophobicity of amino acid residues markedly increased with the addition of e-SWNTs viewed from UV spectra of BSA. The content of α-helix structure in BSA decreased by 6.8% due to the addition of e-SWNTs, indicating that e-SWNTs have an effect on the secondary conformation of BSA. -- Highlights: • The interaction between e-SWNTs and BSA was investigated by multiple spectroscopic methods. • Quenching mechanism was static quenching. • Changes in structure of BSA were inspected by synchronous fluorescence, UV–vis and CD spectrum.

  19. Quantifying Trophic Interactions and Carbon Flow in Louisiana Salt Marshes Using Multiple Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, M. J.; Lopez-Duarte, P. C.; Olin, J.; Johnson, J. J.; Able, K.; Martin, C. W.; Fodrie, J.; Hooper-Bui, L. M.; Taylor, S.; Stouffer, P.; Roberts, B. J.; Rabalais, N. N.; Jensen, O.

    2017-12-01

    Salt marshes are critical habitats for many species in the northern Gulf of Mexico. However, given their complex nature, quantifying trophic linkages and the flow of carbon through salt marsh food webs is challenging. This gap in our understanding of food web structure and function limits our ability to evaluate the impacts of natural and anthropogenic stressors on salt marsh ecosystems. For example, 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill had the potential to alter trophic and energy pathways. Even so, our ability to evaluate its effects on Louisiana salt marsh food webs was limited by a poor basis for comparison of the pre-spill baseline food web. To be better equipped to measure significant alterations in salt marsh ecosystems in the future, we quantified trophic interactions at two marsh sites in Barataria Bay, LA in May and October of 2015. Trophic structure and carbon flow across 52 species of saltmarsh primary producers and consumers were examined through a combination of three approaches: bulk tissue stable isotope analysis (δ13C, δ15N, δ34S), dietary fatty acid analysis (FAA), and compound-specific stable isotope analysis of essential amino acids (δ13C EAA). Bulk stable isotope analysis indicated similar trophic diversity between sites and seasons with the use of aquatic resources increasing concomitantly with trophic level. FAA and δ13C EAA biomarkers revealed that marsh organisms were largely divided into two groups: those that primarily derive carbon from terrestrial C4 grasses, and those that predominately derive carbon from a combination of phytoplankton and benthic microalgal sources. Differences in trophic structure and carbon flow were minimal between seasons and sites that were variably impacted by the DWH spill. These data on salt marsh ecosystem structure will be useful to inform future injury assessments and restoration initiatives.

  20. Application of digital image processing to determine the causes of failures in SAE 1018 carbon steel; Aplicacion del procesamiento digital de imagenes para la determinacion de las causas que provocan fallas en el acero al carbono SAE 1018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolanos-Rodriguez, E [Escuela Superior de Tizayuca, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Tizayuca, Hidalgo (Mexico)]. E-mail: bola7112@yahoo.com.mx; Gonzalez-Islas, J.C. [Universidad Tecnologica de Tulancingo, Tulancingo, Hidalgo (Mexico)]. E-mail: juanc.gonzalez@utec-tgo.edu.mx; Felipe-Riveron, E.M. [Centro de Investigacion en Computacion, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: edgardo@cic.ipn.mx

    2013-03-15

    The research is focused on determining the causes of failures in the SAE 1018 carbon steel that is used in pipes carrying drinking water. Digital processing of images captured by photomicrographs by scanning electron microscopy coupled with the technique of X-ray microanalysis. The results demonstrate that the low quality of the raw materials and the manufacturing process of steel are the reasons for the occurrence of cracks observed in the material. [Spanish] La investigacion se centra en determinar las causas que provocan fallas en el acero al carbono SAE 1018 que es utilizado en tuberias que transportan agua potable. Se emplea el procesamiento digital de imagenes de las microfotografias captadas por medio de microscopia electronica de barrido, unido a la tecnica de microanalisis de rayos X. Los resultados obtenidos demuestran que la baja calidad de las materias primas y el proceso de manufactura del acero son las razones de la ocurrencia de fisuras observadas en el material.

  1. Digital gaming and second language development: Japanese learners interactions in a MMORPG

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Peterson

    2011-01-01

    Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are identified as valuable arenas for language learning, as they provide access to contexts and types of interaction that are held to be beneficial in second language acquisition research. This paper will describe the development and key features of these games, and explore claims made regarding their value as environments for language learning. The discussion will then examine current research. This is followed by an analysis of t...

  2. Comprehensive spectroscopic studies on the interaction of biomolecules with surfactant detached multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Gajalakshmi; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, Natarajan

    2015-04-01

    This paper investigates the interaction of ten diverse biomolecules with surfactant detached Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs) using multiple spectroscopic methods. Declining fluorescence intensity of biomolecules in combination with the hyperchromic effect in UV-Visible spectra confirmed the existence of the ground state complex formation. Quenching mechanism remains static and non-fluorescent. 3D spectral data of biomolecules suggested the possibilities of disturbances to the aromatic microenvironment of tryptophan and tyrosine residues arising out of CNTs interaction. Amide band Shifts corresponding to the secondary structure of biomolecules were observed in the of FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. In addition, there exists an increased Raman intensity of tryptophan residues of biomolecules upon interaction with CNTs. Hence, the binding of the aromatic structures of CNTs with the aromatic amino acid residues, in a particular, tryptophan was evidenced. Far UV Circular spectra have showed the loss of alpha-helical contents in biomolecules upon interaction with CNTs. Near UV CD spectra confirmed the alterations in the tryptophan positions of the peptide backbone. Hence, our results have demonstrated that the interaction of biomolecules with OH-MWCNTs would involve binding cum structural changes and alteration to their aromatic micro-environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Interaction between Palladium Nanoparticles and Surface-Modified Carbon Nanotubes: Role of Surface Functionalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Bingsen; Shao, Lidong; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    degrees C. We focus on probing the effects of oxygen and nitrogen-containing functional groups on supported palladium nanoparticles (NPs) in the model catalytic system. The stability of palladium NPs supported on CNTs depends strongly on the surface properties of CNTs. Moreover, the oxygen...... feature, instability, and subtle response of the components upon application of an external field. Herein, we use insitu TEM, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques to record the interaction in palladium on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) from room temperature to 600...

  4. USER–APPROPRIATE VIEWER FOR HIGH RESOLUTION INTERACTIVE ENGAGEMENT WITH 3D DIGITAL CULTURAL ARTEFACTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gillespie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Three dimensional (3D laser scanning is an important documentation technique for cultural heritage. This technology has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008. The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination. This is in part due to the need for specialised 3D software and a supported graphics card to display high resolution 3D models. This can be detrimental to one of the main goals of cultural institutions, which is to share knowledge and enable activities such as research, education and entertainment. This has limited the presentation of 3D models of cultural heritage objects to mainly either images or videos. Yet with recent developments in computer graphics, increased internet speed and emerging technologies such as Adobe's Stage 3D (Adobe, 2013 and WebGL (Khronos, 2013, it is now possible to share a dataset directly within a webpage. This allows website visitors to interact with the 3D dataset allowing them to explore every angle of the object, gaining an insight into its shape and nature. This can be very important considering that it is difficult to offer the same level of understanding of the object through the use of traditional mediums such as photographs and videos. Yet this presents a range of problems: this is a very novel experience and very few people have engaged with 3D objects outside of 3D software packages or games

  5. User-Appropriate Viewer for High Resolution Interactive Engagement with 3d Digital Cultural Artefacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, D.; La Pensée, A.; Cooper, M.

    2013-07-01

    Three dimensional (3D) laser scanning is an important documentation technique for cultural heritage. This technology has been adopted from the engineering and aeronautical industry and is an invaluable tool for the documentation of objects within museum collections (La Pensée, 2008). The datasets created via close range laser scanning are extremely accurate and the created 3D dataset allows for a more detailed analysis in comparison to other documentation technologies such as photography. The dataset can be used for a range of different applications including: documentation; archiving; surface monitoring; replication; gallery interactives; educational sessions; conservation and visualization. However, the novel nature of a 3D dataset is presenting a rather unique challenge with respect to its sharing and dissemination. This is in part due to the need for specialised 3D software and a supported graphics card to display high resolution 3D models. This can be detrimental to one of the main goals of cultural institutions, which is to share knowledge and enable activities such as research, education and entertainment. This has limited the presentation of 3D models of cultural heritage objects to mainly either images or videos. Yet with recent developments in computer graphics, increased internet speed and emerging technologies such as Adobe's Stage 3D (Adobe, 2013) and WebGL (Khronos, 2013), it is now possible to share a dataset directly within a webpage. This allows website visitors to interact with the 3D dataset allowing them to explore every angle of the object, gaining an insight into its shape and nature. This can be very important considering that it is difficult to offer the same level of understanding of the object through the use of traditional mediums such as photographs and videos. Yet this presents a range of problems: this is a very novel experience and very few people have engaged with 3D objects outside of 3D software packages or games. This paper

  6. Emission switching in carbon dots coated CdTe quantum dots driving by pH dependent hetero-interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiao; Wang, Hao; Yi, Qinghua; Wang, Yun; Cong, Shan; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Yinghui; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jiexiong@uestc.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Qian, Zhicheng [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Huang, Jianwen; Xiong, Jie, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jiexiong@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Luo, Hongmei [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Due to the different emission mechanism between fluorescent carbon dots and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), it is of interest to explore the potential emission in hetero-structured carbon dots/semiconducting QDs. Herein, we design carbon dots coated CdTe QDs (CDQDs) and investigate their inherent emission. We demonstrate switchable emission for the hetero-interactions of the CDQDs. Optical analyses indicate electron transfer between the carbon dots and the CdTe QDs. A heterojunction electron process is proposed as the driving mechanism based on N atom protonation of the carbon dots. This work advances our understanding of the interaction mechanism of the heterostructured CDQDs and benefits the future development of optoelectronic nanodevices with new functionalities.

  7. Water flow in carbon-based nanoporous membranes impacted by interactions between hydrated ions and aromatic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Shi, Guosheng; Fang, Haiping

    2017-02-24

    Carbon-based nanoporous membranes, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphene/graphene oxide and graphyne, have shown great potential in water desalination and purification, gas and ion separation, biosensors, and lithium-based batteries, etc. A deep understanding of the interaction between hydrated ions in an aqueous solution and the graphitic surface in systems composed of water, ions and a graphitic surface is essential for applications with carbon-based nanoporous membrane platforms. In this review, we describe the recent progress of the interaction between hydrated ions and aromatic ring structures on the carbon-based surface and its applications in the water flow in a carbon nanotube. We expect that these works can be extended to the understanding of water flow in other nanoporous membranes, such as nanoporous graphene, graphyne and stacked sheets of graphene oxide.

  8. Interactions with Virtual People: Do Avatars Dream of Digital Sheep?. Chapter 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Mel; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores another form of artificial entity, ones without physical embodiment. We refer to virtual characters as the name for a type of interactive object that have become familiar in computer games and within virtual reality applications. We refer to these as avatars: three-dimensional graphical objects that are in more-or-less human form which can interact with humans. Sometimes such avatars will be representations of real-humans who are interacting together within a shared networked virtual environment, other times the representations will be of entirely computer generated characters. Unlike other authors, who reserve the term agent for entirely computer generated characters and avatars for virtual embodiments of real people; the same term here is used for both. This is because avatars and agents are on a continuum. The question is where does their behaviour originate? At the extremes the behaviour is either completely computer generated or comes only from tracking of a real person. However, not every aspect of a real person can be tracked every eyebrow move, every blink, every breath rather real tracking data would be supplemented by inferred behaviours which are programmed based on the available information as to what the real human is doing and her/his underlying emotional and psychological state. Hence there is always some programmed behaviour it is only a matter of how much. In any case the same underlying problem remains how can the human character be portrayed in such a manner that its actions are believable and have an impact on the real people with whom it interacts? This paper has three main parts. In the first part we will review some evidence that suggests that humans react with appropriate affect in their interactions with virtual human characters, or with other humans who are represented as avatars. This is so in spite of the fact that the representational fidelity is relatively low. Our evidence will be from the realm of psychotherapy

  9. Evidence for carbon flux shortage and strong carbon/nitrogen interactions in pea nodules at early stages of water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Loli; González, Esther M; Arrese-Igor, Cesar

    2005-09-01

    Symbiotic N2 fixation in legume nodules declines under a wide range of environmental stresses. A high correlation between N2 fixation decline and sucrose synthase (SS; EC 2.4.1.13) activity down-regulation has been reported, although it has still to be elucidated whether a causal relationship between SS activity down-regulation and N2 fixation decline can be established. In order to study the likely C/N interactions within nodules and the effects on N2 fixation, pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cv. Sugar snap) were subjected to progressive water stress by withholding irrigation. Under these conditions, nodule SS activity declined concomitantly with apparent nitrogenase activity. The levels of UDP-glucose, glucose-1-phosphate, glucose-6-phosphate, and fructose-6-phosphate decreased in water-stressed nodules compared with unstressed nodules. Drought also had a marked effect on nodule concentrations of malate, succinate, and alpha-ketoglutarate. Moreover, a general decline in nodule adenylate content was detected. NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH; EC 1.1.1.42) was the only enzyme whose activity increased as a result of water deficit, compensating for a possible C/N imbalance and/or supplying NADPH in circumstances that the pentose phosphate pathway was impaired, as suggested by the decline in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH; EC 1.1.1.49) activity. The overall results show the occurrence of strong C/N interactions in nodules subjected to water stress and support a likely limitation of carbon flux that might be involved in the decline of N2 fixation under drought.

  10. Interactions of phospholipid monolayer with single-walled carbon nanotube wrapped by lysophospholipid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Siwool; Kim, Hyungsu, E-mail: hkim@dku.edu

    2012-10-01

    In this study, we prepared single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) wrapped by 1-stearoyl-2-hydroxy-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1 Prime -rac-glycerol) (LPG), leading to a complex of SWNT-LPG. In an attempt to investigate the interactions of SWNT-LPG with a mimicked cell surface, SWNT-LPG solution was injected into the sub-phase of Langmuir trough to form a mixed monolayer with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG), respectively. In addition to the measurement of typical surface pressure-area isotherms under compression mode, area changes occurring during insertion of SWNT-LPG into the monolayer were recorded at various surface pressures. Changes in surface potential were also measured for evident tracing of the degree of interactions between sub-phase and monolayer. A systematic comparison of relaxation patterns and insertion behavior along with surface potential data provided a rational basis to distinguish the degree of interactions between SWNT-LPG and the designated monolayer. The observed tendencies were found to be in accordance with the surface topography as revealed by the tapping mode atomic force microscopy. It was consistently observed that SWNT-LPG interacted with DPPC to a greater extent than with DPPG, when the sufficient coverage of nanotube surface by LPG molecules was assured. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complex of single-walled carbon nanotubes and lysophospholipid (SWNT-LPG) is formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composite monolayer is formed by inserting SWNT-LPG into the phospholipid monolayer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measure area-pressure responses and dipole potentials during the insertion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Properties of composite monolayer depend on the kind of phospholipid and LPG content.

  11. A Digital Repository and Execution Platform for Interactive Scholarly Publications in Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Victoria; Jessop, Mark; Fletcher, Martyn; Weeks, Michael; Turner, Aaron; Jackson, Tom; Ingram, Colin; Smith, Leslie; Austin, Jim

    2016-01-01

    The CARMEN Virtual Laboratory (VL) is a cloud-based platform which allows neuroscientists to store, share, develop, execute, reproduce and publicise their work. This paper describes new functionality in the CARMEN VL: an interactive publications repository. This new facility allows users to link data and software to publications. This enables other users to examine data and software associated with the publication and execute the associated software within the VL using the same data as the authors used in the publication. The cloud-based architecture and SaaS (Software as a Service) framework allows vast data sets to be uploaded and analysed using software services. Thus, this new interactive publications facility allows others to build on research results through reuse. This aligns with recent developments by funding agencies, institutions, and publishers with a move to open access research. Open access provides reproducibility and verification of research resources and results. Publications and their associated data and software will be assured of long-term preservation and curation in the repository. Further, analysing research data and the evaluations described in publications frequently requires a number of execution stages many of which are iterative. The VL provides a scientific workflow environment to combine software services into a processing tree. These workflows can also be associated with publications and executed by users. The VL also provides a secure environment where users can decide the access rights for each resource to ensure copyright and privacy restrictions are met.

  12. Yb:KYW planar waveguide laser Q-switched by evanescent-field interaction with carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Jun Wan; Choi, Sun Young; Yeom, Dong-Il; Aravazhi, S.; Pollnau, Markus; Griebner, Uwe; Petrov, Valentin; Rotermund, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    We report Q-switched operation of a planar waveguide laser by evanescent-field interaction with single-walled carbon nanotubes deposited on top of the waveguide. The saturable-absorber-integrated gain medium, which operates based on evanescent-field interaction, enables the realization of a

  13. Magma-carbonate interaction processes and associated CO2 release at Merapi volcano, Indonesia: insights from experimental petrology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deegan, F.M.; Troll, V.R.; Freda, C.; Misti, V.; Chadwick, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for continuing, late-stage interaction between the magmatic system at Merapi volcano, Indonesia, and local crustal carbonate (limestone). Calc-silicate xenoliths within Merapi basaltic-andesite eruptive rocks display textures indicative of intense interaction between

  14. The Brain's Response to Digital Math Apps: A Pilot Study Examining Children's Cortical Responses during Touch-Screen Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Joseph M.; Moyer-Packenham, Patricia S.; Tucker, Stephen I.; Shumway, Jessica F.; Jordan, Kerry E.; Gillam, Ronald B.

    2018-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an easy to use neuroimaging technique that is portable and maintains a liberal tolerance to movement. As such, fNIRS represents an ideal tool to observe children's neural activity as they engage in real-world classroom activities, such as the interaction with digital math apps on an iPad. Here, we…

  15. E-Learning Content Design Standards Based on Interactive Digital Concepts Maps in the Light of Meaningful and Constructivist Learning Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, Mohammed Kamal

    2018-01-01

    The present study aims to identify standards of interactive digital concepts maps design and their measurement indicators as a tool to develop, organize and administer e-learning content in the light of Meaningful Learning Theory and Constructivist Learning Theory. To achieve the objective of the research, the author prepared a list of E-learning…

  16. Temperature and rainfall interact to control carbon cycling in tropical forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Philip G; Cleveland, Cory C; Wieder, William R; Sullivan, Benjamin W; Doughty, Christopher E; Dobrowski, Solomon Z; Townsend, Alan R

    2017-06-01

    Tropical forests dominate global terrestrial carbon (C) exchange, and recent droughts in the Amazon Basin have contributed to short-term declines in terrestrial carbon dioxide uptake and storage. However, the effects of longer-term climate variability on tropical forest carbon dynamics are still not well understood. We synthesised field data from more than 150 tropical forest sites to explore how climate regulates tropical forest aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP) and organic matter decomposition, and combined those data with two existing databases to explore climate - C relationships globally. While previous analyses have focused on the effects of either temperature or rainfall on ANPP, our results highlight the importance of interactions between temperature and rainfall on the C cycle. In cool forests (forests (> 20 °C) it consistently enhanced both ANPP and decomposition. At the global scale, our analysis showed an increase in ANPP with rainfall in relatively warm sites, inconsistent with declines in ANPP with rainfall reported previously. Overall, our results alter our understanding of climate - C cycle relationships, with high precipitation accelerating rates of C exchange with the atmosphere in the most productive biome on earth. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Imitation of deuterium plasma interaction with the surface of carbon materials in gaseous divertor conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korshunov, S.N. E-mail: sinet@nfi.kiae.ru; Guseva, M.I.; Gureev, V.M.; Danelyan, L.S.; Khripunov, B.I.; Kolbasov, B.N.; Kulikauskas, V.S.; Litnovsky, A.M.; Martynenko, Yu.V.; Petrov, V.B.; Zatekin, V.V

    2003-03-01

    The experiments on simulation of gas divertor conditions were done in the LENTA facility under interaction of a plasma flow with neutral gas. The samples of carbon materials were exposed in a steady-state deuterium plasma (ion energy 5 eV, ion flux 5x10{sup 21} m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, fluence 10{sup 26} m{sup -2}) at 1470 K (MPG-8) and at 1320 K (SEP NB31). Heavy deuterocarbon molecules (C{sub 2}D{sub 2}, C{sub 2}D{sub 4}, C{sub 2}D{sub 6}) were observed in mass spectra of the discharge. This fact and high erosion yields show the presence of chemical erosion. Deuterium accumulation in carbon materials was studied by elastic recoil detection analysis. The integral deuterium content is 6x10{sup 18} m{sup -2} in SEP NB31 and 1.95x10{sup 19} m{sup -2} in MPG-8. The profiles of C and Mo atom distributions in deposited layer on Mo collector is 'X'-like. Carbon atoms distribution in deposited layer on Si is uniform. The integral deuterium content in co-deposited layers is 1.4x10{sup 21} m{sup -2} on Si and 4.8x10{sup 20} m{sup -2} on Mo. A globular structure of co-deposited layer on Mo collector was found.

  18. Tres lustros del periodismo digital:interactividad e hipertextualidad Fifteen Years of Online Journalism. Interaction and Hypertextuality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizy Navarro Zamora

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available En el 2009 se cumplen 15 años del inicio del periodismo en Internet. Las características del periodismo han evolucionado con la convergencia digital. La interactividad e hipertextualidad son dos elementos que configuran la esencia de la relación entre periodismo y tecnologías de la información y comunicación. En esta investigación se realizó el análisis del perfil y elementos del periodismo digital, así como el emisor y receptor de este proceso comunicativo. El corpus de la investigación fueron diez medios internacionales y los siguientes medios nacionales: 100 periódicos, 30 cadenas de televisión y 30 emisoras de radio que desde hace más de 10 años están en Internet. También se realizó el envío de 2.000 correos electrónicos a un corpus de otros tantos periodistas: reporteros, editorialistas y webmaster. On-line journalism completes 15 years of existence in 2009. The characteristics of journalism have evolved with information technology. Interaction and hypertextuality are two elements that configure the essence of the relationship between journalism and new information and communication technologies. This research analyzes the profile and elements of on-line journalism, as well as the transmitter and receiver in this communication process. The research corpus is 10 international media and the following Mexican media: 100 newspapers, 30 television stations and 30 radio stations, all with more than 10 years’ on-line experience. Also, two hundred e-mails were sent out to journalists, leader writers and webmasters.

  19. Interactions between California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard and the National Renewable Fuel Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whistance, Jarrett; Thompson, Wyatt; Meyer, Seth

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the economic interactions between a national renewable fuel policy, namely the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) in the United States, and a sub-national renewable fuel policy, the Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) in California. The two policies have a similar objective of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, but the policies differ in the manner in which those objectives are met. The RFS imposes a hierarchical mandate of renewable fuel use for each year whereas the LCFS imposes a specific annual carbon-intensity reduction with less of a fuel specific mandate. We model the interactions using a partial-equilibrium structural model of agricultural and energy markets in the US and Rest-of-World regions. Our results suggest the policies are mutually reinforcing in that the compliance costs of meeting one of the requirements is lower in the presence of the other policy. In addition, the two policies combine to create a spatial shift in renewable fuel use toward California even though overall renewable fuel use remains relatively unchanged. - Highlights: • Results suggest the RFS and LCFS are mutually reinforcing. • Overall level of renewable fuel use is similar across scenarios. • Renewable fuel use shifts toward California in the presence of the LCFS. • Higher ethanol blend (e.g. E85) use also shifts toward California.

  20. Digital model for harmonic interactions in AC/DC/AC systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarini, A P; Rangel, R D; Pilotto, L A.S.; Pinto, R J; Passos, Junior, R [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1994-12-31

    The main purpose of this paper is to present a model for calculation of HVdc converter harmonics taking into account the influence of the harmonic interactions between the ac systems in dc link transmissions. The ideas and methodologies used in the model development take into account the dc current ripple and ac voltage distortion in the ac systems. The theory of switching functions is applied to contemplate for the frequency conversions between the ac and dc sides, in an iterative process. It is possible then to obtain, even in balanced situations, non-characteristic harmonics that are produced by frequencies originated in the other terminal, which can be significant in a strongly coupled system, such as back-to-back configuration. (author) 9 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Lifshitz-type formulas for graphene and single-wall carbon nanotubes: van der Waals and Casimir interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordag, M.; Geyer, B.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.

    2006-01-01

    Lifshitz-type formulas are obtained for the van der Waals and Casimir interaction between graphene and a material plate, graphene and an atom or a molecule, and between a single-wall carbon nanotube and a plate. The reflection properties of electromagnetic oscillations on graphene are governed by the specific boundary conditions imposed on the infinitely thin positively charged plasma sheet, carrying a continuous fluid with some mass and charge density. The obtained formulas are applied to graphene interacting with Au and Si plates, to hydrogen atoms and molecules interacting with graphene, and to single-wall carbon nanotubes interacting with Au and Si plates. The generalizations to more complicated carbon nanostructures are discussed

  2. Ecosystem-groundwater interactions under changing land uses: Linking water, salts, and carbon across central Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobbagy, E. G.; Nosetto, M. D.; Santoni, C. S.; Jackson, R. B.

    2007-05-01

    Although most ecosystems display a one-way connection with groundwater based on the regulation of deep water drainage (recharge), this link can become reciprocal when the saturated zone is shallow and plants take up groundwater (discharge). In what context is the reciprocal link most likely? How is it affected by land use changes? Has it consequences on salt and carbon cycling? We examine these questions across a precipitation gradient in the Pampas and Espinal of Argentina focusing on three vegetation change situations (mean annual rainfall): afforestation of humid (900-1300 mm) and subhumid grassland (700-900 mm/yr of rainfall), annual cultivation of subhumid grasslands (700-800 mm/yr), and annual cultivation of semiarid forests (500-700 mm). Humid and subhumid grasslands have shallow (measurements. Groundwater contributions enhance carbon uptake in plantations compared to grasslands as suggested by aboveground biomass measurements and satellite vegetation indexes from sites with and without access to groundwater. Where rainfall is 15 m deep) and recharge under natural conditions is null. The establishment of crops, however, triggers the onset of recharge, as evidenced by vadose zones getting wetter and leached of atmospheric chloride. Cropping may cause water table raises leading to a two-way coupling of ecosystems and groundwater in the future, as it has been documented for similar settings in Australia and the Sahel. In the Pampas land use change interacts with groundwater consumption leading to higher carbon uptake (humid and subhumid grasslands) and salt accumulation (subhumid grasslands). In the Espinal (semiarid forest) land use change currently involves a one-way effect on groundwater recharge that may switch to a reciprocal connection if regional water table raises occur. Neglecting the role of groundwater in flat sedimentary plains can obscure our understanding of carbon and salt cycling and curtail our attempts to sustain soil and water resources under

  3. Numerical modelling of fluid-rock interactions: Lessons learnt from carbonate rocks diagenesis studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Fadi; Bachaud, Pierre; Michel, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of fluid-rock interactions and their impact on carbonate host-rocks has recently become a very attractive research topic within academic and industrial realms. Today, a common operational workflow that aims at predicting the relevant diagenetic processes on the host rocks (i.e. fluid-rock interactions) consists of three main stages: i) constructing a conceptual diagenesis model including inferred preferential fluids pathways; ii) quantifying the resulted diagenetic phases (e.g. depositing cements, dissolved and recrystallized minerals); and iii) numerical modelling of diagenetic processes. Most of the concepts of diagenetic processes operate at the larger, basin-scale, however, the description of the diagenetic phases (products of such processes) and their association with the overall petrophysical evolution of sedimentary rocks remain at reservoir (and even outcrop/ well core) scale. Conceptual models of diagenetic processes are thereafter constructed based on studying surface-exposed rocks and well cores (e.g. petrography, geochemistry, fluid inclusions). We are able to quantify the diagenetic products with various evolving techniques and on varying scales (e.g. point-counting, 2D and 3D image analysis, XRD, micro-CT and pore network models). Geochemical modelling makes use of thermodynamic and kinetic rules as well as data-bases to simulate chemical reactions and fluid-rock interactions. This can be through a 0D model, whereby a certain process is tested (e.g. the likelihood of a certain chemical reaction to operate under specific conditions). Results relate to the fluids and mineral phases involved in the chemical reactions. They could be used as arguments to support or refute proposed outcomes of fluid-rock interactions. Coupling geochemical modelling with transport (reactive transport model; 1D, 2D and 3D) is another possibility, attractive as it provides forward simulations of diagenetic processes and resulting phases. This

  4. Interactive effects of carbon footprint information and its accessibility on value and subjective qualities of food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Wada, Yuji; Kamada, Akiko; Masuda, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Masako; Goto, Sho-ichi; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Cai, Dongsheng; Oka, Takashi; Dan, Ippeita

    2010-10-01

    We aimed to explore the interactive effects of the accessibility of information and the degree of carbon footprint score on consumers' value judgments of food products. Participants (n=151, undergraduate students in Japan) rated their maximum willingness to pay (WTP) for four food products varying in information accessibility (active-search or read-only conditions) and in carbon footprint values (low, middle, high, or non-display) provided. We also assessed further effects of information accessibly and carbon footprint value on other product attributes utilizing the subjective estimation of taste, quality, healthiness, and environmental friendliness. Results of the experiment demonstrated an interactive effect of information accessibility and the degree of carbon emission on consumer valuation of carbon footprint-labeled food. The carbon footprint value had a stronger impact on participants' WTP in the active-search condition than in the read-only condition. Similar to WTP, the results of the subjective ratings for product qualities also exhibited an interactive effect of the two factors on the rating of environmental friendliness for products. These results imply that the perceived environmental friendliness inferable from a carbon footprint label contributes to creating value for a food product.

  5. Interaction of carbon nanoparticles to serum albumin: elucidation of the extent of perturbation of serum albumin conformations and thermodynamical parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Samir [Molecular and Human Genetics Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Hossain, Maidul [Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Devi, P. Sujatha [Nano-Structured Materials Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata 700032 (India); Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh [Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chaudhuri, Keya, E-mail: keya.chaudhuri@gmail.com [Molecular and Human Genetics Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Strong interaction of serum albumins to CNPs and potential toxicity. ► Partial unfolding and alteration of BSA and HSA secondary structure by CNP. ► Significant insight into design of nanoparticles in biomedical applications. -- Abstract: Carbon nanoparticles continuously generated from industries and vehicles due to incomplete combustion of fuels is one of the potent causes of air pollution. The exposure of this polluted air with carbon nanoparticles, introduced into the bloodstream of animals in the course of respiration, motivated us to study their interaction with plasma proteins, bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin. Carbon nanoparticles with very small size and high purity were synthesized by dehydration of D-glucose using concentrated sulphuric acid as dehydrating agent. These were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy and UV–visible spectroscopy. Carbon nanoparticles-protein interactions were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry. The fluorescence quenching constants and thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy change (ΔH°), entropy change (ΔS°) and free energy change (ΔG°) were calculated, which indicated a strong static quenching and primary electrostatic interaction between the carbon nanoparticles and blood proteins. Circular dichroism spectra provided the information about the secondary structure alteration of the proteins in presence of carbon nanoparticles. These findings have shed light towards an understanding of the interactions between carbon nanoparticles and serum proteins which may clarify the potential risks and undesirable health effects of carbon nanoparticles, as well as the related cellular trafficking and systemic translocation.

  6. INTERACTIONS MEDIATED BY TECHNOLOGY IN THE CLASSROOM: THE USE OF SOCIAL NETWORKS AND THE DIGITAL DIVIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranice Hoehr Pedrazzi Pozzer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The National Program for Access to Secondary Education and Employment (Pronatec, created by the federal government has offered, in recent years, training in technical courses at post-secondary level for young people and adults inserted in the educational system and who were attending or finishing high school, including the Youth and Adult Education system (EJA. Thus, some classes of technical courses presented a varied profile of students from teenagers who attend public schools and even older adults who are returning to school after years of absence from the education system. The present study analyzed four groups of students aged between 15 and 63 years. This age difference, how the oldest students use or not technology and the kind of relationship between the students in the classroom raised questions about their relationship on social networks. This network usage by the students significantly influenced the pedagogical practice during the course, considering that the students asked the teacher to use it as a teaching and learning resource. The students transit from reality to virtual world with the naturalness of people who were born inserted in this context of interactions mediated by technology.

  7. CREATING TEACHING AND LEARNING OBJECTS THROUGH INTERACTIVE DIGITAL BLACKBOARD (IDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carles Dorado Perea

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The virtual Laboratory of Educative Technology is a research and development project which has been funded by the 2009 research grant at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona UAB, (Spain. Its aim is to improve the IT skills of both lecturers and students, in the use of technological tools, like the IDB, with the purpose of triggering the processes of information communication in the classroom. Ultimately it focuses in an improvement in the processes of education and learning.This article describes the experience carried out in the Research Group of Methodologies in Education and Multimedia (MEM at the Education Faculty at UAB. Through interactive and collaborative communication in Internet, it has been selecting, designing and creating materials and situations.The incorporation of this simple and reasonable technology, in its diverse modalities, as well as being user-friendly, allows the participant the double perspective of action and reflection. It also allows for an analysis and evaluation of the generation process, obtention of results, encouraging therefore dynamic collaboration and the generation knowledge.

  8. Interactive Digital Serious Games for the Assessment, Rehabilitation, and Prediction of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Kazmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dementia is a serious, progressive, and often debilitating illness with no known cure, having a severe adverse effect on memory, behaviour, reasoning, and communication. A comprehensive review of current refereed research material in the use of games in this area is scarce and suffers from being orientated towards commercially available games or derivatives such as “Dr. Kawashima’s brain training.” There is much lesser concern for bespoke research grade alternatives. This review will attempt to assess the current state of the art in research orientated games for dementia, importantly identifying systems capable of prediction before the onset of the disease. It can be ascertained from the literature reviewed that there are clearly a large number of interactive computer game based mechanisms used for dementia. However, these are each highly intrusive in terms of affecting normal living and the patient is aware of being tested; furthermore their long-term or real benefits are unknown as is their effect over conventional tests. It is important to predict cognitive impairment at a stage early enough to maximise benefit from treatment and therapeutic intervention. Considering the availability, use, and increasing power of modern mobile smartphones, it is logically plausible to explore this platform for dementia healthcare.

  9. Discovering Language through Augmented Reality and the Interactive Digital White Board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ruperta Pérez-Lisboa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the development of phonological, semantic, and syntactic aspects by using augmented reality and interactive whiteboard with boys and girls in the kindergarten of Liceo San Felipe, San Felipe, Chili. With the implementation of these tools, learning experiences were carried out, enhancing the understanding of sentences and words in their successive components: linguistic segmentation, phonological awareness, and reflection on the meaning of words and sentences. The experiments were carried out in a didactic classroom of the course of Educacion Parvularia (Pre-School Education at the University of Playa Ancha, San Felipe Campus, for 60 minutes, once a week for four months. It was a quasi-experimental study, and through pre- and post-tests, it was possible to verify the development of 18 children of a municipal school in San Felipe. The instruments used were the Linguistic Segmentation Test, Comprehensive and Expressive Language Examination Test (ELCE; Subtest semantic aspect, Test Evaluation O; Subtest words and phrases. The results, based on the comparison of pre- and post-test, showed changes in the management of the semantic, syntactic, and phonological aspects achieved by the children with this methodology. However, more research is needed to validate this proposal in teaching metalinguistic.

  10. Reforestation Effects on Carbon Stocks in the Northeast USA: Interactions among Earthworms, Land-Use History and Soil Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D. S.; Görres, J. H.; Knowles, M.; Cogbill, C. V.

    2017-12-01

    Reforestation has occurred in many areas of the northeastern USA that were cleared for agriculture in the 1700s and 1800s. Net gains in carbon have occurred but these gains may be affected by earthworm invasions. All earthworm species common to New England were introduced from either Europe or, more recently, Asia. We have been monitoring 18 managed forest stands in Vermont to be able to determine long-term changes in carbon stores. In addition to measuring carbon with depth into the C horizon, we have documented land use history dating back to colonial times, determined earthworm species and density, measured tree species and site metrics, and measured a suite of soil chemical parameters. We also determined carbon distribution in soil microaggregates in a subset of sites. Prior land use in the 18 monitored plots included cultivation, pasture, farm woodlot and possibly iron mining. Higher earthworm species diversity correlated with reduced forest floor depth, higher mineral soil carbon, and greater stability (microaggregate-protected) of that carbon. Sites with the highest worm density and species richness had a history of more intense agricultural land use (although not all former agricultural sites had earthworms). There were also positive interactions between exchangeable calcium pools and earthworm density, and between elevation and carbon in the forest floor. With only 18 sites, it is difficult to establish statistically robust relationships. The effect of reforestation on present-day carbon stores appears to be a complex interaction of land-use history, site location, earthworm history and soil chemistry.

  11. Insights on the molecular mechanism for the recalcitrance of biochars: interactive effects of carbon and silicon components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Baoliang

    2014-08-19

    Few studies have investigated the effects of structural heterogeneity (particularly the interactions of silicon and carbon) on the mechanisms for the recalcitrance of biochar. In this study, the molecular mechanisms for the recalcitrance of biochars derived from rice straw at 300, 500, and 700 °C (named RS300, RS500, and RS700, respectively) were elucidated. Short-term (24 h) and long-term (240 h) oxidation kinetics experiments were conducted under different concentrations of H2O2 to distinguish the stable carbon pools in the biochars. We discovered that the stabilities of the biochars were influenced not only by their aromaticity but also through possible protection by silicon encapsulation, which is regulated by pyrolysis temperatures. The aromatic components and recalcitrance of the biochars increased with increasing pyrolysis temperatures. The morphologies of the carbon forms in all of the biochars were also greatly associated with those of silica. Silica-encapsulation protection only occurred for RS500, not for RS300 and RS700. In RS300, carbon and silica were both amorphous, and they were easily decomposed by H2O2. The separation of crystalline silica from condensed aromatic carbon in RS700 eliminated the protective role of silicon on carbon. The effect of the biochar particle size on the stability of the biochar was greatly influenced by C-Si interactions and by the oxidation intensities. A novel silicon-and-carbon-coupled framework model was proposed to guide biochar carbon sequestration.

  12. The interaction between land use change, sediment fluxes and carbon dynamics: evaluating an integrated soil-landscape model at the millennial time-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchoms, Samuel; Van Oost, Kristof; Vanacker, Veerle

    2015-04-01

    erosion and export rates, both modern and averaged over the last millennium, fall into the published range. Mean erosion rate over the last 1000 years equals 4.6 t/ha over the entire catchment while the export rate is 1.2 t/ha. (ii) Carbon content in the erosion areas is well predicted for lower soil layers (from 20 to 80 cm) where no significant differences were found between observational and modeled C content. There is though a significant difference for the top soil where modeled mean is 0.92% compared to the 0.8% in observations. (iii) erosion and deposition's spatial patterns are relatively well represented: correspondence between erosion areas as extracted from the digital soil map and modeled erosion maps higher for slightly truncated areas than in high truncation areas (55% of the modeled erosions pixels correspond to a non-depositional area compared to 37%). Correspondence between the model and the soil map increases with the total deposition ranging from 19% to 30% Yet, the model overestimated the carbon content in depositional areas, where statistical differences between observed and modeled carbon amount were found for each soil layers. This indicates that other factors, not accounted for by the model, influence carbon turnover for these sites. They may have a different dynamic than eroding places, cycling carbon faster or transferring it quicker to higher depth. Overall, the results indicates that the model performs relatively well in predicting sediment fluxes and carbon amount on long time scale during transient simulation. They underline the importance of developing an integrated approach to understand the dynamic and interactions at the landscape scale.

  13. Microbial Interactions With Dissolved Organic Matter Drive Carbon Dynamics and Community Succession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqin Wu

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of dynamic interactions between natural organic matter (NOM and microbial communities is critical not only to delineate the routes of NOM degradation/transformation and carbon (C fluxes, but also to understand microbial community evolution and succession in ecosystems. Yet, these processes in subsurface environments are usually studied independently, and a comprehensive view has been elusive thus far. In this study, we fed sediment-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM to groundwater microbes and continually analyzed microbial transformation of DOM over a 50-day incubation. To document fine-scale changes in DOM chemistry, we applied high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS and soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (sXAS. We also monitored the trajectory of microbial biomass, community structure and activity over this time period. Together, these analyses provided an unprecedented comprehensive view of interactions between sediment-derived DOM and indigenous subsurface groundwater microbes. Microbial decomposition of labile C in DOM was immediately evident from biomass increase and total organic carbon (TOC decrease. The change of microbial composition was closely related to DOM turnover: microbial community in early stages of incubation was influenced by relatively labile tannin- and protein-like compounds; while in later stages the community composition evolved to be most correlated with less labile lipid- and lignin-like compounds. These changes in microbial community structure and function, coupled with the contribution of microbial products to DOM pool affected the further transformation of DOM, culminating in stark changes to DOM composition over time. Our study demonstrates a distinct response of microbial communities to biotransformation of DOM, which improves our understanding of coupled interactions between sediment-derived DOM, microbial processes, and community structure in

  14. Interaction of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol with high carbon iron filings: Reaction and sorption mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Alok [Environmental Engineering and Management Programme, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Bose, Purnendu [Environmental Engineering and Management Programme, Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)], E-mail: pbose@iitk.ac.in

    2009-05-15

    Reductive dehalogenation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) by two types of high carbon iron filings (HCIF), HCIF-1 and HCIF-2 was studied in batch reactors. While the iron, copper, manganese and carbon content of the two types of HCIF was similar, the specific surface area of HCIF-1 and HCIF-2 were 1.944 and 3.418 m{sup 2} g{sup -1}, respectively. During interaction with HCIF-1, 2,4,6-TCP adsorbed on HCIF-1 surface resulting in rapid reduction of aqueous phase 2,4,6-TCP concentration. However, reductive dehalogenation of 2,4,6-TCP was negligible. During interaction between 2,4,6-TCP and HCIF-2, both 2,4,6-TCP adsorption on HCIF-2, and 2,4,6,-TCP dechlorination was observed. 2,4,6-TCP partitioning between solid and aqueous phase could be described by a Freundlich isotherm, while 2,4,6-TCP dechlorination could be described by an appropriate rate expression. A mathematical model was developed for describing the overall interaction of 2,4,6-TCP with HCIF-2, incorporating simultaneous adsorption/desorption and dechlorination reactions of 2,4,6-TCP with the HCIF surface. 2,4-Dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) and minor amounts of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) evolved as 2,4,6-TCP dechlorination by-products. The evolved 2,4-DCP partitioned strongly to the HCIF surface. 4-CP and 2-CP accumulated in the aqueous phase. No transformation of 2-CP or 4-CP to phenol was observed.

  15. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan Vivian, E-mail: yan.li@colostate.edu [Colorado State University, Department of Design and Merchandising (United States); Cathles, Lawrence M., E-mail: lmc19@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (United States)

    2016-03-15

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl{sub 2}, and MgCl{sub 2}) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl{sub 2} and MgCl{sub 2} solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.Graphical Abstract.

  16. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yan Vivian; Cathles, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl_2, and MgCl_2) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl_2 and MgCl_2 solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl_2 and MgCl_2 solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.Graphical Abstract

  17. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian

    2016-03-02

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl2 and MgCl2 solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a calcite probe and an M-dot coated surface shows that hydration forces repel the particles in the DI water, NaCl, and mixed solutions, but not in the CaCl2 and MgCl2 solutions. These results show that near-zero charge and strongly hydrophilic decoration are the causes of the remarkable inertness of carbon-cored nanoparticles, and also suggest that nanoparticles could be useful in solute-surface interaction studies.

  18. Unraveling origins of the heterogeneous curvature dependence of polypeptide interactions with carbon nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Asis K; Tiwari, Mrityunjay K; Vanka, Kumar; Sengupta, Neelanjana

    2016-02-17

    Emerging nanotechnology has rapidly broadened interfacial prospects of biological molecules with carbon nanomaterials (CNs). A prerequisite for effectively harnessing such hybrid materials is a multi-faceted understanding of their complex interfacial interactions as functions of the physico-chemical characteristics and the surface topography of the individual components. In this article, we address the origins of the curvature dependence of polypeptide adsorption on CN surfaces (CNSs), a phenomenon bearing an acute influence upon the behavior and activity of CN-protein conjugates. Our benchmark molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the amphiphilic full-length amyloid beta (Aβ) peptide demonstrate that protein adsorption is strongest on the concave (inner) CN surface, weakest on the convex (outer) surface, and intermediary on the planar surface, in agreement with recent experimental reports. The curvature effects, however, are found to manifest non-uniformly between the amino acid subtypes. To understand the underlying interplay of the chemical nature of the amino acids and surface topography of the CNs, we performed high-level quantum chemical (QM) calculations with amino acid analogs (AAA) representing their five prominent classes, and convex, concave and planar CN fragments. Molecular electrostatic potential maps reveal pronounced curvature dependence in the mixing of electron densities, and a resulting variance in the stabilization of the non-covalently bound molecular complexes. Interestingly, our study revealed that the interaction trends of the high-level QM calculations were captured well by the empirical force field. The findings in this study have important bearing upon the design of carbon based bio-nanomaterials, and additionally, provide valuable insights into the accuracy of various computational techniques for probing non-bonded interfacial interactions.

  19. Influence of nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaniwa, T., E-mail: taku@nirs.go.jp; Kanematsu, N. [Medical Physics Research Program, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Tsuji, H.; Kamada, T. [Hospital, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: In carbon-ion radiotherapy treatment planning, the planar integrated dose (PID) measured in water is applied to the patient dose calculation with density scaling using the stopping power ratio. Since body tissues are chemically different from water, this dose calculation can be subject to errors, particularly due to differences in inelastic nuclear interactions. In recent studies, the authors proposed and validated a PID correction method for these errors. In the present study, the authors used this correction method to assess the influence of these nuclear interactions in body tissues on tumor dose in various clinical cases. Methods: Using 10–20 cases each of prostate, head and neck (HN), bone and soft tissue (BS), lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine neoplasms, the authors first used treatment plans for carbon-ion radiotherapy without nuclear interaction correction to derive uncorrected dose distributions. The authors then compared these distributions with recalculated distributions using the nuclear interaction correction (corrected dose distributions). Results: Median (25%/75% quartiles) differences between the target mean uncorrected doses and corrected doses were 0.2% (0.1%/0.2%), 0.0% (0.0%/0.0%), −0.3% (−0.4%/−0.2%), −0.1% (−0.2%/−0.1%), −0.1% (−0.2%/0.0%), −0.4% (−0.5%/−0.1%), and −0.3% (−0.4%/0.0%) for the prostate, HN, BS, lung, liver, pancreas, and uterine cases, respectively. The largest difference of −1.6% in target mean and −2.5% at maximum were observed in a uterine case. Conclusions: For most clinical cases, dose calculation errors due to the water nonequivalence of the tissues in nuclear interactions would be marginal compared to intrinsic uncertainties in treatment planning, patient setup, beam delivery, and clinical response. In some extreme cases, however, these errors can be substantial. Accordingly, this correction method should be routinely applied to treatment planning in clinical practice.

  20. Carbon dioxide digital subtraction angiography using a new gas management system; Digitale Subtraktionsangiographie mit Kohlendioxid unter Verwendung eines neuen Gasdosiersystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz-Rode, T.; Alzen, G.; Guenther, R.W. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum der RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Purpose: The clinical evaluation of digital subtraction angiography with carbon dioxide using a newly developed low-tech CO{sub 2}-dosage- and injection system. Method and patients: The hand-held system (CO{sub 2} angio set) consists of a dosage chamber in connection with a special stopcock to apportion the gas. By optimising injection volume and pressure steady gas flow characteristics are approximated. A safety design prevents unintentional gas injection volume and pressure steady gas flow characteristics are approximated. A safety design prevents unintentional gas injection. CO{sub 2} arteriographies were performed on 185 patients. Main indications were renal insufficiency and a history of adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media. In patients with femoral connula access, catheterless reflux angiography was performed. Results: The injection system provided complete and coherent visualisation of the abdominal aorta, visceral, pelvic, and lower limb arteries via catheter (71 cases) or via femoral cannula using reflux technique (114 cases). Stenoses, occlusions, and collaterals were assessable. Employing the gas reflux over the aortic bifurcation bilateral run-off studies up to the calf trifurcation were performed via unilateral femoral cannula. Use of a dedicated stacking software improved image quality of distal femoral, popliteal and calf arteries. Conclusion: The CO{sub 2} management system allows adequate imaging of the arteries below the diaphragm. Ease and safety of use and low costs are advantageous. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Die klinische Erprobung der digitalen Subtraktionsangiographie mit Kohlendioxid unter Verwendung eines neuentwickelten, einfachen Gasdosier- und Injektionssystems. Methode und Patienten: Eine Dosierkammer mit einstellbarem Volumen in Verbindung mit einem Spezial-Hahn (CO{sub 2}-Angio-Set) portioniert das Gas. Durch Optimierung von Injektionsvolumen und -druck wurde eine konstante Ausstroemcharakteristik angenaehert. Das System wurde

  1. Fluorescence spectrometry of the interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Y.; Cai, H.; Miao, J.; Yang, Q.; Li, Y.; Li, J.; Fu, D.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with catalase is investigated using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic techniques. The results of the fluorescence experiments suggest that MWCNTs quench the intrinsic fluorescence of catalase via a static quenching mechanism. The circular dichroism spectral results reveal the unfolding of catalase with a significant decrease in the α-helix content in the presence of MWCNTs, which indicates that the conformation of catalase is changed in the binding process, thereby remarkably decreasing its activity. The binding constants and the number of binding sites of the MWCNT to the catalase are calculated at different temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters, such as the changes in free energy (ΔG), enthalpy (ΔH), and entropy (ΔS), are calculated using thermodynamic equations. The fact that all negative values of ΔG, ΔH, and ΔS are obtained suggests that the interaction of the MWCNTs with catalase is spontaneous, and that hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions play an important role in the binding process. (authors)

  2. Interactions and effects of BSA-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes on different cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Laura; Tardani, Franco; La Mesa, Camillo; Bonincontro, Adalberto; Bianco, Alberto; Risuleo, Gianfranco

    2016-04-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have shown great promise in several biomedical contexts, spanning from drug delivery to tissue regeneration. Thanks to their unique size-related properties, single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are particularly interesting in these fields. However, their use in nanomedicine requires a clear demonstration of their safety in terms of tissue damage, toxicity and pro-inflammatory response. Thus, a better understanding of the cytotoxicity mechanisms, the cellular interactions and the effects that these materials have on cell survival and on biological membranes is an important first step for an appropriate assessment of their biocompatibility. In this study we show how bovine serum albumin (BSA) is able to generate homogeneous and stable dispersions of SWCNTs (BSA-CNTs), suggesting their possible use in the biomedical field. On the other hand, this study wishes to shed more light on the impact and the interactions of protein-stabilized SWCNTs with two different cell types exploiting multidisciplinary techniques. We show that BSA-CNTs are efficiently taken up by cells. We also attempt to describe the effect that the interaction with cells has on the dielectric characteristics of the plasma membrane and ion flux using electrorotation. We then focus on the BSA-CNTs’ acute toxicity using different cellular models. The novel aspect of this work is the evaluation of the membrane alterations that have been poorly investigated to date.

  3. Nanomaterial–protein interactions: the case of pristine and functionalized carbon nanotubes and porcine gastric mucin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbero, Nadia [University of Torino, Department of Chemistry and NIS Interdepartmental Centre (Italy); Marenchino, Marco; Campos-Olivas, Ramón [Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Structural Biology and Biocomputing Programme, NMR Unit (Spain); Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta [University of Torino, Department of Drug Science and Technology (Italy); Bonandini, Luca [University of Torino, Department of Chemistry and NIS Interdepartmental Centre (Italy); Boskovic, Jasminka [Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Structural Biology and Biocomputing Programme, NMR Unit (Spain); Viscardi, Guido [University of Torino, Department of Chemistry and NIS Interdepartmental Centre (Italy); Visentin, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.visentin@unito.it [University of Torino, Molecular Biotechnology and Health Sciences Department (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Mucus represents a serious obstacle that prevents the penetration of drug carrier's transport across the mucus barrier. This study highlights the interaction between mucin glycoprotein, mucin from porcine stomach Type III (PGM) and different pristine and functionalized single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs), under physiological conditions, in order to investigate the affinity of different CNTs to mucin. This aspect could be of the utmost importance for the use of CNTs for biomedical purposes. The interaction between CNTs and PGM was investigated by using different techniques like fluorescence steady-state spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic light scattering (DLS), circular dichroism (CD), electrophoresis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We demonstrated that mucin has impressive capabilities for binding CNTs in physiological solutions. Moreover, we proved that the nanomaterial–protein interaction is influenced by the different natures of the tubes (SW and MW) and by their different functionalizations (pristine and oxidized CNTs).Graphical Abstract.

  4. Learn English or die: The effects of digital games on interaction and willingness to communicate in a foreign language

    OpenAIRE

    Hayo Reinders; Sorada Wattana

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been a lot of interest in the potential role of digital games in language education. Playing digital games is said to be motivating to students and to benefit the development of social skills, such as collaboration, and metacognitive skills such as planning and organisation. An important potential benefit is also that digital games encourage the use of the target language in a non-threatening environment. Willingness to communicate has been shown to affect second lan...

  5. Model for the interaction between interface migration and carbon diffusion during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite and interface migration during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures is modeled, assuming the same chemical potential of carbon in martensite and austenite at the interface and allowing the motion of the phase interface when a free-energy difference occurs. The simulations show that the motion of the martensite-austenite interface can be significant and can takes place in either direction

  6. Digital Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson Brooks, Eva; Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a study exploring the outcomes from children’s play with technology in early childhood learning practices. The paper addresses questions related to how digital technology can foster creativity in early childhood learning environments. It consists of an analysis of children......’s interaction with the KidSmart furniture focusing on digital creativity potentials and play values suggested by the technology. The study applied a qualitative approach and included125 children (aged three to five), 10 pedagogues, and two librarians. The results suggests that educators should sensitively...... consider intervening when children are interacting with technology, and rather put emphasize into the integration of the technology into the environment and to the curriculum in order to shape playful structures for children’s digital creativity....

  7. Non-covalent conjugates of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid for interaction with cells overexpressing folate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Novoa, Leidy V.

    2013-01-01

    We here present amethod to form a noncovalent conjugate of single-walled carbon nanotubes and folic acid aimed to interact with cells over-expressing folate receptors. The bonding was obtained without covalent chemical functionalization using a simple, rapid “one pot” synthesis method. The zeta...... a low toxicity of the conjugates in the THP-1 cells. The low toxicity and the cellular uptake of single-walled carbon nanotube–folic acid by cancer cells suggest their potential use in carbon nanotube-based drug delivery systems and in the diagnosis of cancer or tropical diseases such as leishmaniasis....

  8. Study of gaseous interactions in carbon nanotube field-effect transistors through selective Si3N4 passivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Ning; Zhang Qing; Tan, O K; Marzari, Nicola

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with Si 3 N 4 passivated source and drain contacts and exposed carbon nanotube channel show n-type characteristics in air. In contrast, by passivating only the source contact, a diode-like behavior with a maximum current rectification ratio of 4.6 x 10 3 is observed. The rectifying characteristic vanishes in a vacuum but recovers once the devices are exposed to air. From our experiments, key parameters, such as critical gas pressure, adsorption energy of oxygen molecules and the contact barrier height modulation, can be obtained for studying the gaseous interaction in the carbon nanotube devices.

  9. Additive interaction of carbon dots extracted from soluble coffee and biogenic silver nanoparticles against bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Patricia F.; Durán, Nelson; Nakazato, Gerson

    2017-01-01

    It is known the presence of carbon dots (CDs) in carbohydrate based foods. CDs extracted from coffee grounds and instant coffee was also published. CDs from soluble coffee revealed an average size of 4.4 nm. CDs were well-dispersed in water, fluorescent and we have characterized by XPS, XRD analysis, fluorescence and by FTIR spectra. The MIC value by serial micro-dilution assays for CDs on S. aureus ATCC 25923 was 250 μg/mL and E. coli ATCC 25922 >1000 ug/mL. For silver nanoparticles biogenically synthesized was 6.7 μg/mL. Following the checkerboard assay with combining ½ MIC values of the MICs of 125 μg/mL of carbon dots and 3.4 μg/mL of silver nanoparticles, following the fractionated inhibitory concentration (FIC) index methodology, on S. aureus gave a fractionated inhibitory concentration (FIC) value of 1.0, meaning additive interaction. In general, the unfunctionalized CDs showed to be inefficient as antibacterial compounds, however the CDs extracted from Coffee powder and together silver nanoparticles appeared interesting as antibacterial association. (paper)

  10. Effect of interwall interaction on the electronic structure of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, M; Boyer, T A; Biradar, S; Ge, L; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M; Barrera, E V; Elías-Zúñiga, A

    2015-01-01

    Through this study, the results of density functional theory calculations within the local density approximation of the electronic structure of zigzag–zigzag double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs), with chiral indices (n, 0)@(m, 0) for n = 7–15, and m = 15–26, has been presented and the effects of interwall interaction and orbital hybridization on the electronic structure of these systems has been discussed. It was observed that the electronic band gap of the aforementioned DWCNTs depends on the interwall distance only for metallic–semiconductor configurations and on the intrinsic properties of the constituent tubes in all other combinations. It was also observed that the calculated band gap for most of the metallic–metallic DWCNTs was smaller than semiconductor–metallic, metallic–semiconductor, and semiconductor–semiconductor configurations. Metallic–semiconductor DWCNTs were found to be desirable for band gap tuning applications because of their dependence on interwall distance, opening up the possibility of using such systems in electronic device applications, such as transistors. Other applications include the use of DWCNTs in macroscopic carbon nanotube conducting wires, for which metallic–metallic and semiconducting–metallic zigzag–zigzag DWCNTs were found to be the most desirable configurations due to their small band gaps. (paper)

  11. Redox Interactions between Iron and Carbon in Planetary Mantles: Implications for Degassing and Melting Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A.; Righter, K.

    2009-01-01

    Carbon stability in planetary mantles has been studied by numerous authors because it is thought to be the source of C-bearing atmospheres and of C-rich lavas observed at the planetary surface. In the Earth, carbonaceous peridotites and eclogites compositions have been experimentally studied at mantle conditions [1] [2] [3]. [4] showed that the fO2 variations observed in martian meteorites can be explained by polybaric graphite-CO-CO2 equilibria in the Martian mantle. Based on thermodynamic calculations [4] and [5] inferred that the stable form of carbon in the source regions of the Martian basalts should be graphite (and/or diamond), and equilibrium with melts would be a source of CO2 for the martian atmosphere. Considering the high content of iron in the Martian mantle (approx.18.0 wt% FeO; [6]), compared to Earth s mantle (8.0 wt% FeO; [7]) Fe/C redox interactions should be studied in more detail.

  12. Modelling Carbon Emissions in Calluna vulgaris–Dominated Ecosystems when Prescribed Burning and Wildfires Interact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Victor M.; Alday, Josu G.; Lee, HyoHyeMi; Allen, Katherine A.; Marrs, Rob H.

    2016-01-01

    A present challenge in fire ecology is to optimize management techniques so that ecological services are maximized and C emissions minimized. Here, we modeled the effects of different prescribed-burning rotation intervals and wildfires on carbon emissions (present and future) in British moorlands. Biomass-accumulation curves from four Calluna-dominated ecosystems along a north-south gradient in Great Britain were calculated and used within a matrix-model based on Markov Chains to calculate above-ground biomass-loads and annual C emissions under different prescribed-burning rotation intervals. Additionally, we assessed the interaction of these parameters with a decreasing wildfire return intervals. We observed that litter accumulation patterns varied between sites. Northern sites (colder and wetter) accumulated lower amounts of litter with time than southern sites (hotter and drier). The accumulation patterns of the living vegetation dominated by Calluna were determined by site-specific conditions. The optimal prescribed-burning rotation interval for minimizing annual carbon emissions also differed between sites: the optimal rotation interval for northern sites was between 30 and 50 years, whereas for southern sites a hump-backed relationship was found with the optimal interval either between 8 to 10 years or between 30 to 50 years. Increasing wildfire frequency interacted with prescribed-burning rotation intervals by both increasing C emissions and modifying the optimum prescribed-burning interval for minimum C emission. This highlights the importance of studying site-specific biomass accumulation patterns with respect to environmental conditions for identifying suitable fire-rotation intervals to minimize C emissions. PMID:27880840

  13. Modelling Carbon Emissions in Calluna vulgaris-Dominated Ecosystems when Prescribed Burning and Wildfires Interact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Victor M; Alday, Josu G; Lee, HyoHyeMi; Allen, Katherine A; Marrs, Rob H

    2016-01-01

    A present challenge in fire ecology is to optimize management techniques so that ecological services are maximized and C emissions minimized. Here, we modeled the effects of different prescribed-burning rotation intervals and wildfires on carbon emissions (present and future) in British moorlands. Biomass-accumulation curves from four Calluna-dominated ecosystems along a north-south gradient in Great Britain were calculated and used within a matrix-model based on Markov Chains to calculate above-ground biomass-loads and annual C emissions under different prescribed-burning rotation intervals. Additionally, we assessed the interaction of these parameters with a decreasing wildfire return intervals. We observed that litter accumulation patterns varied between sites. Northern sites (colder and wetter) accumulated lower amounts of litter with time than southern sites (hotter and drier). The accumulation patterns of the living vegetation dominated by Calluna were determined by site-specific conditions. The optimal prescribed-burning rotation interval for minimizing annual carbon emissions also differed between sites: the optimal rotation interval for northern sites was between 30 and 50 years, whereas for southern sites a hump-backed relationship was found with the optimal interval either between 8 to 10 years or between 30 to 50 years. Increasing wildfire frequency interacted with prescribed-burning rotation intervals by both increasing C emissions and modifying the optimum prescribed-burning interval for minimum C emission. This highlights the importance of studying site-specific biomass accumulation patterns with respect to environmental conditions for identifying suitable fire-rotation intervals to minimize C emissions.

  14. The Effectiveness of Using Interactive Multimedia in Improving the Concept of Fashion Design and Its Application in The Making of Digital Fashion Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiana, W.

    2018-02-01

    This research is related to the effort to design a more representative learning system to improve the learning result of digital fashion design, through the development of interactive multimedia based on motion graphic. This research is aimed to know the effect of interactive multimedia application based on motion graphic to increase the mastery of the concept and skill of the students to making fashion designing in digital format. The research method used is quasi experiment with research design of Non-equivalent Control Group Design. The lectures are conducted in two different classes, namely class A as the Experimental Class and class B as the Control Class. From the calculation result after interpreted using Normalize Gain, there is an increase of higher learning result in student with interactive learning based on motion graphic, compared with student achievement on conventional learning. In this research, interactive multimedia learning based on motion graphic is effective toward the improvement of student learning in concept mastering indicator and on the aspect of making fashion design in digital format.

  15. The Effectiveness of Using Interactive Multimedia Based on Motion Graphic in Concept Mastering Enhancement and Fashion Designing Skill in Digital Format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winwin Wiana

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This research is related to the effort to design a more representative learning system to improve the learning result of digital fashion design, through the development of interactive multimedia based on motion graphic. This research is aimed to know the effect of interactive multimedia application based on motion graphic to increase the mastery of the concept and skill of the students to making fashion designing in digital format. The research method used is quasi experiment with research design of Nonequivalent Control Group Design. The lectures are conducted in two different classes, namely class A as the Experimental Class and class B as the Control Class. From the calculation result after interpreted using Normalize Gain, there is an increase of higher learning result in student with interactive learning based on motion graphic, compared with student achievement on conventional learning. In this research, interactive multimedia learning based on motion graphic is effective toward the improvement of student learning in concept mastering indicator and on the aspect of making fashion design in digital format.

  16. Historical and projected carbon balance of mature black spruce ecosystems across north america: The role of carbon-nitrogen interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clein, Joy S.; McGuire, A.D.; Zhang, X.; Kicklighter, D.W.; Melillo, J.M.; Wofsy, S.C.; Jarvis, P.G.; Massheder, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The role of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) interactions on sequestration of atmospheric CO2 in black spruce ecosystems across North America was evaluated with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) by applying parameterizations of the model in which C-N dynamics were either coupled or uncoupled. First, the performance of the parameterizations, which were developed for the dynamics of black spruce ecosystems at the Bonanza Creek Long-Term Ecological Research site in Alaska, were evaluated by simulating C dynamics at eddy correlation tower sites in the Boreal Ecosystem Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) for black spruce ecosystems in the northern study area (northern site) and the southern study area (southern site) with local climate data. We compared simulated monthly growing season (May to September) estimates of gross primary production (GPP), total ecosystem respiration (RESP), and net ecosystem production (NEP) from 1994 to 1997 to available field-based estimates at both sites. At the northern site, monthly growing season estimates of GPP and RESP for the coupled and uncoupled simulations were highly correlated with the field-based estimates (coupled: R2= 0.77, 0.88 for GPP and RESP; uncoupled: R2 = 0.67, 0.92 for GPP and RESP). Although the simulated seasonal pattern of NEP generally matched the field-based data, the correlations between field-based and simulated monthly growing season NEP were lower (R2 = 0.40, 0.00 for coupled and uncoupled simulations, respectively) in comparison to the correlations between field-based and simulated GPP and RESP. The annual NEP simulated by the coupled parameterization fell within the uncertainty of field-based estimates in two of three years. On the other hand, annual NEP simulated by the uncoupled parameterization only fell within the field-based uncertainty in one of three years. At the southern site, simulated NEP generally matched field-based NEP estimates, and the correlation between monthly growing season field-based and

  17. Spin-curvature interaction from curved Dirac equation: Application to single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Erhu; Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Shengli

    2017-06-01

    The spin-curvature interaction (SCI) and its effects are investigated based on curved Dirac equation. Through the low-energy approximation of curved Dirac equation, the Hamiltonian of SCI is obtained and depends on the geometry and spinor structure of manifold. We find that the curvature can be considered as field strength and couples with spin through Zeeman-like term. Then, we use dimension reduction to derive the local Hamiltonian of SCI for cylinder surface, which implies that the effective Hamiltonian of single-wall carbon nanotubes results from the geometry and spinor structure of lattice and includes two types of interactions: one does not break any symmetries of the lattice and only shifts the Dirac points for all nanotubes, while the other one does and opens the gaps except for armchair nanotubes. At last, analytical expressions of the band gaps and the shifts of their positions induced by curvature are given for metallic nanotubes. These results agree well with experiments and can be verified experimentally.

  18. Compositing polyetherimide with polyfluorene wrapped carbon nanotubes for enhanced interfacial interaction and conductivity

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ye

    2014-06-25

    A novel approach to chemically functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for making superior polyetherimide (PEI) nanocomposites with polyfluorene polymer is presented. In this approach, MWCNTs are non-covalently functionalized with poly(9,9-dioctyfluorenyl-2,7-diyl) (PFO) through π-π stacking as confirmed by UV-vis, fluorescence, and Raman spectra. Atomic force microscopy as well as scanning and transmission electron microscopy shows the PFO coated MWCNTs, which provides excellent dispersion of the latter in both solvent and PEI matrix. The strong interaction of PFO with PEI chains, as evidenced from fluorescence spectra, supports the good adhesion of dispersed MWCNTs to PEI leading to stronger interfacial interactions. As a result, the addition of as little as 0.25 wt % of modified MWCNTs to PEI matrix can strongly improve the mechanical properties of the composite (increase of 46% in storage modulus). Increasing the amount of MWCNTs to 2.0 wt % (0.5 wt % PFO loading) affords a great increase of 119% in storage modulus. Furthermore, a sharp decrease of 12 orders of magnitude in volume resistivity of PEI composite is obtained with only 0.5 wt % of PFO modified MWCNT. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  19. Interactions between plasma-treated carbon nanotubes and electrically neutral materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Nakamura, Keiji

    2014-10-01

    A plasma treatment can create dangling bonds on the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The dangling bonds are so reactive that the bonds possibly interact with other neutral species even out of the plasma if the lifetime of the bonds is effectively long. In order to have good understandings with the interactions, we placed multi-wall CNTs (MWCNTs) in atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge that was created in a closed environment with the voltage at 5 kV. We set 50 W for the operating power and 15 minutes for the process time for this plasma treatment. Our preliminary results showed that the reaction between dangling bonds and neutrals likely occurred in the situation when CNTs were treated with argon plasma, and then exposed in a nitrogen-rich dry box. We did Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy after the treatments. The measurement showed that the spectrum with plasma-treated CNTs was different from pristine CNTs. This is an indication that the plasma-treated CNTs have reactive cites on the surface even after the discharge (~ minutes), and then the CNTs likely reacted with the neutral species that causes the different spectrum. In this poster, we will show more details from our results and further progresses from this research.

  20. Plasmon-organic fiber interactions in diamond-like carbon coated nanostructured gold films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cielecki, Paweł Piotr; Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Kostiuočenko, Oksana; Leißner, Till; Tamulevičius, Tomas; Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Adam, Jost; Fiutowski, Jacek

    2017-11-01

    Gold is the most commonly used plasmonic material, however soft and prone to mechanical deformations. It has been shown that the durability of gold plasmonic substrates can be improved by applying a protective diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating. In this work, we investigate the influence of such protective layers on plasmonic interactions in organic-plasmonic hybrid systems. We consider systems, consisting of 1-Cyano-quaterphenylene nanofibers on top of gold nano-square plasmonic arrays, coated with protective layers of varying thickness. We numerically investigate the spectral position of surface plasmon polariton resonances and electric field intensity, as a function of protective layer thickness, using the finite-difference time-domain method. To confirm the numerically indicated field enhancement preservation on top of protective layers, we experimentally map the second harmonic response of organic nanofibers. Subsequently, we characterize the plasmonic coupling between organic nanofibers and underlying substrates, considered as one of the main loss channels for photoluminescence from nanofibers, by time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Our findings reveal that, for the investigated system, plasmonic interactions are preserved for DLC coatings up to 55 nm. This is relevant for the fabrication of new passive and active plasmonic components with increased durability and hence prolonged lifetime.

  1. Towards an understanding of the molecular regulation of carbon allocation in diatoms: the interaction of energy and carbon allocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Heiko; Jakob, Torsten; Fanesi, Andrea; Wilhelm, Christian

    2017-09-05

    In microalgae, the photosynthesis-driven CO 2 assimilation delivers cell building blocks that are used in different biosynthetic pathways. Little is known about how the cell regulates the subsequent carbon allocation to, for example, cell growth or for storage. However, knowledge about these regulatory mechanisms is of high biotechnological and ecological importance. In diatoms, the situation becomes even more complex because, as a consequence of their secondary endosymbiotic origin, the compartmentation of the pathways for the primary metabolic routes is different from green algae. Therefore, the mechanisms to manipulate the carbon allocation pattern cannot be adopted from the green lineage. This review describes the general pathways of cellular energy distribution from light absorption towards the final allocation of carbon into macromolecules and summarizes the current knowledge of diatom-specific allocation patterns. We further describe the (limited) knowledge of regulatory mechanisms of carbon partitioning between lipids, carbohydrates and proteins in diatoms. We present solutions to overcome the problems that hinder the identification of regulatory elements of carbon metabolism.This article is part of the themed issue 'The peculiar carbon metabolism in diatoms'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Nutrient cycling for biomass: Interactive proteomic/transcriptomic networks for global carbon management processes within poplar-mycorrhizal interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cseke, Leland [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States)

    2016-08-30

    This project addresses the need to develop system-scale models at the symbiotic interface between ectomycorrhizal fungi (Laccaria bicolor) and tree species (Populus tremuloides) in response to environmental nutrient availability / biochemistry. Using our now well-established laboratory Laccaria x poplar system, we address the hypothesis that essential regulatory and metabolic mechanisms can be inferred from genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic-level changes that occur in response to environmental nutrient availability. The project addresses this hypothesis by applying state-of-the-art protein-level analytic approaches to fill the gap in our understanding of how mycorrhizal regulatory and metabolic processes at the transcript-level translate to nutrient uptake, carbon management and ultimate net primary productivity of plants. In most cases, these techniques were not previously optimized for poplar trees or Laccaria. Thus, one of the major contributions of this project has been to provide avenues for new research in these species by overcoming the pitfalls that had previously prevented the use of techniques such as ChIP-Seq and SWATH-proteomics. Since it is the proteins that sense and interact with the environment, participate in signal cascades, activate and regulate gene expression, perform the activities of metabolism and ultimately sequester carbon and generate biomass, an understanding of protein activities during symbiosis-linked nutrient uptake is critical to any systems-level approach that links metabolic processes to the environment. This project uses a team of experts at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to address the above hypothesis using a multiple "omics" approach that combines gene and protein expression as well as protein modifications, and biochemical analyses (performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)) in poplar trees under mycorrhizal and

  3. Electrochemical monitoring of the interaction between mitomycin C and DNA at chitosan--carbon nanotube composite modified electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    CANAVAR, Pembe Ece; EKŞİN, Ece; ERDEM, Arzum

    2015-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT) and chitosan composite (chitosan*CNT) based sensors were developed as DNA biosensors, and then they were applied for electrochemical investigation of the interaction between the anticancer drug mitomycin C (MC) and DNA. The oxidation signals of MC and guanine were monitored before and after the interaction process by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The DPV results were in good agreement with those of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)....

  4. Carbon Nanotube Conditioning: Ab Initio Simulations of the Effect of Interwall Interaction, Defects And Doping on the Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Matias Soto

    Using carbon nanotubes for electrical conduction applications at the macroscale has been shown to be a difficult task for some time now, mainly, due to defects and impurities present, and lack of uniform electronic properties in synthesized carbon nanotube bundles. Some researchers have suggested that growing only metallic armchair nanotubes and arranging them with an ideal contact length could lead to the ultimate electrical conductivity; however, such recipe presents too high of a cost to pay. A different route is to learn to manage the defects, impurities, and the electronic properties of carbon nanotubes present in bundles grown by current state-of-the-art reactors, so that the electrical conduction of a bundle or even wire may be enhanced. In our work, we have used first-principles density functional theory calculations to study the effect of interwall interaction, defects and doping on the electronic structure of metallic, semi-metal and semiconducting single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes in order to gain a clear picture of their properties. The electronic band gap for a range of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes with chiral indices (5,0) - (30,0) was obtained. Their properties were used as a stepping stone in the study of the interwall interaction in double-walled carbon nanotubes, from which it was found that the electronic band gap depends on the type of inner and outer tubes, average diameter, and interwall distance. The effect of vacancy defects was also studied for a range of single-walled carbon nanotubes. It was found that the electronic band gap is reduced for the entire range of zigzag carbon nanotubes, even at vacancy defects concentrations of less than 1%. Finally, interaction potentials obtained via first-principles calculations were generalized by developing mathematical models for the purpose of running simulations at a larger length scale using molecular dynamics of the adsorption doping of diatomic iodine. An ideal adsorption site

  5. Effects of intermolecular interactions on the stability of carbon nanotube–gold nanoparticle conjugates in solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konczak L

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lukasz Konczak,1 Jolanta Narkiewicz-Michalek,2 Giorgia Pastorin,3 Tomasz Panczyk1 1Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow, 2Department of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, Poland; 3Department of Pharmacy, National University of Singapore, Singapore Abstract: This work deals with the role of intermolecular interactions in the stability of a carbon nanotube (CNT capped by functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. The importance of such a system is due to its potential application as a pH-controlled drug carrier. Our preliminary experimental studies showed that fabrication of such a nanobottle/nanocontainer is feasible and it is possible to encapsulate the anticancer drug cisplatin inside the inner space of a CNT and seal its ends by functionalized AuNPs. The expected behavior, that is, detachment of AuNPs at acidic pH and the release of cisplatin, was, however, not observed. On the other hand, our theoretical studies of chemically identical system led to the conclusion that the release of cisplatin at acidic pH should be observed. Therefore, in this work, a deeper theoretical analysis of various factors that could be responsible for the disagreement between experimental and theoretical results were performed. The study found that the major factor is a large dispersion interaction component acting between CNT and AuNP in solution in the case of the experimental system. This factor can be controlled to some extent by tuning the system size or the ratio between AuNP diameter and CNT diameter. Thus, such kind of a pH-sensitive drug carrier is still of great interest, but its structural parameters need to be properly adjusted. Keywords: hydrazone bond, drug delivery, dispersion interactions, cisplatin, acidic pH

  6. Surface modification of carbon fibers and its effect on the fiber–matrix interaction of UHMWPE based composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukov, D.I.; Stepashkin, A.A.; Gorshenkov, M.V.; Tcherdyntsev, V.V.; Kaloshkin, S.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Both chemical and thermal treatments of UKN 5000 carbon fibers allow one to obtain well-developed surface. • The changes of structure and properties of VMN-4 fibers after both thermal and chemical oxidation are insignificant due to more perfect initial structure of these fibers. • The oxidative treatment of carbon fibers allows one to improve the interfacial interaction in the UHMWPE-based composites. • The oxidative treatment of the fibers allows one to a triple increase of Young’s modulus of the modified fibers reinforced UHMWPE composites. -- Abstract: The PAN-based carbon fibers (CF) were subjected to thermal and chemical oxidation under various conditions. The variation in the surface morphology of carbon fibers after surface treatment was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that the tensile strength of carbon fibers changed after surface modification. The interaction between the fibers and the matrix OF ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was characterized by the Young modulus of produced composites. It was shown that the Young modulus of composites reinforced with modified carbon fibers was significantly higher than that of composites reinforced with non-modified fibers

  7. Q.U.E.S.T. An Interactive Earth Science Study Tool: Connecting Real Students to Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, A.; Danowski, D.; Brindisi, C.; Sandvol, C.; Seber, D.

    2001-05-01

    Quick Use Earth Study Tool (QUEST) is an experimental educational interface to the Cornell University's Geoscience Information System (http://atlas.geo.cornell.edu). The information system currently includes more than 100 geographic, geologic, and geophysical data sets along with World Wide Web based interactive mapping tools for data display and analysis. The system is GIS based and accessible via any web browser that support Java applets. QUEST is the companion module that has been developed to assist educators who wish to use these data to their fullest potential, providing tutorials, sample exercises, and suggested projects. Clearly, students learn best when they engage in the practice of science. One means to accomplish this is to have students access primary scientific data. Our experience suggests that a structured exploration of original data sets enhances student learning. For this reason we have selected a subset of Cornell's available geoscience data, and have designed a series of activities that allow students to explore dynamic Earth processes. Currently, these data include the ISC seismicity catalog, volcanism data from the Smithsonian Institution, and digital topography from the USGS and NOAA. The QUEST interface allows students to query the data sets based on a variety of criteria (e.g., earthquakes can be sorted by date, magnitude, depth, and location), or perform computations on data (e.g., sea level can be interactively mapped at any elevation on the DEM). Because the system is GIS-based, multiple data sets can be displayed simultaneously in order for users to examine the spatial relationships between geological features. Users can zoom in to regions of interest, and a map history window keeps track of student work so that comparisons are easily made. QUEST is accompanied by a Teacher's Manual to assist teachers in extracting the most information from the available data and tools. Through these efforts we hope to provide teachers and students

  8. ESR study on the interaction between carbon blacks and oxygen molecules; ESR ho ni yoru carbon black to sanso bunshi tono sogo sayo no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, M.; Toriyama, K.; Konishi, Y. [National Industrial Research Institute of Nagoya, Nagoya (Japan)

    2000-02-24

    Interaction between carbon blacks and oxygen molecules has been studied by means of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The ESR spectra of the carbon blacks appears at the g-value of free spin, which are contributed by both isolated electrons and conduction electrons. Upon introducing oxygen to the system the ESR linewidth was broadened in proportion to the partial pressure of oxygen. In case of lampblack (LB 101, Degussa) the interaction was not so strong that it took a tong time at 77K for the linewidth to reach the maxmum value. In case of gassblack (P 140 V, Degussa), on the other hand, the oxygen was easily adsorbed at 298K and the linewidth at 77K became its maximum immediately after cooling. The number of unpaired electrons decreased when the system was kept at 298 K and the decrease was prominent for the local spins. These phenomena have been explained with a simple band model for the electron. (author)

  9. The role of linked phospholipids in the rubber-filler interaction in carbon nanotube (CNT) filler natural rubber (NR) composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, H.H.; Abhijeet, S.; Ilish, S.; Klehm, J.; Henning, S.; Beiner, M.; Sarkawi, S.S.; Dierkes, Wilma K.; Das, A.; Fischer, D.; Stöckelhuber, K.-W.; Wiessner, S.; Khatiwada, S.P.; Adhikari, R.; Pham, T.; Heinrich, G.; Radusch, H.-J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to evidence the role of the linked phospholipids of natural rubber (NR) in the rubber-carbon nanotube (CNT) interactions in rubber composites. Three rubbers namely NR, deproteinized NR (DPNR) and a synthetic rubber isoprene (IR) were used as matrix for CNTs. The

  10. Soil fauna and organic amendment interactions affect soil carbon and crop performance in semi-arid West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouédraogo, E.; Brussaard, L.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2007-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at Kaibo in southern Burkina Faso on an Eutric Cambisol during the 2000 rainy season to assess the interaction of organic amendment quality and soil fauna, affecting soil organic carbon and sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) performance. Plots were treated with the

  11. How interactions between top-down and bottom-up controls on carbon cycling affect fluxes within and from lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadro, S.; Piovia-Scott, J.; Nelson, C.; Sickman, J. O.; Knapp, R.

    2017-12-01

    While the role of inland waters in global carbon cycling has grown clearer in recent decades, the extent to which top-down and bottom-up mechanisms interact to regulate dynamics at the catchment scale is not well understood. The degree to which lakes process, export, or store terrestrial carbon is influenced by hydrological variability, variation in the magnitude of terrestrial organic matter (t-OM) entering a system, the efficiency with which such material is metabolized by bacterioplankton, the extent to which it is incorporated into secondary consumer biomass, and by the effects of food-web structure, such as the presence or absence of top predators. However, how these processes interact to mediate carbon fluxes between terrestrial, aquatic, and atmospheric reservoirs remains unclear. We develop a conceptual model that explores how interactions among these factors ultimately affects carbon dynamics using data from lakes located in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California. The Sierra are an excellent system for studies of carbon cycling because elevation-induced landscape gradients in soil development and vegetation cover provide large natural variation in terrestrial inputs to lakes, while variation in confounding factors such as lake morphometry or trophic state is comparatively small. Dissolved organic carbon concentrations increase 100 fold in lakes spanning the alpine to montane elevation gradient found in the Sierra, and fluorescence characteristics reflect an increasingly terrestrial signature with decreasing elevation. Bacterioplankton make up a large proportion of total ecosystem metabolism in these systems, and their metabolic efficiency is tightly coupled to the composition of dissolved organic matter. Stable isotope food web data (δ13C, Δ14C, and δ2H) and measurements of pCO2 from lakes indicate the magnitude of allochthony, rates if carbon cycling, and ecosystem heterotrophy all increase with the increasingly terrestrial signature of dissolved

  12. From grand narratives of democracy to small expectations of participation : Audiences, citizenship, and interactive tools in digital journalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Chris; Witschge, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    This article critically examines the invocation of democracy in the discourse of audience participation in digital journalism. Rather than simply restate the familiar grand narratives that traditionally described journalism's function for democracy (information source, watchdog, public

  13. DFT study of Fe-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: Stability, catalytic activity, and interaction with carbon atom for single-walled carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhimin; Wang, Qiang; Shan, Xiaoye; Zhu, Hongjun; Li, Wei-qi; Chen, Guang-hui

    2015-01-01

    Metal catalysts play an important role in the nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). It is essential for probing the nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs to fundamentally understand the properties of the metal catalysts and their interaction with carbon species. In this study, we systematically studied the stability of 13- and 55-atom Fe and Fe-Ni core-shell particles as well as these particles interaction with the carbon atoms using the density functional theory calculations. Icosahedral 13- and 55-atom Fe-Ni core-shell bimetallic particles have higher stability than the corresponding monometallic Fe and Ni particles. Opposite charge transfer (or distribution) in these particles leads to the Fe surface-shell displays a positive charge, while the Ni surface-shell exhibits a negative charge. The opposite charge transfer would induce different chemical activities. Compared with the monometallic Fe and Ni particles, the core-shell bimetallic particles have weaker interaction with C atoms. More importantly, C atoms only prefer staying on the surface of the bimetallic particles. In contrast, C atoms prefer locating into the subsurface of the monometallic particles, which is more likely to form stable metal carbides. The difference of the mono- and bimetallic particles on this issue may result in different nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic catalysts and a better understanding nucleation and growth mechanism of SWCNTs

  14. From Grand Narratives of Democracy to Small Expectations of Participation:Audiences, citizenship, and interactive tools in digital journalism

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Chris; Witschge, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    This chapter critically examines the invocation of democracy in the discourse of audience participation in digital journalism. Rather than simply restate the familiar grand narratives that traditionally described journalism’s function for democracy (information source, watchdog, public representative, mediation for political actors), we compare and contrast conceptualisations of the audience found within these and discuss how digital technologies impact these relationships. We consider how “p...

  15. Effects of black carbon and boundary layer interaction on surface ozone in Nanjing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinhui; Zhu, Bin; Xiao, Hui; Kang, Hanqing; Pan, Chen; Wang, Dongdong; Wang, Honglei

    2018-05-01

    As an important solar radiation absorbing aerosol, the effect of black carbon (BC) on surface ozone, via reducing photolysis rate, has been widely discussed by offline model studies. However, BC-boundary layer (BL) interactions also influence surface ozone. Using the online model simulations and process analysis, we demonstrate the significant impact of BC-BL interaction on surface ozone in Nanjing. The absorbing effect of BC heats the air above the BL and suppresses and delays the development of the BL, which eventually leads to a change in surface ozone via a change in the contributions from chemical and physical processes (photochemistry, vertical mixing and advection). For chemical processes, the suppression of the BL leads to large amounts of ozone precursors being confined below the BL which has an increased effect on ozone chemical production and offsets the decrease caused by the reduction of the photolysis rate, thus enhancing ozone chemical formation from 10:00 to 12:00 LT. Furthermore, changes in physical processes, especially the vertical mixing process, show a more significant influence on surface ozone. The weakened turbulence, caused by the suppressed BL, entrains much less ozone aloft down to the surface. Finally, summing-up the changes in the processes, surface ozone reduces before noon and the maximum reduction reaches 16.4 ppb at 12:00 LT. In the afternoon, the changes in chemical process are small which inconspicuously influence surface ozone. However, change in the vertical mixing process still influences surface ozone significantly. Due to the delayed development of the BL, there are obvious ozone gradients around the top of BL. Therefore, high concentrations of ozone aloft can still be entrained down to the surface which offsets the reduction of surface ozone. Comparing the changes in the processes, the change in vertical mixing plays the most important role in impacting surface ozone. Our results highlight the great impacts BC

  16. Effects of black carbon and boundary layer interaction on surface ozone in Nanjing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gao

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available As an important solar radiation absorbing aerosol, the effect of black carbon (BC on surface ozone, via reducing photolysis rate, has been widely discussed by offline model studies. However, BC–boundary layer (BL interactions also influence surface ozone. Using the online model simulations and process analysis, we demonstrate the significant impact of BC–BL interaction on surface ozone in Nanjing. The absorbing effect of BC heats the air above the BL and suppresses and delays the development of the BL, which eventually leads to a change in surface ozone via a change in the contributions from chemical and physical processes (photochemistry, vertical mixing and advection. For chemical processes, the suppression of the BL leads to large amounts of ozone precursors being confined below the BL which has an increased effect on ozone chemical production and offsets the decrease caused by the reduction of the photolysis rate, thus enhancing ozone chemical formation from 10:00 to 12:00 LT. Furthermore, changes in physical processes, especially the vertical mixing process, show a more significant influence on surface ozone. The weakened turbulence, caused by the suppressed BL, entrains much less ozone aloft down to the surface. Finally, summing-up the changes in the processes, surface ozone reduces before noon and the maximum reduction reaches 16.4 ppb at 12:00 LT. In the afternoon, the changes in chemical process are small which inconspicuously influence surface ozone. However, change in the vertical mixing process still influences surface ozone significantly. Due to the delayed development of the BL, there are obvious ozone gradients around the top of BL. Therefore, high concentrations of ozone aloft can still be entrained down to the surface which offsets the reduction of surface ozone. Comparing the changes in the processes, the change in vertical mixing plays the most important role in impacting surface ozone. Our results highlight the

  17. Digital broadcasting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ji Hyeong

    1999-06-01

    This book contains twelve chapters, which deals with digitization of broadcast signal such as digital open, digitization of video signal and sound signal digitization of broadcasting equipment like DTPP and digital VTR, digitization of equipment to transmit such as digital STL, digital FPU and digital SNG, digitization of transmit about digital TV transmit and radio transmit, digital broadcasting system on necessity and advantage, digital broadcasting system abroad and Korea, digital broadcasting of outline, advantage of digital TV, ripple effect of digital broadcasting and consideration of digital broadcasting, ground wave digital broadcasting of DVB-T in Europe DTV in U.S.A and ISDB-T in Japan, HDTV broadcasting, satellite broadcasting, digital TV broadcasting in Korea, digital radio broadcasting and new broadcasting service.

  18. Modeling soil organic carbon stock after 10 years of cover crops in Mediterranean vineyards: improving ANN prediction by digital terrain analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Novara, Agata; Santoro, Antonino; Gristina, Luciano

    2014-05-01

    Estimate changes in soil organic carbon (SOC) stock after Agro Environment Measures adoption are strategically for national and regional scale. Uncertainty in estimates also represents a very important parameter in terms of evaluation of the exact costs and agro environment payments to farmers. In this study we modeled the variation of SOC stock after 10-year cover crop adoption in a vine growing area of South-Eastern Sicily. A paired-site approach was chosen to study the difference in SOC stocks. A total 100 paired sites (i.e. two adjacent plots) were chosen and three soil samples (Ap soil horizons, circa 0-30 cm depth) were collected in each plot to obtain a mean value of organic carbon concentration for each plot. The variation of soil organic carbon (SOCv) for each plot was calculated by differences between concentrations of the plot subjected to cover crops (SOC10) and the relative plot subjected to traditional agronomic practices (SOC0). The feasibility of using artificial neural networks as a method to predict soil organic carbon stock variation and the contribution of digital terrain analysis to improve the prediction were tested. We randomly subdivided the experimental values of SOC-stock difference in 80 learning samples and 20 test samples for model validation. SOCv was strongly correlated to the SOC0 concentration. Model validation using only SOCv as unique covariate showed a training and test perfection of 0.724 and 0.871 respectively. We hypothesized that terrain-driven hydrological flow patterns, mass-movement and local micro-climatic factors could be responsible processes contributing for SOC redistributions, thus affecting soil carbon stock in time. Terrain attributes were derived by digital terrain analysis from the 10 m DEM of the study area. A total of 37 terrain attributes were calculated and submitted to statistical feature selection. The Chi-square ranking indicated only 4 significant covariates among the terrain attributes (slope height

  19. Effects of multiple interacting disturbances and salvage logging on forest carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, J.B.; Fraver, S.; Milo, A.M.; D'Amato, A.W.; Palik, B.; Shinneman, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is anticipated to increase the frequency of disturbances, potentially impacting carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about the implications of either multiple disturbances or post-disturbance forest management activities on ecosystem carbon stocks. This study quantified how forest carbon stocks responded to stand-replacing blowdown and wildfire, both individually and in combination with and without post-disturbance salvage operations, in a sub-boreal jack pine ecosystem. Individually, blowdown or fire caused similar decreases in live carbon and total ecosystem carbon. However, whereas blowdown increased carbon in down woody material and forest floor, fire increased carbon in standing snags, a difference that may have consequences for long-term carbon cycling patterns. Fire after the blowdown caused substantial additional reduction in ecosystem carbon stocks, suggesting that potential increases in multiple disturbance events may represent a challenge for sustaining ecosystem carbon stocks. Salvage logging, as examined here, decreased carbon stored in snags and down woody material but had no significant effect on total ecosystem carbon stocks.

  20. Effects of multiple interacting disturbances and salvage logging on forest carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    John B. Bradford; Shawn Fraver; Amy M. Milo; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is anticipated to increase the frequency of disturbances, potentially impacting carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about the implications of either multiple disturbances or post-disturbance forest management activities on ecosystem carbon stocks. This study quantified how forest carbon stocks responded to stand-replacing...

  1. Dissolved organic carbon--contaminant interaction descriptors found by 3D force field calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govers, H A J; Krop, H B; Parsons, J R; Tambach, T; Kubicki, J D

    2002-03-01

    Enthalpies of transfer at 300 K of various partitioning processes were calculated in order to study the suitability of 3D force fields for the calculation of partitioning constants. A 3D fulvic acid (FA) model of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was built in a MM+ force field using AMI atomic charges and geometrical optimization (GO). 3,5-Dichlorobiphenyl (PCB14), 4,4'-dichlorobiphenyl (PCB15), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis-(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane (PPDDT) and 2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine (Atrazine) were inserted into different sites and their interaction energies with FA were calculated. Energies of hydration were calculated and subtracted from FA-contaminant interactions of selected sites. The resulting values for the enthalpies of transfer from water to DOC were 2.8, -1.4, -6.4 and 0.0 kcal/mol for PCB 14, PCB15, PPDDT and Atrazine, respectively. The value of PPDDT compared favorably with the experimental value of -5.0 kcal/mol. Prior to this, the method was studied by the calculation of the enthalpies of vaporization and aqueous solution using various force fields. In the MM + force field GO predicted enthalpies of vaporization deviated by +0.7 (PCB14), +3.6 (PCB15) and -0.7 (PPDDT)kcal/mol from experimental data, whereas enthalpies of aqueous solution deviated by -3.6 (PCB14), +5.8 (PCB15) and +3.7 (PPDDT) kcal/mol. Only for PCB14 the wrong sign of this enthalpy value was predicted. Potential advantages and limitations of the approach were discussed.

  2. Improvement of interaction between pre-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes and unsaturated polyester resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, M. D. H., E-mail: dhbeg@yahoo.com; Moshiul Alam, A. K. M., E-mail: akmmalam@gmail.com; Yunus, R. M. [Universiti Malaysia Pahang, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering (Malaysia); Mina, M. F. [Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Department of Physics (Bangladesh)

    2015-01-15

    Efforts are being given to the development of well-dispersed nanoparticle-reinforced polymer nanocomposites in order to tailor the material properties. In this perspective, well dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) was prepared using pre-dispersed MWCNTs in tetrahydrofuran solvent with ultrasonication method. Then the well-dispersed MWCNTs reinforced UPR nanocomposites were fabricated through solvent evaporation. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy indicates a good interaction between matrix and MWCNTs. This along with homogeneous dispersion of nanotubes in matrix has been confirmed by the field emission scanning electron microscopy. At low shear rate, the value of viscosity of UPR is 8,593 mPa s and that of pre-dispersed MWCNT–UPR suspension is 43,491 mPa s, showing implicitly a good dispersion of nanotubes. A notable improvement in the crystallinity of UPR from 14 to 21 % after MWCNTs inclusion was observed by X-ray diffractometry. The mechanical properties, such as tensile strength, tensile modulus, impact strength, and elongation-at-break, of nanocomposite were found to be increased to 22, 20, 28, and 87 %, respectively. The estimated melting enthalpy per gram for composites as analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry is higher than that of UPR. The onset temperature of thermal decomposition in the nanocomposites as monitored by thermogravimetric analysis is found higher than that of UPR. Correlations among MWCNTs dispersion, nucleation, fracture morphology, and various properties were measured and reported.

  3. Interaction of cholesterol with carbon nanotubes: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciani, Anthony J.; Gupta, Bikash C.; Batra, Inder P.

    2008-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are being presented as medical devices at an increasing rate. To date, they have been suggested as targets for the thermal ablation of cancers, as delivery systems for pharmaceuticals, and as bio-sensors. A common thread amongst these applications is that CNTs are used as a delivery vector for some pharmaceutical into the body. We consider here the possibility that CNTs might be used as a device to trap and remove chemicals, particularly cholesterol, from a living organism. We have performed ab-initio calculations to determine how cholesterol might interact with CNTs placed inside the body. We have found that cholesterol exhibits no particular affinity for or effect on a bare CNT; however, its binding energy can be increased by functionalizing the CNT with a Ca adatom. We found that a Ca adatom on the wall of a CNT increases the binding energy of cholesterol to a CNT by around 1.5 eV, regardless of the nanotube's diameter. The presence of the cholesterol does not affect the band structure of the CNT, but the Ca atom does have an effect near the Fermi level. This indicates that a CNT based detector could function by detecting the alteration to the electronic structure caused by the induced adsorption of an adatom in the trinary system of CNT + cholesterol + adatom.

  4. Interaction of Fe-Al-Cr-C with the melt of an alkali metal carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitina, E. V.

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of an Fe-Al-Cr-C (29.5 wt % Fe, 29.35 wt % Cr, 2.56 wt % C, 38.59 wt % Al) alloy with the melt of a lithium, sodium, or potassium carbonate containing 1-5 wt % addition to a salt phase is studied by gravimetry and measuring the corrosion potential and anode polarization curves in the temperature range 500-600°C. As passivators, the substances that decrease the corrosion losses due to hardening and thickening of an oxide film (lithium, sodium, potassium hydroxides) are used. As corrosion stimulators (activators), sodium chloride, fluoride, and sulfate are used. The coalloying of iron with chromium and aluminum results in high corrosion resistance against both frontal (continuous) and local (pitting, intercrystalline) corrosion as a result of formation of chemically resistant and high-adhesion oxide layers with their participation. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals gamma aluminum oxide, spinel (alumochromite) traces, and lithium aluminate at the surface.

  5. Interaction of both plasmas in CO2 laser-MAG hybrid welding of carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsuna, Muneharu; Chen, Liang

    2003-03-01

    Researches and developments of laser and arc hybrid welding has been curried out since in 1978. Especially, CO2 laser and TIG hybrid welding has been studied for increasing the penetration depth and welding speed. Recently laser and MIG/MAG/Plasma hybrid welding processes have been developed and applied to industries. It was recognized as a new welding process that promote the flexibility of the process for increasing the penetration depth, welding speed and allowable joint gap and improving the quality of the welds. In the present work, CO2 Laser-MAG hybrid welding of carbon steel (SM490) was investigated to make clear the phenomenon and characteristics of hybrid welding process comparing with laser welding and MAG process. The effects of many process parameters such as welding current, arc voltage, welding speed, defocusing distance, laser-to-arc distance on penetration depth, bead shape, spatter, arc stability and plasma formation were investigated in the present work. Especially, the interaction of laser plasma and MAG arc plasma was considered by changing the laser to arc distance (=DLA).

  6. Electromechanical interactions in a carbon nanotube based thin film field emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, N; Mahapatra, D Roy; Sun, Y; Yeow, J T W; Melnik, R V N; Jaffray, D A

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as promising candidates for biomedical x-ray devices and other applications of field emission. CNTs grown/deposited in a thin film are used as cathodes for field emission. In spite of the good performance of such cathodes, the procedure to estimate the device current is not straightforward and the required insight towards design optimization is not well developed. In this paper, we report an analysis aided by a computational model and experiments by which the process of evolution and self-assembly (reorientation) of CNTs is characterized and the device current is estimated. The modeling approach involves two steps: (i) a phenomenological description of the degradation and fragmentation of CNTs and (ii) a mechanics based modeling of electromechanical interaction among CNTs during field emission. A computational scheme is developed by which the states of CNTs are updated in a time incremental manner. Finally, the device current is obtained by using the Fowler-Nordheim equation for field emission and by integrating the current density over computational cells. A detailed analysis of the results reveals the deflected shapes of the CNTs in an ensemble and the extent to which the initial state of geometry and orientation angles affect the device current. Experimental results confirm these effects

  7. Nuclear Energy and Renewables interaction: System Effects in Low-carbon Electricity Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keppler, Jan Horst; Cometto, Marco

    2013-01-01

    This report presents a synthesis of the OECD/NEA study 'Nuclear Energy and Renewables: System Effects in Low-carbon Electricity Systems'. It addresses the increasingly important interactions of variable renewables and dispatchable energy technologies, such as nuclear power, in terms of their effects on electricity systems. These effects add costs to the production of electricity, which are not usually transparent. The report recommends that decision-makers should take into account such system costs and internalise them according to a 'generator pays' principle, which is currently not the case. Analysing data from six OECD/NEA countries, the study finds that including the system costs of variable renewables at the level of the electricity grid increases the total costs of electricity supply by up to one-third, depending on technology, country and penetration levels. In addition, it concludes that, unless the current market subsidies for renewables are altered, dispatchable technologies will increasingly not be replaced as they reach their end of life and consequently security of supply will suffer. This implies that significant changes in management and cost allocation will be needed to generate the flexibility required for an economically viable coexistence of nuclear energy and renewables in increasingly de-carbonised electricity systems

  8. Soil Organic Carbon and Its interaction with Minerals in Two Hillslopes with Different Climates and Erosion Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Yoo, K.; Wackett, A. A.; Gutknecht, J.; Amundson, R.; Heimsath, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Climate and topography have been widely recognized as important factors regulating soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics but their interactive effects on SOC storage and its pools remain poorly constrained. Here we aimed to evaluate SOC storages and carbon-mineral interactions along two hillslope transects with moderately different climates (MAP: 549 mm vs. 816 mm) in Southeastern Australia. We sampled soil along the convex (eroding)-to-convergent (depositional) continuum at each hillslope transect and conducted size and density fractionation of these samples. In responses to the difference in climate factor, SOC inventories of eroding soils were twice as large at the wetter site compared with the drier site but showed little difference between two sites in depositional soils. These trends in SOC inventories were primarily controlled by SOC concentrations and secondarily by soil thicknesses. Similar patterns were observed for mineral associated organic carbon (MOC), and the abundances of MOC were controlled by the two independently operating processes affecting MOC concentration and fine-heavy fraction minerals. The contents and species of secondary clay and iron oxide minerals, abundances of particulate organic carbon, and bioturbation affected MOC concentrations. In contrast, the abundances of fine-heavy fraction minerals were impacted by erosion mechanisms that uniquely responded to regional- and micro- climate conditions. Consequently, topographic influences on SOC inventories and carbon-mineral interactions were more strongly pronounced in the drier climate where vegetation and erosion mechanisms were sensitive to microclimate. Our results highlight the significance of understanding topography and erosional processes in capturing climatic effects on soil carbon dynamics.

  9. Enhancing the Reuse of Digital Resources for Integrated Systems to Represent, Understand and Dynamize Complex Interactions in Architectural Cultural Heritage Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F. J.; Martinez, R.; Finat, J.; Martinez, J.; Puche, J. C.; Finat, F. J.

    2013-07-01

    In this work we develop a multiply interconnected system which involves objects, agents and interactions between them from the use of ICT applied to open repositories, users communities and web services. Our approach is applied to Architectural Cultural Heritage Environments (ACHE). It includes components relative to digital accessibility (to augmented ACHE repositories), contents management (ontologies for the semantic web), semiautomatic recognition (to ease the reuse of materials) and serious videogames (for interaction in urban environments). Their combination provides a support for local real/remote virtual tourism (including some tools for low-level RT display of rendering in portable devices), mobile-based smart interactions (with a special regard to monitored environments) and CH related games (as extended web services). Main contributions to AR models on usual GIS applied to architectural environments, concern to an interactive support performed directly on digital files which allows to access to CH contents which are referred to GIS of urban districts (involving facades, historical or preindustrial buildings) and/or CH repositories in a ludic and transversal way to acquire cognitive, medial and social abilities in collaborative environments.

  10. Mineral Dissolution and Precipitation due to Carbon Dioxide-Water-Rock Interactions: The Significance of Accessory Minerals in Carbonate Reservoirs (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba, J. P.; Marcon, V.; Chopping, C.

    2013-12-01

    Accessory minerals in carbonate reservoirs, and in the caprocks that seal these reservoirs, can provide insight into multiphase fluid (CO2 + H2O)-rock interactions and the behavior of CO2 that resides in these water-rock systems. Our program integrates field data, hydrothermal experiments, and geochemical modeling to evaluate CO2-water-rock reactions and processes in a variety of carbonate reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region of the US. These studies provide insights into a wide range of geologic environments, including natural CO2 reservoirs, geologic carbon sequestration, engineered geothermal systems, enhanced oil and gas recovery, and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. One suite of experiments evaluates the Madison Limestone on the Moxa Arch, Southwest Wyoming, a sulfur-rich natural CO2 reservoir. Mineral textures and geochemical features developed in the experiments suggest that carbonate minerals which constitute the natural reservoir will initially dissolve in response to emplacement of CO2. Euhedral, bladed anhydrite concomitantly precipitates in response to injected CO2. Analogous anhydrite is observed in drill core, suggesting that secondary anhydrite in the natural reservoir may be related to emplacement of CO2 into the Madison Limestone. Carbonate minerals ultimately re-precipitate, and anhydrite dissolves, as the rock buffers the acidity and reasserts geochemical control. Another suite of experiments emulates injection of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery in the Desert Creek Limestone (Paradox Formation), Paradox Basin, Southeast Utah. Euhedral iron oxyhydroxides (hematite) precipitate at pH 4.5 to 5 and low Eh (approximately -0.1 V) as a consequence of water-rock reaction. Injection of CO2 decreases pH to approximately 3.5 and increases Eh by approximately 0.1 V, yielding secondary mineralization of euhedral pyrite instead of iron oxyhydroxides. Carbonate minerals also dissolve and ultimately re-precipitate, as determined by experiments in the

  11. Charaterising water-rock interaction in a mixed carbonate-evaporite karstified aquifer system, Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirathititham, R.; Whitaker, F.

    2017-12-01

    Qatar is an arid country, most of the rainfall (80 mm/yr) occurring during intense storms. Surface runoff is endorheic and recharge is facilitated by karst features developed over an extended (c.30 Ma) period of exposure of the carbonate bedrock. In December 2016, we sampled a rare intense rainfall event (41 mm over 3 days), after which waters ponded within low-relief terminal depressions prior to infiltration. We compare the chemistry of these recharge waters with that of ground waters from 76 wells distributed across Qatar to understand the nature and spatial distribution of water-rock interaction. Using Cl- as a conservative tracer for seawater mixing, we calculate concentrations of rock-derived Ca2+, Mg2+ and SO42-. During surface detention, rain chemistry is modified by evaporation and interaction with clays and the surface bedrock over days to weeks. However, groundwater chemistry is dominated by subsurface interaction between recharge waters and the karstified Tertiary aquifers. These include the largely dolomitic Paleocene to Lower Eocene Umm er Radhuma (UER) and overlying Lower Eocene Rus, with the Middle Eocene Abarug limestone forming a locally important aquifer in the south west. Away from coastal areas which show clear evidence of salinisation, TDS of groundwaters in the interior of the peninsula increases from north to south. All groundwaters are significantly enriched in SO42-, but this enrichment is marked greater in the south. This likely reflects the presence of a unit of middle Rus gypsum that in the south of the country confines the Lower Rus and UER aquifers, whilst in the north either gypsum was not deposited or has been dissolved. Waters in the Abarug limestone show limited sulfate enrichment and a 1:1 molar ratio of rock-derived SO42-: Ca2+, but across much of the country both SO42- enrichment and SO42-: Ca2+ molar ratio are significantly higher, the latter reaching 2:1 and suggesting an additional sink for Ca2+. The dolomite aquifer waters

  12. Investigating Interactions between the Silica and Carbon Cycles during Precipitation and Early Diagenesis of Authigenic Clay/Carbonate-Mineral Associations in the Carbonate Rock Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, J. A.; Francisca Martinez Ruiz, F.; Sanchez-Roman, M.; Anjos, S.; Bontognali, T. R. R.; Nascimento, G. S.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2017-12-01

    The study of authigenic clay/carbonate-mineral associations within carbonate sequences has important implications for the interpretation of scientific problems related with rock reservoir properties, such as alteration of potential porosity and permeability. More specifically, when clay minerals are randomly distributed within the carbonate matrix, it becomes difficult to predict reservoir characteristics. In order to understand this mineral association in the geological record, we have undertaken a comparative study of specially designed laboratory experiments with modern environments, where clay minerals have been shown to precipitate together with a range of carbonate minerals, including calcite, Mg-calcite and dolomite. Two modern dolomite-forming environments, the Coorong lakes, South Australia and Brejo do Espinho Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were selected for this investigation. For comparative evaluation, enrichment microbial culture experiments, using natural pore water from Brejo do Espinho as the growth medium to promote mineral precipitation, were performed under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To establish the environmental parameters and biological processes facilitating the dual mineral association, the experimental samples have been compared with the natural minerals using HRTEM measurements. The results demonstrate that the clay and carbonate minerals apparently do not co-precipitate, but the precipitation of the different minerals in the same sample has probably occurred under different environmental conditions with variable chemistries, e.g., hypersalinity versus normal salinity resulting from the changing ratio of evaporation versus precipitation. Thus, the investigated mineral association is not a product of diagenetic processes but of sequential in situ precipitation processes related to changes in the silica and carbon availability. Implications for ancient carbonate formations will be presented and discussed in the context of a specific

  13. Fungal Volatiles Can Act as Carbon Sources and Semiochemicals to Mediate Interspecific Interactions Among Bark Beetle-Associated Fungal Symbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan A Cale

    Full Text Available Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae has killed millions of hectares of pine forests in western North America. Beetle success is dependent upon a community of symbiotic fungi comprised of Grosmannia clavigera, Ophiostoma montium, and Leptographium longiclavatum. Factors regulating the dynamics of this community during pine infection are largely unknown. However, fungal volatile organic compounds (FVOCs help shape fungal interactions in model and agricultural systems and thus may be important drivers of interactions among bark beetle-associated fungi. We investigated whether FVOCs can mediate interspecific interactions among mountain pine beetle's fungal symbionts by affecting fungal growth and reproduction. Headspace volatiles were collected and identified to determine species-specific volatile profiles. Interspecific effects of volatiles on fungal growth and conidia production were assessed by pairing physically-separated fungal cultures grown either on a carbon-poor or -rich substrate, inside a shared-headspace environment. Fungal VOC profiles differed by species and influenced the growth and/or conidia production of the other species. Further, our results showed that FVOCs can be used as carbon sources for fungi developing on carbon-poor substrates. This is the first report demonstrating that FVOCs can drive interactions among bark beetle fungal symbionts, and thus are important factors in beetle attack success.

  14. Influence of surface chemistry of carbon materials on their interactions with inorganic nitrogen contaminants in soil and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumaraj; Padhye, Lokesh P

    2017-10-01

    Inorganic nitrogen contaminants (INC) (NH 4 + , NO 3 - , NO 2 - , NH 3 , NO, NO 2 , and N 2 O) pose a growing risk to the environment, and their remediation methods are highly sought after. Application of carbon materials (CM), such as biochar and activated carbon, to remediate INC from agricultural fields and wastewater treatment plants has gained a significant interest since past few years. Understanding the role of surface chemistry of CM in adsorption of various INC is highly critical to increase adsorption efficiency as well as to assess the long term impact of using these highly recalcitrant CM for remediation of INC. Critical reviews of adsorption studies related to INC have revealed that carbon surface chemistry (surface functional groups, pH, Eh, elemental composition, and mineral content) has significant influence on adsorption of INC. Compared to basic functional groups, oxygen containing surface functional groups have been found to be more influential for adsorption of INC. However, basic sites on carbon materials still play an important role in chemisorption of anionic INC. Apart from surface functional groups, pH, Eh and pH zpc of CM and elemental and mineral composition of its surface are important properties capable of altering INC interactions with CM. This review summarizes our current understanding of INC interactions with CM's surface through the known chemisorption mechanisms: electrostatic interaction, hydrogen bonding, electron donor-acceptor mechanism, hydrophobic and hydrophilic interaction, chemisorption aided by minerals, and interactions influenced by pH and elemental composition. Change in surface chemistry of CM in soil during aging is also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The interaction of the flux errors and transport errors in modeled atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Butler, M. P.; Keller, K.; Davis, K. J.; Jacobson, A. R.; Schuh, A. E.; Basu, S.; Liu, J.; Baker, D.; Crowell, S.; Zhou, Y.; Williams, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Regional estimates of biogenic carbon fluxes over North America from top-down atmospheric inversions and terrestrial biogeochemical (or bottom-up) models remain inconsistent at annual and sub-annual time scales. While top-down estimates are impacted by limited atmospheric data, uncertain prior flux estimates and errors in the atmospheric transport models, bottom-up fluxes are affected by uncertain driver data, uncertain model parameters and missing mechanisms across ecosystems. This study quantifies both flux errors and transport errors, and their interaction in the CO2 atmospheric simulation. These errors are assessed by an ensemble approach. The WRF-Chem model is set up with 17 biospheric fluxes from the Multiscale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project, CarbonTracker-Near Real Time, and the Simple Biosphere model. The spread of the flux ensemble members represents the flux uncertainty in the modeled CO2 concentrations. For the transport errors, WRF-Chem is run using three physical model configurations with three stochastic perturbations to sample the errors from both the physical parameterizations of the model and the initial conditions. Additionally, the uncertainties from boundary conditions are assessed using four CO2 global inversion models which have assimilated tower and satellite CO2 observations. The error structures are assessed in time and space. The flux ensemble members overall overestimate CO2 concentrations. They also show larger temporal variability than the observations. These results suggest that the flux ensemble is overdispersive. In contrast, the transport ensemble is underdispersive. The averaged spatial distribution of modeled CO2 shows strong positive biogenic signal in the southern US and strong negative signals along the eastern coast of Canada. We hypothesize that the former is caused by the 3-hourly downscaling algorithm from which the nighttime respiration dominates the daytime modeled CO2 signals and that the latter

  16. SU-F-J-204: Carbon Digitally Reconstructed Radiography (CDRR): A GPU Based Tool for Fast and Versatile Carbonimaging Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, M F; Seco, J; Baroni, G; Riboldi, M

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Research in carbon imaging has been growing over the past years, as a way to increase treatment accuracy and patient positioning in carbon therapy. The purpose of this tool is to allow a fast and flexible way to generate CDRR data without the need to use Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. It can also be used to predict future clinically measured data. Methods: A python interface has been developed, which uses information from CT or 4DCT and thetreatment calibration curve to compute the Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) of carbon ions. A GPU based ray tracing algorithm computes the WEPL of each individual carbon traveling through the CT voxels. A multiple peak detection method to estimate high contrast margin positioning has been implemented (described elsewhere). MC simulations have been used to simulate carbons depth dose curves in order to simulate the response of a range detector. Results: The tool allows the upload of CT or 4DCT images. The user has the possibility to selectphase/slice of interested as well as position, angle…). The WEPL is represented as a range detector which can be used to assess range dilution and multiple peak detection effects. The tool also provides knowledge of the minimum energy that should be considered for imaging purposes. The multiple peak detection method has been used in a lung tumor case, showing an accuracy of 1mm in determine the exact interface position. Conclusion: The tool offers an easy and fast way to simulate carbon imaging data. It can be used for educational and for clinical purposes, allowing the user to test beam energies and angles before real acquisition. An analysis add-on is being developed, where the used will have the opportunity to select different reconstruction methods and detector types (range or energy). Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia (FCT), PhD Grant number SFRH/BD/85749/2012

  17. SU-F-J-204: Carbon Digitally Reconstructed Radiography (CDRR): A GPU Based Tool for Fast and Versatile Carbonimaging Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, M F [Dipartamento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria - DEIB, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Seco, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Baroni, G; Riboldi, M [Dipartamento di Elettronica, Informazione e Bioingegneria - DEIB, Politecnico di Milano (Italy); Bioengineering Unit, Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica, Pavia (Italy)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Research in carbon imaging has been growing over the past years, as a way to increase treatment accuracy and patient positioning in carbon therapy. The purpose of this tool is to allow a fast and flexible way to generate CDRR data without the need to use Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. It can also be used to predict future clinically measured data. Methods: A python interface has been developed, which uses information from CT or 4DCT and thetreatment calibration curve to compute the Water Equivalent Path Length (WEPL) of carbon ions. A GPU based ray tracing algorithm computes the WEPL of each individual carbon traveling through the CT voxels. A multiple peak detection method to estimate high contrast margin positioning has been implemented (described elsewhere). MC simulations have been used to simulate carbons depth dose curves in order to simulate the response of a range detector. Results: The tool allows the upload of CT or 4DCT images. The user has the possibility to selectphase/slice of interested as well as position, angle…). The WEPL is represented as a range detector which can be used to assess range dilution and multiple peak detection effects. The tool also provides knowledge of the minimum energy that should be considered for imaging purposes. The multiple peak detection method has been used in a lung tumor case, showing an accuracy of 1mm in determine the exact interface position. Conclusion: The tool offers an easy and fast way to simulate carbon imaging data. It can be used for educational and for clinical purposes, allowing the user to test beam energies and angles before real acquisition. An analysis add-on is being developed, where the used will have the opportunity to select different reconstruction methods and detector types (range or energy). Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia (FCT), PhD Grant number SFRH/BD/85749/2012.

  18. Study of the Adsorbent-Adsorbate Interactions from Cd(II) and Pb(II) Adsorption on Activated Carbon and Activated Carbon Fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Doo Won; Kim, Bohye; Yang, Kap Seung [Chonnam National Univ., Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Yongkyun; Park, Eun Nam [Microfilter Co., Ltd, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    The adsorption characteristics of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in aqueous solution using granular activated carbon (GAC), activated carbon fiber (ACF), modified ACF (NaACF), and a mixture of GAC and NaACF (GAC/NaACF) have been studied. The surface properties, such as morphology, surface functional groups, and composition of various adsorbents were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The specific surface area, total pore volume, and pore size distribution were investigated using nitrogen adsorption, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) methods. In this study, NaACF showed a high adsorption capacity and rate for heavy metal ions due to the improvement of its ion-exchange capabilities by additional oxygen functional groups. Moreover, the GAC and NaACF mixture was used as an adsorbent to determine the adsorbent-adsorbate interaction in the presence of two competitive adsorbents.

  19. Study of the Adsorbent-Adsorbate Interactions from Cd(II) and Pb(II) Adsorption on Activated Carbon and Activated Carbon Fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Doo Won; Kim, Bohye; Yang, Kap Seung; Lim, Yongkyun; Park, Eun Nam

    2013-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of Cd(II) and Pb(II) in aqueous solution using granular activated carbon (GAC), activated carbon fiber (ACF), modified ACF (NaACF), and a mixture of GAC and NaACF (GAC/NaACF) have been studied. The surface properties, such as morphology, surface functional groups, and composition of various adsorbents were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements. The specific surface area, total pore volume, and pore size distribution were investigated using nitrogen adsorption, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) methods. In this study, NaACF showed a high adsorption capacity and rate for heavy metal ions due to the improvement of its ion-exchange capabilities by additional oxygen functional groups. Moreover, the GAC and NaACF mixture was used as an adsorbent to determine the adsorbent-adsorbate interaction in the presence of two competitive adsorbents

  20. Nutrient demand and fungal access to resources control the carbon allocation to the symbiotic partners in tripartite interactions of Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, Arjun; Garcia, Kevin; Wang, Xiurong; Pfeffer, Philip E; Strahan, Gary D; Bücking, Heike

    2018-06-02

    Legumes form tripartite interactions with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and rhizobia, and both root symbionts exchange nutrients against carbon from their host. The carbon costs of these interactions are substantial, but our current understanding of how the host controls its carbon allocation to individual root symbionts is limited. We examined nutrient uptake and carbon allocation in tripartite interactions of Medicago truncatula under different nutrient supply conditions, and when the fungal partner had access to nitrogen, and followed the gene expression of several plant transporters of the SUT and SWEET family. Tripartite interactions led to synergistic growth responses and stimulated the phosphate and nitrogen uptake of the plant. Plant nutrient demand but also fungal access to nutrients played an important role for the carbon transport to different root symbionts, and the plant allocated more carbon to rhizobia under nitrogen demand, but more carbon to the fungal partner when nitrogen was available. These changes in carbon allocation were consistent with changes in the SUT and SWEET expression. Our study provides important insights into how the host plant controls its carbon allocation under different nutrient supply conditions and changes its carbon allocation to different root symbionts to maximize its symbiotic benefits. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Transient simulations of historical climate change including interactive carbon emissions from land-use change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, A.; Matthews, H. D.

    2009-04-01

    Carbon fluxes from land conversion are among the most uncertain variables in our understanding of the contemporary carbon cycle, which limits our ability to estimate both the total human contribution to current climate forcing and the net effect of terrestrial biosphere changes on atmospheric CO2 increases. The current generation of coupled climate-carbon models have made significant progress in simulating the coupled climate and carbon cycle response to anthropogenic CO2 emissions, but do not typically include land-use change as a dynamic component of the simulation. In this work we have incorporated a book-keeping land-use carbon accounting model into the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM), and intermediate-complexity coupled climate-carbon model. The terrestrial component of the UVic ESCM allows an aerial competition of five plant functional types (PFTs) in response to climatic conditions and area availability, and tracks the associated changes in affected carbon pools. In order to model CO2 emissions from land conversion in the terrestrial component of the model, we calculate the allocation of carbon to short and long-lived wood products following specified land-cover change, and use varying decay timescales to estimate CO2 emissions. We use recently available spatial datasets of both crop and pasture distributions to drive a series of transient simulations and estimate the net contribution of human land-use change to historical carbon emissions and climate change.

  2. The role of organo-mineral interactions on the capacity of soils to store carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, K.; Abramoff, R. Z.; Riley, W. J.; Torn, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Observed patterns of soil organic carbon (SOC) content across geochemical regimes are signatures of process and provide opportunities to understand the underlying decomposition and stabilization mechanisms that can guide their representation in models. The type of sorption equation used in soil decomposition models has large implications for both SOC stock and its temperature sensitivity. Here we compared different model formulations of SOC sorption to mineral surfaces, motivated by the myriad of chemical associations between organic and mineral surfaces, and used laboratory and field incubations to inform model parameters. We explored linear, Langmuir, and Freundlich adsorption models, where the latter emerges from heterogeneous compositions of substrate and surface components. We show the effect of model representations on predicted trends of SOC as a function of mineralogy and discuss the role of soil C saturation on emergent patterns. Specifically, our results highlight that the response of mineral-associated (`protected') SOC to changes in plant C inputs depends greatly on the C saturation deficit of the soil and thus, the representation of organo-mineral interactions in models can lead to nonlinear steady-state responses in protected SOC. We also find that, consistent with field experiments, the trend in protected SOC and mineral C saturation capacity is linear, but, interestingly, the slope depends on the degree of C saturation. We contend that this latter finding is an important consideration for field studies that did not find a universal slope and interpreted this as an inability of mineralogy to explain observed patterns. Our results also suggest that warming affects this slope, with higher temperatures causing a decrease in the amount of protected C for a given saturation capacity and C input rate. This means that more C inputs will be needed to keep the same amount of protected C at higher temperatures. Organo-mineral interactions play a key role in

  3. Interactions Between Stratigraphy and Interfacial Properties on Flow and Trapping in Geologic Carbon Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Clarens, Andres F.

    2018-01-01

    Gas leakage from geologic carbon storage sites could undermine the long-term goal of reducing emissions to the atmosphere and negatively impact groundwater resources. Despite this, there remain uncertainties associated with the transport processes that would govern this leakage. These stem from the complex interaction between governing forces (e.g., gravitational, viscous, and capillary), the heterogeneous nature of the porous media, and the characteristic length scales of these leakage events, all of which impact the CO2 fluid flow processes. Here we assessed how sub-basin-scale horizons in porous media could impact the migration and trapping of a CO2 plume. A high-pressure column packed with two layers of sand with different properties (e.g., grain size and wettability) was used to create a low-contrast stratigraphic horizon. CO2 in supercritical or liquid phase was injected into the bottom of the column under various conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, and capillary number) and the transport of the resulting plume was recorded using electrical resistivity. The results show that CO2 trapping was most strongly impacted by shifting the wettability balance to mixed-wet conditions, particularly for residual saturation. A 16% increase in the cosine of the contact angle for a mixed-wet sand resulted in nearly twice as much residual trapping. Permeability contrast, pressure, and temperature also impacted the residual saturation but to a lesser extent. Flow rate affected the dynamics of saturation profile development, but the effect is transient, suggesting that the other effects observed here could apply to a broad range of leakage conditions.

  4. High-energy neutron yields in interactions of carbon ions with 114Sn and 124Sn nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinov, M.B.; Gavrilov, B.P.; Kovalenko, S.S.; Kozulin, Eh.M.; Mozhaev, A.N.; Oganesyan, Yu.Ts.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.

    1984-01-01

    The measurements of the yields of neutrons (energy more than 5 MeV) emitted in the interactions of carbon-12 ions (9 MeV/nucl.) with nuclei of two tin isotopes are conducted. The results obtained prove the effect of nucleon composition of a nucleus on the process of formation of high-energy neutrons. To clarify the concrete interaction mechanism it is necessary to perform systematic research for a number of isotopes differing in the relation of the number of neutrons and protons and binding energies of the last neutron

  5. Study on neutron interactions with protons and carbon nuclei at p=4.2 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekmirzaev, R.N.; Muminov, M.M.; Sultanov, M.U.; Grishina, O.V.; Dolejsi, J.; Tas, P.; Trka, Z.

    1988-01-01

    The production of neutrons with p=4.2 GeV/c in d(C 3 H 8 ) collisions and their interaction with proton and carbon nuclei are studied. The experimental material has been obtained using the 2m propane bubble chamber irradiated by deuterons with p=4.2 GeV/c per nucleon at the Dubna synchrophasotron, JINR. The data on multiplicity and momentum characteristics of secondary particles in np and nC interactions compared with the calculations on the LUND model are obtained

  6. Soil fauna and organic amendment interactions affect soil carbon and crop performance in semi-arid West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ouédraogo, E.; Brussaard, L.; Stroosnijder, L.

    2007-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted at Kaibo in southern Burkina Faso on an Eutric Cambisol during the 2000 rainy season to assess the interaction of organic amendment quality and soil fauna, affecting soil organic carbon and sorghum ( Sorghum bicolor L. Moench) performance. Plots were treated with the pesticides Dursban and Endosulfan to exclude soil fauna or left untreated. Sub-treatments consisted of surface-placed maize straw ( C/N ratio= 58), Andropogon straw ( C/N ratio= 153), cattle dung ...

  7. The Brain’s Response to Digital Math Apps: A Pilot Study Examining Children’s Cortical Responses During Touch-Screen Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Joseph; Moyer-Packenham, Patricia Seray; Tucker, Stephen; Shumway, Jessica; Jordan, Kerry; Gillam, Ron

    2018-01-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is an easy to use neuroimaging technique that is portable and maintains a liberal tolerance to movement. As such, fNIRS represents an ideal tool to observe children’s neural activity as they engage in real-world classroom activities, such as the interaction with digital math apps on an iPad. Here, we provide the results of an initial hypothesis-generating pilot study designed to assess patterns of cortical activity that occur when children interac...

  8. Interactions between carbon sequestration and shade tree diversity in a smallholder coffee cooperative in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Meryl Breton; Méndez, V Ernesto

    2014-04-01

    Agroforestry systems have substantial potential to conserve native biodiversity and provide ecosystem services. In particular, agroforestry systems have the potential to conserve native tree diversity and sequester carbon for climate change mitigation. However, little research has been conducted on the temporal stability of species diversity and aboveground carbon stocks in these systems or the relation between species diversity and aboveground carbon sequestration. We measured changes in shade-tree diversity and shade-tree carbon stocks in 14 plots of a 35-ha coffee cooperative over 9 years and analyzed relations between species diversity and carbon sequestration. Carbon sequestration was positively correlated with initial species richness of shade trees. Species diversity of shade trees did not change significantly over the study period, but carbon stocks increased due to tree growth. Our results show a potential for carbon sequestration and long-term biodiversity conservation in smallholder coffee agroforestry systems and illustrate the opportunity for synergies between biodiversity conservation and climate change mitigation. © 2013 Society for Conservation Biology.

  9. Interactive effects of environmental change and management strategies on regional forest carbon emissions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudiburg, Tara W.; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Thornton, Peter E.; Law, Beverly E.

    2013-01-01

    Climate mitigation activities in forests need to be quantified in terms of the long-term effects on forest carbon stocks, accumulation, and emissions. The impacts of future environmental change and bioenergy harvests on regional forest carbon storage have not been quantified. We conducted a

  10. Modeling Biogeochemical-Physical Interactions and Carbon Flux in the Sargasso Sea (Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study site)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, Sergio R.; McClain, Charles R.; Christian, James R.

    2001-01-01

    An ecosystem-carbon cycle model is used to analyze the biogeochemical-physical interactions and carbon fluxes in the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site for the period of 1992-1998. The model results compare well with observations (most variables are within 8% of observed values). The sea-air flux ranges from -0.32 to -0.50 mol C/sq m/yr, depending upon the gas transfer algorithm used. This estimate is within the range (-0.22 to -0.83 mol C/sq m/yr) of previously reported values which indicates that the BATS region is a weak sink of atmospheric CO2. The overall carbon balance consists of atmospheric CO2 uptake of 0.3 Mol C/sq m/yr, upward dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) bottom flux of 1.1 Mol C/sq m/yr, and carbon export of 1.4 mol C/sq m/yr via sedimentation. Upper ocean DIC levels increased between 1992 and 1996 at a rate of approximately 1.2 (micro)mol/kg/yr, consistent with observations. However, this trend was reversed during 1997-1998 to -2.7 (micro)mol/kg/yr in response to hydrographic changes imposed by the El Nino-La Nina transition, which were manifested in the Sargasso Sea by the warmest SST and lowest surface salinity of the period (1992-1998).

  11. Desert dust and anthropogenic aerosol interactions in the Community Climate System Model coupled-carbon-climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mahowald

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Coupled-carbon-climate simulations are an essential tool for predicting the impact of human activity onto the climate and biogeochemistry. Here we incorporate prognostic desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into the CCSM3.1 coupled carbon-climate model and explore the resulting interactions with climate and biogeochemical dynamics through a series of transient anthropogenic simulations (20th and 21st centuries and sensitivity studies. The inclusion of prognostic aerosols into this model has a small net global cooling effect on climate but does not significantly impact the globally averaged carbon cycle; we argue that this is likely to be because the CCSM3.1 model has a small climate feedback onto the carbon cycle. We propose a mechanism for including desert dust and anthropogenic aerosols into a simple carbon-climate feedback analysis to explain the results of our and previous studies. Inclusion of aerosols has statistically significant impacts on regional climate and biogeochemistry, in particular through the effects on the ocean nitrogen cycle and primary productivity of altered iron inputs from desert dust deposition.

  12. Development of digital reconstructed radiography software at new treatment facility for carbon-ion beam scanning of National Institute of Radiological Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Inaniwa, Taku; Kumagai, Motoki; Kuwae, Tsunekazu; Matsuzaki, Yuka; Furukawa, Takuji; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Noda, Koji

    2012-06-01

    To increase the accuracy of carbon ion beam scanning therapy, we have developed a graphical user interface-based digitally-reconstructed radiograph (DRR) software system for use in routine clinical practice at our center. The DRR software is used in particular scenarios in the new treatment facility to achieve the same level of geometrical accuracy at the treatment as at the imaging session. DRR calculation is implemented simply as the summation of CT image voxel values along the X-ray projection ray. Since we implemented graphics processing unit-based computation, the DRR images are calculated with a speed sufficient for the particular clinical practice requirements. Since high spatial resolution flat panel detector (FPD) images should be registered to the reference DRR images in patient setup process in any scenarios, the DRR images also needs higher spatial resolution close to that of FPD images. To overcome the limitation of the CT spatial resolution imposed by the CT voxel size, we applied image processing to improve the calculated DRR spatial resolution. The DRR software introduced here enabled patient positioning with sufficient accuracy for the implementation of carbon-ion beam scanning therapy at our center.

  13. Pore space quantification of carbonate rocks before-after supercritical CO2 interaction by optical image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrezueta, Edgar; José Domínguez-Cuesta, María

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this research is to show an experimental application of an automated quantification process of optical porosity in thin sections. Petrographic studies using scanning electronic microscopy, optical microscopy (OpM) and optical image analysis (OIA) could provide a reproducible pore characterization of carbonate rocks in applications related to the geological storage of CO2. This research is focused on i) the quantification of optical pores in a carbonate rock before and after supercritical CO2-rich brine (P ≈ 7.5 MPa and T ≈ 35 °C) and ii) the description of the process followed to guarantee the reproducibility of the OIA method on images acquired with high-resolution scanner. Mineral images were acquired from thin sections using a high-resolution scanner (HRS). Digital images were geo-referenced by using geographic information system to ensure correct spatial correlation and superposition. The optical measures of porosity by image analysis on the carbonates thin sections showed an effective pore segmentation considering different cross-polarized light conditions (90°/0°; 120°/30°) and plane-polarized light conditions (90°/-) of the same petrographic scene. The pore characterization by OpM and OIA-HRS has allowed a preliminary approximation of pore evolution in carbonate rocks under the supercritical CO2-rich brine. This study shows a fast, effective and reproducible methodology that allowed a preliminary characterization (changes in the pore network) of the samples studied. The procedure carried out could be applied to similar experimental injection tests.

  14. Interactions between nitrogen deposition, land cover conversion, and climate change determine the contemporary carbon balance of Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churkina, G.; Zaehle, S.; Hughes, J.; Viovy, N.; Chen, Y.; Jung, M.; Heumann, B. W.; Ramankutty, N.; Heimann, M.; Jones, C.

    2010-09-01

    European ecosystems are thought to take up large amounts of carbon, but neither the rate nor the contributions of the underlying processes are well known. In the second half of the 20th century, carbon dioxide concentrations have risen by more that 100 ppm, atmospheric nitrogen deposition has more than doubled, and European mean temperatures were increasing by 0.02 °C yr-1. The extents of forest and grasslands have increased with the respective rates of 5800 km2 yr-1 and 1100 km2 yr-1 as agricultural land has been abandoned at a rate of 7000 km2 yr-1. In this study, we analyze the responses of European land ecosystems to the aforementioned environmental changes using results from four process-based ecosystem models: BIOME-BGC, JULES, ORCHIDEE, and O-CN. The models suggest that European ecosystems sequester carbon at a rate of 56 TgC yr-1 (mean of four models for 1951-2000) with strong interannual variability (±88 TgC yr-1, average across models) and substantial inter-model uncertainty (±39 TgC yr-1). Decadal budgets suggest that there has been a continuous increase in the mean net carbon storage of ecosystems from 85 TgC yr-1 in 1980s to 108 TgC yr-1 in 1990s, and to 114 TgC yr-1 in 2000-2007. The physiological effect of rising CO2 in combination with nitrogen deposition and forest re-growth have been identified as the important explanatory factors for this net carbon storage. Changes in the growth of woody vegetation are suggested as an important contributor to the European carbon sink. Simulated ecosystem responses were more consistent for the two models accounting for terrestrial carbon-nitrogen dynamics than for the two models which only accounted for carbon cycling and the effects of land cover change. Studies of the interactions of carbon-nitrogen dynamics with land use changes are needed to further improve the quantitative understanding of the driving forces of the European land carbon balance.

  15. Interactions between nitrogen deposition, land cover conversion, and climate change determine the contemporary carbon balance of Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Churkina

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available European ecosystems are thought to take up large amounts of carbon, but neither the rate nor the contributions of the underlying processes are well known. In the second half of the 20th century, carbon dioxide concentrations have risen by more that 100 ppm, atmospheric nitrogen deposition has more than doubled, and European mean temperatures were increasing by 0.02 °C yr−1. The extents of forest and grasslands have increased with the respective rates of 5800 km2 yr−1 and 1100 km2 yr−1 as agricultural land has been abandoned at a rate of 7000 km2 yr−1. In this study, we analyze the responses of European land ecosystems to the aforementioned environmental changes using results from four process-based ecosystem models: BIOME-BGC, JULES, ORCHIDEE, and O-CN. The models suggest that European ecosystems sequester carbon at a rate of 56 TgC yr−1 (mean of four models for 1951–2000 with strong interannual variability (±88 TgC yr−1, average across models and substantial inter-model uncertainty (±39 TgC yr−1. Decadal budgets suggest that there has been a continuous increase in the mean net carbon storage of ecosystems from 85 TgC yr−1 in 1980s to 108 TgC yr−1 in 1990s, and to 114 TgC yr−1 in 2000–2007. The physiological effect of rising CO2 in combination with nitrogen deposition and forest re-growth have been identified as the important explanatory factors for this net carbon storage. Changes in the growth of woody vegetation are suggested as an important contributor to the European carbon sink. Simulated ecosystem responses were more consistent for the two models accounting for terrestrial carbon-nitrogen dynamics than for the two models which only accounted for carbon cycling and the effects of land cover change. Studies of the interactions of carbon-nitrogen dynamics with

  16. Interaction between Carbon Nanotubes and Aromatic Hydrocarbon-degrading Microbes and its Effect on Carbon Nanotubes Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y.; Wang, L.; Poulson, S.; Wang, X.; Xing, B.; Yang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Due to their unique electrical, optical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been substantially produced and widely applied during the past decades, leading to their increased probability of entering the environment. Some estimation suggests that CNTs are accumulated in agricultural systems with their soil concentration increasing by 0.4-157 ng/kg/year. This has raised concerns about environmental impacts of these emerging contaminants including their ecotoxicity. Meanwhile, transformation of CNTs in the environment can significantly affect their transport, bioavailability and thereby ecotoxicity. So far, environmental biodegradation of CNTs remains obscure. Given the high diversity of soil microorganisms and their metabolic potentials, it is important to investigate microbial biodegradation of CNTs under various environmental conditions. This study focuses on an aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium, Mycobacterium vanbaalenii PYR-1, as a model microorganism capable of ring cleavage. We hypothesize that bacterial activities could transform CNTs to more hydrophilic forms, increasing their aqueous stability and environmental reactivity. We incubated M. vanbaalenii PYR-1 with 13C-labeded multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for 30 days, monitored δ13C in the system, characterized MWCNTs before and after the reaction, and compared the results with culture-negative controls. To investigate effects of various environmental conditions, including the presence of extracellular oxidative enzymes from white-rot fungi, additional experiments will be conducted and results compared will be compared among different setups. Moreover, we will measure adverse impacts of CNTs on the metabolic activities of M. vanbaalenii PYR-1, particularly its biodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

  17. Interactive effects of environmental change and management strategies on regional forest carbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudiburg, Tara W; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Thornton, Peter E; Law, Beverly E

    2013-11-19

    Climate mitigation activities in forests need to be quantified in terms of the long-term effects on forest carbon stocks, accumulation, and emissions. The impacts of future environmental change and bioenergy harvests on regional forest carbon storage have not been quantified. We conducted a comprehensive modeling study and life-cycle assessment of the impacts of projected changes in climate, CO2 concentration, and N deposition, and region-wide forest management policies on regional forest carbon fluxes. By 2100, if current management strategies continue, then the warming and CO2 fertilization effect in the given projections result in a 32-68% increase in net carbon uptake, overshadowing increased carbon emissions from projected increases in fire activity and other forest disturbance factors. To test the response to new harvesting strategies, repeated thinnings were applied in areas susceptible to fire to reduce mortality, and two clear-cut rotations were applied in productive forests to provide biomass for wood products and bioenergy. The management strategies examined here lead to long-term increased carbon emissions over current harvesting practices, although semiarid regions contribute little to the increase. The harvest rates were unsustainable. This comprehensive approach could serve as a foundation for regional place-based assessments of management effects on future carbon sequestration by forests in other locations.

  18. Design and Implement a Digital H{sub {infinity}}Robust Controller for a MW-Class PMSG-Based Grid-Interactive Wind Energy Conversion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howlander, Abdul Motin [Faculty of Engineering, Univ. of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Urasaki, Naomitsu [Faculty of Engineering, Univ. of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Yona, Atsushi [Faculty of Engineering, Univ. of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Senjyu, Tomonobu [Faculty of Engineering, Univ. of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Saber, Ahmed Yousuf [Operation Technology, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2013-04-15

    A digital H{sub {infinity}}controller for a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) based wind energy conversion system (WECS) is presented. Wind energy is an uncertain fluctuating resource which requires a tight control management. So, it is still an exigent task for the control design engineers. The conventional proportional-integral (PI) control is not ideal during high turbulence wind velocities, and the nonlinear behavior of the power converters. These are raising interest towards the robust control concepts. The robust design is to find a controller, for a given system, such that the closed-loop system becomes robust that assurance high-integrity and fault tolerant control system, robust H{sub {infinity}}control theory has befallen a standard design method of choice over the past two decades in industrial control applications. The robust H{sub {infinity}}control theory is also gaining eminence in the WECS. Due to the implementation complexity for the continuous H{sub {infinity}}controller, and availability of the high speedy micro-controllers, the design of a sample-data or a digital H{sub {infinity}}controller is very important for the realistic implementation. But there isn’t a single research to evaluate the performance of the digital H{sub {infinity}}controller for the WECS. In this paper, the proposed digital H{sub {infinity}}controller schemes comprise for the both generator and grid interactive power converters, and the control performances are compared with the conventional PI controller and the fuzzy controller. Simulation results confirm the efficacy of the proposed method Energies 2013, 6 2085 which are ensured the WECS stabilities, mitigate shaft stress, and improving the DC-link voltage and output power qualities.

  19. Design and Implement a Digital H∞ Robust Controller for a MW-Class PMSG-Based Grid-Interactive Wind Energy Conversion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonobu Senjyu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A digital H∞ controller for a permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG based wind energy conversion system (WECS is presented. Wind energy is an uncertain fluctuating resource which requires a tight control management. So, it is still an exigent task for the control design engineers. The conventional proportional-integral (PI control is not ideal during high turbulence wind velocities, and the nonlinear behavior of the power converters. These are raising interest towards the robust control concepts. The robust design is to find a controller, for a given system, such that the closed-loop system becomes robust that assurance high-integrity and fault tolerant control system, robust H∞ control theory has befallen a standard design method of choice over the past two decades in industrial control applications. The robust H∞ control theory is also gaining eminence in the WECS. Due to the implementation complexity for the continuous H∞ controller, and availability of the high speedy micro-controllers, the design of a sample-data or a digital H∞ controller is very important for the realistic implementation. But there isn’t a single research to evaluate the performance of the digital H∞ controller for the WECS. In this paper, the proposed digital H∞ controller schemes comprise for the both generator and grid interactive power converters, and the control performances are compared with the conventional PI controller and the fuzzy controller. Simulation results confirm the efficacy of the proposed method Energies 2013, 6 2085 which are ensured the WECS stabilities, mitigate shaft stress, and improving the DC-link voltage and output power qualities.

  20. Predictive Finite Rate Model for Oxygen-Carbon Interactions at High Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poovathingal, Savio

    An oxidation model for carbon surfaces is developed to predict ablation rates for carbon heat shields used in hypersonic vehicles. Unlike existing empirical models, the approach used here was to probe gas-surface interactions individually and then based on an understanding of the relevant fundamental processes, build a predictive model that would be accurate over a wide range of pressures and temperatures, and even microstructures. Initially, molecular dynamics was used to understand the oxidation processes on the surface. The molecular dynamics simulations were compared to molecular beam experiments and good qualitative agreement was observed. The simulations reproduced cylindrical pitting observed in the experiments where oxidation was rapid and primarily occurred around a defect. However, the studies were limited to small systems at low temperatures and could simulate time scales only of the order of nanoseconds. Molecular beam experiments at high surface temperature indicated that a majority of surface reaction products were produced through thermal mechanisms. Since the reactions were thermal, they occurred over long time scales which were computationally prohibitive for molecular dynamics to simulate. The experiments provided detailed dynamical data on the scattering of O, O2, CO, and CO2 and it was found that the data from molecular beam experiments could be used directly to build a model. The data was initially used to deduce surface reaction probabilities at 800 K. The reaction probabilities were then incorporated into the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Simulations were performed where the microstructure was resolved and dissociated oxygen convected and diffused towards it. For a gas-surface temperature of 800 K, it was found that despite CO being the dominant surface reaction product, a gas-phase reaction forms significant CO2 within the microstructure region. It was also found that surface area did not play any role in concentration of

  1. Sequence Dependent Interactions Between DNA and Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxbury, Daniel

    It is known that single-stranded DNA adopts a helical wrap around a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), forming a water-dispersible hybrid molecule. The ability to sort mixtures of SWCNTs based on chirality (electronic species) has recently been demonstrated using special short DNA sequences that recognize certain matching SWCNTs of specific chirality. This thesis investigates the intricacies of DNA-SWCNT sequence-specific interactions through both experimental and molecular simulation studies. The DNA-SWCNT binding strengths were experimentally quantified by studying the kinetics of DNA replacement by a surfactant on the surface of particular SWCNTs. Recognition ability was found to correlate strongly with measured binding strength, e.g. DNA sequence (TAT)4 was found to bind 20 times stronger to the (6,5)-SWCNT than sequence (TAT)4T. Next, using replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations, equilibrium structures formed by (a) single-strands and (b) multiple-strands of 12-mer oligonucleotides adsorbed on various SWCNTs were explored. A number of structural motifs were discovered in which the DNA strand wraps around the SWCNT and 'stitches' to itself via hydrogen bonding. Great variability among equilibrium structures was observed and shown to be directly influenced by DNA sequence and SWCNT type. For example, the (6,5)-SWCNT DNA recognition sequence, (TAT)4, was found to wrap in a tight single-stranded right-handed helical conformation. In contrast, DNA sequence T12 forms a beta-barrel left-handed structure on the same SWCNT. These are the first theoretical indications that DNA-based SWCNT selectivity can arise on a molecular level. In a biomedical collaboration with the Mayo Clinic, pathways for DNA-SWCNT internalization into healthy human endothelial cells were explored. Through absorbance spectroscopy, TEM imaging, and confocal fluorescence microscopy, we showed that intracellular concentrations of SWCNTs far exceeded those of the incubation

  2. A model using marginal efficiency of investment to analyse carbon and nitrogen interactions in forested ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. Q.; Williams, M.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles are coupled in terrestrial ecosystems through multiple processes including photosynthesis, tissue allocation, respiration, N fixation, N uptake, and decomposition of litter and soil organic matter. Capturing the constraint of N on terrestrial C uptake and storage has been a focus of the Earth System modelling community. Here we explore the trade-offs and sensitivities of allocating C and N to different tissues in order to optimize the productivity of plants using a new, simple model of ecosystem C-N cycling and interactions (ACONITE). ACONITE builds on theory related to plant economics in order to predict key ecosystem properties (leaf area index, leaf C:N, N fixation, and plant C use efficiency) based on the optimization of the marginal change in net C or N uptake associated with a change in allocation of C or N to plant tissues. We simulated and evaluated steady-state and transient ecosystem stocks and fluxes in three different forest ecosystems types (tropical evergreen, temperate deciduous, and temperate evergreen). Leaf C:N differed among the three ecosystem types (temperate deciduous database describing plant traits. Gross primary productivity (GPP) and net primary productivity (NPP) estimates compared well to observed fluxes at the simulation sites. A sensitivity analysis revealed that parameterization of the relationship between leaf N and leaf respiration had the largest influence on leaf area index and leaf C:N. Also, a widely used linear leaf N-respiration relationship did not yield a realistic leaf C:N, while a more recently reported non-linear relationship simulated leaf C:N that compared better to the global trait database than the linear relationship. Overall, our ability to constrain leaf area index and allow spatially and temporally variable leaf C:N can help address challenges simulating these properties in ecosystem and Earth System models. Furthermore, the simple approach with emergent properties based on

  3. The Arthur Interactive Media Study: Initial Findings From a Cross-Age Peer Mentoring and Digital Media-Based Character Development Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond P. Bowers

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the midst of increasing emphasis on the inclusion of character education in both school and out-of-school time programs, digital technologies have become ubiquitous in these settings. Based on the potential of these technologies to enhance children’s character development, the Arthur Interactive Media (AIM study investigated if one specific unit or set of digital media-based activities engaged youth in discussions about character. First and second grade students were paired with 4th and 5th grade students, respectively, while engaging with an online interactive graphic novel (IGN about a character-relevant story based on the Arthur cartoon series. Teachers (n = 8 completed surveys about the AIM Unit, and conversations between cross-age peer dyads (n = 27 dyads during their engagement with the IGN were analyzed. Results indicated that teachers were very satisfied with the materials and reported that children were very engaged throughout. Analyses of children’s conversations indicated that children participated in character-relevant conversations involving humility, forgiveness, and future-mindedness while engaging with the IGN.

  4. Effect of oxygen co-injected with carbon dioxide on Gothic shale caprock–CO2–brine interaction during geologic carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-09-01

    Co-injection of oxygen, a significant component in CO2 streams produced by the oxyfuel combustion process, can cause a significant alteration of the redox state in deep geologic formations during geologic carbon sequestration. The potential impact of co-injected oxygen on the interaction between synthetic CO2–brine (0.1 M NaCl) and shale caprock (Gothic shale from the Aneth Unit in Utah) and mobilization of trace metals was investigated at ~ 10 MPa and ~ 75 °C. A range of relative volume percentages of O2 to CO2 (0, 1, 4 and 8%) were used in these experiments to address the effect of oxygen on shale–CO2–brine interaction under various conditions. Major mineral phases in Gothic shale are quartz, calcite, dolomite, montmorillonite, and pyrite. During Gothic shale–CO2–brine interaction in the presence of oxygen, pyrite oxidation occurred extensively and caused enhanced dissolution of calcite and dolomite. Pyrite oxidation and calcite dissolution subsequently resulted in the precipitation of Fe(III) oxides and gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). In the presence of oxygen, dissolved Mn and Ni were elevated because of oxidative dissolution of pyrite. The mobility of dissolved Ba was controlled by barite (BaSO4) precipitation in the presence of oxygen. Dissolved U in the experimental brines increased to ~ 8–14 μg/L, with concentrations being slightly higher in the absence of oxygen than in the presence of oxygen. Experimental and modeling results indicate the interaction between shale caprock and oxygen co-injected with CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration can exert significant impacts on brine pH, solubility of carbonate minerals, stability of sulfide minerals, and mobility of trace metals. The major impact of oxygen is most likely to occur in the zone near CO2 injection wells where impurity gases can accumulate. Finally, oxygen in CO2

  5. The fate of calcium carbonate nanoparticles administered by oral route: absorption and their interaction with biological matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee JA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jeong-A Lee,1,* Mi-Kyung Kim,1,* Hyoung-Mi Kim,2,* Jong Kwon Lee,3 Jayoung Jeong,4 Young-Rok Kim,5 Jae-Min Oh,2 Soo-Jin Choi1 1Department of Food Science and Technology, Seoul Women’s University, Seoul, Republic of Korea; 2Department of Chemistry and Medical Chemistry, College of Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Wonju, Republic of Korea; 3Hazard Substances Analysis Division, Gwangju Regional Food and Drug Administration, Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Gwangju, Republic of Korea; 4Toxicological Research Division, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Ministry of Food and Drug Safety, Chungcheongbuk-do, Republic of Korea; 5Department of Food Science and Biotechnology, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Republic of Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Orally administered particles rapidly interact with biological fluids containing proteins, enzymes, electrolytes, and other biomolecules to eventually form particles covered by a corona, and this corona potentially affects particle uptake, fate, absorption, distribution, and elimination in vivo. This study explored relationships between the biological interactions of calcium carbonate particles and their biokinetics.Methods: We examined the effects of food grade calcium carbonates of different particle size (nano [N-Cal] and bulk [B-Cal]: specific surface areas of 15.8 and 0.83 m2/g, respectively on biological interactions in in vitro simulated physiological fluids, ex vivo biofluids, and in vivo in gastrointestinal fluid. Moreover, absorption and tissue distribution of calcium carbonates were evaluated following a single dose oral administration to rats.Results: N-Cal interacted more with biomatrices than bulk materials in vitro and ex vivo, as evidenced by high fluorescence quenching ratios, but it did not interact more actively with biomatrices in vivo. Analysis of coronas revealed that immunoglobulin, apolipoprotein, thrombin, and fibrinogen

  6. CO2 bubble generation and migration during magma-carbonate interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, L. S.; Deegan, F. M.; Freda, C.; Jolis, E. M.; Masotta, M.; Misiti, V.; Taddeucci, J.; Troll, V. R.

    2015-04-01

    We conducted quantitative textural analysis of vesicles in high temperature and pressure carbonate assimilation experiments (1200 °C, 0.5 GPa) to investigate CO2 generation and subsequent bubble migration from carbonate into magma. We employed Mt. Merapi (Indonesia) and Mt. Vesuvius (Italy) compositions as magmatic starting materials and present three experimental series using (1) a dry basaltic-andesite, (2) a hydrous basaltic-andesite (2 wt% H2O), and (3) a hydrous shoshonite (2 wt% H2O). The duration of the experiments was varied from 0 to 300 s, and carbonate assimilation produced a CO2-rich fluid and CaO-enriched melts in all cases. The rate of carbonate assimilation, however, changed as a function of melt viscosity, which affected the 2D vesicle number, vesicle volume, and vesicle size distribution within each experiment. Relatively low-viscosity melts (i.e. Vesuvius experiments) facilitated efficient removal of bubbles from the reaction site. This allowed carbonate assimilation to continue unhindered and large volumes of CO2 to be liberated, a scenario thought to fuel sustained CO2-driven eruptions at the surface. Conversely, at higher viscosity (i.e. Merapi experiments), bubble migration became progressively inhibited and bubble concentration at the reaction site caused localised volatile over-pressure that can eventually trigger short-lived explosive outbursts. Melt viscosity therefore exerts a fundamental control on carbonate assimilation rates and, by consequence, the style of CO2-fuelled eruptions.

  7. Results from Pion-Carbon Interactions Measured by NA61/SHINE for Improved Understanding of Extensive Air Showers

    CERN Document Server

    Herve, Alexander

    2015-07-21

    The interpretation of extensive air shower measurements, produced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays, relies on the correct modeling of the hadron-air interactions that occur during the shower development. The majority of hadronic particles are produced at equivalent beam energies below the TeV range. NA61/SHINE is a fixed target experiment using secondary beams produced at CERN at the SPS. Hadron-hadron interactions have been recorded at beam momenta between 13 and 350 GeV/c with a wide-acceptance spectrometer. In this contribution we present measurements of the spectra of charged pions and the $\\rho^0$ production in pion-carbon interactions, which are essential for modeling of air showers.

  8. Digital collections and exhibits

    CERN Document Server

    Denzer, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Today's libraries are taking advantage of cutting-edge technologies such as flat panel displays using touch, sound, and hands-free motions to design amazing exhibits using everything from simple computer hardware to advanced technologies such as the Microsoft Kinect. Libraries of all types are striving to add new interactive experiences for their patrons through exciting digital exhibits, both online and off. Digital Collections and Exhibits takes away the mystery of designing stunning digital exhibits to spotlight library trea

  9. Digitalization of daycare institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    in the intergenerational interaction with as well as the intragenerational interaction among daycare children. To some extent, digital media usage, foremost of tablet computers, has seen a discursive and material normalization across a number Danish daycare institutions before at all clarifying how it could be rendered...... as on situated sociomaterial approaches to critical psychological practice research in order to inquire into possible specificities of digital media device usage: How is this usage similar to and different from interacting via other material-communicative devices in a pedagogical practice? How do digital media......The digitalization of Danish daycare institutions is not only affecting the ways staff is documenting and reporting on its pedagogical work. It also appears to be redefining what pedagogical work itself is about, given the drastic increase in deployment of digital (mobile) media devices...

  10. A study on interaction of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes for an effective ejection of the molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, N.; Wang, Q.

    2012-01-01

    The ejection of DNA molecules from carbon nanotubes is reported from interaction energy perspectives by molecular dynamics simulations. The critical ejection energy, which is to be applied to a DNA molecule for a successful ejection from a carbon nanotube, is investigated based on a study on the friction and binding energy between the DNA molecule and the tube. An effective ejection is realized by subjecting a kinetic energy on the DNA molecule that is larger than the solved critical ejection energy. In addition, the relationship between ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and carbon nanotubes is investigated. -- Highlights: ► Report the ejection of DNA molecules from CNTs from interaction energy perspectives. ► Develop a methodology for the critical energy of an effective ejection of a DNA molecule from a CNT. ► Present the relationship between critical ejection energies and sizes of DNA molecules and CNTs. ► Provide a general guidance on the ejection of encapsulated molecules from CNTs.

  11. Soil organic carbon content assessment in a heterogeneous landscape: comparison of digital soil mapping and visible and near Infrared spectroscopy approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michot, Didier; Fouad, Youssef; Pascal, Pichelin; Viaud, Valérie; Soltani, Inès; Walter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    This study aims are: i) to assess SOC content distribution according to the global soil map (GSM) project recommendations in a heterogeneous landscape ; ii) to compare the prediction performance of digital soil mapping (DSM) and visible-near infrared (Vis-NIR) spectroscopy approaches. The study area of 140 ha, located at Plancoët, surrounds the unique mineral spring water of Brittany (Western France). It's a hillock characterized by a heterogeneous landscape mosaic with different types of forest, permanent pastures and wetlands along a small coastal river. We acquired two independent datasets: j) 50 points selected using a conditioned Latin hypercube sampling (cLHS); jj) 254 points corresponding to the GSM grid. Soil samples were collected in three layers (0-5, 20-25 and 40-50cm) for both sampling strategies. SOC content was only measured in cLHS soil samples, while Vis-NIR spectra were measured on all the collected samples. For the DSM approach, a machine-learning algorithm (Cubist) was applied on the cLHS calibration data to build rule-based models linking soil carbon content in the different layers with environmental covariates, derived from digital elevation model, geological variables, land use data and existing large scale soil maps. For the spectroscopy approach, we used two calibration datasets: k) the local cLHS ; kk) a subset selected from the regional spectral database of Brittany after a PCA with a hierarchical clustering analysis and spiked by local cLHS spectra. The PLS regression algorithm with "leave-one-out" cross validation was performed for both calibration datasets. SOC contents for the 3 layers of the GSM grid were predicted using the different approaches and were compared with each other. Their prediction performance was evaluated by the following parameters: R2, RMSE and RPD. Both approaches led to satisfactory predictions for SOC content with an advantage for the spectral approach, particularly as regards the pertinence of the variation

  12. On the interactions between carbon monoxide and transition metals; Contribution a l'etude des interractions de l'oxyde de carbone et des metaux de transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degras, D E [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1966-12-01

    The sticking of carbon monoxide on surface atoms of transition metals is a collective phenomenon: according to the adsorption process period which is considered, this phenomenon may be formally described either by the Elovich equation or essentially from a steric point of view. The process rate depends upon the nature of the metal, the carbon monoxide pressure the temperature and the population densities of the induced and fundamental energy levels of the gas-solid bond. At least one of these induced levels tends to disappear with increasing time. For a localised adsorption and taking into account the surface Rayleigh waves, the analysis of the surface entropy yields the so-called iso-kinetic temperature for thermal desorption. This temperature is correlated with the cohesive energy of the metal surface atoms. Finally, it is shown that the interactions of a low energy electron bean with adsorbed molecules - reflection and energy exchange, desorption, ionization or dissociative ionization are strongly dependent on the energy levels of the gas-solid bond and the relative populations of these levels. (author) [French] La capture des molecules d'oxyde de carbone par les atomes de surface des metaux de transition est un phenomene collectif: il peut etre decrit formellernent soit par l'equation d'Elovich, soit a partir de considerations purement steriques suivant la periode envisagee dans l'evolution du processus d'adsorption. Cette evolution est determinee par la nature du metal, la pression d'oxyde de carbone, la temperature et la densite des populations des niveaux fondamental et induits de la liaison. L'un au moins de ceux-ci tend a disparaitre avec le temps. L' etude de l'entropie du complexe de surface a partir des ondes de Rayleigh en adsorption localisee permet de retrouver theoriquernent la temperature dite isocinetique dans la dissociation thermique de ce complexe. Cette temperature depend de la cohesion des atomes rnetalliques de surface. Enfin l'interaction d

  13. Navigate the Digital Rapids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Julie; Davis, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    How can teachers teach digital citizenship when the digital landscape is changing so rapidly? How can teachers teach proper online social interactions when the students are outside their classroom and thus outside their control? Will encouraging students to engage in global collaborative environments land teachers in hot water? These are the…

  14. Computational study of the shift of the G band of double-walled carbon nanotubes due to interlayer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Valentin N.; Levshov, Dmitry I.; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Paillet, Matthieu

    2018-04-01

    The interactions between the layers of double-walled carbon nanotubes induce a measurable shift of the G bands relative to the isolated layers. While experimental data on this shift in freestanding double-walled carbon nanotubes has been reported in the past several years, a comprehensive theoretical description of the observed shift is still lacking. The prediction of this shift is important for supporting the assignment of the measured double-walled nanotubes to particular nanotube types. Here, we report a computational study of the G-band shift as a function of the semiconducting inner layer radius and interlayer separation. We find that with increasing interlayer separation, the G band shift decreases, passes through zero and becomes negative, and further increases in absolute value for the wide range of considered inner layer radii. The theoretical predictions are shown to agree with the available experimental data within the experimental uncertainty.

  15. Interactions between proteins and carbon-based nanoparticles: exploring the origin of nanotoxicity at the molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Guanghong; Kang, Seung-Gu; Xiu, Peng; Zhao, Yuliang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2013-05-27

    The widespread application of nanomaterials has spurred an interest in the study of interactions between nanoparticles and proteins due to the biosafety concerns of these nanomaterials. In this review, a summary is presented of some of the recent studies on this important subject, especially on the interactions of proteins with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and metallofullerenols. Two potential molecular mechanisms have been proposed for CNTs' inhibition of protein functions. The driving forces of CNTs' adsorption onto proteins are found to be mainly hydrophobic interactions and the so-called π-π stacking between CNTs' carbon rings and proteins' aromatic residues. However, there is also recent evidence showing that endohedral metallofullerenol Gd@C82 (OH)22 can be used to inhibit tumor growth, thus acting as a potential nanomedicine. These recent findings have provided a better understanding of nanotoxicity at the molecular level and also suggested therapeutic potential by using nanoparticles' cytotoxicity against cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. [Interactions of straw, nitrogen fertilizer and bacterivorous nematodes on soil labile carbon and nitrogen and greenhouse gas emissions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng-Hao; Wang, Nan; Liu, Man-Qiang; Li, Fang-Hui; Zhu, Kang-Li; Li, Hui-Xin; Hu, Feng

    2014-11-01

    A 3 x 2 factorial design of microcosm experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects of straw, nitrogen fertilizer and bacterivorous nematodes on soil microbial biomass carbon (C(mic)) and nitrogen (N(mic)), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (DON), mineral nitrogen (NH(4+)-N and NO(3-)-N), and greenhouse gas (CO2, N2O and CH4) emissions. Results showed that straw amendment remarkably increased the numbers of bacterivorous nematodes and the contents of Cmic and Nmic, but Cmic and Nmic decreased with the increasing dose of nitrogen fertilization. The effects of bacterivorous nematodes strongly depended on either straw or nitrogen fertilization. The interactions of straw, nitrogen fertilization and bacterivorous nematodes on soil DOC, DON and mineral nitrogen were strong. Straw and nitrogen fertilization increased DOC and mineral nitrogen contents, but their influences on DON depended on the bacterivorous nematodes. The DOC and mineral nitrogen were negatively and positively influenced by the bacterivorous nematodes, re- spectively. Straw significantly promoted CO2 and N2O emissions but inhibited CH4 emission, while interactions between nematodes and nitrogen fertilization on emissions of greenhouse gases were obvious. In the presence of straw, nematodes increased cumulative CO2 emissions with low nitrogen fertilization, but decreased CO2 and N2O emissions with high nitrogen fertilization on the 56th day after incubation. In summary, mechanical understanding the soil ecological process would inevitably needs to consider the roles of soil microfauna.

  17. Interaction between fullerene halves C{sub n} (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Amrish, E-mail: amrish99@gmail.com; Kaur, Sandeep, E-mail: sipusukhn@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala (India); Mudahar, Isha, E-mail: isha@pbi.ac.in [Department of Basic and Applied Sciences, Punjabi University, Patiala (India)

    2016-05-06

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves C{sub n} (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  18. Chemical and carbon isotope composition of Varzeas sediments and its interactions with some Amazon basin rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinelli, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Varzea sediment samples were collected on the banks of Amazon rivers and in the most important tributaires. The samples were taken in three different river stages. The major cations, pH, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, carbon and δ 13 C values were determined. The concentration of major basic cations - Ca,Mg,K e Na were greater in the main channel sediments than in the tributaires. Probably the differences in the substrats geology and erosion regimes of the basins account for this patterns, generally. The major basic cation, total phosphorus and carbon concentration were lower in the low Amazon Varzeas. Between the three differents sampling periods, pratically the elements concentration in Varzea sediment was constant. Finally, the datas showed that the most parts of Varzea carbon sediment had it's origin in the fine particulated organic matter transported by the Amazon river. (C.D.G.) [pt

  19. Interaction between fullerene halves C_n (n ≤ 40) and single wall carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Amrish; Kaur, Sandeep; Mudahar, Isha

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the structural and electronic properties of carbon nanotube with small fullerene halves C_n (n ≤ 40) which are covalently bonded to the side wall of an armchair single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) using first principle method based on density functional theory. The fullerene size results in weak bonding between fullerene halves and carbon nanotube (CNT). Further, it was found that the C-C bond distance that attaches the fullerene half and CNT is of the order of 1.60 Å. The calculated binding energies indicate the stability of the complexes formed. The HOMO-LUMO gaps and electron density of state plots points towards the metallicity of the complex formed. Our calculations on charge transfer reveal that very small amount of charge is transferred from CNT to fullerene halves.

  20. Interaction of carbon reduction and green energy promotion in a small fossil-fuel importing economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pethig, Ruediger; Wittlich, Christian

    2009-01-01

    We study the incidence of carbon-reduction and green-energy promotion policies in an open fossil-fuel importing general equilibrium economy. The focus is on mixed price-based or quantity-based policies. Instruments directed toward promoting green energy are shown to reduce also carbon emissions and vice versa. Their direct effects are stronger than their side effects, the more so, the greater is the elasticity of substitution in consumption between energy and the consumption good. We calculate the effects of variations in individual policy parameters, especially on energy prices and welfare costs, and determine the impact of exogenous fossil-fuel price shocks on the economy. (orig.)

  1. Plasmon-Organic Fiber Interactions in Diamond-Like Carbon Coated Nanostructured Gold Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cielecki, Pawel Piotr; Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Kostiučenko, Oksana

    2017-01-01

    Gold is the most commonly used plasmonic material, however soft and prone to mechanical deformations. It has been shown that the durability of gold plasmonic substrates can be improved by applying a protective diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating. In this work, we investigate the influence of such p......Gold is the most commonly used plasmonic material, however soft and prone to mechanical deformations. It has been shown that the durability of gold plasmonic substrates can be improved by applying a protective diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating. In this work, we investigate the influence...

  2. Phosphorus, carbon- and nitrogen interactions in productive and degraded tropical pastures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberson, A.; Hegglin, D. D.; Nesper, M.; Rao, I.; Fonte, S.; Ramirez, B.; Velasquez, J.; Tamburini, F.; Bünemann, E. K.; Frossard, E.

    2011-12-01

    Pastures are the main land use in deforested areas of tropical South America. The highly weathered soils of these regions usually have low total and available phosphorus (P) contents. Low P availability can strongly limit plant and animal productivity and other soil ecosystem functions. Most introduced pastures of Brachiaria spp. are grass-alone (GA) while some are grass-legume (GL) pastures. The majority of the introduced pastures, particularly the grass-alone are at some state of degradation (GD). Pasture degradation induces severe loss of plant biomass production, with drastic ecological and economic implications. Although the importance of P deficiency in pasture degradation has been recognized, the knowledge generated on stoichiometry of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and P along pathways of the nutrient cycles of pastures, with different botanical composition and productivity, has been very limited. We will present results of a case study realized during 2010 to 2011 in the forest margins agro-ecosystem of the department of Caquetá, Colombia. Our objectives were to determine: i) whether P availability is lower in degraded compared to productive pastures, and ii) whether the introduction of legumes in the pasture increases P availability through enhanced biological P cycling through plant growth, plant litter decomposition and the soil microbial biomass; and iii) whether pasture types (GA vs GL) and the state of pasture degradation affect the C:N:P ratios in nutrient pools of the soil-plant system. An on-farm study was conducted on nine farms in the department of Caquetá, Colombia. On every farm three different pasture types were studied: degraded grass alone pastures (GD), productive grass-alone pastures (GA) and productive grass-legume pastures (GL). Basic soil characteristics and indicators on soil P status, microbial P cycling, plant biomass production, plant litter deposition and nutrient concentrations in plant tissue were determined. Analysis of P, C and N

  3. Carbonic Anhydrase IX is Not a Predictor of Outcomes in Non-Metastatic Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma - A Digital Analysis of Tissue Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Zerati

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The knowledge about the molecular biology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC is evolving, and Carbonic Anhydrase type IX (CA-IX has emerged as a potential prognostic marker in this challenging disease. However, most of the literature about CA-IX on ccRCC comes from series on metastatic cancer, with a lack of series on non-metastatic cancer. The objective is to evaluate the expression of CA-IX in a cohort of non-metastatic ccRCC, correlating with 1 overall survival, and 2 with established prognostic parameters (T stage, tumor size, Fuhrman nuclear grade, microvascular invasion and peri-renal fat invasion. Materials and Methods This is a retrospective cohort study. We evaluated 95 patients with non-metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma, as to the expression of CA-IX. The analyzed parameters where: overall survival (OS, TNM stage, tumor size (TS, Fuhrman nuclear grade (FNG, microvascular invasion (MVI, peri-renal fat invasion (PFI. We utilized a custom built tissue microarray, and the immunoexpression was digitally quantified using the Photoshop® software. Results: Th e mean follow-up time was 7.9 years (range 1.9 to 19.5 years. The analysis of CA-IX expression against the selected prognostic parameters showed no correlation. The results are as follows: Overall survival (p = 0.790; T stage (p = 0.179; tumor size (p = 0.143; grouped Fuhrman nuclear grade (p = 0.598; microvascular invasion (p = 0.685, and peri-renal fat invasion (p = 0.104. Conclusion Carbonic anhydrase type IX expression does not correlate with overall survival and conventional prognostic parameters in non-metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  4. Application Design Of Interactive Multimedia Development Based Motion Graphic On Making Fashion Design Learning In Digital Format

    OpenAIRE

    Winwin Wiana

    2017-01-01

    This study is a research and development aimed at developing multimedia interactive learning based animation as an effort to improve student learning motivation in learning Fashion Design Technology apart from this study also aims to design a learning program courses Fashion Design Technology with a focus on optimizing the use of interactive media in learning process. From this study showed 1 A preliminary study found that the problems faced by students when studying Fashion Design Technology...

  5. Cellular interactions of a water-soluble supramolecular polymer complex of carbon nanotubes with human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeonju; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2012-08-01

    Water-soluble, PAX-loaded carbon nanotubes are fabricated by employing a synthetic polyampholyte, PDM. To investigate the suitability of the polyampholyte and the nanotubes as drug carriers, different cellular interactions such as the human epithelial Caco-2 cells viability, their effect on the cell growth, and the change in the transepithelial electrical resistance in Caco-2 cells are studied. The resulting complex is found to exhibit an effective anti-cancer effect against colon cancer cells and an increased the reduction of the electrical resistance in the Caco-2 cells when compared to the precursor PAX. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Analyzing power of polarized protons interactions with carbon nuclei at 0.71-3.61 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anoshina, E.V.; Bodyagin, V.A.; Vardanyan, I.N.; Gribushin, A.M.; Ershov, A.A.; Kruglov, N.A.; Sarycheva, L.I.

    1997-01-01

    For the first time at JINR synchrophasotron an experiment in the polarized proton beam was carried out. Beams of polarized protons with energy T p = 0.71-3.61 GeV, polarization P p ≅ 0.5 and intensity I p ≅ 10 6 particles/spell have been formed, their characteristics were investigated, and a possibility to use those beams as initial for physical and methodical investigations has been shown. The proton-carbon interaction analyzing power at the energies of 1.46 and 3.61 GeV has been measured for two values of the scattering angle. 22 refs., 3 figs

  7. Interaction of paracetamol and 125I-paracetamol with surface groups of activated carbon. Theoretical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel Hernandez-Valdes; Ulises Jauregui-Haza; Carlos Enriquez-Victorero; Melvin Arias

    2015-01-01

    The selection of activated carbon (AC) filters for water decontamination is currently carried out empirically. The low concentrations of drugs in the environment make the radioisotope labeling a valuable tool for physical and chemical studies of the adsorption process. A theoretical study of paracetamol and 125 I-paracetamol adsorption onto AC was performed to evaluate the interactions between pollutants and surface groups (SG) of AC. Paracetamol was labeled with 125 I and adsorption isotherms were obtained using radioanalytical and spectrophotometric techniques. The radioanalytical method overestimates the paracetamol adsorption. The validity of the chosen approach for qualitative assessment of SG influence over the adsorption process was demonstrated. (author)

  8. A novel approach to probe host-pathogen interactions of bovine digital dermatitis, a model of a complex polymicrobial infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcatili, Paolo; Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Sicheritz-Pontén, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial infections represent a great challenge for the clarification of disease etiology and the development of comprehensive diagnostic or therapeutic tools, particularly for fastidious and difficult-to-cultivate bacteria. Using bovine digital dermatitis (DD) as a disease model, we introduce...... a novel strategy to study the pathogenesis of complex infections. The strategy combines meta-transcriptomics with high-density peptide-microarray technology to screen for in vivo-expressed microbial genes and the host antibody response at the site of infection. Bacterial expression patterns supported....... The extraordinary diversity observed in bacterial expression, antigens and host antibody responses between individual cows pointed toward microbial variability as a hallmark of DD. Persistence of infection and DD reinfection in the same individual is common; thus, high microbial diversity may undermine the host...

  9. Regional Responses to Black Carbon Aerosols: The Importance of Air-Sea Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanadesikan, A.; Scott, A. A.; Pradal, M.-A.; Seviour, W. J. M.; Waugh, D. W.

    2017-12-01

    The impact of modern black carbon aerosols on climate via their changes in radiative balance is studied using a coupled model where sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are allowed to vary and an atmosphere-only version of the same model where SSTs are held fixed. Allowing the ocean to respond is shown to have a profound impact on the pattern of temperature change. Particularly, large impacts are found in the North Pacific (which cools by up to 1 K in the coupled model) and in north central Asia (which warms in the coupled simulation and cools in the fixed SST simulation). Neither set of experiments shows large changes in surface temperatures in the Southeast Asian region where the atmospheric burden of black carbon is highest. These results are related to the stabilization of the atmosphere and changes in oceanic heat transport. Over the North Pacific, atmospheric stabilization results in an increase in stratiform clouds. The resulting shading reduces evaporation, freshening the surface layer of the ocean and reducing the inflow of warm subtropical waters. Over the land, a delicate balance between greater atmospheric absorption, shading of the surface and changes in latent cooling of the surface helps to determine whether warming or cooling is seen. Our results emphasize the importance of coupling in determining the response of the climate system to black carbon and suggest that black carbon may play an important role in modulating climate change over the North Pacific.

  10. Electronic Interactions between "Pea" and "Pod" : The Case of Oligothiophenes Encapsulated in Carbon Nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Jia; Blondeau, Pascal; Salice, Patrizio; Menna, Enzo; Bartova, Barbora; Hebert, Cecile; Leschner, Jens; Kaiser, Ute; Milko, Matus; Ambrosch-Draxl, Claudia; Loi, Maria Antonietta

    2011-01-01

    One of the most challenging strategies to achieve tunable nanophotonic devices is to build robust nanohybrids with variable emission in the visible spectral range, while keeping the merits of pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). This goal is realized by filling SWNTs ("pods") with a

  11. Carbon Nanotubes: A Review on Structure and Their Interaction with Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Saifuddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanotubes (CNTs are allotropes of carbon with a nanostructure that can have a length-to-diameter ratio greater than 1,000,000. Techniques have been developed to produce nanotubes in sizeable quantities, including arc discharge, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition. Developments in the past few years have illustrated the potentially revolutionizing impact of nanomaterials, especially in biomedical imaging, drug delivery, biosensing, and the design of functional nanocomposites. Methods to effectively interface proteins with nanomaterials for realizing these applications continue to evolve. The high surface-to-volume ratio offered by nanoparticles resulted in the concentration of the immobilized entity being considerably higher than that afforded by other materials. There has also been an increasing interest in understanding the influence of nanomaterials on the structure and function of proteins. Various immobilization methods have been developed, and in particular, specific attachment of enzymes on carbon nanotubes has been an important focus of attention. With the growing attention paid to cascade enzymatic reaction, it is possible that multienzyme coimmobilization would be one of the next goals in the future. In this paper, we focus on advances in methodology for enzyme immobilization on carbon nanotubes.

  12. Climate policy and fiscal constraints : Do tax interactions outweigh carbon leakage?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Carolyn; Fox, Alan K.

    2012-01-01

    Climate policymaking faces twin challenges of carbon leakage and public sector revenue requirements. A large literature advocates the use of CO2 pricing and recycling the revenues to lower distorting taxes as a way to minimize costs. In this paper, we explore the implications of labor tax

  13. Interactions of changing climate and shifts in forest composition on stand carbon balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang Jyh-Min; Louis Iverson; Anantha Prasad; Kim Brown

    2006-01-01

    Given that climate influences forest biogeographic distribution, many researchers have created models predicting shifts in tree species range with future climate change scenarios. The objective of this study is to investigate the forest carbon consequences of shifts in stand species composition with current and future climate scenarios using such a model.

  14. Interaction of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Beam with Carbon Collimators

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R; Hoffmann, Dieter H H; Kadi, Y; Shutov, A; Piriz, AR

    2006-01-01

    The LHC will operate at an energy of 7 TeV with a luminosity of 1034cm-2s-1. This requires two beams, each with 2808 bunches. The energy stored in each beam of 362 MJ. In a previous paper the mechanisms causing equipment damage in case of a failure of the machine protection system was discussed, assuming that the entire beam is deflected into a copper target [1, 2]. Another failure scenario is the deflection of beam into carbon material. Carbon collimators and beam absorbers are installed in many locations around the LHC to diffuse or absorb beam losses. Since the collimator jaws are close to the beam, it is very likely that they are hit first when the beam is accidentally deflected. Here we present the results of two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of the heating of a solid carbon cylinder irradiated by the LHC beam with nominal parameters, carried out using the BIG-2 computer code [3] while the energy loss of the 7 TeV protons in carbon is calculated using the well known FLUKA code [4]. Our calculation...

  15. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) mediates tumor cell interactions with microenvironment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Závadová, Zuzana; Závada, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2005), s. 977-982 ISSN 1021-335X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/02/0405 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : carbonic anhydrase IX * cell adhesion * microenvironment Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.572, year: 2005

  16. Interactive mathematical model of self-healing in carbonated cementitious materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zemskov, S.V.; Copuroglu, O.; Vermolen, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    A mathematical model for the post-damage recovery of carbonated cement is described. The model is based on a two-dimensional initial-boundary value problem for a system of partial differential equations. The study is embedded within the framework of investigating the effect of using lightweight

  17. QQS orphan gene regulates carbon and nitrogen partitioning across species via NF-YC interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Zheng, Wenguang; Zhu, Yanbing; Ye, Huaxun; Tang, Buyun; Arendsee, Zebulun W; Jones, Dallas; Li, Ruoran; Ortiz, Diego; Zhao, Xuefeng; Du, Chuanlong; Nettleton, Dan; Scott, M Paul; Salas-Fernandez, Maria G; Yin, Yanhai; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    2015-11-24

    The allocation of carbon and nitrogen resources to the synthesis of plant proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids is complex and under the control of many genes; much remains to be understood about this process. QQS (Qua-Quine Starch; At3g30720), an orphan gene unique to Arabidopsis thaliana, regulates metabolic processes affecting carbon and nitrogen partitioning among proteins and carbohydrates, modulating leaf and seed composition in Arabidopsis and soybean. Here the universality of QQS function in modulating carbon and nitrogen allocation is exemplified by a series of transgenic experiments. We show that ectopic expression of QQS increases soybean protein independent of the genetic background and original protein content of the cultivar. Furthermore, transgenic QQS expression increases the protein content of maize, a C4 species (a species that uses 4-carbon photosynthesis), and rice, a protein-poor agronomic crop, both highly divergent from Arabidopsis. We determine that QQS protein binds to the transcriptional regulator AtNF-YC4 (Arabidopsis nuclear factor Y, subunit C4). Overexpression of AtNF-YC4 in Arabidopsis mimics the QQS-overexpression phenotype, increasing protein and decreasing starch levels. NF-YC, a component of the NF-Y complex, is conserved across eukaryotes. The NF-YC4 homologs of soybean, rice, and maize also bind to QQS, which provides an explanation of how QQS can act in species where it does not occur endogenously. These findings are, to our knowledge, the first insight into the mechanism of action of QQS in modulating carbon and nitrogen allocation across species. They have major implications for the emergence and function of orphan genes, and identify a nontransgenic strategy for modulating protein levels in crop species, a trait of great agronomic significance.

  18. Interpretation of quasi-static and dynamic tensile behavior by digital image correlation technique in TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) and low-carbon steel sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Minju; Park, Jaeyeong; Sohn, Seok Su; Kim, Hyoung Seop [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nack J. [Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sunghak, E-mail: shlee@postech.ac.kr [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-02

    In this study, dynamic tensile tests were conducted on TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) and low-carbon (LC) steel sheets at a strain rate of 1500–2000/s by using a split Hopkinson tensile bar, and deformation mechanisms related with improvement of dynamic tensile properties were investigated by a digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The dynamic tensile strength was higher than the quasi-static tensile strength in both TWIP and LC sheets, while the dynamic elongation was same to the quasi-static elongation in the TWIP sheet and was much lower than the quasi-static elongation in the LC sheet. According to the DIC results of the dynamically tensioned TWIP sheet, the homogeneous deformation occurred before the necking at the strain of 47.4%. This indicated that the dynamic deformation processes were almost similar to the quasi-static ones as the TWIP sheet was homogeneously deformed in the initial and intermediate deformation stages. This could be explained by deformation mechanisms including twinning, in consideration of favorable effect of increased twinning on tensile properties under the dynamic loading. On the other hand, the dynamically tensioned LC sheet was rapidly deformed and fractured as the necking was intensified in a narrow strain-concentrated region. The present DIC technique is an outstanding method for detailed dynamic deformation analyses, and provides an important idea for practical safety analyses of automotive steel sheets.

  19. Voltammetric paracetamole sensor using a gold electrode made from a digital versatile disc chip and modified with a hybrid material consisting of carbon nanotubes and copper nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daneshvar, Leili; Rounaghi, Gholam Hossein; Tarahomi, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    A composite consisting of carbon nanotubes (CNT) and copper nanoparticles (CuNPs) was prepared by a chemical reduction method, and its structure characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive spectroscopy and FT-IR spectrometry. The hybrid composite was deposited on the surface of a disposable gold electrode that was manufactured from a commercial digital versatile gold disc by a drop casting method. The electrochemical properties of the modified electrode were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The sensor showed an excellent electrocatalytic activity towards oxidation of paracetamole (PA). The calibration plot (with current typically measured at 0.41 V vs. Ag/AgCl) is linear in the 0.5 to 80 μM concentration range, and the detection limit is as low as 10 nM. The sensor was successfully applied to the determination of PA in spiked water and tablet samples where it gave recoveries ranging between 95.25 and 100.5 %. (author)

  20. Evaluation of anastomosis between intrahepatic or extrahepatic vessels by intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography using carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazono, Nobuaki; Inoue, Hiroki; Ueno, Kazuto; Nishida, Hirotoshi; Kanetsuki, Ichirou; Miyake, Satoshi; Nakajo, Masayuki

    1995-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) intra-arterial subtraction angiography (IADSA) was performed in 31 patients with various hepatobiliary disease. The injection sites of CO 2 were proper hepatic artery (10/31; group A), segmental hepatic artery (18/31; group B), and peripheral inferior phrenic artery (3/31; group C), respectively. In group A, only the third order branches of the portal venous system were visualized anterogradely in 8 of 10 patients. In group B, the microcatheter was placed coaxially through a 5 French guiding catheter at the main arterial supply of the tumor in 7 patients and at the peripheral segmental branch of the hepatic artery in 11 patients. The portal venous system was visualized retrogradely in all of the patients regardless of the injection site. The injected CO 2 may flow back into the portal vein through the anastmosis known as the peribiliary or periportal plexus. In group C, not only the portal vein but also the pulmonary artery or pericardial vein were visualized by this method. CO 2 -IADSA was useful to image the minute communications between the various vessels, which have been not hitherto visualized by iodinated contrast medium. (author)

  1. Evaluation of anastomosis between intrahepatic or extrahepatic vessels by intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography using carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazono, Nobuaki; Inoue, Hiroki; Ueno, Kazuto; Nishida, Hirotoshi; Kanetsuki, Ichirou; Miyake, Satoshi; Nakajo, Masayuki [Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1995-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) intra-arterial subtraction angiography (IADSA) was performed in 31 patients with various hepatobiliary disease. The injection sites of CO{sub 2} were proper hepatic artery (10/31; group A), segmental hepatic artery (18/31; group B), and peripheral inferior phrenic artery (3/31; group C), respectively. In group A, only the third order branches of the portal venous system were visualized anterogradely in 8 of 10 patients. In group B, the microcatheter was placed coaxially through a 5 French guiding catheter at the main arterial supply of the tumor in 7 patients and at the peripheral segmental branch of the hepatic artery in 11 patients. The portal venous system was visualized retrogradely in all of the patients regardless of the injection site. The injected CO{sub 2} may flow back into the portal vein through the anastmosis known as the peribiliary or periportal plexus. In group C, not only the portal vein but also the pulmonary artery or pericardial vein were visualized by this method. CO{sub 2}-IADSA was useful to image the minute communications between the various vessels, which have been not hitherto visualized by iodinated contrast medium. (author).

  2. Digital disruption ?syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Clair; Staib, Andrew

    2017-05-18

    The digital transformation of hospitals in Australia is occurring rapidly in order to facilitate innovation and improve efficiency. Rapid transformation can cause temporary disruption of hospital workflows and staff as processes are adapted to the new digital workflows. The aim of this paper is to outline various types of digital disruption and some strategies for effective management. A large tertiary university hospital recently underwent a rapid, successful roll-out of an integrated electronic medical record (EMR). We observed this transformation and propose several digital disruption "syndromes" to assist with understanding and management during digital transformation: digital deceleration, digital transparency, digital hypervigilance, data discordance, digital churn and post-digital 'depression'. These 'syndromes' are defined and discussed in detail. Successful management of this temporary digital disruption is important to ensure a successful transition to a digital platform. What is known about this topic? Digital disruption is defined as the changes facilitated by digital technologies that occur at a pace and magnitude that disrupt established ways of value creation, social interactions, doing business and more generally our thinking. Increasing numbers of Australian hospitals are implementing digital solutions to replace traditional paper-based systems for patient care in order to create opportunities for improved care and efficiencies. Such large scale change has the potential to create transient disruption to workflows and staff. Managing this temporary disruption effectively is an important factor in the successful implementation of an EMR. What does this paper add? A large tertiary university hospital recently underwent a successful rapid roll-out of an integrated electronic medical record (EMR) to become Australia's largest digital hospital over a 3-week period. We observed and assisted with the management of several cultural, behavioural and

  3. Interactions among Carbon Dioxide, Heat, and Chemical Lures in Attracting the Bed Bug, Cimex lectularius L. (Hemiptera: Cimicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinderpal Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Commercial bed bug (Cimex lectularius L. monitors incorporating carbon dioxide (CO2, heat, and chemical lures are being used for detecting bed bugs; however, there are few reported studies on the effectiveness of chemical lures in bed bug monitors and the interactions among chemical lure, CO2, and heat. We screened 12 chemicals for their attraction to bed bugs and evaluated interactions among chemical lures, CO2, and heat. The chemical lure mixture consisting of nonanal, 1-octen-3-ol, spearmint oil, and coriander Egyptian oil was found to be most attractive to bed bugs and significantly increased the trap catches in laboratory bioassays. Adding this chemical lure mixture when CO2 was present increased the trap catches compared with traps baited with CO2 alone, whereas adding heat did not significantly increase trap catches when CO2 was present. Results suggest a combination of chemical lure and CO2 is essential for designing effective bed bug monitors.

  4. Catalysis with Gold Complexes Immobilised on Carbon Nanotubes by π-π Stacking Interactions: Heterogeneous Catalysis versus the Boomerang Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriamont, Charles; Devillers, Michel; Riant, Olivier; Hermans, Sophie

    2013-09-02

    A new pyrene-tagged gold(I) complex has been synthesised and tested as a homogeneous catalyst. First, a simple 1,6-enyne was chosen as a model substrate for cyclisation by using different solvents to optimise the reaction conditions. The non-covalent immobilisation of our pyrene-tagged gold complex onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes through π-π stacking interactions was then explored to obtain a supported homogeneous catalyst. The heterogenised catalyst and its homogeneous counterpart exhibited similar activity in a range of enyne cyclisation reactions. Bearing in mind that π-π interactions are affected by temperature and solvent polarity, the reuse and robustness of the supported homogeneous catalyst was tested to explore the scope and limitations of the recyclability of this catalyst. Under the optimised conditions, recyclability was observed by using the concept of the boomerang effect. Copyright © 2013 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennebutte, H G; Goutal, E

    1921-07-04

    Materials such as coal, peat, or schist are subjected to a rising temperature in successive stages in apparatus in which the distillation products are withdrawn at each stage. For example in a three-stage process, the acid products of the first or low-temperature stage are fixed in a suitable reagent, the basic products from a second or higher-temperature stage are absorbed in an acid reagent, hydrocarbons being retained by solvents, while the third are subjected to a pyrogenation process carried out in a closed vessel. Wherein the material is subjected in stages to a rising temperature, the gasified products being withdrawn at each stage, and are prevented as far as possible from mixing with the carbonized products.

  6. Doing science by waving hands: Talk, symbiotic gesture, and interaction with digital content as resources in student inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorcic, Bor; Planinsic, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate some of the ways in which students, when given the opportunity and an appropriate learning environment, spontaneously engage in collaborative inquiry. We studied small groups of high school students interacting around and with an interactive whiteboard equipped with Algodoo software, as they investigated orbital motion. Using multimodal discourse analysis, we found that in their discussions the students relied heavily on nonverbal meaning-making resources, most notably hand gestures and resources in the surrounding environment (items displayed on the interactive whiteboard). They juxtaposed talk with gestures and resources in the environment to communicate ideas that they initially were not able to express using words alone. By spontaneously recruiting and combining a diverse set of meaning-making resources, the students were able to express relatively fluently complex ideas on a novel physics topic, and to engage in practices that resemble a scientific approach to exploration of new phenomena.

  7. Application Design Of Interactive Multimedia Development Based Motion Graphic On Making Fashion Design Learning In Digital Format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winwin Wiana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is a research and development aimed at developing multimedia interactive learning based animation as an effort to improve student learning motivation in learning Fashion Design Technology apart from this study also aims to design a learning program courses Fashion Design Technology with a focus on optimizing the use of interactive media in learning process. From this study showed 1 A preliminary study found that the problems faced by students when studying Fashion Design Technology is the student is not optimal when learning designing clothes based computer technology both in terms of learning content learning mechanisms that still uses a linear media and limitations of highly structured learning time. 2 Animation multimedia has the following characteristics a media of learning is convergent interactive self-contained in the sense of giving convenience to users without the guidance of others as multimedia applications can present the material to see more interesting and informative. 3 Design of multimedia learning software developed include the creation of flowcharts storyboards and drafting manuscript of interactive multimedia based animation. 4 Based on the results of validation by multimedia experts obtained an average percentage of 85.55 viability of the material experts obtained an average percentage of 90.84 viability and by students as users gained an average percentage of 96.38 eligibility so it can be said that the standard of the feasibility of interactive multimedia based animation developed is included in the category of Very High or Very Good. Furthermore experts agree that the development of interactive multimedia based animation on learning Fashion Design Technology can be used with some aspects that need to be improved to obtain higher levels of feasibility more optimal.

  8. DIALOGISM, DECODING AND INTERACTIVE DIGITAL MARKETING CONCERNING THE BODILY PRACTICES IN THE ON-LINE VIDEO OLYMPIKUS.MOV FESTIVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Roberto Godoi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to understand the meanings associated bodily practices in the videos of the festival OLYMPIKUS.MOV, and also analyze the reception/interaction Internet users on these videos. The methodology consisted the description of the videos, the selection of comments and further analysis based on the notion of dialogic language of Mikhail Bakhtin and the types of decoding Stuart Hall. We concluded that there was a large range of bodily practices and meanings related to them in the videos. Reception/interaction Internet provides a critical dialogue, congratulation, and suggestive questioning on the videos.

  9. Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.H.; Bernard, S.; Andersen, G.L.; Chen, W.

    2009-03-01

    Interactions between plants and microbes are an integral part of our terrestrial ecosystem. Microbe-plant interactions are being applied in many areas. In this review, we present recent reports of applications in the areas of plant-growth promotion, biocontrol, bioactive compound and biomaterial production, remediation and carbon sequestration. Challenges, limitations and future outlook for each field are discussed.

  10. Interaction between D-fructose dehydrogenase and methoxy-substituent-functionalized carbon surface to increase productive orientations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Hong-qi; Hibino, Yuya; Kitazumi, Yuki; Shirai, Osamu; Kano, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Methoxy-functionalized surface improves the DET-type bioelectrocatalysis of FDH. • Methoxy-functionalized surface increases productive orientations. • The total catalytic activity of FDH is almost independent of the modification. • High current density as well as good stability is useful for biofuel cells. - Abstract: D-Fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) from Gluconobacter japonicus NBRC3260 catalyzes the two-electron oxidation of D-fructose to 5-keto-D-fructose, and it is widely used in biofuel cells and biosensors. In this study, methoxy-substituent-functionalized carbon electrodes are constructed by electrochemical oxidation of methoxy-aniline derivatives on Ketjen Black (KB)-modified electrodes to improve the immobilization and bioelectrocatalysis of FDH. It is proposed that the specific interaction between FDH, especially the heme c moiety, and methoxy substituent(s) of amines on carbon electrode increases the proportion of the productively oriented FDH molecules to the total FDHs. Consequently, the limiting catalytic current density of the D-fructose oxidation increases to as much as 23 ± 2 mA cm −2 in FDH/2,4-dimethoxyaniline/KB/glassy carbon electrode, for example.

  11. Evaluating interactive digital television applications through usability heuristics Evaluando aplicaciones de televisión digital interactiva a través de heurísticas de usabilidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Solano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Interactive Digital Television (iDT is considered as the convergence of television and computer technologies. Usability evaluation for applications based on emerging information technology brings new challenges. The main iDT feature is that the user may interact with the application; therefore usability should be a main concern when designing iDT applications. Current research usually focuses on iDT applications from a technical point of view, rather than a user-centered approach. There is a need for new usability evaluation methods or at least for the use of traditional evaluations in novel ways. A set of specific usability heuristics was defined and validated, in order to help the usability evaluations of iDT applications. A usability checklist to be used when applying iDT heuristics is also proposed.La Televisión Digital Interactiva (TDi es considerada como la convergencia de la televisión y las tecnologías de la computación. La evaluación de usabilidad para aplicaciones basadas en tecnologías emergentes trae nuevos retos. La principal característica de la TDi es que los usuarios pueden interactuar con las aplicaciones; de esta manera la usabilidad es el principal aspecto a considerar cuando se diseñan aplicaciones de TDi. Las investigaciones actuales normalmente están enfocadas sobre las aplicaciones de TDi desde un punto de vista técnico, y no desde un enfoque centrado en el usuario. Hay una necesidad de nuevos métodos de evaluación de usabilidad o, por lo menos, utilizar de nuevas formas los métodos de evaluación existentes. Un conjunto de heurísticas de usabilidad específicas ha sido definido y validado, con el objetivo de ayudar en la evaluación de usabilidad de aplicaciones de TDi. También se ha propuesto una lista de verificación para ser usada al momento de aplicar las heurísticas de usabilidad.

  12. Geochemical modelling of CO2-water-rock interactions for carbon storage : data requirements and outputs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirste, D.

    2008-01-01

    A geochemical model was used to predict the short-term and long-term behaviour of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), formation water, and reservoir mineralogy at a carbon sequestration site. Data requirements for the geochemical model included detailed mineral petrography; formation water chemistry; thermodynamic and kinetic data for mineral phases; and rock and reservoir physical characteristics. The model was used to determine the types of outputs expected for potential CO 2 storage sites and natural analogues. Reaction path modelling was conducted to determine the total reactivity or CO 2 storage capability of the rock by applying static equilibrium and kinetic simulations. Potential product phases were identified using the modelling technique, which also enabled the identification of the chemical evolution of the system. Results of the modelling study demonstrated that changes in porosity and permeability over time should be considered during the site selection process.

  13. Digital Tourism on the Way to Digital Marketing Success

    OpenAIRE

    RATIU, Monica Paula; PURCAREA, Ioan Matei

    2015-01-01

    There is a real need of digital support of the tourist experience before, during and after the tourist activity, because digitization is steadily becoming the main pathway for consumer journeys. The digital revolution changed the way consumers shop for travel products and interact with brands. Tourism businesses need to utilize digital marketing techniques in their practices and to right track consumer activity across channels and devices. Getting vital information from customers via social m...

  14. Tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions synchronize forest carbon losses from hurricanes and Amazon fires

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Y; Randerson, JT; Morton, DC

    2015-01-01

    ©2015. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. We describe a climate mode synchronizing forest carbon losses from North and South America by analyzing time series of tropical North Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), landfall hurricanes and tropical storms, and Amazon fires during 1995-2013. Years with anomalously high tropical North Atlantic SSTs during March-June were often followed by a more active hurricane season and a larger number of satellite-detected fires in the south...

  15. Effects of high CO2 levels on dynamic photosynthesis: carbon gain, mechanisms, and environmental interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomimatsu, Hajime; Tang, Yanhong

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the photosynthetic responses of terrestrial plants to environments with high levels of CO2 is essential to address the ecological effects of elevated atmospheric CO2. Most photosynthetic models used for global carbon issues are based on steady-state photosynthesis, whereby photosynthesis is measured under constant environmental conditions; however, terrestrial plant photosynthesis under natural conditions is highly dynamic, and photosynthetic rates change in response to rapid changes in environmental factors. To predict future contributions of photosynthesis to the global carbon cycle, it is necessary to understand the dynamic nature of photosynthesis in relation to high CO2 levels. In this review, we summarize the current body of knowledge on the photosynthetic response to changes in light intensity under experimentally elevated CO2 conditions. We found that short-term exposure to high CO2 enhances photosynthetic rate, reduces photosynthetic induction time, and reduces post-illumination CO2 burst, resulting in increased leaf carbon gain during dynamic photosynthesis. However, long-term exposure to high CO2 during plant growth has varying effects on dynamic photosynthesis. High levels of CO2 increase the carbon gain in photosynthetic induction in some species, but have no significant effects in other species. Some studies have shown that high CO2 levels reduce the biochemical limitation on RuBP regeneration and Rubisco activation during photosynthetic induction, whereas the effects of high levels of CO2 on stomatal conductance differ among species. Few studies have examined the influence of environmental factors on effects of high levels of CO2 on dynamic photosynthesis. We identified several knowledge gaps that should be addressed to aid future predictions of photosynthesis in high-CO2 environments.

  16. Interactions of Reduced Deforestation and the Carbon Market: The Role of Market Regulations and Future Commitments

    OpenAIRE

    Anger, Niels; Dixon, Alistair; Livengood, Erich

    2009-01-01

    Reducing emissions from deforestation and degradation (REDD) has been proposed as a potentially inexpensive and plentiful source of emission abatement to supplement other longterm climate policies. However, critics doubt that REDD credits are environmentally equivalent to domestic emission reductions, and suggest an excess supply may disrupt carbon markets. In this context, we investigate the economic implications of emissions market regulations and future emissions reduction commitments, as ...

  17. Effect of carbon nanotube dispersion on glass transition in cross-linked epoxy-carbon nanotube nanocomposites: role of interfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ketan S; Khare, Rajesh

    2013-06-20

    We have used atomistic molecular simulations to study the effect of nanofiller dispersion on the glass transition behavior of cross-linked epoxy-carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites. Specific chemical interactions at the interface of CNTs and cross-linked epoxy create an interphase region, whose impact on the properties of their nanocomposites increases with an increasing extent of dispersion. To investigate this aspect, we have compared the volumetric, structural, and dynamical properties of three systems: neat cross-linked epoxy, cross-linked epoxy nanocomposite containing dispersed CNTs, and cross-linked epoxy nanocomposite containing aggregated CNTs. We find that the nanocomposite containing dispersed CNTs shows a depression in the glass transition temperature (Tg) by ~66 K as compared to the neat cross-linked epoxy, whereas such a large depression is absent in the nanocomposite containing aggregated CNTs. Our results suggest that the poor interfacial interactions between the CNTs and the cross-linked epoxy matrix lead to a more compressible interphase region between the CNTs and the bulk matrix. An analysis of the resulting dynamic heterogeneity shows that the probability of percolation of immobile domains becomes unity near the Tg calculated from volumetric properties. Our observations also lend support to the conceptual analogy between polymer nanocomposites and the nanoconfinement of polymer thin films.

  18. Theoretical study of γ-hexachlorocyclohexane and β-hexachlorocyclohexane isomers interaction with surface groups of activated carbon model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Durimel, Axelle; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises

    2014-06-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is employed in drinking water purification without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanism of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) onto it. Hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) is an organochlorinated contaminant present in water and soils of banana crops production zones of the Caribbean. The most relevant isomers of HCH are γ-HCH and β-HCH, both with great environmental persistence. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on HCH adsorption is done in order to help to understand the process and may lead to improve the AC selection process. A simplified AC model consisting of naphthalene with a functional group was used to assess the influence of SGs over the adsorption process. The Multiple Minima Hypersurface (MMH) methodology was employed to study γ-HCH and β-HCH interactions with different AC SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) under different hydration and pH conditions. The results obtained showed that association of HCH with SGs preferentially occurs between the axial protons of HCH and SG's oxygen atom, and the most favorable interactions occurring with charged SGs. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance HCH adsorption onto AC under neutral pH conditions. Finally, this work presents an inexpensive computer aided methodology for preselecting activated carbon SGs content for the removal of a given compound. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Interactive effects of agricultural management and topography on soil carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladoni, M.; Kravchenko, S.; Munoz, J.; Erickson, M.

    2012-12-01

    Proper agricultural management scenarios such as no-tillage, cover cropping, agroforestry, have demonstrated potential to increase the amount of carbon sequestered in soil and to mitigate atmospheric carbon levels. The knowledge about positive effects of cover cropping comes mostly from small uniform experimental plots, but whether these positive effects will exists in large scale fields with diverse topography and what would be the magnitude of these effects on a field scale remains to be seen. Our objective is to compare performance of different agricultural managements including those with cover crops in their influences on SOC across diverse topographical landscape in large agricultural fields. The three studied agricultural practices are Conventionally tilled and fertilized management without cover crops (T1), Low-input management with reduced chemical inputs (T3) and Organic (T4) management, the latter two have rye and red clover cover crops as part of their rotations. Within each field 1- 4 transects with three topographical positions of "depression", "slope" and "summit" were identified. The first soil sampling was done in spring 2010 and the second set of soil samples were collected from topographical positions during growing season of 2011. Samples were analyzed for total SOC and also particulate organic carbon (POC) content to show the changes in active pools of SOC. The results showed that topography has a significant influence in performance of cover crops. Agricultural managements with cover crops increased the POC in soil and the magnitude of this increase was different across space. Cover crops built the highest POC in depressions followed by summit and then slope. The conventional agricultural management increased POC in depression but decreased it on slopes. Low-input agricultural management when coupled with cover cropping has a potential to produce the highest increase in active pools of SOC across topographically diverse fields. The ratio of

  20. Water-rock interaction under peri-glacial conditions: example of the secondary carbonates of the Broegger Peninsula (Spitzbergen)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marlin, C.; Dever, L.

    1998-01-01

    Measurements of the isotopic and chemical contents of soil water and carbonates at different field sites in Spitzbergen were undertaken to study the precipitation conditions of soil secondary calcites under the current peri-glacial climate. A main experimental site ('cote 80') has been established located on a fluvio-glacial terrasse at 80 m.a.s.l. near Ny Alesund (79 deg N, 12 deg. E). The active layer is at around 1.2 m depth on a continuous permafrost. The soil temperatures measured every 5 cm from the surface to the permafrost show that the freezing fronts move both the surface and permafrost, converging at around 0.6 m depth where the system is closed. During the beginning of the freezing period, the solute content increases in the residual water according to the distribution coefficient between water and ice. Calcite precipitation occurs in a second stage as indicated by the simultaneous decrease of the calcite saturation index and increase of the concentration of non-interactive elements. Chemical and isotopic ( 18 O, 2 H, 13 C et 14 C) analyses have been made on the different samples with a mineralogical description of the carbonate coatings obtained by SEM and microprobe analyses. The isotopic values result from a mixing between recent calcites and 'old' calcites. The recent calcites are probably in isotopic equilibrium with the present day solutions. The 'old calcites' have precipitated under colder conditions than today. The low radiocarbon activities (10.2 to 24.8 pcm) of the 'cote 80' site indicate that the 'old calcites' have precipitated during the last interglacial period or an inter-stadial period of the Pleistocene. The good relationship between the carbon- 14 activity and the carbon- 13 content indicates that the beginning of the pedogenesis is not identical at all sites and is dependent on the timing of deglaciation and vulnerability of rocks to frost-weathering. (authors)

  1. Interaction of carbon nano tubes with DNA segments; Interacao de nanotubos de carbono com segmentos de DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peressinotto, Valdirene Sullas Teixeira

    2007-07-01

    Single- and double-stranded DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules can strongly bind to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) via non-covalent interactions. Under certain conditions, the DNA molecule spontaneously self-assembles into a helical wrapping around the tubular structure of the carbon nanotubes to form DNA/SWNT hybrids, which are both stable and soluble in water. This system has recently received extensive attention, since, besides rendering SWNTs dispersible in water as individual tubes, the DNA hybrids are very promising candidates for many applications in nanotechnology and molecular biology. All the possible applications for DNA-SWNT hybrids require, however, a fully understanding of DNA-nanotube wrapping mechanism which is still lacking in the literature. In this context, the aim of this work was to investigate the non-covalent interaction in aqueous medium between SWNTs and synthetic DNA segments having a known nucleotide sequence. Initially, the study was focused on poly d(GT)n sequences (n = 10, 30 and 45) that contain a sequence of alternating guanine and thymine bases and for which the efficiency to disperse and separate carbon nanotubes has already been demonstrated. Besides the size of GT sequences, the effects of ionic strength and pH in the interaction were also investigated. Afterwards, we studied the interaction of SWNT with DNA molecules that contain only a single type of nitrogenous base (DNA homopolymers), which has not been reported in details in the literature. We investigated homopolymers of poly dA{sub 20}, poly dT{sub 20}, poly dC{sub 20} and the duplex poly dA{sub 20}:dT{sub 20}. Most of the study was carried out with small-diameter HiPco SWNTs (with diameters between 0.7 and 1.2 nm). In some studies, SWNTs with diameter around 1.4 nm, synthesized via laser ablation and arc-discharge methods, were also investigated. The arc-discharge nanotubes used in this study were functionalized with carboxylic groups (-COOH) due to their

  2. Desorption, partitioning, and dechlorination characteristics of PCBs in sediments in interaction with reactive activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyeok; Lawal, Wasiu; Al-Abed, Souhail R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Problematic aged real PCBs-contaminated sediment (WHS) was examined. • Performance of reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with Pd–ZVI was tested. • Fate and transport of PCBs bound to WHS in the presence of RAC was fully traced. • Direct mixing configuration was compared with compartment configuration. • Results reflected real world complexities associated with slow desorption of PCBs. - Abstract: Sediment (WHS) in Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, heavily contaminated and aged with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was treated with reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles. Lab test proceeded in a direct mixing configuration of RAC and WHS. A compartment configuration, where RAC was physically separated from WHS, was also designed to trace the sequential transport and fate of PCBs, including desorption, adsorption, dechlorination, and re-partitioning. PCBs, once desorbed from WHS, were immediately sequestrated to RAC and subject to dechlorination. Direct mixing of WHS with RAC was one-order of magnitude more effective for dechlorination than compartment configuration. Compared to their desorption-followed by-adsorption route, direct physical contact of RAC with PCBs bound to WHS exhibited negligible contribution to the availability of PCBs for dechlorination reaction. Addition of RAC even in compartment configuration facilitated PCBs desorption from WHS. However, slow desorption of PCBs limited overall performance, resulting in a five-order of magnitude lower dechlorination yield when compared with treatment of purely aqueous PCBs. The low dechlorination yield reflected real world complexities in treating 3.19% organic carbon-containing WHS aged with PCBs for 40 years. These observations were further supported when compared with results on clean Cesar Creek sediment spiked with 2-chlorinated biphenyls

  3. Interaction of Sulfate Assimilation with Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism in Lemna minor1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopriva, Stanislav; Suter, Marianne; von Ballmoos, Peter; Hesse, Holger; Krähenbühl, Urs; Rennenberg, Heinz; Brunold, Christian

    2002-01-01

    Cysteine synthesis from sulfide and O-acetyl-l-serine (OAS) is a reaction interconnecting sulfate, nitrogen, and carbon assimilation. Using Lemna minor, we analyzed the effects of omission of CO2 from the atmosphere and simultaneous application of alternative carbon sources on adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate reductase (APR) and nitrate reductase (NR), the key enzymes of sulfate and nitrate assimilation, respectively. Incubation in air without CO2 led to severe decrease in APR and NR activities and mRNA levels, but ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase was not considerably affected. Simultaneous addition of sucrose (Suc) prevented the reduction in enzyme activities, but not in mRNA levels. OAS, a known regulator of sulfate assimilation, could also attenuate the effect of missing CO2 on APR, but did not affect NR. When the plants were subjected to normal air after a 24-h pretreatment in air without CO2, APR and NR activities and mRNA levels recovered within the next 24 h. The addition of Suc and glucose in air without CO2 also recovered both enzyme activities, with OAS again influenced only APR. 35SO42− feeding showed that treatment in air without CO2 severely inhibited sulfate uptake and the flux through sulfate assimilation. After a resupply of normal air or the addition of Suc, incorporation of 35S into proteins and glutathione greatly increased. OAS treatment resulted in high labeling of cysteine; the incorporation of 35S in proteins and glutathione was much less increased compared with treatment with normal air or Suc. These results corroborate the tight interconnection of sulfate, nitrate, and carbon assimilation. PMID:12428005

  4. Desorption, partitioning, and dechlorination characteristics of PCBs in sediments in interaction with reactive activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyeok, E-mail: hchoi@uta.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Texas at Arlington, 416 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0308 (United States); Environmental and Earth Sciences Program, The University of Texas at Arlington, 500 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0049 (United States); Lawal, Wasiu [Environmental and Earth Sciences Program, The University of Texas at Arlington, 500 Yates Street, Arlington, TX 76019-0049 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 26 W. Martin Luther King Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Highlights: • Problematic aged real PCBs-contaminated sediment (WHS) was examined. • Performance of reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with Pd–ZVI was tested. • Fate and transport of PCBs bound to WHS in the presence of RAC was fully traced. • Direct mixing configuration was compared with compartment configuration. • Results reflected real world complexities associated with slow desorption of PCBs. - Abstract: Sediment (WHS) in Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, heavily contaminated and aged with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was treated with reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles. Lab test proceeded in a direct mixing configuration of RAC and WHS. A compartment configuration, where RAC was physically separated from WHS, was also designed to trace the sequential transport and fate of PCBs, including desorption, adsorption, dechlorination, and re-partitioning. PCBs, once desorbed from WHS, were immediately sequestrated to RAC and subject to dechlorination. Direct mixing of WHS with RAC was one-order of magnitude more effective for dechlorination than compartment configuration. Compared to their desorption-followed by-adsorption route, direct physical contact of RAC with PCBs bound to WHS exhibited negligible contribution to the availability of PCBs for dechlorination reaction. Addition of RAC even in compartment configuration facilitated PCBs desorption from WHS. However, slow desorption of PCBs limited overall performance, resulting in a five-order of magnitude lower dechlorination yield when compared with treatment of purely aqueous PCBs. The low dechlorination yield reflected real world complexities in treating 3.19% organic carbon-containing WHS aged with PCBs for 40 years. These observations were further supported when compared with results on clean Cesar Creek sediment spiked with 2-chlorinated biphenyls.

  5. Tropical North Atlantic ocean-atmosphere interactions synchronize forest carbon losses from hurricanes and Amazon fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Randerson, James T.; Morton, Douglas C.

    2015-08-01

    We describe a climate mode synchronizing forest carbon losses from North and South America by analyzing time series of tropical North Atlantic sea surface temperatures (SSTs), landfall hurricanes and tropical storms, and Amazon fires during 1995-2013. Years with anomalously high tropical North Atlantic SSTs during March-June were often followed by a more active hurricane season and a larger number of satellite-detected fires in the southern Amazon during June-November. The relationship between North Atlantic tropical cyclones and southern Amazon fires (r = 0.61, p forests.

  6. Interactions between iron and organic matter may influence the fate of permafrost carbon in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cory, R. M.; Trusiak, A.; Ward, C.; Kling, G. W.; Tfaily, M.; Paša-Tolić, L.; Noel, V.; Bargar, J.

    2017-12-01

    The ongoing thawing of permafrost soils is the only environmental change that allows tremendous stores of organic carbon (C) to be converted into carbon dioxide (CO2) on decadal time scales, thus providing a positive and accelerating feedback to global warming. Evidence suggests that iron enhances abiotic reactions that convert dissolved organic matter (DOM) to CO2 in dark soils and in sunlit surface waters depending on its redox state and association with DOM (i.e., iron-DOM complexation). However, the complexation of iron in surface waters and soils remains too poorly understood to predict how iron influences the rates of oxidation of DOM to CO2. To address this knowledge gap, we characterized iron-DOM complexation in iron-rich soil and surface waters of the Arctic, in combination with measurements of DOM oxidation to CO2. These waters contain high concentrations of dissolved iron and DOM (up to 1 and 2 mM, respectively), and low concentrations of other potential ligands for iron such as sulfide, carbonate, chloride, or bromide. Ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to identify ligands for iron within the DOM pool, and synchrotron based X-ray analysis (XAS and EXAFS) was used to assess iron's oxidation state, to detect iron complexation, and to constrain the chemical composition of the complexes. Across a natural gradient of dissolved iron and DOM concentrations, many potential ligands were identified within DOM that are expected to complex with iron (e.g., aromatic acids). EXAFS showed substantial complexation of reduced ferrous iron (Fe(II)) to DOM in arctic soil waters, on the basis of comparison to Fe(II)-DOM reference spectra. Identification of iron complexed to DOM in soil waters is consistent with strongly co-varying iron and DOM concentrations in arctic soil and surface waters, and supports our hypothesis that complexation of iron by DOM influences dark and light redox reactions that oxidize DOM to CO2. Understanding the molecular

  7. Gas-phase studies of AunOm+ interacting with carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, M. L.; Castleman, A. W.

    2004-04-01

    The results of reactions between preformed cationic gold oxide clusters and carbon monoxide have been investigated utilizing a fast-flow reactor mass spectrometer. From these studies, it was found that all AunOm+ produced in the cluster source disappeared with CO addition at the reactant gas inlet. Furthermore, with CO addition, intermediate peaks of the form AunOm(CO)x+ (n=1-2, m=0-3, x=0-2) were produced, with some of the species continuing to react at higher CO flows.

  8. Quantum beats study of the 4He+ beam-carbon foil interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, A.; Desesquelles, J.

    1979-01-01

    Excitation cross-sections are deduced from the analysis of quantum beats in an electric field for an 4 He + (n=4) ion beam scattering through a thin carbon foil. The population distribution obtained at 1 MeV for 4S, 4P, 4D and 4F levels is in good agreement with a second-order Born approximation calculation of the electronic capture He ++ +C→He + (n=4) + C + . The alignment is found to be negative for P, D and F levels. The coherences Δl=+-1 have been measured, for amplitudes and phases [fr

  9. The effect of fire and permafrost interactions on soil carbon accumulation in an upland black spruce ecosystem of interior Alaska: Implications for post-thaw carbon loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, J. A.; Harden, J.W.; McGuire, A.D.; Kanevskiy, M.Z.; Jorgenson, M.T.; Xu, X.

    2011-01-01

    High-latitude regions store large amounts of organic carbon (OC) in active-layer soils and permafrost, accounting for nearly half of the global belowground OC pool. In the boreal region, recent warming has promoted changes in the fire regime, which may exacerbate rates of permafrost thaw and alter soil OC dynamics in both organic and mineral soil. We examined how interactions between fire and permafrost govern rates of soil OC accumulation in organic horizons, mineral soil of the active layer, and near-surface permafrost in a black spruce ecosystem of interior Alaska. To estimate OC accumulation rates, we used chronosequence, radiocarbon, and modeling approaches. We also developed a simple model to track long-term changes in soil OC stocks over past fire cycles and to evaluate the response of OC stocks to future changes in the fire regime. Our chronosequence and radiocarbon data indicate that OC turnover varies with soil depth, with fastest turnover occurring in shallow organic horizons (~60 years) and slowest turnover in near-surface permafrost (>3000 years). Modeling analysis indicates that OC accumulation in organic horizons was strongly governed by carbon losses via combustion and burial of charred remains in deep organic horizons. OC accumulation in mineral soil was influenced by active layer depth, which determined the proportion of mineral OC in a thawed or frozen state and thus, determined loss rates via decomposition. Our model results suggest that future changes in fire regime will result in substantial reductions in OC stocks, largely from the deep organic horizon. Additional OC losses will result from fire-induced thawing of near-surface permafrost. From these findings, we conclude that the vulnerability of deep OC stocks to future warming is closely linked to the sensitivity of permafrost to wildfire disturbance. ?? 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Toughening of Epoxy Adhesives by Combined Interaction of Carbon Nanotubes and Silsesquioxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Barra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The extensive use of adhesives in many structural applications in the transport industry and particularly in the aeronautic field is due to numerous advantages of bonded joints. However, still many researchers are working to enhance the mechanical properties and rheological performance of adhesives by using nanoadditives. In this study the effect of the addition of Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs with Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane (POSS compounds, either Glycidyl Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (GPOSS or DodecaPhenyl Oligomeric Silsesquioxanes (DPHPOSS to Tetraglycidyl Methylene Dianiline (TGMDA epoxy formulation, was investigated. The formulations contain neither a tougher matrix such as elastomers nor other additives typically used to provide a closer match in the coefficient of thermal expansion in order to discriminate only the effect of the addition of the above-mentioned components. Bonded aluminium single lap joints were made using both untreated and Chromic Acid Anodisation (CAA-treated aluminium alloy T2024 adherends. The effects of the different chemical functionalities of POSS compounds, as well as the synergistic effect between the MWCNT and POSS combination on adhesion strength, were evaluated by viscosity measurement, tensile tests, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA, single lap joint shear strength tests, and morphological investigation. The best performance in the Lap Shear Strength (LSS of the manufactured joints has been found for treated adherends bonded with epoxy adhesive containing MWCNTs and GPOSS. Carbon nanotubes have been found to play a very effective bridging function across the fracture surface of the bonded joints.

  11. Desorption, partitioning, and dechlorination characteristics of PCBs in sediments in interaction with reactive activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyeok; Lawal, Wasiu; Al-Abed, Souhail R

    2015-04-28

    Sediment (WHS) in Waukegan Harbor, Illinois, heavily contaminated and aged with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), was treated with reactive activated carbon (RAC) impregnated with palladized iron nanoparticles. Lab test proceeded in a direct mixing configuration of RAC and WHS. A compartment configuration, where RAC was physically separated from WHS, was also designed to trace the sequential transport and fate of PCBs, including desorption, adsorption, dechlorination, and re-partitioning. PCBs, once desorbed from WHS, were immediately sequestrated to RAC and subject to dechlorination. Direct mixing of WHS with RAC was one-order of magnitude more effective for dechlorination than compartment configuration. Compared to their desorption-followed by-adsorption route, direct physical contact of RAC with PCBs bound to WHS exhibited negligible contribution to the availability of PCBs for dechlorination reaction. Addition of RAC even in compartment configuration facilitated PCBs desorption from WHS. However, slow desorption of PCBs limited overall performance, resulting in a five-order of magnitude lower dechlorination yield when compared with treatment of purely aqueous PCBs. The low dechlorination yield reflected real world complexities in treating 3.19% organic carbon-containing WHS aged with PCBs for 40 years. These observations were further supported when compared with results on clean Cesar Creek sediment spiked with 2-chlorinated biphenyls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Phytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes in soybean as determined by interactions with micronutrients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaytseva, Olga, E-mail: olga.zaytseva@uni-hohenheim.de [University of Hohenheim, Institute of Crop Science (340h), Faculty of Agriculture (Germany); Wang, Zhengrui [Academia Sinica, Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center (China); Neumann, Günter [University of Hohenheim, Institute of Crop Science (340h), Faculty of Agriculture (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Carbon nanomaterials released into the environment exert extremely variable effects on living organisms. In this study, we used soybean (Glycine max) to investigate early responses to seed exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, outer diameter 20–70 nm, inner diameter 5–10 nm, length of >2 μm). Soybean seeds were imbibed with deionised water (control) or MWCNT suspension (1000 mg L{sup −1}) and were analysed for MWCNT contamination using light microscopy. The seedlings vitality status was evaluated by staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride and measurement of oxidative stress indicators in the root tissue. Micronutrient (Zn, Mn, Cu) availability in different seedling organs was assessed and the effects of antioxidants, and micronutrient supplementation was investigated. Oxidative stress induction by MWCNTs was detectable in radicle tips, coincided with MWCNTs accumulation and was reverted by external application of proline as antioxidant and micronutrients (Zn, Cu, Mn) as cofactors for various enzymes involved in oxidative stress defence. Accordingly, SOD activity increased after Zn supplementation. During germination, the MWCNT treatments reduced Zn translocation from the cotyledons to the seedling and MWCNTs exhibited adsorption potential for Zn and Cu, which may be involved in internal micronutrients immobilisation. This study demonstrates for the first time that MWCNT phytotoxicity is linked with oxidative stress-related disturbances of micronutrient homeostasis.

  13. Phytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes in soybean as determined by interactions with micronutrients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaytseva, Olga; Wang, Zhengrui; Neumann, Günter

    2017-01-01

    Carbon nanomaterials released into the environment exert extremely variable effects on living organisms. In this study, we used soybean (Glycine max) to investigate early responses to seed exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, outer diameter 20–70 nm, inner diameter 5–10 nm, length of >2 μm). Soybean seeds were imbibed with deionised water (control) or MWCNT suspension (1000 mg L"−"1) and were analysed for MWCNT contamination using light microscopy. The seedlings vitality status was evaluated by staining with triphenyltetrazolium chloride and measurement of oxidative stress indicators in the root tissue. Micronutrient (Zn, Mn, Cu) availability in different seedling organs was assessed and the effects of antioxidants, and micronutrient supplementation was investigated. Oxidative stress induction by MWCNTs was detectable in radicle tips, coincided with MWCNTs accumulation and was reverted by external application of proline as antioxidant and micronutrients (Zn, Cu, Mn) as cofactors for various enzymes involved in oxidative stress defence. Accordingly, SOD activity increased after Zn supplementation. During germination, the MWCNT treatments reduced Zn translocation from the cotyledons to the seedling and MWCNTs exhibited adsorption potential for Zn and Cu, which may be involved in internal micronutrients immobilisation. This study demonstrates for the first time that MWCNT phytotoxicity is linked with oxidative stress-related disturbances of micronutrient homeostasis.

  14. Global carbon - nitrogen - phosphorus cycle interactions: A key to solving the atmospheric CO2 balance problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, B. J.; Mellillo, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    If all biotic sinks of atmospheric CO2 reported were added a value of about 0.4 Gt C/yr would be found. For each category, a very high (non-conservative) estimate was used. This still does not provide a sufficient basis for achieving a balance between the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2. The bulk of the discrepancy lies in a combination of errors in the major terms, the greatest being in a combination of errors in the major terms, the greatest being in the net biotic release and ocean uptake segments, but smaller errors or biases may exist in calculations of the rate of atmospheric CO2 increase and total fossil fuel use as well. The reason why biotic sinks are not capable of balancing the CO2 increase via nutrient-matching in the short-term is apparent from a comparison of the stoichiometry of the sources and sinks. The burning of fossil fuels and forest biomass releases much more CO2-carbon than is sequestered as organic carbon.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann methods applied to large-scale three-dimensional virtual cores constructed from digital optical borehole images of the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukop, Michael C.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-11-01

    Digital optical borehole images at approximately 2 mm vertical resolution and borehole caliper data were used to create three-dimensional renderings of the distribution of (1) matrix porosity and (2) vuggy megaporosity for the karst carbonate Biscayne aquifer in southeastern Florida. The renderings based on the borehole data were used as input into Lattice Boltzmann methods to obtain intrinsic permeability estimates for this extremely transmissive aquifer, where traditional aquifer test methods may fail due to very small drawdowns and non-Darcian flow that can reduce apparent hydraulic conductivity. Variogram analysis of the borehole data suggests a nearly isotropic rock structure at lag lengths up to the nominal borehole diameter. A strong correlation between the diameter of the borehole and the presence of vuggy megaporosity in the data set led to a bias in the variogram where the computed horizontal spatial autocorrelation is strong at lag distances greater than the nominal borehole size. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of flow across a 0.4 × 0.4 × 17 m (2.72 m3 volume) parallel-walled column of rendered matrix and vuggy megaporosity indicates a high hydraulic conductivity of 53 m s-1. This value is similar to previous Lattice Boltzmann calculations of hydraulic conductivity in smaller limestone samples of the Biscayne aquifer. The development of simulation methods that reproduce dual-porosity systems with higher resolution and fidelity and that consider flow through horizontally longer renderings could provide improved estimates of the hydraulic conductivity and help to address questions about the importance of scale.

  16. Carbon monoxide interacts with auxin and nitric oxide to cope with iron deficiency in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    To clarify the roles of CO, NO and auxin in the plant response to iron deficiency and to establish how the signaling molecules interact to enhance Fe acquisition, we conducted physiological, genetic, and molecular analyses that compared the responses of various Arabidopsis mutants, including hy1 (CO...

  17. Surface Modification of Carbon Nanotubes with Conjugated Polyelectrolytes: Fundamental Interactions and Applications in Composite Materials, Nanofibers, Electronics, and Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Ezzeddine, Alaa

    2015-10-01

    Ever since their discovery, Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been renowned to be potential candidates for a variety of applications. Nevertheless, the difficulties accompanied with their dispersion and poor solubility in various solvents have hindered CNTs potential applications. As a result, studies have been developed to address the dispersion problem. The solution is in modifying the surfaces of the nanotubes covalently or non-covalently with a desired dispersant. Various materials have been employed for this purpose out of which polymers are the most common. Non-covalent functionalization of CNTs via polymer wrapping represents an attractive method to obtain a stable and homogenous CNTs dispersion. This method is able to change the surface properties of the nanotubes without destroying their intrinsic structure and preserving their properties. This thesis explores and studies the surface modification and solublization of pristine single and multiwalled carbon nanotubes via a simple solution mixing technique through non-covalent interactions of CNTs with various anionic and cationic conjugated polyelectrolytes (CPEs). The work includes studying the interaction of various poly(phenylene ethynylene) electrolytes with MWCNTs and an imidazolium functionalized poly(3-hexylthiophene) with SWCNTs. Our work here focuses on the noncovalent modifications of carbon nanotubes using novel CPEs in order to use these resulting CPE/CNT complexes in various applications. Upon modifying the CNTs with the CPEs, the resulting CPE/CNT complex has been proven to be easily dispersed in various organic and aqueous solution with excellent homogeneity and stability for several months. This complex was then used as a nanofiller and was dispersed in another polymer matrix (poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA). The PMMA/CPE/CNT composite materials were cast or electrospun depending on their desired application. The presence of the CPE modified CNTs in the polymer matrix has been proven to enhance

  18. CO2 and CH4 fluxes and carbon balance in the atmospheric interaction of boreal peatlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alm, J.

    1997-01-01

    Release of CO 2 from peat was studied using IR analyzer in a range of boreal peatlands under varying nutrient status and moisture conditions. Root associated CO 2 efflux was separated from the total release by experiments both in the field and in a greenhouse. Emissions of CO 2 and CH 4 (the latter by gas chromatography) were measured during the snow-covered period and their contribution to the annual fluxes of these gases was inspected. Ecosystem exchange of CO 2 under varying irradiation, temperature and moisture conditions was measured at different microsites at two peatland sites with different nutrient ecology. One site represented minerotrophic conditions during a wet growing season and the other site ombrotrophic conditions during an exceptionally dry growing season. Annual carbon balances were compiled for the two sites, and the role of the microsites in the annual carbon balance and CH 4 release was studied. The Holocene history of CO 2 sequestration and CH 4 emission dynamics in a raised mire were simulated using lateral and vertical growth rates derived from radiocarbon ages of peat samples from mire bottom and vertical cores. The model was formulated for a geographic information system (GIS). Artificial or natural lowering of water table increased CO 2 release from peat. A drought lasting from late May to July caused a 90 g C m 2 net loss in the annual C balance of a natural ombrotrophic bog. In drained forested sites the increase in peat CO 2 release could be even 100 %, but the development of the tree layer at least partially compensated for these losses. Wet conditions induced a net accumulation of 67 g C m -2 a -1 in the minerotrophic fen site, while the long term average accumulation rate is estimated to be only 15 g C m -2 a -1 for Finnish fens. Carbon balance in boreal peatlands is thus extremely sensitive to year-to-year climatic variations. Root activity of vascular plants contributed to the total peat CO 2 efflux by 10-40 % as root respiration

  19. Low-energy particle interaction at carbon nanowalls on W surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, N., E-mail: nozomi.tanaka@ppl2.qse.tohoku.ac.j [Tohoku University, Aramaki 6-01-2, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Yamaoka, H. [Harima Institute, RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research), Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Tsumori, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Nagamura, T.; Sasao, M. [Tohoku University, Aramaki 6-01-2, Aoba, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Kenmotsu, T. [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan); Matsumoto, Y. [Tokushima Bunri University, Yamashiro, Tokushima 770-8514 (Japan); Wada, M. [Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    We measured the characteristics of the reflected particles from a carbon nanowall (CNW) deposited on a W surface following the injection of 1-2 keV H{sup +} and O{sup +} ions. The reflected ion energies and intensities indicated a contribution from multiple scattering in the target. The reflection angular dependence of the reflected ion intensities reached the maximum around the mirror angle and showed a sharp distribution, which may be attributable to the effect due to the aligned structure of the CNW. The energies and intensities of the reflected ions decreased with the time of ion bombardment. The intensities and energies of the reflected ions were, however, recovered to some degree by baking the sample, indicating the surface modification due to retention of the injected particles during the injection. We used the Monte Carlo simulation code ACAT (Atomic Collision in Amorphous Target) to study these processes theoretically and the calculated results supported the experimental results.

  20. Interactions between biomass energy technologies and nutrient and carbon balances at the farm level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Uffe; Molt Petersen, B. [Danish Inst. of Agricultural Science, Dept. of Agroecology, Tjele (Denmark)

    2006-08-15

    Biomass energy is by far the largest renewable energy source in the world (IEA Renewable information (www.iea.org)). Biomass utilisation is closely linked to management and sustainability issues of forestry and agriculture. Carbon is extracted from forests and agriculture to bioenergy facilities, from where it is partly or fully emitted as CO{sub 2} and thus no longer available for sustaining soil organic matter content. Nutrients are extracted as well and, depending of the conversion technology, they may be recycled to farmland or lost as gaseous emissions. Thus, we must be able to describe these effects, and to suggest strategies to alleviate adverse effects on farm sustainability and on the environment. By choosing intelligent combinations of cropping systems and energy conversion technologies, win-win solutions may be achieved. This paper illustrates, via three cases, some agricultural impacts of choice of biomass technology and describes an intriguing possibility for recycling municipal or industrial wastes through the bioenergy chain. (au)

  1. Effect of carbon nanotube functionalization on mechanical and thermal properties of cross-linked epoxy-carbon nanotube nanocomposites: role of strengthening the interfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, Ketan S; Khabaz, Fardin; Khare, Rajesh

    2014-05-14

    We have used amido-amine functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that form covalent bonds with cross-linked epoxy matrices to elucidate the role of the matrix-filler interphase in the enhancement of mechanical and thermal properties in these nanocomposites. For the base case of nanocomposites of cross-linked epoxy and pristine single-walled CNTs, our previous work (Khare, K. S.; Khare, R. J. Phys. Chem. B 2013, 117, 7444-7454) has shown that weak matrix-filler interactions cause the interphase region in the nanocomposite to be more compressible. Furthermore, because of the weak matrix-filler interactions, the nanocomposite containing dispersed pristine CNTs has a glass transition temperature (Tg) that is ∼66 K lower than the neat polymer. In this work, we demonstrate that in spite of the presence of stiff CNTs in the nanocomposite, the Young's modulus of the nanocomposite containing dispersed pristine CNTs is virtually unchanged compared to the neat cross-linked epoxy. This observation suggests that the compressibility of the matrix-filler interphase interferes with the ability of the CNTs to reinforce the matrix. Furthermore, when the compressibility of the interphase is reduced by the use of amido-amine functionalized CNTs, the mechanical reinforcement due to the filler is more effective, resulting in a ∼50% increase in the Young's modulus compared to the neat cross-linked epoxy. Correspondingly, the functionalization of the CNTs also led to a recovery in the Tg making it effectively the same as the neat polymer and also resulted in a ∼12% increase in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposite containing functionalized CNTs compared to that containing pristine CNTs. These results demonstrate that the functionalization of the CNTs facilitates the transfer of both mechanical load and thermal energy across the matrix-filler interface.

  2. Assessing the use of digital radiography and a real-time interactive pulmonary nodule analysis system for large population lung cancer screening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yan; Ma Daqing; He Wen

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and objectives: To assess the use of chest digital radiograph (DR) assisted with a real-time interactive pulmonary nodule analysis system in large population lung cancer screening. Materials and methods: 346 DR/CR patient studies with corresponding CT images were selected from 12,500 patients screened for lung cancer from year 2007 to 2009. Two expert chest radiologists established CT-confirmed Gold Standard of nodules on DR/CR images with consensus. These cases were read by eight other chest radiologists (participating radiologists) first without using a real-time interactive pulmonary nodule analysis system and then re-read using the system. Performances of participating radiologists and the computer system were analyzed. Results: The computer system achieved similar performance on DR and CR images, with a detection rate of 76% and an average FPs of 2.0 per image. Before and after using the computer-aided detection system, the nodule detection sensitivities of the participating radiologists were 62.3% and 77.3% respectively, and the A z values increased from 0.794 to 0.831. Statistical analysis demonstrated statically significant improvement for the participating radiologists after using the computer analysis system with a P-value 0.05. Conclusion: The computer system could help radiologists identify more lesions, especially small ones that are more likely to be overlooked on chest DR/CR images, and could help reduce inter-observer diagnostic variations, while its FPs were easy to recognize and dismiss. It is suggested that DR/CR assisted by the real-time interactive pulmonary nodule analysis system may be an effective means to screen large populations for lung cancer.

  3. Modeling coupled interactions of carbon, water, and ozone exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. I: Model description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolov, Ned; Zeller, Karl F.

    2003-01-01

    A new biophysical model (FORFLUX) is presented to link ozone deposition with carbon and water cycles in terrestrial ecosystems. - A new biophysical model (FORFLUX) is presented to study the simultaneous exchange of ozone, carbon dioxide, and water vapor between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The model mechanistically couples all major processes controlling ecosystem flows trace gases and water implementing recent concepts in plant eco-physiology, micrometeorology, and soil hydrology. FORFLUX consists of four interconnected modules-a leaf photosynthesis model, a canopy flux model, a soil heat-, water- and CO 2 - transport model, and a snow pack model. Photosynthesis, water-vapor flux and ozone uptake at the leaf level are computed by the LEAFC3 sub-model. The canopy module scales leaf responses to a stand level by numerical integration of the LEAFC3 model over canopy leaf area index (LAI). The integration takes into account (1) radiative transfer inside the canopy, (2) variation of foliage photosynthetic capacity with canopy depth, (3) wind speed attenuation throughout the canopy, and (4) rainfall interception by foliage elements. The soil module uses principles of the diffusion theory to predict temperature and moisture dynamics within the soil column, evaporation, and CO 2 efflux from soil. The effect of soil heterogeneity on field-scale fluxes is simulated employing the Bresler-Dagan stochastic concept. The accumulation and melt of snow on the ground is predicted using an explicit energy balance approach. Ozone deposition is modeled as a sum of three fluxes- ozone uptake via plant stomata, deposition to non-transpiring plant surfaces, and ozone flux into the ground. All biophysical interactions are computed hourly while model projections are made at either hourly or daily time step. FORFLUX represents a comprehensive approach to studying ozone deposition and its link to carbon and water cycles in terrestrial ecosystems

  4. Coatings of Different Carbon Nanotubes on Platinum Electrodes for Neuronal Devices: Preparation, Cytocompatibility and Interaction with Spiral Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burblies, Niklas; Schulze, Jennifer; Schwarz, Hans-Christoph; Kranz, Katharina; Motz, Damian; Vogt, Carla; Lenarz, Thomas; Warnecke, Athanasia; Behrens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cochlear and deep brain implants are prominent examples for neuronal prostheses with clinical relevance. Current research focuses on the improvement of the long-term functionality and the size reduction of neural interface electrodes. A promising approach is the application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), either as pure electrodes but especially as coating material for electrodes. The interaction of CNTs with neuronal cells has shown promising results in various studies, but these appear to depend on the specific type of neurons as well as on the kind of nanotubes. To evaluate a potential application of carbon nanotube coatings for cochlear electrodes, it is necessary to investigate the cytocompatibility of carbon nanotube coatings on platinum for the specific type of neuron in the inner ear, namely spiral ganglion neurons. In this study we have combined the chemical processing of as-delivered CNTs, the fabrication of coatings on platinum, and the characterization of the electrical properties of the coatings as well as a general cytocompatibility testing and the first cell culture investigations of CNTs with spiral ganglion neurons. By applying a modification process to three different as-received CNTs via a reflux treatment with nitric acid, long-term stable aqueous CNT dispersions free of dispersing agents were obtained. These were used to coat platinum substrates by an automated spray-coating process. These coatings enhance the electrical properties of platinum electrodes, decreasing the impedance values and raising the capacitances. Cell culture investigations of the different CNT coatings on platinum with NIH3T3 fibroblasts attest an overall good cytocompatibility of these coatings. For spiral ganglion neurons, this can also be observed but a desired positive effect of the CNTs on the neurons is absent. Furthermore, we found that the well-established DAPI staining assay does not function on the coatings prepared from single-wall nanotubes.

  5. Technology interactions among low-carbon energy technologies: What can we learn from a large number of scenarios?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McJeon, Haewon C.; Clarke, Leon; Kyle, Page; Wise, Marshall; Hackbarth, Andrew; Bryant, Benjamin P.; Lempert, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced low-carbon energy technologies can substantially reduce the cost of stabilizing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Understanding the interactions between these technologies and their impact on the costs of stabilization can help inform energy policy decisions. Many previous studies have addressed this challenge by exploring a small number of representative scenarios that represent particular combinations of future technology developments. This paper uses a combinatorial approach in which scenarios are created for all combinations of the technology development assumptions that underlie a smaller, representative set of scenarios. We estimate stabilization costs for 768 runs of the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), based on 384 different combinations of assumptions about the future performance of technologies and two stabilization goals. Graphical depiction of the distribution of stabilization costs provides first-order insights about the full data set and individual technologies. We apply a formal scenario discovery method to obtain more nuanced insights about the combinations of technology assumptions most strongly associated with high-cost outcomes. Many of the fundamental insights from traditional representative scenario analysis still hold under this comprehensive combinatorial analysis. For example, the importance of carbon capture and storage (CCS) and the substitution effect among supply technologies are consistently demonstrated. The results also provide more clarity regarding insights not easily demonstrated through representative scenario analysis. For example, they show more clearly how certain supply technologies can provide a hedge against high stabilization costs, and that aggregate end-use efficiency improvements deliver relatively consistent stabilization cost reductions. Furthermore, the results indicate that a lack of CCS options combined with lower technological advances in the buildings sector or the transportation sector is

  6. Interactions of carbon dioxide with model organic molecules: A comparative theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trung, Nguyen Tien; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2013-08-01

    Interaction energies obtained using CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ//MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ computations including both ZPE and BSSE corrections range from -2.9 to -14.2 kJ mol-1. While formic acid forms the most stable complex with CO2, formaldehyde yields the least stable complex. Lewis acid-base interaction such as C-N⋯C(CO2), Cdbnd O⋯C(CO2), which overcomes C-H⋯O blue-shifting hydrogen bond, plays a significant role in stabilizing most complexes. However, the strength of (HCOOH, CO2) is mainly determined by O-H⋯O red-shifting hydrogen bond. The C-H⋯O blue-shifting hydrogen bond is revealed upon complexation of CH3OH, HCHO, HCOOH, CH3COCH3 and HCOOCH3 with CO2. Remarkably, existence of weak hydrogen bonded C-H⋯O interaction is not found in the (CH3OCH3, CO2) and (CH3NH2, CO2) pairs.

  7. Oxidation of cumene hydroperoxide on glassy carbon electrodes in aqueous solution and its interaction with ascorbic and gallic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estévez, Rafael; Mellado, José Miguel Rodríguez; Mayén, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    The cumene hydroperoxide oxidation on glassy carbon electrodes involves an irreversible one-electron transfer to peroxide and phenoxy radicals, being the main end products hydroquinone and acetone. The overall oxidation mechanism occurs in two steps: formation of acetone and a phenoxy radical, and the reaction of this phenoxy radical with water, getting stability by oxidizing into p-benzoquinone The interaction of such radicals with ascorbic and gallic acids decreases the oxidation signal of cumene hydroperoxide in differential pulse voltammetry. This decrease, due to the scavenging of the radicals formed after the electron transfer, is related to the antioxidant activities. So, it is possible to substitute the mercury as a probe for the electrochemical determination of antioxidant activity.

  8. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-07-02

    A {sup 13}C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V{sub H}, V{sub L}, and C{sub L} domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with {sup 13}C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with (1-{sup 13}C)Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule.

  9. Carbon-13 NMR study of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies: Antigen binding and domain-domain interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Koichi; Matsunaga, Chigusa; Odaka, Asano; Yamato, Sumie; Takaha, Wakana; Shimada, Ichio; Arata, Yoji

    1991-01-01

    A 13 C NMR study is reported of switch variant anti-dansyl antibodies, which possess the identical V H , V L , and C L domains in conjunction with highly homologous but not identical heavy-chain constant regions. Each of the antibodies has been selectively labeled with 13 C at the carbonyl carbon of Trp, Tyr, His, or Cys residue by growing hybridoma cells in serum-free medium. Spectral assignments have been made by folowing the procedure described previously for the switch variant antibodies labeled with [1- 13 C]Met. On the basis of the spectral data collected for the antibodies and their proteolytic fragments, the authors discuss how 13 C NMR spectroscopy can be used for the structural analyses of antigen binding and also of domain-domain interactions in the antibody molecule

  10. Ab Initio Density Functional Theory Investigation of the Interaction between Carbon Nanotubes and Water Molecules during Water Desalination Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loay A. Elalfy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Density functional theory calculations using B3LYP/3-21G level of theory have been implemented on 6 carbon nanotubes (CNTs structures (3 zigzag and 3 armchair CNTs to study the energetics of the reverse osmosis during water desalination process. Calculations of the band gap, interaction energy, highest occupied molecular orbital, lowest unoccupied molecular orbital, electronegativity, hardness, and pressure of the system are discussed. The calculations showed that the water molecule that exists inside the CNT is about 2-3 Å away from its wall. The calculations have proven that the zigzag CNTs are more efficient for reverse osmosis water desalination process than armchair CNTs as the reverse osmosis process requires pressure of approximately 200 MPa for armchair CNTs, which is consistent with the values used in molecular dynamics simulations, while that needed when using zigzag CNTs was in the order of 60 MPa.

  11. Acid–base interaction between carbon black and polyurethane molecules with different amine values: Dispersion stability of carbon black suspension for use in lithium ion battery cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kil, Ki Chun; Kim, Gu Yeon; Cho, Chae-Woong; Lim, Myung Duk; Kim, Kijun; Jeong, Kyung-Min; Lee, Jinuk; Paik, Ungyu

    2013-01-01

    The dispersion properties of carbon black (CB) slurries as well as the accompanying electrochemical properties of Li(Ni 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 )O 2 (NCM) electrodes were investigated by controlling the amine value of polyurethane-based dispersants. The increase in amine value of dispersants leads to an increase in adsorption level on CB surface due to a strong acid/base interaction between dispersants and CB particles, providing the improvement of steric repulsion between particles at the solid–liquid interface. This results in the enhancement of the dispersion stability of CB and the related microstructure of the electrodes. Electrochemical experiments indicated that the rate capabilities and cycle performance of the electrodes are in good agreement with dispersion properties of CB slurries. However, it was found that the excessive addition of the dispersant was deleterious to electrochemical properties because the non-adsorbed dispersants act as an electronic conduction barrier between solid phases. Therefore, it is suggested that the amine value of dispersant and tailored amount of dispersant addition can be key roles for obtaining the optimized dispersion stability of CB and the corresponding excellent electrochemical properties of the cathode

  12. Molecular-scale tribology of amorphous carbon coatings: effects of film thickness, adhesion, and long-range interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, G T; Mikulski, Paul T; Harrison, Judith A

    2002-06-19

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to investigate the atomic-scale friction and wear when hydrogen-terminated diamond (111) counterfaces are in sliding contact with diamond (111) surfaces coated with amorphous, hydrogen-free carbon films. Two films, with approximately the same ratio of sp(3)-to-sp(2) carbon, but different thicknesses, have been examined. Both systems give a similar average friction in the load range examined. Above a critical load, a series of tribochemical reactions occur resulting in a significant restructuring of the film. This restructuring is analogous to the "run-in" observed in macroscopic friction experiments and reduces the friction. The contribution of adhesion between the probe (counterface) and the sample to friction was examined by varying the saturation of the counterface. Decreasing the degree of counterface saturation, by reducing the hydrogen termination, increases the friction. Finally, the contribution of long-range interactions to friction was examined by using two potential energy functions that differ only in their long-range forces to examine friction in the same system.

  13. Interactive effects of oxygen, carbon dioxide and flow on photosynthesis and respiration in the scleractinian coral Galaxea fascicularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinga, Ronald; Derksen-Hooijberg, Marlous; Wijgerde, Tim; Verreth, Johan A J

    2017-06-15

    Rates of dark respiration and net photosynthesis were measured for six replicate clonal fragments of the stony coral Galaxea fascicularis (Linnaeus 1767), which were incubated under 12 different combinations of dissolved oxygen (20%, 100% and 150% saturation), dissolved carbon dioxide (9.5 and 19.1 µmol l -1 ) and water flow (1-1.6 versus 4-13 cm s -1 ) in a repeated measures design. Dark respiration was enhanced by increased flow and increased oxygen saturation in an interactive way, which relates to improved oxygen influx into the coral tissue. Oxygen saturation did not influence net photosynthesis: neither hypoxia nor hyperoxia affected net photosynthesis, irrespective of flow and pH, which suggests that hyperoxia does not induce high rates of photorespiration in this coral. Flow and pH had a synergistic effect on net photosynthesis: at high flow, a decrease in pH stimulated net photosynthesis by 14%. These results indicate that for this individual of G. fascicularis , increased uptake of carbon dioxide rather than increased efflux of oxygen explains the beneficial effect of water flow on photosynthesis. Rates of net photosynthesis measured in this study are among the highest ever recorded for scleractinian corals and confirm a strong scope for growth. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Characterization of the interaction between therapeutical carbon ions and bone-like materials and related impact on treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, Anna; Durante, Marco [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwereionen, Darmstadt (Germany); TU Darmstadt (Germany); Carlino, Antonio [University of Palermo (Italy); Kaderka, Robert; Kraemer, Michael; La Tessa, Chiara; Scifoni, Emanuele [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwereionen, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Radiotherapy is one of the most common and effective therapies for cancer. The treatment planning system for ions TRiP98 was developed at GSI, Darmstadt. In TRiP98, the interaction between primary radiation and tissue is modeled from experimental data measured in water and rescaled to other tissue. This approximation is not accurate enough for biological materials whose elemental composition besides density deviates significantly from water. The nuclear attenuation of carbon beams in bone-like materials was measured and an estimation of the fragmentation cross section was done. In parallel, the dose profile inhomogeneity predicted by TRiP98 at the interface between water and bones was investigated and measured at HIT (Heidelberg). A 3D treatment plan was delivered in a water phantom equipped with bone targets. Pin-point ionization chambers and X-ray dosimetric films were used for measuring the dose at different positions. As a further step, the measured cross sections of carbon ions in bone have been implemented in TRiP98. The comparison of the dose profiles calculated with the standard and benchmarked versions of the treatment planning will give an estimate of the improvement.

  15. Plant-Soil Relationships of Bromus tectorum L.: Interactions among Labile Carbon Additions, Soil Invasion Status, and Fertilizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blank, R.R.; Young, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Invasion of western North America by the annual exotic grass Bromus tectorum L. (cheatgrass) has been an ecological disaster. High soil bioavailability of nitrogen is a contributing factor in the invasive potential of B. tectorum. Application of labile carbon sources to the soil can immobilize soil nitrogen and favor native species. We studied the interaction of labile carbon addition (sucrose), with soil invasion status and fertilizer addition on the growth of B. tectorum. Soils were non invaded (BNI) and B. tectorum invaded (BI). Treatments were control, sucrose, combined fertilizer, and sucrose + fertilizer. The greenhouse experiment continued for 3 growth-cycles. After the 1st growth-cycle, sucrose addition reduced B. tectorum aboveground mass almost 70 times for the BI soil but did not significantly reduce growth in the BNI soil. B. tectorum aboveground mass, after the 1st growth-cycle, was over 27 times greater for BI control soils than BNI control soils. Although sucrose addition reduced soil-solution NO 3 , tissue N was not significantly lowered, suggesting that reduction of soil available N may not be solely responsible for reduction in B. tectorum growth. Non invaded soil inhibits growth of B. tectorum. Understanding this mechanism may lead to viable control strategies.

  16. Relevance of the Interaction between the M-Phthalocyanines and Carbon Nanotubes in the Electroactivity toward ORR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gaitán, Carolina; Ruiz-Rosas, Ramiro; Morallón, Emilia; Cazorla-Amorós, Diego

    2017-10-31

    In this work, the influence of the interaction between the iron and cobalt-phthalocyanines (FePc and CoPc) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) used as support in the electroactivity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline media has been investigated. A series of thermal treatments were performed on these materials in order to modify the interaction between the CNTs and the phthalocyanines. The FePc-based catalysts showed the highest activity, with comparable performance to the state-of-the-art Pt-Vulcan catalyst. A heat treatment at 400 °C improved the activity of FePc-based catalysts, while the use of higher temperatures or oxidative atmosphere rendered the decomposition of the macrocyclic compound and consequently the loss of the electrochemical activity of the complex. CoPc-based catalysts performance was negatively affected for all of the tested treatments. Thermogravimetric analyses demonstrated that the FePc was stabilized when loaded onto CNTs, while CoPc did not show such a feature, pointing to a better interaction of the FePc instead of the CoPc. Interestingly, electrochemical measurements demonstrated an improvement of the electron transfer rate in thermally treated FePc-based catalysts. They also allowed us to assess that only 15% of the iron in the catalyst was available for direct electron transfer. This is the same iron amount that remains on the catalyst after a strong acid washing with concentrated HCl (ca. 0.3 wt %), which is enough to deliver a comparable ORR activity. Durability tests confirmed that the catalysts deactivation occurs at a slower rate in those catalysts where FePc is strongly attached to the CNT surface. Thus, the highest ORR activity seems to be provided by those FePc molecules that are strongly attached to the CNT surface, pointing out the relevance of the interaction between the support and the FePc in these catalysts.

  17. Digital radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brody, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    Digital Radiography begins with an orderly introduction to the fundamental concepts of digital imaging. The entire X-ray digital imagining system is described, from an overall characterization of image quality to specific components required for a digital radiographic system. Because subtraction is central to digital radiographic systems, the author details the use of various subtraction methods for image enhancement. Complex concepts are illustrated with numerous examples and presented in terms that can readily be understood by physicians without an advanced mathematics background. The second part of the book discusses implementations and applications of digital imagining systems based on area and scanned detector technologies. This section includes thorough coverage of digital fluoroscopy, scanned projection radiography, and film-based digital imaging systems, and features a state-of-the-art synopsis of the applications of digital subtraction angiography. The book concludes with a timely assessment of anticipated technological advances

  18. Digital Communication and Politics in Aragon. A two-way communication formula for the interaction between politicians and citizens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Ruiz-Carreras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This research presents blogs as an innovative and rich tool for political communication. Blogs can facilitate two-way communication and true interaction between citizens and politicians. The article analyses in depth the content, uses, and characteristics of five weblogs written by Aragonese politicians. Although the study detects some weaknesses in the current political use of blogs, it encourages political parties to use blogs and other online resources, not only during electoral campaigns to improve the reputation of political leaders but also continuously and particularly in situations of special interest for the citizenship. The study shows that the use of blogs by Aragonese politicians is no longer just a transitory phenomenon and has become a reality. The article also demonstrates that politicians use blogs mostly as a pre-electoral tooland to a much lesser extent as an element of communication to promote democracy. It has been observed that politicians’ blogs are used as a tool to overcome situations of crisis and to compensate negative opinions caused by questionable acts.

  19. Digital Density as the Driving Force of Digital Transformation Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Bush, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Digital technologies have increased the influence of technology in business, even changing business models and strategies of organisations. This influence, called Digital Transformation of Business (DT), happens when there is an increase of the number of digital connections, information and interactions. This phenom-ena has been defined as Digital Density (DD) and aims to provide an assessment of the digitalization status of an organization. With the concept of DD we pro-pose the DD Framework, t...

  20. Production of cumulative protons in the pion-carbon interactions at 5 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdinov, O.B.; Bajramov, A.A.; Budagov, Yu.A.; Valkar, Sh.; Dvornik, A.M.; Lomakin, Yu.F.; Majlov, A.A.; Flyagin, V.B.; Kharzheev, Yu.N.

    1983-01-01

    For the π -12 C interactions at the incident momentum of 5 GeV/c the relation between the divergence angle and the sum of kinetic energies of two protons, one of which is emitted into the backward hemisphere, and the other into the forward hemisphere, in the laboratory system is investigated. The obtained results can be considered as an evidence to that the absorption of slow pions is a possible mechanism responsible for the cumulative production of protons in the momentum range of 0.2-0.6 GeV/c

  1. Functional interaction between bicarbonate transporters and carbonic anhydrase modulates lactate uptake into mouse cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetz, Jan; Barros, L Felipe; San Martín, Alejandro; Becker, Holger M

    2015-07-01

    Blood-derived lactate is a precious energy substrate for the heart muscle. Lactate is transported into cardiomyocytes via monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) together with H(+), which couples lactate uptake to cellular pH regulation. In this study, we have investigated how the interplay between different acid/base transporters and carbonic anhydrases (CA), which catalyze the reversible hydration of CO2, modulates the uptake of lactate into isolated mouse cardiomyocytes. Lactate transport was estimated both as lactate-induced acidification and as changes in intracellular lactate levels measured with a newly developed Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) nanosensor. Recordings of intracellular pH showed an increase in the rate of lactate-induced acidification when CA was inhibited by 6-ethoxy-2-benzothiazolesulfonamide (EZA), while direct measurements of lactate flux demonstrated a decrease in MCT transport activity, when CA was inhibited. The data indicate that catalytic activity of extracellular CA increases lactate uptake and counteracts intracellular lactate-induced acidification. We propose a hypothetical model, in which HCO3 (-), formed from cell-derived CO2 at the outer surface of the cardiomyocyte plasma membrane by membrane-anchored, extracellular CA, is transported into the cell via Na(+)/HCO3 (-) cotransport to counteract intracellular acidification, while the remaining H(+) stabilizes extracellular pH at the surface of the plasma membrane during MCT activity to enhance lactate influx into cardiomyocytes.

  2. Metal-Carbon Interactions on Reduced Graphene Oxide under Facile Thermal Treatment: Microbiological and Cell Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. V. Carreño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver-functionalized reduced graphene oxide (Ag-rGO nanosheets were prepared by single chemical and thermal processes, with very low concentration of silver. The resulting carbon framework consists of reduced graphene oxide (rGO sheets or 3D networks, decorated with anchored silver nanoparticles. The Ag-rGO nanosheets were dispersed into a polymer matrix and the composites evaluated for use as biological scaffolds. The rGO material in poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS has been tested for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus (S. Aureus bacteria, after exposure times of 24 and 120 hours, as well as in the determination of cell viability on cultures of fibroblast cells (NIH/3T3. Using 1 mL of Ag-rGO in PDMS the antibacterial effectiveness against Staphylococcus aureus was limited, showing an increased amount of Colony Forming Units (CFU, after 24 hours of contact. In the cell viability assay, after 48 hours of contact, the group of 1 mL of Ag-rGO with PDMS was the only group that increased cell viability when compared to the control group. In this context, it is believed these behaviors are due to the increase in cell adhesion capacity promoted by the rGO. Thus, the Ag-rGO/PDMS hybrid nanocomposite films can be used as scaffolds for tissue engineering, as they limit antimicrobial activity.

  3. Global and regional effects of land-use change on climate in 21. century simulations with interactive carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boysen, L.R.; Brovkin, V.; Pongratz, J.; Gayler, V.; Arora, V.K.; Cadule, P.; Noblet-Ducoudre, N. de; Kato, E.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-geophysical (BGP) and biogeochemical (BGC) effects of land-use and land cover change (LULCC) are separated at the global and regional scales in new interactive CO 2 simulations for the 21. century. Results from four earth system models (ESMs) are analyzed for the future RCP8.5 scenario from simulations with and without land-use and land cover change (LULCC), contributing to the Land-Use and Climate, Identification of robust impacts (LUCID) project. Over the period 2006-2100, LULCC causes the atmospheric CO 2 concentration to increase by 12, 22, and 66 ppm in CanESM2, MIROC-ESM, and MPI-ESM-LR, respectively. Statistically significant changes in global near-surface temperature are found in three models with a BGC induced global mean annual warming between 0.07 and 0.23 K. BGP-induced responses are simulated by three models in areas of intense LULCC of varying sign and magnitude (between -0.47 and 0.10 K). Modifications of the land carbon pool by LULCC are disentangled in accordance with processes that can lead to increases and decreases in this carbon pool. Global land carbon losses due to LULCC are simulated by all models: 218, 57, 35 and 34 Gt C by MPI-ESM-LR, MIROC-ESM, IPSL-CM5A-LR and CanESM2, respectively. On the contrary, the CO 2 -fertilization effect caused by elevated atmospheric CO 2 concentrations due to LULCC leads to a land carbon gain of 39 Gt C in MPI-ESM-LR and is almost negligible in the other models. A substantial part of the spread in models' responses to LULCC is attributed to the differences in implementation of LULCC (e.g., whether pastures or crops are simulated explicitly) and the simulation of specific processes. Simple idealized experiments with clear protocols for implementing LULCC in ESMs are needed to increase the understanding of model responses and the statistical significance of results, especially when analyzing the regional-scale impacts of LULCC. (authors)

  4. Global and regional effects of land-use change on climate in 21st century simulations with interactive carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Boysen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Biogeophysical (BGP and biogeochemical (BGC effects of land-use and land cover change (LULCC are separated at the global and regional scales in new interactive CO2 simulations for the 21st century. Results from four earth system models (ESMs are analyzed for the future RCP8.5 scenario from simulations with and without land-use and land cover change (LULCC, contributing to the Land-Use and Climate, IDentification of robust impacts (LUCID project. Over the period 2006–2100, LULCC causes the atmospheric CO2 concentration to increase by 12, 22, and 66 ppm in CanESM2, MIROC-ESM, and MPI-ESM-LR, respectively. Statistically significant changes in global near-surface temperature are found in three models with a BGC-induced global mean annual warming between 0.07 and 0.23 K. BGP-induced responses are simulated by three models in areas of intense LULCC of varying sign and magnitude (between −0.47 and 0.10 K. Modifications of the land carbon pool by LULCC are disentangled in accordance with processes that can lead to increases and decreases in this carbon pool. Global land carbon losses due to LULCC are simulated by all models: 218, 57, 35 and 34 Gt C by MPI-ESM-LR, MIROC-ESM, IPSL-CM5A-LR and CanESM2, respectively. On the contrary, the CO2-fertilization effect caused by elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations due to LULCC leads to a land carbon gain of 39 Gt C in MPI-ESM-LR and is almost negligible in the other models. A substantial part of the spread in models' responses to LULCC is attributed to the differences in implementation of LULCC (e.g., whether pastures or crops are simulated explicitly and the simulation of specific processes. Simple idealized experiments with clear protocols for implementing LULCC in ESMs are needed to increase the understanding of model responses and the statistical significance of results, especially when analyzing the regional-scale impacts of LULCC.

  5. Investigation of Plugging of Narrow Sodium Channels by Sodium and Carbon Dioxide Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun Hee; Wi, Myung-Hwan; Min, Jae Hong; Kim, Tae-joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The supercritical CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle system is known to be a promising power conversion system for improving the efficiency and preventing the sodium water reaction (SWR) of the current SFR concept using a Rankine steam cycle. PCHEs are known to have potential for reducing the volume occupied by the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} exchangers as well as the heat exchanger mass relative to traditional shell-and-tube heat exchangers. Here, we report a study on a plugging test by the interaction of sodium and CO{sub 2} to investigate design parameters of sodium channels in the realistic operating conditions. We investigated a plugging test by an interaction of sodium and CO{sub 2} with different cross sectional areas of the sodium channels. It was found that the flow rate of sodium decreased earlier and faster with a narrower cross sectional area compared to a wider one. Our experimental results are expected to be used for determining the sodium channel areas of PCHEs.

  6. Motions and electrostatic interactions in natural and semisynthetic myoglobins: a carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskalick, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    It is expected that the internal motions of amino acid side chains and protein backbone segments influence and are in turn affected by charge-charge and related interactions, steric constraints, hydrophobic forces, and hydrogen bonding. As an initial test of this theory 13 C-enriched glycine, alanine, and isoleucine have been substituted for the amino terminal valine of sperm whale myoglobin using semisynthetic techniques. 13 C-NMR has been used to analyze the motions of the side chain and the protonation state of the alpha amino group as a function of pH. The addition of a single methyl group to the side chain can alter the alpha amino pK value by as much as 0.3 pH units indicating a delicately balanced set of change-charge interactions between the alpha amino group and the rest of the protein. Further evidence in support of the state theory was found upon examination of the internal motions of seven of nine isoleucine vectors. These motions were extracted from natural abundance 13 C-NMR relaxation data. The results suggest a strong possibility that concerted motions are important. Also, an increase in temperature from 32 0 C to 52 0 C leads to an electrostatically driven tightening of the myoglobin structure as evidenced by no significant increase in motion amplitude of most of the vectors

  7. Dielectric properties of liquid systems: study of interactions in the systems carbon tetrachloride with benzene, toluene, and p-xylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián H. Buep

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Intermolecular associations in liquid systems of non-polar and slightly polar compounds were studied through excess molar volumes (VEM and excess dielectric properties (εE and n2ED for mixtures of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4 with benzene (C6H6, toluene (C6H5CH3, and p-xylene (p-(CH32C6H4. These excess properties were calculated from measurements of density (ρ, static permittivity (ε, and refractive index (nD over the whole range of concentrations at 298.15 K. The values of the excess dielectric properties for these mixtures were fitted in two different ways, one through least squares using the Redlich–Kister equation and the other using a model developed to explain deviations from ideality. The first fit was found to be descriptive while the second gave the equilibrium constant values for the interaction products actually formed in the mixtures and the respective electronic polarizabilities and dipole moments, indicating the existence of interaction products.

  8. Interactions between 59Fe(14C)EDTA and soils containing calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargitai-Toth, A.; Konya, J.

    1991-01-01

    Interaction between FeEDTA and calcareous soils was followed over a period of four weeks using a radiotracer technique, and a kinetic evaluation of the results was performed. 59 Fe served to determine the quantity of iron, 14 C to assay for EDTA and 45 Ca to measure calcium. During the experiment, i.e. within four weeks in case of the chernozem soil 61% and in case of the clayey meadow soil 51% of the iron chelate disappeared from the solution. The loss in soluble iron was partly due to a rapid sorption process of about an hour and partly due to the slow decomposition of FeEDTA to Fe(OH) 3 . The two processes could be separated using the Christiansen equation. (author) 9 refs.; 1 figs.; 2 tabs

  9. The interaction between diamond like carbon (DLC coatings and ionic liquids under boundary lubrication conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Milewski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyse antiwear DLC coatings produced by physical vapour deposition. The a-C:H coatings were deposited on steel elements designed to operate under friction conditions. The coating structure was studied by observing the surface topography with a scanning electron microscope (SEM and a profilometer. The friction and wear properties of the coatings were examined using a ball-on-disc tribotester. The lubricants tested were two types of ionic liquids (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate and trihexyltetradecylphosphonium bis(trifluoromethy-lsulphonyl amide. The experimental data was used to select ionic liquids with the best tribological properties to operate under lubricated friction conditions and interact with DLC coatings.

  10. Simultaneous high speed digital cinematographic and X-ray radiographic imaging of a intense multi-fluid interaction with rapid phase changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansson, Roberta Concilio; Park, Hyun Sun; Dinh, Truc-Nam [Royal Institute of Technology, Division of Nuclear Power Safety, AlbaNova, Stockholm SE-106 91 (Sweden)

    2009-04-15

    As typical for the study of the vapor explosions, the qualitative and quantitative understanding of the phenomena requires visualization of both material and interface dynamics. A new approach to multi-fluid multiphase visualization is presented with the focus on the development of a synchronized high-speed visualization by digital cinematography and X-ray radiography. The developed system, named SHARP (simultaneous high-speed acquisition of X-ray radiography and photography), and its image processing methodology, directed to an image synchronization procedure and a separate quantification of vapor and molten material dynamics, is presented in this paper. Furthermore, we exploit an intrinsic property of the X-ray radiation, namely the differences in linear mass attenuation coefficients over the beam path through a multi-component system, to characterize the evolution of molten material distribution. Analysis of the data obtained by the SHARP system and image processing procedure developed granted new insights into the physics of the vapor explosion phenomena, as well as, quantitative information of the associated dynamic micro-interactions. (author)

  11. Wildfire and forest disease interaction lead to greater loss of soil nutrients and carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Richard C; Meentemeyer, Ross K; Rizzo, David M

    2016-09-01

    Fire and forest disease have significant ecological impacts, but the interactions of these two disturbances are rarely studied. We measured soil C, N, Ca, P, and pH in forests of the Big Sur region of California impacted by the exotic pathogen Phytophthora ramorum, cause of sudden oak death, and the 2008 Basin wildfire complex. In Big Sur, overstory tree mortality following P. ramorum invasion has been extensive in redwood and mixed evergreen forests, where the pathogen kills true oaks and tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus). Sampling was conducted across a full-factorial combination of disease/no disease and burned/unburned conditions in both forest types. Forest floor organic matter and associated nutrients were greater in unburned redwood compared to unburned mixed evergreen forests. Post-fire element pools were similar between forest types, but lower in burned-invaded compared to burned-uninvaded plots. We found evidence disease-generated fuels led to increased loss of forest floor C, N, Ca, and P. The same effects were associated with lower %C and higher PO4-P in the mineral soil. Fire-disease interactions were linear functions of pre-fire host mortality which was similar between the forest types. Our analysis suggests that these effects increased forest floor C loss by as much as 24.4 and 21.3 % in redwood and mixed evergreen forests, respectively, with similar maximum losses for the other forest floor elements. Accumulation of sudden oak death generated fuels has potential to increase fire-related loss of soil nutrients at the region-scale of this disease and similar patterns are likely in other forests, where fire and disease overlap.

  12. Competitive interactions between native and invasive exotic plant species are altered under elevated carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manea, Anthony; Leishman, Michelle R

    2011-03-01

    We hypothesized that the greater competitive ability of invasive exotic plants relative to native plants would increase under elevated CO(2) because they typically have traits that confer the ability for fast growth when resources are not limiting and thus are likely to be more responsive to elevated CO(2). A series of competition experiments under ambient and elevated CO(2) glasshouse conditions were conducted to determine an index of relative competition intensity for 14 native-invasive exotic species-pairs. Traits including specific leaf area, leaf mass ratio, leaf area ratio, relative growth rate, net assimilation rate and root weight ratio were measured. Competitive rankings within species-pairs were not affected by CO(2) concentration: invasive exotic species were more competitive in 9 of the 14 species-pairs and native species were more competitive in the remaining 5 species-pairs, regardless of CO(2) concentration. However, there was a significant interaction between plant type and CO(2) treatment due to reduced competitive response of native species under elevated compared with ambient CO(2) conditions. Native species had significantly lower specific leaf area and leaf area ratio under elevated compared with ambient CO(2). We also compared traits of more-competitive with less-competitive species, regardless of plant type, under both CO(2) treatments. More-competitive species had smaller leaf weight ratio and leaf area ratio, and larger relative growth rate and net assimilation rate under both ambient and elevated CO(2) conditions. These results suggest that growth and allocation traits can be useful predictors of the outcome of competitive interactions under both ambient and elevated CO(2) conditions. Under predicted future atmospheric CO(2) conditions, competitive rankings among species may not change substantially, but the relative success of invasive exotic species may be increased. Thus, under future atmospheric CO(2) conditions, the ecological and

  13. Digital mammography; Mamografia digital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier, M.; Torres, R.

    2010-07-01

    Mammography represents one of the most demanding radiographic applications, simultaneously requiring excellent contrast sensitivity, high spatial resolution, and wide dynamic range. Film/screen is the most widely extended image receptor in mammography due to both its high spatial resolution and contrast. The film/screen limitations are related with its narrow latitude, structural noise and that is at the same time the medium for the image acquisition, storage and presentation. Several digital detector made with different technologies can overcome these difficulties. Here, these technologies as well as their main advantages and disadvantages are analyzed. Also it is discussed its impact on the mammography examinations, mainly on the breast screening programs. (Author).

  14. On modeling biomolecular–surface nonbonded interactions: application to nucleobase adsorption on single-wall carbon nanotube surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akdim, B; Pachter, R; Day, P N; Kim, S S; Naik, R R

    2012-01-01

    In this work we explored the selectivity of single nucleobases towards adsorption on chiral single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by density functional theory calculations. Specifically, the adsorption of molecular models of guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T), and cytosine (C), as well as of AT and GC Watson–Crick (WC) base pairs on chiral SWCNT C(6, 5), C(9, 1) and C(8, 3) model structures, was analyzed in detail. The importance of correcting the exchange–correlation functional for London dispersion was clearly demonstrated, yet limitations in modeling such interactions by considering the SWCNT as a molecular model may mask subtle effects in a molecular–macroscopic material system. The trend in the calculated adsorption energies of the nucleobases on same diameter C(6, 5) and C(9, 1) SWCNT surfaces, i.e. G > A > T > C, was consistent with related computations and experimental work on graphitic surfaces, however contradicting experimental data on the adsorption of single-strand short homo-oligonucleotides on SWCNTs that demonstrated a trend of G > C > A > T (Albertorio et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 395101). A possible role of electrostatic interactions in this case was partially captured by applying the effective fragment potential method, emphasizing that the interplay of the various contributions in modeling nonbonded interactions is complicated by theoretical limitations. Finally, because the calculated adsorption energies for Watson–Crick base pairs have shown little effect upon adsorption of the base pair farther from the surface, the results on SWCNT sorting by salmon genomic DNA could be indicative of partial unfolding of the double helix upon adsorption on the SWCNT surface. (paper)

  15. Theoretical study of chlordecone and surface groups interaction in an activated carbon model under acidic and neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-Carballo, Juan José; Melchor-Rodríguez, Kenia; Hernández-Valdés, Daniel; Enriquez-Victorero, Carlos; Montero-Alejo, Ana Lilian; Gaspard, Sarra; Jáuregui-Haza, Ulises Javier

    2016-04-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) are widely used in the purification of drinking water without almost any knowledge about the adsorption mechanisms of the persistent organic pollutants. Chlordecone (CLD, Kepone) is an organochlorinated synthetic compound that has been used mainly as agricultural insecticide. CLD has been identified and listed as a persistent organic pollutant by the Stockholm Convention. The selection of the best suited AC for this type of contaminants is mainly an empirical and costly process. A theoretical study of the influence of AC surface groups (SGs) on CLD adsorption is done in order to help understanding the process. This may provide a first selection criteria for the preparation of AC with suitable surface properties. A model of AC consisting of a seven membered ring graphene sheet (coronene) with a functional group on the edge was used to evaluate the influence of the SGs over the adsorption. Multiple Minima Hypersurface methodology (MMH) coupled with PM7 semiempirical Hamiltonian was employed in order to study the interactions of the chlordecone with SGs (hydroxyl and carboxyl) at acidic and neutral pH and different hydration conditions. Selected structures were re-optimized using CAM-B3LYP to achieve a well-defined electron density to characterize the interactions by the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules approach. The deprotonated form of surface carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of AC models show the strongest interactions, suggesting a chemical adsorption. An increase in carboxylic SGs content is proposed to enhance CLD adsorption onto AC at neutral pH conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Three Connected Climate Education Interactives: Carbon Cycle, Earth System Energy Flows, and Climate Change Impacts/Adaptations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Pacific Islands Climate Education Partnership (PCEP) serves the U.S. Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) Region. The international entities served by PCEP are the state of Hawai'i (USA); three Freely Associated States (the Federated States of Micronesia, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau), and three Territories (Guam, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, and American Samoa). Funded by NSF, the PCEP aims to educate the region's students and citizens in ways that exemplify modern science and indigenous environmental knowledge, address the urgency of climate change impacts, and focus on adaptation strategies that can increase resiliency with respect to climate change impacts. Unfortunately the vast majority of the science texts used in schools come from the US mainland and feature contexts that do not relate to the lives of Pacific island students. The curricular materials also tend to be older and to have very weak climate science content, especially with respect to tropical islands and climate change. In collaboration with public broadcast station WGBH, PCEP has developed three climate education interactives that sequentially provide an introduction to key climate change education concepts. The first in the series focuses on the global carbon cycle and connects increased atmospheric CO2 with rising global temperatures. The second analyzes Earth system energy flows to explain the key role of the increased greenhouse effect. The third focuses on four climate change impacts (higher temperatures, rising sea level, changes in precipitation, and ocean acidification), and adaptation strategies to increase resiliency of local ecosystems and human systems. While the interactives have a Pacific island visual and text perspective, they are broadly applicable for other education audiences. Learners can use the interactives to engage with the basic science concepts, and then apply the climate change impacts to their own contexts.

  17. Interaction of a Ni(II) tetraazaannulene complex with elongated fullerenes as simple models for carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henao-Holguín, Laura Verónica; Basiuk, Vladimir A

    2015-06-01

    Nickel(II) complex of 5,14-dihydro-6,8,15,17-tetramethyldibenzo[b,i][1,4,8,11] tetraazacyclotetradecine (NiTMTAA), which can be employed for noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), represents a more complex and interesting case in terms of structure of the resulting nanohybrids, as compared to the related materials functionalized with porphyrins and phthalocyanines. Due to its saddle shape, the NiTMTAA molecule adsorbed can adopt different, energetically non-equivalent orientations with respect to CNT, depending on whether CH3 or C6H4 groups contact the latter. The main goal of the present work was to provide information on the interactions of NiTMTAA with simple single-walled CNT (SWNT) models accessible for dispersion-corrected DFT calculations. For reasons of comparison, we employed three such functionals: M06-2X and LC-BLYP as implemented in Gaussian 09 package, and PBE-G as implemented in Materials Studio 6.0. In order to roughly estimate the effect of nanotube chirality on the interaction strenght, we considered two short closed-end SWNT models (also referred to as 'elongated fullerenes'), one armchair and one zigzag, derived from C60 and C80 hemispheres. In addition, we calculated similar complexes with C60, as well as I h and D 5h isomers of C80. The results were analyzed in terms of optimized geometries, formation energies, HOMO-LUMO gap energies, and intermolecular separations. Graphical Abstract Interaction of Ni(II) tetraazaannulene complex with elongated fullerenes.

  18. Digital Tectonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Karl; Borup, Ruben; Søndergaard, Asbjørn

    2014-01-01

    Digital Tectonics treats the architectonical possibilities in digital generation of form and production. The publication is the first volume of a series, in which aspects of the strategic focus areas of the Aarhus School of Architecture will be disseminated.......Digital Tectonics treats the architectonical possibilities in digital generation of form and production. The publication is the first volume of a series, in which aspects of the strategic focus areas of the Aarhus School of Architecture will be disseminated....

  19. Digital squares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Kim, Chul E

    1988-01-01

    Digital squares are defined and their geometric properties characterized. A linear time algorithm is presented that considers a convex digital region and determines whether or not it is a digital square. The algorithm also determines the range of the values of the parameter set of its preimages....... The analysis involves transforming the boundary of a digital region into parameter space of slope and y-intercept...

  20. Digital skrivedidaktik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Digital skrivedidaktik består af to dele. Første del præsenterer teori om skrivekompetence og digital skrivning. Digital skrivning er karakteriseret ved at tekster skrives på computer og med digitale værktøjer, hvilket ændrer skrivningens traditionelle praksis, produkt og processer. Hvad er digital...... om elevens skriveproces) og Blogskrivning (der styrker eleverne i at bruge blogs i undervisningen)....