WorldWideScience

Sample records for interactive assembly guide

  1. Interactive Assembly Guide using Augmented Reality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Martin; Andersen, Rasmus Skovgaard; Larsen, Christian Lindequist

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an Augmented Reality system for aiding a pump assembling process at Grundfos, one of the leading pump producers. Stable pose estimation of the pump is required in order to augment the graphics correctly. This is achieved by matching image edges with synthesized edges from CAD...... norm. A dynamic visualization of the augmented graphics provides the user with guidance. Usability tests show that the accuracy of the system is sufficient for assembling the pump....

  2. Fuel assembly guide tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1979-01-01

    This invention is directed toward a nuclear fuel assembly guide tube arrangement which restrains spacer grid movement due to coolant flow and which offers secondary means for supporting a fuel assembly during handling and transfer operations

  3. Control rod guide tube assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly including sleeves telescoped over end portions of control rod guide tubes which bear against internal shoulders of the sleeves. Upper ends of the sleeves protrude beyond a control rod guide tube spider and are locked in place by means of a resilient cellular lattice or lock that is seated in mating grooves in the outer surfaces of the sleeves. A grapple is provided for disengaging the entire lock structure spider and associated washers, springs and a grill from the end of the fuel assembly in order to enable these components to be removed and subsequently replaced on the fuel assembly after inspection and repair. (UK)

  4. Control rod guide tube assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    An improved fuel assembly is described as consisting of a sleeve that engages one end of a control rod guide tube essentially fixing the guide tube to one of the fuel assembly end structures. The end of the sleeve protrudes above the surface of the end fitting. The outer surface of the sleeve has a peripheral groove that engages the resilient sides of a cellular grid or lattice shaped lock. This lock fixes the sleeve in position between the various elements that comprise the end fitting, thereby eliminating a profusion of costly and potentially troublesome nuts, threaded studs and the like that are frequently employed in the fuel assemblies that are presently in use

  5. DNA-guided nanoparticle assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Oleg; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Maye, Mathew; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    In some embodiments, DNA-capped nanoparticles are used to define a degree of crystalline order in assemblies thereof. In some embodiments, thermodynamically reversible and stable body-centered cubic (bcc) structures, with particles occupying <.about.10% of the unit cell, are formed. Designs and pathways amenable to the crystallization of particle assemblies are identified. In some embodiments, a plasmonic crystal is provided. In some aspects, a method for controlling the properties of particle assemblages is provided. In some embodiments a catalyst is formed from nanoparticles linked by nucleic acid sequences and forming an open crystal structure with catalytically active agents attached to the crystal on its surface or in interstices.

  6. Orthology Guided Assembly in highly heterozygous crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruttink, Tom; Sterck, Lieven; Rohde, Antje

    2013-01-01

    to outbreeding crop species hamper De Bruijn Graph-based de novo assembly algorithms, causing transcript fragmentation and the redundant assembly of allelic contigs. If multiple genotypes are sequenced to study genetic diversity, primary de novo assembly is best performed per genotype to limit the level......Despite current advances in next-generation sequencing data analysis procedures, de novo assembly of a reference sequence required for SNP discovery and expression analysis is still a major challenge in genetically uncharacterized, highly heterozygous species. High levels of polymorphism inherent...... of polymorphism and avoid transcript fragmentation. Here, we propose an Orthology Guided Assembly procedure that first uses sequence similarity (tBLASTn) to proteins of a model species to select allelic and fragmented contigs from all genotypes and then performs CAP3 clustering on a gene-by-gene basis. Thus, we...

  7. Capillary Assembly of Colloids: Interactions on Planar and Curved Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Iris B.; Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    2018-03-01

    In directed assembly, small building blocks are assembled into an organized structure under the influence of guiding fields. Capillary interactions provide a versatile route for structure formation. Colloids adsorbed on fluid interfaces distort the interface, which creates an associated energy field. When neighboring distortions overlap, colloids interact to minimize interfacial area. Contact line pinning, particle shape, and surface chemistry play important roles in structure formation. Interface curvature acts like an external field; particles migrate and assemble in patterns dictated by curvature gradients. We review basic analysis and recent findings in this rapidly evolving literature. Understanding the roles of assembly is essential for tuning the mechanical, physical, and optical properties of the structure.

  8. Guide tube insert assembly for use in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopkins, R.J.; Land, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes an internals assembly for a nuclear reactor of the type including an upper support plate and an upper core plate, each having apertures for conducting control rod assemblies into an out of fuel assemblies with the apertures of the upper support plate being aligned with the apertures of the upper core plate, a guide tube insert assembly comprising: an elongated tubular body extending between at least one of the aligned apertures formed in the upper support plate and the upper core plate; guide plates within the elongated tubular body, each of the guide plates having a planar surface extending substantially perpendicular to an axial direction of the tubular body; at least one interconnecting means for interconnecting the guide plates into a guide tube insert assembly such that the guide plates are simultaneously mountable within and removable from the elongated body, and the periphery of each of the guide plates is spaced apart from the inner walls of the elongated tubular body at every point when the insert assembly is mounted within the tubular body, and a stabilizing means for securing the lowermost guide plate of the guide tube insert assembly within the elongated tubular body to prevent rotational and lateral movement between the guide tube insert assembly and the tubular body

  9. Top-nozzle mounted replacement guide pin assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmore, C.B.; Andrews, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    A replacement guide pin assembly is provided for aligning a nuclear fuel assembly with an upper core plate of a nuclear reactor core. The guide pin assembly includes a guide pin body having a radially expandable base insertable within a hole in the top nozzle, a ferrule insertable within the guide pin base and capable of imparting a radially and outwardly directed force on the expandable base to expand it within the hole of the top nozzle and thereby secure the guide pin body to the top nozzle in response to a predetermined displacement of the ferrule relative to the guide pin body along its longitudinal axis, and a lock screw interfitted with the ferrule and threaded into the guide pin body so as to produce the predetermined displacement of the ferrule. (author)

  10. Small molecule-guided thermoresponsive supramolecular assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Rancatore, Benjamin J.; Mauldin, Clayton E.; Frechet, Jean; Xu, Ting

    2012-01-01

    Small organic molecules with strong intermolecular interactions have a wide range of desirable optical and electronic properties and rich phase behaviors. Incorporating them into block copolymer (BCP)-based supramolecules opens new routes to generate functional responsive materials. Using oligothiophene- containing supramolecules, we present systematic studies of critical thermodynamic parameters and kinetic pathway that govern the coassemblies of BCP and strongly interacting small molecules. A number of potentially useful morphologies for optoelectronic materials, including a nanoscopic network of oligothiophene and nanoscopic crystalline lamellae, were obtained by varying the assembly pathway. Hierarchical coassemblies of oligothiophene and BCP, rather than macrophase separation, can be obtained. Crystallization of the oligothiophene not only induces chain stretching of the BCP block the oligothiophene is hydrogen bonded to but also changes the conformation of the other BCP coil block. This leads to an over 70% change in the BCP periodicity (e.g., from 31 to 53 nm) as the oligothiophene changes from a melt to a crystalline state, which provides access to a large BCP periodicity using fairly low molecular weight BCP. The present studies have demonstrated the experimental feasibility of generating thermoresponsive materials that convert heat into mechanical energy. Incorporating strongly interacting small molecules into BCP supramolecules effectively increases the BCP periodicity and may also open new opportunities to tailor their optical properties without the need for high molecular weight BCP. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. Small molecule-guided thermoresponsive supramolecular assemblies

    KAUST Repository

    Rancatore, Benjamin J.

    2012-10-23

    Small organic molecules with strong intermolecular interactions have a wide range of desirable optical and electronic properties and rich phase behaviors. Incorporating them into block copolymer (BCP)-based supramolecules opens new routes to generate functional responsive materials. Using oligothiophene- containing supramolecules, we present systematic studies of critical thermodynamic parameters and kinetic pathway that govern the coassemblies of BCP and strongly interacting small molecules. A number of potentially useful morphologies for optoelectronic materials, including a nanoscopic network of oligothiophene and nanoscopic crystalline lamellae, were obtained by varying the assembly pathway. Hierarchical coassemblies of oligothiophene and BCP, rather than macrophase separation, can be obtained. Crystallization of the oligothiophene not only induces chain stretching of the BCP block the oligothiophene is hydrogen bonded to but also changes the conformation of the other BCP coil block. This leads to an over 70% change in the BCP periodicity (e.g., from 31 to 53 nm) as the oligothiophene changes from a melt to a crystalline state, which provides access to a large BCP periodicity using fairly low molecular weight BCP. The present studies have demonstrated the experimental feasibility of generating thermoresponsive materials that convert heat into mechanical energy. Incorporating strongly interacting small molecules into BCP supramolecules effectively increases the BCP periodicity and may also open new opportunities to tailor their optical properties without the need for high molecular weight BCP. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    Novel liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) provide a biologically inspired route for designing multifunctional bionanotheranostics. LNAs combine the benefits of lipids and liposomes to encapsulate, transport, and protect hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutics with functional nanoparticles. Functional nanoparticles endow LNAs with additional capabilities, including the ability to target diseases, triggered drug release, controlled therapeutic output, and diagnostic capabilities to produce a drug delivery system that can effectively and efficiently deliver therapeutics while reducing side effects. Not only could LNAs make existing drugs better, they could also provide an avenue to allow once promising non-approved drugs (rejected due to harmful side effects, inadequate pharmacokinetics, and poor efficacy) to be safely used through targeted and controlled delivery directly to the diseased site. LNAs have the potential to be stimuli responsive, delivering drugs on command by external (ultrasound, RF heating, etc.) or internal (pH, blood sugar, heart rate, etc.) stimuli. Individually, lipids and nanoparticles have been clinically approved for therapy, such as Doxil (a liposomal doxorubicin for cancer treatment), and diagnosis, such as Feridex (an iron oxide nanoparticle an MRI contrast enhancement agent for liver tumors). In order to engineer these multifunctional LNAs for theranostic applications, the interactions between nanoparticles and lipids must be better understood. This research sought to explore the formation, design, structures, characteristics, and functions of LNAs. To achieve this goal, different types of LNAs were formed, specifically magnetoliposomes, bilayer decorated LNAs (DLNAs), and lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). A fluorescent probe was embedded in the lipid bilayer of magnetoliposomes allowing the local temperature and membrane fluidity to be observed. When subjected to an electromagnetic field that heated the encapsulated iron

  13. Molecular interactions in nanocellulose assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yoshiharu

    2017-12-01

    The contribution of hydrogen bonds and the London dispersion force in the cohesion of cellulose is discussed in the light of the structure, spectroscopic data, empirical molecular-modelling parameters and thermodynamics data of analogue molecules. The hydrogen bond of cellulose is mainly electrostatic, and the stabilization energy in cellulose for each hydrogen bond is estimated to be between 17 and 30 kJ mol-1. On average, hydroxyl groups of cellulose form hydrogen bonds comparable to those of other simple alcohols. The London dispersion interaction may be estimated from empirical attraction terms in molecular modelling by simple integration over all components. Although this interaction extends to relatively large distances in colloidal systems, the short-range interaction is dominant for the cohesion of cellulose and is equivalent to a compression of 3 GPa. Trends of heat of vaporization of alkyl alcohols and alkanes suggests a stabilization by such hydroxyl group hydrogen bonding to be of the order of 24 kJ mol-1, whereas the London dispersion force contributes about 0.41 kJ mol-1 Da-1. The simple arithmetic sum of the energy is consistent with the experimental enthalpy of sublimation of small sugars, where the main part of the cohesive energy comes from hydrogen bonds. For cellulose, because of the reduced number of hydroxyl groups, the London dispersion force provides the main contribution to intermolecular cohesion. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue `New horizons for cellulose nanotechnology'.

  14. Predominantly ligand guided non-covalently linked assemblies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    JUBARAJ B BARUAH

    2018-05-12

    May 12, 2018 ... Abstract. Various non-covalently linked inorganic self-assemblies formed by the supramolecular interacting .... metal-organic frameworks.59 Inorganic chemists rou- ...... two-dimensional organic–inorganic layered perovskite.

  15. Mounting apparatus for a nozzle guide vane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Gary L.; Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a ceramic nozzle guide assembly with an apparatus for mounting it to a metal nozzle case that includes an intermediate ceramic mounting ring. The mounting ring includes a plurality of projections that are received within a plurality of receptacles formed in the nozzle case. The projections of the mounting ring are secured within the receptacles by a ceramic retainer that allows contact between the two components only along arcuate surfaces thus eliminating sliding contact between the components.

  16. Crystal-Structure-Guided Design of Self-Assembling RNA Nanotriangles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerneke, Mark A; Dibrov, Sergey M; Hermann, Thomas

    2016-03-14

    RNA nanotechnology uses RNA structural motifs to build nanosized architectures that assemble through selective base-pair interactions. Herein, we report the crystal-structure-guided design of highly stable RNA nanotriangles that self-assemble cooperatively from short oligonucleotides. The crystal structure of an 81 nucleotide nanotriangle determined at 2.6 Å resolution reveals the so-far smallest circularly closed nanoobject made entirely of double-stranded RNA. The assembly of the nanotriangle architecture involved RNA corner motifs that were derived from ligand-responsive RNA switches, which offer the opportunity to control self-assembly and dissociation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Oracle Hyperion Interactive Reporting 11 Expert Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Cody, Edward J

    2011-01-01

    This book is written in a simple, easy to understand format with screenshots, code samples, and step-by-step explanations that will guide you through the advanced techniques used by the experts. If you are an Oracle Hyperion Interactive reporting user or developer looking to become an expert in the product, then this book is for you. You will require a basic knowledge of Interactive Reporting, as this book starts with a brief overview and then dives into advanced techniques, functions, and best practices. Beginner users should consult The Business Analyst's Guide to Oracle Hyperion Interactive

  18. Regulating DNA Self-assembly by DNA-Surface Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longfei; Li, Yulin; Wang, Yong; Zheng, Jianwei; Mao, Chengde

    2017-12-14

    DNA self-assembly provides a powerful approach for preparation of nanostructures. It is often studied in bulk solution and involves only DNA-DNA interactions. When confined to surfaces, DNA-surface interactions become an additional, important factor to DNA self-assembly. However, the way in which DNA-surface interactions influence DNA self-assembly is not well studied. In this study, we showed that weak DNA-DNA interactions could be stabilized by DNA-surface interactions to allow large DNA nanostructures to form. In addition, the assembly can be conducted isothermally at room temperature in as little as 5 seconds. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Development of In-pile Plug Assembly and Primary Shutter for Cold Neutron Guide System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jin Won; Cho, Yeong Garp; Ryu, Jeong Soo; Lee, Jung Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The HANARO, a 30 MW multi-purpose research reactor in Korea, will be equipped with a neutron guide system, in order to transport cold neutrons from the neutron source to the neutron scattering instruments in the neutron guide hall near the reactor building. The neutron guide system of HANARO consists of the in-pile plug assembly with in-pile guides, the primary shutter with in-shutter guides, the neutron guides in the guide shielding room with dedicated secondary shutters, and the neutron guides connected to the instruments in the neutron guide hall. The functions of the in-pile plug assembly are to shield the reactor environment from a nuclear radiation and to support the neutron guides and maintain them precisely oriented. The primary shutter is a mechanical device to be installed just after the in-pile plug assembly, which stops neutron flux on demand. This report describes the mechanical design, fabrication, and installation procedure of the in-pile plug assembly and the primary shutter for the neutron guide system at HANARO. A special tool and procedure for a replacement of in-pile plug and guide cassette is also presented with the interface condition in the reactor hall.

  20. Electric arc apparatus for severing split-pin assemblies of guide tubes of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, D.C.; Kauric, C.E.; Persang, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for use in the replacement of an old split-pin assembly of a guide tube of a nuclear reactor by a new split-pin assembly, the old split-pin assembly including an old split pin and an old nut securing the old split pin to the guide tube, the old split-pin assembly and the guide tube being radioactive. The apparatus includes a metal disintegration machining tool, the tool having an electrode, means for mounting the tool submerged in a pool of water in engagement with the guide tube and with the old split-pin assembly secured to the guide tube, the tool being so mounted with the electrode in position to coact electrically with the last-named old split-pin assembly but not with the guide tube, and means, connected to the tool, for firing a disintegrating arc between the electrode and the assembly to disintegrate the assembly into readily removable fragments

  1. Discussion on the re-irradiated fuel assembly with damaged guide vanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ligang

    2013-01-01

    In January 2011, during the second plant of CNNC Nuclear Power Operations Management Co., Ltd.(hereinafter referred to as the second plant) refueling outage, the visual inspection found the guide vanes of fuel assembly A had felling off. After the National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) estimated and approved, the fuel assembly A was reloaded in the specified location of reactor core. During the refueling outage in March 2012, the fuel assembly A was removed again from the reactor core. Visual inspection confirmed that the fuel assembly A was complete and without abnormal changes. The practice provides reference for re-irradiated of fuel assembly with the same type of damaged guide vanes, and provides case support for standard development for the same type of re-irradiated fuel assembly with damaged guide vanes. (author)

  2. Fast and simple protein-alignment-guided assembly of orthologous gene families from microbiome sequencing reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huson, Daniel H; Tappu, Rewati; Bazinet, Adam L; Xie, Chao; Cummings, Michael P; Nieselt, Kay; Williams, Rohan

    2017-01-25

    Microbiome sequencing projects typically collect tens of millions of short reads per sample. Depending on the goals of the project, the short reads can either be subjected to direct sequence analysis or be assembled into longer contigs. The assembly of whole genomes from metagenomic sequencing reads is a very difficult problem. However, for some questions, only specific genes of interest need to be assembled. This is then a gene-centric assembly where the goal is to assemble reads into contigs for a family of orthologous genes. We present a new method for performing gene-centric assembly, called protein-alignment-guided assembly, and provide an implementation in our metagenome analysis tool MEGAN. Genes are assembled on the fly, based on the alignment of all reads against a protein reference database such as NCBI-nr. Specifically, the user selects a gene family based on a classification such as KEGG and all reads binned to that gene family are assembled. Using published synthetic community metagenome sequencing reads and a set of 41 gene families, we show that the performance of this approach compares favorably with that of full-featured assemblers and that of a recently published HMM-based gene-centric assembler, both in terms of the number of reference genes detected and of the percentage of reference sequence covered. Protein-alignment-guided assembly of orthologous gene families complements whole-metagenome assembly in a new and very useful way.

  3. Fixture and method for rectifying damaged guide thimble insert sleeves in a reconstitutable fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shallenberger, J.M.; Ferlan, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    A guide thimble damage-rectifying method is described for use on a reconstitutable fuel assembly being held in a work station with its top nozzle removed to expose a plurality of guide thimbles having one of several different types of damage. The method consists of: (a) providing a base having a plurality of tool positioning openings defined therein in a pattern matched with that of the guide thimbles of the fuel assembly; (b) mounting the base on the work station with its tool positioning openings in alignment with the guide thimbles of the fuel assembly and such that the base is movable toward the guide thimbles; (c) providing a plurality of different tools each operable to rectify one of the different types of guide thimble damage; (d) mounting selected ones of the different tools in respective ones of the openings of the base in alignment with ones of the thimbles having the respective types of guide thimble damage capable of being rectified by the selected tools such that upon movement of the base toward the guide thimbles the respective types of guide thimble damage will be rectified by the selected tools; (e) providing a group of positioning elements; (f) mounting the positioning elements in selected ones of the base openings corresponding to undamaged ones of the guide thimbles such that upon movement of the base toward the guide thimbles the positioning elements become mounted on upper end portions of the corresponding undamaged ones of the guide thimbles for precisely locating the fixture relative to the guide thimble upper end portions for accurate performance of the repairable damage rectifying operation by the tools as the base is moved toward the guide thimbles; and (g) moving the base toward the guide thimbles so as to mount the positioning elements on the corresponding ones of the undamaged guide thimbles and effect rectification of the damaged guide thimbles by the selected tools

  4. Exploration of Metagenome Assemblies with an Interactive Visualization Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, Michael; Nordberg, Henrik; Smirnova, Tatyana; Andersen, Evan; Tringe, Susannah; Hess, Matthias; Dubchak, Inna

    2014-07-09

    Metagenomics, one of the fastest growing areas of modern genomic science, is the genetic profiling of the entire community of microbial organisms present in an environmental sample. Elviz is a web-based tool for the interactive exploration of metagenome assemblies. Elviz can be used with publicly available data sets from the Joint Genome Institute or with custom user-loaded assemblies. Elviz is available at genome.jgi.doe.gov/viz

  5. A protein interaction map of the kalimantacin biosynthesis assembly line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit Uytterhoeven

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial secondary metabolite kalimantacin is produced by a hybrid polyketide/ non-ribosomal peptide system in Pseudomonas fluorescens BCCM_ID9359. In this study, the kalimantacin biosynthesis gene cluster is analyzed by yeast two-hybrid analysis, creating a protein-protein interaction map of the entire assembly line. In total, 28 potential interactions were identified, of which 13 could be confirmed further. These interactions include the dimerization of ketosynthase domains, a link between assembly line modules 9 and 10, and a specific interaction between the trans-acting enoyl reductase BatK and the carrier proteins of modules 8 and 10. These interactions reveal fundamental insight into the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites.This study is the first to reveal interactions in a complete biosynthetic pathway. Similar future studies could build a strong basis for engineering strategies in such clusters.

  6. Bundle duct interaction studies for fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsia, H.T.S.; Kaplan, S.

    1981-06-01

    It is known that the wire-wrapped rods and duct in an LMFBR are undergoing a gradual structural distortion from the initially uniform geometry under the combined effects of thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling and creep. These deformations have a significant effect on flow characteristics, thus causing changes in thermal behavior such as cladding temperature and temperature distribution within a bundle. The temperature distribution may further enhance or retard irradiation induced deformation of the bundle. This report summarizes the results of the continuing effort in investigating the bundle-duct interaction, focusing on the need for the large development plant

  7. Rail-Guided Multi-Robot System for 3D Cellular Hydrogel Assembly with Coordinated Nanomanipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Wang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The 3D assembly of micro-/nano-building blocks with multi-nanomanipulator coordinated manipulation is one of the central elements of nanomanipulation. A novel rail-guided nanomanipulation system was proposed for the assembly of a cellular vascular-like hydrogel microchannel. The system was equipped with three nanomanipulators and was restricted on the rail in order to realize the arbitrary change of the end-effectors during the assembly. It was set up with hybrid motors to achieve both a large operating space and a 30 nm positional resolution. The 2D components such as the assembly units were fabricated through the encapsulation of cells in the hydrogel. The coordinated manipulation strategies among the multi-nanomanipulators were designed with vision feedback and were demonstrated through the bottom-up assembly of the vascular-like microtube. As a result, the multi-layered microchannel was assembled through the cooperation of the nanomanipulation system.

  8. Improvement of the Threespine Stickleback Genome Using a Hi-C-Based Proximity-Guided Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peichel, Catherine L; Sullivan, Shawn T; Liachko, Ivan; White, Michael A

    2017-09-01

    Scaffolding genomes into complete chromosome assemblies remains challenging even with the rapidly increasing sequence coverage generated by current next-generation sequence technologies. Even with scaffolding information, many genome assemblies remain incomplete. The genome of the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus), a fish model system in evolutionary genetics and genomics, is not completely assembled despite scaffolding with high-density linkage maps. Here, we first test the ability of a Hi-C based proximity-guided assembly (PGA) to perform a de novo genome assembly from relatively short contigs. Using Hi-C based PGA, we generated complete chromosome assemblies from a distribution of short contigs (20-100 kb). We found that 96.40% of contigs were correctly assigned to linkage groups (LGs), with ordering nearly identical to the previous genome assembly. Using available bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences, we provide evidence that some of the few discrepancies between the Hi-C assembly and the existing assembly are due to structural variation between the populations used for the 2 assemblies or errors in the existing assembly. This Hi-C assembly also allowed us to improve the existing assembly, assigning over 60% (13.35 Mb) of the previously unassigned (~21.7 Mb) contigs to LGs. Together, our results highlight the potential of the Hi-C based PGA method to be used in combination with short read data to perform relatively inexpensive de novo genome assemblies. This approach will be particularly useful in organisms in which it is difficult to perform linkage mapping or to obtain high molecular weight DNA required for other scaffolding methods. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Template-Guided Self-Assembly of Discrete Optoplasmonic Molecules and Extended Optoplasmonic Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Björn M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The integration of metallic and dielectric building blocks into optoplasmonic structures creates new electromagnetic systems in which plasmonic and photonic modes can interact in the near-, intermediate- and farfield. The morphology-dependent electromagnetic coupling between the different building blocks in these hybrid structures provides a multitude of opportunities for controlling electromagnetic fields in both spatial and frequency domain as well as for engineering the phase landscape and the local density of optical states. Control over any of these properties requires, however, rational fabrication approaches for well-defined metal-dielectric hybrid structures. Template-guided self-assembly is a versatile fabrication method capable of integrating metallic and dielectric components into discrete optoplasmonic structures, arrays, or metasurfaces. The structural flexibility provided by the approach is illustrated by two representative implementations of optoplasmonic materials discussed in this review. In optoplasmonic atoms or molecules optical microcavities (OMs serve as whispering gallery mode resonators that provide a discrete photonic mode spectrum to interact with plasmonic nanostructures contained in the evanescent fields of the OMs. In extended hetero-nanoparticle arrays in-plane scattered light induces geometry-dependent photonic resonances that mix with the localized surface plasmon resonances of the metal nanoparticles.We characterize the fundamental electromagnetic working principles underlying both optoplasmonic approaches and review the fabrication strategies implemented to realize them.

  10. The soluble loop BC region guides, but not dictates, the assembly of the transmembrane cytochrome b6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Tome-Stangl

    Full Text Available Studying folding and assembly of naturally occurring α-helical transmembrane proteins can inspire the design of membrane proteins with defined functions. Thus far, most studies have focused on the role of membrane-integrated protein regions. However, to fully understand folding pathways and stabilization of α-helical membrane proteins, it is vital to also include the role of soluble loops. We have analyzed the impact of interhelical loops on folding, assembly and stability of the heme-containing four-helix bundle transmembrane protein cytochrome b6 that is involved in charge transfer across biomembranes. Cytochrome b6 consists of two transmembrane helical hairpins that sandwich two heme molecules. Our analyses strongly suggest that the loop connecting the helical hairpins is not crucial for positioning the two protein "halves" for proper folding and assembly of the holo-protein. Furthermore, proteolytic removal of any of the remaining two loops, which connect the two transmembrane helices of a hairpin structure, appears to also not crucially effect folding and assembly. Overall, the transmembrane four-helix bundle appears to be mainly stabilized via interhelical interactions in the transmembrane regions, while the soluble loop regions guide assembly and stabilize the holo-protein. The results of this study might steer future strategies aiming at designing heme-binding four-helix bundle structures, involved in transmembrane charge transfer reactions.

  11. Guided self-assembly of nanostructured titanium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Baoxiang; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Fossum, Jon Otto; Knudsen, Kenneth D; Yu Yingda

    2012-01-01

    A series of nanostructured titanium oxide particles were synthesized by a simple wet chemical method and characterized by means of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)/wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermal analysis, and rheometry. Tetrabutyl titanate (TBT) and ethylene glycol (EG) can be combined to form either TiO x nanowires or smooth nanorods, and the molar ratio of TBT:EG determines which of these is obtained. Therefore, TiO x nanorods with a highly rough surface can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant in an EG solution. Furthermore, TiO x nanorods with two sharp ends can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of salt (LiCl) in an EG solution. The AFM results show that the TiO x nanorods with rough surfaces are formed by the self-assembly of TiO x nanospheres. The electrorheological (ER) effect was investigated using a suspension of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods dispersed in silicone oil. Oil suspensions of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods exhibit a dramatic reorganization when submitted to a strong DC electric field and the particles aggregate to form chain-like structures along the direction of applied electric field. Two-dimensional SAXS images from chains of anisotropically shaped particles exhibit a marked asymmetry in the SAXS patterns, reflecting the preferential self-assembly of the particles in the field. The suspension of rough TiO x nanorods shows stronger ER properties than that of the other nanostructured TiO x particles. We find that the particle surface roughness plays an important role in modification of the dielectric properties and in the enhancement of the ER effect. (paper)

  12. Guided self-assembly of nanostructured titanium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoxiang; Rozynek, Zbigniew; Fossum, Jon Otto; Knudsen, Kenneth D.; Yu, Yingda

    2012-02-01

    A series of nanostructured titanium oxide particles were synthesized by a simple wet chemical method and characterized by means of small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS)/wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS), atomic force microscope (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), thermal analysis, and rheometry. Tetrabutyl titanate (TBT) and ethylene glycol (EG) can be combined to form either TiOx nanowires or smooth nanorods, and the molar ratio of TBT:EG determines which of these is obtained. Therefore, TiOx nanorods with a highly rough surface can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of cetyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant in an EG solution. Furthermore, TiOx nanorods with two sharp ends can be obtained by hydrolysis of TBT with the addition of salt (LiCl) in an EG solution. The AFM results show that the TiOx nanorods with rough surfaces are formed by the self-assembly of TiOx nanospheres. The electrorheological (ER) effect was investigated using a suspension of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods dispersed in silicone oil. Oil suspensions of titanium oxide nanowires or nanorods exhibit a dramatic reorganization when submitted to a strong DC electric field and the particles aggregate to form chain-like structures along the direction of applied electric field. Two-dimensional SAXS images from chains of anisotropically shaped particles exhibit a marked asymmetry in the SAXS patterns, reflecting the preferential self-assembly of the particles in the field. The suspension of rough TiOx nanorods shows stronger ER properties than that of the other nanostructured TiOx particles. We find that the particle surface roughness plays an important role in modification of the dielectric properties and in the enhancement of the ER effect.

  13. Development of an interactive dental trauma guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Ove; Lauridsen, Eva; Christensen, Søren Steno Ahrensburg

    2009-01-01

    resulting in 54 trauma scenarios of which many have specific requirements for treatment The situation is further complicated by the fact that the two dentitions have very different treatment demands. As a result it's impossible even for experienced practitioners to provide evidence-based treatment...... be available on the internet at: "www.DentalTraumaGuide.org". We hope that the Dental Trauma Guide can help improve the knowledge about dental traumatology worldwide and hereby improve the quality of treatment....

  14. Fastener locking device for attaching guide thimble to fuel assembly bottom nozzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widener, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor fuel assembly including an end nozzle and at least one longitudinally-extending guide thimble projecting away from the end nozzle. The end nozzle has at least one passageway defined therethrough and a ledge defined within the passageway so as to face away from the guide thimble and divide the passageway into a first portion extending from the ledge toward the guide thimble. A second portion extends from the ledge away from the guide thimble. The second passageway portion has a larger cross-sectional size than the first passageway portion, the end nozzle also having recess means defined thereon in the second portion of the passageway. The guide thimble has an end disposed adjacent to the first portion of the passageway with threaded means defined thereon and a fastener locking device

  15. The shielding calculation for the CN guide shielding assembly in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. S.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H.

    2006-01-01

    The cold neutron research facility in HANARO is under construction. The area including neutron guides and rotary shutter in the reactor hall should be shielded by the guide shielding assembly which is constructed of heavy concrete blocks and structure. The guide shielding assembly is divided into 2 parts, A and B. Part A is about 6.4 meters apart from the reactor biological shield and it is constructed of heavy concrete blocks whose density is above 4.0g/cm 3 . And part B is a fixed heavy concrete structure whose density is above 3.5g/cm 3 . The rotary shutter is also made with heavy concrete whose density is above 4.0g/cm 3 and includes 5 neutron guides inside. It can block the neutron beam by rotating when CNS is not operating. The dose criterion outside the guide shielding assembly is established as 12.5 μSv/hr which is also applied to reactor shielding in HANARO

  16. Nuclear fuel assembly grid sleeve/guide thimble bulge orientation gage and inspection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widener, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes a method of inspecting a fuel assembly to determine the orientation of externally-projecting mated bulges connecting a grid sleeve to a guide thimble of the assembly, the method comprising the steps of: (a) inserting a radially-expandable tubular member within the guide thimble, the tubular member having externally-projecting embossments thereon spaced circumferentially from one another about the tubular member, the embossments being the same in number as the bulges of the guide thimble and configured to fit therewithin; (b) axially moving an elongated expansion member, which extends through and rotatably mounts the tubular member, relative to the tubular member from a first position in which the expansion member permits inward contraction of the tubular member and displacement of embossments thereon away from the interior of the guide thimble bulges for removing the embossments from registry therewith and a second position in which the expansion member produces radial expansion of the tubular member and displacement of the embossments thereon toward the interior of the guide thimble bulges for placing the embossments in registry therewith; (c) rotating the tubular member relative to the expansion member so as to bring the embossments on the tubular member into alignment with the guide thimble bulges as the embossments on the tubular member are being displaced toward and into registry with the interior of the bulges; and (d) responsive to rotation of the tubular member away from a reference position, providing an indication of the orientation of the guide thimble bulges relative to a reference point upon displacement of the embossments into registry therewith

  17. Colloidal interactions in field-directed self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lele, Pushkar P.

    This thesis discusses: (1) the fabrication of an experimental tool, namely holographic optical tweezers for simultaneously manipulating spatial locations of multiple particles, (2) development of a framework for interpreting hydrodynamic interactions between multiple particles close to a no-slip surface and comparisons of experimental data with predictive modeling results (Stokesian dynamics simulations) (3) investigations of colloidal particle interactions under external AC fields and the intriguing spontaneous pattern formations in the suspension and, (4) the use of an unconventional assemble-stretch technique for creating novel 2D and 3D crystalline arrays of anisotropically shaped particles, from spherical particle templates. By blinking holographic optical traps, we investigate the hydrodynamic interactions in multi-particle ensembles, influenced by a no-slip surface. The measurements are carried out by screening out electrostatic interactions in the suspension. We observe that with increasing proximity with the surface, the effect of particle-particle hydrodynamic interactions on the short-time self-diffusivities is screened. We use the Stokeslet representation of particles and combine it with the method of images to understand the correlated motion of particles within the ensembles. Analysis of the resultant ensemble eigen-modes reveals that even in dilute suspensions, the effective diffusivities decay as the inverse of the separations, over the range of particle-particle separations we experimented with. The relative modes exhibit dominant contributions from close neighboring particles and the collective modes incorporate long-range contributions from all particles in the ensemble. Our analysis also confirms that for larger number of particles in the ensemble, the contributions from particle-particle interactions increase and in concentrated suspensions they over-ride the strong hydrodynamic screening by the wall. We investigate the microstructure of

  18. Two low coverage bird genomes and a comparison of reference-guided versus de novo genome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Daren C; Schield, Drew R; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Fujita, Matthew K; Andrew, Audra L; Oyler-McCance, Sara J; Fike, Jennifer A; Tomback, Diana F; Ruggiero, Robert P; Castoe, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    As a greater number and diversity of high-quality vertebrate reference genomes become available, it is increasingly feasible to use these references to guide new draft assemblies for related species. Reference-guided assembly approaches may substantially increase the contiguity and completeness of a new genome using only low levels of genome coverage that might otherwise be insufficient for de novo genome assembly. We used low-coverage (∼3.5-5.5x) Illumina paired-end sequencing to assemble draft genomes of two bird species (the Gunnison Sage-Grouse, Centrocercus minimus, and the Clark's Nutcracker, Nucifraga columbiana). We used these data to estimate de novo genome assemblies and reference-guided assemblies, and compared the information content and completeness of these assemblies by comparing CEGMA gene set representation, repeat element content, simple sequence repeat content, and GC isochore structure among assemblies. Our results demonstrate that even lower-coverage genome sequencing projects are capable of producing informative and useful genomic resources, particularly through the use of reference-guided assemblies.

  19. Two low coverage bird genomes and a comparison of reference-guided versus de novo genome assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Card, Daren C.; Schield, Drew R.; Reyes-Velasco, Jacobo; Fujita, Matthre K.; Andrew, Audra L.; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Tomback, Diana F.; Ruggiero, Robert P.; Castoe, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    As a greater number and diversity of high-quality vertebrate reference genomes become available, it is increasingly feasible to use these references to guide new draft assemblies for related species. Reference-guided assembly approaches may substantially increase the contiguity and completeness of a new genome using only low levels of genome coverage that might otherwise be insufficient for de novo genome assembly. We used low-coverage (~3.5–5.5x) Illumina paired-end sequencing to assemble draft genomes of two bird species (the Gunnison Sage-Grouse, Centrocercus minimus, and the Clark's Nutcracker, Nucifraga columbiana). We used these data to estimate de novo genome assemblies and reference-guided assemblies, and compared the information content and completeness of these assemblies by comparing CEGMA gene set representation, repeat element content, simple sequence repeat content, and GC isochore structure among assemblies. Our results demonstrate that even lower-coverage genome sequencing projects are capable of producing informative and useful genomic resources, particularly through the use of reference-guided assemblies.

  20. Interactive data manipulation program. FAWTEK user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, W.B.; Sauer, S.

    1980-02-01

    This report describes the interactive data acquisition and manipulation program FAWTEK.'The program allows users of the electron beam data acquisition facility to control the R7912 digitizers and to perform a variety of mathematical operations on data arrays. Commands are entered in a high level language via a Tektronix 4010 terminal console. Each command directive and associated parameters is described in detail

  1. Interactive data manipulation program FAWTEK user guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyer, W.B.

    1977-02-01

    The interactive data acquisitio and manipulation program FAWTEK is described. The program allows users of the electron beam data acquisition facility to control the R7912 digitizers and to perform a variety of mathematical operations on data arrays. Commands are entered in a high-level language via a Tektronix 4010 terminal console. Each command directive, aling with its associated parameters, is described in detail

  2. Efficient flow and human centred assembly by an interactive approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikhout, S.M.; Helmes, R.B.M.; Rhijn, J.W. van

    2004-01-01

    Due to fluctuations on the market, manufacturing of many product variations, and wish for fine-tuning between production and assembly a fan and motor manufacturing company wanted to improve their assembly line. The aims were efficient flow and human centered assembly in the new product line.

  3. Buckling resistance calculation of Guide Thimbles for the mechanical design of fuel assembly type PWR under normal reactor operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, C.B.L.

    1990-01-01

    The calculations demonstrate the fulfillment of one of the mechanical design criteria for the Fuel Assembly Structure under normal reactor operating conditions. The calculations of stresses in the Guide Thimbles are performed with the aid of the program ANSYS. This paper contains program parameters and modelling of a typical Fuel Assembly for a Reactor similar to ANGRA II. (author)

  4. Nanoparticle decoration with surfactants: Molecular interactions, assembly, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Pramanik, Chandrani; Heinz, Ozge; Ding, Yifu; Mishra, Ratan K.; Marchon, Delphine; Flatt, Robert J.; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Llop, Jordi; Moya, Sergio; Ziolo, Ronald F.

    2017-02-01

    Nanostructures of diverse chemical nature are used as biomarkers, therapeutics, catalysts, and structural reinforcements. The decoration with surfactants has a long history and is essential to introduce specific functions. The definition of surfactants in this review is very broad, following its lexical meaning ;surface active agents;, and therefore includes traditional alkyl modifiers, biological ligands, polymers, and other surface active molecules. The review systematically covers covalent and non-covalent interactions of such surfactants with various types of nanomaterials, including metals, oxides, layered materials, and polymers as well as their applications. The major themes are (i) molecular recognition and noncovalent assembly mechanisms of surfactants on the nanoparticle and nanocrystal surfaces, (ii) covalent grafting techniques and multi-step surface modification, (iii) dispersion properties and surface reactions, (iv) the use of surfactants to influence crystal growth, as well as (v) the incorporation of biorecognition and other material-targeting functionality. For the diverse materials classes, similarities and differences in surfactant assembly, function, as well as materials performance in specific applications are described in a comparative way. Major factors that lead to differentiation are the surface energy, surface chemistry and pH sensitivity, as well as the degree of surface regularity and defects in the nanoparticle cores and in the surfactant shell. The review covers a broad range of surface modifications and applications in biological recognition and therapeutics, sensors, nanomaterials for catalysis, energy conversion and storage, the dispersion properties of nanoparticles in structural composites and cement, as well as purification systems and classical detergents. Design principles for surfactants to optimize the performance of specific nanostructures are discussed. The review concludes with challenges and opportunities.

  5. Interrogating the architecture of protein assemblies and protein interaction networks by cross-linking mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Fan; Heck, Albert J R

    2015-01-01

    Proteins are involved in almost all processes of the living cell. They are organized through extensive networks of interaction, by tightly bound macromolecular assemblies or more transiently via signaling nodes. Therefore, revealing the architecture of protein complexes and protein interaction

  6. The Assembly-Activating Protein Promotes Stability and Interactions between AAV’s Viral Proteins to Nucleate Capsid Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C. Maurer

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: The adeno-associated virus (AAV vector is a preferred delivery platform for in vivo gene therapy. Natural and engineered variations of the AAV capsid affect a plurality of phenotypes relevant to gene therapy, including vector production and host tropism. Fundamental to these aspects is the mechanism of AAV capsid assembly. Here, the role of the viral co-factor assembly-activating protein (AAP was evaluated in 12 naturally occurring AAVs and 9 putative ancestral capsid intermediates. The results demonstrate increased capsid protein stability and VP-VP interactions in the presence of AAP. The capsid’s dependence on AAP can be partly overcome by strengthening interactions between monomers within the assembly, as illustrated by the transfer of a minimal motif defined by a phenotype-to-phylogeny mapping method. These findings suggest that the emergence of AAP within the Dependovirus genus relaxes structural constraints on AAV assembly in favor of increasing the degrees of freedom for the capsid to evolve. : Maurer et al. describe a phenotype-to-phylogeny mapping strategy correlating phenotypic variation in AAVs to a reconstructed phylogeny, revealing capsid structure-function relationships relevant to that phenotype. Dependence on the viral co-factor AAP for capsid assembly is examined, and capsid functional motifs, in addition to mechanistic roles of AAP, are elucidated. Keywords: AAV, AAP, adeno-associated virus, capsid assembly, manufacturing, capsid, vector engineering, structure-function, gene therapy

  7. Wide-range light-harvesting donor-acceptor assemblies through specific intergelator interactions via self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Suman K; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2012-12-03

    We have synthesized two new low-molecular-mass organogelators based on tri-p-phenylene vinylene derivatives, one of which could be designated as the donor whereas the other one is an acceptor. These were prepared specifically to show the intergelator interactions at the molecular level by using donor-acceptor self-assembly to achieve appropriate control over their macroscopic properties. Intermolecular hydrogen-bonding, π-stacking, and van der Waals interactions operate for both the individual components and the mixtures, leading to the formation of gels in the chosen organic solvents. Evidence for intergelator interactions was acquired from various spectroscopic, microscopic, thermal, and mechanical investigations. Due to the photochromic nature of these molecules, interesting photophysical properties, such as solvatochromism and J-type aggregation, were clearly observed. An efficient energy transfer was exhibited by the mixture of donor-acceptor assemblies. An array of four chromophores was built up by inclusion of two known dyes (anthracene and rhodamine 6G) for the energy-transfer studies. Interestingly, an energy-transfer cascade was observed in the assembly of four chromophores in a particular order (anthracene-donor-acceptor-rhodamine 6G), and if one of the components was removed from the assembly the energy transfer process was discontinued. This allowed the build up of a light-harvesting process with a wide range. Excitation at one end produces an emission at the other end of the assembly. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-07-09

    The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

  9. A hybrid reference-guided de novo assembly approach for generating Cyclospora mitochondrion genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, G R; Cinar, H N; Murphy, H R; Durigan, M; Almeria, M; Tall, B D; DaSilva, A J

    2018-01-01

    Cyclospora cayetanensis is a coccidian parasite associated with large and complex foodborne outbreaks worldwide. Linking samples from cyclosporiasis patients during foodborne outbreaks with suspected contaminated food sources, using conventional epidemiological methods, has been a persistent challenge. To address this issue, development of new methods based on potential genomically-derived markers for strain-level identification has been a priority for the food safety research community. The absence of reference genomes to identify nucleotide and structural variants with a high degree of confidence has limited the application of using sequencing data for source tracking during outbreak investigations. In this work, we determined the quality of a high resolution, curated, public mitochondrial genome assembly to be used as a reference genome by applying bioinformatic analyses. Using this reference genome, three new mitochondrial genome assemblies were built starting with metagenomic reads generated by sequencing DNA extracted from oocysts present in stool samples from cyclosporiasis patients. Nucleotide variants were identified in the new and other publicly available genomes in comparison with the mitochondrial reference genome. A consolidated workflow, presented here, to generate new mitochondrion genomes using our reference-guided de novo assembly approach could be useful in facilitating the generation of other mitochondrion sequences, and in their application for subtyping C. cayetanensis strains during foodborne outbreak investigations.

  10. Guided-wave acousto-optics interactions, devices, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    1990-01-01

    The field of integrated- or guided-wave optics has experienced significant and continuous growth since its inception in the late 1960s. There has been a considerable increase in research and development activity in this field worldwide and some significant advances in the realization of working in­ tegrated optic devices and modules have been made in recent years. In fact, there have already been some commercial manufacturing and technical ap­ plications of such devices and modules. The guided-wave-acoustooptics involving Bragg interactions between guided optical waves and surface acoustic waves is one of the areas of in­ tegrated-optics that has reached some degree of scientific and technological maturity. This topical volume is devoted to an in-depth treatment of this emerging branch of science and technology. Presented in this volume are concise treatments on bulk-wave acoustooptics, guided-wave optics, and surface acoustic waves, and detailed studies of guided-wave acoustooptic Bragg diffraction in thr...

  11. Composite Agency: Semiotics of Modularity and Guiding Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, Alexei A

    2017-07-01

    Principles of constructivism are used here to explore how organisms develop tools, subagents, scaffolds, signs, and adaptations. Here I discuss reasons why organisms have composite nature and include diverse subagents that interact in partially cooperating and partially conflicting ways. Such modularity is necessary for efficient and robust functionality, including mutual construction and adaptability at various time scales. Subagents interact via material and semiotic relations, some of which force or prescribe actions of partners. Other interactions, which I call "guiding", do not have immediate effects and do not disrupt the evolution and learning capacity of partner agents. However, they modify the extent of learning and evolutionary possibilities of partners via establishment of scaffolds and constraints. As a result, subagents construct reciprocal scaffolding for each other to rebalance their communal evolution and learning. As an example, I discuss guiding interactions between the body and mind of animals, where the pain system adjusts mind-based learning to the physical and physiological constraints of the body. Reciprocal effects of mind and behaviors on the development and evolution of the body includes the effects of Lamarck and Baldwin.

  12. Graphics and control of the guide tube assembly reinforcement manipulators at Sizewell 'A'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burden, C.

    1996-01-01

    A method was devised to reinforce the lower lug welds of the Guide Tube Assemblies (GTA's) at Sizewell 'A'. A six degree of freedom manipulator was designed to place a clamp around the lugs and tighten it. The manipulator was fitted with the three fixed cameras but required another surveillance manipulator positioned in an adjacent standpipe to provide additional views. The need to prepare two standpipes limited the rate at which reinforcements could be made. Therefore an articulated two arm camera manipulator, which could be used on the existing manipulator mast was designed and built. The two manipulators were driven from separate desks and were controlled by the same supervisory computer linked to online graphics. The camera arm joints were driven on preplanned routes using a single joystick because of the complex moves and tight spaces involved. A large number of GTA sites have now been reinforced including a dropped GTA which had to be raised to carry out clamping. (Author)

  13. Magnetically-guided assembly of microfluidic fibers for ordered construction of diverse netlike modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingfu; Shi, Qing; Wang, Huaping; Sun, Tao; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, a magnetically-guided assembly method is proposed to methodically construct diverse modules with a microfiber-based network for promoting nutrient circulation and waste excretion of cell culture. The microfiber is smoothly spun from the microfluidic device via precise control of the volumetric flow rate, and superparamagnetic nanoparticles within the alginate solution of the microfluidic fiber enable its magnetic response. The magnetized device is used to effectively capture the microfiber using its powerful magnetic flux density and high magnetic field gradient. Subsequently, the dot-matrix magnetic flux density is used to distribute the microfibers in an orderly fashion that depends on the array structure of the magnetized device. Furthermore, the magnetic microfluidic fibers are spatially organized into desired locations and are cross-aligned to form highly interconnected netlike modules in a liquid environment. Therefore, the experimental results herein demonstrate the structural controllability and stability of various modules and establish the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  14. Assembling phosphorene flexagons for 2D electron-density-guided nanopatterning and nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kisung; Jang, Woosun; Soon, Aloysius

    2017-07-27

    To build upon the rich structural diversity in the ever-increasing polymorphic phases of two-dimensional phosphorene, we propose different assembly methods (namely, the "bottom-up" and "top-down" approaches) that involve four commonly reported parent phases (i.e. the α-, β-, γ-, and δ-phosphorene) in combination with the lately reported remarkably low-energy one-dimensional defects in α-phosphorene. In doing so, we generate various periodically repeated phosphorene patterns in these so-called phosphorene flexagons and present their local electron density (via simulated scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images). These interesting electron density patterns seen in the flexagons (mimicking symmetry patterns that one may typically see in a kaleidoscope) may assist as potential 2D templates where electron-density-guided nanopatterning and nanofabrication in complex organized nanoarchitectures are important.

  15. Probing Interactions in Complex Molecular Systems through Ordered Assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Yoreo, J.J.; Bartelt, M.C.; Orme, C.A.; Villacampa, A.; Weeks, B.L.; Miller, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    Emerging from the machinery of epitaxial science and chemical synthesis, is a growing emphasis on development of self-organized systems of complex molecular species. The nature of self-organization in these systems spans the continuum from simple crystallization of large molecules such as dendrimers and proteins, to assembly into large organized networks of nanometer-scale structures such as quantum dots or nanoparticles. In truth, self-organization in complex molecular systems has always been a central feature of many scientific disciplines including fields as diverse as structural biology, polymer science and geochemistry. But over the past decade, changes in those fields have often been marked by the degree to which researchers are using molecular-scale approaches to understand the hierarchy of structures and processes driven by this ordered assembly. At the same time, physical scientists have begun to use their knowledge of simple atomic and molecular systems to fabricate synthetic self-organized systems. This increasing activity in the field of self-organization is testament to the success of the physical and chemical sciences in building a detailed understanding of crystallization and epitaxy in simple atomic and molecular systems, one that is soundly rooted in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. One of the fundamental challenges of chemistry and materials science in the coming decades is to develop a similarly well-founded physical understanding of assembly processes in complex molecular systems. Over the past five years, we have successfully used in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the physical controls on single crystal epitaxy from solutions for a wide range of molecular species. More recently, we have combined this method with grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and kinetic Monte Carlo modeling in order to relate morphology to surface atomic structure and processes. The purpose of this proposal was to extend this approach to assemblies

  16. Interactive domains in the molecular chaperone human alphaB crystallin modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy G Ghosh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Small heat shock proteins regulate microtubule assembly during cell proliferation and in response to stress through interactions that are poorly understood.Novel functions for five interactive sequences in the small heat shock protein and molecular chaperone, human alphaB crystallin, were investigated in the assembly/disassembly of microtubules and aggregation of tubulin using synthetic peptides and mutants of human alphaB crystallin.The interactive sequence (113FISREFHR(120 exposed on the surface of alphaB crystallin decreased microtubule assembly by approximately 45%. In contrast, the interactive sequences, (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, corresponding to the beta8 strand and the C-terminal extension respectively, which are involved in complex formation, increased microtubule assembly by approximately 34-45%. The alphaB crystallin peptides, (113FISREFHR(120 and (156ERTIPITRE(164, inhibited microtubule disassembly by approximately 26-36%, and the peptides (113FISREFHR(120 and (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 decreased the thermal aggregation of tubulin by approximately 42-44%. The (131LTITSSLSSDGV(142 and (156ERTIPITRE(164 peptides were more effective than the widely used anti-cancer drug, Paclitaxel, in modulating tubulinmicrotubule dynamics. Mutagenesis of these interactive sequences in wt human alphaB crystallin confirmed the effects of the alphaB crystallin peptides on microtubule assembly/disassembly and tubulin aggregation. The regulation of microtubule assembly by alphaB crystallin varied over a narrow range of concentrations. The assembly of microtubules was maximal at alphaB crystallin to tubulin molar ratios between 1:4 and 2:1, while molar ratios >2:1 inhibited microtubule assembly.Interactive sequences on the surface of human alphaB crystallin collectively modulate microtubule assembly through a dynamic subunit exchange mechanism that depends on the concentration and ratio of alphaB crystallin to tubulin. These are the first

  17. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This User's Guide provides instruction in the setup and operation of the equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Instructions are also given on how to load the magnetic disks and access the interactive part of the program. Two other companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. Reactor Accident Assessment Methods (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 2) describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios

  18. Three invariant Hi-C interaction patterns: Applications to genome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddes, Sivan; Zelig, Aviv; Kaplan, Noam

    2018-06-01

    Assembly of reference-quality genomes from next-generation sequencing data is a key challenge in genomics. Recently, we and others have shown that Hi-C data can be used to address several outstanding challenges in the field of genome assembly. This principle has since been developed in academia and industry, and has been used in the assembly of several major genomes. In this paper, we explore the central principles underlying Hi-C-based assembly approaches, by quantitatively defining and characterizing three invariant Hi-C interaction patterns on which these approaches can build: Intrachromosomal interaction enrichment, distance-dependent interaction decay and local interaction smoothness. Specifically, we evaluate to what degree each invariant pattern holds on a single locus level in different species, cell types and Hi-C map resolutions. We find that these patterns are generally consistent across species and cell types but are affected by sequencing depth, and that matrix balancing improves consistency of loci with all three invariant patterns. Finally, we overview current Hi-C-based assembly approaches in light of these invariant patterns and demonstrate how local interaction smoothness can be used to easily detect scaffolding errors in extremely sparse Hi-C maps. We suggest that simultaneously considering all three invariant patterns may lead to better Hi-C-based genome assembly methods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrostatic interactions govern both nucleation and elongation during phage P22 procapsid assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parent, Kristin N.; Doyle, Shannon M.; Anderson, Eric; Teschke, Carolyn M.

    2005-01-01

    Icosahedral capsid assembly is an example of a reaction controlled solely by the interactions of the proteins involved. Bacteriophage P22 procapsids can be assembled in vitro by mixing coat and scaffolding proteins in a nucleation-limited reaction, where scaffolding protein directs the proper assembly of coat protein. Here, we investigated the effect of the buffer composition on the interactions necessary for capsid assembly. Different concentrations of various salts, chosen to follow the electroselectivity series for anions, were added to the assembly reaction. The concentration and type of salt was found to be crucial for proper nucleation of procapsids. Nucleation in low salt concentrations readily occurred but led to bowl-like partial procapsids, as visualized by negative stain electron microscopy. The edge of the partial capsids remained assembly-competent since coat protein addition triggered procapsid completion. The addition of salt to the partial capsids also caused procapsid completion. In addition, each salt affected both assembly rates and the extent of procapsid formation. We hypothesize that low salt conditions increase the coat protein:scaffolding protein affinity, causing excessive nuclei to form, which decreases coat protein levels leading to incomplete assembly

  20. MYBPH inhibits NM IIA assembly via direct interaction with NMHC IIA and reduces cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosono, Yasuyuki; Usukura, Jiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Yanagisawa, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Takahashi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► MYBPH inhibits NMHC IIA assembly and cell motility. ► MYBPH interacts to assembly-competent NM IIA. ► MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA. -- Abstract: Actomyosin filament assembly is a critical step in tumor cell migration. We previously found that myosin binding protein H (MYBPH) is directly transactivated by the TTF-1 lineage-survival oncogene in lung adenocarcinomas and inhibits phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) of non-muscle myosin IIA (NM IIA) via direct interaction with Rho kinase 1 (ROCK1). Here, we report that MYBPH also directly interacts with an additional molecule, non-muscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMHC IIA), which was found to occur between MYBPH and the rod portion of NMHC IIA. MYBPH inhibited NMHC IIA assembly and reduced cell motility. Conversely, siMYBPH-induced increased motility was partially, yet significantly, suppressed by blebbistatin, a non-muscle myosin II inhibitor, while more profound effects were attained by combined treatment with siROCK1 and blebbistatin. Electron microscopy observations showed well-ordered paracrystals of NMHC IIA reflecting an assembled state, which were significantly less frequently observed in the presence of MYBPH. Furthermore, an in vitro sedimentation assay showed that a greater amount of NMHC IIA was in an unassembled state in the presence of MYBPH. Interestingly, treatment with a ROCK inhibitor that impairs transition of NM IIA from an assembly-incompetent to assembly-competent state reduced the interaction between MYBPH and NMHC IIA, suggesting that MYBPH has higher affinity to assembly-competent NM IIA. These results suggest that MYBPH inhibits RLC and NMHC IIA, independent components of NM IIA, and negatively regulates actomyosin organization at 2 distinct steps, resulting in firm inhibition of NM IIA assembly.

  1. Self-Assembled Student Interactions in Undergraduate General Chemistry Clicker Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacArthur, James R.; Jones, Loretta

    2013-01-01

    Student interviews, focus groups, and classroom observations were used in an exploratory study of the nature of student interactions in a large (300+ students) general chemistry course taught with clickers. These data suggest that students are self-assembling their learning environment: choosing ways in which to interact with one another during…

  2. YB-1 promotes microtubule assembly in vitro through interaction with tubulin and microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baconnais Sonia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background YB-1 is a major regulator of gene expression in eukaryotic cells. In addition to its role in transcription, YB-1 plays a key role in translation and stabilization of mRNAs. Results We show here that YB-1 interacts with tubulin and microtubules and stimulates microtubule assembly in vitro. High resolution imaging via electron and atomic force microscopy revealed that microtubules assembled in the presence of YB-1 exhibited a normal single wall ultrastructure and indicated that YB-1 most probably coats the outer microtubule wall. Furthermore, we found that YB-1 also promotes the assembly of MAPs-tubulin and subtilisin-treated tubulin. Finally, we demonstrated that tubulin interferes with RNA:YB-1 complexes. Conclusion These results suggest that YB-1 may regulate microtubule assembly in vivo and that its interaction with tubulin may contribute to the control of mRNA translation.

  3. Development of biodegradable scaffolds based on magnetically guided assembly of magnetic sugar particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengzhi; Uchida, Tomoyuki; Tercero, Carlos; Ikeda, Seiichi; Ooe, Katsutoshi; Fukuda, Toshio; Arai, Fumihito; Negoro, Makoto; Kwon, Guiryong

    2012-05-31

    Biodegradable scaffolds with controlled pore layout and porosity have great significance in tissue engineering for cell penetration, tissue ingrowth, vascularization, and nutrient delivery. Porogen leaching has been commonly used to control pore size, pore structure and porosity in the scaffold. In this paper we focus on the use/development of two magnetically guided porogen assembly methods using magnetic sugar particles (MSPs) for scaffold fabrication. First, a patterning device is utilized to align MSPs following designed templates. Then a magnetic sheet film is fabricated by mixing poly(vinyl alcohol, PVA) and NdFeB powder for steering the MSPs. After poly(l-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (PLCL) casting and removal of the sugar template, a scaffold with spherical pores is obtained. The surface and the inner structure of the scaffolds are evaluated using light and electron micrographs showing their interconnection of pores, pore wall morphology and porosity. Single layer scaffolds with the size of 8mm in width and 10mm in length were constructed with controllable pore diameters in the ranges of 105-150 μm, 250-300 μm and 425-500 μm. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Shock buffer for nuclear control assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, F.

    1977-01-01

    A shock buffer is provided for the gradual deceleration of a rapidly descending control element assembly in a nuclear reactor. The interactive buffer components are associated respectively with the movable control element assembly and part of the upper guide structure independent of and spaced from the fuel assemblies of the reactor

  5. Interdependence of pyrene interactions and tetramolecular G4-DNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doluca, Osman; Withers, Jamie M; Loo, Trevor S; Edwards, Patrick J B; González, Carlos; Filichev, Vyacheslav V

    2015-03-28

    Controlling the arrangement of organic chromophores in supramolecular architectures is of primary importance for the development of novel functional molecules. Insertion of a twisted intercalating nucleic acid (TINA) moiety, containing phenylethynylpyren-1-yl derivatives, into a G-rich DNA sequence alters G-quadruplex folding, resulting in supramolecular structures with defined pyrene arrangements. Based on CD, NMR and ESI-mass-spectra, as well as TINA excited dimer (excimer) fluorescence emission we propose that insertion of the TINA monomer in the middle of a dTG4T sequence (i.e. dTGGXGGT, where X is TINA) converts a parallel tetramolecular G-quadruplex into an assembly composed of two identical antiparallel G-quadruplex subunits stacked via TINA-TINA interface. Kinetic analysis showed that TINA-TINA association controls complex formation in the presence of Na(+) but barely competes with guanine-mediated association in K(+) or in the sequence with the longer G-run (dTGGGXGGGT). These results demonstrate new perspectives in the design of molecular entities that can kinetically control G-quadruplex formation and show how tetramolecular G-quadruplexes can be used as a tuneable scaffold to control the arrangement of organic chromophores.

  6. Inverted-conical light guide for crosstalk reduction in tightly-packed scintillator matrix and MAPMT assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Y.-Y.; Chen, P.; Huang, J.-J.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the Inverted-Conical light guide designed for optical crosstalk reduction in the scintillator-MAPMT assemblies. The research was motivated by the 30% crosstalk observed in UFFO X-ray telescope, UBAT, during the preliminary calibration with MAPMTs of 64 2.88 × 2.88 mm2...... pixels and identically gridded YSO crystal matrices. We began the study with the energy and crosstalk calibrations of the detector, then we constructed a GEANT4 simulation with the customized metallic film model as the MAPMT photocathode. The simulation reproduced more than 70% of the crosstalk...... and explained it as a consequence of the total reflection produced by the photocathode. The result indicated that the crosstalk mechanism could be a common case in most of the contact-assembled scintillation detectors. The concept of the Inverted-Conical light guide was to suppress the total reflection...

  7. Validation of PWR core seismic models with shaking table tests on interacting scale 1 fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viallet, E.; Bolsee, G.; Ladouceur, B.; Goubin, T.; Rigaudeau, J.

    2003-01-01

    The fuel assembly mechanical strength must be justified with respect to the lateral loads under accident conditions, in particular seismic loads. This justification is performed by means of time-history analyses with dynamic models of an assembly row in the core, allowing for assembly deformations, impacts at grid locations and reactor coolant effects. Due to necessary simplifications, the models include 'equivalent' parameters adjusted with respect to dynamic characterisation tests of the fuel assemblies. Complementing such tests on isolated assemblies by an overall model validation with shaking table tests on interacting assemblies is obviously desirable. Seismic tests have been performed by French CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) on a row of six full scale fuel assemblies, including two types of 17 x 17 12ft design. The row models are built according to the usual procedure, with preliminary characterisation tests performed on a single assembly. The test-calculation comparisons are made for two test configurations : in air and in water. The relatively large number of accelerograms (15, used for each configuration) is also favourable to significant comparisons. The results are presented for the impact forces at row ends, displacements at mid assembly, and also 'statistical' parameters. Despite a non-negligible scattering in the results obtained with different accelerograms, the calculations prove realistic, and the modelling process is validated with a good confidence level. This satisfactory validation allows to evaluate precisely the margins in the seismic design methodology of the fuel assemblies, and thus to confirm the safety of the plants in case of seismic event. (author)

  8. Single molecule sequencing-guided scaffolding and correction of draft assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shenglong; Chen, Danny Z; Emrich, Scott J

    2017-12-06

    Although single molecule sequencing is still improving, the lengths of the generated sequences are inevitably an advantage in genome assembly. Prior work that utilizes long reads to conduct genome assembly has mostly focused on correcting sequencing errors and improving contiguity of de novo assemblies. We propose a disassembling-reassembling approach for both correcting structural errors in the draft assembly and scaffolding a target assembly based on error-corrected single molecule sequences. To achieve this goal, we formulate a maximum alternating path cover problem. We prove that this problem is NP-hard, and solve it by a 2-approximation algorithm. Our experimental results show that our approach can improve the structural correctness of target assemblies in the cost of some contiguity, even with smaller amounts of long reads. In addition, our reassembling process can also serve as a competitive scaffolder relative to well-established assembly benchmarks.

  9. Interactions Between HIV-1 Gag and Viral RNA Genome Enhance Virion Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dilley, Kari A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Galli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    between Gag and viral RNA are required for the enhancement of particle production. Taken together, these studies are consistent with our previous hypothesis that specific dimeric viral RNA:Gag interactions are the nucleation event of infectious virion assembly, ensuring that one RNA dimer is packaged......Most HIV-1 virions contain two copies of full-length viral RNA, indicating that genome packaging is efficient and tightly regulated. However, the structural protein Gag is the only component required for the assembly of noninfectious virus-like particles and the viral RNA is dispensable...... in this process. The mechanism that allows HIV-1 to achieve such high efficiency of genome packaging when a packageable viral RNA is not required for virus assembly is currently unknown. In this report, we examined the role of HIV-1 RNA in virus assembly and found that packageable HIV-1 RNA enhances particle...

  10. Reversible Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Vesicles and Nanofibers Driven by Chalcogen-Bonding Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Xiang, Jun; Zhao, Yue; Yan, Qiang

    2018-05-29

    Chalcogen-bonding interactions have been viewed as new noncovalent forces in supramolecular chemistry. However, harnessing chalcogen bonds to drive molecular self-assembly processes is still unexplored. Here we report for the first time a novel class of supra-amphiphiles formed by Te···O or Se···O chalcogen-bonding interactions, and their self-assembly into supramolecular vesicles and nanofibers. A quasi-calix[4]chalcogenadiazole (C4Ch) as macrocyclic donor and a tailed pyridine N-oxide surfactant as molecular acceptor are designed to construct the donor-acceptor complex via chalcogen-chalcogen connection between the chalcogenadiazole moieties and oxide anion. The affinity of such chalcogen-bonding can dictate the geometry of supra-amphiphiles, driving diverse self-assembled morphologies. Furthermore, the reversible disassembly of these nanostructures can be promoted by introducing competing anions, such as halide ions, or by decreasing the systemic pH value.

  11. Extension of lattice cluster theory to strongly interacting, self-assembling polymeric systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Karl F

    2009-02-14

    A new extension of the lattice cluster theory is developed to describe the influence of monomer structure and local correlations on the free energy of strongly interacting and self-assembling polymer systems. This extension combines a systematic high dimension (1/d) and high temperature expansion (that is appropriate for weakly interacting systems) with a direct treatment of strong interactions. The general theory is illustrated for a binary polymer blend whose two components contain "sticky" donor and acceptor groups, respectively. The free energy is determined as an explicit function of the donor-acceptor contact probabilities that depend, in turn, on the local structure and both the strong and weak interactions.

  12. Understanding Molecular Interactions within Chemically Selective Layered Polymer Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary J. Blanchard

    2009-06-30

    This work focuses on two broad issues. These are (1) the molecular origin of the chemical selectivity achieved with ultrathin polymer multilayers, and (2) how the viscoelastic properties of the polymer layers are affected by exposure to solvent and analytes. These issues are inter-related, and to understand them we need to design experiments that probe both the energetic and kinetic aspects of interfacial adsorption processes. This project focuses on controling the chemical structure, thickness, morphology and sequential ordering of polymer layers bound to interfaces using maleimide-vinyl ether and closely related alternating copolymerization chemistry and efficient covalent cross-linking reactions that allow for layer-by-layer polymer deposition. This chemistry has been developed during the funding cycle of this Grant. We have measure the equilibrium constants for interactions between specific layers within the polymer interfaces and size-controlled, surface-functionalized gold nanoparticles. The ability to control both size and functionality of gold nanoparticle model analytes allows us to evaluate the average “pore size” that characterizes our polymer films. We have measured the “bulk” viscosity and shear modulus of the ultrathin polymer films as a function of solvent overlayer identity using quartz crystal microbalance complex impedance measurements. We have measured microscopic viscosity at specific locations within the layered polymer interfaces with time-resolved fluorescence lifetime and depolarization techniques. We combine polymer, cross-linking and nanoparticle synthetic expertise with a host of characterization techniques, including QCM gravimetry and complex impedance analysis, steady state and time-resolved spectroscopies.

  13. Retroviral Gag protein-RNA interactions: Implications for specific genomic RNA packaging and virion assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Erik D; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2018-03-31

    Retroviral Gag proteins are responsible for coordinating many aspects of virion assembly. Gag possesses two distinct nucleic acid binding domains, matrix (MA) and nucleocapsid (NC). One of the critical functions of Gag is to specifically recognize, bind, and package the retroviral genomic RNA (gRNA) into assembling virions. Gag interactions with cellular RNAs have also been shown to regulate aspects of assembly. Recent results have shed light on the role of MA and NC domain interactions with nucleic acids, and how they jointly function to ensure packaging of the retroviral gRNA. Here, we will review the literature regarding RNA interactions with NC, MA, as well as overall mechanisms employed by Gag to interact with RNA. The discussion focuses on human immunodeficiency virus type-1, but other retroviruses will also be discussed. A model is presented combining all of the available data summarizing the various factors and layers of selection Gag employs to ensure specific gRNA packaging and correct virion assembly. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interactive orbital proximity operations planning system instruction and training guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Arthur J.; Ellis, Stephen R.

    1994-01-01

    This guide instructs users in the operation of a Proximity Operations Planning System. This system uses an interactive graphical method for planning fuel-efficient rendezvous trajectories in the multi-spacecraft environment of the space station and allows the operator to compose a multi-burn transfer trajectory between orbit initial chaser and target trajectories. The available task time (window) of the mission is predetermined and the maneuver is subject to various operational constraints, such as departure, arrival, spatial, plume impingement, and en route passage constraints. The maneuvers are described in terms of the relative motion experienced in a space station centered coordinate system. Both in-orbital plane as well as out-of-orbital plane maneuvering is considered. A number of visual optimization aids are used for assisting the operator in reaching fuel-efficient solutions. These optimization aids are based on the Primer Vector theory. The visual feedback of trajectory shapes, operational constraints, and optimization functions, provided by user-transparent and continuously active background computations, allows the operator to make fast, iterative design changes that rapidly converge to fuel-efficient solutions. The planning tool is an example of operator-assisted optimization of nonlinear cost functions.

  15. Combining de novo and reference-guided assembly with scaffold_builder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silva, G.G.; Dutilh, B.E.; Matthews, T.D.; Elkins, K.; Schmieder, R.; Dinsdale, E.A.; Edwards, R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome sequencing has become routine, however genome assembly still remains a challenge despite the computational advances in the last decade. In particular, the abundance of repeat elements in genomes makes it difficult to assemble them into a single complete sequence. Identical repeats shorter

  16. Self assembled linear polymeric chains with tuneable semiflexibility using isotropic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Alex; Chatterji, Apratim

    2018-04-01

    We propose a two-body spherically symmetric (isotropic) potential such that particles interacting by the potential self-assemble into linear semiflexible polymeric chains without branching. By suitable control of the potential parameters, we can control the persistence length of the polymer and can even introduce a controlled number of branches. Thus we show how to achieve effective directional interactions starting from spherically symmetric potentials. The self-assembled polymers have an exponential distribution of chain lengths akin to what is observed for worm-like micellar systems. On increasing particle density, the polymeric chains self-organize to an ordered line-hexagonal phase where every chain is surrounded by six parallel chains, the transition is first order. On further increase in monomer density, the order is destroyed and we get a branched gel-like phase. This potential can be used to model semi-flexible equilibrium polymers with tunable semiflexibility and excluded volume. The use of the potential is computationally cheap and hence can be used to simulate and probe equilibrium polymer dynamics with long chains. The potential also gives a plausible method of tuning colloidal interactions in experiments such that one can obtain self-assembling polymeric chains made up of colloids and probe polymer dynamics using an optical microscope. Furthermore, we show how a modified potential leads to the observation of an intermediate nematic phase of self-assembled chains in between the low density disordered phase and the line-ordered hexagonal phase.

  17. Inverted-conical light guide for crosstalk reduction in tightly-packed scintillator matrix and MAPMT assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-Y., E-mail: gixd@hep1.phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, C.R. [National Space Organization (NSPO), 8F., No. 9, Prosperity 1 s Rd., Hsinchu Science Park, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, P.; Huang, J.-J. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Huang, M.A. [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Energy Engineering, National United University, 1, Lienda, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, T.-C. [Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Nam, J.W. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, M.-Z., E-mail: mzwang@hep1.phys.ntu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Rd., Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Bogomolov, V. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 119234 (Russian Federation); Physics Department of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 119234 (Russian Federation); Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C. [National Space Institute, Astrophysics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens, Lyngby (Denmark); and others

    2015-01-21

    In this paper we present the Inverted-Conical light guide designed for optical crosstalk reduction in the scintillator-MAPMT assemblies. The research was motivated by the 30% crosstalk observed in UFFO X-ray telescope, UBAT, during the preliminary calibration with MAPMTs of 64 2.88×2.88 mm{sup 2} pixels and identically gridded YSO crystal matrices. We began the study with the energy and crosstalk calibrations of the detector, then we constructed a GEANT4 simulation with the customized metallic film model as the MAPMT photocathode. The simulation reproduced more than 70% of the crosstalk and explained it as a consequence of the total reflection produced by the photocathode. The result indicated that the crosstalk mechanism could be a common case in most of the contact-assembled scintillation detectors. The concept of the Inverted-Conical light guide was to suppress the total reflection by contracting the incident angle of the scintillation. We optimized the design in the simulation and fabricated a test sample. The test sample reduced 52% crosstalk with a loss of 6% signal yield. The idea of the Inverted-Conical light guide can be adapted by scintillation detectors multi-pixel, imaging-purpose scintillation detectors such as the ultra-fast GRB observatory UFFO-UBAT, whose performances are sensitive to responding time, image resolution, and geometrical modifications.

  18. Inverted-conical light guide for crosstalk reduction in tightly-packed scintillator matrix and MAPMT assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.-Y.; Chen, C.R.; Chen, P.; Huang, J.-J.; Huang, M.A.; Liu, T.-C.; Nam, J.W.; Wang, M.-Z.; Bogomolov, V.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the Inverted-Conical light guide designed for optical crosstalk reduction in the scintillator-MAPMT assemblies. The research was motivated by the 30% crosstalk observed in UFFO X-ray telescope, UBAT, during the preliminary calibration with MAPMTs of 64 2.88×2.88 mm 2 pixels and identically gridded YSO crystal matrices. We began the study with the energy and crosstalk calibrations of the detector, then we constructed a GEANT4 simulation with the customized metallic film model as the MAPMT photocathode. The simulation reproduced more than 70% of the crosstalk and explained it as a consequence of the total reflection produced by the photocathode. The result indicated that the crosstalk mechanism could be a common case in most of the contact-assembled scintillation detectors. The concept of the Inverted-Conical light guide was to suppress the total reflection by contracting the incident angle of the scintillation. We optimized the design in the simulation and fabricated a test sample. The test sample reduced 52% crosstalk with a loss of 6% signal yield. The idea of the Inverted-Conical light guide can be adapted by scintillation detectors multi-pixel, imaging-purpose scintillation detectors such as the ultra-fast GRB observatory UFFO-UBAT, whose performances are sensitive to responding time, image resolution, and geometrical modifications

  19. The thermodynamics of Pr55Gag-RNA interaction regulate the assembly of HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanumant S Tanwar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The interactions that occur during HIV Pr55Gag oligomerization and genomic RNA packaging are essential elements that facilitate HIV assembly. However, mechanistic details of these interactions are not clearly defined. Here, we overcome previous limitations in producing large quantities of full-length recombinant Pr55Gag that is required for isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC studies, and we have revealed the thermodynamic properties of HIV assembly for the first time. Thermodynamic analysis showed that the binding between RNA and HIV Pr55Gag is an energetically favourable reaction (ΔG<0 that is further enhanced by the oligomerization of Pr55Gag. The change in enthalpy (ΔH widens sequentially from: (1 Pr55Gag-Psi RNA binding during HIV genome selection; to (2 Pr55Gag-Guanosine Uridine (GU-containing RNA binding in cytoplasm/plasma membrane; and then to (3 Pr55Gag-Adenosine(A-containing RNA binding in immature HIV. These data imply the stepwise increments of heat being released during HIV biogenesis may help to facilitate the process of viral assembly. By mimicking the interactions between A-containing RNA and oligomeric Pr55Gag in immature HIV, it was noted that a p6 domain truncated Pr50Gag Δp6 is less efficient than full-length Pr55Gag in this thermodynamic process. These data suggest a potential unknown role of p6 in Pr55Gag-Pr55Gag oligomerization and/or Pr55Gag-RNA interaction during HIV assembly. Our data provide direct evidence on how nucleic acid sequences and the oligomeric state of Pr55Gag regulate HIV assembly.

  20. Electric Field Guided Assembly of One-Dimensional Nanostructures for High Performance Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing Kam Liu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Various nanowire or nanotube-based devices have been demonstrated to fulfill the anticipated future demands on sensors. To fabricate such devices, electric field-based methods have demonstrated a great potential to integrate one-dimensional nanostructures into various forms. This review paper discusses theoretical and experimental aspects of the working principles, the assembled structures, and the unique functions associated with electric field-based assembly. The challenges and opportunities of the assembly methods are addressed in conjunction with future directions toward high performance sensors.

  1. Modulated growth, stability and interactions of liquid-like coacervate assemblies of elastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muiznieks, Lisa D; Cirulis, Judith T; van der Horst, Astrid; Reinhardt, Dieter P; Wuite, Gijs J L; Pomès, Régis; Keeley, Fred W

    2014-06-01

    Elastin self-assembles from monomers into polymer networks that display elasticity and resilience. The first major step in assembly is a liquid-liquid phase separation known as coacervation. This process represents a continuum of stages from initial phase separation to early growth of droplets by coalescence and later "maturation" leading to fiber formation. Assembly of tropoelastin-rich globules is on pathway for fiber formation in vivo. However, little is known about these intermediates beyond their size distribution. Here we investigate the contribution of sequence and structural motifs from full-length tropoelastin and a set of elastin-like polypeptides to the maturation of coacervate assemblies, observing their growth, stability and interaction behavior, and polypeptide alignment within matured globules. We conclude that maturation is driven by surface properties, leading to stabilization of the interface between the hydrophobic interior and aqueous solvent, potentially through structural motifs, and discuss implications for droplet interactions in fiber formation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Mathematics for physicists and engineers fundamentals and interactive study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Weltner, Klaus; Weber, Wolfgang J; Schuster, Peter; Grosjean, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This textbook offers an accessible and highly approved approach which is characterized by the combination of the textbook with a detailed study guide available online at our repository extras.springer.com. This study guide divides the whole learning task into small units which the student is very likely to master successfully. Thus he or she is asked to read and study a limited section of the textbook and to return to the study guide afterwards. Working with the study guide his or her learning results are controlled, monitored and deepened by graded questions, exercises, repetitions and finally by problems and applications of the content studied. Since the degree of difficulties is slowly rising the students gain confidence and experience their own progress in mathematical competence thus fostering motivation. Furthermore in case of learning difficulties he or she is given supplementary explanations and in case of individual needs supplementary exercises and applications. So the sequence of the studies is ind...

  3. Interaction between laser-produced plasma and guiding magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Jun; Takahashi, Kazumasa; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Transportation properties of laser-produced plasma through a guiding magnetic field were examined. A drifting dense plasma produced by a KrF laser was injected into an axisymmetric magnetic field induced by permanent ring magnets. The plasma ion flux in the guiding magnetic field was measured by a Faraday cup at various distances from the laser target. Numerical analyses based on a collective focusing model were performed to simulate plasma particle trajectories and then compared with the experimental results. (author)

  4. Coaxial guiding assembly for internal through-passing probe for eddy current testing of tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubis, S.; Holec, P.

    1989-01-01

    The device features guiding cases mounted on springs provided on the peripheries with two rows of radial openings into which are wound flexible fibres parallel with the case axis. The advantage of the design is that active elements which provide the coaxial guiding of the probe are oriented in the direction of the probe movement. This significantly reduces friction between the probe and the internal wall of the tube and thereby also wear of the guide parts of the probe. (J.B.). 2 figs

  5. Design of absorber assemblies with intentional pellet-cladding mechanical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Birney, K.R.; Pitner, A.L.; Basmajian, J.A.

    1980-04-01

    A number of improvements in absorber assembly performance characteristics can be achieved through implementation of absorber cladding mechanical interaction (ACMI). Benefits include lower operating temperatures, less potential for material relocation, longer lifetime, and increased reactivity worth. Analyses indicate that substantial cladding strains may be attainable without significant risk of breach. However, actual in-reactor testing of ACMI in absorber elements will be required before design criteria can be revised to accept ACMI

  6. Specific ion effects on the hydrophobic interaction of benzene self-assembled monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobberschütz, Sören; Pedersen, Morten Rimmen; Hassenkam, Tue

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of aromatic compounds with various ions in aqueous solutions plays a role in a number of fields, as diverse as protein folding and enhanced oil recovery, among others. Therefore, we have investigated the effect of the four electrolytes, KCl, NaCl, MgCl2 and CaCl2, on the hydrophobic...... interaction of benzene self-assembled monolayers. Using the jump to contact phenomenon of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip as an indicator of attractive forces between the surfaces of a sample and the tip, we discovered lower frequencies in the snap in as well as narrower distributions for the snap...

  7. Guided assembly of nanoparticles on electrostatically charged nanocrystalline diamond thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verveniotis Elisseos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We apply atomic force microscope for local electrostatic charging of oxygen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD thin films deposited on silicon, to induce electrostatically driven self-assembly of colloidal alumina nanoparticles into micro-patterns. Considering possible capacitive, sp2 phase and spatial uniformity factors to charging, we employ films with sub-100 nm thickness and about 60% relative sp2 phase content, probe the spatial material uniformity by Raman and electron microscopy, and repeat experiments at various positions. We demonstrate that electrostatic potential contrast on the NCD films varies between 0.1 and 1.2 V and that the contrast of more than ±1 V (as detected by Kelvin force microscopy is able to induce self-assembly of the nanoparticles via coulombic and polarization forces. This opens prospects for applications of diamond and its unique set of properties in self-assembly of nano-devices and nano-systems.

  8. Computer tomography guided lung biopsy using interactive breath-hold control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Haseem; Krag-Andersen, Shella; Naqibullah, Matiullah

    2017-01-01

    Background: Interactive breath-hold control (IBC) may improve the accuracy and decrease the complication rate of computed tomography (CT)-guided lung biopsy, but this presumption has not been proven in a randomized study. Methods: Patients admitted for CT-guided lung biopsy were randomized...

  9. Interaction between Gaming and Multistage Guiding Strategies on Students' Field Trip Mobile Learning Performance and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Liu, Guan-Zhi; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In this study, an integrated gaming and multistage guiding approach was proposed for conducting in-field mobile learning activities. A mobile learning system was developed based on the proposed approach. To investigate the interaction between the gaming and guiding strategies on students' learning performance and motivation, a 2 × 2 experiment was…

  10. Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 2B, User's guide to the LWR assemblies data base, Appendix 2C, User's guide to the LWR radiological data base, Appendix 2D, User's guide to the LWR quantities data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This User's Guide for the LWR Assemblies data base system is part of the Characteristics Data Base being developed under the Waste Systems Data Development Program. The objective of the LWR Assemblies data base is to provide access at the personal computer level to information about fuel assemblies used in light-water reactors. The information available is physical descriptions of intact fuel assemblies and radiological descriptions of spent fuel disassembly hardware. The LWR Assemblies data base is a user-oriented menu driven system. Each menu is instructive about its use. Section 5 of this guide provides a sample session with the data base to assist the user

  11. Burnable absorber-integrated Guide Thimble (BigT) - 1. Design concepts and neutronic characterization on the fuel assembly benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahya, Mohd-Syukri; Yu, Hwanyeal; Kim, Yonghee

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual designs of a new burnable absorber (BA) for the pressurized water reactor (PWR), which is named 'Burnable absorber-integrated Guide Thimble' (BigT). The BigT integrates BA materials into standard guide thimble in a PWR fuel assembly. Neutronic sensitivities and practical design considerations of the BigT concept are points of highlight in the first half of the paper. Specifically, the BigT concepts are characterized in view of its BA material and spatial self-shielding variations. In addition, the BigT replaceability requirement, bottom-end design specifications and thermal-hydraulic considerations are also deliberated. Meanwhile, much of the second half of the paper is devoted to demonstrate practical viability of the BigT absorbers via comparative evaluations against the conventional BA technologies in representative 17x17 and 16x16 fuel assembly lattices. For the 17x17 lattice evaluations, all three BigT variants are benchmarked against Westinghouse's existing BA technologies, while in the 16x16 assembly analyses, the BigT designs are compared against traditional integral gadolinia-urania rod design. All analyses clearly show that the BigT absorbers perform as well as the commercial BA technologies in terms of reactivity and power peaking management. In addition, it has been shown that sufficiently high control rod worth can be obtained with the BigT absorbers in place. All neutronic simulations were completed using the Monte Carlo Serpent code with ENDF/B-VII.0 library. (author)

  12. Ebola virus VP24 interacts with NP to facilitate nucleocapsid assembly and genome packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banadyga, Logan; Hoenen, Thomas; Ambroggio, Xavier; Dunham, Eric; Groseth, Allison; Ebihara, Hideki

    2017-08-09

    Ebola virus causes devastating hemorrhagic fever outbreaks for which no approved therapeutic exists. The viral nucleocapsid, which is minimally composed of the proteins NP, VP35, and VP24, represents an attractive target for drug development; however, the molecular determinants that govern the interactions and functions of these three proteins are still unknown. Through a series of mutational analyses, in combination with biochemical and bioinformatics approaches, we identified a region on VP24 that was critical for its interaction with NP. Importantly, we demonstrated that the interaction between VP24 and NP was required for both nucleocapsid assembly and genome packaging. Not only does this study underscore the critical role that these proteins play in the viral replication cycle, but it also identifies a key interaction interface on VP24 that may serve as a novel target for antiviral therapeutic intervention.

  13. WormGUIDES: an interactive single cell developmental atlas and tool for collaborative multidimensional data exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Anthony; Catena, Raúl; Kovacevic, Ismar; Shah, Pavak; Yu, Zidong; Marquina-Solis, Javier; Kumar, Abhishek; Wu, Yicong; Schaff, James; Colón-Ramos, Daniel; Shroff, Hari; Mohler, William A; Bao, Zhirong

    2015-06-09

    Imaging and image analysis advances are yielding increasingly complete and complicated records of cellular events in tissues and whole embryos. The ability to follow hundreds to thousands of cells at the individual level demands a spatio-temporal data infrastructure: tools to assemble and collate knowledge about development spatially in a manner analogous to geographic information systems (GIS). Just as GIS indexes items or events based on their spatio-temporal or 4D location on the Earth these tools would organize knowledge based on location within the tissues or embryos. Developmental processes are highly context-specific, but the complexity of the 4D environment in which they unfold is a barrier to assembling an understanding of any particular process from diverse sources of information. In the same way that GIS aids the understanding and use of geo-located large data sets, software can, with a proper frame of reference, allow large biological data sets to be understood spatially. Intuitive tools are needed to navigate the spatial structure of complex tissue, collate large data sets and existing knowledge with this spatial structure and help users derive hypotheses about developmental mechanisms. Toward this goal we have developed WormGUIDES, a mobile application that presents a 4D developmental atlas for Caenorhabditis elegans. The WormGUIDES mobile app enables users to navigate a 3D model depicting the nuclear positions of all cells in the developing embryo. The identity of each cell can be queried with a tap, and community databases searched for available information about that cell. Information about ancestry, fate and gene expression can be used to label cells and craft customized visualizations that highlight cells as potential players in an event of interest. Scenes are easily saved, shared and published to other WormGUIDES users. The mobile app is available for Android and iOS platforms. WormGUIDES provides an important tool for examining developmental

  14. Mathematics for physicists and engineers fundamentals and interactive study guide

    CERN Document Server

    Weltner, Klaus; Grosjean, Jean; Schuster, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Mathematics is the basic language in physics and engineering. It is an essential tool which first and second year students have to master as soon as possible. A lack of competence in mathematics is the main reason for failure and drop out in the beginning periods of study. This textbook offers an accessible and highly approved approach which is characterized by the combination of the textbook with a detailed study guide available online at extras.springer.com. This study guide divides the whole learning task into small units which the student is very likely to master successfully. Thus he or she is asked to read and study a limited section of the textbook and to return to the study guide afterwards. Working with the study guide his or her learning results are controlled, monitored and deepened by graded questions, exercises, repetitions and finally by problems and applications of the content studied. Since the degree of difficulties is slowly rising the students gain confidence and experience their own progre...

  15. New Insights into HTLV-1 Particle Structure, Assembly, and Gag-Gag Interactions in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolene L. Johnson

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 has a reputation for being extremely difficult to study in cell culture. The challenges in propagating HTLV-1 has prevented a rigorous analysis of how these viruses replicate in cells, including the detailed steps involved in virus assembly. The details for how retrovirus particle assembly occurs are poorly understood, even for other more tractable retroviral systems. Recent studies on HTLV-1 using state-of-the-art cryo-electron microscopy and fluorescence-based biophysical approaches explored questions related to HTLV-1 particle size, Gag stoichiometry in virions, and Gag-Gag interactions in living cells. These results provided new and exciting insights into fundamental aspects of HTLV-1 particle assembly—which are distinct from those of other retroviruses, including HIV-1. The application of these and other novel biophysical approaches promise to provide exciting new insights into HTLV-1 replication.

  16. Essential Assembly Factor Rpf2 Forms Novel Interactions within the 5S RNP in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamina, Anyango D; Jaremko, Daniel; Christen, Linda; Williams, Noreen

    2017-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is a highly complex and conserved cellular process that is responsible for making ribosomes. During this process, there are several assembly steps that function as regulators to ensure proper ribosome formation. One of these steps is the assembly of the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) in the central protuberance of the 60S ribosomal subunit. In eukaryotes, the 5S RNP is composed of 5S rRNA, ribosomal proteins L5 and L11, and assembly factors Rpf2 and Rrs1. Our laboratory previously showed that in Trypanosoma brucei , the 5S RNP is composed of 5S rRNA, L5, and trypanosome-specific RNA binding proteins P34 and P37. In this study, we characterize an additional component of the 5S RNP, the T. brucei homolog of Rpf2. This is the first study to functionally characterize interactions mediated by Rpf2 in an organism other than fungi. T . brucei Rpf2 (TbRpf2) was identified from tandem affinity purification using extracts prepared from protein A-tobacco etch virus (TEV)-protein C (PTP)-tagged L5, P34, and P37 cell lines, followed by mass spectrometry analysis. We characterized the binding interactions between TbRpf2 and the previously characterized members of the T. brucei 5S RNP. Our studies show that TbRpf2 mediates conserved binding interactions with 5S rRNA and L5 and that TbRpf2 also interacts with trypanosome-specific proteins P34 and P37. We performed RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of TbRpf2 and showed that this protein is essential for the survival of the parasites and is critical for proper ribosome formation. These studies provide new insights into a critical checkpoint in the ribosome biogenesis pathway in T. brucei . IMPORTANCE Trypanosoma brucei is the parasitic protozoan that causes African sleeping sickness. Ribosome assembly is essential for the survival of this parasite through the different host environments it encounters during its life cycle. The assembly of the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (5S RNP) functions as one of

  17. Computation-Guided Design of a Stimulus-Responsive Multienzyme Supramolecular Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Dolan, Elliott M; Tan, Sophia K; Lin, Tianyun; Sontag, Eduardo D; Khare, Sagar D

    2017-10-18

    The construction of stimulus-responsive supramolecular complexes of metabolic pathway enzymes, inspired by natural multienzyme assemblies (metabolons), provides an attractive avenue for efficient and spatiotemporally controllable one-pot biotransformations. We have constructed a phosphorylation- and optically responsive metabolon for the biodegradation of the environmental pollutant 1,2,3-trichloropropane. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Guided interaction exploration in artifact-centric process models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eck, M.L.; Sidorova, N.; van der Aalst, W.M.P.

    2017-01-01

    Artifact-centric process models aim to describe complex processes as a collection of interacting artifacts. Recent development in process mining allow for the discovery of such models. However, the focus is often on the representation of the individual artifacts rather than their interactions. Based

  19. Re-docking scheme for generating near-native protein complexes by assembling residue interaction fingerprints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Uchikoga

    Full Text Available Interaction profile method is a useful method for processing rigid-body docking. After the docking process, the resulting set of docking poses could be classified by calculating similarities among them using these interaction profiles to search for near-native poses. However, there are some cases where the near-native poses are not included in this set of docking poses even when the bound-state structures are used. Therefore, we have developed a method for generating near-native docking poses by introducing a re-docking process. We devised a method for calculating the profile of interaction fingerprints by assembling protein complexes after determining certain core-protein complexes. For our analysis, we used 44 bound-state protein complexes selected from the ZDOCK benchmark dataset ver. 2.0, including some protein pairs none of which generated near-native poses in the docking process. Consequently, after the re-docking process we obtained profiles of interaction fingerprints, some of which yielded near-native poses. The re-docking process involved searching for possible docking poses in a restricted area using the profile of interaction fingerprints. If the profile includes interactions identical to those in the native complex, we obtained near-native docking poses. Accordingly, near-native poses were obtained for all bound-state protein complexes examined here. Application of interaction fingerprints to the re-docking process yielded structures with more native interactions, even when a docking pose, obtained following the initial docking process, contained only a small number of native amino acid interactions. Thus, utilization of the profile of interaction fingerprints in the re-docking process yielded more near-native poses.

  20. Re-docking scheme for generating near-native protein complexes by assembling residue interaction fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchikoga, Nobuyuki; Matsuzaki, Yuri; Ohue, Masahito; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Akiyama, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Interaction profile method is a useful method for processing rigid-body docking. After the docking process, the resulting set of docking poses could be classified by calculating similarities among them using these interaction profiles to search for near-native poses. However, there are some cases where the near-native poses are not included in this set of docking poses even when the bound-state structures are used. Therefore, we have developed a method for generating near-native docking poses by introducing a re-docking process. We devised a method for calculating the profile of interaction fingerprints by assembling protein complexes after determining certain core-protein complexes. For our analysis, we used 44 bound-state protein complexes selected from the ZDOCK benchmark dataset ver. 2.0, including some protein pairs none of which generated near-native poses in the docking process. Consequently, after the re-docking process we obtained profiles of interaction fingerprints, some of which yielded near-native poses. The re-docking process involved searching for possible docking poses in a restricted area using the profile of interaction fingerprints. If the profile includes interactions identical to those in the native complex, we obtained near-native docking poses. Accordingly, near-native poses were obtained for all bound-state protein complexes examined here. Application of interaction fingerprints to the re-docking process yielded structures with more native interactions, even when a docking pose, obtained following the initial docking process, contained only a small number of native amino acid interactions. Thus, utilization of the profile of interaction fingerprints in the re-docking process yielded more near-native poses.

  1. Contribution of cation-π interactions to the stability of Sm/LSm oligomeric assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucić, Ivana D; Nikolić, Milan R; Stojanović, Srđan Đ

    2015-07-01

    In this work, we have analyzed the influence of cation-π interactions to the stability of Sm/LSm assemblies and their environmental preferences. The number of interactions formed by arginine is higher than lysine in the cationic group, while histidine is comparatively higher than phenylalanine and tyrosine in the π group. Arg-Tyr interactions are predominant among the various pairs analyzed. The furcation level of multiple cation-π interactions is much higher than that of single cation-π interactions in Sm/LSm interfaces. We have found hot spot residues forming cation-π interactions, and hot spot composition is similar for all aromatic residues. The Arg-Phe pair has the strongest interaction energy of -8.81 kcal mol(-1) among all the possible pairs of amino acids. The extent of burial of the residue side-chain correlates with the ΔΔG of binding for residues in the core and also for hot spot residues cation-π bonded across the interface. Secondary structure of the cation-π residues shows that Arg and Lys preferred to be in strand. Among the π residues, His prefers to be in helix, Phe prefers to be in turn, and Tyr prefers to be in strand. Stabilization centers for these proteins showed that all the five residues found in cation-π interactions are important in locating one or more of such centers. More than 50 % of the cation-π interacting residues are highly conserved. It is likely that the cation-π interactions contribute significantly to the overall stability of Sm/LSm proteins.

  2. Artificial biofilms establish the role of matrix interactions in staphylococcal biofilm assembly and disassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Elizabeth J.; Ganesan, Mahesh; Younger, John G.; Solomon, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the microstructural and mechanical properties of bacterial biofilms can be created through colloidal self-assembly of cells and polymers, and thereby link the complex material properties of biofilms to well understood colloidal and polymeric behaviors. This finding is applied to soften and disassemble staphylococcal biofilms through pH changes. Bacterial biofilms are viscoelastic, structured communities of cells encapsulated in an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) comprised of polysaccharides, proteins, and DNA. Although the identity and abundance of EPS macromolecules are known, how these matrix materials interact with themselves and bacterial cells to generate biofilm morphology and mechanics is not understood. Here, we find that the colloidal self-assembly of Staphylococcus epidermidis RP62A cells and polysaccharides into viscoelastic biofilms is driven by thermodynamic phase instability of EPS. pH conditions that induce phase instability of chitosan produce artificial S. epidermidis biofilms whose mechanics match natural S. epidermidis biofilms. Furthermore, pH-induced solubilization of the matrix triggers disassembly in both artificial and natural S. epidermidis biofilms. This pH-induced disassembly occurs in biofilms formed by five additional staphylococcal strains, including three clinical isolates. Our findings suggest that colloidal self-assembly of cells and matrix polymers produces biofilm viscoelasticity and that biofilm control strategies can exploit this mechanism. PMID:26272750

  3. Hand Gesture Modeling and Recognition for Human and Robot Interactive Assembly Using Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Chen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gesture recognition is essential for human and robot collaboration. Within an industrial hybrid assembly cell, the performance of such a system significantly affects the safety of human workers. This work presents an approach to recognizing hand gestures accurately during an assembly task while in collaboration with a robot co-worker. We have designed and developed a sensor system for measuring natural human-robot interactions. The position and rotation information of a human worker's hands and fingertips are tracked in 3D space while completing a task. A modified chain-code method is proposed to describe the motion trajectory of the measured hands and fingertips. The Hidden Markov Model (HMM method is adopted to recognize patterns via data streams and identify workers' gesture patterns and assembly intentions. The effectiveness of the proposed system is verified by experimental results. The outcome demonstrates that the proposed system is able to automatically segment the data streams and recognize the gesture patterns thus represented with a reasonable accuracy ratio.

  4. Metabolic Interaction between Urea Cycle and Citric Acid Cycle Shunt: A Guided Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesi, Rossana; Balestri, Francesco; Ipata, Piero L.

    2018-01-01

    This article is a guided pedagogical approach, devoted to postgraduate students specializing in biochemistry, aimed at presenting all single reactions and overall equations leading to the metabolic interaction between ureagenesis and citric acid cycle to be incorporated into a two-three lecture series about the interaction of urea cycle with other…

  5. Interactions of Na+, K+, Mg2+, and Ca 2+ with benzene self-assembled monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Rimmen; Matthiesen, Jesper; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2014-01-01

    that are most common in the natural world, namely, Na+, K+, Mg 2+, and Ca2+. Specifically, we investigated how these ions affect the interactions between surfaces covered by self-Assembled monolayers (SAMs) terminated with benzene molecules. We used a flat oxidized silicon substrate and an atomic force...... from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) allowed us to conclude that K+ binds in the benzene layers, creating a positive surface charge on the benzene-covered surfaces, thus leading to lower adhesion in KCl solutions than in pure water. Evidence suggested that Ca2+ does not bind to the surfaces...... measurements. The results of our studies clearly show that even a nonpolar, hydrophobic molecule, such as benzene, has a role to play in the behavior of aqueous solutions and that it interacts differently depending on which ions are present. Even ions from the same column in the periodic table behave...

  6. Multi-atlas Based Segmentation Editing with Interaction-Guided Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sang Hyun; Gao, Yaozong; Shen, Dinggang

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel multi-atlas based segmentation method to address the editing scenario, when given an incomplete segmentation along with a set of training label images. Unlike previous multi-atlas based methods, which depend solely on appearance features, we incorporate interaction-guided constraints to find appropriate training labels and derive their voting weights. Specifically, we divide user interactions, provided on erroneous parts, into multiple local interaction combinations, and th...

  7. Digital storytelling a creator's guide to interactive entertainment

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Carolyn Handler

    2014-01-01

    Digital Storytelling shows you how to create immersive, interactive narratives across a multitude of platforms, devices, and media. From age-old storytelling techniques to cutting-edge development processes, this book covers creating stories for all forms of New Media, including transmedia storytelling, video games, mobile apps, and second screen experiences. The way a story is told, a message is delivered, or a narrative is navigated has changed dramatically over the last few years. Stories are told through video games, interactive books, and social media. Stories are told on all sorts of different platforms and through all sorts of different devices. They're immersive, letting the user interact with the story and letting the user enter the story and shape it themselves.This book features case studies that cover a great spectrum of platforms and different story genres. It also shows you how to plan processes for developing interactive narratives for all forms of entertainment and non-fiction purposes: educat...

  8. Rod cluster control assemblies and rod cluster control guide tubes: wear and drop time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbinden, M.

    1997-01-01

    The wear of RCCAs and of RCC guide tubes is due to two quite different mechanisms and the remedies to apply for each case might lead to contradictory solutions: - the impact/sliding wear for the seldom moving RCCAs, namely the shutdown RCCAs, under flow-induced vibrations, - the axial sliding wear for the control rods subjected to the stepping movements ordered by the acting load. In this case the hydraulic sticking forces are those which produce an evolution of the surface states that may increase the drop time. The introduction, an historical survey of the encountered difficulties, is followed by short description of the components and then the paper presents contributions of EDF in the R and D field, which take place in two successive multi-annual projects. Lastly, some information is given about the recent evolutions and new problems as well for impact/sliding wear as for drop time under normal or seismic conditions. (author)

  9. Co-assembly of Peptide Amphiphiles and Lipids into Supramolecular Nanostructures Driven by Anion-π Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhilin; Erbas, Aykut; Tantakitti, Faifan; Palmer, Liam C.; Jackman, Joshua A.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Cho, Nam-Joon; Stupp, Samuel I. (Nanyang); (NWU)

    2017-06-01

    Co-assembly of binary systems driven by specific non-covalent interactions can greatly expand the structural and functional space of supramolecular nanostructures. We report here on the self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles and fatty acids driven primarily by anion-π interactions. The peptide sequences investigated were functionalized with a perfluorinated phenylalanine residue to promote anion-π interactions with carboxylate headgroups in fatty acids. These interactions were verified here by NMR and circular dichroism experiments as well as investigated using atomistic simulations. Positioning the aromatic units close to the N-terminus of the peptide backbone near the hydrophobic core of cylindrical nanofibers leads to strong anion-π interactions between both components. With a low content of dodecanoic acid in this position, the cylindrical morphology is preserved. However, as the aromatic units are moved along the peptide backbone away from the hydrophobic core, the interactions with dodecanoic acid transform the cylindrical supramolecular morphology into ribbon-like structures. Increasing the ratio of dodecanoic acid to PA leads to either the formation of large vesicles in the binary systems where the anion-π interactions are strong, or a heterogeneous mixture of assemblies when the peptide amphiphiles associate weakly with dodecanoic acid. Our findings reveal how co-assembly involving designed specific interactions can drastically change supramolecular morphology and even cross from nano to micro scales.

  10. Using droplet-on-demand based printing to guide self-assembly in a peptide-protein based bioink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedegaard, Clara; Collin, Estelle; Redondo-Gomez, Carlos; Nguyen, Luong T. H.; Ng, Kee Woei; Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso A.; Castrejon-Pita, J. Rafael; Mata, Alvaro

    2017-11-01

    Tissue engineering aims to capture details of the extracellular matrix (ECM) that stimulate tissue regeneration. Advanced biofabrication techniques have enabled structural complexity, however they are restricted by the choice of material due to stringent printing requirements, leading to a lack of nanoscale control and molecular versatility. In this project, we exploit the dynamics of droplet fluid interactions combined with the co-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PAs) with biomolecules/proteins to develop a new approach to droplet-based biofabrication. A custom-made droplet generator was developed and used to controllably dispense droplets of PA into a protein solution resulting in gel formation within milliseconds. Taking advantage of the interfacial and inertial forces during the droplet/liquid interaction, it is possible to control the co-assembly kinetics, to give rise to aligned or disordered nanofibers, hydrogel structures of different geometries and sizes, surface topographies, and higher-ordered structures made from multiple hydrogels. The process allows multiple cell types to be spatially distributed on the outside or embedded within the ECM mimetic scaffolds, whilst exhibiting high cell viability (>88%). ERC Starting Grant (STROFUNSCAFF), FP7-PEOPLE-2013-CIG Biomorph and the Royal Society.

  11. An Interactive Method to Solve Infeasibility in Linear Programming Test Assembling Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huitzing, Hiddo A.

    2004-01-01

    In optimal assembly of tests from item banks, linear programming (LP) models have proved to be very useful. Assembly by hand has become nearly impossible, but these LP techniques are able to find the best solutions, given the demands and needs of the test to be assembled and the specifics of the item bank from which it is assembled. However,…

  12. Interaction of impeller and guide vane in a series-designed axial-flow pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S; Choi, Y S; Lee, K Y; Kim, J H

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the interaction of the impeller and guide vane in a series-designed axial-flow pump was examined through the implementation of a commercial CFD code. The impeller series design refers to the general design procedure of the base impeller shape which must satisfy the various flow rate and head requirements by changing the impeller setting angle and number of blades of the base impeller. An arc type meridional shape was used to keep the meridional shape of the hub and shroud with various impeller setting angles. The blade angle and the thickness distribution of the impeller were designed as an NACA airfoil type. In the design of the guide vane, it was necessary to consider the outlet flow condition of the impeller with the given setting angle. The meridional shape of the guide vane were designed taking into consideration the setting angle of the impeller, and the blade angle distribution of the guide vane was determined with a traditional design method using vane plane development. In order to achieve the optimum impeller design and guide vane, three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics and the DOE method were applied. The interaction between the impeller and guide vane with different combination set of impeller setting angles and number of impeller blades was addressed by analyzing the flow field of the computational results.

  13. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGKζ by attenuating its association with importins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Ichimura, Tohru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya; Iseki, Ken; Yagisawa, Hitoshi; Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Goto, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGKζ, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGKζ. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGKζ binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGKζ and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGKζ because binding of NAP1Ls to DGKζ blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGKζ, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGKζ. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGKζ and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  14. Effective interactions between nanoparticles: Creating temperature-independent solvation environments for self-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Hari O. S., E-mail: cyz108802@chemistry.iitd.ac.in, E-mail: hariyadav.iitd@gmail.com; Shrivastav, Gourav; Agarwal, Manish; Chakravarty, Charusita [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology-Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2016-06-28

    The extent to which solvent-mediated effective interactions between nanoparticles can be predicted based on structure and associated thermodynamic estimators for bulk solvents and for solvation of single and pairs of nanoparticles is studied here. As a test of the approach, we analyse the strategy for creating temperature-independent solvent environments using a series of homologous chain fluids as solvents, as suggested by an experimental paper [M. I. Bodnarchuk et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 11967 (2010)]. Our conclusions are based on molecular dynamics simulations of Au{sub 140}(SC{sub 10}H{sub 21}){sub 62} nanoparticles in n-alkane solvents, specifically hexane, octane, decane and dodecane, using the TraPPE-UA potential to model the alkanes and alkylthiols. The 140-atom gold core of the nanocrystal is held rigid in a truncated octahedral geometry and the gold-thiolate interaction is modeled using a Morse potential. The experimental observation was that the structural and rheological properties of n-alkane solvents are constant over a temperature range determined by equivalent solvent vapour pressures. We show that this is a consequence of the fact that long chain alkane liquids behave to a good approximation as simple liquids formed by packing of monomeric methyl/methylene units. Over the corresponding temperature range (233–361 K), the solvation environment is approximately constant at the single and pair nanoparticle levels under good solvent conditions. However, quantitative variations of the order of 10%–20% do exist in various quantities, such as molar volume of solute at infinite dilution, entropy of solvation, and onset distance for soft repulsions. In the opposite limit of a poor solvent, represented by vacuum in this study, the effective interactions between nanoparticles are no longer temperature-independent with attractive interactions increasing by up to 50% on decreasing the temperature from 361 K to 290 K, accompanied by an increase in

  15. 78 FR 37570 - Certain Products Containing Interactive Program Guide and Parental Control Technology; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-21

    ... Interactive Program Guide and Parental Control Technology; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public... questions regarding filing should contact the Secretary (202-205-2000). Any person desiring to submit a... taken under the authority of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (19 U.S.C. 1337), and of...

  16. Encountering the Chinese: A Guide for Americans. Second Edition. The InterAct Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzhong, Hu; Grove, Cornelius L.

    This book provides a practical and culturally sensitive guide to Chinese culture along with insights into how to communicate with and interact with Chinese people. This edition contains information on economic changes and the gradual demise of state owned companies in addition to information about basic Chinese values, cultural norms, and…

  17. Students' Guided Reinvention of Definition of Limit of a Sequence with Interactive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Alfinio; Park, Jungeun

    2016-01-01

    In a course emphasizing interactive technology, 19 students, including 18 mathematics education majors, mostly in their first year, reinvented the definition of limit of a sequence while working in small cooperative groups. The class spent four sessions of 75 minutes each on a cyclical process of guided reinvention of the definition of limit of a…

  18. Interactive Character as a Virtual Tour Guide to an Online Museum Exhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Pilar; Yokoi, Shigeki

    Online museums could benefit from digital "lifelike" characters in order to guide users to virtual tours and to customize the tour information to users' interests. Digital characters have been explored in online museum web sites with different degrees of interaction and modes of communication. Such research, however, does not explore…

  19. Functional Behavioral Assessment: An Interactive Training Module. User's Manual & Facilitator's Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaupsin, Carl J.; Scott, Terry M.; Nelson, C. Michael

    This user's manual and facilitator's guide is intended for use with an accompanying interactive CD-ROM to provide a complete training program in conducting functional behavioral assessments (FBAs) as required under the 1997 reauthorization of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Chapter 1 provides general information for users, such as…

  20. Tetratricopeptide repeat protein Pyg7 is essential for photosystem I assembly by interacting with PsaC in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huixia; Li, Pin; Zhang, Aihong; Wen, Xiaogang; Zhang, Lixin; Lu, Congming

    2017-09-01

    Although progress has been made in determining the structure and understanding the function of photosystem I (PSI), the PSI assembly process remains poorly understood. PsaC is an essential subunit of PSI and participates in the transfer of electrons to ferredoxin. However, how PsaC is assembled during accumulation of the PSI complex is unknown. In the present study, we showed that Pyg7 localized to the stromal thylakoid and associated with the PSI complex. We also showed that Pyg7 interacted with PsaC. Furthermore, we found that the PSI assembly process was blocked following formation of the PsaAB heterodimer in the pyg7 mutant. In addition, the analyses of PSI stability in Pyg7RNAi plants showed that Pyg7 is involved in maintaining the assembled PSI complex under excess-light conditions. Moreover, we demonstrated that decreased Pyg7 content resulted in decreased efficiency of PSI assembly in Pyg7RNAi plants. These findings suggest that the role of Pyg7 in PSI biogenesis has evolved as an essential assembly factor by interacting with PsaC in Arabidopsis, in addition to being a stability factor for PSI as seen in Synechocystis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Research on multi - channel interactive virtual assembly system for power equipment under the “VR+” era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yilong; Duan, Xitong; Wu, Lei; He, Jin; Xu, Wu

    2017-06-01

    With the development of the “VR+” era, the traditional virtual assembly system of power equipment has been unable to satisfy our growing needs. In this paper, based on the analysis of the traditional virtual assembly system of electric power equipment and the application of VR technology in the virtual assembly system of electric power equipment in our country, this paper puts forward the scheme of establishing the virtual assembly system of power equipment: At first, we should obtain the information of power equipment, then we should using OpenGL and multi texture technology to build 3D solid graphics library. After the completion of three-dimensional modeling, we can use the dynamic link library DLL package three-dimensional solid graphics generation program to realize the modularization of power equipment model library and power equipment model library generated hidden algorithm. After the establishment of 3D power equipment model database, we set up the virtual assembly system of 3D power equipment to separate the assembly operation of the power equipment from the space. At the same time, aiming at the deficiency of the traditional gesture recognition algorithm, we propose a gesture recognition algorithm based on improved PSO algorithm for BP neural network data glove. Finally, the virtual assembly system of power equipment can really achieve multi-channel interaction function.

  2. Assemble: an interactive graphical tool to analyze and build RNA architectures at the 2D and 3D levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossinet, Fabrice; Ludwig, Thomas E; Westhof, Eric

    2010-08-15

    Assemble is an intuitive graphical interface to analyze, manipulate and build complex 3D RNA architectures. It provides several advanced and unique features within the framework of a semi-automated modeling process that can be performed by homology and ab initio with or without electron density maps. Those include the interactive editing of a secondary structure and a searchable, embedded library of annotated tertiary structures. Assemble helps users with performing recurrent and otherwise tedious tasks in structural RNA research. Assemble is released under an open-source license (MIT license) and is freely available at http://bioinformatics.org/assemble. It is implemented in the Java language and runs on MacOSX, Linux and Windows operating systems.

  3. Ionic Liquids As Self-Assembly Guide for the Formation of Nanostructured Block Copolymer Membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Madhavan, Poornima

    2015-04-30

    Nanostructured block copolymer membranes were manufactured by water induced phase inversion, using ionic liquids (ILs) as cosolvents. The effect of ionic liquids on the morphology was investigated, by using polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinyl pyridine) (PS-b-PV4P) diblock as membrane copolymer matrix and imidazolium and pyridinium based ILs. The effect of IL concentration and chemical composition was evident with particular interaction with P4VP blocks. The order of block copolymer/ILs solutions previous to the membrane casting was confirmed by cryo scanning electron microscopy and the morphologies of the manufactured nanostructured membranes were characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Non-protic ionic liquids facilitate the formation of hexagonal nanoporous block copolymer structure, while protic ILs led to a lamella-structured membrane. The rheology of the IL/block copolymer solutions was investigated, evaluating the storage and loss moduli. Most membranes prepared with ionic liquid had higher water flux than pure block copolymer membranes without additives.

  4. Supramolecular Assembly of Comb-like Macromolecules Induced by Chemical Reactions that Modulate the Macromolecular Interactions In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hongwei; Fu, Hailin; Zhang, Yanfeng; Shih, Kuo-Chih; Ren, Yuan; Anuganti, Murali; Nieh, Mu-Ping; Cheng, Jianjun; Lin, Yao

    2017-08-16

    Supramolecular polymerization or assembly of proteins or large macromolecular units by a homogeneous nucleation mechanism can be quite slow and require specific solution conditions. In nature, protein assembly is often regulated by molecules that modulate the electrostatic interactions of the protein subunits for various association strengths. The key to this regulation is the coupling of the assembly process with a reversible or irreversible chemical reaction that occurs within the constituent subunits. However, realizing this complex process by the rational design of synthetic molecules or macromolecules remains a challenge. Herein, we use a synthetic polypeptide-grafted comb macromolecule to demonstrate how the in situ modulation of interactions between the charged macromolecules affects their resulting supramolecular structures. The kinetics of structural formation was studied and can be described by a generalized model of nucleated polymerization containing secondary pathways. Basic thermodynamic analysis indicated the delicate role of the electrostatic interactions between the charged subunits in the reaction-induced assembly process. This approach may be applicable for assembling a variety of ionic soft matters that are amenable to chemical reactions in situ.

  5. Unraveling protein-protein interactions in clathrin assemblies via atomic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Albert J; Lafer, Eileen M; Peng, Jennifer Q; Smith, Paul D; Nossal, Ralph

    2013-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM), single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and single particle force spectroscopy (SPFS) are used to characterize intermolecular interactions and domain structures of clathrin triskelia and clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs). The latter are involved in receptor-mediated endocytosis (RME) and other trafficking pathways. Here, we subject individual triskelia, bovine-brain CCVs, and reconstituted clathrin-AP180 coats to AFM-SMFS and AFM-SPFS pulling experiments and apply novel analytics to extract force-extension relations from very large data sets. The spectroscopic fingerprints of these samples differ markedly, providing important new information about the mechanism of CCV uncoating. For individual triskelia, SMFS reveals a series of events associated with heavy chain alpha-helix hairpin unfolding, as well as cooperative unraveling of several hairpin domains. SPFS of clathrin assemblies exposes weaker clathrin-clathrin interactions that are indicative of inter-leg association essential for RME and intracellular trafficking. Clathrin-AP180 coats are energetically easier to unravel than the coats of CCVs, with a non-trivial dependence on force-loading rate. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Key aromatic/hydrophobic amino acids controlling a cross-amyloid peptide interaction versus amyloid self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakou, Maria; Hille, Kathleen; Kracklauer, Michael; Spanopoulou, Anna; Frost, Christina V; Malideli, Eleni; Yan, Li-Mei; Caporale, Andrea; Zacharias, Martin; Kapurniotu, Aphrodite

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of the intrinsically disordered polypeptide islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP), which is associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), with the Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide modulates their self-assembly into amyloid fibrils and may link the pathogeneses of these two cell-degenerative diseases. However, the molecular determinants of this interaction remain elusive. Using a systematic alanine scan approach, fluorescence spectroscopy, and other biophysical methods, including heterocomplex pulldown assays, far-UV CD spectroscopy, the thioflavin T binding assay, transmission EM, and molecular dynamics simulations, here we identified single aromatic/hydrophobic residues within the amyloid core IAPP region as hot spots or key residues of its cross-interaction with Aβ40(42) peptide. Importantly, we also find that none of these residues in isolation plays a key role in IAPP self-assembly, whereas simultaneous substitution of four aromatic/hydrophobic residues with Ala dramatically impairs both IAPP self-assembly and hetero-assembly with Aβ40(42). Furthermore, our experiments yielded several novel IAPP analogs, whose sequences are highly similar to that of IAPP but have distinct amyloid self- or cross-interaction potentials. The identified similarities and major differences controlling IAPP cross-peptide interaction with Aβ40(42) versus its amyloid self-assembly offer a molecular basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms. We propose that these insights will aid in designing intervention strategies and novel IAPP analogs for the management of type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, or other diseases related to IAPP dysfunction or cross-amyloid interactions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Interaction between lysozyme and humic acid in layer-by-layer assemblies: Effects of pH and ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, W.F.; Norde, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between protein and soluble organic matter is studied through layer-by-layer assembly of lysozyme (LSZ) and purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) at a solid surface (2-D) and in solution (3-D). By bringing a silica surface in alternating contact with solutions of LSZ and PAHA a

  8. Interaction between lysozyme and humic acid in layer-by-layer assemblies : Effects of pH and ionic strength

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, Wenfeng; Norde, Willem; Koopal, Luuk K.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between protein and soluble organic matter is studied through layer-by-layer assembly of lysozyme (LSZ) and purified Aldrich humic acid (PAHA) at a solid surface (2-D) and in solution (3-D). By bringing a silica surface in alternating contact with solutions of LSZ and PAHA a

  9. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Tokunobu.

    1990-01-01

    A fuel assembly used in a FBR type nuclear reactor comprises a plurality of fuel rods and a moderator guide member (water rod). A moderator exit opening/closing mechanism is formed at the upper portion of the moderator guide member for opening and closing a moderator exit. In the initial fuel charging operation cycle to the reactor, the moderator exit is closed by the moderator exit opening/closing mechanism. Then, voids are accumulated at the inner upper portion of the moderator guide member to harden spectrum and a great amount of plutonium is generated and accumulated in the fuel assembly. Further, in the fuel re-charging operation cycle, the moderator guide member is used having the moderator exit opened. In this case, voids are discharged from the moderator guide member to decrease the ratio, and the plutonium accumulated in the initial charging operation cycle is burnt. In this way, the fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  10. An analysis of fast reactor fuel assembly performance taking into account their mechanical interaction in the core and refuelling line capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buksha, Yu.K.; Zabudko, L.M.; Kravchenko, I.N.; Matveenko, L.V.; Meshkov, M.N.

    1984-01-01

    An approach to assessment of fast reactor fuel assembly performance has been considered. A concept of passive restraint of fuel assemblies in a reactor adopted in the USSR is described. Some methods for calculating the interassembly interactions during operation are briefly outlined, some calculated results are presented. A problem of fuel assembly performance during refuelling taking into account the refuelling line capabilities is considered. Some results from fuel assemblies operation experience in the BN-600 reactor are given. (author)

  11. Light-emitting self-assembled peptide nucleic acids exhibit both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Or; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Grunwald, Assaf; Liebes-Peer, Yael; Bachar, Mor; Buzhansky, Ludmila; Mossou, Estelle; Forsyth, V Trevor; Schwartz, Tal; Ebenstein, Yuval; Frolow, Felix; Shimon, Linda J W; Patolsky, Fernando; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-04-01

    The two main branches of bionanotechnology involve the self-assembly of either peptides or DNA. Peptide scaffolds offer chemical versatility, architectural flexibility and structural complexity, but they lack the precise base pairing and molecular recognition available with nucleic acid assemblies. Here, inspired by the ability of aromatic dipeptides to form ordered nanostructures with unique physical properties, we explore the assembly of peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), which are short DNA mimics that have an amide backbone. All 16 combinations of the very short di-PNA building blocks were synthesized and assayed for their ability to self-associate. Only three guanine-containing di-PNAs-CG, GC and GG-could form ordered assemblies, as observed by electron microscopy, and these di-PNAs efficiently assembled into discrete architectures within a few minutes. The X-ray crystal structure of the GC di-PNA showed the occurrence of both stacking interactions and Watson-Crick base pairing. The assemblies were also found to exhibit optical properties including voltage-dependent electroluminescence and wide-range excitation-dependent fluorescence in the visible region.

  12. Giant magnetoresistance in cluster-assembled nanostructures: on the influence of inter-particle interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyarzún, Simón; Domingues Tavares de Sa, Artur; Tuaillon-Combes, Juliette; Tamion, Alexandre; Hillion, Arnaud; Boisron, Olivier; Mosset, Alexis; Pellarin, Michel; Dupuis, Véronique; Hillenkamp, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    The giant magnetoresistance response of granular systems has since its discovery been described by a simple model based on the geometric orientation of the magnetic moments of adjacent nanoparticles. This model has been proven quite successful in many cases but its being based on decoupled neighboring grains has never been verified as all available studies rely on samples with too high concentration. Here we report on magnetic and magnetotransport measurements of cluster-assembled nanostructures with cobalt clusters around 2.3 nm diameter embedded in copper matrices at different concentrations. The thorough magnetic characterization based on the recently developed “triple fit” method allows the detection of measurable inter-particle interactions and thus assures true superparamagnetic behavior in the most dilute sample. The spintronic response is compared to theory and we show that only at low concentration (0.5 at.% Co) all experiments are consistent and the common theoretical description is appropriate. Increasing the concentration to 2.5 and 5 at.% implies deviations between magnetometry and magnetotransport

  13. Structural Transformation of Diblock Copolymer/Homopolymer Assemblies by Tuning Cylindrical Confinement and Interfacial Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiangping; Wang, Ke; Liang, Ruijing; Yang, Yi; Zhou, Huamin; Xie, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jintao

    2015-11-17

    In this study, we report the controllable structural transformation of block copolymer/homopolymer binary blends in cylindrical nanopores. Polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine)/homopolystyrene (SVP/hPS) nanorods (NRs) can be fabricated by pouring the polymers into an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) channel and isolated by selective removal of the AAO membrane. In this two-dimensional (2D) confinement, SVP self-assembles into NRs with concentric lamellar structure, and the internal structure can be tailored with the addition of hPS. We show that the weight fraction and molecular weight of hPS and the diameter of the channels can significantly affect the internal structure of the NRs. Moreover, mesoporous materials with tunable pore shape, size, and packing style can be prepared by selective solvent swelling of the structured NRs. In addition, these NRs can transform into spherical structures through solvent-absorption annealing, triggering the conversion from 2D to 3D confinement. More importantly, the transformation dynamics can be tuned by varying the preference property of surfactant to the polymers. It is proven that the shape and internal structure of the polymer particles are dominated by the interfacial interactions governed by the surfactants.

  14. Actin-interacting protein 1 controls assembly and permeability of intestinal epithelial apical junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Susana; Baranwal, Somesh; Ivanov, Andrei I

    2015-05-01

    Adherens junctions (AJs) and tight junctions (TJs) are crucial regulators of the integrity and restitution of the intestinal epithelial barrier. The structure and function of epithelial junctions depend on their association with the cortical actin cytoskeleton that, in polarized epithelial cells, is represented by a prominent perijunctional actomyosin belt. The assembly and stability of the perijunctional cytoskeleton is controlled by constant turnover (disassembly and reassembly) of actin filaments. Actin-interacting protein (Aip) 1 is an emerging regulator of the actin cytoskeleton, playing a critical role in filament disassembly. In this study, we examined the roles of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of AJs and TJs in human intestinal epithelium. Aip1 was enriched at apical junctions in polarized human intestinal epithelial cells and normal mouse colonic mucosa. Knockdown of Aip1 by RNA interference increased the paracellular permeability of epithelial cell monolayers, decreased recruitment of AJ/TJ proteins to steady-state intercellular contacts, and attenuated junctional reassembly in a calcium-switch model. The observed defects of AJ/TJ structure and functions were accompanied by abnormal organization and dynamics of the perijunctional F-actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, loss of Aip1 impaired the apico-basal polarity of intestinal epithelial cell monolayers and inhibited formation of polarized epithelial cysts in 3-D Matrigel. Our findings demonstrate a previously unanticipated role of Aip1 in regulating the structure and remodeling of intestinal epithelial junctions and early steps of epithelial morphogenesis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Different assembly of type IV collagen on hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrata alters endothelial cells interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NM Coelho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the structural role of type IV collagen (Col IV in the assembly of the basement membrane (BM and the perspective of mimicking its organization for vascular tissue engineering purposes, we studied the adsorption pattern of this protein on model hydrophilic (clean glass and hydrophobic trichloro(octadecylsilane (ODS surfaces known to strongly affect the behavior of other matrix proteins. The amount of fluorescently labeled Col IV was quantified showing saturation of the surface for concentration of the adsorbing solution of about 50μg/ml, but with approximately twice more adsorbed protein on ODS. AFM studies revealed a fine – nearly single molecular size – network arrangement of Col IV on hydrophilic glass, which turns into a prominent and growing polygonal network consisting of molecular aggregates on hydrophobic ODS. The protein layer forms within minutes in a concentration-dependent manner. We further found that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC attach less efficiently to the aggregated Col IV (on ODS, as judged by the significantly altered cell spreading, focal adhesions formation and the development of actin cytoskeleton. Conversely, the immunofluorescence studies for integrins revealed that the fine Col IV network formed on hydrophilic substrata is better recognized by the cells via both α1 and α2 heterodimers which support cellular interaction, apart from these on hydrophobic ODS where almost no clustering of integrins was observed.

  16. Electrochemical evaluation of avidin-biotin interaction on self-assembled gold electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, S.-J.; Chang, B.-W.; Wu, C.-C.; Lai, M.-F.; Chang, H.-C.

    2005-01-01

    The avidin-biotin interaction on 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid self-assembled gold electrodes was investigated by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The interfacial properties of the modified electrodes were evaluated in the presence of the Fe(China) 6 3-/4- couple redox as a probe. A simple equivalent circuit model with a constant phase element was used to interpret the obtained impedance spectra. The results of cyclic voltammetry showed that the voltammetric behavior of the redox probe was influenced by the electrode surface modification. It is evident that the accumulation of treated substances and the binding of biotin to avidin on the electrode surface resulted in the increasing electron-transfer resistance and the decreasing capacitance. The changes in the electron-transfer resistance on the avidin-modified electrodes were more sensitive than that in the capacitance while detecting biotin over the 2-10 μg/mL concentration. The detection amount can be as low as 20 ng/mL based on the electron-transfer resistance that presented the change of 4.3 kΩ without the use of labels. The development of a rapid, facile, and sensitive method for the quantitation of nanogram quantities of biomolecules utilizing EIS may be achieved

  17. The self-assembly of particles with isotropic interactions: Using DNA coated colloids to create designer nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R. B.; Dion, S.; Konigslow, K. von

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent field theory equations are presented that are suitable for use as a coarse-grained model for DNA coated colloids, polymer-grafted nanoparticles and other systems with approximately isotropic interactions. The equations are generalized for arbitrary numbers of chemically distinct colloids. The advantages and limitations of such a coarse-grained approach for DNA coated colloids are discussed, as are similarities with block copolymer self-assembly. In particular, preliminary results for three species self-assembly are presented that parallel results from a two dimensional ABC triblock copolymer phase. The possibility of incorporating crystallization, dynamics, inverse statistical mechanics and multiscale modelling techniques are discussed

  18. A key centriole assembly interaction interface between human PLK4 and STIL appears to not be conserved in flies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A. Cottee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A small number of proteins form a conserved pathway of centriole duplication. In humans and flies, the binding of PLK4/Sak to STIL/Ana2 initiates daughter centriole assembly. In humans, this interaction is mediated by an interaction between the Polo-Box-3 (PB3 domain of PLK4 and the coiled-coil domain of STIL (HsCCD. We showed previously that the Drosophila Ana2 coiled-coil domain (DmCCD is essential for centriole assembly, but it forms a tight parallel tetramer in vitro that likely precludes an interaction with PB3. Here, we show that the isolated HsCCD and HsPB3 domains form a mixture of homo-multimers in vitro, but these readily dissociate when mixed to form the previously described 1:1 HsCCD:HsPB3 complex. In contrast, although Drosophila PB3 (DmPB3 adopts a canonical polo-box fold, it does not detectably interact with DmCCD in vitro. Thus, surprisingly, a key centriole assembly interaction interface appears to differ between humans and flies.

  19. Bacteriophage Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia A. Aksyuk

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages have been a model system to study assembly processes for over half a century. Formation of infectious phage particles involves specific protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions, as well as large conformational changes of assembly precursors. The sequence and molecular mechanisms of phage assembly have been elucidated by a variety of methods. Differences and similarities of assembly processes in several different groups of bacteriophages are discussed in this review. The general principles of phage assembly are applicable to many macromolecular complexes.

  20. A practical guide to build de-novo assemblies for single tissues of non-model organisms: the example of a Neotropical frog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Montero-Mendieta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequencing (WGS is a very valuable resource to understand the evolutionary history of poorly known species. However, in organisms with large genomes, as most amphibians, WGS is still excessively challenging and transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq represents a cost-effective tool to explore genome-wide variability. Non-model organisms do not usually have a reference genome and the transcriptome must be assembled de-novo. We used RNA-seq to obtain the transcriptomic profile for Oreobates cruralis, a poorly known South American direct-developing frog. In total, 550,871 transcripts were assembled, corresponding to 422,999 putative genes. Of those, we identified 23,500, 37,349, 38,120 and 45,885 genes present in the Pfam, EggNOG, KEGG and GO databases, respectively. Interestingly, our results suggested that genes related to immune system and defense mechanisms are abundant in the transcriptome of O. cruralis. We also present a pipeline to assist with pre-processing, assembling, evaluating and functionally annotating a de-novo transcriptome from RNA-seq data of non-model organisms. Our pipeline guides the inexperienced user in an intuitive way through all the necessary steps to build de-novo transcriptome assemblies using readily available software and is freely available at: https://github.com/biomendi/TRANSCRIPTOME-ASSEMBLY-PIPELINE/wiki.

  1. Comparing genome guided assembly and phased variants based assembly approach to separate the homoeolog transcripts in tetraploid peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homoeologous copies of transcripts are abundant in many self-pollinating species including tetraploid peanut, and can impose a challenge to build a transcriptome reference without the merging of homoeologs. De novo transcriptome assembly of tetraploid OLin with single kmer and multiple kmer approach...

  2. Modulated growth, stability and interactions of liquid-like coacervate assemblies of elastin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muiznieks, L.D.; Cirulis, J.T.; Reinhardt, D.P.; Wuite, G.J.L.; Pomes, R.; Keeley, F.W.

    2014-01-01

    Elastin self-assembles from monomers into polymer networks that display elasticity and resilience. The first major step in assembly is a liquid-liquid phase separation known as coacervation. This process represents a continuum of stages from initial phase separation to early growth of droplets by

  3. Molecular self assembly and chiral recognition of copper octacyanophthalocyanine on Au(111): Interplay of intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sk, Rejaul; Dhara, Barun; Miller, Joel; Deshpande, Aparna

    Submolecular resolution scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) of copper octacyanophthalocyanine, CuPc(CN)8, at 77 K demonstrates that these achiral molecules form a two dimensional (2D) tetramer-based self-assembly upon evaporation onto an atomically flat Au(111) substrate. They assemble in two different structurally chiral configurations upon adsorption on Au(111). Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS),acquired at 77 K, unveils the HOMO and LUMO energy levels of this self-assembly. Voltage dependent STM images show that each molecule in both the structurally chiral configurations individually becomes chiral by breaking the mirror symmetry due to the enhanced intermolecular dipolar coupling interaction at the LUMO energy while the individual molecules remain achiral at the HOMO energy and within the HOMO-LUMO gap. At the LUMO energy, the handedness of the each chiral molecule is decided by the direction of the dipolar coupling interaction in the tetramer unit cell. This preference for LUMO energy indicates that this chirality is purely electronic in nature and it manifests on top of the organizational chirality that is present in the self-assembly independent of the orbital energy. Supported by IISER Pune and DAE-BRNS, India (Project No. 2011/20/37C/17/BRNS).

  4. Structure and interactions in biomaterials based on membrane-biopolymer self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koltover, Ilya

    Physical and chemical properties of artificial pure lipid membranes have been extensively studied during the last two decades and are relatively well understood. However, most real membrane systems of biological and biotechnological importance incorporate macromolecules either embedded into the membranes or absorbed onto their surfaces. We have investigated three classes of self-assembled membrane-biopolymer biomaterials: (i) Structure, interactions and stability of the two-dimensional crystals of the integral membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR). We have conducted a synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of oriented bR multilayers. The important findings were as follows: (1) the protein 2D lattice exhibited diffraction patterns characteristic of a 2D solid with power-law decay of in-plane positional correlations, which allowed to measure the elastic constants of protein crystal; (2) The crystal melting temperature was a function of the multilayer hydration, reflecting the effect of inter-membrane repulsion on the stability of protein lattice; (3) Preparation of nearly perfect (mosaicity gene therapy applications. We have established that DNA complexes with cationic lipid (DOTAP) and a neutral lipid (DOPC) have a compact multilayer liquid crystalline structure ( L ca ) with DNA intercalated between the lipid bilayers in a periodic 2D smectic phase. Furthermore, a different 2D columnar phase of complexes was found in mixtures with a transfectionen-hancing lipid DOPE. This structure ( HcII ) derived from synchrotron x-ray diffraction consists of DNA coated by cationic lipid monolayers and arranged on a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice. Optical microscopy revealed that the L ca complexes bind stably to anionic vesicles (models of cellular membranes), whereas the more transfectant HcII complexes are unstable, rapidly fusing and releasing DNA upon adhering to anionic vesicles.

  5. Modulation of intra- and inter-sheet interactions in short peptide self-assembly by acetonitrile in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Li; Zhao Yurong; Zhou Peng; Xu Hai; Wang Yanting

    2016-01-01

    Besides our previous experimental discovery (Zhao Y R, et al . 2015 Langmuir , 31, 12975) that acetonitrile (ACN) can tune the morphological features of nanostructures self-assembled by short peptides KIIIIK (KI4K) in aqueous solution, further experiments reported in this work demonstrate that ACN can also tune the mass of the self-assembled nanostructures. To understand the microscopic mechanism how ACN molecules interfere peptide self-assembly process, we conducted a series of molecular dynamics simulations on a monomer, a cross- β sheet structure, and a proto-fibril of KI4K in pure water, pure ACN, and ACN-water mixtures, respectively. The simulation results indicate that ACN enhances the intra-sheet interaction dominated by the hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) interactions between peptide backbones, but weakens the inter-sheet interaction dominated by the interactions between hydrophobic side chains. Through analyzing the correlations between different groups of solvent and peptides and the solvent behaviors around the proto-fibril, we have found that both the polar and nonpolar groups of ACN play significant roles in causing the opposite effects on intermolecular interactions among peptides. The weaker correlation of the polar group of ACN than water molecule with the peptide backbone enhances H-bonding interactions between peptides in the proto-fibril. The stronger correlation of the nonpolar group of ACN than water molecule with the peptide side chain leads to the accumulation of ACN molecules around the proto-fibril with their hydrophilic groups exposed to water, which in turn allows more water molecules close to the proto-fibril surface and weakens the inter-sheet interactions. The two opposite effects caused by ACN form a microscopic mechanism clearly explaining our experimental observations. (paper)

  6. Simulation of Guided Wave Interaction with In-Plane Fiber Waviness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, Cara A. C.; Juarez, Peter D.

    2016-01-01

    Reducing the timeline for certification of composite materials and enabling the expanded use of advanced composite materials for aerospace applications are two primary goals of NASA's Advanced Composites Project (ACP). A key a technical challenge area for accomplishing these goals is the development of rapid composite inspection methods with improved defect characterization capabilities. Ongoing work at NASA Langley is focused on expanding ultrasonic simulation capabilities for composite materials. Simulation tools can be used to guide the development of optimal inspection methods. Custom code based on elastodynamic finite integration technique is currently being developed and implemented to study ultrasonic wave interaction with manufacturing defects, such as in-plane fiber waviness (marcelling). This paper describes details of validation comparisons performed to enable simulation of guided wave propagation in composites containing fiber waviness. Simulation results for guided wave interaction with in-plane fiber waviness are also discussed. The results show that the wavefield is affected by the presence of waviness on both the surface containing fiber waviness, as well as the opposite surface to the location of waviness.

  7. Single-molecule sequencing and Hi-C-based proximity-guided assembly of amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) chromosomes provide insights into genome evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Lightfoot, D. J.; Jarvis, David Erwin; Ramaraj, T.; Lee, R.; Jellen, E. N.; Maughan, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) was a food staple among the ancient civilizations of Central and South America that has recently received increased attention due to the high nutritional value of the seeds, with the potential to help alleviate malnutrition and food security concerns, particularly in arid and semiarid regions of the developing world. Here, we present a reference-quality assembly of the amaranth genome which will assist the agronomic development of the species.Results: Utilizing single-molecule, real-time sequencing (Pacific Biosciences) and chromatin interaction mapping (Hi-C) to close assembly gaps and scaffold contigs, respectively, we improved our previously reported Illumina-based assembly to produce a chromosome-scale assembly with a scaffold N50 of 24.4 Mb. The 16 largest scaffolds contain 98% of the assembly and likely represent the haploid chromosomes (n = 16). To demonstrate the accuracy and utility of this approach, we produced physical and genetic maps and identified candidate genes for the betalain pigmentation pathway. The chromosome-scale assembly facilitated a genome-wide syntenic comparison of amaranth with other Amaranthaceae species, revealing chromosome loss and fusion events in amaranth that explain the reduction from the ancestral haploid chromosome number (n = 18) for a tetraploid member of the Amaranthaceae. as major evolutionary events in the 2n = 32 amaranths and clearly establish the homoeologous relationship among most of the subgenome chromosomes, which will facilitate future investigations of intragenomic changes that occurred post polyploidization.

  8. Interactions within the yeast t-SNARE Sso1p that control SNARE complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, M; Chen, X; Cocina, A E; Schultz, S M; Hughson, F M

    2000-10-01

    In the eukaryotic secretory and endocytic pathways, transport vesicles shuttle cargo among intracellular organelles and to and from the plasma membrane. Cargo delivery entails fusion of the transport vesicle with its target, a process thought to be mediated by membrane bridging SNARE protein complexes. Temporal and spatial control of intracellular trafficking depends in part on regulating the assembly of these complexes. In vitro, SNARE assembly is inhibited by the closed conformation adopted by the syntaxin family of SNAREs. To visualize this closed conformation directly, the X-ray crystal structure of a yeast syntaxin, Sso1p, has been determined and refined to 2.1 A resolution. Mutants designed to destabilize the closed conformation exhibit accelerated rates of SNARE assembly. Our results provide insight into the mechanism of SNARE assembly and its intramolecular and intermolecular regulation.

  9. Interactive Computer Lessons for Introductory Economics: Guided Inquiry-From Supply and Demand to Women in the Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John; Weil, Gordon

    1986-01-01

    The interactive feature of computers is used to incorporate a guided inquiry method of learning introductory economics, extending the Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) method beyond drills. (Author/JDH)

  10. Tunable self-assembled spin chains of strongly interacting cold atoms for demonstration of reliable quantum state transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loft, N. J. S.; Marchukov, O. V.; Petrosyan, D.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an efficient computational method to treat long, one-dimensional systems of strongly-interacting atoms forming self-assembled spin chains. Such systems can be used to realize many spin chain model Hamiltonians tunable by the external confining potential. As a concrete...... demonstration, we consider quantum state transfer in a Heisenberg spin chain and we show how to determine the confining potential in order to obtain nearly-perfect state transfer....

  11. Nuclear reactor spacer assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Groves, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor is disclosed wherein the fuel element receiving and supporting grid is comprised of a first metal, the guide tubes which pass through the grid assembly are comprised of a second metal and the grid is supported on the guide tubes by means of expanded sleeves located intermediate the grid and guide tubes. The fuel assembly is fabricated by inserting the sleeves, of initial outer diameter commensurate with the guide tube outer diameters, through the holes in the grid assembly provided for the guide tubes and thereafter expanding the sleeves radially outwardly along their entire length such that the guide tubes can subsequently be passed through the sleeves. The step of radial expansion, as a result of windows provided in the sleeves having dimensions commensurate with the geometry of the grid, mechanically captures the grid and simultaneously preloads the sleeve against the grid whereby relative motion between the grid and guide tube will be precluded

  12. Self-Assembly of Microscale Parts through Magnetic and Capillary Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Dubey

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembly is a promising technique to overcome fundamental limitations with integrating, packaging, and general handling of individual electronic-related components with characteristic lengths significantly smaller than 1 mm. Here we describe the use of magnetic and capillary forces to self-assemble 280 µm sized silicon building blocks into interconnected structures which approach a three-dimensional crystalline configuration. Integrated permanent magnet microstructures provided magnetic forces, while a low-melting-point solder alloy provided capillary forces. A finite element model of forces between the magnetic features demonstrated the utility of magnetic forces at this size scale. Despite a slight departure from designed dimensions in the actual fabricated parts, the combination of magnetic and capillary forces improved the assembly yield to 8%, over approximately 0.1% achieved previously with capillary forces alone.

  13. Interaction of a 238Pu fueled-sphere assembly with a simulated terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinkruger, F.J.; Patterson, J.H.; Herrera, B.; Nelson, G.B.; Matlack, G.M.; Waterbury, G.R.; Pavone, D.

    1981-02-01

    A 238 Pu fueled sphere assembly (FSA) was exposed to a simulated humid environment on sandy soil for 3 y. After a 70-week exposure, plutonium was first detected in measurable quantities in rain and condensate samples. A core sample taken in the ninety-third week contained 302 ng of plutonium. Examination of the FSA after exposure revealed a hole in the bottom of the graphite impact shell (GIS) and a leaking weld on the vent assembly of the postimpact containment shell (PICS). These two openings may be the pathways for plutonium entry into the environment from the FSA

  14. Interplay of adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions in self-assembled molecular surface nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnadt, Joachim; Xu, Wei; Vang, Ronnie Thorbjørn

    2010-01-01

    a large tolerance to monatomic surface steps on the Ag(110) surface. The observed behaviour is explained in terms of strong intermolecular hydrogen bonding and a strong surface-mediated directionality, assisted by a sufficient degree of molecular backbone flexibility. In contrast, the same kind of step......-edge crossing is not observed when the molecules are adsorbed on the isotropic Ag(111) or more reactive Cu(110) surfaces. On Ag(111), similar 1-D assemblies are formed to those on Ag(110), but they are oriented along the step edges. On Cu(110), the carboxylic groups of NDCA are deprotonated and form covalent...... bonds to the surface, a situation which is also achieved on Ag(110) by annealing to 200 degrees C. These results show that the formation of particular self-assembled molecular nanostructures depends significantly on a subtle balance between the adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions...

  15. Unique Self-Assembly Patterns Based on the Thiacalix[4]arene-Silver Interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sýkora, Jan; Himl, M.; Stibor, I.; Císařová, I.; Lhoták, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 10 (2007), s. 2244-2248 ISSN 0040-4020 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : thiacalixarene * self-assembly * x-ray crystallography Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.869, year: 2007

  16. Kinetics of the CRISPR-Cas9 effector complex assembly and the role of 3′-terminal segment of guide RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Semenova, Ekaterina; Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Severinov, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 is widely applied for genome engineering in various organisms. The assembly of single guide RNA (sgRNA) with the Cas9 protein may limit the Cas9/sgRNA effector complex function. We developed a FRET-based assay for detection of CRISPR–Cas9 complex binding to its targets and used this assay to investigate the kinetics of Cas9 assembly with a set of structurally distinct sgRNAs. We find that Cas9 and isolated sgRNAs form the effector complex efficiently and rapidly. Yet, the assembly process is sensitive to the presence of moderate concentrations of non-specific RNA competitors, which considerably delay the Cas9/sgRNA complex formation, while not significantly affecting already formed complexes. This observation suggests that the rate of sgRNA loading into Cas9 in cells can be determined by competition between sgRNA and intracellular RNA molecules for the binding to Cas9. Non-specific RNAs exerted particularly large inhibitory effects on formation of Cas9 complexes with sgRNAs bearing shortened 3′-terminal segments. This result implies that the 3′-terminal segment confers sgRNA the ability to withstand competition from non-specific RNA and at least in part may explain the fact that use of sgRNAs truncated for the 3′-terminal stem loops leads to reduced activity during genomic editing. PMID:26945042

  17. Smart human serum albumin-indocyanine green nanoparticles generated by programmed assembly for dual-modal imaging-guided cancer synergistic phototherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Zonghai; Hu, Dehong; Zheng, Mingbin; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Huilong; Gao, Duyang; Gong, Ping; Gao, Guanhui; Zhang, Pengfei; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2014-12-23

    Phototherapy, including photodynamic therapy (PDT) and photothermal therapy (PTT), is a light-activated local treatment modality that is under intensive preclinical and clinical investigations for cancer. To enhance the treatment efficiency of phototherapy and reduce the light-associated side effects, it is highly desirable to improve drug accumulation and precision guided phototherapy for efficient conversion of the absorbed light energy to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and local hyperthermia. In the present study, a programmed assembly strategy was developed for the preparation of human serum albumin (HSA)-indocyanine green (ICG) nanoparticles (HSA-ICG NPs) by intermolecular disulfide conjugations. This study indicated that HSA-ICG NPs had a high accumulation with tumor-to-normal tissue ratio of 36.12±5.12 at 24 h and a long-term retention with more than 7 days in 4T1 tumor-bearing mice, where the tumor and its margin, normal tissue were clearly identified via ICG-based in vivo near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence and photoacoustic dual-modal imaging and spectrum-resolved technology. Meanwhile, HSA-ICG NPs efficiently induced ROS and local hyperthermia simultaneously for synergetic PDT/PTT treatments under a single NIR laser irradiation. After an intravenous injection of HSA-ICG NPs followed by imaging-guided precision phototherapy (808 nm, 0.8 W/cm2 for 5 min), the tumor was completely suppressed, no tumor recurrence and treatments-induced toxicity were observed. The results suggest that HSA-ICG NPs generated by programmed assembly as smart theranostic nanoplatforms are highly potential for imaging-guided cancer phototherapy with PDT/PTT synergistic effects.

  18. Self-assembly of Hydrazide-based Heterodimers Driven by Hydrogen Bonding and Donor-Acceptor Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG,Dai-Jun; WANG,Peng; LI,Xiao-Qiang; LI,Zhan-Ting

    2006-01-01

    A new series of hydrogen bonding-driven heterodimers have been self-assembled in chloroform from hydrazide-based monomers. Additional intermolecular donor-acceptor interaction between the electron-rich bis(p-phenylene)-34-crown-10 unit and the electron-deficient naphthalene diimide unit has been utilized to increase the stability of the dimmers, and pronounced cooperativity of the two discrete non-covalent forces to stabilize the dimer has been revealed by the quantitative 1H (2D) NMR and UV-Vis experiments.

  19. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto.

    1991-01-01

    In a fuel assembly in which spectral shift type moderator guide members are arranged, the moderator guide member has a flow channel resistance member, that provides flow resistance against the moderators, in the upstream of a moderator flowing channel, by which the ratio of removing coolants is set greater at the upstream than downstream. With such a constitution, the void distribution increasing upward in the channel box except for the portion of the moderator guide member is moderated by the increase of the area of the void region that expands downward in the guide member. Accordingly, the axial power distribution is flattened throughout the operation cycle and excess distortion is eliminated to improve the fuel integrity. (T.M.)

  20. An interactive parents' guide for feeding preschool-aged children: pilot studies for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznar, Melissa M; Carlson, John S; Hughes, Sheryl O; Pavangadkar, Amol S; Scott, Marci K; Hoerr, Sharon L

    2014-05-01

    There are few motivational materials to help families with limited resources develop optimal, practical feeding strategies for young children to reduce dietary risk for poor diet and weight status. Formative evaluation strategies consisting of both qualitative and quantitative data helped to refine the parent feeding guide Eat Healthy, Your Children are Watching, A Parent's Guide to Raising a Healthy Eater. An interdisciplinary planning team developed a five-topic, multimedia, interactive guide addressing the strategies most associated with improved diet quality and weight status of children aged 3 to 5 years. Research staff conducted iterative phases of field testing, reformatting, in-depth interviews, and materials testing with Head Start or Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education caregivers (N=38) of children aged 3 to 5 years during 2011 and 2012. Convergence of feedback from caregivers' interviews and each booklet's attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction subscale scores were used to determine and affirm areas for improvement. Lower than desired attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction scores (optimal score=5) in 2011 and too much text resulted in revisions and reformatting that improved scores from 3.8 to 4.9 in 2012. The revision of materials to reflect less text, additional white space, checklists of mealtime behaviors, and learning activities for preschool-aged children resulted in dramatically improved materials and greater acceptance by parents, as shown by both quantitative and qualitative evaluations. Formative evaluation procedures involving the use of data-based decision making allowed for the development of intervention materials that met the unique needs of the population served. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. SILVA tree viewer: interactive web browsing of the SILVA phylogenetic guide trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccati, Alan; Gerken, Jan; Quast, Christian; Yilmaz, Pelin; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2017-09-30

    Phylogenetic trees are an important tool to study the evolutionary relationships among organisms. The huge amount of available taxa poses difficulties in their interactive visualization. This hampers the interaction with the users to provide feedback for the further improvement of the taxonomic framework. The SILVA Tree Viewer is a web application designed for visualizing large phylogenetic trees without requiring the download of any software tool or data files. The SILVA Tree Viewer is based on Web Geographic Information Systems (Web-GIS) technology with a PostgreSQL backend. It enables zoom and pan functionalities similar to Google Maps. The SILVA Tree Viewer enables access to two phylogenetic (guide) trees provided by the SILVA database: the SSU Ref NR99 inferred from high-quality, full-length small subunit sequences, clustered at 99% sequence identity and the LSU Ref inferred from high-quality, full-length large subunit sequences. The Tree Viewer provides tree navigation, search and browse tools as well as an interactive feedback system to collect any kinds of requests ranging from taxonomy to data curation and improving the tool itself.

  2. Characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and other radioactive wastes which may require long-term isolation: Appendix 2E, Physical descriptions of LWR nonfuel assembly hardware, Appendix 2F, User's guide to the LWR nonfuel assembly data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    This appendix includes a two to three page Physical Description report for each Non-fuel Assembly (NFA) Hardware item identified from the current data. Information was obtained via subcontracts with these NFA hardware vendors: Babcock and Wildox, Combustion Engineering and Westinghouse. Data for some NFA hardware are not available. For such hardware, the information shown in this report was obtained from the open literature. Efforts to obtain additional information are continuing. NFA hardware can be grouped into six categories: BWR Channels, Control Elements, Guide Tube Plugs/Orifice Rods, Instrumentation, Neutron Poisons, and Neutron Sources. This appendix lists Physical Description reports alphabetically by vendor within each category. Individual Physical Description reports can be generated interactively through the menu-driven LWR Non-Fuel Assembly Hardware Data Base system. These reports can be viewed on the screen, directed to a printer, or saved in a text file for later use. Special reports and compilations of specific data items can be produced on request

  3. Assembly and Analysis of Differential Transcriptome Responses of Hevea brasiliensis on Interaction with Microcyclus ulei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriel Alonso Hurtado Páez

    Full Text Available Natural rubber (Hevea brasiliensis is a tropical tree used commercially for the production of latex, from which 40,000 products are generated. The fungus Microcyclus ulei infects this tree, causing South American leaf blight (SALB disease. This disease causes developmental delays and significant crop losses, thereby decreasing the production of latex. Currently several groups are working on obtaining clones of rubber tree with durable resistance to SALB through the use of extensive molecular biology techniques. In this study, we used a secondary clone that was resistant to M. ulei isolate GCL012. This clone, FX 3864 was obtained by crossing between clones PB 86 and B 38 (H. brasiliensis x H. brasiliensis. RNA-Seq high-throughput sequencing technology was used to analyze the differential expression of the FX 3864 clone transcriptome at 0 and 48 h post infection (hpi with the M. ulei isolate GCL012. A total of 158,134,220 reads were assembled using the de novo assembly strategy to generate 90,775 contigs with an N50 of 1672. Using a reference-based assembly, 76,278 contigs were generated with an N50 of 1324. We identified 86 differentially expressed genes associated with the defense response of FX 3864 to GCL012. Seven putative genes members of the AP2/ERF ethylene (ET-dependent superfamily were found to be down-regulated. An increase in salicylic acid (SA was associated with the up-regulation of three genes involved in cell wall synthesis and remodeling, as well as in the down-regulation of the putative gene CPR5. The defense response of FX 3864 against the GCL012 isolate was associated with the antagonistic SA, ET and jasmonic acid (JA pathways. These responses are characteristic of plant resistance to biotrophic pathogens.

  4. Final Scientific Report - Electromagnetic Interactions in Self-Assembled Metallo-Dielectric Biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragnea, Bogdan G. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2017-05-03

    Achievements which resulted from previous DOE funding include: templated virus-like particle assembly thermodynamics, development of single particle photothermal absorption spectroscopy and dark- field spectroscopy instrumentation for the measurement of optical properties of virus-like nanoparticles, electromagnetic simulations of coupled nanoparticle cluster systems, virus contact mechanics, energy transfer and fluorescence quenching in multichromophore systems supported on biomolecular templates, and photo physical work on virus-aptamer systems. A current total of eight published research articles and a book chapter are acknowledging DOE support for the period 2013-2016.

  5. Cooperative Interactions between 480 kDa Ankyrin-G and EB Proteins Assemble the Axon Initial Segment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréal, Amélie; Fassier, Coralie; Le Bras, Barbara; Bullier, Erika; De Gois, Stéphanie; Hazan, Jamilé; Hoogenraad, Casper C; Couraud, François

    2016-04-20

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is required for generating action potentials and maintaining neuronal polarity. Significant progress has been made in deciphering the basic building blocks composing the AIS, but the underlying mechanisms required for AIS formation remains unclear. The scaffolding protein ankyrin-G is the master-organizer of the AIS. Microtubules and their interactors, particularly end-binding proteins (EBs), have emerged as potential key players in AIS formation. Here, we show that the longest isoform of ankyrin-G (480AnkG) selectively associates with EBs via its specific tail domain and that this interaction is crucial for AIS formation and neuronal polarity in cultured rodent hippocampal neurons. EBs are essential for 480AnkG localization and stabilization at the AIS, whereas 480AnkG is required for the specific accumulation of EBs in the proximal axon. Our findings thus provide a conceptual framework for understanding how the cooperative relationship between 480AnkG and EBs induces the assembly of microtubule-AIS structures in the proximal axon. Neuronal polarity is crucial for the proper function of neurons. The assembly of the axon initial segment (AIS), which is the hallmark of early neuronal polarization, relies on the longest 480 kDa ankyrin-G isoform. The microtubule cytoskeleton and its interacting proteins were suggested to be early key players in the process of AIS formation. In this study, we show that the crosstalk between 480 kDa ankyrin-G and the microtubule plus-end tracking proteins, EBs, at the proximal axon is decisive for AIS assembly and neuronal polarity. Our work thus provides insight into the functional mechanisms used by 480 kDa ankyrin-G to drive the AIS formation and thereby to establish neuronal polarity. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/364421-13$15.00/0.

  6. The Crystal Structure of a Maxi/Mini-Ferritin Chimera Reveals Guiding Principles for the Assembly of Protein Cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornell, Thomas A. [Department; Division; Srivastava, Yogesh [Genome; Jauch, Ralf [Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore; Genome; Fan, Rongli [Division; Orner, Brendan P. [Department; Division

    2017-07-19

    Cage proteins assemble into nanoscale structures with large central cavities. They play roles, including those as virus capsids and chaperones, and have been applied to drug delivery and nanomaterials. Furthermore, protein cages have been used as model systems to understand and design protein quaternary structure. Ferritins are ubiquitous protein cages that manage iron homeostasis and oxidative damage. Two ferritin subfamilies have strongly similar tertiary structure yet distinct quaternary structure: maxi-ferritins normally assemble into 24-meric, octahedral cages with C-terminal E-helices centered around 4-fold symmetry axes, and mini-ferritins are 12-meric, tetrahedral cages with 3-fold axes defined by C-termini lacking E-domains. To understand the role E-domains play in ferritin quaternary structure, we previously designed a chimera of a maxi-ferritin E-domain fused to the C-terminus of a mini-ferritin. The chimera is a 12-mer cage midway in size between those of the maxi- and mini-ferritin. The research described herein sets out to understand (a) whether the increase in size over a typical mini-ferritin is due to a frozen state where the E-domain is flipped out of the cage and (b) whether the symmetrical preference of the E-domain in the maxi-ferritin (4-fold axis) overrules the C-terminal preference in the mini-ferritin (3-fold axis). With a 1.99 Å resolution crystal structure, we determined that the chimera assembles into a tetrahedral cage that can be nearly superimposed with the parent mini-ferritin, and that the E-domains are flipped external to the cage at the 3-fold symmetry axes.

  7. Direct chill casting of aluminium alloys under electromagnetic interaction by permanent magnet assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojarevičs, Andris; Kaldre, Imants; Milgrāvis, Mikus; Beinerts, Toms

    2018-05-01

    Direct chill casting is one of the methods used in industry to obtain good microstructure and properties of aluminium alloys. Nevertheless, for some alloys grain structure is not optimal. In this study, we offer the use of electromagnetic interaction to modify melt convection near the solidification interface. Solidification under various electromagnetic interactions has been widely studied, but usually at low solidification velocity and high thermal gradient. This type of interaction may succeed fragmentation of dendrite arms and transport of solidification nuclei thus leading to improved material structure and properties. Realization of experimental small-scale crystallizer and electromagnetic system has been described in this article.

  8. EXPEL - a computing module for molten fuel/coolant interactions in fast reactor sub-assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fishlock, T.P.

    1975-10-01

    This report describes a module for computing the effects of a molten fuel/coolant interaction in a fast reactor subassembly. The module is to be incorporated into the FRAX code which calculates the consequences of hypothetical whole core accidents. Details of the interaction are unknown and in consequence the model contains a large number of parameters which must be set by assumption. By variation of these parameters the interaction may be made mild or explosive. Results of a parametric survey are included. (author)

  9. Ionic interactions in electroactive self-assembled monolayers of ferrocene species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delong, Hugh C.; Donohue, John J.; Buttry, Daniel A.

    1991-04-01

    The electrochemical and interfacial behavior of two types of electroactive self-assembled monolayer systems is investigated at gold electrodes. The first type is a ferrocene-based surfactant (a redox surfactant) derived from (dimethylamino)methylferrocene via quaternization of the amino group with various n-alkylbromides. These have a long alkyl chain with 16 or 18 carbons in the chain pendent from the cationic ammonium group. These are referred to as C16 and C18. The second type is a ferrocene-based dimeric species with a disulfide functional group capable of providing a permanent anchor to the Au electrode, thus endowing monolayers of this species with exceptional stability towards desorption. The electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQM) is used to monitor the mass changes which occur at the electrode surface during the redox processes of these two species.

  10. IDRC and BetterEvaluation launch an interactive guide to manage ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-10-21

    Oct 21, 2016 ... ... evaluations, this guide is intended for program and project managers. ... used to hire evaluators, and guide the management of the evaluation. ... Strategic Evaluation on Communicating Research for Influence: Part I.

  11. Microprocessors & their operating systems a comprehensive guide to 8, 16 & 32 bit hardware, assembly language & computer architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, R C

    1989-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive guide to all of the major microprocessor families (8, 16 and 32 bit). The hardware aspects and software implications are described, giving the reader an overall understanding of microcomputer architectures. The internal processor operation of each microprocessor device is presented, followed by descriptions of the instruction set and applications for the device. Software considerations are expanded with descriptions and examples of the main high level programming languages (BASIC, Pascal and C). The book also includes detailed descriptions of the three main operatin

  12. Precise Steric Control over 2D versus 3D Self-Assembly of Antimony(III) Alkoxide Cages through Strong Secondary Bonding Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaven, Shiva; Yu, Jingze; Yasin, Jason; Unruh, Daniel K; Cozzolino, Anthony F

    2017-07-17

    Antimony(III) alkoxide cages were designed as building blocks for predictable supramolecular self-assembly. Supramolecular synthons featuring two Sb···O secondary bonding interactions (SBIs), each SBI stronger than 30 kJ/mol, were used to drive the formation of the supramolecular architectures. Judicious choice of pendant groups provided predictable control over the formation of self-assembled 3D columnar helices, which crystallized with hollow morphologies, or a self-assembled 2D bilayer. The Sb-O stretching frequency provides a spectroscopic signature of Sb···O SBI formation.

  13. Highly specific salt bridges govern bacteriophage P22 icosahedral capsid assembly: identification of the site in coat protein responsible for interaction with scaffolding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortines, Juliana R; Motwani, Tina; Vyas, Aashay A; Teschke, Carolyn M

    2014-05-01

    Icosahedral virus assembly requires a series of concerted and highly specific protein-protein interactions to produce a proper capsid. In bacteriophage P22, only coat protein (gp5) and scaffolding protein (gp8) are needed to assemble a procapsid-like particle, both in vivo and in vitro. In scaffolding protein's coat binding domain, residue R293 is required for procapsid assembly, while residue K296 is important but not essential. Here, we investigate the interaction of scaffolding protein with acidic residues in the N-arm of coat protein, since this interaction has been shown to be electrostatic. Through site-directed mutagenesis of genes 5 and 8, we show that changing coat protein N-arm residue 14 from aspartic acid to alanine causes a lethal phenotype. Coat protein residue D14 is shown by cross-linking to interact with scaffolding protein residue R293 and, thus, is intimately involved in proper procapsid assembly. To a lesser extent, coat protein N-arm residue E18 is also implicated in the interaction with scaffolding protein and is involved in capsid size determination, since a cysteine mutation at this site generated petite capsids. The final acidic residue in the N-arm that was tested, E15, is shown to only weakly interact with scaffolding protein's coat binding domain. This work supports growing evidence that surface charge density may be the driving force of virus capsid protein interactions. Bacteriophage P22 infects Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and is a model for icosahedral viral capsid assembly. In this system, coat protein interacts with an internal scaffolding protein, triggering the assembly of an intermediate called a procapsid. Previously, we determined that there is a single amino acid in scaffolding protein required for P22 procapsid assembly, although others modulate affinity. Here, we identify partners in coat protein. We show experimentally that relatively weak interactions between coat and scaffolding proteins are capable of driving

  14. Molecular interactions in self-assembled nano-structures of chitosan-sodium alginate based polyelectrolyte complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasupalli, Geeta Kumari; Verma, Devendra

    2018-03-16

    We report here the self-assembled structures of polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) of polyanionic sodium alginate with the polycationic chitosan at room temperature. The PECs prepared at different pH values exhibited two distinct morphologies. The chitosan-alginate PECs self-assembled into the fibrous structure in a low pH range of pH3 to 7. The PECs obtained at high pH series around pH8 and above resulted in the formation of colloidal nanoparticles in the range of 120±9.48nm to 46.02±16.66nm. The zeta potential measurement showed that PECs prepared at lower pH (pHPECs prepared at higher pH than 6 exhibited highly negative surface charge. The molecular interactions in nano-colloids and fibers were evaluated using FTIR analysis. The results attest that the ionic state of the chitosan and alginate plays an important role controlling the morphologies of the PECS. The present study has identified the enormous potential of the polyelectrolytes complexes to exploit shape by the alteration of ionic strength. These findings might be useful in the development of novel biomaterial. The produced fibers and nanocolloids could be applied as a biomaterial for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Sexual potency following interactive ultrasound-guided brachytherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stock, Richard G.; Stone, Nelson N.; Iannuzzi, Christopher

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of a therapeutic modality on sexual potency is often an important consideration for patients choosing a treatment for prostate cancer. We prospectively assessed patients' penile erectile function before and following interactive ultrasound-guided transperineal permanent radioactive seed implantation to determine its effect on sexual function. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine patients underwent permanent radioactive seed implantation from June 1990 to April 1994 for localized prostate cancer (T1-T2) and were followed for a median of 15 months (1.5-52 months). 125 I seeds were implanted in 73 patients with a combined Gleason grade of 2-6, and 103 Pd seeds were implanted in 16 patients with higher grade lesions. The sexual potency of these patients was assessed prior to, at 3 and 6 months, and every 6 months after implantation. Erectile function was graded using a numerical score of 0 to 3 (0 = impotent (no erections), 1 = ability to have erections but insufficient for vaginal penetration, 2 = erectile function sufficient for vaginal penetration but suboptimal, 3 = normal erectile function). The pretreatment potency scores were as follows: 0 in 24 patients, 1 in 6 patients, 2 in 22 patients, and 3 in 37 patients. Results: The actuarial impotency rates (score = 0) following implantation for those patients possessing some degree of erectile function prior to implantation (65 patients) were 2.5% at 1 year and 6% at 2 years. The actuarial decrease in sexual function rates (a drop in score of at least one point) were 29% at 1 year and 39% at 2 years. Only two patients became impotent following treatment and this occurred at 1 year and 16 months. The time period for a decrease in erectile function to occur ranged from 1.8 months to 32.7 months, with a median of 6.8 months. Patients with higher grade tumors showed a greater decrease in potency score compared to patients with lower grade tumors. Conclusion: Interactive ultrasound-guided transperineal

  16. A 3D network of helicates fully assembled by pi-stacking interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Miguel; Taglietti, Angelo; Gatteschi, Dante; Sorace, Lorenzo; Sangregorio, Claudio; González, Ana M; Maneiro, Marcelino; Pedrido, Rosa M; Bermejo, Manuel R

    2003-08-07

    The neutral dinuclear dihelicate [Cu2(L)2] x 2CH3CN (1) forms a unique 3D network in the solid state due to pi-stacking interactions, which are responsible for intermolecular antiferromagnetic coupling between Cu(II) ions.

  17. Folded plate assemblies with branching column supports : Interaction and control of overall shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falk, A.; Turrin, M.; von Buelow, P.

    2010-01-01

    The work described in this paper aims at developing the interrelation and overall effects of interaction between a folded plate roof structure and a system of branching column supports. In the context of architectural performance it is of interest to discuss the effects of the material on

  18. Logic of quench protection assembly for BEPC II interaction region superconducting magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Fusan; Cheng Jian

    2006-01-01

    Two superconducting magnet complexes are used in BEPC II interaction region. The corresponding quench protection system divides all related faults into two classes and takes different protection actions according to the urgency degree. Since BEPC II has two operating modes and the superconducting magnets use different power supplies in different operating modes, the quench protection system must take the mode switching into consideration. (authors)

  19. A uranium-based UO_2"+-Mn"2"+ single-chain magnet assembled trough cation-cation interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougel, Victor; Chatelain, Lucile; Hermle, Johannes; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella; Caciuffo, Roberto; Colineau, Eric; Tuna, Floriana; Magnani, Nicola; Geyer, Arnaud de

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain magnets (SCMs) are materials composed of magnetically isolated one-dimensional (1D) units exhibiting slow relaxation of magnetization. The occurrence of SCM behavior requires the fulfillment of stringent conditions for exchange and anisotropy interactions. Herein, we report the synthesis, the structure, and the magnetic characterization of the first actinide-containing SCM. The 5f-3d heterometallic 1D chains [{[UO_2(salen)(py)][M(py)_4](NO_3)}]_n, (M=Cd (1) and M=Mn (2); py=pyridine) are assembled trough cation-cation interaction from the reaction of the uranyl(V) complex [UO_2(salen)py][Cp"*_2Co] (Cp"*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) with Cd(NO_3)_2 or Mn(NO_3)_2 in pyridine. The infinite UMn chain displays a high relaxation barrier of 134±0.8 K (93±0.5 cm"-"1), probably as a result of strong intra-chain magnetic interactions combined with the high Ising anisotropy of the uranyl(V) dioxo group. It also exhibits an open magnetic hysteresis loop at T<6 K, with an impressive coercive field of 3.4 T at 2 K.

  20. A uranium-based UO_2"+-Mn"2"+ single-chain magnet assembled trough cation-cation interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougel, Victor; Chatelain, Lucile; Hermle, Johannes; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella; Caciuffo, Roberto; Colineau, Eric; Tuna, Floriana; Magnani, Nicola; Geyer, Arnaud de

    2014-01-01

    Single-chain magnets (SCMs) are materials composed of magnetically isolated one-dimensional (1D) units exhibiting slow relaxation of magnetization. The occurrence of SCM behavior requires the fulfillment of stringent conditions for exchange and anisotropy interactions. Herein, we report the synthesis, the structure, and the magnetic characterization of the first actinide-containing SCM. The 5f-3d heterometallic 1D chains [{[UO_2(salen)(py)][M(py)_4](NO_3)}]_n, (M=Cd (1) and M=Mn (2); py=pyridine) are assembled trough cation-cation interaction from the reaction of the uranyl(V) complex [UO_2(salen)py][Cp*_2Co] (Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) with Cd(NO_3)_2 or Mn(NO_3)_2 in pyridine. The infinite UMn chain displays a high relaxation barrier of 134 ±0.8 K (93 ±0.5 cm"-"1), probably as a result of strong intra-chain magnetic interactions combined with the high Ising anisotropy of the uranyl(V) dioxo group. It also exhibits an open magnetic hysteresis loop at T <6 K, with an impressive coercive field of 3.4 T at 2 K. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Interaction of nucleosome assembly proteins abolishes nuclear localization of DGK{zeta} by attenuating its association with importins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okada, Masashi; Hozumi, Yasukazu [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Ichimura, Tohru [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Masakazu; Takahashi, Nobuya [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Iseki, Ken [Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan); Yagisawa, Hitoshi [Laboratory of Biological Signaling, Graduate School of Life Science, University of Hyogo, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Shinkawa, Takashi; Isobe, Toshiaki [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Sciences and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Goto, Kaoru, E-mail: kgoto@med.id.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata 990-9585 (Japan)

    2011-12-10

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) is involved in the regulation of lipid-mediated signal transduction through the metabolism of a second messenger diacylglycerol. Of the DGK family, DGK{zeta}, which contains a nuclear localization signal, localizes mainly to the nucleus but translocates to the cytoplasm under pathological conditions. However, the detailed mechanism of translocation and its functional significance remain unclear. To elucidate these issues, we used a proteomic approach to search for protein targets that interact with DGK{zeta}. Results show that nucleosome assembly protein (NAP) 1-like 1 (NAP1L1) and NAP1-like 4 (NAP1L4) are identified as novel DGK{zeta} binding partners. NAP1Ls constitutively shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in transfected HEK293 cells. The molecular interaction of DGK{zeta} and NAP1Ls prohibits nuclear import of DGK{zeta} because binding of NAP1Ls to DGK{zeta} blocks import carrier proteins, Qip1 and NPI1, to interact with DGK{zeta}, leading to cytoplasmic tethering of DGK{zeta}. In addition, overexpression of NAP1Ls exerts a protective effect against doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that NAP1Ls are involved in a novel molecular basis for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of DGK{zeta} and provide a clue to examine functional significance of its translocation under pathological conditions.

  2. Eight supramolecular assemblies constructed from bis(benzimidazole) and organic acids through strong classical hydrogen bonding and weak noncovalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shouwen; Wang, Daqi

    2014-05-01

    Eight crystalline organic acid-base adducts derived from alkane bridged bis(N-benzimidazole) and organic acids (2,4,6-trinitrophenol, p-nitrobenzoic acid, m-nitrobenzoic acid, 3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 5-sulfosalicylic acid and oxalic acid) were prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, IR, mp, and elemental analysis. Of the eight compounds five are organic salts (1, 4, 6, 7 and 8) and the other three (2, 3, and 5) are cocrystals. In all of the adducts except 1 and 8, the ratio of the acid and the base is 2:1. All eight supramolecular assemblies involve extensive intermolecular classical hydrogen bonds as well as other noncovalent interactions. The role of weak and strong noncovalent interactions in the crystal packing is ascertained. These weak interactions combined, all the complexes displayed 3D framework structure. The results presented herein indicate that the strength and directionality of the classical N+-H⋯O-, O-H⋯O, and O-H⋯N hydrogen bonds (ionic or neutral) and other nonbonding associations between acids and ditopic benzimidazoles are sufficient to bring about the formation of cocrystals or organic salts.

  3. Nano Cu interaction with single amino acid tyrosine derived self-assemblies; study through XRD, AFM, confocal Raman microscopy, SERS and DFT methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindhan, Raman; Karthikeyan, Balakrishnan

    2017-12-01

    3,5-Bis(trifluoromethyl)benzylamine derivatives of single amino acid tyrosine produced self-assembled nanotubes (BTTNTs) as simple Phe-Phe. It has been observed that tyrosine derivative gives exclusively micro and nano tubes irrespective of the concentration of the precursor monomer. However, the introduced xenobiotic trifluoromethyl group (TFM) present in key backbone positionsof the self assembly gives the specific therapeutic function has been highlighted. Herein this work study of such self assembled nanotubes were studied through experimental and theoretical methods. The interaction of nanocopper cluster with the nanotubes (Cu@BTTNTs) were extensively studied by various methods like XRD, AFM, confocal Raman microscopy, SERS and theoretical methods like Mulliken's atomic charge analysis. SERS reveals that the interactions of Cu cluster with NH2, OH, NH and phenyl ring π-electrons system of BTTNTs. DFT studies gave the total dipole moment values of Cu@BTTNTs and explained the nature of interaction.

  4. Alternative stable states and alternative endstates of community assembly through intra- and interspecific positive and negative interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerla, Daan J; Mooij, Wolf M

    2014-09-01

    Positive and negative interactions within and between species may occur simultaneously, with the net effect depending on population densities. For instance, at low densities plants may ameliorate stress, while competition for resources dominates at higher densities. Here, we propose a simple two-species model in which con- and heterospecifics have a positive effect on per capita growth rate at low densities, while negative interactions dominate at high densities. The model thus includes both Allee effects (intraspecific positive effects) and mutualism (interspecific positive effects), as well as intra- and interspecific competition. Using graphical methods we derive conditions for alternative stable states and species coexistence. We show that mutual non-invasibility (i.e. the inability of each species to invade a population of the other) is more likely when species have a strong positive effect on the own species or a strong negative effect on the other species. Mutual non-invasibility implies alternative stable states, however, there may also be alternative stable states at which species coexist. In the case of species symmetry (i.e. when species are indistinguishable), such alternative coexistence states require that if the positive effect exerted at low densities at the own species is stronger than on the other species, the negative effect at higher densities is also stronger on the own species than on the other species, or, vice versa, if the interspecific positive effects at low densities are stronger than the intraspecific effects, the negative effects at higher densities are also stronger between species than within species. However, the reachability of alternative stable states is restricted by the frequency and density at which species are introduced during community assembly, so that alternative stable states do not always represent alternative endstates of community assembly. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Macromolecular shape and interactions in layer-by-layer assemblies within cylindrical nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzara, Thomas D; Lau, K H Aaron; Knoll, Wolfgang; Janshoff, Andreas; Steinem, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition of polyelectrolytes and proteins within the cylindrical nanopores of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes was studied by optical waveguide spectroscopy (OWS). AAO has aligned cylindrical, nonintersecting pores with a defined pore diameter d(0) and functions as a planar optical waveguide so as to monitor, in situ, the LbL process by OWS. The LbL deposition of globular proteins, i.e., avidin and biotinylated bovine serum albumin was compared with that of linear polyelectrolytes (linear-PEs), both species being of similar molecular weight. LbL deposition within the cylindrical AAO geometry for different pore diameters (d(0) = 25-80 nm) for the various macromolecular species, showed that the multilayer film growth was inhibited at different maximum numbers of LbL steps (n(max)). The value of n(max) was greatest for linear-PEs, while proteins had a lower value. The cylindrical pore geometry imposes a physical limit to LbL growth such that n(max) is strongly dependent on the overall internal structure of the LbL film. For all macromolecular species, deposition was inhibited in native AAO, having pores of d(0) = 25-30 nm. Both, OWS and scanning electron microscopy showed that LbL growth in larger AAO pores (d(0) > 25-30 nm) became inhibited when approaching a pore diameter of d(eff,n_max) = 25-35 nm, a similar size to that of native AAO pores, with d(0) = 25-30 nm. For a reasonable estimation of d(eff,n_max), the actual volume occupied by a macromolecular assembly must be taken into consideration. The results clearly show that electrostatic LbL allowed for compact macromolecular layers, whereas proteins formed loosely packed multilayers.

  6. Optical transitions and electronic interactions in self-assembled cobalt-fullerene mixture films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lavrentiev, Vasyl; Chvostová, Dagmar; Lavrentieva, Inna; Vacík, Jiří; Daskal, Y.; Barchuk, M.; Rafaja, D.; Dejneka, Alexandr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 48 (2017), č. článku 485305. ISSN 0022-3727 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk LM2015088; GA MŠk LM2015056 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : fullerene * cobalt * electronic interaction * optical absorption * mixture film Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; BO - Biophysics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics , supercond.); Biophysics (FZU-D) Impact factor: 2.588, year: 2016

  7. Renormalization of effective mass in self-assembled quantum dots due to electron-electron interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babinski, A; Korkusinski, M; Hawrylak, P; Wasilewski, Z R; Potemski, M

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic-field dispersion of the multiexcitons related to the p shell of a single quantum dot (QD) is analysed in this work. The reduced cyclotron effective mass of carriers is determined from the energy splitting between the p + - and p − - related multiexcitonic emission lines. The reduced mass in the occupied QD was found to be larger than the mass related to the QD's single particle structure. The apparent increase of the reduced mass with increasing excitonic occupation of the dot is related to the mass renoralization due to electron-electron interactions within a multiexcitonic droplet

  8. Role of dipolar interactions on morphologies and tunnel magnetoresistance in assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Manish; Carrey, Julian; Banerjee, Varsha

    2018-05-01

    We undertake comprehensive simulations of 2d arrays (Lx ×Ly) of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with dipole-dipole interactions by solving LLG equations. Our primary interest is to understand the correspondence between equilibrium spin (ES) morphologies and tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR) as a function of Θ - the ratio of the dipolar to the anisotropy strength, sample size Lx , aspect ratio Ar =Ly /Lx and the direction of the applied field H → = HêH . The parameter Θ is varied by choosing three distinct particles: (i) α -Fe2O3 (Θ ≃ 0) , (ii) Co (Θ ≃ 0.37) and (iii) Fe3O4 (Θ ≃ 1.28) . Our main observations are as follows: (a) For weakly interacting spins (Θ ≃ 0) , the morphology has randomly oriented magnetic moments for all sample sizes and aspect ratios. The TMR exhibits a peak value of 50% at the coercive field Hc . It is robust with respect to Lx and Ar , and isotropic with respect to êH . (b) For strong interactions (Θ > 1) , the moments order in the plane of the sample. The ES morphology comprises of magnetically aligned regions interspersed with flux closure loops. For fields along x or y, the maximum TMR amplitude decrease to ∼30%. For êH = z ̂ , it drops to ∼3%. The TMR is robust with respect to Lx and Ar and isotropic in the x and y directions only. (c) In strongly interacting samples (Θ > 1) with Lx comparable to the size of a flux closure loop, increasing Ar creates ferromagnetic chains in the sample oriented along y or - y . Consequently, for êH = y ̂ , the TMR magnitude for Ar = 1 is ∼33% while that for Ar = 32 drops to ∼16%. For êH = x ̂ on the other hand, it is ∼30% and independent of Ar . The TMR of long ribbons of MNPs has a strong dependence on Ar and is anisotropic in all three directions.

  9. Dopamine Modulation of Hippocampal — Prefrontal Cortical Interaction Drives Memory-Guided Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Yukiori; Grace, Anthony A.

    2007-01-01

    Information gleaned from learning and memory processes is essential in guiding behavior towards a specific goal. However, the neural mechanisms that determine how these processes are effectively utilized to guide goal-directed behavior are unknown. Here, we show that rats utilize retrospective and prospective memory and flexible switching between these two memory processes to guide behaviors to obtain rewards. We found that retrospective memory is mainly processed in the hippocampus (HPC), bu...

  10. Fibrillarin and Nop56 interact before being co-assembled in box C/D snoRNPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechertier, Tanguy; Grob, Alice; Hernandez-Verdun, Daniele; Roussel, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs play crucial roles in ribosome biogenesis. They guide folding, site-specific nucleotide modifications and participate in cleavage of precursor ribosomal RNAs. To better understand how the biogenesis of the box C/D small nucleolar RNPs (snoRNPs) occur in a cellular context, we used a new approach based on the possibility of relocalizing a given nuclear complex by adding an affinity tag for B23 to one component of this complex. We selectively delocalized each core box C/D protein, namely 15.5kD, Nop56, Nop58 and fibrillarin, and analyzed the effect of such changes on other components of the box C/D snoRNPs. We show that modifying the localization and the mobility of core box C/D proteins impairs their association with box C/D snoRNPs. In addition, we demonstrate that fibrillarin and Nop56 directly interact in vivo. This interaction, indispensable for the association of both proteins with the box C/D snoRNPs, does not involve the glycine- and arginine-rich domain or the RNA-binding domain but the alpha-helix domain of fibrillarin. In addition, no RNA seems required to maintain fibrillarin-Nop56 interaction

  11. Interaction of Ionic Liquids with Lipid Biomembrane: Implication from Supramolecular Assembly to Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Benxin; Lan, Nan; Zhu, Y. Elaine

    2013-03-01

    An explosion in the research activities using ionic liquids (ILs) as new ``green'' chemicals in several chemical and biomedical processes has resulted in the urgent need to understand their impact in term of their transport and toxicity towards aquatic organisms. Though a few experimental toxicology studies have reported that some ionic liquids are toxic with increased hydrophobicity of ILs while others are not, our understanding of the molecular level mechanism of IL toxicity remains poorly understood. In this talk, we will discuss our recent study of the interaction of ionic liquids with model cell membranes. We have found that the ILs could induce morphological change of lipid bilayers when a critical concentration is exceeded, leading to the swelling and tube-like formation of lipid bilayers. The critical concentration shows a strong dependence on the length of hydrocarbon tails and hydrophobic counterions. By SAXS, Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) and fluorescence microscopic measurement, we have confirmed that tube-like lipid complexes result from the insertion of ILs with long hydrocarbon chains to minimize the hydrophobic interaction with aqueous media. This finding could give insight to the modification and adoption of ILs for the engineering of micro-organisms.

  12. Cooperative Assembly of Magneto-Nanovesicles with Tunable Wall Thickness and Permeability for MRI-Guided Drug Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Kuikun

    2018-03-15

    This article describes the fabrication of nanosized magneto-vesicles (MVs) comprising tunable layers of densely packed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in membranes via cooperative assembly of polymer-tethered SPIONs and free poly(styrene)- b-poly(acrylic acid) (PS- b-PAA). The membrane thickness of MVs could be well controlled from 9.8 to 93.2 nm by varying the weight ratio of PS- b-PAA to SPIONs. The increase in membrane thickness was accompanied by the transition from monolayer MVs, to double-layered MVs and to multilayered MVs (MuMVs). This can be attributed to the variation in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of polymer-grafted SPIONs upon the insertion and binding of PS- b-PAA onto the surface of nanoparticles. Therapeutic agents can be efficiently encapsulated in the hollow cavity of MVs and the release of payload can be tuned by varying the membrane thickness of nanovesicles. Due to the high packing density of SPIONs, the MuMVs showed the highest magnetization and transverse relaxivity rate ( r2) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among these MVs and individual SPIONs. Upon intravenous injection, doxorubicin-loaded MuMVs conjugated with RGD peptides could be effectively enriched at tumor sites due to synergetic effect of magnetic and active targeting. As a result, they exhibited drastically enhanced signal in MRI, improved tumor delivery efficiency of drugs as well as enhanced antitumor efficacy, compared with groups with only magnetic or active targeting strategy. The unique nanoplatform may find applications in effective disease control by delivering imaging and therapy to organs/tissues that are not readily accessible by conventional delivery vehicles.

  13. Cooperative Assembly of Magneto-Nanovesicles with Tunable Wall Thickness and Permeability for MRI-Guided Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kuikun; Liu, Yijing; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Qian; Kong, Chuncai; Yi, Chenglin; Zhou, Zijian; Wang, Zhantong; Zhang, Guofeng; Zhang, Yang; Khashab, Niveen M; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Nie, Zhihong

    2018-04-04

    This article describes the fabrication of nanosized magneto-vesicles (MVs) comprising tunable layers of densely packed superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) in membranes via cooperative assembly of polymer-tethered SPIONs and free poly(styrene)- b-poly(acrylic acid) (PS- b-PAA). The membrane thickness of MVs could be well controlled from 9.8 to 93.2 nm by varying the weight ratio of PS- b-PAA to SPIONs. The increase in membrane thickness was accompanied by the transition from monolayer MVs, to double-layered MVs and to multilayered MVs (MuMVs). This can be attributed to the variation in the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of polymer-grafted SPIONs upon the insertion and binding of PS- b-PAA onto the surface of nanoparticles. Therapeutic agents can be efficiently encapsulated in the hollow cavity of MVs and the release of payload can be tuned by varying the membrane thickness of nanovesicles. Due to the high packing density of SPIONs, the MuMVs showed the highest magnetization and transverse relaxivity rate ( r 2 ) in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among these MVs and individual SPIONs. Upon intravenous injection, doxorubicin-loaded MuMVs conjugated with RGD peptides could be effectively enriched at tumor sites due to synergetic effect of magnetic and active targeting. As a result, they exhibited drastically enhanced signal in MRI, improved tumor delivery efficiency of drugs as well as enhanced antitumor efficacy, compared with groups with only magnetic or active targeting strategy. The unique nanoplatform may find applications in effective disease control by delivering imaging and therapy to organs/tissues that are not readily accessible by conventional delivery vehicles.

  14. Interactions of p60, a mediator of progesterone receptor assembly, with heat shock proteins hsp90 and hsp70

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, S; Prapapanich, V; Rimerman, R A

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies on the assembly of progesterone receptor (PR) complexes in vitro have suggested that PR assembly is a dynamic, ordered process involving at least eight nonreceptor proteins. One of these proteins, p60, appears transiently during assembly and is not a component of functionally...

  15. Self-assembly via anisotropic interactions : Modeling association kinetics of patchy particle systems and self-assembly induced by critical Casimir forces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newton, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Self-assembly, the non-dissipative spontaneous formation of structural order spans many length scales, from amphiphilic molecules forming micelles to stars forming galaxies. This thesis mainly deals with systems on the colloidal length scale where the size of a particle is between a nanometer and a

  16. An informatics model for guiding assembly of telemicrobiology workstations for malaria collaborative diagnostics using commodity products and open-source software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crandall Ian

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deficits in clinical microbiology infrastructure exacerbate global infectious disease burdens. This paper examines how commodity computation, communication, and measurement products combined with open-source analysis and communication applications can be incorporated into laboratory medicine microbiology protocols. Those commodity components are all now sourceable globally. An informatics model is presented for guiding the use of low-cost commodity components and free software in the assembly of clinically useful and usable telemicrobiology workstations. Methods The model incorporates two general principles: 1 collaborative diagnostics, where free and open communication and networking applications are used to link distributed collaborators for reciprocal assistance in organizing and interpreting digital diagnostic data; and 2 commodity engineering, which leverages globally available consumer electronics and open-source informatics applications, to build generic open systems that measure needed information in ways substantially equivalent to more complex proprietary systems. Routine microscopic examination of Giemsa and fluorescently stained blood smears for diagnosing malaria is used as an example to validate the model. Results The model is used as a constraint-based guide for the design, assembly, and testing of a functioning, open, and commoditized telemicroscopy system that supports distributed acquisition, exploration, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of digital microscopy images of stained malarial blood smears while also supporting remote diagnostic tracking, quality assessment and diagnostic process development. Conclusion The open telemicroscopy workstation design and use-process described here can address clinical microbiology infrastructure deficits in an economically sound and sustainable manner. It can boost capacity to deal with comprehensive measurement of disease and care outcomes in individuals and

  17. An informatics model for guiding assembly of telemicrobiology workstations for malaria collaborative diagnostics using commodity products and open-source software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhanic, West; Crandall, Ian; Pennefather, Peter

    2009-07-17

    Deficits in clinical microbiology infrastructure exacerbate global infectious disease burdens. This paper examines how commodity computation, communication, and measurement products combined with open-source analysis and communication applications can be incorporated into laboratory medicine microbiology protocols. Those commodity components are all now sourceable globally. An informatics model is presented for guiding the use of low-cost commodity components and free software in the assembly of clinically useful and usable telemicrobiology workstations. The model incorporates two general principles: 1) collaborative diagnostics, where free and open communication and networking applications are used to link distributed collaborators for reciprocal assistance in organizing and interpreting digital diagnostic data; and 2) commodity engineering, which leverages globally available consumer electronics and open-source informatics applications, to build generic open systems that measure needed information in ways substantially equivalent to more complex proprietary systems. Routine microscopic examination of Giemsa and fluorescently stained blood smears for diagnosing malaria is used as an example to validate the model. The model is used as a constraint-based guide for the design, assembly, and testing of a functioning, open, and commoditized telemicroscopy system that supports distributed acquisition, exploration, analysis, interpretation, and reporting of digital microscopy images of stained malarial blood smears while also supporting remote diagnostic tracking, quality assessment and diagnostic process development. The open telemicroscopy workstation design and use-process described here can address clinical microbiology infrastructure deficits in an economically sound and sustainable manner. It can boost capacity to deal with comprehensive measurement of disease and care outcomes in individuals and groups in a distributed and collaborative fashion. The workstation

  18. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Amulya Nidhi; Redeker, Virginie; Fritz, Nicolas; Pieri, Laura; Almeida, Leandro G; Spolidoro, Maria; Liebmann, Thomas; Bousset, Luc; Renner, Marianne; Léna, Clément; Aperia, Anita; Melki, Ronald; Triller, Antoine

    2016-06-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn) is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD). This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively) (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397[1]). α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based approach. We also performed experiments on pure cultures of astrocytes to identify astrocyte-specific proteins interacting with oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn (conditions 3 and 4, respectively). For each condition, proteins interacting selectively with α-syn assemblies were identified by comparison to proteins pulled-down from untreated cells used as controls. The mass spectrometry data, the database search and the peak lists have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PRIDE: PXD002256 to PRIDE: PXD002263 and doi: 10.6019/PXD002256 to 10.6019/PXD002263.

  19. Stabilization of cucurbituril/guest assemblies via long-range Coulombic and CH···O interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Roymon; Nkrumah, Anna; Clark, Ronald J; Masson, Eric

    2014-05-07

    Cucurbit[n]urils (CB[n], n = 6-8) interact strongly with metal-bound 4'-substituted terpyridine ligands (M = Fe(II) and Ir(III)) via CH···O hydrogen bonding, despite significant separation between the positive metallic cation and the carbonylated rim of CB[n], and the location of the latter in the second coordination sphere of the metal ion. While water has been shown to mediate interactions between cations and CB[n]s in some assemblies, mediation by organic ligands is unprecedented. The recognition process is driven by the contrasted combination of extremely favorable binding enthalpies (up to 20.2 kcal/mol) and very unfavorable entropic components (as low as -10.2 kcal/mol). Dynamic oligomers were prepared in the presence of CB[8], which acts as a "soft", noncovalent linker between metal/terpyridine complexes, and interconnects two 4'-substituents inside its cavity. Social self-sorting between CB[8] and metal/terpyridine complexes bearing 4'-(2-naphthyl) and 4'-(2,3,5,6-tetrafluorophenyl) substituents was also observed, and could afford well-organized oligomers with alternating Fe(II) and Ir(III) cations.

  20. Field - dipole interactions in L-cysteine-thiolate self assembled at p- and n-GaAs(100) electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarescu, Valentina; Toader, Ana-Maria; Enache, Mirela; Preda, Loredana; Anastasescu, Mihai; Dobrescu, Gianina; Negrila, Catalin; Lazarescu, Mihai Florin

    2015-01-01

    L-cysteine-thiolate monolayers spontaneously self-assembled on p- and n-GaAs(100) electrodes have been investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in H 2 SO 4 solutions. On p-doped samples a potential-induced reversible proton transfer occurs within the L-cysteine-thiolate layer during both forward and backward potential scans; in contrast, on n-doped samples it is observed only in the reverse scan. The XPS data and the fractal analysis of the AFM images point to the field - dipole interactions operating distinctively in the L-cysteine-thiolate layer formed at p- and n-doped semiconducting substrates as the origin of the observed difference. The interaction of this small but highly polar molecule with the electrostatic field driven by the diffuse distribution of the excess charge in the semiconductor subsurface region both in equilibrium and under polarization conditions turned out to play a key role in determining the optimal orientation of the two polar groups. The latter one seems to be a prerequisite for the potential-induced internal proton transfer

  1. A physical model describing the interaction of nuclear transport receptors with FG nucleoporin domain assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Raphael; Osmanović, Dino; Ehret, Severin; Araya Callis, Carolina; Frey, Steffen; Stewart, Murray; You, Changjiang; Görlich, Dirk; Hoogenboom, Bart W; Richter, Ralf P

    2016-04-08

    The permeability barrier of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) controls bulk nucleocytoplasmic exchange. It consists of nucleoporin domains rich in phenylalanine-glycine motifs (FG domains). As a bottom-up nanoscale model for the permeability barrier, we have used planar films produced with three different end-grafted FG domains, and quantitatively analyzed the binding of two different nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), NTF2 and Importin β, together with the concomitant film thickness changes. NTR binding caused only moderate changes in film thickness; the binding isotherms showed negative cooperativity and could all be mapped onto a single master curve. This universal NTR binding behavior - a key element for the transport selectivity of the NPC - was quantitatively reproduced by a physical model that treats FG domains as regular, flexible polymers, and NTRs as spherical colloids with a homogeneous surface, ignoring the detailed arrangement of interaction sites along FG domains and on the NTR surface.

  2. Guiding transcranial brain stimulation by EEG/MEG to interact with ongoing brain activity and associated functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thut, Gregor; Bergmann, Til Ole; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    of NTBS with respect to the ongoing brain activity. Temporal patterns of ongoing neuronal activity, in particular brain oscillations and their fluctuations, can be traced with electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG), to guide the timing as well as the stimulation settings of NTBS. These novel, online...... and offline EEG/MEG-guided NTBS-approaches are tailored to specifically interact with the underlying brain activity. Online EEG/MEG has been used to guide the timing of NTBS (i.e., when to stimulate): by taking into account instantaneous phase or power of oscillatory brain activity, NTBS can be aligned......Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques have a wide range of applications but also suffer from a number of limitations mainly related to poor specificity of intervention and variable effect size. These limitations motivated recent efforts to focus on the temporal dimension...

  3. Self assembling nanocomposites for protein delivery: supramolecular interactions of soluble polymers with protein drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaso, Stefano; Caliceti, Paolo

    2013-01-02

    Translation of therapeutic proteins to pharmaceutical products is often encumbered by their inadequate physicochemical and biopharmaceutical properties, namely low stability and poor bioavailability. Over the last decades, several academic and industrial research programs have been focused on development of biocompatible polymers to produce appropriate formulations that provide for enhanced therapeutic performance. According to their physicochemical properties, polymers have been exploited to obtain a variety of formulations including biodegradable microparticles, 3-dimensional hydrogels, bioconjugates and soluble nanocomposites. Several soluble polymers bearing charges or hydrophobic moieties along the macromolecular backbone have been found to physically associate with proteins to form soluble nanocomplexes. Physical complexation is deemed a valuable alternative tool to the chemical bioconjugation. Soluble protein/polymer nanocomplexes formed by physical specific or unspecific interactions have been found in fact to possess peculiar physicochemical, and biopharmaceutical properties. Accordingly, soluble polymeric systems have been developed to increase the protein stability, enhance the bioavailability, promote the absorption across the biological barriers, and prolong the protein residence in the bloodstream. Furthermore, a few polymers have been found to favour the protein internalisation into cells or boost their immunogenic potential by acting as immunoadjuvant in vaccination protocols. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Situativity theory: a perspective on how participants and the environment can interact: AMEE Guide no. 52.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durning, Steven J; Artino, Anthony R

    2011-01-01

    Situativity theory refers to theoretical frameworks which argue that knowledge, thinking, and learning are situated (or located) in experience. The importance of context to these theories is paramount, including the unique contribution of the environment to knowledge, thinking, and learning; indeed, they argue that knowledge, thinking, and learning cannot be separated from (they are dependent upon) context. Situativity theory includes situated cognition, situated learning, ecological psychology, and distributed cognition. In this Guide, we first outline key tenets of situativity theory and then compare situativity theory to information processing theory; we suspect that the reader may be quite familiar with the latter, which has prevailed in medical education research. Contrasting situativity theory with information processing theory also serves to highlight some unique potential contributions of situativity theory to work in medical education. Further, we discuss each of these situativity theories and then relate the theories to the clinical context. Examples and illustrations for each of the theories are used throughout. We will conclude with some potential considerations for future exploration. Some implications of situativity theory include: a new way of approaching knowledge and how experience and the environment impact knowledge, thinking, and learning; recognizing that the situativity framework can be a useful tool to "diagnose" the teaching or clinical event; the notion that increasing individual responsibility and participation in a community (i.e., increasing "belonging") is essential to learning; understanding that the teaching and clinical environment can be complex (i.e., non-linear and multi-level); recognizing that explicit attention to how participants in a group interact with each other (not only with the teacher) and how the associated learning artifacts, such as computers, can meaningfully impact learning.

  5. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Bassler, E.A.; Huckestein, E.A.; Salton, R.B.; Tower, S.N.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel assembly adapted for use with a pressurized water nuclear reactor having capabilities for fluid moderator spectral shift control is described comprising: parallel arranged elongated nuclear fuel elements; means for providing for axial support of the fuel elements and for arranging the fuel elements in a spaced array; thimbles interspersed among the fuel elements adapted for insertion of a rod control cluster therewithin; means for structurally joining the fuel elements and the guide thimbles; fluid moderator control means for providing a volume of low neutron absorbing fluid within the fuel assembly and for removing a substantially equivalent volume of reactor coolant water therefrom, a first flow manifold at one end of the fuel assembly sealingly connected to a first end of the moderator control tubes whereby the first ends are commonly flow connected; and a second flow manifold, having an inlet passage and an outlet passage therein, sealingly connected to a second end of the moderator control tubes at a second end of the fuel assembly

  6. Guide device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, C.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel handling guide tube centering device for use in nuclear reactors during fuel assembly handling operations. The device comprises an outer ring secured to the flange of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, a rotatable table rotatably coupled to the outer ring, and a plurality of openings through the table. Truncated locating cones are positioned in each of the openings in the table, and the locating cones center the guide tube during fuel handling operations. The openings in the table are located such that each fuel assembly in the nuclear core may be aligned with one of the openings by a suitable rotation of the table. The locating cones thereby provide alignment between the fuel handling mechanism located in the guide tube and the individual fuel assemblies of the cone. The need for a device to provide alignment is especially critical for floating nuclear power plants, where wave motion may exist during fuel handling operations. 5 claims, 4 figures

  7. The role of biotic interactions in plant community assembly: What is the community species pool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švamberková, Eva; Vítová, Alena; Lepš, Jan

    2017-11-01

    Differences in plant species composition between a community and its species pool are considered to reflect the effect of community filters. If we define the species pool as a set of species able to reach a site and form a viable population in a given abiotic environment (i.e. to pass the dispersal and abiotic filter), the difference in species composition should correspond to the effect of biotic interactions. However, most of the operational definitions of the species pool are based on co-occurrence patterns and thus also reflect the effect of biotic relationships, including definitions based on functional plant traits, Ellenberg indicator values or Beals index. We conducted two seed introduction experiments in an oligotrophic wet meadow with the aim of demonstrating that many species excluded, according to the above definitions, from a species pool are in fact able to establish there successfully if competition is removed. In sowing experiments, we studied the establishment and survival of species after the removal of competition (i.e. in artificial gaps) and in intact vegetation. We also investigated inter-annual variability of seed germination and seedling establishment and competitive exclusion of sown species. The investigated species also included those from very different habitats (i.e. species with very low corresponding Beals index or Ellenberg indicator values that were different from the target community weighted mean). Many of these species were able to grow in the focal wet meadow if competition was removed, but they did not establish and survive in the intact community. These species are thus not limited by abiotic conditions, but by the biotic filter. We also recorded a great inter-annual variability in seed germination and seedling establishment. Competitive exclusion of species with different ecological requirements could be quite fast (one and half seasons) in some species, but some non-resident species were able to survive several seasons; the

  8. MR-1S Interacts with PET100 and PET117 in Module-Based Assembly of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Vidoni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The biogenesis of human cytochrome c oxidase (COX is an intricate process in which three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA-encoded core subunits are assembled in a coordinated way with at least 11 nucleus-encoded subunits. Many chaperones shared between yeast and humans are involved in COX assembly. Here, we have used a MT-CO3 mutant cybrid cell line to define the composition of assembly intermediates and identify new human COX assembly factors. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis led us to modify the assembly model from a sequential pathway to a module-based process. Each module contains one of the three core subunits, together with different ancillary components, including HIGD1A. By the same analysis, we identified the short isoform of the myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1S as a new COX assembly factor, which works with the highly conserved PET100 and PET117 chaperones to assist COX biogenesis in higher eukaryotes.

  9. The concept of transcortical cell assemblies: a key to the understanding of cortical lateralization and interhemispheric interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvermüller, F; Mohr, B

    1996-01-01

    According to Hebb, elements of higher cognitive processes, such as concepts, words and mental images, are realized in the brain as cortical cell assemblies, i.e. large and strongly connected neuron populations that form functional units. Neurons belonging to such assemblies may be scattered over wide cortical areas, and some cell assemblies may even comprise neurons of both hemispheres (transcortical assemblies). If full activation (ignition) of an assembly leads to fast circulation of neuronal activity in the assembly, this process should be visible in high-frequency cortical responses. Some evidence will be reviewed that cell assembly ignition indeed leads to changes in high-frequency cortical responses which can be recorded in the EEG and MEG. Within the cell assembly-framework, the question of cortical laterality translates into the question of how neurons of transcortical assemblies are balanced between the hemispheres. This approach allows for different degrees of laterality. Recent evidence is summarized that the degree of laterality indeed differs between language units. For example, the cortical representation of certain words appears to be strongly lateralized to the left hemisphere while those of others are less lateralized. If neurons of both hemispheres are part of one assembly bihemispheric processing should lead to a processing advantage compared to processing in the dominant hemisphere alone. The latter appears to be the case for lexical processing, as revealed by recent behavioral studies. In conclusion, the cell assembly-framework suggests a more fine-grained description of the issue of cortical laterality; it is not appropriate to ask whether "modules" supporting higher cortical functions are located either in the left or right hemisphere. Rather, it appears fruitful to ask how the neurons of transcortical cell assemblies are balanced between the hemispheres.

  10. Investigating organic multilayers by spectroscopic ellipsometry: specific and non-specific interactions of polyhistidine with NTA self-assembled monolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Solano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: A versatile strategy for protein–surface coupling in biochips exploits the affinity for polyhistidine of the nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA group loaded with Ni(II. Methods based on optical reflectivity measurements such as spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE allow for label-free, non-invasive monitoring of molecule adsorption/desorption at surfaces.Results: This paper describes a SE study about the interaction of hexahistidine (His6 on gold substrates functionalized with a thiolate self-assembled monolayer bearing the NTA end group. By systematically applying the difference spectra method, which emphasizes the small changes of the ellipsometry spectral response upon the nanoscale thickening/thinning of the molecular film, we characterized different steps of the process such as the NTA-functionalization of Au, the adsorption of the His6 layer and its eventual displacement after reaction with competitive ligands. The films were investigated in liquid, and ex situ in ambient air. The SE investigation has been complemented by AFM measurements based on nanolithography methods (nanografting mode.Conclusion: Our approach to the SE data, exploiting the full spectroscopic potential of the method and basic optical models, was able to provide a picture of the variation of the film thickness along the process. The combination of δΔi+1,i(λ, δΨi+1,i(λ (layer-addition mode and δΔ†i',i+1(λ, δΨ†i',i+1(λ (layer-removal mode difference spectra allowed us to clearly disentangle the adsorption of His6 on the Ni-free NTA layer, due to non specific interactions, from the formation of a neatly thicker His6 film induced by the Ni(II-loading of the NTA SAM.

  11. Fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.; Tower, S.N.; Huckestein, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor comprises a 5x5 array of guide tubes in a generally 20x20 array of fuel elements, the guide tubes being arranged to accommodate either control rods or water displacer rods. The fuel assembly has top and bottom Inconel (Registered Trade Mark) grids and intermediate Zircaloy grids in engagement with the guide tubes and supporting the fuel elements and guide tubes while allowing flow of reactor coolant through the assembly. (author)

  12. Development of Self-Assembled Nanoribbon Bound Peptide-Polyaniline Composite Scaffolds and Their Interactions with Neural Cortical Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M. Smith

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Degenerative neurological disorders and traumatic brain injuries cause significant damage to quality of life and often impact survival. As a result, novel treatments are necessary that can allow for the regeneration of neural tissue. In this work, a new biomimetic scaffold was designed with potential for applications in neural tissue regeneration. To develop the scaffold, we first prepared a new bolaamphiphile that was capable of undergoing self-assembly into nanoribbons at pH 7. Those nanoribbons were then utilized as templates for conjugation with specific proteins known to play a critical role in neural tissue growth. The template (Ile-TMG-Ile was prepared by conjugating tetramethyleneglutaric acid with isoleucine and the ability of the bolaamphiphile to self-assemble was probed at a pH range of 4 through 9. The nanoribbons formed under neutral conditions were then functionalized step-wise with the basement membrane protein laminin, the neurotropic factor artemin and Type IV collagen. The conductive polymer polyaniline (PANI was then incorporated through electrostatic and π–π stacking interactions to the scaffold to impart electrical properties. Distinct morphology changes were observed upon conjugation with each layer, which was also accompanied by an increase in Young’s Modulus as well as surface roughness. The Young’s Modulus of the dried PANI-bound biocomposite scaffolds was found to be 5.5 GPa, indicating the mechanical strength of the scaffold. Thermal phase changes studied indicated broad endothermic peaks upon incorporation of the proteins which were diminished upon binding with PANI. The scaffolds also exhibited in vitro biodegradable behavior over a period of three weeks. Furthermore, we observed cell proliferation and short neurite outgrowths in the presence of rat neural cortical cells, confirming that the scaffolds may be applicable in neural tissue regeneration. The electrochemical properties of the scaffolds were also

  13. Development of Self-Assembled Nanoribbon Bound Peptide-Polyaniline Composite Scaffolds and Their Interactions with Neural Cortical Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew M.; Pajovich, Harrison T.; Banerjee, Ipsita A.

    2018-01-01

    Degenerative neurological disorders and traumatic brain injuries cause significant damage to quality of life and often impact survival. As a result, novel treatments are necessary that can allow for the regeneration of neural tissue. In this work, a new biomimetic scaffold was designed with potential for applications in neural tissue regeneration. To develop the scaffold, we first prepared a new bolaamphiphile that was capable of undergoing self-assembly into nanoribbons at pH 7. Those nanoribbons were then utilized as templates for conjugation with specific proteins known to play a critical role in neural tissue growth. The template (Ile-TMG-Ile) was prepared by conjugating tetramethyleneglutaric acid with isoleucine and the ability of the bolaamphiphile to self-assemble was probed at a pH range of 4 through 9. The nanoribbons formed under neutral conditions were then functionalized step-wise with the basement membrane protein laminin, the neurotropic factor artemin and Type IV collagen. The conductive polymer polyaniline (PANI) was then incorporated through electrostatic and π–π stacking interactions to the scaffold to impart electrical properties. Distinct morphology changes were observed upon conjugation with each layer, which was also accompanied by an increase in Young’s Modulus as well as surface roughness. The Young’s Modulus of the dried PANI-bound biocomposite scaffolds was found to be 5.5 GPa, indicating the mechanical strength of the scaffold. Thermal phase changes studied indicated broad endothermic peaks upon incorporation of the proteins which were diminished upon binding with PANI. The scaffolds also exhibited in vitro biodegradable behavior over a period of three weeks. Furthermore, we observed cell proliferation and short neurite outgrowths in the presence of rat neural cortical cells, confirming that the scaffolds may be applicable in neural tissue regeneration. The electrochemical properties of the scaffolds were also studied by

  14. Layer-by-layer assembly of peptide based bioorganic–inorganic hybrid scaffolds and their interactions with osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, Steven M.; Fath, Karl R.; Phekoo, Aruna P.; Knoll, Grant A.; Banerjee, Ipsita A.

    2015-01-01

    In this work we have developed a new family of biocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration by utilizing self-assembled fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl protected Valyl-cetylamide (FVC) nanoassemblies as templates. To tailor the assemblies for enhanced osteoblast attachment and proliferation, we incorporated (a) Type I collagen, (b) a hydroxyapatite binding peptide sequence (EDPHNEVDGDK) derived from dentin sialophosphoprotein and (c) the osteoinductive bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) to the templates by layer-by-layer assembly. The assemblies were then incubated with hydroxyapatite nanocrystals blended with varying mass percentages of TiO 2 nanoparticles and coated with alginate to form three dimensional scaffolds for potential applications in bone tissue regeneration. The morphology was examined by TEM and SEM and the binding interactions were probed by FITR spectroscopy. The scaffolds were found to be non-cytotoxic, adhered to mouse preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells and promoted osteogenic differentiation as indicated by the results obtained by alkaline phosphatase assay. Furthermore, they were found to be biodegradable and possessed inherent antibacterial capability. Thus, we have developed a new family of tissue-engineered biocomposite scaffolds with potential applications in bone regeneration. - Highlights: • Fmoc-val-cetylamide assemblies were used as templates. • Collagen, a short dentin sialophosphoprotein derived sequence and BMP-4 were incorporated. • Hydroxyapatite–TiO 2 nanocomposite blends and alginate were incorporated. • The 3D scaffold biocomposites adhered to preosteoblasts and promoted osteoblast differentiation. • The biocomposites also displayed antimicrobial activity

  15. Layer-by-layer assembly of peptide based bioorganic–inorganic hybrid scaffolds and their interactions with osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanelli, Steven M. [Fordham University Department of Chemistry, 441 East Fordham Road, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Fath, Karl R. [The City University of New York, Queens College, Department of Biology, 65-30 Kissena Blvd, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, NY 10016 (United States); Phekoo, Aruna P. [The City University of New York, Queens College, Department of Biology, 65-30 Kissena Blvd, Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Knoll, Grant A. [Fordham University Department of Chemistry, 441 East Fordham Road, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States); Banerjee, Ipsita A., E-mail: banerjee@fordham.edu [Fordham University Department of Chemistry, 441 East Fordham Road, Bronx, NY 10458 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    In this work we have developed a new family of biocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue regeneration by utilizing self-assembled fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl protected Valyl-cetylamide (FVC) nanoassemblies as templates. To tailor the assemblies for enhanced osteoblast attachment and proliferation, we incorporated (a) Type I collagen, (b) a hydroxyapatite binding peptide sequence (EDPHNEVDGDK) derived from dentin sialophosphoprotein and (c) the osteoinductive bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP-4) to the templates by layer-by-layer assembly. The assemblies were then incubated with hydroxyapatite nanocrystals blended with varying mass percentages of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles and coated with alginate to form three dimensional scaffolds for potential applications in bone tissue regeneration. The morphology was examined by TEM and SEM and the binding interactions were probed by FITR spectroscopy. The scaffolds were found to be non-cytotoxic, adhered to mouse preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells and promoted osteogenic differentiation as indicated by the results obtained by alkaline phosphatase assay. Furthermore, they were found to be biodegradable and possessed inherent antibacterial capability. Thus, we have developed a new family of tissue-engineered biocomposite scaffolds with potential applications in bone regeneration. - Highlights: • Fmoc-val-cetylamide assemblies were used as templates. • Collagen, a short dentin sialophosphoprotein derived sequence and BMP-4 were incorporated. • Hydroxyapatite–TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite blends and alginate were incorporated. • The 3D scaffold biocomposites adhered to preosteoblasts and promoted osteoblast differentiation. • The biocomposites also displayed antimicrobial activity.

  16. Data in support of the identification of neuronal and astrocyte proteins interacting with extracellularly applied oligomeric and fibrillar α-synuclein assemblies by mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya Nidhi Shrivastava

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available α-Synuclein (α-syn is the principal component of Lewy bodies, the pathophysiological hallmark of individuals affected by Parkinson disease (PD. This neuropathologic form of α-syn contributes to PD progression and propagation of α-syn assemblies between neurons. The data we present here support the proteomic analysis used to identify neuronal proteins that specifically interact with extracellularly applied oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn assemblies (conditions 1 and 2, respectively (doi: 10.15252/embj.201591397 [1]. α-syn assemblies and their cellular partner proteins were pulled down from neuronal cell lysed shortly after exposure to exogenous α-syn assemblies and the associated proteins were identified by mass spectrometry using a shotgun proteomic-based approach. We also performed experiments on pure cultures of astrocytes to identify astrocyte-specific proteins interacting with oligomeric or fibrillar α-syn (conditions 3 and 4, respectively. For each condition, proteins interacting selectively with α-syn assemblies were identified by comparison to proteins pulled-down from untreated cells used as controls. The mass spectrometry data, the database search and the peak lists have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium database via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifiers PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002256 to PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002263 and doi: 10.6019/http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002256 to 10.6019/http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD002263.

  17. In situ assembly of fibrinogen/hyaluronic acid hydrogel via knob-hole interaction for 3D cellular engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengjie Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronic acid (HA-based hydrogels have applied widely for biomedical applications due to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. However, the use of initiators or crosslinkers during the hydrogel formation may cause cytotoxicity and thereby impair the biocompatibility. Inspired by the crosslinking mechanism of fibrin gel, a novel HA-based hydrogel was developed via the in situ supramolecular assembly based on knob-hole interactions between fibrinogen and knob-grafted HA (knob-g-HA in this study. The knob-grafted HA was synthesized by coupling knob peptides (GPRPAAC, a mimic peptide of fibrin knob A to HA via Michael addition. Then the translucent fibrinogen/knob-g-HA hydrogels were prepared by simply mixing the solutions of knob-g-HA and fibrinogen at the knob/hole ratio of 1.2. The rheological behaviors of the fibrinogen/knob-g-HA hydrogels with the fibrinogen concentrations of 50, 100 and 200 mg/mL were evaluated, and it was found that the dynamic storage moduli (G′ were higher than the loss moduli (G″ over the whole frequency range for all the groups. The SEM results showed that fibrinogen/knob-g-HA hydrogels presented the heterogeneous mesh-like structures which were different from the honeycomb-like structures of fibrinogen/MA-HA hydrogels. Correspondingly, a higher swelling ratio was obtained in the groups of fibrinogen/knob-g-HA hydrogel. Finally, the cytocompatibility of fibrinogen/knob-g-HA hydrogels was proved by live/dead stainings and MTT assays in the 293T cells encapsulation test. All these results highlight the biological potential of the fibrinogen/knob-g-HA hydrogels for 3D cellular engineering.

  18. Teacher-Guided Interactive Multimedia for Teaching English in an EFL Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Roland; Jenks, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study explored the effect of a "Teacher Guided Multimedia" CD-ROM program as a supplement in teaching vocabulary acquisition to EFL students. Eighty seven juniors in the Food and Beverage Management Department at Yuanpei University in northern Taiwan participated in the study. Students from two intact classes were…

  19. Guided Design: Sensitivity to Black-White Interactions When Giving Nursing Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Theresa M.

    This paper discusses the use of guided design with white student nurses at the Medical College of Virginia Nursing School to help them develop an awareness of and reduce stereotypic responses when they are providing nursing care to black patients. The need for this type of training for both faculty and students is discussed, a series of seminars…

  20. Chromatin compaction by condensin I, intra-kinetochore stretch and tension, and anaphase onset, in collective spindle assembly checkpoint interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsson, Leif

    2014-01-01

    The control mechanism in mitosis and meiosis by which cells decide to inhibit or allow segregation, the so-called spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), increases the fidelity of chromosome segregation. It acts like a clockwork mechanism which measures time in units of stable attachments of microtubules (MTs) to kinetochores (the order parameter). Stable MT–kinetochore attachments mediate poleward forces and ‘unstable’ attachments, acting alone or together with motor proteins on kinetochores via chromosomes, antipoleward forces. Stable and unstable attachments could be separated, and the non-equilibrium integrated MT mediated force acting on stably attached kinetochores was derived in a collective interaction (Matsson 2009 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 502101), in which kinetochores were treated as rigid protein complexes. As forces and tension in that model became equally distributed in all bioriented sister chromatid (SC) pairs, segregation was inhibited without need of a ‘wait-anaphase’ signal. In this generalization, the kinetochore is divided into an inner chromatin proximal complex and an outer MT proximal complex, and the integrated MT mediated force is divided into an integrated poleward and an integrated antipoleward force. The model also describes the collective interaction of condensin I with chromatin, which together with the MT mediated dynamics yields the putative in vivo tension in kinetochores and centromeric and pericentromeric chromatin, as a non-linear function of the order parameter. Supported by the compaction force and an increased stiffness in chromatin towards the end of metaphase, the two opposing integrated MT mediated poleward forces, together with metaphase oscillations, induce a swift and synchronized anaphase onset by first increasing the intra-kinetochore stretch. This increase lowers the SAC energy threshold, making a cleavage by separase of all cohesin tethering SC pairs in anaphase energetically possible, thereby reducing the

  1. Influence of functionalized silicones on hair fiber-fiber interactions and on the relationship with the macroscopic behavior of hair assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussaud, Anne; Fieschi-Corso, Lara

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that silicones alter hair surface properties and that silicones have a significant impact on the macroscopic behavior of hair assembly, such as visual appearance, combing performance and manageability of the hair. In order to fine-tune the chemistry of functionlized silicones for specific consumer benefits and hair types, we investigated the influence of silicones on hair fiber-fiber interactions and their correlation to hair volume. The incline plane fiber loop method, implemented with a high-precision motorized rotary stage, was used to quantify the fiber-fiber interactions. Low load static friction was studied as a function of polymer molecular weight, dose and chemical architecture. This information was related to the macroscopic behavior of hair assembly, using virgin curly hair in high humidity.

  2. Evaluation of the magnitude and effects of bundle duct interaction in fuel assemblies at developmental plant conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serell, D.C.; Kaplan, S.

    1980-09-01

    Purpose of this evaluation is to estimate the magnitude and effects of irradiation and creep induced fuel bundle deformations in the developmental plant. This report focuses on the trends of the results and the ability of present models to evaluate the assembly temperatures in the presence of bundle deformation. Although this analysis focuses on the developmental plant, the conclusions are applicable to LMFBR fuel assemblies in general if they have wire spacers

  3. MR-1S Interacts with PET100 and PET117 in Module-Based Assembly of Human Cytochrome c Oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidoni, Sara; Harbour, Michael E; Guerrero-Castillo, Sergio; Signes, Alba; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Taylor, Robert W; Tiranti, Valeria; Arnold, Susanne; Fernandez-Vizarra, Erika; Zeviani, Massimo

    2017-02-14

    The biogenesis of human cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is an intricate process in which three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded core subunits are assembled in a coordinated way with at least 11 nucleus-encoded subunits. Many chaperones shared between yeast and humans are involved in COX assembly. Here, we have used a MT-CO3 mutant cybrid cell line to define the composition of assembly intermediates and identify new human COX assembly factors. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis led us to modify the assembly model from a sequential pathway to a module-based process. Each module contains one of the three core subunits, together with different ancillary components, including HIGD1A. By the same analysis, we identified the short isoform of the myofibrillogenesis regulator 1 (MR-1S) as a new COX assembly factor, which works with the highly conserved PET100 and PET117 chaperones to assist COX biogenesis in higher eukaryotes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Development Of An Android Based Interactive Guide For The Berliner Medizinhistorisches Museum Der Charité

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Klempert

    2016-06-01

    The “BMM Guide” is available for all visitors of the museum on lendable devices or for students (professional audience using their personal devices and installing the application manually via the web-access eduroam. The guide is connected to the internet. It is designed to easily expand, update or transfer the content catalogue data. At the moment there is a connection between the exhibit and text-, image-, video- or virtual microscope content via QR-Code. The offline mode is limited to the connection between text content and the exhibit. We also implemented a multi-language support for English and German. The application has information like room plans, opening times and latest news of the museum. The museum guide is an easy handable, selfexplaining blended learning tool that can be embedded in the general education. .This guide for the exhibitions of the Berliner Medizinhistorisches Museum opens a new branch for self-study of students. Nevertheless he still has a potential to be integrated in curricular lectures in the future.

  5. Breaking-Cas—interactive design of guide RNAs for CRISPR-Cas experiments for ENSEMBL genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros, Juan C.; Franch, Mònica; Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; San-León, David; Montoliu, Lluis; Cubas, Pilar; Pazos, Florencio

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas technology is enabling targeted genome editing in multiple organisms with unprecedented accuracy and specificity by using RNA-guided nucleases. A critical point when planning a CRISPR/Cas experiment is the design of the guide RNA (gRNA), which directs the nuclease and associated machinery to the desired genomic location. This gRNA has to fulfil the requirements of the nuclease and lack homology with other genome sites that could lead to off-target effects. Here we introduce the Breaking-Cas system for the design of gRNAs for CRISPR/Cas experiments, including those based in the Cas9 nuclease as well as others recently introduced. The server has unique features not available in other tools, including the possibility of using all eukaryotic genomes available in ENSEMBL (currently around 700), placing variable PAM sequences at 5′ or 3′ and setting the guide RNA length and the scores per nucleotides. It can be freely accessed at: http://bioinfogp.cnb.csic.es/tools/breakingcas, and the code is available upon request. PMID:27166368

  6. Prediction of protein-protein interactions in dengue virus coat proteins guided by low resolution cryoEM structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Narayanaswamy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue virus along with the other members of the flaviviridae family has reemerged as deadly human pathogens. Understanding the mechanistic details of these infections can be highly rewarding in developing effective antivirals. During maturation of the virus inside the host cell, the coat proteins E and M undergo conformational changes, altering the morphology of the viral coat. However, due to low resolution nature of the available 3-D structures of viral assemblies, the atomic details of these changes are still elusive. Results In the present analysis, starting from Cα positions of low resolution cryo electron microscopic structures the residue level details of protein-protein interaction interfaces of dengue virus coat proteins have been predicted. By comparing the preexisting structures of virus in different phases of life cycle, the changes taking place in these predicted protein-protein interaction interfaces were followed as a function of maturation process of the virus. Besides changing the current notion about the presence of only homodimers in the mature viral coat, the present analysis indicated presence of a proline-rich motif at the protein-protein interaction interface of the coat protein. Investigating the conservation status of these seemingly functionally crucial residues across other members of flaviviridae family enabled dissecting common mechanisms used for infections by these viruses. Conclusions Thus, using computational approach the present analysis has provided better insights into the preexisting low resolution structures of virus assemblies, the findings of which can be made use of in designing effective antivirals against these deadly human pathogens.

  7. Short-range interactions between surfactants, silica species and EDTA⁴- salt during self-assembly of siliceous mesoporous molecular sieve: a UV Raman study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiayin; Liu, Liping; Li, Peng; Xiong, Guang

    2012-11-01

    The effects of surfactants, counterions and additive salts on the formation of siliceous mesoporous molecular sieves during self-assembly process were investigated by UV Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The surfactant molecules experience the rearrangement after adding the silica species and adjusting the pH value. The obvious change of the Raman bands related to the surfactants supports a cooperative interaction between surfactant and inorganic species during self-assembly process. The addition of EDTANa(4) to the system induces the interaction between the COO(-) groups of EDTA(4-) and silanol groups of silica and a strong interaction between the EDTA(4-) and the N(+)(CH(3))(3) groups of the surfactant. The above interactions may be the main reason for the salt effect. The new information from the change of the chemical bonds allows for a further analysis to the interactions of different salts between surfactants and silica species at molecular level. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary experience with interactive guided brain biopsies using a vertically opened 0.5-T MR system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, J.P.; Dietrich, J.; Lieberenz, S.; Schmidt, F.; Sorge, O.; Trantakis, C.; Seifert, V.; Kellermann, S.; Schober, R.; Franke, P.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate the feasibility and accuracy of brain biopsies performed within a vertically opened MR system. We worked with the interventional 0.5-T MR ''SIGNA SP'' (General Electric Medical Systems, Milwaukee, Wis.) with an integrated tracking device ''Flashpoint Position Encoder'' (Image Guided Technologies, USA). As a holding device for this instrument we constructed a special frame. The whole system allows an exact adjustment of an optimum biopsy direction and guidance of the biopsy in a non-stereotactic, interactive mode in near real-time. As biopsy tools we used MR-compatible aspiration and specially made side-cut needles (Daum, Germany; E-Z-EM, USA). We performed a prospective diagnostic brain biopsy study in 18 patients. Guidance of the needle was carried out using gradient-echo single-slice technique. The sample was taken after controlling the exact position of the needle tip on spin-echo images. In 12 cases an exact neuropathological diagnosis was possible. In 6 cases of negative biopsy (4 aspiration biopsies) the samples were not representative. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of interactive MR-guided minimally invasive brain biopsies in an open MR system. The best results were achieved using cut needles for biopsies of contrast-enhancing lesions visible on T1-weighted gradient-echo guidance sequence. (orig.)

  9. Using PyMOL to Explore the Effects of ph on Noncovalent Interactions between Immunoglobulin G and Protein A: A Guided-Inquiry Biochemistry Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche Allred, Zahilyn D.; Tai, Heeyoung; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Page, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Students' understandings of foundational concepts such as noncovalent interactions, pH and pK[subscript a] are crucial for success in undergraduate biochemistry courses. We developed a guided-inquiry activity to aid students in making connections between noncovalent interactions and pH/pK[subscript a]. Students explore these concepts by examining…

  10. Social interaction, globalization and computer-aided analysis a practical guide to developing social simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Osherenko, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This thorough, multidisciplinary study discusses the findings of social interaction and social simulation using understandable global examples. Shows the reader how to acquire intercultural data, illustrating each step with descriptive comments and program code.

  11. Interactive extraction of neural structures with user-guided morphological diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Yong Wan,; Otsuna, H.; Chi-Bin Chien,; Hansen, C.

    2012-01-01

    Extracting neural structures with their fine details from confocal volumes is essential to quantitative analysis in neurobiology research. Despite the abundance of various segmentation methods and tools, for complex neural structures, both manual and semi-automatic methods are ine ective either in full 3D or when user interactions are restricted to 2D slices. Novel interaction techniques and fast algorithms are demanded by neurobiologists to interactively and intuitively extract neural structures from confocal data. In this paper, we present such an algorithm-technique combination, which lets users interactively select desired structures from visualization results instead of 2D slices. By integrating the segmentation functions with a confocal visualization tool neurobiologists can easily extract complex neural structures within their typical visualization workflow.

  12. Interactive extraction of neural structures with user-guided morphological diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Yong Wan,

    2012-10-01

    Extracting neural structures with their fine details from confocal volumes is essential to quantitative analysis in neurobiology research. Despite the abundance of various segmentation methods and tools, for complex neural structures, both manual and semi-automatic methods are ine ective either in full 3D or when user interactions are restricted to 2D slices. Novel interaction techniques and fast algorithms are demanded by neurobiologists to interactively and intuitively extract neural structures from confocal data. In this paper, we present such an algorithm-technique combination, which lets users interactively select desired structures from visualization results instead of 2D slices. By integrating the segmentation functions with a confocal visualization tool neurobiologists can easily extract complex neural structures within their typical visualization workflow.

  13. SILVA tree viewer: interactive web browsing of the SILVA phylogenetic guide trees

    OpenAIRE

    Beccati, Alan; Gerken, Jan; Quast, Christian; Yilmaz, Pelin; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic trees are an important tool to study the evolutionary relationships among organisms. The huge amount of available taxa poses difficulties in their interactive visualization. This hampers the interaction with the users to provide feedback for the further improvement of the taxonomic framework. Results The SILVA Tree Viewer is a web application designed for visualizing large phylogenetic trees without requiring the download of any software tool or data files. The SILVA T...

  14. Interactive prostate segmentation using atlas-guided semi-supervised learning and adaptive feature selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Hyun [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Gao, Yaozong, E-mail: yzgao@cs.unc.edu [Department of Computer Science, Department of Radiology, and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Shi, Yinghuan, E-mail: syh@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Novel Software Technology, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Shen, Dinggang, E-mail: dgshen@med.unc.edu [Department of Radiology and BRIC, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 and Department of Brain and Cognitive Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Accurate prostate segmentation is necessary for maximizing the effectiveness of radiation therapy of prostate cancer. However, manual segmentation from 3D CT images is very time-consuming and often causes large intra- and interobserver variations across clinicians. Many segmentation methods have been proposed to automate this labor-intensive process, but tedious manual editing is still required due to the limited performance. In this paper, the authors propose a new interactive segmentation method that can (1) flexibly generate the editing result with a few scribbles or dots provided by a clinician, (2) fast deliver intermediate results to the clinician, and (3) sequentially correct the segmentations from any type of automatic or interactive segmentation methods. Methods: The authors formulate the editing problem as a semisupervised learning problem which can utilize a priori knowledge of training data and also the valuable information from user interactions. Specifically, from a region of interest near the given user interactions, the appropriate training labels, which are well matched with the user interactions, can be locally searched from a training set. With voting from the selected training labels, both confident prostate and background voxels, as well as unconfident voxels can be estimated. To reflect informative relationship between voxels, location-adaptive features are selected from the confident voxels by using regression forest and Fisher separation criterion. Then, the manifold configuration computed in the derived feature space is enforced into the semisupervised learning algorithm. The labels of unconfident voxels are then predicted by regularizing semisupervised learning algorithm. Results: The proposed interactive segmentation method was applied to correct automatic segmentation results of 30 challenging CT images. The correction was conducted three times with different user interactions performed at different time periods, in order to

  15. Interactive prostate segmentation using atlas-guided semi-supervised learning and adaptive feature selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Yinghuan; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate prostate segmentation is necessary for maximizing the effectiveness of radiation therapy of prostate cancer. However, manual segmentation from 3D CT images is very time-consuming and often causes large intra- and interobserver variations across clinicians. Many segmentation methods have been proposed to automate this labor-intensive process, but tedious manual editing is still required due to the limited performance. In this paper, the authors propose a new interactive segmentation method that can (1) flexibly generate the editing result with a few scribbles or dots provided by a clinician, (2) fast deliver intermediate results to the clinician, and (3) sequentially correct the segmentations from any type of automatic or interactive segmentation methods. Methods: The authors formulate the editing problem as a semisupervised learning problem which can utilize a priori knowledge of training data and also the valuable information from user interactions. Specifically, from a region of interest near the given user interactions, the appropriate training labels, which are well matched with the user interactions, can be locally searched from a training set. With voting from the selected training labels, both confident prostate and background voxels, as well as unconfident voxels can be estimated. To reflect informative relationship between voxels, location-adaptive features are selected from the confident voxels by using regression forest and Fisher separation criterion. Then, the manifold configuration computed in the derived feature space is enforced into the semisupervised learning algorithm. The labels of unconfident voxels are then predicted by regularizing semisupervised learning algorithm. Results: The proposed interactive segmentation method was applied to correct automatic segmentation results of 30 challenging CT images. The correction was conducted three times with different user interactions performed at different time periods, in order to

  16. Interactive prostate segmentation using atlas-guided semi-supervised learning and adaptive feature selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Gao, Yaozong; Shi, Yinghuan; Shen, Dinggang

    2014-11-01

    Accurate prostate segmentation is necessary for maximizing the effectiveness of radiation therapy of prostate cancer. However, manual segmentation from 3D CT images is very time-consuming and often causes large intra- and interobserver variations across clinicians. Many segmentation methods have been proposed to automate this labor-intensive process, but tedious manual editing is still required due to the limited performance. In this paper, the authors propose a new interactive segmentation method that can (1) flexibly generate the editing result with a few scribbles or dots provided by a clinician, (2) fast deliver intermediate results to the clinician, and (3) sequentially correct the segmentations from any type of automatic or interactive segmentation methods. The authors formulate the editing problem as a semisupervised learning problem which can utilize a priori knowledge of training data and also the valuable information from user interactions. Specifically, from a region of interest near the given user interactions, the appropriate training labels, which are well matched with the user interactions, can be locally searched from a training set. With voting from the selected training labels, both confident prostate and background voxels, as well as unconfident voxels can be estimated. To reflect informative relationship between voxels, location-adaptive features are selected from the confident voxels by using regression forest and Fisher separation criterion. Then, the manifold configuration computed in the derived feature space is enforced into the semisupervised learning algorithm. The labels of unconfident voxels are then predicted by regularizing semisupervised learning algorithm. The proposed interactive segmentation method was applied to correct automatic segmentation results of 30 challenging CT images. The correction was conducted three times with different user interactions performed at different time periods, in order to evaluate both the efficiency

  17. Interactive or static reports to guide clinical interpretation of cancer genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stacy W; Gagan, Jeffrey; Cerami, Ethan; Cronin, Angel M; Uno, Hajime; Oliver, Nelly; Lowenstein, Carol; Lederman, Ruth; Revette, Anna; Suarez, Aaron; Lee, Charlotte; Bryan, Jordan; Sholl, Lynette; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2018-05-01

    Misinterpretation of complex genomic data presents a major challenge in the implementation of precision oncology. We sought to determine whether interactive genomic reports with embedded clinician education and optimized data visualization improved genomic data interpretation. We conducted a randomized, vignette-based survey study to determine whether exposure to interactive reports for a somatic gene panel, as compared to static reports, improves physicians' genomic comprehension and report-related satisfaction (overall scores calculated across 3 vignettes, range 0-18 and 1-4, respectively, higher score corresponding with improved endpoints). One hundred and five physicians at a tertiary cancer center participated (29% participation rate): 67% medical, 20% pediatric, 7% radiation, and 7% surgical oncology; 37% female. Prior to viewing the case-based vignettes, 34% of the physicians reported difficulty making treatment recommendations based on the standard static report. After vignette/report exposure, physicians' overall comprehension scores did not differ by report type (mean score: interactive 11.6 vs static 10.5, difference = 1.1, 95% CI, -0.3, 2.5, P = .13). However, physicians exposed to the interactive report were more likely to correctly assess sequencing quality (P < .001) and understand when reports needed to be interpreted with caution (eg, low tumor purity; P = .02). Overall satisfaction scores were higher in the interactive group (mean score 2.5 vs 2.1, difference = 0.4, 95% CI, 0.2-0.7, P = .001). Interactive genomic reports may improve physicians' ability to accurately assess genomic data and increase report-related satisfaction. Additional research in users' genomic needs and efforts to integrate interactive reports into electronic health records may facilitate the implementation of precision oncology.

  18. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirukawa, Koji; Sakurada, Koichi.

    1992-01-01

    In a fuel assembly for a BWR type reactor, water rods or water crosses are disposed between fuel rods, and a value with a spring is disposed at the top of the coolant flow channel thereof, which opens a discharge port when pressure is increased to greater than a predetermined value. Further, a control element for the amount of coolant flow rate is inserted retractable to a control element guide tube formed at the lower portion of the water rod or the water cross. When the amount of control elements inserted to the control element guide tube is small and the inflown coolant flow rate is great, the void coefficient at the inside of the water rod is less than 5%. On the other hand, when the control elements are inserted, the flow resistance is increased, so that the void coefficient in the water rod is greater than 80%. When the pressure in the water rod is increased, the valve with the spring is raised to escape water or steams. Then, since the variation range of the change of the void coefficient can be controlled reliably by the amount of the control elements inserted, and nuclear fuel materials can be utilized effectively. (N.H.)

  19. An interactive virtual guide for the AR based visit of archaeological sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acampora, G.; Abate, A.F.; Ricciardi, S.

    2011-01-01

    One of the most interesting research lines about avatars is the design and the implementation of a synthetic behaviour able to drive avatar's actions according to an adaptive interaction paradigm. This aspect, indeed, is of fundamental importance to many advanced applications involving avatars and

  20. Understanding guide dog team interactions: design opportunities to support work and play

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauser, S.; Wakkary, R.L.; Neustaedter, C.

    2014-01-01

    The visually impaired have been a longstanding and well-recognized user group addressed in the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Recently, the study of sighted dog owners and their pets has gained interest in HCI. Despite this, there is a noticeable gap in the field with regards to research

  1. Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the Vehicle Assembly Industry: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Energy and Plant Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galitsky, Christina; Galitsky, Christina; Worrell, Ernst

    2008-01-01

    The motor vehicle industry in the U.S. spends about $3.6 billion on energy annually. In this report, we focus on auto assembly plants. In the U.S., over 70 assembly plants currently produce 13 million cars and trucks each year. In assembly plants, energy expenditures is a relatively small cost factor in the total production process. Still, as manufacturers face an increasingly competitive environment, energy efficiency improvements can provide a means to reduce costs without negatively affecting the yield or the quality of the product. In addition, reducing energy costs reduces the unpredictability associated with variable energy prices in today?s marketplace, which could negatively affect predictable earnings, an important element for publicly-traded companies such as those in the motor vehicle industry. In this report, we first present a summary of the motor vehicle assembly process and energy use. This is followed by a discussion of energy efficiency opportunities available for assembly plants. Where available, we provide specific primary energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies, as well as references to technical literature. If available, we have listed costs and typical payback periods. We include experiences of assembly plants worldwide with energy efficiency measures reviewed in the report. Our findings suggest that although most motor vehicle companies in the U.S. have energy management teams or programs, there are still opportunities available at individual plants to reduce energy consumption cost effectively. Further research on the economics of the measures for individual assembly plants, as part of an energy management program, is needed to assess the potential impact of selected technologies at these plants.

  2. Data Mining as a Guide for the Construction of Crosslinked Nanoparticles with Low Immunotoxicity via Controlling Polymer Chemistry and Supramolecular Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The potential immunotoxicity of nanoparticles that are currently being approved or in different phases of clinical trials or under rigorous in vitro and in vivo characterizations in several laboratories has recently raised special attention. Products with no apparent in vitro or in vivo toxicity may still trigger the various components of the immune system, unintentionally, and lead to serious adverse reactions. Cytokines are one of the useful biomarkers to predict the effect of biotherapeutics on modulating the immune system and for screening the immunotoxicity of nanoparticles, both in vitro and in vivo, and were found recently to partially predict the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of nanomaterials. Control of polymer chemistry and supramolecular assembly provides a great opportunity for construction of biocompatible nanoparticles for biomedical clinical applications. However, the sources of data collected regarding immunotoxicities of nanomaterials are diverse and experiments are usually conducted using different assays and under specific conditions, making direct comparisons nearly impossible and, thus, tailoring properties of nanomaterials based on the available data is challenging. In this account, the effects of chemical structure, crosslinking, degradability, morphology, concentration and surface chemistry on the immunotoxicity of an expansive array of polymeric nanomaterials will be highlighted, with focus being given on assays conducted using the same in vitro and in vivo models and experimental conditions. Furthermore, numerical descriptive values have been utilized, uniquely, to stand for induction of cytokines by nanoparticles. This treatment of available data provides a simple and easy way to compare the immunotoxicity of various nanomaterials, and the values were found to correlate-well with published data. Based on the investigated polymeric systems in this study, valuable information has been collected that aids in the

  3. Data Mining as a Guide for the Construction of Cross-Linked Nanoparticles with Low Immunotoxicity via Control of Polymer Chemistry and Supramolecular Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L

    2015-06-16

    The potential immunotoxicity of nanoparticles that are currently being approved, in different phases of clinical trials, or undergoing rigorous in vitro and in vivo characterizations in several laboratories has recently raised special attention. Products with no apparent in vitro or in vivo toxicity may still trigger various components of the immune system unintentionally and lead to serious adverse reactions. Cytokines are one of the useful biomarkers for predicting the effect of biotherapeutics on modulation of the immune system and for screening the immunotoxicity of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo, and they were recently found to partially predict the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of nanomaterials. Control of polymer chemistry and supramolecular assembly provides a great opportunity for the construction of biocompatible nanoparticles for biomedical clinical applications. However, the sources of data collected regarding immunotoxicities of nanomaterials are diverse, and experiments are usually conducted using different assays under specific conditions. As a result, making direct comparisons nearly impossible, and thus, tailoring the properties of nanomaterials on the basis of the available data is challenging. In this Account, the effects of chemical structure, cross-linking, degradability, morphology, concentration, and surface chemistry on the immunotoxicity of an expansive array of polymeric nanomaterials will be highlighted, with a focus on assays conducted using the same in vitro and in vivo models and experimental conditions. Furthermore, numerical descriptive values have been utilized uniquely to stand for induction of cytokines by nanoparticles. This treatment of available data provides a simple way to compare the immunotoxicities of various nanomaterials, and the values were found to correlate well with published data. On the basis of the polymeric systems investigated in this study, valuable information has been collected that

  4. Fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1979-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel assembly, hollow guide posts protrude into a fuel assembly and fitting grill from a biased spring pad with a plunger that moves with the spring pad plugging one end of each of the guide posts. A plate on the end fitting grill that has a hole for fluid discharge partially plugs the other end of the guide post. Pressurized water coolant that fills the guide post volume acts as a shock absorber and should the reactor core receive a major seismic or other shock, the fuel assembly is compelled to move towards a pad depending from a transversely disposed support grid. The pad bears against the spring pad and the plunger progressively blocks the orifices provided by slots in the guide posts thus gradually absorbing the applied shock. After the orifice has been completely blocked, controlled fluid discharge continues through a hole coil spring cooperating in the attenuation of the shock. (author)

  5. QuickRNASeq: Guide for Pipeline Implementation and for Interactive Results Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen; Zhao, Shanrong; Zhang, Chi; Vincent, Michael S; Zhang, Baohong

    2018-01-01

    Sequencing of transcribed RNA molecules (RNA-Seq) has been used wildly for studying cell transcriptomes in bulk or at the single-cell level (Wang et al., Nat Rev Genet, 10:57-63, 2009; Ozsolak and Milos, Nat Rev Genet, 12:87-98, 2011; Sandberg, Nat Methods, 11:22-24, 2014) and is becoming the de facto technology for investigating gene expression level changes in various biological conditions, on the time course, and under drug treatments. Furthermore, RNA-Seq data helped identify fusion genes that are related to certain cancers (Maher et al., Nature, 458:97-101, 2009). Differential gene expression before and after drug treatments provides insights to mechanism of action, pharmacodynamics of the drugs, and safety concerns (Dixit et al., Genomics, 107:178-188, 2016). Because each RNA-Seq run generates tens to hundreds of millions of short reads with size ranging from 50 to 200 bp, a tool that deciphers these short reads to an integrated and digestible analysis report is in high demand. QuickRNASeq (Zhao et al., BMC Genomics, 17:39-53, 2016) is an application for large-scale RNA-Seq data analysis and real-time interactive visualization of complex data sets. This application automates the use of several of the best open-source tools to efficiently generate user friendly, easy to share, and ready to publish report. Figures in this protocol illustrate some of the interactive plots produced by QuickRNASeq. The visualization features of the application have been further improved since its first publication in early 2016. The original QuickRNASeq publication (Zhao et al., BMC Genomics, 17:39-53, 2016) provided details of background, software selection, and implementation. Here, we outline the steps required to implement QuickRNASeq in user's own environment, as well as demonstrate some basic yet powerful utilities of the advanced interactive visualization modules in the report.

  6. Fuel assembly supporting structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisch, F.W.; Fuchs, H.P.; Knoedler, D.; Steinke, A.; Steven, J.

    1976-01-01

    For use in forming the core of a pressurized-water reactor, a fuel assembly supporting structure for holding a bundle of interspaced fuel rods, is formed by interspaced end pieces having holes in which the end portions of control rod guide tubes are inserted, fuel rod spacer grids being positioned by these guide tubes between the end pieces. The end pieces are fastened to the end portions of the guide tubes, to integrate the supporting structure, and in the case of at least one of the end pieces, this is done by means which releases that end piece from the guide tubes when the end pieces receive an abnormal thrust force directed towards each other and which would otherwise place the guide tubes under a compressive stress that would cause them to buckle. The spacer grids normally hold the fuel rods interspaced by distances determined by nuclear physics, and buckling of the control rod guide tubes can distort the fuel rod spacer grids with consequent dearrangement of the fuel rod interspacing. A sudden loss of pressure in a pressurized-water reactor pressure vessel can result in the pressurized coolant in the vessel discharging from the vessel at such high velocity as to result in the abnormal thrust force on the end pieces of each fuel assembly, which could cause buckling of the control rod guide tubes when the end pieces are fixed to them in the normal rigid and unyielding manner

  7. Interplay between Carotenoids, Abscisic Acid and Jasmonate Guides the Compatible Rice-Meloidogyne graminicola Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Kyndt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have characterized the role of carotenoids and chlorophyll in the compatible interaction between the sedentary root knot nematode (RKN Meloidogyne graminicola and the monocot model plant rice (Oryza sativa. Previous transcriptome data showed a differential expression of carotenoid and chlorophyll biosynthesis genes in nematode-induced giant cells and gall tissue. Metabolite measurement showed that galls indeed accumulate chlorophyll a, b and carotenoids, as well as the hormone abscisic acid (ABA. When ABA was externally applied on rice plants, or when ABA-biosynthesis was inhibited, a significant increase in gall formation and nematode development was found, showing the complex role of ABA in this interaction. ABA application suppressed jasmonic acid (JA levels in the plants, while ABA-biosynthesis inhibition lead to increased JA levels confirming an antagonism between ABA and JA in rice roots. In addition, combined applications of ABA and JA showed that the ABA-effect can overcome JA-induced defense. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the accumulation of chlorophyll and carotenoid precursors would be beneficial to nematode infection. Indeed, when chemically blocking the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway at different steps, which leads to differential accumulation of carotenoids and chlorophyll in the plants, a positive and clear link between accumulation of carotenoids and chlorophyll and rice susceptibility to RKN was detected.

  8. Effects of nonfiction guided interactive read-alouds and think-alouds on fourth grader's depth of content area science vocabulary knowledge and comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Tania Tamara

    Effects of nonfiction guided interactive read-alouds and think-alouds as a supplement to basal science textbooks on three vocabulary measures, definitions, examples, and characteristics, and one multiple-choice comprehension measure were assessed for 127 fourth graders over three time periods: pretest, posttest, and a 2-week delayed posttest. Two of three fourth-grade elementary science teachers implemented a series of 12 content-enhanced guided interactive scripted lessons. Two of these teachers implemented two treatments each. The first condition employed basal science textbooks as the text for guided interactive read-alouds and think-alouds while the second treatment employed basal science textbooks in conjunction with nonfiction text sets as the texts for guided interactive read-alouds and think-alouds. The third teacher, guided by traditional lesson plans, provided students with silent independent reading instruction using basal science textbooks. Multivariate analyses of variance and analyses of variance tests showed that mean scores for both treatment groups significantly improved on definitions and characteristics measures at posttest and either stabilized or slightly declined at delayed posttest. The treatment-plus group lost considerably on the examples posttest measure. The treatment group improved mean scores on the examples posttest measure, outperforming the treatment-plus group and the control group. Alternately, the control group significantly improved on the delayed posttest examples measure. Additionally, the two groups implementing guided interactive read-alouds and think-alouds performed better than the independent reading group on multiple-choice comprehension measures at posttest and sustained those gains 2 weeks later on delayed posttests. Findings maintain the incremental nature of vocabulary acquisition and development research and emphasize the roles of listening and speaking as critical features for integrating vocabulary into long

  9. Design principles for cancer therapy guided by changes in complexity of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzekry, Sebastian; Tuszynski, Jack A; Rietman, Edward A; Lakka Klement, Giannoula

    2015-05-28

    The ever-increasing expanse of online bioinformatics data is enabling new ways to, not only explore the visualization of these data, but also to apply novel mathematical methods to extract meaningful information for clinically relevant analysis of pathways and treatment decisions. One of the methods used for computing topological characteristics of a space at different spatial resolutions is persistent homology. This concept can also be applied to network theory, and more specifically to protein-protein interaction networks, where the number of rings in an individual cancer network represents a measure of complexity. We observed a linear correlation of R = -0.55 between persistent homology and 5-year survival of patients with a variety of cancers. This relationship was used to predict the proteins within a protein-protein interaction network with the most impact on cancer progression. By re-computing the persistent homology after computationally removing an individual node (protein) from the protein-protein interaction network, we were able to evaluate whether such an inhibition would lead to improvement in patient survival. The power of this approach lied in its ability to identify the effects of inhibition of multiple proteins and in the ability to expose whether the effect of a single inhibition may be amplified by inhibition of other proteins. More importantly, we illustrate specific examples of persistent homology calculations, which correctly predict the survival benefit observed effects in clinical trials using inhibitors of the identified molecular target. We propose that computational approaches such as persistent homology may be used in the future for selection of molecular therapies in clinic. The technique uses a mathematical algorithm to evaluate the node (protein) whose inhibition has the highest potential to reduce network complexity. The greater the drop in persistent homology, the greater reduction in network complexity, and thus a larger

  10. Building new discrete supramolecular assemblies through the interaction of iso-tellurazole N-oxides with Lewis acids and bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Peter C; Jenkins, Hilary A; Britten, James F; Vargas-Baca, Ignacio

    2017-10-13

    The supramolecular macrocycles spontaneously assembled by iso-tellurazole N-oxides are stable towards Lewis bases as strong as N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC) but readily react with Lewis acids such as BR 3 (R = Ph, F). The electron acceptor ability of the tellurium atom is greatly enhanced in the resulting O-bonded adducts, which consequently enables binding to a variety of Lewis bases that includes acetonitrile, 4-dimethylaminopyridine, 4,4'-bipyridine, triphenyl phosphine, a N-heterocyclic carbene and a second molecule of iso-tellurazole N-oxide.

  11. Competitive interactions between forest trees are driven by species' trait hierarchy, not phylogenetic or functional similarity: implications for forest community assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunstler, Georges; Lavergne, Sébastien; Courbaud, Benoît; Thuiller, Wilfried; Vieilledent, Ghislain; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Kattge, Jens; Coomes, David A

    2012-08-01

    The relative importance of competition vs. environmental filtering in the assembly of communities is commonly inferred from their functional and phylogenetic structure, on the grounds that similar species compete most strongly for resources and are therefore less likely to coexist locally. This approach ignores the possibility that competitive effects can be determined by relative positions of species on a hierarchy of competitive ability. Using growth data, we estimated 275 interaction coefficients between tree species in the French mountains. We show that interaction strengths are mainly driven by trait hierarchy and not by functional or phylogenetic similarity. On the basis of this result, we thus propose that functional and phylogenetic convergence in local tree community might be due to competition-sorting species with different competitive abilities and not only environmental filtering as commonly assumed. We then show a functional and phylogenetic convergence of forest structure with increasing plot age, which supports this view. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  12. Controlled Self-Assembly of Low-Dimensional Alq3 Nanostructures from 1D Nanowires to 2D Plates via Intermolecular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianmin; Yin, Baipeng; Fu, Shaoyan; Jin, Cuihong; Liu, Xin; Bian, Zhenpan; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Lu; Li, Xiaoyu

    2018-03-01

    Due to the intense influence of the shape and size of the photon building blocks on the limitation and guidance of optical waves, an important strategy is the fabrication of different structures. Herein, organic semiconductor tris-(8-hydroxyquinoline)aluminium (Alq3) nanostructures with controllable morphology, ranging from one-dimensional nanowires to two-dimensional plates, have been prepared through altering intermolecular interactions with employing the anti-solvent diffusion cooperate with solvent-volatilization induced self-assembly method. The morphologies of the formed nanostructures, which are closely related to the stacking modes of the molecules, can be exactly controlled by altering the polarity of anti-solvents that can influence various intermolecular interactions. The synthesis strategy reported here can potentially be extended to other functional organic nanomaterials.

  13. Interactions of iron-bound frataxin with ISCU and ferredoxin on the cysteine desulfurase complex leading to Fe-S cluster assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kai; Frederick, Ronnie O; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2018-06-01

    Frataxin (FXN) is involved in mitochondrial iron‑sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis and serves to accelerate Fe-S cluster formation. FXN deficiency is associated with Friedreich ataxia, a neurodegenerative disease. We have used a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy to investigate interactions among the components of the biological machine that carries out the assembly of iron‑sulfur clusters in human mitochondria. Our results show that FXN tightly binds a single Fe 2+ but not Fe 3+ . While FXN (with or without bound Fe 2+ ) does not bind the scaffold protein ISCU directly, the two proteins interact mutually when each is bound to the cysteine desulfurase complex ([NFS1] 2 :[ISD11] 2 :[Acp] 2 ), abbreviated as (NIA) 2 , where "N" represents the cysteine desulfurase (NFS1), "I" represents the accessory protein (ISD11), and "A" represents acyl carrier protein (Acp). FXN binds (NIA) 2 weakly in the absence of ISCU but more strongly in its presence. Fe 2+ -FXN binds to the (NIA) 2 -ISCU 2 complex without release of iron. However, upon the addition of both l-cysteine and a reductant (either reduced FDX2 or DTT), Fe 2+ is released from FXN as consistent with Fe 2+ -FXN being the proximal source of iron for Fe-S cluster assembly. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Interaction of the iron–sulfur cluster assembly protein IscU with the Hsc66/Hsc20 molecular chaperone system of Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Kevin G.; Silberg, Jonathan J.; Vickery, Larry E.

    2000-01-01

    The iscU gene in bacteria is located in a gene cluster encoding proteins implicated in iron–sulfur cluster assembly and an hsc70-type (heat shock cognate) molecular chaperone system, iscSUA-hscBA. To investigate possible interactions between these systems, we have overproduced and purified the IscU protein from Escherichia coli and have studied its interactions with the hscA and hscB gene products Hsc66 and Hsc20. IscU and its iron–sulfur complex (IscU–Fe/S) stimulated the basal steady-state ATPase activity of Hsc66 weakly in the absence of Hsc20 but, in the presence of Hsc20, increased the ATPase activity up to 480-fold. Hsc20 also decreased the apparent Km for IscU stimulation of Hsc66 ATPase activity, and surface plasmon resonance studies revealed that Hsc20 enhances binding of IscU to Hsc66. Surface plasmon resonance and isothermal titration calorimetry further showed that IscU and Hsc20 form a complex, and Hsc20 may thereby aid in the targeting of IscU to Hsc66. These results establish a direct and specific role for the Hsc66/Hsc20 chaperone system in functioning with isc gene components for the assembly of iron–sulfur cluster proteins. PMID:10869428

  15. moBeat: Using interactive music to guide and motivate users during aerobic exercising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vlist, Bram; Bartneck, Christoph; Mäueler, Sebastian

    2011-06-01

    An increasing number of people are having trouble staying fit and maintaining a healthy bodyweight because of lack of physical activity. Getting people to exercise is crucial. However, many struggle with developing healthy exercising habits, due to hurdles like having to leave the house and the boring character of endurance exercising. In this paper, we report on a design project that explores the use of audio to motivate and provide feedback and guidance during exercising in a home environment. We developed moBeat, a system that provides intensity-based coaching while exercising, giving real-time feedback on training pace and intensity by means of interactive music. We conducted a within-subject comparison between our moBeat system and a commercially available heart rate watch. With moBeat, we achieved a comparable success rate: our system has a significant, positive influence on intrinsic motivation and attentional focus, but we did not see significant differences with regard to either perceived exertion or effectiveness. Although promising, future research is needed.

  16. Quantifying the thermodynamic interactions of polyhedral boranes in solution to guide nanocomposite fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutz, M.; Eastwood, Eric; Lee, Mark E.; Bowen, Daniel E.; Dadmun, M. D.

    2012-01-01

    The solubility of boron containing nanoparticles in a variety of solvents is quantified using static light scattering in conjunction with refractometry. Four polyhedral boranes were tested in this work, using refractometry to obtain dn/dc, while static light scattering quantifies A 2 . A 2 obtained from these measurements was then used to calculate χ, the solute–solvent interaction parameter, and the Hildebrand solubility parameter, δ, which provides a quantifiable method to identify good solvents. Of the nanoparticles studied, 1,3-di-o-carboranylpropane is thermodynamically stable in toluene, with a χ less than 0.5, a solubility limit of 2.47 mg/mL, and all solutions remaining clear with no visible particle settling. For all of the particles tested, there was good correlation between the physical observations of the solutions, χ, and δ. For instance, lower values of χ correspond to a smaller radius of gyration (R g ). A list of suitable solvents based on δ is also presented.

  17. Quantifying the thermodynamic interactions of polyhedral boranes in solution to guide nanocomposite fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutz, M. [University of Tennessee, Department of Chemistry (United States); Eastwood, Eric [Honeywell Kansas City Plant (United States); Lee, Mark E. [University of Missouri (United States); Bowen, Daniel E. [Honeywell Kansas City Plant (United States); Dadmun, M. D., E-mail: dad@utk.edu [University of Tennessee, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The solubility of boron containing nanoparticles in a variety of solvents is quantified using static light scattering in conjunction with refractometry. Four polyhedral boranes were tested in this work, using refractometry to obtain dn/dc, while static light scattering quantifies A{sub 2}. A{sub 2} obtained from these measurements was then used to calculate {chi}, the solute-solvent interaction parameter, and the Hildebrand solubility parameter, {delta}, which provides a quantifiable method to identify good solvents. Of the nanoparticles studied, 1,3-di-o-carboranylpropane is thermodynamically stable in toluene, with a {chi} less than 0.5, a solubility limit of 2.47 mg/mL, and all solutions remaining clear with no visible particle settling. For all of the particles tested, there was good correlation between the physical observations of the solutions, {chi}, and {delta}. For instance, lower values of {chi} correspond to a smaller radius of gyration (R{sub g}). A list of suitable solvents based on {delta} is also presented.

  18. Molecular characterization and intermolecular interaction of coat protein of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus: implications for virus assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshrestha, Saurabh; Hallan, Vipin; Sharma, Anshul; Seth, Chandrika Attri; Chauhan, Anjali; Zaidi, Aijaz Asghar

    2013-09-01

    Coat protein (CP) and RNA3 from Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV-rose), the most prevalent virus infecting rose in India, were characterized and regions in the coat protein important for self-interaction, during dimer formation were identified. The sequence analysis of CP and partial RNA 3 revealed that the rose isolate of PNRSV in India belongs to PV-32 group of PNRSV isolates. Apart from the already established group specific features of PV-32 group member's additional group-specific and host specific features were also identified. Presence of methionine at position 90 in the amino acid sequence alignment of PNRSV CP gene (belonging to PV-32 group) was identified as the specific conserved feature for the rose isolates of PNRSV. As protein-protein interaction plays a vital role in the infection process, an attempt was made to identify the portions of PNRSV CP responsible for self-interaction using yeast two-hybrid system. It was found (after analysis of the deletion clones) that the C-terminal region of PNRSV CP (amino acids 153-226) plays a vital role in this interaction during dimer formation. N-terminal of PNRSV CP is previously known to be involved in CP-RNA interactions, but our results also suggested that N-terminal of PNRSV CP represented by amino acids 1-77 also interacts with C-terminal (amino acids 153-226) in yeast two-hybrid system, suggesting its probable involvement in the CP-CP interaction.

  19. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vikhorev, Yu.V.; Biryukov, G.I.; Kirilyuk, N.A.; Lobanov, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    A fuel assembly is proposed for nuclear reactors allowing remote replacement of control rod bundles or their shifting from one assembly to another, i.e., their multipurpose use. This leads to a significant increase in fuel assembly usability. In the fuel assembly the control rod bundle is placed in guide tube channels to which baffles are attached for fuel element spacing. The remote handling of control rods is provided by a hollow cylinder with openings in its lower bottom through which the control rods pass. All control rods in a bundle are mounted to a cross beam which in turn is mounted in the cylinder and is designed for grasping the whole rod bundle by a remotely controlled telescopic mechanism in bundle replacement or shifting. (Z.M.)

  20. Chaperoning 5S RNA assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madru, Clément; Lebaron, Simon; Blaud, Magali; Delbos, Lila; Pipoli, Juliana; Pasmant, Eric; Réty, Stéphane; Leulliot, Nicolas

    2015-07-01

    In eukaryotes, three of the four ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs)—the 5.8S, 18S, and 25S/28S rRNAs—are processed from a single pre-rRNA transcript and assembled into ribosomes. The fourth rRNA, the 5S rRNA, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and is assembled into the 5S ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), containing ribosomal proteins Rpl5/uL18 and Rpl11/uL5, prior to its incorporation into preribosomes. In mammals, the 5S RNP is also a central regulator of the homeostasis of the tumor suppressor p53. The nucleolar localization of the 5S RNP and its assembly into preribosomes are performed by a specialized complex composed of Rpf2 and Rrs1 in yeast or Bxdc1 and hRrs1 in humans. Here we report the structural and functional characterization of the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex alone, in complex with the 5S RNA, and within pre-60S ribosomes. We show that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex contains a specialized 5S RNA E-loop-binding module, contacts the Rpl5 protein, and also contacts the ribosome assembly factor Rsa4 and the 25S RNA. We propose that the Rpf2-Rrs1 complex establishes a network of interactions that guide the incorporation of the 5S RNP in preribosomes in the initial conformation prior to its rotation to form the central protuberance found in the mature large ribosomal subunit. © 2015 Madru et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Interactive navigation-guided ophthalmic plastic surgery: the utility of 3D CT-DCG-guided dacryolocalization in secondary acquired lacrimal duct obstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali MJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Javed Ali,1 Swati Singh,1 Milind N Naik,1 Swathi Kaliki,2 Tarjani Vivek Dave1 1Govindram Seksaria Institute of Dacryology, 2The Operation Eyesight Universal Institute for Eye Cancer, L V Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, Telangana, India Aim: The aim of this study was to report the preliminary experience with the techniques and utility of navigation-guided, 3D, computed tomography–dacryocystography (CT-DCG in the management of secondary acquired lacrimal drainage obstructions.Methods: Stereotactic surgeries using CT-DCG as the intraoperative image-guiding tool were performed in 3 patients. One patient had nasolacrimal duct obstruction (NLDO following a complete maxillectomy for a sinus malignancy, and the other 2 had NLDO following extensive maxillofacial trauma. All patients underwent a 3D CT-DCG. Image-guided dacryolocalization (IGDL was performed using the intraoperative image-guided StealthStation™ system in the electromagnetic mode. All patients underwent navigation-guided powered endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR. The utility of intraoperative dacryocystographic guidance and the ability to localize the lacrimal drainage system in the altered endoscopic anatomical milieu were noted.Results: Intraoperative geometric localization of the lacrimal sac and the nasolacrimal duct could be easily achieved. Constant orientation of the lacrimal drainage system was possible while navigating in the vicinity of altered endoscopic perilacrimal anatomy. Useful clues with regard to modifications while performing a powered endoscopic DCR could be obtained. Surgeries could be performed with utmost safety and precision, thereby avoiding complications. Detailed preoperative 3D CT-DCG reconstructions with constant intraoperative dacryolocalization were found to be essential for successful outcomes.Conclusion: The 3D CT-DCG-guided navigation procedure is very useful while performing endoscopic DCRs in cases of secondary acquired and complex

  2. OligArch: A software tool to allow artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS to guide the autonomous self-assembly of long DNA constructs from multiple DNA single strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. Bradley

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biologists wishing to self-assemble large DNA (L-DNA constructs from small DNA fragments made by automated synthesis need fragments that hybridize predictably. Such predictability is difficult to obtain with nucleotides built from just the four standard nucleotides. Natural DNA's peculiar combination of strong and weak G:C and A:T pairs, the context-dependence of the strengths of those pairs, unimolecular strand folding that competes with desired interstrand hybridization, and non-Watson–Crick interactions available to standard DNA, all contribute to this unpredictability. In principle, adding extra nucleotides to the genetic alphabet can improve the predictability and reliability of autonomous DNA self-assembly, simply by increasing the information density of oligonucleotide sequences. These extra nucleotides are now available as parts of artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGIS, and tools are now available to generate entirely standard DNA from AEGIS DNA during PCR amplification. Here, we describe the OligArch (for "oligonucleotide architecting" software, an application that permits synthetic biologists to engineer optimally self-assembling DNA constructs from both six- and eight-letter AEGIS alphabets. This software has been used to design oligonucleotides that self-assemble to form complete genes from 20 or more single-stranded synthetic oligonucleotides. OligArch is therefore a key element of a scalable and integrated infrastructure for the rapid and designed engineering of biology.

  3. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bando, Masaru.

    1993-01-01

    As neutron irradiation progresses on a fuel assembly of an FBR type reactor, a strong force is exerted to cause ruptures if the arrangement of fuel elements is not displaced, whereas the fuel elements may be brought into direct contact with each other not by way of spacers to cause burning damages if the arrangement is displaced. In the present invention, the circumference of fuel elements arranged in a normal triangle lattice is surrounded by a wrapper tube having a hexagonal cross section, wire spacers are wound therearound, and deformable spacers are distributed to optional positions for fuel elements in the wrapper tube. Interaction between the fuel elements caused by irradiation is effectively absorbed, thereby enabling to delay the occurrence of the rupture and burning damages of the elements. (N.H.)

  4. Mediator binds to boundaries of chromosomal interaction domains and to proteins involved in DNA looping, RNA metabolism, chromatin remodeling, and actin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chereji, Razvan V; Bharatula, Vasudha; Elfving, Nils; Blomberg, Jeanette; Larsson, Miriam; Morozov, Alexandre V; Broach, James R; Björklund, Stefan

    2017-09-06

    Mediator is a multi-unit molecular complex that plays a key role in transferring signals from transcriptional regulators to RNA polymerase II in eukaryotes. We have combined biochemical purification of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mediator from chromatin with chromatin immunoprecipitation in order to reveal Mediator occupancy on DNA genome-wide, and to identify proteins interacting specifically with Mediator on the chromatin template. Tandem mass spectrometry of proteins in immunoprecipitates of mediator complexes revealed specific interactions between Mediator and the RSC, Arp2/Arp3, CPF, CF 1A and Lsm complexes in chromatin. These factors are primarily involved in chromatin remodeling, actin assembly, mRNA 3'-end processing, gene looping and mRNA decay, but they have also been shown to enter the nucleus and participate in Pol II transcription. Moreover, we have found that Mediator, in addition to binding Pol II promoters, occupies chromosomal interacting domain (CID) boundaries and that Mediator in chromatin associates with proteins that have been shown to interact with CID boundaries, such as Sth1, Ssu72 and histone H4. This suggests that Mediator plays a significant role in higher-order genome organization. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Single-molecule sequencing and Hi-C-based proximity-guided assembly of amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) chromosomes provide insights into genome evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Lightfoot, D. J.

    2017-08-29

    Background: Amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) was a food staple among the ancient civilizations of Central and South America that has recently received increased attention due to the high nutritional value of the seeds, with the potential to help alleviate malnutrition and food security concerns, particularly in arid and semiarid regions of the developing world. Here, we present a reference-quality assembly of the amaranth genome which will assist the agronomic development of the species.

  6. Shock absorbing structure for nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1981-01-01

    A hydraulic apparatus is described that absorbs shocks that may be applied to fuel assemblies. Spring pads mounted on the upper end fittings of the fuel assemblies have plungers that move within hollow guide posts attached to the upper grids of the fuel assemblies. (L.L.)

  7. Analysis of the leaf transcriptome of Musa acuminata during interaction with Mycosphaerella musicola: gene assembly, annotation and marker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Marco A N; de Cruz, Viviane Oliveira; Emediato, Flavia L; de Teixeira, Cristiane Camargo; Azevedo, Vânia C Rennó; Brasileiro, Ana C M; Amorim, Edson P; Ferreira, Claudia F; Martins, Natalia F; Togawa, Roberto C; Júnior, Georgios J Pappas; da Silva, Orzenil Bonfim; Miller, Robert N G

    2013-02-05

    Although banana (Musa sp.) is an important edible crop, contributing towards poverty alleviation and food security, limited transcriptome datasets are available for use in accelerated molecular-based breeding in this genus. 454 GS-FLX Titanium technology was employed to determine the sequence of gene transcripts in genotypes of Musa acuminata ssp. burmannicoides Calcutta 4 and M. acuminata subgroup Cavendish cv. Grande Naine, contrasting in resistance to the fungal pathogen Mycosphaerella musicola, causal organism of Sigatoka leaf spot disease. To enrich for transcripts under biotic stress responses, full length-enriched cDNA libraries were prepared from whole plant leaf materials, both uninfected and artificially challenged with pathogen conidiospores. The study generated 846,762 high quality sequence reads, with an average length of 334 bp and totalling 283 Mbp. De novo assembly generated 36,384 and 35,269 unigene sequences for M. acuminata Calcutta 4 and Cavendish Grande Naine, respectively. A total of 64.4% of the unigenes were annotated through Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) similarity analyses against public databases.Assembled sequences were functionally mapped to Gene Ontology (GO) terms, with unigene functions covering a diverse range of molecular functions, biological processes and cellular components. Genes from a number of defense-related pathways were observed in transcripts from each cDNA library. Over 99% of contig unigenes mapped to exon regions in the reference M. acuminata DH Pahang whole genome sequence. A total of 4068 genic-SSR loci were identified in Calcutta 4 and 4095 in Cavendish Grande Naine. A subset of 95 potential defense-related gene-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were validated for specific amplification and polymorphism across M. acuminata accessions. Fourteen loci were polymorphic, with alleles per polymorphic locus ranging from 3 to 8 and polymorphism information content ranging from 0.34 to 0.82. A large set

  8. Interaction between a hydrophobic rigid face and a flexible alkyl tail: Thermodynamics of self-assembling of sodium cholate and SDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Guangyue; Sheng, Jianhui; Wang, Yujie; Wu, Hui; Zhao, Yang; Zhuo, Kelei; Bastos, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Critical concentrations and enthalpy changes for stepwise aggregation are obtained by ITC. • ITC allowed the thermodynamic characterization for NaCA/SDS self-assembling. • Steroid face-to-alkyl chain hydrophobic interaction tends to be saturated at molar ratio 1:1.5. • Alkyl-steroid interaction favors micellization of NaCA/SDS and the mixture shows nonideal behavior. • Intermolecular interaction and excess enthalpies were discussed according to Rubingh’s model. - Abstract: The thermodynamics of molecular self-assembling of an anionic biosurfactant, sodium cholate (NaCA) and its mixtures with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) in aqueous solution have been investigated by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), along with fluorescence and conductivity measurements. Different critical concentrations were obtained by these three techniques – critical pre-micelle concentration (cmc_p_r_e) and critical micelle concentration (cmc) for pure NaCA, and critical micelle concentrations (cmc_m_i_x) for the mixed systems with differently initial SDS concentrations. Importantly, ITC allowed us to directly measure the enthalpy changes of pre-micelle formation (ΔH_p_r_e_m_i_c = (−0.28 ± 0.02) kJ·mol"−"1) and of micelle formation (ΔH_m_i_c = (−1.76 ± 0.05) kJ·mol"−"1) for pure NaCA as well as the enthalpies for micellization for the mixed systems NaCA/SDS. The non-ideality of the mixed surfactant solution was evaluated in terms of interaction parameters and excess enthalpies that were calculated in the light of Clint’s and Rubingh’s models. It was found that there is an obvious synergistic effect in the NaCA/SDS mixed system. From all these results we can ascribe the strong interaction between the same charge surfactants NaCA and SDS to the structural difference in their hydrophobic moieties. In fact, the flexible alkyl chains of SDS and the non-planar hydrophobic β-faces of NaCA tend to have a more compact packing than pure NaCA.

  9. Thermodynamic solution properties of pefloxacin mesylate and its interactions with organized assemblies of anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usman, Muhammad; Rashid, Muhammad Abid; Mansha, Asim; Siddiq, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Free energy of adsorption is more negative than free energy of micellization. • Micellization becomes more spontaneous at high temperature. • There is strong interaction between PFM and SDS. - Abstract: This manuscript reports the physicochemical behavior of antibiotic amphiphilic drug pefloxacin mesylate (PFM) and its interaction with anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The data of surface tension and electrical conductivity are helpful to detect the CMC as well as to calculate surface parameters, i.e. surface pressure, π, surface excess concentration, Γ, area per molecule of drug and standard Gibbs free energy of adsorption, ΔG ads and thermodynamic parameters like standard free energy of micellization, ΔG m , standard enthalpy of micellization, ΔH m and standard entropy of micellization, ΔS m . The interaction of this drug with anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was studied by electrical conductivity and UV/visible spectroscopy. This enabled us to compute the values of partition coefficient (K x ), free energy of partition, ΔG p , binding constant, K b , free energy of binding, ΔG b , number of drug molecules per micelle, n, and thermodynamic parameters of drug–surfactant interaction

  10. Modeling the formation of ordered nano-assemblies comprised by dendrimers and linear polyelectrolytes: The role of Coulombic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, E.; Karatasos, K.

    2012-10-01

    Models of mixtures of peripherally charged dendrimers with oppositely charged linear polyelectrolytes in the presence of explicit solvent are studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations. Under the influence of varying strength of electrostatic interactions, these systems appear to form dynamically arrested film-like interconnected structures in the polymer-rich phase. Acting like a pseudo-thermodynamic inverse temperature, the increase of the strength of the Coulombic interactions drive the polymeric constituents of the mixture to a gradual dynamic freezing-in. The timescale of the average density fluctuations of the formed complexes initially increases in the weak electrostatic regime reaching a finite limit as the strength of electrostatic interactions grow. Although the models are overall electrically neutral, during this process the dendrimer/linear complexes develop a polar character with an excess charge mainly close to the periphery of the dendrimers. The morphological characteristics of the resulted pattern are found to depend on the size of the polymer chains on account of the distinct conformational features assumed by the complexed linear polyelectrolytes of different length. In addition, the length of the polymer chain appears to affect the dynamics of the counterions, thus affecting the ionic transport properties of the system. It appears, therefore, that the strength of electrostatic interactions together with the length of the linear polyelectrolytes are parameters to which these systems are particularly responsive, offering thus the possibility for a better control of the resulted structure and the electric properties of these soft-colloidal systems.

  11. Alternative stable states and alternative endstates of community assembly through intra- and interspecific positive and negative interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerla, D.J.; Mooij, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Positive and negative interactions within and between species may occur simultaneously, with the net effect depending on population densities. For instance, at low densities plants may ameliorate stress, while competition for resources dominates at higher densities. Here, we propose a simple

  12. CCBuilder: an interactive web-based tool for building, designing and assessing coiled-coil protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher W; Bruning, Marc; Ibarra, Amaurys Á; Bartlett, Gail J; Thomson, Andrew R; Sessions, Richard B; Brady, R Leo; Woolfson, Derek N

    2014-11-01

    The ability to accurately model protein structures at the atomistic level underpins efforts to understand protein folding, to engineer natural proteins predictably and to design proteins de novo. Homology-based methods are well established and produce impressive results. However, these are limited to structures presented by and resolved for natural proteins. Addressing this problem more widely and deriving truly ab initio models requires mathematical descriptions for protein folds; the means to decorate these with natural, engineered or de novo sequences; and methods to score the resulting models. We present CCBuilder, a web-based application that tackles the problem for a defined but large class of protein structure, the α-helical coiled coils. CCBuilder generates coiled-coil backbones, builds side chains onto these frameworks and provides a range of metrics to measure the quality of the models. Its straightforward graphical user interface provides broad functionality that allows users to build and assess models, in which helix geometry, coiled-coil architecture and topology and protein sequence can be varied rapidly. We demonstrate the utility of CCBuilder by assembling models for 653 coiled-coil structures from the PDB, which cover >96% of the known coiled-coil types, and by generating models for rarer and de novo coiled-coil structures. CCBuilder is freely available, without registration, at http://coiledcoils.chm.bris.ac.uk/app/cc_builder/. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  13. Herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22 interacts with TAF-I proteins and inhibits nucleosome assembly but not regulation of histone acetylation by INHAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Hans; Okuwaki, Mitsuru; Hong, Rui; Chakravarti, Debabrata; Nagata, Kyosuke; O'Hare, Peter

    2003-09-01

    Affinity chromatography was used to identify cellular proteins that interact with the herpes simplex virus (HSV) tegument protein VP22. Among a small set of proteins that bind specifically to VP22, we identified TAF-I (template-activating factor I), a chromatin remodelling protein and close homologue of the histone chaperone protein NAP-1. TAF-I has been shown previously to promote more ordered transfer of histones to naked DNA through a direct interaction with histones. TAF-I, as a subunit of the INHAT (inhibitor of acetyltransferases) protein complex, also binds to histones and masks them from being substrates for the acetyltransferases p300 and PCAF. Using in vitro assays for TAF-I activity in chromatin assembly, we show that VP22 inhibits nucleosome deposition on DNA by binding to TAF-I. We also observed that VP22 binds non-specifically to DNA, an activity that is abolished by TAF-I. However, the presence of VP22 does not affect the property of INHAT in inhibiting the histone acetyltransferase activity of p300 or PCAF in vitro. We speculate that this interaction could be relevant to HSV DNA organization early in infection, for example, by interfering with nucleosomal deposition on the genome. Consistent with this possibility was the observation that overexpression of TAF-I in transfected cells interferes with the progression of HSV-1 infection.

  14. A uranium-based UO{sub 2}{sup +}-Mn{sup 2+} single-chain magnet assembled trough cation-cation interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougel, Victor; Chatelain, Lucile; Hermle, Johannes; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [CEA-Grenoble (France). Lab. de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination; Caciuffo, Roberto; Colineau, Eric [European Commission, Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Transuranium Elements; Tuna, Floriana [Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Chemistry; Magnani, Nicola [KIT Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. of Nanotechnology; Geyer, Arnaud de [CEA-Grenoble (France). Service General des Rayons X

    2014-01-13

    Single-chain magnets (SCMs) are materials composed of magnetically isolated one-dimensional (1D) units exhibiting slow relaxation of magnetization. The occurrence of SCM behavior requires the fulfillment of stringent conditions for exchange and anisotropy interactions. Herein, we report the synthesis, the structure, and the magnetic characterization of the first actinide-containing SCM. The 5f-3d heterometallic 1D chains [{[UO_2(salen)(py)][M(py)_4](NO_3)}]{sub n}, (M=Cd (1) and M=Mn (2); py=pyridine) are assembled trough cation-cation interaction from the reaction of the uranyl(V) complex [UO{sub 2}(salen)py][Cp{sup *}{sub 2}Co] (Cp{sup *}=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) with Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} or Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} in pyridine. The infinite UMn chain displays a high relaxation barrier of 134±0.8 K (93±0.5 cm{sup -1}), probably as a result of strong intra-chain magnetic interactions combined with the high Ising anisotropy of the uranyl(V) dioxo group. It also exhibits an open magnetic hysteresis loop at T<6 K, with an impressive coercive field of 3.4 T at 2 K.

  15. A uranium-based UO{sub 2}{sup +}-Mn{sup 2+} single-chain magnet assembled trough cation-cation interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougel, Victor; Chatelain, Lucile; Hermle, Johannes; Pecaut, Jacques; Mazzanti, Marinella [Laboratoire de Reconnaissance Ionique et Chimie de Coordination, SCIB, UMR-E3 CEA-UJF, INAC, CEA-Grenoble (France); Caciuffo, Roberto; Colineau, Eric [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Tuna, Floriana [EPSRC UK EPR Facility, School of Chemistry and Photon Science Institute, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Magnani, Nicola [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Geyer, Arnaud de [Service General des Rayons X, SP2M, INAC, CEA-Grenoble (France)

    2014-01-13

    Single-chain magnets (SCMs) are materials composed of magnetically isolated one-dimensional (1D) units exhibiting slow relaxation of magnetization. The occurrence of SCM behavior requires the fulfillment of stringent conditions for exchange and anisotropy interactions. Herein, we report the synthesis, the structure, and the magnetic characterization of the first actinide-containing SCM. The 5f-3d heterometallic 1D chains [{[UO_2(salen)(py)][M(py)_4](NO_3)}]{sub n}, (M=Cd (1) and M=Mn (2); py=pyridine) are assembled trough cation-cation interaction from the reaction of the uranyl(V) complex [UO{sub 2}(salen)py][Cp*{sub 2}Co] (Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) with Cd(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} or Mn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} in pyridine. The infinite UMn chain displays a high relaxation barrier of 134 ±0.8 K (93 ±0.5 cm{sup -1}), probably as a result of strong intra-chain magnetic interactions combined with the high Ising anisotropy of the uranyl(V) dioxo group. It also exhibits an open magnetic hysteresis loop at T <6 K, with an impressive coercive field of 3.4 T at 2 K. (Copyright copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Hirshfeld surface analyses and crystal structures of supramolecular self-assembly thiourea derivatives directed by non-covalent interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Ilkay; Solmaz, Ummuhan; Binzet, Gun; Keskin, Ebru; Arslan, Birdal; Arslan, Hakan

    2018-04-01

    The novel N-(bis(3,5-dimethoxybenzyl)carbamothioyl)-4-R-benzamide (R: H, Cl, CH3 and OCH3) compounds have been synthesized and characterized by FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Their crystal structures were also determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Hirshfeld surfaces analysis and their associated two dimensional fingerprint plots of compounds were used as theoretical approach to assess driving force for crystal structure formation via the intermolecular interactions in the crystal lattices of synthesized compounds. The study of X-ray single crystal diffraction and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis of the prepared compounds shows that hydrogen bonding and other weaker interactions such as Nsbnd H⋯S, weak Csbnd H⋯S, Csbnd H⋯O, Csbnd H⋯N and Csbnd H···π intermolecular interactions and π-π stacking, among molecules of synthesized compounds participate in a cooperative way to stabilize the supramolecular structures.

  17. Structure of Streptococcus agalactiae tip pilin GBS104: a model for GBS pili assembly and host interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, Vengadesan [UNESCO Regional Centre for Biotechnology (RCB), Gurgaon 122 016, Haryana (India); Dwivedi, Prabhat [University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Kim, Brandon J. [San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Samal, Alexandra; Macon, Kevin [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); Ma, Xin; Mishra, Arunima [University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Doran, Kelly S. [San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Ton-That, Hung [University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Narayana, Sthanam V. L., E-mail: narayana@uab.edu [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294 (United States); UNESCO Regional Centre for Biotechnology (RCB), Gurgaon 122 016, Haryana (India)

    2013-06-01

    The crystal structure of a 75 kDa central fragment of GBS104, a tip pilin from the 2063V/R strain of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS), is reported. The crystal structure of a 75 kDa central fragment of GBS104, a tip pilin from the 2063V/R strain of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS), is reported. In addition, a homology model of the remaining two domains of GBS104 was built and a model of full-length GBS104 was generated by combining the homology model (the N1 and N4 domains) and the crystal structure of the 75 kDa fragment (the N2 and N3 domains). This rod-shaped GBS104 model is constructed of three IgG-like domains (the N1, N2 and N4 domains) and one vWFA-like domain (the N3 domain). The N1 and N2 domains of GBS104 are assembled with distinct and remote segments contributed by the N- and C-termini. The metal-binding site in the N3 domain of GBS104 is in the closed/low-affinity conformation. Interestingly, this domain hosts two long arms that project away from the metal-binding site. Using site-directed mutagenesis, two cysteine residues that lock the N3 domain of GBS104 into the open/high-affinity conformation were introduced. Both wild-type and disulfide-locked recombinant proteins were tested for binding to extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, fibrinogen and laminin, and an increase in fibronectin binding affinity was identified for the disulfide-locked N3 domain, suggesting that induced conformational changes may play a possible role in receptor binding.

  18. Structure of Streptococcus agalactiae tip pilin GBS104: a model for GBS pili assembly and host interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Vengadesan; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Kim, Brandon J.; Samal, Alexandra; Macon, Kevin; Ma, Xin; Mishra, Arunima; Doran, Kelly S.; Ton-That, Hung; Narayana, Sthanam V. L.

    2013-01-01

    The crystal structure of a 75 kDa central fragment of GBS104, a tip pilin from the 2063V/R strain of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS), is reported. The crystal structure of a 75 kDa central fragment of GBS104, a tip pilin from the 2063V/R strain of Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus; GBS), is reported. In addition, a homology model of the remaining two domains of GBS104 was built and a model of full-length GBS104 was generated by combining the homology model (the N1 and N4 domains) and the crystal structure of the 75 kDa fragment (the N2 and N3 domains). This rod-shaped GBS104 model is constructed of three IgG-like domains (the N1, N2 and N4 domains) and one vWFA-like domain (the N3 domain). The N1 and N2 domains of GBS104 are assembled with distinct and remote segments contributed by the N- and C-termini. The metal-binding site in the N3 domain of GBS104 is in the closed/low-affinity conformation. Interestingly, this domain hosts two long arms that project away from the metal-binding site. Using site-directed mutagenesis, two cysteine residues that lock the N3 domain of GBS104 into the open/high-affinity conformation were introduced. Both wild-type and disulfide-locked recombinant proteins were tested for binding to extracellular matrix proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, fibrinogen and laminin, and an increase in fibronectin binding affinity was identified for the disulfide-locked N3 domain, suggesting that induced conformational changes may play a possible role in receptor binding

  19. Interaction between Nbp35 and Cfd1 proteins of cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly reveals a stable complex formation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Anwar

    Full Text Available Iron-Sulfur (Fe-S proteins are involved in many biological functions such as electron transport, photosynthesis, regulation of gene expression and enzymatic activities. Biosynthesis and transfer of Fe-S clusters depend on Fe-S clusters assembly processes such as ISC, SUF, NIF, and CIA systems. Unlike other eukaryotes which possess ISC and CIA systems, amitochondriate Entamoeba histolytica has retained NIF & CIA systems for Fe-S cluster assembly in the cytosol. In the present study, we have elucidated interaction between two proteins of E. histolytica CIA system, Cytosolic Fe-S cluster deficient 1 (Cfd1 protein and Nucleotide binding protein 35 (Nbp35. In-silico analysis showed that structural regions ranging from amino acid residues (P33-K35, G131-V135 and I147-E151 of Nbp35 and (G5-V6, M34-D39 and G46-A52 of Cfd1 are involved in the formation of protein-protein complex. Furthermore, Molecular dynamic (MD simulations study suggested that hydrophobic forces surpass over hydrophilic forces between Nbp35 and Cfd1 and Van-der-Waal interaction plays crucial role in the formation of stable complex. Both proteins were separately cloned, expressed as recombinant fusion proteins in E. coli and purified to homogeneity by affinity column chromatography. Physical interaction between Nbp35 and Cfd1 proteins was confirmed in vitro by co-purification of recombinant Nbp35 with thrombin digested Cfd1 and in vivo by pull down assay and immunoprecipitation. The insilico, in vitro as well as in vivo results prove a stable interaction between these two proteins, supporting the possibility of its involvement in Fe-S cluster transfer to target apo-proteins through CIA machinery in E. histolytica. Our study indicates that initial synthesis of a Fe-S precursor in mitochondria is not necessary for the formation of Cfd1-Nbp35 complex. Thus, Cfd1 and Nbp35 with the help of cytosolic NifS and NifU proteins can participate in the maturation of non-mitosomal Fe-S proteins

  20. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent scattering of gaseous fission products released from fuel assemblies stored in an fbr type reactor. Constitution; A cap provided with means capable of storing gas is adapted to amount to the assembly handling head, for example, by way of threading in a storage rack of spent fuel assemblies consisting of a bottom plate, a top plate and an assembly support mechanism. By previously eliminating the gas inside of the assembly and the cap in the storage rack, gaseous fission products upon loading, if released from fuel rods during storage, are stored in the cap and do not scatter in the storage rack. (Horiuchi, T.)

  1. Sequence assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Hoffmann, S.; Frankel, Annett Maria

    2009-01-01

    Despite the rapidly increasing number of sequenced and re-sequenced genomes, many issues regarding the computational assembly of large-scale sequencing data have remain unresolved. Computational assembly is crucial in large genome projects as well for the evolving high-throughput technologies and...... in genomic DNA, highly expressed genes and alternative transcripts in EST sequences. We summarize existing comparisons of different assemblers and provide a detailed descriptions and directions for download of assembly programs at: http://genome.ku.dk/resources/assembly/methods.html....

  2. Needle-tissue interactive mechanism and steering control in image-guided robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pan; Yang, Zhiyong; Jiang, Shan

    2018-06-01

    Image-guided robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery is an important medicine procedure used for biopsy or local target therapy. In order to reach the target region not accessible using traditional techniques, long and thin flexible needles are inserted into the soft tissue which has large deformation and nonlinear characteristics. However, the detection results and therapeutic effect are directly influenced by the targeting accuracy of needle steering. For this reason, the needle-tissue interactive mechanism, path planning, and steering control are investigated in this review by searching literatures in the last 10 years, which results in a comprehensive overview of the existing techniques with the main accomplishments, limitations, and recommendations. Through comprehensive analyses, surgical simulation for insertion into multi-layer inhomogeneous tissue is verified as a primary and propositional aspect to be explored, which accurately predicts the nonlinear needle deflection and tissue deformation. Investigation of the path planning of flexible needles is recommended to an anatomical or a deformable environment which has characteristics of the tissue deformation. Nonholonomic modeling combined with duty-cycled spinning for needle steering, which tracks the tip position in real time and compensates for the deviation error, is recommended as a future research focus in the steering control in anatomical and deformable environments. Graphical abstract a Insertion force when the needle is inserted into soft tissue. b Needle deflection model when the needle is inserted into soft tissue [68]. c Path planning in anatomical environments [92]. d Duty-cycled spinning incorporated in nonholonomic needle steering [64].

  3. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  4. Multi-Robot Assembly Strategies and Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARVEL, JEREMY A.; BOSTELMAN, ROGER; FALCO, JOE

    2018-01-01

    We present a survey of multi-robot assembly applications and methods and describe trends and general insights into the multi-robot assembly problem for industrial applications. We focus on fixtureless assembly strategies featuring two or more robotic systems. Such robotic systems include industrial robot arms, dexterous robotic hands, and autonomous mobile platforms, such as automated guided vehicles. In this survey, we identify the types of assemblies that are enabled by utilizing multiple robots, the algorithms that synchronize the motions of the robots to complete the assembly operations, and the metrics used to assess the quality and performance of the assemblies. PMID:29497234

  5. Multi-Robot Assembly Strategies and Metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Jeremy A; Bostelman, Roger; Falco, Joe

    2018-02-01

    We present a survey of multi-robot assembly applications and methods and describe trends and general insights into the multi-robot assembly problem for industrial applications. We focus on fixtureless assembly strategies featuring two or more robotic systems. Such robotic systems include industrial robot arms, dexterous robotic hands, and autonomous mobile platforms, such as automated guided vehicles. In this survey, we identify the types of assemblies that are enabled by utilizing multiple robots, the algorithms that synchronize the motions of the robots to complete the assembly operations, and the metrics used to assess the quality and performance of the assemblies.

  6. Synthetic heme/copper assemblies: toward an understanding of cytochrome c oxidase interactions with dioxygen and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematian, Shabnam; Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2015-08-18

    Our long-time niche in synthetic biological inorganic chemistry has been to design ligands and generate coordination complexes of copper or iron ions or both, those reacting with dioxygen (O2) or nitrogen oxides (e.g., nitric oxide (NO(g)) and nitrite (NO2(-))) or both. As inspiration for this work, we turn to mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, which is responsible for dioxygen consumption and is also the predominant target for NO(g) and nitrite within mitochondria. In this Account, we highlight recent advances in studying synthetic heme/Cu complexes in two respects. First, there is the design, synthesis, and characterization of new O2 adducts whose further study will add insights into O2 reductive cleavage chemistry. Second, we describe how related heme/Cu constructs reduce nitrite ion to NO(g) or the reverse, oxidize NO(g) to nitrite. The reactions of nitrogen oxides occur as part of CcO's function, which is intimately tied to cellular O2 balance. We had first discovered that reduced heme/Cu compounds react with O2 giving μ-oxo heme-Fe(III)-O-Cu(II)(L) products; their properties are discussed. The O-atom is derived from dioxygen, and interrogations of these systems led to the construction and characterization of three distinctive classes of heme-peroxo complexes, two high-spin and one low-spin species. Recent investigations include a new approach to the synthesis of low-spin heme-peroxo-Cu complexes, employing a "naked" synthon, where the copper ligand denticity and geometric types can be varied. The result is a collection of such complexes; spectroscopic and structural features (by DFT calculations) are described. Some of these compounds are reactive toward reductants/protons effecting subsequent O-O cleavage. This points to how subtle improvements in ligand environment lead to a desired local structure and resulting optimized reactivity, as known to occur at enzyme active sites. The other sector of research is focused on heme/Cu assemblies mediating the redox

  7. WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant]/SRL in situ tests: Part 2, Pictorial history of MIIT [Materials Interface Interactions Tests] and final MIIT matrices, assemblies, and sample listings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicks, G.G.; Weinle, M.E.; Molecke, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    In situ testing of Savannah River Plant [SRP] waste glass is an important component in ensuring technical and public confidence in the safety and effective performance of the wasteforms. Savannah River Laboratory [SRL] is currently involved in joint programs involving field testing of SRP waste in Sweden, Belgium, and the United Kingdom. Most recently, this in situ effort has been expanded to include the first field tests to be conducted in the United States, involving burial of a variety of simulated nuclear waste systems. This new effort, called the Materials Interface Interactions Tests or MIIT, is a program jointly conducted by Sandia National Laboratory/Waste Isolation Pilot Plant [WIPP] and SRL. Over 1800 samples, supplied by the United States, France, West Germany, Belgium, Canada, Japan, and the United Kingdom, were buried approximately 650m below the earth's surface in the salt geology at WIPP, near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The MIIT program is one of the largest cooperative efforts ever undertaken in the waste management field; the data produced from these tests are designed to benefit a wide cross-section of the waste management community. An earlier document provided an overview of the WIPP MIIT program and described its place in the waste glass assessment program at Savannah River. This document represents the second in this series and its objectives include: (1) providing a pictorial history of assembly and installation of wasteforms, metals, and geologic samples in WIPP; (2) providing 'finalized and completed' sample matrices for the entire 7-part MIIT program; (3) documenting final sample assemblies by the use of schematic drawings, including each sample, its orientation, and its environment; and (4) providing a complete listing of all samples and the means for managing analyses and resulting data

  8. Electron Transport Chain Is Biochemically Linked to Pilus Assembly Required for Polymicrobial Interactions and Biofilm Formation in the Gram-Positive Actinobacterium Actinomyces oris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkys C. Sanchez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-positive actinobacteria Actinomyces spp. are key colonizers in the development of oral biofilms due to the inherent ability of Actinomyces to adhere to receptor polysaccharides on the surface of oral streptococci and host cells. This receptor-dependent bacterial interaction, or coaggregation, requires a unique sortase-catalyzed pilus consisting of the pilus shaft FimA and the coaggregation factor CafA forming the pilus tip. While the essential role of the sortase machine SrtC2 in pilus assembly, biofilm formation, and coaggregation has been established, little is known about trans-acting factors contributing to these processes. We report here a large-scale Tn5 transposon screen for mutants defective in Actinomyces oris coaggregation with Streptococcus oralis. We obtained 33 independent clones, 13 of which completely failed to aggregate with S. oralis, and the remainder of which exhibited a range of phenotypes from severely to weakly defective coaggregation. The former had Tn5 insertions in fimA, cafA, or srtC2, as expected; the latter were mapped to genes coding for uncharacterized proteins and various nuo genes encoding the NADH dehydrogenase subunits. Electron microscopy and biochemical analyses of mutants with nonpolar deletions of nuo genes and ubiE, a menaquinone C-methyltransferase-encoding gene downstream of the nuo locus, confirmed the pilus and coaggregation defects. Both nuoA and ubiE mutants were defective in oxidation of MdbA, the major oxidoreductase required for oxidative folding of pilus proteins. Furthermore, supplementation of the ubiE mutant with exogenous menaquinone-4 rescued the cell growth and pilus defects. Altogether, we propose that the A. oris electron transport chain is biochemically linked to pilus assembly via oxidative protein folding.

  9. Polyelectrolyte multi-layers assembly of SiCHA nanopowders and collagen type I on aminolysed PLA films to enhance cell-material interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba Ismail, Yanny Marliana; Ferreira, Ana Marina; Bretcanu, Oana; Dalgarno, Kenneth; El Haj, Alicia J

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a new approach in assembling bone extracellular matrix components onto PLA films, and investigates the most favourable environment which can be created using the technique for cell-material interactions. Poly (lactic acid) (PLA) films were chemically modified by covalently binding the poly(ethylene imine) (PEI) as to prepare the substrate for immobilization of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) coating. Negatively charged polyelectrolyte consists of well-dispersed silicon-carbonated hydroxyapatite (SiCHA) nanopowders in hyaluronic acid (Hya) was deposited onto the modified PLA films followed by SiCHA in collagen type I as the positively charged polyelectrolyte. The outermost layer was finally cross-linked by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide hydrocholoride and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide sodium salt (EDC/NHS) solutions. The physicochemical features of the coated PLA films were monitored via X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The amounts of calcium and collagen deposited on the surface were qualitatively and quantitatively determined. The surface characterizations suggested that 5-BL has the optimum surface roughness and highest amounts of calcium and collagen depositions among tested films. In vitro human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultured on the coated PLA films confirmed that the coating materials greatly improved cell attachment and survival compared to unmodified PLA films. The cell viability, cell proliferation and Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP) expression on 5-BL were found to be the most favourable of the tested films. Hence, this newly developed coating materials assembly could contribute to the improvement of the bioactivity of polymeric materials and structures aimed to bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Modeling of interaction between cytochrome c and the WD domains of Apaf-1: bifurcated salt bridges underlying apoptosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalaeva, Daria N; Dibrova, Daria V; Galperin, Michael Y; Mulkidjanian, Armen Y

    2015-05-27

    Binding of cytochrome c, released from the damaged mitochondria, to the apoptotic protease activating factor 1 (Apaf-1) is a key event in the apoptotic signaling cascade. The binding triggers a major domain rearrangement in Apaf-1, which leads to oligomerization of Apaf-1/cytochrome c complexes into an apoptosome. Despite the availability of crystal structures of cytochrome c and Apaf-1 and cryo-electron microscopy models of the entire apoptosome, the binding mode of cytochrome c to Apaf-1, as well as the nature of the amino acid residues of Apaf-1 involved remain obscure. We investigated the interaction between cytochrome c and Apaf-1 by combining several modeling approaches. We have applied protein-protein docking and energy minimization, evaluated the resulting models of the Apaf-1/cytochrome c complex, and carried out a further analysis by means of molecular dynamics simulations. We ended up with a single model structure where all the lysine residues of cytochrome c that are known as functionally-relevant were involved in forming salt bridges with acidic residues of Apaf-1. This model has revealed three distinctive bifurcated salt bridges, each involving a single lysine residue of cytochrome c and two neighboring acidic resides of Apaf-1. Salt bridge-forming amino acids of Apaf-1 showed a clear evolutionary pattern within Metazoa, with pairs of acidic residues of Apaf-1, involved in bifurcated salt bridges, reaching their highest numbers in the sequences of vertebrates, in which the cytochrome c-mediated mechanism of apoptosome formation seems to be typical. The reported model of an Apaf-1/cytochrome c complex provides insights in the nature of protein-protein interactions which are hard to observe in crystallographic or electron microscopy studies. Bifurcated salt bridges can be expected to be stronger than simple salt bridges, and their formation might promote the conformational change of Apaf-1, leading to the formation of an apoptosome. Combination of

  11. Respective Functions of Two Distinct Siwi Complexes Assembled during PIWI-Interacting RNA Biogenesis in Bombyx Germ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumichi M. Nishida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA biogenesis consists of two sequential steps: primary piRNA processing and the ping-pong cycle that depends on reciprocal Slicer-mediated RNA cleavage by PIWI proteins. However, the molecular functions of the factors involved remain elusive. Here, we show that RNAs cleaved by a Bombyx mori PIWI, Siwi, remain bound to the protein upon cleavage but are released by a DEAD box protein BmVasa. BmVasa copurifies with Siwi but not another PIWI BmAgo3. A lack of BmVasa does not affect primary piRNA processing but abolishes the ping-pong cycle. Siwi also forms a complex with BmSpn-E and BmQin. This complex is physically separable from the Siwi/BmVasa complex. BmSpn-E, unlike BmVasa, is necessary for primary piRNA production. We propose a model for piRNA biogenesis, where the BmSpn-E/BmQin dimer binds Siwi to function in primary piRNA processing, whereas BmVasa, by associating with Siwi, ensures target RNA release upon cleavage to facilitate the ping-pong cycle.

  12. Uniform two-dimensional square assemblies from conjugated block copolymers driven by π–π interactions with controllable sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Liang; Wang, Meijing; Jia, Xiangmeng; Chen, Wei; Qian, Hujun; He, Feng

    2018-02-28

    Two-dimensional (2-D) micro- and nano- architectures are attractive because of their unique properties caused by their ultrathin and flat morphologies. However, the formation of 2-D supramolecular highly symmetrical structures with considerable control is still a major challenge. Here, we presented a simple approach for the preparation of regular and homogeneous 2-D fluorescent square noncrystallization micelles with conjugated diblock copolymers PPV12-b-P2VPn through a process of dissolving-cooling-aging. The scale of the formed micelles could be controlled by the ratio of PPV/P2VP blocks and the concentration of the solution. The forming process of the platelet square micelles was analyzed by UV-Vis, DLS and SLS, while the molecular arrangement was characterized by GIXD. The results revealed that the micelles of PPV12-b-P2VPn initially form 1-D structures and then grow into 2-D structures in solution, and the growth is driven by intermolecular π-π interactions with the PPV12 blocks. The formation of 2-D square micelles is induced by herringbone arrangement of the molecules, which is closely related to the presence of the branched alkyl chains attached to conjugated PPV12 cores.

  13. Assembling RNA Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shou-Jun

    2017-01-01

    RNA nanoparticles are designed and self-assembled according to noncanonical interactions of naturally conserved RNA motifs and/or canonical Watson-Crick base-pairing interactions, which have potential applications in gene therapy and nanomedicine. These artificially engineered nanoparticles are mainly synthesized from in vitro transcribed RNAs, purified by denaturing and native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), and characterized with native PAGE, AFM, and TEM technologies. The protocols of in vitro transcription, denaturing and native PAGE, and RNA nanoparticle self-assembly are described in detail.

  14. Nanopore Long-Read Guided Complete Genome Assembly of Hydrogenophaga intermedia, and Genomic Insights into 4-Aminobenzenesulfonate, p-Aminobenzoic Acid and Hydrogen Metabolism in the Genus Hydrogenophaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Han M; Lee, Yin P; Austin, Christopher M

    2017-01-01

    We improved upon the previously reported draft genome of Hydrogenophaga intermedia strain PBC, a 4-aminobenzenesulfonate-degrading bacterium, by supplementing the assembly with Nanopore long reads which enabled the reconstruction of the genome as a single contig. From the complete genome, major genes responsible for the catabolism of 4-aminobenzenesulfonate in strain PBC are clustered in two distinct genomic regions. Although the catabolic genes for 4-sulfocatechol, the deaminated product of 4-aminobenzenesulfonate, are only found in H. intermedia , the sad operon responsible for the first deamination step of 4-aminobenzenesulfonate is conserved in various Hydrogenophaga strains. The absence of pabB gene in the complete genome of H. intermedia PBC is consistent with its p -aminobenzoic acid (pABA) auxotrophy but surprisingly comparative genomics analysis of 14 Hydrogenophaga genomes indicate that pABA auxotrophy is not an uncommon feature among members of this genus. Of even more interest, several Hydrogenophaga strains do not possess the genomic potential for hydrogen oxidation, calling for a revision to the taxonomic description of Hydrogenophaga as "hydrogen eating bacteria."

  15. Self-assembled nanoparticles based on PEGylated conjugated polyelectrolyte and drug molecules for image-guided drug delivery and photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Youyong; Liu, Bin

    2014-09-10

    A drug delivery system based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) grafted conjugated polyelectrolyte (CPE) has been developed to serve as a polymeric photosensitizer and drug carrier for combined photodynamic and chemotherapy. The amphiphilic brush copolymer can self-assemble into micellar nanopaticles (NPs) in aqueous media with hydrophobic conjugated polyelectrolyte backbone as the core and hydrophilic PEG as the shell. The NPs have an average diameter of about 100 nm, with the absorption and emission maxima at 502 and 598 nm, respectively, making them suitable for bioimaging applications. Moreover, the CPE itself can serve as a photosensitizer, which makes the NPs not only a carrier for drug but also a photosensitizing unit for photodynamic therapy, resulting in the combination of chemo- and photodynamic therapy for cancer. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for the combination therapy to U87-MG cells is 12.7 μg mL(-1), which is much lower than that for the solely photodynamic therapy (25.5 μg mL(-1)) or chemotherapy (132.8 μg mL(-1)). To improve the tumor specificity of the system, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) tripeptide as the receptor to integrin αvβ3 overexpressed cancer cells was further incorporated to the surface of the NPs. The delivery system based on PEGylated CPE is easy to fabricate, which integrates the merits of targeted cancer cell image, chemotherapeutic drug delivery, and photodynamic therapy, making it promising for cancer treatment.

  16. Iron phthalocyanine on Cu(111): Coverage-dependent assembly and symmetry breaking, temperature-induced homocoupling, and modification of the adsorbate-surface interaction by annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snezhkova, Olesia; Bischoff, Felix; He, Yuanqin; Wiengarten, Alissa; Chaudhary, Shilpi; Johansson, Niclas; Schulte, Karina; Knudsen, Jan; Barth, Johannes V; Seufert, Knud; Auwärter, Willi; Schnadt, Joachim

    2016-03-07

    We have examined the geometric and electronic structures of iron phthalocyanine assemblies on a Cu(111) surface at different sub- to mono-layer coverages and the changes induced by thermal annealing at temperatures between 250 and 320 °C by scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The symmetry breaking observed in scanning tunneling microscopy images is found to be coverage dependent and to persist upon annealing. Further, we find that annealing to temperatures between 300 and 320 °C leads to both desorption of iron phthalocyanine molecules from the surface and their agglomeration. We see clear evidence of temperature-induced homocoupling reactions of the iron phthalocyanine molecules following dehydrogenation of their isoindole rings, similar to what has been observed for related tetrapyrroles on transition metal surfaces. Finally, spectroscopy indicates a modified substrate-adsorbate interaction upon annealing with a shortened bond distance. This finding could potentially explain a changed reactivity of Cu-supported iron phthalocyanine in comparison to that of the pristine compound.

  17. Reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Groves, M.D.

    1980-01-01

    A nuclear reactor fuel assembly having a lower end fitting and actuating means interacting therewith for holding the assembly down on the core support stand against the upward flow of coolant. Locking means for interacting with projections on the support stand are carried by the lower end fitting and are actuated by the movement of an actuating rod operated from above the top of the assembly. In one embodiment of the invention the downward movement of the actuating rod forces a latched spring to move outward into locking engagement with a shoulder on the support stand projections. In another embodiment, the actuating rod is rotated to effect the locking between the end fitting and the projection. (author)

  18. Self-assembly of self-assembled molecular triangles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    While the solution state structure of 1 can be best described as a trinuclear complex, in the solidstate well-fashioned intermolecular - and CH- interactions are observed. Thus, in the solid-state further self-assembly of already self-assembled molecular triangle is witnessed. The triangular panels are arranged in a linear ...

  19. Virtual Reality and Haptics for Product Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Restivo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Haptics can significantly enhance the user's sense of immersion and interactivity. An industrial application of virtual reality and haptics for product assembly is described in this paper, which provides a new and low-cost approach for product assembly design, assembly task planning and assembly operation training. A demonstration of the system with haptics device interaction was available at the session of exp.at'11.

  20. Assessing Online Learning Objects: Student Evaluation of a Guide on the Side Interactive Learning Tutorial Designed by SRJC Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtue, Alicia; Dean, Ellen; Matheson, Molly

    2014-01-01

    More and more of today's scholars conduct their research in a digital realm rather than using a print collection. The University of Arizona Libraries Guide on the Side tutorial software offers an opportunity to apply the principles of active learning with real world research scenarios. This paper reports on the design and introduction of…

  1. Controlling noncovalent interactions between a lysine-rich α-helical peptide and self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on Au through functional group diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J., E-mail: lwebb@cm.utexas.edu

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Functional variety in SAMs control covalent binding of proteins to surfaces. • Peptide density on Au(111) surfaces controlled by SAM functional groups. • Affinity between biomolecule and SAM surface follows a Langmuir isotherm. • Surface chemistry can mimic functional group diversity in proteins and peptides. - Abstract: Reliably attaching a structured biomolecule to an inorganic substrate would enable the preparation of surfaces that incorporate both biological and inorganic functions and structures. To this end, we have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to well-ordered alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on a Au(111) surface, in which the SAM is composed of a mixture of methyl and azide termination. Proteins, however, are composed of many diverse functional groups, and this composition directly effects protein structure, interactions, and reactivity. Here, we explore the utility of mixed SAMs with alternative terminating functional groups to tune and direct the reactivity of the surface through noncovalent peptide-surface interactions. We study both polar surfaces (OH-terminated) and charged surfaces (COOH- and NH{sub 3}-terminated, which are negatively and positively charged, respectively, under our reaction conditions). Surfaces were functionalized with a bipolar peptide composed of Lys and Leu residues that could express different interactions through either hydrophilic and/or charge (Lys) or hydrophobic (Leu) influences. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize surfaces at all stages of the peptide functionalization procedure. This strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. Mixed SAMs that included a positively charged alkanethiol along with the azide-terminated thiol resulted in a more efficient reaction and better

  2. Controlling noncovalent interactions between a lysine-rich α-helical peptide and self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on Au through functional group diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Onyirioha, Kristeen; Webb, Lauren J.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Functional variety in SAMs control covalent binding of proteins to surfaces. • Peptide density on Au(111) surfaces controlled by SAM functional groups. • Affinity between biomolecule and SAM surface follows a Langmuir isotherm. • Surface chemistry can mimic functional group diversity in proteins and peptides. - Abstract: Reliably attaching a structured biomolecule to an inorganic substrate would enable the preparation of surfaces that incorporate both biological and inorganic functions and structures. To this end, we have previously developed a procedure using the copper(I)-catalyzed click reaction to tether synthetic α-helical peptides carrying two alkyne groups to well-ordered alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers (SAM) on a Au(111) surface, in which the SAM is composed of a mixture of methyl and azide termination. Proteins, however, are composed of many diverse functional groups, and this composition directly effects protein structure, interactions, and reactivity. Here, we explore the utility of mixed SAMs with alternative terminating functional groups to tune and direct the reactivity of the surface through noncovalent peptide-surface interactions. We study both polar surfaces (OH-terminated) and charged surfaces (COOH- and NH_3-terminated, which are negatively and positively charged, respectively, under our reaction conditions). Surfaces were functionalized with a bipolar peptide composed of Lys and Leu residues that could express different interactions through either hydrophilic and/or charge (Lys) or hydrophobic (Leu) influences. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and surface infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize surfaces at all stages of the peptide functionalization procedure. This strategy resulted in a high density of surface-bound α-helices without aggregation. Mixed SAMs that included a positively charged alkanethiol along with the azide-terminated thiol resulted in a more efficient reaction and better alignment

  3. Amide linkages mimic phosphates in RNA interactions with proteins and are well tolerated in the guide strand of short interfering RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutisya, Daniel; Hardcastle, Travis; Cheruiyot, Samwel K; Pallan, Pradeep S; Kennedy, Scott D; Egli, Martin; Kelley, Melissa L; Smith, Anja van Brabant; Rozners, Eriks

    2017-08-21

    While the use of RNA interference (RNAi) in molecular biology and functional genomics is a well-established technology, in vivo applications of synthetic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) require chemical modifications. We recently found that amides as non-ionic replacements for phosphodiesters may be useful modifications for optimization of siRNAs. Herein, we report a comprehensive study of systematic replacement of a single phosphate with an amide linkage throughout the guide strand of siRNAs. The results show that amides are surprisingly well tolerated in the seed and central regions of the guide strand and increase the silencing activity when placed between nucleosides 10 and 12, at the catalytic site of Argonaute. A potential explanation is provided by the first crystal structure of an amide-modified RNA-DNA with Bacillus halodurans RNase H1. The structure reveals how small changes in both RNA and protein conformation allow the amide to establish hydrogen bonding interactions with the protein. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that these alternative binding modes may compensate for interactions lost due to the absence of a phosphodiester moiety. Our results suggest that an amide can mimic important hydrogen bonding interactions with proteins required for RNAi activity and may be a promising modification for optimization of biological properties of siRNAs. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Amide linkages mimic phosphates in RNA interactions with proteins and are well tolerated in the guide strand of short interfering RNAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mutisya, Daniel; Hardcastle, Travis; Cheruiyot, Samwel K.; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Kennedy, Scott D.; Egli, Martin; Kelley, Melissa L.; Smith, Anja van Brabant; Rozners, Eriks

    2017-06-27

    While the use of RNA interference (RNAi) in molecular biology and functional genomics is a well-established technology, in vivo applications of synthetic short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) require chemical modifications. We recently found that amides as non-ionic replacements for phosphodiesters may be useful modifications for optimization of siRNAs. Herein, we report a comprehensive study of systematic replacement of a single phosphate with an amide linkage throughout the guide strand of siRNAs. The results show that amides are surprisingly well tolerated in the seed and central regions of the guide strand and increase the silencing activity when placed between nucleosides 10 and 12, at the catalytic site of Argonaute. A potential explanation is provided by the first crystal structure of an amide-modified RNA–DNA with Bacillus halodurans RNase H1. The structure reveals how small changes in both RNA and protein conformation allow the amide to establish hydrogen bonding interactions with the protein. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that these alternative binding modes may compensate for interactions lost due to the absence of a phosphodiester moiety. Our results suggest that an amide can mimic important hydrogen bonding interactions with proteins required for RNAi activity and may be a promising modification for optimization of biological properties of siRNAs.

  5. Simulations of molecular self-assembled monolayers on surfaces: packing structures, formation processes and functions tuned by intermolecular and interfacial interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jin; Li, Wei; Chen, Shuang; Ma, Jing

    2016-08-17

    Surfaces modified with a functional molecular monolayer are essential for the fabrication of nano-scale electronics or machines with novel physical, chemical, and/or biological properties. Theoretical simulation based on advanced quantum chemical and classical models is at present a necessary tool in the development, design, and understanding of the interfacial nanostructure. The nanoscale surface morphology, growth processes, and functions are controlled by not only the electronic structures (molecular energy levels, dipole moments, polarizabilities, and optical properties) of building units but also the subtle balance between intermolecular and interfacial interactions. The switchable surfaces are also constructed by introducing stimuli-responsive units like azobenzene derivatives. To bridge the gap between experiments and theoretical models, opportunities and challenges for future development of modelling of ferroelectricity, entropy, and chemical reactions of surface-supported monolayers are also addressed. Theoretical simulations will allow us to obtain important and detailed information about the structure and dynamics of monolayer modified interfaces, which will guide the rational design and optimization of dynamic interfaces to meet challenges of controlling optical, electrical, and biological functions.

  6. Fuel assembly reconstitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgado, Mario M.; Oliveira, Monica G.N.; Ferreira Junior, Decio B.M.; Santos, Barbara O. dos; Santos, Jorge E. dos

    2009-01-01

    Fuel failures have been happened in Nuclear Power Plants worldwide, without lost of integrity and safety, mainly for the public, environment and power plants workers. The most common causes of these events are corrosion (CRUD), fretting and pellet cladding interaction. These failures are identified by increasing the activity of fission products, verified by chemical analyses of reactor coolant. Through these analyses, during the fourth operation cycle of Angra 2 Nuclear Power Plant, was possible to observe fuel failure indication. This indication was confirmed in the end of the cycle during the unloading of reactor core through leakage tests of fuel assembly, using the equipment called 'In Mast Sipping' and 'Box Sipping'. After confirmed, the fuel assembly reconstitution was scheduled, and happened in April, 2007, where was identified the cause and the fuel rod failure, which was substitute by dummy rods (zircaloy). The cause was fretting by 'debris'. The actions to avoid and prevent fuel assemblies failures are important. The goals of this work are to describe the methodology of fuel assembly reconstitution using the FARE (Fuel Assembly Reconstitution Equipment) system, to describe the results of this task in economic and security factors of the company and show how the fuel assembly failures are identified during operation and during the outage. (author)

  7. Apparatus for lifting spent fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirasawa, Yoshinari; Sato, Isao; Yoneda, Yoshiyuki.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To increase the efficiency of cooling of a used fuel assembly being moved within a guide tube in the axial direction thereof by directly cooling the assembly with cooling gas fed into the guide tube, thus facilitating the handling of the spent fuel assembly. Structure: An end of a lock portion is inserted into the top portion of a spent fuel assembly, the assembly being hooked on the lock portion. The lock portion is provided on its outer periphery with a seal member and a centering member and at its tip with a pawl capable of being projected and retracted in the radial direction. Thus, when the lock portion is moved along the guide tube, the used fuel assembly can be moved along the guide tube by maintaining the concentric relation thereto. Meanwhile, when cooling gas is fed into the guide tube, it is blown into the used fuel assembly to directly cool the same. Thus, the cooling efficiency can be increased. (Moriyama, M.)

  8. Fuel assemblies for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leclercg, J.

    1985-01-01

    Improvements to guide tubes for the fuel assemblies of light water nuclear reactors, said assemblies being immersed in operation in the cooling water of the core of such a reactor, the guide tubes being of the type made from zircaloy and fixed at their two ends respectively to an upper end part and a lower end part made from stainless steel or Irconel and which incorporate devices for braking the fall of the control rods which they house during the rapid shutdown of the reactor, wherein the said braking devices are constituted by means for restricting the diameter of the guide tubes comprising for each guide tube a zircaloy inner sleeve spot welded to the said guide tube and whose internal diameter permits the passage, with a calibrated clearance, of the corresponding control rod, the sleeve being distributed over the lower portion of each guide tube and associated with orifices made in the actual guide tubes to produce the progressive hydraulic absorption of the end of the fall of the control rods

  9. [E75, R78 and D82 of Escherichia coli FtsZ are key residues for FtsZ cellular self-assembly and FtsZ-MreB interaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yujia; Lu, Qiaonan; Zheng, Xiaowei; Ma, Yuanfang; Lu, Feng

    2016-02-04

    To explore effects of FtsZ mutants FtsZ(E75A), FtsZ(R78G) and FtsZ(D82A) on FtsZ self-assembly and interaction of FtsZ with MreB in Escherichia coli strains. METHODS) We constructed FtsZ and its mutant's plasmids by molecular clone and site-directed mutagenesis methods, and purified targeted proteins by affinity chromatography. QN6(ftsZ::yfp-cat), QN7(tsZ::yfp-cat), QN8(ftsZ(R78G)::yfp-cat) and QN9 (ftsZ(D82A):.:yfp-cat) strains were constructed by linear DNA homologous recombination. We observed cellular localization pattern of FtsZ and its mutants in E. coli by living cell imaging experiments, examined interaction of FtsZ/FtsZ*-FtsZ* and FtsZ/FtsZ*-MreB by Coimmunoprecipitation and bacteria two hybrid, and analyzed assembly characteristics of FtsZ mutants by Light scattering. RESULTS) The Yfp-labeled FtsZ(E75A), FtsZ(R78G) and FtsZ(D82A) mutant proteins failed to assemble into functional Z-ring structure and localize correctly in E. coli strains. Interaction of FtsZ with its mutants, or FtsZ*-FtsZ* and FtsZ*-MreB interaction were weakened or completely disappeared. In addition, in vitro experiments show that E75A, R78G and D82A mutations decreased the polymerization efficiency of FtsZ monomer. FtsZ E75, R78 and D82 are critical amino acids in the assembly, function of FtsZ protein and FtsZ-MreB interaction in E. coli strains.

  10. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  11. Structure and assembly mechanism for heteromeric kainate receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Janesh; Schuck, Peter; Mayer, Mark L

    2011-07-28

    Native glutamate receptor ion channels are tetrameric assemblies containing two or more different subunits. NMDA receptors are obligate heteromers formed by coassembly of two or three divergent gene families. While some AMPA and kainate receptors can form functional homomeric ion channels, the KA1 and KA2 subunits are obligate heteromers which function only in combination with GluR5-7. The mechanisms controlling glutamate receptor assembly involve an initial step in which the amino terminal domains (ATD) assemble as dimers. Here, we establish by sedimentation velocity that the ATDs of GluR6 and KA2 coassemble as a heterodimer of K(d) 11 nM, 32,000-fold lower than the K(d) for homodimer formation by KA2; we solve crystal structures for the GluR6/KA2 ATD heterodimer and heterotetramer assemblies. Using these structures as a guide, we perform a mutant cycle analysis to probe the energetics of assembly and show that high-affinity ATD interactions are required for biosynthesis of functional heteromeric receptors. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A porous medium approach for the fluid structure interaction modelling of a water pressurized nuclear reactor core fuel assemblies: simulation and experimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricciardi, G.

    2008-10-01

    The designing of a pressurized water reactor core subjected to seismic loading, is a major concern of the nuclear industry. We propose, in this PhD report, to establish the global behaviour equations of the core, in term of a porous medium. Local equations of fluid and structure are space averaged on a control volume, thus we define an equivalent fluid and an equivalent structure, of which unknowns are defined on the whole space. The non-linear fuel assemblies behaviour is modelled by a visco-elastic constitutive law. The fluid-structure coupling is accounted for by a body force, the expression of that force is based on empirical formula of fluid forces acting on a tube subject to an axial flow. The resulting equations are solved using a finite element method. A validation of the model, on three experimental device, is proposed. The first one presents two fuel assemblies subjected to axial flow. One of the two fuel assemblies is deviated from its position of equilibrium and released, while the other is at rest. The second one presents a six assemblies row, immersed in water, placed on a shaking table that can simulate seismic loading. Finally, the last one presents nine fuel assemblies network, arranged in a three by three, subject to an axial flow. The displacement of the central fuel assembly is imposed. The simulations are in agreement with the experiments, the model reproduces the influence of the flow of fluid on the dynamics and coupling of the fuel assemblies. (author)

  13. Zipper-interacting protein kinase is involved in regulation of ubiquitination of the androgen receptor, thereby contributing to dynamic transcription complex assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felten, A; Brinckmann, D; Landsberg, G; Scheidtmann, K H

    2013-10-10

    We have recently identified apoptosis-antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), tumor-susceptibility gene 101 (TSG101) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) as novel coactivators of the androgen receptor (AR). The mechanisms of coactivation remained obscure, however. Here we investigated the interplay and interdependence between these coactivators and the AR using the endogenous prostate specific antigen (PSA) gene as model for AR-target genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with siRNA-mediated knockdown revealed that recruitment of AATF and ZIPK to the PSA enhancer was dependent on AR, whereas recruitment of TSG101 was dependent on AATF. Association of AR and its coactivators with the PSA enhancer or promoter occurred in cycles. Dissociation of AR-transcription complexes was due to degradation because inhibition of the proteasome system by MG132 caused accumulation of AR at enhancer/promoter elements. Moreover, inhibition of degradation strongly reduced transcription, indicating that continued and efficient transcription is based on initiation, degradation and reinitiation cycles. Interestingly, knockdown of ZIPK by siRNA had a similar effect as MG132, leading to reduced transcription but enhanced accumulation of AR at androgen-response elements. In addition, knockdown of ZIPK, as well as overexpression of a dominant-negative ZIPK mutant, diminished polyubiquitination of AR. Furthermore, ZIPK cooperated with the E3 ligase Mdm2 in AR-dependent transactivation, assembled into a single complex on chromatin and phosphorylated Mdm2 in vitro. These results suggest that ZIPK has a crucial role in regulation of ubiquitination and degradation of the AR, and hence promoter clearance and efficient transcription.

  14. Assembling an aesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Emily

    2012-12-01

    Recent research informing and related to the study of three-dimensional scientific models is assembled here in a way that explores an aesthetic, specifically, of touch. I concentrate on the materiality of models, drawing on insights from the history and philosophy of science, design and metaphysics. This article chronicles the ways in which touch, or material interactions, operate in the world of 3D models, and its role in what models mean and do. I end with a call for greater attention to scientific process, described as assembly of and within science, which is revealed by this focus on touch. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrostatic interactions for directed assembly of high performance nanostructured energetic materials of Al/Fe2O3/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Ma, Zhuang; Li, Guoping; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Benbo; Luo, Yunjun

    2016-01-01

    Electrostatic self-assembly in organic solvent without intensively oxidative or corrosive environments, was adopted to prepare Al/Fe 2 O 3 /MWCNT nanostructured energetic materials as an energy generating material. The negatively charged MWCNT was used as a glue-like agent to direct the self-assembly of the well dispersed positively charged Al (fuel) and Fe 2 O 3 (oxide) nanoparticles. This spontaneous assembly method without any surfactant chemistry or other chemical and biological moieties decreased the aggregation of the same nanoparticles largely, moreover, the poor interfacial contact between the Al (fuel) and Fe 2 O 3 (oxide) nanoparticles was improved significantly, which was the key characteristic of high performance nanostructured energetic materials. In addition, the assembly process was confirmed as Diffusion-Limited Aggregation. The assembled Al/Fe 2 O 3 /MWCNT nanostructured energetic materials showed excellent performance with heat release of 2400 J/g, peak pressure of 0.42 MPa and pressurization rate of 105.71 MPa/s, superior to that in the control group Al/Fe 2 O 3 nanostructured energetic materials prepared by sonication with heat release of 1326 J/g, peak pressure of 0.19 MPa and pressurization rate of 33.33 MPa/s. Therefore, the approach, which is facile, opens a promising route to the high performance nanostructured energetic materials. - Graphical abstract: The negatively charged MWCNT was used as a glue-like agent to direct the self-assembly of the well dispersed positively charged Al (fuel) and Fe 2 O 3 (oxide) nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A facile spontaneous electrostatic assembly strategy without surfactant was adopted. • The fuels and oxidizers assembled into densely packed nanostructured composites. • The assembled nanostructured energetic materials have excellent performance. • This high performance energetic material can be scaled up for practical application. • This strategy can be applied into other nanostructured

  16. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Hideaki; Sakai, Takao; Ishida, Tomio; Yokota, Norikatsu.

    1992-01-01

    The lower ends of a plurality of plate-like shape memory alloys are secured at the periphery of the upper inside of the handling head of a fuel assembly. As the shape memory alloy, a Cu-Zn alloy, a Ti-Pd alloy or a Fe-Ni alloy is used. When high temperature coolants flow out to the handling head, the shape memory alloy deforms by warping to the outer side more greatly toward the upper portion thereof with the temperature increase of the coolants. As the result, the shape of the flow channel of the coolants is changed so as to enlarge at the exit of the upper end of the fuel assembly. Then, the pressure loss of the coolants in the fuel assembly is decreased by the enlargement. Accordingly, the flow rate of the coolants in the fuel assembly is increased to lower the temperature of the coolants. Further, high temperature coolants and low temperature coolants are mixed sufficiently just above the fuel assembly. This can suppress the temperature fluctuation of the mixed coolants in the upper portion of the reactor core, thereby enabling to decrease a fatigue and failures of the structural components in the upper portion of the reactor core. (I.N.)

  17. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.; Yang, Yongliang; Yan, Dongming; Li, Wilmot; Agrawala, Maneesh

    2010-01-01

    How things work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of individual parts and the interactions between parts based on their geometry and a few user specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions between parts. We present results for a wide variety of assemblies. © 2010 ACM.

  18. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.; Yang, Yongliang; Yan, Dongming; Li, Wilmot; Agrawala, Maneesh

    2013-01-01

    How-things-work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of the individual parts and the interactions across the parts based on their geometry and a few user-specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences, and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions across parts. We demonstrate our system on a wide variety of assemblies. © 2013 ACM 0001-0782/13/01.

  19. Illustrating how mechanical assemblies work

    KAUST Repository

    Mitra, Niloy J.

    2010-07-26

    How things work visualizations use a variety of visual techniques to depict the operation of complex mechanical assemblies. We present an automated approach for generating such visualizations. Starting with a 3D CAD model of an assembly, we first infer the motions of individual parts and the interactions between parts based on their geometry and a few user specified constraints. We then use this information to generate visualizations that incorporate motion arrows, frame sequences and animation to convey the causal chain of motions and mechanical interactions between parts. We present results for a wide variety of assemblies. © 2010 ACM.

  20. Roof assembly

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Villiers, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this chapter is to provide sustainability criteria for roof system design that can be used by planners, designers and developers as a planning, design and development guide for sustainable building projects....

  1. Inverse design of multicomponent assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeros, William D.; Lindquist, Beth A.; Jadrich, Ryan B.; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2018-03-01

    Inverse design can be a useful strategy for discovering interactions that drive particles to spontaneously self-assemble into a desired structure. Here, we extend an inverse design methodology—relative entropy optimization—to determine isotropic interactions that promote assembly of targeted multicomponent phases, and we apply this extension to design interactions for a variety of binary crystals ranging from compact triangular and square architectures to highly open structures with dodecagonal and octadecagonal motifs. We compare the resulting optimized (self- and cross) interactions for the binary assemblies to those obtained from optimization of analogous single-component systems. This comparison reveals that self-interactions act as a "primer" to position particles at approximately correct coordination shell distances, while cross interactions act as the "binder" that refines and locks the system into the desired configuration. For simpler binary targets, it is possible to successfully design self-assembling systems while restricting one of these interaction types to be a hard-core-like potential. However, optimization of both self- and cross interaction types appears necessary to design for assembly of more complex or open structures.

  2. Improved guide tube bulge tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaill, R.E.; Phillips, W.D.

    1979-01-01

    A guide tube bulge tool for securing control rod guide tubes to a fuel assembly grid, includes a cylinder having several flexible tines each of which is equipped with a semispherical radially outwardly extending projection. A tapered ram fits into the cylinder so as to force the tines outwardly when the ram is pulled into the cylinder while supporting the other tines. (UK)

  3. Magnetic nanoparticle assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    Trohidou, Kalliopi N

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles with diameters in the range of a few nanometers are today at the cutting edge of modern technology and innovation because of their use in numerous applications ranging from engineering to biomedicine. A great deal of scientific interest has been focused on the functionalization of magnetic nanoparticle assemblies. The understanding of interparticle interactions is necessary to clarify the physics of these assemblies and their use in the development of high-performance magnetic materials. This book reviews prominent research studies on the static and dynamic magnetic properties of nanoparticle assemblies, gathering together experimental and computational techniques in an effort to reveal their optimized magnetic properties for biomedical use and as ultra-high magnetic recording media.

  4. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Matsuzuka, Ryuji.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a fuel assembly which can decrease pressure loss of coolant to uniform temperature. Structure: A sectional area of a flow passage in the vicinity of an inner peripheral surface of a wrapper tube is limited over the entire length to prevent the temperature of a fuel element in the outermost peripheral portion from being excessively decreased to thereby flatten temperature distribution. To this end, a plurality of pincture-frame-like sheet metals constituting a spacer for supporting a fuel assembly, which has a plurality of fuel elements planted lengthwise and in given spaced relation within the wrapper tube, is disposed in longitudinal grooves and in stacked fashion to form a substantially honeycomb-like space in cross section. The fuel elements are inserted and supported in the space to form a fuel assembly. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagano, Mamoru; Yoshioka, Ritsuo

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively utilize nuclear fuels by increasing the reactivity of a fuel assembly and reduce the concentration at the central region thereof upon completion of the burning. Constitution: A fuel assembly is bisected into a central region and a peripheral region by disposing an inner channel box within a channel box. The flow rate of coolants passing through the central region is made greater than that in the peripheral region. The concentration of uranium 235 of the fuel rods in the central region is made higher. In such a structure, since the moderating effect in the central region is improved, the reactivity of the fuel assembly is increased and the uranium concentration in the central region upon completion of the burning can be reduced, fuel economy and effective utilization of uranium can be attained. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Interactive navigation-guided ophthalmic plastic surgery: navigation enabling of telescopes and their use in endoscopic lacrimal surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali MJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad Javed Ali,1 Swati Singh,1 Milind N Naik,1 Swathi Kaliki,2 Tarjani Vivek Dave1 1The Institute of Dacryology, 2The Operation Eyesight Universal Institute for Eye Cancer, L.V. Prasad Eye Institute, Hyderabad, India Purpose: The aims of this study were to report the preliminary experience of using telescopes, which were enabled for navigation guidance, and their utility in complex endoscopic lacrimal surgeries. Methods: Navigation enabling of the telescope was achieved by using the AxiEM™ malleable neuronavigation shunt stylet. Image-guided dacryolocalization was performed in five patients using the intraoperative image-guided StealthStation™ system in the electromagnetic mode. The “look ahead” protocol software was used to assist the surgeon in assessing the intraoperative geometric location of the endoscope and what lies ahead in real time. All patients underwent navigation-guided powered endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy. The utility of uninterrupted navigation guidance throughout the surgery with the endoscope as the navigating tool was noted. Results: Intraoperative geometric localization of the lacrimal sac and the nasolacrimal duct could be easily deciphered. Constant orientation of the lacrimal drainage system and the peri-lacrimal anatomy was possible without the need for repeated point localizations throughout the surgery. The “look ahead” features could accurately alert the surgeon of anatomical structures that exists at 5, 10 and 15 mm in front of the endoscope. Good securing of the shunt stylet with the telescope was found to be essential for constant and accurate navigation. Conclusion: Navigation-enabled endoscopes provide the surgeon with the advantage of sustained stereotactic anatomical awareness at all times during the surgery. Keywords: telescope, endoscope, image guidance, navigation, lacrimal surgery, powered endoscopic DCR

  7. User's guide for ABCI version 9.4 (azimuthal beam cavity interaction) and introducing the ABCI windows application package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, Yong Ho

    2005-12-01

    ABCI is a computer program which solves the Maxwell equations directly in the time domain when a bunched beam goes through an axi-symmetric structure on or off axis. An arbitrary charge distribution can be defined by the user (default=Gaussian). This document is meant to be a comprehensive user's guide to describe all features of ABCI version 9.4, including also all additions since the release of the guide for version 8.8. All appendixes from the previous two user's guides that contain different important topics are also quoted. The main advantages of ABCI lie in its high speed of execution, the minimum use of computer memory, implementation of Napoly integration method and many elaborate options of Fourier transformations. In the version 9.4, even wake potentials for a counter-rotating beam of opposite charge can be calculated instead of usual ones for a beam trailing the driving beams. Now, the Windows application version of ABCI is available as a package which includes ABCI stand-alone executable modules, the sample input files, the source codes, manuals and the Windows version of TopDrawer, TopDrawW. This package can be downloaded from the ABCI home page: http://abci.kek.jp/abci.htm. Just by drag-and-droping an input file on the icon of ABCI application, all the calculation results pop out. Neither compilation of the source code nor installation of the program to Windows is necessary. Together with the TopDrawer for Windows, all works (computation of wake fields, generation of figures and so on) can be done simply and easily on Windows alone. How to use ABCI on Windows and how to install the program to other computer systems are explained at the end of this manual. (author)

  8. A study of the friction and wear processes of the structural components of fuel assemblies for water-cooled and water moderated power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarov, V.; Afanasiev, A.; Matvienko, I.; Drozdov, Y.; Puchkov, V.

    2011-01-01

    The friction forces affect the fuel assembly (FA) strength at all the stages of its lifecycle. The paper covers the methods and the results of the pre-irradiation experimental studies of the static and dynamic processes the friction forces are involved in. These comprise the FA assembling at the manufacturer, fuel rod flow-induced vibration and fretting-wear in the fuel rod-to-cell friction pairs, rod cluster control assembly (RCCA) movement in the FA guide tubes, FA bowing, FA loading-unloading into the core, irradiation-induced growth and thermal-mechanical fuel rod-to-spacer grid interaction. (authors)

  9. Valve assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandling, M.

    1981-01-01

    An improved valve assembly, used for controlling the flow of radioactive slurry, is described. Radioactive contamination of the air during removal or replacement of the valve is prevented by sucking air from the atmosphere through a portion of the structure above the valve housing. (U.K.)

  10. Electrostatic interactions for directed assembly of high performance nanostructured energetic materials of Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Ma, Zhuang; Li, Guoping; Wang, Zhen; Zhao, Benbo; Luo, Yunjun, E-mail: yjluo@bit.edu.cn

    2016-05-15

    Electrostatic self-assembly in organic solvent without intensively oxidative or corrosive environments, was adopted to prepare Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MWCNT nanostructured energetic materials as an energy generating material. The negatively charged MWCNT was used as a glue-like agent to direct the self-assembly of the well dispersed positively charged Al (fuel) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (oxide) nanoparticles. This spontaneous assembly method without any surfactant chemistry or other chemical and biological moieties decreased the aggregation of the same nanoparticles largely, moreover, the poor interfacial contact between the Al (fuel) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (oxide) nanoparticles was improved significantly, which was the key characteristic of high performance nanostructured energetic materials. In addition, the assembly process was confirmed as Diffusion-Limited Aggregation. The assembled Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/MWCNT nanostructured energetic materials showed excellent performance with heat release of 2400 J/g, peak pressure of 0.42 MPa and pressurization rate of 105.71 MPa/s, superior to that in the control group Al/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructured energetic materials prepared by sonication with heat release of 1326 J/g, peak pressure of 0.19 MPa and pressurization rate of 33.33 MPa/s. Therefore, the approach, which is facile, opens a promising route to the high performance nanostructured energetic materials. - Graphical abstract: The negatively charged MWCNT was used as a glue-like agent to direct the self-assembly of the well dispersed positively charged Al (fuel) and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (oxide) nanoparticles. - Highlights: • A facile spontaneous electrostatic assembly strategy without surfactant was adopted. • The fuels and oxidizers assembled into densely packed nanostructured composites. • The assembled nanostructured energetic materials have excellent performance. • This high performance energetic material can be scaled up for practical application. • This

  11. Inventory of Federal Energy-Related Environment and Safety Research for FY 1978. Volume III, interactive terminal users guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C. E.; Barker, Janice F.

    1979-12-01

    This users' guide was prepared to provide interested persons access to, via computer terminals, federally funded energy-related environmental and safety research projects for FY 1978. Although this information is also available in hardbound volumes, this on-line searching capability is expected to reduce the time required to answer ad hoc questions and, at the same time, produce meaningful reports. The data contained in this data base are not exhaustive and represent research reported by the following agencies: Department of Agriculture, Department of Commerce, Department of Defense, Department of Energy, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Department of the Interior, Department of Transportation, Federal Energy Administration, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Science Foundation, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Tennessee Valley Authority, U.S. Coast Guard, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

  12. SU-C-BRA-01: Interactive Auto-Segmentation for Bowel in Online Adaptive MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy by Using a Multi-Region Labeling Algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Y; Chen, I; Kashani, R; Wan, H; Maughan, N; Muccigrosso, D; Parikh, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In MRI-guided online adaptive radiation therapy, re-contouring of bowel is time-consuming and can impact the overall time of patients on table. The study aims to auto-segment bowel on volumetric MR images by using an interactive multi-region labeling algorithm. Methods: 5 Patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer underwent fractionated radiotherapy (18–25 fractions each, total 118 fractions) on an MRI-guided radiation therapy system with a 0.35 Tesla magnet and three Co-60 sources. At each fraction, a volumetric MR image of the patient was acquired when the patient was in the treatment position. An interactive two-dimensional multi-region labeling technique based on graph cut solver was applied on several typical MRI images to segment the large bowel and small bowel, followed by a shape based contour interpolation for generating entire bowel contours along all image slices. The resulted contours were compared with the physician’s manual contouring by using metrics of Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. Results: Image data sets from the first 5 fractions of each patient were selected (total of 25 image data sets) for the segmentation test. The algorithm segmented the large and small bowel effectively and efficiently. All bowel segments were successfully identified, auto-contoured and matched with manual contours. The time cost by the algorithm for each image slice was within 30 seconds. For large bowel, the calculated Dice coefficients and Hausdorff distances (mean±std) were 0.77±0.07 and 13.13±5.01mm, respectively; for small bowel, the corresponding metrics were 0.73±0.08and 14.15±4.72mm, respectively. Conclusion: The preliminary results demonstrated the potential of the proposed algorithm in auto-segmenting large and small bowel on low field MRI images in MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy. Further work will be focused on improving its segmentation accuracy and lessening human interaction.

  13. SU-C-BRA-01: Interactive Auto-Segmentation for Bowel in Online Adaptive MRI-Guided Radiation Therapy by Using a Multi-Region Labeling Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Y; Chen, I; Kashani, R; Wan, H; Maughan, N; Muccigrosso, D; Parikh, P [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-guided online adaptive radiation therapy, re-contouring of bowel is time-consuming and can impact the overall time of patients on table. The study aims to auto-segment bowel on volumetric MR images by using an interactive multi-region labeling algorithm. Methods: 5 Patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer underwent fractionated radiotherapy (18–25 fractions each, total 118 fractions) on an MRI-guided radiation therapy system with a 0.35 Tesla magnet and three Co-60 sources. At each fraction, a volumetric MR image of the patient was acquired when the patient was in the treatment position. An interactive two-dimensional multi-region labeling technique based on graph cut solver was applied on several typical MRI images to segment the large bowel and small bowel, followed by a shape based contour interpolation for generating entire bowel contours along all image slices. The resulted contours were compared with the physician’s manual contouring by using metrics of Dice coefficient and Hausdorff distance. Results: Image data sets from the first 5 fractions of each patient were selected (total of 25 image data sets) for the segmentation test. The algorithm segmented the large and small bowel effectively and efficiently. All bowel segments were successfully identified, auto-contoured and matched with manual contours. The time cost by the algorithm for each image slice was within 30 seconds. For large bowel, the calculated Dice coefficients and Hausdorff distances (mean±std) were 0.77±0.07 and 13.13±5.01mm, respectively; for small bowel, the corresponding metrics were 0.73±0.08and 14.15±4.72mm, respectively. Conclusion: The preliminary results demonstrated the potential of the proposed algorithm in auto-segmenting large and small bowel on low field MRI images in MRI-guided adaptive radiation therapy. Further work will be focused on improving its segmentation accuracy and lessening human interaction.

  14. Fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gjertsen, R.K.

    1982-01-01

    A fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor comprises a locking mechanism that is capable of locking the fuel assembly to the core plate of a nuclear reactor to prevent inadvertent movement of the fuel assembly. The locking mechanism comprises a ratchet mechanism 108 that allows the fuel assembly to be easily locked to the core plate but prevents unlocking except when the ratchet is disengaged. The ratchet mechanism is coupled to the locking mechanism by a rotatable guide tube for a control rod or water displacer rod. (author)

  15. Improvements in nuclear fuel assembly cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eaton, C.W.; Seeley, T.A.; Ince, G.; Speakman, W.T.

    1986-03-12

    The fuel pin/guide tube supporting grids of an assembly cage for a multi pin fuel element or a reflector element for a stringer are mounted in the moderator sleeve by way of mounting assemblies engaged in grooves machined into the interior surface of the sleeve, each mounting assembly including a split ring which is assembled into its groove by being radially contracted, pushed along the sleeve into registry with the groove and allowed to radially expand. The split ring may carry burnable neutron absorber. The region of the sleeve between two adjacent grids may be of smaller internal diameter than the remainder of the sleeve.

  16. Managing the Complexity of Human/Machine Interactions in Computerized Learning Environments: Guiding Students' Command Process through Instrumental Orchestrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trouche, Luc

    2004-01-01

    After an introduction which addresses some basic questions, this article is organized around three points: (1) The theoretical framework of the so-called "instrumental approach" which has been a theme in the last two CAME symposia; (2) A consideration of two processes ("instrumentalization" and "instrumentation") which interact in the…

  17. Using PyMOL to Explore the Effects of pH on Noncovalent Interactions between Immunoglobulin G and Protein A: A Guided-Inquiry Biochemistry Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche Allred, Zahilyn D; Tai, Heeyoung; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Page, Richard C

    2017-11-01

    Students' understandings of foundational concepts such as noncovalent interactions, pH and pK a are crucial for success in undergraduate biochemistry courses. We developed a guided-inquiry activity to aid students in making connections between noncovalent interactions and pH/pK a . Students explore these concepts by examining the primary and tertiary structures of immunoglobulin G (IgG) and Protein A. Students use PyMOL, an open source molecular visualization application, to (1) identify hydrogen bonds and salt bridges between and within the proteins at physiological pH and (2) apply their knowledge of pH/pK a to association rate constant data for these proteins at pH 4 and pH 11. The laboratory activity was implemented within a one semester biochemistry laboratory for students majoring in allied health disciplines, engineering, and biological sciences. Several extensions for more advanced students are discussed. Students' overall performance highlighted their ability to successfully complete tasks such as labeling and identifying noncovalent interactions and revealed difficulties with analyzing noncovalent interactions under varying pH/pK a conditions. Students' evaluations after completing the activity indicated they felt challenged but also recognized the potential of the activity to help them gain meaningful understanding of the connections between noncovalent interactions, pH, pK a , and protein structure. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(6):528-536, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echigoya, Hironori; Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To render the axial distribution relatively flat. Constitution: First nuclear element comprises a fuel can made of zircalloy i.e., the metal with less neutron absorption, which is filled with a plurality of UO 2 pellets and sealed by using a lower end plug, a plenum spring and an upper end plug by means of welding. Second fuel element is formed by substituting a part of the UO 2 pellets with a water tube which is sealed with water and has a space for allowing the heat expansion. The nuclear fuel assembly is constituted by using the first and second fuel elements together. In such a structure, since water reflects neutrons and decrease their leakage to increase the temperature, reactivity is added at the upper portion of the fuel assembly to thereby flatten the axial power distribution. Accordingly, stable operation is possible only by means of deep control rods while requiring no shallow control rods. (Sekiya, K.)

  19. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Mitsuo.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the corrosion rate and suppress the increase of radioactive corrosion products in reactor water of nuclear fuel assemblies for use in BWR type reactors having spacer springs made of nickel based deposition reinforced type alloys. Constitution: Spacer rings made of nickel based deposition reinforced type alloy are incorporated and used as fuel assemblies after applying treatment of dipping and maintaining at high temperature water followed by heating in steams. Since this can remove the nickel leaching into reactor water at the initial stage, Co-58 as the radioactive corrosion products in the reactor water can be reduced, and the operation at in-service inspection or repairement can be facilitated to improve the working efficiency of the nuclear power plant. The dipping time is desirably more than 10 hours and more desirably more than 30 hours. (Horiuchi, T. )

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Shoichi; Hirano, Yasushi.

    1998-01-01

    A one-half or more of entire fuel rods in a fuel assembly comprises MOX fuel rods containing less than 1wt% of burnable poisons, and at least a portion of the burnable poisons comprises gadolinium. Then, surplus reactivity at an initial stage of operation cycle is controlled to eliminate burnable poisons remained unburnt at a final stage, as well as increase thermal reactivity. In addition, the content of fission plutonium is determined to greater than the content of uranium 235, and fuel rods at corner portions are made not to incorporate burnable poisons. Fuel rods not containing burnable poisons are disposed at positions in adjacent with fuel rods facing to a water rod at one or two directions. Local power at radial center of the fuel assembly is increased to flatten the distortion of radial power distribution. (N.H.)

  1. Reactive Geochemical Transport Modeling of Concentrated AqueousSolutions: Supplement to TOUGHREACT User's Guide for the PitzerIon-Interaction Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel , Carl

    2006-12-15

    In this report, we present: -- The Pitzer ion-interactiontheory and models -- Input file requirements for using the TOUGHREACTPitzer ion-interaction model and associated databases -- Run-time errormessages -- Verification test cases and application examples. For themain code structure, features, overall solution methods, description ofinput/output files for parameters other than those specific to theimplemented Pitzer model, and error messages, see the TOUGHREACT User'sGuide (Xu et al., 2005). The TOUGHREACT Pitzer version runs on aDEC-alpha architecture CPU, under OSF1 V5.1, with Compaq Digital FortranCompiler. The compiler run-time libraries are required for execution aswell as compilation. The code also runs on Intel Pentium IV andhigher-version CPU-based machines with Compaq Visual Fortran Compiler orIntel Fortran Compiler (integrated with the Microsoft DevelopmentEnvironment). The minimum hardware configuration should include 1 GB RAMand 1 GB (2 GB recommended) of available disk space.

  2. Modelling Polar Self Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Sayar, Mehmet; Solis, Francisco J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2001-03-01

    Recent experimental studies in our group have shown that self assembled thin films of noncentrosymmetric supramolecular objects composed of triblock rodcoil molecules exhibit finite polar order. These aggregates have both long range dipolar and short range Ising-like interactions. We study the ground state of a simple model with these competing interactions. We find that the competition between Ising-like and dipolar forces yield a periodic domain structure, which can be controlled by adjusting the force constants and film thickness. When the surface forces are included in the potential, the system exhibits a finite macroscopic polar order.

  3. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    5th April, 2016 – Ordinary General Assembly of the Staff Association! In the first semester of each year, the Staff Association (SA) invites its members to attend and participate in the Ordinary General Assembly (OGA). This year the OGA will be held on Tuesday, April 5th 2016 from 11:00 to 12:00 in BE Auditorium, Meyrin (6-2-024). During the Ordinary General Assembly, the activity and financial reports of the SA are presented and submitted for approval to the members. This is the occasion to get a global view on the activities of the SA, its financial management, and an opportunity to express one’s opinion, including taking part in the votes. Other points are listed on the agenda, as proposed by the Staff Council. Who can vote? Only “ordinary” members (MPE) of the SA can vote. Associated members (MPA) of the SA and/or affiliated pensioners have a right to vote on those topics that are of direct interest to them. Who can give his/her opinion? The Ordinary General Asse...

  4. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Sei; Ando, Ryohei; Mitsutake, Toru.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly suitable to a BWR-type reactor and improved especially with the nuclear characteristic, heat performance, hydraulic performance, dismantling or assembling performance and economical property. A part of poison rods are formed as a large-diameter/multi-region poison rods having a larger diameter than a fuel rod. A large number of fuel rods are disposed surrounding a large diameter water rod and a group of the large-diameter/multi-region poison rods in adjacent with the water rod. The large-diameter water rod has a burnable poison at the tube wall portion. At least a portion of the large-diameter poison rods has a coolant circulation portion allowing coolants to circulate therethrough. Since the large-diameter poison rods are disposed at a position of high neutron fluxes, a large neutron multiplication factor suppression effect can be provided, thereby enabling to reduce the number of burnable poison rods relative to fuels. As a result, power peaking in the fuel assembly is moderated and a greater amount of plutonium can be loaded. In addition the flow of cooling water which tends to gather around the large diameter water rod can be controlled to improve cooling performance of fuels. (N.H.)

  5. Metallic Contact Formation for Molecular Electronics : Interactions between Vapor-Deposited Metals and Self-Assembled Monolayers of Conjugated Mono- and Dithiols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Bert de; Frank, Martin M.; Chabal, Yves J.; Jiang, Weirong; Garfunkel, Eric; Bao, Zhenan

    2004-01-01

    We present grazing-incidence Fourier transform infrared and AFM data of Au, Al, and Ti vapor-deposited onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of conjugated mono- and dithiols. SAMs of 4,4'''-dimercapto-p-quaterphenyl, 4,4''-dimercapto-p-terphenyl, and 4,4'-dimercapto-p-biphenyl have reactive thiols

  6. Self-assembling nanoparticles encapsulating zoledronic acid inhibit mesenchymal stromal cells differentiation, migration and secretion of proangiogenic factors and their interactions with prostate cancer cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borghese, C.; Casagrande, N.; Pivetta, E.; Colombatti, A.; Boccellino, M.; Amler, Evžen; Normanno, N.; Caraglia, M.; de Rosa, G.; Aldinucci, D.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 26 (2017), s. 42926-42938 ISSN 1949-2553 Institutional support: RVO:68378041 Keywords : zoledronic acid * self-assembling nanoparticles * mesenchymal stromal cells * prostate cancer * tumor microenvironment Subject RIV: FP - Other Medical Disciplines OBOR OECD: Technologies involving the manipulation of cells, tissues, organs or the whole organism (assisted reproduction) Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  7. [Mutual guiding and following of movement - The interaction process in mobilisation based on the example of kinaesthetics: A qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Carola; Vosseler, Birgit; Senn, Beate; Gattinger, Heidrun

    2018-06-01

    Background: Mobility impairment is often seen as a reason for needing long-term care. Thus, promoting mobility becomes increasingly significant in nursing homes. The kinaesthetic approach offers a way to support nursing home residents in using their own resources to maintain or improve their mobility. Aim: The present study intends to identify the characteristics of the interaction between nursing home residents with impaired mobility and kinaesthetic trainers during mobilisation. Methods: This secondary analysis comprises nine video sequences interpreted according to Grounded Theory-principles. The findings are described in a basic model. Results: The interaction with nursing home residents is focused on adapted movement support. This assistance shows a positive effect on residents’ self-activity in the tracking process and in the context of other strategies. Intervening conditions like residents’ daily constitution have an influence on nurses’ kinaesthetic strategies. Thereby, nurses have to be highly competent in self-perception. Conclusion: Adapted movement support proves to be a phenomenon basing on the nurse-resident-interaction and allowing residents to actively participate in collaborative action.

  8. Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 interacts with Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2 and supports Fe-S assembly and DNA integrity in mitochondria of fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxins that bind Fe-S cluster are known to participate in Fe-S cluster assembly. However, their precise role has not been well understood. Among three monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3, 4, and 5) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe only Grx5 resides in mitochondria. The Δgrx5 mutant requires cysteine on minimal media, and does not grow on non-fermentable carbon source such as glycerol. We found that the mutant is low in the activity of Fe-S enzymes in mitochondria as well as in the cytoplasm. Screening of multi-copy suppressor of growth defects of the mutant identified isa1 + gene encoding a putative A-type Fe-S scaffold, in addition to mas5 + and hsc1 + genes encoding putative chaperones for Fe-S assembly process. Examination of other scaffold and chaperone genes revealed that isa2 + , but not isu1 + and ssc1 + , complemented the growth phenotype of Δgrx5 mutant as isa1 + did, partly through restoration of Fe-S enzyme activities. The mutant also showed a significant decrease in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that Grx5 interacts in vivo with Isa1 and Isa2 proteins in mitochondria by observing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. These results indicate that Grx5 plays a central role in Fe-S assembly process through interaction with A-type Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, each of which is an essential protein in S. pombe, and supports mitochondrial genome integrity as well as Fe-S assembly.

  9. The effect of the fuel rod friction force to the fuel assembly lateral mechanical characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Dong Geun; Jeon, Sang Youn; Suh, Jung Min

    2012-01-01

    The Fuel Assembly (FA) for light water reactor consists of hundreds of fuel rods, guide tubes, spacer grids, top/bottom nozzles. The guide tubes transmit vertical loads between the top and bottom nozzles, position the fuel rod support grids vertically, react the loads from the fuel rods that are applied to the grids, and provide some of the lateral load capability for the overall fuel assembly. The guide tubes are the structural members of the skeleton assembly. And the spacer grids maintain the fuel rod array by providing positive lateral restraint to the fuel rod but only frictional restraint in the axial direction. Figure 1 shows the outline of skeleton, FA and the location of guide tubes in the view of cross section. 17x17 FA has 24 guide tubes and one instrumentation tube. When the FA is in reactor, the lateral stiffness is one of very important factors from the view point of in reactor integrity of fuel assembly such as guarantee of the cool able geometry, the control rod insertion etc. The lateral stiffness of FA is mainly determined by skeleton lateral stiffness. And the fuel rods loaded in the spacer grids reinforce the FA lateral stiffness. Generally, fuel rods and spacer grids create the nonlinear friction force between fuel rod tube and grid spring/dimple against external lateral force of FA. Thus, it is necessary to study the contribution of the fuel rods friction force to the FA lateral stiffness. So, this paper is to show how much amount of the fuel rod grid interaction contributes to the FA lateral stiffness based on the test results

  10. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1970-01-01

    Herein disclosed is a fuel assembly in which a fuel rod bundle is easily detachable by rotating a fuel rod fastener rotatably mounted to the upper surface of an upper tie-plate supporting a fuel bundle therebelow. A locking portion at the leading end of each fuel rod protrudes through the upper tie-plate and is engaged with or separated from the tie-plate by the rotation of the fastener. The removal of a desired fuel rod can therefore be remotely accomplished without the necessity of handling pawls, locking washers and nuts. (Owens, K.J.)

  11. Assembling consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assembling Consumption marks a definitive step in the institutionalisation of qualitative business research. By gathering leading scholars and educators who study markets, marketing and consumption through the lenses of philosophy, sociology and anthropology, this book clarifies and applies...... the investigative tools offered by assemblage theory, actor-network theory and non-representational theory. Clear theoretical explanation and methodological innovation, alongside empirical applications of these emerging frameworks will offer readers new and refreshing perspectives on consumer culture and market...... societies. This is an essential reading for both seasoned scholars and advanced students of markets, economies and social forms of consumption....

  12. Interactive surface in the PapD chaperone cleft is conserved in pilus chaperone superfamily and essential in subunit recognition and assembly.

    OpenAIRE

    Slonim, L N; Pinkner, J S; Brändén, C I; Hultgren, S J

    1992-01-01

    The assembly of adhesive pili in Gram-negative bacteria is modulated by specialized periplasmic chaperone systems. PapD is the prototype member of the superfamily of periplasmic pilus chaperones. Previously, the alignment of chaperone sequences superimposed on the three dimensional structure of PapD revealed the presence of invariant, conserved and variable amino acids. Representative residues that protruded into the PapD cleft were targeted for site directed mutagenesis to investigate the pi...

  13. Feasibility and acceptability of patient partnership to improve access to primary care for the physical health of patients with severe mental illnesses: an interactive guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jean-François; Lesage, Alain; Boisvert, Christine; Denis, Frédéric; Bonin, Jean-Pierre; Kisely, Steve

    2015-09-14

    Even in countries with universal healthcare systems, excess mortality rates due to physical chronic diseases in patients also suffering from serious mental illness like schizophrenia is such that their life expectancy could be lessened by up to 20 years. The possible explanations for this disparity include: unhealthy habits (i.e. smoking; lack of exercise); side-effects of psychotropic medication; delays in the detection or initial presentation leading to a more advanced disease at diagnosis; and inequity of access to services. The main objective of this paper is to explore the feasibility and acceptability of patient partnership for developing an interactive guide to improve access to primary care providers for chronic diseases management and health promotion among patients with severe mental illnesses. A participatory action research design was used to engage patients with mental illness as full research partners for a strategy for patient-oriented research in primary care for persons with schizophrenia who also have chronic physical illnesses. This strategy was also developed in partnership with a health and social services centre responsible for the health of the population of a territory with about 100,000 inhabitants in East-end Montreal, Canada. A new interactive guide was developed by patient research partners and used by 146 participating patients with serious mental illness who live on this territory, for them to be better prepared for their medical appointment with a General Practitioner by becoming more aware of their own physical condition. Patient research partners produced a series of 33 short videos depicting signs and symptoms of common chronic diseases and risk factors for the leading causes of mortality and study participants were able to complete the corresponding 33-item questionnaire on an electronic touch screen tablet. What proved to be most relevant in terms of interactivity was the dynamic that has developed among the study participants

  14. Device for identifying fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, Tetsuo; Miyazawa, Tatsuo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately identify a symbol printed on a hanging tool at the upper part of a fuel assembly. Constitution: Optical fibers are bundled to prepare a detector which is disposed at a predetermined position on a hanging tool. This position is set by a guide. Thus, the light emitted from an illumination lamp arrives at the bottom of a groove printed on the upper surface of the tool, and is divided into a weak light reflected upwardly and a strong light reflected on the surface lower than the groove. When these lights are received by the optical fibers, the fibers corresponding to the grooved position become dark, and the fibers corresponding to the ungrooved position become bright. Since the fuel assembly is identified by the dark and bright of the optical fibers as symbols, different machining can be performed every fuel assembly on the upper surface of the tool. (Yoshihara, H.)

  15. Guide tube sleeve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attix, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The invention increases the operating capacity of a nuclear reactor by causing a modification in the flow pattern of the coolant which enhances the coolant's effectiveness. The apparatus provides a thin-walled tubular sleeve closely surrounding but not attached to the exterior surface of a guide tube in a fuel assembly. The wall of the sleeve has tabs projecting outwardly into adjacent flow channels. The sleeve is attached to the wall of a cellular void through which passes the guide tube associated with said sleeve. The tabs increase the flow of water in the channel and thus increase the heat transfer

  16. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Kunitoshi; Azekura, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    In a reactor core of a heavy water moderated light water cooled pressure tube type reactor, no sufficient effects have been obtained for the transfer width to a negative side of void reactivity change in a region of a great void coefficient. Then, a moderation region divided into upper and lower two regions is disposed at the central portion of a fuel assembly. Coolants flown into the lower region can be discharged to the cooling region from an opening disposed at the upper end portion of the lower region. Light water flows from the lower region of the moderator region to the cooling region of the reactor core upper portion, to lower the void coefficient. As a result, the reactivity performance at low void coefficient, i.e., a void reaction rate is transferred to the negative side. Thus, this flattens the power distribution in the fuel assembly, increases the thermal margin and enables rapid operaiton and control of the reactor core, as well as contributes to the increase of fuel burnup ratio and reduction of the fuel cycle cost. (N.H.)

  17. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Nishida, Koji; Karasawa, Hidetoshi; Kanazawa, Toru; Orii, Akihito; Nagayoshi, Takuji; Kashiwai, Shin-ichi; Masuhara, Yasuhiro

    1998-01-01

    The present invention concerns a fuel assembly, for a BWR type nuclear reactor, comprising fuel rods in 9 x 9 matrix. The inner width of the channel box is about 132mm and the length of the fuel rods which are not short fuel rods is about 4m. Two water rods having a circular cross section are arranged on a diagonal line in a portion of 3 x 3 matrix at the center of the fuel assembly, and two fuel rods are disposed at vacant spaces, and the number of fuel rods is 74. Eight fuel rods are determined as short fuel rods among 74 fuel rods. Assuming the fuel inventory in the short fuel rod as X(kg), and the fuel inventory in the fuel rods other than the short fuel rods as Y(kg), X and Y satisfy the relation: X + Y ≥ 173m, Y ≤ - 9.7X + 292, Y ≤ - 0.3X + 203 and X > 0. Then, even when the short fuel rods are used, the fuel inventory is increased and fuel economy can be improved. (I.N.)

  18. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fushimi, Atsushi; Shimada, Hidemitsu; Aoyama, Motoo; Nakajima, Junjiro

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly for an n x n lattice-like BWR type reactor, n is determined to 9 or greater, and the enrichment degree of plutonium is determined to 4.4% by weight or less. Alternatively, n is determined to 10 or greater, and the enrichment degree of plutonium is determined to 5.2% by weight or less. An average take-out burnup degree is determined to 39GWd/t or less, and the matrix is determined to 9 x 9 or more, or the average take-out burnup degree is determined to 51GWd/t, and the matrix is determined to 10 x 10 or more and the increase of the margin of the maximum power density obtained thereby is utilized for the compensation of the increase of distortion of power distribution due to decrease of the kinds of plutonium enrichment degree, thereby enabling to reduce the kind of the enrichment degree of MOX fuel rods to one. As a result, the manufacturing step for fuel pellets can be simplified to reduce the manufacturing cost for MOX fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  19. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : 1- Adoption de l’ordre du jour. 2- Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. 3- Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. 4- Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. 5- Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. 6- Programme 2015. 7- Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. 8- Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. 9- Élections des membres de la Commission é...

  20. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 avril 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2016. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2016. Programme de travail 2017. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2017 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2018. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposées. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. Élections des vérifica...

  1. General Assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Mardi 5 avril à 11 h 00 BE Auditorium Meyrin (6-2-024) Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 5 mai 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2015. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2015. Programme de travail 2016. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2016 Approbation du taux de cotisation pour 2017. Modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commissio...

  2. General assembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Mardi 5 mai à 11 h 00 Salle 13-2-005 Conformément aux statuts de l’Association du personnel, une Assemblée générale ordinaire est organisée une fois par année (article IV.2.1). Projet d’ordre du jour : Adoption de l’ordre du jour. Approbation du procès-verbal de l’Assemblée générale ordinaire du 22 mai 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport d’activités 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport financier 2014. Présentation et approbation du rapport des vérificateurs aux comptes pour 2014. Programme 2015. Présentation et approbation du projet de budget 2015 et taux de cotisation pour 2015. Pas de modifications aux Statuts de l'Association du personnel proposée. Élections des membres de la Commission électorale. &am...

  3. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomata, Terumitsu.

    1993-01-01

    Among fuel pellets to be loaded to fuel cans of a fuel assembly, fuel pellets having a small thermal power are charged in a region from the end of each of spacers up to about 50mm on the upstream of coolants that flow vertically at the periphery of fuel rods. Coolants at the periphery of fuel rods are heated by the heat generation, to result in voids. However, since cooling effect on the upstream of the spacers is low due to influences of the spacers. Further, since the fuel pellets disposed in the upstream region have small thermal power, a void coefficient is not increased. Even if a thermal power exceeding cooling performance should be generated, there is no worry of causing burnout in the upstream region. Even if burnout should be caused, safety margin and reliability relative to burnout are improved, to increase an allowable thermal power, thereby enabling to improve integrity and reliability of fuel rods and fuel assemblies. (N.H.)

  4. INTERACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochum, Elizabeth; Borggreen, Gunhild; Murphey, TD

    This paper considers the impact of visual art and performance on robotics and human-computer interaction and outlines a research project that combines puppetry and live performance with robotics. Kinesics—communication through movement—is the foundation of many theatre and performance traditions ...

  5. Implementing LibGuides 2: An Academic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Vicky; Lucky, Shannon; McLean, Jaclyn

    2015-01-01

    Since 1997, the University of Saskatchewan Library has used "subject pages" to highlight key library resources. When Springshare announced it was launching LibGuides v2, a project team was assembled to transition a mixture of locally produced guides and guides created with the original LibGuides v1 software. This article synthesizes best…

  6. Nuclear fuel assembly top nozzle with improved arrangement of hold-down leaf spring assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Mario, E.E.; Lawson, C.N.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a top nozzle for use in a fuel assembly having guide thimbles for mounting the top nozzle. It comprises: a lower adapter plate having a periphery bounding an interior thereof mountable to the guide thimbles: guide structures attached to and extending along the periphery of the adapter plate and upwardly therefrom; an upper hold-down plate mounted to the guide structures for slidable movement relative thereto such that the upper plate can move toward and away from the interior of the lower plate within the space bounded by the guide structures as the upper plate slidably moves along the guide structures; and leaf spring assemblies interposed between and engaged with the lower and upper plates so as to yieldably support the upper plate in spaced relation above the lower plate and bias the upper plate for movement away from the lower plate; the leaf spring assemblies being provided in a non-peripheral arrangement relative to the periphery of the lower plate in which the assemblies cross the interior of the lower plate in a diagonal fashion between adjacent ones of the guide structures

  7. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto; Ogiya, Shunsuke.

    1989-01-01

    For improving the economy of a BWR type reactor by making the operation cycle longer, the fuel enrichment degree has to be increased further. However, this makes the subcriticality shallower in the upper portion of the reactor core, to bring about a possibility that the reactor shutdown becomes impossible. In the present invention, a portion of fuel rod is constituted as partial length fuel rods (P-fuel rods) in which the entire stack length in the effective portion is made shorter by reducing the concentration of fissionable materials in the axial portion. A plurality of moderator rods are disposed at least on one diagonal line of a fuel assembly and P-fuel rods are arranged at a position put between the moderator rods. This makes it possible to reactor shutdown and makes the axial power distribution satisfactory even if the fuel enrichment degree is increased. (T.M.)

  8. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wataumi, Kazutoshi; Tajiri, Hiroshi.

    1992-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor, a pellet to be loaded comprises an external layer of fissile materials containing burnable poisons and an internal layer of fissile materials not containing burnable poison. For example, there is provided a dual type pellet comprising an external layer made of UO 2 incorporated with Gd 2 O 3 at a predetermined concentration as the burnable poisons and an internal layer made of UO 2 not containing Gd 2 O 3 . The amount of the burnable poisons required for predetermined places is controlled by the thickness of the ring of the external layer. This can dissipate an unnecessary poisoning effect at the final stage of the combustion cycle. Further, since only one or a few kinds of powder mixture of the burnable poisons and the fissile materials is necessary, production and product control can be facilitated. (I.N.)

  9. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Yoko; Aoyama, Motoo; Oyama, Jun-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    Burnable poison-incorporating fuel rods of a first group are disposed in a region in adjacent with a water rod having a large diameter (neutron moderator rod) disposed to the central portion of a fuel assembly. Burnable poison-incorporating fuel rods of a second group are disposed to a region other than peripheral zone in adjacent with a channel box and corners positioned at an inner zone, in adjacent with the channel box. The average concentration of burnable poisons of the burnable poison-incorporating fuel rods of the first group is made greater than that of the second group. With such a constitution, when the burnable poisons of the first group are burnt out, the burnable poisons of the second group are also burnt out at the same time. Accordingly, an amount of burnable poisons left unburnt at the final stage of the operation cycle is reduced, to improve the reactivity. This can improve the economical property. (I.N.)

  10. Fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshioka, Ritsuo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the operation performance of a BWR type reactor by improving the distribution of the uranium enrichment and the incorporation amount of burnable poisons in fuel assemblies. Constitution: The average enrichment of uranium 235 is increased in the upper portion as compared with that in the lower portion, while the incorporation amount of burnable poisons is increased in an upper portion as compared with that in the lower portion. The difference in the incorporation amount of the burnable poisons between the upper and lower portions is attained by charging two kinds of fuel rods; the ones incorporated with the burnable poisons over the entire length and the others incorporated with the burnable poisons only in the upper portions. (Seki, T.)

  11. Reconstitutable fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferlan, S.J.; Kmonk, S.; Schallenberger, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    A reconstitutable fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor which includes a mechanical, rather than metallurgical, arrangement for connecting control rod guide thimbles to the top and bottom nozzles of a fuel assembly. Multiple sleeves enclosing control rod guide thimbles interconnect the top nozzle to the fuel assembly upper grid. Each sleeve is secured to the top nozzle by retaining rings disposed on opposite sides of the nozzle. Similar sleeves enclose the lower end of control rod guide thimbles and interconnect the bottom nozzle with the lowermost grid on the assembly. An end plug fitted in the bottom end of each sleeve extends through the bottom nozzle and is secured thereto by a retaining ring. Should it be necessary to remove a fuel rod from the assembly, the retaining rings in either the top or bottom nozzles may be removed to release the nozzle from the control rod guide thimbles and thus expose either the top or bottom ends of the fuel rods to fuel rod removing mechanisms

  12. Identification of nucleosome assembly protein 1 (NAP1) as an interacting partner of plant ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) and a positive regulator of rDNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Ora [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sunghan [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Yun-jeong [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo-Young [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Hee-Jong, E-mail: heejkoh@snu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Science, Plant Genomics and Breeding Institute, Research Institute of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-921 (Korea, Republic of); Cheon, Choong-Ill, E-mail: ccheon@sookmyung.ac.kr [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women' s University, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-18

    The ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) is a downstream component of the signaling mediated by the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase that acts as a central regulator of the key metabolic processes, such as protein translation and ribosome biogenesis, in response to various environmental cues. In our previous study, we identified a novel role of plant RPS6, which negatively regulates rDNA transcription, forming a complex with a plant-specific histone deacetylase, AtHD2B. Here we report that the Arabidopsis RPS6 interacts additionally with a histone chaperone, nucleosome assembly protein 1(AtNAP1;1). The interaction does not appear to preclude the association of RPS6 with AtHD2B, as the AtNAP1 was also able to interact with AtHD2B as well as with an RPS6-AtHD2B fusion protein in the BiFC assay and pulldown experiment. Similar to a positive effect of the ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (AtS6K1) on rDNA transcription observed in this study, overexpression or down regulation of the AtNAP1;1 resulted in concomitant increase and decrease, respectively, in rDNA transcription suggesting a positive regulatory role played by AtNAP1 in plant rDNA transcription, possibly through derepression of the negative effect of the RPS6-AtHD2B complex. - Highlights: • Nucleosome assembly protein 1 (AtNAP1) interacts with RPS6 as well as with AtHD2B. • rDNA transcription is regulated S6K1. • Overexpression or down regulation of AtNAP1 results in concomitant increase or decrease in rDNA transcription.

  13. The Type IV Pilus Assembly ATPase PilB of Myxococcus xanthus Interacts with the Inner Membrane Platform Protein PilC and the Nucleotide-binding Protein PilM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Lisa Franziska; Friedrich, Carmen; Harms, Andrea; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; van der Does, Chris

    2016-03-25

    Type IV pili (T4P) are ubiquitous bacterial cell surface structures, involved in processes such as twitching motility, biofilm formation, bacteriophage infection, surface attachment, virulence, and natural transformation. T4P are assembled by machinery that can be divided into the outer membrane pore complex, the alignment complex that connects components in the inner and outer membrane, and the motor complex in the inner membrane and cytoplasm. Here, we characterize the inner membrane platform protein PilC, the cytosolic assembly ATPase PilB of the motor complex, and the cytosolic nucleotide-binding protein PilM of the alignment complex of the T4P machinery ofMyxococcus xanthus PilC was purified as a dimer and reconstituted into liposomes. PilB was isolated as a monomer and bound ATP in a non-cooperative manner, but PilB fused to Hcp1 ofPseudomonas aeruginosaformed a hexamer and bound ATP in a cooperative manner. Hexameric but not monomeric PilB bound to PilC reconstituted in liposomes, and this binding stimulated PilB ATPase activity. PilM could only be purified when it was stabilized by a fusion with a peptide corresponding to the first 16 amino acids of PilN, supporting an interaction between PilM and PilN(1-16). PilM-N(1-16) was isolated as a monomer that bound but did not hydrolyze ATP. PilM interacted directly with PilB, but only with PilC in the presence of PilB, suggesting an indirect interaction. We propose that PilB interacts with PilC and with PilM, thus establishing the connection between the alignment and the motor complex. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. PAVE: Program for assembling and viewing ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bomhoff Matthew

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New sequencing technologies are rapidly emerging. Many laboratories are simultaneously working with the traditional Sanger ESTs and experimenting with ESTs generated by the 454 Life Science sequencers. Though Sanger ESTs have been used to generate contigs for many years, no program takes full advantage of the 5' and 3' mate-pair information, hence, many tentative transcripts are assembled into two separate contigs. The new 454 technology has the benefit of high-throughput expression profiling, but introduces time and space problems for assembling large contigs. Results The PAVE (Program for Assembling and Viewing ESTs assembler takes advantage of the 5' and 3' mate-pair information by requiring that the mate-pairs be assembled into the same contig and joined by n's if the two sub-contigs do not overlap. It handles the depth of 454 data sets by "burying" similar ESTs during assembly, which retains the expression level information while circumventing time and space problems. PAVE uses MegaBLAST for the clustering step and CAP3 for assembly, however it assembles incrementally to enforce the mate-pair constraint, bury ESTs, and reduce incorrect joins and splits. The PAVE data management system uses a MySQL database to store multiple libraries of ESTs along with their metadata; the management system allows multiple assemblies with variations on libraries and parameters. Analysis routines provide standard annotation for the contigs including a measure of differentially expressed genes across the libraries. A Java viewer program is provided for display and analysis of the results. Our results clearly show the benefit of using the PAVE assembler to explicitly use mate-pair information and bury ESTs for large contigs. Conclusion The PAVE assembler provides a software package for assembling Sanger and/or 454 ESTs. The assembly software, data management software, Java viewer and user's guide are freely available.

  15. PAVE: program for assembling and viewing ESTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Carol; Johnson, Eric; Bomhoff, Matthew; Descour, Anne

    2009-08-26

    New sequencing technologies are rapidly emerging. Many laboratories are simultaneously working with the traditional Sanger ESTs and experimenting with ESTs generated by the 454 Life Science sequencers. Though Sanger ESTs have been used to generate contigs for many years, no program takes full advantage of the 5' and 3' mate-pair information, hence, many tentative transcripts are assembled into two separate contigs. The new 454 technology has the benefit of high-throughput expression profiling, but introduces time and space problems for assembling large contigs. The PAVE (Program for Assembling and Viewing ESTs) assembler takes advantage of the 5' and 3' mate-pair information by requiring that the mate-pairs be assembled into the same contig and joined by n's if the two sub-contigs do not overlap. It handles the depth of 454 data sets by "burying" similar ESTs during assembly, which retains the expression level information while circumventing time and space problems. PAVE uses MegaBLAST for the clustering step and CAP3 for assembly, however it assembles incrementally to enforce the mate-pair constraint, bury ESTs, and reduce incorrect joins and splits. The PAVE data management system uses a MySQL database to store multiple libraries of ESTs along with their metadata; the management system allows multiple assemblies with variations on libraries and parameters. Analysis routines provide standard annotation for the contigs including a measure of differentially expressed genes across the libraries. A Java viewer program is provided for display and analysis of the results. Our results clearly show the benefit of using the PAVE assembler to explicitly use mate-pair information and bury ESTs for large contigs. The PAVE assembler provides a software package for assembling Sanger and/or 454 ESTs. The assembly software, data management software, Java viewer and user's guide are freely available.

  16. Shock buffer for nuclear control element assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevilacqua, F.

    1977-01-01

    A shock buffer for a control element assembly in a nuclear reactor is described, comprising a piston and a cylinder. The piston is affixed to and extends upward from the control rod guide structure; the cylinder is supported by the upper portion of the control element assembly and is vertically oriented with open end downward for receiving the piston. Coolant liquid normally has free access to the cylinder. The piston displaces liquid from the cylinder when inserted, thereby decelerating the control element assembly near its lower extent of travel. (LL)

  17. Evaporation-induced assembly of biomimetic polypeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyes, Joseph; Junkin, Michael; Cappello, Joseph; Wu Xiaoyi; Wong, Pak Kin

    2008-01-01

    We report an evaporation assisted plasma lithography (EAPL) process for guided self-assembly of a biomimetic silk-elastinlike protein (SELP). We demonstrate the formation of SELP structures from millimeter to submicrometer range on plasma-treatment surface templates during an evaporation-induced self-assembly process. The self-assembly processes at different humidities and droplet volumes were investigated. The process occurs efficiently in a window of optimized operating conditions found to be at 70% relative humidity and 8 μl volume of SELP solution. The EAPL approach provides a useful technique for the realization of functional devices and systems using these biomimetic materials

  18. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraiwa, Koji; Ueda, Makoto

    1989-01-01

    In a fuel assembly used for a light water cooled reactor such as a BWR type reactor, a water rod is divided axially into an upper outer tube and a lower outer tube by means of a plug disposed from the lower end of a water rod to a position 1/4 - 1/2 of the entire length for the water rod. Inlet apertures and exit apertures for moderators are respectively perforated for the divided outer tube and upper and lower portions. Further, an upper inner tube with less neutron irradiation growing amount than the outer tube is perforated on the plug in the outer tube, while a lower inner tube with greater neutron irradiation growing amount than the outer tube is suspended from the lower surface of the plug in the outer tube. Then, the opening area for the exit apertures disposed to the upper outer tube and the lower outer tube is controlled depending on the difference of the neutron irradiation growing amount between the upper inner tube and the upper outer tube, and the difference of the neutron irradiation growing amount between the lower inner tube and the lower outer tube. This enables effective spectral shift operation and improve the fuel economy. (T.M.)

  19. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hajime.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel assembly having fuel rods of different length, fuel pellets of mixed oxides of uranium and plutonium are loaded to a short fuel rod. The volume ratio of a pellet-loaded portion to a plenum portion of the short fuel rod is made greater than the volume ratio of a fuel rod to which uranium fuel pellets are loaded. In addition, the volume of the plenum portion of the short fuel rod is set greater depending on the plutonium content in the loaded fuel pellets. MOX fuel pellets are loaded on the short fuel rods having a greater degree of freedom relevant to the setting for the volume of the plenum portion compared with that of a long rod fuel, and the volume of the plenum portion is ensured greater depending on the plutonium content. Even if a large amount of FP gas and He gas are discharged from the MOX fuels compared with that from the uranium fuels, the internal pressure of the MOX fuel rod during operation is maintained substantially identical with that of the uranium fuel rod, so that a risk of generating excess stresses applied to the fuel cladding tubes and rupture of fuels are greatly reduced. (N.H.)

  20. Fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Akiyoshi; Bessho, Yasunori; Aoyama, Motoo; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Hirakawa, Hiromasa; Yamashita, Jun-ichi; Hayashi, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    In a fuel assembly of a BWR type reactor in which a water rod of a large diameter is disposed at the central portion, the cross sectional area perpendicular to the axial direction comprises a region a of a fuel rod group facing to a wide gap water region to which a control rod is inserted, a region b of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the wide gap water region other than the region a, a region d of a fuel rod group facing to a narrow gap water region and a region c of a fuel rod group disposed on the side of the narrow gap water region other than the region d. When comparing an amount of fission products contained in the four regions relative to that in the entire regions and average enrichment degrees of fuel rods for the four regions, the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group of the region a is minimized, and the relative amount and the average enrichment degree of the fuel rod group in the region b is maximized. Then, reactor shut down margin during cold operation can be improved while flattening the power in the cross section perpendicular to the axial direction. (N.H.)

  1. Use of piezoelectric-excited millimeter-sized cantilever sensors to measure albumin interaction with self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols having different functional headgroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Gossett A; Mutharasan, Raj

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, we describe a new modality of measuring human serum albumin (HSA) adsorption continuously on CH3-, COOH-, and OH-terminated self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of C11-alkanethiols and the direct quantification of the adsorbed amount. A gold-coated piezoelectric-excited millimeter-sized cantilever (PEMC) sensor of 6-mm2 sensing area was fabricated, where resonant frequency decreases upon mass increase. The resonant frequency in air of the detection peak was 45.5 +/- 0.01 kHz. SAMs of C11-thiols (in absolute ethanol) with different end groups was prepared on the PEMC sensor and then exposed to buffer solution containing HSA at 10 microg/mL. The resonant frequency decreased exponentially and reached a steady-state value within 30 min. The decrease in resonant frequency indicates that the mass of the sensor increased due to HSA adsorption onto the SAM layer. The frequency change obtained for the HSA adsorption on CH3-, COOH-, and OH-terminated SAM were 520.8 +/- 8.6 (n = 3), 290.4 +/- 6.1 (n = 2), and 210.6 +/- 8.1 Hz (n = 3), respectively. These results confirm prior conclusions that albumin adsorption decreased in the order, CH(3) > COOH > OH. Observed binding rate constants were 0.163 +/- 0.003, 0.248 +/- 0.006, and 0.381 +/- 0.001 min(-1), for methyl, carboxylic, and hydroxyl end groups, respectively. The significance of the results reported here is that both the formation of self-assembled monolayers and adsorption of serum protein onto the formed layer can be measured continuously, and quantification of the adsorbed amount can be determined directly.

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel assemblies and end fitting grid structures therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    An improved end fitting grid structure is described for nuclear fuel assemblies which overcomes the need for load-bearing control rod guide tubes and the expensive special fittings that these tubes required. (UK)

  3. Inlet for fuel assembly having finger control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, A.; Suvanto, A.; Tornblom, L.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with vertically arranged fuel assemblies positioned on supporting members and with control rods displaceably arranged in guide tubes between the fuel rods inside the fuel assemblies is described. The supporting plate is provided with a transverse end piece with throttling means for the liquid flow which passes from below up through the supporting member and past the fuel rods in the fuel assembly. The inlets for the guide tubes for the control rods are located below the end piece and the throttling means. In this way a higher pressure prevails at the inlet to the guide tubes than above the end piece, so that a stronger flow of coolant is produced through guide tubes than through the fuel assembly. (U.S.)

  4. Theory of Connectivity: Nature and Nurture of Cell Assemblies and Cognitive Computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng; Liu, Jun; Tsien, Joe Z

    2016-01-01

    Richard Semon and Donald Hebb are among the firsts to put forth the notion of cell assembly-a group of coherently or sequentially-activated neurons-to represent percept, memory, or concept. Despite the rekindled interest in this century-old idea, the concept of cell assembly still remains ill-defined and its operational principle is poorly understood. What is the size of a cell assembly? How should a cell assembly be organized? What is the computational logic underlying Hebbian cell assemblies? How might Nature vs. Nurture interact at the level of a cell assembly? In contrast to the widely assumed randomness within the mature but naïve cell assembly, the Theory of Connectivity postulates that the brain consists of the developmentally pre-programmed cell assemblies known as the functional connectivity motif (FCM). Principal cells within such FCM is organized by the power-of-two-based mathematical principle that guides the construction of specific-to-general combinatorial connectivity patterns in neuronal circuits, giving rise to a full range of specific features, various relational patterns, and generalized knowledge. This pre-configured canonical computation is predicted to be evolutionarily conserved across many circuits, ranging from these encoding memory engrams and imagination to decision-making and motor control. Although the power-of-two-based wiring and computational logic places a mathematical boundary on an individual's cognitive capacity, the fullest intellectual potential can be brought about by optimized nature and nurture. This theory may also open up a new avenue to examining how genetic mutations and various drugs might impair or improve the computational logic of brain circuits.

  5. Theory of Connectivity: Nature and Nurture of Cell Assemblies and Cognitive Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng eLi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Richard Semon and Donald Hebb are among the firsts to put forth the notion of cell assembly – a group of coherently or sequentially-activated neurons– to represent percept, memory, or concept. Despite the rekindled interest in this age-old idea, the concept of cell assembly still remains ill-defined and its operational principle is poorly understood. What is the size of a cell assembly? How should a cell assembly be organized? What is the computational logic underlying Hebbian cell assemblies? How might Nature vs Nurture interact at the level of a cell assembly? In contrast to the widely assumed local randomness within the mature but naïve cell assembly, the recent Theory of Connectivity postulates that the brain consists of the developmentally pre-programmed cell assemblies known as the functional connectivity motif (FCM. Principal cells within such FCM is organized by the power-of-two-based mathematical principle that guides the construction of specific-to-general combinatorial connectivity patterns in neuronal circuits, giving rise to a full range of specific features, various relational patterns, and generalized knowledge. This pre-configured canonical computation is predicted to be evolutionarily conserved across many circuits, ranging from these encoding memory engrams and imagination to decision-making and motor control. Although the power-of-two-based wiring and computational logic places a mathematical boundary on an individual’s cognitive capacity, the fullest intellectual potential can be brought about by optimized nature and nurture. This theory may also open up a new avenue to examining how genetic mutations and various drugs might impair or enhance the computational logic of brain circuits.

  6. Assembly of the CMS hadronic calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The hadronic calorimeter is assembled on the end-cap of the CMS detector in the assembly hall. Hadronic calorimeters measure the energy of particles that interact via the strong force, called hadrons. The detectors are made in a sandwich-like structure where these scintillator tiles are placed between metal sheets.

  7. Method for the detection of defective nuclear fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrie, W.E.; Womack, R.E.; White, N.W. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    There is applied an ultrasonic transmitter on a tape carrier by means of which the ultrasonic transmitter can be guided underwater between the fuel assemblies. If a fuel assembly is defective, i.e. filled with water, the reflection coefficient at the front interface between cladding and inner space of the fuel assembly will decrease. Essential parts of the ultrasonic signal will move through the liquid and will not be reflected until the backward liquid/metal interface of the fuel assembly. This impulse echo is different from that of the gas-filled fuel assembly. (DG) [de

  8. Comparison of the application of plate and beam theories to the elastic dilation and interaction of PFR sub-assembly wrappers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, R.L.

    1977-10-01

    A wrapper face is assumed to be a long, narrow, rectangular plate. The mechanical interaction between adjacent dilating wrappers in contact along an axial line is discussed in terms of the theory of the bending of plates. A variational method is used to obtain neat and concise equations that determine both the interaction load and the length of the line of contact. The prime objective of the work is to compare the results obtained from plate theory with corresponding expressions from much simpler calculations based on beam theory. Numerical results indicate that the elastic dilation of a wrapper and its interaction with a neighbouring wrapper can be calculated to adequate accuracy by simple beam theory. (author)

  9. Debris removal system for a nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, F.W. Jr.; Dailey, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    A system is described for working on an elongated nuclear fuel assembly suspended vertically and submerged in a spent fuel pool having fuel assembly racks at the bottom. The system comprises a work platform disposable in the pool and adapted to be supported on the fuel assembly racks. The platform has an opening disposed in registry with a selected one of the underlying racks; guide means carried by the platform for guiding the suspended fuel assembly into the opening and the selected rack to accommodate vertical movement of the fuel assembly into and out of the rack to make different portions of the fuel assembly accessible from the platform; and tool manipulating apparatus disposable on the platform adjacent to the opening, the tool manipulating apparatus including a tool carriage. Tool holders for respectively holding associated tools. Each of the tool holders is mounted on the tool carriage for reciprocating movement with respect along a predetermined axis between extended and retracted conditions

  10. The oligomeric assembly of the novel haem-degrading protein HbpS is essential for interaction with its cognate two-component sensor kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ortiz de Orué Lucana, Darío; Bogel, Gabriele; Zou, Peijian; Groves, Matthew R

    2009-01-01

    HbpS, a novel protein of previously unknown function from Streptomyces reticuli, is up-regulated in response to haemin- and peroxide-based oxidative stress and interacts with the SenS/SenR two-component signal transduction system. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structures (2.2

  11. Self-Assembly of Colloidal Particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is self-assembly where one engineers interaction between nanoscopic building blocks so ..... big question in the field how this microscopic chirality of the virus gets translated ... shape emerges due to a competition between the surface tension.

  12. Grapples for manipulating end fittings for nuclear reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1982-01-01

    A nuclear fuel assembly includes control rod guide tubes the upper ends of which protrude beyond a spider and are locked in place by means of a cellular lattice seated in grooves in the outer surfaces of the sleeves. A grapple is provided for disengaging the structure comprising lattice, spider, springs and a grill from the end of the fuel assembly to enable these components to be removed in an assembly state and subsequently replaced after inspection and repair. (author)

  13. Radical probing of spliceosome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, Charnpal S; Kent, Oliver A; MacMillan, Andrew M

    2017-08-01

    Here we describe the synthesis and use of a directed hydroxyl radical probe, tethered to a pre-mRNA substrate, to map the structure of this substrate during the spliceosome assembly process. These studies indicate an early organization and proximation of conserved pre-mRNA sequences during spliceosome assembly. This methodology may be adapted to the synthesis of a wide variety of modified RNAs for use as probes of RNA structure and RNA-protein interaction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nuclear fuel assembly seismic amplitude limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    The ability of a nuclear reactor to withstand high seismic loading is enhanced by including, on each fuel assembly, at least one seismic grid which reduces the magnitude of the possible lateral deflection of the individual fuel elements and the entire fuel assembly. The reduction in possible deflection minimizes the possibility of impact of the spacer grids of one fuel assembly on those of an adjacent fuel assembly and reduces the magnitude of forces associated with any such impact thereby minimizing the possibility of fuel assembly damage as a result of high seismic loading. The seismic grid is mounted from the fuel assembly guide tubes, has greater external dimensions when compared to the fuel assembly spacer grids and normally does not support or otherwise contact the fuel elements. The reduction in possible deflection is achieved through reduction of the clearance between adjacent fuel assemblies made possible by the use in the seismic grid of a high strength material characterized by favorable thermal expansion characteristics and minimal irradiation induced expansion

  15. Fundamental mechanisms in flue-gas conditioning. Topical report No. 1, Literature review and assembly of theories on the interactions of ash and FGD sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, R.S.; Vann Bush, P.; Snyder, T.R.

    1992-01-09

    The overall goal of this research project is to formulate a mathematical model of flue gas conditioning. This model will be based on an understanding of why ash properties, such as cohesivity and resistivity, are changed by conditioning. Such a model could serve as a component of the performance models of particulate control devices where flue gas conditioning is used. There are two specific objectives of this research project, which divide the planned research into two main parts. One part of the project is designed to determine how ash particles are modified by interactions with sorbent injection processes and to describe the mechanisms by which these interactions affect fine particle collection. The objective of the other part of the project is to identify the mechanisms by which conditioning agents, including chemically active compounds, modify the key properties of fine fly ash particles.

  16. Technical support for a proposed decay heat guide using SAS2H/ORIGEN-S data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, O.W.; Parks, C.V.; Renier, J.P.

    1994-09-01

    Major revisions are proposed to the current US Nuclear Regulatory Commission decay heat rate guide entitled ''Regulatory Guide 3.54, Spent Fuel Heat Generation in an Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation,'' using a new data base produced by the SAS2H analysis sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The data base for the proposed guide revision has been significantly improved by increasing the number and range of parameters that generally characterize pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) and boiling-water-reactor (BWR) spent fuel assemblies. Using generic PWR and BWR assembly models, calculations were performed with each model for six different burnups at each of three separate specific powers to produce heat rates at 20 cooling times in the range of 1 to 110 y. The proposed procedure specifies proper interpolation formulae for the tabulated heat generation rates. Adjustment formulae for the interpolated values are provided to account for differences in initial 235 U enrichment and changes in the specific power of a cycle from the average value. Finally, safety factor formulae were derived as a function of burnup, cooling time, and type of reactor. The proposed guide revision was designed to be easier to use. Also, the complete data base and guide procedure is incorporated into an interactive code called LWRARC which can be executed on a personal computer. The report shows adequate comparisons of heat rates computed by SAS2H/ORIGEN-S and measurements for 10 BWR and 10 PWR fuel assemblies. The average differences of the computed minus the measured heat rates of fuel assemblies were -07 ± 2.6% for the BWR and 1.5 ± 1.3% for the PWR. In addition, a detailed analysis of the proposed procedure indicated the method and equations to be valid

  17. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions. (authors)

  18. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions

  19. Newnes electronics assembly handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Brindley, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Newnes Electronics Assembly Handbook: Techniques, Standards and Quality Assurance focuses on the aspects of electronic assembling. The handbook first looks at the printed circuit board (PCB). Base materials, basic mechanical properties, cleaning of assemblies, design, and PCB manufacturing processes are then explained. The text also discusses surface mounted assemblies and packaging of electromechanical assemblies, as well as the soldering process. Requirements for the soldering process; solderability and protective coatings; cleaning of PCBs; and mass solder/component reflow soldering are des

  20. Interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach towards controllable in situ self-assembly of artificial pinning centers in RE-123 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Judy; Shi, Jack

    2017-10-01

    Raising critical current density J c in high temperature superconductors (HTSs) is an important strategy towards performance-cost balanced HTS technology for commercialization. The development of strong nanoscale artificial pinning centers (APCs) in HTS, such as YBa2Cu3O7 or RE-123 in general, represents one of the most exciting progressions in HTS material research in the last decade. Significantly raised J c has been demonstrated in APC/RE-123 nanocomposites by enhanced pinning on magnetic vortices in magnetic fields towards that demanded in practical applications. Among other processes, strain-mediated self-organization has been explored extensively for in situ formation of the APCs based on fundamental physics design rules. The desire in controlling the morphology, dimension, orientation, and concentration of APCs has led to a fundamental question on how strains interact in determining APCs at a macroscopic scale. Answering this question demands an interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach towards a thorough understanding of fundamental physics governing the strain-mediated self-organization of the APCs in the APC/RE-123 nanocomposites. Such an understanding is the key for a leap forward from the traditionally empirical method to materials-by-design to enable an optimal APC landscape to be achieved in epitaxial films of APC/YBCO nanocomposites under a precise guidance of fundamental physics. The paper intends to provide a review of recent progress made in the controllable generation of APCs using the interactive modeling-synthesis-characterization approach. The emphasis will be given to the understanding so far achieved using such an approach on the collective effect of the strain field on the morphology, dimension, and orientation of APCs in epitaxial APC/RE-123 nanocomposite films.

  1. Self-assembling peptide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Kai; Makam, Pandeeswar; Aizen, Ruth; Gazit, Ehud

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductors are central to the modern electronics and optics industries. Conventional semiconductive materials bear inherent limitations, especially in emerging fields such as interfacing with biological systems and bottom-up fabrication. A promising candidate for bioinspired and durable nanoscale semiconductors is the family of self-assembled nanostructures comprising short peptides. The highly ordered and directional intermolecular π-π interactions and hydrogen-bonding network allow the formation of quantum confined structures within the peptide self-assemblies, thus decreasing the band gaps of the superstructures into semiconductor regions. As a result of the diverse architectures and ease of modification of peptide self-assemblies, their semiconductivity can be readily tuned, doped, and functionalized. Therefore, this family of electroactive supramolecular materials may bridge the gap between the inorganic semiconductor world and biological systems. PMID:29146781

  2. Guiding nanocrystal organization within mesoscale lipid thin-film templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Dylan; Zhai, You; Oh, Nuri; Shim, Moonsub; Leal, Cecilia

    Recently a great deal of interest has been established in the cooperative intermolecular interactions in hard and soft meso-structured composite materials. Much of this research has focused on the effects of nanoparticle incorporation into block copolymers that otherwise self-assemble into periodic mesostructures through microphase separation. Through careful selection of the polymer components the nanoparticles can be directed to also microphase separate and therefore exhibit symmetry induced by the block copolymers. Such systems are promising for enabling the organization of nanoparticle superstructures. Although this is useful in many applications such as in bottom-up assembly of opti-electronic materials, most of these applications would benefit from interplay between structure and dynamics. Much like block-copolymers, lipids can self-assembly into a variety of structures with 1D lamellar, 2D Hexagonal, and 3D cubic symmetry. However, unlike block-copolymers phase stabilization and conversion from one geometry to another happens under a minute. We will show our recent efforts into using lipid thin films to guide the assembly of nanoparticle superstructures resembling those displayed by lipid polymorphs and how they distort lipid equilibrium phase behavior. Funding from the Office of Naval Research.

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alder, J.L.; Kmonk, S.; Racki, F.R.

    1981-01-01

    A grid for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly which includes intersecting straps arranged to form a structure of egg crate configuration. The cells defined by the intersecting straps are adapted to contain axially extending fuel rods, each of which occupy one cell, while each control rod guide tube or thimble occupies the space of four cells. To effect attachment of each guide thimble to the grid, a short intermediate sleeve is brazed to the strap walls and the guide thimble is then inserted therein and mechanically secured to the sleeve walls. Each sleeve preferably, although not necessarily, is equipped with circumferentially spaced openings useful in adjusting dimples and springs in adjacent cells. To accurately orient each sleeve in position in the grid, the ends of straps extending in one direction project through transversely extending straps and terminate in the wall of the guide sleeve. Other straps positioned at right angles thereto terminate in that portion of the wall of a strap which lies next to a wall of the sleeve

  4. Slotted rotatable target assembly and systematic error analysis for a search for long range spin dependent interactions from exotic vector boson exchange using neutron spin rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, C.; Crawford, B.; Fox, W.; Francis, I.; Holley, A.; Magers, S.; Sarsour, M.; Snow, W. M.; Vanderwerp, J.

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the design and construction of a novel target array of nonmagnetic test masses used in a neutron polarimetry measurement made in search for new possible exotic spin dependent neutron-atominteractions of Nature at sub-mm length scales. This target was designed to accept and efficiently transmit a transversely polarized slow neutron beam through a series of long open parallel slots bounded by flat rectangular plates. These openings possessed equal atom density gradients normal to the slots from the flat test masses with dimensions optimized to achieve maximum sensitivity to an exotic spin-dependent interaction from vector boson exchanges with ranges in the mm - μm regime. The parallel slots were oriented differently in four quadrants that can be rotated about the neutron beam axis in discrete 90°increments using a Geneva drive. The spin rotation signals from the 4 quadrants were measured using a segmented neutron ion chamber to suppress possible systematic errors from stray magnetic fields in the target region. We discuss the per-neutron sensitivity of the target to the exotic interaction, the design constraints, the potential sources of systematic errors which could be present in this design, and our estimate of the achievable sensitivity using this method.

  5. Directed Self-Assembly of Nanodispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furst, Eric M [University of Delaware

    2013-11-15

    Directed self-assembly promises to be the technologically and economically optimal approach to industrial-scale nanotechnology, and will enable the realization of inexpensive, reproducible and active nanostructured materials with tailored photonic, transport and mechanical properties. These new nanomaterials will play a critical role in meeting the 21st century grand challenges of the US, including energy diversity and sustainability, national security and economic competitiveness. The goal of this work was to develop and fundamentally validate methods of directed selfassembly of nanomaterials and nanodispersion processing. The specific aims were: 1. Nanocolloid self-assembly and interactions in AC electric fields. In an effort to reduce the particle sizes used in AC electric field self-assembly to lengthscales, we propose detailed characterizations of field-driven structures and studies of the fundamental underlying particle interactions. We will utilize microscopy and light scattering to assess order-disorder transitions and self-assembled structures under a variety of field and physicochemical conditions. Optical trapping will be used to measure particle interactions. These experiments will be synergetic with calculations of the particle polarizability, enabling us to both validate interactions and predict the order-disorder transition for nanocolloids. 2. Assembly of anisotropic nanocolloids. Particle shape has profound effects on structure and flow behavior of dispersions, and greatly complicates their processing and self-assembly. The methods developed to study the self-assembled structures and underlying particle interactions for dispersions of isotropic nanocolloids will be extended to systems composed of anisotropic particles. This report reviews several key advances that have been made during this project, including, (1) advances in the measurement of particle polarization mechanisms underlying field-directed self-assembly, and (2) progress in the

  6. Biophysical Regulation of Vascular Differentiation and Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Gerecht, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    The ability to grow stem cells in the laboratory and to guide their maturation to functional cells allows us to study the underlying mechanisms that govern vasculature differentiation and assembly in health and disease. Accumulating evidence suggests that early stages of vascular growth are exquisitely tuned by biophysical cues from the microenvironment, yet the scientific understanding of such cellular environments is still in its infancy. Comprehending these processes sufficiently to manipulate them would pave the way to controlling blood vessel growth in therapeutic applications. This book assembles the works and views of experts from various disciplines to provide a unique perspective on how different aspects of its microenvironment regulate the differentiation and assembly of the vasculature. In particular, it describes recent efforts to exploit modern engineering techniques to study and manipulate various biophysical cues. Biophysical Regulation of Vascular Differentiation and Assembly provides an inter...

  7. ATP-dependent human RISC assembly pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoda, Mayuko; Kawamata, Tomoko; Paroo, Zain; Ye, Xuecheng; Iwasaki, Shintaro; Liu, Qinghua; Tomari, Yukihide

    2010-01-01

    The assembly of RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) is a key process in small RNA-mediated gene silencing. In humans, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are incorporated into RISCs containing the Argonaute (AGO) subfamily proteins Ago1-4. Previous studies have proposed that, unlike Drosophila melanogaster RISC assembly pathways, human RISC assembly is coupled with dicing and is independent of ATP. Here we show by careful reexamination that, in humans, RISC assembly and dicing are uncoupled, and ATP greatly facilitates RISC loading of small-RNA duplexes. Moreover, all four human AGO proteins show remarkably similar structural preferences for small-RNA duplexes: central mismatches promote RISC loading, and seed or 3'-mid (guide position 12-15) mismatches facilitate unwinding. All these features of human AGO proteins are highly reminiscent of fly Ago1 but not fly Ago2.

  8. Self-assembling hydrogels crosslinked solely by receptor-ligand interactions: tunability, rationalization of physical properties, and 3D cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael S; Tsurkan, Mikhail V; Chwalek, Karolina; Bornhauser, Martin; Schlierf, Michael; Werner, Carsten; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-02-16

    We report a novel, noncovalent hydrogel system crosslinked solely by receptor-ligand interactions between biotin and avidin. The simple hydrogel synthesis and functionalization together with the widespread use of biotinylated ligands in biosciences make this versatile system suitable for many applications. The gels possess a range of tunable physical properties, including stiffness, lifetime, and swelling. The erosion rates, unexpectedly fast compared to the kinetic parameters for biotin-avidin, are explored in terms of stretching tensions on the polymers, a concept well-known on the single-molecule level, but largely unexplored in supramolecular systems. As proof of utility, the gels were functionalized with different peptide sequences to control human mesenchymal stromal cell morphology in 3D culture. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Facilitative-competitive interactions in an old-growth forest: the importance of large-diameter trees as benefactors and stimulators for forest community assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Forrester, David I; Härdtle, Werner; Sturm, Knut; von Oheimb, Goddert

    2015-01-01

    The role of competition in tree communities is increasingly well understood, while little is known about the patterns and mechanisms of the interplay between above- and belowground competition in tree communities. This knowledge, however, is crucial for a better understanding of community dynamics and developing adaptive near-natural management strategies. We assessed neighbourhood interactions in an unmanaged old-growth European beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest by quantifying variation in the intensity of above- (shading) and belowground competition (crowding) among dominant and co-dominant canopy beech trees during tree maturation. Shading had on average a much larger impact on radial growth than crowding and the sensitivity to changes in competitive conditions was lowest for crowding effects. We found that each mode of competition reduced the effect of the other. Increasing crowding reduced the negative effect of shading, and at high levels of shading, crowding actually had a facilitative effect and increased growth. Our study demonstrates that complementarity in above- and belowground processes enable F. sylvatica to alter resource acquisition strategies, thus optimising tree radial growth. As a result, competition seemed to become less important in stands with a high growing stock and tree communities with a long continuity of anthropogenic undisturbed population dynamics. We suggest that growth rates do not exclusively depend on the density of potential competitors at the intraspecific level, but on the conspecific aggregation of large-diameter trees and their functional role for regulating biotic filtering processes. This finding highlights the potential importance of the rarely examined relationship between the spatial aggregation pattern of large-diameter trees and the outcome of neighbourhood interactions, which may be central to community dynamics and the related forest ecosystem services.

  10. Membrane interactions of a self-assembling model peptide that mimics the self-association, structure and toxicity of Aβ(1-40)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salay, Luiz C.; Qi, Wei; Keshet, Ben; Tamm, Lukas K.; Fernandez, Erik J.

    2013-01-01

    β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) is a primary protein component of senile plaques in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and plays an important, but not fully understood role in neurotoxicity. Model peptides with the demonstrated ability to mimic the structural and toxicity behavior of Aβ could provide a means to evaluate the contributions to toxicity that are common to self–associating peptides from many disease states. In this work, we have studied the peptide-membrane interactions of a model β-sheet peptide, P11-2 (CH3CO-Gln-Gln-Arg-Phe-Gln-Trp-Gln-Phe-Glu-Gln-Gln-NH2), by fluorescence, infrared spectroscopy, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange. Like Aβ(1-40), the peptide is toxic, and conditions which produce intermediate oligomers show higher toxicity against cells than either monomeric forms or higher aggregates of the peptide. Further, P11-2 also binds to both zwitterionic (POPC) and negatively charged (POPC:POPG) liposomes, acquires a partial β-sheet conformation in presence of lipid, and is protected against deuterium exchange in the presence of lipids. The results show that a simple rationally designed model β-sheet peptide recapitulates many important features of Aβ peptide structure and function, reinforcing the idea that toxicity arises, at least in part, from a common mode of action on membranes that is independent of specific aspects of the amino acid sequence. Further studies of such well-behaved model peptide systems will facilitate the investigation of the general principles that govern the molecular interactions of aggregation-prone disease-associated peptides with cell and/or membrane surfaces. PMID:19393615

  11. Facilitative-competitive interactions in an old-growth forest: the importance of large-diameter trees as benefactors and stimulators for forest community assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Fichtner

    Full Text Available The role of competition in tree communities is increasingly well understood, while little is known about the patterns and mechanisms of the interplay between above- and belowground competition in tree communities. This knowledge, however, is crucial for a better understanding of community dynamics and developing adaptive near-natural management strategies. We assessed neighbourhood interactions in an unmanaged old-growth European beech (Fagus sylvatica forest by quantifying variation in the intensity of above- (shading and belowground competition (crowding among dominant and co-dominant canopy beech trees during tree maturation. Shading had on average a much larger impact on radial growth than crowding and the sensitivity to changes in competitive conditions was lowest for crowding effects. We found that each mode of competition reduced the effect of the other. Increasing crowding reduced the negative effect of shading, and at high levels of shading, crowding actually had a facilitative effect and increased growth. Our study demonstrates that complementarity in above- and belowground processes enable F. sylvatica to alter resource acquisition strategies, thus optimising tree radial growth. As a result, competition seemed to become less important in stands with a high growing stock and tree communities with a long continuity of anthropogenic undisturbed population dynamics. We suggest that growth rates do not exclusively depend on the density of potential competitors at the intraspecific level, but on the conspecific aggregation of large-diameter trees and their functional role for regulating biotic filtering processes. This finding highlights the potential importance of the rarely examined relationship between the spatial aggregation pattern of large-diameter trees and the outcome of neighbourhood interactions, which may be central to community dynamics and the related forest ecosystem services.

  12. Facilitative-Competitive Interactions in an Old-Growth Forest: The Importance of Large-Diameter Trees as Benefactors and Stimulators for Forest Community Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtner, Andreas; Forrester, David I.; Härdtle, Werner; Sturm, Knut; von Oheimb, Goddert

    2015-01-01

    The role of competition in tree communities is increasingly well understood, while little is known about the patterns and mechanisms of the interplay between above- and belowground competition in tree communities. This knowledge, however, is crucial for a better understanding of community dynamics and developing adaptive near-natural management strategies. We assessed neighbourhood interactions in an unmanaged old-growth European beech (Fagus sylvatica) forest by quantifying variation in the intensity of above- (shading) and belowground competition (crowding) among dominant and co-dominant canopy beech trees during tree maturation. Shading had on average a much larger impact on radial growth than crowding and the sensitivity to changes in competitive conditions was lowest for crowding effects. We found that each mode of competition reduced the effect of the other. Increasing crowding reduced the negative effect of shading, and at high levels of shading, crowding actually had a facilitative effect and increased growth. Our study demonstrates that complementarity in above- and belowground processes enable F. sylvatica to alter resource acquisition strategies, thus optimising tree radial growth. As a result, competition seemed to become less important in stands with a high growing stock and tree communities with a long continuity of anthropogenic undisturbed population dynamics. We suggest that growth rates do not exclusively depend on the density of potential competitors at the intraspecific level, but on the conspecific aggregation of large-diameter trees and their functional role for regulating biotic filtering processes. This finding highlights the potential importance of the rarely examined relationship between the spatial aggregation pattern of large-diameter trees and the outcome of neighbourhood interactions, which may be central to community dynamics and the related forest ecosystem services. PMID:25803035

  13. Hydraulic shock damper for fuel assemblies of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabson, F.S.

    1978-01-01

    A typical embodiment of this invention provides a hydraulic mechanism for alleviating the effect of seismic forces and other stresses that are applied to a fuel assembly in a nuclear reactor. Illustratively, hollow guide posts potrude into a fuel assembly end fitting grid from biased spring pads. Plungers that move with the spring pads plug one end of each of the respective guide posts. Plates on the end fitting grid that have individual holes for fluid discharge partially plug the other ends of the respective guide posts, thereby providing a hydraulic means for absorbing the longitudinal component of seismic shocks and other anticipated forces. (Auth.)

  14. Fuel assemblies mechanical behaviour improvements based on design changes and loading patterns computational analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, J.; Aullo, M.; Gutierrez, E.

    2001-01-01

    In the past few years, incomplete RCCA insertion events (IRI) have been taking place at some nuclear plants. Large guide thimble distortion caused by high compressive loads together with the irradiation induced material creep and growth, is considered as the primary cause of those events. This disturbing phenomenon is worsened when some fuel assemblies are deformed to the extent that they push the neighbouring fuel assemblies and the distortion is transmitted along the core. In order to better understand this mechanism, ENUSA has developed a methodology based on finite element core simulation to enable assessments on the propensity of a given core loading pattern to propagate the distortion along the core. At the same time, the core loading pattern could be decided interacting with nuclear design to obtain the optimum response under both, nuclear and mechanical point of views, with the objective of progressively attenuating the core distortion. (author)

  15. Light-assisted, templated self-assembly of gold nanoparticle chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquay, Eric; Martínez, Luis Javier; Huang, Ningfeng; Mejia, Camilo A; Sarkar, Debarghya; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2014-09-10

    We experimentally demonstrate the technique of light-assisted, templated self-assembly (LATS) to trap and assemble 200 nm diameter gold nanoparticles. We excite a guided-resonance mode of a photonic-crystal slab with 1.55 μm laser light to create an array of optical traps. Unlike our previous demonstration of LATS with polystyrene particles, we find that the interparticle interactions play a significant role in the resulting particle patterns. Despite a two-dimensionally periodic intensity profile in the slab, the particles form one-dimensional chains whose orientations can be controlled by the incident polarization of the light. The formation of chains can be understood in terms of a competition between the gradient force due to the excitation of the mode in the slab and optical binding between particles.

  16. Identifying the nature of surface chemical modification for directed self-assembly of block copolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Evangelio

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, block copolymer lithography has emerged as a viable alternative technology for advanced lithography. In chemical-epitaxy-directed self-assembly, the interfacial energy between the substrate and each block copolymer domain plays a key role on the final ordering. Here, we focus on the experimental characterization of the chemical interactions that occur at the interface built between different chemical guiding patterns and the domains of the block copolymers. We have chosen hard X-ray high kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy as an exploration technique because it provides information on the electronic structure of buried interfaces. The outcome of the characterization sheds light onto key aspects of directed self-assembly: grafted brush layer, chemical pattern creation and brush/block co-polymer interface.

  17. Tunable and rapid self-assembly of block copolymers using mixed solvent vapors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woon Ik; Tong, Sheng; Liu, Yuzi; Jung, Il Woong; Roelofs, Andreas; Hong, Seungbum

    2014-12-21

    Pattern generation of well-controlled block copolymers (BCPs) with a high Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ) is important for applications in sub-20 nm nanolithography. We used mixed solvents of dimethylformamide (DMF) and toluene to control the morphology as well as the time to achieve the targeted morphology via self-assembly of BCPs. By precisely controlling the volume ratio of DMF and toluene, well-ordered line, honeycomb, circular hole, and lamellar nanostructures were obtained from a cylinder-forming poly(styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine) (PS-b-P2VP) BCP with high χ. Furthermore, a well-aligned 12 nm line pattern was successfully achieved in the guiding template within one minute using the mixed solvents. This practical method may also be applicable to self-assembly of other BCPs, providing more opportunities for the next-generation sub-10 nm lithography applications.

  18. CFD method research on characteristics cells in rod bundle fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jie; Chen Bingyan; Zhang Hong

    2011-01-01

    Two characteristic cells are in AFA-3G fuel assembly, that is typical cell and control rod guide cell. And there are some rules on the arrangement of mixing vanes. For the two characteristic cells, mixing capability is evaluated axially from the point of the first and second kind of sub-channel with CFD method. Mass mixing and heat mixing are interaction but different with each other. Although the mass mixing in the first kind of sub-channel is stronger, the thermal capability of the two is to some tune from the point of heat transfer. In the experiment research on thermal-hydraulic performance of AFA-3G fuel assembly, the arrangements of mixing vanes should refer to the two spacer grids of characteristic cells. (authors)

  19. Template mediated protein self-assembly as a valuable tool in regenerative therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, B; Eltohamy, M; Yadavalli, V K; Reis, R L; Kim, H W

    2018-04-11

    The assembly of natural proteinaceous biopolymers into macro-scale architectures is of great importance in synthetic biology, soft-material science and regenerative therapy. The self-assembly of protein tends to be limited due to anisotropic interactions among protein molecules, poor solubility and stability. Here, we introduce a unique platform to self-immobilize diverse proteins (fibrous and globular, positively and negatively charged, low and high molecular weight) using silicon surfaces with pendant -NH 2 groups via a facile one step diffusion limited aggregation (DLA) method. All the experimental proteins (type I collagen, bovine serum albumin and cytochrome C) self-assemble into seaweed-like branched dendritic architectures via classical DLA in the absence of any electrolytes. The notable differences in branching architectures are due to dissimilarities in protein colloidal sub-units, which is typical for each protein type, along with the heterogeneous distribution of surface -NH 2 groups. Fractal analysis of assembled structures is used to explain the underlying route of fractal deposition; which concludes how proteins with different functionality can yield similar assembly. Further, the nano-micro-structured surfaces can be used to provide functional topographical cues to study cellular responses, as demonstrated using rat bone marrow stem cells. The results indicate that the immobilization of proteins via DLA does not affect functionality, instead serving as topographical cues to guide cell morphology. This indicates a promising design strategy at the tissue-material interface and is anticipated to guide future surface modifications. A cost-effective standard templating strategy is therefore proposed for fundamental and applied particle aggregation studies, which can be used at multiple length scales for biomaterial design and surface reformation.

  20. Structure and assembly of the essential RNA ring component of a viral DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Fang; Lu, Changrui; Zhao, Wei; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R; Anderson, Dwight L; Jardine, Paul J; Grimes, Shelley; Ke, Ailong

    2011-05-03

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component in the assembly and operation of the powerful bacteriophage 29 DNA packaging motor. The pRNA forms a multimeric ring via intermolecular base-pairing interactions between protomers that serves to guide the assembly of the ring ATPase that drives DNA packaging. Here we report the quaternary structure of this rare multimeric RNA at 3.5 Å resolution, crystallized as tetrameric rings. Strong quaternary interactions and the inherent flexibility helped rationalize how free pRNA is able to adopt multiple oligomerization states in solution. These characteristics also allowed excellent fitting of the crystallographic pRNA protomers into previous prohead/pRNA cryo-EM reconstructions, supporting the presence of a pentameric, but not hexameric, pRNA ring in the context of the DNA packaging motor. The pentameric pRNA ring anchors itself directly to the phage prohead by interacting specifically with the fivefold symmetric capsid structures that surround the head-tail connector portal. From these contacts, five RNA superhelices project from the pRNA ring, where they serve as scaffolds for binding and assembly of the ring ATPase, and possibly mediate communication between motor components. Construction of structure-based designer pRNAs with little sequence similarity to the wild-type pRNA were shown to fully support the packaging of 29 DNA.

  1. Holddown device for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing ''floating'' of nuclear-reactor fuel assemblies due to hydraulic forces is disclosed. The apparatus uses a holddown column made of the same material as the core barrel. The column is positioned in a center guide-tube location in the fuel assembly in such a manner as to enable it either to slide within the center guide tube or, if the center guide tube is replaced by the column, to slide through openings in the spacer grids. The lower end of the holddown column engages the lower end fitting of the fuel assembly, and the upper end of the column engages a flow plate to which holddown force is applied. As a consequence of this arrangement, holddown force is transmitted from the flow plate through the holddown column to the lower end fitting. Movement of the fuel assembly is thereby prevented without a compression load being applied to the fuel-assemb1ly structure. In addition, variations due to thermal expansion in the distance between the lower core plate and the upper core plate are largely made up for by corresponding variations in the holddown column because the holddown column and the core barrel can be made of the same material

  2. Force-controlled robotic assembly processes of rigid and flexible objects methodologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghalyan, Ibrahim Fahad Jasim

    2016-01-01

    This book provides comprehensive and integrated approaches for rigid and flexible object assembly. It presents comparison studies with the available force-guided robotic processes and covers contact-state modeling, scheme control strategies, and position searching algorithms. Further, it includes experimental validations for different assembly situations, including those for the assembly of industrial parts taken from the automotive industry. .

  3. Synthetic assembly of novel avidin-biotin-GlcNAc (ABG) complex as an attractive bio-probe and its interaction with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Amrita; Koyama, Tetsuo; Hatano, Ken; Matsuoka, Koji

    2016-10-01

    A tetravalent GlcNAc pendant glycocluster was constructed with terminal biotin through C6 linker. To acquire the multivalent carbohydrate-protein interactions, we synthesized a glycopolymer of tetrameric structure using N-acetyl-d-glucosamine (GlcNAc) as the target carbohydrate by the use of 4-(4,6-dimethoxy-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl)-4-methylmorpholinium chloride (DMT-MM) as coupling reagent, followed by biotin-avidin complexation leading to the formation of glycocluster of avidin-biotin-GlcNAc conjugate (ABG complex). The dynamic light scattering (DLS) system was implied for size detection and to check the binding affinity of GlcNAc conjugate with a WGA lectin we use fluorometric assay by means of specific excitation of tryptophan at λex 295nm and it was found to be very high Ka∼1.39×10(7) M(-1) in case of ABG complex as compared to GlcNAc only Ka∼1.01×10(4) M(-1) with the phenomenon proven to be due to glycocluster effect. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Handling device for nuclear fuel assemblies and assembly appropriate for such a device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cransac, J.P.; Jaquelin, R.; Renaux, C.

    1985-01-01

    The handling device comprises a guide tube of which axis is vertical, in which a grab moves, hanging from a chain, under the action of a back-geared motor. The grab being stopped in its rotation in the guide tube, an assembly can be gripped with a bayonet system while controlling the rotation of the grab - guide tube system a back-geared motor. The device can be hanged from the small or large rotating plug of a fast neutron reactor. It can be used in a handling flask [fr

  5. QUAST: quality assessment tool for genome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alexey; Saveliev, Vladislav; Vyahhi, Nikolay; Tesler, Glenn

    2013-04-15

    Limitations of genome sequencing techniques have led to dozens of assembly algorithms, none of which is perfect. A number of methods for comparing assemblers have been developed, but none is yet a recognized benchmark. Further, most existing methods for comparing assemblies are only applicable to new assemblies of finished genomes; the problem of evaluating assemblies of previously unsequenced species has not been adequately considered. Here, we present QUAST-a quality assessment tool for evaluating and comparing genome assemblies. This tool improves on leading assembly comparison software with new ideas and quality metrics. QUAST can evaluate assemblies both with a reference genome, as well as without a reference. QUAST produces many reports, summary tables and plots to help scientists in their research and in their publications. In this study, we used QUAST to compare several genome assemblers on three datasets. QUAST tables and plots for all of them are available in the Supplementary Material, and interactive versions of these reports are on the QUAST website. http://bioinf.spbau.ru/quast . Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. Supporting Self-Assembly : the IKEA Effect on Mobile Health Persuasive Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yunlong; Pfeil, Ulrike; Reiterer, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose the idea of examining the effect of self-assembly on the success of mobile health persuasive technology. The IKEA effect shows that individuals evaluate products assembled by themselves more positively than pre-assembled products. The IKEA effect has been proven in several domains, e.g., in human robot interaction, where participants who assembled the robot evaluated the robot and the interaction with the robot more favorably than participants who did not assemble th...

  7. Fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, H M; Miller, D L; Tong, L S

    1973-09-06

    The subject of the patent is a spacer design applicable, primarily, to LWR, and especially, though not specifically PWR, fuel assemblies. The spacer consists of an egg-box type of assembly formed of interlocking pressed plates giving a square lattice whose openings accommodate fuel pins or regulating rods. The pressed plates are formed to provide pressed-out spring-like flanges which hold the fuel pins in position and guide the regulating rods. Additional pressed-out flanges ensure the correct configuration of the spacer structure. The spacer is designed to present as little resistance as possible to coolant flow.

  8. Guided labworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lærke Bang

    For the last 40 years physics education research has shown poor learning outcomes of guided labs. Still this is found to be a very used teaching method in the upper secodary schools. This study explains the teacher's choice of guided labs throught the concept of redesign as obstacle dislodgement...

  9. Self-Assembly of DNA-Coated Particles: Experiment, Simulation and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minseok

    complementary ssDNA functionality on individual particles ('multi-flavoring') as opposed to functionalization of particles with the same type of ssDNA ('uni-flavoring') is explored as a possible design handle for tuning interparticle interactions and, thereby, accessing diverse structures. We employ a combination of simulations, theory, and experimental validation toward establishing 'multi-flavoring' as a rational design strategy. Firstly, MD simulations are carried out using effective pair potentials to describe interparticle interactions that are representative of different degrees of ssDNA 'multi-flavoring'. These simulations reveal the template-free assembly of a diversity of 2D crystal polymorphs that is apparently tunable by controlling the relative attractive strengths between like and unlike functionalized particles. The resulting phase diagrams predict conditions (i.e., strengths of relative interparticle interactions) for obtaining crystalline phases with lattice symmetries ranging among square, alternating string hexagonal, random hexagonal, rhombic, honeycomb, and even kagome. Finally, these model findings are translated to experiments, in which binary microparticles are decorated with a tailored mixture of two different complementary ssDNA strands as a straight-forward means to realize tunable particle interactions. Guided by simple statistical mechanics and the detailed MD simulations, 'multi-flavoring' and control of solution phase particle stoichiometry resulted in experimental realization of structurally diverse 2D microparticle assemblies consistent with predictions, such as square, pentagonal and hexagonal lattices (honeycomb, kagome). The combined simulation, theory, and experimental findings reveal how control of interparticle interactions via DNA-functionalized particle "multi-flavoring" can lead to an even wider range of accessible colloidal crystal structures. The 2D experiments coupled with the model predictions may be used to provide new fundamental

  10. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e. g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is

  11. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Y.; Tashima, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of nuclear reactor fuel assemblies arranged in the form of a lattice wherein there is attached to the interface of one of two adjacent fuel assemblies a plate spring having a concave portion curved toward said interface and to the interface of the other fuel assembly a plate spring having a convex portion curved away from said interface

  12. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David H [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  13. Integrating succession and community assembly perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cynthia; HilleRisLambers, Janneke

    2016-01-01

    Succession and community assembly research overlap in many respects, such as through their focus on how ecological processes like dispersal, environmental filters, and biotic interactions influence community structure. Indeed, many recent advances have been made by successional studies that draw on modern analytical techniques introduced by contemporary community assembly studies. However, community assembly studies generally lack a temporal perspective, both on how the forces structuring communities might change over time and on how historical contingency (e.g. priority effects and legacy effects) and complex transitions (e.g. threshold effects) might alter community trajectories. We believe a full understanding of the complex interacting processes that shape community dynamics across large temporal scales can best be achieved by combining concepts, tools, and study systems into an integrated conceptual framework that draws upon both succession and community assembly theory.

  14. Soldering in electronics assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Judd, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Soldering in Electronics Assembly discusses several concerns in soldering of electronic assemblies. The book is comprised of nine chapters that tackle different areas in electronic assembly soldering. Chapter 1 discusses the soldering process itself, while Chapter 2 covers the electronic assemblies. Chapter 3 talks about solders and Chapter 4 deals with flux. The text also tackles the CS and SC soldering process. The cleaning of soldered assemblies, solder quality, and standards and specifications are also discussed. The book will be of great use to professionals who deal with electronic assem

  15. Nuclear fuel string assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ip, A.K.; Koyanagi, K.; Tarasuk, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    A method of fabricating rodded fuels suitable for use in pressure tube type reactors and in pressure vessel type reactors is described. Fuel rods are secured as an inner and an outer sub-assembly, each rod attached between mounting rings secured to the rod ends. The two sub-assemblies are telescoped together and positioned by spaced thimbles located between them to provide precise positioning while permittng differential axial movement between the sub-assemblies. Such sub-assemblies are particularly suited for mounting as bundle strings. The method provides particular advantages in the assembly of annular-section fuel pins, which includes booster fuel containing enriched fuel material. (LL)

  16. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmonier, Pierre; Mesnage, Bernard; Nervi, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    This invention refers to fuel assemblies for a liquid metal cooled fast neutron reactor. Each assembly is composed of a hollow vertical casing, of regular polygonal section, containing a bundle of clad pins filled with a fissile or fertile substance. The casing is open at its upper end and has a cylindrical foot at its lower end for positioning the assembly in a housing provided in the horizontal diagrid, on which the core assembly rests. A set of flat bars located on the external surface of the casing enables it to be correctly orientated in its housing among the other core assemblies [fr

  17. Adobe Edge Quickstart Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Labrecque, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Adobe Edge Quickstart Guide is a practical guide on creating engaging content for the Web with Adobe's newest HTML5 tool. By taking a chapter-by-chapter look at each major aspect of Adobe Edge, the book lets you digest the available features in small, easily understandable chunks, allowing you to start using Adobe Edge for your web design needs immediately. If you are interested in creating engaging motion and interactive compositions using web standards with professional tooling, then this book is for you. Those with a background in Flash Professional wanting to get started quickly with Adobe

  18. HBR guides

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Nancy; Dillon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Master your most pressing professional challenges with this seven-volume set that collects the smartest best practices from leading experts all in one place. "HBR Guide to Better Business Writing" and "HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations" help you perfect your communication skills; "HBR Guide to Managing Up and Across" and "HBR Guide to Office Politics" show you how to build the best professional relationships; "HBR Guide to Finance Basics for Managers" is the one book you'll ever need to teach you about the numbers; "HBR Guide to Project Management" addresses tough questions such as how to manage stakeholder expectations and how to manage uncertainty in a complex project; and "HBR Guide to Getting the Right Work Done" goes beyond basic productivity tips to teach you how to prioritize and focus on your work. This specially priced set of the most popular books in the series makes a perfect gift for aspiring leaders looking for trusted advice. Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from ...

  19. Pattern fuel assembly loading system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, H.J.; Gerkey, K.S.; Miller, T.W.; Wylie, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes an interactive system for facilitating preloading of fuel rods into magazines, which comprises: an operator work station adapted for positioning between a supply of fuel rods of predetermined types, and the magazine defining grid locations for a predetermined fuel assembly; display means associated with the work station; scanner means associated with the work station and adapted for reading predetermined information accompanying the fuel rods; a rectangular frame adapted for attachment to one end of the fuel assembly loading magazine; prompter/detector means associated with the frame for detecting insertion of a fuel rod into the magazine; and processing means responsive to the scanner means and the sensing means for prompting the operator via the display means to pre-load the fuel rods into desired grid locations in the magazine. An apparatus is described for facilitating pre-loading of fuel rods in predetermined grid locations of a fuel assembly loading magazine, comprising: a rectangular frame adapted for attachment to one end of the fuel assembly loading magazine; and means associated with the frame for detecting insertion of fuel rods into the magazine

  20. Software support for Motorola 68000 microprocessor at CERN. M68MIL cross macro assembler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eicken, H. von.

    1983-01-01

    This document is a user's guide for programming the Motorola 68000 microprocessor in assembly language. It describes the programming model, addressing modes and instruction set of the M 68000 as well as the use of the M68mil cross macro assembler. Version 3.6 of the assembler has been installed at CERN on CDC, DEC VAX, IBM, Norsk Data and Siemens computers. The source code of the assembler is available from CERN on request. (orig.)

  1. Assembly of Triblock Amphiphilic Peptides into One-Dimensional Aggregates and Network Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgur, Beytullah; Sayar, Mehmet

    2016-10-06

    Peptide assembly plays a key role in both neurological diseases and development of novel biomaterials with well-defined nanostructures. Synthetic model peptides provide a unique platform to explore the role of intermolecular interactions in the assembly process. A triblock peptide architecture designed by the Hartgerink group is a versatile system which relies on Coulomb interactions, hydrogen bonding, and hydrophobicity to guide these peptides' assembly at three different length scales: β-sheets, double-wall ribbon-like aggregates, and finally a highly porous network structure which can support gels with ≤1% by weight peptide concentration. In this study, by using molecular dynamics simulations of a structure based implicit solvent coarse grained model, we analyzed this hierarchical assembly process. Parametrization of our CG model is based on multiple-state points from atomistic simulations, which enables this model to represent the conformational adaptability of the triblock peptide molecule based on the surrounding medium. Our results indicate that emergence of the double-wall β-sheet packing mechanism, proposed in light of the experimental evidence, strongly depends on the subtle balance of the intermolecular forces. We demonstrate that, even though backbone hydrogen bonding dominates the early nucleation stages, depending on the strength of the hydrophobic and Coulomb forces, alternative structures such as zero-dimensional aggregates with two β-sheets oriented orthogonally (which we refer to as a cross-packed structure) and β-sheets with misoriented hydrophobic side chains are also feasible. We discuss the implications of these competing structures for the three different length scales of assembly by systematically investigating the influence of density, counterion valency, and hydrophobicity.

  2. Fuel assembly gripping device using self-locking mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G. M.; Choi, S.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, T. W.; Jeong, K. H.; Park, K. B.; Chang, M. H.

    1999-07-01

    This report presents an actuating principles and structure for two kind of the fuel assembly gripping devices (Gripper-A, B) developed for SMART. The main components of these grippers are push bundle, rotation bundle, upper guide tube and chuck assembly. The rope attached to winch system on moving cask hangs gripper's push bundle. Due to a down-and-up operation of winch system, the push bundle pushes crown teeth shaped rotation bundle and then it is pushed down and rotated counter clockwise. The push-and-pull sequential operation of push bundle makes the rotation bundle is pushed, rotated and returned, moreover it makes the chuck assembly is expanded or shrunk. The expansion and shrinkage motion of chuck assembly makes the gripper latch and release the fuel assembly. Gripper-A suits for the handling of the fuel assembly with square shaped latching hole. Otherwise Gripper-B suits for a circular shaped latching hole. (author). 5 refs., 20 figs

  3. Method and apparatus for assembling permanent magnet rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, J.S.; Adams, D.J.

    1999-06-22

    A permanent magnet assembly for assembly in large permanent magnet motors and generators includes a two-piece carrier that can be slid into a slot in the rotor and then secured in place using a set screw. The invention also provides an auxiliary carrier device with guide rails that line up with the teeth of the rotor, so that a permanent magnet assembly can be pushed first into a slot, and then down the slot to its proper location. An auxiliary tool is provided to move the permanent magnet assembly into position in the slot before it is secured in place. Methods of assembling and disassembling the magnet assemblies in the rotor are also disclosed. 2 figs.

  4. Medication Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Where the Money Goes Have ...

  5. Magnetic self-assembly of small parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, Sheetal B.

    Modern society's propensity for miniaturized end-user products is compelling electronic manufacturers to assemble and package different micro-scale, multi-technology components in more efficient and cost-effective manners. As the size of the components gets smaller, issues such as part sticking and alignment precision create challenges that slow the throughput of conventional robotic pick-n-place systems. As an alternative, various self-assembly approaches have been proposed to manipulate micro to millimeter scale components in a parallel fashion without human or robotic intervention. In this dissertation, magnetic self-assembly (MSA) is demonstrated as a highly efficient, completely parallel process for assembly of millimeter scale components. MSA is achieved by integrating permanent micromagnets onto component bonding surfaces using wafer-level microfabrication processes. Embedded bonded powder methods are used for fabrication of the magnets. The magnets are then magnetized using pulse magnetization methods, and the wafers are then singulated to form individual components. When the components are randomly mixed together, self-assembly occurs when the intermagnetic forces overcome the mixing forces. Analytical and finite element methods (FEM) are used to study the force interactions between the micromagnets. The multifunctional aspects of MSA are presented through demonstration of part-to-part and part-to-substrate assembly of 1 mm x 1mm x 0.5 mm silicon components. Part-to-part assembly is demonstrated by batch assembly of free-floating parts in a liquid environment with the assembly yield of different magnetic patterns varying from 88% to 90% in 20 s. Part-to-substrate assembly is demonstrated by assembling an ordered array onto a fixed substrate in a dry environment with the assembly yield varying from 86% to 99%. In both cases, diverse magnetic shapes/patterns are used to control the alignment and angular orientation of the components. A mathematical model is

  6. Florida public transportation anti-terrorism resource guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    The Center for Urban Transportation (CUTR) at the University of South Florida (USF) assembled this guide to provide public transit agencies in Florida with information on current resources available to assist them with improving system security and g...

  7. An iterative homogenization technique that preserves assembly core exchanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondot, Ph.; Sanchez, R.

    2003-01-01

    A new interactive homogenization procedure for reactor core calculations is proposed that requires iterative transport assembly and diffusion core calculations. At each iteration the transport solution of every assembly type is used to produce homogenized cross sections for the core calculation. The converged solution gives assembly fine multigroup transport fluxes that preserve macro-group assembly exchanges in the core. This homogenization avoids the periodic lattice-leakage model approximation and gives detailed assembly transport fluxes without need of an approximated flux reconstruction. Preliminary results are given for a one-dimensional core model. (authors)

  8. Design of the Mechanical Parts for the Neutron Guide System at HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, J. W.; Cho, Y. G.; Cho, S. J.; Ryu, J. S.

    2008-01-01

    The research reactor HANARO (High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr) in Korea will be equipped with a neutron guide system, in order to transport cold neutrons from the neutron source to the neutron scattering instruments in the neutron guide hall near the reactor building. The neutron guide system of HANARO consists of the in-pile plug assembly with in-pile guides, the primary shutter with in-shutter guides, the neutron guides in the guide shielding room with dedicated secondary shutters, and the neutron guides connected to the instruments in the neutron guide hall. Functions of the in-pile plug assembly are to shield the reactor environment from nuclear radiation and to support the neutron guides and maintain them precisely oriented. The primary shutter is a mechanical structure to be installed just after the in-pile plug assembly, which stops neutron flux on demand. This paper describes the design of the in-pile assembly and the primary shutter for the neutron guide system at HANARO. The design of the guide shielding assembly for the primary shutter and the neutron guides is also presented

  9. Assembly tool design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanamori, Naokazu; Nakahira, Masataka; Ohkawa, Yoshinao; Tada, Eisuke; Seki, Masahiro

    1996-06-01

    The reactor core of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is assembled with a number of large and asymmetric components within a tight tolerance in order to assure the structural integrity for various loads and to provide the tritium confinement. In addition, the assembly procedure should be compatible with remote operation since the core structures will be activated by 14-MeV neutrons once it starts operation and thus personal access will be prohibited. Accordingly, the assembly procedure and tool design are quite essential and should be designed from the beginning to facilitate remote operation. According to the ITER Design Task Agreement, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has performed design study to develop the assembly procedures and associated tool design for the ITER tokamak assembly. This report describes outlines of the assembly tools and the remaining issues obtained in this design study. (author)

  10. Fuel assembly storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiranuma, Hiroshi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To remove limitation of the number of storage of fuel assemblies to increase the number of storage thereof so as to relatively reduce the water depth required for shielding radioactive rays. Structure: Fuel assembly storage rack containers for receiving a plurality of spent fuel assembly racks are stacked in multi-layer fashion within a storage pool filled with water for shielding radioactive rays and removing heat. (Furukawa, Y.)

  11. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  12. Composite turbine bucket assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

    2014-05-20

    A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

  13. Our interests in protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    protein interactions. Evolution of P-P partnerships. Evolution of P-P structures. Evolutionary dynamics of P-P interactions. Dynamics of P-P interaction network. Host-pathogen interactions. CryoEM mapping of gigantic protein assemblies.

  14. Fabrication of a pressurized water reactor fuel element prototype with Zy-control rod guide tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezold, H.; Romeiser, H.J.

    1978-10-01

    A prototype fuel assembly with zircaloy guide was fabricated by mass production methods. The fastening of the Inconel spacer grids to the guide tubes and the transition joint for fixing the tubes to the stainless stell upper end-fitting of the assembly were investigated. Tools and welding devices were developed for the construction of the skeleton. (orig.) [de

  15. Reactor core and control rod assembly in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Itooka, Satoshi.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel assemblies and control rod assemblies are attached respectively to reactor core support plates each in a cantilever fashion. Intermediate spacer pads are disposed to the lateral side of a wrapper tube just above the fuel rod region. Intermediate space pads are disposed to the lateral side of a control rod guide tube just above a fuel rod region. The thickness of the intermediate spacer pad for the control rod assembly is made smaller than the thickness of the intermediate spacer pad for the fuel assembly. This can prevent contact between intermediate spacer pads of the control guide tube and the fuel assembly even if the temperature of coolants is elevated to thermally expand the intermediate spacer pad, by which the radial displacement amount of the reactor core region along the direction of the height of the control guide tube is reduced substantially to zero. Accordingly, contribution of the control rod assembly to the radial expansion reactivity can be reduced to zero or negative level, by which the effect of the negative radial expansion reactivity of the reactor is increased to improve the safety upon thermal transient stage, for example, loss of coolant flow rate accident. (I.N.)

  16. Regulation of corneal stroma extracellular matrix assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shoujun; Mienaltowski, Michael J; Birk, David E

    2015-04-01

    The transparent cornea is the major refractive element of the eye. A finely controlled assembly of the stromal extracellular matrix is critical to corneal function, as well as in establishing the appropriate mechanical stability required to maintain corneal shape and curvature. In the stroma, homogeneous, small diameter collagen fibrils, regularly packed with a highly ordered hierarchical organization, are essential for function. This review focuses on corneal stroma assembly and the regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis. Corneal collagen fibrillogenesis involves multiple molecules interacting in sequential steps, as well as interactions between keratocytes and stroma matrix components. The stroma has the highest collagen V:I ratio in the body. Collagen V regulates the nucleation of protofibril assembly, thus controlling the number of fibrils and assembly of smaller diameter fibrils in the stroma. The corneal stroma is also enriched in small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) that cooperate in a temporal and spatial manner to regulate linear and lateral collagen fibril growth. In addition, the fibril-associated collagens (FACITs) such as collagen XII and collagen XIV have roles in the regulation of fibril packing and inter-lamellar interactions. A communicating keratocyte network contributes to the overall and long-range regulation of stromal extracellular matrix assembly, by creating micro-domains where the sequential steps in stromal matrix assembly are controlled. Keratocytes control the synthesis of extracellular matrix components, which interact with the keratocytes dynamically to coordinate the regulatory steps into a cohesive process. Mutations or deficiencies in stromal regulatory molecules result in altered interactions and deficiencies in both transparency and refraction, leading to corneal stroma pathobiology such as stromal dystrophies, cornea plana and keratoconus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electron transfer dynamics across self-assembled N-(2-mercaptoethyl) octadecanamide/mycolic acid layers: impedimetric insights into the structural integrity and interaction with anti-mycolic acid antibodies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ozoemena, KI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The integrity and properties of mycolic acid (MA) antigens integrated into a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of N-(2-mercaptoethyl)octadecanamide, (MEODA), on a gold electrode have been interrogated using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical...

  18. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delafosse, Jacques.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a nuclear fuel assembly for a light or heavy water reactor, or for a fast reactor of the kind with a bundle of cladded pins, maintained parallel to each other in a regular network by an assembly of separate supporting grids, fitted with elastic bearing surfaces on these pins [fr

  19. Assembling Transgender Moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greteman, Adam J.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the author seeks to assemble moments--scholarly, popular, and aesthetic--in order to explore the possibilities that emerge as moments collect in education's encounters with the needs, struggles, and possibilities of transgender lives and practices. Assembling moments, the author argues, illustrates the value of "moments"…

  20. Vertical pump assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohnal, M.; Rosel, J.; Skarka, V.

    1988-01-01

    The mounting is described of the drive assembly of a vertical pump for nuclear power plants in areas with seismic risk. The assembly is attached to the building floor using flexible and damping elements. The design allows producing seismically resistant pumps without major design changes in the existing types of vertical pumps. (E.S.). 1 fig

  1. Fuel Assembly Damping Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kanghee; Kang, Heungseok; Oh, Dongseok; Yoon, Kyungho; Kim, Hyungkyu; Kim, Jaeyong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    This paper summary the fuel assembly damping data in air/in still water/under flow, released from foreign fuel vendors, compared our data with the published data. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping measurement testing are also briefly discussed. Understanding of each fuel assembly damping mechanisms according to the surrounding medium and flow velocity can support the fuel design improvement in fuel assembly dynamics and structural integrity aspect. Because the upgraded requirements of the newly-developed advanced reactor system will demands to minimize fuel design margin in integrity evaluation, reduction in conservatism of fuel assembly damping can contribute to alleviate the fuel design margin for sure. Damping is an energy dissipation mechanism in a vibrating mechanical structure and prevents a resonant structure from having infinite vibration amplitudes. The sources of fuel assembly damping are various from support friction to flow contribution, and it can be increased by the viscosity or drag of surrounding fluid medium or the average velocity of water flowing. Fuel licensing requires fuel design evaluation in transient or accidental condition. Dynamic response analysis of fuel assembly is to show fuel integrity and requires information on assembly-wise damping in dry condition and under wet or water flowing condition. However, damping measurement test for the full-scale fuel assembly prototype is not easy to carry out because of the scale (fuel prototype, test facility), unsteadiness of test data (scattering, random sampling and processing), instrumentation under water flowing (water-proof response measurement), and noise. LWR fuel technology division in KAERI is preparing the infra structure for damping measurement test of full-scale fuel assembly, to support fuel industries and related research activities. Here is a preliminary summary of fuel assembly damping, published in the literature. Some technical issues in fuel assembly damping

  2. Self-assembled nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jin Z; Liu, Jun; Chen, Shaowei; Liu, Gang-yu

    2003-01-01

    Nanostructures refer to materials that have relevant dimensions on the nanometer length scales and reside in the mesoscopic regime between isolated atoms and molecules in bulk matter. These materials have unique physical properties that are distinctly different from bulk materials. Self-Assembled Nanostructures provides systematic coverage of basic nanomaterials science including materials assembly and synthesis, characterization, and application. Suitable for both beginners and experts, it balances the chemistry aspects of nanomaterials with physical principles. It also highlights nanomaterial-based architectures including assembled or self-assembled systems. Filled with in-depth discussion of important applications of nano-architectures as well as potential applications ranging from physical to chemical and biological systems, Self-Assembled Nanostructures is the essential reference or text for scientists involved with nanostructures.

  3. Fuel assembly for light-water cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroux, J.C.; Burfin, P.

    1995-01-01

    In order to make easier the replacement of damaged fuel rods, a fuel assembly has been designed with a cluster of parallel fuel rods maintained in guide tubes with braces and sockets fixed on each tube ends; at least one of the fixing sockets of each tube is dismountable as well as an adapter plate on the socket, in order to lock or un-lock the guide tubes from the sockets. 11 fig

  4. 3D Assembly Group Analysis for Cognitive Automation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Brecher

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A concept that allows the cognitive automation of robotic assembly processes is introduced. An assembly cell comprised of two robots was designed to verify the concept. For the purpose of validation a customer-defined part group consisting of Hubelino bricks is assembled. One of the key aspects for this process is the verification of the assembly group. Hence a software component was designed that utilizes the Microsoft Kinect to perceive both depth and color data in the assembly area. This information is used to determine the current state of the assembly group and is compared to a CAD model for validation purposes. In order to efficiently resolve erroneous situations, the results are interactively accessible to a human expert. The implications for an industrial application are demonstrated by transferring the developed concepts to an assembly scenario for switch-cabinet systems.

  5. CAD Parts-Based Assembly Modeling by Probabilistic Reasoning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Kai-Ke; Hu, Kai-Mo; Yin, Li-Cheng; Yan, Dongming; Wang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, increasing amount of parts and sub-assemblies are publicly available, which can be used directly for product development instead of creating from scratch. In this paper, we propose an interactive design framework for efficient and smart assembly modeling, in order to improve the design efficiency. Our approach is based on a probabilistic reasoning. Given a collection of industrial assemblies, we learn a probabilistic graphical model from the relationships between the parts of assemblies. Then in the modeling stage, this probabilistic model is used to suggest the most likely used parts compatible with the current assembly. Finally, the parts are assembled under certain geometric constraints. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework through a variety of assembly models produced by our prototype system. © 2015 IEEE.

  6. CAD Parts-Based Assembly Modeling by Probabilistic Reasoning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Kai-Ke

    2016-04-11

    Nowadays, increasing amount of parts and sub-assemblies are publicly available, which can be used directly for product development instead of creating from scratch. In this paper, we propose an interactive design framework for efficient and smart assembly modeling, in order to improve the design efficiency. Our approach is based on a probabilistic reasoning. Given a collection of industrial assemblies, we learn a probabilistic graphical model from the relationships between the parts of assemblies. Then in the modeling stage, this probabilistic model is used to suggest the most likely used parts compatible with the current assembly. Finally, the parts are assembled under certain geometric constraints. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our framework through a variety of assembly models produced by our prototype system. © 2015 IEEE.

  7. Homebuyer's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindt, Roger P.; Harris, Jack

    Designed to assist prospective buyers in making such important decisions as whether to buy a new or older home and within what price range, the guide provides information on the purchase process. Discussion of the purchase process covers the life-cycle costs (recurring homeownership costs that must be met every month); selection of a home;…

  8. Supracolloidal Architectures Self-Assembled in Microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuejiao; Tian, Feng; Liu, Xin; Parker, Richard M; Lan, Yang; Wu, Yuchao; Yu, Ziyi; Scherman, Oren A; Abell, Chris

    2015-10-26

    We demonstrate a novel method for the formation of a library of structured colloidal assemblies by exploiting the supramolecular heteroternary host-guest interaction between cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) and methyl viologen- and naphthalene-functionalised particles. The approach is dependent upon compartmentalisation in microdroplets generated by a microfluidic platform. Though the distribution of colloidal particles encapsulated within each microdroplet followed a Poisson distribution, tuning the concentration of the initial colloidal particle suspensions provided some level of control over the structure of the formed colloidal assemblies. This ability to direct the assembly of complementarily-functionalised colloids through a supramolecular interaction, without the need for complex modification of the colloidal surface or external stimuli, presents an exciting new approach towards the design of structured colloidal materials with the potential to produce many challenging structures. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Alternative Pathways to Apprenticeships. Good Practice Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2015

    2015-01-01

    Apprenticeships are changing. The increasing proportions of people entering apprenticeships at various levels of ability and backgrounds are stimulating demand for alternative pathways to completions. This good practice guide assembles the key findings for education practitioners and workplace supervisors from three related research reports on…

  10. V-TECS Guide for Carpenter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Charles G.; And Others

    This curriculum guide provides materials for a nine-duty course in carpentry. The nine duties are estimating materials, preparing building site, sharpening tools, building and installing foundation forms, installing rough framing, installing roof components, installing exterior finishes, installing interior finishes, and assembling and…

  11. Adding biological meaning to human protein-protein interactions identified by yeast two-hybrid screenings: A guide through bioinformatics tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgueiras, Juliana; Silva, Joana Vieira; Fardilha, Margarida

    2018-01-16

    "A man is known by the company he keeps" is a popular expression that perfectly fits proteins. A common approach to characterize the function of a target protein is to identify its interacting partners and thus infer its roles based on the known functions of the interactors. Protein-protein interaction networks (PPINs) have been created for several organisms, including humans, primarily as results of high-throughput screenings, such as yeast two-hybrid (Y2H). Their unequivocal use to understand events underlying human pathophysiology is promising in identifying genes and proteins associated with diseases. Therefore, numerous opportunities have emerged for PPINs as tools for clinical management of diseases: network-based disease classification systems, discovery of biomarkers and identification of therapeutic targets. Despite the great advantages of PPINs, their use is still unrecognised by several researchers who generate high-throughput data to generally characterize interactions in a certain model or to select an interaction to study in detail. We strongly believe that both approaches are not exclusive and that we can use PPINs as a complementary methodology and rich-source of information to the initial study proposal. Here, we suggest a pipeline to deal with Y2H results using bioinformatics tools freely available for academics. Yeast two-hybrid is widely-used to identify protein-protein interactions. Conventionally, the positive clones that result from a yeast two-hybrid screening are sequenced to identify the interactors of the protein of interest (also known as bait protein), and few interactions, thought as potentially relevant for the model in study, are selected for further validation using biochemical methods (e.g. co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization). The huge amount of data that is potentially lost during this conservative approach motivated us to write this tutorial-like review, so that researchers feel encouraged to take advantage of

  12. On the solution self-assembly of nanocolloidal brushes: insights from simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Striolo, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of novel nanoparticles with exceptional properties continues to stimulate the search for advanced applications in fields as diverse as solar energy harvesting and polymer reinforcement. It is widely recognized that to practically exploit the promised benefits it is necessary to guide the assembly of the various nanoparticles into well-defined supra-molecular structures. Towards this goal, we report Monte Carlo simulation results for the self-assembly of spherical nanoparticles in implicit solvent. The nanoparticles interact solely via dispersive interactions, modeled as square-well potentials. To control the morphology of the self-assembled aggregates, side chains are grafted on specific locations on the nanoparticle surface (i.e., on the equator, on the tropics, on the entire tropical region, or uniformly on the nanoparticle surface). The results are discussed in terms of average cluster size, probability of observing aggregates of given size, and aggregate radius of gyration and asphericity as a function of the aggregate size. The parameters of interest are the solution conditions and the nanoparticle volume fraction (always in the dilute regime). As shown in previous reports (e.g., Striolo 2007 Small 3 628), the nanoparticles form insoluble agglomerates in the absence of the side chains. When the side chains are long and uniformly distributed on the nanoparticles, these remain individually dispersed in solution. More importantly, when the side chains are grafted on selected locations on the nanoparticles, these self-assemble, yielding structures composed of up to 7-10 nanoparticles. The number of grafted side chains is the parameter that predominantly determines the average aggregate size, while the aggregate morphology can be tuned by appropriately controlling the distribution and length of the grafted side chains.

  13. Self-assembly of patchy colloidal dumbbells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avvisati, Guido|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/407630198; Vissers, Teun|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829943; Dijkstra, Marjolein|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123538807

    2015-01-01

    We employ Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the self-assembly of patchy colloidal dumbbells interacting via a modified Kern-Frenkel potential by probing the system concentration and dumbbell shape. We consider dumbbells consisting of one attractive sphere with diameter sigma(1) and one

  14. TPX assembly plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, D.

    1993-01-01

    The TPX machine will be assembled in the TFTR Test Cell at the Plasma Physics Laboratory, utilizing the existing TFTR machine foundation. Preparation of the area for assembly will begin after completion of the decontamination and decommissioning phase on TFTR and certification that the radiation levels remaining, if any, are consistent with the types of operations planned. Assembly operations begin with the arrival of the first components, and conclude, approximately 24 months later, with the successful completion of the integrated systems tests and the achievement of a first plasma

  15. Nuclear reactor control assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negron, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes an assembly for providing global power control in a nuclear reactor having the core split into two halves. It comprises a disk assembly formed from at least two disks each machined with an identical surface hole pattern such that rotation of one disk relative to the other causes the hole pattern to open or close, the disk assembly being positioned substantially at the longitudinal center of and coaxial with the core halves; and means for rotating at least one of the disks relative to the other

  16. Controllable self-assembly of sodium caseinate with a zwitterionic vitamin-derived bolaamphiphile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Hui; Sun, Yu-Long; Yang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Zhong-Xiu

    2013-11-06

    The control of self-assembly of sodium caseinate (SC) including the formation of mixed layers, microspheres, or nanoparticles is highly relevant to the microstructure of food and the design of promising drug delivery systems. In this paper, we designed a structure-switchable zwitterionic bolaamphiphile, 1,12-diaminododecanediorotate (DDO), from orotic acid, which has special binding sites and can guide the self-assembly of SC. Complexation between SC and DDO was investigated using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and fluorescence spectra measurements. Monomeric DDO was bound to the negatively charged sites on the SC micelle and made the structure of SC more compact with decreased electrostatic repulsion between the head groups. Vesicular DDO led to reassociation of vesicles with enlarged size via preferable hydrophobic interactions. Moreover, the aggregation between SC and DDO was found to be temperature-dependent and reversible. This research provides an effective way to control the reversible self-assembly of SC by the zwitterionic vitamin-derived bolaamphiphile.

  17. Light induced assembly and self-sorting of silica microparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilanova Garcia, N.; De Feijter, I.; Teunissen, A.J.P.; Voets, I.K.

    2018-01-01

    To tailor the properties of colloidal materials, precise control over the self-assembly of their constituents is a prerequisite. Here, we govern the assembly of silica particles by functionalization with supramolecular moieties which interact with each other via directional and reversible hydrogen

  18. Electrostatics and the assembly of an RNA virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoot, van der P.P.A.M.; Bruinsma, R.

    2005-01-01

    Electrostatic interactions play a central role in the assembly of single-stranded RNA viruses. Under physiological conditions of salinity and acidity, virus capsid assembly requires the presence of genomic material that is oppositely charged to the core proteins. In this paper we apply basic polymer

  19. Assembly of nanoparticles on patterned surfaces by noncovalent interachtions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maury, P.A.; Reinhoudt, David; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the recent developments in the assembly of nanoparticles into patterned arrays. An introduction is given on nanoparticles assembly and its applications. This is followed by a discussion on recent papers, seen from the perspective of the interaction between particle and

  20. Programming Interactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Noble, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Ready to create rich interactive experiences with your artwork, designs, or prototypes? This is the ideal place to start. With this hands-on guide, you'll explore several themes in interactive art and design-including 3D graphics, sound, physical interaction, computer vision, and geolocation-and learn the basic programming and electronics concepts you need to implement them. No previous experience is necessary. You'll get a complete introduction to three free tools created specifically for artists and designers: the Processing programming language, the Arduino microcontroller, and the openFr

  1. Physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Constantine G; Winfree, Erik

    2017-06-19

    DNA tiles provide a promising technique for assembling structures with nanoscale resolution through self-assembly by basic interactions rather than top-down assembly of individual structures. Tile systems can be programmed to grow based on logical rules, allowing for a small number of tile types to assemble large, complex assemblies that can retain nanoscale resolution. Such algorithmic systems can even assemble different structures using the same tiles, based on inputs that seed the growth. While programming and theoretical analysis of tile self-assembly often makes use of abstract logical models of growth, experimentally implemented systems are governed by nanoscale physical processes that can lead to very different behavior, more accurately modeled by taking into account the thermodynamics and kinetics of tile attachment and detachment in solution. This review discusses the relationships between more abstract and more physically realistic tile assembly models. A central concern is how consideration of model differences enables the design of tile systems that robustly exhibit the desired abstract behavior in realistic physical models and in experimental implementations. Conversely, we identify situations where self-assembly in abstract models can not be well-approximated by physically realistic models, putting constraints on physical relevance of the abstract models. To facilitate the discussion, we introduce a unified model of tile self-assembly that clarifies the relationships between several well-studied models in the literature. Throughout, we highlight open questions regarding the physical principles for DNA tile self-assembly.

  2. Spontaneous Assembly of Exopolymers from Phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Xue Ding

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton exopolymeric substances (EPS contribute significantly to the dissolved organic car bon (DOC pool in the ocean, playing crucial roles in the surface ocean car bon cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that ~10% of marine DOC can self-assemble as microgels through electro static Ca bonds providing hotspots of enriched microbial substrate. How ever, the question whether EPS can self-assemble and the formation mechanisms for EPS microgels have not been examined. Here were port that EPS from three representative phytoplankton species, Synechococcus, Emiliania huxleyi, and Skeletonema costatum can spontaneously self assemble in artificial sea water (ASW, forming microscopic gels of ~ 3 - 4 __m in diameter. Different from the marine DOC polymers assembly, these EPS samples can self-assemble in Ca2+-free ASW. Further experiments from fluorescence enhancement and chemical composition analysis confirmed the existence of fair amounts of hydrophobic domains in these EPS samples. These results suggest that hydrophobic interactions play a key role in the assembly of EPS from these three species of marine phytoplankton.

  3. Terminating DNA Tile Assembly with Nanostructured Caps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Deepak K; Jiang, Ruoyu; Reinhart, Seth; Mohammed, Abdul M; Jorgenson, Tyler D; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-10-24

    Precise control over the nucleation, growth, and termination of self-assembly processes is a fundamental tool for controlling product yield and assembly dynamics. Mechanisms for altering these processes programmatically could allow the use of simple components to self-assemble complex final products or to design processes allowing for dynamic assembly or reconfiguration. Here we use DNA tile self-assembly to develop general design principles for building complexes that can bind to a growing biomolecular assembly and terminate its growth by systematically characterizing how different DNA origami nanostructures interact with the growing ends of DNA tile nanotubes. We find that nanostructures that present binding interfaces for all of the binding sites on a growing facet can bind selectively to growing ends and stop growth when these interfaces are presented on either a rigid or floppy scaffold. In contrast, nucleation of nanotubes requires the presentation of binding sites in an arrangement that matches the shape of the structure's facet. As a result, it is possible to build nanostructures that can terminate the growth of existing nanotubes but cannot nucleate a new structure. The resulting design principles for constructing structures that direct nucleation and termination of the growth of one-dimensional nanostructures can also serve as a starting point for programmatically directing two- and three-dimensional crystallization processes using nanostructure design.

  4. Inverse Problem in Self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Alexei

    2012-02-01

    By decorating colloids and nanoparticles with DNA, one can introduce highly selective key-lock interactions between them. This leads to a new class of systems and problems in soft condensed matter physics. In particular, this opens a possibility to solve inverse problem in self-assembly: how to build an arbitrary desired structure with the bottom-up approach? I will present a theoretical and computational analysis of the hierarchical strategy in attacking this problem. It involves self-assembly of particular building blocks (``octopus particles''), that in turn would assemble into the target structure. On a conceptual level, our approach combines elements of three different brands of programmable self assembly: DNA nanotechnology, nanoparticle-DNA assemblies and patchy colloids. I will discuss the general design principles, theoretical and practical limitations of this approach, and illustrate them with our simulation results. Our crucial result is that not only it is possible to design a system that has a given nanostructure as a ground state, but one can also program and optimize the kinetic pathway for its self-assembly.

  5. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    A bimetallic spacer means is cooperatively associated with a nuclear fuel assembly and operative to resist the occurrence of in-reactor bowing of the nuclear fuel assembly. The bimetallic spacer means in one embodiment of the invention includes a space grid formed, at least principally, of zircaloy to the external surface of which are attached a plurality of stainless steel strips. In another embodiment the strips are attached to fuel pins. In each of the embodiments, the stainless steel strips during power production expand outwardly to a greater extent than do the members to which the stainless steel strips are attached, thereby forming stiff springs which abut against like bimetallic spacer means with which the other nuclear fuel assemblies are provided in a given nuclear reactor core to thus prevent the occurrence of in-reactor bowing of the nuclear fuel assemblies. (author)

  6. Fuel assembly spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Ken-etsu.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the pressure loss of coolants by fuel assembly spacers. Constitution: Spacers for supporting a fuel assembly are attached by means of a plurality of wires to an outer frame. The outer frame is made of shape memory alloy such that the wires are caused to slacken at normal temperature and the slacking of the wires is eliminated in excess of the transition temperature. Since the wires slacken at the normal temperature, fuel rods can be inserted easily. After the insertion of the fuel rods, when the entire portion or the outer frame is heated by water or gas at a predetermined temperature, the outer frame resumes its previously memorized shape to tighten the wires and, accordingly, the fuel rods can be supported firmly. In this way, since the fuel rods are inserted in the slacken state of the wires and, after the assembling, the outer frame resumes its memorized shape, the assembling work can be conducted efficiently. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betten, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    Under the invention the fuel assembly is particularly suitable for liquid metal cooled fast neutron breeder reactors. Hence, according to the invention a fuel assembly cladding includes inward corrugations with respect to the remainder of the cladding according to a recurring pattern determined by the pitch of the metal wire helically wound round the fuel rods of the assembly. The parts of the cladding pressed inwards correspond to the areas in which the wire encircling the peripheral fuel rods is generally located apart from the cladding, thereby reducing the play between the cladding and the peripheral fuel rods situated in these areas. The reduction in the play in turn improves the coolant flow in the internal secondary channels of the fuel assembly to the detriment of the flow in the peripheral secondary channels and thereby establishes a better coolant fluid temperature profile [fr

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Shungo; Ogiya, Shunsuke.

    1990-01-01

    In a fuel assembly, if the entire fuels comprise mixed oxide fuels, reactivity change in cold temperature-power operation is increased to worsen the reactor shutdown margin. The reactor shutdown margin has been improved by increasing the burnable poison concentration thereby reducing the reactivity of the fuel assembly. However, since unburnt poisons are present at the completion of the reactor operation, the reactivity can not be utilized effectively to bring about economical disadvantage. In view of the above, the reactivity change between lower temperature-power operations is reduced by providing a non-boiling range with more than 9.1% of cross sectional area at the inside of a channel at the central portion of the fuel assembly. As a result, the amount of the unburnt burnable poisons is decreased, the economy of fuel assembly is improved and the reactor shutdown margin can be increase. (N.H.)

  9. Bottom nozzle to guide tube connection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, W.J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel assembly which includes an upper end fitting and a lower end fitting spaced therefrom and connected thereto by elongated guide tubes of one alloy having an open upper end and a closed lower end with spaced fuel element retaining grids mounted on the guide tubes therebetween, the closed lower ends of the guide tubes including a threaded central passageway and the attachment of the guide tubes to the lower end fitting of another alloy. It comprises: an externally threaded bolt with a first end threadably received in the threaded central passageway of the lower end of the guide tube and a head at the other end of the side of the lower end fitting opposite the guide tube; an interruption in the external threads of the bolt which forms a groove which communicates the interior of the guide tube with the side of the lower end fitting opposite the guide tube and enhances its frictional engagement with the threaded central passageway, thereby to hold and attach the guide tube and lower end fitting firmly together, even through a series of temperature cycles

  10. Operating procedures for the Pajarito Site Critical Assembly Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malenfant, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    Operating procedures consistent with DOE Order 5480.2, Chapter VI, and the American National Standard Safety Guide for the Performance of Critical Experiments are defined for the Pajarito Site Critical Assembly Facility of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. These operating procedures supersede and update those previously published in 1973 and apply to any criticality experiment performed at the facility

  11. Tensile testing grips are easily assembled under liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalka, R. J.; Vandergrift, E. F.

    1967-01-01

    Split-screw grips for tensile testing provide uniform loading on the specimen shoulders. Holes in the heads enable the screws and specimen to be threaded as an assembly into a grip body, closely controlled guides and seats afford positive seating, and precision machining of mating surfaces minimizes misalignment effects.

  12. Self-assembly of coiled coil peptides into nanoparticles vs 2-d plates: effects of assembly pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghee; Pochan, Darrin

    Molecular solution assembly, or self-assembly, is a process by which ordered nanostructures or patterns are formed by non-covalent interactions during assembly. Biomimicry, the use of bioinspired molecules or biologically relevant materials, is an important area of self-assembly research with peptides serving a critical role as molecular tools. The morphology of peptide assemblies can be controlled by adjusting solution conditions such as the concentration of peptides, the temperature, and pH. Herein, spherical nanostructures, which have potential for creating an encapsulation system, are formed by self-assembly when coiled coil peptides are combined in solution. These peptides are homotrimeric and heterodimeric coiled-coil bundles and the homotrimer is connected with each of heterodimer through their external surfaces via disulfide bonds. The resultant covalent constructs could co-assemble into complementary trimeric hubs, respectively. The two peptide constructs are directly mixed and assembled in solution in order to produce either spherical particles or 2-d plates depending on the solution conditions and kinetic pathway of assembly. In particular, structural changes of the self-assembled peptides are explored by control of the thermal history of the assembly solution.

  13. Physics of the Brain: Interaction of the Optical-Fiber-Guided Multi-Ultraviolet-Photon Beams with the Epilepsy Topion, (the Seizure Onset Area)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    A novel method for the possible prevention of epileptic seizures is proposed, based on the multi-ultraviolet-photon beam interaction with the epilepsy topion, (nonlinear coupling of an ultra high frequency mode to the brain beta phonons). It is hypothesized that epilepsy is a chaotic-dynamics phenomenon: small electrical changes in the epilepsy-topion lead, (within the 10s of milliseconds), to the onset of chaos, (seizure--excessive electrical discharge), and subsequent cascading into adjacent areas. The ultraviolet photons may control the imbalance of sodium and potassium ions and, consequently, may prove to be efficient in the prevention of epileptic seizures. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  14. Combined fuel assembly and thimble plug gripper for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus for loading and unloading a fuel assembly into and from the core of a nuclear reactor and for removing and inserting control rod guide thimble plugs from and into the fuel assembly during a reactor refueling operation in substantially less time than that presently required and in a more reliable, safe and efficient manner. (UK)

  15. Studying Axon-Astrocyte Functional Interactions by 3D Two-Photon Ca2+ Imaging: A Practical Guide to Experiments and "Big Data" Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savtchouk, Iaroslav; Carriero, Giovanni; Volterra, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Recent advances in fast volumetric imaging have enabled rapid generation of large amounts of multi-dimensional functional data. While many computer frameworks exist for data storage and analysis of the multi-gigabyte Ca 2+ imaging experiments in neurons, they are less useful for analyzing Ca 2+ dynamics in astrocytes, where transients do not follow a predictable spatio-temporal distribution pattern. In this manuscript, we provide a detailed protocol and commentary for recording and analyzing three-dimensional (3D) Ca 2+ transients through time in GCaMP6f-expressing astrocytes of adult brain slices in response to axonal stimulation, using our recently developed tools to perform interactive exploration, filtering, and time-correlation analysis of the transients. In addition to the protocol, we release our in-house software tools and discuss parameters pertinent to conducting axonal stimulation/response experiments across various brain regions and conditions. Our software tools are available from the Volterra Lab webpage at https://wwwfbm.unil.ch/dnf/group/glia-an-active-synaptic-partner/member/volterra-andrea-volterra in the form of software plugins for Image J (NIH)-a de facto standard in scientific image analysis. Three programs are available: MultiROI_TZ_profiler for interactive graphing of several movable ROIs simultaneously, Gaussian_Filter5D for Gaussian filtering in several dimensions, and Correlation_Calculator for computing various cross-correlation parameters on voxel collections through time.

  16. Examples of geodiversity - biodiversity interactions in the concise guide Inspiration Treasure House Earth, a tool for spatial planning with geodiversity and geoheritage at community level

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Hanneke; Jungerius, Pieter Dirk; van der Graaff, Evert; de Groof, Arthur; Doornbos, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    SIKB is a Dutch network organisation, set up to guarantee a minimum quality of soil management. The network encompasses both the private and the public sector. Their activities include the development of decision-making procedures and rendering of services for soil remediation and soil handling, i.a. through standardisation and certification. Each year SIKB produces concise hand-outs to assist and improve soil management. In 2000 the Dutch Ministry of Agriculture then responsible for earth heritage management, commissioned the Stichting Geomorfologie & Landschap to find out how geoheritage and geodiversity were cared for at the community level. The conclusion was that concern for geomorphology, geology, soil and their importance for landscape management and spatial planning was minimal in most Dutch communities. They were only mentioned in the descriptive paragraphs of the local community plan, often very short and using complex terminology not to be understood by any community member. Only in few communities it had resulted in geoheritage protection or attention for preserving the geodiversity of the area. Therefore, in 2007, SIKB and Geoheritage NL produced a hand-out to improve attention for geoheritage and geodiversity at the level of the local community. They produced a concise guide to get geoheritage and geodiversity within the different levels of the spatial plan of the local communities, then called bestemmingsplan now named structuurplan. This hand-out was a success: it had four re-prints and people are still interested in receiving a copy, although it is out of print. Yet, those working with it explained in a special meeting to evaluate the hand-out that it was too thorough a product to inspire decision makers and their colleagues in the local community. Apart from this, SIKB preferred not to make a reprint, but to come with a new product to revive attention. In 2013 we started to develop a hand-out which focusses on examples clarifying why attention for

  17. Self-assembly from milli- to nanoscales: methods and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mastrangeli, M; Celis, J-P; Abbasi, S; Varel, C; Böhringer, K F; Van Hoof, C

    2009-01-01

    The design and fabrication techniques for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and nanodevices are progressing rapidly. However, due to material and process flow incompatibilities in the fabrication of sensors, actuators and electronic circuitry, a final packaging step is often necessary to integrate all components of a heterogeneous microsystem on a common substrate. Robotic pick-and-place, although accurate and reliable at larger scales, is a serial process that downscales unfavorably due to stiction problems, fragility and sheer number of components. Self-assembly, on the other hand, is parallel and can be used for device sizes ranging from millimeters to nanometers. In this review, the state-of-the-art in methods and applications for self-assembly is reviewed. Methods for assembling three-dimensional (3D) MEMS structures out of two-dimensional (2D) ones are described. The use of capillary forces for folding 2D plates into 3D structures, as well as assembling parts onto a common substrate or aggregating parts to each other into 2D or 3D structures, is discussed. Shape matching and guided assembly by magnetic forces and electric fields are also reviewed. Finally, colloidal self-assembly and DNA-based self-assembly, mainly used at the nanoscale, are surveyed, and aspects of theoretical modeling of stochastic assembly processes are discussed. (topical review)

  18. WHO: World Health Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, A

    1992-05-23

    1200 delegates from 175 member countries attended the 45th World Health Assembly in Geneva. Everyone at the Assembly ratified measures to prevent and control AIDS. 12 countries intended to do long term planning for community based care for AIDS patients. Further the Assembly denounced instances where countries and individuals denied the gravity of the AIDS pandemic. In fact, it expressed the importance for urgent and intensive action against HIV/AIDS. The assembly backed proposals to prevent and control sexually transmitted diseases that affect AIDS patients, especially hepatitis B. For example, in countries with hepatitis B prevalence 8% (many countries in Sub-Sahara Africa, Asia, the Pacific region, and South America), health officials should introduce hepatitis B vaccine into their existing immunization programs by 1995. By 1997, this vaccine should be part of all immunization programs. The Assembly was aware of the obstacles of establishing reliable cold chains for nationwide distribution, however. Delegates in Committee A objected to the fact that 50% of the populations of developing countries continued to have limited access to essential drugs. They also expressed disapproval in implementation of WHO's 1988 ethical criteria for promotion of drugs which WHO entrusted to the Council for International Organisations of Medical Sciences (CIOMS). CIOMS lacked WHO's status and thus could not effectively monitor drug advertising. In fact, the pharmaceutical industry as well as WHO provided the funds for a meeting of 25 experts to discuss principles included in the ethical criteria. At least 4 countries insisted that WHO have the ultimate authority in monitoring drug advertising. Delegates did adopt a compromise resolution on this topic which required that industry promotion methods be reported to the 1994 Assembly via the Executive Board. The Assembly requested WHO to establish an international advisory committee on nursing and midwifery and to improve the network of

  19. Expert Guide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per

    , their benefits and limitations, economical feasibility and impact on energy savings, company image, comfort, productivity, building functionality and flexibility and gives guidance on design of these concepts, including integration of responsive building elements and HVAC-systems and build examples......This guide summarizes the work of Subtask B of IEA-ECBCS Annex 44 “Integrating Environmentally Responsive Elements in Buildings” and is based on the contributions from the participating countries. The publication is an official Annex report. With a focus on innovative building concepts...

  20. Dynamic behaviour of diagnostic assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecinka, L.

    1980-01-01

    The methodology is shown of calculating the frequency spectrum of a diagnostic assembly. The oscillations of the assembly as a whole, of a fuel rod bundle, the assembly jacket and of the individual rods in the bundle were considered. The manufacture is suggested of a model assembly which would be used for testing forced vibrations using an experimental water loop. (M.S.)